Annual Report

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Annual Report
Annual Report
Centre for
Family Literacy
Vision:
A healthy, literate society where all
are able to contribute and succeed.
Mission:
The Centre for Family Literacy builds,
develops and improves literacy with
families and communities.
Board of
Directors 2007
Jason S. Randhawa, Chair
James M. Hutton, Vice Chair
Dr. Susan Lynch, Vice Chair*
Randy Boissonnault, Past Chair
Chris Burrows, Treasurer*
Dwayne Lysak, Acting Secretary Treasurer
Mitchell Flaman
David Hiebert
Tom F. Hodson*
Dr. Heather Raymond
Kim Thornton
*Retired in April 2007
Message from
the Honorary Chair
Every action in support of increased literacy in our
community makes a difference. Literacy is the key to
unlocking the talent and potential within each and
every individual. Personally, I can think of no better
investment than an investment in human talent.
“
The more
you read, the
more things
you will know.
The more that
you learn, the
more places
you’ll go.
Dr. Seuss,
“I Can Read With
My Eyes Shut!”
Eric Newell, University of Alberta Chancellor
Honorary Chair of the Centre for Family Literacy
Centre for Family Literacy Annual Report 2007
1
Report from Our Leaders
“
Reading is a
ladder out of
poverty. It is
probably one of
the best
anti-poverty,
anti-deprivation,
anti-crime,
anti-vandalism
policies you
can think of.
As the Centre enters its 8th year (having existed
as Prospects Literacy Association for 21 years
before that) change is a constant that has
become the norm. What hasn’t changed is our
organizational commitment to meeting the
needs of participants, our partners and
funders, our changing community and the
evolving field of family literacy.
Local trends affecting our participants and programs
were discussed during our first ever cross-program
partner meeting in June:
“
Gordon Brown,
Prime Minister of
United Kingdom
We explored the impacts of the booming economy on
staff retention, volunteerism and the families we serve.
Front line workers reported a sharp increase in parents
working several low paying jobs to pay higher rents;
they are simply too stressed and stretched to attend
literacy programs with their children.
We also discussed the high number and unique needs
of participants from new refugee groups who have no
first-language literacy to build on; the challenges they
face are often daunting.
Provincially, the Centre piloted four Regional Networks to
provide local training and support for family literacy. The
model allows for timely responses to the specific needs
of a region during a time of much change.
On the national level, we continue to advance the
capacity and professional standards of the family literacy
field through the Foundations in Family Literacy training.
This training was developed in 2001 with contributors
from across Canada and is now being revised and
updated with several new chapters. These developments
are the culmination of the work the Centre has been
2
doing since its inception – developing, delivering and
providing training using evidence based programs and
the most recent research and best practices in the field.
This year Vancouver Community College adopted
the training as the basis for its family literacy
certificate program.
In order for Maureen Sanders to participate in this
important national work, she and Kimberley Onclin,
Program Manager at the Centre since 2002, became
Co-Executive Directors this past fall.
As in every year, we looked to our past and our future
and to the community needs around us to guide our
literacy work. We continue to benefit from the wisdom
of our Board of Directors and the many perspectives
these members bring to discussions. We also benefit
from the talent and passion of our employees and our
wonderful volunteers, without whom our work would
not happen.
Thank you to all of you who supported us this year
through partnerships, funding and donations, and
through being a part of the family literacy community
through your interest and commitment.
Together we work for change we know is necessary. We
wish to express our great appreciation for the support
and encouragement we receive for our efforts to ensure
that ours is a healthy, literate society where all are able
to contribute and succeed.
Sincerely,
Jason Randhawa, Chair
Maureen Sanders, Co-Executive Director
Kimberley Onclin, Co-Executive Director
Centre for Family Literacy Annual Report 2007
3
Lois Hole Memorial
Literacy Awards
In 2007, the Centre for Family Literacy
established the Lois Hole Memorial Literacy
Awards in memory of our beloved patron, the
Honourable Dr. Lois E. Hole. The awards were
presented at the Leading with Literacy
Breakfast in January 2007.
Award Recipient
Linn Pascal
The Lois Hole Learner Award:
Linn Pascal
“While growing up in the Caribbean, I was labelled
‘slow’ because of my inability to read,” says Linn. In July
2005, he joined the adult tutoring program. “It was
late in life, but not too late.“ While in the program, Linn
discovered he was dyslexic.
