Kellogg Company

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Kellogg Company
Kellogg Company
One Kellogg Square
Battle Creek, Michigan 49016-3599
Prospectus for the employees of the European Economic Area (“EEA”)
(direct or indirect) subsidiaries of Kellogg Company in relation to equity
incentive plans relating to Kellogg Company shares
Pursuant to Article 23 of the Law of June 16, 2006 on the public offerings of securities and the
admission to trading of securities on a regulated market, the Belgian Financial Services and
Markets Authority has approved this prospectus on March 22, 2016. This prospectus was
established by the issuer and the issuer is responsible for this prospectus. The prospectus has
been approved in connection with the operations proposed to the investors. The approval
represents neither an assessment of the transaction’s opportunity or quality nor the
authentication of the financial and accounting information presented or more generally the
issuer’s position, by the Belgian Financial Services and Markets Authority.
This prospectus will be made available to the respective employees of the (direct or indirect)
subsidiaries of Kellogg Company located in the EEA jurisdictions in which offerings under the
respective equity incentive plans are considered public offerings. At the time of approval of this
prospectus, these jurisdictions are Belgium, Ireland, and the United Kingdom. This prospectus will be
made available on the intranet of Kellogg Company and free paper copies will be available to the
employees upon request by contacting the Human Resources Departments of their employers. For
participants to the Belgian Plan, this prospectus will also be made available on the respective plan
website at Computershare, the current stock plan administrator of the Belgian Plan. For participants to
the UK Plan and for participants to the Irish Plan, this prospectus will also be made available on the
respective plan website at Capita, the current stock plan administrator of both the UK Plan and the
Irish Plan.
An investment in the shares as described in this prospectus is subject to risks. An investor faces the
risk of losing a part or all of his invested capital. Before participating in the equity incentive plans of
Kellogg Company, prospective investors should carefully read the entire prospectus, containing a
description of the offer and the risk factors, with special attention to the risk factors (see Part I
(Summary), p. 6 to p. 18 and Part II (Risk Factors), p. 19). Their decision should solely be based on
the information contained in the prospectus.
Note to the prospectus
This prospectus was established in accordance with the principles laid down in the Belgian Law of
June 16, 2006 on the public offerings of securities and the admission to trading of securities on a
regulated market, in Directive 2003/71/EC of November 4, 2003, as amended, and in the Commission
Regulation 809/2004 of April 29, 2004, as amended.
This prospectus contains, among other things, a summary conveying the essential characteristics of,
and risks associated with, the issuer and the offered securities. More detailed information concerning
the issuer and the securities to be offered is reflected in the exhibits attached to this prospectus. The
documents referred to in the relevant chapters are attached as annexes to this prospectus.
Kellogg Company
Equity incentive plans
EU Prospectus
Dated: March 22, 2016
2
Company responsible for the prospectus
The responsibility for this prospectus is assumed by Kellogg Company, a company incorporated and
existing under the laws of the State of Delaware, U.S.A., with its principal executive offices at One
Kellogg Square, Battle Creek, Michigan 49016-3599, U.S.A., represented by its Board of Directors.
Kellogg Company ensures, having taken all reasonable care, that the information contained in this
prospectus is, to the best of its knowledge, in accordance with the facts and that the prospectus does
not contain omissions likely to affect the import of this prospectus.
Kellogg Company
Equity incentive plans
EU Prospectus
Dated: March 22, 2016
3
TABLE OF CONTENTS
I. SUMMARY.......................................................................................................................... 6
SECTION A — INTRODUCTION AND WARNINGS ............................................... 6
SECTION B — ISSUER ................................................................................................ 7
SECTION C — SECURITIES..................................................................................... 10
SECTION D — RISKS................................................................................................. 10
SECTION E — OFFER ............................................................................................... 13
II. RISK FACTORS ............................................................................................................... 19
III. INFORMATION ON THE OFFER AND DILUTION RESULTING
THEREFROM ........................................................................................................... 19
A. INFORMATION CONCERNING THE OFFER ...................................................... 19
A.1. Description of the offer ................................................................................ 19
A.2 Use of proceeds ............................................................................................ 29
A.3 Costs related to the sale of Shares................................................................ 30
B. MAXIMUM DILUTION ........................................................................................... 31
IV. KEY INFORMATION ON THE COMPANY’S FINANCIAL CONDITION,
CAPITALIZATION AND INDEBTEDNESS, WORKING CAPITAL AND
RISK FACTORS ....................................................................................................... 32
A. STATUTORY AUDITORS ...................................................................................... 32
B. SHARE CAPITAL .................................................................................................... 32
C. KEY FINANCIAL DATA ........................................................................................ 33
V. INFORMATION ON THE COMPANY .......................................................................... 36
A. COMPANY HISTORY AND ACTIVITIES ............................................................. 36
B. PARTICULAR PROVISIONS OF THE BYLAWS.................................................. 37
C. BOARD OF DIRECTORS (AS PER FEBRUARY 24, 2016) .................................. 37
D. EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE AND OTHER EXECUTIVE OFFICERS (AS
PER FEBRUARY 24, 2016)............................................................................... 37
VI. OPERATING AND FINANCIAL REVIEW AND PROSPECTS ................................. 38
VII. DIRECTORS, SENIOR MANAGEMENT AND EMPLOYEES ................................. 38
VIII. MAJOR SHAREHOLDERS AND RELATED PARTY TRANSACTIONS .............. 38
IX. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ................................................................................... 38
Kellogg Company
Equity incentive plans
EU Prospectus
Dated: March 22, 2016
4
LIST OF EXHIBITS
EXHIBIT I
KELLOGG COMPANY SUB-PLAN TO THE 2013 LONG-TERM INCENTIVE PLAN
FOR PARTICIPANTS IN BELGIUM, AND THE KELLOGG COMPANY 2013 LONGTERM INCENTIVE PLAN
EXHIBIT II
KELLOGG UK SHARE INCENTIVE PLAN
EXHIBIT III
KELLOGG (IRELAND) EMPLOYEE SHARE OWNERSHIP PLAN
EXHIBIT IV
ANNUAL REPORT ON FORM 10-K
FILED BY KELLOGG COMPANY ON FEBRUARY 24, 2016
EXHIBIT V
DEFINITIVE PROXY STATEMENT ON FORM DEF 14A
FILED BY KELLOGG COMPANY ON MARCH 10, 2016
EXHIBIT VI
TAX AND SOCIAL SECURITY CONSEQUENCES OF PARTICIPATION IN THE
KELLOGG COMPANY SUB-PLAN TO THE 2013 LONG-TERM INCENTIVE PLAN
FOR PARTICIPANTS IN BELGIUM, THE KELLOGG UK SHARE INCENTIVE PLAN
FOR PARTICIPANTS IN THE UK AND THE KELLOGG (IRELAND) EMPLOYEE
SHARE OWNERSHIP PLAN FOR PARTICIPANTS IN IRELAND.
Kellogg Company
Equity incentive plans
EU Prospectus
Dated: March 22, 2016
5
I. Summary
Summaries are made up of disclosure requirements known as "Elements." These Elements are
numbered in Sections A – E (A.1 – E.7).
This summary contains all the Elements required to be included in a summary for this type of
securities and Issuer. Because some Elements are not required to be addressed, there may be gaps in
the numbering sequence of the Elements.
Even though an Element may be required to be inserted in the summary because of the type of
securities and Issuer, it is possible that no relevant information can be given regarding the Element. In
this case a short description of the Element is included in the summary with the mention of "not
applicable."
SECTION A — INTRODUCTION AND WARNINGS
A.1
Warning to the
reader
Kellogg Company
Equity incentive plans
EU Prospectus
Dated: March 22, 2016
This summary should be read as an introduction to the prospectus.
Any decision to invest in the securities should be based on
consideration of the prospectus as a whole by the investor. Where a
claim relating to the information contained in the prospectus is
brought before a court, the plaintiff investor might, under the
national legislation of the Member States of the European Union or
States party to the European Economic Area Agreement, have to
bear the costs of translating the prospectus before the legal
proceedings are initiated. Civil liability attaches to those persons
who have presented the summary including any translation thereof,
and applied for its notification, but only if the summary is
misleading, inaccurate or inconsistent when read together with the
other parts of the prospectus or it does not provide, when read
together with the other parts of the prospectus, key information in
order to aid investors when considering whether to invest in such
securities.
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SECTION B — ISSUER
B.1
Legal and
commercial name of
the issuer
Kellogg Company (the “Company” or “Kellogg”) or, as the case may
be, one of its subsidiaries.
B.2
Domicile and legal
form of Kellogg, the
legislation under
which the issuer
operates and its
country of
incorporation
Kellogg Company is a corporation incorporated under the laws of the
State of Delaware, U.S.A., with its principle executive offices at One
Kellogg Square, Battle Creek, Michigan 49016-3599, United States of
America.
B.3
Description of the nature of Kellogg's current operations and its principal activities
Kellogg is the world’s leading producer of cereal, second largest producer of cookies and crackers, and a
leading producer of savory snacks and frozen foods. Additional product offerings include toaster
pastries, cereal bars, fruit-flavored snacks and veggie foods. Kellogg products are manufactured and
marketed globally.
B.4a
Recent trends
During 2013 Kellogg announced Project K, a four-year efficiency and
effectiveness program. The program is expected to generate a
significant amount of savings, once all phases are approved and
implemented, that will be invested in key strategic areas of focus for the
business. Kellogg expects that this investment will drive future growth
in revenues, gross margin, operating profit, and cash flow.
B.5
Organizational
structure
Kellogg is the parent company of the Kellogg group. Kellogg holds,
directly or indirectly, the capital and voting rights of each of its
subsidiaries.
B.6
Interests in
Kellogg's capital
Not applicable. Pursuant to its Q&A, ESMA considers that Item 18 of
Annex I of the Commission Regulation 809/2004 of April 29, 2004 (the
"Prospectus Regulation") is generally not pertinent for offers of shares
to employees and can thus be omitted from the prospectus in
accordance with Article 23.4 of the Prospectus Regulation.
B.7
Financial information concerning Kellogg for the fiscal years ended January 2, 2016,
January 3, 2015 and December 28, 2013
Kellogg Company
Equity incentive plans
EU Prospectus
Dated: March 22, 2016
7
Kellogg Company and Subsidiaries
Selected Financial Data
2015
(millions, except per share data and number of employees)
2014
2013
Operating trends
Net sales (a)
$
Gross profit as a % of net sales (a)
13,525
$
14,580
$
14,792
34.6%
34.7%
41.3%
526
494
523
8
9
9
898
1,094
1,131
193
199
199
1,091
1,024
2,837
Depreciation
Amortization
Advertising expense (b)
Research and development expense
Operating profit (a)
Operating profit as a % of net sales (a)
8.1%
7.0%
19.2%
227
209
235
614
632
1,807
354
358
363
356
360
365
1.74
1.76
4.98
1.72
1.75
4.94
Interest expense
Net income attributable to Kellogg Company (a)
Average shares outstanding:
Basic
Diluted
Per share amounts:
Basic
Diluted (a)
Cash flow trends
Net cash provided by operating activities
$
1,691
$
1,793
$
1,807
Capital expenditures
553
582
637
1,138
1,211
1,170
Net cash provided by operating activities reduced by capital expenditures (c)
Net cash used in investing activities
Net cash provided by (used in) financing activities
(1,127)
(573)
(641)
(706)
(1,063)
(1,141)
Interest coverage ratio (d)
6.8
7.3
14.3
Capital structure trends
Total assets
$
15,265
$
15,153
$
15,474
Property, net
3,621
3,769
3,856
2,470
1,435
1,028
Short-term debt and current maturities of long-term debt
Kellogg Company
Equity incentive plans
EU Prospectus
Dated: March 22, 2016
8
Long-term debt
5,289
5,935
6,330
2,128
2,789
3,545
$61-74
$57-69
$55-68
1.98
1.90
1.80
33,577
29,818
30,277
Total Kellogg Company equity
Share price trends
Stock price range
Cash dividends per common share
Number of employees
(a)
Non-GAAP currency-neutral comparable definitions of these metrics are reconciled to the directly comparable measure
in accordance with U.S. GAAP within the Management’s Discussion and Analysis of the Company’s Annual Report on
Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended January 2, 2016 (Exhibit IV). The Company believes the use of such non-GAAP
measures provides increased transparency and assists in understanding the Company's underlying operating
performance.
(b)
Advertising and consumer promotions are included in total brand-building, a measure that the Company uses to
determine the level of investment it makes to support the Company's brands. Advertising has declined in 2015 as a
result of foreign currency translation as well as the implementation of efficiency and effectiveness programs including a
shift in investments to non-advertising consumer promotion programs. Total brand-building investment has declined in
2015 approximately 50 basis points as a percentage of net sales. The Company's brand building is down including
shifts of investment into other areas such as food, the evolving shift in media investment from TV to digital, and
efficiency and effectiveness benefits. The Company's zero-based budgeting initiative may identify additional efficiency
and effectiveness opportunities in brand building as it proceeds through 2016. The Company may choose to reinvest
these savings back into brand building or other areas such as food reformulation or capacity to drive revenue growth.
The Company remains committed to invest in its brands at an industry-leading level to maintain the strength of its many
recognizable brands in the marketplace.
(c)
The Company uses this non-GAAP financial measure, which is reconciled above, to focus management and investors
on the amount of cash available for debt repayment, dividend distribution, acquisition opportunities, and share
repurchase.
(d)
Interest coverage ratio is calculated based on net income attributable to the Company before interest expense, income
taxes, depreciation and amortization, divided by interest expense.
B.8
Pro forma financial
information
Not applicable. There are no significant gross changes as defined in
Item 20.2 of Annex I of the Prospectus Regulation.
B.9
Profit forecast
Not applicable. This prospectus does not contain any profit forecast.
B.10
Qualifications in
the audit report on
the historical
financial
information
Not applicable. There are no qualifications in the auditors' report.
B.11
Working capital
statement
Not applicable. Kellogg's working capital is sufficient for its present
requirements.
Kellogg Company
Equity incentive plans
EU Prospectus
Dated: March 22, 2016
9
SECTION C — SECURITIES
C.1
Type and class of the
securities being
offered, including
the security
identification code
The shares of Kellogg having a par value of US$ 0.25 per share (the
“Shares”) offered pursuant to this prospectus can be either authorized
but unissued Shares or treasury Shares, and are or will be, after their
issuance, listed on the New York Stock Exchange (the "NYSE"). The
ticker symbol for the Shares is “K”. The ISIN Code of the Company’s
Shares is US4878361082.
C.2
Currency of the
securities issue
The United States Dollar is the currency of the securities issue.
C.3
Number of shares
issued
As of January 29, 2016, 350,257,015 Shares were issued and
outstanding.
C.4
Rights attached to
the securities
Once the Shares acquired under the offer are issued, an employee
participating in the offer will have the rights of a normal shareholder,
including dividend and voting rights.
C.5
Transferability
restrictions
The Shares in this offering may be subject to certain transferability
restrictions as set out in Element E.3 below.
C.6
Admission to
trading on a
regulated market
As noted in Element C.1 above, the Shares are listed on the NYSE.
C.7
Dividend policy
Kellogg paid quarterly dividends to shareholders totalling US$1.98 per
share in 2015, US$1.90 per Share in 2014 and US$1.80 per Share in
2013. Total cash paid for dividends increased by 3.0% in 2015 and
4.0% in 2014. In February 2016, the board of directors declared a
dividend of $.50 per Share, payable on March 15, 2016 to shareholders
of record at the close of business on March 1, 2016.
SECTION D — RISKS
D.1
Key risks related to
the Company or its
industry
Kellogg Company
Equity incentive plans
EU Prospectus
Dated: March 22, 2016
The risks related to the Company's business can be summarized as
follows:

The Company may not realize the benefits that it expects from
its global four-year efficiency and effectiveness program
(Project K);

The Company may not realize the benefits it expects from the
adoption of zero-based budgeting;

The Company's results may be materially and adversely
10
impacted as a result of increases in the price of raw materials,
including agricultural commodities, fuel and labor;
Kellogg Company
Equity incentive plans
EU Prospectus
Dated: March 22, 2016

A shortage in the labor pool, failure to successfully negotiate
collectively bargained agreements, or other general inflationary
pressures or changes in applicable laws and regulations could
increase labor cost, which could have a material adverse effect
on the Company's consolidated operating results or financial
condition;

Multiemployer Pension Plans could adversely affect the
Company's business;

The Company operates in the highly competitive food industry;

The Company may be unable to maintain its profit margins in
the face of a consolidating retail environment. In addition, the
loss of one of its largest customers could negatively impact its
sales and profits;

The Company's results may be negatively impacted if consumers
do not maintain their favorable perception of its brands;

Tax matters, including changes in tax rates, disagreements with
taxing authorities and imposition of new taxes could impact the
Company's results of operations and financial condition;

If the Company's food products become adulterated, misbranded
or mislabeled, it might need to recall those items and may
experience product liability if consumers are injured as a result;

Unanticipated business disruptions could have an adverse effect
on the Company's business, financial condition and results of
operations;

Evolving tax, environmental, food quality and safety or other
regulations or failure to comply with existing licensing, labeling,
trade, food quality and safety and other regulations and laws
could have a material adverse effect on the Company's
consolidated financial condition;

The Company's operations face significant foreign currency
exchange rate exposure and currency restrictions which could
negatively impact its operating results;

If the Company pursues strategic acquisitions, alliances,
divestitures or joint ventures, it may not be able to successfully
consummate favorable transactions or successfully integrate
11
acquired businesses;
D.3
Key risks related to
Kellogg Company
Equity incentive plans
EU Prospectus
Dated: March 22, 2016

Potential liabilities and costs from litigation could adversely
affect the Company's business;

The Company's consolidated financial results and demand for its
products are dependent on the successful development of new
products and processes;

The Company's postretirement benefit-related costs and funding
requirements could increase as a result of volatility in the
financial markets, changes in interest rates and actuarial
assumptions;

The Company has a substantial amount of indebtedness;

The Company's performance is affected by general economic
and political conditions and taxation policies;

An impairment of the carrying value of goodwill or other
acquired intangibles could negatively affect the Company's
consolidated operating results and net worth;

The Company must leverage its brand value to compete against
retailer brands;

The Company may not achieve its targeted cost savings and
efficiencies from cost reduction initiatives;

Technology failures could disrupt the Company's operations and
negatively impact its business;

The Company's intellectual property rights are valuable, and any
inability to protect them could reduce the value of its products
and brands;

The Company is subject to risks generally associated with
companies that operate globally;

The Company's operations in certain emerging markets expose it
to political, economic and regulatory risks;

Adverse changes in the global climate or extreme weather
conditions could adversely affect the Company's business or
operations.
The risks related to the participation itself in The Kellogg Company SubPlan to the 2013 Long-Term Incentive Plan for Participants in Belgium
12
the Shares
(the “Belgian Plan”), The Kellogg UK Share Incentive Plan (the “UK
Plan”), and The Kellogg (Ireland) Employee Share Ownership Plan (the
“Irish Plan”), together referred to as the "Plans", can be summarized as
follows:

Participation in the Plans is subject to the same risks as inherent
to any investment in shares (such as a change of the stock
exchange price of the shares) and a participant in the Plans
therefore potentially faces the risk of losing a part or all of his
invested capital.

Participation in the Plans is subject to a currency risk (e.g.,
US$/EUR or US$/Sterling pound) that could adversely affect the
value derived from the participation in the Plans.

The possible tax and/or social security consequences of the
participation in the Plans could adversely affect the value
derived from the participation in the Plans.

Under the Plans, there may be certain restrictions with respect to
the withdrawal of shares, which may lead to a certain restriction
on the liquidity thereof.
SECTION E — OFFER
E.1
Net proceeds and
expenses
Taking into account the total eligible compensation of the eligible
employees under the Plans and the features of the Plans, the maximum
total annual amount of proceeds would be approximately EUR 5.9
million (US$ 6.5 million). The Company has incurred legal costs of
approximately US$ 35,000 to implement this prospectus in order to
offer securities under the Plans to eligible employees of its subsidiaries
in the European Economic Area.
E.2a
Reasons for the
offer
The purpose of the Belgian Plan is to provide an opportunity for the
eligible employees of certain of the Company’s Belgian subsidiaries
and affiliates to purchase Shares through payroll deductions and thereby
have an additional incentive to contribute to the Company’s success.
The purpose of the UK Plan is to provide an opportunity for the eligible
employees of certain of the Company’s UK subsidiaries to acquire
Shares. UK Plan Participants thereby have an additional incentive to
contribute to the Company’s success.
The purpose of the Irish Plan is to provide an opportunity for the
eligible employees of certain of the Company’s Irish subsidiaries and
affiliates to purchase Shares at market value via payroll deductions
Kellogg Company
Equity incentive plans
EU Prospectus
Dated: March 22, 2016
13
from after-tax earnings in order to receive a matching number of "free"
Shares that are exempt from income tax, subject to certain conditions.
Participants thereby have an additional incentive to contribute to the
Company’s success.
E.3
Description of the
terms and
conditions of the
offer
The below description of the terms and conditions of the offer is
only intended to be a very high level summary of those terms and
conditions. The reader is strongly encouraged to read the Belgian
Plan, UK Plan and Irish Plan as attached under Exhibits I, II and
III to this prospectus.
Belgian Plan
The Belgian Plan was authorized by the Compensation Committee of
Kellogg, and is a sub-plan of the 2013 Long Term Incentive Plan (the
"LTIP").
The LTIP and the Belgian Plan is administered by the Company’s
Compensation Committee (the “Committee”).
Any individual who is an active permanent employee of Wimble
Manufacturing Belgium BVBA, and any other (direct or indirect)
subsidiary of the Company in Belgium that may be designated by the
Committee as participating in the Belgian Plan (each a "Participating
Company"), and who has been employed by a Participating Company
for a period of at least six months, on or after April 1, 2013 (an
"Eligible Employee") is eligible to participate in the Belgian Plan.
There will be monthly “Offering Periods” for the purchase of Shares
under the Belgian Plan. The first business day of each Offering Period
is an “Offering Date” and the last day of an Offering Period, or if this is
not a business day, the first following business day, is an "Acquisition
Date".
An Eligible Employee may become a participant in the Belgian Plan
("Belgian Plan Participant") as of an Offering Date by accepting the
terms of an enrollment agreement on the form provided by the
Company (which may be in written or electronic form, as prescribed by
the Company).
The enrollment agreement shall set forth the percentage of the Belgian
Plan Participant’s "Base Pay" (i.e. the Eligible Employee's actual annual
gross pay (including thirteenth month and holiday pay, but excluding
other forms of remuneration and benefits (such as severance benefits,
redundancy pay, termination indemnities and other post-employment
benefits, as well as shift differentials, overtime, bonuses and income
from other equity awards)), divided by 12) to be paid as contributions
pursuant to the Belgian Plan (or shall otherwise provide for the Belgian
Kellogg Company
Equity incentive plans
EU Prospectus
Dated: March 22, 2016
14
Plan Participant to elect such percentage).
The Belgian Plan Participant shall elect to have payroll deductions
made on each payday during the Offering Period in an amount not less
than one percent (1%) and not more than five percent (5%) of such
Belgian Plan Participant’s Base Pay on each monthly payday
(determined by the Participating Company), or such other maximum
percentage as the Committee may establish from time to time before an
Offering Date.
On each Acquisition Date, each Belgian Plan Participant shall be
granted Shares subject to a restriction period as described hereunder
("Restricted Shares") under the Plan in consideration of paying the
contributions to the Company. The number of Restricted Shares
granted on each Acquisition Date shall be determined by dividing such
Belgian Plan Participant's contributions accumulated during the
Offering Period by the fair market value of a Share on the Acquisition
Date (the "Base Number") and multiplying the Base Number by 1.5.
For purposes of the Belgian plan, the term "fair market value" on any
date generally means the officially quoted closing price in the primary
trading session for a share of the Company's common stock on the
NYSE-Composite Transactions Tape or on any other stock exchange, if
any, on which such common stock is primarily traded.
The Restricted Shares shall be subject to a restriction period of two
years from the Acquisition Date, or such other period of time as
determined by the Committee (the "Belgian Plan Restriction Period").
During the Belgian Plan Restriction Period, the Belgian Plan Participant
has all of the legal rights of a shareholder of the Company, but may not
sell, transfer or otherwise dispose of the Restricted Shares.
UK Plan
The UK Plan is an all-employee share plan that provides employees (if
participating in the UK Plan, a "UK Plan Participant") of participating
companies with the opportunity to acquire Shares.
The UK Plan has been formally approved by HM Revenue & Customs
under Part 10 of Schedule 2 of the Income Tax (Earnings and Pensions)
Act 2003.
The trustee and administrator of the UK Plan is a professional trust and
administration provider, Capita IRG Trustees Limited.
Under the UK Plan there are potentially four types of share awards,
although in each instance the shares in question are Shares:

Kellogg Company
Equity incentive plans
EU Prospectus
Dated: March 22, 2016
Free Shares.
15

Purchased Shares.

Matching Shares.

Dividend Shares.
These Shares are acquired outright but are held on the UK Plan
Participant's behalf in a trust (the "UK Plan Trust").
The UK Plan can make an award of currently up to £3,000 worth of
Shares ("Free Shares") to each UK Plan Participant in a tax year. This
allocation may be subject to performance targets.
UK Plan Participants are required to hold the Free Shares in the UK
Plan Trust for a holding period specified by the Company at the time of
acquisition. This holding period will be between three and five years.
Under the UK Plan, UK Plan Participants may be invited to buy Shares
out of their pre-tax income (by deduction from salary via the payroll
system) up to a specified limit of currently £1,500 per year or 10% of
salary, if lower ("Purchased Shares").
The Shares are acquired at their market value. For purposes of the UK
plan, the term "market value" on any date generally means (a) if the
trustees acquire all of the Shares from a purchase made on the NYSE
and appropriate all of the Shares to the UK Plan Participants on the date
on which they were purchased, the average of the prices at which the
trustees acquire the Shares on that purchase date; or (b) if the trustees
acquire the Shares from a purchase made on the NYSE and appropriate
the Shares to the UK Plan Participants on a date other than the date on
which the Shares were purchased, the closing price of a Share for the
dealing day immediately preceding the appropriation date in question.
Shares can be purchased either shortly after a salary deduction, or
deductions can be accumulated by the UK Plan Trust for a period (of up
to 12 months) with the Shares being bought shortly after the end of this
accumulation period.
A UK Plan Participant may withdraw their Purchased Shares from the
UK Plan Trust at any time (though this may have adverse tax
consequences).
"Matching Shares" are additional Shares that the company may choose
to award to UK Plan Participants who acquire Purchased Shares. The
maximum matching ratio which can be awarded under the UK Plan is
two Matching Shares for every one Purchased Share bought but it can
be less.
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Dated: March 22, 2016
16
Matching Shares have a holding period of three to five years (this
period is specified at the date of acquisition).
Dividends paid on an employee's UK Plan Shares may either be passed
straight on to the employee or reinvested in the UK Plan. UK Plan
Participants may choose whether or not they wish to reinvest the
dividends.
If dividends are reinvested, Shares are bought with the dividend
payment ("Dividend Shares") and these are subject to a holding period
within the UK Plan Trust of three years.
Any individual who is an employee of a participating company on the
relevant qualifying date (this depends on the type of share award, but
broadly means at the date of acquisition of the Shares in question, or
through-out the Accumulation Period, if there is one, with regards the
Purchased or Matching Shares) and is subject to UK income tax on
his/her employment is eligible to participate in the UK Plan.
Irish Plan
The trustee and administrator of the Irish Plan is a professional trust and
administration provider, Capita Corporate Trustees Limited.
Any individual who is an employee of a participating company (being
one of the Irish subsidiaries of Kellogg that has been nominated as such
by Kellogg Lux 1 S.a.r.l.) on the relevant qualifying date (being not
more than 3 months before the beginning of a plan period) and is
subject to Irish income tax on his/her employment is eligible to
participate in the Irish Plan.
In respect of each plan period (being a calendar month) for which the
Irish Plan is operated, the board of Kellogg Lux 1 S.a.r.l. invites eligible
employees to elect to make contributions via payroll to enable the
trustee to acquire Shares. Kellogg Lux 1 S.a.r.l. has determined that
under the Irish Plan, the maximum value of such contributions is 3.5%
of the employee's gross eligible earnings net of tax (subject to an overriding maximum contribution of EUR 529.16 per month) and the
minimum contribution per plan period is EUR 10.
The relevant participating company, being the employer of such eligible
employee, provides such sum to the trustee to enable the trustee to
purchase the same amount of Shares as the employee contribution will
purchase for that plan period.
The Shares are acquired at their fair market value. For purposes of the
Irish plan, the term "fair market value" on any date generally means the
middle market quotation on the dealing day immediately preceding
such date of a Share on the NYSE converted into Euro at the exchange
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Dated: March 22, 2016
17
rate prevailing on such date.
The Shares purchased with employee contributions must be held in trust
for a minimum period of two years. The matching Shares must also be
held in trust for at least two years from the date of appropriation, but
must be left in trust for a total of three years in order to qualify for the
maximum income tax relief.
E.4
Description of
material interest to
the offer including
conflict of interests
Not applicable. There are no such interests.
E.5
Name of the entity
offering to sell the
security
Kellogg Company.
E.6
Maximum dilution
Assuming that the Shares offered would all be newly issued to the
extent the Plans allow for the issuance of new Shares, the holdings of a
shareholder of Kellogg currently holding 1% of the total outstanding
share capital of Kellogg as of January 29, 2016, i.e., 3,502,570 Shares,
and who is not an eligible employee participating in the offer, would be
diluted as indicated in the following table:
E.7
Estimated expenses
charged to the
investor by the
issuer or offeror
Kellogg Company
Equity incentive plans
EU Prospectus
Dated: March 22, 2016
Percentage of the
total
outstanding Shares
Total number of
outstanding Shares
Before the issuance of
Shares under the Plans (as
of January 29, 2016)
1.000%
350,257,015
After issuance of 43,175
Shares under the Plans
0.99988%
350,300,190
Not applicable. There are no such expenses.
18
II. Risk factors
(a)
The risk factors to be taken into consideration when participating in the Plans consist, on the
one hand, of risks related to the participation of the Plans itself, and, on the other hand, risks related to
the Company’s business.
The risks related to the participation itself in the Company’s Plans can be summarized as follows:

Participation in the Plans is subject to the same risks as inherent to any investment in shares
(such as a change of the stock exchange price of the shares) and a participant in the Plans
therefore potentially faces the risk of losing a part or all of his invested capital.

Participation in the Plans is subject to a currency risk (e.g., US$/EUR or US$/Sterling pound)
that could adversely affect the value derived from the participation in the Plans.

The possible tax and /or social security consequences of the participation in the Plans could
adversely affect the value derived from the participation in the Plans.

Under the Plans, there may be certain restrictions with respect to the withdrawal of shares
which may lead to a certain restriction on the liquidity thereof.
(b)
Information concerning the risk factors related to the Company’s business, that may affect
future business or results of the Company, is reported on page 6-15 of the Company’s Annual Report
on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended January 2, 2016 (Exhibit IV).
III. Information on the offer and dilution resulting therefrom
A. Information concerning the offer
A.1. Description of the offer
General information
Kellogg Company (the “Company” or “Kellogg”), a Delaware corporation, with its principle
executive offices at One Kellogg Square, Battle Creek, Michigan 49016-3599, United States of
America (or, as the case may be, one of its subsidiaries), is providing eligible employees of certain of
its (direct or indirect) subsidiaries in Europe the opportunity to acquire shares of the Company’s
common stock having a par value of US$0.25 per share (“Shares”) under the following equity
incentive plans:

the Belgian Plan;

the UK Plan; and

the Irish Plan.
The Company’s Shares are listed on the NYSE under the ticker symbol “K”.
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Equity incentive plans
EU Prospectus
Dated: March 22, 2016
19
The main features of the Plans are described hereafter. The following description is only a summary.
The awards are consequently subject to the actual terms and conditions of the Belgian Plan, the UK
Plan, and the Irish Plan, the full text of which is enclosed in Exhibits I, II, and III respectively.
Belgian Plan
Background and Purpose
The Belgian Plan was authorized by the Compensation Committee of Kellogg, and is a sub-plan of
the LTIP, which was adopted by the Company’s Board of Directors on February 22, 2013 and was
approved by the Company’s shareholders on April 26, 2013. The purpose of the Belgian Plan is to
provide an opportunity for the eligible employees of certain of the Company’s Belgian subsidiaries
and affiliates to purchase Shares through payroll deductions and thereby have an additional incentive
to contribute to the Company’s success. The aggregate number of Shares that may be issued and sold
under the LTIP is 22,000,000, subject to proportionate adjustment in the event of stock splits and
similar events.
Administration
The LTIP and the Belgian Plan are administered by the Committee. The Committee is authorized to
construe and interpret the Belgian Plan and to promulgate, amend and rescind rules and regulations
relating to the implementation, administration and maintenance of the Belgian Plan. Subject to the
terms and conditions of the Belgian Plan, the Committee shall make all determinations necessary or
advisable for the implementation, administration and maintenance of the Belgian Plan including,
without limitation, (a) selecting the Belgian Plan's Participants, (b) making Awards in such amounts
and form as the Committee shall determine, (c) imposing such restrictions, terms and conditions upon
such Awards as the Committee shall deem appropriate, and (d) correcting any technical defect(s) or
technical omission(s), or reconciling any technical inconsistency(ies), in the Belgian Plan and/or any
Award Agreement. Computershare Shareowner Services (“Computershare”) is currently the stock
plan administrator for the Belgian Plan.
Eligibility of Employees
Any individual who is an Eligible Employee is eligible to participate in the Belgian Plan.
Offering Periods and Payroll Deductions
There will be monthly Offering Periods for the purchase of Shares under the Belgian Plan. The first
business day of each Offering Period is an Offering Date and the last day of an Offering Period, or if
this is not a business day, the first following business day, is an Acquisition Date. The first Offering
Period for the Eligible Employees in Belgium began on April 19, 2013 and ended on May 18, 2013.
Subsequent Offering Periods run consecutively following the expiration of the preceding Offering
Period.
An Eligible Employee may become a Belgian Plan Participant as of an Offering Date by accepting
the terms of an enrollment agreement on the form provided by the Company (which may be in written
or electronic form, as prescribed by the Company) at such times and in accordance with such
procedures as may be established by the Committee for the Offering Period commencing with that
Offering Date. The enrollment agreement shall set forth the percentage of the Belgian Plan
Kellogg Company
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EU Prospectus
Dated: March 22, 2016
20
Participant’s "Base Pay" (i.e. the Eligible Employee's actual annual gross pay (including thirteenth
month and holiday pay, but excluding other forms of remuneration and benefits (such as severance
benefits, redundancy pay, termination indemnities and other post-employment benefits, as well as
shift differentials, overtime, bonuses and income from other equity awards)), divided by 12) to be
paid as contributions pursuant to the Belgian Plan (or shall otherwise provide for the Belgian Plan
Participant to elect such percentage).
The Belgian Plan Participant shall elect to have payroll deductions made on each payday during the
Offering Period in an amount not less than one percent (1%) and not more than five percent (5%) of
such Belgian Plan Participant’s Base Pay on each monthly payday (determined by the Participating
Company), or such other maximum percentage as the Committee may establish from time to time
before an Offering Date.
All payroll deductions or other payments made by the Belgian Plan Participant shall be credited to his
or her "Cash Account" (i.e. an account established and maintained by the Company or a brokerage or
other financial services firm designated by the Company for each Belgian Plan Participant for the
purpose of holding contributions made during an Offering Period until the Acquisition Date) under
the Belgian Plan. The Belgian Plan Participant may not make any additional payments into such Cash
Account.
A Belgian Plan Participant may withdraw all but not less than all the contributions credited to his or
her Cash Account, by giving notice of withdrawal from the Belgian Plan in accordance with the
withdrawal procedures established by the Committee. All of the Belgian Plan Participant’s
contributions credited to his or her Cash Account will be paid to him or her promptly after receipt of
his or her notice of withdrawal and his or her participation in the Belgian Plan will be automatically
terminated, and no further contributions may be made by the Belgian Plan Participant with respect to
that Offering Period. If the Belgian Plan Participant wishes to participate in a succeeding Offering
Period, he or she will need to re-enroll in the Belgian Plan
Grant of Restricted Shares
On each Acquisition Date, each Belgian Plan Participant shall be granted Restricted Shares under the
Plan in consideration of paying the contributions to the Company. The number of Restricted Shares
granted on each Acquisition Date shall be determined by dividing such Belgian Plan Participant's
contributions accumulated during the Offering Period and retained in the Cash Account as of the
Acquisition Date by the fair market value of a Share on the Acquisition Date (i.e. the Base Number)
and multiplying the Base Number by 1.5. If the result is not a whole number, fractional Restricted
Shares will be allocated. For purposes of the Belgian plan, the term "fair market value" on any date
generally means the officially quoted closing price in the primary trading session for a share of the
Company's common stock on the NYSE-Composite Transactions Tape or on any other stock
exchange, if any, on which such common stock is primarily traded.
The Restricted Shares shall be subject to the Belgian Plan Restriction Period. During the Belgian
Plan Restriction Period, the Belgian Plan Participant has all of the legal rights of a shareholder of the
Company, but may not sell, transfer or otherwise dispose of the Restricted Shares. The Company
may require that Restricted Shares acquired under the Belgian Plan be held in a stock account
established in the name of the Belgian Plan Participant, subject to such rules as determined by the
Committee, including designation of a brokerage or other financial services firm to hold such
Restricted Shares. After the lapse of the Belgian Plan Restriction Period, the Belgian Plan Participant
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Dated: March 22, 2016
21
may freely sell, transfer or otherwise dispose of the Shares and is no longer required to hold the
Shares in the stock account.
Dividends
All dividends paid out to a Belgian Plan Participant on Shares held under the Belgian Plan with
Computershare will by default be used to acquire additional Shares. Shares so acquired will not be
subject to the Belgian Plan Restriction Period applicable to Restricted Shares.
A Belgian Plan Participant can, however, elect to have the dividends mentioned in the above
paragraph paid out in cash, in which case he will receive said dividends by cheque.
Termination of Employment
Upon Termination of Service (i.e. the first date a Belgian Plan Participant no longer actively performs
active employment with a Participating Company) prior to the Acquisition Date for any reason,
including retirement, disability or death, the contributions credited to a Sub-Plan Participant's Cash
Account will be promptly returned to him or her or his or her legal representatives or heirs, his or her
participation will be automatically terminated, and no further contributions may be made by the
Belgian Plan Participant with respect to that Offering Period. If a Participating Company ceases to be
a Participating Company, each person employed by that Participating Company will be deemed to
have a Termination of Service for purposes of the Belgian Plan.
Corporate Transactions
In the event of the proposed dissolution or liquidation of the Company, any Offering Period then in
progress will terminate immediately prior to the consummation of such proposed action, unless
otherwise provided by the Committee. If a Belgian Plan Participant’s participation in the Belgian
Plan is terminated pursuant to the preceding sentence, the contributions then credited to such Belgian
Plan Participant’s Cash Account will be paid to him or her in cash without interest. In the event of a
change in control as defined in Section 14 of the LTIP, unless otherwise determined by the
Committee, the Belgian Plan shall be assumed or substituted by the successor corporation or a parent
or subsidiary of such successor corporation, or, if not so assumed or substituted, the Offering Period
then in progress shall be shortened and the Board shall set a new Acquisition Date (the “New
Acquisition Date”). The New Acquisition Date shall be on or before the date of consummation of the
transaction and the Committee shall notify each Belgian Plan Participant in writing, at least ten (10)
days prior to the New Acquisition Date, that the Acquisition Date has been changed to the New
Acquisition Date, unless prior to such date he or she has withdrawn from the Offering Period.
The treatment of Restricted Shares in the event of a change in control as defined in Section 14 of the
LTIP shall be as set forth in the LTIP, except that contrary to Section 14.1.2. of the LTIP, the
restrictions applicable to Restricted Shares granted under the Belgian Plan shall not lapse in the event
of a change in control as defined in Section 14 of the LTIP (unless the Committee (or its delegate)
decides otherwise).
Amendment or Termination
The Committee may at any time and for any reason terminate or amend the Belgian Plan.
Kellogg Company
Equity incentive plans
EU Prospectus
Dated: March 22, 2016
22
Without regard to whether any Belgian Plan Participant's rights may be considered to have been
adversely affected, the Committee shall be entitled to change the Offering Periods, establish the
exchange ratio applicable to contributions made in a currency other than U.S. dollars, permit payroll
deductions in excess of the rate designated by a Belgian Plan Participant in order to adjust for delays
or mistakes in the Company’s processing of properly completed contribution elections, establish
reasonable waiting and adjustment periods and/or accounting and crediting procedures to ensure that
contributions made under the Belgian Plan properly correspond with deductions made from the
Belgian Plan Participant’s Base Pay, and establish such other limitations or procedures as the
Committee determines in its sole discretion advisable which are consistent with the Belgian Plan.
Transferability
Neither the contributions credited to a Belgian Plan Participant’s Cash Account nor any rights with
regard to the Restricted Shares that may be granted under the Belgian Plan may be assigned,
transferred, pledged or otherwise disposed of in any way (other than by will, the laws of descent and
distribution) by the Belgian Plan Participant. Any such attempt at assignment, transfer, pledge or
other disposition shall be without effect, except that the Company may treat such act as an election to
withdraw funds in accordance with the rules on withdrawal from the Belgian Plan.
Term of the Belgian Plan
The Belgian Plan shall continue in effect until the earlier of its termination by the Company’s Board
of Directors or the date on which all of the Shares available for issuance under the LTIP have been
issued.
UK Plan
Background and Purpose
The UK Plan is an all-employee share plan that provides employees (if participating in the UK Plan, a
UK Plan Participant) of participating companies with the opportunity to acquire Shares.
The purpose of the UK Plan is to provide an opportunity for the eligible employees of certain of the
Company’s UK subsidiaries to acquire Shares. UK Plan Participants thereby have an additional
incentive to contribute to the Company’s success.
The UK Plan has been formally approved by HM Revenue & Customs under Part 10 of Schedule 2 of
the Income Tax (Earnings and Pensions) Act 2003.
Any company which is incorporated in the UK and is controlled by the Company may participate in
the UK Plan. The following companies currently participate:
Kellogg UK Holding Company Limited (Company Number 3216332)
Kellogg Company of Great Britain Limited (Company Number 199171)
Kellogg Supply Services (Europe) Limited (Company Number 3233413)
Kellogg Marketing and Sales Company (UK) Limited (Company Number 3237431)
Kellogg Company
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EU Prospectus
Dated: March 22, 2016
23
Kellogg Management Services (Europe) Limited (Company Number 3233144)
Portable Foods Manufacturing Company Limited (Company Number 3533251)
Administration
In accordance with the relevant UK legislation the UK Plan is constituted under a trust deed executed
in England and Wales. The trust document specifies the primary duties of the trustees and the
Company, the more detailed operation of the UK Plan is set out in the scheme rules contained in a
schedule to this trust deed.
The trustee and administrator of the UK Plan is a professional trust and administration provider,
Capita IRG Trustees Limited.
The trustee, and the "UK Plan Manager" (a duly authorised officer or officers of a participating
company) are responsible for the operation of the UK Plan. Subject to the provisions of the UK Plan
and the provisions set out in the relevant UK tax legislation governing such plans, the trustee and the
UK Plan Manager shall make all determinations necessary or advisable for the implementation,
administration and maintenance of the UK Plan including, without limitation, (a) determining
eligibility for the UK Plan, (b) appropriating Shares to UK Plan Participants and (c) subject to prior
approval of HM Revenue & Customs, correcting any technical defect(s) or technical omission(s), or
reconciling any technical inconsistency(ies), in the UK Plan and/or any award made thereunder.
Different Types of Share Awards
Under the UK Plan there are potentially four types of share awards, although in each instance the
shares in question are Shares:

Free Shares.

Purchased Shares.

Matching Shares.

Dividend Shares.
These Shares are acquired outright but are held on the UK Plan Participant's behalf in the UK Plan
Trust.
The relevant holding periods, and restrictions on transfer applying to the Shares, will depend on the
type of share award as set out below.
Free Shares
The UK Plan can make an award of up to £3,000 worth of Free Shares to each UK Plan Participant in
a tax year. This allocation may be subject to performance targets.
UK Plan Participants cannot immediately sell their Free Shares.
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EU Prospectus
Dated: March 22, 2016
24
UK Plan Participants are required to hold the Free Shares in the UK Plan Trust for a holding period
specified by the Company at the time of acquisition. This holding period will be between three and
five years.
Purchased Shares
Under the UK Plan, UK Plan Participants may be invited to buy Purchased Shares out of their pre-tax
income (by deduction from salary via the payroll system) up to a limit of £1,500 per year or 10% of
salary, if lower.
The Shares are acquired at their market value. For purposes of the UK plan, the term " market value"
on any date generally means (a) if the trustees acquire all of the Shares from a purchase made on the
NYSE and appropriate all of the Shares to the UK Plan Participants on the date on which they were
purchased, the average of the prices at which the trustees acquire the Shares on that purchase date; or
(b) if the trustees acquire the Shares from a purchase made on the NYSE and appropriate the Shares
to the UK Plan Participants on a date other than the date on which the Shares were purchased, the
closing price of a Share for the dealing day immediately preceding the appropriation date in question.
Shares can be purchased either shortly after a salary deduction, or deductions can be accumulated by
the UK Plan Trust for a period (of up to 12 months) with the Shares being bought shortly after the end
of this accumulation period.
A UK Plan Participant may withdraw their Purchased Shares from the UK Plan Trust at any time
(though this may have adverse tax consequences).
Matching Shares
Matching Shares are additional Shares that the company may choose to award to UK Plan
Participants who acquire Purchased Shares. The maximum matching ratio which can be awarded
under the UK Plan is two Matching Shares for every one Purchased Share bought but it can be less.
Matching Shares have a holding period of three to five years (this period is specified at the date of
acquisition).
Dividend Shares
Dividends paid on an employee's UK Plan Shares may either be passed straight on to the employee or
reinvested in the UK Plan. UK Plan Participants may choose whether or not they wish to reinvest the
dividends.
If dividends are reinvested, Dividend Shares are bought with the dividend payment and these are
subject to a holding period within the UK Plan Trust of three years.
Eligibility of Employees
Any individual who is an employee of a participating company on the relevant qualifying date (this
depends on the type of share award, but broadly means at the date of acquisition of the Shares in
question, or through-out the Accumulation Period, if there is one, with regards the Purchased or
Matching Shares) and is subject to UK income tax on his/her employment is eligible to participate in
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Equity incentive plans
EU Prospectus
Dated: March 22, 2016
25
the UK Plan.
Dividends
UK Plan Participants have the choice to either receive a cash dividend payment or acquire Dividend
Shares. Where a cash dividend is taken it must be paid over to UK Plan Participants as soon as
practicable.
Termination of Employment
On cessation of employment the UK Plan Manager has to notify the trustees of the position as soon as
reasonably practicable.
The consequences of the termination of employment depend upon the nature of the share award.
Matching Shares will be forfeited if the employee leaves (other than in specified "good leaver""
circumstances) within up to three years of the award being made.
Purchased Shares are not subject to forfeiture in the event that the UK Plan Participant ceases to be
employed by the company. Any Purchased Shares that are not forfeited must be withdrawn from the
UK Plan Trust.
Any Matching Shares that are not forfeited upon a UK Plan Participant leaving employment must be
withdrawn from the UK Plan Trust.
If the UK Plan Participant leaves employment, Dividend Shares must be withdrawn from the UK Plan
Trust.
If the UK Plan Participant ceases to be employed (other than in specified circumstances) within a
period of up to three years of the date of the award of Free Shares the UK Plan Participants rights to
the Free Shares are forfeited. Any Free Shares that are not forfeited must be withdrawn from the UK
Plan Trust.
Corporate Transactions
In the event of a corporate transaction affecting the Shares held in trust, UK Plan Participants will
generally be treated the same as all shareholders. Depending on the nature of the transaction, there
may be UK tax implications for UK Plan Participants.
Amendment or Termination
The Company may at any time and for any reason suspend or terminate the making of offers under
the UK Plan.
The Company and the trustee may vary or amend the provisions of the UK Plan at any time provided
such variation, amendment or revocation does not disadvantage the rights of UK Plan Participants
which have accrued under the UK Plan and no such variation, amendment or revocation is effective
until approved by HM Revenue & Customs.
Kellogg Company
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EU Prospectus
Dated: March 22, 2016
26
Irish Plan
Background and Purpose
The Irish Plan was adopted by a subsidiary of Kellogg, Kellogg Lux 1 S.a.r.l. (a company registered
in Luxembourg whose registered office is at 560A, Rue de Neudorf, L-2220, Luxembourg and
registered under number B 103 831) on 12 December 2010. The adoption of the Irish Plan by this
entity was to facilitate the consolidation of two equity incentive plans that had previously been
approved by the Irish Revenue Commissioners and had operated in Ireland for a number of years for
the benefit of employees of various Irish subsidiaries, and such consolidation necessitated the
establishment of the Irish Plan by a company that had control over all of the relevant Irish subsidiaries
in order to meet the requirements of Irish tax legislation.
The purpose of the Irish Plan is to provide an opportunity for the eligible employees of certain of the
Company’s Irish subsidiaries and affiliates to purchase Shares at market value via payroll deductions
from after-tax earnings in order to receive a matching number of "free" Shares that are exempt from
income tax, subject to certain conditions. Participants thereby have an additional incentive to
contribute to the Company’s success. Both the purchased and free allocations are satisfied by way of
market purchases of Shares, on a monthly basis, with the relevant employer companies providing the
funds for the matching element.
Administration
The Irish Plan is constituted under an Irish trust deed, as the tax legislation and Irish Revenue practice
requires that the purchased and matching Shares are held in an Irish trust for specified minimum
periods in order to qualify for favourable tax treatment. The trustee and administrator of the Irish
Plan is a professional trust and administration provider, Capita Corporate Trustees Limited. The
trustee, with the consent of Kellogg Lux 1 S.a.r.l. and the Irish Revenue Commissioners, is authorized
to construe and interpret the Irish Plan, and make amendments from time to time, subject to the
provisions therein and the provisions set out in the relevant Irish tax legislation governing such plans.
Subject to the terms and conditions of the Irish Plan and applicable Irish tax legislation, the trustee
together with Kellogg Lux 1 S.a.r.l. shall make all determinations necessary or advisable for the
implementation, administration and maintenance of the Irish Plan including, without limitation, (a)
determining eligibility for the Irish Plan, (b) appropriating Shares to Participants and (c) subject to
prior approval of Irish Revenue, correcting any technical defect(s) or technical omission(s), or
reconciling any technical inconsistency(ies), in the Irish Plan and/or any award made thereunder.
Eligibility of Employees
Any individual who is an employee of a participating company (being one of the Irish subsidiaries of
Kellogg that has been nominated as such by Kellogg Lux 1 S.a.r.l.) on the relevant qualifying date
(being not more than 3 months before the beginning of a plan period) and is subject to Irish income
tax on his/her employment is eligible to participate in the Irish Plan. The participating companies are
currently as follows:



Kellogg Company of Ireland Limited (registered in Ireland under no. 49450)
Kellogg Europe Trading Limited (registered in Ireland under no. 387390)
Kellogg Europe Treasury Services Limited (registered in Ireland under no. 435553)
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EU Prospectus
Dated: March 22, 2016
27

