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Portland!
THURSDAY, JULY 17, 2014 • PORTLANDTRIBUNE.COM • PUBLISHED TUESDAY AND THURSDAY
PortlandTribune
Hospitals
face big
fines for
poor care
Portland facilities
targeted for penalties
in federal crackdown
By PETER KORN
The Tribune
A number of Portland-area
hospitals are on track to
have their Medicare payments reduced this fall as
part of a federal program to
penalize hospitals with high
rates of infection and other
hospital-acquired conditions.
The penalties, scheduled to take
“The big
effect in Octochange
ber and based
on three years
here is a
of data, are
pretty
part of the
seismic
2010 Affordable
Care
shift in
Act’s initiative
the way
to change hoshospitals
pital reimursement.
think about bThe
idea is to
how to
promote bettreat their ter care with
emphasis
patients.” an
o n p at i e n t
— Paul Matsui, safety. The
The Advisory bottom perBoard executive fo r m i n g 2 5
director percent of all
hospitals nationwide will
receive penalties of up to 1 percent of their annual Medicare
payments.
A study of preliminary federal data by nonprofit, Washington, D.C.-based Kaiser
Health News reveals that Legacy Good Samaritan Medical
Center in Northwest Portland
ranks lowest among Portlandarea hospitals for hospital-acquired conditions. Out of 3,226
hospitals analyzed by federal
officials, Good Samaritan
ranked 212th from the bottom,
according to data released by
Kaiser Health News.
The three basic measures in
the scoring were:
■ Frequency of bloodstream
infections in patients in whom
catheters have been inserted
into major arteries.
■ Rates of infection from
catheters inserted into bladders to drain urine.
■ Various safety problems
including bedsores, falls and
Darrell Hames,
middle, is captain
and steersperson
for the Castaways
dragon boat team,
one of a growing
number that
practice yearround on the
Willamette River.
■ Popular sport offers paddlers fun, fitness, friendship
DRAGON
RIDERS
Story by Jennifer Anderson
Photos by Jonathan House
T
he swoosh, swoosh of paddles slicing through
the water is just part of the Willamette River’s
chorus one recent Thursday evening.
It happens to be Thursday, July 3, and the
clamor of Portland’s Safeway
Waterfront Blues Festival fades
quickly as the Castaways glide
upriver.
In between the caller’s commands, an eagle cries out from the
trees on the back side of Ross Island and everyone stops to listen
and try to spot it.
They see a man walking through
the foliage on Ross Island and joke
about Bigfoot. They wave to other
boaters, kayakers and paddle
boarders, and take delight in passing under the Tillikum Crossing,
which they watched being built
from Day One.
“You really get hooked,” says
team captain Darrell Hames, 55, a Southeast Portland
caterer by day who’s been dragon boating since 2004.
“You go out in the evening in the fall and winter, see the
lights of the buildings reflecting on the river. The water
is glass smooth. It’s magical.”
The Castaways are part of Portland’s burgeoning
subculture of dragon-boat paddlers that compete in a
race circuit across the United States and Canada every spring and summer and practice year-round, far
beyond the Rose Festival season.
What started with one boat from Kaohsiung, Taiwan,
coming to the U.S. in 1986 has led to Portland becoming
a mecca for dragon boating along the West Coast.
The sport also is popular on the East Coast, in
The sun lowers as the Castaways return to dock after a practice on the Willamette River.
The sport also
is popular on
the East Coast,
in Hawaii, Asia
and elsewhere
around the
globe —
anywhere
there’s a body
of water.
See DRAGON BOATS / Page 2
Markets’ push puts food on tables
Healthy Plate gives
low-income buyers a
place at the table
By STEFANIE DONAHUE
The Tribune
From a fruit-infused bread
pudding to a chocolate beet
cake, Robert Adams likes to
experiment in the kitchen.
The 47-year-old Adams, who is
homeless, has volunteered at
Sisters of the Road Cafe for two
years. Whenever he can, Adams
See HOSPITALS / Page 4
brings in hand-picked, local ingredients from a nearby farmers
market — all made possible by a
two-month-old initiative called
Portland Tribune
Inside
the Healthy Plate Project.
In May, New Seasons Market
donated $5,000 to Sisters of the
Road, which connected low-income shoppers to fresh market
food. The project was so popular
it served 300 of their volunteers
in eight weeks and the funds ran
out.
“People of lower income, or
houseless, don’t always get nutritious meals using their EBT
(electronic benefit transfer)
card,” says Adams, who volunteers at Sisters of the Road from
7 a.m. to 5 p.m., five days a week.
“(A) hot, nutritious meal every
day, Monday through Friday, is
how it should be.”
Healthy Plate is one of several
initiatives across the United
States that aim to make farmers
market food affordable for all
customers. The nationwide push
is a sign that farmers markets
are beginning to see the opportunity to make locally grown
food accessible, says Trudy Toliver, executive director of the
Portland Farmers Market and
the Farmers Market Fund.
“It’s not so much of a ‘why
now,’” Toliver says. “It’s a ‘finally.’”
Thousands in Oregon are
making use of food assistance
programs, such as SNAP, the
federal Supplemental Nutrition
Assistance Program. In May,
161,947 people in Multnomah
County and 792,075 in Oregon
used SNAP, says Katie Furia,
TRIBUNE PHOTO: LACEY JACOBY
The Northwest Portland Farmers Market accepts various forms of
payment, including cash, card and Supplemental Nutrition Assistance
See MARKETS / Page 7 Program (SNAP) funds.
PORTLAND’S JAGER CHASING
STEEPLE GLORY
— SEE SPORTS, PAGE B10
“Pamplin Media Group’s pledge is to
deliver balanced news that reflects the
stories of our communities. Thank you
for reading our newspapers.”
— DR. ROBERT B. PAMPLIN JR.
OWNER & NEIGHBOR
A2 NEWS
The Portland Tribune Thursday, July 17, 2014
Dragon boats: All ages paddle on teams
■ From page 1
Hawaii, Asia and elsewhere
around the globe — anywhere
there’s a body of water.
In 1989, the Portland-Kaohsiung Sister City Association organized what’s now the annual
Portland Rose Festival Dragon
Boat Race, which attracts thousands of paddlers and spectators to the waterfront every
June. Up next is the annual
Portland Dragon Boat Festival,
set for Sept. 6 and 7 at Gov. Tom
McCall Waterfront Park.
Now in its 12th year, the festival started with 12 teams and
grew to 85 teams from around
the world last year. This year,
65 are set to attend, since a big
international race is happening
the same weekend.
It’s an idyllic lifestyle for
thousands of dragon boaters
who paddle as much for the social aspect as for the fitness
benefits and adrenaline rush
from competition.
“I’m probably
more of a (dragon
boat) addict than
a nyb o dy e l s e
you’ll ever meet,”
says Ken Polnicky, 51, an engineer who lives in
the West Hills and
has been paddling
since 2003.
At one time, he
says, he calculated that he was spending about
20 hours per week, between
practicing, training and coaching for the Paddles of Fury as
well as recruiting, fundraising
and organizing event logistics.
Like Hood to Coast or Cycle
Oregon, dragon boating is a way
of life that lives and dies by the
strength of the team, paddlers
say. “You have to have what you
call the eye of the tiger: the desire to improve, get better, work
really hard,” Polnicky says. “It’s
sort of fun to face those challenges as a group, fail or succeed as a group.”
Rose Festival dragon boat
teams use the colorful “Kaohsiung” boats, with the decorative
Chinese dragon head and tail.
Most other Portland teams race
without the head and tail in
longer and sleeker “Six-Sixteen” fiberglass boats, made in
Canada. Paddles are wood or
carbon fiber.
If you haven’t seen dragon
boating in action, it’s part art,
part science. There are seats
for 20 paddlers, who face frontward and drive the boat forward by pulling through the
water at the same time.
They follow commands of the
caller, who stands facing them
at the front of the boat, calling
out their series (combinations
of 20 strokes), setting the pace,
letting them know when to rest
or change positions, and firing
their teammates up.
The other key team position is
the steersperson, who keeps the
dragon boat on course, controlling it with an oar rigged at the
rear of the boat.
Races are quick,
500 meters.
Many paddlers
compete on two or
COURTESY OF TOM KETURI
three teams, cross- The SunDragons, a team of high school students from across the metro area, are one of Portland’s longest-running teams. Here, the flagtraining with out- catchers reach for the flags at the Portland Rose Festival Dragon Boat Race.
riggers — a canoe
can to keep promoting dragon
built for up to eight lem on June 29, they placed third
boating in the high schools. “I
paddlers that com- out of 24 teams in Division 1.
Portland’s dragon boat teams
only have them for a window of
pete in four- to
fall along a wide spectrum of
time; the average is two years,”
— Vernon Lee 10-mile races.
he says. “I’ve had guys who’ve
The
d r ag o n social groups and competition
never played sports become
boats competing in levels.
The Portland Fire Dragons
stellar paddler athletes.”
the Portland Rose Festival are in
Most paddlers who started in
a completely separate category, will represent the U.S. in Italy in
Portland’s earliest days of dragwith another element that September for the Club Crew
on boating are still active in the
makes for dramatic flair. Each World Championships, a prestiscene. Lee is one of the originals,
team has a designated flag catch- gious international competition.
There’s an “out and proud”
having paddled on an early team
er, whose job is to capture the
in the late 1980s with former
flag as they race around a float- lesbian team (Amazon Dragons), a team of women lawyers
Congressman David Wu. It all
ing buoy in their lane.
(OWLS Dragonflies) and two
happened by accident.
Teams cover spectrum
teams of breast cancer surviLee, who is Chinese, says he
Some of Portland’s dragon vors (Pink Phoenix and Wasabi
and his cousin had been invited
boat teams are hard-core com- Team SOAR).
TRIBUNE PHOTO: JONATHAN HOUSE to join a “Chinese team,” so
petitive; others are less so, but
Pink Phoenix was the first Dragon boat fans and spectators will descend on the waterfront Sept.
they went down to RiverPlace
all are a strong social network. team of survivors that formed 6-7 for the Portland Dragon Boat Festival.
Marina to check it out.
For the scores of people in the country, in the late ‘90s.
“There was a Chinese guy;
who’ve just moved to Portland, Now there are about 80 breast early in the morning and just opened up to include students he said ‘Hop on,’” Lee recalls.
dragon boating is an easy way cancer survivor teams across started a moonlight paddle, from high schools across the city. “We thought, well, he’s Chiin: “You have 30 new friends, the nation.
Despite the popularity, Lee nese, let’s hop on.”
heading out on the water as
mini vacations, happy hours,
There are two teams of blind night falls once a month to take fears the number of youth
As it happens, Wu paddled
all of a sudden you have this paddlers (Blind Ambition and in the serenity of the full moon. dragon boat teams is on the de- for a different team than the
social life with all these new Wasabi VIP), and a team of decline, and soon there won’t be one they were invited to join. “I
people,” Polnicky says.
enough high school teams to got on the wrong boat,” Lee
velopmentally and physically Youth teams face barriers
There also are a handful of compete in their own division says. “More people came, but
The Castaways — a group of disabled athletes (Wasabi Speyouth teams in high school and in the Rose Festival races.
engineers, teachers, nurses, ac- cial Dragons).
no Asians.”
countants, librarians and comThere were six high school
There are two teams for pad- college, from public and private
Lee and his cousin liked the
puter geeks, 20-somethings to dlers over age 50, the Wasabi schools across the city.
teams this year, half as many team so much, however, that
Vernon Lee, 63, of Cedar as in 2003, when schools such they stayed on for several years,
retirees — are a mix of both.
Grand Masters Mixed and the
Four couples — including Golden Dragons, whose oldest Hills, started the SunDragons as Cleveland, Lincoln, Wilson, raced competitively and later
Hames, the captain — have met member is 96 and average age is high school dragon boat team Franklin, Grant, Sunset and branched off to form other teams.
in 1998.
on the boat, married and had 78.
Beaverton high schools had Since then, Lee has been one of
As a longtime paddler, he teams of their own.
children. The beer gardens af“We don’t let those little 20the sport’s biggest advocates.
ter practice might’ve have and 30-year-olds intimidate wanted his sons to try out the
One major barrier to youth
Hames, the Castaways capsomething to do with that.
us,” says Bettianne Goetz, 74, of sport when they got to Sunset teams is the availability of ex- tain, says he hears people all
Competition-wise, they like Fairview, who’s been paddling High School. So he formed the perienced coaches who can the time say they’d never have
to call themselves “competi- since 1990. “Almost all of the team, recruited and trained commit to staying with their the athletic ability to paddle on
tively recreational,” looking to teams we race are younger students, and coached them to teams through the years, Lee a dragon boat. He tries to conplace in their division at each than us. A lot of them are the be competitive at the local, re- says. Parent time — to manage vince them otherwise.
gional, national and interna- the team, organize transportarace but never at the expense ages of our grandchildren.”
“It’s sort of a misnomer,” he
of training too hard or having
tion and other logistics, and says, that paddling expertise is
The Golden Dragons are tional level.
He’s still coaching, as is his take on the liability — is anoth- required. “The power comes
too much fun.
competitive, Goetz says, but
At the recent World Beat take pride in enjoying the slow- 26-year-old son, and in the past er major hurdle.
from the sync of the stroke, evDragon Boat Races, held in Sa- er moments, too. They practice three years the SunDragons
Lee is doing everything he eryone working together.”
“I’ve had guys
who’ve never
played sports
become stellar
paddler
athletes.”
Sport grows in Portland
In the past 25 years, Portland’s scene has grown to boast
about 54 teams, both womens
and mixed (co-ed). More form
every year.
The teams belong to one of
two nonprofit paddling clubs,
DragonSports USA and Wasabi
Paddling Club. Both clubs own
large fleets of dragon boats (as
well as outrigger canoes) that
they rent to teams, and support
the teams with recruitment,
coaching support and other efforts. Some of the outrigger
teams race along the Pacific circuit, up to Seattle; this weekend
they’ll be at the Gorge Games.
Portland’s dragon boat teams
are now in the height of their
race season, most practicing
about three times per week on
the Willamette.
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NEWS A3
The Portland Tribune Thursday, July 17, 2014
A
lthough Oregon Republican Rep. Greg
Walden is heavily favored to win re-election in November, his Democratic opponent is trying to
generate some enthusiasm for
her long-shot 2nd District bid.
Aelea Christofferson has
just released her first Web ad
stressing her support for expanding health care benefits.
The ad also takes a shot at
Walden, accusing him of
spending too much time traveling the country to raise
money for other Republican
candidates as chairman of the
National Republican Congressional Committee.
Christofferson undercut
that a message a bit, though,
by traveling to Detroit this
week to speak at the annual
gathering of Netroots Nation.
Although officially a coalition
of progressive-minded organi-
zations, Netroots Nation
clearly supports Democrats.
Vice President Joe Biden is
this year’s keynote speaker.
Previous gatherings have
featured Barack Obama, Al
Gore, Nancy Pelosi and Harry
Reid, and both Bill and Hillary
Clinton.
Big money came from
small sources
Oregon U.S. Sen. Jeff Merkley is walking a political tightrope these days.
On one hand, the Democratic candidate is attacking
the influence of big money in
politics, enlisting the support
of progressive favorite, U.S.
Sen. Elizabeth Warren. In a
June 29 email, Merkley’s campaign quotes the Massachusetts Democrat as saying,
“The right-wing Super PACs
and powerful special interests
Accusations against
Walden don’t carry
much weight
have a new target:
our friend and progressive champion Jeff
Merkley.”
On the other
hand, Merkley
also is bragging
about how much money he’s rolling in. In a July 8
email to supporters, Merkley
boasts that he’s raised $1.8
million in the past three
months alone and currently
has $3.5 million in the bank.
He says most of the
contributions were
$100 or less,
however.
Merkley’s
Republican opponent, Monica
Wehby, has yet to release her recent fundraising totals.
SOURCESSAY
Portland’s policies not
embraced across county
“First they’ll come for
your guns, then they’ll come imposing controversial polifor your plastic bags.”
cies favored in Portland that
That’s the conspiratorial
are more liberal than those
spin local lawyer Bruce Mcsupported in such cities as
Cain has put on the current
Fairview, Gresham, Troutcivil suit on the gun condale or Wood Village.
trol ordinance the
Think art taxes, limMultnomah County
ited garbage collecCommission adtions, and mandaopted in May 2013.
tory medical
It’s not as wacky
leave.
as it sounds, howThe case was
ever. The ordiheard before Multnance was written
nomah County Cirto apply to all cities
cuit
Judge Kathleen
McCAIN
in the county that
Dailey on July 9. She
have not adopted its
is not expected to
gun control policies, somerule for several weeks. Mcthing the county had never
Cain’s argument already had
attempted to do before.
proved persuasive with sevMcCain is representing
eral elected officials in Multfive county residents who
nomah County cities other
say the commission has
than Portland, however. The
overstepped its authority. He Troutdale City Council
argues if the county prepassed an ordinance just bevails, there’s nothing to prefore the trial started that
vent the commission from
asked to intervene in it.
PDXUPDATE
Dougy Center design
earns Gold Nugget honor
Portland’s Scott Edwards Architecture won a Gold Nugget
award in June’s national design
and construction competition
for its work on the new Dougy
Center.
The firm was awarded a 2014
Grand Award for its design of
the Dougy Center replacement
project. The center, a place for
grieving families to gather for
counseling or to share experiences, was rebuilt after a 2009
fire.
Bremik Construction built
the Dougy Center replacement.
Winners in the annual competition were selected from
more than 600 entries from
around the world. The 51st
Gold Nugget Awards are organized by PCBC, the building
industry’s conference, trade
show and meeting place. The
competition is co-sponsored by
Builder magazine.
Better cash that tax
refund check soon
Thousands of Oregon taxpayers have tax refund money
awaiting them, but they have to
cash their checks soon. The Oregon Department of Revenue
has mailed letters to about
2,000 taxpayers in possession of
refund checks that haven’t
been cashed as a reminder to
redeem the checks prior to October.
Checks are considered void
after two years and are then
sent to the Department of State
Lands. Last year, Oregon taxpayers did not cash refund
checks worth about $1.9 million.
For more information, go to
oregon.gov/dor, or call 1-800356-4222 toll-free.
Pesky squirrels give
power grid a shock
When the power goes out on
a hot day, most people assume
overuse of air conditioning is to
blame.
But from June 12 through July 7, four substation outages on
the Westside and in North Portland were caused by adorably
nimble, fluffy-tailed and unintentionally suicidal squirrels.
All four outages were in Portland General Electric’s territory
and one — the Oak Hills substation at Northwest Cornell Road
and Twin Oaks Drive in Beaverton — was hit twice. By different
squirrels, of course.
“This is clearly an unusual
convergence of squirrel activity,” said Steve Corson, spokesman for PGE. “We’d like to
have a break from squirrels for
awhile.”
Here’s the run-down of PGE’s
squirrel-related outages in re-
cent weeks, affecting tens of
thousands of customers. On
June 12, squirrels blew out the
Six Corners Substation, affecting 10,400 customers in Sherwood and Tualatin.
On July 2, the Northwest
Cornell and Twin Oaks substation was hit, affecting 10,000
customers in Beaverton, Hillsboro, Cedar Mill and Bethany.
On July 6, more than 8,000 customers were affected in Kenton, Arbor Lodge and St. Johns
areas. On July 7, Northwest
Cornell and Twin Oaks was hit
again, affecting more than 8,000
Beaverton-area customers.
The outages left many customers in the affected areas
wondering how sweet-faced
squirrels could cause so much
damage.
“It’s not all that unusual to
have wildlife that does damage,” Corson said. “But some
years, there’s more squirrel activity than others.
“Normally, vegetation and
tree limbs are more of a problem,” he added. “But last year
was the first in recent memory
that squirrels accounted for 18
percent of outages and vegetation only 17 percent.”
Drone control focus
of panel discussion
Worried about drones? A panel discussion in August could
Reconstruction of
the Dougy Center
after a 2009 fire
has earned a Gold
Nugget award for
Portland’s Scott
Edwards
Architecture. The
national honor
was selected last
month from
among more than
600 international
entries.
COURTESY OF SCOTT
EDWARDS ARCHITECTURE
help ease your mind — or not.
Oregonians for Drone Control will host a discussion on
drone issues and concerns
from 7 to 9:30 p.m., Aug. 7, at
the First Unitarian Church, Eliot Chapel, Southwest 12th Avenue and Salmon Street, Portland. The event has a suggested
donation of $5 to $20.
Retired U.S. Army Col. Ann
Wright will join the discussion
on the use of drones by the
state and by private corporations. Wright resigned as a U.S.
diplomat in protest of the Iraq
War in 2003.
Also taking part in the discussion are Brian Whiteside,
vice president of the Cascade
chapter of the Association of
Unmanned Vehicle Systems International; and Peter Lumsdaine, founder of the Alliance
to Resist Robotic Warfare.
For more information, check
the group’s Facebook page, OregonDroneControl.
City removes barrier
to ex-offenders
The city of Portland has removed language from its employment applications that requires some applicants to sign
a criminal history statement.
Questions about criminal back-
ground, if relevant to a position, would be asked in the hiring process.
City officials said the statements could be a barrier to
some ex-offenders, preventing
them from working for the city.
“This removes a barrier to
employment with the city,
which will attract a more diverse pool of applicants to city
jobs, one step in addressing the
collective impact of crime,”
says Mayor Charlie Hales.
Portland joins more than 60
U.S. jurisdictions, including
Multnomah County, in removing the barrier to employment
for ex-offenders.
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A4 NEWS
The Portland Tribune Thursday, July 17, 2014
■ From page 1
Some gains made
Nearly all Portland-area hospitals during the past three
years have joined in a Partnership for Patients effort to reduce medical errors, Waldo
says. As a result, according to
Waldo, Oregon hospitals have
made major gains. Surgical site
infections among the 33 Oregon
hospitals in Partnership for Patients have dropped 55 percent.
Central line infections have
been lowered 40 percent. Ventilator-associated pneumonia
has been reduced 80 percent,
according to Waldo.
Ironically, even those improvements might not keep Oregon hospitals from incurring
penalties. The Medicare program is structured so that hospitals that rank in the bottom
25 percent nationally will get
penalized, regardless of their
actual rates of infection and
other problems. Experts say
hospitals all over the country
have been working to keep
from ending up in the bottom 25
percent.
“That’s the complaint of the
industry,” says Jordan Rau, a
researcher/writer for Kaiser
Health News. “It’s an arbitrary
cutoff, and hospitals can be improving significantly yet still be
penalized. Even if your rate is
going down, if everyone else’s
rate is going down at the same
rate you’re not doing better.”
Cleaning hands
helps prevent
infections at
Portland-area
hospitals trying
to avoid
penalties under
new Medicare
rules.
TRIBUNE PHOTO:
JAIME VALDEZ
The federal rules also mean penalties imposed on hospitals.
that two hospitals could have In 2012, Medicare started penalvery similar rates, with one izing and giving bonuses to hosreceiving a penalty and the pitals based on a series of qualother not, if they are on differ- ity measurements. In 2013, 2,225
ent sides of the 25 percent hospitals nationwide lost a porthreshold.
tion of Medicare payments for
Hospitals that work hard to having excessive rates of re-adreduce errors might be at a dis- mitting patients for problems
advantage in another way, Wal- related to their initial treatdo says.
ments.
“A lot of times, when you reIn 2013, penalties for high really work hard to make an im- admission rates were issued to
provement, say reduce infec- (in order of greatest penalty)
tions, you may find more be- Legacy Meridian Park Medical
cause you didn’t have a system Center, Legacy Emanuel Medical
in place (before)
Center, Providence
to discover them
Willamette Falls
all,” Waldo says.
Medical Center in
That, she says,
Oregon City, Oreputs hospitals
gon Health & Scimaking the most
ence University,
effort in an unLegacy Good Sacomfortable posimaritan Medical
tion. “They may
Center, and Legacy
be finding more,
Mt. Hood Medical
and they may still
Center.
end up in the penA typical Portalty box,” she
land-area hospisays.
tal, according to
— Erica Mobley, M at su i , m i g h t
For some of the
patient safety advocate have gross operatPortland-area
hospitals the fines
ing income of only
will likely be measured in the $2 million to $3 million, so a
hundreds of thousands of dol- loss of a few hundred thoulars. Those fines are signifi- sand dollars would hurt. Accant, says Paul Matsui, execu- cording to Matsui, some large
tive director of The Advisory hospitals already have sufBoard, a health care analytics fered more than $1 million in
and research firm in Washing- Medicare penalties.
ton, D.C.
