Wi-Fi GoGo E190 - Embraer Commercial Aviation

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Wi-Fi GoGo E190 - Embraer Commercial Aviation
We're
Growing Again!
EMBRAER
Leadership
Spotlight
In addition to the executive aircraft manufacturing
complex opened last year in Melbourne, Florida, that is now
producing our line of Phenom jets, the company will establish a
new Embraer Engineering and Technology Center.
Eric Christensen
It’s with great enthusiasm that I’ve
joined Embraer as the Vice President
of Marketing. I’m proud to lead the
marketing efforts in North America for
our successful family of E-Jets. I’ve been privileged to observe and
participate in the growth of the regional airline industry for the past
25 years while I served as Vice President at SkyWest Inc.
The US regional airline industry has definitely matured and has
become an important component of the national transportation system. Four corporate carrier groups now carry 70%
of all passengers.
The center with be a state-of-the-art 67,000 square foot facility
located adjacent to the Melbourne International Airport and across
from the Phenom assembly building. Construction is expected to be
completed in 2013.
Melbourne was selected because of its skilled labor force and proximity to the
Space Coast, home to Cape Canaveral and NASA’s recently concluded Space
Shuttle operations. The new center will employee 200 workers by the end of 2016
although 40 will likely be hired by the end of this year. Embraer plans to partner with
universities and other educational institutions locally and across the country.
The next 25 years should also
be interesting. Although many
regional carriers now face significant challenges, I’m confident
that the regional airline industry
will continue to play an important
role in the overall commercial
airline industry.
At Embraer, we are well
positioned to fulfill our operators’
requirements by offering a family
The Engineering and Technology Center will focus on research and development activities in the
of E-Jets with 70 to 122-seat capacity. Our
areas of aerospace products and technology. The first projects will cover interiors for executive
aircraft and support divisions have earned great
aircraft and will make use of a dedicated laboratory for the study and testing of materials.
reputations providing solutions that complement
This is the second research and development center that Embraer has established.
our operator fleets. Furthermore, we are committed
A similar facility in Minas Gerais, Brazil, was inaugurated last November.
to additional improvements, including significant
reductions in operating costs to ensure our continued
Embraer received the 2011 Impact Award from the Melbourne Regional Chamber of
leadership in our segment.
Commerce for the company’s contribution to the area’s economy. The award was
Please don’t hesitate to call upon us to help you in any way
possible. We are here to support you with all our resources.
given in recognition of Embraer’s investment in the community with the Phenom
factory and the Executive Jets Customer Center.
Eric Christensen
Vice President, Marketing
Commercial Aviation – North America
For information about pre-owned Embraer aircraft visit www.eccleasing.com
www.EmbraerCommercialAviation.com
For information about Embraer's Commercial aircraft,
please contact us at 954-359-3800 or email us at [email protected]
Journeys is produced by Embraer’s Marketing and Sales team. (Fort Lauderdale)
We welcome your comments and contributions. Please contact Jean Eastman - [email protected]
Other
Websites
that might
Interest You:
www.EmbraerDefenseSystems.com
www.EmbraerExecutiveJets.com
www.Ruleof70to110.com
www.EforEfficiency.com
www.paxfactor.com
www.eccLeasing.com
www.aeroneiva.com.br
www.Embraer.com
May 2012
News and Perspectives from Embraer North America
Wi-Fi is a
GoGo
on the
E190
The proximity of Dallas and
Houston to Mexico means that the
average flight time for most
transborder nonstops averages
about two hours. Even to cities in
the very south, like Huatulco, the
ERJs are flying 2.5 hours. The
combination of capacity and range
make the airplanes the ideal
equipment type for markets with
lower demand.
Linking
Mexico to
the World
Every day, some 70 nonstop
flights operated by United
Express, American Eagle and
AeroMexico Connect link hub
cities in Texas with secondary
points in Mexico. The
transborder frequencies connect
27 Mexican communities with the vast domestic and
international networks of the U.S. carriers at Dallas and
Houston. The aircraft that fly those routes are the
ERJ135, ERJ140 and ERJ145.
United Express serves 19 cities in Mexico from
Houston while American Eagle has scheduled
flights to nine destinations. AeroMexico Connect
flies its ERJ145s seasonally to Brownsville,
Miami and Los Angeles from three
secondary points. Collectively, the
ERJs of the three airlines carry
nearly 900,000 passengers
between the two countries
every year.