Kellogg European Logistics Services Company Limited (registered in Ireland under no.
513281).
Offering Periods and Payroll Deductions
In respect of each plan period (being a calendar month) for which the Irish Plan is operated, the board
of Kellogg Lux 1 S.a.r.l. invites eligible employees to elect to make contributions via payroll to
enable the trustee to acquire Shares. Kellogg Lux 1 S.a.r.l. has determined that under the Irish Plan,
the maximum value of such contributions is 3.5% of the employee's gross eligible earnings net of tax
(subject to an over-riding maximum contribution of EUR 529.16 per month) and the minimum
contribution per plan period is EUR 10 (which are within Irish Revenue guidelines). The relevant
participating company, being the employer of such eligible employee, provides such sum to the
trustee to enable the trustee to purchase the same amount of Shares as the employee contribution will
purchase for that plan period.
The Shares are purchased at their fair market value. For purposes of the Irish plan, the term "fair
market value" on any date generally means the middle market quotation on the dealing day
immediately preceding such date of a Share on the NYSE converted into Euro at the exchange rate
prevailing on such date.
Under Irish tax legislation and Revenue practice, the maximum value of Shares that can be purchased
by an employee from his/her own resources in each tax year is 7.5% of gross basic salary, and the
maximum value of Shares that can be appropriated free of income tax (i.e. the matching award) to a
participant in any tax year is EUR 12,700.
An eligible employee may become a participant in the Irish Plan by completing a contract of
participation that will continue to govern his participation on an ongoing basis until such time as the
employee ceases to be eligible or withdraws from the Irish Plan. The participant can vary his
contribution in subsequent plan periods subject to the limits in the Irish Plan and applicable Irish tax
legislation. Such change will only have effect as of the tax year following the year in which such
change was notified.
Holding Period and Restrictions on Transfer
The Shares purchased with employee contributions must be held in trust for a minimum period of two
years. The matching Shares must also be held in trust for at least two years from the date of
appropriation, but must be left in trust for a total of three years in order to qualify for the maximum
income tax relief. There are limited exceptions to these holding periods, where employment ceases
due to injury, disability, redundancy, retirement or death, or if the participant has reached Irish state
pension age (currently 66 years).
During the period the Shares are held in trust the participant has all the beneficial rights attaching to
the Shares but the legal ownership is with the trustee. The trustee must deal with the Shares on the
terms set out in the trust deed and rules of the Irish Plan. After two years the participant is free to
dispose of the Shares but if he/she disposes of any matching award prior to the 3rd anniversary there
will generally be a claw back of income tax.
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Dividends
All dividends paid out on Shares held in the trust for participants of the Irish Plan are paid out in cash
to participants no later than the last day of the tax year in which they are received by the trustee.
Termination of Employment
On cessation of employment any Shares already appropriated to a participant remain the property of
such participant. He/she can leave the Shares in trust for the remainder of the holding periods
outlined above and continue to avail of the maximum income tax relief. If the participant disposes of
matching Shares prior to the third anniversary of the date of appropriation he/she will be subject to a
claw back of income tax on 100% of the value of the Shares at the date they were allocated (or if less,
the proceeds of the disposal of such Shares). If cessation of employment is due to injury, disability,
redundancy or retirement all Shares can be disposed of immediately but there is a claw back of
income tax on 50% of the value of the matching award at the date it was received (or if less, the
proceeds of the disposal of such Shares). In the event of the death of a participant no income tax claw
back applies.
Corporate Transactions
In the event of a corporate transaction affecting the Shares held in trust, participants will generally be
treated the same as all shareholders. Depending on the nature of the transaction, there may be Irish
tax implications for participants.
Amendment or Termination
The board of Kellogg Lux 1 S.a.r.l. may at any time and for any reason suspend or terminate the
making of offers under the Irish Plan. Kellogg Lux 1 S.a.r.l. and the trustee may vary or amend the
provisions of the Irish Plan at any time provided such variation, amendment or revocation does not
affect the beneficial interest of participants in Shares already appropriated and no such variation,
amendment or revocation is effective until approved in writing in advance by the Irish Revenue
Commissioners.
Term of the Irish Plan
The Irish Plan shall continue in effect until the date on which the board of Kellogg Lux 1 S.a.r.l. and
the trustee may by deed declare to be the termination date, but this may not be earlier than three years
from the last preceding appropriation date.
A.2 Use of proceeds
The proceeds, if any, of the offers under the Plans will be used by the Company for general corporate
purposes.
Kellogg Company
Equity incentive plans
EU Prospectus
Dated: March 22, 2016
29
A.3 Costs related to the sale of Shares
Belgian Plan
If a participant seeks to sell Shares acquired under the Belgian Plan, he/she will be charged a trading
fee of US$ 0.03 per share, with a minimum of US$ 29.95 for transactions ordered through the
Computershare website or interactive telephone system, and a minimum of US$ 49.95 for
transactions ordered through Computershare representatives, plus a fee payable to the U.S. Securities
and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) equal to US$ 21.80 per million dollars (as of trade date February
16, 2016, this fee payable to the SEC will amount to US$ 0.0000218 per dollar of gross proceeds,
rounded up to the next cent).
If proceeds are transferred to the participant by cheque in US$, no extra fee is charged. A US$ 25.00
fee will be charged if the cheque is delivered in another currency than US$. A US$ 25.00 fee is
charged if the cheque needs to be delivered within a day.
If proceeds are transferred to the participant through wire transfer, a US$ 35.00 fee will be charged.
If shares are delivered to the employee, a US$ 50.00 fee will be charged.
Please note that Computershare and the Company reserve the right to change the fees at any time.
More information on real-time trading and limit orders, can be obtained by contacting Computershare
at 001 732-645-4171.
UK Plan
If a participant directs the Trustees to sell any of his Purchased and Matching Shares there may be
some brokers commission, currently set at 0.35%, and with a minimum of US$ 45, and a Capita
administration fee which will be deducted from the sale proceeds. If Shares are sold on a bulk sales
day, no brokers commission will be due. If proceeds are transferred to the participant through wire
transfer, a £ 16 fee will be charged
Irish Plan
If a participant seeks to sell Shares acquired under the Irish Plan, he/she will be responsible for the
costs, such as broker and administration costs, associated with that sale. Actual costs will vary
depending on whether the participant takes part in a group sale with other participants, and will also
depend on the value of the entire amount of Shares being sold. At the date of this prospectus, costs
for an individual sale will be 0.35% of proceeds, subject to a minimum commission of EUR 35, plus
a EUR 22.40 administration fee. The Irish broker (Davy stockbrokers) and the administrator of the
Irish Plan (Capita) reserve the right to change the fees at any time. If proceeds are transferred to the
participant through wire transfer, a EUR 25 fee will be charged
Further information concerning the offer, including offer statistics, the method and expected timetable
and admission to trading details, is set forth in the Kellogg Company Sub-Plan to the 2013 LongTerm Incentive Plan for Participants in Belgium (Exhibit I), The Kellogg UK Share Incentive Plan
(Exhibit II), The Kellogg (Ireland) Employee Share Ownership Plan (Exhibit III), and in the
Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended January 2, 2016 (Exhibit IV).
Kellogg Company
Equity incentive plans
EU Prospectus
Dated: March 22, 2016
30
B. Maximum Dilution
As of February 24, 2016, the Shares under the Plans are being offered to approximately 2,550 eligible
employees of certain EEA subsidiaries of the Company. Taking into account the total eligible
compensation of the eligible employees under the Plans and the features of the Plans, a maximum
total annual amount of approximately EUR 5.9 million (US$ 6.5 million) could be contributed in the
respective Plans by the respective eligible employees.
The fair market value of a Share on March 4, 2016 was US$ 75.23. Assuming eligible employees
would purchase during each offering period one-twelfth of the total number of Shares they were
entitled to purchase during a calendar year at the purchase price applicable on March 4, 2016 (i.e.,
US$ 75.23), the eligible employees would together be entitled, taking the rules of the respective Plans
into account, to acquire a maximum of approximately 175,606 Shares under the Plans assuming no
other Plan limitations are exceeded.
The UK Plan and the Irish Plan do however not result in a dilution, as the Shares purchased under the
UK Plan and the Irish Plan are purchased in the market. The Belgian Plan does however result in a
certain dilution.
Taking into account the total eligible compensation of the eligible employees under the Belgian Plan
and the features of the Belgian Plan, a maximum total annual amount of approximately EUR
1,968,500 (US$ 2,165,350) could be contributed in the Belgian Plan by the respective eligible
employees. Assuming eligible employees under the Belgian Plan would purchase during each
offering period one-twelfth of the total number of Shares they were entitled to purchase during a
calendar year at the purchase price applicable on March 4, 2016 (i.e., US$ 75.23), the eligible
employees under the Belgian Plan would together be entitled, taking the rules of the Belgian Plan into
account, to purchase a maximum of 43,175 Shares under the Belgian Plan on an annual basis
(assuming no other Belgian Plan limitations are exceeded). Based on the above assumptions, the
holding of a shareholder of the Company currently holding 1% of the total outstanding share capital
of the Company as of January 29, 2016 (i.e. 3,502,570 Shares) would be diluted by the Belgian Plan
as indicated in the following table:
Before the offering
After issuance of 43,175 Shares under the
Belgian Plan
Kellogg Company
Equity incentive plans
EU Prospectus
Dated: March 22, 2016
Percentage of the total
outstanding shares
Total number of
outstanding shares
1.00%
350,257,015
0.99988%
350,300,190
31
IV. Key information on the Company’s financial condition, capitalization and
indebtedness, working capital and risk factors
A. Statutory auditors
The statutory auditors of the Company over the fiscal years ended on December 28, 2013 and ended
on January 3, 2015 and ended on January 2, 2016 were PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP, 1900 Saint
Antoine Street, Detroit, Michigan 48226. The accounts for such years, prepared in accordance with
the U.S. GAAP, were audited, and the audit reports contained no qualification.
B. Share capital
The aggregate market value of the common stock held by non-affiliates of the registrant (assuming
for purposes of this computation only that the W. K. Kellogg Foundation Trust, directors and
executive officers may be affiliates) as of the close of business on July 4, 2015 was approximately
$17.7 billion based on the closing price of $63.14 for one share of common stock, as reported for the
New York Stock Exchange on that date.
As of January 29, 2016, 350,257,015 shares of the common stock of the registrant were issued and
outstanding.
There are no shareholders in the Company that, directly or indirectly, singly or jointly, exercise or are
capable of exercising control over the Company.
Based on filings made under Section 13(d) and 13(g) of the Exchange Act, as of March 10, 2016, the
only persons known by the Company to be beneficial owners of more than 5% of its common stock
were:
(i)
W.K. Kellogg Foundation Trust, c/o The Bank of New York Mellon Corporation, One Wall
Street, New York, NY 10286, being the beneficial owner of 21.3% of the Company's
common stock;
(ii)
KeyCorp, 127 Public Square, Cleveland, OH 44114-1306, being the beneficial owner of
7.8% of the Company's common stock;
(iii) Gordon Gund, 14 Nassau Street, Princeton, NJ 08542-4523, being the beneficial owner of
7.7% of the Company's common stock.
For the fiscal year ended on January 2, 2016, no third parties have attempted a public takeover bid on
the Company, by purchase or exchange of Shares of the Company.
Kellogg Company
Equity incentive plans
EU Prospectus
Dated: March 22, 2016
32
C. Key financial data
Consolidated Statement of Income
2015
(millions, except per share data)
2014
2013
Net sales
$
13,525
$
14,580
$
14,792
Cost of goods sold
8,844
9,517
8,689
3,590
4,039
3,266
Selling, general and administrative expense
Operating profit
$
1,091
$
1,024
$
2,837
Interest expense
227
209
235
(91)
10
4
773
825
2,606
159
186
792
Other income (expense), net
Income before income taxes
Income taxes
Earnings (loss) from unconsolidated entities
—
(6)
(6)
Net income
$
Net income (loss) attributable to
noncontrolling interests
Net income attributable to Kellogg
Company
614
$
—
633
$
1,808
1
1
$
614
$
632
$
1,807
$
1.74
$
1.76
$
4.98
$
1.72
$
1.75
$
4.94
$
1.98
$
1.90
$
1.80
Per share amounts:
Basic
Diluted
Dividends per share
For further detail on the consolidated Kellogg Company income, please refer to the Notes to
Consolidated Financial Statements on page 55 and following of the Company's Annual Report on
Form 10-K for the fiscal year ending on January 2, 2016.
Kellogg Company
Equity incentive plans
EU Prospectus
Dated: March 22, 2016
33
Consolidated Balance Sheet
2015
(millions, except share data)
2014
Current assets
Cash and cash equivalents
$
251
$
443
Accounts receivable, net
1,344
1,276
1,250
1,279
391
342
3,236
3,340
3,621
3,769
4,968
4,971
2,268
2,295
456
1
716
777
Inventories
Other current assets
Total current assets
Property, net
Goodwill
Other intangibles, net
Investment in unconsolidated entities
Other assets
Total assets
$
15,265
$
15,153
$
1,266
$
607
Current liabilities
Current maturities of long-term debt
Notes payable
1,204
828
1,907
1,528
1,362
1,401
5,739
4,364
5,289
5,935
685
726
946
777
468
500
—
—
105
105
745
678
6,597
6,689
Accounts payable
Other current liabilities
Total current liabilities
Long-term debt
Deferred income taxes
Pension liability
Other liabilities
Commitments and contingencies
Equity
Common stock, $.25 par value, 1,000,000,000 shares authorized
Issued: 420,315,589 shares in 2015 and 420,125,937 shares in 2014
Capital in excess of par value
Retained earnings
Kellogg Company
Equity incentive plans
EU Prospectus
Dated: March 22, 2016
34
Treasury stock, at cost
70,291,514 shares in 2015 and 64,123,181 shares in 2014
Accumulated other comprehensive income (loss)
(3,943)
(3,470)
(1,376)
(1,213)
2,128
2,789
10
62
2,138
2,851
Total Kellogg Company equity
Noncontrolling interests
Total equity
Total liabilities and equity
$
15,265
$
15,153
For further detail on the consolidated Kellogg Company balance sheet, please refer to the Notes to
Consolidated Financial Statements on page 55 and following of the Company's Annual Report on
Form 10-K for the fiscal year ending on January 2, 2016.
Quarterly results and annual reports will be published respectively in the Company’s Quarterly
Reports on Form 10-Q and the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K, which are available on the
Company’s website (http://investor.kelloggs.com, under the “SEC filings” captions).
Additional information, such as the credit ratings of the Company, can be found in the Company’s
Annual Report on Form 10-K (Exhibit IV).
The cost of the stock-based compensation for U.S. GAAP accounting purposes is elaborated upon in
the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K (Exhibit IV). In addition, the Company has incurred
legal costs of approximately US$ 35,000 to implement this prospectus in order to offer securities
under the Plans to eligible employees of its subsidiaries in the EEA.
Further information concerning the Company’s financial condition, including selected financial data,
information on capitalization and indebtedness and a description of the risk factors is set forth in the
Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended January 2, 2016 (Exhibit IV).
The reasons for the offer and the use of proceeds are described in I.A above.
Information on the Company’s capitalization and indebtedness and stockholder’s equity is set forth in
the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended January 2, 2016 (Exhibit IV).
For detailed information related to the Company’s Capital, please refer to page 53 of the Company’s
Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended January 2, 2016 (Exhibit IV). For detailed
information related to the Company’s indebtedness, please refer to pages 70-73 of the Company’s
Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended January 2, 2016 (Exhibit IV). For detailed
information related to stockholder’s equity, please refer to pages 67-69 of the Company’s Annual
Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended January 2, 2016 (Exhibit IV). For detailed information
on the Company's working capital, please refer to pages 39-42 of the Company’s Annual Report on
Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended January 2, 2016 (Exhibit IV). For detailed information on the
Company's risk factors, please refer to pages 6-15 of the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K
for the fiscal year ended January 2, 2016 (Exhibit IV).
Kellogg Company
Equity incentive plans
EU Prospectus
Dated: March 22, 2016
35
V. Information on the Company
A. Company history and activities
Kellogg Company was formed when production of Kellogg’s Corn Flakes® began at W.K. Kellogg’s
newly formed Battle Creek Toasted Corn Flakes Company in 1906.
W.K. Kellogg began worldwide expansion of the company in 1914. By 1938, Kellogg had built
plants in England and Australia. After W.K. Kellogg’s death in 1951, Kellogg continued to expand its
operations, building plants in Latin America and Asia.
Kellogg has established itself as an industry leader with health-conscious, innovative breakfast
choices like Special K, All Bran and Product 19 cereals.
Kellogg continued to expand its operations by acquiring the vegetarian-based food group
Worthington Foods in 1999 and the organic-based food group Kashi Company in 2000. Kellogg also
acquired snack leader Keebler Foods Company in 2001. A multi-year global relationship with
Kellogg and Disney was formed in 2002 to introduce several new cereal and snack food products to
the market.
In 2012, Kellogg's became the world's second-largest snack food company by acquiring the Pringles
potato crisps brand from Procter & Gamble.
The Company currently manages its operations through nine operating segments that are based on
product category or geographic location. These operating segments are evaluated for similarity with
regards to economic characteristics, products, production processes, types or classes of customers,
distribution methods and regulatory environments to determine if they can be aggregated into
reportable segments.
The reportable segments are discussed in greater detail below:
The U.S. Morning Foods operating segment includes cereal, toaster pastries, health and wellness bars,
and beverages.
U.S. Snacks includes cookies, crackers, cereal bars, savory snacks and fruit-flavored snacks.
U.S. Specialty represents food away from home channels, including food service, convenience,
vending, Girl Scouts and food manufacturing. The food service business is mostly non-commercial,
serving institutions such as schools and hospitals.
North America Other represents the U.S. Frozen, Kashi and Canada operating segments. As these
operating segments are not considered economically similar enough to aggregate with other operating
segments and are immaterial for separate disclosure, they have been grouped together as a single
reportable segment.
The three remaining reportable segments are based on geographic location – Europe which consists
principally of European countries; Latin America which is comprised of Central and South America
Kellogg Company
Equity incentive plans
EU Prospectus
Dated: March 22, 2016
36
and includes Mexico; and Asia Pacific which is comprised of South Africa, Australia and other Asian
and Pacific markets.
B. Particular provisions of the bylaws
The Company’s annual meeting of shareholders is held for the purpose of electing directors and
conducting other business as may properly come before the meeting and is held each year. The last
annual shareholders’ meeting was held on April 24, 2015.
C. Board of Directors (as per February 24, 2016)
Name
Age
Jim Jenness
John Bryant
John Dillon
Gordon Gund
Zachary Gund
Ann McLaughlin Korologos
Don Knauss
Mary A. Laschinger
Cynthia H. Milligan
Rogelio Rebolledo
La June Montgomery Tabron
Stephanie Burns
Noel Wallace
Carolyn Tastad
69
50
77
76
45
74
65
55
69
71
53
61
51
54
D. Executive Committee and Other Executive Officers (as per February 24, 2016)
Name
Function
John Bryant
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer
Ronald Dissinger
Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer
Alistair Hirst
Senior Vice President, Global Supply Chain
Samantha Long
Senior Vice President, Global Human Resources
Paul Norman
Senior Vice President, Kellogg Company and President, Kellogg
North America
Gary Pilnick
Vice Chairman, Corporate Development and Chief Legal Officer
To the extent that such activity is required to be disclosed in Exhibits IV or V, for at least the previous
five years, none of the directors or executive officers of the Company has:
Kellogg Company
Equity incentive plans
EU Prospectus
Dated: March 22, 2016
37
(a)
been convicted in relation to fraudulent offences;
(b)
been associated with any bankruptcies, receiverships or liquidations when acting in
their capacity as directors or executive officers of the Company; or
(c)
been subject to any official public incrimination and/or sanctions by statutory or
regulatory authorities (including designated professional bodies) or ever been
disqualified by a court from acting as a member of the administrative, management
or supervisory bodies of an issuer or from acting in the management or conduct of the
affairs of any issuer.
There are no family relationships between any of the directors and the executive officers listed above.
As indicated in the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K (Exhibit IV), the Company has adopted
guidelines regarding corporate governance, including a Code of Conduct, the full text of which is
available on the Company’s website, at http://investor.kelloggs.com/investor-relations/corporategovernance/code-of-conduct/default.aspx.
Further information on the Company, including its history and development, a business overview, its
organizational structure and information concerning its property, is set forth in the Company’s
Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended January 2, 2016 (Exhibit IV).
VI. Operating and financial review and prospects
Information concerning the Company’s operating results, its liquidity and capital resources and
trends, among other things, is set forth in the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal
year ended January 2, 2016 (Exhibit IV).
VII. Directors, senior management and employees
Information concerning the Company’s directors and senior management, their remuneration, Board
practices, the Company’s employees and share ownership is set forth in the Company’s Annual
Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended January 2, 2016 (Exhibit IV) and in the Company’s
Definitive Proxy Statement (Exhibit V).
VIII. Major shareholders and related party transactions
Information concerning major shareholders of the Company, related party transactions and
information concerning interests of experts and advisers is set forth in the Company’s Definitive
Proxy Statement (Exhibit V).
IX. Additional information
More detailed information about the Company, including information about its charter documents,
and its businesses, as well as the contact information for certain subsidiaries of the Company, is
available on the Company’s website (http://investor.kelloggs.com).
Kellogg Company
Equity incentive plans
EU Prospectus
Dated: March 22, 2016
38
The Annual Report on Form 10-K for the Company and its predecessors for fiscal years ending
January 2, 2016, January 3, 2015 and December 28, 2013, as well as Quarterly Reports on Form 10Q, Current Reports on Form 8-K and amendments to those reports filed or furnished pursuant to
Section 13 (a) or 15 (d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, are also made available
on the Company’s website (http://investor.kelloggs.com, under the “SEC filings” captions) after the
Company electronically files such materials with, or furnishes them to, the SEC.
Required filings by the Company’s officers and directors and certain third parties with respect to
transactions or holdings in Company shares are also made available on the Company’s website, as are
statements for the Company’s shareholder meetings. These filings may also be read and copied at the
SEC’s Public Reference Room at 100 F Street, NE, Washington, D.C. 20549. The SEC also
maintains an internet site (www.sec.gov) that contains reports, proxy and information statements and
other information regarding issuers that file electronically with the SEC.
Information about the Company’s Board of Directors and Board Committees is available on the
Company’s website (http://investor.kelloggs.com, under the “Corporate Governance” captions).
Kellogg Company
Equity incentive plans
EU Prospectus
Dated: March 22, 2016
39
EXHIBITS
Kellogg Company
Equity incentive plans
EU Prospectus
Dated: March 22, 2016
Exhibits
EXHIBIT I
KELLOGG COMPANY SUB-PLAN TO THE 2013 LONG-TERM INCENTIVE PLAN FOR
PARTICIPANTS IN BELGIUM, AND THE KELLOGG COMPANY 2013
LONG-TERM INCENTIVE PLAN
Kellogg Company
Equity incentive plans
EU Prospectus
Dated: March 22, 2016
Exhibits
KELLOGG COMPANY
SUB-PLAN TO THE
2013 LONG-TERM INCENTIVE PLAN
FOR PARTICIPANTS IN BELGIUM
1.
PURPOSE OF THE SUB-PLAN.
(a)
Kellogg Company (the "Company") established the 2013 Long-Term
Incentive Plan (the “Plan”) to further and promote the interests of the Company, its
subsidiaries and shareowners by enabling the Company and its subsidiaries to attract,
retain and motivate employees and officers or those who will become employees or
officers, and to align the interests of those individuals and the Company's shareowners.
Capitalized terms used but not otherwise defined in this sub-plan shall have the meanings
ascribed to such terms in the Plan.
(b)
Section 3 of the Plan authorizes the Compensation Committee (the
"Committee") to promulgate rules and regulations relating to the implementation,
administration and maintenance of the Plan.
(c)
The Committee has determined that it is appropriate and advisable to
establish a sub-plan to the Plan for Participants in Belgium, for the purpose of allowing
certain employees in Belgium to acquire shares of Common Stock at a discounted price
through accumulated payroll deductions (the “Sub-Plan”).
(d)
2.
The Plan is part of the Sub-Plan and is hereby incorporated by reference.
DEFINITIONS.
"Acquisition Date"
means the last day of an Offering Period, unless such date is
not a Business Day, in which case the Acquisition Date will
be the first following Business Day.
"Base Number"
shall have the meaning set forth in Section 9(a).
“Base Pay”
means, as determined by the Company, the Employee's actual
annual gross pay (including thirteenth month and holiday
pay, but excluding other forms of remuneration and benefits
(such as severance benefits, redundancy pay, termination
indemnities and other post-employment benefits, as well as
shift differentials, overtime, bonuses and income from other
equity awards)), divided by 12.
“Business Day”
means a day on which a Share can be purchased on the
regulated market on which the Shares are listed and traded.
“Cash Account”
means the account established and maintained by the
Company or a brokerage or other financial services firm
designated by the Company for each Sub-Plan Participant for
the purpose of holding Contributions made during an
Offering Period until the Acquisition Date.
"Contributions"
means all amounts credited to the Cash Account of a SubPlan Participant pursuant to the Sub-Plan.
“Employee”
means, as determined by the Company, any individual who is
an active permanent employee of a Participating Company,
whether full-time or part-time, and who has been employed
by the Participating Company for a period of at least six
months, excluding (i) any employee merely employed by a
Participating Company for a specified and limited period of
time and (ii) any employee who by reason of a negotiated
collective bargaining, other trade union agreement or other
agreement is excluded from participation in the Sub-Plan.
"Offering Date"
means the first Business Day of each Offering Period under
the Sub-Plan.
"Offering Period"
shall have the meaning set forth in Section 4.
“Participating Company” means Wimble Manufacturing Belgium BVBA, and any
Subsidiary in Belgium that may subsequently be designated
by the Committee (or its delegate) as participating in the SubPlan, or any successor thereof.
“Service”
means, as determined by the Company, full-time or part-time
active employment by an individual with a Participating
Company.
“Share”
means a share of Common Stock.
"Stock Account"
means an account established and maintained by the
Company or a brokerage or other financial services firm
designated by the Company for each Sub-Plan Participant for
the purpose of holding Restricted Shares.
“Sub-Plan Effective Date” means April 26, 2013.
"Sub-Plan Participant"
means an eligible Employee who decides to enroll in the
Sub-Plan.
"Sub-Plan Restriction Period" shall have the meaning set forth in Section 9(b).
“Termination of Service” means the first date a Sub-Plan Participant no longer actively
performs (or is considered as performing) Service, as
determined by the Company. Termination of Service is not
deemed to occur in the case of any leave of absence approved
by the Company or during any leave of absence for which
reemployment upon the expiration of the leave is guaranteed
by contract or statute.
Capitalized terms used in this Sub-Plan but not defined herein shall have the meaning
ascribed to such terms in the Plan.
3.
ELIGIBILITY.
Any individual who is an Employee on or after the Sub-Plan Effective Date is
eligible to participate in the Sub-Plan.
4.
OPERATION OF THE SUB-PLAN
(a)
The Sub-Plan will be offered through succeeding monthly Offering
Periods (each an "Offering Period"). An Offering Period shall start on the 19th day of
each month and ends on the 18th day of the following month.
(b)
The Sub-Plan shall continue until terminated in accordance with Section
13 hereof. The Committee shall have the power to change the duration and/or the
frequency of Offering Periods with respect to future offerings if such change is
announced prior to the scheduled beginning of the first Offering Period to be affected.
5.
PARTICIPATION
(a)
An eligible Employee may become a Sub-Plan Participant as of an
Offering Date by accepting the terms of an enrollment agreement on the form provided
by the Company (which may be in written or electronic form, as prescribed by the
Company) at such times and in accordance with such procedures as may be established
by the Committee (or its delegate) for the Offering Period commencing with that
Offering Date. The enrollment agreement shall set forth the percentage of the Sub-Plan
Participant’s Base Pay (subject to Section 6(a) below) to be paid as Contributions
pursuant to the Sub-Plan (or shall otherwise provide for the Sub-Plan Participant to elect
such percentage).
(b)
A Sub-Plan Participant may contribute to the Sub-Plan by means of
payroll deductions, unless payroll deductions are not permitted under local law, as
determined by the Company, in which case Sub-Plan Participants may be permitted by
the Participating Company (in its sole discretion) to contribute to the Sub-Plan by an
alternative method. Payroll deductions, or, if payroll deductions are not permitted under
local law, payments made under an alternative method, shall commence as of the first
paydate following the Offering Date and shall end on the last payday on or prior to the
Acquisition Date of the Offering Period to which the enrollment agreement is applicable,
unless the Sub-Plan Participant's participation is terminated sooner as provided in Section
7 or Section 8.
(c)
Except as provided below in this paragraph, a Sub-Plan Participant in an
Offering Period shall be automatically re-enrolled in each succeeding Offering Period at
the same applicable rate of Contributions, provided that the Sub-Plan Participant remains
an eligible Employee through the entire applicable Offering Period and subject to
changes in the Sub-Plan Participant’s rate of Contributions as provided for in Section 6.
If a Sub-Plan Participant timely withdraws from the Sub-Plan for an Offering Period, or
has a Termination of Service during an Offering Period, the Sub-Plan Participant shall
not be automatically re-enrolled in the succeeding Offering Period. The Committee may
terminate automatic re-enrollment at any time with respect to any Offering Period that
has not yet commenced at the time of such termination.
6.
CONTRIBUTIONS.
(a)
Where permitted under local law, the Sub-Plan Participant shall elect to
have payroll deductions made on each payday during the Offering Period in an amount
not less than one percent (1%) and not more than five percent (5%) of such Sub-Plan
Participant’s Base Pay on each (monthly) payday (determined by the Participating
Company), or such other maximum percentage as the Committee may establish from
time to time before an Offering Date. Where payroll deductions are not permitted under
local law, the Sub-Plan Participant may be permitted by the Participating Company (in its
sole discretion) to contribute to the Sub-Plan by an alternative method, as determined by
the Company. All payroll deductions or other payments made by the Sub-Plan Participant
shall be credited to his or her Cash Account under the Sub-Plan. The Sub-Plan Participant
may not make any additional payments into such Cash Account.
(b)
The Sub-Plan Participant may not increase or decrease the rate of his or
her Contributions during an Offering Period. The Sub-Plan Participant may change the
rate of his or her Contributions effective as of the beginning of any Offering Period by
submitting a new Contribution rate election to the Company (or its delegate) at such
times and in accordance with such procedures as may be established by the Committee
(or its delegate) prior to the beginning of such Offering Period. Unless otherwise
provided by the Committee, any election by a Sub-Plan Participant pursuant to this
Section 6(b) to reduce his or her Contributions to zero shall be deemed to be a withdrawal
by that Sub-Plan Participant from the Sub-Plan for that Offering Period and all
subsequent Offering Periods pursuant to Section 7. If the Sub-Plan Participant wishes to
participate in a succeeding Offering Period, he or she will need to re-enroll in the SubPlan.
(c)
No interest shall accrue on the Contributions of a Sub-Plan Participant.
7.
WITHDRAWAL.
A Sub-Plan Participant may withdraw all but not less than all the Contributions
credited to his or her Cash Account, by giving notice of withdrawal from the Sub-Plan in
accordance with the withdrawal procedures established by the Committee (or its
delegate). All of the Sub-Plan Participant’s Contributions credited to his or her Cash
Account will be paid to him or her promptly after receipt of his or her notice of
withdrawal and his or her participation in the Sub-Plan will be automatically terminated,
and no further Contributions may be made by the Sub-Plan Participant with respect to
that Offering Period. If the Sub-Plan Participant wishes to participate in a succeeding
Offering Period, he or she will need to re-enroll in the Sub-Plan.
8.
TERMINATION.
Upon Termination of Service prior to the Acquisition Date for any reason,
including retirement, Disability or death, the Contributions credited to a Sub-Plan
Participant's Cash Account will be promptly returned to him or her or his or her legal
representatives or heirs, his or her participation will be automatically terminated, and no
further Contributions may be made by the Sub-Plan Participant with respect to that
Offering Period. If a Participating Company ceases to be a Participating Company, each
person employed by that Participating Company will be deemed to have a Termination of
Service for purposes of the Sub-Plan.
9.
GRANT OF RESTRICTED SHARES.
(a)
On each Acquisition Date, each Sub-Plan Participant shall be granted
Restricted Shares under the Plan in consideration of paying the Contributions to the
Company. The number of Restricted Shares granted on each Acquisition Date shall be
determined by dividing such Sub-Plan Participant's Contributions accumulated during the
Offering Period and retained in the Cash Account as of the Acquisition Date by the Fair
Market Value of a Share on the Acquisition Date (the "Base Number") and multiplying
the Base Number by 1.5. If the result is not a whole number, fractional Restricted Shares
will be allocated.
(b)
The Restricted Shares shall be subject to a restriction period of two years
from the Acquisition Date, or such other period of time as determined by the Committee
(the "Sub-Plan Restriction Period"). During the Sub-Plan Restriction Period, the SubPlan Participant has all of the legal rights of a shareholder of the Company, but may not
sell, transfer or otherwise dispose of the Restricted Shares. The Company may require
that Restricted Shares acquired under the Sub-Plan be held in a Stock Account
established in the name of the Sub-Plan Participant, subject to such rules as determined
by the Committee, including designation of a brokerage or other financial services firm to
hold such Restricted Shares. After the lapse of the Sub-Plan Restriction Period, the SubPlan Participant may freely sell, transfer or otherwise dispose of the Shares and is no
longer required to hold the Shares in the Stock Account.
10.
TRANSFERABILITY.
Neither the Contributions credited to a Sub-Plan Participant’s Cash Account nor
any rights with regard to the Restricted Shares that may be granted under the Plan or the
Sub-Plan may be assigned, transferred, pledged or otherwise disposed of in any way
(other than by will, the laws of descent and distribution) by the Sub-Plan Participant.
Any such attempt at assignment, transfer, pledge or other disposition shall be without
effect, except that the Company may treat such act as an election to withdraw funds in
accordance with Section 7.
11.
CORPORATE TRANSACTIONS.
(a)
In the event of the proposed dissolution or liquidation of the Company,
any Offering Period then in progress will terminate immediately prior to the
consummation of such proposed action, unless otherwise provided by the Committee. If
a Sub-Plan Participant’s participation in the Sub-Plan is terminated pursuant to the
preceding sentence, the Contributions then credited to such Sub-Plan Participant’s Cash
Account will be paid to him or her in cash without interest. In the event of a Change in
Control, unless otherwise determined by the Committee, the Sub-Plan shall be assumed
or substituted by the successor corporation or a parent or subsidiary of such successor
corporation, or, if not so assumed or substituted, the Offering Period then in progress
shall be shortened and the Board (or its delegate) shall set a new Acquisition Date (the
“New Acquisition Date”). The New Acquisition Date shall be on or before the date of
consummation of the transaction and the Committee (or its delegate) shall notify each
Sub-Plan Participant in writing, at least ten (10) days prior to the New Acquisition Date,
that the Acquisition Date has been changed to the New Acquisition Date, unless prior to
such date he or she has withdrawn from the Offering Period as provided in Section 8.
(b)
The treatment of Restricted Shares in the event of a Change in Control
shall be as set forth in the Plan, except that contrary to Section 14.1.2. of the Plan, the
restrictions applicable to Restricted Shares granted under the Sub-Plan shall not lapse in
the event of a Change in Control (unless the Committee (or its delegate) decides
otherwise).
12.
AMENDMENT OR TERMINATION.
(a)
The Committee may at any time and for any reason terminate or amend
the Sub-Plan.
(b)
Without regard to whether any Sub-Plan Participant's rights may be
considered to have been adversely affected, the Committee (or its delegate) shall be
entitled to change the Offering Periods, establish the exchange ratio applicable to
Contributions made in a currency other than U.S. dollars, permit payroll deductions in
excess of the rate designated by a Sub-Plan Participant in order to adjust for delays or
mistakes in the Company’s processing of properly completed Contribution elections,
establish reasonable waiting and adjustment periods and/or accounting and crediting
procedures to ensure that Contributions made under the Sub-Plan properly correspond
with deductions made from the Sub-Plan Participant’s Base Pay, and establish such other
limitations or procedures as the Committee determines in its sole discretion advisable
which are consistent with the Plan.
KELLOGG COMPANY 2013 LONG-TERM INCENTIVE PLAN
1.
PURPOSE. The purpose of the 2013 Long-Term Incentive Plan is to further and
promote the interests of Kellogg Company, its Subsidiaries and its shareowners by enabling
the Company and its Subsidiaries to attract, retain and motivate employees and officers or
those who will become employees or officers, and to align the interests of those individuals
and the Company’s shareowners. To do this, the Plan offers performance-based incentive
awards and equity-based opportunities providing such employees and officers with a
proprietary interest in maximizing the growth, profitability and overall success of the
Company and its Subsidiaries.
2.
DEFINITIONS. Unless the context clearly indicates otherwise, for purposes of the
Plan, the following terms shall have the following meanings:
2.1.
“10% Shareowner” has the meaning set forth in Section 6.2.
2.2.
“Award” means an award or grant made to a Participant under Sections 6, 7,
8 and/or 9 of the Plan.
2.3.
“Award Agreement” means the written agreement executed by a Participant
pursuant to Sections 3.2 and 16.7 of the Plan in connection with the granting of an Award.
2.4.
2.5.
time to time.
“Base Value” has the meaning set forth in Section 7.2.
“Board” means the Board of Directors of the Company, as constituted from
2.6.
“Cause” means, unless otherwise determined by the Committee in the
applicable Award Agreement, the following: (i) in the case where there is no employment
agreement, change in control agreement or similar agreement in effect between the
Company or any Subsidiary and the Participant at the time of the grant of the Award (or
where there is such an agreement but it does not define “cause” (or words of like import)),
termination due to: (a) the willful and continued failure of the Participant to perform
substantially the Participant's duties with the Company or any entity controlled by, controlling
or under common control with the Company (other than any such failure resulting from
incapacity due to physical or mental illness), after a written demand for substantial
performance is delivered to the Participant by the Board or the Chief Executive Officer of the
Company which specifically identifies the manner in which the Board or the Chief Executive
Officer believes that the Participant has not substantially performed the Participant's duties;
or (b) the willful engaging by the Participant in illegal conduct or gross misconduct which is
materially and demonstrably injurious to the Company or any entity controlled by, controlling
or under common control with the Company; provided, however, that no act, or failure to act,
on the part of the Participant shall be considered "willful" unless it is done, or omitted to be
done, by the Participant in bad faith or without reasonable belief that the Participant's action
or omission was in the best interests of the Company or any entity controlled by, controlling
or under common control with the Company; provided, further, that any act, or failure to act,
based upon authority given pursuant to a resolution duly adopted by the Board or upon the
instructions of the Chief Executive Officer of the Company or a senior officer of the Company
or based upon the advice of counsel for the Company or any entity controlled by, controlling
or under common control with the Company shall be conclusively presumed to be done, or
omitted to be done, by the Participant in good faith and in the best interests of the Company
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or any entity controlled by, controlling or under common control with the Company; or (ii) in
the case where there is an employment agreement, change in control agreement or similar
agreement in effect between the Company or any Subsidiary and the Participant at the time
of the grant of the Award that defines “cause” (or words of like import), “cause” as defined
under such agreement.
2.7.
“Change in Control” has the meaning set forth in Section 14.2.
2.8.
“Change in Control Price” has the meaning set forth in Section 13.3
2.9.
“Code” means the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as in effect and as
amended from time to time, or any successor statute thereto, together with any rules,
regulations and interpretations promulgated thereunder or with respect thereto.
2.10. “Collective Awards” means Awards together with any awards issued under
Old Plans as of the Effective Date.
2.11. “Committee” means the committee of the Board designated to administer the
Plan, as described in Section 3 of the Plan.
2.12. “Common Stock” means the Common Stock, par value $0.25 per share, of
the Company or any security of the Company issued by the Company in substitution or
exchange therefor.
2.13. “Company” means Kellogg Company, a Delaware corporation, or any
successor corporation to Kellogg Company.
2.14.
“Covered Employee” has the meaning set forth in Section 9.6.
2.15.
“Director” means a director of the Company.
2.16. “Disability” means disability as defined in the Participant’s then effective
employment agreement, or if the Participant is not then a party to an effective employment
agreement with the Company which defines disability, “Disability” means disability as
determined by the Committee in accordance with standards and procedures similar to those
under the Company’s long-term disability plan, if any. Subject to the first sentence of this
Section 2.15, at any time that the Company does not maintain a long-term disability plan,
“Disability” shall mean any physical or mental disability which is determined to be total and
permanent by a physician selected in good faith by the Company. Notwithstanding the
foregoing, for purposes of Incentive Stock Options “Disability” shall mean a permanent and
total disability as defined in Section 22(e)(3) of the Code, and for purposes of any Award that
is subject to Section 409A of the Code, “Disability” shall mean that a Participant is “disabled”
under Section 409A(a)(2)(c)(i) or (ii) of the Code.
2.17.
“Effective Date” has the meaning set forth in Section 16.11.
2.18. “Exchange Act” means the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as in effect and
as amended from time to time, or any successor statute thereto, together with any rules,
regulations and interpretations promulgated thereunder or with respect thereto.
2.19.
“Exercise Value” has the meaning set forth in Section 7.2.
2
2.20. “Fair Market Value” on any date means (a) the officially quoted closing price
in the primary trading session for a share of the Common Stock on the New York Stock
Exchange-Composite Transactions Tape or on any other stock exchange, if any, on which
the Common Stock is primarily traded (or if no shares of the Common Stock were traded on
such date, then on the most recent previous date on which any shares of the Common Stock
were so traded), or (b) if clause (a) is not applicable, the value of a share of the Common
Stock for such date as established by the Committee, using any reasonable method of
valuation consistent with the requirements of Section 409A of the Code.
2.21. “Good Reason” means, unless otherwise determined by the Committee in
the applicable Award Agreement, the following: (i) in the case where there is no employment
agreement, change in control agreement or similar agreement in effect between the
Company or any Subsidiary and the Participant at the time of the grant of the Award (or
where there is such an agreement but it does not define “good reason” (or words of like
import)), termination due to: (a) a diminution in any material respect of the Participant's
position (including status, offices, titles and reporting requirements), authority, duties or
responsibilities from those in effect immediately prior to the Change in Control, excluding for
this purpose an isolated, insubstantial and inadvertent action not taken in bad faith and that is
remedied by the Company and/or or any entity controlled by, controlling or under common
control with the Company promptly after receipt of notice thereof given by the Participant; (b)
a decrease in the Participant's Annual Base Salary (as defined below) or a decrease in the
Participant's target Annual Bonus (as defined below) percentage from the target Annual
Bonus percentage in effect for such Participant immediately prior to the Change in Control or,
if higher, the date of receipt of the notice of termination by the Participant (excluding a
decrease in target Annual Bonus percentage resulting from an across-the-board change to
the applicable bonus plan or policy which generally has an equal impact on the other senior
executives of the Company and any entity controlled by, controlling or under common control
with the Company); or (c) the Company's or any entity controlled by, controlling or under
common control with the Company requiring the Participant to be based at any office or
location, other than the office or location where the Participant was based and performed
services immediately prior to the Change in Control, that is not reasonably commutable by
the Participant on a daily basis; provided, that any good faith determination of Good Reason
made by the Participant shall be conclusive; or (ii) in the case where there is an employment
agreement, change in control agreement or similar agreement in effect between the
Company or any Subsidiary and the Participant at the time of the grant of the Award that
defines “good reason” (or words of like import), “good reason” as defined under such
agreement. For purposes of this definition, “Annual Base Salary“ means twelve times the
higher of (i) the highest monthly base salary paid or payable to the Participant by the
Company and any entity controlled by, controlling or under common control with the
Company in respect of the twelve-month period immediately preceding the month in which
the Change in Control occurs, and (ii) the highest monthly base salary in effect at any time
thereafter, in each case including any base salary that has been earned and deferred. For
purposes of this definition, “Annual Bonus“ means the annual cash bonus awarded to the
Participant in respect of a fiscal year under the Company's or any entity controlled by,
controlling or under common control with the Company’s annual incentive plans, or any
comparable bonus under any predecessor or successor plans.
2.22. “Incentive Stock Option” means any stock option granted pursuant to the
provisions of Section 6 of the Plan (and the relevant Award Agreement) that is intended to be
(and is specifically designated as) an “incentive stock option” within the meaning of
Section 422 of the Code.
3
2.23.
“Incumbent Board” has the meaning set forth in Section 14.2.
2.24.
“Merger Event” has the meaning set forth in Section 13.3.
2.25. “Net Exercise” means a Participant’s ability to exercise a Stock Option by
directing the Company to deduct from the shares of Common Stock issuable upon exercise
of his or her Stock Option a number of shares of Common Stock having an aggregate Fair
Market Value equal to the sum of the aggregate exercise price therefor plus the amount of
the Participant’s minimum tax withholding (if any), whereupon the Company shall issue to the
Participant the net remaining number of shares of Common Stock after such deductions.
2.26. “Non-Employee Director” means a director of the Company who is a
“nonemployee director” within the meaning of Rule 16b-3 promulgated under the Exchange
Act.
2.27. “Non-Qualified Stock Option” means any Stock Option granted pursuant to
the provisions of Section 6 of the Plan (and the relevant Award Agreement) that is not an
Incentive Stock Option.
2.28. “Old Plans” means the Kellogg Company 2001 Long-Term Incentive Plan, the
Kellogg Company 2003 Long-Term Incentive Plan and the Kellogg Company 2009 LongTerm Incentive Plan.
2.29. “Other Cash-Based Award” means an Award granted pursuant to Section
9.8 and payable in cash at such time or times and subject to such terms and conditions as
determined by the Committee in its sole discretion.
2.30. “Outside Director” means a director of the Company who is an “outside
director” within the meaning of Section 162(m) of the Code.
2.31. “Outstanding Company Common Stock” has the meaning set forth in
Section 14.2.
2.32. “Outstanding Company Voting Securities” has the meaning set forth in
Section 14.2.
2.33. “Participant” means any individual who is selected from time to time under
Section 5 to receive an Award under the Plan.
2.34. “Performance-Based Compensation” means any Award that is intended to
constitute “performance-based compensation” within the meaning of Code Section
162(m)(4)(C).
2.35. “Performance Share Unit” or “Performance Share” means an Award
granted pursuant to the provisions of Section 9 of the Plan and the relevant Award
Agreement, or a Restricted Share Unit or Restricted Share intended to be PerformanceBased Compensation.
2.36. “Performance Unit” means an Award granted pursuant to the provisions of
Section 9 of the Plan and the relevant Award Agreement.
2.37.
“Person” has the meaning set forth in Section 14.2.
4
2.38. “Plan” means this Kellogg Company 2013 Long-Term Incentive Plan, as set
forth herein and as in effect and as amended from time to time (together with any rules and
regulations promulgated by the Committee with respect thereto).
2.39. “Restricted Shares” means an Award of restricted shares of Common Stock
granted pursuant to the provisions of Section 8 of the Plan and the relevant Award
Agreement.
2.40. “Restricted Share Units” means an Award granted pursuant to the
provisions of Section 8 of the Plan and the relevant Award Agreement.
2.41.
“Restriction Period” has the meaning set forth in Section 8.3.
2.42. “Retirement” means the voluntary termination by the Participant from active
employment with the Company and its Subsidiaries on or after the attainment of normal
retirement age under Company-sponsored pension or retirement plans, or any other age with
the consent of the Committee.
2.43. “Section 16 Officer” means an “officer” as such term is defined in Rule 16a1(f) of the Exchange Act.
2.44. “Stock Appreciation Right” means an Award described in Section 7.2 of the
Plan and granted pursuant to the provisions of Section 7 of the Plan.
2.45.
“Stock Option” means a Non-Qualified Stock Option or an Incentive Stock
Option.
2.46. “Subsidiary(ies)” means any corporation or other entity of which outstanding
shares or ownership interests representing 50% or more of the combined voting power of
such corporation or other entity entitled to elect the management thereof, or such lesser
percentage as may be approved by the Committee, are owned directly or indirectly by the
Company. Notwithstanding the foregoing, for purposes of Incentive Stock Options,
“Subsidiary” means any subsidiary corporation of the Company within the meaning of Section
424(f) of the Code.
3.
ADMINISTRATION.
3.1.
The Committee. The Plan shall be administered by the Compensation
Committee of the Board, as constituted from time to time. The Committee shall consist of
two or more non-employee directors, each of whom shall be (i) a “non-employee director” as
defined in Rule 16b-3 of the Exchange Act; (ii) to the extent required by Section 162(m) of the
Code, an “outside director” as defined under Section 162(m) of the Code; and (iii) an
“independent director” as defined under Section 303A of the Listed Company Manual of the
New York Stock Exchange or such other applicable stock exchange rule. To the extent no
Committee exists that has the authority to administer this Plan, the functions of the
Committee shall be exercised by the Board. If for any reason the appointed Committee does
not meet the requirements of Rule 16b-3 of the Exchange Act, Section 162(m) of the Code or
Section 303A of the Listed Company Manual, such noncompliance shall not affect the validity
of Awards, grants, interpretations or other actions of the Committee.
3.2.
Plan Administration and Plan Rules. The Committee is authorized to
construe and interpret the Plan and to promulgate, amend and rescind rules and regulations
5
relating to the implementation, administration and maintenance of the Plan. Subject to the
terms and conditions of the Plan, the Committee shall make all determinations necessary or
advisable for the implementation, administration and maintenance of the Plan including,
without limitation, (a) selecting the Plan’s Participants, (b) making Awards in such amounts
and form as the Committee shall determine, (c) imposing such restrictions, terms and
conditions upon such Awards as the Committee shall deem appropriate, and (d) correcting
any technical defect(s) or technical omission(s), or reconciling any technical
inconsistency(ies), in the Plan and/or any Award Agreement. Subject to applicable law, the
Committee may designate persons other than members of the Committee to carry out the
day-to-day ministerial administration of the Plan under such conditions and limitations as it
may prescribe. Subject to the requirements of Section 157(c) of the Delaware General
Corporation Law (or any successor statute), the Committee may, in its sole discretion,
delegate its authority to one or more senior executive officers for the purpose of making
Awards to Participants who are not Section 16 Officers, but no officer of the Company shall
have the authority to grant Awards to himself or herself. Any such delegation shall be made
by resolution of the Board and such resolution shall set forth the total number of shares of
Common Stock that may be subject to Awards granted pursuant to such delegation. The
Committee’s determinations under the Plan need not be uniform and may be made
selectively among Participants, whether or not such Participants are similarly situated. Any
determination, decision or action of the Committee in connection with the construction,
interpretation, administration, implementation or maintenance of the Plan shall be final,
conclusive and binding upon all Participants and any person(s) claiming under or through any
Participants. The Company shall effect the granting of Awards under the Plan, in accordance
with the determinations made by the Committee, by execution of Award Agreements in such
form as is approved by the Committee.
3.3.
Liability Limitation. Neither the Board, the Committee, nor any member of
either, nor any of their designees, shall be liable for any act, omission, interpretation,
construction or determination made in good faith in connection with the Plan (or any Award
Agreement) or any transaction hereunder, and the members of the Board and the Committee
shall be entitled to indemnification and reimbursement by the Company in respect of any
claim, loss, damage or expense (including, without limitation, attorneys’ fees) arising or
resulting therefrom to the fullest extent permitted by law and/or under any directors and
officers liability insurance coverage which may be in effect from time to time.
4.
TERM OF PLAN/COMMON STOCK SUBJECT TO PLAN.
4.1.
Limitations for Incentive Stock Options. Incentive Stock Options may not
be granted following February 22, 2023, which is the ten-year anniversary of the Board’s
adoption of the Plan. The maximum number of shares of Common Stock that may be issued
pursuant to the grant of Incentive Stock Options under the Plan shall be 22,000,000 shares
(as may be adjusted pursuant to Section 13.2), without regard to the provisions of Section
4.2(ii).
4.2.
Limitations for Common Stock.
(i)
The maximum number of shares of Common Stock in respect of which
Awards may be granted or paid out under the Plan, subject to
adjustment as provided in this Section, Section 4.3 and Section 13.2 of
the Plan, shall not exceed 22,000,000 shares, plus the aggregate