“Yes, it definitely matters,”
The upcoming penalties for Matsui says. “We’re talking
hospital-acquired conditions about hospitals that operate on
are actually the third phase of big revenues but pretty thin
“There needs
to be more
(penalties) in
order to get
hospitals to
make some
serious
improvements.”
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And the penalties are working, Matsui says. Hospital readmissions are dropping since
those fines began. The penalty
program reverses the incentives in traditional fee-for-service payments, in which hospitals were basically rewarded
for creating more need for
health services as Medicare
paid more bills.
“The big change here is a
pretty seismic shift in the way
hospitals think about how to
treat their patients,” Matsui
says. “It’s moving away from
performing more services to
thinking about this quality
component.”
But Erica Mobley, spokeswoman for The Leapfrog
Group, a Washington, D.C.based patient safety nonprofit,
says not all hospitals are putting maximum effort into better patient care as a way to
avoid Medicare penalties.
“A lot of hospital spending is
more on trying to change the
rules than they are trying to
get better,” Mobley says. Hospital lobbyists, she says, have
been working hard to alter the
Medicare penalty programs.
Hospital penalties will increase in the years ahead, from
1 percent of Medicare payments this year to 2 percent of
payments next year. And Mobley says that’s a good thing.
“There needs to be more in
order to get hospitals to make
some serious improvements,”
she says.
The penalties will have real
impact, Mobley says, when consumers, not hospitals, start to
take them seriously.
“We would like to see consumers looking at this data and saying, ‘I don’t want to go to this
hospital anymore,’” she says.
“Only when hospitals are faced
with that kind of financial risk
are they really going to put effort
into making improvements.”
Hales and Novick hope to
raise around $50 million a year
for maintenance and safety
projects from the fee. They
want the revenue to be raised
evenly between residential
properties and non-residential
properties, including businesses, governments, and nonprofit
organizations, including
churches. They want the City
Council to vote on the proposal
on Nov. 12.
Two new working groups appointed by Hales and Novick to
consider alternatives to the
non-residential fee held their
first meetings this week. One is
focused on the business fee.
The other is considering the fee
on governments, nonprofits and
low-income families.
The two work groups were
appointed after businesses and
nonprofit organizations questioned the proposed method of
determining the transportation
user fees. The calculations were
challenged as unfairly penalizing small businesses, among
other things.
There is no working group
dedicated exclusively to property owners who do not qualify for
low-income discounts. Hales and
Novick have reached agreement
with City Commissioner Amanda Fritz on a fee that phases into
a maximum of $12 a month during three years, and that has discounts for low-income households, including those living in
multifamily buildings.
Sanderson says many other
Portlanders will not be able to afford the residential fee, however.
“There are a lot of Portlanders who won’t qualify for a lowincome discount whose budgets
are tight enough to make this
additional tax devastating,”
says Sanderson.
Devastating taxes
Emotions are rising as
Mayor Charlie Hales and
Commissioner Steve Novick
work to nudge their proposed street fee forward.
An opponent to the fee has
filed petitions to recall Hales
and Novick with the city auditor’s office. Ray Horton, a
Southeast Portland resident,
announced his intention to file
the petitions last week on a
Facebook page opposed to the
fee: Stop Portland Street Fee.
“There’s a serious problem
with the way the city government, particularly Hales and
Novick, are approaching taking
money from the people without
listening to the people,” says
Horton, who voted for both of
the city officials.
Meanwhile, an important advisory committee appointed by
Hales and Novick failed to immediately reach agreement on
the terms — or even need — for
the fee at its first meeting Monday afternoon.
Members of the committee,
who are charged with considering how the fee should be applied to businesses, could not
agree on whether the Portland
Bureau of Transportation is
wisely spending its existing
budget, how much additional
money is needed to maintain
and improve city roads, and
where it should come from.
Despite widespread public
criticism of the proposed fee,
Horton faces an uphill battle.
He must collect nearly 35,000
valid signatures from registered Portland voters on each
petition by early October. And
not everyone who frequents the
Facebook page — which has
nearly 2,000 “likes” — agrees
with the proposed recall, according to co-founder Ann
Sanderson.
“Our page contains ideas
from many different Portlanders who are passionately opposed to this tax and facilitates
many conversations about how
to achieve our goals,” says
Sanderson, who owns the
Odango! Hair Studio.
Novick responded during the
weekend to news of the recall
petitions, saying he and Hales
are “morally compelled” to find
more money to better maintain
the city’s streets, and asked
Portlanders to offer their ideas.
“We will keep on explaining
as best we can how dire our
transportation maintenance
and safety needs are, and as
time goes on I think more and
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Business, nonprofit
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484989.062414
accidental lung punctures.
Legacy Mt. Hood Medical
Center in Gresham received
the next-lowest score among
Portland-area hospitals. It
ranked 242th out of 3,226. Legacy Emanuel Medical Center
and Providence St. Vincent
Medical Center also are due for
federal penalties if the data remain in place.
Diane Waldo says the preliminary federal data may not
hold up. Waldo, associate vice
president of quality and clinical
operations for the Oregon Association of Hospitals and
Health Systems, says Oregon
hospitals are well aware of the
specter of federal penalties and
have been making efforts to improve their national rankings.
Recall looms over
street fee discussion
The business work group
held its first meeting Monday
afternoon. It includes representatives of such business organizations as Associated General
Contractors; the Building Owners and Managers Association,
the Commercial Real Estate Development Association; the Oregon Restaurant and Lodging
Association; the Portland Business Alliance; the Working Waterfront Coalition; and Venture
Portland, which represents
neighborhood business districts. Sanderson also serves
on it.
Members could not agree on
many of the basic issues at the
meeting, however. Downtown
developer Greg Goodman wanted more information on how
PBOT spends its existing resources. Benjamin Chessar of
the Commercial Real Estate Development Association thought
more than a $50 million a year
might actually be needed. Sanderson thought the figure might
be too high, however.
PBOT Director Leah Treat
promised to provide additional
information before the next
meeting.
The other work group was
scheduled to meet this week. Its
members represent such nonprofits as: AARP; Central City
Concern; the Community Alliance of Tenants; the Coalition of
Communities of Color; Ecumenical Ministries of Oregon; Elders
in Action; the Latino Network;
and the Oregon Food Bank. It
also includes schools in the area.
KOIN News 6 contributed to this
story.
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Hospitals: Medicare payments cut
NEWS A5
The Portland Tribune Thursday, July 17, 2014
Oregon won’t smile on dental therapists
Little effort made to
fill dental services gap
despite high demand
By PETER KORN
The Tribune
A new national study promotes the efficiency of dental therapists in delivering
care to underserved populations, just as the possibility
of dental therapists operating in Oregon appears more
remote than ever.
Oregon for years has had
one of the nation’s worst records for providing dental care.
More than half of children on
the Oregon Health Plan, in one
study, received no dental care
in the course of a year. Another
study found that fewer than
one in five elderly Oregonians
in long-term care saw a dentist.
Experts say oral disease can
contribute to a host of maladies, including heart disease,
and dental pain is the No. 1
cause of children missing
school.
The Washington, D.C.-based
Pew Charitable Trusts have
been pushing dental therapists
as part of the answer. Dental
therapists, currently practicing
in Minnesota and Alaska and
soon coming to Maine, are the
dental equivalent of nurse
practitioners, who are able to
perform some, but not all of a
physician’s treatments and often are willing to work in areas
where doctors are scarce.
In 2011 the Oregon Legislature adopted a bill authorizing
pilot projects to explore the
possibilities for training and
using dental therapists. And
last year, the Legislature authorized $100,000 for a staffing
position at the Oregon Health
Authority to oversee dental pilot projects.
Nevertheless, nobody in Oregon is currently pursuing a
dental therapist pilot project,
according to state officials. Of-
ficials at the state’s only dental
school, at Oregon Health & Science University, say it won’t get
involved in training dental
therapists, and its dean says
training dental therapists is
not the best way to address the
gap in dental services around
the state.
Dental
therapists still
have not caught
on in Oregon as
an alternative
way to provide
care to lowincome people
and others in
need of
dentistry.
Therapists go untapped
Yet the evidence for dental
therapists as part of the solution is persuasive. The Pew
study found that a dental therapist hired by a safety net medical clinic in Minnesota conducted 1,756 patient visits for a population of people who were
mostly low-income immigrants.
Medicaid payments made to the
therapist exceeded the costs of
employing her by more than
$30,000, leading the clinic to hire
a second dental therapist.
In Alaska, two dental therapists provided care to 1,352 patients, many of whom previously had not had access to
dental care. Those two therapists generated $216,000 in net
revenue.
The Pew study noted that
millions of U.S. citizens simply
don’t have access to dental
care. Most dentists will not see
Medicaid patients because reimbursement is low. In addition, many people in rural areas and in low-income urban
neighborhoods do not have
dentists nearby.
Dental therapists are viewed
by Pew as a solution, once they
receive training at dental
schools to perform basic dental
care, including drilling and filling cavities. Supervised by a
dentist, they can actually boost
the dentist’s income as they
free the dentist to perform
more sophisticated and expensive surgeries, according to a
previous study.
State Sen. Laurie Monnes
Anderson, D-Gresham, sponsored the bill to authorize dental therapist pilot projects in
Oregon, and says she is disappointed that neither nonprofits
nor the dental school have
TRIBUNE FILE PHOTO
stepped forward to train thera- need for traditional responses
pists. The Oregon Dental Asso- to cavities, and dental hygienciation and the American Den- ists will be better able to hantal Association have opposed dle a wider range of problems.
state licensing of dental thera- “We’re moving away from drilling teeth and more like treatpists.
ing (decay) like a
“I really think
chronic disease,”
there’s a fear of
he says.
market share,”
Marucha says
Monnes Andernew therapies that
son says. “That’s
scoop out decayed
the story all the
tooth structures
way
around.
and fill cavities usWithout the dentists having full
— Dr. Leon Assael, ing tooth-colored
control over what
University of Minnesota m at e r i a l s a n d
should be done,
School of Dentistry dean sealants are becoming more popthere is a fear
ular, and dental
that oral health
will go out of the hands of den- hygienists can be trained to
tists, which I know will never perform those procedures. Hygienists cannot legally use
happen.”
Dr. Phillip Marucha, dean of drills, needed in traditional apthe OHSU school of dentistry, proaches to filling cavities.
Marucha says he’s hoping to
says Oregon dentists simply
have a different view of how help start a pilot program at
best to get dental care to those the dental school in which hyOregonians who don’t current- gienists can be trained in the
ly receive it. Marucha envi- scoop-and-fill treatments and
sions providing a few weeks of says using hygienists for the
advanced training to the state’s program makes sense.
“They don’t need a lot of admany dental hygienists, and
says that represents a better vanced training because
alternative than taking two they’re already working in the
years to train dental therapists. mouth,” Marucha says.
Marucha also supports a
Dental needs change
new idea being tested in CaliMarucha says that in the fu- fornia called a Virtual Dental
ture, there will be much less Home, in which low-income
“You’ve got
dental demand
down and dental
disease is up.”
Savas, Smith clash over proposed bond
By SHASTA KEARNS MOORE
The Tribune
board. The rate per $1,000 of assessed property value would increase from 54 cents to 89 cents.
Fifteen cents of the increase will
go towards operating costs of the
entire parks system. The extra 20
cents — about $25 million total —
will go toward debt payments on
new parks.
A public hearing to discuss the
ballot measure is 10 a.m. Thursday,
July 17, at the Red Soils campus.
In Assael’s view, hygienists,
even with extra training, cannot
perform the dental work needed
by thousands of Oregonians
who have no other access to
dental care. Scooping and filling
techniques, he says, are a solution for only about a third of patients with cavities. The rest
need and will continue to need
traditional drilling and filling.
Assael says Oregon’s problem in providing dental care to
its residents mostly comes
down to money.
He says dentists are making
significantly less money than
they did five years ago, from a
national average of about
$450,000 per year to just more
than $200,000 per year. That
helps explain why they won’t
take low-reimbursement Medicaid patients.
Last year, Assael says, just
more than one in three U.S.
residents saw a dentist, a dangerously low figure. Some of
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Fragmented system
The board eventually voted to
work on an even distribution
among the three areas — approximately $8.33 million each.
Though Commissioner Jim Bernard agreed with Commissioner
Martha Schrader that the proposal didn’t feel ready to present
to voters, he joined Ludlow and
Smith in voting to move forward.
“It seems like this is getting
worse every time we get together,” Bernard said. “Happy Valley
is less happy. Oak Grove/Oak
Lodge is less happy. And we
haven’t worked out all these details yet.”
Savas voted no and Schrader
abstained.
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“I’m concerned that, frankly,
it’s not going to pass,” Schrader said. “And if it doesn’t pass,
it’s just going to continue to
fragment what was a cohesive
system.”
As it stands now, the full ballot
measure will create a separate
North Clackamas Parks and Recreation District with its own
elected board. The commissioners serve as the park district
486188.071714
Clackamas County commissioners clashed July 8 in continuing discussions on ballot
language for an effort to raise
taxes to build new parks.
Commissioner Paul Savas has
been arguing passionately for
new parks to be built in “severely underserved” Oak Grove and
Jennings Lodge areas south of
Milwaukie. Savas said he has
failed to convince his fellow commissioners of the need there and
faulted them for not reading the
2004 North Clackamas Parks and
Recreation District Master Plan,
which he said outlines several
proposals that have not been followed through.
“This is a great document,”
Savas said. “If you read this,
you’ll have a greater understanding of the issue.”
Commissioner Tootie Smith
said she felt insulted. “Mr. Savas
if you’re trying to endear your
board members to vote your way,
I suggest you not insult us by
suggesting that we haven’t read
anything or suggesting that
you’re all-knowledgeable and
we’re not.”
The issue boils down to whether voters would approve a tax
rate hike of 35 cents per $1,000 of
assessed property value if they
didn’t see direct benefit to their
neighborhood.
The North Clackamas Parks
and Recreation District currently has 64 parks properties, but
only 11 in the area of most concern to Savas. Money to build
new parks tends to come from
fees charged to developers, but
that area was built two decades
ago — there’s no new development money coming in.
Commission Chair John Ludlow said he worries that if the
parks bond is weighted too heavily towards that area, no one else
in the district would vote for it.
“We can read all we want,”
Ludlow said. “Now we have to
find the money so that we can
live the dream.”
Money at root
that, he says, is due to a lack of
dentists in key areas, but the
greater reason is that many
people do not have dental insurance coverage and cannot
afford to pay out of their own
pockets. He says he observed
many people in Oregon nursing
homes with deteriorating
teeth, which can lead to other
health problems ranging from
weight loss to life-endangering
infections.
“You’ve got dental demand
down and dental disease is up,”
he says. “This is a perverse
state of affairs.”
Assael says he has seen dental therapists fill a great need
in Minnesota, primarily by
drilling and filling cavities for
much less than dentists charge.
Minnesota’s dental therapists,
in fact, are required to take on
low-income patients.
On average, according to
Assael, Minnesota dental
therapists are earning between $50,000 and $75,000 a
year. They don’t take business
away from dentists, he says,
because they’re mostly working with patients dentists
won’t take.
“Dental therapy is the greatest vehicle we’ve come up with
to deal with the problem of untreated tooth decay from the
standpoint of access,” Assael
says. “It’s great to teach people
how to scoop and fill, but it’s
not the treatment of dental (decay). To say that all of it is, is
silly.”
Assael’s take on why Oregon dentists oppose the authorization of dental therapists?
“They’re afraid to give them a
drill,” he says. “It’s a matter of
professional identity and
economics.”
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residents receive dental education and preventive care from
hygienists who collaborate
with dentists through telemedicine systems.
But that simply isn’t enough
to help the nearly one in three
Oregonians who receive no
regular dental care, says Dr.
Leon Assael, dean of the University of Minnesota School of
Dentistry, the only dental
school in the United States that
currently trains dental therapists. Prior to becoming dean at
the University of Minnesota,
Assael spent nine and a half
years at the OHSU dental
school and was chairman of
OHSU’s department of oral and
maxillofacial surgery.
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A6 INSIGHT
The Portland Tribune Thursday, July 17, 2014
{ INSIGHT }
A little advice for Oregon’s next governor
O
n Friday, July 18, Gov. John
Kitzhaber and state Rep. Dennis Richardson will square off
in the first gubernatorial debate of the year at the Oregon Newspaper Publishers Association convention in
Salem.
The debate is guaranteed to feature
back-and-forth bickering and fingerpointing over the Cover Oregon website
debacle, as well as
discussion about the
relative competency
of each of the two
major party candidates. Along the way,
however, we hope the two men who
would be governor will directly address
those concerns that strike closest to the
hearts of all Oregonians.
It’s true that Kitzhaber’s failure to
oversee the Cover Oregon website adequately has opened a narrow opportunity for his Republican rival to halt the
GOP’s losing streak in statewide elections. Yet, Richardson must do more
than complain about Kitzhaber’s deficiencies as an administrator — he also
must offer credible suggestions for improving Oregon’s performance in the areas that people most value.
Fortunately for the candidates, what
Oregonians care about is easy to deci-
OUROPINION
pher. The Oregon Values and Beliefs
Survey, conducted last year by DHM Research with the help of some of Oregon’s
most important institutions, provides
clear guidance.
The 9,000 people in Oregon who participated in that survey placed education at the top of the list. Kindergarten
through 12th grade were deemed to be
a higher priority than post-secondary
education, and Oregonians clearly were
concerned not only about the quality of
education, but also how the state was
going to fund it. When you consider
that one ranking by Education Week
places Oregon 40th among states for academic achievement, it’s clear that the
public is correct to demand continuing
improvement in this area.
The DHM research also shows that
post-secondary education is vital to a
broad spectrum of the population. Oregonians want greater accessibility and
affordable tuition. Oregon state Treasurer Ted Wheeler has been the most assertive public official in suggesting ways to
help Oregon residents afford the cost of
college. The two major-party candidates
for governor need to lay out their own
plans with the same specificity that
Wheeler has.
The second-highest priority for Ore-
Portland
Tribune
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EDITOR
Steve Law
COPY EDITOR
Mikel Kelly
Square repairs shouldn’t come from bond
I
attended the town hall
meeting recently held at
Cleveland High School
where Portland City Commissioner Amanda Fritz discussed her parks replacement
bond proposal (Fritz: Park bond
gains citizen support, July 3).
I fail to see the need to include Pioneer Courthouse
Square as a focus area of the
bond funds and have to ask the
broader question, What kind of
“business model” are Portland
Parks & Recreation and the Pioneer Courthouse Square
Board of Trustees using, such
that Pioneer Courthouse
Square is in need of bond funds
to make repairs?
Why is the most programmed
Portland park space, with four
major tenants and permit fees
from more than 300 annual
events, not generating sufficient
revenue to pay for the needed replacement waterproof membrane under the bricks? If it was
known that the waterproof membrane had a 20-year design life,
then why weren’t funds set aside
from tenant revenue and permit
fees to pay for this needed repair? Why was this needed repair not programmed into the
public improvements needed
within the Downtown Waterfront Urban Renewal Area a decade ago?
PHOTOGRAPHERS
Paul Gronke
Jonathan House
Jaime Valdez
Keith Klippstein
PRODUCTION
Michael Beaird, Valerie
Clarke, Chris Fowler
CONTRIBUTOR
Rob Cullivan
WEB SITE
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accurate living chronicle
about how our citizens,
government and
businesses live, work
and play. The Portland
Tribune is dedicated
to providing vital
communication and
leadership throughout
our community.
Again, what kind of business
model is Portland Parks & Recreation operating with, in regard to the operations, management and maintenance of Pioneer Courthouse Square, such
that it needs to take much needed bond revenue from the numerous other city parks, playgrounds, trails, swimming pools
and other facilities?
I personally will not advocate
nor support the proposed 2014
parks replacement bond unless
the Pioneer Courthouse Square
repairs are removed as a focus
area of the bond funds. I challenge the talented and connected
Pioneer Courthouse Square
Board of Trustees to develop a financial plan for the replacement
of the failing waterproof membrane under the bricks and not
compete for, nor look to, the limited bond funds from the 2014
parks replacement bond.
Wesley Risher
Southwest Portland
People should care
about old homes
The Markham home in Laurelhurst was built in 1911 (Laurelhurst was plotted in 1910, and
nothing is older than that), and
the San Francisco Google guy is
Kevin Rose, not Kevin Jones
ing sold to Californians moving
up here because they can’t afford
to live in San Francisco any
more, a trend that is happening
here. Portland is turning into
Supporters
San Francisco North, and we all
of Portland’s
Living Room — soon won’t be able to afford to
live here anymore.
Pioneer
Jo Haemer
Courthouse
North Portland
Square — hope
to see more
funds set aside
to make
necessary
repairs to the
The amendment supported by
city landmark.
Mayor Charlie Hales and Jason
TRIBUNE FILE PHOTO Miner of 1000 Friends of Oregon
— allowing occasional shortterm rentals of condominiums
and apartments — makes sense.
(City Council finalizes ordinance
“Every generation wants to
to legalize Airbnb style rentals
live in a larger home. Who am I
here, web story, July 2). This
to say my children can’t live in
would help condo owners and
the house they want, if they can
renters offset some of their costs
afford it?” says homebuilder Jeff when they’re traveling, without
Fish in your article (New endan- leading to the unintended consegered species: old homes, July
quence of converting available
10).
housing into short-term rentals.
Sorry, but Mr. Fish is asleep at
To avoid the conversion of afthe wheel. He seems to be unfordable apartments into expenaware of the small-house movesive short-term rentals, the
ment that is growing here. Also,
amendment should make it illewith so few middle-class jobs
gal for people to do this more
available and replaced with mini- than a given number of days per
mum-wage service jobs, most
year.
working folks in Portland can’t
Steve Gutmann
afford big houses. They are beSoutheast Portland
Regulate rentals for
condos, apartments
(Rose recently had planned to
demolish a Willamette Heights
home but, after heated protest,
decided to sell it instead).
That said, I loved this article
(New endangered species: old
homes, July 10). Go Terra
Wheeler! Her effort to save
homes is a good start, though it
seems there are still quite a few
people who just don’t get why
people care about preserving
old neighborhoods. It has nothing to do with fearing change.
Also, there’s so much history
that is lost when one house is replaced, so the density argument
is B.S.
Christopher Wilson
Southeast Portland
Harder to afford
large homes
‘Postmark’ rule puts burden on voting system
MYVIEW
INSIGHT
PAGE EDITOR
surface is transportation, and the DHM
survey reveals a split between urban
and rural populations. Residents who
live along the Interstate 5 corridor are
more supportive of public transit projects, while rural residents place greater
value on road and highway construction.
The issue of maintaining, improving
and expanding Oregon’s transportation
infrastructure is one the state’s next governor cannot ignore. While there is a
need to find funding for big, expensive
projects in the Portland metro area, including mass transit, the attention paid
to Portland cannot come at the expense
of the rest of the state. Oregon’s rural areas and their economies depend on the
highway system as the only realistic link
for business and personal transportation.
The issue of how to fund transportation projects is more than just asphalt,
dollars and cents — it’s indicative of a
governor’s bigger responsibility.
Oregon’s governor must represent the
entire state, not just the areas with the
most votes. This state’s residents have
many common values and concerns —
including education, health care and
transportation — and the two leading
candidates for governor would do well to
directly address those very issues at every opportunity they have to debate.
READERS’LETTERS
Pete Vogel
ART DIRECTION
AND DESIGN
gon residents is health care and healthy
living, but their concerns are much
broader than Cover Oregon, Oracle or
Obamacare. Rising to the top of the
health care list were wellness and personal responsibility. Oregonians advocated holding people accountable for
high-risk behaviors — such as smoking,
drug use or lack of exercise — through
higher insurance premiums.
The survey also revealed that in 2013
the public did, in fact, want major changes to the existing health care system.
