AGRA`s Program for Africa`s Seed Systems (PASS):

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AGRA`s Program for Africa`s Seed Systems (PASS):
AGRA’s Program
for Africa’s Seed
Systems (PASS):
Strengthening Public
Crop Genetic
Improvement and
Private Input Supply
Across Africa
Evolution of Seed Systems Development, 2002-2014
1998-2002:
Period of enquiry; diagnostic surveys
2002-2005:
Testing of a model
2005-2006:
Raising funds for expansion
2007-2011:
PASS Phase I: Scaling up, implementation,
tweaking
2013-2017:
PASS Phase II: Validation, broad (continent-wide)
application
June, 2013:
Selected by the G8 group of countries to
coordinate a “Scaling Seed and Technologies”
initiative in six countries
PASS SEED VALUE CHAIN
COMMUNICATION & PARTNERSHIP
UPDATE
Commercialization
Research and Development
Production and Marketing
2014
Identify strongest univs.
Establish grant support
Identify breeding teams
Develop breeding strategy
Identify seed enterprises
Est. prod., market strategy
Identify service providers
Establish grant support
Recruit top-level fellows
Curriculum oversight
Thesis research oversight
Re-integrate students
Establish grant support
Breeding oversight
Link breeders to SC’s.
Assist commercialization
Establish grant support
Coordinate BDS training
Monitor prod’n, marketing
Link to investment funds
Oversee training
Oversee credit guarantee
Link AD’s to seed co’s
Create AD links to farmers
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First, though, some really good news…
Maize Production, Productivity in Uganda
Source: Uganda Bureau of Statistics
4 PASS Guiding Principals
Principal No. 1: “No Improved Seed, No Green Revolution”
Effect on Maize Yields Among Smallholder Farmers in Western Kenya
from Adoption of Improved Seed and Fertilizer, 1997-2007
1935
2000
1800
Kg Maize Grain per Ha
1600
1215
1271.25
1400
1200
838.125
1000
800
600
400
200
0
Local Variety,
No Fertilizer
Hybrid Variety,
No Fertilizer
Local Variety
Plus Fertilizer
Hybrid Variety
Plus Fertilizer
Principal No. 2: “Africa is Vast and Diverse. Strategies
for Crop Improvement and Seed Supply Must Embrace
this Reality”
•
•
•
•
Diverse agro-ecologies
A diversity of crops
Rain-fed systems
Segmented political
landscape
Principal No. 3: “We Need to Build a Private, African
Seed Industry.”
Principal No. 4: “Farmers Everywhere Want
and Need Improved Seed”
1935–2000: Yields
reach 9 mt/ha
Start of
adoption of
hybrid seed
1865–1935: Yields
stuck at 1.5 mt/ha
Maize Situation in Uganda
Source: Uganda Bureau of Statistics, FAOSTAT
Demonstrating the Benefits of Improved,
Adapted Varieties in Mali
On the left, a local land
race maize variety.
On the right, new,
hybrid maize
variety developed
by the Int’l. Maize and
Wheat Improvement Ctr.
Sotuba, Mali
September, 2008.
Benefits of Improved, Adapted
Sorghum Varieties in Mali
Left, a local land
race variety.
Right, new,
hybrid sorghum
variety developed
by l’Institut de
l’Economie Rurale.
Djalakoroba, Mali
October, 2009.
Improved
sorghum hybrid
in farmer’s field.
Burkina Faso,
October, 2009
Benefits of Improved, Adapted Rice
Varieties in Burkina Faso
In the
foreground,
local land race
of upland rice.
In the
background,
Nerica.
Benefits of Improved, Adapted Bean
Varieties in Rwanda
In the foreground, improved variety.