number of shares of Common Stock described in Section 4.2(ii).
6
4.3.
(ii)
Any shares of Common Stock that are subject to Collective Awards
that expire or lapse or are forfeited, surrendered, cancelled, terminated
or settled in cash in lieu of Common Stock shall again be available for
Awards under the Plan, subject to the provisions of Section 4.3, to the
extent of such expiration, forfeiture, surrender, cancellation,
termination or settlement of such Collective Awards (as may be
adjusted pursuant to Section 13.2). Shares of Common Stock that as
of the Effective Date have not been issued under either the Kellogg
Company 2001 Long-Term Incentive Plan or the Kellogg Company
2003 Long-Term Incentive Plan, and are not covered by outstanding
awards under such plans granted on or before the Effective Date, shall
not be available for Awards under the Plan. Shares of Common Stock
that as of the Effective Date have not been issued under the Kellogg
Company 2009 Long-Term Incentive Plan, and are not covered by
outstanding awards under such plan granted on or before the Effective
Date, shall be available for Awards under the Plan.
(iii)
Common Stock which may be issued under the Plan may be either
authorized and unissued shares or issued shares which have been
reacquired by the Company (in the open-market or in private
transactions) and which are being held as treasury shares. No
fractional shares of Common Stock shall be issued under the Plan, and
the Committee shall determine the manner in which fractional share
value shall be treated.
(iv)
In the event of a change in the Common Stock of the Company that is
limited to a change in the designation thereof to “Capital Stock” or
other similar designation, or to a change in the par value thereof, or
from par value to no par value, without increase or decrease in the
number of issued shares, the shares resulting from any such change
shall be deemed to be the Common Stock for purposes of the Plan.
Computation of Available Shares.
(i)
For the purpose of computing the total number of shares of Common
Stock available for Awards under the Plan, there shall be counted
against the limitations set forth in Section 4.2 of the Plan (subject to the
remainder of this Section and Section 13.2) the maximum number of
shares of Common Stock issued upon exercise or settlement of
Awards granted under Sections 6 and 7 of the Plan and the number of
shares of Common Stock issued under grants of Restricted Shares,
Restricted Share Units and Performance Share Units pursuant to
Sections 8 and 9 of the Plan, in each case determined as of the date
on which such Awards are issued; provided, however, that (A) the total
number of shares remaining available for issuance under the Plan shall
be reduced by 2.0 shares for each share issued pursuant to an Award
other than a Stock Option or a Stock Appreciation Right, or potentially
issuable pursuant to an outstanding Award other than a Stock Option
or a Stock Appreciation Right, and (B) Awards granted in connection
with the assumption of, or in substitution or exchange for, outstanding
awards granted by a company or other entity acquired by the Company
or any Subsidiary or with which the Company or any Subsidiary
7
combines shall not reduce the maximum number of shares of Common
Stock remaining available for issuance under the Plan.
(ii)
In the event that any shares of Common Stock are withheld by the
Company or shares of Common Stock that are already owned by the
Participant are tendered (either actually or by attestation) by a
Participant to satisfy any tax withholding obligation pursuant to Section
16.1 with respect to an Award or a Collective Award other than a Stock
Option or Stock Appreciation Right, then the shares so tendered or
withheld shall automatically again become available for issuance under
the Plan and correspondingly increase the total number of shares
available for issuance under Section 4.2 in accordance with the same
ratio specified in clause (A) of the proviso in Section 4.3(i).
Notwithstanding anything to the contrary in this Section 4.3(ii), the
following shares of Common Stock will not again become available for
issuance under the Plan: (I) any shares which would have been
issued upon any exercise of a Stock Option but for the fact that the
exercise price was paid by a Net Exercise pursuant to Section 6.5 or
any shares of Common Stock that are already owned by the
Participant are tendered (either actually or by attestation) by a
Participant in payment of the exercise price of a Stock Option; (II) any
shares withheld by the Company or shares of Common Stock that are
already owned by the Participant are tendered (either actually or by
attestation) by a Participant to satisfy any tax withholding obligation
with respect to a Stock Option or Stock Appreciation Right or a
Collective Award that is a Stock Option or Stock Appreciation Right;
(III) shares covered by a Stock Appreciation Right issued under the
Plan or the Old Plans that are not issued in connection with the stock
settlement of the Stock Appreciation Right upon its exercise; or (IV)
shares that are repurchased by the Company using Stock Option
exercise proceeds.
4.4.
Maximum Yearly Awards. The maximum annual Common Stock amounts in
this Section 4.4 are subject to adjustment under Section 13.2 and are subject to the Plan
maximum determined pursuant to Sections 4.2 and 4.3.
4.4.1 Stock Options and Stock Appreciation Rights. The maximum
number of shares of Common Stock that may be subject to Awards of Stock Options or Stock
Appreciation Rights to any Participant in any calendar year under the Plan shall not exceed
2,000,000 shares of Common Stock.
4.4.2 Restricted Shares and Restricted Share Units. There is no annual
individual share limitation for Awards of Restricted Shares or Restricted Share Units which
are not intended to be Performance-Based Compensation.
4.4.3 Performance Share Units. The maximum number of shares of
Common Stock that may be subject to Performance Share Units granted to any Participant in
any calendar year under the Plan shall not exceed 1,000,000 shares of Common Stock.
4.4.4 Performance Units. The maximum cash amount payable under any
Performance Unit intended to be Performance-Based Compensation to any Participant for
any calendar year shall be $10 million.
8
4.4.5 Other Cash-Based Awards. The maximum cash amount payable
under any Other Cash-Based Award intended to be Performance-Based Compensation to
any Participant for any calendar year shall be $6 million.
4.5.
Minimum Purchase Price. Notwithstanding any provision of the Plan to the
contrary, if authorized but previously unissued shares of Common Stock are issued under the
Plan, such shares shall not be issued for consideration that is less than as permitted under
applicable law.
5.
ELIGIBILITY.
5.1.
General. Individuals eligible for Awards under the Plan shall consist of
employees, officers and directors or those who will become employees, officers or directors
of the Company and/or its Subsidiaries whose performance or contribution, in the sole
discretion of the Committee, benefits or will benefit the Company or any Subsidiary.
5.2.
Minimum Vesting Requirements. Notwithstanding any other provision in the
Plan to the contrary, except as otherwise provided in this Section 5.2, (i) Restricted Shares
and Restricted Share Units that vest solely as a result of the passage of time and continued
service by the Participant shall be subject to a vesting period of not less than three years
from the date of grant of the applicable Award (but permitting pro rata vesting over such
time); and (ii) Restricted Shares, Restricted Share Units, Performance Shares and
Performance Share Units whose vesting is subject to the achievement of specified
Performance Goals over a performance period shall be subject to a performance period of
not less than one year from the date of grant of the applicable Award. The minimum vesting
periods specified in clauses (i) and (ii) of the preceding sentence shall not apply: (A) to
Awards made in payment of earned performance-based Awards and other earned cashbased incentive compensation; (B) to a termination of employment due to death, Disability or
Retirement; (C) upon a Change in Control; (D) to Awards granted in connection with the
assumption of, or in substitution or exchange for, outstanding awards granted by a company
or other entity acquired by the Company or any Subsidiary or with which the Company or any
Subsidiary combines that does not reduce the vesting period of the award being replaced; or
(E) to Awards involving an aggregate number of shares of Common Stock not in excess of
five (5) percent of the number of shares available for Awards under the first sentence of
Section 4.2(i).
6.
STOCK OPTIONS.
6.1.
Terms and Conditions. Stock Options granted under the Plan shall be in
respect of Common Stock and may be in the form of Incentive Stock Options or NonQualified Stock Options. Such Stock Options shall be subject to the terms and conditions set
forth in this Section 6 and any additional terms and conditions, not inconsistent with the
express terms and provisions of the Plan, as the Committee shall set forth in the relevant
Award Agreement.
6.2.
Grant. Stock Options may be granted under the Plan in such form as the
Committee may from time to time approve. Stock Options may be granted alone or in
addition to other Awards under the Plan or in tandem with Stock Appreciation Rights.
Additional provisions shall apply to Incentive Stock Options granted to any employee who
owns (within the meaning of Section 422(b)(6) of the Code) more than ten percent (10%) of
the total combined voting power of all classes of stock of the Company or its parent
9
corporation or any Subsidiary of the Company, within the meaning of Sections 424(e) and
(f) of the Code (a “10% Shareowner”).
6.3.
Exercise Price. The exercise price per share of Common Stock subject to a
Stock Option shall be determined by the Committee; provided, however, that the exercise
price of a Stock Option shall not be less than one hundred percent (100%) of the Fair Market
Value of the Common Stock on the grant date of such Stock Option; provided, further,
however, that, in the case of a 10% Shareowner, the exercise price of an Incentive Stock
Option shall not be less than one hundred ten percent (110%) of the Fair Market Value of the
Common Stock on the grant date.
6.4.
Term. The term of each Stock Option shall be such period of time as is fixed
by the Committee; provided, however, that the term of any Stock Option shall not exceed ten
(10) years (five (5) years, in the case of a 10% Shareowner receiving an Incentive Stock
Option) after the date immediately preceding the date on which the Stock Option is granted.
6.5.
Method of Exercise. A Stock Option may be exercised, in whole or in part, by
giving written notice of exercise to the Secretary of the Company, or the Secretary’s
designee, specifying the number of shares to be purchased. Such notice shall be
accompanied by payment in full of the exercise price. The methods of payment permitted by
this Plan for payment in full of the aggregate exercise price of a Stock Option are as follows:
(i) by cash, certified check, bank draft, electronic transfer, or money order payable to the
order of the Company, (ii) if permitted by the Committee in its sole discretion, by surrendering
(or attesting to the ownership of) shares of Common Stock already owned by the Participant,
(iii) pursuant to a Net Exercise arrangement; provided, however, that in such event, the
Committee may exercise its discretion to limit the use of a Net Exercise solely with respect to
the portion of such payment required to be made with respect to tax withholding, or (iv) if
permitted by the Committee (in its sole discretion) and applicable law, by delivery of, alone or
in conjunction with a partial cash or instrument payment, some other form of payment
acceptable to the Committee. Payment instruments shall be received by the Company
subject to collection. The proceeds received by the Company upon exercise of any Stock
Option may be used by the Company for general corporate purposes. Any portion of a Stock
Option that is exercised may not be exercised again. The shares issued to an optionee for
the portion of any Stock Option exercised by attesting to the ownership of shares shall not
exceed the number of shares issuable as a result of such exercise (determined as though
payment in full therefor were being made in cash) less the number of shares for which
attestation of ownership is submitted. The value of owned shares submitted (directly or by
attestation) in full or partial payment for the shares purchased upon exercise of a Stock
Option shall be equal to the aggregate Fair Market Value of such owned shares on the date
of the exercise of such Stock Option.
6.6.
Exercisability. Any Stock Option granted under the Plan shall become
exercisable on such date or dates, or based on the attainment of such performance goals, as
determined by the Committee (in its sole discretion) at any time and from time to time in
respect of such Stock Option, and as set forth in the applicable Award Agreement.
Notwithstanding anything to the contrary contained in this Section 6.6, unless otherwise
provided in an Award Agreement, such Stock Option shall become one hundred percent
(100%) vested and exercisable as to the aggregate number of shares of Common Stock
underlying such Stock Option upon the death, Disability or Retirement of the Participant.
6.7.
Tandem Grants. If Non-Qualified Stock Options and Stock Appreciation
Rights are granted in tandem, as designated in the relevant Award Agreements, the right of a
10
Participant to exercise any such tandem Stock Option shall terminate to the extent that the
shares of Common Stock subject to such Stock Option are used to calculate amounts or
shares receivable upon the exercise of the related tandem Stock Appreciation Right.
6.8.
No Reload Provision. Stock Options granted under this Plan shall not contain
any provision entitling the optionee to the automatic grant of additional Stock Options in
connection with any exercise of the original Stock Option.
7.
STOCK APPRECIATION RIGHTS.
7.1.
Terms and Conditions. The grant of Stock Appreciation Rights under the
Plan shall be subject to the terms and conditions set forth in this Section 7 and any additional
terms and conditions, not inconsistent with the express terms and provisions of the Plan, as
the Committee shall set forth in the relevant Award Agreement.
7.2.
Stock Appreciation Rights. A Stock Appreciation Right is an Award granted
with respect to a specified number of shares of Common Stock, as shall be determined by
the Committee, entitling a Participant to receive an amount equal to the excess of the Fair
Market Value of a share of Common Stock on the date of exercise (the “Exercise Value”)
over the Fair Market Value of a share of Common Stock on the grant date of the Stock
Appreciation Right (the “Base Value”), multiplied by the number of shares of Common Stock
with respect to which the Stock Appreciation Right shall have been exercised. In the case of
a Stock Appreciation Right related to a Stock Option described in Section 6.7, the Base
Value shall be the purchase price of a share of Common Stock under the Stock Option,
provided, however, such amount may not be less than the Fair Market Value of the Common
Stock on the date the Stock Appreciation Right is awarded. The Base Value of a Stock
Appreciation Right shall not be less than one hundred percent (100%) of the Fair Market
Value of the Common Stock on the grant date of such Stock Appreciation Right.
7.3.
Grant. A Stock Appreciation Right may be granted in addition to any other
Award under the Plan or in tandem with or independent of a Non-Qualified Stock Option.
7.4.
Term. The term of each Stock Appreciation Right shall be such period of time
as is fixed by the Committee; provided, however, that the term of any Stock Appreciation
Right shall not exceed ten (10) years after the date immediately preceding the date on which
the Stock Appreciation Right is granted.
7.5.
Date of Exercisability. In respect of any Stock Appreciation Right granted
under the Plan, unless otherwise (a) determined by the Committee (in its sole discretion) at
any time and from time to time in respect of any such Stock Appreciation Right, or
(b) provided in the Award Agreement, a Stock Appreciation Right may be exercised by a
Participant, in accordance with and subject to all of the procedures established by the
Committee, in whole or in part at such time or times and/or based on the achievement of
such performance goals as determined by the Committee in its sole discretion.
Notwithstanding the preceding sentence, in no event shall a Stock Appreciation Right be
exercisable prior to the exercisability of any Non-Qualified Stock Option with which it is
granted in tandem. The Committee may also provide, as set forth in the relevant Award
Agreement and without limitation, that some Stock Appreciation Rights shall be automatically
exercised and settled on one or more fixed dates specified therein by the Committee.
7.6.
Form of Payment. Upon exercise of a Stock Appreciation Right, payment
may be made to the Participant in respect thereof in cash, in Restricted Shares or in shares
11
of unrestricted Common Stock, or in any combination thereof, as the Committee, in its sole
discretion, shall determine and provide in the relevant Award Agreement.
7.7.
Tandem Grant. The right of a Participant to exercise a tandem Stock
Appreciation Right shall terminate to the extent such Participant exercises the Non-Qualified
Stock Option to which such Stock Appreciation Right is related.
8.
RESTRICTED SHARES AND RESTRICTED SHARE UNITS.
8.1.
Restricted Share and Restricted Share Unit Grants. A grant of Restricted
Shares is an Award of shares of Common Stock granted to a Participant, subject to such
restrictions, terms and conditions as the Committee deems appropriate, including, without
limitation, (a) restrictions on the sale, assignment, transfer, hypothecation or other disposition
of such shares, (b) the requirement that the Participant deposit such shares with the
Company while such shares are subject to such restrictions, and (c) the requirement that
such shares be forfeited upon termination of employment for specified reasons within a
specified period of time or for other reasons (including, without limitation, the failure to
achieve designated performance goals). A grant of Restricted Share Units is a notional
Award of shares of Common Stock which entitle the Participant to a number of unrestricted
shares of Common Stock equal to (or a cash amount equal in value to such number of
unrestricted shares of Common Stock) the number of Restricted Share Units upon the lapse
of similar restrictions, terms and conditions.
8.2.
Terms and Conditions. Grants of Restricted Shares and Restricted Share
Units shall be subject to the terms and conditions set forth in this Section 8 and any
additional terms and conditions, not inconsistent with the express terms and provisions of the
Plan, as the Committee shall set forth in the relevant Award Agreement. Restricted Shares
and Restricted Share Units may be granted alone or in addition to any other Awards under
the Plan. Subject to the terms of the Plan, the Committee shall determine the number of
Restricted Shares and Restricted Share Units to be granted to a Participant and the
Committee may provide or impose different terms and conditions on any particular Restricted
Share or Restricted Share Units grant made to any Participant. With respect to each
Participant receiving an Award of Restricted Shares, there shall be issued a stock certificate
(or certificates) in respect of such Restricted Shares. Such stock certificate(s) shall be
registered in the name of such Participant, shall be accompanied by a stock power duly
executed by such Participant, and shall bear, among other required legends, the following
legend:
“The transferability of this certificate and the shares of stock represented hereby are
subject to the terms and conditions (including, without limitation, forfeiture events)
contained in the Kellogg Company 2013 Long-Term Incentive Plan and an Award
Agreement entered into between the registered owner hereof and Kellogg Company.
Copies of such Plan and Award Agreement are on file in the office of the Secretary of
Kellogg Company, One Kellogg Square, Battle Creek, MI 49016. Kellogg Company
will furnish to the recordholder of the certificate, without charge and upon written
request at its principal place of business, a copy of such Plan and Award Agreement.
Kellogg Company reserves the right to refuse to record the transfer of this certificate
until all such restrictions are satisfied, all such terms are complied with and all such
conditions are satisfied.”
Such stock certificate evidencing such shares shall, in the sole discretion of the Committee,
be deposited with and held in custody by the Company until the restrictions thereon shall
12
have lapsed and all of the terms and conditions applicable to such grant shall have been
satisfied. With respect to each Participant receiving an Award of Restricted Share Units that
is settled in shares of Common Stock, there shall be issued a stock certificate (or certificates)
in respect of the underlying shares of Common Stock upon the lapse of the restrictions
associated with such Restricted Share Units.
8.3.
Restriction Period. In accordance with Sections 8.1 and 8.2 of the Plan and
unless otherwise determined by the Committee (in its sole discretion) at any time and from
time to time, Restricted Shares and Restricted Share Units shall only become unrestricted
and vested in accordance with the vesting schedule relating to such Restricted Shares and
Restricted Share Units, if any, as the Committee may establish in the relevant Award
Agreement, which may be based on the lapse of a specified time period or periods or on the
attainment of specified performance goals (the “Restriction Period”). During the Restriction
Period, such Restricted Shares and the underlying shares of Common Stock with respect to
the Restricted Share Units shall be and remain unvested and a Participant may not sell,
assign, transfer, pledge, encumber or otherwise dispose of or hypothecate such Award. Upon
satisfaction of the vesting schedule and any other applicable restrictions, terms and
conditions, the Participant shall be entitled to receive payment of the Restricted Shares or a
portion thereof, as the case may be, as provided in Section 8.4 of the Plan. Restricted Share
Units may be paid in cash, shares of Common Stock or any combination thereof, as
determined by the Committee. To the extent that any Restricted Share Award or Restricted
Share Unit Award is intended to be Performance-Based Compensation, such Award shall be
subject to the provisions of Sections 9.4, 9.6 and 9.7, and the certification requirements
contained in Section 9.5.
8.4.
Payment of Restricted Share and Restricted Share Unit Grants. After the
satisfaction and/or lapse of the restrictions, terms and conditions established by the
Committee in respect of a grant of Restricted Shares, a new or additional certificate, without
the legend set forth in Section 8.2 of the Plan, for the number of shares of Common Stock
which are no longer subject (or deemed subject) to such restrictions, terms and conditions
shall, as soon as practicable thereafter, be delivered to the Participant. Restricted Share
Units may be paid or settled in cash or in shares of Common Stock, or in combination
thereof, as the Committee, in its sole discretion, shall determine and provide in the relevant
Award Agreement.
8.5.
Shareowner Rights. A Participant shall have, with respect to the shares of
Common Stock underlying a grant of Restricted Shares (but not under Restricted Share
Units), all of the rights of a shareowner of such shares (except as such rights are limited or
restricted under the Plan or in the relevant Award Agreement).
9.
PERFORMANCE UNITS AND PERFORMANCE SHARE UNITS AND OTHER
CASH-BASED AWARDS.
9.1.
Terms and Conditions. Performance Units and Performance Share Units
shall be subject to the terms and conditions set forth in this Section 9 and any additional
terms and conditions, not inconsistent with the express provisions of the Plan, as the
Committee shall set forth in the relevant Award Agreement.
9.2.
Performance Unit and Performance Share Unit Grants. A grant of
Performance Units is a notional Award of units (with each unit representing such monetary
amount or value as is designated by the Committee in the Award Agreement) granted to a
Participant, subject to such terms and conditions as the Committee deems appropriate,
13
including, without limitation, the requirement that the Participant forfeit such units (or a portion
thereof) in the event certain performance criteria or other conditions are not met within a
designated period of time. A grant of Performance Share Units is an Award of actual or
notional shares of Common Stock which entitle the Participant to a number of shares of
Common Stock equal to the number of Performance Share Units upon achievement of
specified performance goals and such other terms and conditions as the Committee deems
appropriate.
9.3.
Grants. Performance Units and Performance Share Units may be granted
alone or in addition to any other Awards under the Plan. Subject to the terms of the Plan, the
Committee shall determine the number of Performance Units and Performance Share Units
to be granted to a Participant and the Committee may impose different terms and conditions
on any particular Performance Units and Performance Share Units granted to any
Participant.
9.4.
Performance Goals and Performance Periods. Participants receiving a
grant of Performance Units and Performance Share Units shall be entitled to payment in
respect of such Awards if the Company and/or the Participant achieves specified
performance goals (the “Performance Goals”) during and in respect of a designated
performance period (the “Performance Period”). The Performance Goals and the
Performance Period shall be established in writing by the Committee, in its sole discretion.
The Committee shall establish Performance Goals for each Performance Period prior to, or
as soon as practicable after, the commencement of such Performance Period (and, in any
event, no later than ninety (90) days after the commencement of the Performance Period or
such other period required by applicable law). At the time of the granting of Performance
Units and Performance Share Units which are intended to constitute Performance-Based
Compensation, or at any time thereafter, in either case to the extent permitted under Section
162(m) of the Code without adversely affecting the treatment of the Award as PerformanceBased Compensation, the Committee may provide for the manner in which performance will
be measured against the Performance Goals (or may adjust the Performance Goals) to
reflect the impact of specified corporate transactions, accounting or tax law changes and
other extraordinary or nonrecurring events. The Committee shall also establish a schedule or
schedules for Performance Units and Performance Share Units setting forth the portion of the
Award which will be earned or forfeited based on the degree of achievement, or lack thereof,
of the Performance Goals at the end of the relevant Performance Period. In setting
Performance Goals, the Committee may use, but shall not be limited to, such measures as:
total shareowner return; net earnings growth; sales or revenue growth; cash flow; net sales;
operating income; net income; net income per share (basic or diluted); earnings before or
after any one or more of taxes, interest, depreciation and amortization; profitability as
measured by return ratios (including return on invested capital, return on assets, return on
equity, return on investment and return on sales); market share; cost reduction goals;
margins (including one or more of gross, operating and net income margins); stock price;
economic value added; working capital; and strategic plan development and implementation;
or such other measure or measures of performance as the Committee, in its sole discretion,
may deem appropriate (which may include those measures set forth in Section 9.6). Such
performance measures shall be defined as to their respective components and meaning by
the Committee (in its sole discretion) and may be based on the attainment of specified levels
of Company (or Subsidiary, division, or other operational or administrative department of the
Company) performance relative to the performance of other corporations or based on
individual participant Performance Goals.
14
9.5.
Payment of Units. With respect to each Performance Unit and Performance
Share Unit, the Participant shall, if the applicable Performance Goals have been achieved, or
partially achieved, as determined by the Committee in its sole discretion, by the Company
and/or the Participant during the relevant Performance Period, be entitled to receive payment
in an amount equal to the designated value of each Performance Unit and Performance
Share Unit times the number of such units so earned. Prior to the vesting, payment,
settlement or lapsing of any restrictions with respect to any Performance Unit and
Performance Share Unit that is intended to constitute Performance-Based Compensation
made to a Participant who is subject to Section 162(m) of the Code, the Committee shall
certify in writing that the applicable Performance Goals have been satisfied to the extent
necessary for such Award to qualify as Performance-Based Compensation. Payment in
settlement of earned Performance Units shall be made in cash as soon as practicable in the
calendar year following the conclusion of the respective Performance Period. Payment in
settlement of earned Performance Share Units shall be made in unrestricted Common Stock
or in Restricted Shares, or any combination thereof, as the Committee in its sole discretion
shall determine and provide in the relevant Award Agreement, and in any case as soon as
practicable in the calendar year following the conclusion of the respective Performance
Period.
9.6.
Performance-Based Awards. Performance Units, Performance Share Units,
Restricted Shares, and Restricted Share Units and other Awards subject to performance
criteria that are intended to be Performance-Based Compensation shall be paid solely on
account of the attainment of one or more pre-established, objective Performance Goals
within the meaning of Section 162(m) and the regulations thereunder. Until otherwise
determined by the Committee, the Performance Goals shall be the attainment of preestablished levels of (or pre-established changes or improvements in) any of net sales, net
income, market price per share, earnings per share, return on equity, return on capital
employed, return on invested capital, cash flow, discounted cash flow, cumulative cash flow,
operating profit, gross or pre-tax profits, post-tax profits, gross or net margins, consolidated
net income, unit sales volume, economic value added, costs or cost reduction initiatives,
production, unit production volume, improvements in financial ratings, regulatory compliance,
achievement of balance sheet or income statement objectives, market or category share,
organizational objectives (including diversity, safety and K-values), productivity initiatives,
acquisition integration, total return to shareowners (including both the market value of the
Company’s stock and dividends thereon) and or any other performance measure the
Committee deems appropriate (which may include those measures set forth in Section 9.4).
Performance Goals may be in respect of the performance of the Company, any of its
Subsidiaries or affiliates or any combination thereof on either a consolidated, business unit or
divisional level. Performance Goals may be absolute or relative (to prior performance of the
Company or to the performance of one or more other entities or external indices) and may be
expressed in terms of a progression within a specified range. The payout of any such Award
to a Covered Employee may be reduced, but not increased, based on the degree of
attainment of other performance criteria or otherwise at the discretion of the Committee. For
purposes of the Plan, “Covered Employee” has the same meaning as set forth in Section
162(m) of the Code.
9.7.
Termination of Employment. If the Participant ceases to be an employee
before the end of any Performance Period due to the Participant’s death, Retirement or
Disability, such Participant (or the Participant’s legal representative or designated
beneficiary) shall receive all of the amount which would have been paid to the Participant had
the Participant continued as an employee to the end of the Performance Period, payable at
the same time as it would otherwise would have been paid in the absence of any such
15
termination. Unless otherwise determined by the Committee, if a Participant ceases to be an
employee for any other reason, any unpaid amounts for outstanding Performance Periods
shall be forfeited.
9.8.
Other Cash-Based Awards. The Committee may from time to time grant
Other Cash-Based Awards to Participants in such amounts, on such terms and conditions,
and for such consideration, including no consideration or such minimum consideration as
may be required by applicable law, as it shall determine in its sole discretion. Other CashBased Awards may be granted subject to the satisfaction of vesting conditions or may be
awarded purely as a bonus and not subject to restrictions or conditions, and if subject to
vesting conditions, the Committee may accelerate the vesting of such Awards at any time in
its sole discretion, subject to the limitations of the Plan. The grant of an Other Cash-Based
Award shall not require a segregation of any of the Company’s assets for satisfaction of the
Company’s payment obligation thereunder. Other Cash-Based Awards granted under the
Plan may be granted in a manner intended to be Performance-Based Compensation, and to
the extent that any Other Cash-Based Award is granted with such intention, such Award shall
be subject to the provisions of Sections 9.4, 9.6 and 9.7, and the certification requirements
contained in Section 9.5.
10.
DEFERRAL ELECTIONS/TAX REIMBURSEMENTS. The Committee may permit or
require a Participant to elect to defer receipt of any payment of cash or any delivery of shares
of Common Stock or other item that would otherwise be due to such Participant by virtue of
the exercise, settlement or payment of any Award made under the Plan. If any such election
is permitted or required, the Committee may impose any restrictions it deems to be
necessary or appropriate with respect to (i) any deferral election made with respect to an
Award under the Plan and (ii) the timing of the payment of any deferred amounts, in each
case, in order to cause such deferral election and payment timing to comply with the
requirements of Section 409A of the Code. The Committee may also provide in the relevant
Award Agreement for a tax reimbursement payment to be made by the Company in cash in
favor of any Participant in connection with the tax consequences resulting from the grant,
exercise, settlement, or payment of any Award made under the Plan.
11.
DIVIDEND AND DIVIDEND EQUIVALENTS. As specified in the relevant Award
Agreement, the Committee may provide that Awards (other than Stock Options Stock
Appreciation Rights and unvested Performance Share Units) denominated in shares earn
dividends or dividend equivalents; provided that dividends or dividend equivalents shall only
be paid or accrued on Performance Shares or other Awards subject to performance-based
vesting conditions to the extent that such Awards are actually earned. Dividends or any such
dividend equivalents may be paid currently in cash or shares of Common Stock or may be
credited to an account established by the Committee under the Plan in the name of the
Participant. To the extent that such Dividends or dividend equivalents are credited to an
account and are not paid currently, such credited amounts shall be paid at such time or times
as determined by the Committee and set forth in an Award Agreement consistent with the
requirements of Section 409A of the Code. Any crediting of dividends or dividend
equivalents may be subject to such restrictions and conditions as the Committee may
establish, including reinvestment in additional shares or share equivalents. Any stock
dividends paid in respect of unvested Restricted Shares or unvested Restricted Share Units
shall be treated as additional Restricted Shares or Restricted Share Units and shall be
subject to the same restrictions and other terms and conditions that apply to the unvested
Restricted Shares or unvested Restricted Share Units in respect of which such stock
dividends are issued.
16
12.
NON-TRANSFERABILITY OF AWARDS. Except as provided below, no Award under
the Plan or any Award Agreement, and no rights or interests herein or therein, shall or may
be assigned, transferred, sold, exchanged, encumbered, pledged, or otherwise hypothecated
or disposed of by a Participant or any beneficiary(ies) of any Participant, except by
testamentary disposition by the Participant or the laws of intestate succession. No such
interest shall be subject to execution, attachment or similar legal process, including, without
limitation, seizure for the payment of the Participant’s debts, judgments, alimony, or separate
maintenance. Except as provided below, during the lifetime of a Participant, Stock Options
and Stock Appreciation Rights are exercisable only by the Participant or his or her legal
representative. Notwithstanding the foregoing, the Committee may from time to time permit
Awards to be transferable to “family members” (within the meaning of the General
Instructions to Form S-8) subject to such terms and conditions as the Committee may impose
and applicable law; provided, however, no Award may be transferred for value (as defined in
the General Instructions to Form S-8). Any transfer contrary to this Section 12 will nullify the
Award.
13.
CHANGES IN CAPITALIZATION AND OTHER MATTERS.
13.1. No Corporate Action Restriction. The existence of the Plan, any Award
Agreement and/or the Awards granted hereunder shall not limit, affect or restrict in any way
the right or power of the Board or the shareowners of the Company to make or authorize
(a) any adjustment, recapitalization, reorganization or other change in the Company’s or any
Subsidiary’s capital structure or its business, (b) any merger, consolidation or change in the
ownership of the Company or any Subsidiary, (c) any issue of bonds, debentures, capital,
preferred or prior preference stocks ahead of or affecting the Company’s or any Subsidiary’s
capital stock or the rights thereof, (d) any dissolution or liquidation of the Company or any
Subsidiary, (e) any sale or transfer of all or any part of the Company’s or any Subsidiary’s
assets or business, or (f) any other corporate act or proceeding by the Company or any
Subsidiary. No Participant, beneficiary or any other person shall have any claim against any
member of the Board or the Committee, the Company or any Subsidiary, or any employees,
officers, shareowners or agents of the Company or any Subsidiary, as a result of any such
action.
13.2. Recapitalization Adjustments. In the event of a dividend or other distribution
(whether in the form of cash, Common Stock, other securities, or other property) other than
regular cash dividends, recapitalization, stock split, reverse stock split, reorganization,
merger, consolidation, split-up, spin-off, combination, Change in Control or exchange of
Common Stock or other securities of the Company, or other corporate transaction or event
affects the Common Stock such that an adjustment is necessary or appropriate in order to
prevent dilution or enlargement of benefits or potential benefits intended to be made available
under the Plan, the Board shall equitably adjust (i) the number of shares of Common Stock or
other securities of the Company (or number and kind of other securities or property) with
respect to which Awards may be granted, (ii) the maximum share limitation applicable to
each type of Award that may be granted to any individual participant in any calendar year,
(iii) the number of shares of Common Stock or other securities of the Company (or number
and kind of other securities or property) subject to outstanding Awards, and (iv) the exercise
price with respect to any Stock Option or the Base Value with respect to any Stock
Appreciation Right.
13.3. Mergers. If the Company enters into or is involved in any merger,
reorganization, Change in Control or other business combination with any person or entity (a
“Merger Event”), the Board may, prior to such Merger Event and effective upon such
17
Merger Event, take such action as it deems appropriate, including, but not limited to,
replacing Awards with substitute Awards in respect of the shares, other securities or other
property of the surviving corporation or any affiliate of the surviving corporation on such terms
and conditions, as to the number of shares, pricing and otherwise, which shall substantially
preserve the value, rights and benefits of any affected Awards granted hereunder as of the
date of the consummation of the Merger Event. Notwithstanding anything to the contrary in
the Plan, if any Merger Event or Change in Control occurs, the Company shall have the right,
but not the obligation, to cancel each Participant’s Stock Options and/or Stock Appreciation
Rights and to pay to each affected Participant in connection with the cancellation of such
Participant’s Stock Options and/or Stock Appreciation Rights, an amount equal to the excess
(if any) of the Change in Control Price (as defined below), as determined by the Board, of the
Common Stock underlying any unexercised Stock Options or Stock Appreciation Rights
(whether then exercisable or not) over the aggregate exercise price of such unexercised
Stock Options and/or Stock Appreciation Rights, and make additional adjustments and/or
settlements of other outstanding Awards as it determines to be fair and equitable to affected
Participants.
Upon receipt by any affected Participant of any such substitute Award (or payment) as a
result of any such Merger Event, such Participant’s affected Awards for which such substitute
Awards (or payment) were received shall be thereupon cancelled without the need for
obtaining the consent of any such affected Participant.
For purposes of the Plan, “Change in Control Price” means the highest price per share of
Common Stock paid in any transaction related to a Change in Control of the Company or a
Merger Event. To the extent that the consideration paid in any such transaction described
above consists all or in part of securities or other non-cash consideration, the value of such
securities or other non-cash consideration shall be determined in the good-faith discretion of
the Board consistent with provisions of Section 409A of the Code and/or other applicable law.
14.
CHANGE IN CONTROL PROVISIONS.
14.1. Impact of Event. Notwithstanding any other provision of the Plan to the
contrary and unless otherwise determined by the Committee prior to a Change in Control, in
the event of a Change in Control, outstanding Awards under the Plan shall be subject to the
applicable treatment described in this Section 14.
14.1.1 Assumption of Outstanding Awards. In the event that outstanding
Awards under the Plan are assumed, continued or substituted by the successor to the
Company in connection with such Change in Control, such Awards shall be subject to the
adjustment provisions of Section 13 and shall otherwise continue in effect with all of the
terms and conditions of the Plan and the applicable Award Agreement. In the event that a
Participant holding any such assumed, continued or substituted Awards experiences a
termination of service with the Company or its successor by the Company or its successor
without Cause or by such Participant for Good Reason, in either case, within two (2) years
following such Change in Control, such Participant’s outstanding Awards shall become fully
vested, exercisable and payable (as applicable) as of the date of such termination; provided,
however, that to the extent any Award constitutes nonqualified deferred compensation, such
Award shall not be payable until the date such Award would have been payable in the
absence of this Section 14.1.1 if the acceleration of such payment would cause the tax
consequences set forth in Section 409A(a)(1) of the Code to apply to such Award.
18
14.1.2 No Assumption of Outstanding Awards.
In the event that
outstanding Awards under the Plan are not assumed, continued or substituted by the
successor to the Company in connection with such Change in Control, such Awards shall be
subject to the following treatment:
(i)
Any Stock Options and Stock Appreciation Rights outstanding as of the
date such Change in Control is determined to have occurred, and
which are not then exercisable and vested, shall become fully
exercisable and vested;
(ii)
The restrictions and deferral limitations applicable to any Restricted
Shares shall lapse, and such Restricted Shares shall become free of
all restrictions and become fully vested and transferable;
(iii)
All Performance Units and Other Cash-Based Awards shall be
considered to be earned and payable in full, and any deferral or other
restrictions shall lapse, and such Performance Units and Other CashBased Awards shall be settled in cash (with the value being
determined by the Committee, in its sole discretion), and all Restricted
Share Units and Performance Share Units shall become fully vested
and payable, in each case, as promptly as is practicable on or
following the Change in Control; provided, however, that in the event
that the Change in Control does not constitute a “change in the
ownership or effective control,” or a “change in the ownership of a
substantial portion of the assets,” of the Company, in each case within
the meaning of Section 409A(a)(2)(A)(v) of the Code, Performance
Units, Other Cash-Based Awards, Restricted Share Units and
Performance Share Units shall not be payable until the date such
Other Cash-Based Awards, Performance Units, Restricted Share Units
and Performance Share Units would have been payable in the
absence of this Section 14.1.2 if the acceleration of such payment
would cause the tax consequences set forth in Section 409A(a)(1) of
the Code to apply to such Other Cash-Based Awards, Performance
Units, Restricted Share Units and Performance Share Units; and
(iv)
The Committee may also make additional adjustments and/or
settlements of outstanding Awards as it deems appropriate and
consistent with the Plan’s purposes (including Section 13.3).
14.2. Definition of Change in Control. For purposes of the Plan, a “Change in
Control” shall mean the happening of any of the following events:
(i)
An acquisition after the date hereof by any individual, entity or group
(within the meaning of Section 13(d)(3) or 14(d)(2) of the Exchange
Act) (a “Person”) of beneficial ownership (within the meaning of
Rule 13d-3 promulgated under the Exchange Act) of 20% or more of
either (a) the then outstanding shares of common stock of the
Company (the “Outstanding Company Common Stock”) or (b) the
combined voting power of the then outstanding voting securities of the
Company entitled to vote generally in the election of directors (the
“Outstanding Company Voting Securities”); excluding, however,
the following: (1) any acquisition directly from the Company, other than
19
an acquisition by virtue of the exercise of a conversion privilege unless
the security being so converted was itself acquired directly from the
Company or approved by the Incumbent Board (as defined below),
(2) any increase in beneficial ownership of a Person as a result of any
acquisition by the Company, (3) any acquisition by any employee
benefit plan (or related trust) sponsored or maintained by the Company
or any entity controlled by the Company, (4) any acquisition by an
underwriter temporarily holding Company securities pursuant to an
offering of such securities, or (5) any acquisition pursuant to a
transaction which complies with clauses (1), (2) and (3) of subsection
(iii) of this Section 14.2; or
(ii)
A change in the composition of the Board such that the individuals
who, as of the Effective Date of the Plan, constitute the Board (such
Board shall be hereinafter referred to as the “Incumbent Board”)
cease for any reason to constitute at least a majority of the Board;
provided, however, for purposes of this Section, that any individual
who becomes a member of the Board subsequent to the Effective Date
of the Plan, whose election, or nomination for election by the
Company’s shareowners, was approved by a vote of at least a majority
of those individuals who are members of the Board and who were also
members of the Incumbent Board (or deemed to be such pursuant to
this proviso), either by a specific vote or by approval of the proxy
statement of the Company in which such person is named as a
nominee for director, without written objection to such nomination shall
be considered as though such individual were a member of the
Incumbent Board; but, provided further, that any such individual whose
initial assumption of office occurs as a result of either an actual or
threatened election contest with respect to the election or removal of
directors or other actual or threatened solicitation of proxies or
consents by or on behalf of a Person other than the Board shall not be
so considered as a member of the Incumbent Board; or
(iii)
Consummation of a reorganization, merger or consolidation (or similar
transaction), a sale or other disposition of all or substantially all of the
assets of the Company, or the acquisition of assets or stock of another
entity; in each case, unless immediately following such transaction (1)
all or substantially all of the individuals and entities who are the
beneficial owners, respectively, of the Outstanding Company Common
Stock and Outstanding Company Voting Securities immediately prior to
such transaction will beneficially own, directly or indirectly, more than
60% of, respectively, the outstanding shares of common stock, and the
combined voting power of the then outstanding voting securities
entitled to vote generally in the election of directors, as the case may
be, of the corporation resulting from such transaction (including,
without limitation, a corporation which as a result of such transaction
owns the Company or all or substantially all of the Company’s assets
either directly or through one or more subsidiaries) in substantially the
same proportions as their ownership, immediately prior to such
transaction, of the Outstanding Company Common Stock and
Outstanding Company Voting Securities, as the case may be, (2) no
Person (other than the Company, any employee benefit plan (or
20
related trust) of the Company or such corporation resulting from such
transaction) will beneficially own, directly or indirectly, 20% or more of,
respectively, the outstanding shares of common stock of the
corporation resulting from such transaction or the combined voting
power of the outstanding voting securities of such corporation entitled
to vote generally in the election of directors, except to the extent that
such ownership existed prior to the transaction, and (3) individuals who
were members of the Incumbent Board at the time of the Board’s
approval of the execution of the initial agreement providing for such
transaction will constitute at least a majority of the members of the
board of directors of the corporation resulting from such transaction
(including, without limitation, a corporation which as a result of such
transaction owns the Company or all or substantially all of the
Company’s assets either directly or through one or more subsidiaries);
or
(iv)
The approval by the shareowners of the Company of a complete
liquidation or dissolution of the Company.
Notwithstanding the foregoing, with respect to any Award that is characterized
as nonqualified deferred compensation within the meaning of Section 409A of
the Code, an event shall not be considered to be a Change in Control under
the Plan for purposes of payment of such Award unless such event is also a
“change in ownership,” a “change in effective control” or a “change in the
ownership of a substantial portion of the assets” of the Company within the
meaning of Section 409A of the Code.
15.
AMENDMENT, SUSPENSION, AND TERMINATION.
15.1. In General. The Board may suspend or terminate the Plan (or any portion
thereof) at any time and may amend the Plan at any time and from time to time in such
respects as the Board may deem advisable to ensure that any and all Awards conform to or
otherwise reflect any change in applicable laws or regulations, or to permit the Company or
the Participants to benefit from any change in applicable laws or regulations, or in any other
respect the Board may deem to be in the best interests of the Company or any Subsidiary.
No such amendment, suspension or termination shall (a) subject to Section 16.6, materially
adversely affect the rights of any Participant under any outstanding Awards, without the
consent of such Participant, (b) make any change that would disqualify the Plan, or any other
plan of the Company or any Subsidiary intended to be so qualified, from the benefits provided
under Section 422 of the Code, or any successor provisions thereto, or (c) except as
contemplated by Section 13, increase the number of shares available for Awards pursuant to
Section 4.2 without shareowner approval. In addition, the Company will obtain shareowner
approval of any modification of the Plan or Awards to the extent required by applicable laws
or regulations or the regulations of any stock exchange upon which the Common Stock is
then listed that purport to (i) materially modify the requirements as to eligibility for
participation in the Plan, (ii) allow the repurchase of Stock Options or Stock Appreciation
Rights for cash, other types of Awards under the Plan or other property (other than in
connection with a Change in Control) or (iii) extend the termination date of the Plan.
15.2. No Repricing.
Except as contemplated by Section 13, the terms of
outstanding Awards may not be amended to reduce the exercise price of outstanding Stock
Options or the Base Value of outstanding Stock Appreciation Rights or to cancel outstanding
21
Stock Options or Stock Appreciation Rights in exchange for cash, other Awards or Stock
Options or Stock Appreciation Rights with an exercise price or Base Price that is less than
the exercise price or Base Price of the original Stock Options or Stock Appreciation Rights
without shareowner approval.
15.3. Award Agreement Modifications. Subject to Section 15.1, the Committee
may (in its sole discretion) amend or modify at any time and from time to time the terms and
provisions of any outstanding Stock Options, Stock Appreciation Rights, Other Cash-Based
Awards, Performance Units, Performance Share Units, Restricted Share Units, or Restricted
Share grants, in any manner to the extent that the Committee under the Plan or any Award
Agreement could have initially determined the restrictions, terms and provisions of such
Stock Options, Stock Appreciation Rights, Other Cash-Based Awards, Performance Units,
Performance Share Units, Restricted Share Units and/or Restricted Share grants, including,
without limitation, changing or accelerating (a) the date or dates as of which such Stock
Options or Stock Appreciation Rights shall become exercisable, (b) the date or dates as of
which such Restricted Share grants or Restricted Share Units shall become vested, or (c) the
performance period or goals in respect of any Other Cash-Based Awards, Performance
Share Units or Performance Units, except to the extent that any such amendment or
modification would cause any such Award intended to qualify as Performance-Based
Compensation to cease to so qualify. The authority to accelerate the exercisability or vesting
or otherwise terminate restrictions relating to an incentive Award may be exercised only in
connection with a Participant’s death, Disability or Retirement, in connection with a Change in
Control, or to the extent such actions involve an aggregate number of shares of Common
Stock not in excess of 5 percent of the number of shares available for Incentive Awards.
Subject to Section 16.6, no such amendment or modification shall, however, materially
adversely affect the rights of any Participant under any such Award without the consent of
such Participant. Notwithstanding the foregoing, without the consent of affected Participants,
Awards may be amended or revised when necessary to avoid the imposition of additional tax
under Section 409A of the Code.
16.
MISCELLANEOUS.
16.1. Tax Withholding. The Company shall have the right to deduct from any
payment or settlement under the Plan, including, without limitation, the exercise of any Stock
Option or Stock Appreciation Right, or the delivery, transfer or vesting of any Common Stock
or Restricted Shares, any minimum statutorily required domestic or foreign federal, state,
local or other taxes of any kind which the Committee, in its sole discretion, deems necessary
to be withheld to comply with the Code and/or any other applicable law, rule or regulation.
Shares of Common Stock may be used to satisfy any such tax withholding. Such shares of
Common Stock shall be valued based on the Fair Market Value of such shares as of the date
the tax withholding is required to be made, such date to be determined by the Committee. In
addition, the Company shall have the right to require payment from a Participant to cover any
applicable withholding or other employment taxes due upon any payment or settlement under
the Plan.
16.2. No Right to Employment. Neither the adoption of the Plan, the granting of
any Award, nor the execution of any Award Agreement, shall confer upon any employee of
the Company or any Subsidiary any right to continued employment with the Company or any
Subsidiary, as the case may be, nor shall it interfere in any way with the right, if any, of the
Company or any Subsidiary to terminate the employment of any employee at any time for
any reason.
22
16.3. Unfunded Plan. The Plan shall be unfunded and the Company shall not be
required to segregate any assets in connection with any Awards under the Plan. Any liability
of the Company to any person with respect to any Award under the Plan or any Award
Agreement shall be based solely upon the contractual obligations that may be created as a
result of the Plan or any such Award Agreement. No such obligation of the Company shall be
deemed to be secured by any pledge of, encumbrance on, or other interest in, any property
or asset of the Company or any Subsidiary. Nothing contained in the Plan or any Award
Agreement shall be construed as creating in respect of any Participant (or beneficiary thereof
or any other person) any equity or other interest of any kind in any assets of the Company or
any Subsidiary or creating a trust of any kind or a fiduciary relationship of any kind between
the Company, any Subsidiary and/or any such Participant, any beneficiary thereof or any
other person.
16.4. Payments to a Trust. The Committee is authorized to cause to be
established a trust agreement or several trust agreements or similar arrangements from
which the Committee may make payments of amounts due or to become due to any
Participants under the Plan.
16.5. Other Company Benefit and Compensation Programs. Payments and
other benefits received by a Participant under an Award made pursuant to the Plan shall not
be deemed a part of a Participant’s compensation for purposes of the determination of
benefits under any other employee welfare or benefit plans or arrangements, if any, provided
by the Company or any Subsidiary unless expressly provided in such other plans or
arrangements, or except where the Board expressly determines in writing that inclusion of an
Award or portion of an Award should be included to accurately reflect competitive
compensation practices or to recognize that an Award has been made in lieu of a portion of
competitive annual base salary or other cash compensation. Awards under the Plan may be
made in addition to, in combination with, or as alternatives to, grants, awards or payments
under any other plans or arrangements of the Company or its Subsidiaries. The existence of
the Plan notwithstanding, the Company or any Subsidiary may adopt such other
compensation plans or programs and additional compensation arrangements as it deems
necessary to attract, retain and motivate employees.
16.6. Listing, Registration and Other Legal Compliance. No Awards or shares of
the Common Stock shall be required to be issued or granted under the Plan unless legal
counsel for the Company shall be satisfied that such issuance or grant will be in compliance
with all applicable securities laws and regulations and any other applicable laws or
regulations. The Committee may require, as a condition of any payment or share issuance,
that certain agreements, undertakings, representations, certificates, and/or information, as
the Committee may deem necessary or advisable, be executed or provided to the Company
to assure compliance with all such applicable laws or regulations. Certificates for shares of
the Restricted Shares and/or Common Stock delivered under the Plan may be subject to
such stock-transfer orders and such other restrictions as the Committee may deem advisable
under the rules, regulations, or other requirements of the Securities and Exchange
Commission, any stock exchange upon which the Common Stock is then listed, and any
applicable laws. In addition, if, at any time specified herein (or in any Award Agreement or
otherwise) for (a) the making of any Award, or the making of any determination, (b) the
