R 2 0 1 2 - 2 0 1 3 - Scripps Institution of Oceanography

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R 2 0 1 2 - 2 0 1 3 - Scripps Institution of Oceanography
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Annual
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2 0 1 2 - 2 0 1 3
Scripps Logotype
Message from the Director
welcomed a new chancellor to UC San
Diego and conducted a successful search for its new director, Margaret Leinen. I am pleased to report Dr. Leinen
joined us on October 1, 2013.
IN THE PAST YEAR, SCRIPPS INSTITUTION OF OCEANOGRAPHY
During his six-year term, Scripps Emeritus Director Tony Haymet brought financial stability to the institution, allowing
needed investments in many important initiatives. For example, a year ago, UC San Diego launched the Scripps
marine biology undergraduate major. Enrollment in the wide-range of Scripps undergraduate offerings is growing
rapidly. Faculty size remains stable and seven new recruits across all the disciplines at Scripps joined in the past
year—making 48 new academic appointments since Tony began as director.
Despite growing fiscal restraint in research funding, Scripps-sponsored research remains steady at more than $150 million annually. Scientists at Scripps
successfully competed for funding from a range of federal, state, and local
agencies, foundations, and companies to support innovative research and
education. Scripps is grateful for continued philanthropic support to provide
seed funds, stability for our students, and needed infrastructure investments.
Construction continues
for the 2015 delivery of
R/V Sally Ride (AGOR 28),
an Ocean Class research
vessel funded by the
Office of Naval Research
and operated by Scripps as
part of the U.S. academic
research fleet.
Scripps actively participated in
campus-wide strategic planning
efforts. Several new initiatives, including the Center for Oceans and
Human Health and the Center for
Aerosol Impacts on Climate and
the Environment, attest to the importance of increasing cross-campus collaboration and interdisciplinary approaches to scientific problems.
In June, Scripps celebrated the opening of the Marine Ecosystem Sensing, Observation, and Modeling Laboratory,
whose construction was funded by the National Institute of Standards and Technology and UC San Diego. As
its name suggests, the building brings together collaborators at the interfaces of a range of disciplines and
consolidates expertise near the new NOAA Southwest Fisheries Science Center. The new Scripps research
vessel Sally Ride, funded by the Office of Naval Research, will be completed in 2015. These are among many
infrastructure improvements initiated during Tony’s directorship.
With great sadness, I note the passing of three of our esteemed scientists: Victor Anderson, Devendra Lal, and
Edward Frieman. They are sorely missed. In addition to his many other significant accomplishments, Ed Frieman
served as Scripps director from 1986-1996.
th
Finally, it has been a pleasure and an honor to serve as Scripps interim director during its 110 year, and I thank all
of Scripps and our friends for supporting me during this endeavor.
Interim Director
Scripps Institution of Oceanography
UC San Diego
C H A N C ELLO R K H OSL A L E A DS UC SA N D I EG O STRATEG I C PLANNING
DURING THE 2012-2013 YEAR,
Chancellor Pradeep K. Khosla led
a strategic planning process for
UC San Diego. “This process has
helped us to sharpen our mission to
be a student-centered, researchoriented, service-oriented public
university,” said Chancellor Khosla.
“Going forward, every decision we
make will be based on these eight
words.”
The strategic planning process began last November with town hall meetings, interviews, focus groups, and surveys, to gather input and ideas from
a wide range of campus and community members on what they envision
and want for UC San Diego’s future. Scripps Interim Director Cathy Constable and many Scripps academics, students, and staff participated in a
variety of planning activities. The information-gathering phase is complete,
and the Chancellor and the Executive Vice Chancellor have worked with
cabinet and council members to finalize a mission statement, overarching
values and goals for the campus, which can be viewed on the strategic
planning website: plan.ucsd.edu. That framework will lead to the first draft
of the strategic plan.
MARGARET LEINEN NAMED SCRIPPS OCEANOGRAPHY DIRECTOR
ON OCTOBER 1, 2013 ,
UC San Diego welcomed Margaret Leinen, Ph.D.,
as Vice Chancellor for Marine Sciences, Director of Scripps Institution of
Oceanography, and Dean of the School of Marine Sciences. Dr. Leinen
is a highly distinguished, award-winning oceanographer and an accomplished executive with extensive national and international experience in
ocean science, global climate and environmental issues, federal research
administration, and non-profit startups.
“Dr. Leinen’s experience leading innovation and creating collaborative programs make her the right choice for Scripps and a key campus partner in
implementing UC San Diego’s strategic plan,” said Chancellor Pradeep K.
Khosla. “Our strategic planning process has sharpened our mission to be
a student-centered, research-focused, service-oriented public university.
Scripps is one of UC San Diego’s pillars of excellence whose fundamentals
are extremely strong.” “I am honored to be chosen as Scripps Director and UC San Diego Vice
Chancellor,” said Dr. Leinen. “I am excited by the combination of Scripps’s
110 years of research and educational excellence and UC San Diego’s
culture of interdisciplinary innovation.”
Dr. Leinen replaces Tony Haymet, who served as UC San Diego Vice
Chancellor for Marine Sciences from 2006 until his retirement from the
administrative post at the end of 2012. Additional information and external comments can be found at
https://scripps.ucsd.edu/news/13104
[2]
75
SURF progr a m
SURF is a 10-week summer internship program at
Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UC San Diego, that
is part of the National Science Foundation-supported
Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU)
program. It encourages undergraduates – particularly
those from underserved communities who have shown
potential – to consider careers in oceanography, marine
biology, earth science, or related sciences. Besides
working in labs or performing field research with
scientists, undergraduates are briefed on how to apply
for graduate school and other practical knowledge they
would need to take the next step toward science careers.