“The Centre has some great resources,” says Linn’s tutor
Glenna Gardiner. “They really helped Linn focus on the
words so they make sense.”
Linn now has a new, higher paying job and is reading
the newspaper; he sees a whole new world opening
for him where he can reach his true potential.
4
The Lois Hole Community
Leadership Award:
Dr. Ruth Hayden
Dr. Hayden was instrumental in founding the Centre
for Family Literacy and is an influential leader in
emergent and family literacy, working tirelessly to
advance the cause and providing a wide variety of
training to front line workers in many sectors.
“
To be
recognized
for doing the
work I love
in the name
of Lois Hole,
a champion
of literacy in
Alberta, is truly
an honour.
Dr. Hayden
Award Recipient
Dr. Ruth Hayden
Dr. Hayden also helped the Centre develop
numerous training tools, co-authoring several Centre
for Family Literacy resources. Ruth has helped bring
the joy and benefits of family literacy to hundreds
of Albertans.
Centre for Family Literacy Annual Report 2007
5
Volunteer Leadership
Over the years, the Centre for Family Literacy
has depended on volunteers to help deliver
programs and govern the organization.
“
To me, literacy is
the absolute key
to unlocking
human
potential.
More recently, many community volunteers have
stepped forward to work on committees to enhance
the Centre’s efforts to increase awareness and raise
the resources necessary to deliver our programs
and services.
“
Ken Regan,
General Manager,
CKUA Radio
Network
Jay Averill, Manager of Corporate Communications,
Stantec Inc. worked with the Board and staff to develop
key messages important to the Centre. “If an organization
wants to raise awareness of its goals and rally people
around a cause it needs to have a great story,” says Jay.
“It’s been a wonderful experience working with the
Centre to develop and start telling its story.”
Ken Regan, General Manager, CKUA Radio Network,
volunteered to help create a new Public Relations
Committee of the Board, “I’m honoured to volunteer with
the Centre because I believe the work they do is crucial.”
“The CFL addresses an extremely important issue in our
society and it has been my pleasure to work with them
over the past several years,” says Jared Smith, Principal,
Incite Solutions Inc, who helps coordinate the quarterly
corporate breakfasts each year. “My efforts have been
small compared to the inspiration that I have received
in exchange.”
The list goes on, and the Centre is indebted to each and
every volunteer for the commitment and dedication they
demonstrate every time they share their gifts of time and
talent with us.
6
Family Literacy
Certificate Program
Vancouver Community College is now hosting
Canada’s first Family Literacy Certificate Program
using the Centre for Family Literacy’s existing
Foundational Training in Family Literacy as the core
content for the course.
“We are delighted to have been able to draw on the
expertise, experience and groundbreaking curriculum
development of the Centre for Family Literacy!” says
Gyda Chud, Dean, Centre for Continuing Studies,
Vancouver Community College. “In fact, our partnership
program and its success to date would not have been
possible without the commitment of the Centre to
professionalize this relatively new field.”
This program builds knowledge and skills in a wide
range of areas that are key to high quality programs and
services and is facilitated by leaders in the family
literacy field.
“
This training
truly provided
a foundation
from which
I can build
and expand
my skills,
knowledge
and experience.
“Family literacy is gaining widespread interest as a
cross-sectoral, long-term and sustainable approach to
family education, support and services,” says Maureen
Sanders, Co-Executive
Director of the Centre
for Family Literacy. “The
Certificate Program
provides participants with
the opportunity to build
the essential knowledge,
skills and attitudes needed
to work effectively with
families to support their
literacy development.”
Centre for Family Literacy Annual Report 2007
Participant
7
The floor of the multi-purpose room is strewn
with blankets; parents with babies and tots in
tow arrive… and soon a parade of wheelchairs
and walkers encircle the group in a warm,
friendly embrace. not what you might expect at
an early childhood, oral literacy program.
“
“
It takes a village ….
I get tired but
I just love it,
so I stay until
the very end.
Tom, a
participant in the
intergenerational
Rhymes that
Bind program
We know the importance of literacy in families is passed
from one generation to the next. To encourage this
positive cycle, the Centre now hosts one of its Rhymes
that Bind programs at a seniors’ complex and is seeking
more locations.
Tom, who comes weekly, likes to join in the singing.
“The babies seem to really like my voice,” he says. But
Tom doesn’t stop singing just because the program has
ended, he goes on until all the visiting is over and the
children have gone home.