Kitzhaber and Richardson certainly will
talk about the failed website, but the
public will want to hear Richardson describe how his approach to the larger issues of health care delivery and cost will
differ from Kitzhaber.
It was no surprise to learn from the
DHM survey that Oregonians are ardent
supporters of the environment, but they
also would like to see more robust economic growth. The survey revealed that
57 percent of Oregonians favored environmental protection at the risk of slowing economic growth — a majority to be
sure, but not a strong one. Oregonians
still need a much better economy for the
state to be able to invest money in services such as public education.
Another issue that rises quickly to the
T
he final tally for
the 2000 U.S. presidential election in Florida
was George W.
Bush, 2,912,790 votes, and Al
Gore, 2,912,253 votes — a difference of 537 votes.
Of course, everyone knows
that the presidential contest in
2000 went all the way to the Supreme Court, which refused to
stop the certification of the
election by Florida Secretary of
State Katherine Harris, and
that in turn gave Bush his electoral margin and victory.
Nearly every election observer agrees that Florida 2000
was a low point in the history
of American electoral democracy. Imagine how much worse
it would have been if, the day
after the election, hundreds of
thousands, if not millions, of
ballots nationwide had not
even been counted yet because
they were still winding their
way through the postal system.
In that 2010 election, control
of the U.S. Senate turned on
the outcome of a very small
number of competitive races.
One of the most interesting
was held in Alaska, where incumbent Lisa Murkowski was
fighting for her political life after being forced into a write-in
candidacy against the Tea Party-sponsored Joe Miller and
Scott McAdams.
It was very possible that control of the U.S. Senate, and the
future of Obama’s major fiscal
and social policies, would turn
on the Alaska Senate race. And
given the nature of the postal
system in Alaska, it also was
possible that it would be weeks
before we’d know the final outcome, as late-arriving postal
ballots were counted.
Eleven states and the District of Columbia count late-arriving vote-by-mail ballots, as
long as they have been postmarked by election day. Washington is among these states.
In California, a recently proposed bill goes further, requiring that ballots be counted if
they arrive by mail without a
postmark, as long as they are
signed and dated by the voter.
No such proposals have
emerged yet in Oregon, the national leader in voting by mail,
and my hopes are that they do
not.
It is unfortunate when a voter waits too long to cast a ballot or worse, through no fault
of their own, a ballot fails to be
delivered in a timely basis.
This is why county election administrators and the Oregon
secretary of state print prominent warnings on the ballot envelope about the due date, advertise heavily and establish
drop boxes located around the
county.
Oregon voters seem to understand this. It’s a little
known fact that Oregon is not
primarily a “vote-by-mail”
state, but a “vote-by-drop-box”
state. In the 2012 election, for
example, 53 percent of ballots
in Multnomah County were
hand-delivered to a drop box or
at the counter, or sent by fax.
In practice, the postmark
“deadline” actually works to
disenfranchise more voters
than the election day “dead-
line.” The Washington Policy
Center compared the percentage of late-arriving ballots in
the five largest Oregon and
Washington counties in November 2012, and more Washington than Oregon voters
missed the deadline. Oregon
has the stricter deadline, yet
turnout in Oregon is higher.
Allowing ballots to arrive after Election Day creates unnecessary administrative burdens.
It can sow confusion about
election results. And it relies
on the post office to apply consistent postmarks.
But, more importantly, the
“postmark” rule elevates the
individual interest in having
their ballot count above the
collective interest in determining the outcome of an election
fairly and efficiently.
The individual franchise is
important because it helps to
assure that political leaders
are responsive to the public
and lends legitimacy to the actions of political leaders.
Elections as a collective act,
however, are fundamentally
about allocating political power. Elections emerged in the
17th century, relatively late in
the history of human governance. They were seen as an
elitist institution in ancient
Athens. Winston Churchill famously described democracy
as “the worst form of government, except for all the others.”
We should work to assure
that every Oregonian and every American has ready access
to the ballot. This is why Oregon adopted vote by mail and
is why many states have moved
to hybrid election systems,
with election-day, vote-by-mail,
and early in-person balloting.
We should work to develop
new technologies that may allow for Internet voting in the
future.
But we also should try to
make sure that elections are
decided quickly, without unnecessary delay. If this requires voters to remember to
mail a ballot three days before
the election or deliver it by
hand to one of many ballot
drop-box locations, this is a
reasonable compromise.
Paul Gronke is political director for
Portland’s DHM Research.
Portland Tribune editorial board
Submissions
■ J. Mark Garber – president, Portland Tribune
and Community Newspapers Inc.
503-546-0714; [email protected]
■ Kevin Harden – managing editor, Portland Tribune
503-546-5167; [email protected]
■ Vance Tong – associate publisher, Portland Tribune
503-546-5146; [email protected]
The Portland Tribune welcomes essays on topics of public interest. Submissions should be no longer than
600 words and may be edited. Letters should be no longer than 250 words. Both submissions should include your
name, home address and telephone number for verification purposes. Please send submissions via e-mail:
[email protected] You may fax them to 503-546-0727 or send them to “Letters to the Editor,”
Portland Tribune, 6605 S.E. Lake Road, Portland, OR 97222.
NEWS A7
The Portland Tribune Thursday, July 17, 2014
Blue Lake closed
because of illnesses
Two families reported
symptoms after
swimming in lake
By CARI HACHMANN
Pamplin Media Group
The Multnomah County
Health Department is working with Blue Lake Regional
Park officials to investigate
reports of diarrheal illness
from people who visited the
lake the weekend of July 12
and 13, said county spokeswoman Julie SullivanSpringhetti.
Park officials closed the lake
to swimming Monday morning,
July 14, after two families reported symptoms of diarrhea,
vomiting, rash and cramps.
The Multnomah County
Health Department Communicable Disease program is trying to find out what the diarrheal illness is and whether it
can be traced to swimming in
the lake.
“Our initial impression is
that the illness is due to norovirus or a similar stomach virus,” said Deputy Health Officer Dr. Jennifer Vines.
According to health officials,
norovirus is a common cause
of vomiting and diarrhea,
which there is no treatment for.
Most people recover in 24 to 48
hours, but children and the elderly can suffer dehydration as
a complication.
“Anyone with these symptoms should be sure to drink
plenty of fluids and contact
their health care provider with
any concerns,” Vines added.
Sullivan-Springhetti said routine water samples taken earlier
this month at Blue Lake showed
low levels of E coli, but the water
is not tested for norovirus.
Park officials collected samples on Monday to check for E
coli in the water.
Health officials said outbreaks of both norovirus and E
coli have been associated with
TRIBUNE PHOTO: LACEY JACOBY
Blue Lake in the past.
The
Northwest
Portland
Farmers
Market
receives
an
average
of
500
to
700
customers
per
day.
It
is
open
from
2
to
6
p.m.
every
Thursday
The county health department shared the following in- beginning in early June and ending in late September.
formation:
a high number of users, with 7 is confident they will get the
■ Viruses and bacteria that
percent last year and nearly 11 funding.
cause diarrhea can be transPortland is not unique in
percent in 2012.
mitted in shallow lakes when
“We’re going to make it hapAt the King market, 5 percent pen,” she says. “Once it proves offering food assistance prosomeone who is ill sheds stool
of shoppers used SNAP last itself, it will be easy to fund- grams at farmers markets. A
in the water.
Seattle program called Fresh
year. And at the Kenton market raise.”
■ Other swimmers can inadBucks, similar to Fresh
last year, just 4 percent of people
vertently swallow contaminatFarmer Ian Winters, of Win- Exchange, provides SNAP users
used SNAP.
ed water and become ill. Park
ters Farms in Troutdale, esti- with a match of up to $10 at
Overall, the Northwest, Buck- mates about a quarter to a third participating seasonal markets
officials take precautions to
man and King markets saw a dip of his customers are using the per visit.
promote water flow and miniin SNAP use this past year, food assistance programs.
mize risk to swimmers.
Seattle’s program is much largwhich Toliver says could be due
Sullivan-Springhetti said the
He has seen the number of er, but provides an interesting
to a number of factors. Pro- customers using food assistance comparison as it continues to
county is continuing to work
grams like SNAP, she says, typi- grow since he started vending expand to more locations.
with park officials to deterSeven Seattle farmers markets
cally have temporary users, five years ago, which he’s glad
mine when it is safe to re-open
making constant outreach nec- for. “Nutrition is something that started the program as a pilot in
the lake.
2012 and grew to a participating
An update will be provide SNAP outreach manager at essary for the program to sur- matters to everyone,” he says. 16 markets and two farm stands
Partners for a Hunger-Free Or- vive. In addition, Fresh Ex- “Whether they know it or not.” last year.
later today, officials said.
egon.
change has been forced to
In the 2013 Fresh Bucks seaSince 2004, all Portland farm- change its matching amount Healthy Plate
son, from July through December,
Back at Sisters of the Road in 7,871 transactions were recorded
ers markets have accepted due to shifts in available fundSNAP and also recognize other ing, typically from donations Old Town, Healthy Plate — the at the 16 participating markets.
food assistance programs such and grants, unlike Seattle, which two-month-old program that And that number more than douas Women, Infants and Children received $150,000 in city money just ran out of funding — al- bled from the prior year, according
to statistics provided by Karen
and Senior Farm Direct Nutri- in addition to donations for their lowed Adams to purchase what Kinney, executive director of the
he says was “better tasting than Washington State Farmers Market
tion Program vouchers, which similar program last year.
are both processed directly by
In 2010, Fresh Exchange start- the stuff you get at supermar- Association.
farmers, Toliver says.
ed matching up to $10, later kets.”
Now, staff members hope to see
And now, Sisters of the Road the program hosted year-round at
In addition, four of the eight dropped to $5 that August,
waukie on their way to Portland.
Proposed rerouting of Line 99’s Portland markets host the pro- raised it to $7 in 2012, and has of- is looking for donations in hopes all markets in 2015, she says.
In terms of SNAP funds used,
of making the program run
express service from Clacka- gram Fresh Exchange, which fered $5 since 2013.
Seattle’s 16 Fresh Bucks markets
mas Community College and provides SNAP recipients with a
Low-income shoppers may year-round.
The project allowed volun- brought in $107,483 last season.
downtown Oregon City would dollar per dollar spent on ap- soon get another benefit. Toliver
provide service to the Mil- proved farmers market items up says the Farmers Market Fund, teers at the Sisters of the Road Portland’s four markets brought in
$45,241 last year.
waukie station and the park- to $5 per visit, at the King, Buck- a charitable organization com- Café to exchange their earned
“Everyone is benefitting,” Kinney
and-ride lot on Main Street man, Kenton and Northwest panion to the market, plans to punch cards for tokens, which says. “Good access is something
markets — that means spending launch grant proposals during could be redeemed for up to $15 that is important to so many
north of downtown.
Line 99 would continue to $5 in SNAP money gets partici- the next six to nine months to per day at all Portland farmers organizations.”
Portland across the new Sell- pants $10 to spend.
add yet another program which market locations.
Traditionally, the punch
According to data from the would aim to raise awareness
wood Bridge, which may not be
cards, worth $3 apiece, are to purchase food with a longer
completed by September next Portland Farmers Market detail- about healthy eating.
ing SNAP use at all participating
year in time for light rail.
The program, she says, would earned by Sisters of the Road shelf-life — get their hands on
A draft copy of the proposed Fresh Exchange locations since potentially partner with local volunteers who help to maintain, the fresh and nutritious prodbus service plan is considered each location started hosting the service agencies to provide clean and cook at the cafe and ucts they need and deserve.
“People with food insecurity
“very preliminary” by TriMet program, the Buckman market vouchers in exchange for food are redeemable for two meals
definitely need access to healthy
officials. TriMet’s Southeast attracted the most SNAP shop- and also incorporate healthy- and beverages at the location.
Volunteers say Healthy Plate food,” says Kris Soebroto, the
Service Enhancement Plan pers last year, with 8 percent of eating workshops, similar to a
anticipates public comments total shoppers using SNAP. The program the Lloyd Farmers was a way for lower-income café’s development co-manager.
Northwest market also attracted Market hosts. Toliver says she shoppers — who normally have “That is everyone’s right.”
during the summer.
Markets:
Initiative
running out
of funds
■ From page 1
TriMet sessions look
at bus line changes
By RAYMOND RENDLEMAN
Pamplin Media Group
TriMet hosts a series of
public meetings this month
regarding the proposed
changes to bus service upon
the completion of the Portland-Milwaukie light-rail
project in 2015.
Minimizing “duplicative” service of Southeast McLoughlin
Boulevard’s bus lines 31, 32, 33
and 99 has been a major goal of
this planning effort.
Although the transit agency
is proposing terminating Line 33
in Milwaukie and requiring a
transfer to light rail, riders from
Oregon City didn’t want to always have to transfer in Mil-
INSTEAD OF JUST HANGING OUT ON SATURDAYS
I HELP KIDS HANG IN THERE
AT SCHOOL
BECAUSE I DON’T JUST WEAR THE SHIRT, I LIVE IT.
®
GIVE. ADVOCATE. VOLUNTEER. LIVE UNITED
Michael Cleveland is part of United Way’s ongoing work to improve
the education, income, and health of our communities. To find
out how you can help create opportunities for a better life for all,
visit LIVEUNITED.ORG.
A GLIMPSE UP NORTH
A8 NEWS
The Portland Tribune Thursday, July 17, 2014
MemorialTributes
Celebrating The Lives
Of Local Residents
To place an obituary, go online to any of our newspaper websites and fill out our easy to use form.
P
832 NE Broadway
503-783-3393
Milwaukie
17064 SE McLoughlin Blvd.
503-653-7076
Perry graduated from Corbett High School in
1976 and attended Central Oregon Community
College. He had lived in Bend, Seattle and
Corbett areas. Perry enjoyed snow skiing, boating and camping.
Portland resident Rosalie G.
Tangen, 81, passed away on July 8,
2014 in Portland, Oregon. Public
Funeral Services will be held on
Thursday July 17, 2014 at 10:30AM
at Sunnyside Little Chapel of the
Chimes, 11667 SE Stevens Rd.,
Portland, with visitation and
reception to follow the service.
Private burial at Willamette
National Cemetery. Remembrances
in Rosalie’s name may be made to your favorite charity.
To share a memory, please visit www.sunnysidechimes.com.
Serving the
southwest
community for
over 160 years.
Portland
erry Julius Weien died on July 8, 2014
in Troutdale, Oregon. He was born on
October 13, 1957 in Gresham, Oregon
to Wayne and Evelyn (Lampert) Weien.
December 4, 1932 to July 8, 2014
■ Independent
Tualatin
■ Non-Denominational
8970 SW Tualatin Sherwood Rd
503-885-7800
■ Non-Profit
473733.071514
412210.012413
Perry is survived by his brothers, Carl Weien,
Corbett, OR., Greg Lewis, St. Petersburg,
Florida, Garth Lewis, Springdale, OR., and
Casey Lewis, Gresham, OR., and his sister,
Stephanie Llewellyn of Happy Valley, OR.
Traditional Funeral $$1,975
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Tigard, OR 97223
503.639.5347
crescentgrovecemetery.com
Rose was born in St. Joe, MO on December 4, 1932.
Rose graduated from Gresham High School. she worked
at the Bonneville Dam fish counting station, A & W
Restaurant and owned The Village Flower Shop in
Fairview, OR. She married Bruce Tangen in 1951. Rose
enjoyed family get-togethers, her garden, hunting,
fishing, bowling and reading. Rose is survived by sons,
Frank, Darrel, Brian, Kevin; daughter, Tammie; sister,
Marion; brothers, Melvin, Stan and Rich; 19
grandchildren; 18 great-grandchildren; and seven greatgreat-grandchildren. Her husband Bruce, her parents,
two brothers and grandson preceded her in death.
Virginia Viola Barber
October 23, 1919 to July 8, 2014
Vincent A. Lowenberg
In Loving Memory
Arden Butler
November 29, 1942 – June 30, 2014
In Loving Memory
Olga Stach Riedel
Olga Stach Riedel, widow of
Rev. Fred Riedel, was called to
her eternal rest on July 1, 2014.
She will be buried in Bismarck, North
Dakota on July 8 at Sunset Memorial
Gardens Cemetery next to her husband.
Olga was born June 29, 1916 in Santa Fe, Argentina
to parents Jacob and Caroline Stach, She married the
missionary called to her area, Rev. Fred Riedel, (who
actually confirmed her)
on February 8, 1934 near Las Breñas, Argentina,
They were soon called to a new mission at Macia Entre
Rios, Argentina and served there until 1941.
The Riedels then moved back to the place of Fred’s
home and family, New Salem, ND. She worked with
him at numerous churches in North Dakota, starting a
church in Otter Creek, and later moving to Beulah. Here,
they adopted their son Fredrick. They also spent a
couple years in Jamestown, where Fredrick started
school.
In 1955, the family went back to South America for
a short time to do mission work in Venezuela. Olga
also lived with Pastor Fred in Minnesota, Northern
Idaho, and Washington State. She moved to Gresham.
Oregon after her husband’s passing in 1994.
Olga was a professional seamstress who taught
many people about the gospel. She could teach in
English, Spanish, and German, and was always ready
with a cup of coffee when people would visit. She was
an incredible wife, mother, grandmother, and friend.
Olga was preceded in death by 12 siblings, her
husband Fred, and her grandson, Kyle. She is survived
by son Fred (Jr.) and his wife Koni, of Gresham,
Oregon, and two grandchildren - Gavin and Kristi. She
has one living brother, Julio Stach, still residing in
Argentina.
A memorial service was held at 10AM on July 7 at
Zion Lutheran Church in New Salem, ND. Pastor
Erhart Bauer, a family friend, officiated. Another
memorial service will be held at 10AM on July 22 at
Ascension Lutheran Church in Portland, OR, officiated
by Pastor Dennis Bohren. Memorial contributions in
Olga’s name may be made to Ascension Lutheran
Church, or to South American missions c/o Ascension
Lutheran Church at 1440 SE 182nd Ave. Portland, OR
97233-5009.
470976.071614
June 29, 1916 July 1, 2014
474853.071814
Vincent A. Lowenberg was
born in Donnellson, Iowa Sept.
15, 1926 to Viola (Krehbiel) and
Herbert Lowenberg. He had one
sister, Elaine (Lowenberg) Harper
and 83 first cousins, some of
whom were double first cousins.
Vince loved his large family
and kept great correspondence
throughout the years.
Vince married Tyra Elisabeth
(Lisa) Lindahl Aug 26, 1961 at
Ekero Church on an island in Stockholm’s archipelago.
The church was built in 1106, and it stands close to
where Sweden’s king and queen live today. They
were married 52 years and have three children Karin,
Robert, and Kirsten, and six grandchildren.
Our dad grew up in Donnellson, where he sang in
the church choir, was on the high school basketball
team, and even played the clarinet in a Dixieland
jazz band. After high school Dad went to Iowa State
University for two years before signing up to serve
his country in the Navy during World War ll. After
the war, Dad returned to school, and graduated from
the University of Michigan. After graduation, Dad
moved to Boston and earned his MBA from Harvard
Business School.
While at Michigan, he sang with the Men’s Glee Club
(the oldest in the nation), and two months ago, the men
from the current Michigan Men’s Glee Club honored him
with a private concert on the front lawn of his home in
Lake Oswego. Approximately 20 years ago, Dad declined
an Honorary Doctorate to teach in the Department of
Economics with the University of Michigan.
Vince worked as an economist and consultant for
a number of companies including Stanford Research
Institute (SRI), the United Nations and USAID. Dad
travelled the world for SRI, and his longest assignments
allowed him to move his family to Sweden for a year, and
to Ethiopia for two years. Eventually, the family moved
to a small farm in Lake Oswego where Mom and Dad
lived for 40 years together. From that home base, Dad
accepted a twelve month assignment with the United
Nations in Zambia, and an eighteen month assignment
with the US State Department in Cairo, Egypt. Dad
was also a longtime member of the Bohemian Club in
San Francisco which allowed him longtime friendships
in business and life. He deeply enjoyed the “Grove” in
the summers, writing and performing music and plays
with the other members. The Redwoods were always
one of his favorite places to be.
The farm in Lake Oswego was our Dad’s big love.
He could spend hours in his amazing garden, pick fruit
from the orchard, or tend to the various animals we
had on the farm. He spent countless hours teaching
his children the value of hard work by example and
word, because he knew that hard work builds great
character. Our dad loved the adventure of life and had
a passion to see the world. In his 87 years he was able
to travel to more than 137 countries — and the family
accompanied him to 41 of them.
Of all of Dad’s accomplishments and adventures,
none compared to his love for the Lord. He was very
involved in The Gideons International, and would
take every opportunity to pass out a Bible. Wherever
he was traveling to, he would make sure he filled one
briefcase with Bibles in the language of the country he
was going to be in . . . even if it was communist Russia
(in the 1980s) or communist China.
Dad was a devoted husband, father, grandfather
and friend. We will miss him terribly. We are thankful
for all the amazing memories and adventures, and we
are exceptionally thankful that we will be together
again in Eternity. We love you Dad!
Services were held July 14 at Lake Oswego United
Methodist Church. Contributions in his honor may
be made to The Gideons International (gideons.org),
Samaritans Purse International (samaritanspurse.
org) or Lake Oswego United Methodist Church
(lakeoswegoumc.org)
473735.071614
September 15, 1926 to July 7, 2014
Long time Sandy resident
Virginia Viola Barber died July 8th
2014 in a Happy Valley senior care
facility with family by her side.
She was 94.
A funeral service will be held
on Thursday July 17th 2014 at 2:00
PM at the Sandy Funeral Home
located at 39551 Pleasant Street,
Sandy OR 97055. Reception
following service 3:30PM at Sandy Historical Museum
located at 39345 Pioneer Blvd, Sandy, OR 97055.
Virginia Viola Sites was born in Kettle Falls, WA on
October 23rd, 1919. She was raised in Kettle Falls. In
1945 Virginia moved to Ketchikan, Territory of Alaska
where she worked as a telephone operator for the
territory.
In 1957 Virginia moved to Sandy, OR where she was
united in marriage to Duey Barber on February 11th
1957. They made their home in the Sandy area where
they owned & operated the Dairy Wonder & Western
Auto.
Virginia enjoyed fishing, camping, playing her
Ukulele, dancing, and laughing with friends.
Survivors include; daughters Lois Allread & Janet
Heitman; 5 grandchildren; 8 great grandchildren; 2 great
great grandchildren.
She was loved and will be missed!!!
The family requests memorial contributions be made
to the Mt Hood Hospice, 39641 Scenic St, Sandy, OR
97055.
473730.071514
October 13, 1957 - July 8, 2014
Memorial service will be on Friday, July 18th
at 1:00 P.M. at Corbett Community Church,
34309 NE Mershon Rd.
Rosalie G. Tangen
Crescent Grove
Cemetery &
Mausoleum
Arden Barry Butler died June 30,
2014 at his home in Dundee, OR, of cancer. He was born in Portland, OR on November 29, 1942, the son of Asa and
Mary (Mills) Butler. He attended
Springbrook Grade School and Newberg
High School, graduating in 1960. He
earned a B.A. Degree in Secondary Education from Cascade College in Portland, in 1965. After college, he served
two years of alternate service with the
Salvation Army. On June 8, 1968, Arden
married Joan Hewitt of Willamina, OR, whom he met in the
college choir. They resided in the Newberg/Dundee area for
46 years.
Following his marriage, Arden worked briefly as a caseworker for the State of Oregon. He became an aircraft mechanic for Columbia Helicopters in Aurora; and a truck driver
for construction companies. In 1999, he began working in
maintenance at Tilikum Camp and Retreat Center, followed
by two years in plant services at George Fox University, before retiring in 2012.
Arden enjoyed the outdoors. He liked music and books. He
loved people; family and friends. He had a servant’s heart and
lived to help others. He worshiped and served at West
Chehalem Friends Church for the past 40 years, having been
a lifelong member, beginning in Springbrook.
Arden is survived by his wife, Joan; son Dennis (Lauren
Druse); and daughter Jodi Lynne. Surviving also is a large extended family of which he was a much loved and valued member. He was preceded in death by his parents, Asa and Mary
(Mills) Butler and sisters, Lenore Johnson and Inez Butler.