YEARS
UNDERGRADUATE EDUCATION:
E X PA N S I O N A N D G R O W T H
UNDERGRADUATE EDUCATION AT SCRIPPS CONTINUES TO THRIVE.
The educational endeavor at Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UC San
Diego, continues to expand and successfully place graduates in a wide range
of leading-edge industries. Undergraduate education began on the Scripps
campus 75 years ago as part of an oceanography degree program through
UCLA. In 1964, Scripps added an undergraduate degree program in earth
sciences.
Undergraduate education at Scripps expanded with the roll out of a new
major in marine biology, which graduated the first student, Tsz Fung (Garfield)
Kwan in Spring 2013. The major joins the existing earth sciences major and a
minor in marine science as part of our undergraduate offerings.
The new major is growing and now has 143 students, 56 of them
incoming freshmen. Two of these are Robins Scholars, beneficiaries of a
scholarship named for Charles Robins, a longtime supporter of students
throughout UC San Diego. Robins Scholar Jeffrey Wilde said that he had
always loved the ocean, but decided on marine biology as a major after a
recent dive in Fiji. He was excited to learn about the new major offered by UC
San Diego given Scripps’s reputation.
“I anticipate the Robins scholarship benefitting me not just at UC San
Diego as an undergraduate, but also in the future, potentially making an
impact on the trajectory of my entire life,” Wilde said.
Graduate education at Scripps has also continued to flourish. From fall
2012 to summer 2013, Scripps conferred 25 doctorates. Many of these new
Ph.D.s have continued at Scripps as postdoctoral researchers, while several
others have launched careers in industry and government, working with
companies such as ExxonMobil, the office of Senator Edward J. Markey, the
Salk Institute, and Citizens Climate Lobby.
T h i s year, NSF s u p p orted 10 SU R F s tu d en t
fellowships, said Scripps academic coordinator Jane
Teranes. After receiving 450 applications, Scripps
researchers supported another nine fellowships using
other sources of funding for the 2013 edition of SURF.
Angelica Gilroy was looking for a paid internship in
2011 when she had a conversation with an academic
coordinator at Scripps Oceanography. By the end
of it, she wound up on a path to a career in physical
oceanography. Now she studies ocean heat transport in
Antarctica’s coastal waters with Scripps oceanographer
Sarah Gille as her adviser.
[3]
Photo: James Wilkinson
STATE-OF-THE-ART LABORATORY OPENS
Research in the new Marine Ecosystem Sensing,
Observation and Modeling (MESOM) laboratory
ranges from ecosystem dynamics, conservation, and
Scripps scientists currently
the formation of clouds to the chemistry and physics
engage in nearly 400 active
of ocean systems impacted by a changing climate.
The facility brings together Scripps scientists who are
research projects across the
building upon a long history of research on marine
globe. Last year, they successfully
ecosystems and their response to climate variability
competed for more than $150
and change. Researchers and engineers in the
million in sponsored research
new lab develop physical, biological, and chemical
encompassing physical, chemical,
sensors and autonomous oceanographic platforms.
biological, geological, and
They use observed and theoretical data to develop
geophysical studies of the oceans,
physical and biological models, forecasts, and other
products with an overarching goal of developing
atmosphere, and Earth. programs to provide the scientific foundation for
marine ecosystem forecasting. The building, co-
Research Highlights
IM PROVING HURRICANE FORECASTING
funded by the National Institute of Standards and
Technology, is on track to be the first LEED Platinum
lab building at UC San Diego.
With funding from the Hurricane Sandy Relief appropriations
bill, Scripps scientists are working to improve weather and hurricane forecasts. One project will improve
observations of the tropical ocean and atmosphere crucial to understanding and forecasting El NiñoSouthern Oscillation (ENSO) variability, including its impacts on North American extreme rainfall events,
droughts, and temperature. By augmenting the equatorial Pacific distribution of Argo floats (see “Measuring the Pulse of the Planet” on page 9) and gliders, the project will improve our understanding of the
evolving physical state of the tropical Pacific Ocean, reduce future operational costs of maintaining the
observatory, and provide real-time data to operational weather centers.
While scientists have made dramatic improvements in hurricane track forecasts, accurate intensity
forecasts are still problematic due to a lack of observational data. Current observational capabilities from
When Typhoon Bopha passed over the Palau Islands in the
space, coastal radar, ships, and sparsely distributed moorings, gliders, floats, and drifters are insufficient
Western Pacific in December of 2012, unmanned Scripps
to provide the necessary density of subsurface ocean and sea surface atmospheric observations (wind
and pressure). Another project will develop a modern generation of hurricane instruments for targeted,
real-time ocean observations, which will significantly improve the reliability of storm intensity predictions.
instruments (yellow dots on image) provided hourly reports of
wind speed, wind direction, visibility, air temperature, relative
humidity, barometric pressure, and rain accumulation, and
were the only meteorological observations made in this area.