issuance or other distribution of Restricted Shares and/or Common Stock, or (c) the payment
of amounts to or through a Participant with respect to any Award, any law, rule, regulation or
other requirement of any governmental authority or agency shall require either the Company,
any Subsidiary or any Participant (or any estate, designated beneficiary or other legal
representative thereof) to take any action in connection with any such determination, any
23
such shares to be issued or distributed, any such payment, or the making of any such
determination, as the case may be, shall be deferred until such required action is taken. With
respect to Section 16 Officers, transactions under the Plan are intended to comply with all
applicable conditions of Rule 16b-3 promulgated under the Exchange Act. In addition, the
Company or Committee may, at the time of grant or thereafter, impose additional or different
conditions or take other actions with respect to Awards made to Participants in countries
outside of the United States of America, to the extent required or made advisable by
applicable laws and regulations.
16.7. Award Agreements. Each Participant receiving an Award under the Plan
shall enter into an Award Agreement with the Company in a form specified by the Committee.
Each such Participant shall then agree to the restrictions, terms and conditions of the Award
set forth therein and in the Plan. An Award Agreement may provide that, notwithstanding any
other provision in this Plan to the contrary, if the Participant breaches provisions in the Award
Agreement during or after the Participant’s employment, then the Participant will forfeit and/or
repay all Awards (whether unvested or vested) and profits realized in connection therewith.
16.8. Designation of Beneficiary. Each Participant to whom an Award has been
made under the Plan may designate a beneficiary or beneficiaries to exercise any Award or
to receive any payment which under the terms of the Plan and the relevant Award Agreement
may become exercisable or payable on or after the Participant’s death. At any time, and from
time to time, any such designation may be changed or cancelled by the Participant without
the consent of any such beneficiary. Any such designation, change or cancellation must be
on a form provided for that purpose by the Committee and shall not be effective until received
by the Committee. If no beneficiary has been designated by a deceased Participant, or if the
designated beneficiaries have predeceased the Participant, the beneficiary shall be the
Participant’s estate. If the Participant designates more than one beneficiary, any payments
under the Plan to such beneficiaries shall be made in equal shares unless the Participant has
expressly designated otherwise, in which case the payments shall be made in the shares
designated by the Participant.
16.9. Leaves of Absence/Transfers. The Committee shall have the power to
promulgate rules and regulations and to make determinations, as it deems appropriate, under
the Plan in respect of any leave of absence from the Company or any Subsidiary granted to a
Participant. Without limiting the generality of the foregoing, the Committee may determine
whether any such leave of absence shall be treated as if the Participant has terminated
employment with the Company or any such Subsidiary. If a Participant transfers within the
Company, or to or from any Subsidiary, such Participant shall not be deemed to have
terminated employment as a result of such transfers.
16.10. Governing Law. The Plan and all actions taken thereunder shall be governed
by and construed in accordance with the laws of the State of Delaware, without reference to
the principles of conflict of laws thereof. Any titles and headings herein are for reference
purposes only, and shall in no way limit, define or otherwise affect the meaning, construction
or interpretation of any provisions of the Plan.
16.11. Effective Date. The Plan shall be effective as of February 22, 2013 (the
“Effective Date”) subject to approval by the shareowners of the Company. Prior to such
shareowner approval, the Committee may grant Awards conditioned on shareowner
approval. If such shareowner approval is not obtained at or before the first annual meeting of
shareowners to occur after the adoption of the Plan by the Board (including any
adjournments or postponements thereof), the Plan and any Awards made thereunder shall
24
terminate ab initio and be of no further force and effect. In no event shall awards be granted
under the Plan after February 22, 2023 (or such earlier date that the Plan may be terminated
by the Board), but the term and exercise of Awards granted theretofore may extend beyond
that date.
16.12. Section 409A of the Code. The Plan is intended to comply with the
applicable requirements of Section 409A of the Code and shall be limited, construed and
interpreted in accordance with such intent. To the extent that any Award is subject to Section
409A of the Code, it shall be paid in a manner that will comply with Section 409A of the
Code, including the final treasury regulations or any other official guidance issued by the
Secretary of the Treasury or the Internal Revenue Service with respect thereto.
Notwithstanding any contrary provision in the Plan or any Award Agreement, any payment(s)
of nonqualified deferred compensation (within the meaning of Section 409A of the Code) that
are otherwise required to be made under the Plan to a “specified employee” (as defined
under Section 409A of the Code) as a result of such employee’s separation from service
(other than a payment that is not subject to Section 409A of the Code) shall be delayed for
the first six (6) months following such separation from service (or, if earlier, the date of death
of the specified employee) and shall instead be paid (in a manner set forth in the Award
Agreement) upon expiration of such delay period. Any provision of the Plan that is
inconsistent with Section 409A of the Code shall be deemed to be amended to comply with
Section 409A of the Code and to the extent such provision cannot be amended to comply
therewith, such provision shall be null and void.
16.13. Recoupment of Awards. A Participant’s rights with respect to any Award
hereunder shall in all events be subject to (i) any right that the Company may have under any
Company recoupment policy or other agreement or arrangement with a Participant, or (ii) any
right or obligation that the Company may have regarding the clawback of “incentive-based
compensation” under Section 10D of the Exchange Act and any applicable rules and
regulations promulgated thereunder from time to time by the U.S. Securities and Exchange
Commission.
KELLOGG COMPANY
25
EXHIBIT II
KELLOGG UK SHARE INCENTIVE PLAN
Kellogg Company
Equity incentive plans
EU Prospectus
Dated: March 22, 2016
Exhibits
DATED
2002
KELLOGG COMPANY
and
CAPITA IRG TRUSTEES LIMITED
TRUST DEED AND RULES
OF
THE KELLOGG COMPANY
INLAND REVENUE APPROVED
SHARE INCENTIVE PLAN
Adopted by the Directors on:
Approved by the Inland Revenue on:
Inland Revenue reference no: A1504/SY
Settled as a deed by Landwell on behalf of PricewaterhouseCoopers
Landwell
St Andrews House
20 St Andrews Street
London
EC4A 3TL
Reference: GWT/LR/SRN
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CONTENTS
Trust Deed
Clause
1.
Interpretation
2.
Object of Trust
3.
Achieving Object of Trust
3.1
Monies received from Participating Companies
3.2
Purchased Share Monies
4.
Unused funds
4.1
Trustee to apply unused funds for costs etc
4.2
Trustee to account for monies upon termination of Plan
5.
Right to deal with reconstructions, etc
5.1
Trustee to act on Participant’s directions
5.2
Trustee to use reasonable endeavours to obtain directions
5.3
No liability for acting on directions
6.
Accountability for PAYE and other deductions
7.
Maintenance of Trust records
7.1
Trustee to procure preparation of Trust records
7.2
Duty to keep records of PAYE deductions
7.3
Trustee to submit Trust records to Company or other Participating Company
7.4
Company’s or other Participating Company’s right to inspect Trust records
8.
Securities and title
8.1
Securities may be placed in custody
8.2
More than one Trustee may be registered proprietor
9.
Application of Plan to Subsidiaries
9.1
Extension of Plan to Subsidiaries
9.2
Circumstances where Plan may cease to apply to Subsidiary
9.3
Trustee not liable to account to former Participating Companies
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(2)
10.
Duties of Participating Companies
10.1
Duty to contribute sums and provide information
10.2
Continuing liability of former Participating Companies
11.
Protection of the Trustee
11.1
Limited liability for monetary obligations
11.2
Trustee to comply with Company’s directions
11.3
Indemnity
11.4
No obligation to become involved in management
12.
Additional powers
12.1
Additional powers of the Trustee
12.2
Trustee’s power to invest monies etc
12.3
Trustee’s power of sale
13.
Proceedings of Trustees
13.1
Scope of clause
13.2
Regulations for conduct of business
13.3
Quorum for meetings of Trustees
13.4
Majority voting of Trustees
13.5
Written resolutions of Trustees
14.
Administration
14.1
Delegation
14.2
Trustee being a company
14.3
Minutes of meetings
14.4
Professional advice
14.5
Trustee’s agents
14.6
Trustee may execute deeds etc
15.
Remuneration and interests of the Trustees
15.1
Individual Trustees
15.2
Professional Trustees
15.3
Corporate Trustees
15.4
Right to be employed by Company or Subsidiary
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(3)
16.
Permitted dealings of Trustees
16.1
Trustee permitted to hold shares etc
16.2
No requirement to account for benefits
17.
Number, appointment, retirement and removal of Trustees
17.1
Minimum number of Trustees
17.2
Statutory power to appoint new and additional Trustees
17.3
Power to appoint additional Trustees
17.4
Company ceasing to exist
17.5
Removal of Trustees
17.6
Retirement of Trustees
17.7
Transfer of Trust property following removal or retirement of Trustees
17.8
Section 37 of the Trustee Act 1925
17.9
Residence of Trustees
18.
Delegation of Administration by the Company and other matters
18.1
Delegation of Administration
18.2
Exercise of powers
18.3
Information supplied by Participating Company
19.
Duration and winding up of the Plan
19.1
Termination on expiry of the Trust Period
19.2
Outstanding liabilities
19.3
Completion of obligations
20.
Supremacy of Trust Deed over rules of Plan
21.
Governing Law and Jurisdiction
21.1
Governing Law
21.2
Jurisdiction
21.3
Jurisdiction agreement for benefit of Company
21.4
Participant deemed to submit to such jurisdiction
22.
Amendment of Trust Deed and Rules
22.1
Amendment of Deed and Rules
22.2
Amendments to be binding
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23.
General Provisions
23.1
Counterparts
23.2
Irrevocability
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Schedule
Rules of The Kellogg Company Inland Revenue Approved Share Incentive Plan
Rule
1.
Interpretation
2.
Purpose of the Plan
3.
Participation on same terms
PART I – FREE SHARES
4.
Issue of Invitations
4.1
Discretion of Directors
4.2
Limit on individual participation
4.3
Contents of Free Shares Invitations
4.4
Free Shares Agreement and Free Shares Invitations
4.5
Election to participate in any Award of Free Shares
5.
Allocation of Free Shares by reference to performance
5.1
Free Shares may be allocated by reference to performance
5.2
Performance Allowances to apply to all
5.3
UK Plan Manager to provide information
5.4
Use of method 1 or method 2
5.5
Performance Allowances: method 1
5.6
Performance Allowances: method 2
5.7
Same terms basis for Free Shares Awards
6.
Performance Targets
6.1
Imposition of Performance Targets
6.2
Nature of Performance Targets
6.3
Membership of Performance Unit
6.4
Substitution, variation or waiver of Performance Targets
7.
Appropriation of Free Shares
7.1
Provision of information by UK Plan Manager to the Trustee
7.2
Appropriation
7.3
Notification of Appropriation to Participants
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8.
Restrictions on dealings in, and permitted transfers of Free Shares
8.1
Restrictions on disposals by Participants
8.2
Restrictions on disposals by the Trustee
8.3
Transfer of Free Shares after the Free Shares Holding Period
9.
Cessation of Relevant Employment and early transfer of Free Shares
9.1
Trustee to be notified of cessation of Relevant Employment
9.2
Early transfer of Free Shares
9.3
Forfeiture of Free Shares
9.4
Injury, disability, redundancy, retirement etc
9.5
Death
PART II - PURCHASED SHARES
10.
Purchased Shares Invitations
10.1
Issue of Purchased Shares Invitations
10.2
Timing of Purchased Shares Invitations
10.3
Contents of Purchased Shares Invitation
10.4
Purchased Shares Agreement and Purchased Shares Invitation
10.5
Contents of Purchased Shares Agreement
10.6
Agreement may be withdrawn
10.7
Excess Salary deductions
10.8
Scaling down
10.9
Purchased Share Money held for Eligible Employee
10.10 Interest on Purchased Share Money
11.
Instructions given during Accumulation Period
11.1
Variation of Salary deductions and intervals
11.2
Notice to suspend Salary deductions
11.3
Notice to terminate Purchased Shares Agreement
11.4
UK Plan Manager to give effect to notices
11.5
Purchased Shares Agreement to apply to new holding
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12.
Acquisition of Purchased Shares
12.1
Acquisition of Shares by Trustee (no Accumulation Period)
12.2
Acquisition of Shares by Trustee (with Accumulation Period)
12.3
Notification of acquisition to Participants
12.4
Salary deductions not invested in Purchased Shares
13.
Transfer of Purchased Shares by Participant
13.1
Participants may request transfer of Purchased Shares
13.2
Trustee to comply with request
14.
Cessation of Relevant Employment
14.1
Trustee to be notified of cessation of Relevant Employment
14.2
14.3
Cessation of Relevant Employment prior to the Purchased Shares Acquisition Date
Transfer of Purchased Shares on cessation of Relevant Employment
PART III – MATCHING SHARES
15.
Notification of Matching Shares
15.1
Relationship to Purchased Shares
15.2
Additional contents of Purchased Shares Agreement
16.
Appropriation of Matching Shares
16.1
Provision of information by the UK Plan Manager to Trustee
16.2
Appropriation of Matching Shares
16.3
Notification of Appropriation to Participants
17.
Restrictions on dealings in, and permitted transfers of Matching Shares
18.
Cessation of Relevant Employment and early withdrawal of Purchased Shares
18.1
Trustee to be notified of cessation of Relevant Employment
18.2
Early withdrawal of Purchased Shares
18.3
Early transfer of Matching Shares
18.4
Forfeiture of Matching Shares
18.5
Injury, disability, redundancy, retirement etc
18.6
Death
PART IV - DIVIDEND SHARES
19.
Provision of Dividend Shares
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19.1
Relationship to Plan Shares
19.2
Direction revocable
19.3
Dividend not invested in Dividend Shares
19.4
Timing of acquisition of Dividend Shares
19.5
Participants to be treated equally
20.
Amount and type of Dividend Shares
20.1
Type of Shares to be used as Dividend Shares
20.2
Calculation of number of Dividend Shares
20.3
Dividend amounts carried forward
20.4
Circumstances for payment of cash dividends
21.
Notification of acquisition of Dividend Shares
22.
Restrictions on dealings in and permitted transfers of Dividend Shares
23.
Cessation of Relevant Employment
23.1
Trustee to be notified of cessation of Relevant Employment
23.2
Early transfer of Dividend Shares
23.3
Death
PART V – GENERAL REQUIREMENTS
24.
Requirements generally applicable to Plan Shares
24.1
Participants may elect not to participate
24.2
Individuals eligible for Appropriation
24.3
Shares not Appropriated or forfeited
24.4
Shares ceasing to qualify
24.5
Death of Participant
24.6
Funds to be provided by Participating Companies
24.7
Shares purchased off market by the Trustee
24.8
Shares with different rights
24.9
Foreign Dividends
24.10 Timing of contributions to Trustee
25.
Permitted dealings in Plan Shares
26.
Receipts by the Trustee
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27.
Exercise of voting rights attaching to Plan Shares
27.1
Trustee to notify Participants of resolutions
27.2
Participant to instruct Trustee how to vote
27.3
Notification of Participants’ directions to Trustee to be in writing
28.
Company reconstructions
28.1
New holdings of Shares
28.2
Meaning of “new holding”
29.
Rights Issues
29.1
Application of rule
29.2
Trustee to provide information to Participants
29.3
Participants to give written directions to Trustee
29.4
Cash amounts arising to be dealt with by Trustee
29.5
Failure by Participant to give any direction
30.
Duty to account for PAYE on cash amounts
30.1
Trustee to make PAYE deductions
30.2
Trustee to deal with PAYE deductions
31.
Duty to account for PAYE on transfers of assets
31.1
Trustee to make PAYE deductions
31.2
Trustee to deal with PAYE deductions
32.
Apportionment of Capital Receipts
32.1
Treatment of Capital Receipts
32.2
Trustee to inform Participants
33.
Termination of Plan
33.1
Company may terminate Plan
33.2
Consequences of termination of Plan
33.3
Inland Revenue withdrawal of Plan approval
34.
Shares from Qualifying Share Ownership Trusts
35.
Notices
35.1
Notice by Company, Participating Company etc
35.2
Deceased Participant
35.3
Notice to Company, Participating Company etc
35.4
Trustee to distribute Company documentation
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35.5
Notification of liability to Income Tax
36.
Fractional entitlements
37.
Protection of the Trustee
38.
Relationship of Plan to contract of employment
39.
Alterations
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THIS DEED of TRUST is made on
2002
BETWEEN:
(1)
Kellogg Company (incorporated in the State of Delaware) whose registered office
is located at No. 100 West Tenth Street in the City of Wilmington, County of New
Castle State of Delaware (“the Company”);
(2)
Capita IRG Trustees Limited (incorporated in England and Wales under company
number 2729260) whose registered office is situated at Bourne House, 34
Beckenham Road, Beckenham, Kent BR3 4TU (“the Original Trustee”);
(3)
Kellogg UK Holding Company Limited (incorporated in England and Wales under
company number 3216332) whose registered office is situated at The Kellogg
Building, Talbot Road, Manchester M16 0PU;
(4)
Kellogg Company of Great Britain Limited (incorporated in England and Wales
under company number 199171) whose registered office is situated at The Kellogg
Building, Talbot Road, Manchester, M16 0PU;
(5)
Kellogg Supply Services (Europe) Limited (incorporated in England and Wales
under company number3233413) whose registered office is situated at The Kellogg
Building, Talbot Road, Manchester, M16 0PU;
(6)
Kellogg Marketing and Sales Company (UK) Limited (incorporated in England and
Wales under company number 3237431) whose registered office is situated at The
Kellogg Building, Talbot Road, Manchester, M16 0PU;
(7)
Kellogg Management Services (Europe) Limited (incorporated in England and
Wales under company number 3233144) whose registered office is situated at The
Kellogg Building, Talbot Road, Manchester, M16 0PU; and
(8)
Portable Foods Manufacturing Company Limited (incorporated in England and
Wales under company number 3533251) whose registered office is situated at The
Kellogg Building, Talbot Road, Manchester, M16 0PU.
PRELIMINARY:
(A)
The Company wishes to establish a share incentive plan, to be known as the
Kellogg UK Share Incentive Plan, approved in accordance with the provisions of
Schedule 8 and constituting an Employees’ Share Scheme.
(B)
The Plan was adopted by the Directors on
a continued opportunity to purchase Shares.
(C)
The Original Trustee has agreed to act as the first trustee of the Plan.
2002 to provide employees
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(D)
The Original Trustee has received the sum of £50 from the Company as an initial
contribution to the trusts established by this Trust Deed.
THE TRUST DEED WITNESSES as follows:
1
INTERPRETATION
In this Trust Deed:
1.1
unless the context otherwise requires the definitions set out in Rule 1.1 of the
Schedule shall apply and the following words and expressions shall have the
following meanings:
Beneficiary
a bona fide employee or former employee of a
Subsidiary;
Charitable
exclusively charitable under English law;
Trust Deed
this trust deed in its present form or as amended from
time to time;
Trust Period
the period commencing on the date of this Trust Deed
an ending on the expiry of 80 years from the date of
this Trust Deed and so that the period of 80 years from
the date of this Trust Deed shall be the perpetuity
period for the purpose of section 1 of the Perpetuities
and Accumulations Act 1964; and
Trustee
the Original Trustee and any additional or replacement
trustee from time to time of the Plan.
1.2
Unless otherwise specified, the interpretation provisions of Rule 1.2 of the
Schedule shall apply.
1.3
References to clauses are to clauses of this Trust Deed.
2
OBJECT OF TRUST
All Plan Shares held by the Trustee will be held UPON TRUST for the
Beneficiaries respectively entitled to them under the Plan subject to the provisions
set out below and to the power of the Trustee to transfer or cause to be transferred
to the person beneficially entitled to them any Plan Shares in accordance with the
Plan.
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3
ACHIEVING OBJECT OF TRUST
3.1
Monies received from Participating Companies
Subject to the provisions set out below the Trustee shall apply monies it receives
from the Participating Companies in the acquisition of Shares for Appropriation or
for the purposes of clause 4.1 and to hold such Shares once Appropriated and all
other trust property deriving from such Shares on trust for the Participants to whom
such Shares have been Appropriated and to apply and deal with the same in
accordance with the Plan provided always that:
3.1.1
the Trustee shall not dispose of a Participant’s Free Shares during the Free
Shares Holding Period, Matching Shares during the Matching Shares
Holding Period or Dividend Shares during the Dividend Shares Holding
Period (whether by transfer to the Participant or otherwise) except as
provided in the Rules;
3.1.2 the Trustee shall not (subject to the Rules) dispose of any of a Participant’s
Free Shares after the end of the Free Shares Holding Period, Matching
Shares after the end of the Matching Shares Holding Period or Dividend
Shares after the end of the Dividend Shares Holding Period except pursuant
to a direction validly given by or on behalf of the Participant or any person
in whom the beneficial interest in those Shares is for the time being vested;
3.1.3 the Trustee shall deal with any right attaching to Free Shares, Matching
Shares or Dividend Shares to be allotted or to acquire other shares,
securities or rights of any description only pursuant to a written direction
given by or on behalf of the Participant or any person in whom the
beneficial interest in such Free Shares, Matching Shares or Dividend Shares
is for the time being vested.
3.2
Purchased Share Monies
Subject to the provisions set out below the Trustee shall apply Purchased Share
Money in the acquisition of Purchased Shares and shall hold such shares once
acquired on trust for the Participants on whose respective behalves they have been
acquired and apply and deal with the same in accordance with the Plan provided
always that:
3.2.1
the Trustee shall not (subject to the Rules) dispose of a Participant’s
Purchased Shares (whether by transfer to the Participant or otherwise)
except pursuant to a direction validly given by or on behalf of the
Participant or any person in whom the beneficial interest in those Purchased
Shares is for the time being vested;
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3.2.2
the Trustee shall deal with any right attaching to Purchased Shares to
acquire other shares securities or rights of any description only pursuant to a
written direction) given by or on behalf of the Participant or any person in
whom the beneficial interest in the Purchased Shares is for the time being
vested.
4
UNUSED FUNDS
4.1
Trustee to apply unused funds for costs etc
Where pursuant to the Plan the Trustee holds any monies, shares, securities or other
assets which represent or represent income derived from:
4.1.1
any monies or assets received from the Participating Companies for the
purposes of the Plan but which have not been applied and which are not
required to be applied under the Plan in an Appropriation; or
4.1.2
any Capital Receipt of less than £3 which would be distributable to a
Participant save for the provisions concerning such sums in the Rules; and
4.1.3
any assets relating to the Plan (including any amounts specifically paid to
the Trustee as a contribution to any costs, charges and expenses incurred in
connection with the establishment and operation of the Plan) which are not
held for the benefit of a Participant in consequence of an Appropriation to
him or any acquisition of Purchased Shares by him and which are not
required to be applied under the Plan
then the Trustee may apply such assets or the sale proceeds in or towards any
reasonable costs, charges and expenses of the Plan and may during the Trust Period
and subject to the law relating to accumulations accumulate any income thereon
and hold the same for the general purposes of the Plan. The Trustee shall notify the
Company on request of all amounts and assets held for such purposes.
4.2
Trustee to account for monies upon termination of Plan
If at any time the Plan is terminated the Trustee shall account to the Participating
Companies for any unused monies then held on the trusts of clause 4.1.
Notwithstanding such termination the Trustee shall continue to administer the Plan
in accordance with the Trust Deed and the Rules. At the earlier of the expiry of the
Trust Period and the third anniversary of the termination of the Plan the Trustee
shall convert into money any trust property held subject to the trusts of the Plan
declared in the Trust Deed and which are not either Purchased Shares, or Dividend
Shares nor Appropriated to Participants and shall pay such money to such one or
more Charitable organisations and if more than one in such proportions as the
Trustee shall, in its absolute discretion determine. The receipt of the proper officer
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of the recipient Charitable organisation shall be a valid discharge of the Trustee for
the benefit received by it.
5
RIGHT TO DEAL WITH RECONSTRUCTIONS, ETC
5.1
Trustee to act on Participant’s directions
The Trustee may at any time on behalf of any Participant who has given a direction
to the Trustee under the Rules (but not otherwise) enter into any compromise or
arrangement with respect to or may release or forbear to exercise all or any of its
rights as shareholder whether in connection with a scheme of reconstruction or
amalgamation or otherwise and may accept in or towards satisfaction of all or any
of such rights such consideration as such Participant shall direct whether in the
form of cash, stock, shares, debentures, debenture stock or obligations or securities
without the Trustee being in any way liable or responsible for any loss resulting
from complying with any such direction or any liability or increased liability of
such Participant to tax or in respect of any inadequacy or alleged inadequacy in the
nature or amount of such consideration.
5.2
Trustee to use reasonable endeavours to obtain directions
The Trustee shall use reasonable endeavours to ensure that the directions of
Participants are obtained in respect of any matters affecting the rights of holders of
Plan Shares.
5.3
No liability for acting on directions
The Trustee shall not be liable or responsible for any loss or any liability or
increased liability of a Participant to tax arising out of the failure of such
Participant to give a direction to the Trustee or the failure of such Participant to
give a direction to the Trustee within a particular time or if the Participant has
directed the Trustee to use its discretion in any way arising out of the bona fide
exercise by the Trustee of that discretion.
6
ACCOUNTABILITY FOR PAYE AND OTHER DEDUCTIONS
The Company, any Participating Company or the Trustee may account to the Inland
Revenue or other authority concerned for any amounts deducted from payments
made, or assets transferred, pursuant to the Plan in respect of income tax or any
other deductions required by statute or regulations made thereunder.
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7
MAINTENANCE OF TRUST RECORDS
7.1
Trustee to procure preparation of Trust records
The Trustee shall maintain all necessary accounts (including the accounts of
individual employees) records and other documents necessary to carry out its
obligations in connection with:
7.2
7.1.1
the proper administration of the Plan; and
7.1.2
the PAYE obligations of the employer company (as that expression is
defined in paragraph 95 of Schedule 8) so far as they relate to the Plan.
Duty to keep records of PAYE deductions
The Trustee shall keep records of all PAYE deductions, including payments to the
Participating Companies in respect of PAYE obligations.
7.3
Trustee to submit Trust records to Company or any other Participating
Company
The Trustee shall submit to the Company or any other Participating Company such
reports or other information as it may reasonably require for the purpose of
ensuring that the Plan is properly administered and without prejudice to the
generality of the foregoing the Trustee shall submit to the Company or any other
Participating Company copies of all documents including the annual returns which
have been supplied to the Board of Inland Revenue within twenty-one days of their
being so supplied.
7.4
Company’s and any other Participating Company’s right to inspect Trust
records
The Company and any other Participating Company shall at all times be entitled on
service of 3 days written notice or as otherwise agreed between the Company or
any other Participating Company respectively and the Trustee to inspect all
accounts, documents and records maintained by the Trustee for the purposes of the
Plan and may at any time and at its absolute discretion audit or cause to be audited
those accounts, documents and records.
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8
SECURITIES AND TITLE
8.1
Securities may be placed in custody
The Trustee may place the documents of title for the time being in its possession in
any bank or safe deposit and shall not be responsible for any losses incurred by so
doing.
8.2
More than one Trustee may be registered proprietor
At any time when there is more than one Trustee, the Trustee shall be entitled to
procure that any one or more of them may be registered as proprietor of any
property held by them upon the trusts of the Trust Deed.
9
APPLICATION OF PLAN TO SUBSIDIARIES
9.1
Extension of Plan to Subsidiaries
The Plan may with the consent of the Company be extended to any Subsidiary by a
deed of adherence in a form approved by the UK Plan Manager executed by that
Subsidiary and the Company.
9.2
Circumstances where Plan may cease to apply to Subsidiary
The Plan shall cease to extend to a Participating Company when:
9.2.1
such Participating Company ceases to be a Subsidiary; or
9.2.2
a notice is served by the Company upon the Trustee and the Participating
Company that the Plan shall cease to apply to that Participating Company;
or
9.2.3
a Participating Company withdraws from the Plan on such conditions as
may be agreed by the Company
but such cessation shall not affect the subsisting rights of Beneficiaries under the
Plan which have arisen under the Plan prior to such cessation.
9.3
Trustee not liable to account to former Participating Companies
Where the Plan ceases to extend to a Participating Company in accordance with
clause 9.2 then the Trustee shall not be liable to account to such Participating
Company for any unused monies then held on the trusts of clause 4.1.
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10
DUTIES OF PARTICIPATING COMPANIES
10.1
Duty to contribute sums and provide information
If and so long as any company is a Participating Company it shall:
10.1.1 contribute and pay to the Trustee such sums as are required by the Trustee
to purchase or subscribe for Shares to be Appropriated to Participants of
that Participating Company together with a fair proportion of the sums
required to meet:
10.1.1.1
the reasonable expenses of the Trustee in operating and
administering the Plan; and
10.1.1.2
any remuneration payable to the Trustee
to the extent that such expenses and remuneration cannot be met out of such
of the assets held by the Trustee as are applicable for that purpose
10.1.2 provide the Trustee with all information reasonably required from it for the
purposes of the administration and operation of the Plan in such form as the
Trustee may reasonably require.
10.2
Continuing liability of former Participating Companies
Any company that ceases to be a Participating Company shall remain liable to meet
its fair proportion of the expenses of the Trustee.
11
PROTECTION OF THE TRUSTEE
11.1
Limited liability for monetary obligations
The Trustee shall not be liable to satisfy any monetary obligations under the Plan
(including but without prejudice to the generality of the foregoing any monetary
obligations to Eligible Employees) beyond the sums of money (including income)
from time to time in its hands or under its control as Trustee of the Plan and
properly applicable for that purpose.
11.2
Trustee to comply with Company’s directions
The Trustee shall comply with any directions given by the Company (including for
the avoidance of doubt any person to whom any delegation under clause 18.1 has
been made) under the Rules and shall not be under any liability in respect of such
compliance to the Company (or such other person under clause 18.1) or to any
Eligible Employee.
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11.3
Indemnity
Subject to any agreement to the contrary between the Company or any Participating
Company and the Trustee, the Company, shall pay to or reimburse the Trustee all
expenses properly incurred by it in connection with the Trust and shall fully
indemnify the Trustee against all actions, claims, losses, demands, proceedings,
charges, expenses, costs, damages, taxes, duties and other liabilities incurred by it
in connection with the Trust or in connection with the proper administration and
operation of the Plan provided that a Trustee shall not be paid, reimbursed or
indemnified in respect of:
11.3.1 any sum which can under clause 4.1 be recovered by the Trustee either out
of the assets held subject to the Plan or from other Participating Companies;
and
11.3.2 any fraud, wilful misconduct, or in the case of a Trustee receiving
remuneration for acting as a Trustee, negligence by it or any of its officers
or employees.
In addition, the Trustee shall have the benefit of all indemnities conferred
on trustees by the Trustee Act 1925 and generally by law.
11.4
No obligation to become involved in management
The Trustee shall not be under any obligation to:
11.4.1 become a director or other officer, or interfere in the management or affairs,
of any company, any of the shares, debentures, debenture stock or securities
which are held on the trusts created by the Trust Deed or of any company
associated with any such company, notwithstanding that the Trustee may
have (whether directly or indirectly) a substantial holding in, or control of,
any such company; or
11.4.2 seek information about the affairs of any such company but may leave the
conduct of the affairs of any such company to its directors, officers or other
persons managing the company provided the Trustee has no actual notice of
any act of dishonesty on the part of such persons in connection with the
management of the company.
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12
ADDITIONAL POWERS
12.1
Additional powers of the Trustee
In addition and without prejudice to the powers vested in it by the other provisions
of the Trust Deed and by law, the Trustee shall have the following powers and
discretions:
12.1.1 to agree with the Company (or, as appropriate, such other person to whom
powers are delegated under clause 18.1) all matters relating to the operation
and administration of the trusts created by the Trust Deed and so that no
person claiming an interest under the Trust shall be entitled to question the
legality or correctness of any arrangement or agreement made between the
Company (or, as appropriate, such other person to whom powers are
delegated under clause 18.1) and the Trustee in relation to such operation
and administration;
12.1.2 from time to time in writing to authorise such other person or persons
whether or not a Trustee, as the Trustee shall think fit to draw and endorse
cheques and to give receipts and discharges for any monies or other
property payable transferable or deliverable to the Trustee and every such
receipt or discharge shall be as valid and effectual as if such receipt or
discharge was given by the Trustee and the production of such written
authority of the Trustee shall be a sufficient protection to any person taking
any such receipt or discharge and (unless that person shall have received
express notice in writing of the revocation of the authority) he shall be
entitled to assume and act upon the assumption that the authority remains
unrevoked;
12.1.3 at any time, to borrow or raise money only for the purpose of subscribing
for or purchasing Shares or any other purpose for which money may be
applied under the Trust Deed. Any loan made by a Participating Company
to the Trustee shall be on such terms as the Participating Company and the
Trustee agree;
12.1.4 to make any payment to any Beneficiary into the Beneficiary’s bank
account and the Trustee shall be discharged from obtaining a receipt or
seeing the application of any such payment; and
12.1.5 to pay any amount, whether income or capital, intended to be paid to, or
applied for the benefit generally of, any minor to his or her parent or
guardian, whose receipt shall be a valid discharge of the Trustee.
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12.2
Trustee’s power to invest monies etc
Subject to any provision to the contrary in the Rules the Trustee shall in respect of
monies or other assets not held on trust for a Participant have the same full and
unrestricted powers of investing and transposing investments and laying out monies
in all respects as if it were absolutely entitled to them beneficially and without
regard to any requirement as to diversification.
12.3
Trustee’s power of sale
Subject to any provision to the contrary in the Rules the Trustee shall in respect of
any assets not held on trust for a Participant have all the powers of sale of a
beneficial owner in respect of such assets.
13
PROCEEDINGS OF TRUSTEES
13.1
Scope of clause
Unless a corporate trustee is the sole Trustee, the following provisions of this
clause 13 shall govern the proceedings of the Trustees.
13.2
Regulations for conduct of business
The Trustees shall meet together and, subject to the following provisions of this
clause 13, make such regulations for the conduct of their business as they
determine.
13.3
Quorum for meetings of Trustees
The quorum for any meeting of the Trustees shall be two. A meeting of the
Trustees at which a quorum is present shall be competent to exercise all the powers
and discretions exercisable by the Trustees generally.
13.4
Majority voting of Trustees
At any meeting of the Trustees, all questions shall be decided by a majority of the
votes of the Trustees present and voting thereon. In the event of an equality of
votes, the chairman of the meeting, if any, shall have a second or casting vote. In
the event of an equality of votes on the election of a chairman at any meeting, the
chairman shall be chosen by lot.
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13.5
Written resolutions of Trustees
A resolution in writing signed by all the Trustees shall be as valid and effective as
if it had been passed at a meeting of the Trustees and the same may consist of two
or more documents in similar form each signed by one or more of the Trustees.
14
ADMINISTRATION
14.1
Delegation
Where there is more than one Trustee, the Trustees may from time to time delegate
any business to any one or more of their number.
14.2
Trustee being a company
A Trustee which is a company may in its capacity as a Trustee act by its officers
and may by such officers have and exercise all powers trusts and discretions vested
in it under the Trust Deed.
14.3
Minutes of meetings
The Trustee shall cause proper minutes to be kept and entered in a book provided
for the purpose of all its resolutions and proceedings and any such minutes of any
meeting of the Trustee, if purported to be signed by the chairman of such meeting
or by the chairman of a subsequent meeting, shall be admissible as prima facie
evidence of the matters stated in such minutes.
14.4
Professional advice
The Trustee may employ and act on the advice or opinion of any solicitor,
accountant, or other person engaged in any profession or business whether such
advice was obtained by the Trustee or by the Company or any other Participating
Company (or as appropriate by such other person to whom powers are delegated
under clause 18.1). The Trustee shall not be responsible for any loss occasioned by
its acting on that advice.
14.5
Trustee’s agents
The Trustee may employ on such terms as the Company or any other Participating
Company may agree as to remuneration any agent to transact any business in
connection with the Plan and the Trustee shall not be liable for any loss arising by
reason of the fraud or negligence of such agent.
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14.6
Trustee may execute deeds etc
The Trustee may execute or authorise the execution or delivery by any agent of it
of any trust, deeds, documents or other instruments by the impression of the
Trustees’ signatures (where there is more than one Trustee) or (in the case of a sole
corporate trustee) by the signature of two or more officers of the corporate trustee,
in writing, printing, lithograph, photocopying and other modes of representing or
reproducing words in a visible form and may authorise the delivery of such
instruments on its behalf.
15
REMUNERATION AND INTERESTS OF THE TRUSTEES
15.1
Individual Trustees
Any individual Trustee shall be entitled to receive and retain as remuneration for
his services under the Trust Deed such sum or sums as a Participating Company
may from time to time resolve to pay to him notwithstanding that he is also an
officer or employee of a Participating Company and he shall not be disqualified
from voting or taking part in any decision of the Trustees on any matter by virtue of
any personal or beneficial interest (actual or prospective) therein.
15.2
Professional Trustees
Any Trustee who is a solicitor, accountant, or other person engaged in any
profession or business shall be entitled to charge and be paid all normal and other
charges for business transacted, services rendered or time spent personally or by the
Trustee’s firm in connection with the Plan, including acts which a Trustee not
engaged in any profession or business could have done personally.
15.3
Corporate Trustees
Any Trustee which is a company shall be entitled to charge and be paid such
reasonable remuneration or charges as shall from time to time be agreed in writing
between the Company (or, as appropriate, such other person, to whom powers are
delegated, under clause 18.1) and such company and any such company (being a
bank) shall be entitled subject to the written consent of the Company (or, as
appropriate, such other person, to whom powers are delegated, under clause 18.1) ,
to act as banker and perform any services in relation to the Plan on the same terms
as would be made with a customer in the ordinary course of its business as a banker
without accounting for any resultant profit including without prejudice to the
generality of the foregoing retention of its customary share of brokerage
commission.
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15.4
Right to be employed by Company or Subsidiary
Any Trustee or officer of a corporate trustee may be employed by, or be appointed
an officer of, the Company or any Subsidiary and shall be entitled to keep for his
benefit such remuneration as he may receive by virtue of such position and shall
not be liable to account for any such benefit.
16
PERMITTED DEALINGS OF TRUSTEES
16.1
Trustee permitted to hold shares etc
No Trustee (nor any director or other officer of a company acting as a Trustee) shall
be precluded from acquiring, holding or dealing with any shares, debentures,
debenture stock or securities of the Company or any other Participating Company
or any other company in which the Trustee may be interested or from entering into
any contract or other transaction with the Company or any other Participating
Company or any such other company or being interested in any such contract or
transaction. No Trustee (nor any director or other officer of a company acting as a
Trustee) shall be liable to account to any Beneficiary, Eligible Employee or
Participant or, where there is more than one Trustee, to the other Trustees or the
Company or any other Participating Company or such other company for any
profits so made or benefits so obtained by him.
16.2
No requirement to account for benefits
The Trustee (and any director or other officer of a company acting as a Trustee)
who is or becomes a Beneficiary may retain all benefits to which he becomes
entitled under the Plan and shall not be liable to account for any such benefit.
17
NUMBER, APPOINTMENT, RETIREMENT AND REMOVAL OF
TRUSTEES
17.1
Minimum number of Trustees
The minimum number of Trustees shall be:
17.1.1 in the case of a Trustee which is a company (whether or not a trust
corporation), one; and
17.1.2 in any other case, three.
17.1.3 while the number of Trustees is below the minimum number, a continuing
Trustee shall not be entitled to exercise any power or discretion under the
Trust Deed.
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17.1.4 if, after the removal, retirement or death of a Trustee, there are fewer than
the minimum number of Trustees required by clause 17.1.2, the Company
shall forthwith appoint a new Trustee in place of the removed retiring or
dead Trustee.
17.2
Statutory power to appoint new and additional Trustees
The statutory power of appointing new and additional Trustees contained in section
36 of the Trustee Act 1925 shall be vested in the Company and may be exercised
by a resolution of the Directors or in writing signed by a person duly authorised by
a resolution of the Directors.
17.3
Power to appoint additional Trustees
In addition to the statutory power of appointing new and additional Trustees, the
Company shall have the power by a resolution of the Directors or in writing signed
by a person duly authorised by a resolution of the Directors to appoint additional
Trustees notwithstanding that the effect of such appointment would be to increase
the number of Trustees beyond four.
17.4
Company ceasing to exist
If the Company ceases to exist otherwise than in consequence of a reconstruction or
amalgamation, all powers of appointing and removing Trustees shall become
vested in the Trustee.
17.5
Removal of Trustees
The Company may by a resolution of the Directors or in writing signed by a person
duly authorised by a resolution of the Directors, notice of which, in either case, is
given to the Trustee, and without assigning any reason therefor, remove a Trustee
from office, but not so as to reduce the number of Trustees below that specified in
clause 17.1. If no later date is specified in the notice, such removal shall take place
immediately on the receipt of the notice by the Trustee. If a later date is specified
in the notice, such removal shall take place on the later of the receipt of the notice
by the Trustee and the date specified in the notice.
17.6
Retirement of Trustees
A Trustee may retire by giving the Company written notice of his desire to retire
but not so as to reduce the number of Trustees below that specified in clause 17.1.
If the requirements of clause 17.1 will continue to be satisfied such notice shall take
effect at the expiry of three months or such other period as may be agreed in
writing by the Company after the date of such notice.
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If the requirements of clause 17.1 will not continue to be satisfied, the Company
shall, within three months after the giving of such notice, appoint an additional
Trustee. If the Company fails to do so within such period, the retiring Trustee may
by deed appoint an additional Trustee and his retirement shall thereupon become
effective.
17.7
Transfer of trust property following removal or retirement
Forthwith following his removal or retirement as a Trustee, the outgoing Trustee
shall transfer all property held by him subject to the Plan and deliver all documents
in his possession relating to the Plan to the remaining Trustees and shall execute all
such documents and do all such things as may be necessary to give effect to his
removal or retirement.
17.8
Section 37 of the Trustee Act 1925
Section 37(1)(c) of the Trustee Act 1925 shall apply to the Plan as if all references
in that section to a trust corporation were references to any company authorised by
its memorandum and articles to undertake trust business.
17.9
Residence of Trustees
The Company shall ensure that all the Trustees or any sole Trustee which is a
company shall at all times be resident for tax purposes in the United Kingdom.
18
DELEGATION OF ADMINISTRATION BY THE COMPANY AND OTHER
MATTERS
18.1
Delegation of Administration
The Company or the Directors may at any time delegate in writing to the directors
of any other Participating Company or to any Participating Company’s duly
authorised officers any of its powers and duties under the Trust Deed or any
business including the exercise of any discretion provided always that the Company
shall not delegate the duties imposed on it or the rights given to it under clauses 9.1,
11.3, 17.2, 17.3, 17.5 or 22.
18.2
Exercise of powers
Except as otherwise provided in the Trust Deed or in the Rules the powers and
discretions exercisable by any Participating Company in relation to the Plan shall
be exercisable in the case of the Company by the Directors and otherwise by
resolution of the directors of such Participating Company or by a duly authorised
committee thereof and a copy of any resolution signed or purporting to be signed
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by the secretary or any director of such company shall be sufficient authority to the
Trustee to act thereunder.
18.3
Information supplied by Participating Company
The Trustee shall be entitled, in the absence of manifest error, to rely without
further enquiry on any information or advice supplied to them by any Participating
Company in connection with the trust created by the Trust Deed.
19
DURATION AND WINDING UP OF THE PLAN
19.1
Termination on expiry of the Trust Period
The Plan shall terminate on the earlier of:
19.1.1 the expiry of the Trust Period; and
19.1.2 a plan termination notice validly issued under Rule 33 of the Plan
and references throughout the Trust Deed to a termination of the Plan shall be taken
to be a termination as herein provided.
19.2
Outstanding liabilities
On or after the termination of the Plan no further sums shall be paid to the Trustee
by the Participating Companies save that all Participating Companies shall remain
liable to pay their just proportion of the costs charges and expenses of the Plan.
19.3
Completion of obligations
Following any termination of the Plan the Trustee shall remain responsible for the
completion of its obligations under the Plan.
20
SUPREMACY OF TRUST DEED OVER RULES OF PLAN
The Trustee’s rights duties and powers are regulated by the Trust Deed and by the
Rules and in the case of inconsistency or conflict between the provisions of the
Trust Deed and of the Rules the provisions of the Trust Deed shall prevail.
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21
GOVERNING LAW AND JURISDICTION
21.1
Governing Law
The formation, existence, construction, performance, validity and all aspects
whatsoever of the Trust Deed and the Rules or any term of the Trust Deed or any
Rules shall be governed by English law.
21.2
Jurisdiction
Subject to 21.3 below, the English courts shall have exclusive jurisdiction to settle
any dispute which may arise out of, or in connection with, the Trust Deed or the
Rules.
21.3
Jurisdiction agreement for benefit of Company
The Company retains the right to bring proceedings in the English courts or any
other court of competent jurisdiction.
21.4
Participant deemed to submit to such jurisdiction
By accepting an Award and not renouncing it, a Participant is deemed to have
agreed to submit to such jurisdiction.
22
AMENDMENT OF TRUST DEED AND RULES
22.1
Amendment of Deed and Rules
The Company may at any time and from time to time in the case of the Trust Deed
by a supplemental deed and in the case of the Rules by resolution of the Directors
amend, modify, or alter the Plan in any respect (such amendment modification or
alteration being referred to in this clause 22.1 as a “modification”) provided that:
22.1.1 no modification shall alter to the disadvantage of any Participant his rights
which have accrued to him under the Plan before the date of such
modification;
22.1.2 no modification shall modify or alter to the disadvantage of the Trustee the
provisions for its protection and indemnity contained in the Plan without the
written agreement of the Trustee;
22.1.3 no modification shall be made which would or might infringe any rule
against perpetuities or which could result in the Plan ceasing to be an
Employees’ Share Scheme; and
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22.1.4 whilst the Plan is approved by the Board of Inland Revenue, no
modification to any key feature (as defined in paragraph 118(3)(a) of
Schedule 8) of the Plan shall take effect without the approval of the Board
of Inland Revenue.
22.2
Amendments to be binding
Any modification made in accordance with the provisions of this clause 22 shall be
binding upon all persons from time to time interested in the Plan including the
Company and any other Participating Company.
23
GENERAL PROVISIONS
23.1
Counterparts
The Trust Deed may be executed in any number of counterparts, and by the parties
on separate counterparts, each of which when so executed and delivered shall be an
original, but all the counterparts will together constitute one and the same Trust
Deed.
23.2
Irrevocability
Subject to the provisions of the Trust Deed, the trusts hereby declared are
irrevocable.
EXECUTED by the parties as a deed and delivered on the date first mentioned above.
SIGNED as a deed by
Kellogg Company
acting by its authorised signatory
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SIGNED as a deed by
Capita IRG Trustees Limited
acting by a director and its secretary/ two directors:
Director
Director/Secretary
SIGNED as a deed by
Kellogg UK Holding Company Limited
acting by a director and its secretary/ two directors:
Director
Director/Secretary
SIGNED as a deed by
Kellogg Company of Great Britain Limited
acting by a director and its secretary/ two directors:
Director
Director/Secretary
SIGNED as a deed by
Kellogg Supply Services (Europe) Limited
acting by a director and its secretary/ two directors:
Director
Director/Secretary
SIGNED as a deed by
Kellogg Marketing and Sales Company (UK) Limited
acting by a director and its secretary/ two directors:
Director
Director/Secretary
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SIGNED as a deed by
Kellogg Management Services (Europe) Limited
acting by a director and its secretary/ two directors:
Director
Director/Secretary
SIGNED as a deed by
Portable Foods Manufacturing Company Limited
acting by a director and its secretary/ two directors:
Director
Director/Secretary
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SCHEDULE
RULES OF THE KELLOGG COMPANY INLAND REVENUE APPROVED
SHARE INCENTIVE PLAN
1
INTERPRETATION
1.1
In this Schedule, unless the context otherwise requires, the following words and
expressions have the following meanings:
Accounting Period
an accounting reference period of the
Company within the meaning of section 224
of the Companies Act 1985 or a new
accounting reference period of the Company
within the meaning of section 225 of the
Companies Act 1985;
Accumulation Period
a period determined at the discretion of the
UK Plan Manager, not exceeding 12 months
which must be the same for all Participants;
Appropriate
to confer a beneficial interest in Free Shares
or Matching Shares on a Participant, subject
to the provisions of the Plan, and the
expressions “Appropriation” and
“Appropriated” shall be construed
accordingly;
Associate
the meaning set out in paragraphs 20, 21 and
22 of Schedule 8;
Associated Company
in relation to two companies if:
(a)
one company has Control of the other;
(b)
both are under the Control of the same
person or persons;
Award
the award to Participants of any one or more
of Free Shares, Purchased Shares or Matching
Shares in accordance with the Plan;
Capital Receipt
a receipt by the Trustee of money or money’s
worth of the type defined in paragraph 79 of
Schedule 8;
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Close Company
the meaning set out in section 414 ICTA
1988;
Company
Kellogg Company incorporated in the State of
Delaware whose registered office is situated
at No. 100 West Tenth Street in the City of
Wilmington, County of New Castle, State of
Delaware;
Connected Company
(a)
a company which Controls or is
Controlled by the Company or which
is controlled by a company which also
Controls the Company;
(b)
a company which is a member of a
consortium owning the Company or
which is owned in part by the
Company as a member of the
consortium;
Control
Directors
the meaning set out in section 840 ICTA
1988;
(a)
the board of directors of the Company
or a duly authorised committee thereof;
or
(b)
some other duly authorised person;
Dividend Shares
Shares acquired with dividends paid in respect
of Plan Shares as set out in Part IV;
Dividend Shares
Appropriation Date
the date on which the Trustee acquires
Dividend Shares pursuant to Rule 19.4;
Dividend Shares Holding Period
the period beginning on the Dividend Shares
Appropriation Date and ending on the earlier
of the third anniversary of that date and the
date on which the Participant ceases to have
any Relevant Employment;
Eligible Employee
an individual who in the case of Free Shares
at a Free Shares Appropriation Date, and in
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the case of Purchased Shares or Matching
Shares:
(a)
if there is no Accumulation Period, at
the time the money for the acquisition
of such Purchased Shares is deducted;
and
(b)
if there is an Accumulation Period, at
the time of the first deduction of
money for the acquisition of such
Purchased Shares:
(i)
is an employee of a
Participating Company; and
(ii)
has been such an employee (or
has otherwise been an
employee of a Qualifying
Company) at all times during
any Qualifying Period; and
(iii)
is chargeable to tax in respect
of his office or employment
with a Participating Company
under Case I of Schedule E;
and
(iv)
has not either himself or
through any Associate and
whether in either case alone or
together with one or more
Associates has not had within
the preceding twelve months, a
Material Interest in a Close
Company whose shares may be
Appropriated or acquired
under the Plan or a company
which has Control of such a
company or is a member of a
consortium which owns such a
company; and
(v)
has not, in the same Year of
Assessment participated in a
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share incentive plan approved
under Schedule 8 (other than
the Plan) established by the
Company or a Connected
Company (which for the
avoidance of doubt shall
include where an employee
would have participated but for
his failure to obtain a
Performance Allowance) or, in
relation to an Award of Free
Shares has not in the same
Year of Assessment
participated in a profit sharing
scheme approved under
Schedule 9 to ICTA 1988
established by the Company or
a Connected Company;
or an individual who at the relevant
time satisfies the requirements above,
excluding (iii), whom the UK Plan
Manager has, in its absolute discretion
determined should be included;
Employees’ Share Scheme
the meaning set out in section 743 of the
Companies Act 1985;
Forfeiture Period
the period(s) determined by the UK Plan
Manager pursuant to Rules 4.3.7, 15.2.5 or
15.2.6, as appropriate, provided that the
period(s) shall not exceed 3 years from the
relevant date of Appropriation;
Free Shares
Shares entitlement to which is as set out in
Part I;
Free Shares Agreement
an agreement issued by the UK Plan Manager
under Rule 4;
Free Shares Appropriation Date
the date on which the Trustee Appropriates an
Award of Free Share;
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Free Shares Closing Date
the date specified in the Free Shares Invitation
by which the Free Shares Agreement must be
received by the UK Plan Manager;
Free Shares Holding Period
the period beginning on the Free Shares
Appropriation Date and ending on a date
determined from time to time at the discretion
of the UK Plan Manager, and being not earlier
than the third anniversary nor later than the
fifth anniversary of the Free Shares
Appropriation Date or, if earlier, the date on
which the Participant ceases to be in Relevant
Employment and which period shall be the
same for all Free Shares comprised in the
same Award and shall not be increased at any