A memorial service will be held at the West Chehalem
Friends Church on Friday, August 1 at 3:00 p.m., to celebrate
his life. Private inurnment will take place at Newberg Friends
Cemetery. Arrangements made by Crown Memorial. Visit
www.anewtradition.com for a full obituary.
Memorial contributions may be made to these camping
ministries: Tilikum Retreat Center, 15321 N.E. North Valley
Road, Newberg, OR 97132 or Twin Rocks Friends Camp,
18705 U.S. 101, Rockaway Beach, OR 97142.
In Loving Memory of
Linda Mae Lauder
April 6, 1943 June 19, 2014
Linda Mae Lauder, born
April 6, 1943 in Corvallis, OR
to Ervin and Georgia V. [Miser]
Nail, passed away on June 19, 2014
in Mesa, Arizona at the age of 71. She
was raised in Pea Ridge, Arkansas. In 1959 she
moved to Portland, Oregon where she graduated
from David Douglas High School in 1961. On
the Saturday preceding her birthday in 1963,
Linda met Mick Lauder, whom she later married
on June 12, 1967. Linda was a loving wife,
mother and grandmother who worked for 30
years as an office manager at various auto body
shops while raising her family. She enjoyed
doing yard work, shopping and listening to
country music, especially the talents of Vince
Gill whom she saw in concert several times.
Linda was also a good dancer who could twostep or swing to any music with rhythm. Linda is
survived by her beloved husband Mick Lauder;
her daughters Debbie (Jim) Chianello; Stephanie
(John) Burleigh; her mother Georgia Purcell;
sisters Peggy Rake and Dianna Roberts; her
brother Jerry (Sandi) Nail as well as her
grandchildren Nick, Lindy and Ava. Please join
us in celebration of her life at The Gresham
Memorial Chapel on Monday, July 14th, 2014 at
11:00 a.m.. A reception will follow the service in
the basement of the Chapel.
473729.071114
Perry Julius Weien
NEWS A9
The Portland Tribune Thursday, July 17, 2014
Celebrate Their Life
Helen Mozelle Medio
December 04, 1943 to July 13, 2014
Placing an obituary is a final keepsake of a loved one
and provides a memorial tribute to their life.
FORT WORTH -- Helen Mozelle Medio, 70, passed
away Sunday, July 13, 2014.
Helen was born Dec. 04, 1943 in Laredo, TX., to
Adriel McFarran Slack and Mable Clair Reed.
Survivors: Sons, Anthony J. Medio and Frank C.
Medio, Jr.; and daughter, Tina Marie Starewich.
The Pamplin Media Group offers both paid tributes and death notices as a service to the community.
To place a tribute, please go online to any of our newspaper websites and fill out our easy to use tribute form.
GREENWOOD CHAPEL
Greenwood Funerals-Cremation
3100 White Settlement Rd., 817-336-0584
View and sign guestbook at
www.star-telegram.com/obituaries
Please feel free to contact any of our newspaper representatives with any questions.
John T. Nelson
April 5, 1947 to July 7, 2014
In Loving Memory
PortlandTribune
SEE LIFE, B1
HED THURSDAY
UNE.COM • PUBLIS
ORTLANDTRIB
ILY PAPER • WWW.P
NATION’S BEST NONDA
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By JIM REDDEN
The Tribune
d police car behind
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David
“Grimm” actor
door or make
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police are
comes time to
show, Portland
cops say
an arrest on the
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they sometimes and places, and for an
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see
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COURTESY OF SCOTT
GREEN/NBC
WATCHING
THE DETECTIVES
STORY BY
PETER KORN
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TRIBUNE PHOTO:
February 9, 1927 to July 2, 2014
October 11, 1919
- June 16, 2014
JAIME VALDEZ
safe
Diesel into the
Weinberger walks Mounted Patrol
Officer Benson
the
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Portland Police
Centennial Mills
portion of the
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Street.
ly Garden Projectdirector
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By JENNIFER
blocks from
about
information
in the Sabin
The Tribune
son
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. The
each site. Hundr hneighborhood of
out and
throug
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NORTHEAST
Next time you’re Portland, of people and subthird co-foun pioeast
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Tim Wessels,
about in North the flowers.
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season this spring.
project of their a public forum founde breed a winter-hardy
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to
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See BUZZ / Page
project. “Bees
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to
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JONATHAN HOUSE
In three years,41 stops — 40
TRIBUNE PHOTO:
is to
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come to include
Group’s pledge
nity Orchard last r.
“Pamplin Media news that reflects the
Sabin Commu
last summe
party for the
deliver balanced
ities. Thank you
volunteer work plants and shrubs to the orchard
stories of our commun ers.”
neighbors at a
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B. PAMPLIN R
— DR. ROBERT
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TribTown
Daniel G. Clausen, of Tigard Oregon,
passed away at the age of 94 while in
the hospice care of the Hopewell House.
Daniel was born October 11, 1919 in Minneapolis,
Minnesota, the only son to Herbert Clausen and
Emma Wahlstrand. Daniel attended Minneapolisí
Minnehaha Academy and received his high school
diploma from North High. In his youth he met his
future wife through church. Daniel married Edith
Johnson on May 2, 1941 in their hometown of
Minneapolis. Daniel enlisted to serve in World War
II and served as a Captain of the Air Corp. Upon his
return from service, his family moved to Tangent,
Oregon, where they built and managed a motel. The
family lived in the motel until their homes were built
on a 5 acre stretch along Highway 99.
In 1954, Daniel and Edith moved to Portland and
were active members of the North Baptist Church as
well as the Burlingame Baptist Church. In 1976 they
moved to Tigard and became well-known parishioners
of Grace Point Church in Tigard, Oregon. Daniel
will be remembered for his compassionate love of
his family, as an excellent baritone vocalist with a
passion for music, and for his devotion to the Lord.
Survivors include Daniel’s children; son, Daniel
G. and Maggie Clausen; daughter Judith and Donald
Campbell; four grandchildren; Matthew Clausen,
Michelle Monroe, Jenifer M. McCourt, and Heather
B. Milligan; and ten great-grandchildren. Daniel was
preceded in death by his wife of 64 years, Edith; and
his two sisters Eleanor and Ruby.
A Celebration of Life with reception following will
be held on Thursday, July 24, 2014 at 1:00 p.m. at
Grace Point Community Church, 11075 SW Gaarde
St, Tigard, OR 97224.
HOME
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THURSDAY, DECEM
HOSEN THE
CHOSE
CH
19, 2013 • TWICE
A celebration of Barbara’s life will be held on August
3, 2014 at the Lake House at Blue Lake Park from 1-3
pm. Please bring photos and fond memories to share.
Remembrances can be made to Eastco Diversified
Services.
One year in office,
ity
mayor puts prior s
on revenue, park
69
ONE YEAR
SUBSCRIPTION
Getting your local metro news is easier than you think.
By STEVE LAW
The Tribune
Charlie
Portland Mayor
purd Friday to
Hales pledge
sue a new tax
measure to
pave city
in
streets
2014, as well
to
g
as fundin
build out the
city’s parks
system.
Hales also
told the Port“I don’t feel
land Tribune
editorial
a need to
board that
look at a
he’s exploring
of the
a major reno- map
vation of Vet- city and
erans Memocome up
m,
Coliseu
rial
hoping to pig- with new
the
on
gyback
visions at
.
World Indoor
Macy’s (above)
outside
the
Field
Track &
rs in their tracks
‘Star
holiday shoppe a (right).
Wars’ and
Championmoment.”
roopers stop
a
with Queen Apailan
his Imperial Stormt
Trek’ both have
ships coming
— Mayor
Darth Vader and of Canby has his picture taken
turn
l
lot of fans who
lood will
to the Oregon
Charlie Hales
Jedidiah Maxwel
out, and we always
flow when
Convention
fun.”
have a lot of
fans of
Center in 2016.
tiThe compe
“Star
(See related
Page A8.)
Oregon vs. Oregon
story,
the
to
Wars” and “Star
himself a “B”
has been
tion, similar
Hales gave
blood drive,
in office,
Trek” rally their this month.
his first year
State Civil War in the past. It has been
for
later
upters
grade
the
suppor
ded in setting
the hope for blood held three times
fans, which
but said he succee
At least that’s
“Star Wars” the popuiality and plaincan Red Cross
won twice by
a tone of “colleg City Hall.
ing, considering clubs in
coming Ameri supporters of the two
at
fan
is not surpris
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has two active
drive that pits ainme nt franch ises
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lar franchise
of which have
One example:
a new
popula r entert to see who can turn
d area, both
ble
the need for
other
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Blood the Portlan
bones about
against each
to pave dozens
. The Galaxy Sat- lot of practice suppor king, homesource
e
donors
and
tic-loo
revenu
out the most a.m. to 2:30 p.m. on
city’s gravel
events in authen
9
of miles of the
es.
Drive is from at the donor center at
a dozen of
made costum
28,
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mud streets.
ly, more than
urday, Dec.
point in kiddin
Most recent
t the Salvaver Ave.
“There’s no
ves,” he
3131 N. Vancou
for us,” says them showed up to suppor
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lly drop beRed Cross
2
See HALES / Page
tions norma
See BLOOD / Page
New Year’s
Mathew. “Dona
sgiving and
tween Thank are so busy. But ‘Star
because people
You can now have the Tuesday and Thursday Portland Tribune
mailed to your home each week.
TY B
BEAM ME UP, SCOT
THE FORCE IS D
OUT FOR BLOO
n • Photos by Jaime
Story by Jim Redde
Valdez
Tech firms
seek a place
in economy’s
spotlight other
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Pat downs likel ps
co
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to increa
e streetothers
take to th
ation a priority;
n, but
Intel is well-know r the radar
companies fly unde
Police say converss are recipe for trouble
say random stop
By JIM REDDEN
The Tribune
nies in the
t inside and
high-tech compa
them
his flashligh
There are more Intel — and many of
Murphy shines black men. They aren’t
than
ge
g dope.
Portland area trying to get that messa
sees three young
colors or smokin
By PETER KORN
are desperately
off. Dale and
wearing gang
the
sitting, engine
The Tribune
just
companies in
e
out.
g They’r
of world-class
to talk to them.
gotten out
“There’s a ton
Thursday evenin
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the word hasn’t der and
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TRIBUNE PHOTO:
Accord
10
the curb on SECOND OF TWO STORIE
microcosm
See TECH / Page
asking
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squad car to
Avenue.
Murphy — after
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Team officer Patrick man who had been sitting
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program’s defi is clear that done right, permission — pats down
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Media Group’s reflects the
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car
news that
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Page 11 parked
deliver balanced
See POLICING /
g job or someo
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rible parkin ocking the street.
stories of our commun ers.”
newspap
tionally half-bl walk toward the car,
for reading our
PAMPLIN JR.
As the officers
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— DR. ROBERT
Portland Tribune
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473732.071514
Barbara is the founder and was the long time
administrator of Eastco Diversified Services, a nonprofit agency dedicated to providing services to people
with developmental disabilities. Barbara started Eastco
Diversified Services in 1968 as MeRe Center, a private
school for children with developmental disabilities.
After her “retirement” from Eastco, she continued to
work there part time for many more years.
$
DITION
TUESDAY E
— SEE LIFE,
Barbara grew up in Gresham on Regner Rd. on her
parent’s farm. There she developed a group of friends
she adored all her life. She helped keep the “Regner
Road gang” in touch with each other throughout their
lives and looked forward to the “Regner Road Picnic”
each summer.
WE’VE GOT THE ANSWER!
IKE
AVERT A STR
DEAL MIGHT
rs reache
Portland teache the story at portlandtribune.com
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Lifelong Gresham resident,
Barbara Madsen Place, passed
away July 2 after a brief
illness.
She was born on
February 9, 1927 in Gresham,
Oregon. Barbara is survived
by her children, Ron Place,
Claudia Place, Karen Curry,
her granddaughter Stacie
Curry, her brother and sisterin-law Jim & Nancy Madsen,
her sister Jean Kahr, her
sisters-in-law Delores Kraii,
Dianne Nagen, Evelyn Elliott and many loving relatives,
friends and co-workers. Barbara’s husband of 64 years,
Don Place, passed away in May of 2013.
WANT MORE
NEWS?
SCHLITTENTAG!
TWICE CHOSEN THE
ARY 20, 2014 •
THURSDAY, FEBRU
Barbara Madsen Place
Daniel G. Clausen
473728.071614
John T. Nelson, age 67 of
Rhododendron, Oregon passed
away on Monday, July 7th in
Portland, Oregon. He was born
April 5, 1947, in Asheville, North
Carolina. He was the third of
seven children born to Marie and
George Nelson.
John graduated with a
Bachelor
of
Arts
in
Communication from the
University of Portland in 1969,
where he was president of his fraternity Sigma Tau
Omega. John was commissioned as a 2nd Lieutenant in
the United States Air Force while stationed at McCoy Air
Force Base in Orlando, Florida. He was a Vietnam
Veteran having served two overseas tours as a Captain
flying B-52’s operating from Thailand and Guam. In
1972, John joined Pacific NW Bell which evolved into
AT&T and Lucent Technologies. He retired as an
Account Executive in 2000.
John is survived by his wife Susan, children; Laura
(Ed) Ramsey and Christopher Nelson both of Redmond,
WA, siblings; George (Twyla) Nelson of Albany, OR,
Sister Helen Nelson of Waterloo, IA, Robert (Wendy)
Nelson of Vancouver, WA, Ann (Michael) Erikson of
Redwood City, CA, Gene (Krisanne) Nelson of Chico,
CA, Lisa (Harvey) Clark of Canby, OR; granddaughter
Madeleine Ramsey, Nieces and nephews; Erin, Stephanie,
Eric, Brian, Katie and David.
A Memorial Mass will be held at 12 p.m., Friday, July
11, 2014, at Christ the King Catholic Church, 7414 SE
Michael Dr., Milwaukie, OR 97222. Interment with
Military Honors will be 9:30 a.m., Monday, July 14,
2014 in Willamette National Cemetery. In lieu of
flowers memorial contributions may be placed with the
Wounded Warrior Project, 4899 Belfort Rd., Suite 300,
Jacksonville, FL 32256 www.woundedwarriorproject.
org and also with Dogs for the Deaf, 10175 Wheeler Rd.,
Central Point, OR 97502 www.dogsforthedeaf.org.
Arrangements entrusted to Zeller Chapel of the Roses
(503) 287-1155 www.zellerchapeloftheroses.com.
A10 NEWS
The Portland Tribune Thursday, July 17, 2014
TribunePuzzles
The Crossword Puzzle
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Published every Tuesday and Thursday
www.portlandtribune.com | 503.684.0360
NEWS A11
The Portland Tribune Thursday, July 17, 2014
Wheels!
The 2014 Nissan Leaf can be
equipped to charge from
public DC fast chargers, but
studies show most buyers
charge them at home.
TRIBUNE PHOTO: JOHN M. VINCENT
There’s more than
one road to the
GREEN
FUTURE
There’s more to Drive Revolution than just the cars. Like this exhibit at the Portand International Auto Show, industry experts will be on hand to answer your
alternative energy questions. TRIBUNE PHOTO: JOHN M. VINCENT
low or when the gasoline engine needs
help, an electric motor (or multiple motors) moves the vehicle. The Toyota Prius
is the most recognized hybrid, but they
exist in nearly every market sector from
the large Infiniti QX70 Hybrid to the highly refined Honda Accord and Kia Optima
Hybrids.
Plug-in hybrids go one step further by
initially charging the battery from an external power source such as a home
charging station. By using that battery
power rather than the onboard internal
combustion engine, some plug-in hybrid
drivers rarely burn any gasoline at all.
The Toyota Prius Plug-in and the Ford
“Energi” lineup are plug-in hybrids.
Although GM calls them “extended
range electric vehicles,” Chevrolet’s Volt
and Cadillac’s new ELR are plug-in hybrid
vehicles that rely mostly on electricity,
but can switch to a gasoline-powered
range extender for longer trips. BMW’s i3
can be equipped with such a range extender, or it can act as a pure batteryelectric vehicle.
Battery electric vehicles run purely on
electrical power. The Nissan Leaf was the
first mainstream electric car, but the marketplace is getting more crowded all the
time. With aggressive lease and purchase
By JOHN M. VINCENT
For Pamplin Media Group
I
OMSI’s Drive Revolution
WHAT: See the latest in sustainable
transportation options including
bikes, cars, public transportation
and more. Drive some of the latest
alternative fuel vehicles in the
market.
WHEN: Saturday, July 19, 10 a.m. –
5 p.m.
WHERE: OMSI, North parking lot,
1945 SE Water Ave, Portland
COST: Free
For more information: omsi.edu/
events/
f there is one certainty in future
transportation, it is that vehicles
will be more efficient and produce
fewer emissions.
However, the question remains:
How do we get there? That’s the topic of
OMSI’s Drive Revolution, a program on
Saturday, July 19, that will explore many
routes toward a sustainable future.
Visitors will “gain a deeper knowledge
of the sciences around transportation,
and what’s available,” says OMSI’s Melony Beaird. Displays will include bicycle
makers, utilities, and car sharing companies. Also, some of the newest vehicles
will be available for test drives.
There’s no single technology to move
us away from our oil-dependency, but
rather a blend of technologies tailored to
each transportation sector. Like tools in a
toolbox, different technologies apply best
to different transportation needs. Not all
the vehicles below will be on hand at
Drive Revolution, but a selection is scheduled to be.
Hybrids use an internal combustion
engine and regenerative brakes to charge
a battery pack. When power needs are
The wildly popular
Ram 1500
EcoDiesel is rated
at 28 mpg on the
highway, but with
a bit of selfcontrol drivers
can beat that
number.
TRIBUNE PHOTO:
JOHN M. VINCENT
pricing, the economics of buying an electric get more attractive each day.
Several new and exciting electric cars
are poised to enter the Oregon market.
The Fiat 500e, Volkswagen E-Golf and Kia
Soul Electric are set to bring electric out
of the enthusiast market and into the
mainstream. Tesla’s sexy Model S is will
be joined by the Model X crossover in
their lineup.
Compressed natural gas is an alternative fuel that people don’t think about —
but they should. Honda’s Civic Natural
Gas is powered by the domestically pro-
Armstrong Volkswagen
GHLIN
McLOUVD.
BL
RIVER
ROAD
At Armstrong Volkswagen
it’s not about us . . . it’s
all about you. What you
want, what you need, at
your pace and on terms
you will appreciate!
Here it’s
all about
you . . .
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to terms with, and complete our
used car purchase. The sales and
business people are the best I’ve
worked with in a long time. Very
straight up guys.”
1000
Turbocharged Reward Card
On New 2014 Turbo Models*
Sales Event
2014 Beetle 1.8T
0%
2014 Jetta SE
ON NEW 2014
*Turbocharged Reward Card offer good on purchase or lease of new, unused
2014 Volkswagen turbocharged models. The Volkswagen Prepaid MasterCard Turbocharged Reward Card is issued by The Bancorp Bank pursuant to
license by MasterCard International Incorporated. MasterCard is a registered
trademark of MasterCard International Incorporated. The Bancorp Bank;
Member FDIC. This Card may be used everywhere Debit MasterCard is accepted. Cannot be redeemed for cash. Card offer ends July 31, 2014. Offer
valid in US only. See dealer for details. Excludes Jetta S, Jetta Hybrid, Golf
2.5L, Jetta SportWagen 2.5L, Passat V6, CC V6 Executive 4MOTION, Touareg
V6, and Touareg Hybrid models. Please allw 8-10 weeks for delivery. Expires
two years from date of issue, except where prohibited
2014 Passat TDI® SE
2014 Tiguan SEL
TOUAREG
UP TO
60 MOS.** AND CC
APR
You can get a $1000 Turbocharged Reward
Card when you purchase or lease a new
2014 Volkswagen Turbo Model.
0.9% ON ALL NEW 2014
APR
UP TO
60 MOS.**
VOLKSWAGEN
**Financing available through VCI, A tier, on approval of
credit. Offer expires 7/31/14.
OR 24,000 MILE BUMPER TO BUMPER LIMITED WARRANTY
ARMSTRONG VW SELECTION OF CERTIFIED PRE-OWNED VEHICLES •• 224YEAR
HOUR ROADSIDE ASSISTANCE • 112 POINT INSPECTION
2012 VW JETTA SE
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%
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13,995
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WITH
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18,995
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1.99
$
%
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60MOS.**
2013 VW JETTA TDI PREMIUM
2014 VW TIGUAN R-LINE
1.99
1.99
Vin388994
St#71008
23,995
$
%
UP
APR TO
60MOS.**
Vin#027069
#70996
33,995
$
%
UP
APR TO
60MOS.**
476209.071614
**Available through VCI, on approved credit, A+ tier, expires July 31, 2014
Armstrong
Volkswagen
www.armstrongvw.com
Sales: (503) 656-2924
OREGON
CITY
BRIDGE
“We purchased a certified pre
owned 2012 Jetta GLI. The
process was easy, the staff was
very friendly and helped get the
financing right.”
– Erik K.
Tualatin, OR
– Michael C.
Lake Oswego, OR
$ ,
EXIT 9
ARMSTRONG
VW
I-205 /
www.armstrongvw.com
duced and relatively inexpensive fuel.
With the development of a publicly accessible fueling infrastructure, natural gas
becomes a highly viable alternative to
gasoline.
Clean diesel is especially popular in
Portland, where Volkswagen sells a higher percentage of diesel vehicles than anywhere else in America. Their 2015 Golf
features a more refined version of the
venerable TDI engine. Recently joining
VW in the diesel movement is Chrysler
with their EcoDiesel Ram pickup and
Jeep Grand Cherokee.
ARLINGTON ST.
OMSI program to
delve into the future
of alternative auto
energy technology
ARMSTRONG VW SERVICE COUPON
MULTI-POINT VEHICLE
INSPECTION
FREE ESTIMATE PROVIDED ON
NEEDED SERVICE AND PARTS.
FREE
INCLUDES: CV joint boots, exhaust system, fluid levels, v-belts, exterior lights,
ball joints and tie rods, tire wear and air
pressure, cooling system and hoses,.
Must present coupon at time of write up. Not valid with other
specials or offers. Valid only at Armstrong VW. Expires July 31,
2014. Call for an appointment today.
ARMSTRONG VW SERVICE COUPON
ALL TIRES NOW AT
EMPLOYEE PRICING
BUY THEM NOW FOR WHAT
EMPLOYEES OF VW AND
ARMSTONG BUY THEM FOR.
VW recommended tires, VW tested, designed
and engineered for your VW.
Must present coupon at time of write up. Not valid with other
specials or offers. Valid only at Armstrong VW. Expires July 31,
2014. No cash value.
ARMSTRONG VW SERVICE COUPON
FREE
ALIGNMENT CHECK
Includes: Front and rear toe-in, toe-out and
camber check. Ball joints and tie-rod ends
check. Tire wear and air presssure check,
suspension inspection. We will advise the cost
if a 4 wheel alignment is needed.
Must present coupon at time of write up. Not valid with other
specials or offers. Valid only at Armstrong VW. Expires July 31,
2014. Call for an appointment today.
A12 NEWS
The Portland Tribune Thursday, July 17, 2014
A name you can trust
BRUCE CHEVROLET
0%
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SILVERADO
O
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$
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ruce Discount.
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Bruce
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4
0353
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$
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M
$27,060, Vin # EZ310241, Stk # 480258.
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27,988
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Sale Price after $2750 factory rebate, $1182 Bruce discount. MSRP
$31,920, Vin # EZ344889, Stk # 480329.
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$
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MS
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2014 PRE-OWNED SPARK EV
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Electric Vehicle, 2 LT PACKAGE, Just 1500 miles. In Service
7/26/13. Remainder of Factory Warranty
Power Windows and Locks, ABS Brakes, Air Conditioning, Alloy
p
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$
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24,888
Sale price after $1500 factory rebate, $812 Bruce discount. MSRP $18,200.
VIN E4213078, STK# 410307
4
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$
4000
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$
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Sale Pricee after $2000 factory rebate, $1117 Bruce discount. MSRP
$23,105, Vin # EF121711, Stk # 460046.
discount MSRP
M
Sale Pricee after $1750 factory rebate
rebate, $1257 Bruce discount.