These data were used by the NOAA National Weather Service
390
Mauna Loa CO2
380
+0.4
370
+0.3
360
+0.2
350
+0.1
340
0
Global-mean temperature
-0.1
-0.2
HIATUS IN RISING GLOBAL TEMPERATURES EXPLAINED
New research by Scripps climate scientists indicates
that cooler eastern Pacific Ocean waters tempered
the warming effect of increased atmospheric
330
greenhouse gases on worldwide temperatures.
320
From 1950-2000, global-mean temperatures rose
by 0.13º C per decade, but have since leveled
-0.3
off. Scripps scientist Yu Kosaka and Revelle Chair
-0.4
1980
1990
2000
2010
(Guam) and the DOD Joint Typhoon Warning Center (Honolulu)
during the storm. Image: Coastal Observing Research and
Development Center at Scripps, which developed and deployed
the instruments.
Scripps study contributed to the discussion of
the hiatus contained in the IPCC report, providing
evidence that it is temporary and does not affect the
long-term climate warming trend. Shang-Ping Xie concluded that natural variability
The paper “Recent global-warming hiatus tied to
in eastern Pacific Ocean cooling caused the
equatorial Pacific surface cooling” appeared in the
break in rising temperatures. The hiatus was a
August 2013 journal Nature. The National Science
contentious and widely publicized issue when the
Foundation, the National Basic Research Program
the atmosphere. The CO2 data are annual averages
Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC)
of China, and the NOAA Climate Program Office
from the Scripps-operated Mauna Loa Observatory.
recently released its Fifth Assessment Report. The
supported the research.
Observed CO2 levels and global-mean temperature
since 1970. Recent Scripps research proposes an
explanation for the leveling off of temperatures since
2000 despite the continuing rise of observed CO2 in
[4]
Statement of Activity
FY ‘11-’12
FY ‘12-’13
(expensed
this period)
R E VE N U E
FY ‘12-’13
(expensed
this period)
(awarded this period)
Sponsored Research
127,374,698 130,367,053 Federal Government
113,923,354 118,512,725 National Science Foundation
39,634,425 36,583,684 Department of the Navy
23,294,393 24,297,246 National Aeronautics and Space Administration
4,442,536 5,286,394 National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
18,638,019 20,218,378 Department of Energy
2,320,738 2,197,415 Other Department of Defense Agencies
787,292 834,220 Other Federal Departments
960,405 885,985 National Institutes of Health
2,632,117 3,727,384 Federal Flow-Thru
13,903,837 20,576,440 ARRA
7,039,279 3,657,454 ARRA Flow-Thru
270,313 248,126 State Government
7,206,585 6,891,705 Local Government
738,703 439,057 Private Contracts
3,980,900 4,261,071 UC Sponsored Research
1,525,155 262,495 University of California Support
35,876,295 38,008,092 State General Funds
20,271,710 Student Fee Funds
824,312 Benefits for UCSD FTE
5,469,573 6,230,148 1 Core Funds (includes $2M to cover OP tax)
31,777,944 Indirect Cost Recovery from prior year F&A (overhead)
9,310,700 Earned Revenue
10,156,268 11,011,985 Birch Aquarium at Scripps (BAS) 5,359,810 5,533,757 Recharge Unit Revenues 4,073,301 5,067,959 Intellectual Property & Royalty Income
49,511 37,774 Other Revenue
673,646 372,495 (mostly Scripps Forum, Martin Johnson House)
151,361,190
123,964,043
54,634,847
27,765,932
6,400,936
25,951,507
564,400
1,328,541
3,727,442
3,590,438
4,821,838
1,151,656
21,382,528
41,125
Private Giving
9,939,691 6,266,707 2 Private Gifts
7,727,716 4,088,782 FO O T N O T E S:
3 Private Grants
2,211,975 2,177,925 Interest Income
1,862,690 1,769,051 1 UCSD's budget model changed in FY 12-13. Gen Interest Income
274,453 15,662 eral Funds, Student Fees, and ICR are now considered
Core Funds. Endowment Yield
1,588,237 1,753,389 TOTAL REVENUE
185,209,642 187,422,888 2 $4.09M includes only gifts received and available
for spending in UC Regents funds in the current year.
Expenses
With bequests, pledges, contributions to endowment,
Research Programs - SEEK
156,455,809 165,332,576 and gifts booked with the UCSD Foundation, total SIO
Sponsored Research
123,480,999 134,044,379 Development fundraising was $9.32M in FY 12-13.
Ships
30,638,368 28,788,445 Oceanographic Collections
371,653 432,191 3 Private grants are typically restricted funds and con Contract & Grant Administration
835,685 869,000 sidered Sponsored Research; however, UCSD counts
Research Development & Planning
598,527 667,049 as Private Giving. Research Infrastructure & Support Units
530,577 531,514 4 Excludes funds transferred to UCSD Facilities DeInstruction Programs - TEACH
9,121,428 9,914,950 sign and Construction or Facilities Management and
spent by those units on SIO projects. FY 12-13 total
Outreach - COMMUNICATE
8,437,098 8,657,678 facility/capital improvement expenses paid by SIO were
Birch Aquarium at Scripps
7,053,368 6,953,233 appoximately $5.7M.