Although the majority of the United
Express flights are once daily, half of
American Eagle’s ERJ nonstops are double
and even triple daily. That high frequency
ensures passengers are not only able to
conduct same-day business in Texas or Mexico
without overnight hotel expenses, they can also
connect to several AA flight departure banks at DFW.
Network connectivity is a critical factor in scheduling.
Most outbound Mexico flights depart early in the morning
to access the greatest number
of markets at the AA and UA hubs
with the shortest possible online
connection times. Conversely,
most inbound Mexico flights arrive
at night to facilitate southbound
transfers in Texas. ERJ crews
remain overnight at the Mexican
destinations.
ERJs have been the mainstay of Texas-Mexico
transborder flights for nearly a decade but carriers have
been deploying E-Jets in a handful of markets. Both
Frontier Airlines and AeroMexico Connect have flown their
E190s seasonally between Durango, Monterrey,
Zihuatanejo and Los Cabos and Denver, Kansas City and
Chicago. The E190’s longer range capability
allows the airplanes to easily fly nonstop to
any point in Mexico from those U.S. cities.
Until demand increases, ERJs will
continue to be the aircraft
linking secondary points in
Mexico with Dallas,
Houston and the world.
Wi-Fi is a
GoGo
on the
E190
Passengers flying aboard Frontier
Airlines’ fleet of E190s are now
surfing the internet while cruising
at 37,000 ft. A paw print of Larry
the Lynx, Frontier’s “spokesanimal” and a “Wi-Fi On Board”
logo at the entrance to each aircraft tells
travelers that their E-Jet is equipped with
GoGo’s inflight wireless system.
On board entertainment systems are
not new to the E-Jets platform.
JetBlue Airways installed LiveTV™
and XM Satellite Radio™ on its
E190s when it started receiving them
seven years ago. Air Canada was the
first E-Jet operators to configure its
entire fleet of E175s and E190s with
audio and video-on-demand
programming and power ports at every
seat. Around the world, carriers are
installing Wi-Fi connectivity that use either
ground or satellite-based signals.
GoGo is the largest North American inflight
Wi-Fi service provider with 1,500 aircraft
using its technology. Of all internet-enabled
commercial aircraft on the continent, 87%
use GoGo connectivity including the
mainline fleets of American Airlines, United
Airlines, Virgin America, and Delta Air Lines.
The Wi-Fi set-up is relatively simple. GoGo
designed and built its own network of
transmission towers across the continent.
The principle of using your cell phone when
you are in motion on the ground was
adapted for aircraft applications. As an
E190 moves miles above the Earth,
onboard connections are relayed via
the closest transmission tower
selected to give the strongest
possible signal. Since there is no
structural interference between the
ground and an airplane, Wi-Fi links
are strong, continuous and reliable. The
tower signals are collected by a vaneshaped antenna on the fuselage, processed
by an onboard computer, distributed
wirelessly to each user and returned to
the tower.
As airlines
schedule their
E-Jets on everlonger sectors, in-flight entertainment and
Wi-Fi connectivity are becoming competitive
product advantages and sources of
ancillary revenue. Wi-Fi pricing varies by
carrier but most charge a fixed fee by
sector distance, flight time or even by
month. Later this year, JetBlue will begin
installing Wi-Fi on its fleet with satellitebased technology provided by ViaSat.
From the Desk of
Charlie Hillis
An Industry in Transition
As we approach the annual gathering
of our industry colleagues at the RAA
in Minneapolis, we are reminded that
despite the apparent strength of many of
the mainline carriers, the regional sector is
not sharing in the upturn. As the cost of
fuel increases and partner airlines redefine
their revenue sharing agreements,
regional operators are facing tough times.
Aircraft manufacturers, too, are adversely
affected by the volatility of the economy
and industry trends that impact the
viability of their airplanes and their
customers. Our business has always
been defined as one that is cyclical and
aligned with the strength of our economy.
But I would characterize our industry’s
current state as more in a transition than
a cycle. Regional aircraft are still vital
to the strength of a carrier’s network.
They provide the
connectivity on
which the economic
livelihoods of so many
communities depend
and the feed mainline airlines need.
For 37 years, the RAA has been a
welcome forum in which to discuss our
common interests. I’m hopeful that
members at this year’s assembly will
give visibility to the critical issues that we
all face and propose solutions that will
help us transition to a stronger regional
industry.