$17,995, Vin # E7182405, Stk # 440106.
$
30,995
Sale price
rice after $1000 factory rebate, Bruce discount $3000. VIN
EU165243, STK# 420271
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$
2012 MALIBU LTZ
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16,988
Leather, Moonroof, 1 owner #P99366
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2013 Impala LTZ
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1 at
19,888
1 Owner, Absolutely Loaded with Features. #P10008
$
2011 EQUINOX LT AWD1 at
23,888
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$
2013 SUBURBAN LT 1 at
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2012 GRAND CARAVAN SXT 1 at $15,988
Power Sliding Doors #P10009
OFF
Save now on your 100,000 Mile Scheduled Maintenance. See
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with other offers. Coupon valid at vehicle check-in.
Expires 7/31/14 Must present coupon at time of service
Coupon Code:32
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SUMMER SPECIAL
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Change Oil and Oil Filter, Check all fluids,
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2010 MINI COOPER
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2006 EXPRESS 2500 PASSENGER LT
1at $16,888 11 passenger, low miles. # P10020
2006 HUMMER H3 4X4 1 at $19,888
Leather, Automatic, Low Miles. #480212b
19
$
95
Expires 7/31/14 Must present coupon at time of service.
Excludes Semi Synthetic, Synthetic and Diesel Engines.
2012 EQUINOX LTZ
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2008 SUBURBAN LTZ 1 at 21,888
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2012 TOYOTA TACOMA
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$
OFF
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1084 SW OAK ST • HILLSBORO • 888-546-7350
Mon-Fri 8:30-9:00 Sat 8:30-8:00 Closed Sunday (Family Day)
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883
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tax, if applicable. Coupon valid at vehicle check-in.
Expires 7/31/14 Must present coupon at time of service.
Coupon Code:19
2 year/24,000 mile Standard CPO Plan
12 mo./12,000 mile Bumper to Bumper Warranty
5 Year/100,000 mile Power Train Limited Warranty
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All vehicles subject to prior sale. Tax, licence, title processing fees not included. All financing subject to credit approval. Interest rates and rebates subject to change without prior notice.
Pictures for illus. only. Offers expire Monday 7/21/14.
Bread & Brew: Things are hot at Tamale Boy — Page 3
Weekend!Life
SAND
SECTION B
PortlandTribune
THURSDAY, JULY 17, 2014
■ Annual event pits corporate citizens in sculpture building contest
IN THE CITY
O
nce again, our corporate citizens are
getting dirty and
creating masterpieces for kids’ causes at
Yoshida’s Sand in the City.
For six hours on Friday,
July 18, from 9:30 a.m. to 4
p.m., corporate teams will be
building sand sculptures at
Pioneer Courthouse Square,
using the tools of the trade to
merge water and sand to
make a compact, claylike substance in forms, then carving
intricate sculptures. Team
members will be hustling under the guidance of sand
masters such as Lorie Gordon
and architects.
Gordon expects anxious
times at 5 hours, 55 minutes
into the process.
“I always laugh because
there’s always a team that
finishes five minutes before,”
she says. “You get so engrossed. You spend so long
on the sculpture, you get to
the bottom, and you lose
sense of detail. Most teams
find they end up scrapping
an element.”
Starting at 10 a.m. on Saturday and Sunday, July 19
and 20, the sculptures will be
on display and there’ll be many activities (Evergreen Aviation Carnival Tent), live music (Petty Fever, 90 Proof,
East on 14, Power Pep Band)
and more. Kids can build
their own castles in the giant
Sand Box or have their faces
painted.
It’s an all-volunteer event,
and funds raised will go to
kids in need in the Portland
metropolitan area.
This year’s 12 corporate
teams include Hoffman Construction, which has been involved from the start (19
years), and, of course, Yoshida Group. Teams train for six
weeks. “Some people have
natural talent,” Gordon says.
“It takes picking up the tools
and having someone show
you how to do it. We all have
a little kid in us.”
For more info: sandinthe
citypdx.org.
— Jason Vondersmith
PHOTOS COURTESY OF FRED KAWABATA/SAND IN THE CITY
(Above) At the popular Sand in the City, crews get down and dirty building sculptures. (Below, from left) Sand master Lorie Gordon helps lead the
process to build sculptures, such as big bears, with sand sculpture-building tools.
THESHORTLIST
MISC.
Oregon Berry Festival
A highlight of the
Sherwood Robin
Hood Festival,
Maid Marian
knights her
subjects as
court members,
Robin Hood and
Merrymen (and
Merrywomen)
look on.
COURTESY OF
CINDY CADDELL
Robin Hood fest brings
revelry to the realm
Sherwood celebrates
60 years of medieval
and modern fun
By SUSAN DANZ
For Pamplin Media Group
This year’s 60th Robin
Hood Festival on Friday and
Saturday, July 18 and 19, in
Old Town Sherwood promises to be a special event.
The festival will honor those
who had a part in creating the
first official Robin Hood Festival in 1954, turning it into an
event that has become one of
the oldest community festivals
in Oregon.
Clearly inspired by the people’s hero of English folklore,
the first Robin Hood parade
was organized in 1946 by returning World War II veterans
who banded together to form a
group called Robin Hood and
his Merry Men.
In fall 1952, they launched a
harvest festival, which officially
became the Robin Hood Festival in July 1954. The Maid Marian Court began in the early
1950s, even before the first official fest. With a tradition that
links the generations, one of
this year’s Maid Marian court
members is the granddaughter
of the first Maid Marian.
In 1956, an unusual sporting
event came into being when
Sherwood challenged Notting-
ham, England, to an archery
match. Intensely competitive,
this is the 59th year of the international contest. A special
delegation of archers is traveling to Sherwood this year to be
welcomed by the city and
knighted on July 18.
In Old Town both days,
there’ll be music and revelry to
delight young and old. Both
medieval and modern, the festival features popular bands of
today on one stage, with creative family entertainment,
medieval music, swordplay and
dance on another. The Voices
for the Performing Arts Royal
Academy will perform “Beauty
and the Beast” on a third stage.
See FEST / Page 3
It’s the fourth annual event highlighting
one of our sweetest bounties, from marionberries to olallieberries. There’ll be vendors
and products, cooking demonstrations and
a children’s booth.
Noon Friday, July 18, 11 a.m. Saturday,
July 19, Ecotrust Building, 721 N.W. Ninth
Ave., oregonberryfestival.com (check for
schedule)
Velodrome Challenge
Local cycling enthusiasts and national/
international cyclists flock to Alpenrose
Dairy for the event, in its 16th year. The
three-day competition draws the largest velodrome crowd in North America, organizers say. The Alpenrose Velodrome is one of
only 25 bicycle racing tracks in the nation,
and popular because of its 43-degree angle,
meaning racers have to maintain speeds of
12.5 mph or faster.
Friday-Sunday, July 18-20, Alpenrose
Velodrome, 6149 S.W. Shattuck Road, alpen
rosechallenge.com, free
Portland Highland Games
The unique Scottish athletic events are
accompanied by Scottish pipes and drums
and whiskey and dancing.
Noon Friday, July 18, 8 a.m. Saturday, July
19, Mt. Hood Community College, 26000 S.E.
Stark St., Gresham, phga.org, $5-$65
Oregon Brewers Festival
It’s the 27th annual event, one of the nation’s longest running and best-loved craft
beer festivals, a great place to learn about
craft beers — and taste them, of course.
There’ll be 86 craft breweries on site, with
30 styles of brews. Organizers expect more
than 80,000 attendees.
Noon-9 p.m. Wednesday-Saturday, July
23-26, noon-7 p.m. Sunday, July 27, Waterfront Park, oregonbrewfest.com, free, $7
tasting glass, $1 tokens
Fair time
Local fairs are coming up, starting with the
Hood River County Fair, which features country music’s John Michael Montgomery at 8
p.m. Saturday, July 26. Old-fashioned, it’s been
deemed one of the better fairs in the state for
its entertainment, food, displays and activities, including “Walk on the Wild Side” exotic
animal show and “Wool Busting!” (sheep riding) for kids.
Noon daily (carnival at 1 p.m.), Wednesday-Saturday, July 23-26, Hood River County Fairgrounds, 3020 Wy’east Road, near
Odell, hoodriverfair.org, $7, $10 Saturday
(music free with admission)
STAGE
Noon Tunes
The concert series at Pioneer Courthouse
Square got underway this week with Jeremy
Wilson on Tuesday. The rest of the summer’s
lineup (from noon to 1 p.m. each day): July 17,
Shoebox Letters; July 22, Lilla D’Mone; July 24,
Matt Brown; July 29, Ashleigh Flynn; July 31,
John Thayer; Aug. 5, Lincoln’s Beard; Aug. 7,
Dresses; Aug. 12, Jared Evers; Aug. 14, Hawks
Do Not Share. For info: thesquarepdx.org.
PDX Pop Now!
More than 40 aspiring Portland bands
and artists take the indoor/outdoor stages
at AudioCinema in the 11th annual event.
6 p.m. Friday, July 18, noon Saturday,
July 19, 1 p.m. Sunday, July 20, AudioCinema, 226 S.E. Madison St., pdxpopnow.com
(check for schedule), free
Northwest Dance Project
The company’s sixth annual Pretty Creatives International Choreographic Competition is bigger and better, moving to Lincoln
Hall. It features two winners of NDP’s Pretty
Creatives competition — Lesley Telford and
Eric Handman, who created in 18 hours
working with 40 dancers.
7:30 p.m. Saturday, July 19, Lincoln Hall,
1620 S.W. Park Ave., nwdanceproject.org,
$15, $20 at door
B2 LIFE
Portland!Life
Bits&Pieces
Outdoor movies
Drive-In at Zidell Yards, the
Northwest Film Center/Zidell’s
pop-up outdoor film series
sponsored by Laika, will feature five movies: July 18 —
“Purple Rain,” 7:30 p.m.,
“Mean Streets,” 11:30 p.m.; July 19 — “Dirty Dancing,” 7:30
p.m., “Enter The Dragon,”
11:30 p.m.; July 20 — “Stand By
Me,” 7:30 p.m.
Zidell’s South Waterfront
property, between the Ross
Island Bridge and Tilikum
Crossing, will be transformed
into a temporary outdoor theater, fashioned after drive-in
movies. Admission: $8, $12
double feature (cash only). Info: nwfilm.org.
More on ‘Backstrom’
The FOX-TV comedy crime
procedural series “Backstrom,”
being filmed in Vancouver, Brit-
ish Columbia, about a Portland
detective with Portland setting/
scenery/feel, which could air
midseason 2015, features Rainn
Wilson as main character Everett Backstrom, “a man with no
filter,” FOX promotion says. He
had been banished for five
years for offensive behavior,
and returned to the Portland
Police Bureau to lead the new
Special Crimes Unit. The Backstrom character, shown as “unhealthy, offensive, irascible —
albeit brilliant,” is based on
Swedish criminologist and novelist Leif G.W. Persson’s series
of books of the same name.
Hart Hanson is the creator and
executive director.
Native art
The first annual NW Native
Art Show will be held from 8
a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday, July 19
and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday,
July 20 at Director Park, 815
S.W. Park Ave. More than 40
Native artists will represent
more than 30 tribes. For info:
NWNativeArt Show.com.
— Jason Vondersmith
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LiveMusic!
By ROB CULLIVAN
Pamplin Media Group
July 18-20
Free jazz
The 34th Annual Cathedral
Park Jazz Festival runs Friday
to Sunday, July 18 to 20, under
the St. Johns Bridge, and is
free.
Here’s a quick summary of
each day’s bands:
■ Friday, July 18: Roosevelt
High School Band at 5 p.m., followed by DK Stewart Sextet
with the Soul Survivor Horns at
6:20 p.m. Blues queen Karen
Lovely takes the stage at 7:40
and the Roseland Hunters finish with a set at 9 p.m.
■ Saturday, July 19: Battle
Ground High School Band
kicks off the day at noon, followed by the Lily Wilde Orchestra at 1 p.m.
Tom Wakeling, Alan Jones,
Randy Porter and David Evans
take the stage at 2:20 p.m., followed by the Bobby Torres
Latin All Stars at 3:40 p.m. The
great Mel Brown Septet plays
at 5 p.m., followed by the Chris
Brown Quartet at 6:20 p.m.
Devin Phillips hops on stage at
7:40 p.m., followed by Farnell
Newton + Soul 3 at 9 p.m.
■ Sunday, July 20: At noon,
the Portland Youth Jazz Orchestra starts playing, followed
by the Art Abrams Swing Machine at 1:20 p.m.
The Quadraphonnes, one of
city’s grooviest bands, starts
jammin’ at 2:40 p.m. The Jeff
Baker Sextet with David Valdez, Jason Palmer, Andrea Niemic and Thomas Barber plays
at 4 p.m. George Colligan’s Theoretical Planets, featuring Nicole Glover and Joe Manis at
5:20 p.m., is followed by the
Louis “King Louie” Pain B3
Trio featuring Renato Caranto
and Micah Kassell at 6:40 p.m.
At sunset the festival will culminate with a showing of the
1954 hit Jimmy Stewart movie,
“The Glen Miller Story.”
Each night of the festival The
Central Hotel hosts after-hours
performances.
9:30-11:30 a.m.
Complimentary
Lunch
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 6
St Pius X
Community Center
1260 NW Saltzman Rd.
Portland
Exhibitors
Noon-3:00 p.m.
THURSDAY, AUGUST 14
Lake Bible Church
4565 Carman Dr.
Lake Oswego
RSVP EARLY: Visit UpsideofDownsizing.com
or call 503-208-9421
469160.071714
A beautiful
setting under
the St. Johns
Bridge is part of
the 34th Annual
Cathedral Park
Jazz Festival,
July 18 to 20,
which includes
many top
Portland-area
performers.
COURTESY OF
PHOTOMARS
For more information, visit
cpjazz.com.
July 17
Ghana have a good time
Born in Ghana and now
based in Colorado, drummer/
bandleader Paa Kow (pronounced Pah Ko) creates wonderfully danceable, jazzy, percussive and horn-driven songs
that incorporate lyrics in his
native language, Fante, as well
as English.
Paa Kow, Ojos Feos, 8 p.m.
Thursday, July 17, Lola’s
Room, Crystal Ballroom, 1332
W. Burnside St. $8. Info: 503225-0047, mcmenamins.com.
July 19
Rock en español
Los Seis Pistos hail from Los
Angeles via Mexico and have
taught us the following:
1. Tommy Ramone may have
died last week, but his band’s
influence never will.
2. Without Northern Ireland’s
Stiff Little Fingers there is no
Green Day, Blink 182 or Los
Seis Pistos.
3. Listening to rock ‘n’ roll in
a language other than English
makes you realize how universal its feel is and how stupid international conflicts are.
This band just released
“Punk Will Never Die,” which
showcases both their English
punk songs and their Spanish
ones. It’s worth the dinero.
The Punctuals, Los Sies Pistos, Thunder Goat, 8 p.m. Saturday, July 19, Dante’s, 350 W.
Burnside St. $8. Info: 503-3457892, danteslive.com.
July 20
OK corrals
You could argue that OK Go
is one of the most important
bands of the last 10 years, given
their 2006 video “Here It Goes
Again” (you know, the treadmills) inspired pretty much every artist on Earth to get on
YouTube, where thousands of
musicians have now developed
audiences.
But regardless of its viral
fame, OK Go would deserve acclaim for its power-pop-meetselectronic-dance music in any
era. Like Franz Ferdinand,
these Grammy-winning cats
know how to write a perfect
hook and arrange a tune that
wakes you up.
OK Go, Myles Hendrik, 7
p.m. Sunday, July 20, Hawthorne Theatre, 1507 S.E. 39th
Ave. $18 in advance, $20 at the
door. Info: 503-233-7100, hawthornetheatre.com.
July 23
Wednesday wig out
Once a month on Wednesdays, Alberta Street Pub hosts
the Local Roots Radio Live
Concert Series. This week’s
showcases features Rachel Taylor Brown, Thom Lyons, Anne
Weiss, Beth Wood, Lewi Longmire, Carley Baer and such
bands as Metts and Ryan and
Collins all doing 30-minute sets.
The shows are recorded for
broadcast on The Local Roots
Radio Show heard Sunday
nights from 7 to 9 p.m. on
KMUZ-FM 88.5 in Salem and
streamed live at KMUZ.org.
Local Roots, 7:30 p.m.
Wednesday, July 23, Alberta
Street Pub, 1036 N.E. Alberta St.
$5. Info: facebook.com/localrootsmusicnw.
Sarah smiles
Sarah Jaffe is about to release her third studio album
“Don’t Disconnect,” which
takes her a bit further from her
acoustic roots as she evolves into a indie pop-rock singer for
the mid-tempo adult crowd.
Jaffe’s toured with Midlake,
Chelsea Wolfe, Norah Jones
and Portland’s own Blitzen
Trapper and has a pretty good
shot at becoming one of the
more prominent singer-songwriters of our era.
The Polyphonic Spree, Sarah
Jaffe, Friends and Family, 9
p.m. Wednesday, July 23, Doug
Fir Lounge, 830 E. Burnside St.
$18 in advance, $20 day of
show. Info: 503-288-3895, missis
sippistudios.com.
Lake Oswego chef a contender
on new ‘Food Fighters’ show
Home cooks compete
against pros to win
cash on new TV show
By BARB RANDALL
Pamplin Media Group
Presentations
The Portland Tribune Thursday, July 17, 2014
Elisha Joyce of Lake Oswego considers herself a pretty
good cook, and now she has
the opportunity to prove it on
national television.
Joyce is one of seven contestants on NBC’s new culinary
game show “Food Fighters,”
which premieres at 8 p.m. Tuesday on KGW Channel 8. It’s a
chance for top-notch amateur
cooks to put their signature dishes to the test against professional
chefs for the chance to win as
much as $100,000 per episode.
Joyce and her fellow contestants will square off against expert chefs who’ll be following the
same recipes. Completed dishes
will then be sampled by culinary
judges in a blind taste test called
“The Dinner Party.” If the home
cooks win, they’ll earn a cash
prize. If not, they still get to face
off against another culinary expert, climbing a money ladder
with increasing cash prizes for
every professional chef they
knock out.
Joyce, who was born in Guam,
learned to cook by watching her
grandmother. She carried her
love of good food into adult life,
she says, but it wasn’t until she
married that her culinary skills
blossomed.
“I wanted to make my husband happy,” she says. And
when the couple started having
children, she wanted to set a
good example of eating well for
them.
Joyce was an early advocate
for eating quinoa, and she created a nutritious granola bar-like
snack, “Smarty Bars,” with her
children in mind. She was such a
proponent of the grain that she
soon became known as the
“Quinoa Queen”; she now promotes the use of quinoa via her
blog, Rebel Grains, and also
sings its praises frequently as a
guest on the local television
show “AM Northwest.”
Joyce says she learned about
“Food Fighters” while surfing
the Internet.
“The announcement said
something like, ‘Do you think
you cook better than a profes-
COURTESY OF NBC
Elisha Joyce of Lake Oswego is
competing in NBC’s new highstakes culinary game, “Food
Fighters.”
sional chef?’ I said ‘Yes!’” Joyce
says. Her application must have
had all the right ingredients, because she was quickly chosen
for the eight-episode series.
Joyce says the signature dishes she chose to present on “Food
Fighters” are a reflection of who
she is and how she feeds her
family.
“We eat a wide variety of dishes,” she says. “So you get a flavor
for lots of different foods.” She
prepared a Guam-influenced
eggroll called lumpia, a mango
tart, a chicken-and-rice dish she
remembers her grandmother
making, fish tacos, and a salmonand-quinoa recipe.
“The story behind the fish tacos is that my husband and I had
them on our first date,” she says.
“I wanted to wow him at home
with them.”
Celebrity chef Lorena Garcia
will compete against Joyce in
Tuesday’s episode. Who will
come out on top? You’ll have to
tune in to find out. Make sure to
follow her progress online at
LakeOswegoReview.com, and
pick up a copy of The Lake Oswego Review on Thursdays for a
weekly recap.
Other contestants in the new
show include: Melissa Clinton, a
high school biology teacher from
Scotch Plains, N.J.; Jon Coombs,
a U.S. Army Operations NCO
from Lansdowne, Va.; Kena
Peay, an administrative assistant from Oakland, Calif; Cortney Anderson-Sanford, a homemaker from Seattle; Annie
Smith, a stay-at-home mom from
Corona Del Ray, Calif.; and Jim
Stark, a retired fashion apparel
executive from La Jolla, Calif.
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LIFE B3
Portland!Life
The Portland Tribune Thursday, July 17, 2014
Fest: Knighting, archery slated
■ From page 1
PAMPLIN MEDIA GROUP PHOTOS: ADAM WICKHAM
Tamales wrapped in corn husk, common in northern Mexico, are some of the tasty items at Tamale Boy,
which has successfully evolved from food cart to brick-and-mortar restaurant on Northeast Dekum Street.
Tamale Boy’s grown up
and living on Dekum St.
T
he folks at Tamale Boy
say the secret ingredient to their food is love.
That may be the case,
but they also whip up a mean
guacamole.
This casual neighborhood spot
— which opened in March in
Northeast Portland’s up-andcoming Woodlawn neighborhood — prepares the guacamole
tableside.
A server comes out with the
ingredients piled high in a molcajete (Mexican mortar and
pestle) and makes conversation
as he grinds it to a perfect nottoo-creamy, not-too-chunky
consistency.
He’s happy to share the secret
ingredients with you, if you ask:
A little pumpkin seed, chile oil
and lime oil. Who knew?
At $8, it’s enough guacamole
for at least four people, but you’ll
want to ask for more chips.
The fresh-made tortilla chips
are sprinkled with a light seasoning, and the spicy verde salsa is
thick, tangy and tasty enough to
drink with a spoon.
The frijoles puercos (beans
with pork) is one of the most
buzzed about menu items,
hearty and lovingly cooked with
bacon, ham, chorizo, chopped
onion and chipotle. More chips,
please.
But no one comes for just the
starters.
The main event — the reason
Tamale Boy rocketed from food
cart fame to brick-and-mortar
restaurant in two short years —
is the tamales.
They don’t disappoint. The
menu is simple, with tamales
made in two styles, three variet-
Bread&Brew
A biweekly restaurant
or bar review
Tamale Boy
■ Where: 1764 N.E. Dekum St.
503-206-8022
■ When: Open 11 a.m.-9 p.m.
Tues.-Fri.; 10 a.m.-10 p.m. Sat.;
10 a.m.-3 p.m. Sun.
■ More: tamaleboy.com
ies each. All are gluten-free.
Oaxaqueños tamales ($4.50
each), from southern Mexico
and central and South America,
are wrapped in a banana leaf,
which imparts a sweet flavor to
the masa. Norteño tamales
($3.50 each) are wrapped in corn
husk, most common in northern
Mexico. Here they’re tied like
presents with ribbons at each
end.
The masa is smooth, fresh and
creamy, not grainy.
The rajas tamale (roasted
pasilla peppers, onion, corn and
queso fresco) is one of two solid
vegetarian options; the vegetales
(carrot, onion, spinach and zucchini) also is vegan.
The cochinita pibil (slowcooked pork) and tinga de pollo
(chicken with chipotle and adobo) are on the bland side, the
meat tender and juicy enough,
but nothing to knock your socks
off.
Instead, try the zesty chile
Yummy and
“addictive” —
it’s the mole
negro burrito
(right) at
Tamale Boy.
verde tamale (pork in tomatillo
sauce), or the sweetly satisfying
mole negro tamale (chicken with
traditional mole sauce). For even
more of the addictive stuff, order
the burrito ($6.50) and pay two
bucks extra to smother it with
mole sauce.
Yes, it’s a tamale place, but the
burrito is a standout. Choose
from a half-dozen meat or veggie
fillings, including the slowcooked carnitas, well-seasoned
and married with gently cooked
black beans and rice in a fresh
flour tortilla. It’s enormous, nearly big enough for two.
Tamale Boy’s restaurant
prices are the same as the food
cart’s. The owner, Jamie Soltero
Jr., didn’t see a need to raise prices. He still operates the food cart
at two different sites on Mondays, Thursdays and every other
Friday, a venture he took on in
2012 as an expansion of his catering company, which launched a
year earlier.