time in respect of Free Shares already
Appropriated;
Free Shares Invitation
an invitation to participate in an offer for Free
Shares issued by the UK Plan Manager under
Rule 4;
ICTA 1988
the Income and Corporation Taxes Act 1988;
Initial Market Value
the Market Value of a Share:
Market Value
(i)
in the case of Free Shares, on the Free
Shares Appropriation Date;
(ii)
in the case of Matching Shares, on the
Matching Shares Appropriation Date;
and
(iii)
in the case of Dividend Shares, on the
Dividend Shares Appropriation Date;
(a)
where the Shares are listed on the New
York Stock Exchange:
(i)
if the Trustees acquire all of the Shares
from a purchase made on that market
and Appropriate all of the Shares on
the date on which they were purchased,
the average of the prices at which the
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Trustees acquire the Shares on that
purchase date; or;;
Matching Shares
(ii)
if the Trustees acquire the Shares from
a purchase made on that market and
Appropriate the Shares on a date other
than the date on which the Shares were
purchased, the closing price of a Share
(as derived from the Financial Times)
for the dealing day immediately
preceding the day in question;
(b)
where the shares are not listed on the
New York Stock Exchange, the market
value of a Share as determined in
accordance with the provisions of Part
VIII of the Taxation of Chargeable
Gains Act 1992 and paragraph 125 of
Schedule 8 and agreed for the purposes
of the Plan with Inland Revenue Shares
Valuation on or before that day;
Shares entitlement to which is as set out in
Part III which shall:
(a)
be shares of the same class and carry
the same rights as the Purchased
Shares to which they relate;
(b)
be Appropriated on the same day as
the Purchased Shares to which they
relate are acquired; and
(c)
be Appropriated to all Participants on
exactly the same basis;
Matching Shares
Appropriation Date
the date on which the Trustee Appropriates
an Award of Matching Shares;
Matching Shares Holding
Period
the period beginning on the Matching Shares
Appropriation Date and ending on a date
determined from time to time at the discretion
of the UK Plan Manager, and being not earlier
than the third anniversary nor later than the
fifth anniversary of the Matching Shares
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Appropriation Date or, if earlier, the date on
which the Participant ceases to be in Relevant
Employment, and which period shall be the
same for all Matching Shares comprised in
the same Award and shall not be increased at
any time in respect of Matching Shares
already Appropriated;
Material Interest
the meaning set out in paragraphs 15, 17, 18
and 19 of Schedule 8;
New York Stock Exchange
the New York Stock Exchange or any
successor body;
Offer
a general offer which is made to holders of
shares of the same class as Plan Shares or of
other shares in the Company and in either
case which is made on condition that if
satisfied the person making the offer will have
Control of the Company;
Participant
an Eligible Employee to whom the Trustee
has made an Appropriation or on whose
behalf Purchased Shares or Dividend Shares
have been acquired or, where the context
permits, an Eligible Employee who has
submitted a duly completed Free Shares
Agreement or Purchased Shares Agreement in
accordance with Rule 4.3.5 or 10.3.5
respectively;
Participating Company
a Subsidiary which is a party to the Trust
Deed or has pursuant to clause 9 executed a
deed of adherence;
Performance Allowance
an Appropriation of Free Shares where:
(a)
whether or not Free Shares are
Appropriated; and/or
(b)
the number or value of Free Shares
Appropriated
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is subject to the satisfaction of a Performance
Target;
Performance Target
a performance target imposed by the UK Plan
Manager under Rule 6;
Performance Unit
a group comprising one or more Participants
to whom a Performance Target applies;
Plan
the Kellogg Company Inland Revenue
Approved Share Incentive Plan as constituted
by this Trust Deed and Rules in their present
form or as amended from time to time and
known as the Kellogg UK Share Incentive
Plan;
Plan Shares
Free Shares, Purchased Shares, Matching
Shares and Dividend Shares which have been
Appropriated to a Participant or are held on
his behalf by the Trustees;
Purchased Shares
Shares, entitlement to which is as set out in
Part II;
Purchased Shares Acquisition
Date
the date determined by the Trustee in
accordance with Rule 10.3.4;
Purchased Shares Agreement
an agreement issued by the UK Plan Manager
under Rule 10.4;
Purchased Shares Closing Date
the date specified in the Purchased Shares
Invitation by which the completed Purchased
Shares Agreement must be received by the
UK Plan Manager;
Purchased Shares Invitation
an invitation issued by the UK Plan Managers
under Rule 10;
Purchased Shares Market Value
in the case of a Purchased Shares Agreement
with:
(a)
an Accumulation Period, the lower of
the Market Value of a Share on:
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(i)
the first day of the Accumulation
Period; and
(ii)
the Purchased Shares Acquisition
Date;
(b)
no Accumulation Period, the Market
Value of a Share on the Purchased
Shares Acquisition Date.
Purchased Share Money
the meaning given to that term by Rule
10.5.2;
Qualifying Company
the meaning set out in paragraph 14 of
Schedule 8;
Qualifying Corporate Bond
the meaning set out in section 117 of the
Taxation of Chargeable Gains Act 1992;
Qualifying Period
a period determined by the UK Plan Manager
in relation to any Award of Shares under the
Plan which may be different for different
Awards provided that:
Relevant Amount
(a)
in the case of Free Shares it shall not
exceed the period of 18 months before
the Free Shares Appropriation Date;
(b)
in the case of Purchased Shares and
Matching Shares where there is an
Accumulation Period it shall not
exceed the period of 6 months before
the beginning of the Accumulation
Period;
(c)
in the case of Purchased Shares and
Matching Shares where there is no
Accumulation Period it shall not
exceed the period of 18 months
before the deduction of money for the
acquisition of such Purchased Shares;
(a)
in respect of Free Shares, £3,000 in
any Year of Assessment;
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(b)
(c)
in respect of Purchased Shares, the
lower of:
(i)
£125 per month or if the Salary
is not paid monthly such
amount as bears to £125 the
same proportion as the pay
interval in question bears to
one month; and
(ii)
10% of Salary which if there is
no Accumulation Period shall
mean 10% of the Salary
payment concerned and if there
is an Accumulation Period
shall mean 10% of the total
Salary of the Participant over
that period;
in respect of Dividend Shares £1,500
in any Year of Assessment,
subject in each case to such amendment as
may be made to that limit under the Finance
Act 2000 from time to time;
Relevant Employment
employment by a Participating Company or
any Associated Company of a Participating
Company;
Retirement Age
the age of 55;
Rules
these rules as from time to time amended;
Salary
such of the emoluments of the office or
employment by virtue of which a Participant
is eligible to participate in the Plan as are
liable to be paid under deduction of tax
pursuant to section 203 ICTA 1988 or which
would be if that individual were within the
scope of Schedule E, after deducting amounts
included by virtue of Chapter II Part V ICTA
1988 or which would have been had the
individual been within the scope of Schedule
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E, together with amounts that would be so
liable apart from Schedule 8;
1.2
Schedule 8
Schedule 8 to the Finance Act 2000;
Shares
shares of fully paid common stock in the
capital of the Company (or any shares
representing the same) which satisfy the
conditions in paragraphs 60 to 67 inclusive of
Schedule 8;
Subsidiary
any UK incorporated company over which the
Company has Control;
UK Plan Manager
the duly authorised officer or officers of a
Participating Company whom the Directors
have appointed to act in such capacity for the
purpose of the Plan; and
Year of Assessment
a period commencing on 6 April in any year
and ending on 5 April in the following year.
In the Plan, unless otherwise specified:
1.2.1
the contents, clause and Rule headings are inserted for ease of reference
only and do not affect their interpretation;
1.2.2
references to clauses, Rules, Parts and the Schedule are to clauses, rules,
parts of, and the schedule to the Plan;
1.2.3
a reference to writing includes any mode of reproducing words in a legible
form and reduced to paper;
1.2.4
the singular includes the plural and vice-versa and the masculine includes
the feminine;
1.2.5
a reference to a statutory provision includes any statutory modification,
amendment or re-enactment thereof; and
1.2.6
the Interpretation Act 1978 applies to the Plan in the same way as it applies
to an enactment.
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2
PURPOSE OF THE PLAN
The purpose of the Plan is to enable Eligible Employees of Participating
Companies to acquire Shares which give them a continuing stake in the Company.
3
PARTICIPATION ON SAME TERMS
On each occasion when an Award is to be made, subject to Rule 5 every Eligible
Employee shall be invited to participate in an Award on the same terms and those
who do actually participate must do so on the same terms.
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PART I – FREE SHARES
4
ISSUE OF INVITATIONS
4.1
Discretion of Directors
The Directors may in their absolute discretion determine that an Award of Free
Shares may be made and, accordingly instruct the UK Plan Manager to issue Free
Shares Invitations.
4.2
Limit on individual participation
In any Year of Assessment, the Initial Market Value of Free Shares Appropriated to
a Participant shall not exceed the Relevant Amount.
4.3
Contents of Free Shares Invitations
Free Shares Invitations shall be in such form as the UK Plan Manager determines
from time to time and shall state:
4.3.1
the Free Shares Closing Date;
4.3.2
the expected Free Shares Appropriation Date;
4.3.3
the Free Shares Holding Period;
4.3.4
that, by accepting the Free Shares Invitation, the Eligible Employee
becomes bound in contract with the UK Plan Manager to observe the
restrictions set out in the Free Shares Agreement;
4.3.5
that an Eligible Employee who wishes to accept the Free Shares under the
Award shall submit to the Company, prior to the Free Shares Closing Date,
a duly completed Free Shares Agreement;
4.3.6
that the individual shall only be entitled to an Appropriation of Free Shares
if he remains an Eligible Employee at the Free Shares Appropriation Date;
4.3.7
that (as determined at the discretion of the UK Plan Manager) the provisions
of either Rules 9.2 or 9.3 shall apply to the Award and, if Rule 9.3 applies,
shall state what the applicable Forfeiture Period shall be; and
4.3.8
such additional information, not inconsistent with the Rules and the Trust
Deed as the UK Plan Manager may from time to time determine.
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4.4
Free Shares Agreement and Free Shares Invitations
Each Eligible Employee shall be sent a Free Shares Invitation and a Free Shares
Agreement which shall be in such form as the UK Plan Manager may determine
from time to time and shall require the Eligible Employee to contract with the
Company as set out in Rule 8.
4.5
Election to participate in any Award of Free Shares
A Free Shares Agreement may include an election by a Participant to participate in
any Award of Free Shares until such time as he notifies the UK Plan Manager that
he no longer wishes to so participate. Where a Participant makes such an election
he shall be deemed to have complied with Rule 4.3.5 in relation to each Award of
Free Shares until the election is withdrawn.
5
ALLOCATION OF FREE SHARES BY REFERENCE TO PERFORMANCE
5.1
Free shares may be allocated by reference to performance
The UK Plan Manager may stipulate that the number of Free Shares (if any) to be
Appropriated to each Participant on a given occasion shall be determined by
reference to Performance Allowances.
5.2
Performance Allowances to apply to all
If Performance Allowances are used, they shall apply to all Participants.
5.3
UK Plan Manager to provide information
If Performance Allowances are used the UK Plan Manager shall, as soon as
reasonably practicable:
5.3.1
notify each Participant participating in the Award of the Performance
Targets to be used to determine the number or value of Free Shares
Appropriated to him; and
5.3.2
notify all Eligible Employees of any Participating Company, in general
terms, of the Performance Targets to be used to determine the number or
value of Free Shares to be Appropriated to each Participant under the
Award (provided that the UK Plan Manager may exclude any information
the disclosure of which it reasonably considers would prejudice commercial
confidentiality).
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5.4
Use of method 1 or method 2
The UK Plan Manager shall determine the number of Free Shares (if any) to be
Appropriated to each Participant by reference to performance using method 1 or
method 2. The same method shall be used for all Participants for each Award.
5.5
Performance Allowances: method 1
By this method:
5.5.1
at least 20% of Free Shares Appropriated under any Award shall be
Appropriated without reference to a Performance Target;
5.5.2
the remaining Free Shares shall be Appropriated by reference to a
Performance Target; and
5.5.3
the highest Appropriation made to a Participant by reference to performance
in any period shall be not more than four times the number of Free Shares
Appropriated to an individual without reference to a Performance Target at
the same time.
If this method is used:
5.6
5.5.4
the Free Shares Appropriated without reference to a Performance Target
shall be Appropriated on the same terms as provided in Rule 5.7; and
5.5.5
the Free Shares Appropriated by reference to a Performance Target need not
be Appropriated on the same terms as provided in Rule 5.7.
Performance Allowances: method 2
By this method:
5.6.1
some or all Free Shares shall be Appropriated by reference to performance;
5.6.2
the Appropriation of Free Shares to Participants who are members of the
same Performance Unit shall be made on the same terms, as provided in
Rule 5.7; and
Free Shares Appropriated for each Performance Unit shall be treated as separate
Awards for the purposes of Rule 5.7 only.
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5.7
Same terms basis for Free Shares Awards
An Award of Free Shares on the same terms shall be on terms determined by the
UK Plan Manager which may be directly proportional to any one or more
separately of a Participant’s:
5.7.1
remuneration from;
5.7.2
length of service with;
5.7.3
number of hours worked for;
any one or more Participating Companies.
6
PERFORMANCE TARGETS
6.1
Imposition of Performance Targets
The UK Plan Manager may impose one or more Performance Targets in order to
determine the number or value of Free Shares (if any) subject to a Performance
Allowance.
6.2
Nature of Performance Targets
Any Performance Target imposed shall be:
6.3
6.2.1
based on business results or other objective criteria; and
6.2.2
a fair and objective measure of the performance of the Performance Unit(s)
to which it applies.
Membership of Performance Unit
No Participant shall be a member of more than one Performance Unit.
6.4
Substitution, variation or waiver of Performance Targets
6.4.1
If an event occurs which causes the UK Plan Manager to consider that a
Performance Target is no longer appropriate, the UK Plan Manager may
substitute, vary or waive such Performance Target in such manner (and
make such consequential amendments to the Rules) as:
6.4.1.1
is reasonable in the circumstances;
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6.4.1.2
6.4.1.3
6.4.2
produces a fairer measure of performance and is neither materially
more nor less difficult to satisfy; and
continues to comply with Rule 6.2.
The UK Plan Manager shall, as soon as reasonably practicable, notify each
Participant affected of any such substitution, variation or waiver of the
Performance Target.
7
APPROPRIATION OF FREE SHARES
7.1
Provision of information by the UK Plan Manager to the Trustee
As soon as practicable after the end of the period to which the Performance Target
relates (in the case of Performance Allowances) or the Free Shares Closing Date the
UK Plan Manager shall inform the Trustee of:
7.2
7.1.1
the name and address of each Participant to whom Free Shares are to be
Appropriated, together with details of the Participating Company which
employs the Participant;
7.1.2
the number of Free Shares to be Appropriated to each Participant on this
occasion.
Appropriation
On the expected Free Shares Appropriation Date, the Trustee shall Appropriate to
each Participant the number of Free Shares notified to the Trustee under Rule 7.1.
7.3
Notification of Appropriation to Participants
As soon as practicable after the Free Shares Appropriation Date, the Trustee shall
notify each Participant to whom Free Shares have been Appropriated of:
7.3.1
the number and description of Free Shares Appropriated to him;
7.3.2
the Free Shares Appropriation Date;
7.3.3
their Initial Market Value; and
7.3.4
the applicable Free Shares Holding Period.
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8
RESTRICTIONS ON DEALINGS IN, AND PERMITTED TRANSFERS OF
FREE SHARES
8.1
Restrictions on disposals by Participants
Subject to Rules 25 and 27, during the Free Shares Holding Period a Participant
shall:
8.2
8.1.1
permit the Trustee to hold his Free Shares; and
8.1.2
not assign, charge or otherwise dispose of his beneficial interest in his Free
Shares.
Restrictions on disposals by the Trustee
Subject to Rules 9, 29 and 31 and paragraph 121(5) of Schedule 8 the Trustee:
8.3
8.2.1
shall not dispose of any Free Shares, whether by transfer to the Participant
or otherwise, during the Free Shares Holding Period;
8.2.2
shall not dispose of any Free Shares after the Free Shares Holding Period
except in accordance with a direction given by or on behalf of the
Participant; and
8.2.3
shall not deal with any right conferred in respect of a Participant’s Free
Shares to be allotted other shares, securities or other rights except pursuant
to a direction given by or on behalf of the Participant or any person in
whom the beneficial interest in his Free Shares is for the time being vested.
Transfer of Free Shares after the Free Shares Holding Period
8.3.1
A Participant may, at any time after the Free Shares Holding Period direct
the Trustee by notice in writing to:
8.3.1.1
transfer the Participant’s Free Shares to the Participant; or
8.3.1.2
transfer the Free Shares to some other person named by the
Participant; or
8.3.1.3
dispose of the Free Shares by way of sale for the best
consideration in money that can reasonably be obtained at the time
of sale and to account for the proceeds to the Participant or some
other person named by the Participant.
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8.3.2
Within 30 days after receipt of a notice referred to in Rule 8.3.1 the Trustee
shall comply with the instructions set out in such notice after first
complying with Rules 30 and 31 as appropriate.
9
CESSATION OF RELEVANT EMPLOYMENT AND EARLY TRANSFER
OF FREE SHARES
9.1
Trustee to be notified of cessation of Relevant Employment
If a Participant ceases to be in Relevant Employment then the UK Plan Manager
shall as soon as reasonably practicable inform the Trustee of such cessation and
whether the provisions of Rule 9.2 or 9.3 apply.
9.2
Early transfer of Free Shares
Where the Trustee has been notified by the UK Plan Manager in accordance with
Rule 9.1 that this Rule 9.2 applies then as soon as reasonably practicable after the
receipt of such notification and in any event within 30 days after the cessation of
the Relevant Employment the Trustee shall transfer the Free Shares to the
Participant or as directed by him prior to the transfer, in accordance with Rules
8.3.1.2 or 8.3.1.3 provided always that the Trustee shall first comply with Rule 31.
9.3
Forfeiture of Free Shares
Where the Trustee has been notified by the UK Plan Manager in accordance with
Rule 9.1 that this Rule 9.3 applies then, subject to Rules 9.4 and 9.5 the
Participant’s beneficial entitlement to his Free Shares shall lapse immediately on
his ceasing to be in Relevant Employment before the end of the Forfeiture Period
and he shall cease to have any rights to such Free Shares.
9.4
Injury, disability, redundancy, retirement etc
Notwithstanding Rule 9.3 if a Participant ceases to be in Relevant Employment by
reason of:
9.4.1
injury or disability established to the satisfaction of the UK Plan Manager;
9.4.2
redundancy within the meaning of the Employment Rights Act 1996;
9.4.3
a transfer of employment which is subject to the Transfer of Undertaking
(Protection of Employment) Regulations 1981;
9.4.4
a change of Control or other circumstances giving rise to the Participant’s
employing company ceasing to be an Associated Company of any
Participating Company;
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9.4.5
retirement on or after reaching Retirement Age;
then the Trustee shall act in accordance with Rule 9.2.
9.5
Death
If a Participant ceases to be in Relevant Employment by reason of his death then
the Trustee shall act in accordance with Rule 24.5.
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PART II – PURCHASED SHARES
10
PURCHASED SHARES INVITATIONS
10.1
Issue of Purchased Shares Invitations
The Directors may in their absolute discretion determine that an Award of
Purchased Shares may be made and, accordingly instruct the UK Plan Manager to
issue Purchased Shares Invitations.
10.2
Timing of Purchased Shares Invitations
Purchased Shares Invitations must be issued before the commencement of any
relevant Accumulation Period.
10.3
Contents of Purchased Shares Invitation
Purchased Shares Invitations shall be in such form as the UK Plan Manager may
determine from time to time and shall state:
10.3.1 the Purchased Shares Closing Date;
10.3.2 the maximum Salary deduction permitted under the Purchased Shares
Agreement (being the lesser of the Relevant Amount and such other amount
(being a multiple of £1) as the UK Plan Manager may determine and
specify);
10.3.3 the minimum Salary deduction permitted determined by the UK Plan
Manager which sum must be no greater than £10 per month (or such other
amount as may be permitted from time to time under paragraph 37 of
Schedule 8);
10.3.4 the expected Purchased Shares Acquisition Date being a date determined by
the Trustee which:
10.3.4.1 where there is no Accumulation Period, shall be within 30 days
after the deduction from Salary referred to in Rule 10.5.2 is made;
10.3.4.2 where there is an Accumulation Period shall be not more than 30
days after the end of the Accumulation Period.
10.3.5 that an Eligible Employee who wishes to accept Purchased Shares under the
Award shall submit to the UK Plan Manager, prior to the Purchased Shares
Closing Date, a duly completed Purchased Shares Agreement; and
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10.3.6 if appropriate, the commencement date (which may not commence later
than the date of the first Salary deduction to be made under the Participant’s
Purchased Shares Agreement) and length of the Accumulation Period.
10.4
Purchased Shares Agreement and Purchased Shares Invitation
Each Eligible Employee shall be sent a Purchased Shares Agreement and a
Purchased Shares Invitation.
10.5
Contents of Purchased Shares Agreement
A Purchased Shares Agreement shall be in such form as the UK Plan Manager may
determine from time to time and shall:
10.5.1 set out a notice in the form prescribed by regulations and pursuant to
paragraph 38 of Schedule 8;
10.5.2 require the Eligible Employee to state the amount of Salary deduction(s)
being a multiple of £1 and not exceeding the maximum permitted under
Rule 10.3.2) which he wishes to allocate for the purchase of Purchased
Shares under the Purchased Shares Agreement (“Purchased Share Money”);
and
10.5.3 state the intervals at which such amounts should be deducted; and
10.5.4 permit the Eligible Employee to notify the Trustee that he wishes to have
any excess amount remaining after the acquisition of Purchased Shares to be
paid over to him subject to the Trustee complying with Rule 32. For the
avoidance of doubt, if the Trustee does not receive such written notification
and excess amount remaining after the acquisition of Purchased Shares will
be retained by the Trustee and added to the next Accumulation Period or
where there is no next Accumulation Period, retained by the Trustee and
added to the next Salary deduction;
10.5.5 state the commencement date (which may not commence later than the date
of the first Salary deduction to be made under the Eligible Employee’s
Purchased Shares Agreement) and length of the Accumulation Period, if
applicable; and
10.5.6 if applicable, state the maximum number of Purchased Shares to be included
in the Award on this occasion.
10.6
Agreement may be withdrawn
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A Purchased Shares Agreement shall have effect until such time as a Participant
notifies the UK Plan Manager that he no longer wishes to so participate.
10.7
Excess Salary deductions
Any amounts deducted in excess of the amounts permitted must be paid over to the
Participant as soon as practicable, not including sums retained by the Trustee in
complying with Rule 30.
10.8
Scaling down
If the Company receives applications for Purchased Shares in excess of any
maximum specified in accordance with Rule 10.5.6 the amount of deduction of
Purchased Share Money specified by each Participant shall be reduced pro rata.
10.9
Purchased Share Money held for Eligible Employee
Purchased Share Money must subject to Rules 11.4 and 14.2 be:
10.9.1 paid to the Trustee as soon as practicable; and
10.9.2 held by the Trustee on behalf of a Participant with:
10.9.2.1 an institution authorised under the Banking Act 1987;
10.9.2.2 a building society; or
10.9.2.3 a relevant European institution
until it is used to acquire Purchased Shares on a Participant’s behalf.
10.10 Interest on Purchased Share Money
The Trustee must account to a Participant, for any interest received on Purchased
Share Money held on his behalf.
11
INSTRUCTIONS GIVEN DURING ACCUMULATION PERIOD
11.1
Variation of Salary deductions and intervals
Subject to Rules 10.3.2, 10,3,3, 10.3.8, and notwithstanding Rule 10.5.5 a
Participant may, with the prior agreement of the UK Plan Manager, vary the
amount and or the intervals of the salary deduction authorised under his Purchased
Shares Agreement.
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11.2
Notice to suspend Salary deductions
A Participant may, at any time direct the UK Plan Manager by notice in writing to:
11.2.1 suspend the making of Salary deductions; or
11.2.2 recommence the making of Salary deductions
under his Purchased Shares Agreement provided always that the Participant may
not permit the UK Plan Manager to make additional Salary deductions to make up
for any Salary deductions which were missed.
11.3
Notice to terminate Purchased Shares Agreement
A Participant may, at any time notify the UK Plan Manager in writing that he
wishes to terminate his Purchased Shares Agreement.
11.4
UK Plan Manager to give effect to notices
11.4.1 Where the UK Plan Manager receives a notice to suspend or terminate
deductions under Rule 11.2 or 11.3, it shall (unless a later date is specified
in the notice) within 30 days of receipt of the notice give effect to the same,
and shall:
11.4.1.1 arrange for all further deductions of Purchased Share Money under
the Participant’s Purchased Shares Agreement to cease;
11.4.1.2 in the case of a notice under Rule 11.3 instruct the Trustee, subject
to first complying with Rule 30, to pay over to that Participant
Purchased Share Money held on his behalf.
11.4.2
11.5
When the UK Plan Manager receives a notice to recommence Salary
deductions under Rule 11.2 it shall (unless a later date is specified in the
notice) recommence deductions on the date of the first deduction due under
the Purchased Shares Agreement following 30 days after receipt of the
notice.
Purchased Shares Agreement to apply to new holding
Where during an Accumulation Period a transaction occurs in relation to any of the
shares to be acquired under a Purchased Shares Agreement which results in a new
holding of Shares being equated with the original holding for the purposes of
capital gains tax and the Participant gives his consent, the Purchased Shares
Agreement shall have effect following that transaction as if it were an agreement
for the purchase of shares comprised in the new holding.
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12
ACQUISITION OF PURCHASED SHARES
12.1
Acquisition of Shares by Trustee (no Accumulation Period)
After the deduction of Purchased Share Money the Trustee shall calculate the
number of Purchased Shares to be acquired on behalf of each Participant by
dividing (as nearly as possible) each Participant’s Purchased Share Money deducted
under his Purchased Shares Agreement by the Purchased Shares Market Value. The
Trustee shall then acquire such Shares on behalf of Participants within 30 days of
such deduction.
12.2
Acquisition of Shares by Trustee (with Accumulation Period)
After the expiry of the Accumulation Period the Trustee shall calculate the number
of Purchased Shares to be acquired on behalf of each Participant by dividing (as
nearly as possible) each Participant’s aggregate Purchased Share Money salary
deducted under his Purchased Shares Agreement during the Accumulation Period
(together with any amount carried forward from a previous Accumulation Period by
agreement with the Participant) by the Purchased Shares Market Value and shall
within 30 days of the end of the Accumulation Period acquire that number of
Shares which shall be held on behalf of the respective Participant as Purchased
Shares.
12.3
Notification of acquisition to Participants
As soon as practicable after the Purchased Shares Acquisition Date, the Trustee
shall notify each Participant on whose behalf Purchased Shares have been acquired
of:
12.3.1 the number and description of Purchased Shares acquired on his behalf;
12.3.2 the Purchased Shares Acquisition Date;
12.3.3 the aggregate amount of the Participant’s Purchased Share Money applied
by the Trustee in acquiring the Purchased Shares; and
12.3.4 the Purchased Shares Market Value.
12.4
Salary deductions not invested in Purchased Shares
Any Purchased Share Money not used to acquire Purchased Shares shall be dealt
with in accordance with the instructions of the Participant under Rule 10.5.4.
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13
TRANSFER OF PURCHASED SHARES BY PARTICIPANT
13.1
Participants may request transfer of Purchased Shares
A Participant may, at any time after the Purchased Shares Acquisition Date direct
the Trustee by notice in writing to:
13.1.1 transfer his Purchased Shares to the Participant; or
13.1.2 transfer his Purchased Shares to some other person named by the
Participant; or
13.1.3 dispose of those Purchased Shares by way of sale and to account for the
proceeds to the Participant or some other person named by the Participant.
13.2
Trustee to comply with request
As soon as reasonably practicable, and in any event within 30 days after receipt of
the notice, the Trustee shall comply with the instructions set out in such notice
provided always that it shall first comply with Rules 30 and 31.
14
CESSATION OF RELEVANT EMPLOYMENT
14.1
Trustee to be notified of cessation of Relevant Employment
If a Participant ceases to be in Relevant Employment then the UK Plan Manager
shall, as soon as reasonably practicable, inform the Trustee of such cessation.
14.2
Cessation of Relevant Employment prior to the Purchased Shares Acquisition
Date
14.2.1 Where there is no Accumulation Period and a Participant ceases to be in
Relevant Employment before the Purchased Shares Acquisition Date but
after the deduction of Purchased Share Money he shall be treated as ceasing
to be in Relevant Employment immediately after the Purchased Shares
Acquisition Date.
14.2.2 Where there is an Accumulation Period and a Participant ceases to be in
Relevant Employment during the Accumulation Period the Trustee shall,
subject to first complying with Rule 30, pay over to that Participant as soon
as reasonably practicable all Salary deductions that have been made under
his Purchased Shares Agreement.
14.2.3 Where there is an Accumulation Period and a Participant ceases to be in
Relevant Employment after the final deduction of Purchased Share Money
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and before the Purchased Shares Acquisition Date he shall be treated as
ceasing to be in Relevant Employment immediately after the Purchased
Shares Acquisition Date.
14.3
Transfer of Purchased Shares on cessation of Relevant Employment
Where the Participant ceases or is treated as ceasing to be in Relevant Employment
on or following the Partnership Shares Acquisition Date and where the Trustee
receives a notification under Rule 14.1 then as soon as reasonably practicable after
the receipt of such notification and in any event within 30 days after the cessation
of the Relevant Employment the Trustee shall transfer the Purchased Shares to the
Participant or as directed by him in writing prior to the transfer provided always
that the Trustee shall first comply with Rule 31.
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PART III – MATCHING SHARES
15
NOTIFICATION OF MATCHING SHARES
15.1
Relationship to Purchased Shares
Where the Directors have exercised their discretion under Rule 10.1 they may in
their absolute discretion also determine that an Appropriation of Matching Shares
shall be made to those Eligible Employees who enter into a Purchased Shares
Agreement.
15.2
Additional contents of Purchased Shares Agreement
Where the Directors exercise their discretion under Rule 15.1 then in addition to the
requirements set out in Rule 10.5 each Purchased Shares Agreement shall state:
15.2.1 the Matching Shares Appropriation Date (which shall be the same as the
Purchased Shares Acquisition Date);
15.2.2 the ratio of Matching Shares to Purchased Shares for this Award of
Purchased Shares which:
15.2.2.1 shall not exceed a maximum of two Matching Shares for every
Purchased Share acquired on behalf of the Participant; and
15.2.2.2 shall be the same ratio for all Participants;
15.2.3 the circumstances and manner in which the ratio may be changed by the UK
Plan Manager, and if the UK Plan Manager decides to alter the ratio of
Matching Shares to Purchased Shares prior to the Purchased Share
Acquisition Date the UK Plan Manager shall notify each Participant
affected prior to the Purchased Shares Acquisition Date;
15.2.4 the Matching Shares Holding Period;
15.2.5 the Forfeiture Period applicable in the event of a transfer of Purchased
Shares pursuant to Rule 13;
15.2.6 that (as determined at the discretion of the UK Plan Manager) the provisions
of either Rules 18.3 or 18.4 shall apply to the Award and, if Rule 18.4
applies, shall state what the applicable Forfeiture Period shall be;
15.2.7 such additional information not inconsistent with the Rules and the Trust
Deed as the UK Plan Manager may from time to time determine.
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16
APPROPRIATION OF MATCHING SHARES
16.1
Calculation by Trustee
At the same time as the Trustee calculates the number of Purchased Shares to be
acquired on behalf of a Participant pursuant to Rule 12.1 or 12.2 it shall
additionally calculate the number of Matching Shares to be Appropriated to each
Participant.
16.2
Appropriation of Matching Shares
Subject to Rule 24.12 on the Matching Shares Appropriation Date the Trustees
shall Appropriate to each Participant the number of Matching Shares notified to it
under Rule 16.1.
16.3
Notification of Appropriation to Participants
At the same time as making a notification pursuant to Rule 12.3 the Trustee shall
notify each Participant to whom Matching Shares have been Appropriated of:
16.3.1 the number and description of the Matching Shares Appropriated to him;
16.3.2 the Matching Shares Appropriation Date;
16.3.3 their Initial Market Value; and
16.3.4 the Matching Shares Holding Period.
17
RESTRICTIONS ON DEALINGS IN, AND PERMITTED TRANSFERS OF
MATCHING SHARES
The provisions of Rule 8 shall apply mutatis mutandis to Matching Shares during
the Matching Shares Holding Period as they apply to Free Shares during the Free
Shares Holding Period, save that the reference to Rule 9 shall be construed as a
reference to Rule 18.
18
CESSATION OF RELEVANT EMPLOYMENT AND EARLY
WITHDRAWAL OF PURCHASED SHARES
18.1
Trustee to be notified of cessation of Relevant Employment
If a Participant ceases to be in Relevant Employment then the UK Plan Manager
shall, as soon as reasonably practicable, inform the Trustee of such cessation and
whether the provisions of Rule 18.3 or 18.4 apply.
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18.2
Early withdrawal of Purchased Shares
Where the Trustee receives a notice under Rule 13.1 before the expiry of the
applicable Forfeiture Period then subject to Rules 18.5 and 18.6 the Participant’s
beneficial entitlement to his Matching Shares (awarded in respect of the Purchased
Shares which are being withdrawn) shall lapse immediately and he shall cease to
have any rights to such Matching Shares.
18.3
Early transfer of Matching Shares
Where the Trustee has been notified by the UK Plan Manager that this Rule 18.3
applies then as soon as reasonably practicable after the receipt of such notification
and in any event within 30 days after the cessation of the Relevant Employment the
Trustee shall transfer the Matching Shares to the Participant or as directed by him
in writing prior to the transfer provided always that the Trustee shall first comply
with Rule 31.
18.4
Forfeiture of Matching Shares
Where the Trustee has been notified by the UK Plan Manager that this Rule 18.4
applies then subject to Rules 18.5 and 18.6 the Participant’s beneficial entitlement
to his Matching Shares shall lapse immediately on his ceasing to be in Relevant
Employment before the end of the Forfeiture Period and he shall cease to have any
rights to such Matching Shares.
18.5
Injury, disability, redundancy, retirement etc
Notwithstanding Rule 18.4 if a Participant ceases to be in Relevant Employment for
a reason set out in Rule 9.4, the Trustee shall act in accordance with Rule 18.3.
18.6
Death
If a Participant ceases to be in Relevant Employment by reason of his death, the
Trustee shall act in accordance with Rule 24.5.
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PART IV – DIVIDEND SHARES
19
PROVISION OF DIVIDEND SHARES
19.1
Relationship to Plan Shares
The Directors may in their absolute discretion direct that:
19.1.1 all cash dividends paid in respect of Plan Shares held on behalf of
Participants must be used to acquire further Shares on their behalf; or
19.1.2 all cash dividends paid in respect of Plan Shares held on behalf of
Participants may at the election of Participants be used to acquire further
Shares on their behalf
referred to as Dividend Shares.
19.2
Direction revocable
The Directors may at any time revoke any direction made pursuant to Rule 19.1.
19.3
Dividend not invested in Dividend Shares
Where dividends paid in respect of Plan Shares are not required to be reinvested in
Dividend Shares they must be paid over to Participants as soon as practicable.
19.4
Timing of acquisition of Dividend Shares
The Trustee must use any dividends to be used to acquire Dividend Shares on
behalf of Participants within 30 days of the date when they receive such dividend.
19.5
Participants to be treated equally
In exercising their powers in relation to the acquisition of Dividend Shares the
Trustee shall treat all Participants fairly and equally.
20
AMOUNT AND TYPE OF DIVIDEND SHARES
20.1
Type of Shares to be used as Dividend Shares
Dividend Shares shall be of the same class, and carry the same rights as the
Participant’s Plan Shares in respect of which the relevant dividends were paid and
must not be subject to any provision for forfeiture.
20.2
Calculation of number of Dividend Shares
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20.2.1 Subject to Rule 20.2.3, the number of whole Shares to be acquired as
Dividend Shares on behalf of each Participant on each occasion shall be
calculated by taking the aggregate amount of the cash dividends paid on the
Participant’s Plan Shares (together with any amounts carried forward under
Rule 20.3) and dividing this amount (as nearly as possible) by the Market
Value of the Shares on the date on which they are acquired by the Trustee.
20.2.2 The basis for the calculation carried out under this Rule 20.2 shall be the
same for all Participants who are to receive Dividend Shares on that
occasion.
20.2.3 The maximum amount of Dividend Shares acquired pursuant to the Plan or
any other share incentive plans established by the Company or a Connected
Company and approved by the Inland Revenue under Schedule 8 may not
exceed the Relevant Amount.
20.3
Dividend amounts carried forward
To the extent that a dividend paid in respect of a Participant’s Plan Shares could not
be used to acquire Dividend Shares under this Rule 20 then such amount of the
dividend may be retained by the Trustee and, subject to Rule 20.4, carried forward
to be added to the amount of the next cash dividend to be used to acquire Dividend
Shares (and for the purposes of this Rule 20 shall be treated as used to acquire
Dividend Shares before an amount derived from a later cash dividend) and the
Trustee shall keep records of such amounts to enable it to comply with Rule 20.4.
20.4
Circumstances for payment of cash dividends
Any amount retained by the Trustee pursuant to Rule 20.3 shall be paid in cash as
soon as possible to the Participant where:
20.4.1 such amount has not been used to acquire Dividend Shares by the third
anniversary of the date on which the dividend was paid; or
20.4.2 the Participant ceases to be in Relevant Employment provided always that
the Trustee shall first comply with Rule 30; or
20.4.3 a plan termination notice is issued in respect of the Plan.
21
NOTIFICATION OF ACQUISITION OF DIVIDEND SHARES
21.1
As soon as practicable after the Dividend Shares Acquisition Date, the Trustee shall
notify each Participant for whom Dividend Shares have been acquired of:
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21.1.1 the Dividend Shares Acquisition Date;
21.1.2 the number and description of Dividend Shares acquired on his behalf;
21.1.3 their Initial Market Value;
21.1.4 the Dividend Shares Holding Period; and
21.1.5 the amount of any dividend carried forward under Rule 20.3.
22
RESTRICTIONS ON DEALINGS IN AND PERMITTED TRANSFERS OF,
DIVIDEND SHARES
The provisions of Rule 8 shall apply mutatis mutandis to Dividend Shares during
the Dividend Shares Holding Period as they apply to Free Shares during the Free
Shares Holding Period, save that the reference to Rule 9 shall be construed as a
reference to Rule 23.
23
CESSATION OF RELEVANT EMPLOYMENT
23.1
Trustee to be notified of cessation of Relevant Employment
If a Participant ceases to be in Relevant Employment then the UK Plan Manager
shall, as soon as reasonably practicable, inform the Trustee of such cessation.
23.2
Early transfer of Dividend Shares
As soon as reasonably practicable after the receipt of a notification referred to in
Rule 23.1, and in any event within 30 days after the cessation of the Relevant
Employment, the Trustee shall transfer the Dividend Shares to the Participant, or as
the Participant has directed the Trustee in writing, received prior to the transfer,
provided always that the Trustee shall first comply with Rule 31.
23.3
Death
If a Participant ceases to be in Relevant Employment by reason of his death, the
Trustee shall act in accordance with Rule 24.5.
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PART V – GENERAL REQUIREMENTS
24
REQUIREMENTS GENERALLY APPLICABLE TO PLAN SHARES
24.1
Participants may elect not to participate
Notwithstanding any other Rule, a Participant may direct that Shares are not to be
Appropriated to him or acquired on his behalf, by giving written notice to the UK
Plan Manager before the relevant Appropriation date or acquisition date.
24.2
Individuals eligible for Appropriation
No Appropriation or acquisition shall be made to or on behalf of an individual who
has ceased to be an Eligible Employee.
24.3
Shares not Appropriated or forfeited
Shares which are not Appropriated nor acquired on behalf of the Participant or Free
Shares or Matching Shares which have been forfeited under the Rules shall be
retained by the Trustee for use under the Plan on future occasions.
24.4
Shares ceasing to qualify
If Shares which are held by the Trustee for the purposes of the Plan cease to be
Shares, they shall not be used for the purposes of the Plan.
24.5
Death of Participant
24.5.1 Following the death of a Participant, the Trustee shall, as soon as
practicable, transfer the Participant’s Plan Shares to or to the order of his
legal personal representatives.
24.5.2 All references in the Plan to a Participant shall, where the context requires,
be references to the legal personal representative of the Participant.
24.6
Funds to be provided by Participating Companies
24.6.1 The Trustee shall acquire by subscription or purchase using monies paid to
it by each relevant Participating Company as soon as practicable after
receiving such monies, the number of Shares to be Appropriated to that
Participating Company’s Participants as Free Shares or Matching Shares;
and
24.6.2 the Trustee shall, if so directed by the UK Plan Manager, acquire by
subscription or purchase Shares at any time using monies paid to it by
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Participating Companies for future Appropriations of Shares to, or
acquisitions of Shares on behalf of, Eligible Employees.
24.7
Shares purchased off market by the Trustee
Where the Trustee proposes to purchase Shares otherwise than through the New
York Stock Exchange, the Trustee shall not purchase the Shares for a price in
excess of that for which, in the opinion of the Company’s brokers, it could purchase
those Shares through the New York Stock Exchange.
24.8
Shares with different rights
If the Shares to be Appropriated to, or acquired on behalf of each Participant, do
not carry the same rights as to dividends or otherwise, the shares appropriated to or
acquired on behalf of each Participant shall (as nearly as possible) contain the same
proportions of Shares with different rights.
24.9
Foreign Dividends
Where any foreign cash dividend is received in respect of Plan Shares held on
behalf of a Participant, the Trustee shall give him notice of the amount of any
foreign tax deducted from the dividend before it was paid.
24.10 Timing of contributions to Trustee
Monies to be paid by the Participating Companies to the Trustee for the purchase or
subscription of Shares in respect of an Appropriation shall be paid not later than the
dealing day immediately prior to such relevant Appropriation date.
25
PERMITTED DEALINGS IN PLAN SHARES
A Participant shall be entitled at any time to direct the Trustee:
25.1
to accept an offer for any of his Plan Shares if the acceptance will result in a
new holding being equated with the original shares for the purposes of
capital gains tax; or
25.2
to accept an offer of a Qualifying Corporate Bond, whether alone or with
cash or other assets or both, for his Plan Shares if the offer forms part of a
general offer as referred in Rule 25.3; or
25.3
to accept an offer of cash, with or without other assets, for his Plan Shares if
the offer forms part of a general offer which is made to holders of shares of
the same class as his Plan Shares or of shares in the Company and which is
made in the first instance on a condition such that if it is satisfied the person
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making the offer will have control of the Company within the meaning of
section 416 of ICTA 1988; or
25.4
to agree a transaction affecting his Plan Shares, or such of them as are of a
particular class, if the transaction would be entered into pursuant to a
compromise, arrangement or scheme applicable to or affecting:
25.4.1 all the ordinary share capital of the Company or, as the case may be,
all the shares of the class in question; or
25.4.2 all the shares, or all the shares of the class in question, which are
held by a class of shareholder identified otherwise than by reference
to their employment or their participation in the Plan or any other
approved share incentive plan.
26
RECEIPTS BY THE TRUSTEE
Subject to Rule 30, the Trustee shall pay or transfer to a Participant any money or
money’s worth it receives in respect of, or by reference to, the Participant’s Plan
Shares unless it is a Capital Receipt which consists of a new holding referred to in
Rule 28, provided that the Trustees shall not distribute any Capital Receipt to a
Participant if the amount payable to that Participant would be less than £3.
27
EXERCISE OF VOTING RIGHTS ATTACHING TO PLAN SHARES
27.1
Trustee to notify Participants of resolutions
In the event of a general meeting of the Company or any separate general meeting
of the holders of shares which include Plan Shares the Trustee shall notify each
Participant of any resolution of which the Trustee has received notification and
shall invite each Participant to direct the Trustee how to vote.
27.2
Participant to instruct Trustee how to vote
Following notification pursuant to Rule 27.1, the Participant or other person in
whom the beneficial interest in the Plan Shares is for the time being vested, may
instruct the Trustee how to exercise the voting rights carried by the Plan Shares:
27.2.1 the Trustee shall not be obliged to attend the general meeting and may
exercise the voting rights either personally or by proxy;
27.2.2 in the case of “any other business” at an annual general meeting of the
Company, the Trustee shall be entitled to vote (or refrain from voting) as it
thinks fit;
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27.2.3 on a show of hands, the Trustee shall vote in accordance with the wishes of
the majority of Participants instructing it; and
27.2.4 on a poll, the Trustee shall vote or lodge proxy cards only in accordance
with the directions of each Participant, which directions must have been
returned to the Trustee in accordance with the instructions accompanying
the notification. In the absence of any such direction the Trustee shall
abstain from voting.
27.3
Notification of Participants’ directions to Trustee to be in writing
Any direction given by a Participant to the Trustee pursuant to Rule 27.2 shall be in
writing under the hand of the Participant and shall not be binding upon the Trustee
unless it has been received by the Trustee not less than 96 hours before the time for
the holding of the meeting.
28
COMPANY RECONSTRUCTIONS
28.1
New holdings of Shares
Subject to Rule 28.2, where there occurs in relation to a Participant’s Plan Shares a
company reconstruction which results in a new holding, or would result in a new
holding were it not for the fact that the new holding consists of or includes a
Qualifying Corporate Bond:
28.1.1 the company reconstruction shall be treated as not involving a disposal of
the Plan Shares comprised in the original holding;
28.1.2 references in the Rules to a Participant’s Plan Shares shall be construed,
after the date of the company reconstruction, as being references to the
shares comprised in the new holding;
28.1.3 such new holding shall be deemed to have been Appropriated to or acquired
on behalf of the Participant on the date the original holding was
Appropriated to or acquired by him and shall be held by the Trustee on the
same terms.
28.2
Meaning of “new holding”
For the purpose of Rule 28.1:
28.2.1 in the context of a new holding, any reference in this Rule 28 to shares
includes a reference to securities and rights of any description which form
part of the new holding for the purpose of Chapter II of Part IV to Taxation
of Chargeable Gains Act 1992; and
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28.2.2 an issue of shares of any of the following descriptions (in respect of which a
charge to income tax arises) made as part of a company reconstruction shall
not be treated as forming part of a new holding:
28.2.2.1 redeemable shares or securities issued as mentioned in section
209(2)(c) ICTA 1988;
28.2.2.2 share capital issued in circumstances such that section 210(1)
ICTA 1988 applies;
28.2.2.3 share capital to which section 249 ICTA 1988 applies.
29
RIGHTS ISSUES
29.1
Application of Rule
This Rule 29 applies to rights attaching to a Participant’s Plan Shares to be allotted,
on payment, other shares, securities or rights of any description (together referred
to as “Rights”).
29.2
Trustee to provide information to Participants
The Trustee shall, inform each Participant of any Rights arising in respect of Plan
Shares and shall either send the Participant a copy of the document relating to the
Rights or sufficient details to enable the Participant to act in accordance with Rule
29.3.
29.3
Participants to give written directions to Trustee
The Trustee shall deal with the Rights only pursuant to a written direction given by,
or on behalf of, the Participant or any person in whom the beneficial interest in the
Plan Shares is for the time being vested. Such written direction must be received
by the Trustee before the expiry of five days before the closing date for acceptance
of the Rights offer or within such other time limit set at the absolute discretion of
the Trustee, and may direct the Trustee:
29.3.1 to take up all or part of the Rights provided that such instruction is
accompanied by payment in cash of the amount necessary to exercise such
rights; or
29.3.2 to sell all of the Rights; or
29.3.3 to sell such part of the Rights as enables the Trustee to use the proceeds of
sale to exercise entitlement to the remaining Rights of the Participant.
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29.4
Cash amounts arising to be dealt with by Trustee
Any cash arising from the disposal of the Rights (except insofar as it is used to
exercise such Rights in accordance with Rule 29.3.3) shall be dealt with by the
Trustee in accordance with Rule 26.
29.5
Failure by Participant to give any direction
If a Participant fails to give any direction under Rule 29.3, or has not otherwise
authorised the Trustee, or fails to pay any appropriate amount of cash, then the
Trustee shall take no action in respect of the Rights associated with that
Participant’s Plan Shares.
30
DUTY TO ACCOUNT FOR PAYE ON CASH AMOUNTS
30.1
Trustee to make PAYE deductions
The Trustee shall withhold from:
30.1.1 a Capital Receipt referred to in Rule 26;
30.1.2 any monies returned to individuals under Rules 10 and 12; and
30.1.3 the proceeds of a disposal of Plan Shares, other than Dividend Shares, by
the Trustee in accordance with a direction from a Participant (except in so
far as the proceeds are used to take up Rights in accordance with Rule
29.3.3)
an amount equal to any income tax and employee’s national insurance contributions
chargeable on such sum for which a Participating Company or the Trustee is
required to make a deduction under the PAYE system.
30.2
Trustee to deal with PAYE deductions
30.2.1 The Trustee shall if it is responsible for operating PAYE in relation to such
sum, retain it, or otherwise pay such sum as is referred to in Rule 30.1 to
one or more Participating Companies in proportion to their respective
obligations to operate PAYE in relation to such sum.
30.2.2 If there is no Participating Company for the purposes of Rule 30.2.1 the
Trustee shall deduct income tax at the basic rate for the time being in force
as if the Participant were a former employee of the Trustee.
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31
DUTY TO ACCOUNT FOR PAYE ON TRANSFERS OF ASSETS
31.1
Trustee to make PAYE deductions
Where under any Rule Plan Shares cease to be subject to the Plan and in relation to:
31.1.1 Free Shares it is prior to the fifth anniversary of the Free Shares
Appropriation Date;
31.1.2 Purchased Shares it is prior to the fifth anniversary of the Purchased Shares
Acquisition Date; or
31.1.3 Matching Shares it is prior to the fifth anniversary of the Matching Shares
Appropriation Date
the Trustee shall unless otherwise provided with funds from the Participant to meet
any liability for income tax and/or employee’s national insurance contributions,
dispose of a sufficient number of the Participant’s Plan Shares (for the best
consideration in money that can reasonably be obtained at the time of sale), the
proceeds of which shall (as far as possible) be equal to any income tax and/or
employees’ national insurance contributions chargeable on the Plan Shares to be
transferred and for which the Trustee or a Participating Company is required to
make a PAYE deduction.
31.2
Trustee to deal with PAYE deductions
The Trustee and/or a Participating Company shall account to the Board of Inland
Revenue for any income tax and/or employees’ national insurance contributions
referred to in Rule 31.1 and shall pay over to the Participant the difference (if any)
between the proceeds from the disposal of his Plan Shares under Rule 31.1 and the
amount due.
32
APPORTIONMENT OF CAPITAL RECEIPTS
32.1
Treatment of Capital Receipts
If the Trustee receives any Capital Receipt referred in Rule 26 in respect of, or by
reference to, any Plan Shares held on behalf of more than one Participant, then, if
and to the extent that such Capital Receipt cannot be precisely divided between
such Participants in the appropriate proportions:
32.1.1 to the extent that it is money’s worth, the Trustee shall sell it for the best
possible consideration in money that can reasonably be obtained and shall
divide the proceeds of sale (after deducting any expenses of sale and any
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taxation which may be payable by the Trustee) among the Participants in
question; and
32.1.2 to the extent that it is money the Trustee’s obligations under this Rule 34
shall be deemed to be discharged if the Trustee pays to each Participant the
appropriate amount, rounded down to the nearest penny.
32.2
Trustee to inform Participants
The Trustee shall inform each Participant in respect of whose Plan Shares the
Capital Receipt was received of the treatment thereof for income tax purposes.
33
TERMINATION OF PLAN
33.1
Company may terminate Plan
The Company may at any time decide to terminate the Plan and if it does so must
issue a plan termination notice copies of which shall be given without delay to:
33.1.1 the Inland Revenue;
33.1.2 the Trustee; and
33.1.3 each Participant.
33.2
Consequences of termination of Plan
If the Company issues a plan termination notice in accordance with Rule 33.1:
33.2.1
no further Awards may be made under the Plan;
33.2.2the Trustees shall remove any Plan Shares from the Plan in accordance with
paragraph 121 of Schedule 8; and
33.2.3any Purchased Share Money held on behalf of a Participant must be paid to
him as soon as practicable thereafter.
33.3
Inland Revenue withdrawal of Plan approval
If Inland Revenue approval of the Plan is withdrawn any Purchased Share Money
held on behalf of a Participant must be paid to him as soon as practicable thereafter.
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34
SHARES FROM QUALIFYING SHARE OWNERSHIP TRUSTS
Where Shares are transferred to the Trustees in accordance with paragraph 76 of
Schedule 8, they shall award such Shares only as Free and Matching Shares, and in
priority to other available Shares.
35
NOTICES
35.1
Notice by Company, Participating Company etc
Any notice, document or other communication given by, or on behalf of the
Company, a Participating Company, the UK Plan Manager or the Trustee to any
person in connection with the Plan shall be deemed to have been duly given if
delivered to him at his place of work, if he is employed by a Participating
Company, or sent through the post in a pre paid envelope to the address last known
to the UK Plan Manager to be his address and, if so sent, shall be deemed to have
been duly given on the date of posting.
35.2
Deceased Participant
Any notice, document or other communication given to a Participant shall be
deemed to have been duly given notwithstanding that such person is then deceased
(and whether or not the Company, a Participating Company, the UK Plan Manager
or Trustee has notice of his death) except where his personal representatives have
established their title to the satisfaction of the UK Plan Manager or Trustee as
appropriate and supplied to the UK Plan Manager and the Trustee an address to
which notices, documents and other communications are to be sent.
35.3
Notice to Company, etc
Any notice, document or other communication given to the Company, a
Participating Company, the UK Plan Manager, or the Trustee in connection with
the Plan shall be delivered or sent through the post to the Company, a Participating
Company, the UK Plan Manager, or the Trustee (as the case may be) at the address
as from time to time notified to Eligible Employees or Participants but shall not in
any event be deemed to be duly given unless it is actually received at such address.
35.4
Trustee to distribute Company documentation
If the Trustee receives any annual or interim report, notice of meeting, circular,
letter of offer or other documentation (excepting a dividend warrant or a document
of title to shares, securities or rights) relating to any Plan Shares, the Trustee may,
as soon as reasonably practicable, send, or procure the sending of, a copy of such