Communications (SIO share) & Web Group
537,335 586,619 Development (SIO share)
364,255 442,602 5 This statement does not reflect all annual expen Diversity
74,113 136,479 ditures associated with operating SIO. Services pro Special Events
47,577 74,013 vided by campus departments are captured in UCSD
Conference Facilities
360,450 464,732 financial reports, e.g., utilities, custodians, payroll,
(Forum debt service, staff, maintenance)
Institutional Support
4,908,051 SIO Administration
1,948,367 IT Services
553,810 4 Facilities Maintenance & Capital Improvements
2,405,875 OP tax on non-core expenditures
TOTAL EXPENSES 5
178,922,385 Net Carryforward/(Deficit) from Current Activities 6,287,257 5,248,815 2,247,421 651,350 1,815,044 535,000 189,154,020 (1,731,132)
central HR, general accounting, purchasing, business
contracts, central IT, transportation & parking, physical planning, community relations, real estate, deferred
maintenance, facilities management.
EX T R A MU R A L FUN D IN G
U.S. Department of Agriculture
U.S. Department of Commerce
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
National Institute of Standards and Technology
U.S. Department of Defense
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Air Force Office of Scientific Research
Miscellaneous Air Force Bases and Agencies
U.S. Department of Energy
U.S. Department of Interior
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
U.S. Geological Survey
Miscellaneous Agencies
U.S. Department of Navy
Office of Naval Research
Naval Postgraduate School
Miscellaneous Naval Agencies
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
[5]
National Aeronautics and Space Administration
National Institutes of Health/Department of Health and Human Services
National Science Foundation
California Bay-Delta Authority
California Coastal Commission
California Department of Boating and Waterways
California Department of Parks and Recreation
SOURCES OF REVENUE
CENSUS
FY 12/13
CALENDAR YEAR 2012
TOTAL: 2,239
TOTAL: $187.4M
Private Gifts & Grants
Interest Income
$6.27M
Earned Revenue
$1.77M
3%
$11.01M
1%
6%
University of California
Support
$38.02M
20%
Staff
874
Sponsored Research
Expenditures
$130.37M
70%
Volunteers
644
29%
(Includes 141 undergraduate
student staff)
39%
Professors
93
(Includes 10 Adjunct
Professors)
4%
Researchers and
Project Scientists
83
Graduate Students
243
(Includes 10 BS/MS students)
Other Academics
298
11%
(20 Project Scientists)
4%
(Includes 67 Emeritus, 58
Visiting Scholars, 102 Postdocs)
13%
Fellowships &
Student Support
$1.41M
15.1%
PRIVATE SUPPORT
AWARDS BY SPONSOR
FY 12/13
FY 12/13
TOTAL: $9.32M
TOTAL: $154.6M
Birch Aquarium Dept. Support
$0.11M
at Scripps
1.2%
$1.12M
12.0%
Instruction
$0.07M
0.7%
NASA
$6.40M
4.1%
Research
$5.07M
54.4%
NIH
$3.59M
2.3%
Department of
Defense
$29.09M
18.8%
Discretionary
$1.54M
16.5%
Private
$25.05M
16.2%
ConocoPhillips Company
The David and Lucile Packard Foundation
Electromagnetic Geoservices AS
Environmental Defense Fund
ExxonMobil Corporation
The Prince Albert II of Monaco Foundation
Fugro
Alaska Department of Fish and Game
Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation
Idemitsu Petroleum Norge
City of San Diego
Institut Català De Ciéncies Del Clima
The J.M. Kaplan Fund
Environment Canada
JX Nippon Oil and Gas Exploration Corporation
Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency
KMS Technologies
U.S.-Israel Binational Science Foundation
Life Sciences Research Foundation
National Geographic Society
Alaska Longline Fishermen’s Association
Neptune Minerals, Inc.
Alfred P. Sloan Foundation
Niko Asia Limited
BP Group
The Ocean Foundation
Chevron Corporation
Commonwealth Scientific & Industrial Orange County Sanitation District
PADI Foundation
Research Organisation
California Energy Commission
California State Coastal Conservancy
California State Lands Commission
San Francisco Bay Conservation and Development Commission
[6]
Other Federal*
$5.60M
3.6%
NOAA
$25.95M
16.8%
NSF
$53.18M
34.4%
* Includes ARRA funding
State
$5.77M
3.7%
Petrobras
Petroleum Geo-Services
PetroMarker
Repsol
Rock Solid Images
The San Diego Foundation
SeaWorld & Busch Gardens Conservation Fund
Seabed Geosolutions
Shell International Exploration
and Production Inc.
Southern California Coastal Water Research Project
Southern California Edison
Statoil
Total S.A.
UC MEXUS
University of the Free State
Waitt Foundation
WesternGeco
Woodside Energy, Ltd.
G iving Impacts
Laura Hamman Fain
Jenny Finkelstein
$1,000,000+
Peggy and Steve Fossett Foundation
Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation b Sidney E. Frank Foundation Gibbet Hill Foundation
$500,000-$999,999
Dinia and Lloyd. L. Green b
Miriam E. and Jerome S. Katzin b
Basil Hefni
Devendra Lal Trust
Hervey Family Fund at the
G. Unger Vetlesen Foundation b
San Diego Foundation
Linda and Nicholas Holland b
$250,000-$499,999 Hydrologic Research Center
Anonymous
Daphne and James D. Jameson b n ]
David DeLaCour*
The J. M. Kaplan Fund, Inc.