If any shyness is experienced, the little ones soon make
short order of it – arms outstretched, wobbling their way
to the first smiling, if somewhat wrinkly, face they see.
Three generations clapping, singing, stomping their feet,
but mostly smiling and laughing – this is a picture that
truly depicts the importance of having all generations
involved in family literacy.
8
“They are so
cute, and so
full of energy,
it really lifts
my spirits.”
Luella, a participant in the
intergenerational Rhymes
that Bind program
Centre for Family Literacy Annual Report 2007
9
“
Thank you for
the opportunity
to attend this
training; it was
very informative
and great
networking.
Family Literacy
Regional Network
“
Participant
“In order to provide the most effective
programming for rural Albertans, it is important
to know what services are available, who is
providing them, where and when,” says Holly
Handfield, Coordinator, northwest Family
Literacy Regional network. “Creating networks
of family literacy practitioners and others
from related sectors allows for the sharing of
this information, effective referrals are made,
training and personal experiences are shared –
these things are critical.”
The Centre for Family Literacy has established four
Family Literacy Regional Networks to fill this need. The
pilot project is funded through the Parent-Child Literacy
Strategy, Community Programs, Alberta Advanced
Education and Technology. Coordinators provide
information on family literacy, act as a resource to Family
Literacy Initiative Funded program coordinators, facilitate
10
family literacy training and coordinate networking
opportunities for organizations delivering family literacy
programs and those wishing to do so.
“Any training in family literacy is welcome, but training
within our own region provides additional value,” says
Judy Smith, Adult and Family Literacy Coordinator,
Community Adult Learning Council, Valleyview. “The
establishment of the Regional Network was a relief. I
felt isolated up here. There were no designated Family
Literacy programs or access to ongoing support; any
networking that did happen we organized ourselves,
and there was never time.”
“
Judy has now built connections with other service
providers who understand her community’s needs and is
able to discuss her thoughts and ideas.
With the success of the year-long pilot project, the
Centre is looking to expand the Family Literacy Network
into more regions of Alberta.
Literacy is not
a luxury, it is
a right and a
responsibility.
If our world
is to meet the
challenges of
the twenty-first
century we
must harness
the energy and
creativity of all
our citizens.
President Bill Clinton
Centre for Family Literacy Annual Report 2007
11
Program
Statistics
Adult Participants
4,665
Child Participants
7,583
Unique and
Innovative Programs
The Centre for Family Literacy provides a wide range of adult
and family literacy programs in Edmonton, as well as training,
resources, information and awareness across Alberta and Canada.
Programs
In partnership with community organizations, our programs support
language and literacy development within a family context.
Books for Babies
Encourages parents of infants between birth and 12 months to
share books with their babies. Each family is given a book bag and a
number of books to support reading from an early age.
Rhymes that Bind
Promotes oral language development as a foundation for literacy.
Books Offer Our Kids Success (B.O.O.K.S.)
Designed for parents of preschool children, B.O.O.K.S. consists of small
group workshops that focus on reading, listening, talking and writing
using high quality children’s books.
Literacy Classroom on Wheels (C.O.W. Bus)
A traveling library for parents and preschool children, the bus makes
weekly stops in high-needs areas of the city so families can visit for
story sharing and free book borrowing.
Lending Boxes
Offers partner agencies a small, free lending library and mini workshops to encourage parents to borrow and share books with
their children.
Storysacks
Involves parents and other community members in the creation of
props, scenery and characters that support and enhance a selected
children’s book.
Multi-Cultural Book Buddies
Provides parents of pre-school children from diverse ethnic backgrounds with books and ideas to support shared reading and literacy
activities in their homes.
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Book Buddies
Provides school aged children with books and ideas to support shared
reading and other literacy activities with preschool siblings and other
family members.
Help Your Child to Read and Write
Parents of elementary school-aged children learn strategies to help
build their children’s confidence and support reading and writing in
the home.
Adult Tutor Program
Trained volunteers work individually with adults who read or write
below a grade nine level. Small group workshops are also offered.
Alberta Prairie Classroom on Wheels (C.O.W. Bus)
The bus travels to rural and urban Alberta communities building
awareness of family literacy, providing fun-filled literacy events and
leaving small legacy libraries.