Charlie Hillis
Vice President, Sales & Marketing
Commercial Aviation, North America
The proximity of Dallas and
Houston to Mexico means that the
average flight time for most
transborder nonstops averages
about two hours. Even to cities in
the very south, like Huatulco, the
ERJs are flying 2.5 hours. The
combination of capacity and range
make the airplanes the ideal
equipment type for markets with
lower demand.
Linking
Mexico to
the World
Every day, some 70 nonstop
flights operated by United
Express, American Eagle and
AeroMexico Connect link hub
cities in Texas with secondary
points in Mexico. The
transborder frequencies connect
27 Mexican communities with the vast domestic and
international networks of the U.S. carriers at Dallas and
Houston. The aircraft that fly those routes are the
ERJ135, ERJ140 and ERJ145.
United Express serves 19 cities in Mexico from
Houston while American Eagle has scheduled
flights to nine destinations. AeroMexico Connect
flies its ERJ145s seasonally to Brownsville,
Miami and Los Angeles from three
secondary points. Collectively, the
ERJs of the three airlines carry
nearly 900,000 passengers
between the two countries
every year.
Although the majority of the United
Express flights are once daily, half of
American Eagle’s ERJ nonstops are double
and even triple daily. That high frequency
ensures passengers are not only able to
conduct same-day business in Texas or Mexico
without overnight hotel expenses, they can also
connect to several AA flight departure banks at DFW.
Network connectivity is a critical factor in scheduling.
Most outbound Mexico flights depart early in the morning
to access the greatest number
of markets at the AA and UA hubs
with the shortest possible online
connection times. Conversely,
most inbound Mexico flights arrive
at night to facilitate southbound
transfers in Texas. ERJ crews
remain overnight at the Mexican
destinations.
ERJs have been the mainstay of Texas-Mexico
transborder flights for nearly a decade but carriers have
been deploying E-Jets in a handful of markets. Both
Frontier Airlines and AeroMexico Connect have flown their
E190s seasonally between Durango, Monterrey,
Zihuatanejo and Los Cabos and Denver, Kansas City and
Chicago. The E190’s longer range capability
allows the airplanes to easily fly nonstop to
any point in Mexico from those U.S. cities.
Until demand increases, ERJs will
continue to be the aircraft
linking secondary points in
Mexico with Dallas,
Houston and the world.
Wi-Fi is a
GoGo
on the
E190
Passengers flying aboard Frontier
Airlines’ fleet of E190s are now
surfing the internet while cruising
at 37,000 ft. A paw print of Larry
the Lynx, Frontier’s “spokesanimal” and a “Wi-Fi On Board”
logo at the entrance to each aircraft tells
travelers that their E-Jet is equipped with
GoGo’s inflight wireless system.
On board entertainment systems are
not new to the E-Jets platform.
JetBlue Airways installed LiveTV™
and XM Satellite Radio™ on its
E190s when it started receiving them
seven years ago. Air Canada was the
first E-Jet operators to configure its
entire fleet of E175s and E190s with
audio and video-on-demand
programming and power ports at every
seat. Around the world, carriers are
installing Wi-Fi connectivity that use either
ground or satellite-based signals.
GoGo is the largest North American inflight
Wi-Fi service provider with 1,500 aircraft
using its technology. Of all internet-enabled
commercial aircraft on the continent, 87%
use GoGo connectivity including the
mainline fleets of American Airlines, United
Airlines, Virgin America, and Delta Air Lines.
The Wi-Fi set-up is relatively simple. GoGo
designed and built its own network of
transmission towers across the continent.
The principle of using your cell phone when
you are in motion on the ground was
adapted for aircraft applications. As an
E190 moves miles above the Earth,
onboard connections are relayed via
the closest transmission tower
selected to give the strongest
possible signal. Since there is no
structural interference between the
ground and an airplane, Wi-Fi links
are strong, continuous and reliable. The
tower signals are collected by a vaneshaped antenna on the fuselage, processed
by an onboard computer, distributed
wirelessly to each user and returned to
the tower.
As airlines
schedule their
E-Jets on everlonger sectors, in-flight entertainment and
Wi-Fi connectivity are becoming competitive
product advantages and sources of
ancillary revenue. Wi-Fi pricing varies by
carrier but most charge a fixed fee by
sector distance, flight time or even by
month. Later this year, JetBlue will begin
installing Wi-Fi on its fleet with satellitebased technology provided by ViaSat.