Christy and Edward Scripps, Jr. b
Sarah and Brian Keating ]
Waitt Family Foundation b
David Klipstein
$100,000-$249,999 Ernest Christian Klipstein Foundation
Laura and Bruce A. Lee
Anonymous The Adelaide and Charles Link Foundation
Jennifer and Gregory Alexander b
Cami Mattson
James Cameron b
Merlin Foundation
Conifer Capital Management, LLC b
George E. Muellner
Earthship Productions, Inc. b
The Pacific Life Foundation
Susan and Sheldon Engelhorn b n
PADI Foundation
Furlotti Family Foundation b
Thomas A. Page b n
Stuart Goode b ] v s
Kara and Adam Rhodes b
Cecil H. and Ida M. Green Foundation for
Susan and Bryce Rhodes b
Earth Sciences b
Emery W. Rhodes b
Estate of Craig A. Johnson b s
Winifred Rhodes b
Ellen Lehman and Charles F. Kennel b ] v
Glenda and Richard H. Rosenblatt b v
Allan and Jane Lehman Foundation
Ellen Browning Scripps Foundation b
at the recommendation of Ellen Lehman v
Margaret K. Scripps n
The Life Sciences Research Foundation b
Kathryn and William H. Scripps b n ] v
Mary Evans Lowe b
Robin M. Smith ]
Cynthia* and George P.* Mitchell b
The Charles H. Stout Foundation b
Betsy and B. Greg Mitchell b
The Edna
Bailey Sussman Fund b
The Prince Albert II of Monaco Foundation b
Andrew David Todd
Moore Family Foundation b
Union Bank of California Foundation b
Betty and Gordon Moore b
The Walton Family Foundation b
$50,000-$99,999
The Wells Fargo Foundation
Anonymous (2)
WWW Foundation and the Rhodes Families b
James Beyster b v
$5,000-$9,999
Stephen and Mary Birch Foundation b
Anonymous
Julia Richardson Brown Foundation b n
Eleanor and John Barbey, Jr. ]
Audrey S. Geisel b ] s
Carl A. Bergard b
The Estate of James B. Kinane
Brenda and Jeffrey R. Bohn
Leslie and Mac McQuown b ]
Constance and Lewis M. Branscomb
b
Miramar Fiduciary Corporation
Joyce and Paul Brooks b n ] v s
National Geographic Society
Coastal Community Foundation
Caroline and Nicolas Nierenberg b
Maryruth M. and Charles S. Cox v
Nierenberg Foundation
The Daphne Seybolt Culpeper
The Ocean Foundation
Memorial Foundation
The David and Lucile Packard Foundation b
Helen and Richard Elkus
Alfred P. Sloan Foundation b
Lorin Legrant and Howard Finkelstein ]
Diane and Joseph Steinberg b
Robert Lloyd Fisher
Linda D. and Stephen M. Strachan b n ]
Lynn M. Gaylord and Charles H. Gaylord, Jr.
Patricia and William Todd b ] s
Connie Golden
$10,000-$49,999
Robert M. Golden Foundation
Anonymous (2)
Jan and James W. Hawkins, Jr. v
Elaine P. Antoniuk b s
Cinda and Thomas O. Hicks b ]
Donna Ballard
Marcy C. and Jeffrey R. Krinsk ]
Currie C. and Thomas A. Barron
Vernie and John McGowan ]
Mary Ann Beyster ]
Kris and James L. McMillan ]
California Community Foundation
Mountain View Farms, LLC The Commerce Trust Company
Nexleaf Analytics
Cox Cares Foundation
Elizabeth and Morgan Dene Oliver b n j
Linnea B. and Paul K. Dayton ] Jeanne T. and Victor Orphan
Dow Agrosciences
& Jane
Susan Randerson and the Willis
Karen and Michael Drogin
Fletcher Family Fund ] v
Patty and Rick Elkus b n ] Paul C. Roads, Jr. b
Lynne and *Howard Robbins ]
PHILANTHROPIC SUPPORT
sup p o rtscrip p s. ucsd . ed u
SCRIPPS INSTITUTION OF OCEANOGRAPHY
at UC San
Diego continues to make groundbreaking discoveries that
inspire solutions to some of the greatest environmental
challenges we face today. A number of activities this year
reflect the extraordinary support and involvement of our family
of supporters. In June, more than 100 members of the Scripps
family gathered on the Ellen Browning Scripps Memorial Pier
for a rededication ceremony. Many Scripps family members are
actively involved in helping the institution be a global leader in
research and education. In addition, Scripps was pleased to present the 2013 Nierenberg
Prize for Science in the Public Interest to explorer and worldrenowned filmmaker James Cameron. The Hollywood icon
came to campus to receive the award, and in turn donated his
cash prize back to Scripps to be used for developing new deepocean technology.
Sadly, Scripps Professor Devendra Lal passed away last year;
however, his generous philanthropy will have a tremendous
impact for generations to come. Prof. Lal endowed both a
graduate fellowship and a fund for academic excellence at
Scripps – both of which represent the extraordinary generosity
and commitment that Prof. Lal exhibited throughout his lifetime.
Another remarkable faculty member, Jeffrey Graham, recently
passed away. Prof. Graham touched the lives of so many
throughout his distinguished career, and this was certainly
reflected in the creation of an endowed fellowship in his name.
Support for this fellowship came from many people, and was
generously matched by Ellen Lehman and Charles Kennel.
Every gift to Scripps makes a difference, and we are particularly
grateful for all the members of E.W. Scripps Associates, the
Friends of the Collections, Director’s Circle, Director’s Cabinet, and
Birch Aquarium at Scripps. Thanks so much for all you do, and we
look forward to welcoming you to campus in the near future. [7]
F
inancial Support
From July 1, 2012 to June 30, 2013
Every effort is taken to ensure accurate information.