In the center, local bean
Benefits of Improved, Adapted Peanut
Varieties in Uganda
On the left, Improved
Variety From NARO
On the right, Farmer’s
Variety
Benefits of Hybrid Maize in Tanzania
On the left, CIMMYT
Hybrid
On the right, Farmer’s
Variety
AGRA/PASS – Results So Far
MSc. & PhD. Students Enrolled in Crop Science and Plant
Breeding
250
No. of Students Enrolled
230
201
200
175
150
138
139
122
92
100
74
50
109
80
56
42
26
0
5
2007
2008
2009
PhD Enrolled
2010
2011
MSc Enrolled
2012
2013
AGRA/PASS – Results So Far
MSc , PhD Crop Science & Plant Breeding Students
Graduated
180
No of Graduated Students
160
153
140
135
120
99
100
80
60
40
36
26
20
0
56
52
19
14
6 0
0
2007
2008
56
42
14
4
2009
PhD Graduated
2010
2011
MSc Graduated
2012
2013
2014
AGRA/PASS – Results So Far
Seed Production (MT), 2007-2013
90,000
81,454
80,000
Quantity of Seed (MT)
70,000
60,000
57,991.6
50,000
40,437.4
40,000
30,000
25,844.8
20,000
9,748.5
10,000
5,663.5
2,346.3
0
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012
2013
AGRA/PASS – Results So Far
Agro dealers trained and Certified (2007-2013)
16000
15,311
13,859
14000
14,098
12000
10000
9,339
8000
7,601
6000
4000
2,634
2000
331
0
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012
2013
AGRA/PASS – Results So Far
Seed production by Crop; 2012
Sunflower, 395.5, 1%
Groundnut, 875.4, 2%
Cowpea, 671.8, 1%
Millet, 1113.1, 2%
Others, 1209.2, 2%
Teff, 141.5, 0%
Sesame, 136.6, 0%
Pigeonpea, 122, 0%
Beans , 1734.5, 3%
Soya, 2842.2, 5%
Sorghum, 3256.1, 6%
Wheat: 5378, 9%
Rice: 9583.4, 17%
Maize: 29,773.6, 52%
AGRA/PASS – Results So Far
Seed Production by Country ,2013
Nigeria
24,246.5
Ethiopia
17,956.5
Uganda
14,300
Tanzania
7,863.5
Malawi
3,946
Burkina Faso
3,543.3
Kenya
2,993.4
Niger
1,349.2
Ghana
1,342.7
Mali
1,201.5
Mozambique
965.1
Zambia
706.4
Rwanda
627.3
South Sudan
244.7
Liberia
159
Sierra Leone
9.3
0
5000
10000
15000
Production (MT)
20000
25000
Breakdown of Certified Seed Production in Selected Countries
PASS Seed Systems Stages of Development
Stage 1
Stage 2
Stage 3
Stage 4
• No original
breeding
• No formal variety
release process
• No private seed
companies
• No/Very few agrodealers
• No outside seed
investors.
• Limited farmer
awareness of
improved seed
• Some original
breeding
• Few small/med.
seed companies
• Var. release
formalized
• Growing agro-dealer
network
• Evolving seed policy
environment
• Early stage outside
investors
• Strong breeding
systems
• Many small seed
companies
• Significant policy
issues, esp.
foundation seed
policies, preventing
further growth
• Outside investors
showing reluctance
• Robust breeding
pipeline
• Multiple stable seed
companies
• Strong interest from
outside investors
• Favorable seed
policies
• Hi farmer awareness
South Sudan
Liberia
Sierra Leone
Niger
Mozambique
Rwanda
Mali
Burkina Faso
Ghana
Ethiopia
Tanzania
Uganda
Zambia
Kenya
Malawi
5 Innovations That Made a Difference:
1. We transferred ownership of the inventive step to
local institutions
5 Innovations That Made a Difference:
2. We approached input supply for smallholder farmers
as a business
5 Innovations That Made a Difference:
3. We taught African seed companies how to produce
high quality, hybrid seed
5 Innovations That Made a Difference:
4. We made local farmers aware of improved seed
5 Innovations That Made a Difference:
5. We built seed marketing chains where farmers live
Current PASS Support and Future Initiatives
 Funded by:
 BMGF ($168 m)
 The Rockefeller Foundation ($50.9 m)
 USAID ($52.2 m)
 HGBF ($11.8 m)
 Dutch Govt. ($11.5 m)
 Korean Govt. ($0.7 m)
Total…………………….$295 m/7 years
 Future Program Prospects:
 Benin (GIZ)
 DRC (HGBF)
 Large-scale farmer awareness building initiative
 Foundation seed initiative using private sector
 Major push on improving seed policies
Thank You

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