document to each Participant on behalf of whom such Plan Shares are held.
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35.5
Notification of liability to income tax
Where a Participant has become liable to income tax under any relevant provision
of ICTA 1988 the Trustee shall, as soon as reasonably practicable, inform the
Participant of any fact material to determining that liability.
36
FRACTIONAL ENTITLEMENTS
36.1
If, on a company reconstruction, the Trustee receives a share or other security
fractions of which would be treated as comprised in two or more Participants’ Plan
Shares:
36.1.1 it shall not form part of any new holding for the purpose of Rule 28;
36.1.2 Rule 32 shall apply to it.
37
PROTECTION OF THE TRUSTEE
Any sale by the Trustee of shares, securities or rights which is effected through a
member of the New York Stock Exchange acting in the ordinary course of his
business shall be presumed to have been made for the best consideration that could
reasonably be obtained at the time of the sale.
38
RELATIONSHIP OF PLAN TO CONTRACT OF EMPLOYMENT
38.1
Notwithstanding any other provision of this Plan:
38.1.1 the Plan or benefits available under the Plan shall not form part of any
contract of employment between any Participating Company and an Eligible
Employee;
38.1.2 unless expressly so provided in his contract of employment, an Eligible
Employee has no right to an Appropriation;
38.1.3 the benefit to an Eligible Employee of participation in the Plan shall not
form any part of his remuneration or count as his remuneration for any
purpose and shall not be pensionable; and
38.1.4 if an Eligible Employee ceases to have a Relevant Employment, he shall not
be entitled to compensation for the loss of any right or benefit or
prospective right or benefit under the Plan whether by way of damages for
unfair dismissal, wrongful dismissal, breach of contract or otherwise.
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39
ALTERATIONS
No modification, alteration, or amendment to these Rules shall be made except in
accordance with clause 22 of the Trust Deed.
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EXHIBIT III
KELLOGG (IRELAND) EMPLOYEE SHARE OWNERSHIP PLAN
Kellogg Company
Equity incentive plans
EU Prospectus
Dated: March 22, 2016
Exhibits
ALG DRAFT
26/02/2014
Dated
day of
2014
KELLOGG LUX 1 SARL
First Part
CAPITA CORPORATE TRUSTEES LIMITED
Second Part
KELLOGG (IRELAND) EMPLOYEE SHARE OWNERSHIP PLAN
DEED OF AMENDMENT
A & L Goodbody
25-28 North Wall Quay
Dublin 1
M-18990193-3
ALG DRAFT
26/02/2014
THIS DEED OF AMENDMENT is made the
day of
2014
BETWEEN
(1)
Kellogg Lux 1 S.à r.l. (registered in Luxembourg under number B103831) whose registered office is at
560A, Rue de Neudorf, L-2220 Luxembourg (hereinafter called the Company) of the first part; and
(2)
Capita Corporate Trustees Limited (a company registered in Ireland with registered number 312941)
whose registered office is situated at 2 Grand Canal Square, Dublin 2 (hereinafter called the Trustee)
of the second part.
WHEREAS
A.
Kellogg Company of Ireland Limited (the Original Company) and Irish Progressive Life Assurance
Company Limited (the First Trustee) (under its former name of Prudential Life of Ireland Limited)
established the Kellogg (Ireland) Employee Share Ownership Plan (hereinafter called the Plan) by
Trust Deed and Rules on 12 October 1988 (the Original Deed) to enable employees and executive
directors of the Original Company to acquire common stock of the Parent Company (as therein defined)
on the terms and in the manner therein set out.
B.
The Original Deed was amended with the consent of the relevant parties thereto and the Revenue
Commissioners by a Deed of Amendment dated 9 January 1998 (First Deed of Amendment).
C.
Goodbody Trustees Limited was appointed trustee in place of the First Trustee by a Deed of
Appointment dated 6 November 1998.
D.
The Original Deed was amended with the consent of the relevant parties thereto and the Revenue
Commissioners by a Deed of Amendment dated 10 November 1998 (Second Deed of Amendment).
E.
The Original Deed was amended with the consent of the relevant parties thereto and the Revenue
Commissioners by a Deed of Amendment dated 24 August 2001 (Third Deed of Amendment). The
Third Deed of Amendment referred inadvertently to the Original Deed having been executed on 12
October 1998. This was in fact an error as the Original Deed was executed on 12 October 1988.
F.
The Original Deed was amended with the consent of the relevant parties thereto and the Revenue
Commissioners by a Deed of Amendment dated 1 September 2005 (Fourth Deed of Amendment).
The Fourth Deed of Amendment referred inadvertently to the Original Deed having been executed on
12 October 1998. This was in fact an error as the Original Deed was executed on 12 October 1988.
G.
The Original Deed was amended with the consent of the relevant parties thereto and the Revenue
Commissioners by a Deed of Consolidation and Amendment dated 14 May 2009 (Fifth Deed of
Amendment). The Fifth Deed of Amendment referred inadvertently to the Original Deed having been
executed on 12 October 1998. This was in fact an error as the Original Deed was executed on 12
October 1988.
M-18990193-3
ALG DRAFT
26/02/2014
H.
The Original Deed was amended with the consent of the relevant parties thereto and the Revenue
Commissioners by a Deed of Amendment dated 6 January 2011 (Sixth Deed of Amendment) under
which (inter alia) the Company replaced the Original Company as the establishing company of the Plan
and the Original Company, Kellogg Europe Trading Limited and Kellogg Europe Treasury Services
Limited adhered to the Plan as Subsidiaries.
I.
Goodbody Trustees Limited retired as trustee of the Plan and was replaced by the Trustees under a
Deed of Retirement and Appointment of Trustee executed on 7 January 2011.
J.
The Original Deed was amended with the consent of the relevant parties thereto and the Revenue
Commissioners by a Deed of Amendment and Adherence dated 20 February 2013 (Seventh Deed of
Amendment), under which Kellogg Logistics Services Company Limited adhered to the Plan as a
Subsidiary.
K.
The provisions of the current trust deed and rules in operation at the date hereof are contained in the
Sixth Deed of Amendment (the Trust Deed and Rules), as amended.
L.
Clause 27 of the Trust Deed provides that the Company and the Trustees may together by Deed vary
or amend or revoke any of the provisions of the Trust Deed (subject as set out therein) and Rule 23 of
the Rules provides that the Board may by resolution at any time modify or vary the Rules (subject as
set out therein).
M.
The parties hereto now wish to make an amendment to the Plan set out below (the amendment to the
Rules having also been approved by board resolution of the Company). The consent of the Revenue
Commissioners to the amendment set out in this Deed has been obtained.
NOW THIS DEED WITNESSETH as follows:
1.
Capitalised terms used in this Deed shall have the same meaning as in the Trust Deed and Rules now
governing the Plan (unless otherwise defined herein).
2.
Rule 6.1 shall be amended and replaced with the following:“6.1
The maximum value of an Employee Contribution which may be made by any Eligible
Employee in any Plan Period shall be such sum as does not exceed the lesser of (i) 3.5 per
cent of such proportion of his gross Eligible Earnings as the Plan Period bears to a calendar
year and (ii) €529.16 per Plan Period, provided that the aggregate of any excess under Rule
6.3 and the Employee Contribution as calculated under this Rule 6.1 shall not exceed (a) 7.5
per cent of the Eligible Employee’s Eligible Earnings or (b) €529.16 per Plan Period.
Notwithstanding any other provision of this Plan, Contracts of Participation, employee
communications or otherwise, in no event shall the total consideration to be paid by Plan
Participants for the purchase of Shares pursuant to an offer under this Plan (when combined
with the total consideration for all other offers to the public by the Parent Company of its Shares
M-18990193-3
ALG DRAFT
26/02/2014
within any EU Member State or European Economic Area Treaty adherent State under this
Plan or otherwise in the twelve month period ending on the day of such offer), exceed
€4,999,999. The amount which can be invested by Participants under the Plan and the number
of Shares that may be purchased with Employee Contributions shall be scaled back should this
be necessary in order to ensure that this limit is not exceeded. Any scale-back imposed to
ensure compliance with this caveat to Rule 6.1 shall be applied automatically without further
reference to Participants and shall be applied to all Eligible Employees on similar terms and on
a pro-rata basis. The limit under this caveat to Rule 6.1 shall apply to an offer under the Plan
only where such offer does not otherwise qualify for an exemption from the prospectus
requirements of the EU Prospectus Directive (apart from under Article 1.2.h thereof) and
applicable local law. Furthermore, the limits and scale-back shall not apply where a prospectus
has been filed in connection with the requirements of the EU Prospectus Directive. Where this
caveat to Rule 6.1 applies to an offer under the Plan, other offers will be counted in the
aggregation for the purposes of calculating the relevant limit to the extent required by the EU
Prospectus Directive and applicable local law.
3.
This Deed may be executed in any number of counterparts and by the several parties to it on separate
counterparts, each of which when so executed will constitute an original but all of which together shall
evidence the same deed.
4.
This Deed shall be governed by and construed in accordance with the law of the Republic of Ireland.
M-18990193-3
ALG DRAFT
26/02/2014
IN WITNESS WHEREOF this Deed has been duly executed by the parties hereto the day and year first herein
written.
_______________________________
KELLOGG LUX 1 SARL
By: _______________________________
Title:_______________________________
GIVEN UNDER
THE COMMON SEAL of
CAPITA CORORATE TRUSTEES LIMITED
in the presence of:
Director
_______________________________
Director/Secretary
_______________________________
M-18990193-3
EXHIBIT IV
ANNUAL REPORT ON FORM 10-K
FILED BY KELLOGG COMPANY ON FEBRUARY 24, 2016
Kellogg Company
Equity incentive plans
EU Prospectus
Dated: March 22, 2016
Exhibits
Morningstar® Document Research℠
FORM 10-K
KELLOGG CO - K
Filed: February 24, 2016 (period: January 02, 2016)
Annual report with a comprehensive overview of the company
The information contained herein may not be copied, adapted or distributed and is not warranted to be accurate, complete or timely. The user
assumes all risks for any damages or losses arising from any use of this information, except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be
limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
UNITED STATES SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549
FORM 10-K
þ
ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF
1934
For the Fiscal Year Ended January 2, 2016
¨
TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For The Transition Period From
To
Commission file number 1-4171
Kellogg Company
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)
Delaware
38-0710690
(State or other jurisdiction of Incorporation
or organization)
(I.R.S. Employer Identification No.)
One Kellogg Square
Battle Creek, Michigan 49016-3599
(Address of Principal Executive Offices)
Registrant’s telephone number: (269) 961-2000
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Securities Act:
Title of each class:
Common Stock, $.25 par value per share
1.750% Senior Notes due 2021
1.250% Senior Notes due 2025
Name of each exchange on which registered:
New York Stock Exchange
New York Stock Exchange
New York Stock Exchange
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Securities Act: None
Indicate by a check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15 (d) of the Act.
Yes ¨
Yes þ
No ¨
No þ
Note — Checking the box above will not relieve any registrant required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Exchange Act from their obligations under those
Sections.
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant: (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding
12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past
90 days. Yes þ No ¨
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its website, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted
pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such
files). Yes þ No ¨
Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of the registrant’s
knowledge in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K. þ
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of
“large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check one)
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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The information contained herein may not be copied, adapted or distributed and is not warranted to be accurate, complete or timely. The user assumes all risks for any damages or losses arising from any use of this information,
except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
Large accelerated filer x
Accelerated filer ¨
Non-accelerated filer ¨
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Act).
Yes ¨
Smaller reporting company ¨
No þ
The aggregate market value of the common stock held by non-affiliates of the registrant (assuming for purposes of this computation only that the W. K. Kellogg Foundation
Trust, directors and executive officers may be affiliates) as of the close of business on July 4, 2015 was approximately $17.7 billion based on the closing price of $63.14 for one
share of common stock, as reported for the New York Stock Exchange on that date.
As of January 29, 2016, 350,257,015 shares of the common stock of the registrant were issued and outstanding.
Parts of the registrant’s Proxy Statement for the Annual Meeting of Shareowners to be held on April 29, 2016 are incorporated by reference into Part III of this Report.
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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The information contained herein may not be copied, adapted or distributed and is not warranted to be accurate, complete or timely. The user assumes all risks for any damages or losses arising from any use of this information,
except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
PART I
ITEM 1. BUSINESS
The Company. Kellogg Company, founded in 1906 and incorporated in Delaware in 1922, and its subsidiaries are engaged in the manufacture and
marketing of ready-to-eat cereal and convenience foods.
The address of the principal business office of Kellogg Company is One Kellogg Square, P.O. Box 3599, Battle Creek, Michigan 49016-3599.
Unless otherwise specified or indicated by the context, “Kellogg,” “we,” “us” and “our” refer to Kellogg Company, its divisions and subsidiaries.
Financial Information About Segments. Information on segments is located in Note 17 within Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements.
Principal Products. Our principal products are ready-to-eat cereals and convenience foods, such as cookies, crackers, savory snacks, toaster
pastries, cereal bars, fruit-flavored snacks, frozen waffles and veggie foods. These products were, as of February 24, 2016, manufactured by us in
20 countries and marketed in more than 180 countries. Our cereal products are generally marketed under the Kellogg’s name and are sold to the
grocery trade through direct sales forces for resale to consumers. We use broker and distributor arrangements for certain products. We also
generally use these, or similar arrangements, in less-developed market areas or in those market areas outside of our focus.
We also market cookies, crackers, crisps, and other convenience foods, under brands such as Kellogg’s, Keebler, Cheez-It, Murray, Austin and
Famous Amos, to supermarkets in the United States through a direct store-door (DSD) delivery system, although other distribution methods are
also used.
Additional information pertaining to the relative sales of our products for the years 2013 through 2015 is located in Note 17 Notes to the
Consolidated Financial Statements, which are included herein under Part II, Item 8.
Raw Materials. Agricultural commodities, including corn, wheat, potato flakes, soy bean oil, sugar and cocoa, are the principal raw materials used
in our products. Cartonboard, corrugated, and plastic are the principal packaging materials used by us. We continually monitor world supplies and
prices of such commodities (which include such packaging materials), as well as government trade policies. The cost of such commodities may
fluctuate widely due to government policy and regulation, weather conditions, climate change or other unforeseen circumstances. Continuous
efforts are made to maintain and improve the quality and supply of such commodities for purposes of our short-term and long-term requirements.
The principal ingredients in the products produced by us in the United States include corn grits, wheat and wheat derivatives, potato flakes, oats,
rice, cocoa and chocolate, soybeans and soybean derivatives, various fruits, sweeteners, vegetable oils, dairy products, eggs, and other filling
ingredients, which are obtained from various sources. While most of these ingredients are purchased from sources in the United States, some
materials are imported due to regional availability and specification requirements.
We enter into long-term contracts for the materials described in this section and purchase these items on the open market, depending on our view
of possible price fluctuations, supply levels, and our relative negotiating power. While the cost of some of these materials has, and may continue
to, increase over time, we believe that we will be able to purchase an adequate supply of these items as needed. As further discussed herein
under Part II, Item 7A, we also use commodity futures and options to hedge some of our costs.
Raw materials and packaging needed for internationally based operations are available in adequate supply and are sourced both locally and
imported from countries other than those where used in manufacturing.
Natural gas and propane are the primary sources of energy used to power processing ovens at major domestic and international facilities, although
certain locations may use oil or propane on a back-up or alternative basis. In addition, considerable amounts of diesel fuel are used in connection
with the distribution of our products. As further discussed herein under Part II, Item 7A, we use over-the-counter commodity price swaps to hedge
some of our natural gas costs.
Trademarks and Technology. Generally, our products are marketed under trademarks we own. Our principal trademarks are our housemarks, brand
names, slogans, and designs related to cereals and convenience foods manufactured and marketed by us, and we also grant licenses to third
parties to use these marks on various goods.
1
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
These trademarks include Kellogg’s for cereals, convenience foods and our other products, and the brand names of certain ready-to-eat cereals,
including All-Bran, Apple Jacks, Bran Buds, Choco Zucaritas, Cocoa Krispies, Complete, Kellogg’s Corn Flakes, Corn Pops, Cracklin’ Oat
Bran, Crispix, Crunchmania, Crunchy Nut, Eggo, Kellogg’s FiberPlus, Froot Loops, Kellogg’s Frosted Flakes, Krave, Frosted Krispies,
Frosted Mini-Wheats, Just Right, Kellogg’s Low Fat Granola, Mueslix, Pops, Product 19, Kellogg’s Origins, Kellogg's Raisin Bran, Raisin
Bran Crunch, Rice Krispies, Rice Krispies Treats, Smacks/Honey Smacks, Smart Start, Special K, Special K Nourish, Special K Red
Berries and Zucaritas in the United States and elsewhere; Sucrilhos, Krunchy Granola, Kellogg's Extra, Kellness, Musli, and Choco Krispis
for cereals in Latin America; Vector in Canada; Coco Pops, Chocos, Frosties, Fruit‘N Fibre, Kellogg’s Crunchy Nut Corn Flakes, Krave,
Honey Loops, Kellogg’s Extra, Country Store, Ricicles, Smacks, Start, Pops, Honey Bsss, Croco Copters and Tresor for cereals in Europe;
and Guardian, Sultana Bran, Frosties, Rice Bubbles, Nutri-Grain, Kellogg’s Iron Man Food, and Sustain for cereals in Asia and Australia.
Additional trademarks are the names of certain combinations of ready-to-eat Kellogg’s cereals, including Fun Pak and Variety.
Other brand names include Kellogg’s Corn Flake Crumbs; All-Bran, Choco Krispis, Froot Loops, Special K, Zucaritas and Sucrilhos for
cereal bars, Pop-Tarts for toaster pastries; Eggo and Nutri-Grain for frozen waffles and pancakes; Eggo and Special K for breakfast
sandwiches; Rice Krispies Treats for convenience foods; Special K protein shakes; Nutri-Grain cereal bars for convenience foods in the United
States and elsewhere; K-Time, Rice Bubbles, Be Natural, Sunibrite and LCMs for convenience foods in Asia and Australia; Choco Krispies,
Tresor and Rice Krispies Squares for convenience foods in Europe; Kashi for certain cereals, convenience foods, frozen foods and pilaf;
GoLean for cereals and nutrition bars; Special K and Vector for meal replacement products; Bear Naked for granola cereal, bars and trail mix,
Pringles for potato crisps, tortilla crisps and potato sticks, and Morningstar Farms and Gardenburger for certain meat alternatives.
We also market convenience foods under trademarks and tradenames which include Keebler, Austin, Cheez-It, Chips Deluxe, Club, E. L.
Fudge, Famous Amos, Fudge Shoppe, Kellogg’s FiberPlus, Gripz, Jack’s, Jackson’s, Krispy, Mother’s, Murray, Murray Sugar Free,
Ready Crust, Right Bites, Sandies, Special K, Soft Batch, Simply Made, Stretch Island, Sunshine, Toasteds, Town House, Vienna
Creams, Vienna Fingers and Zesta. One of our subsidiaries is also the exclusive licensee of the Carr’s cracker line in the United States.
Our trademarks also include logos and depictions of certain animated characters in conjunction with our products, including Snap! Crackle! Pop!
for Cocoa Krispies and Rice Krispies cereals and Rice Krispies Treats convenience foods; Tony the Tiger for Kellogg’s Frosted Flakes,
Zucaritas, Sucrilhos and Frosties cereals and convenience foods; Ernie Keebler for cookies, convenience foods and other products; the Hollow
Tree logo for certain convenience foods; Toucan Sam for Froot Loops cereal; Dig ‘Em for Smacks/Honey Smacks cereal; Sunny for Kellogg’s
Raisin Bran and Raisin Bran Crunch cereals, Coco the Monkey for Coco Pops cereal; Cornelius (aka Cornelio) for Kellogg’s Corn Flakes;
Melvin the Elephant for certain cereal and convenience foods; Chocos the Bear, Sammy the Seal (aka Smaxey the Seal) for certain cereal
products and Mr. P or Julius Pringles for Pringles potato crisps, tortilla crisps and potato sticks.
The slogans The Original & Best, They’re Gr-r-reat!, Show Your Stripes and Follow Your Nose, are used in connection with our ready-to-eat
cereals, along with L’ Eggo my Eggo, used in connection with our frozen waffles and pancakes, Childhood Is Calling, Uncommonly Good and
Baked with Care used in connection with convenience food products, Seven Whole Grains on a Mission used in connection with Kashi natural
foods and Just What the World Ordered used in connection with meat alternatives and You Don't just Eat'em used in connection with potato
crisps are also important Kellogg trademarks.
The trademarks listed above, among others, when taken as a whole, are important to our business. Certain individual trademarks are also
important to our business. Depending on the jurisdiction, trademarks are generally valid as long as they are in use and/or their registrations are
properly maintained and they have not been found to have become generic. Registrations of trademarks can also generally be renewed indefinitely
as long as the trademarks are in use.
We consider that, taken as a whole, the rights under our various patents, which expire from time to time, are a valuable asset, but we do not
believe that our businesses are materially dependent on any single patent or group of related patents. Our activities under licenses or other
franchises or concessions which we hold are similarly a valuable asset, but are not believed to be material.
Seasonality. Demand for our products has generally been approximately level throughout the year, although some of our convenience foods have a
bias for stronger demand in the second half of the year due to events and
2
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
holidays. We also custom-bake cookies for the Girl Scouts of the U.S.A., which are principally sold in the first quarter of the year.
Working Capital. Although terms vary around the world and by business types, in the United States we generally have required payment for goods
sold eleven or sixteen days subsequent to the date of invoice as 2% 10/net 11 or 1% 15/net 16. Receipts from goods sold, supplemented as
required by borrowings, provide for our payment of dividends, repurchases of our common stock, capital expansion, and for other operating
expenses and working capital needs. We anticipate establishing a discrete customer program which would allow for extended customer payment
terms. In connection with this program, we may enter into an agreement with one or more financial institutions to monetize these receivables
resulting in the receivables being de-recognized from our consolidated balance sheet. We currently estimate that the amount of these receivables
held at any time by the financial institution(s) will be approximately $500 to $600 million.
Customers. Our largest customer, Wal-Mart Stores, Inc. and its affiliates, accounted for approximately 21% of consolidated net sales during 2015,
comprised principally of sales within the United States. At January 2, 2016, approximately 18% of our consolidated receivables balance and 27%
of our U.S. receivables balance was comprised of amounts owed by Wal-Mart Stores, Inc. and its affiliates. No other customer accounted for
greater than 10% of net sales in 2015. During 2015, our top five customers, collectively, including Wal-Mart, accounted for approximately 34% of
our consolidated net sales and approximately 47% of U.S. net sales. There has been significant worldwide consolidation in the grocery industry
and we believe that this trend is likely to continue. Although the loss of any large customer for an extended length of time could negatively impact
our sales and profits, we do not anticipate that this will occur to a significant extent due to the consumer demand for our products and our
relationships with our customers. Our products have been generally sold through our own sales forces and through broker and distributor
arrangements, and have been generally resold to consumers in retail stores, restaurants, and other food service establishments.
Backlog. For the most part, orders are filled within a few days of receipt and are subject to cancellation at any time prior to shipment. The backlog
of any unfilled orders at January 2, 2016 and January 3, 2015 was not material to us.
Competition. We have experienced, and expect to continue to experience, intense competition for sales of all of our principal products in our major
product categories, both domestically and internationally. Our products compete with advertised and branded products of a similar nature as well
as unadvertised and private label products, which are typically distributed at lower prices, and generally with other food products. Principal
methods and factors of competition include new product introductions, product quality, taste, convenience, nutritional value, price, advertising and
promotion.
Research and Development. Research to support and expand the use of our existing products and to develop new food products is carried on at
the W. K. Kellogg Institute for Food and Nutrition Research in Battle Creek, Michigan, and at other locations around the world. Our expenditures for
research and development were approximately (in millions): 2015-$193; 2014-$199; 2013-$199.
Regulation. Our activities in the United States are subject to regulation by various government agencies, including the Food and Drug
Administration, Federal Trade Commission and the Departments of Agriculture, Commerce and Labor, as well as voluntary regulation by other
bodies. Various state and local agencies also regulate our activities. Other agencies and bodies outside of the United States, including those of
the European Union and various countries, states and municipalities, also regulate our activities.
Environmental Matters. Our facilities are subject to various U.S. and foreign, federal, state, and local laws and regulations regarding the release of
material into the environment and the protection of the environment in other ways. We are not a party to any material proceedings arising under
these regulations. We believe that compliance with existing environmental laws and regulations will not materially affect our consolidated financial
condition or our competitive position.
Employees. At January 2, 2016, we had approximately 33,577 employees.
Financial Information About Geographic Areas. Information on geographic areas is located in Note 17 within Notes to the Consolidated Financial
Statements, which are included herein under Part II, Item 8.
Executive Officers. The names, ages, and positions of our executive officers (as of February 24, 2016) are listed below, together with their
business experience. Executive officers are elected annually by the Board of Directors.
3
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
John A. Bryant
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer
50
Mr. Bryant has been Chairman of the Board of Kellogg Company since July 2014 and has served as a Kellogg director since July 2010. In
January 2011, he was appointed President and Chief Executive Officer after having served as our Executive Vice President and Chief Operating
Officer since August 2008. Mr. Bryant joined Kellogg in March 1998, and was promoted during the next eight years to a number of key financial
and executive leadership roles. He was appointed Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer, Kellogg Company, President, Kellogg
International in December 2006. In July 2007, Mr. Bryant was appointed Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer, Kellogg Company,
President, Kellogg North America and in August 2008, he was appointed Executive Vice President, Chief Operating Officer and Chief Financial
Officer. Mr. Bryant served as Chief Financial Officer through December 2009.
Ronald L. Dissinger
Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer
57
Mr. Dissinger was appointed Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer effective January 2010. Mr. Dissinger joined Kellogg in 1987 as an
accounting supervisor, and during the next 14 years served in a number of key financial leadership roles, both in the United States and
Australia. In 2001, he was promoted to Vice President and Chief Financial Officer, U.S. Morning Foods. In 2004, Mr. Dissinger became Vice
President, Corporate Financial Planning, and CFO, Kellogg International. In 2005, he became Vice President and CFO, Kellogg Europe and CFO,
Kellogg International. In 2007, Mr. Dissinger was appointed Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer, Kellogg North America.
Alistair D. Hirst
Senior Vice President, Global Supply Chain
56
Mr. Hirst assumed his current position in April 2012. He joined the company in 1984 as a Food Technologist at the Springs, South Africa, plant.
While at the facility, he was promoted to Quality Assurance Manager and Production Manager. From 1993-2001, Mr. Hirst held numerous positions
in South Africa and Australia, including Production Manager, Plant Manager, and Director, Supply Chain. In 2001, Mr. Hirst was promoted to
Director, Procurement at the Manchester, England, facility and was later named European Logistics Director. In 2005, he transferred to the U.S.
when promoted to Vice President, Global Procurement. In 2008, he was promoted to Senior Vice President, Snacks Supply Chain and to Senior
Vice President, North America Supply Chain, in October 2011.
Samantha J. Long
Senior Vice President, Global Human Resources
48
Ms. Long assumed her current position January 1, 2013. She joined the company in 2003 as Director, Human Resources for the United Kingdom,
Republic of Ireland and Middle East/Mediterranean businesses as well as the European finance, sales, human resources, research and
development, information technology, communications and innovations functions. In 2006, Ms. Long transferred to the United States when she
was promoted to Vice President, Human Resources, U.S. Morning Foods & Kashi. She also served as human resources business partner to the
senior vice president of global human resources. From 2008 to 2013, she held the position of Vice President, Human Resources, Kellogg North
America. Before joining the company, she was head of human resources for Sharp Electronics based in the United Kingdom. Prior to that role, she
held a number of positions in her 15-year tenure with International Computers Limited, part of the Fujitsu family of companies.
4
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
Paul T. Norman
Senior Vice President, Kellogg Company
President, Kellogg North America
51
Mr. Norman was appointed President, Kellogg North America in May 2015. He was appointed Senior Vice President, Kellogg Company in
December 2005. Mr. Norman was appointed Chief Growth Officer in October 2013 and also held the role of interim U.S. Morning Foods President
from June 2014 to May 2015. Mr. Norman joined Kellogg’s U.K. sales organization in 1987. From 1989 to 1996, Mr. Norman was promoted to
several marketing roles in France and Canada. He was promoted to director, marketing, Kellogg de Mexico in January 1997; to Vice President,
Marketing, Kellogg USA in February 1999; to President, Kellogg Canada Inc. in December 2000; and to Managing Director, United
Kingdom/Republic of Ireland in February 2002. In September 2004, Mr. Norman was appointed to Vice President, Kellogg Company, and
President, U.S. Morning Foods. In August 2008, Mr. Norman was promoted to President, Kellogg International.
Gary H. Pilnick
Vice Chairman, Corporate Development
and Chief Legal Officer
51
Mr. Pilnick was appointed Vice Chairman, Corporate Development and Chief Legal Officer in January 2016. In August 2003, he was appointed
Senior Vice President, General Counsel and Secretary and assumed responsibility for Corporate Development in June 2004. He joined Kellogg as
Vice President — Deputy General Counsel and Assistant Secretary in September 2000 and served in that position until August 2003. Before
joining Kellogg, he served as Vice President and Chief Counsel of Sara Lee Branded Apparel and as Vice President and Chief Counsel, Corporate
Development and Finance at Sara Lee Corporation.
Availability of Reports; Website Access; Other Information. Our internet address is http://www.kelloggcompany.com. Through “Investor
Relations” — “Financials” — “SEC Filings” on our home page, we make available free of charge our proxy statements, our annual report on
Form 10-K, our quarterly reports on Form 10-Q, our current reports on Form 8-K, SEC Forms 3, 4 and 5 and any amendments to those reports filed
or furnished pursuant to Section 13(a) or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 as soon as reasonably practicable after we electronically
file such material with, or furnish it to, the Securities and Exchange Commission. Our reports filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission
are also made available to read and copy at the SEC’s Public Reference Room at 100 F Street, N.E., Washington, D.C. 20549. You may obtain
information about the Public Reference Room by contacting the SEC at 1-800-SEC-0330. Reports filed with the SEC are also made available on its
website at www.sec.gov.
Copies of the Corporate Governance Guidelines, the Charters of the Audit, Compensation and Nominating and Governance Committees of the
Board of Directors, the Code of Conduct for Kellogg Company directors and Global Code of Ethics for Kellogg Company employees (including the
chief executive officer, chief financial officer and corporate controller) can also be found on the Kellogg Company website. Any amendments or
waivers to the Global Code of Ethics applicable to the chief executive officer, chief financial officer and corporate controller can also be found in
the “Investor Relations” section of the Kellogg Company website. Shareowners may also request a free copy of these documents from: Kellogg
Company, P.O. Box CAMB, Battle Creek, Michigan 49016-9935 (phone: (800) 961-1413), Investor Relations Department at that same address
(phone: (269) 961-2800) or [email protected]
Forward-Looking Statements. This Report contains “forward-looking statements” with projections concerning, among other things, the Company’s
global growth and efficiency program (Project K), the integration of acquired businesses, our strategy, zero-based budgeting, financial principles,
and plans; initiatives, improvements and growth; sales, gross margins, advertising, promotion, merchandising, brand building, operating profit, and
earnings per share; innovation; investments; capital expenditures; asset write-offs and expenditures and costs related to productivity or efficiency
initiatives; the impact of accounting changes and significant accounting estimates; our ability to meet interest and debt principal repayment
obligations; minimum contractual obligations; future common stock repurchases or debt reduction; effective income tax rate; cash flow and core
working capital improvements; interest expense; commodity and energy prices; and employee benefit plan costs and funding. Forward-looking
statements include predictions of future results or activities and may contain the words “expect,” “believe,” “will,” “can,” “anticipate,” “estimate,”
“project,” “should,” or words or phrases of similar meaning. For example, forward5
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
looking statements are found in this Item 1 and in several sections of Management’s Discussion and Analysis. Our actual results or activities may
differ materially from these predictions. Our future results could be affected by a variety of factors, including the ability to implement Project K as
planned, whether the expected amount of costs associated with Project K will exceed forecasts, whether the Company will be able to realize the
anticipated benefits from Project K in the amounts and times expected, the ability to realize the anticipated benefits and synergies from acquired
businesses in the amounts and at the times expected, the impact of competitive conditions; the effectiveness of pricing, advertising, and
promotional programs; the success of innovation, renovation and new product introductions; the recoverability of the carrying value of goodwill and
other intangibles; the success of productivity improvements and business transitions; commodity and energy prices; labor costs; disruptions or
inefficiencies in supply chain; the availability of and interest rates on short-term and long-term financing; actual market performance of benefit plan
trust investments; the levels of spending on systems initiatives, properties, business opportunities, integration of acquired businesses, and other
general and administrative costs; changes in consumer behavior and preferences; the effect of U.S. and foreign economic conditions on items
such as interest rates, statutory tax rates, currency conversion and availability; legal and regulatory factors including changes in food safety,
advertising and labeling laws and regulations; the ultimate impact of product recalls; business disruption or other losses from war, terrorist acts, or
political unrest; risks generally associated with global operations; risks from certain emerging markets; other items; and the risks and uncertainties
described in Item 1A below. Forward-looking statements speak only as of the date they were made, and we undertake no obligation to publicly
update them.
ITEM 1A. RISK FACTORS
In addition to the factors discussed elsewhere in this Report, the following risks and uncertainties could materially adversely affect our business,
financial condition and results of operations. Additional risks and uncertainties not presently known to us or that we currently deem immaterial also
may impair our business operations and financial condition.
We may not realize the benefits that we expect from our global four-year efficiency and effectiveness program (Project K).
In November 2013, the Company announced a global four-year efficiency and effectiveness program (Project K). The successful implementation of
Project K presents significant organizational design and infrastructure challenges and in many cases will require successful negotiations with third
parties, including labor organizations, suppliers, business partners, and other stakeholders. In addition, the project may not advance our business
strategy as expected. As a result, we may not be able to implement Project K as planned, including realizing, in full or in part, the anticipated
benefits from our program. Events and circumstances, such as financial or strategic difficulties, delays and unexpected costs may occur that
could result in our not realizing all or any of the anticipated benefits or our not realizing the anticipated benefits on our expected timetable. If we are
unable to realize the anticipated savings of the program, our ability to fund other initiatives may be adversely affected. Any failure to implement
Project K in accordance with our expectations could adversely affect our financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.
In addition, the complexity of Project K will require a substantial amount of management and operational resources. Our management team must
successfully implement administrative and operational changes necessary to achieve the anticipated benefits of Project K. These and related
demands on our resources may divert the organization’s attention from existing core businesses, integrating or separating personnel and financial
or other systems, have adverse effects on existing business relationships with suppliers and customers, and impact employee morale. As a result
our financial condition, results of operations or cash flows may be adversely affected.
We may not realize the benefits we expect from the adoption of zero-based budgeting.
We recently adopted zero-based budgeting which presents significant organizational challenges. As a result, we may not realize all or part of the
anticipated cost savings or other benefits from the initiative. Other events and circumstances, such as financial or strategic difficulties, delays or
unexpected costs, may also adversely impact our ability to realize all or part of the anticipated cost savings or other benefits, or cause us not to
realize the anticipated cost savings or other benefits on the expected timetable. If we are unable to realize the anticipated cost savings, our ability
to fund other initiatives may be adversely affected. In addition, the initiatives may not advance our strategy as expected. Finally, the complexity of
the implementation will require a substantial amount of management and operational resources. Our management team must successfully execute
the administrative and operational
6
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
changes necessary to achieve the anticipated benefits of the initiatives. These and related demands on our resources may divert the
organization's attention from other business issues, have adverse effects on existing business relationships with suppliers and customers, and
impact employee morale.
Any failure to implement our cost reduction, organizational design or other initiatives in accordance with our plans could adversely affect our
business or financial results.
Our results may be materially and adversely impacted as a result of increases in the price of raw materials, including agricultural commodities, fuel
and labor.
Agricultural commodities, including corn, wheat, soybean oil, sugar and cocoa, are the principal raw materials used in our products. Cartonboard,
corrugated, and plastic are the principal packaging materials used by us. The cost of such commodities may fluctuate widely due to government
policy and regulation, drought and other weather conditions (including the potential effects of climate change) or other unforeseen circumstances.
To the extent that any of the foregoing factors affect the prices of such commodities and we are unable to increase our prices or adequately hedge
against such changes in prices in a manner that offsets such changes, the results of our operations could be materially and adversely affected. In
addition, we use derivatives to hedge price risk associated with forecasted purchases of raw materials. Our hedged price could exceed the spot
price on the date of purchase, resulting in an unfavorable impact on both gross margin and net earnings.
Cereal processing ovens at major domestic and international facilities are regularly fueled by natural gas or propane, which are obtained from local
utilities or other local suppliers. Short-term stand-by propane storage exists at several plants for use in case of interruption in natural gas supplies.
Oil may also be used to fuel certain operations at various plants. In addition, considerable amounts of diesel fuel are used in connection with the
distribution of our products. The cost of fuel may fluctuate widely due to economic and political conditions, government policy and regulation, war,
or other unforeseen circumstances which could have a material adverse effect on our consolidated operating results or financial condition.
A shortage in the labor pool, failure to successfully negotiate collectively bargained agreements, or other general inflationary pressures or changes
in applicable laws and regulations could increase labor cost, which could have a material adverse effect on our consolidated operating results or
financial condition.
Our labor costs include the cost of providing benefits for employees. We sponsor a number of benefit plans for employees in the United States and
various foreign locations, including pension, retiree health and welfare, active health care, severance and other postemployment benefits. We also
participate in a number of multiemployer pension plans for certain of our manufacturing locations. Our major pension plans and U.S. retiree health
and welfare plans are funded with trust assets invested in a globally diversified portfolio of equity securities with smaller holdings of bonds, real
estate and other investments. The annual cost of benefits can vary significantly from year to year and is materially affected by such factors as
changes in the assumed or actual rate of return on major plan assets, a change in the weighted-average discount rate used to measure
obligations, the rate or trend of health care cost inflation, and the outcome of collectively-bargained wage and benefit agreements. Many of our
employees are covered by collectively-bargained agreements and other employees may seek to be covered by collectively-bargained agreements.
Strikes or work stoppages and interruptions could occur if we are unable to renew these agreements on satisfactory terms or enter into new
agreements on satisfactory terms, which could adversely impact our operating results. The terms and conditions of existing, renegotiated or new
agreements could also increase our costs or otherwise affect our ability to fully implement future operational changes to enhance our efficiency.
Multiemployer pension plans could adversely affect our business.
We participate in various “multiemployer” pension plans administered by labor unions representing some of our employees. We make periodic
contributions to these plans to allow them to meet their pension benefit obligations to their participants. Our required contributions to these funds
could increase because of a shrinking contribution base as a result of the insolvency or withdrawal of other companies that currently contribute to
these funds, inability or failure of withdrawing companies to pay their withdrawal liability, lower than expected returns on pension fund assets or
other funding deficiencies. In the event that we withdraw from participation in one of these plans,
then applicable law could require us to make an additional lump-sum contribution to the plan, and we would have to reflect that as an expense in
our consolidated statement of operations and as a liability on our consolidated balance sheet. Our withdrawal liability for any multiemployer plan
would depend on the extent of the plan’s funding of vested benefits. In the ordinary course of our renegotiation of collective bargaining agreements
with labor unions that maintain these plans, we may decide to discontinue participation in a plan, and in that event, we could face a
7
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
withdrawal liability. Some multiemployer plans in which we participate are reported to have significant underfunded liabilities. Such underfunding
could increase the size of our potential withdrawal liability.
We operate in the highly competitive food industry.
We face competition across our product lines, including ready-to-eat cereals and convenience foods, from other companies which have varying
abilities to withstand changes in market conditions. Most of our competitors have substantial financial, marketing and other resources, and
competition with them in our various markets and product lines could cause us to reduce prices, increase capital, marketing or other expenditures,
or lose category share, any of which could have a material adverse effect on our business and financial results. Category share and growth could
also be adversely impacted if we are not successful in introducing new products or in effectively assessing, changing and setting proper pricing.
We may be unable to maintain our profit margins in the face of a consolidating retail environment. In addition, the loss of one of our largest
customers could negatively impact our sales and profits.
Our largest customer, Wal-Mart Stores, Inc. and its affiliates, accounted for approximately 21% of consolidated net sales during 2015, comprised
principally of sales within the United States. At January 2, 2016, approximately 18% of our consolidated receivables balance and 27% of our
U.S. receivables balance was comprised of amounts owed by Wal-Mart Stores, Inc. and its affiliates. No other customer accounted for greater
than 10% of net sales in 2015. During 2015, our top five customers, collectively, including Wal-Mart, accounted for approximately 34% of our
consolidated net sales and approximately 47% of U.S. net sales. As the retail grocery trade continues to consolidate and retailers become larger,
our large retail customers may seek to use their position to improve their profitability through improved efficiency, lower pricing, increased
promotional programs funded by their suppliers and more favorable terms. If we are unable to use our scale, marketing expertise, product
innovation and category leadership positions to respond, our profitability or volume growth could be negatively affected. The loss of any large
customer for an extended length of time could negatively impact our sales and profits.
Our results may be negatively impacted if consumers do not maintain their favorable perception of our brands.
We have a number of iconic brands with significant value. Maintaining and continually enhancing the value of these brands is critical to the
success of our business. Brand value is based in large part on consumer perceptions. Success in promoting and enhancing brand value depends
in large part on our ability to provide high-quality products. Brand value could diminish significantly due to a number of factors, including consumer
perception that we have acted in an irresponsible manner, adverse publicity about our products (whether or not valid), our failure to maintain the
quality of our products, the failure of our products to deliver consistently positive consumer experiences, or the products becoming unavailable to
consumers. The growing use of social and digital media by consumers, Kellogg and third parties increases the speed and extent that information
or misinformation and opinions can be shared. Negative posts or comments about Kellogg, our brands or our products on social or digital media
could seriously damage our brands and reputation, regardless of the information’s accuracy. The harm may be immediate without affording us an
opportunity for redress or correction. Brand recognition can also be impacted by the effectiveness of our advertising campaigns and marketing
programs, as well as our use of social media. If we do not maintain the favorable perception of our brands, our results could be negatively
impacted.
Tax matters, including changes in tax rates, disagreements with taxing authorities and imposition of new taxes could impact our results of
operations and financial condition.
The Company is subject to taxes in the U.S. and numerous foreign jurisdictions where the Company’s subsidiaries are organized. Due to economic
and political conditions, tax rates in various foreign jurisdictions may be subject to significant change. The future effective tax rate could be
effected by changes in mix of earnings in countries with differing statutory tax rates, changes in valuation of deferred tax asset and liabilities, or
changes in tax laws or their interpretation which includes possible U.S. tax reform and contemplated changes in other countries of long-standing
tax principles if finalized and adopted could have a material impact on our income tax expense and deferred tax balances.
We are also subject to regular reviews, examinations and audits by the Internal Revenue Service and other taxing authorities with respect to taxes
inside and outside of the U.S. Although we believe our tax estimates are reasonable, if a taxing authority disagrees with the positions we have
taken, we could face additional tax liability, including interest and penalties. There can be no assurance that payment of such additional amounts
upon final adjudication of any disputes will not have a material impact on our results of operations and financial position.
8
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
The cash we generate outside the U.S. is principally to be used to fund our international development. If the funds generated by our U.S. business
are not sufficient to meet our need for cash in the U.S., we may need to repatriate a portion of our future international earnings to the U.S. Such
international earnings would be subject to U.S. tax which could cause our worldwide effective tax rate to increase.
We also need to comply with new, evolving or revised tax laws and regulations. The enactment of or increases in tariffs, including value added tax,
or other changes in the application of existing taxes, in markets in which we are currently active, or may be active in the future, or on specific
products that we sell or with which our products compete, may have an adverse effect on our business or on our results of operations.
If our food products become adulterated, misbranded or mislabeled, we might need to recall those items and may experience product liability if
consumers are injured as a result.
Selling food products involves a number of legal and other risks, including product contamination, spoilage, product tampering, allergens, or other
adulteration. We may need to recall some of our products if they become adulterated or misbranded. We may also be liable if the consumption of
any of our products causes injury, illness or death. A widespread product recall or market withdrawal could result in significant losses due to their
costs, the destruction of product inventory, and lost sales due to the unavailability of product for a period of time. We could also suffer losses from
a significant product liability judgment against us. A significant product recall or product liability case could also result in adverse publicity,
damage to our reputation, and a loss of consumer confidence in our food products, which could have a material adverse effect on our business
results and the value of our brands. Moreover, even if a product liability or consumer fraud claim is meritless, does not prevail or is not pursued,
the negative publicity surrounding assertions against our company and our products or processes could adversely affect our reputation or brands.
We could also be adversely affected if consumers lose confidence in the safety and quality of certain food products or ingredients, or the food
safety system generally. Adverse publicity about these types of concerns, whether or not valid, may discourage consumers from buying our
products or cause production and delivery disruptions.
Unanticipated business disruptions could have an adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.
We manufacture and source products and materials on a global scale. We have a complex network of suppliers, owned manufacturing locations,
contract manufacturer locations, distribution networks and information systems that support our ability to provide our products to our customers
consistently. Our ability to make, move and sell products globally is critical to our success. Factors that are hard to predict or beyond our control,
such as weather (including any potential effects of climate change), natural disasters, fires or explosions, terrorism, political unrest, health
pandemics or strikes, could damage or disrupt our operations or our suppliers' or contract manufacturers' operations. If we do not effectively
respond to disruptions in our operations, for example, by finding alternative suppliers or replacing capacity at key manufacturing or distribution
locations, or cannot quickly repair damage to our information, production or supply systems, we may be late in delivering or unable to deliver
products to our customers. If that occurs, we may lose our customers' confidence, and long-term consumer demand for our products could
decline. These events could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.
Evolving tax, environmental, food quality and safety or other regulations or failure to comply with existing licensing, labeling, trade, food quality
and safety and other regulations and laws could have a material adverse effect on our consolidated financial condition.
Our activities or products, both in and outside of the United States, are subject to regulation by various federal, state, provincial and local laws,
regulations and government agencies, including the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, U.S. Federal Trade Commission, the U.S. Departments of
Agriculture, Commerce and Labor, as well as similar and other authorities outside of the United States, International Accords and Treaties and
others, including voluntary regulation by other bodies. In addition, legal and regulatory systems in emerging and developing markets may be less
developed, and less certain. These laws and regulations and interpretations thereof may change, sometimes dramatically, as a result of a variety
of factors, including political, economic or social events. The manufacturing, marketing and distribution of food products are subject to
governmental regulation that impose additional regulatory requirements. Those regulations control such matters as food quality and safety,
ingredients, advertising, product or production requirements, labeling, import or export of our products or ingredients, relations with distributors and
retailers, health and safety, the environment, and restrictions on the use of government programs, such as Supplemental Nutritional Assistance
Program, to purchase certain of our products. We are also
9
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
regulated with respect to matters such as licensing requirements, trade and pricing practices, tax, anticorruption standards, advertising and claims,
and environmental matters. The need to comply with new, evolving or revised tax, environmental, food quality and safety, labeling or other laws or
regulations, or new, evolving or changed interpretations or enforcement of existing laws or regulations, may have a material adverse effect on our
business and results of operations. Further, if we are found to be out of compliance with applicable laws and regulations in these areas, we could
be subject to civil remedies, including fines, injunctions, termination of necessary licenses or permits, or recalls, as well as potential criminal
sanctions, any of which could have a material adverse effect on our business. Even if regulatory review does not result in these types of
determinations, it could potentially create negative publicity or perceptions which could harm our business or reputation.
Our operations face significant foreign currency exchange rate exposure and currency restrictions which could negatively impact our operating
results.
We hold assets and incur liabilities, earn revenue and pay expenses in a variety of currencies other than the U.S. dollar, including the euro, British
pound, Australian dollar, Canadian dollar, Mexican peso, Venezuelan bolivar fuerte and Russian ruble. Because our consolidated financial
statements are presented in U.S. dollars, we must translate our assets, liabilities, revenue and expenses into U.S. dollars at then-applicable
exchange rates. Consequently, changes in the value of the U.S. dollar may unpredictably and negatively affect the value of these items in our
consolidated financial statements, even if their value has not changed in their original currency.
If we pursue strategic acquisitions, alliances, divestitures or joint ventures, we may not be able to successfully consummate favorable