If corrections are needed, please call the
Scripps Development Office at (858) 822-1865.
Samuel and Katherine French*
Bertha Lebus Charitable Trust
Mary Anne and Judd J. Brown ]
Daniel M. Smargon and Audrey M. Viterbi ]
Charles Scripps, Jr. ]
Ruth and Ronald Leonardi ]Linda Smith
Jillian and Brian Buchanan ]
Barbara and Sebastian Scripps ]
Michelle and William S. Lerach ] Carol and Stuart Smith v
Anna Marie and James L. Cairns b
SeaWorld and Busch Gardens
Jennifer D. and K. Alan Lonbom ]
Marilyn L. and John E. Cameron
Alice and Richard Snell ]
Conservation
Fund
Ellen and MatthewCarberry ] Donna Lucas ]
Nancy E. Snyder v s
Allie E. Tegner s
Joy and Ronald Mankoff ]s
Mary and Joseph Cech
Society for the Study of Evolution, Inc.
Mary Mei-ling Yang ]
H. H. Mansfield
Chenango Trust
Margaret M. and Clinton R. Spangler s
Joanne and Martin Marugg ] Barbara and Robert W. Starkey ]
Tsaihwa J. Chow Trust b
$2,500-$4,999
Barbara Maurais ] v s
Peter B. Clark ]
Cindy and Kevin E. Stephens
Anonymous (3)
Susan B. McAllister
CleanTECH San Diego ]
Ruth Stern and Morton Levy ] s
American Society of Pharmacognosy
Anne and Andy McCammon ] Ronald E. Stoner ]
Dana and Bay Cobb ]
Rita and Richard C. Atkinson
Susan Lee Waggener and
Nancy L. and Tracy D. Coker ]
Barbara and Sam Takahashi
The R.C. Baker Foundation
Steven C. McCracken ]
Gina
and Brian Conkle ]
Anne C. Taubman and David Boyle ]
Karen and Wolfgang Berger b v l
Carmen McKenna
Courtney Ann Coyle and Steven P. McDonald ]
TCSD Cares Inc.
Jui-Yuan
Chang
Joyce and Michael Critelli ]Adrian de P. McKibbin and
The T. Rowe Price Program for Charitable Giving
Lanna Cheng
b]s
Elizabeth de Bevec McKibbin ] Tierra Verde Resources Inc.
Luis A. Da Silva ]
Andrew Dempsey
Sabina Wallach and Kendall
Melville ]
Patricia and Dennis DeConcini Ann McGowan-Tuskes and Paul Tuskes ]
Horst Felbeck
v
Marilyn and Jordan Messersmith
Mary and George DeJong ]
Union Bank, N.A.
Arthur L. and Joan A. Funk Foundation
Mona Cacciari and Jeffrey Meyer ]
Maria and Luis Delgado ]
Hugh B. Vanderbilt, Jr.
William and Grace Graham
Barbara and Howard G. Milstein ]
William H. Disher ] v
Elizabeth L. Venrick b v s
in honor of Jeffrey Graham
Chuck Mitchell
Eloise S. and Russell E. Duff b ]
Cheryl and Donald Ward s
Nancy and William T. Hammond
Mary Coakley Munk and Walter H. Munk b ]
Andrew Engel and Maryanne Domm ]
Virginia and James Wells v
NigellaHillgarth ] l
Victor and Louise Engleman ] Theresa and Jeff Murdock ]James W. Wickes
IBM Corporation b
Eleanor
Musick and Abraham P. Ordover ]
Environmental Financial Products LLC
Peter H. Wiebe
Louise Keeling
Lucy A. Neale ]
The Evo and Ora DeConcini and
Diana F. and Robert J. Wilder n ]
Matthew A. Kirby and Karen Riffenburgh
Anne and Robert J. Nugent ]Pat and Donald Wilkie l
Thu Family Foundation
Maxine and Gary Kreitzer ]
Ralph O’Connor and Becky Gorham ]
Cody Festa
Diane Willian ]
Richard G. Lambert Foundation
Theresa and Timothy O’Rourke
Jane and Thompson Fetter ] l The Wilson
Sexton Foundation
Albert Leithold
Carol and Russell Penniman
b ] Elizabeth and Clinton D. Winant l
Diane and Elliot Feurerstein ]
Chana and Frank N. Mannen ]
Peters & Freedman, LLP
Edith L. Gallagher and Peter A. Fields
Karin Winner ]
Crystal McKellar
Frances and James F. Peterson ]
Deborah Reynolds and James S.Frank ]
Patricia W. Wong l
Morgan Stanley Smith Barney
Stacey and Joseph Phillips ]Cynthia York and David Wahl
Joy and Edward A.* Frieman, Ph.D. b ]
Global Impact Funding Trust
* Galinson, J.D. s
Una Marie Pierce ]
Elaine and Murray L.
Sybil and Herbert* York ] s
Arlene and Louis K. Navias ]
Brigit and Alan Pitcairn v
MaeAnn Garty b ]
May Zawaideh
Ginger and Charles Nelson ]
PNC InstitutionalInvestments
Jeffrey S. Gee
Bebe and Marvin Zigman ]
Lollie and William E. Nelson b n ]
Peggy and Peter G. Preuss b ] ZZYZX Foundation Inc.