From the Desk of
Charlie Hillis
An Industry in Transition
As we approach the annual gathering
of our industry colleagues at the RAA
in Minneapolis, we are reminded that
despite the apparent strength of many of
the mainline carriers, the regional sector is
not sharing in the upturn. As the cost of
fuel increases and partner airlines redefine
their revenue sharing agreements,
regional operators are facing tough times.
Aircraft manufacturers, too, are adversely
affected by the volatility of the economy
and industry trends that impact the
viability of their airplanes and their
customers. Our business has always
been defined as one that is cyclical and
aligned with the strength of our economy.
But I would characterize our industry’s
current state as more in a transition than
a cycle. Regional aircraft are still vital
to the strength of a carrier’s network.
They provide the
connectivity on
which the economic
livelihoods of so many
communities depend
and the feed mainline airlines need.
For 37 years, the RAA has been a
welcome forum in which to discuss our
common interests. I’m hopeful that
members at this year’s assembly will
give visibility to the critical issues that we
all face and propose solutions that will
help us transition to a stronger regional
industry.
Charlie Hillis
Vice President, Sales & Marketing
Commercial Aviation, North America
We're
Growing Again!
EMBRAER
Leadership
Spotlight
In addition to the executive aircraft manufacturing
complex opened last year in Melbourne, Florida, that is now
producing our line of Phenom jets, the company will establish a
new Embraer Engineering and Technology Center.
Eric Christensen
It’s with great enthusiasm that I’ve
joined Embraer as the Vice President
of Marketing. I’m proud to lead the
marketing efforts in North America for
our successful family of E-Jets. I’ve been privileged to observe and
participate in the growth of the regional airline industry for the past
25 years while I served as Vice President at SkyWest Inc.
The US regional airline industry has definitely matured and has
become an important component of the national transportation system. Four corporate carrier groups now carry 70%
of all passengers.
The center with be a state-of-the-art 67,000 square foot facility
located adjacent to the Melbourne International Airport and across
from the Phenom assembly building. Construction is expected to be
completed in 2013.
Melbourne was selected because of its skilled labor force and proximity to the
Space Coast, home to Cape Canaveral and NASA’s recently concluded Space
Shuttle operations. The new center will employee 200 workers by the end of 2016
although 40 will likely be hired by the end of this year. Embraer plans to partner with
universities and other educational institutions locally and across the country.
The next 25 years should also
be interesting. Although many
regional carriers now face significant challenges, I’m confident
that the regional airline industry
will continue to play an important
role in the overall commercial
airline industry.
At Embraer, we are well
positioned to fulfill our operators’
requirements by offering a family
The Engineering and Technology Center will focus on research and development activities in the
of E-Jets with 70 to 122-seat capacity. Our
areas of aerospace products and technology. The first projects will cover interiors for executive
aircraft and support divisions have earned great
aircraft and will make use of a dedicated laboratory for the study and testing of materials.
reputations providing solutions that complement
This is the second research and development center that Embraer has established.
our operator fleets. Furthermore, we are committed
A similar facility in Minas Gerais, Brazil, was inaugurated last November.
to additional improvements, including significant
reductions in operating costs to ensure our continued
Embraer received the 2011 Impact Award from the Melbourne Regional Chamber of
leadership in our segment.
Commerce for the company’s contribution to the area’s economy. The award was
Please don’t hesitate to call upon us to help you in any way
possible. We are here to support you with all our resources.
given in recognition of Embraer’s investment in the community with the Phenom
factory and the Executive Jets Customer Center.
Eric Christensen
Vice President, Marketing
Commercial Aviation – North America
For information about pre-owned Embraer aircraft visit www.eccleasing.com
www.EmbraerCommercialAviation.com
For information about Embraer's Commercial aircraft,
please contact us at 954-359-3800 or email us at [email protected]
Journeys is produced by Embraer’s Marketing and Sales team. (Fort Lauderdale)
We welcome your comments and contributions. Please contact Jean Eastman - [email protected]
Other
Websites
that might
Interest You:
www.EmbraerDefenseSystems.com
www.EmbraerExecutiveJets.com
www.Ruleof70to110.com
www.EforEfficiency.com
www.paxfactor.com
www.eccLeasing.com
www.aeroneiva.com.br
www.Embraer.com
May 2012
News and Perspectives from Embraer North America
Wi-Fi is a
GoGo
on the
E190

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