The restaurant’s half-dozen
seasonal specials show more sophistication, impressive for a
place you’d just expect to find
tamales. The alambre de camaron, $12, is a heavenly tapas plate
of shrimp, bacon, peppers, avocado, radish and cheese over a
bed of little corn tortillas that
took me to a happy place with
each bite.
The ceviche, $12, house-made
each morning, also is a mustorder this summer. Topped with
edible flowers, it’s full of fresh
shrimp, cucumber, red onion,
tomato, cilantro and hints of
lime. Tastes like poolside in
Mexico.
Two must-haves for any proper neighborhood spot — especially one with spicy food — are
ambience and alcohol. Tamale
Boy has both, boasting a huge
outdoor patio, perfect for kicking back with a Mexican beer or
one of a few season-inspired
cocktails. In July there was the
mouth-watering El Diablo, a
roasted habañero-infused tequila with mango puree, simple
syrup, lemon and lime juice and
a salted rim.
Inside, sit next to the impressive mural of Mayan goddess
Mayahuel, for which Soltero’s
catering company is named.
Between the food, price point
and aesthetic, Tamale Boy seems
to have done everything right.
It’s another Portland food cart
Cinderella story, with more sure
to follow.
Follow: [email protected]
Furniture That Fits!
Come in and see all the new arrivals!
Edy Ridge Elementary School
in Sherwood, with Maid Marian
shooting the first arrow and
handing out the awards.
The archery match pits Sherwood and Nottingham, England, namely Shani Lambert
and Mick Coward and Bernie
and Sharon Dicks, who all will be
knighted. The Sylvan Archers
represent Sherwood.
Best of all, admission to the
festival grounds is free (charges apply for some activities).
For complete information, go
to robinhoodfestival.org.
Susan Danz is the secretary and
publicist for the Sherwood Robin
Hood Festival Association. Pamplin Media Group contributed to
this story.
468819.071514
By JENNIFER ANDERSON
The Tribune
Experience the 26th annual
Knighting Ceremony 6 p.m. Friday, July 18. The 15 people receiving the honor will become
part of a special group of more
than 350 people knighted since
the tradition began.
The popular Community Parade is set for 10 a.m. Saturday,
July 19, inviting entries with
the theme “Once Upon a Time
in Sherwood.” Janice (Swenson) Becker, the first Robin
Hood Festival Maid Marian,
will serve as grand marshal,
along with other original court
members.
Explore the extensive Vendor Village, consisting of more
than 100 booths, with a wide
variety of shopping and activities to discover. The kids will
enjoy arts, crafts and activities.
There is even a dance for teens
on Friday night. Demonstrate
your creativity in the annual
Castle Building Contest or
bring the best entries from
your garden to the Flower and
Plant Show. And, of course,
there will be plenty of delicious
food and a beer and wine garden featuring selections from
local wineries and breweries.
Are you curious about an archery competition nearly 60
years old? Archers of all ages
(up to national championship
level) will demonstrate their
skill 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday
and Sunday, July 19 and 20 at
Tuesday, July 22, 2014
Kire
Kiren
en Kre
Kresa-Reahl,
esa-Reahl, MD
Providence MS Center
Portland, OR
5:30 PM
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM
The Old Spaghetti Factory
715 Southwest Bancroft Street
Portland, OR 97239
Shannon Guensch
MS Advocate
Canby, OR
Free dinner will be served.
Free
484931.070814
Who will win?
Portland or Boston?
Text HEADS or TAILS to 51555 to vote!
Way back in 1845, Francis Pettygrove from Portland, Maine and Asa Lovejoy
from Boston, MA held a coin toss to determine the name of what we now
know as Portland, Oregon. Where did this coin
toss occur? In Oregon City. Portland could
have been known as Boston!
468796.071714
Fun Fabrics
& Styles!
The Coin Toss 8pm July 26
Oregon City’s Liberty Plaza
portlandcointoss.com
OREGON’S
KUHNHAUSEN’S
FURNITURE SHOWCASE
Family Owned & Operated Since 1919
Tuesday-Friday 10-6 • Saturday 10-5
2640 East Burnside Street, Portland, OR
www.kuhnhausensfurniture.com • (503) 234-6638
485462.071614
Nearly 170 years later, we are reenacting
the coin toss during Oregon’s First City
Celebration. Whichever side has the
most votes by 8pm on Saturday,
July 26 will be the side of the coin for
Portland. Will Portland be renamed
Boston for a day?
y
t
i
C
t
s
FirC !
TION
ELEBRA
Downtown Oregon City
July 26, 2014 - 11am to 9pm
Art. Local Wine. Food. Music.
Media Sponsor:
B4 LIFE
The Portland Tribune Thursday, July 17, 2014
Home
Products/Parties
SHAKLEE®
SCOUR OFF
Powerful paste cleaner.
Will clean almost all
surfaces, with no
chemical smell.
Government approved,
& can be used in
RESTAURANTS
& AT HOME.
OFFERING
FREE SAMPLE!
For info: 503-668-2445
Lawnmowers
SELF PROPELLED
LAWNMOWER,
HELP WANTED
bagless, mulching. Great
shape. $65. Call
503-684-2027
COMPUTER:
$10,000 SIGN ON BONUS AND RELOCATION
ASSISTANCE AVAILABLE!
RN Resident Care Manager
Meadow Park Health and Specialty Care Center, an
Extendicare facility, is searching for an RN Resident
Care Manager with proven leadership abilities to assist
the Director of Nursing in the operation of the Nursing
Center. Our ideal candidate will function in a variety of
settings assisting in the planning, organization,
direction, supervision and evaluation of all the nursing
services. Candidates must have excellent clinical,
organizational and leadership skills, a current RN
licensure and prior nurse management experience
preferably in long term care.
We value your experience and hard work and offer an
attractive compensation and industry-leading benefits
package including: medical, dental and vision
insurance, 401(k) and matching contributions,
STD/LTD and life insurance, paid time off – personal,
sick, vacation and holiday, employee-assistance
program – employees and dependents ...And more!
For full time nurses, we offer medical benefits that
start day one with no premium cost during your
introductory period. We strive to provide our employees with the tools necessary for development and success and an environment that fosters career growth.
Interested candidates can apply on-line at
www.extendicare.com/jobs
EOE
Extendistaff Interim Staffing for CNA’s
Extendicare is excited to announce the formation of
The Extendicare Staffing Pool for CNA’s! If you are a
Certified Nursing Assistant who is flexible with working
assignments then this is the perfect position for you!
Our new PRN program is designed to allow you to work
at multiple facilities!! Pay rates for these positions are at
a premium.
Are U looking for Partor Full-time work?
Email:
[email protected]
benefitsgroup.com
(Email only)
OSU Beaver Store is looking for talented, motivated
and friendly individuals to
join our team! HIRING
NOW at Clackamas Town
location: FT Supervisor, FT
Asst. Supervisor, PT Sales
Associates. Enjoy a fun
work environment, awesome perks, and a chance
to help OSU Students!
Apply online at:
www.osubeaverstore.com
Extendistaff Interim Staffing for Nurses
Glacier National Park Lodges is now hiring for Summer
2014. Seeking personable, adventurous and motivated
employees for multiple positions.
• Positions start immediately ~ September
•Employee meals and lodging available
•Over 700 miles of hiking trails
•Join a fun and motivated community
•End of season bonus
NOW SEEKING:
•Dining Room Managers & Asst Managers
(Free room & board)
•Servers and Bartenders •Retail Associates
•Front Desk Associates
APPLY ONLINE: WWW.GLACIERJOBS.COM
Contact [email protected]
or 406-897-7190 for more information.
EOE, M/F/DISABLE/VETERAN
LIFE INSURANCE PROFESSIONALS
We provide the clients:
Are you an insurance agent with no place to go?
Imagine we put you in front of 50-100 business owners
per month. What does an agent need? For starters:
Clients Guaranteed Income great product mix.
We seek experience life insurance professionals for
Area Manager positions as well as Sales Associates.
For consideration please forward your resume to:
[email protected]
Locations: Oregon, Idaho, Washington States.
Market Segment Specialist
We are looking for a Market Segment Specialist
(Aerospace) in the Seattle, WA area. Duties include
technical product application support, part processing
assistance, and productivity improvements to customers.
The ideal candidate will possess broad experience in the
application of indexable, and solid carbide products in
Aerospace materials as well knowledge of Multi-axis
CNC machining, programming, and CAD/CAM. Good
written and oral communication skills are essential.
College degree is a plus
To apply, please visit our career page at
http://secotools.iapplicants.com/
We are an EOE and abide by all Federal and State
mandated laws.
COMMUNITY CLASSIFIEDS
✵
AIR CONDITIONERS:
2 Window units, 1 8,000
BTU,
new
condition
w/remote,
$150.
1,
12,000BTU, new conditon,
$200. Please call:
503-927-8667 or
503-760-4022
$300 WROUGHT IRON
RAILING
Phone:
(503) 830-1119
Web:
www.eiffelfab.com
www.centraltruckdrivingjobs.com
Community
Calendar
Lost & Found
BELLE
BURIAL PLOTS: 2 SBS
burial plots at Finley’s Sunset Hills memorial Park in
SW Portland. They are located in the garden of
Prayer, lot 315, spaces 3 &
4. They are currently valued at $2668/ea, Asking
$2,000/ea and I will pay
the $200 deed of transfer
fee for each plot. The
transaction would be completed at Finley Sunset
Hills with both parties present.
Please
call
503-661-9641 or e-mail:
[email protected]
Furniture/
Home Furnishings
COLLECTION OF
HIGH QUALITY
Thomasville dinning/living
furniture. $2000. Call
503-313-0672
OAK CURIO CABINET,
• 4 glass shelves,
• 3 levels of light,
Asking $400.
(Was $1400 new),
Will e-mail pic upon req.
503-953-4268
[email protected]
PA HOUSE cherry
corner cabinet - $200
OAK CABINET
with glass front - $50
ORIENTAL RUGS:
2- 6’x10’, $100 each;
1- 10’x13’, $200
All in great condition!
Will take BEST OFFER!
(503)987-1149
3 and 1/2 year old golden
brown with white star,
smart, sensitive, 40 pound
spayed female mystery
hound dog mix, loves to
run, play and explore, intense focus on people, has
beginning obedience commands, comes instantly
with a whistle, seeking
calm quiet household to
continue training; foster or
foster to adopt. For more
information
call
503.625.4563 E-mail:
[email protected]
OLD WALKING
PLOW
For sale or trade for 1 ton
of grass hay. $130. Call for
info: 503-656-6874
Miscellaneous for
Sale
Sewing Machines
Vacuum Cleaners
Transparents are ready
now. Gravensteins will be
ready soon! No pesticides.
Picked to order
90¢ per pound.
S Barlow Road • Canby.
INDUSTRIAL SEWING
MACHINE
New HEAVY DUTY
WALKING FOOT
MACHINE. Has reverse,
big bobbin, equipped with
HD servo motor, complete
with table lite, tools & zip
foot for HD leather work.
$950. RoosteRoc Sew Co,
3427 NE 72nd Ave,
Portland
503-939-7290.
COMPUTER
DESK/HUTCH
White wood. 42.5” wide
73” tall 23” depth. 19”
lockable cabinets,
numerous adjustable
storage shelves, printer
shelf, heavy, excellent
condition. $200.
*printer not included
Blueberries, Boysenberries, Raspberries,
& Organically Grown
Vegetables
WHAT IS SWEETER,
REDDER, SIMPLY
BETTER COMING TO
A FIELD NEAR YOU?
U-Pick $1.60 /lb
Sporting Goods
CASH FOR GUNS
SELLING A
COLLECTION OR
SINGLE PIECES
503-704-5045
[email protected]
Timber
2X2 CEDAR
4” long, 130 pieces, all for
$100. Call 503-666-2892
Blueberries picked
to order: $24/10-lbs.
or for 100# or more $22/10-lbs. - or for 200#
or more $20/10-lbs.
JENNIFER’S
RASPBERRIES &
BLUEBERRIES
Open Daily
8am-8pm
18265 SE Neck Rd,
Dayton, OR
For more information,
503-560-9275
503-651-2622
Hay/Straw/Feed
Weds.- Sunday, 8-4p
Morning Shade Farm
8345 S. Barnards Rd.
www.Canby.com/morningshade
KOCH FAMILY
FARMS
GRASS HAY
FOR SALE
$170/ton - Qty Discount
503-981-3627 or 989-3071
OAT HAY, $7/bale,
(60-75# bales).
Food/Meat/Produce
ORCHARD GRASS,
$7/bale
(2nd cutting, 55-60# bales)
- Woodburn -
• Blackberries
• Boysenberries
• Marionberries
• Raspberries
• Silvanberries
• Tayberries
503.989.1136
U-Pick or Ready Picked
MARIONBERRIES
Bring your own
containers
Call for Availability
Open 7 Days a Week: 9-6
SONNEN FARM
We or U-Pick!
South Barlow Berries
29190 S Barlow Road
Canby, OR
503-266-3193 or
503-951-1355
We take orders
Closed on Sundays
SouthBarlowBerries.com
•Pickling •Cucumbers
•Dill •Green Beans
•Tomatoes & MORE!!!
Open Mon-Sun: 8am-6pm
503-982-9570
Pets & Supplies
CHIHUAHUAS: Puppies,
Call for pricing. Financing
avail. Adult adoptions
also. Reputable Oregon
Kennel. Unique Colors,
Long & Short Haired, Tiny
to Hearty sizes. Health
Guaranteed, UTD Vaccinations/ Wormings, Litterbox
Trained, Socialized.
Video/Pictures/ Info/Virtual
Tour:
www.chi-pup.net
References Happily Supplied! Easy I-5 Access.
Drain, Oregon. Umpqua
Valley kennels, Vic & Mary
Kasser, 541-459-5951.
15-20 signs. Mirrors,
lighted, neon, misc
Breweriana items. $10-$20
Call for info: 503-638-5950
ELECTRIC
MOBILITY CART
$425
Call: 503-895-8982
Miscellaneous
Wanted
BEAVERTON/97006:
HERITAGE VILLAGE
COMMUNITY WIDE
GARAGE SALE
123 SW HERITAGE
PKWY
July 18th - 20th: 8-4
GRESHAM:
CASH for DIABETIC
TEST STRIPS
Help those in need.
Paying up to $30 per
box. Free pickup.
Call Sharon:
5 0 3. 6 7 9. 3 6 0 5
HUGE MOVING
SALE
JULY 18-20, 9-4
1465 NW
BERGERON CT
EVERYTHING MUST GO!
LAKE OSWEGO:
WE BUY GOLD, SILVER,
AND PLATINUM
Located at 1030 Young
Street inside the Young
Street Market in
Woodburn. Free testing
and estimates.
Monday-Friday: 2-6 p.m.
WE PAY MORE
Northwest Gold and
Silver Buyers
Fast, Friendly, and Fair
503-989-2510
Musical Instruments/
Entertainment
ESTACADA:
UPRIGHT PLAYER
PIANO
With rolls music.
Refurnished cabinet,
tuned, repaired,
AND WARRANTY.
$1200 OBO. Can deliver
Call 503-752-9930
WURLITZER PIANO
WITH BENCH
Good condition. $250
Call: 503-369-1749
WE BUY GOLD
Sterling Flatware -Silver-Pocket Watches
www.jewelrybuyerportland.com
M-Fri. 9:30-5 Sat 10-4
Black and white very handsome intelligent athletic
neutered male American
Bull dog mix, extremely
personable, he gives his
heart to everyone he
meets; knows multiple obedience
commands;
is
learning to walk on leash;
seeking committed experienced foster or foster to
adopt person as dedicated
to relationships as he is.
Trainer and rescue part of
placement. For more info,
503.625.4563 or E-mail
[email protected]
Call 503-266-1370
ESTACADA 97023
(Off Springwater)
Opening Day:
Wed, July 9th
MON-SAT: 7 am to 4 pm
Closed Sunday.
$1.50 lb u-pick.
4 Acres of Beautiful
Berries!!!
503-668-5552
www.kochfamilyfarm.com
The Jewelry Buyer
Need a new employee?
Advertise it in the
classifieds. Call now!
Call 503-620-7355
U-PICK BLUEBERRIES
DON SMITH’S TREE
FARM
22509 S Stormer Road
4745 Ray Bell
Road NE
St. Paul, OR
97137
503-538-6834
20th N.E. Sandy PDX 503-239-6900
FOUND:
IPOD TOUCH,
black, 5th Gen, found on
SE Division & 8th Avenue.
If this is your IPOD Touch,
contact the Multnomah Co.
police at: (503)823-0000
APPLES
MAKITA Electric Hand
Saw, 7.25”, Like New!!
$90. (503)537-0827
APPAREL/JEWELRY
BRUCE ALMIGHTY
Cash found in downtown
Portland on Tuesday, July
1st near the waterfront. If
you believe it is yours,
please contact the Portland
Police Bureau Property/
Evidence division with the
exact sum and description.
RESORT CAMPGROUND
MEMBERSHIP:
On Nehalem Bay, others
included. Lots of amenities.
Annual dues are $180. Sell
for $1,000/obo. Please call
for info: 503-625-2155.
CLOSE OUT
BEERS SIGNS
Cemetery Lots
Interested candidates can apply online at:
www.extendicare.com/jobs
Questions can be directed to Crystel Rivera at:
253-213-9285
WORK AND LIVE IN GLACIER NATIONAL PARK
FOR SUMMER 2014!
GENERATOR: 5,000 Watt
Coleman, ran 5 hrs max,
garaged & installed in my
garage, like new, $350.
CHAIN SAW: Sears, 16’’,
needs
tune-up,
$25.
MOWER: MTO ELET, rear
bagger,
$25.
STEEL
WHEEL:
Apache,
Hi-speed,
4-hold,
4.60/4.00-8/4 ply nylon,
$20. Call 503-665-7886.
Food/Meat/Produce
Air Conditioning
& Heating
DRIVERS: START WITH
OUR TRAINING OR CONTINUE YOUR SOLID CAREER. You have options!
Company Drivers, Lease
Purchase or Owner Operators Needed 877-369-7104
Qualified candidates must have 1 year of experience in
long term care, be willing to travel to multiple facilities
and have an active state license.
EOE
Liege Waffle Business for
sale. Excellent growth opportunity. All inventory +
irons + website + accounts.
$19,000 cash.
Ph: 509.293.2628.
Building Materials
VOLUNTEERS
Extendicare is excited to announce the formation of The
Extendicare Staffing Pool for RN’s and LPN’s! If you are
a Registered Nurse or Licensed Practical Nurse who is
flexible with working assignments then this is the perfect
position for you! Our new PRN program is designed to
allow you to work at multiple facilities!! Pay rates for
these positions are at a premium.
Due to the quantity and
variety of business opportunity listings we receive, it is impossible for
us to verify every opportunity
advertisement.
Readers respond to
business opportunity
ads at their own risk. If
in doubt about a particular offer, check with the
Better Business Bureau,
503-226-3981 or the
Consumer Protection
Agency, 503-378-4320,
BEFORE investing any
money.
Help Wanted
Job Opportunities
The Mt. Hood Jazz Festival
is looking for volunteers for
its 2014 festival on August
1-2. If you would like to
volunteer please contact:
[email protected] or
503-621-6316. Lots of fun,
meet new friends, free
admission, and a t-shirt!
EOE.
ATTENTION
READERS
Machinery & Tools
Territory Sales
Representative:
Culligan Water Co. of the
Pacific
NorthWest,
a
Culligan franchisee, is currently seeking a motivated
sales representative to sell
our well known, high quality products in homes. Not
only will we start you off
with a generous training
pay package, but we will
supply you with company
generated leads that will
help you boost the value of
your self-generated ones.
On top of this you will receive a car allowance.
For Consideration, call
(800) 696-8051
Qualified candidates must have one year of long term
care experience, be willing to travel to
multiple locations and have an active state license.
Interested candidates can apply online at:
www.extendicare.com/jobs
Questions can be directed to Crystel Rivera at:
253-213-9285
Business
Opportunities
Help
Wanted
Food/Meat/Produce
YARD SALE
SAT, July 19th: 9-2
14130 KNAUS ROAD
(Off Country Club)
Great variety of quality of
new & used items.
NW PORTLAND
Forest Heights
97229
Cynthia Fischborn
ESTATE SALE
9137 NW McKenna Dr
Sat 9-2 • Sun 11-3
Air Conditioned
2 floors full!
Quality furniture,
sectional, suede sofa,
queen beds, animal print
chaise, occasional
tables, hall tables, desk,
Thule cartop carrier,
garage refr, W/D,
electronic baby grand
piano, jewelry, books,
nice decor, dining set,
so much more!
See pics at:
PORTLAND NE:
ESTATE SALE
SAT & SUN: 10-4
3839 NE 73rd Ave
NO LIST
House and garage are
overflowing!!!
Holiday old and new,
indoor - outdoor
Spartan cabinet radio,
Vaill folding chair,
Pronto mobility scooter,
hospital bed, medical
equip, Precious moments
(over 400), Lenox holiday
& cats, Porcelain dolls &
cat figurines, Vintage
furniture pieces, 4 poster
queen bed, China
hutches, Noritake china,
crystal, Some Navy &
pilot pieces, Kitchen,
commercial table saw
and way way more!!!
More info & pics at:
www.tbarbs-sales.com
PORTLAND NE:
JAPANESE
ESTATE SALE
July 17, 18 & 19: 10-4
4920 N Harvard Ave
Japanese novels & VHS,
furniture, Japanese dolls &
frames, women’s clothes
(size M). CASH ONLY.
PORTLAND SE:
DON’T MISS THIS
ONE!!!
FRI & SAT: 9-4
SE Woodstock @ 59th
Quality ~ No Junk. Ethan
Allen,
imported
rugs,
model home furn & access.
CASH ONLY.
PORTLAND SE:
www.estatesale-finder.
com/cynthiafischborn.htm
503-544-7493
House is alarmed.
YARD SALE
SAT & SUN: 9-4
4120 SE Nehalem
Unique items: Collectibles,
culinary, gardening & more
PORTLAND:
LARGE GARAGE
SALE
SAT & SUN 9-4
2365 SW CEDAR
HILLS BLVD
Furniture, office
furniture, clothing,
kitchen items, misc.
PORTLAND:
MOVING SALE
SAT & SUN 9-3
11468 NW
BLACKHAWK DR
Home items, furniture,
bikes, AND MORE!
TROUTDALE:
GARAGE SALE
FRI & SAT 9-5,
3225 SE LEWIS CT.
Collectable porcelain,
kitchen items, china,
figurines, household items,
packpacks, out of storage
from the 60’s & 70’s mostly
new from Germany &
England.
WEST LINN:
ESTATE SALE
THUR-SAT 10-4
23580 JOHNSON
RD
Original art work (E.B.
Quigle, A. Selander, E.J.
Robinson, Captin Lars)
1920 Herschell Carousel
horse/brass pole, carnival
restaurant memorabilia,
antique furniture.
AND MANY UNIQUE!
WEST LINN:
GARAGE SALE
JULY 18th & 19th: 8-4
19844 Bennington Ct
Furniture, lamps, artwork,
misc hshold, kitchen,
bedding, holiday & more.
WEST LINN:
HILLSBORO/97123:
Going-Out-Of-Business/Garage Sale
July 16th - 19th: 9am-3pm
5575 SE Alexander Street, Suite 400
Industrial Hot Plates: multiple sizes including 2
(27” x 36”). CLEPCO temperature controllers, Dektak,
LN2 Dewar,Mini Lathe, Gantry crane/hoist, Industrial
casters, Structural aluminum, Hardware, Power tools,
Hand tools. Assorted; Electrical, Measurement
equipment, Lifting slings, Pallet jacks, Industrial steel
carts & Much more!
The Little Shed and
Front Porch Too
July 19 & 20: 10-4
2450 SW Buckman Rd
(Stafford area)
Featuring vintage garden
and home decor will be
open for a mid-summer,
20% discount, on all
items, 2-days only. Please
stop by and check us out!
Berry Patch
THOMPSON FARMS
• RASPBERRIES
RE!