Training and Services
As a leader in the family literacy field in Canada, sharing our
knowledge is an important aspect of the work we do. The Centre
has developed manuals and delivered workshops, implemented
provincial and national programs and provided the tools needed to
ensure that literacy is seen as everyone’s business.
Annually the Centre provides training opportunities for family literacy
practitioners and others working with families. These training
opportunities include:
The Family Literacy Training Institute
Regional Training across Alberta in family literacy program models
Food for Thought
Online Foundational Training in Family Literacy
Our staff responded to thousands of inquiries during the year
regarding training, funding sources, promotion and awareness
materials and general information about family literacy. These
inquiries came from local, provincial and national programs
and organizations.
Centre for Family Literacy Annual Report 2007
Training,
Outreach and
Awareness
Statistics
Adult Participants
2,147
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Our Partners
Working together toward a common vision,
the Centre for Family Literacy and our community
partners are making a difference.
ABC Head Start programs in
the following schools
Abbott
Belmead
Eastwood
Ekota
Gold Bar
Grace Martin
Kensington
McKee
Sherwood
St. Francis of Assisi
Other Head Start Programs
C.A.P. Head Start at
Atonement Home
Clareview Head Start
Early Head Start
Aboriginal Parent Link Centre
Action Family Literacy Ontario
Alberta Home Visitation
Network Association
Alberta Resource Centre for
Quality Education
ASSIST Community
Services Centre
Ben Calf Robe Society
Bent Arrow Traditional
Healing Society
Big Brothers, Big Sisters
Bissell Centre
Boys’ and Girls’ Club
of Edmonton
Rundle
West Edmonton
Calgary Learning Centre
Candora Society of Edmonton
Capital Health, Early
Intervention Program
14
Child Development Day
Homes of Alberta
Community Cultures Institute
Community Literacy Ontario
Community Options Society
of Edmonton
Edmonton Early Intervention
Program (Kara West)
Edmonton Catholic Schools
Anne Fitzgerald
Holy Trinity
Mother Teresa
Our Lady of Peace
Katherine Therrien
Sacred Heart
St. Alphonsus
St. Francis
St. Joseph
St. Maria Goretti
St. Matthew
Edmonton Chinese
Mennonite Church
Edmonton Garrison Military
Family Resource Centre
Edmonton Public Libraries
Abbottsfield
Calder
Idylwylde
Jasper Place
Millwoods
Sprucewood
Stanley Milner
Edmonton Public Schools
Abbott
Athlone
Bannerman
Belvedere
Brightview
Callingwood
Crawford Plains
Delton
Eastwood
Glendale
Grace Martin
Inglewood
John Barnett
John A. McDougall
Lauderdale
Norwood
Ormsby
Parkdale
R. J. Scott
Rundle
Sifton
Spruce Avenue
Youngstown
Edmonton Chamber of
Voluntary Organizations
English Express
Further Education Society
of Alberta
Health for Two Network
Jasper Place Child & Family
Resource Centre
K.A.R.A. Family Support Centre
La Fédération canadienne pour
l’alphabétisation en français
La Salle Residence
The Learning Centre Literacy
Association & Learning
Connections Program
Literacy Alberta
Literacy B.C.
Literacy for Life Foundation
Literacy Now
(2010 Legacies Now)
Literacy organizations and
Family Literacy programs
across the province
Mennonite Centre
for Newcomers
Centre for Family Literacy Annual Report 2007
Michener Park Residence
Millwoods Centre for
Newcomers
Mill Woods Family
Resource Centre
Movement for
Canadian Literacy
Multi-cultural Health
Brokers Co-operative
National Adult
Literacy Database
Native Counseling Services
of Alberta
Northeast Parent Link Centre
NorQuest College
Norwood Child & Family
Resource Centre
Partners for Kids
Partners for Youth
Public Health Centres
Bonnie Doon
Duggan/Twin Brooks
Eastwood
Jasper Place
North East Health Clinic
Woodcroft
Rainbow Literacy Society
Red Road Healing Society
Royal Alexandra Hospital
(Pastoral Care)
Starbucks Coffee Stores
Terra Centre for Pregnant and
Parenting Teens (Braemar
and Downtown)
Touchmark at Wedgewood
Vancouver Community College
Vietnamese Mothers Group
West End Parent Link Centre
YMCA
Family Ties Program
Jamie Platz Centre
15
Our Supporters
The Centre for Family Literacy is honoured to recognize
our public and private sector supporters who are
committed to helping families grow and prosper.