transactions or successfully integrate acquired businesses.
From time to time, we may evaluate potential acquisitions, alliances, divestitures or joint ventures that would further our strategic objectives. With
respect to acquisitions, we may not be able to identify suitable candidates, consummate a transaction on terms that are favorable to us, or
achieve expected returns, expected synergies and other benefits as a result of integration challenges, or may not achieve those objectives on a
timely basis. Future acquisitions of foreign companies or new foreign ventures would subject us to local regulations and could potentially lead to
risks related to, among other things, increased exposure to foreign exchange rate changes, government price control, repatriation of profits and
liabilities relating to the U.S. Foreign Corrupt Practices Act.
With respect to proposed divestitures of assets or businesses, we may encounter difficulty in finding acquirers or alternative exit strategies on
terms that are favorable to us, which could delay the accomplishment of our strategic objectives, or our divestiture activities may require us to
recognize impairment charges. Companies or operations acquired or joint ventures created may not be profitable or may not achieve sales levels
and profitability that justify the investments made. Our corporate development activities may present financial and operational risks, including
diversion of management attention from existing core businesses, integrating or separating personnel and financial and other systems, and
adverse effects on existing business relationships with suppliers and customers. Future acquisitions could also result in potentially dilutive
issuances of equity securities, the incurrence of debt, contingent liabilities and/or amortization expenses related to certain intangible assets and
increased operating expenses, which could adversely affect our results of operations and financial condition.
Potential liabilities and costs from litigation could adversely affect our business.
There is no guarantee that we will be successful in defending our self in civil, criminal or regulatory actions, including under general, commercial,
employment, environmental, food quality and safety, anti-trust and trade, advertising and claims, and environmental laws and regulations, or in
asserting its rights under various laws. For example, our marketing or claims could face allegations of false or deceptive advertising or other
criticisms which could end up in litigation and result in potential liabilities or costs. In addition, we could incur substantial costs and fees in
defending our self or in asserting our rights in these actions or meeting new legal requirements. The costs and other effects of potential and
pending litigation and administrative actions against us, and new legal requirements, cannot be determined with certainty and may differ from
expectations.
Our consolidated financial results and demand for our products are dependent on the successful development of new products and processes.
There are a number of trends in consumer preferences which may impact us and the industry as a whole. These include changing consumer
dietary trends and the availability of substitute products.
Our success is dependent on anticipating changes in consumer preferences and on successful new product and process development and product
relaunches in response to such changes. Trends within the food industry change
10
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
often, and failure to identify and react to changes in these trends could lead to, among other things, reduced demand and price reductions for our
brands and products. We aim to introduce products or new or improved production processes on a timely basis in order to counteract
obsolescence and decreases in sales of existing products. While we devote significant focus to the development of new products and to the
research, development and technology process functions of our business, we may not be successful in developing new products or our new
products may not be commercially successful. Our future results and our ability to maintain or improve our competitive position will depend on our
capacity to gauge the direction of our key markets and upon our ability to successfully identify, develop, manufacture, market and sell new or
improved products in these changing markets.
Our postretirement benefit-related costs and funding requirements could increase as a result of volatility in the financial markets, changes in
interest rates and actuarial assumptions.
Increases in the costs of postretirement medical and pension benefits may continue and negatively affect
our business as a result of increased usage of medical benefits by retired employees and medical cost inflation, the effect of potential declines in
the stock and bond markets on the performance of our pension and post-retirement plan assets, potential reductions in the discount rate used to
determine the present value of our benefit obligations, and changes to our investment strategy that may impact our expected return on pension
and post-retirement plan assets assumptions. U.S. generally accepted accounting principles require that we calculate income or expense for the
plans using actuarial valuations. These valuations reflect assumptions about financial markets and interest rates, which may change based on
economic conditions. The Company’s accounting policy for defined benefit plans may subject earnings to volatility due to the recognition of
actuarial gains and losses, particularly those due to the change in the fair value of pension and post-retirement plan assets and interest rates. In
addition, funding requirements for our plans may become more significant. However, the ultimate amounts to be contributed are dependent upon,
among other things, interest rates, underlying asset returns, and the impact of legislative or regulatory changes related to pension and postretirement funding obligations.
We have a substantial amount of indebtedness.
We have indebtedness that is substantial in relation to our shareholders’ equity, and we may incur additional indebtedness in the future, or enter
into off-balance sheet financing, which would increase our leverage risks. As of January 2, 2016, we had total debt of approximately $7.8 billion
and total Kellogg Company equity of $2.1 billion.
Our substantial indebtedness could have important consequences, including:
• impairing the ability to access global capital markets to obtain additional financing for working capital, capital expenditures or general
corporate purposes, particularly if the ratings assigned to our debt securities by rating organizations were revised downward or if a rating
organization announces that our ratings are under review for a potential downgrade;
• a downgrade in our credit ratings, particularly our short-term credit rating, would likely reduce the amount of commercial paper we could issue,
increase our commercial paper borrowing costs, or both;
• restricting our flexibility in responding to changing market conditions or making us more vulnerable in the event of a general downturn in
economic conditions or our business;
• requiring a substantial portion of the cash flow from operations to be dedicated to the payment of principal and interest on our debt, reducing
the funds available to us for other purposes such as expansion through acquisitions, paying dividends, repurchasing shares, marketing and
other spending and expansion of our product offerings; and
• causing us to be more leveraged than some of our competitors, which may place us at a competitive disadvantage.
Our ability to make scheduled payments or to refinance our obligations with respect to indebtedness or incur new indebtedness will depend on our
financial and operating performance, which in turn, is subject to prevailing economic conditions, the availability of, and interest rates on, short-term
financing, and financial, business and other factors beyond our control.
Our performance is affected by general economic and political conditions and taxation policies.
Customer and consumer demand for our products may be impacted by recession, financial and credit market disruptions, or other economic
downturns in the United States or other nations. Our results in the past have been, and in the future may continue to be, materially affected by
changes in general economic and political conditions in the United States and other countries, including the interest rate environment in which we
conduct business, the financial markets through which we access capital and currency, political unrest and terrorist acts in the United States or
other countries in which we carry on business.
11
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
Current economic conditions globally may delay or reduce purchases by our customers and consumers. This could result in reductions in sales of
our products, reduced acceptance of innovations, and increased price competition. Deterioration in economic conditions in any of the countries in
which we do business could also cause slower collections on accounts receivable which may adversely impact our liquidity and financial
condition. Financial institutions may be negatively impacted by economic conditions and may consolidate or cease to do business which could
result in a tightening in the credit markets, a low level of liquidity in many financial markets, and increased volatility in fixed income, credit,
currency and equity markets. There could be a number of effects from a financial institution credit crisis on our business, which could include
impaired credit availability and financial stability of our customers, including our suppliers, co-manufacturers and distributors. A disruption in
financial markets may also have an effect on our derivative counterparties and could also impair our banking partners on which we rely for
operating cash management. Any of these events would likely harm our business, results of operations and financial condition.
An impairment of the carrying value of goodwill or other acquired intangibles could negatively affect our consolidated operating results and net
worth.
The carrying value of goodwill represents the fair value of acquired businesses in excess of identifiable assets and liabilities as of the acquisition
date. The carrying value of other intangibles represents the fair value of trademarks, trade names, and other acquired intangibles as of the
acquisition date. Goodwill and other acquired intangibles expected to contribute indefinitely to our cash flows are not amortized, but must be
evaluated by management at least annually for impairment. If carrying value exceeds current fair value, the intangible is considered impaired and
is reduced to fair value via a charge to earnings. Factors which could result in an impairment include, but are not limited to: (i) reduced demand for
our products; (ii) higher commodity prices; (iii) lower prices for our products or increased marketing as a result of increased competition; and
(iv) significant disruptions to our operations as a result of both internal and external events. Should the value of one or more of the acquired
intangibles become impaired, our consolidated earnings and net worth may be materially adversely affected.
As of January 2, 2016, the carrying value of intangible assets totaled approximately $7.2 billion, of which $5.0 billion was goodwill and $2.2 billion
represented trademarks, tradenames, and other acquired intangibles compared to total assets of $15.3 billion and total Kellogg Company equity of
$2.1 billion.
We must leverage our brand value to compete against retailer brands.
In nearly all of our product categories, we face branded and price-based competition. Our products must provide higher value and/or quality to our
consumers than alternatives, particularly during periods of economic uncertainty. Consumers may not buy our products if relative differences in
value and/or quality between our products and retailer brands change in favor of competitors’ products or if consumers perceive this type of
change. If consumers prefer retailer brands, then we could lose category share or sales volumes or shift our product mix to lower margin offerings,
which could have a material effect on our business and consolidated financial position and on the consolidated results of our operations and
profitability.
We may not achieve our targeted cost savings and efficiencies from cost reduction initiatives.
Our success depends in part on our ability to be an efficient producer in a highly competitive industry. We have invested a significant amount in
capital expenditures to improve our operational facilities. Ongoing operational issues are likely to occur when carrying out major production,
procurement, or logistical changes and these, as well as any failure by us to achieve our planned cost savings and efficiencies, could have a
material adverse effect on our business and consolidated financial position and on the consolidated results of our operations and profitability.
Technology failures could disrupt our operations and negatively impact our business.
We increasingly rely on information technology systems to process, transmit, and store electronic information. For example, our production and
distribution facilities and inventory management utilize information technology to increase efficiencies and limit costs. Information technology
systems are also integral to the reporting of our results of operations. Furthermore, a significant portion of the communications between, and
storage of personal data of, our personnel, customers, consumers and suppliers depends on information technology. Our information technology
systems may be vulnerable to a variety of interruptions, as a result of updating our enterprise platform or due to events beyond our control,
including, but not limited to, natural disasters, terrorist attacks, telecommunications failures, computer viruses, hackers, and other security issues.
Moreover, our computer systems have been, and will likely continue to be subjected to computer viruses or other malicious codes, unauthorized
access attempts, and cyber- or phishing-attacks. These events could compromise our confidential
12
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
information, impede or interrupt our business operations, and may result in other negative consequences, including remediation costs, loss of
revenue, litigation and reputational damage. Furthermore, if a breach or other breakdown results in disclosure of confidential or personal
information, we may suffer reputational, competitive and/or business harm. To date, we have not experienced a material breach of cyber
security. While we have implemented administrative and technical controls and taken other preventive actions to reduce the risk of cyber incidents
and protect our information technology, they may be insufficient to prevent physical and electronic break-ins, cyber-attacks or other security
breaches to our computer systems.
Our intellectual property rights are valuable, and any inability to protect them could reduce the value of our products and brands.
We consider our intellectual property rights, particularly and most notably our trademarks, but also including patents, trade secrets, copyrights and
licensing agreements, to be a significant and valuable aspect of our business. We attempt to protect our intellectual property rights through a
combination of patent, trademark, copyright and trade secret laws, as well as licensing agreements, third party nondisclosure and assignment
agreements and policing of third party misuses of our intellectual property. Our failure to obtain or adequately protect our trademarks, products,
new features of our products, or our technology, or any change in law or other changes that serve to lessen or remove the current legal protections
of our intellectual property, may diminish our competitiveness and could materially harm our business.
We may be unaware of intellectual property rights of others that may cover some of our technology, brands or products. Any litigation regarding
patents or other intellectual property could be costly and time-consuming and could divert the attention of our management and key personnel from
our business operations. Third party claims of intellectual property infringement might also require us to enter into costly license agreements. We
also may be subject to significant damages or injunctions against development and sale of certain products.
We are subject to risks generally associated with companies that operate globally.
We are a global company and generated 37% of our 2015 net sales, and 39% of our 2014 and 2013 net sales outside the United States. We
manufacture our products in 20 countries and have operations in more than 180 countries, so we are subject to risks inherent in multinational
operations. Those risks include:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
compliance with U.S. laws affecting operations outside of the United States, such as OFAC trade sanction regulations and Anti-Boycott
regulations,
compliance with anti-corruption laws, including U.S. Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA) and U.K. Bribery Act (UKBA),
compliance with antitrust and competition laws, data privacy laws, and a variety of other local, national and multi-national regulations and laws
in multiple regimes,
changes in tax laws, interpretation of tax laws and tax audit outcomes,
fluctuations or devaluations in currency values, especially in emerging markets,
changes in capital controls, including currency exchange controls, government currency policies or other limits on our ability to import raw
materials or finished product or repatriate cash from outside the United States,
changes in local regulations and laws, the uncertainty of enforcement of remedies in foreign jurisdictions, and foreign ownership restrictions
and the potential for nationalization or expropriation of property or other resources;
discriminatory or conflicting fiscal policies,
increased sovereign risk, such as default by or deterioration in the economies and credit worthiness of local governments,
varying abilities to enforce intellectual property and contractual rights,
greater risk of uncollectible accounts and longer collection cycles,
loss of ability to manage our operations in certain markets which could result in the deconsolidation of such businesses,
design and implementation of effective control environment processes across our diverse operations and employee base, and
imposition of more or new tariffs, quotas, trade barriers, and similar restrictions on our sales or regulations, taxes or policies that might
negatively affect our sales.
The future results of our Venezuelan operations may be adversely affected by many factors, including our ability to take action to mitigate the
effect of a further devaluation of the Venezuelan bolivar, the foreign currency exchange rate and exchange controls, other actions of the
Venezuelan government and the general economic conditions in
13
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
the country, resulting from continued hyper-inflation, continued or increased labor unrest and the deteriorating macroeconomic conditions. In
particular, any additional government actions, such as imposition of price restrictions that prohibit the Company from pricing its products at
acceptable levels, could have a further adverse impact on our results of operations or financial condition that could become material in the future.
Additionally, consumer demand for the Company’s products in Venezuela may decline as a result continued inflationary price increases. These
and other factors could negatively impact the Company's ability to manage our Venezuelan operations and could result in the deconsolidation of
our Venezuelan business. See Note 15 for more information regarding Venezuela.
In addition, political and economic changes or volatility, geopolitical regional conflicts, terrorist activity, political unrest, civil strife, acts of war,
public corruption, expropriation and other economic or political uncertainties could interrupt and negatively affect our business operations or
customer demand. The slowdown in economic growth or high unemployment in some emerging markets could constrain consumer spending, and
declining consumer purchasing power could adversely impact our profitability. Continued instability in the banking and governmental sectors of
certain countries in the European Union or the dynamics associated with the federal and state debt and budget challenges in the United States
could adversely affect us. All of these factors could result in increased costs or decreased revenues, and could materially and adversely affect our
product sales, financial condition and results of operations.
Our operations in certain emerging markets expose us to political, economic and regulatory risks.
Our growth strategy depends in part on our ability to expand our operations in emerging markets. However, some emerging markets have greater
political, economic and currency volatility and greater vulnerability to infrastructure and labor disruptions than more established markets. In many
countries outside of the United States, particularly those with emerging economies, it may be common for others to engage in business practices
prohibited by laws and regulations with extraterritorial reach, such as the FCPA and the UKBA, or local anti-bribery laws. These laws generally
prohibit companies and their employees, contractors or agents from making improper payments to government officials, including in connection
with obtaining permits or engaging in other actions necessary to do business. Failure to comply with these laws could subject us to civil and
criminal penalties that could materially and adversely affect our reputation, financial condition and results of operations.
In addition, competition in emerging markets is increasing as our competitors grow their global operations and low cost local manufacturers expand
and improve their production capacities. Our success in emerging markets is critical to our growth strategy. If we cannot successfully increase our
business in emerging markets and manage associated political, economic and regulatory risks, our product sales, financial condition and results of
operations could be materially and adversely affected.
Adverse changes in the global climate or extreme weather conditions could adversely affect our business or operations
Climate change is a core business issue for Kellogg to ensure the long-term health and viability of the ingredients we use in our products. As set
forth in the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Fifth Assessment Report, there is continuing scientific evidence, as well as concern from
members of the general public, that emissions of greenhouse gases and contributing human activities have caused and will continue to cause
significant changes in global temperatures and weather patterns and increase the frequency or severity of weather events, wildfires and flooding.
As the pressures from climate change and global population growth lead to increased demand, the food system and global supply chain is
becoming increasingly vulnerable to acute shocks, leading to increased prices and volatility, especially in the energy and commodity markets.
Adverse changes such as these could:
•
•
•
•
unfavorably impact the cost or availability of raw or packaging materials, especially if such events have a negative impact on agricultural
productivity or on the supply of water;
disrupt our ability, or the ability of our suppliers or contract manufacturers, to manufacture or distribute our products;
disrupt the retail operations of our customers; or
unfavorably impact the demand for, or the consumer's ability to purchase, our products.
Foreign, federal, state and local regulatory and legislative bodies have proposed various legislative and regulatory measures relating to climate
change, regulating greenhouse gas emissions and energy policies. In the event that such regulation is enacted, we may experience significant
increases in our costs of operation and delivery. In particular, increasing regulation of fuel emissions could substantially increase the distribution
and supply chain costs associated with our products. Lastly, consumers and customers may put an increased priority on purchasing
14
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
products that are sustainably grown and made, requiring us to incur increased costs for additional transparency, due diligence and reporting. As a
result, climate change could negatively affect our business and operations
ITEM 1B. UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS
None.
ITEM 2. PROPERTIES
Our corporate headquarters and principal research and development facilities are located in Battle Creek, Michigan.
We operated, as of February 24, 2016, manufacturing plants and distribution and warehousing facilities totaling more than 38 million square feet of
building area in the United States and other countries. Our plants have been designed and constructed to meet our specific production
requirements, and we periodically invest money for capital and technological improvements. At the time of its selection, each location was
considered to be favorable, based on the location of markets, sources of raw materials, availability of suitable labor, transportation facilities,
location of our other plants producing similar products, and other factors. Our manufacturing facilities in the United States include four cereal
plants and warehouses located in Battle Creek, Michigan; Lancaster, Pennsylvania; Memphis, Tennessee; and Omaha, Nebraska and other plants
or facilities in San Jose, California; Atlanta, Augusta, and Rome, Georgia; Chicago, Illinois; Seelyville, Indiana; Kansas City, Kansas; Florence,
Louisville, and Pikeville, Kentucky; Grand Rapids and Wyoming, Michigan; Blue Anchor, New Jersey; Cary, North Carolina; Cincinnati and
Zanesville, Ohio; Muncy, Pennsylvania; Jackson and Rossville, Tennessee; and Allyn, Washington.
Outside the United States, we had, as of February 24, 2016, additional manufacturing locations, some with warehousing facilities, in Australia,
Belgium, Brazil, Canada, Colombia, Ecuador, Egypt, Germany, Great Britain, India, Japan, Malaysia, Mexico, Poland, Russia, South Africa, South
Korea, Spain, Thailand, and Venezuela. We also have joint ventures in China, Nigeria, and Turkey which own or operate manufacturing or
warehouse facilities.
We generally own our principal properties, including our major office facilities, although some manufacturing facilities are leased, and no owned
property is subject to any major lien or other encumbrance. Distribution facilities (including related warehousing facilities) and offices of non-plant
locations typically are leased. In general, we consider our facilities, taken as a whole, to be suitable, adequate, and of sufficient capacity for our
current operations.
ITEM 3. LEGAL PROCEEDINGS
We are subject to various legal proceedings, claims, and governmental inspections, audits or investigations arising out of our business which
cover matters such as general commercial, governmental regulations, antitrust and trade regulations, product liability, environmental, intellectual
property, employment and other actions. In the opinion of management, the ultimate resolution of these matters will not have a material adverse
effect on our financial position or results of operations.
ITEM 4. MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURE
Not applicable.
PART II
ITEM 5. MARKET FOR THE REGISTRANT’S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF
EQUITY SECURITIES
15
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
Information on the market for our common stock, number of shareowners and dividends is located in Note 16 within Notes to Consolidated
Financial Statements.
In February 2014, the board of directors approved a share repurchase program authorizing us to repurchase shares of our common stock
amounting to $1.5 billion through December 2015. In December 2015, the board of directors approved a share repurchase program authorizing us
to repurchase shares of our common stock amounting to $1.5 billion beginning in January 2016 through December 2017.
The following table provides information with respect to purchases of common shares under programs authorized by our board of directors during
the quarter ended January 2, 2016.
(millions, except per share data)
Period
(a)
Total
Number
of
Shares
Purchased
(d)
Approximate
Dollar
Value of
Shares
that May
Yet Be
Purchased
Under the
Plans or
Programs
(c)
Total
Number
of Shares
Purchased
as Part of
Publicly
Announced
Plans or
Programs
(b)
Average
Price
Paid Per
Share
Month #1:
10/04/15-10/31/15
—
—
—
$
688
Month #2:
11/01/15-11/28/15
1.8
68.68
1.8
$
563
Month #3:
11/29/15-1/02/16
3.2
70.24
3.2
$
338
16
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
ITEM 6. SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA
Kellogg Company and Subsidiaries
Selected Financial Data
2015
(millions, except per share data and number of employees)
2014
2013
2012
2011
Operating trends
Net sales (a)
$
13,525
$
14,580
$
14,792
$
14,197
$
13,198
Gross profit as a % of net sales (a)
34.6%
34.7%
41.3%
38.3%
39.0%
Depreciation
526
494
523
444
367
Amortization
8
9
9
4
2
898
1,094
1,131
1,120
1,138
Advertising expense (b)
Research and development expense
Operating profit (a)
193
199
199
206
192
1,091
1,024
2,837
1,562
1,427
Operating profit as a % of net sales (a)
8.1%
7.0%
19.2%
11.0%
10.8%
Interest expense
227
209
235
261
233
Net income attributable to Kellogg Company (a)
614
632
1,807
961
866
Basic
354
358
363
358
362
Diluted
356
360
365
360
364
Basic
1.74
1.76
4.98
2.68
2.39
Diluted (a)
1.72
1.75
4.94
2.67
2.38
Average shares outstanding:
Per share amounts:
Cash flow trends
Net cash provided by operating activities
$
Capital expenditures
Net cash provided by operating activities reduced by capital expenditures (c)
Net cash used in investing activities
Net cash provided by (used in) financing activities
Interest coverage ratio (d)
1,691
$
1,793
$
1,807
$
1,758
$
1,595
553
582
637
533
594
1,138
1,211
1,170
1,225
1,001
(1,127)
(573)
(641)
(706)
(1,063)
(1,141)
6.8
7.3
14.3
(3,245)
(587)
1,317
(957)
7.8
7.7
Capital structure trends
Total assets
$
15,265
$
15,153
$
15,474
$
15,169
$
11,943
Property, net
3,621
3,769
3,856
3,782
Short-term debt and current maturities of long-term debt
2,470
1,435
1,028
1,820
995
Long-term debt
5,289
5,935
6,330
6,082
5,037
Total Kellogg Company equity
2,128
2,789
3,545
2,404
1,796
$61-74
$57-69
$55-68
$46-57
$48-58
1.98
1.90
1.80
1.74
1.67
33,577
29,818
30,277
31,006
30,671
3,281
Share price trends
Stock price range
Cash dividends per common share
Number of employees
(a) Non-GAAP currency-neutral comparable definitions of these metrics are reconciled to the directly comparable measure in accordance with U.S. GAAP within our
Management’s Discussion and Analysis. We believe the use of such non-GAAP measures provides increased transparency and assists in understanding our underlying
operating performance.
(b) Advertising and consumer promotions are included in total brand-building, a measure that we use to determine the level of investment we make to support our brands.
Advertising has declined in 2015 as a result of foreign currency translation as well as the implementation of efficiency and effectiveness programs including a shift in
investments to non-advertising consumer promotion programs. Total brand-building investment has declined in 2015 approximately 50 basis points as a percentage of
net sales. Our brand building is down including shifts of investment into other areas such as food, the evolving shift in media investment from TV to digital, and efficiency
and effectiveness benefits. Our zero-based budgeting initiative may identify additional efficiency and effectiveness opportunities in brand building as we proceed through
2016. We may choose to reinvest these savings back into brand building or other areas such as food reformulation or capacity to drive revenue growth. We remain
committed to invest in our brands at an industry-leading level to maintain the strength of our many recognizable brands in the marketplace.
(c) We use this non-GAAP financial measure, which is reconciled above, to focus management and investors on the amount of cash available for debt repayment, dividend
distribution, acquisition opportunities, and share repurchase.
(d) Interest coverage ratio is calculated based on net income attributable to Kellogg Company before interest expense, income taxes, depreciation and amortization, divided
by interest expense.
17
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
ITEM 7. MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS
Kellogg Company and Subsidiaries
RESULTS OF OPERATIONS
Business overview
The following Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations (MD&A) is intended to help the reader
understand Kellogg Company, our operations and our present business environment. MD&A is provided as a supplement to, and should be read in
conjunction with, our Consolidated Financial Statements and the accompanying notes thereto contained in Item 8 of this report.
For more than 100 years, consumers have counted on Kellogg for great-tasting, high-quality and nutritious foods. Kellogg is the world’s leading
producer of cereal, second largest producer of cookies and crackers, and a leading producer of savory snacks and frozen foods. Additional product
offerings include toaster pastries, cereal bars, fruit-flavored snacks and veggie foods. Kellogg products are manufactured and marketed globally.
Segments and growth targets
During Q1 2015, we established a new Kashi operating segment in order to optimize future growth potential of this business. This operating
segment is included in the North America Other reportable segment. Including this new operating segment, we manage our operations through nine
operating segments that are based on product category or geographic location. These operating segments are evaluated for similarity with regards
to economic characteristics, products, production processes, types or classes of customers, distribution methods and regulatory environments to
determine if they can be aggregated into reportable segments. We report results of operations in the following reportable segments: U.S. Morning
Foods; U.S. Snacks; U.S. Specialty; North America Other; Europe; Latin America; and Asia Pacific. The reportable segments are discussed in
greater detail in Note 17 within Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.
We manage our Company for sustainable performance defined by our long-term annual growth targets. Our targeted long-term annual growth is lowsingle-digit (1 to 3%) for currency-neutral comparable net sales, mid-single-digit (4 to 6%) for currency-neutral comparable operating profit, and
high-single-digit (7 to 9%) for currency-neutral comparable diluted net earnings per share (EPS).
Significant items impacting comparability
Project K and cost reduction activities
During 2013, we announced Project K, a four-year efficiency and effectiveness program. The program is expected to generate a significant amount
of savings that may be invested in key strategic areas of focus for the business. We expect that this investment will drive future growth in
revenues, gross margin, operating profit, and cash flow. We recorded pre-tax charges related primarily to Project K of $311 million in 2015, $298
million in 2014, and $250 million in 2013.
In 2015 we initiated the implementation of a zero-based budgeting (ZBB) program in our North America business. In support of the ZBB initiative,
we incurred pre-tax charges of approximately $12 million in 2015.
See the Restructuring and cost reduction activities section for more information.
Acquisitions and dispositions
In September 2015, we completed the acquisition of Mass Foods, Egypt's leading cereal company for $46 million, or $44 million net of cash and
cash equivalents acquired. The acquisition added $4 million in incremental net sales to our reported results in the European reportable segment for
2015. The acquisition added less than $1 million of incremental operating profit (before transaction and integration costs) to our reported results for
2015.
In January 2015, we completed the acquisition of a majority interest in Bisco Misr, the number one packaged biscuits company in Egypt for $125
million, or $117 million net of cash and cash equivalents acquired. The acquisition added $54 million in incremental net sales to our reported
results in the European reportable segment for 2015. The acquisition added $4 million of incremental operating profit (before transaction and
integration costs) to our reported results for 2015.
18
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
During the quarter ended September 27, 2014, we entered into an agreement to sell our vegan and vegetarian canned-meat substitute business
unit under the Loma Linda brand to Atlantic Natural Foods (ANF), LLC of Nashville, N.C. The disposition negatively impacted reported net sales in
the U.S. Specialty reportable segment by approximately $9 million in 2015.
Integration and transaction costs
We have incurred integration and transaction costs related to the 2015 acquisitions of Bisco Misr and Mass Foods, the 2015 entry into a joint
venture with Tolaram Africa, and the 2012 acquisition of Pringles as we move these businesses into the Kellogg business model. We recorded pretax integration and transaction costs of $30 million in 2015. We also recorded pre-tax integration costs of $43 million and $65 million in 2014 and
2013, respectively.
Mark-to-market accounting for pension plans, commodities and certain foreign currency contracts
We recognize mark-to-market adjustments for pension plans, commodity contracts, and certain foreign currency contracts as incurred. Actuarial
gains/losses for pension plans are recognized in the year they occur. Changes between contract and market prices for commodities contracts and
certain foreign currency contracts result in gains/losses that are recognized in the quarter they occur. We recorded pre-tax mark-to-market charges
of $446 million, $784 million, and a benefit of $947 million for 2015, 2014, and 2013, respectively.
Other costs impacting comparability
In 2015, a series of previously executed agreements between Kellogg's and a third party variable interest entity (VIE) were terminated resulting in
our determination that we were no longer the primary beneficiary of the VIE. Accordingly, we deconsolidated the financial statements of the VIE.
As a result of the agreement terminations and related settlements, we recognized a loss of $19 million in Other income (expense), net.
In connection with the deconsolidation, we derecognized all assets and liabilities of the VIE, including an allocation of a portion of goodwill from the
U.S. Snacks operating segment, resulting in a $67 million non-cash gain, which was recorded within operating profit.
During 2014 we incurred $6 million of costs related to the evaluation of potential acquisitions.
Venezuela remeasurement and long-lived asset impairment
While we continue to qualify for participation in CENCOEX at the official rate, there has been a continued reduction in the level of U.S. dollars
available to exchange, in part due to recent declines in the price of oil and the overall decline of the macroeconomic environment within the
country. We have experienced an increase in the amount of time it takes to exchange bolivars for U.S. dollars through the CENCOEX exchange
during the year. Given this economic backdrop, and upon review of U.S. dollar cash needs in our Venezuela operations as of the quarter ended
July 4, 2015, we concluded that we were no longer able to obtain sufficient U.S. dollars on a timely basis through the CENCOEX exchange to
support our Venezuela operations resulting in a decision to remeasure our Venezuela subsidiary's financial statements using the SIMADI rate. We
have evaluated all of the facts and circumstances surrounding our Venezuelan business and determined that as of January 2, 2016 the SIMADI
rate continues to be the appropriate rate to use for remeasuring our Venezuelan subsidiary’s financial statements.
In connection with the change from the CENCOEX rate to the SIMADI rate that occurred in the quarter ended July 4, 2015, we evaluated the
carrying value of our non-monetary assets for impairment and lower of cost or market adjustments. As a result of moving from the CENCOEX
official rate to the SIMADI rate, we recorded pre-tax charges totaling $152 million, including $112 million in the Latin America operating segment
and $40 million in the Corporate operating segment. Of the total charges, $100 million was recorded in COGS, $3 million was recorded in SGA, and
$49 million was recorded in Other income (expense), net. These charges consist of $47 million related to the remeasurement of net monetary
assets denominated in Venezuelan bolivar at the SIMADI exchange rate (recorded in Other income (expense), net), $56 million related to reducing
inventory to the lower of cost or market (recorded in COGS) and $49 million related to the impairment of long-lived assets in Venezuela (recorded
primarily in COGS).
As expected, after moving to the SIMADI rate, our Venezuelan subsidiary utilized assets that continued to be remeasured at historical exchange
rates. This resulted in an additional unfavorable impact of $17 million in the Latin America operating segment, including an impact to COGS of $12
million and SGA of $5 million. The total 2015 impact of moving from the CENCOEX official rate to the SIMADI rate was $169 million on a pre-tax
basis, or approximately $.42 on a fully-diluted EPS basis.
19
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
As of January 2, 2016, certain non-monetary assets related to our Venezuelan subsidiary continue to be remeasured at historical exchange rates.
As these assets are utilized by our Venezuelan subsidiary during the first half of 2016 they will be recognized in the income statement at historical
exchange rates resulting in an unfavorable impact of approximately $4 million.
Shipping day differences
The Company's fiscal year normally ends on the Saturday closest to December 31 and as a result, a 53rd week is added approximately every
sixth year. The Company's 2014 fiscal year ended on January 3, 2015, and included a 53rd week. While quarters normally consist of 13-week
periods, the fourth quarter of 2014 included a 14th week. For comparability, the impact of the 53rd week is excluded from our comparable results.
The impact of the fourth quarter 2014 53rd week was $197 million for net sales, $36 million for operating profit and $.07 on a fully-diluted EPS
basis.
Foreign currency translation and the impact of Venezuela
We evaluate the operating results of our business on a currency-neutral basis. We determine currency-neutral operating results by dividing or
multiplying, as appropriate, the current-period local currency operating results by the currency exchange rates used to translate our financial
statements in the comparable prior-year period to determine what the current period U.S. dollar operating results would have been if the currency
exchange rate had not changed from the comparable prior-year period.
As a result of our decision to change the exchange rate that we use to remeasure our Venezuela subsidiary from CENCOEX to the SIMADI
exchange rate beginning mid-2015, the methodology we use to calculate the impact of foreign currency translation, as described above, results in
certain year-over-year growth rates that require additional commentary. We believe that the use of our standard currency-neutral methodology in
combination with the additional commentary provides important information to more fully understand our currency-neutral operating results.
Our 2015 guidance that was maintained consistently throughout the year reflected an expectation of being approximately flat for currency-neutral
comparable net sales and a decline of 2% to 4% for currency-neutral comparable operating profit. Within this guidance, Venezuela was expected
to contribute approximately 1% of growth for both currency-neutral comparable net sales and currency-neutral comparable operating profit. In the
second half of 2015, the Venezuela business experienced significant unplanned inflation that impacted both currency-neutral comparable net sales
and operating profit that was much larger than anticipated in the guidance. To provide increased visibility into how we have delivered against our
2015 guidance, the commentary below provides both currency-neutral comparable results, which include the entire impact of Venezuela, as well as
an adjusted measure that excludes the impact of Venezuela.
For the quarter ended January 2, 2016, Latin America currency-neutral comparable net sales and operating profit growth were 45.3% and 46.2%
respectively. Excluding Venezuela, Latin America currency-neutral comparable net sales and operating profit growth would have been
approximately 1.4% and 2.0%, respectively.
For the year-to-date period ended January 2, 2016, Latin America currency-neutral comparable net sales and operating profit growth were 24.6%
and 15.4% respectively. Excluding Venezuela, Latin America currency-neutral comparable net sales and operating profit growth would have been
approximately 1.3% and a decline of 3.4%, respectively.
For the quarter ended January 2, 2016, Kellogg Consolidated currency-neutral comparable net sales and operating profit growth was 4.2% and
2.8%, respectively. Excluding Venezuela, Kellogg Consolidated currency-neutral comparable net sales and operating profit growth would have
been approximately 0.4% and 0.3%, respectively.
For the year-to-date period ended January 2, 2016, Kellogg Consolidated currency-neutral comparable net sales and operating profit growth was
1.2% and a decline of 2.3%, respectively. Excluding Venezuela, Kellogg Consolidated currency-neutral comparable net sales and operating profit
would have declined by 0.8% and 3.6%, respectively.
Non-GAAP Measures
Comparability of certain financial measures is affected significantly by several types of financial impacts such as foreign currency translation,
integration and transaction costs, mark-to-market adjustments for pension plans,
20
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
commodities and certain foreign currency contracts, Project K costs, costs associated with the Venezuela remeasurement and long-lived asset
impairment, costs associated with the VIE deconsolidation, differences in shipping days, acquisitions, dispositions, and other costs impacting
comparability. To provide increased transparency and assist in understanding our comparable operating performance, we use non-GAAP financial
measures within MD&A that exclude these financial impacts.
Non-GAAP financial measures used include comparable net sales, currency-neutral comparable net sales, comparable net sales growth, currencyneutral comparable net sales growth, comparable gross margin, currency-neutral comparable gross margin, comparable gross profit, currencyneutral comparable gross profit, comparable SGA%, currency-neutral comparable SGA%, comparable operating margin, currency-neutral
comparable operating margin, comparable operating profit, currency-neutral comparable operating profit, comparable operating profit growth,
currency-neutral comparable operating profit growth, comparable income taxes, currency-neutral comparable income taxes, comparable effective
tax rate, currency-neutral comparable effective tax rate, comparable net income attributable to Kellogg Company, currency-neutral comparable net
income attributable to Kellogg Company, comparable diluted EPS, currency-neutral comparable diluted EPS, comparable diluted EPS growth, and
currency-neutral comparable diluted EPS growth.
Financial results
For the full year 2015, our reported net sales decreased by 7.2% due to the negative impact of foreign currency translation and shipping day
differences from the 53rd week that was recognized in the prior year. Currency-neutral comparable net sales increased by 1.2%, which was better
than our expectations, and includes the benefit of pricing taken in Venezuela to offset cost inflation. We experienced currency-neutral comparable
net sales growth in Latin America, which was driven primarily by pricing taken in Venezuela. We also experienced currency-neutral comparable net
sales growth in Asia-Pacific, U. S. Specialty and the Canadian business which is included in the North America Other reportable segment.
Reported operating profit increased by 6.6% primarily due to the favorable year-over-year change in the pension mark-to-market which was partially
offset by the negative impact of foreign currency translation, the impact of remeasuring our Venezuela business using the SIMADI rate in the
second quarter of 2015, and the impact of resetting incentive compensation levels. Currency-neutral comparable operating profit declined by 2.3%,
at the high end of our expectations, due to the resetting of incentive compensation levels which impacted results by approximately 3%. The 1%
growth excluding the effect of resetting incentive compensation levels was the result of sales growth and a 50 basis point reduction in brandbuilding investment as a percentage of net sales. Our brand building is down including shifts of investment into other areas such as food, the
evolving shift in media investment from TV to digital, and efficiency and effectiveness benefits. Our zero-based budgeting initiative may identify
additional efficiency and effectiveness opportunities in brand building as we proceed through 2016. We may choose to reinvest these savings
back into brand building or other areas such as food reformulation or capacity to drive revenue growth. We remain committed to invest in our
brands at an industry-leading level to maintain the strength of our many recognizable brands in the marketplace.
Reported diluted EPS of $1.72 was down 1.7% compared to the prior year of $1.75. Reported diluted EPS was impacted negatively by Project K
costs ($.64), mark-to-market accounting ($.84), the remeasurement of the Venezuelan business using the SIMADI rate ($.42), foreign currency
translation ($.28), and integration costs ($.06), and was impacted positively by a VIE deconsolidation ($.14) and acquisitions ($.01). Currencyneutral comparable diluted EPS of $3.81 was flat compared to prior year of $3.81, in line with our expectations.
21
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
Reconciliation of certain non-GAAP Financial Measures
Consolidated results (dollars in millions, except per share data)
2015
Reported net income attributable to Kellogg Company
$
2014
614
$
632
Mark-to-market
(298)
(513)
Project K and cost reduction activities
(229)
(218)
VIE deconsolidation and other costs impacting comparability
Integration and transaction costs
50
(4)
(22)
(31)
Acquisitions/divestitures
5
—
Shipping day differences
—
25
Venezuela remeasurement
(149)
Comparable net income attributable to Kellogg Company
$
1,257
Foreign currency impact
—
$
1,373
(100)
—
Currency neutral comparable net income attributable to Kellogg Company
$
1,357
$
Reported diluted EPS
$
1.72
$
1,373
1.75
Mark-to-market
(0.84)
(1.42)
Project K and cost reduction activities
(0.64)
(0.61)
0.14
(0.01)
(0.06)
(0.09)
VIE deconsolidation and other costs impacting comparability
Integration and transaction costs
Acquisitions/divestitures
0.01
—
Shipping day differences
—
0.07
Venezuela remeasurement
(0.42)
Comparable diluted EPS
$
3.53
Foreign currency impact
—
$
3.81
$
3.81
(0.28)
Currency neutral comparable diluted EPS
$
3.81
Currency neutral comparable diluted EPS growth
—
—%
For more information on reconciling items in the table above, please refer to the Significant items impacting comparability section.
Consolidated results (dollars in millions, except per share data)
2014
Reported net income attributable to Kellogg Company
$
2013
632
$
1,807
Mark-to-market
(513)
628
Project K and cost reduction activities
(218)
(183)
VIE deconsolidation and other costs impacting comparability
Integration and transaction costs
(4)
—
(31)
(46)
Acquisitions/divestitures
—
2
Shipping day differences
25
—
Venezuela remeasurement
—
Comparable net income attributable to Kellogg Company
$
1,373
Currency neutral comparable net income attributable to Kellogg Company
$
Reported diluted EPS
$
Foreign currency impact
(11)
$
1,417
1,375
$
1,417
1.75
$
4.94
(2)
—
Mark-to-market
(1.42)
1.72
Project K and cost reduction activities
(0.61)
(0.50)
VIE deconsolidation and other costs impacting comparability
(0.01)
Integration and transaction costs
(0.09)
—
(0.13)
Acquisitions/divestitures
—
0.01
Shipping day differences
0.07
—
Venezuela remeasurement
—
Comparable diluted EPS
$
Foreign currency impact
3.81
(0.03)
$
(0.01)
Currency neutral comparable diluted EPS
$
Currency neutral comparable diluted EPS growth
3.82
3.87
—
$
3.87
(1.3)%
For more information on reconciling items in the table above, please refer to the Significant items impacting comparability section.
22
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
Net sales and operating profit
2015 compared to 2014
The following tables provide an analysis of net sales and operating profit performance for 2015 versus 2014:
Year ended January 2, 2016
U.S.
Morning
Foods
(millions)
Reported Net Sales
U.S.
Snacks
U.S.
Specialty
North
America
Other
$ 1,181
—
—
—
(2)
(2)
—
—
—
Integration and transaction costs
—
—
—
—
—
—
(1)
—
(1)
Acquisitions/divestitures
—
—
—
—
58
—
—
—
58
Differences in shipping days
—
—
—
—
(3)
—
—
—
(3)
$ 2,992
$ 3,234
$ 1,181
$ 1,689
—
—
—
$ 2,992
$ 3,234
$ 1,181
U.S.
Morning
Foods
U.S.
Snacks
Currency-Neutral Comparable
Net Sales
$ 2,444
(376)
$ 1,015
$
$
(486)
919
Kellogg
Consolidated
Corporate
$ 3,234
(86)
$ 1,015
Asia
Pacific
$ 2,992
Foreign currency impact
$ 2,497
Latin
America
Project K and cost reduction
activities
Comparable Net Sales
$ 1,687
Europe
920
$
$
(121)
$ 1,775
$ 2,820
$ 1,501
$ 1,041
North
America
Other
Europe
Latin
America
Asia
Pacific
$ 1,864
$ 2,869
$ 1,205
$ 1,007
—
—
$
(4)
$
—
$
—
13,525
13,475
(1,069)
$
14,544
Year ended January 3, 2015
(millions)
Reported Net Sales
U.S.
Specialty
Kellogg
Consolidated
Corporate
$ 3,108
$ 3,329
$ 1,198
Project K and cost reduction
activities
—
—
—
(1)
—
(1)
—
—
(2)
Integration and transaction costs
—
—
—
—
—
—
(1)
—
(1)
Acquisitions/divestitures
—
—
9
—
—
—
—
—
9
Differences in shipping days
66
44
16
30
32
1
8
—
197
$ 3,042
$ 3,285
$ 1,173
$ 1,835
$ 2,837
$ 1,205
$ 1,000
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
$ 3,042
$ 3,285
$ 1,173
$ 1,835
$ 2,837
$ 1,205
$ 1,000
Comparable Net Sales
Foreign currency impact
Currency-Neutral Comparable
Net Sales
$
$
—
—
$
$
—
$
—
14,580
14,377
—
$
14,377
% change - 2015 vs. 2014:
As Reported
(3.7)%
(2.9)%
(1.4)%
(9.5)%
(13.0)%
(15.8)%
Project K and cost reduction
activities
—%
—%
—%
—%
(0.1)%
Integration and transaction costs
—%
—%
—%
—%
—%
Acquisitions/divestitures
—%
—%
(0.8)%
—%
2.0 %
(2.1)%
(1.3)%
(1.3)%
(1.5)%
(1.6)%
(1.6)%
0.7 %
(8.0)%
—%
—%
—%
(4.8)%
(1.6)%
(1.6)%
0.7 %
(3.2)%
Differences in shipping days
Comparable growth
Foreign currency impact
Currency-Neutral Comparable
growth
(8.8)%
—%
(7.2)%
—%
—%
—%
—%
—%
(0.1)%
—%
—%
—%
—%
—%
0.4 %
(1.1)%
—%
(0.8)%
—%
(1.3)%
(13.8)%
(15.8)%
(7.9)%
—%
(6.3)%
(13.2)%
(40.4)%
(11.9)%
—%
(7.5)%
(0.6)%
24.6 %
4.0 %
—%
1.2 %
For more information on reconciling items in the table above, please refer to the Significant items impacting comparability section.
23
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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Year ended January 2, 2016
U.S.
Morning
Foods
(millions)
Reported Operating Profit
$
Mark-to-market
Project K and cost reduction
activities
474
U.S.
Snacks
$
385
North
America
Other
U.S.
Specialty
$
260
$
178
Latin
America
Europe
$
247
$
9
Asia
Pacific
$
54
Kellogg
Consolidated
Corporate
$
(516)
$
1,091
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
(446)
(446)
(58)
(50)
(5)
(63)
(74)
(4)
(13)
(56)
(323)
Other costs impacting
comparability
—
67
—
—
—
—
—
—
67
Integration and transaction
costs
—
—
—
—
(11)
(3)
(14)
(2)
(30)
Acquisitions/divestitures
—
—
—
—
4
—
—
—
4
Differences in shipping days
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
Venezuela remeasurement
Comparable Operating Profit
—
$
Foreign currency impact
Currency-Neutral Comparable
Operating Profit
532
—
$
2
$
530
368
—
$
—
$
368
265
—
$
—
$
265
241
—
$
(15)
$
256
328
(119)
$
(29)
$
357
135
—
$
81
(72)
$
207
(1)
$
(13)
$
94
(11)
(120)
$
(5)
$
(6)
1,939
(132)
$
2,071
Year ended January 3, 2015
U.S.
Morning
Foods
(millions)
Reported Operating Profit
$
Mark-to-market
Project K and cost reduction
activities
479
U.S.
Snacks
$
364
North
America
Other
U.S.
Specialty
$
266
$
295
Latin
America
Europe
$
232
$
169
Asia
Pacific
$
53
Kellogg
Consolidated
Corporate
$
(834)
$
1,024
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
(784)
(784)
(60)
(57)
(3)
(18)
(80)
(8)
(37)
(35)
(298)
Other costs impacting
comparability
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
(6)
(6)
Integration and transaction
costs
—
—
—
—
(36)
—
(7)
—
(43)
Acquisitions/divestitures
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
Differences in shipping days
19
6
3
8
6
(3)
—
(3)
36
Venezuela remeasurement
Comparable Operating Profit
—
$
Foreign currency impact
Currency-Neutral Comparable
Operating Profit
520
—
$
—
$
520
415
—
$
—
$
415
266
—
$
305
—
$
266
—
$
—
$
305
342
—
$
—
$
342
180
—
$
97
—
$
180
—
$
—
$
97
(6)
—
$
—
$
(6)
2,119
—
$
2,119
% change - 2015 vs. 2014:
As Reported
Mark-to-market
Project K and cost reduction
activities
(0.9)%
5.9 %
(2.4)%
(39.8)%
6.7 %
(94.8)%
1.7 %
38.1 %
6.6 %
—%
—%
—%
—%
—%
—%
—%
78.5 %
21.6 %
0.4 %
2.6 %
(0.6)%
(16.5)%
3.7 %
(2.2)%
26.6 %
(50.3)%
(3.3)%
Other costs impacting
comparability
—%
15.8 %
—%
—%
0.1 %
—%
0.1 %
51.8 %
3.4 %
Integration and transaction
costs
—%
(0.1)%
—%
—%
7.3 %
(1.4)%
(9.1)%
(10.0)%
0.3 %
Acquisitions/divestitures
—%
—%
—%
—%
1.3 %
—%
—%
—%
0.2 %
(3.7)%
(1.1)%
(1.0)%
(2.0)%
(1.7)%
0.2 %
0.3 %
50.2 %
(1.4)%
Differences in shipping days
Venezuela remeasurement
Comparable growth
Foreign currency impact
Currency-Neutral Comparable
growth
—%
—%
—%
—%
—%
(66.5)%
—%
(15.1)%
(5.7)%
2.4 %
(11.3)%
(0.8)%
(21.3)%
(4.0)%
(24.9)%
(16.2)%
(67.0)%
(8.5)%
0.3 %
—%
—%
(5.2)%
(8.3)%
(40.3)%
(12.5)%
(62.9)%
(6.2)%
2.1 %
(11.3)%
(0.8)%
(16.1)%
4.3 %
15.4 %
(3.7)%
(4.1)%
(2.3)%
For more information on reconciling items in the table above, please refer to the Significant items impacting comparability section.
U.S. Morning Foods
Currency-neutral comparable net sales declined 1.6% as a result of unfavorable volume and pricing/mix. This segment consists of cereal, toaster
pastries, health and wellness bars, and beverages.
We saw a lot of improvement across the year in the Morning Foods business. We invested where we needed
24
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
to and worked hard to improve the fundamentals by improving our brand building and the new products we
launched. We also invested in our foods and put fun back in the box with Avengers ® and Disney Frozen®-themed cereals.
Our cereal business reported a decline for the full year, although we continued to reflect improving trends throughout the year, and we reported
consumption growth and share gains in the fourth quarter as our business continues to improve ahead of category trends. Our six core cereals in
combination (Special K ®, Raisin Bran®, Frosted Flakes ®, Mini-Wheats ®, Froot Loops ®, and Rice Krispies ®) gained share and increased
consumption for the year, with even stronger growth in both share and consumption in the fourth quarter. Special K ® posted consumption growth
and share gains for the year and even stronger results for the fourth quarter driven primarily by the renovation work we completed on Special K ®
Red Berries. The good growth we saw all year on Raisin Bran® was the result of great advertising and the introduction of Raisin Bran® with
Cranberries.
We expect to continue driving sales in 2016 with the introduction of new products like Special K ® Nourish, a cereal with positive nutrition and
ingredients the consumer can see, and the food includes fruits, nuts and on-trend grains like quinoa. Initial response on this innovation has been
encouraging. In addition, we’re launching Mini-Wheats ® Harvest Delights, Smorz ®, and Disney Dory ®-themed cereal.
Toaster pastries reported a slight sales decline for the year. Health and wellness bars and beverages each reported a sales decline.
Currency-neutral comparable operating profit increased 2.1% due to improved gross margins resulting from lower input costs and Project K savings
as well as lower brand-building investment. This was partially offset by the sales performance, increased distribution costs, and resetting of
incentive compensation levels.
U.S. Snacks
Currency-neutral comparable net sales declined 1.6% as a result of decreased volume which was partially offset by favorable pricing/mix. This
segment consists of crackers, cereal bars, cookies, savory snacks, and fruit-flavored snacks.
Crackers posted a sales decline as consumption declined across several of our products, while consumption increased for our Big 3 brands in
combination (Cheez-It ® , Town House®, and Club®). The consumption decline was due primarily to weakness in Special K ® Cracker Chips during
the first half of the year and full-year weakness in Special K ® Popcorn Chips. The Special K ® Cracker Chips products we restaged earlier this year
posted consumption growth for the past two quarters as a result of improvements in packaging and food. We expect the impact of the remaining
skus to lessen as we progress through 2016. The consumption increase for our Big 3 brands was primarily the result of strong consumption and