• BLUEBERRIES & MO
• MARIONBERRIES
Call for Availability
Conveniently located on the corner
of 222nd & Borges Rd, Damascus
OPEN: 9am-6pm • 7 DAYS A WEEK
503-658-2237
www.olson-farms.com
Fresh Picked
Blackberries,
Blueberries,
Raspberries,
Cherries,
and Vegetables
No Insecticides or Fungicides.
Just Great Taste!!
Located 5 miles south of Powell on SE 242nd or 1 mile north of HWY 212 on 242nd.
Open 9-6, Tues - Sun, Closed Mon
Call for a daily crop update • 503-658-4640
YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD MARKETPLACE ✵ 503-620-SELL (7355) ✵ 8:30AM - 5:00PM ✵ WWW.COMMUNITY -C LASSIFIEDS.COM
27713.062614c
Huron Consulting Services is seeking a Senior
Production BizTalk Administrator in Lake Oswego, OR
with the following requirements: MS in Info Systems,
Comp Sci, Bus Admin, or Engineering or related field & 3
yrs related exp OR BS in Info Systems, Comp Sci, Bus
Admin, or Engineering or related field & 5 yrs related exp.
Prior related exp. must include: monitor and optimize
health and performance of BizTalk servers installed at
client sites, managing risk and recommending and
implementing preventative measures; design and
develop enterprise wide business solutions using
Microsoft .NET frameworks OO programming languages
like C#; design and develop Enterprise Application
Integration solutions using Microsoft middleware
technologies like BizTalk and WCF; design relational
database objects for SQL Server. Apply on-line at
www.huronconsultinggroup.com, Careers,
and search for Keyword:5240
27714.070814 c
Senior Production BizTalk Administrator
Recreational
Membership
LIFE B5
The Portland Tribune Thursday, July 17, 2014
Pets & Supplies
Homes for Sale
AURORA:
OLIVE
Manufactured
Homes/Lots
THE TRIPLE WIDE
STORE
View many floor plans.
2400sf MODEL HOME ON
DISPLAY
503 722 4500
JandMHomes.com
WrightChoiceHomes.com
Once Somebody’s Girl
Abandoned with her back
pack on at the Waterfront
OHS Doggy Dash on May
10, 2014 Olive is seeking a
foster or foster to adopt
home with someone who
has time for her. Olive is 6
years old, a spayed 50
pound female tan and
white pit bull mystery mix,
healthy, sweet natured, active, friendly, gets along
with resident cats and
dogs, needs plenty of exercise, trainer and rescue
sponsored;
trainer
involved: for more information call 503.625.4563
or E-mail:
[email protected]
Popular Palm Harbor
plan on your own land!
2006 2 bdrm, 2 ba, 1,842sf
triple wide home on it’s
own lot. Large living
spaces, vaulted ceiling,
carport, large 100X80 corner lot, out building, garden
space & more!
$180,000.
Call Steve, 503-680-1768
ReMax Equity Group
GERVAIS
!~VIDEO’S~!
Pictures & details
Oregon’s friendliest and
Most informative website
Huge selection of
MANUFACTURED &
MOBILE HOMES.
Family Owned Since 1992
503-652-9446
WE BUY LOTS,
LAND AND FIXERS
$149,000
by Owner
3 bdrm, 1 bth
heat pump, all appliance,
big back yard, 3 fruit trees,
to many updates to list.
Call for appointment.
971-338-3093
All cash, no fees,
30 years in business.
Licensed in Oregon
since 1986!
CLASSIFIEDS
+ business = results.
PUBLISHER’S
NOTICE
Call 503-620-SELL
(503-620-7355)
Manufactured
Homes/Lots
All real estate advertised
herein is subject to the
Federal Fair Housing
Act, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on
race, color, religion, sex,
handicap, familial status
or national origin, or intention to make any
such preferences, limitations or discrimination.
State law forbids discrimination in the sale,
rental or advertising of
real estate based on
factors in addition to
those protected under
federal law. Oregon
State law forbids discrimination based on
marital status. We will
not knowingly accept
any advertising for real
estate which is in violation of the law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings
advertised are available
on an equal opportunity
basis.
Resort & Recreation
Property
NETARTS
ACREAGE FSBO
PRICES SLASHED!!
Peaceful Whiskey Creek
Road location north of
Cape Lookout. On the
‘’3 Capes Scenic Loop’’
• Three adjoining buildable land parcels avail:
2.2 acres - $45,000.
3 acres - $55,000.
7.59 ac - $125,000.
• Public water, phone,
cable, elec. at street.
• Septic required for
vacant lots.
Contact Scott for info:
503-662-7204,
[email protected]
NEW HOME 3 bdrm, 2 ba
$49,900 finished on site
JandMHomes.com
(503) 722-4500
GRESHAM:
!! NEW PRICING !!
$34,500
Nice, 1997 Marlette
manufactured
home.
• 2 bedroom, 1 bath,
• Vaulted ceilings,
• Heat pump with
central cooling,
• Covered porch and
carport,
• Space rent $450/mo.
Call (503)666-2983
for information & appt.
ORDER A NEW
AFFORDABLE
HOME TODAY!
FREE Rent special*
Community Features:
Pool/Playground/Billiard
Room/Gym
Access to the
Clackamas River
CAL-AM HOMES AT
RIVERBEND MHP
13900 SE HWY 212
Clackamas OR 97015
(503)658-4158
www.Cal-Am.com
(EHO) EXP 07/15/14
*Call for details
NETARTS:
HEAVEN KISSED EARTH
FOR THIS 1.1 ACRE
View Lot in Netarts, OR.
Private road with all
custom houses, pond,
nature trail to Pacific Bay.
Offered by owner,
$130,000.
805-987-5116
PLEASE NOTE:
Abbreviations destroy the
intent of your advertisement. Your advertisement
should be attractive and
easy to read. Let us help
you put together your advertisement. Call us today
at:
503-620-SELL(7355)
community-classifieds.com
Motorcycles
Scooters/ATVs
MULINO: 1820sf, 3bd/2ba
New carpet & interior paint.
Gated & private. No smoking or inside pets. Outside
dog okay. $1700/mo.
Call 503-706-1267 or
e-mail at: [email protected]
LINCOLN TOWN CAR
1996:
YAMAHA V-Star 2006
ST PAUL:
RURAL AREA
SINGLE STORY
HOME, 3 BD, 2 BA,
2,000 sq ft, nice yard, No
smokers or indoor pets.
Ref req. $1,500 mo.
Call: 503-931-0481
To place your
Classified advertisement,
call 503-620-SELL(7355)
community-classifieds.com
Senior Citizen
Housing
‘71 CHEVELLE: $10,000
‘35 PLYMOUTH: $2,500
Call Ronnie for more
information.
503-804-8766.
2000 Palm Harbor
28’x42’, 2bdrm, 2ba
$27,900 Canby Manor
Estates 503-682-2719
503-648-3895
PONTIAC Torrent, 2006:
63K miles, new tires,
$9,000. Call 503-550-6151.
Cars For Sale
Very clean, 114K mi, 4dr,
AT, no accidents, clean
title, good tags, Excellent
condition. Great Car!!!
$2750.
LINCOLN CONTINENTAL
1994. - Great engine!
Loaded!! 4-door, 6-cyl, 76K
miles, 20-mpg (in city),
automatic, no leaks, new
brakes/tires/shocks.
$3,200 | (503)491-9384
VOLVO S60 2008: $10000
Well
maintained,
one
owner,
nonsmoker,
no
pets,
Automatic,
AC,
Cruise Control, AM/FM/CD
audio, 5-Cyl, LP Turbo,
2.5L., Leather, 19 MPG
City and 27 MPG Highway,
Premium
Pkg,
Heated
Front Seats, Moon Roof.
Call fo more info:
503-351-1094
Home & Professional Services
Decks
DECKS: New install, deck
repair & removal, pressure
washing & staining.
CCB# 118609,
503-734-7172
Fences
Apartments for Rent
HILLSBORO:
Modern Downtown
Hillsboro Apartment.
W/D in unit. Free
Water/Sewer/Garbage,
across from MAX. *Income
Restrictions Apply.
City Center Apts,
160 SE Washington St.
503.693.9095
Gslcitycenter.com
PORTLAND NW:
1 Bed: $767, 2 Bed: $913!
Free Water/Sewer/Garb!
Spacious open floor plans
include full size W/D. Professional on-site mgmt.
Lush landscaping, Outdoor
Pool, Year round spa,
LARGE Patio w/storage.
*Income and Student
Restriction Apply.
*Pets Welcome!
Westridge Meadows
18476 NW Chemeketa Ln
503-439-9098
JAMES F.
WIEDEMANN
CONSTRUCTION
Remodeling, Windows,
& Doors, Decks,
Fences, Sheds. 20 yrs
exper. L/I/B CCB
#102031.
503-784-6691
James Kramer
Const.
Locally since 1974!
Kitchen, bath, walls,
ceilings, additions,
counters, cabinets,
decks, drywall, tile,
granite, windows and
doors, etc.
Reasonable.
CCB#11518. Jim
503-201-0969,
503-625-5092.
Remodeling & Renovation
All phases. 35-years, local
contractor. 503-658-7012.
ccb#37169
LIKE NEW
3BD 2BA
85 MOBILE HOME
Summit Engineering,
LLC. Remodels, New
Constr. Need engineering?
Call Julie, 971.251.0194
Carpentry
GEM FINISH
CARPENTRY.Com
•Shelves, Closets , Doors
• Murphy Beds , Cabinets
•Stair Railings , Remodels
•Fireplace Sorrounds
27 Years Customer
Satisfaction
Call(503) 913-8141
CCB#148914
Chimney Services
1 bdrm/1ba: $747
2 bdrm/2ba: $895
3 bdrm/2ba: $1028
Water, sewer, garbage
paid. Full size W/D in
every apt. Pool, hot tub,
fitness center & clubhouse.
Professional on-site mgmt.
Beautiful, quiet, residential
neighborhood. $35 App
Fee. Call Today!!!
Wood Ridge Apartments
11999 SW Tualatin Rd
503-691-9085
www.gslwoodridge.com
BIRDS CHIMNEY
SERVICE
1-800-CHIMNEY
Cleaning & Repairs
503-653-4999
CCB# 155449
To place your
Community Classified
advertisement,
call 503-620-SELL(7355).
Cleaning/Organizing
BUILDING MATERIALS
YARD DEBRIS HAULING
•Rototilling •Trimming
•Bark Dust •Gravel •Yard
Maintenance. Free est,
7 days. (503) 626-9806.
Painting & Papering
HANDYMAN MATTERS
Locally owned, nationally
recognized. Specializing in
small to medium jobs
#191473
NORTH VALLEY
PAINTING & REPAIR
WestPortland.HandymanMatters.com
503-621-0700
Decks, Rental turnovers,
Remodels, Sr. Discount
Most homes painted for
$1500 | CCB #199565
Gerry Dean’s
Cleanup
(503) 244-4882
BBB -CCB# 54535
Windows
& Doors
See the Classified
Service Directory!
To place your ad,
call (503) 620-SELL(7355).
MOW •CUT •EDGE
•LEAF CLEANUP •MORE!
Average Price, $30. (503)
550-8871 / 503-708-8770.
nwadvanced.net
Roofing/Gutters
Statewide
Exteriors
YOUR EXTERIOR
ENHANCEMENT
SPECIALIST!
Roofing • Siding
Windows • Doors
Decks • Repairs
Roof & Gutter Cleaning
Pressure Washing
Serving Oregonians
since 1989.
503-508-3381
CCB# 197375
www.statewidexterior.com
licensed, bonded & ins.
Attorneys/Legal
Services
DIVORCE $155. Complete
preparation. Includes
children, custody, support,
property and bills division.
No court appearances.
Divorced in 1-5 weeks possible. 503-772-5295.
www.paralegalalternatives.c
om [email protected]
Milstein Defense
Law
✵
Northwest RV offers one
of the best consignment
programs around. We
have an outstanding reputation for being #1 at
customer service.
Our specialty is -
Here at Northwest RV we
have a large budget for
advertising that targets
buyers of all ages! We
advertise not just locally
but
Nationally
and
throughout Canada!
6492 Portland Road NE
Salem, OR 97305
503-269-2983 or
503-393-3663
Ask for Jasmine
FACING CHARGES?
Utility Trailers
We Can Help!!!
FREE CONSULTATION
BILINGUAL
Criminal Law, DUI
Serving all areas
milsteindefenselaw.com
(503)880-6757
6X8 UTILITITY
TRAILER
Light weight, new bearing
and paint.
10422 NE Wygant
503-309-1266
$500 OBO
CONTRACTORS NW
Decorative Etched, Stamped & Beyond
•Pools •Decks •Patios •Retaining structural walls
•Driveways
•Outdoor Living Areas
Since 1978
CCB#31044
Mowing, Pruning, Trim,
Cleanup & Hauling,
Barkdust, Thatch,
Aerating
Pressure Washing
503-960-7817
* Size: 6’wide x10’ long x
5’ deep (Does not include
503-760-2997
www.cnw-inc.com
Street of Dreams 2013
24x36
30x36
30x48
36x36
36x48
40x48
40x60
60x120
10’ EAVE
$4,765
$5,513
$6,575
$6,219
$7,399
$8,313
$9,644
10’ EAVE
$2,279
$2,770
$3,457
$3,266
$4,191
$4,934
$5,992
$17,848
12’ EAVE
$5,201
$5,978
$7,140
$6,709
$7,998
$8,889
$10,255
12’ EAVE
$2,333
$2,830
$3,539
$3,338
$4,261
$4,995
$6,099
$18,065
tongue length or tire width)
BBAC
14’ EAVE
$5,636
$6,476
$7,644
$7,191
$8,536
$9,556
$10,951
14’ EAVE
$2,394
$2,916
$3,635
$3,426
$4,357
$5,142
$6,241
$18,516
* Axle can carry 2.5 ton.
* Brand new wiring
harness (protected by tubing
front to back), lights, deck
and side walls.
* All wood has 2 coats of
sealer and 2 coats of
paint all the way around
* Tires like new.
* Pulls straight without
weaving.
* All welds redone.
* Ramp in back for easy
access.
Asking $1,995.
If interested or to
make an offer call:
503.372.9078
16’ EAVE
$6,060
$6,967
$8,390
$7,834
$9,396
$10,434
$11,985
16’ EAVE
$2,564
$3,118
$3,747
$3,776
$4,617
$5,599
$6,793
$18,927
Utility Trucks
& Vans
26243.071814c
www.community-classifieds.com
503-620-SELL (7355)
Sell your
puppies here!
C OMMUNITY CLASSIFIEDS
LET US TURN YOUR
RV IN TO $$$$$
UTILITY TRAILER:
24x36
30x36
30x48
36x36
36x48
40x48
40x60
FOB Hubbard, Or. Subject to code requirements.
Price subject to change without notice.
PO Box 407, Hubbard, OR. 97032
OR CCB#86204 WA CCB# PARKEB1071D6
ALUMALITE
FIFTH WHEEL-1985
Large - 24 ft.
Fully Self-Contained
$3,800. 503-313-1947
We will get you
the most for your RV!
Concrete/Paving
CONCRETE: Paver
patios, concrete, asphalt &
dirt removal, concrete
cutting & pressure
washing.
CCB# 118609.
503-734-7172.
Workhouse chassis,
powered by Vortec 8100,
2 slides, 36’, low miles,
excellent condition.
$53,950.
503-970-2991
We sell all types of RV’S.
Our consignment program is free of charge
and there are no hidden
fees.
[email protected]
CONCRETE FLATWORK
Everything Concrete
Excavation/Retaining Wall
ccb#158471 503.297.6271
www.PDXconcrete.com
RVs & Travel
Trailers
Selling your RV!
CARE
Cleaning And
REpair
Prevent leaks from
moss before they
happen!
• Pressure wash roof
• Clean Gutters
• Clean up included
• Free quotes!!!
Tires like new, new battery,
cruise, A/C, canopy,94K
miles, tow hitch. Call for
details, 503-282-9194.
36’ SEA BREEZE LX
2004:
“QUALITY IS NOT
EXPENSIVE IT IS
SIMPLY PRICELESS”.
NW ADVANCED LLC
•Milgard Windows and
Doors , With Warranty
•Sales and Installation
•Remodeling: Kitchen and
Bath
Call(360) 521-4401
CCB#173664
Roofing/Gutters
503-798-3331
YEAR AROUND
SERVICE
•Mowings $25 & up.
•Trimming •Pruning:
Hedges, shrubs, fruit &
ornamental trees.
•Bed work •Fertilize •Bark
•Maintenance programs
Affordable rates!
Call Dave, (503) 753-1838
THROUGH
THE CLASSIFIEDS
CPRplumbing
GARCIA
IT’S TIME FOR
SUMMER
CLEAN-UPS!!!
GET
FAST
RESULTS
CALL
503-620-SELL
Senior Discount
GMC Sierra Sportsman,
diesel, 1982:
30’ FIFTH WHEEL:
Homebuilt by professional
builder. Slideout for living
room/dining room, front
bedroom, rear kitchen,
bath, propane heat, stove,
water heater, tinted windows, basement storage,
holding tanks, rubber roof,
tube frame, tandem axles.
Sold as is. Located in Dayton, Oregon. $4,800.
Please email if interested:
[email protected]
Dirty Windows?
I CAN SEE CLEARLY
Window Cleaning
503-708-8626
10-yrs Exper. Insured.
Plumbing &
Drainage
(503) 867-3859
CHEVY SILVERADO
2001: 2500 HD, Ext Cab.
8.1L V8, 163K Hwy miles,
4WD, tow pkg, short bed
lined, leather int, pwr
seats/windshield, 2 new
batteries, new pwr wind.
NICE!! Asking $11,500.
Phone: 971-276-8875.
Window
Services
CALL NOW!
www.CPRplumbing.info
CHEVY S-10 pickup, 1989:
white, with canopy, trailer
hitch and wired for trailer
lights. V6 automatic 4.3
fuel injected engine with
185,000 miles. Runs great
and tires are like new. I
have title. Asking $1,500.
Call Jon at 503-502-7338
CCB# 111772
Visit our Website for other svc.
a-1sewercontractors.com
www.litkie.com
(503) 668-8000
CCB#194308
MAINTENANCE, LLC
Mowing, weeding, trimming, blackberries, hauling, year-round maintenance.
One-time cleanups for all seasons. E-mail:
[email protected]
503-774-2237
•Sewer Repair , Hookups
•Partysewer Seperation
•Septic Decommission,
Demolition
Call(503) 255-1910
Award Winning
Exteriors
Flawless Interiors
Painting Finer Homes in
your area for 40+ yrs.
Landscape
Maintenance
COMPLETE YARD
SERVICE BY
STEPHEN SECOR
Senior Discounts
We do it all!
Trimming, hedges &
shrubs, pruning, bark
dust. Gutter cleaning,
weeding, blackberries,
staining & pressure
washing & water sealing
(503) 853-0480.
Excavation Is Our
Business!!
A-1 Sewer
Contractors
Serving Portland
Since 1957
503-875-7949
Hauling
NEED YARD HELP?
Debi’s PROFESSIONAL
HOUSECLEANING
Many years exper.
•Non-Toxic Products
•Honest & Reliable
•Senior Help
•Reasonable Rates
503.590.2467
Truong’s Landscape
Maintenance
•Mowing •Weeding •Edging
•Barkdust •Rock •Chips
•Blackberry Rmvl •Pruning
•Haul Away •YardCleanup
FREE ESTIMATES
503-760-2199
Handyman/
Handywoman
jameskramerconstruction.com
www.gslwestridgemeadows.com
PORTLAND NW:
Located near MAX,
Portland Streetcar & Bus.
Beautiful courtyards,
downtown view,
close to Waterfront Park
and the Pearl District.
Great amenities!
The Yards at
Union Station
815 NW Naito Pkwy
503-478-1695
gsltheyards.com
FENCES: New install, old
repair & removal, Chain
link, Pressure washing.
CCB# 118609
503-734-7172
Septic Tanks/Sewers
Landscape
Maintenance
1,100cc, 10K miles, great
condition, no falls, custom
exhaust, windshield,
saddle bags.
Must sell due to medical
issues, $5,000/obo.
503-884-4826
Pickups
CHEVY Cavalier
1997:
503-887-2639
CANBY SENIOR
COMMUNITY
Top of the line Cartier!
As close to new condition
and operation as you can
get! Have all records.
Make an offer.
Call for further details,
Antique & Classic
Autos
Service Directory
Building &
Remodeling
SANDY:
SCAPPOOSE: 2 bdrm, 1
ba mfd home, 65X14, in
55+ park, new lifetime roof
& windows, new 10X12
Tuff Shed, newer applces,
forced air heat & A/C, fncd
yard w/garden area, parking for up to 3 vehicles.
$20,000/obo. Drive by:
52237 Teakwood Dr or call
Dave, 503-410-0343.
E-mail for
details.
503-630-4300
9 cabins, 4 RV spots,
remodeled studios, 1 bd,
and 2 bd. Will carry
contract with down
payment. Income
producing. Asking for
$400,000 altogether. Call
for info: 503-680-0088 or
503-260-8319
TUALATIN:
Double wide, remodeled,
new roof, floors, cabinets.
Lowdown payment.
Financing by
owner.$42,500 Call:
503-663-2839 or
503-705-6710
Sec. 8 OK
[email protected]
1 ACRE PROPERTY.
DONALD:
COUNTRY LIVING!
3 bdrm, 2 ba, large covered porch, fncd back yard,
carport/storage shed.
$39,950.
503-989-3228
FACTORY SPECIAL
IS BACK!!!
Beautiful 1, 2 & 3 bdrm,
laundry hook-up, kitchen
applces. Storage shed.
Includes water & sewer!
Cars For Sale
(503) 201-8868
DETROIT:
Acreage/Lots
ESTACADA
ASK ABOUT OUR
NO DEPOSIT
OPTION
Houses for Rent
wrightchoicehomes.com
Real Estate Wanted
Home For Sale
Houses for Rent
CARGO VAN &
EQUIPMENT
Retirement Sale!!!
New commercial
powerwasher with lots of
equipment & 15’ Cargo
Van. Will sell part or all.
This equipment is high end
and the truck has had one
owner. McMinnville area.
Call for more information:
541-730-0121.
YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD MARKETPLACE ✵ 503-620-SELL (7355) ✵ 8:30AM - 5:00PM ✵ WWW.COMMUNITY -C LASSIFIEDS.COM
B6 LIFE
Ballard Street
Portland!Life
Scary Gary
The Portland Tribune Thursday, July 17, 2014
Free Range
Dog Eat Doug
Strange Brew
Nest Heads
Dogs of C Kennel
Beaverton / Cedar Hills
2905 SW Cedar Hills Blvd.
503.626.1400
Hillsboro / Tanasbourne
2364 NW Amberbrook Dr.
503.352.5252
Oregon City / Hilltop
334 Warner Milne Rd.
503.722.8222
437753.060613 ENT
West Linn / Ristorante
18740 Willamette Dr.
503.636.9555
B U G AT T I S R E STA U R A N T . C O M
SPORTS B7
The Portland Tribune Thursday, July 17, 2014
Barton: Leadership role nurtured
happen.”
Surprisingly, Vanterpool
said his goal for Barton this
summer is to display more
leadership.
“I want to see him continue
his growth as a leader,” the
Portland assistant says. “He
gets emotional. That mental
approach, as far as leadership,
is where he has to grow the
most.”
It’s hard to show leadership,
though, when you’re not on the
court. Barton played only 397
regular-season minutes last
season, less than half of the
time he got during his rookie
year.
Next season, Barton will be
in the final year of his contract,
playing for his future in Portland. He knows he needs to
make strides if he want to continue with the Blazers. The
first steps are being taken in
summer league.
“I’m trying to improve my
overall game,” Barton says.
“Try to make open shots. Try
to get other guys shots. My defense, rebounding. I’m just trying to show I’m a complete
player in every aspect of the
game.”
■ From page 10
says Barton, who has started
for Portland’s entry in the Las
Vegas Summer League. “It’s
not up to me. It’s up to the
coach and the organization. I
can’t put myself in the game.