Donna and Thomas Golich s
Janet and Clyde Ostler ]
Edith and Harold Greenberg ] R T. Vanderbilt Trust
Allison and Robert E. Price ]
Erica and Steven M. Ratner ]
Renita Greenberg ]
Nancy J. Robertson
and Mark Cookingham ]
Lawrence A. Ray and Julie A. Jackson-Ray
Tory and Rick Gulley n ]
L E G E ND
Charles Robins b ] l
James A. Raymond v
Karlene and Walter C. Gutjahr ] s
Samuel I. & John H. Fox Foundation
b Director’s Circle Member
Jacob C. Reinbolt ] Sally Ann Hagan
Schwab Fund for Charitable Giving
($100,000+ cumulative giving)
Robert W. Rex
Kathy and William K. Hagan
vAbeer
v
Betty Shor
Adrian and Efrosine Richards ]
and George Hage
n Director’s Cabinet Member
Jeanne B. Sleeper ] v s l
Pia Aip-Roach and Sean Roach ] (A select group of advisors who work
George Haligowski n ]
Irving Tragen b s
Jonathan Rosen
Frances B. and Thomas A. Harders ]
toward expanding awareness and
Woolley, Jr. ]
Ann and R.B.
Reuben and Sarah Rosen ]
Zandra Rhodes and Salah M. Hassanein b ] n
support of Scripps research, education,
Worldwide Small Change Foundation
Alison Fleming and Brock J. Rosenthal ]
Paula and George Hauer ]
and outreach programs)
Rachel York ]
Sandra and Robert A. Rosenthal ]
Judy Haxo ]
] E.W. Scripps Associates Member
Susan and Ronald J. Heller ] Sharon and Robert Rubin
$1,000-$2,499
($1,000+
annual unrestricted donation)
Dora Saikhon ]
Dyanne Hoffman s l
Anonymous (3)
San Diego Repertory Theatre
MarySusan Howard ]
v Friends of the Collections Member
Paula and Richard Abney ]
Candace and Kent A. Humber ] Richard Sandor ]
($1,000+ annual donation to Scripps
Marina Marrelli
and
Robert
J.
Anslow,
Jr.
]
Allan Sauter v
Kathryn Dickson and Gary Hunt
Oceanographic Collections)
Rebecca and Gregory Arnold ]
C. H. Friedman* and Lynn Schenk ]
Helene and Sam Iacobellis, Sr. ]
l
Ellen’s Circle Member
Christine
and Devron R. Averett ] Patricia Masters and Douglas Inman v
Nancy and William T. Schneider* ] v
($1,000+ annual donation to Birch
Megan Bailiff
n
]
Sarah Schulte
Patricia and Hart Isaacs, Jr. ] l
Aquarium at Scripps)
Gayle Barsamian and David Clapp ]
Scientific Computing International
Atsushi Ishimatsu
Judy and Roger
Benson ]
s York Society Member
Jocelyn A. and Charles B. Scott ]
Nora and Alan* Jaffe b ] v l
Jeff Berg ]
(Individuals that have generously included
Cindy J. Scripps and Jeff Wachs b ]
Bret Jorgensen and Susan Urquidi ]
John A. Berol ]
UC San Diego in their estate plans)
Mrs. Edward W. Scripps II b ]
Adrianus J. Kalmijn
Lois P. and Donald B. Betts ]
* Deceased
Amy and Keith Scripps ]
Kristin Kelly ]
LondaKay and Blaine W. Beyer
Theresa and Thomas O. Scripps ]
James B. Kenny III ]
NOTE: Anonymous represents generous gifts
Lois B. Biddle* s
Jean Johnson-Sexton and
Richard John Kerr
Wilson B. Sexton ]
from members of the Director’s Circle, Director’s
Albert Blum ]
Elizabeth N. Shapiro ] v s
Shirley and William S. Kimmich ]
Cabinet, E.W. Scripps Associates, York Society,
Marilyn and Charles Bohle ]
Carolyn S. and Richard C. Shell ] and various friends and supporters.
Faye and James D. Kitchel
Teresa Boley and Joseph D. Markee ]
Irene Shinsato ]
Steven Knappenberger ]
Nancy Bolyard
Molly and Edward T. Shonsey ] l
Paul Mueller and Clare Kristofco ]
Paula L. and Joseph Boudreau ]
Georgiana Doerr Simmons and
La Jolla Shores Surfing Association ]
Michele Braatz ]
Sharon and Joel Labovitz ]William Simmons ]
Warren and Elaine Breslow
Cindy and Fred Lawley
Family Foundation
[8]
Volunteer Dana Shultz and
Scripps technicians Dave Wolgast
and Megan Roadman prepare to
retrieve a CTD on the Summer
2013 California Cooperative
Oceanic Fisheries Investigations
(CalCOFI) cruise aboard the R/V
New Horizon.
MEASURING THE
PULSE OF THE PLANET:
DISCOVERING
SUSTAINING GLOBAL
LOCAL LEOPARD
AND REGIONAL
SHARKS AT
ENVIRONMENTAL
BIRCH AQUARIUM
OBSERVATIONS
AT SCRIPPS
Scripps researchers develop, install, and operate long-term global and
regional observing systems to monitor, study, and predict environmental
events. These observations improve our ability to understand and predict
environmental change, and increase our knowledge and understanding of
natural hazards such as earthquakes, volcanoes, tsunamis, storm waves,
floods, erosion, hurricanes, tornadoes, wildfires, and harmful algal blooms.