Government
Donors
Alberta Advanced Education
and Technology, Community
Programs
City of Edmonton, Community
Services
Human Resources and Social
Development Canada, Office
of Literacy and Essential Skills
Public Health Agency of
Canada
Region 6 - Edmonton & Area
Child and Family Services
Anonymous (8)
Alberta Association of Library
Technicians
Alberta Business Family
Institute, School of Business,
University of Alberta
Alberta Environment
Alberta Venture
Carol Aubee-Girard
Jay Averill
Alice & Alan Bell Fund*
Annette J. Berry
Randy Boissonnault
Bernie Brotschi
Leah Burrows
Rob Campbell
Fredda Cherlet
CIBC
City Lumber & Millwork
Barbara Dart
G. Dieleman
Liz Duncan
Ron Evans
David Fallowfield
Jill Folkins
Randal & Naylene Fries
Darlene Gadowsky
Troy Galvin
Jennifer Gamble
Serge R. Gilbert
Darrell Giraldeau
Greater Edmonton Library
Association
Funders
Centre for Family Literacy
Society of Alberta Fund*
CIBC World Markets Children’s
Foundation
Edmonton Community Adult
Learning Association
Edmonton Community
Foundation
Edmonton Journal Raise-aReader
Family Literacy Society Fund*
Hutton Family Literacy Fund*
National Collaborating Center
for Determinants of Health
Petro-Canada
Success by 6®
The Rotary Club of Edmonton
United Way of the Alberta
Capital Region
Wild Rose Foundation
16
January 1 to December 31, 2007
Dave Hancock
Sybilla Heinemann
David Hiebert
Arlene Howell-Pick
Robert W. Hutchinson
James M. Hutton
In honour of:
Hope Manuel
Sandra, Marco, Alex
and Amanda
Rev. Claude and
Lynda Delorme
James Tyler Irvine
Tammy Irwin
Carol Kariatsumari
Lyle & Terry Katerenchuk
Catherine and Imants Krumins
Jane Liang-Weissegerber
La Bruyère Fund*
Leading with Literacy Breakfast
Patti M. Lefebvre
Donna Lemieux
Rama Logsetty
Dennis MacLellan
Richard Maranchuk
The McDavid Family
Geraldine R. McLellan
Marina Michaelides
John & Maggie KHG Mitchell
Family Fund*
Lillian Nagy
Neonatal Associates, Royal
Alexandra Hospital
Ogilvie Fund*
Kimberley Onclin
Esther Ondrack
Della Paradis
Centre for Family Literacy Annual Report 2007
Lynne Paul
Dr. & Mrs. Kinsley and
Patricia Payne
Dale Perusini
E. Anne Phipps
Fordyce & Pat Pier
John & Barbara Poole Family
Saifee Rashiq and Ami Singh
Leah Rasmussen
Maureen and
Esmond Sanders
Janice Schneider
Mary Lou Sedgwick
Libby and Roger Smith
Grace Soares
Maria Soares
Starbucks Coffee Company
Deana Stewart
Laurie Stewart
Strathearn United Church
Swim, Bike, Run for Lisa
TELUS Cares – Dollars
for Doers
TELUS – Dollars for Dollars
Brian F. Thompson
Cheryl Lee Tkalcic
United Way of Calgary,
Donor Choice Program
Peter Van Kempen
Deb Whitten
Dr. Grace Wiebe
Andrew Woolfson
Yellowhead Regional Library
*Funds at the Edmonton
Community Foundation
17
Our Supporters
Donations Received
in Memory of
Stephen Wilson:
Doug & Jan Berry
Terry & Leona Colman
Robyn & Nathan Del Vecchio
D. M. Hilts
Sophie & Donald Hunter
Donald & Fay Kennedy
James & Gayl Lepp
Julianne Lilley
Ravi & Joy Mani
Hubert & Val McChesney
Jim McDowall & Carol Moos
Lorne & Audrey Paccagnan
Renfrew County Catholic
District School Board
Sherwood Park Ladies
Curling Club
Sherwood Park Quilt Guild
Darlene Vany
Judith & Jan Vogelaar
Anne Watt
Catharina & David Wilson
Isobel Wilson
In Kind Donors
ACCESS/CHUM TV
Canada Safeway Limited
Eastwood Store
Terra Losa Store
Chapters/Indigo, West
Edmonton
CKUA
DATS, City of Edmonton
Edmonton Journal
Giant Tiger Store
Legacy Magazine
Lobster Press Limited
18
McDonald’s Restaurants
of Canada
Save on Foods
Sobeys, Millwoods
South Edmonton Truck Wash
Stadium Save on Foods
Starbucks Coffee Company
We acknowledge support
from the following book
publishers
Books for Business
Cambridge University Press
Canadian Scholars’ Press Inc.