“I can do anything I put my
mind to. I want to go out there
and contribute like I’ve shown
the last two years. I’ll go in next
season trying to fight for minutes. I’ll be the best teammate I
can be in practice and in the
games, but I want to play more
and get a larger role on the
team and try to make my NBA
future brighter.”
At times in his first two seasons with the Blazers, Barton,
23, has looked like a talent who
might develop into an NBA
starter. At times, he has looked
like an undisciplined player
better suited for streetball.
Barton was a little of both in
the Blazers’ first two LVSL
games, averaging 13.0 points
and 7.0 rebounds but making
only 9 of 26 shots from the field
with five turnovers.
Vanterpool offers mostly
plaudits for Barton, however.
“Will is doing a great job on
the floor,” Vanterpool says.
“His game speaks for itself.
TRIBUNE FILE PHOTO
Will Barton, Blazers swingman, is focusing on his mental approach
to the game and leadership skills as he attempts to improve his
overall game.
Guys love playing with him.
They know he’s unselfish. They
know when he’s handling the
ball a lot, maybe even overdribbling, that it’s not a selfish
thing. They know if they’re
open, he’ll get it to them. Guys
feel comfortable getting the
ball in his hands, because they
know he makes good things
[email protected]
Twitter: @kerryeggers
Thunder:
Everyone
on team
‘wants it’
AFL, he believes that four defensive stops usually should be
enough to win a game.
“It’s really just getting stops,”
Sauk says. “As a defense, you
want to get about four stops a
game. The goal is to stop them,
and the more stops we get, the
better we’ll be able to score on
offense.”
Says Paige-Moss: “One stop
can be deadly. When you get two
and three stops, that’s when
you’re a championship-caliber
defense in any league. You can’t
always expect the offense to
score 60 or 70 points a game.
We’ve got to motivate the offense. If we have to win a game,
that’s what we’re going to do. As
a whole defense, that’s what we
have to do.”
Portland quarterback Kyle
Rowley says the Thunder defense often gives the offense —
which is averaging 45.1 points
per game — an additional
boost.
“We’ve got a good chemistry
on our team, so we’re always
feeding off guys who are making
big plays,” Rowley says. “It helps
us be excited.”
■ From page 10
“We know what we’re capable of.
We still need to work on the little things. Being a new team and
being young, it kind of gets into
our heads and knocks us off
what we’re here to do and that’s
to play football.”
Thunder linebacker Donte
Paige-Moss, 6-3, 270 and from
North Carolina, says that Portland’s success on defense
comes from the way the Thunder practice.
“Game day is the easy part,”
Paige-Moss says. “We try to always work and hold ourselves
accountable during practice.
We’re hard on each other on
Exploring an FDA-approved
treatment option for MS relapses
has faced true adversity, and at
one point, they thought it was
over. But they kept going.
“That’s one thing I appreciate
about this team.”
Thunder coach Matthew Sauk
says he does not lay out specific
goals about what he wants Portland’s defense to achieve each
game in terms of yardage and
points allowed. However, in the
Timbers: The Colorado Rapids
play Portland in an MLS match at
Providence Park, 5 p.m. (NBC
Sports).
Baseball: A five-game homestand between Tri-City and Hillsboro
concludes with the Hops playing
host to a 7 p.m. game at Ron
Tonkin Field. ... Salem-Keizer ends a
five-game stint at Everett, 7 p.m.
Cycling: The 16th annual
Alpenrose Velodrome Challenge hits
the 43-degree banked track at
Alpenrose Dairy for a three-day run.
The event draws cyclists from
around the world who compete on
the 268-meter velodrome for cash
and glory. Friday’s sessions are at 1
p.m. and 6 p.m.
Highland Games: The event,
which began in 1952, takes place
at Mt. Hood Community College.
The athletic challenges are from
noon to 7 p.m., with piping competitions from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m.
Saturday, July 19
Cycling: The Alpenrose
Velodrome Challenge continues at
Alpenrose Dairy in Southwest
Portland. Sessions start at 10 a.m.
and 5 p.m.
Baseball: It’s Hillsboro at the
Eugene Emeralds in the first of a
three-game set, 7 p.m. ... SalemKeizer arrives in Boise for the first of
three games, 6:15 p.m.
Highland Games: Doors open at
8 a.m. at Mt. Hood Community
College.
Australian Rules Football: The
Stumptown Throwdown is today and
Sunday at Northgate Park
Golf: The 104th annual Oregon
Coast Invitational runs through July
26 at Astoria Golf and Country
Club.
Sunday, July 20
Thorns: Portland, coming off a
7-1 blistering of FC Kansas City,
returns to Providence Park for a
National Women’s Soccer League
matchup against the Boston
ARTS
F E S T I V A L
9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Breakers, 2 p.m. (ESPN2).
Cycling: The Alpenrose
Velodrome Challenge’s final day
starts at 10 a.m., with the sixth and
closing session beginning at 3 p.m.
Baseball: Hillsboro is at Eugene,
5 p.m. ... Salem-Keizer is at Boise,
6:15 p.m.
Monday, July 21
Baseball: The West Coast
League All-Star Game is at Kiger
Stadium in Klamath Falls, 6:30
p.m., after the 5:10 p.m. homerun derby. The All-Star Game pits
the North Division against the
South Division. The North roster
includes first baseman Gabe Clark
of Oregon State, and the South
squad has pitchers Jackson
Lockwood and Billy Sahlinger from
the University of Portland and outfielder Steven Packard from
Oregon. ... In the Class A
Northwest League, Hillsboro wraps
up a series at Eugene, 7 p.m.,
and Salem-Keizer finishes its
three-game series at Boise, 6 p.m.
Sports birthdays
July 18, 1954: Wally Walker (age
60), the Trail Blazers’ first-round
draft pick in 1976 was a small forward born in Millersville, Pa.
July 17, 1967: Kevin Pritchard
(age 47), the former Blazers general
manager was born on this day in
Bloomington, Ind.
July 18, 1974: Derek Anderson
(age 40), the Louisville, Ky., native
played 11 NBA seasons, including
from 2001-05 with the Blazers.
July 19, 1985: LaMarcus
Aldridge (age 29), Dallas, Texas,
was the birthplace of the Blazers’
All-Star forward.
Oregon sports history
July 17-21, 1988
Arvydas Sabonis, Soviet basketball star from Lithuania, is in
Portland to rehab a ruptured
Achilles tendon, and he takes time
out for an appearance at the Larry
Steele Basketball Camp at Chiles
Center. Sabonis wows the young
girls in attendance with a dunk, his
smile and his willingness to pose
for photos. Through an interpreter,
he is a guest lecturer, and adds
that he is growing used to Portland.
Meanwhile, at Indiana University,
25-year-old Brian Crouser of
Gresham earns a spot on the U.S.
javelin team for the 1988 Seoul
Olympics, as he throws 260 feet, 8
inches at the Trials.
And Mary Slaney, 29, wins the
Trials women’s 3,000 meters to
also earn a place on the U.S.
Olympic team.
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Thorns: Portland hits the road
for a game at the Chicago Red
Stars, 5 p.m. PT.
Baseball: The Hillsboro Hops
play host to the Tri-City Dust Devils
at Ron Tonkin Field, 7 p.m. ... In
other Class A Northwest League
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Golf: The Rosauers Open
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We’ve stayed consistent
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For the first time in his life,
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more than anyone else.
“This is the first time where I
couldn’t say that I wanted to win
and destroy somebody the most
on the team,” Paige-Moss says.
“We have a lot of guys on defense and offense who really
want this. Everyone on this team
Thursday, July 17
NE 207th
You’re
COURTESY OF BRIAN BEAUDRY
Linebacker Donte Paige-Moss (11) and the Portland Thunder defense
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B8 SPORTS
The Portland Tribune Thursday, July 17, 2014
Eggers: Jager fell in love with steeplechase
■ From page 10
“I wasn’t pissed, but it would
have been nice to get that,” Jager says. “I could have run a little
faster. That was the hardest
steeple I’ve ever run. We were
out about four to five seconds
faster through the first (kilometer) than I’ve ever gone out. I
led for about a lap and ran on
my own the last lap, well behind
Birech.
“To come away second and
getting that close to the American record, I was totally
pleased with that. The cherry
on top would have been getting
the record.”
Jager will get a few more opportunities this summer. He left
Tuesday for Monaco, where
he’ll run in a loaded steeplechase field on Friday.
“We’re undecided about his
schedule after that,” says Jager’s coach, Jerry Schumacher of
the Nike Oregon Project. “He’ll
stay in Europe to train for about
five weeks. Then there is a big
steeple in Brussels (on Sept. 5)
and maybe the Continental Cup
the following week in Morocco.”
Could Jager’s American record fall sometime during the
summer?
“I think so,” he says. “I’m
learning the event better. We’re
going to get in a few fast steeple
races. I’m a year older, a year
stronger. I’m healthy — knock
on wood.
“The Kenyans are good
enough to where most of the Diamond League races are being
won faster than my PR. If a
good race presents itself and I
don’t have to do too much work
on my own, I’m thinking it
should come.”
Asked for his thoughts on a
record attempt, Schumacher
shrugs.
“It’s always a tough question,” he says. “Evan is running
at such a high level already. To
improve off a high level is not
easy to do. But there’s more
time to cut (from Jager’s steeplechase PR), for sure.
“But I don’t think his summer will be just about the steeple. He ran the 5,000 in 13:02 last
year, and he could PR there in
the right race. And maybe he’ll
get into a fast 1,500 as well.”
What is most amazing is how
far Jager has come in such a
short time. An accomplished
distance runner who has a mile
PR of 3:53.33 and made the U.S.
World Championships team at
5,000 in 2009, Jager had never
tried a steeplechase until 2012,
running 8:26.14 at the Mt. SAC
Relays in Walnut, Calif. Three
months later, he was the American record-holder.
“I fell in love with the event
right away,” he says.
“Evan’s a natural athlete to
begin with,” Schumacher says.
“His running style and mechan-
TRIBUNE PHOTO: JONATHAN HOUSE
Portland’s Evan Jager, who has won three American steeplechase titles since taking up the event in 2012, gets some training advice from coach
See JAGER / Page 9 Jerry Schumacher.
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SPORTS B9
The Portland Tribune Thursday, July 17, 2014
Jager:
Athlete’s
sights on
Olympics
■ From page 8
ics are conducive to the steeplechase. After we got into it, it
was pretty obvious he’d be
good at it.”
“With Evan, it’s a doubleedged sword,” says Huling, who
joined the NOP in 2013. “He’s a
beautiful hurdler, and he has
the flat chops to back it up.”
Jager had followed Schumacher to Portland when he
joined Alberto Salazar to coach
runners with NOP in 2008. Jager had just finished a promising
freshman year under Schumacher at Wisconsin.
“Jerry had been the reason I
went there,” Jager says. “When
he left, I didn’t know what to
do. I thought about staying
there, or transferring to another
school. When the
option came about
to come out here
and join him, that
was what I wanted to do the most.
“I was pretty
confident had I
finished out my
collegiate career, I
was going to join
his group out
here. Being able
to stay with him through the
next three years, I said, ‘Why
not?’”
While training under Schumacher and running professionally under the Nike umbrella,
Jager has progressed to within
about a term of earning a degree at Portland State in health
studies.
And he has become the premier steeplechaser in the country, gaining the third of a string
of U.S. titles with a win in the
searing heat of Sacramento last
month.
“I’m pumped about it,” Jager
says. “I’m going to try to keep
the streak going as long as I
can. You have to be happy when
you step onto the track and call
yourself a national champion.”
It almost didn’t happen.
Schumacher had mentioned
the steeplechase not long after
they arrived together in Portland. But in 2010, Jager sustained a navicular bone fracture that laid him up for the
good part of two years.
“I was a little uncertain
about it, because of the extra
pressure and torque (the steeplechase) puts on the foot,”
Schumacher says. “They shoot
horses when they break it,
right? There’s just so much
more pressure and torque on
your feet. You have to be careful with it.
“As 2011 ended and Evan was
healthy, we talked about it
again and decided to give it a
shot. But it has all happened
much faster than we ever
anticipated.”
With only two steeplechases
under his belt, Jager won the
2012 Olympic trials race going
away in 8:17.40. Weeks later, he
took down Daniel Lincoln’s
American record by more than
two seconds in 8:06.81.
“I didn’t realize at the time
how crazy that was,” Jager
says. “I was on such a high,
coming off the U.S. trials. I
knew I was really fit. I thought
I might have had a chance to
run around 8:10 or 8:08. It was
exciting and gave me a huge
amount of confidence going into the London Olympics.”
Jager ran well at London,
finishing behind four Africans
and runner-up Mahiedine
Mekhissi-Benabbad of France.
Jager took the lead with three
laps to go and remained in
the lead pack until 300 meters
remained.
“I was bummed initially,” he
says. “I’d run so well at Monaco
that I’d kind of given myself a
false hope that I could come
away with a shocker of a race
TRIBUNE PHOTOS: JONATHAN HOUSE
at London. I didn’t necessarily
Jerry Schumacher of the Nike Oregon Project is helping to plot out the summer racing schedule and long-term plans for U.S. steeplechase
think I was in the top three, but
champion Evan Jager of Portland.
I thought if things played out
perfectly, I could
Rio de Janeiro. The last U.S.
steal a medal.
lives in a rented five-bedroom
Olympic steeplechase medalist
“Getting run
house in Southwest Portland,
was Brian Diemer, who won
away from so easi- just a mile and a half from the
Evan Jager
ly by five guys on
Nike campus, with fellow Nike
(left), who grew bronze in 1984. There has
the last lap was
Oregon Project runners Elliott
up in Illinois and never been an American win a
medal in the event at the World
demoralizing. It
Heath, Chris Derrick, German
ran collegiately
Championships.
was kind of a slap Fernandez and Ryan Hill.
for Wisconsin,
“It would be really cool to be
in the face. I real“It’s pretty tame,” Jager says.
lives in a fiveable to put myself in the top
ized how much
“We’re all pretty exhausted
bedroom rental
three in the next two championwork I still need to with our busy lives. We don’t
house in
ships,” he offers.
do.”
do much besides running, eatSouthwest
There are plenty of great AfJager enjoyed a ing, sleeping and watching
Portland, near
— Evan Jager
ricans
to go through to reach
solid 2013 season
SportsCenter. But it’s a good
the Nike campus,
that level, of course.
and took another
group. We’ve managed to keep
and rarely gets
“The odds aren’t in his favor,
step in the World Championit relatively clean for five
recognized
but he’s still really young,”
ships at Moscow, placing fifth,
20-something guys.”
around town.
says Huling, 31. “And what he
but finishing fewer than three
Jager says he has grown to
America finish in the 1,500 and
did this year in Oslo was very
atively new at his event. He is
seconds behind champion Eze- love the city of Portland.
impressive.”
looking to begin a move up the
kiel Kemboi of Kenya.
“It has a really great charac- Jerry’s recommendation.”
As he has achieved success
Schumacher knows it won’t
ladder internationally with a
“I ran one of my best steeple
ter to it,” he says. “It’s a small
on the track, Jager hasn’t
happen with one quantum leap.
strong finish this summer.
races ever, and was a lot closer enough city where you feel re“The plan is to continue do“Hopefully, I can finish in the
to the medals than I was at
ally at home. You don’t feel lost changed as a person.
“Very unassuming,” Schumtop three in the rest of the stee- ing what he’s doing,” the coach
London,” Jager says. “I took a
in the size of it. I wish it were
acher says. “You’d never know
says. “Now that Evan is competiples I run this year,” he says.
step in the right direction. Dan
sunnier during the winter, but
(he is an American recordtive at the international level, he
“I’d love to be able to improve
congratulated me as soon as he aside from that, I don’t have
holder). Laid-back. He’s always on my top-five ranking. If I
can start thinking about, ‘How
saw me, which made me realize many complaints.”
in a good mood. Great teamdo I finish in the top three on
could get a top-three ranking
I should probably be happy
Jager’s relationship with
mate, great kid, well-liked by
the biggest stage?’ That’s the
by the end of the year, that
with where I’m at.”
Schumacher now covers seven
everybody.”
World Championships and the
would be incredible.
years.
“He’s very positive,” Huling
Olympic Games. That’s the big
“But that’s the last thing I’ll
“Everything I know about
push now — to find a way to
Though he is one of the prerunning has pretty much come says. “He’s like the antithesis of think about going into those
me. I’m kind of a pessimist
climb up on that stage.”
races. I’ll be competing and
mier distance runners in the
from Jerry,” Jager says. “He’s
If Jager does, he might be inhanging in with all the top
nation, Jager saunters about in been a huge influence in my ca- when it comes to running. I’ve
clined to head back to Algonguys and trying to go for the
anonymity in his adopted
reer. The guys I train with have been trying to adopt some of
his traits going into races.”
quin for another tattoo. One
win.”
hometown. Fellow Nike Oregon been an enormous amount of
colored in bronze, silver or
There’s no question what
Project runners Galen Rupp
support, too. And Nike ... went
gold.
Jager’s next major goal will be
and Mo Farah occasionally may out on a huge limb, taking me
World-class steeplechasers
— to medal at the 2015 World
get recognized in Portland, but on as a 19-year-old kid with one
[email protected]
can continue into their early
Championships in Beijing and
it rarely happens with the
year of college under my belt
Twitter: @kerryeggers
30s. Jager is still young, and rel- at the 2016 Olympic Games in
greatest steeplechaser in
and nothing more than an AllAmerican history.
“The only time is when I’m
doing any sort of Nike appearance,” Jager says. “It’s very
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“You have to be
happy when you
step onto the
track and call
yourself a
national
champion.”
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PRO
Timbers
DARLINGTON NAGBE — It wasn’t
VERONICA BOQUETE
the best of weeks for Portland, but
Nagbe had a highlight with his
screaming shot that knotted a Lamar
Hunt U.S. Open Cup quarterfinal
match with Seattle at 1-1 during
2nd-half stoppage time. The Timbers
went on to lose 3-1 at Tukwila, Wash.
It was the first goal of the year for
Nagbe, a 23-year-old F/MF from
Liberia.
THORNS
The 5-3 MF from Santiago de
Compostela, Spain helped
Portland set National Women’s
Soccer League records for
most goals in a game and
biggest margin of victory as
the Thorns beat visiting FC
Kansas City 7-1. Boquete had
2 goals and 2 assists for a
club-record 6 points in a single game, as Portland picked
up a vital three points in its
run for a NWSL playoff berth.
Thunder
VARMAH SONIE — A 5-8, 175-
pound DB from Northern Iowa, Sonie
helped Portland score perhaps the
biggest triumph of its inaugural Arena
Football League season. He intercepted 2 passes in the 1st half of a
44-31 win at Moda Center over the
rival Los Angeles KISS. The victory
boosted the Thunder’s hopes of making the AFL playoffs.
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PAGE B10
PortlandTribune
THURSDAY, JULY 17, 2014
Three-time U.S.
steeplechase
champion Evan
Jager (right)
leads training
partner Daniel
Huling around
the track
during a
Portland-area
training run.
TRIBUNE PHOTOS:
JONATHAN HOUSE
■ U.S. steeplechase record-holder Evan Jager ready to make global mark
CLIMBING
the LADDER
“Hopefully, I can finish in the
top three in the rest of the
steeples I run this year. I’d
love to be able to improve on
my top-five ranking.”
— Evan Jager
T
he tattoo along the right side of Port“Evan’s one of the best in the world,” says
land’s Evan Jager’s chest is hard to
training partner Daniel Huling, No. 12 on the
miss as he trains shirtless on a warm
2014 world list himself. “And he’s still learning
summer morning, though Jager’s
the event.”
6-2, 145-pound frame is so lean that, as he
In an IAAF Diamond League meet June 11 at
turns sideways, he is apt to almost
Oslo, Jager finished second in a
disappear.
world-class field in 8:06.97 — 0.16 of
The five Olympic rings — black,
a second shy of the American reblue, green, yellow, red — were
cord he set in 2012.
inked during a visit to Jager’s
“It didn’t catch me off guard,”
hometown of Algonquin, Ill., in the
Jager says. “I’d come off running a
weeks following his sixth-place fin13:08 5K at Stanford (two weeks beish in the 3,000-meter steeplechase
fore). For me, 5K fitness has alat the 2012 Olympic Games.
ways translated well to the steeple.
“A lot of athletes had gotten it
I knew I was ready to put myself in
done,” Jager says. “I’d said to mythe mix with the guys competing
self, ‘If I ever get to the Olympics, I O N S P O R T S
to win.”
want to get that done.’ I thought it
The winner was 2014 world leadlooked really cool.”
er Jairus Kipchoge Birech, 21, who
Jager has looked pretty cool just about evestablished a personal record of 8:02.37 while
ery time he has taken the track over the past
running away with victory. Jager, meanwhile,
three years. The 25-year-old former Wisconsin just missed out on a lucrative bonus from his
runner has an American record, three
sponsor, Nike, had he bettered his American
straight U.S. championships and a current No. record.
5 world ranking — behind four Kenyans — in
the steeplechase.
See EGGERS / Page 8
KerryEggers
Make-or-break time for Barton Playoff spot in
Blazer swingman
seeks court time in
last year of contract
By KERRY EGGERS
The Tribune
LAS VEGAS — Will Barton
has never been shy on
chutzpah, in a charming sort
of way.
The Trail Blazers’ lean 6-6
swingman, drawing inspiration
from Muhammad Ali, called
himself the “People’s Champ”
last season. His Twitter handle
is “WilltheThrillB5.”
After collecting 20 points, 11
rebounds and four assists off
the bench in a win over Brooklyn in February — and becoming the first NBA bench player
to achieve such numbers since
Barton himself in April 2013 —
he declared with a smile, “I
make history. Then I rewrite
it.”
“Will has the utmost selfconfidence,” Portland assistant
coach David Vanterpool says.
TRIBUNE FILE PHOTO
“I’m sure he has expressed that Will Barton will enter his third season with the Trail Blazers this year hoping to be a regular contributor off
to everybody here.”
the bench for coach Terry Stotts.
Bold for a second-round
draft pick out of Memphis who
But Barton established him- shooting in 12 minutes of a hopes to become a player coach
averaged 4.0 points, 1.8 re- self as a key member of the ro- Game-2 loss, then poured in 17 Terry Stotts can count on to
bounds and 0.8 assists in the tation in the second round points in 30 minutes in Port- provide something every night
2014-15 regular season, then against San Antonio, averaging land’s only win of the series in off the bench.
“It’s all about opportunity,”
played one minute in the Blaz- 9.0 points in five games against Game 4.
As he looks toward his third
ers’ six-game first-round play- the eventual NBA champions.
off elimination of Houston.
He scored 13 points on 5-for-5 NBA season in 2014-15, Barton
See BARTON / Page 7
Thunder’s reach
Strong defense built
during practice lifts
Arena team on field
By STEPHEN ALEXANDER
The Tribune
In a game that is based on
offense, the Portland Thunder are close to making the
Arena Football League playoffs primarily on the strength
of their defense.
The Thunder (5-11) are
two games
ahead of
their fellow
AFL expansion team,
the Los Angeles KISS
(3-13), in the
PAIGE-MOSS
race to be
one of the
top four National Conference
teams — a finish that would
earn a trip to the postseason.
With two regular-season
games remaining, the KISS still
have hope, but Portland would
have to lose its last two games
and Los Angeles would have to
close with two victories (the
KISS have the tiebreaker).
Here are the key games to go:
“One stop can be deadly.
When you get two and
three stops, that’s when
you’re a championshipcaliber defense in any
league.”
— Donte Paige-Moss, Thunder linebacker
July 19 — San Antonio (1-15) at
Los Angeles; July 20 — Portland
at Arizona (14-2); July 26, the final day of the regular season
— L.A. at Jacksonville (6-9), and
Spokane (9-7) at Portland.
The Thunder have allowed
just 53.4 points per game, a
good stat by Arena standards.
The Portland team also has intercepted 29 passes and recovered 18 fumbles.
“We’re really flying around
looking to make things happen,” says defensive back Bryce
Peila, a 5-11, 205-pounder from
Western Oregon University.
Peila and his defensive teammates were strong out of the
gate this season, and they
haven’t let up, although he says
they aren’t satisfied.
“We continue to work every
day as a defense,” Peila says.
See THUNDER / Page 7

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