With the support of David
DeLaCour’s transformational
es t a t e g if t , t he aquarium
launched its Leopard Shark
Research & Conservation
Initiative, appointing Andy Nosal as the aquarium’s DeLaCour Fellow
for Ecology & Conservation. Nosal, who earned his Ph.D. from Scripps
Institution of Oceanography in Dec. 2012, specializes in shark ecology,
with a focus on La Jolla’s leopard sharks. As the DeLaCour Fellow, he will
spend three years working with Birch Aquarium staff to develop education
programs about sharks for the public.
To raise awareness about this initiative, Birch Aquarium opened
ElasmoBeach in the summer of 2013. Featuring a 13,000-gallon tank
that showcases sharks, rays, and other marine life that live close to our
shore, ElasmoBeach teaches visitors why sharks are critical to the ocean’s
health and why La Jolla Shores is so important to them. Scripps has a long history of initiating and maintaining long-term
environmental observing programs in the oceans, atmosphere, and on
land at regional to global scales. This legacy is perhaps best illustrated by
the well-known Keeling Curve CO2 record. These iconic measurements,
begun in 1958 by Scripps’s Charles David Keeling, comprise the longest
continuous record of CO2 concentrations in the Earth’s atmosphere.
In May 2013, concentrations of this greenhouse gas rose above 400
parts per million for sustained lengths of time throughout much of the
Northern Hemisphere for the first time in human history.
Another observing milestone reached this year was the millionth
ocean profile collected by the global array of robotic floats known as
Argo. Launched in 1998, Argo consists of a fleet of more than 3,600
free-drifting profiling floats communicating via satellite and deployed
throughout the world’s oceans. Argo is one of the primary sources of
data about the climatic state of the oceans, providing observations that
improve scientific understanding of air-sea interaction, ocean currents,
interannual variability, El Niño, mesoscale eddies, water mass properties
and transformation, and computations of global ocean heat content.
Argo data also drive computer models of the climate system, improving
our ability to forecast seasonal climate variations.
Through the Leopard Shark Research & Conservation Initiative, the
aquarium hopes to raise public awareness and appreciation of the local
leopard shark population as well as the Matlahuayl State Marine Reserve,
a protected area where the sharks congregate annually. The story of the
leopard shark and its relatives is an important one—a story the aquarium
is communicating with Nosal’s help, made
possible through the vision and generosity
of David DeLaCour.
[9]
one of the
largest academic
research fleets
in the world.
FOR MORE THAN A CENTURY, SCRIPPS
has served as a pioneering innovator in
the scientific exploration of the oceans. Today, Scripps research vessels
are seagoing laboratories with state-of-the-art sensing systems and
instruments that support a wide range of global ocean-going science,
including studies of the deep sea, marine life, climate change, ocean
circulation, and seafloor processes.
Thousands of scientists, students, engineers, and explorers use Scripps
research vessels every year. About half of these scientists are from Scripps
and other University of California campuses, and the remainder are
affiliated with other U.S. academic institutions, government laboratories,
international collaborators, and K-12 schools. Crewed by dedicated
women and men who are recognized globally for their skill in the demanding
field of scientific ship operations, Scripps research vessels are adept at a
broad range of missions, from intensive day trips off the California coast
for student instruction to sustained overseas deployments involving
back-to-back projects each lasting a month or more.
Signal achievements in 2012-2013 included the discovery and
exploration of submarine methane springs offshore San Diego using
the Scripps Remotely Operated Vehicle Trident aboard R/V Melville, the
installation and evaluation of a $1.2M “robot arm” funded by the National
Science Foundation aboard R/V Roger Revelle to improve the safety and
reliability of CTD deployments in all weather conditions, a successful
NSF-sponsored program aboard R/V New Horizon to teach graduate
students skills required for success as future chief scientists, and a series
of major mooring and towed-instrument programs aboard R/V Robert
Gordon Sproul that have proven it to be “The Little Ship That Could.”
[ 10.]
The Scripps Fleet
Scripps operates
SCRIPPS SHIP TRACKS
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Scripps Institution of Oceanography Cruises 2008-2012
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140˚E
160˚E
R/V Melville
180˚
160˚W
140˚W
R/V New Horizon
120˚W
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80˚W
60˚W
40˚W
R/V Roger Revelle
SCRIPPS RESEARCH VESSELS RANGE WORLDWIDE
20˚W
0˚
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R/V Robert Gordon Sproul
to provide our
researchers with state-of-the-art observational capabilities across the
global ocean. Over the past five years our Global Class ships (R/V Roger
Revelle and R/V Melville) have conducted extended operations across
the remote Pacific, Indian, and Atlantic oceans. Our Intermediate Class
vessel (R/V New Horizon) has focused on the eastern Pacific, including
important work in the Gulf of Alaska, the Gulf of California, and in the
California Current. R/V Robert Gordon Sproul, our Regional Class vessel,
has served our local needs from the Southern California Bight to Northern
California. During this period, Scripps-operated ships completed 275
separate research missions, carrying to sea 4,162 scientists, students,
engineers, and explorers from 308 different institutions.
Scripps Logotype
Phone: 858-534-3624 Email: [email protected]
Web: scripps.ucsd.edu Facebook: facebook.com/scrippsocean Twitter: @Scripps_Ocean and @Explorations
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