DK Publishing, Inc.
Eaglecrest Books
Fire the Imagination
Firefly Books Ltd.
Fitzhenry & Whiteside Limited
Harper Collins Canada Limited
H.B. Fenn and Company Ltd.
Kids Books 4 Less
Lone Pine Publishing
Louise Kool & Galt Limited
McGraw-Hill Ryerson Limited
National Book Service
Nelson, a Division of Thomson
Canada Limited
New Readers Press
Orca Book Publishers
Our Canada
Pearson Canada
Pearson Longman ESL
Penguin Group (Canada)
Raincoast Books
Reader’s Digest Large Print
Scholastic Canada Ltd.
Simon & Schuster Canada
Temeron Books Inc.
University of Toronto Press
January 1 to December 31, 2007
Legacy for Literacy Club
The Legacy for Literacy Club
recognizes and honours
those who have planned a
gift to the Centre for Family
Literacy through a bequest
in their will, life insurance or
trust arrangement or have
made an outright gift to the
Centre for Family Literacy’s
endowment fund.
Keith Anderson and
Carol Kariatsumari
Randy Boissonnault
Chris and Leah Burrows
Rob and Paige Campbell
Caroline and James Gilfillan
Dr. Ruth Hayden
Jim and Nancy Hutton
Paul Kottl and
Heather Raymond
Donna and Gerard Lemieux
John and Barbara Poole
Maureen and
Esmond Sanders
Libby & Roger Smith
Robert and Shirley Stollery
Centre for Family Literacy Annual Report 2007
19
Statement of Operations
For the Year Ended December 31
Revenue
Grants
Donations and fund raising
Casino
Interest
Sales
2007
2006
$ 1,302,854
154,163
57,083
19,341
18,928
$ 1,552,369
$ 1,290,409
116,687
45,720
19,798
7,278
$ 1,479,892
930,157
201,199
151,262
53,408
12,007
5,934
1,353,967
890,548
220,976
121,704
49,159
15,980
8,055
1,306,422
117,596
24,279
20,048
10,244
4,780
176,947
90,851
29,886
16,833
8,905
3,806
150,281
21,455
23,189
9,817
14,030
(10,000)
-
(14,948)
(15,131)
$
6,324
(19,997)
(5,967)
$ 17,222
Program Expenses
Salaries, wages, contracts and benefits
Program delivery
Facilities
Travel: projects and services
Promotion
Travel: programs
Administrative Expenses
Salaries, wages, contracts and benefits
Office
Facilities
Professional fees
Promotion
Excess of revenue over expenses
before other revenue (expenses)
Other revenue (expenses)
Amortization of deferred contributions related to
equipment and leasehold improvements
Contribution to the Edmonton Community Foundation
Amortization of equipment and
leasehold improvements
Excess of revenue over expenses
20
Balance Sheet
As at December 31
2007
2006
$ 653,614
38,481
18,167
710,262
17,921
$ 473,528
14,280
19,696
507,504
27,723
$ 728,183
$ 535,227
$ 66,521
$ 72,759
532,149
3,059
535,208
601,729
329,462
12,876
342,338
415,097
14,862
93,000
18,592
126,454
14,847
93,000
12,283
120,130
$ 728,183
$ 535,227
Assets
Current Assets
Cash and temporary investments
Amounts receivable
Prepaid expenses
Equipment and leasehold improvements
Liabilities and Net Assets
Current Liabilities
Accounts payables and accrued liabilities
Deferred Contributions
Related to operations
Related to equipment and leasehold improvements
Net Assets
Invested in equipment and leasehold improvements
Internally restricted
Unrestricted
*Complete audited financial statements are available on request.
Centre for Family Literacy Annual Report 2007
21
Laugh
Read
Rhyme
Learn
Write
Play
Center for
Family Literacy
201 11456 Jasper Ave NW
Edmonton AB T5K 0M1
Toll Free Phone
Fax
Website
1-866-421-7323
780-421-7323
780-421-7324
www.famlit.ca