share gains in Cheez-It ® due to the Cheez-It ® Grooves and Cheez-It ® Extra Toasty innovations.
The bars business declined due to weakness in the Special K ® and Fiber Plus ® brands. The performance of our Special K bars has improved in the
second half of the year as a result of new products and renovation that occurred early in the year and good results from Special K ® Chewy Nut
bars that were launched in mid-2015. Rice Krispies Treats ® reported double-digit consumption gains and gained share as a result of good core
growth and innovation.
The cookies business consumption declined for the year resulting in lost share, although we have seen improving trends over the second half of
2015 as a result of good performance in Chips Deluxe®, Fudge Shoppe®, and Famous Amos ® due to expanded distribution, new products, and
increased in-store activity. We have great brands in the category and we have some exciting new introductions planned for 2016. We are also
going to give the brands new support in 2016, including the relaunch of advertising featuring the Keebler® Elves.
Savory snacks reported low-single-digit growth as a result of consumption growth due to core products and innovations. The Pringles ® business
had a good year including strength in the on-the-go segment. As we enter the
new year we are adding new capacity and we have good plans; as a result, we look forward to a strong 2016.
Currency-neutral comparable operating profit declined by 11.3% due to unfavorable sales performance and the resetting of incentive compensation
levels.
U.S. Specialty
25
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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Currency-neutral comparable net sales increased 0.7% as a result of favorable pricing/mix which was partially offset by decreased volume. Sales
growth was reported in the Convenience and Vending channels, partially offset by a slight decline in Foodservice partially due to the exit of some
unprofitable business early in the year.
Currency-neutral comparable operating profit declined by 0.8% due to the resetting of incentive compensation levels which more than offset the
favorable sales performance.
North America Other
Currency-neutral comparable net sales declined 3.2% due to decreased volume and unfavorable pricing/mix.
The U.S. Frozen business reported a net sales decline due to the impact from egg prices, network improvements, and a decision to draw down
inventories due to changes in packaging from boxes to bags for our veggie foods business. The packaging conversion is going well, but we expect
sales to continue to be impacted in the first quarter of 2016 and for performance to improve over the balance of the year. The Eggo® hand-held
sandwiches posted double-digit consumption growth and share gains for the year.
The Canada business reported a broad-based net sales increase across several categories for the year. For 2016, the Canadian team is planning
introductions of new products and improved support, much like the rest of the North American region.
Kashi reported a double-digit net sales decline although the business continues to experience stabilized distribution and sequential improvement
across the last two quarters in part due to the impact of the introduction of new products in the second half of 2015. Bear Naked® Granola posted
double-digit consumption growth for the year. We expect continued improvement in 2016 due to further improvement in distribution and the impact
of a focus on new products high in protein from plants.
Currency-neutral comparable operating profit declined 16.1% primarily due to unfavorable sales performance in the U.S. Frozen and Kashi
businesses, net cost inflation including transactional currency expense in the Canadian business and increased material costs in the U.S. Frozen
business, and the resetting of incentive compensation levels.
Europe
Currency-neutral comparable net sales declined 0.6% as a result of relatively flat volume and unfavorable pricing/mix.
The Pringles ® business posted strong, double-digit net sales growth as a result of good promotions, innovations and distribution gains throughout
the year. Both the base business and the launch of Pringles ® Tortilla in the UK and Germany contributed. We have some exciting activity planned
for Pringles ® in 2016 as well, including soccer-themed activity planned to coincide with the Euros soccer tournament in the summer and the
continued roll-out of Pringles ® Tortilla in the region.
The wholesome snacks business posted growth in the second half of the year. This was due to better results in the UK driven in part by Disney ®branded snacks, mini biscuits, Crunchy Nut ®, and Rice Krispies Squares ®. In addition, the Russian business did well. We also have new foods
coming across the region in 2016.
The Cereal business in Europe declined due to challenges in the category in many of the countries. However, we improved our plans for Special
K ® and Crunchy Nut ® in the UK, saw good performance from Extra® in Italy, and
invested behind Kellogg’s ®-branded granola in Germany. Also, we recently launched the Ancient Legends ® brands in the region. These are great
products, which include on-trend ingredients like spelt, apples, sultanas, and chia seeds. We are also applying learnings from our US cereal
business including the renovation of Special K ® Red Berries, the launch of Special K ® Nourish, and we’re also adding more fun in the box.
Currency-neutral comparable operating profit improved 4.3% due to net cost deflation and strong savings, including savings from Project K.
Latin America
Currency-neutral comparable net sales improved 24.6% due to favorable volume and pricing/mix, including the impact of pricing actions in
Venezuela. Excluding Venezuela, currency-neutral comparable net sales would have grown 1.3%.
26
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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We experienced volume growth in several of our markets, including Mexico. We also realized strong price realization in Venezuela as a result of
pricing actions taken to offset cost inflation. Cereal sales in the region increased and we have held or gained share in most of the region. These
share gains have been driven by children's and family brands and the introduction of Kellogg-branded granolas and muesli products.
Sales in the snacks business also increased driven by innovation and go-to-market activity. The Pringles ® business continued to perform well and
we have launched Pringles ® Tortilla in the region.
Our focus on high-frequency stores continues to drive results. We’ve seen results in Convenience and mini-Super stores in Mexico, and in smaller
stores in Colombia. We have also had success driving sales growth through packaging initiatives designed to drive affordability and accessibility in
various areas of the business.
Currency-neutral comparable operating profit improved by 15.4% due to favorable price realization which was partially offset by net cost inflation.
Excluding Venezuela, currency neutral comparable operating profit declined 3.4% as sales growth and margin expansion were more than offset by
increased investment in brand-building and business capabilities.
Asia Pacific
Currency-neutral comparable net sales increased 4.0% as a result of increased volume which was partially offset by unfavorable pricing/mix.
Unfavorable pricing/mix was primarily the result of country mix.
The sales increase was the result of double-digit growth in the Asian markets, double-digit growth in Sub-Saharan Africa, and mid-single-digit
growth in the savory snacks business across the region. The growth in Asia included double-digit sales growth in Japan driven by the continued
growth of the granola category and the impact of new packaging as well as double-digit growth in Korea and Southeast Asia. The savory snacks
business reported broad-based sales growth and share gains due to innovation and gains in distribution.
This sales performance was partially offset by weakness in the Australian cereal category. However, the granola and müesli segments are growing
well and we have a plan to address the weakness in the overall Australian business in 2016. We are also applying lessons learned in our US
business to our Australia business.
Currency-neutral comparable operating profit declined 3.7% as our investment of Project K savings into emerging markets in the region behind
brand investments and capabilities more than offset the favorable sales performance.
Corporate
Currency-neutral comparable operating profit declined due to the resetting of incentive compensation levels which was partially offset by reduced
pension costs.
27
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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2014 compared to 2013
The following tables provide an analysis of net sales and operating profit performance for 2014 versus 2013:
Year ended January 3, 2015
(millions)
Reported Net Sales
U.S.
Morning
Foods
U.S.
Snacks
U.S.
Specialty
North
America
Other
$ 1,198
—
—
—
(1)
—
(1)
—
—
Integration and transaction costs
—
—
—
—
—
—
(1)
—
(1)
Acquisitions/divestitures
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
Foreign currency impact
$ 1,007
Kellogg
Consolidated
Corporate
$ 3,329
Currency-Neutral Comparable
Net Sales
$ 1,205
Asia
Pacific
$ 3,108
Differences in shipping days
$ 2,869
Latin
America
Project K and cost reduction
activities
Comparable Net Sales
$ 1,864
Europe
66
44
16
30
32
1
8
$ 3,042
$ 3,285
$ 1,182
$ 1,835
$ 2,837
$ 1,205
$ 1,000
—
—
—
$ 3,042
$ 3,285
$ 1,182
U.S.
Morning
Foods
U.S.
Snacks
(43)
16
(37)
$
$ 2,821
$ 1,242
$ 1,050
North
America
Other
Europe
Latin
America
Asia
Pacific
$
—
197
$
—
$
—
14,580
(2)
—
$
(50)
$ 1,878
—
14,386
(114)
$
14,500
Year ended December 28, 2013
(millions)
Reported Net Sales
U.S.
Specialty
Kellogg
Consolidated
Corporate
$ 3,195
$ 3,379
$ 1,202
$ 1,940
$ 2,843
$ 1,195
$ 1,038
Project K and cost reduction
activities
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
Integration and transaction costs
—
—
—
(1)
—
—
(4)
—
(5)
Acquisitions/divestitures
—
—
5
—
—
—
1
—
6
Differences in shipping days
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
$ 3,195
$ 3,379
$ 1,197
$ 1,941
$ 2,843
$ 1,195
$ 1,041
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
$ 3,195
$ 3,379
$ 1,197
$ 1,941
$ 2,843
$ 1,195
$ 1,041
Comparable Net Sales
Foreign currency impact
Currency-Neutral Comparable
Net Sales
$
$
—
—
$
$
—
$
—
14,792
14,791
—
$
14,791
% change - 2014 vs. 2013:
As Reported
(2.7)%
(1.5)%
(0.3)%
(3.9)%
0.9 %
0.9 %
Project K and cost reduction
activities
—%
—%
—%
—%
—%
Integration and transaction costs
—%
—%
—%
—%
—%
Acquisitions/divestitures
Differences in shipping days
Comparable growth
Foreign currency impact
Currency-Neutral Comparable
growth
(3.0)%
—%
(1.4)%
—%
—%
—%
—%
—%
0.3 %
—%
0.1 %
(0.1)%
—%
—%
(0.4)%
—%
—%
—%
(0.1)%
—%
2.1 %
1.3 %
1.3 %
1.5 %
1.1 %
0.1 %
0.8 %
—%
1.3 %
(4.8)%
(2.8)%
(1.2)%
(5.4)%
(0.2)%
0.8 %
(4.0)%
—%
(2.7)%
—%
—%
—%
(2.2)%
0.6 %
(3.1)%
(4.8)%
—%
(0.7)%
(4.8)%
(2.8)%
(1.2)%
(3.2)%
(0.8)%
3.9 %
0.8 %
—%
(2.0)%
For more information on reconciling items in the table above, please refer to the Significant items impacting comparability section.
28
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
Year ended January 3, 2015
U.S.
Morning
Foods
(millions)
Reported Operating Profit
$
Mark-to-market
Project K and cost reduction
activities
479
U.S.
Snacks
$
364
North
America
Other
U.S.
Specialty
$
266
$
295
Latin
America
Europe
$
232
$
169
Asia
Pacific
$
53
Kellogg
Consolidated
Corporate
$
(834)
$
1,024
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
(784)
(784)
(60)
(57)
(3)
(18)
(80)
(8)
(37)
(35)
(298)
Other costs impacting
comparability
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
(6)
(6)
Integration and transaction
costs
—
—
—
—
(36)
—
(7)
—
(43)
Acquisitions/divestitures
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
Differences in shipping days
19
6
3
8
6
(3)
—
(3)
36
Venezuela remeasurement
Comparable Operating Profit
—
$
Foreign currency impact
Currency-Neutral Comparable
Operating Profit
520
—
$
—
$
520
415
—
$
—
$
415
266
—
$
305
—
$
266
—
$
(9)
$
314
342
—
$
9
$
333
180
—
$
97
(4)
$
184
—
$
(6)
$
103
(6)
—
$
2
$
(8)
2,119
(8)
$
2,127
Year ended December 28, 2013
U.S.
Morning
Foods
(millions)
Reported Operating Profit
$
Mark-to-market
469
U.S.
Snacks
$
—
Project K and cost reduction
activities
(109)
424
North
America
Other
U.S.
Specialty
$
265
$
314
Latin
America
Europe
$
249
$
157
Asia
Pacific
$
67
Kellogg
Consolidated
Corporate
$
892
$
2,837
—
—
—
—
—
—
947
947
(30)
(5)
(11)
(27)
(5)
(32)
(31)
(250)
—
—
—
—
—
—
(65)
Other costs impacting
comparability
—
—
—
Integration and transaction
costs
—
(12)
—
(1)
(34)
(1)
(11)
(6)
Acquisitions/divestitures
—
—
—
—
—
—
(1)
—
(1)
Differences in shipping days
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
Venezuela remeasurement
Comparable Operating Profit
—
$
Foreign currency impact
Currency-Neutral Comparable
Operating Profit
578
—
$
—
$
578
466
—
$
—
$
466
270
—
$
326
—
$
270
—
$
—
$
326
310
(6)
$
—
$
310
169
—
$
—
$
169
111
—
$
—
$
111
(18)
(6)
$
—
$
(18)
2,212
—
$
2,212
% change - 2014 vs. 2013:
As Reported
Mark-to-market
Project K and cost reduction
activities
2.1 %
(14.2)%
0.4 %
(6.0)%
(7.0)%
7.3 %
(19.6)%
(193.4)%
(63.9)%
—%
—%
—%
—%
—%
—%
—%
(203.1)%
(59.6)%
8.7 %
(6.9)%
0.9 %
(2.3)%
(19.9)%
(1.6)%
(11.2)%
(30.1)%
(2.8)%
Other costs impacting
comparability
—%
—%
—%
—%
(0.1)%
—%
(0.2)%
(22.0)%
(0.2)%
Integration and transaction
costs
—%
2.4 %
—%
0.4 %
0.9 %
0.6 %
3.2 %
7.4 %
0.9 %
Acquisitions/divestitures
—%
—%
—%
—%
—%
—%
1.1 %
—%
0.1 %
Differences in shipping days
3.3 %
1.2 %
1.0 %
2.4 %
1.9 %
(1.8)%
(0.3)%
(12.5)%
1.6 %
Venezuela remeasurement
—%
—%
—%
—%
—%
3.8 %
—%
—%
0.3 %
(9.9)%
(10.9)%
(1.5)%
(6.5)%
10.2 %
6.3 %
(12.2)%
66.9 %
(4.2)%
0.1 %
—%
—%
(2.7)%
2.8 %
(2.7)%
(4.9)%
12.9 %
(0.4)%
(10.0)%
(10.9)%
(1.5)%
(3.8)%
7.4 %
9.0 %
(7.3)%
54.0 %
(3.8)%
Comparable growth
Foreign currency impact
Currency-Neutral Comparable
growth
For more information on reconciling items in the table above, please refer to the Significant items impacting comparability section.
29
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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U.S. Morning Foods
Currency-neutral comparable net sales declined 4.8% as a result of unfavorable volume and pricing/mix. This segment consists of cereal, toaster
pastries, health and wellness bars, and beverages.
The cereal category continued to decline through the year despite our continued investments behind category-building programs that started early
in the year. Much of our decline in the cereal category has come from Special K ®. We experienced weakness in Special K ® as it faced headwinds
from evolving consumer trends regarding weight management. As a result, we changed the positioning of the brand from a focus on dieting to
weight wellness. This focus will stress the role that Special K ® plays in a healthy lifestyle. We have begun the execution of this new positioning for
the overall cereal business through the following initiatives:
•
•
We have launched the See You at Breakfast campaign and the Open for Breakfast digital program designed to help us connect directly with
consumers
We are revitalizing the Special K ® brand and are launching new products such as Special K ® Gluten-free and Special K ® Protein
We expect that these actions will have a positive impact on the performance of the Special K ®, and on the cereal business as a whole. Our plan
for investment is long-term and the levels, content, and effectiveness of the support will evolve, and increase over time.
Toaster pastries reported a sales decline for the year as a result of difficult comparisons due to the peanut butter innovations launched in 2013.
However we did gain share for the year and introduced a new PB&J innovation in November and we expect this to improve sales results. Health
and wellness bars and beverages each reported a sales decline for the year.
Currency-neutral comparable operating profit declined 10.0% due to the unfavorable sales performance and a mid-single-digit increase in cereal
brand-building investment. This was partially offset by a decrease in brand-building investment behind health and wellness bars and beverages,
and continued cost discipline.
U.S. Snacks
Currency-neutral comparable net sales declined 2.8% as a result of decreased volume partially offset by favorable pricing/mix. This segment
consists of crackers, cereal bars, cookies, savory snacks, and fruit-flavored snacks.
Crackers posted a slight sales increase and gained share as a result of the continued success of Cheez-It ® innovations and core products in the
Town House®, and Club® brands due to brand-building support and sales execution. Cheez-It ®, Town House®, and Club® all reported solid
consumption and share gains. The gains in these three brands have been offset by weakness in Special K ® Cracker Chips due to similar
consumer trends that we have experienced in the cereal category. We have addressed this weakness by launching completely restaged Cracker
Chips with new flavors, better flavor and texture profiles, improved packaging, and new positioning. This new product started to arrive in stores in
late 2014.
The bars business declined due to weakness in the Special K ® and Fiber Plus ® brands. The issues with these brands are similar to what we have
experienced in the cereal category. To address these issues we launched new products and activities in the fourth quarter of this year and will
launch more new, great-tasting Special K ® snack bars with new packaging and new positioning. This activity ties into the initiatives we are
launching in other categories and regions around the world. This new product started to arrive in stores in late December. Rice Krispies Treats ®
and Nutri-grain® both reported consumption gains and gained share as a result of good core growth and innovation.
The cookies business declined resulting in lost share. However we saw share gains from Chips Deluxe® as a result of new co-branded products.
We experienced soft performance in our 100-calorie packs business throughout the year. We are migrating consumers to an expanded line of
single-serve products, which should help to reduce the impact of the decline. We also experienced the negative impact of a SKU rationalization
initiative.
30
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
Savory snacks reported mid-single-digit sales growth and held share for the year behind the performance of the core business, Grab ‘n Go, and the
new Pringles ® Tortilla product.
Currency-neutral comparable operating profit declined by 10.9% due to unfavorable sales performance and net cost inflation. This was partially
offset by continued cost discipline.
U.S. Specialty
Currency-neutral comparable net sales declined 1.2% as a result of decreased volume and unfavorable pricing/mix. Sales declines were the result
of the negative impact of weather early in the year, supply issues with a co-packer, and an inventory de-load as a customer shifted from
warehouse to direct delivery.
Currency-neutral comparable operating profit declined by 1.5% due to the unfavorable sales performance. This was partially offset by cost
discipline.
North America Other
Currency-neutral comparable net sales declined 3.2% due to decreased volume and unfavorable pricing/mix.
The U.S. Frozen business reported a decline due to unfavorable comparisons early in the year resulting from strong prior-year growth behind
innovation activity and costs later in the year associated with the launch of new products. New Eggo® Bites and Eggo® handheld sandwiches
performed well during the year. The combination of the Eggo® handheld sandwiches and good results from our Special K ® handheld sandwiches
resulted in a double-digit sales increase for our sandwich business during our final quarter of the year. Consumption of Eggo® waffles is improving
as we have re-launched the L’Eggo My Eggo® brand-building program and launched Eggo® gluten-free and a new variety of Thick-n-Fluffy waffles.
Canada reported a slight increase in sales driven primarily by the snacks business as volumes increased at a low single-digit rate.
Kashi reported a decline in sales as we continued to experience softness in the cereal category. We have identified areas of focus for Kashi®
which is a great brand in a category that is on trend. We have begun the execution of this new positioning through the following initiatives:
•
•
All Kashi Go-Lean® products will be Non GMO Project Verified
All Kashi Heart-to-Heart ® products will meet the USDA’s Organic standard
We expect that these initiatives will have a positive impact on the performance of Kashi®.
Currency-neutral comparable operating profit declined 3.8% primarily due to unfavorable sales performance. This was partially offset by continued
cost discipline.
Europe
Currency-neutral comparable net sales declined 0.8% as a result of flat volume and unfavorable pricing/mix. Cereal category consumption remains
soft in most developed markets, similar to the cereal category in the U.S. Emerging markets reported good growth for the year in both cereal and
snacks. To address the cereal category softness, we executed brand-building activities in the second half of the year. New Special K ® advertising
has recently gone on air which addresses the recent health and wellness trends that have negatively impacted this brand.
Savory snacks performed well throughout the year, with the final quarter of 2014 reporting the highest sales since we acquired the business. New
products are launching, including Pringles ® Tortilla, and we have more capacity coming on-line mid-year.
Currency-neutral comparable operating profit improved 7.4% due to net cost deflation, including strong productivity savings, and decreased brandbuilding investment. This was partially offset by unfavorable sales performance.
Latin America
Currency-neutral comparable net sales improved 3.9% due to favorable pricing/mix which was partially offset by decreased volume. Strong price
realization, primarily from Venezuela, has more than offset sales declines early in the year resulting from the volume elasticity impact of the
introduction of a new food tax in Mexico. We reported growth in Venezuela, Mercosur, and the Pringles business as well as pricing gains in a
majority of our markets. The
31
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
cereal business posted good results, although we saw some competitive price promotions in Mexico which affected selected segments. The
momentum of the savory snacks business continues, driven by strong commercial programs, innovation, and good execution.
Currency-neutral comparable operating profit improved by 9.0% due to favorable sales performance which was partially offset by net cost inflation,
increased brand-building investment to support innovation and new programs, and increased overhead investment.
Asia Pacific
Currency-neutral comparable net sales increased 0.8% as a result of flat volume and favorable pricing/mix. The sales increase was the result of
double-digit growth in the Asian markets and high-single-digit growth in the savory snacks business across the region. This sales performance was
partially offset by weakness in the Australian cereal category and our performance in South Africa as we conducted construction work early in the
year and it took longer than expected to bring the plant back on line.
Currency-neutral comparable operating profit declined 7.3% due to the weakness in the Australian cereal category and our performance in South
Africa. This was partially offset by cost discipline.
Corporate
Currency-neutral comparable operating profit improved as a result of reduced pension costs which was partially offset by increased overhead
investments.
32
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
Margin performance
2015 versus 2014 margin performance was as follows:
Change vs.
prior year (pts.)
2015
2014
Reported gross margin (a)
34.6 %
34.7 %
Mark-to-market (COGS)
(2.2)%
(3.0)%
0.8
Project K and cost reduction activities (COGS)
(1.4)%
(1.0)%
(0.4)
VIE deconsolidation and other costs impacting comparability (COGS)
(0.1)
—%
—%
—
Integration and transaction costs (COGS)
(0.1)%
(0.2)%
0.1
Acquisitions/divestitures (COGS)
(0.1)%
—%
Shipping day differences (COGS)
—%
—%
—
Venezuela remeasurement (COGS)
(0.8)%
—%
(0.8)
Comparable gross margin
39.2 %
38.9 %
0.3
0.4 %
—%
0.4
Foreign currency impact
Currency neutral comparable gross margin
(0.1)
38.8 %
38.9 %
(0.1)
(26.5)%
(27.7)%
1.2
Mark-to-market (SGA)
(1.1)%
(2.4)%
1.3
Project K and cost reduction activities (SGA)
(1.0)%
(1.0)%
—
0.5 %
—%
0.5
(0.1)%
(0.1)%
—
0.1 %
—%
0.1
Reported SGA%
VIE deconsolidation and other costs impacting comparability (SGA)
Integration and transactions costs (SGA)
Acquisitions/divestitures (SGA)
Shipping day differences (SGA)
—%
—%
—
(0.1)%
—%
(0.1)
(24.8)%
(24.2)%
(0.6)
(0.2)%
—%
(0.2)
(24.6)%
(24.2)%
(0.4)
8.1 %
7.0 %
Mark-to-market
(3.3)%
(5.4)%
2.1
Project K and cost reduction activities
(2.4)%
(2.0)%
(0.4)
Venezuela remeasurement (SGA)
Comparable SGA%
Foreign currency impact
Currency neutral comparable SGA%
Reported operating margin
VIE deconsolidation and other costs impacting comparability
1.1
0.5 %
—%
0.5
(0.2)%
(0.3)%
0.1
Acquisitions/divestitures
—%
—%
—
Shipping day differences
—%
—%
—
Venezuela remeasurement
(0.9)%
—%
(0.9)
Comparable operating margin
14.4 %
14.7 %
(0.3)
0.2 %
—%
14.2 %
14.7 %
Integration and transactions costs
Foreign currency impact
Currency neutral comparable operating margin
0.2
(0.5)
For information on the reconciling items in the table above, please refer to the Significant items impacting comparability section.
(a) Reported gross margin as a percentage of net sales. Gross margin is equal to net sales less cost of goods sold.
Currency-neutral comparable gross margin declined by 10 basis points in 2015 due to the impact of Venezuela. Excluding the impact of
Venezuela, currency-neutral comparable gross margin would have increased by 20 basis points as a result of productivity savings, Project K
savings, and deflation in commodities and packaging which was partially offset by higher distribution costs and investment in our foods such as
the launch of granolas and mueslis across the globe and the renovation of existing foods such as Special K ®.
Currency-neutral comparable SG&A% was worse by 40 basis points as a result of resetting incentive compensation, reinvestment of Project K
savings into sales capabilities including adding sales representatives, and re-establishing the Kashi business unit which was partially offset by
improvements resulting from efficiency and effectiveness programs as well as decreased brand building investment.
33
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
Our 2015 and 2014 comparable gross profit, comparable SGA, and comparable operating profit measures are reconciled to the directly comparable
U.S. GAAP measures as follows:
2015
(dollars in millions)
Reported gross profit (a)
$
2014
4,681
$
5,063
Mark-to-market (COGS)
(296)
(438)
Project K and cost reduction activities (COGS)
(195)
(154)
VIE deconsolidation and other costs impacting comparability (COGS)
Integration and transaction costs (COGS)
—
—
(15)
(23)
Acquisitions/divestitures (COGS)
12
—
Shipping day differences (COGS)
—
80
Venezuela remeasurement (COGS)
(112)
Comparable gross profit
$
Foreign currency impact
5,287
—
$
5,598
(355)
—
Currency neutral comparable gross profit
$
5,642
$
5,598
Reported SGA
$
3,590
$
4,039
Mark-to-market (SGA)
(150)
(346)
Project K and cost reduction activities (SGA)
(128)
(144)
VIE deconsolidation and other costs impacting comparability (SGA)
Integration and transaction costs (SGA)
67
(6)
(15)
(20)
Acquisitions/divestitures (SGA)
(8)
—
Shipping day differences (SGA)
—
(44)
Venezuela remeasurement (SGA)
(8)
Comparable SGA
$
3,348
Currency neutral comparable SGA
$
Reported operating profit
$
Foreign currency impact
—
$
3,479
3,571
$
3,479
1,091
$
1,024
223
—
Mark-to-market
(446)
(784)
Project K and cost reduction activities
(323)
(298)
VIE deconsolidation and other costs impacting comparability
Integration and transaction costs
67
(6)
(30)
(43)
Acquisitions/divestitures
4
—
Shipping day differences
—
36
Venezuela remeasurement
(120)
Comparable
$
1,939
$
2,071
Foreign currency impact
—
$
2,119
$
2,119
(132)
Currency neutral comparable operating profit
—
For more information on the reconciling items in the table above, please refer to the Significant items impacting comparability section.
(a) Gross profit is equal to net sales less cost of goods sold.
34
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
2014 versus 2013 margin performance was as follows:
Change vs.
prior year (pts.)
2014
2013
Reported gross margin (a)
34.7 %
41.3 %
(6.6)
Mark-to-market (COGS)
(3.0)%
3.4 %
(6.4)
Project K and cost reduction activities (COGS)
(1.0)%
(1.3)%
0.3
—%
—%
(0.2)%
(0.1)%
Acquisitions/divestitures (COGS)
—%
—%
—
Shipping day differences (COGS)
—%
—%
—
Venezuela remeasurement (COGS)
—%
—%
38.9 %
39.3 %
—%
—%
VIE deconsolidation and other costs impacting comparability (COGS)
Integration and transaction costs (COGS)
Comparable gross margin
Foreign currency impact
Currency neutral comparable gross margin
—
(0.1)
—
(0.4)
—
38.9 %
39.3 %
(0.4)
(27.7)%
(22.1)%
(5.6)
Mark-to-market (SGA)
(2.4)%
3.0 %
(5.4)
Project K and cost reduction activities (SGA)
(1.0)%
(0.4)%
(0.6)
—%
—%
—
(0.1)%
(0.3)%
0.2
Acquisitions/divestitures (SGA)
—%
—%
—
Shipping day differences (SGA)
—%
—%
—
Venezuela remeasurement (SGA)
—%
—%
—
(24.2)%
(24.4)%
0.2
Reported SGA%
VIE deconsolidation and other costs impacting comparability (SGA)
Integration and transactions costs (SGA)
Comparable SGA%
Foreign currency impact
Currency neutral comparable SGA%
Reported operating margin
—%
—%
—
(24.2)%
(24.4)%
0.2
7.0 %
19.2 %
(12.2)
Mark-to-market
(5.4)%
6.4 %
(11.8)
Project K and cost reduction activities
(2.0)%
(1.7)%
(0.3)
—%
—%
—
(0.3)%
(0.4)%
0.1
Acquisitions/divestitures
—%
—%
—
Shipping day differences
—%
—%
—
Venezuela remeasurement
—%
—%
14.7 %
14.9 %
VIE deconsolidation and other costs impacting comparability
Integration and transactions costs
Comparable operating margin
Foreign currency impact
Currency neutral comparable operating margin
—%
—%
14.7 %
14.9 %
—
(0.2)
—
(0.2)
For more information on reconciling items in the table above, please refer to the Significant items impacting comparability section.
Currency-neutral comparable gross margin declined by 40 basis points in 2014 due to the impact of inflation, net of productivity savings, and lower
production volume resulting from soft sales performance. Currency-neutral comparable SG&A% improved by 20 basis points as a result of
continued discipline in overhead control.
35
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
Our 2014 and 2013 comparable gross profit, comparable SGA, and comparable operating profit measures are reconciled to the directly comparable
U.S. GAAP measures as follows:
(dollars in millions)
2014
Reported gross profit (a)
$
2013
5,063
$
6,103
Mark-to-market (COGS)
(438)
510
Project K and cost reduction activities (COGS)
(154)
(195)
VIE deconsolidation and other costs impacting comparability (COGS)
Integration and transaction costs (COGS)
—
—
(23)
(20)
Acquisitions/divestitures (COGS)
—
(1)
Shipping day differences (COGS)
80
—
Venezuela remeasurement (COGS)
—
Comparable gross profit
$
5,598
Currency neutral comparable gross profit
$
Reported SGA
$
Foreign currency impact
(4)
$
5,813
5,634
$
5,813
4,039
$
3,266
(36)
—
Mark-to-market (SGA)
(346)
437
Project K and cost reduction activities (SGA)
(144)
(55)
VIE deconsolidation and other costs impacting comparability (SGA)
(6)
—
(20)
(45)
Acquisitions/divestitures (SGA)
—
—
Shipping day differences (SGA)
(44)
—
Integration and transaction costs (SGA)
Venezuela remeasurement (SGA)
—
Comparable SGA
$
3,479
Currency neutral comparable SGA
$
Reported operating profit
$
Foreign currency impact
(2)
$
3,601
3,507
$
3,601
1,024
$
2,837
28
—
Mark-to-market
(784)
947
Project K and cost reduction activities
(298)
(250)
VIE deconsolidation and other costs impacting comparability
Integration and transaction costs
(6)
—
(43)
(65)
Acquisitions/divestitures
—
(1)
Shipping day differences
36
—
Venezuela remeasurement
—
Comparable
$
2,119
$
2,127
Foreign currency impact
(6)
$
2,212
$
2,212
(8)
Currency neutral comparable operating profit
—
For more information on reconciling items in the table above, please refer to the Significant items impacting comparability section.
Restructuring and cost reduction activities
We view our continued spending on restructuring and cost reduction activities as part of our ongoing operating principles to provide greater visibility
in achieving our long-term profit growth targets. Initiatives undertaken are currently expected to recover cash implementation costs within a fiveyear period of completion. Upon completion (or as each major stage is completed in the case of multi-year programs), the project begins to deliver
cash savings and/or reduced depreciation.
Project K
Project K, a four-year efficiency and effectiveness program, was announced in November 2013, and is expected to generate a significant amount
of savings that may be invested in key strategic areas of focus for the business. We expect that this investment will drive future growth in
revenues, gross margin, operating profit, and cash flow.
36
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
The focus of the program will be to strengthen existing businesses in core markets, increase growth in developing and emerging markets, and
drive an increased level of value-added innovation. The program is expected to provide a number of benefits, including an optimized supply chain
infrastructure, the implementation of global business services, and a new global focus on categories.
We currently anticipate that Project K will result in total pre-tax charges, once all phases are approved and implemented, of $1.2 to $1.4 billion,
with after-tax cash costs, including incremental capital investments, estimated to be $900 million to $1.1 billion. Cash expenditures of
approximately $625 million have been incurred through the end of fiscal year 2015. Total cash expenditures, as defined, are expected to be
approximately $150 million for 2016 and the balance of $125 to $325 million thereafter. Total charges for Project K in 2016 are expected to be
approximately $175 to $200 million.
We expect annual cost savings generated from Project K will be approximately $425 to $475 million by 2018, with approximately two-thirds of the
cost savings to be realized in cost of goods sold. We have realized approximately $180 million of annual savings through the end of 2015. We
expect approximately $100 million of incremental savings in 2016, approximately 75 to 80 percent of which will come from cost of goods sold.
Cost savings will be utilized to increase margins and drive sales growth through additional investments in advertising, in-store execution, sales
capabilities, including adding sales representatives, re-establishing the Kashi business unit, and in the design and quality of our products. We will
also invest in production capacity in developing and emerging markets, and in global category teams.
As a result of Project K, capital spending levels were increased to 4% of net sales during both 2014 and 2015. Our on-going business model
assumes capital spending to be approximately 3-4% of net sales annually.
Thus far, we have funded much of the cash requirements for Project K through our supplier financing initiative. Due to the difference in timing
between expected cash costs for the project and expected future cash savings, we anticipate funding the project through a combination of cash on
hand and short-term debt.
We also expect that the project will have an impact on our consolidated effective income tax rate during the execution of the project due to the
timing of charges being taken in different tax jurisdictions. The impact of this project on our consolidated effective income tax rate will be excluded
from the comparable income tax rate that will be disclosed on a quarterly basis.
Refer to Note 4 within Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements for further information related to Project K and other restructuring activities.
Other Projects
In 2015 we initiated the implementation of a zero-based budgeting (ZBB) program in our North America business. This ZBB program is expected to
deliver visibility to $100 million in annual savings in North America during 2016. We will begin to expand ZBB into our international businesses
during 2016 with modest savings expected in certain locations in 2016. We expect increased savings to be realized in our international businesses
in 2017 and beyond.
In support of the ZBB initiative, we incurred pre-tax charges of approximately $12 million in 2015. We anticipate that ZBB will result in cumulative
pre-tax charges of approximately $25 to $50 million through 2016 which will consist primarily of the design and implementation of business
capabilities.
Foreign currency translation
The reporting currency for our financial statements is the U.S. dollar. Certain of our assets, liabilities, expenses and revenues are denominated in
currencies other than the U.S. dollar, primarily in the euro, British pound, Mexican peso, Australian dollar, Canadian dollar, Venezuelan bolivar
fuerte, and Russian ruble. To prepare our consolidated financial statements, we must translate those assets, liabilities, expenses and revenues
into U.S. dollars at the applicable exchange rates. As a result, increases and decreases in the value of the U.S. dollar against these other
currencies will affect the amount of these items in our consolidated financial statements, even if their value has not changed in their original
currency. This could have significant impact on our results if such increase or decrease in the value of the U.S. dollar is substantial.
37
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
Interest expense
Annual interest expense is illustrated in the following table. The increase in 2015 was primarily due to a higher average level of long-term debt and
to higher interest rates, partially resulting from lower levels of debt swapped to a variable rate. The decline in 2014 was primarily due to refinancing
of maturing long-term debt at lower interest rates and lower interest rates on long-term debt which has effectively been converted to floating rate
obligations through the use of interest rate swaps. Interest income (recorded in other income (expense), net) was (in millions), 2015-$4; 2014-$8;
2013-$7. We currently expect that our 2016 gross interest expense will be approximately $235 to $245 million.
Change vs.
prior year
2015
(dollars in millions)
Reported interest expense
227
$
231
Amounts capitalized
Gross interest expense
2014
$
2013
$
209
$
214
4
$
235
$
237
5
2015
2014
7.9%
(9.7)%
2
Income taxes
Our reported effective tax rates for 2015, 2014 and 2013 were 20.6%, 22.6% and 30.4% respectively. Comparable effective tax rates for 2015,
2014 and 2013 were 25.6%, 28.2%, and 28.4%, respectively.
The 2015 and 2014 effective income tax rates benefited from the mark-to-market loss recorded for our pension plans. Refer to Note 12 within
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements for further information. Fluctuations in foreign currency exchange rates could impact the expected
effective income tax rate as it is dependent upon U.S. dollar earnings of foreign subsidiaries doing business in various countries with differing
statutory tax rates. Additionally, the rate could be impacted if pending uncertain tax matters, including tax positions that could be affected by
planning initiatives, are resolved more or less favorably than we currently expect.
The following table provides a reconciliation of as reported to currency-neutral comparable income taxes and effective income tax rate for 2015 and
2014.
2015
Consolidated results (dollars in millions, except per share data)
Reported income taxes
$
Mark-to-market
Project K and cost reduction activities
2014
159
$
186
(148)
(271)
(94)
(80)
VIE deconsolidation and other costs impacting comparability
(2)
(2)
Integration and transaction costs
(8)
(12)
Acquisitions/divestitures
(1)
—
Shipping day differences
—
11
Venezuela remeasurement
(20)
Comparable income taxes
$
Foreign currency impact
432
—
$
(19)
Currency neutral comparable income taxes
$
451
540
—
$
540
Reported effective income tax rate
20.6 %
22.6 %
Mark-to-market
(4.6)
(5.8)
Project K and cost reduction activities
(0.8)
0.2
VIE deconsolidation and other costs impact comparability
(0.9)
—
—
—
Acquisitions/divestitures
(0.2)
—
Shipping day differences
—
—
Integration and transaction costs
Venezuela remeasurement
1.5
Comparable effective income tax rate
25.6 %
Foreign currency impact
0.7
Currency neutral comparable effective income tax rate
24.9 %
—
28.2 %
—
28.2 %
For more information on reconciling items in the table above, please refer to the Significant items impacting comparability section.
38
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
The following table provides a reconciliation of as reported to currency-neutral comparable income taxes and effective income tax rate for 2014 and
2013.
2014
Consolidated results (dollars in millions, except per share data)
Reported income taxes
$
Mark-to-market
Project K and cost reduction activities
VIE deconsolidation and other costs impacting comparability
2013
186
$
792
(271)
319
(80)
(67)
(2)
—
(12)
(19)
Acquisitions/divestitures
—
—
Shipping day differences
11
—
Venezuela remeasurement
—
(4)
Integration and transaction costs
Comparable income taxes
$
Foreign currency impact
540
$
563
$
563
(3)
Currency neutral comparable income taxes
$
543
—
Reported effective income tax rate
22.6 %
Mark-to-market
(5.8)
1.9
0.2
0.2
Project K and cost reduction activities
30.4 %
VIE deconsolidation and other costs impact comparability
—
—
Integration and transaction costs
—
(0.1)
Acquisitions/divestitures
—
—
Shipping day differences
—
—
Venezuela remeasurement
—
—
28.2 %
28.4 %
Comparable effective income tax rate
Foreign currency impact
Currency neutral comparable effective income tax rate
—
—
28.2 %
28.4 %
For more information on reconciling items in the table above, please refer to the Significant items impacting comparability section.
LIQUIDITY AND CAPITAL RESOURCES
Our principal source of liquidity is operating cash flows supplemented by borrowings for major acquisitions and other significant transactions. Our
cash-generating capability is one of our fundamental strengths and provides us with substantial financial flexibility in meeting operating and
investing needs.
We have historically reported negative working capital primarily as the result of our focus to improve core working capital by reducing our levels of
trade receivables and inventory while extending the timing of payment of our trade payables. In addition, we have a substantial amount of
indebtedness which results in current maturities of long-term debt and notes payable which can have a significant impact on working capital as a
result of the timing of these required payments. These factors, coupled with the use of our ongoing cash flows from operations to service our debt
obligations, pay dividends, fund acquisition opportunities, and repurchase our common stock, reduce our working capital amounts. We had
negative working capital of $2.5 billion and $1.0 billion as of January 2, 2016 and January 3, 2015, respectively.
We believe that our operating cash flows, together with our credit facilities and other available debt financing, will be adequate to meet our
operating, investing and financing needs in the foreseeable future. However, there can be no assurance that volatility and/or disruption in the global
capital and credit markets will not impair our ability to access these markets on terms acceptable to us, or at all.
As of January 2, 2016 and January 3, 2015, we had $231 million and $257 million, respectively, of cash and cash equivalents held in international
jurisdictions which will be used to fund capital and other cash requirements of international operations. These amounts include $2 million and $68
million at January 2, 2016 and January 3, 2015, respectively, subject to currency exchange controls in Venezuela, limiting the total amount of
cash and cash equivalents held by our foreign subsidiaries that can be repatriated at any particular point in time.
39
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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The following table sets forth a summary of our cash flows:
(dollars in millions)
2015
2014
2013
Net cash provided by (used in):
Operating activities
$
1,691
$
1,793
$
1,807
Investing activities
(1,127)
(573)
(641)
Financing activities
(706)
(1,063)
(1,141)
Effect of exchange rates on cash and cash equivalents
Net increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents
(50)
$
(192)
13
$
170
(33)
$
(8)
Operating activities
The principal source of our operating cash flows is net earnings, meaning cash receipts from the sale of our products, net of costs to manufacture
and market our products.
Our net cash provided by operating activities for 2015 amounted to $1,691 million, a decrease of $102 million compared with 2014. The decrease
compared to the prior year is the result of the negative year over year impact of accounts receivable mitigated somewhat by the incremental cash
flow benefit from the supplier financing initiative of approximately $210 million. Our net cash provided by operating activities for 2014 amounted to
$1,793 million, a decrease of $14 million compared with 2013, due primarily to the negative incremental impact of Project K cash requirements
mitigated somewhat by the positive impact from the supplier financing initiative of approximately $210 million.
After-tax cash payments related to Project K were $192 million in 2015, $187 million in 2014, and $18 million in 2013.
Our cash conversion cycle (defined as days of inventory, excluding inventoriable mark-to-market pension costs, and trade receivables outstanding
less days of trade payables outstanding, based on a trailing 12 month average) is relatively short, equating to approximately 14 days and 27 days
for 2015 and 2014, respectively. Core working capital in 2015 averaged 6.2% of net sales, compared to 7.6% in 2014 and 7.8% in 2013. In 2015,
both our cash conversion cycle and core working capital showed improvements in days of trade payables outstanding which includes the positive
impact of a supplier financing initiative. Days of trade receivables and inventory on hand increased slightly from 2014 to 2015.
Our total pension and postretirement benefit plan funding amounted to $33 million, $53 million and $48 million, in 2015, 2014 and 2013,
respectively.
The Pension Protection Act (PPA), and subsequent regulations, determines defined benefit plan minimum funding requirements in the United
States. We believe that we will not be required to make any contributions under PPA requirements until 2021 or beyond. Our projections
concerning timing of PPA funding requirements are subject to change primarily based on general market conditions affecting trust asset
performance, future discount rates based on average yields of high quality corporate bonds and our decisions regarding certain elective provisions
of the PPA.
We currently project that we will make total U.S. and foreign benefit plan contributions in 2016 of approximately $43 million. Actual 2016
contributions could be different from our current projections, as influenced by our decision to undertake discretionary funding of our benefit trusts
versus other competing investment priorities, future changes in government requirements, trust asset performance, renewals of union contracts, or
higher-than-expected health care claims cost experience.
We measure cash flow as net cash provided by operating activities reduced by expenditures for property additions. We use this non-GAAP
financial measure of cash flow to focus management and investors on the amount of cash available for debt repayment, dividend distributions,
acquisition opportunities, and share repurchases. Our cash flow metric is reconciled to the most comparable GAAP measure, as follows:
(dollars in millions)
Net cash provided by operating activities
2015
$
Additions to properties
Cash flow
2014
1,691
$
(553)
$
year-over-year change
1,138
(6.0)%
2013
1,793
$
(582)
$
1,211
1,807
(637)
$
1,170
3.5%
40
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
The decrease in cash flow (as defined) in 2015 compared to 2014 was due primarily to the unfavorable year over year impact of accounts
receivable mitigated somewhat by the favorable year over year impact of trade payables as a result of the supplier financing initiative. The
increase in cash flow in 2014 compared to 2013 was due primarily to lower capital expenditures and improved core working capital partially offset
by the negative impact of Project K cash requirements.
Investing activities
Our net cash used in investing activities for 2015 amounted to $1,127 million, an increase of $554 million compared with 2014. In 2015, we
acquired, for $445 million, a 50% interest in Multipro Singapore Pte. Ltd., a leading distributor of a variety of food products in Nigeria and Ghana,
and an option to purchase a minority interest in an affiliated food manufacturer. In addition to our joint venture investment in 2015, we also
acquired Mass Foods and a majority interest in Bisco Misr.
Capital spending in 2015 included investments in our supply chain infrastructure, and to support capacity requirements in certain markets and
products, including Pringles in Asia-Pacific.
Net cash used in investing activities of $573 million in 2014 decreased $68 million compared with 2013.
Cash paid for additions to properties as a percentage of net sales increased to 4.1% in 2015, from 4.0% in 2014, which was a decrease from 4.3%
in 2013.
Financing activities
Our net cash used by financing activities was $706 million, $1,063 million and $1,141 million for 2015, 2014 and 2013, respectively. The use of
cash in financing activities compared to the prior year declined due primarily to net proceeds from notes payable of $374 million in 2015 versus
$89 million in 2014.
Total debt was $7.8 billion and $7.4 billion at year-end 2015 and 2014, respectively.
In May 2015, we repaid our $350 million 1.125% U.S. Dollar Notes due 2015 at maturity.
In February 2015, we repaid our floating-rate $250 million U.S. Dollar Notes due 2015 at maturity and in March 2015, we issued €600 million of tenyear 1.25% Euro Notes due 2025.
In March 2014, we redeemed $150 million of our 4.00% U.S. Dollar Notes due 2020, $342 million of our 3.125% U.S. Dollar Notes due 2022 and
$189 million of our 2.75% U.S. Dollar Notes due 2023. In connection with the debt redemption, we incurred $1 million of interest expense, offset by
$8 million of accelerated gains on interest rate hedges previously recorded in accumulated other comprehensive income, and incurred $5 million
expense, recorded in Other Income, Expense (net), related to acceleration of fees on the redeemed debt and fees related to the tender offer.
In May 2014, we issued €500 million of seven-year 1.75% Euro Notes due 2021, using the proceeds for general corporate purposes, which
included repayment of a portion of our commercial paper borrowings.
In May 2014, we issued Cdn. $300 million of three-year 2.05% Canadian Dollar Notes due 2017, using the proceeds, together with cash on hand,
to repay our Cdn. $300 million, 2.10% Notes due May 2014 at maturity.
In February 2013, we issued $250 million of two-year floating-rate U.S. Dollar Notes, and $400 million of ten-year 2.75% U.S. Dollar Notes,
resulting in aggregate net proceeds after debt discount of $645 million. The proceeds from these Notes were used for general corporate purposes,
including, together with cash on hand, repayment of the $750 million aggregate principal amount of our 4.25% U.S. Dollar Notes due March 2013.
In April 2013, the board of directors approved a $1 billion share repurchase program expiring in April 2014. In February 2014, the board of directors
approved a new authorization to repurchase up to $1.5 billion in shares through December 2015. In December 2015, the board of directors
approved a share repurchase program authorizing us to repurchase shares of our common stock amounting to $1.5 billion beginning in 2016
through December 2017.
During 2015, we purchased 11 million shares totaling $731 million. During 2014, we purchased 11 million shares totaling $690 million. In May 2013,
we entered into an Accelerated Share Repurchase (ASR) Agreement with a financial institution counterparty and paid $355 million for the purchase
of shares during the term of the agreement which extended through August 2013. The total number of shares delivered upon settlement of the ASR
was based upon the volume weighted average price of the Company’s stock over the term of the agreement. Total shares
41
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
purchased in 2013, including shares delivered under the ASR, amounted to approximately 9 million shares totaling $544 million.
We paid quarterly dividends to shareholders totaling $1.98 per share in 2015, $1.90 per share in 2014 and $1.80 per share in 2013. Total cash paid
for dividends increased by 3.0% in 2015 and 4.0% in 2014. In February 2016, the board of directors declared a dividend of $.50 per common share,
payable on March 15, 2016 to shareholders of record at the close of business on March 1, 2016.
In February 2014, we entered into an unsecured Five-Year Credit Agreement to replace the existing unsecured Four-Year Credit Agreement, which
would have expired in March 2015. The Five-Year Credit Agreement allows us to borrow, on a revolving credit basis, up to $2.0 billion.
Our long-term debt agreements contain customary covenants that limit Kellogg Company and some of its subsidiaries from incurring certain liens
or from entering into certain sale and lease-back transactions. Some agreements also contain change in control provisions. However, they do not
contain acceleration of maturity clauses that are dependent on credit ratings. A change in our credit ratings could limit our access to the
U.S. short-term debt market and/or increase the cost of refinancing long-term debt in the future. However, even under these circumstances, we
would continue to have access to our Five-Year Credit Agreement, which expires in February 2019. This source of liquidity is unused and available
on an unsecured basis, although we do not currently plan to use it.
We monitor the financial strength of our third-party financial institutions, including those that hold our cash and cash equivalents as well as those
who serve as counterparties to our credit facilities, our derivative financial instruments, and other arrangements.
We are in compliance with all covenants as of January 2, 2016. We continue to believe that we will be able to meet our interest and principal
repayment obligations and maintain our debt covenants for the foreseeable future, while still meeting our operational needs, including the pursuit of
selected bolt-on acquisitions. This will be accomplished through our strong cash flow, our short-term borrowings, and our maintenance of credit
facilities on a global basis. We anticipate establishing a discrete customer program which would allow for extended customer payment terms. In
connection with this program, we may enter into an agreement with one or more financial institutions to monetize these receivables resulting in the
receivables being de-recognized from our consolidated balance sheet. We currently estimate that the amount of these receivables held at any
time by the financial institution(s) will be approximately $500 to $600 million.
OFF-BALANCE SHEET ARRANGEMENTS AND CONTRACTUAL OBLIGATIONS
Off-balance sheet arrangements
As of January 2, 2016 and January 3, 2015 we did not have any material off-balance sheet arrangements.
Contractual obligations
The following table summarizes our contractual obligations at January 2, 2016:
Contractual obligations
Payments due by period
(millions)
Total
2016
2017
2018
2019
2021 and
beyond
2020
Long-term debt:
Principal
Interest (a)
Capital leases (b)
Operating leases (c)
Purchase obligations (d)
Uncertain tax positions (e)
Other long-term obligations (f)
$
6,517
1,262
627
1,837
$
217
188
$
407
178
$
506
161
$
851
151
$
2,864
5
2
1
1
—
—
1
672
171
152
119
81
62
87
1,135
951
113
46
13
11
1
13
13
—
—
—
—
—
732
101
53
51
53
124
350
942
Total
$
10,911
$
2,717
$
1,134
$
802
$
814
$
1,199
$
4,245
(a) Includes interest payments on our long-term debt and payments on our interest rate swaps. Interest calculated on our variable rate debt was forecasted using the LIBOR
forward rate curve as of January 2, 2016.
(b) The total expected cash payments on our capital leases include interest expense totaling less than $1 million over the periods presented above.
(c) Operating leases represent the minimum rental commitments under non-cancelable operating leases.
42
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
(d) Purchase obligations consist primarily of fixed commitments for raw materials to be utilized in the normal course of business and for marketing, advertising and other
services. The amounts presented in the table do not include items already recorded in accounts payable or other current liabilities at year-end 2015, nor does the table
reflect cash flows we are likely to incur based on our plans, but are not obligated to incur. Therefore, it should be noted that the exclusion of these items from the table
could be a limitation in assessing our total future cash flows under contracts.
(e) As of January 2, 2016, our total liability for uncertain tax positions was $73 million, of which $13 million is expected to be paid in the next twelve months. We are not able
to reasonably estimate the timing of future cash flows related to the remaining $60 million.
(f) Other long-term obligations are those associated with noncurrent liabilities recorded within the Consolidated Balance Sheet at year-end 2015 and consist principally of
projected commitments under deferred compensation arrangements, multiemployer plans, and supplemental employee retirement benefits. The table also includes our
current estimate of minimum contributions to defined benefit pension and postretirement benefit plans through 2021 as follows: 2016-$43; 2017-$34; 2018-$34; 2019-$34;
2020-$103; 2021-$190.
CRITICAL ACCOUNTING ESTIMATES
Promotional expenditures
Our promotional activities are conducted either through the retail trade or directly with consumers and include activities such as in-store displays
and events, feature price discounts, consumer coupons, contests and loyalty programs. The costs of these activities are generally recognized at
the time the related revenue is recorded, which normally precedes the actual cash expenditure. The recognition of these costs therefore requires
management judgment regarding the volume of promotional offers that will be redeemed by either the retail trade or consumer. These estimates
are made using various techniques including historical data on performance of similar promotional programs. Differences between estimated
expense and actual redemptions are normally insignificant and recognized as a change in management estimate in a subsequent period. On a fullyear basis, these subsequent period adjustments represent approximately 0.4% of our company’s net sales. However, our company’s total
promotional expenditures (including amounts classified as a revenue reduction) are significant, so it is likely our results would be materially
different if different assumptions or conditions were to prevail.
Property
Long-lived assets such as property, plant and equipment are tested for impairment when conditions indicate that the carrying value may not be
recoverable. Management evaluates several conditions, including, but not limited to, the following: a significant decrease in the market price of an
asset or an asset group; a significant adverse change in the extent or manner in which a long-lived asset is being used, including an extended
period of idleness; and a current expectation that, more likely than not, a long-lived asset or asset group will be sold or otherwise disposed of
significantly before the end of its previously estimated useful life. For assets to be held and used, we project the expected future undiscounted
cash flows generated by the long-lived asset or asset group over the remaining useful life of the primary asset. If the cash flow analysis yields an
amount less than the carrying amount we determine the fair value of the asset or asset group by using comparable market data. There are inherent
uncertainties associated with the judgments and estimates we use in these analyses.
At January 2, 2016, we have property, plant and equipment of $3.6 billion, net of accumulated depreciation, on our balance sheet. Included in this
amount are approximately $51 million of idle assets.
Goodwill and other intangible assets
We perform an impairment evaluation of goodwill and intangible assets with indefinite useful lives at least annually during the fourth quarter of each
year in conjunction with our annual budgeting process.
Goodwill impairment testing first requires a comparison between the carrying value and fair value of a reporting unit with associated goodwill.
Carrying value is based on the assets and liabilities associated with the operations of that reporting unit, which often requires allocation of shared
or corporate items among reporting units. For the 2015 goodwill impairment test, the fair value of the reporting units was estimated based on
market multiples. Our approach employs market multiples based on earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization (EBITDA) and
earnings for companies comparable to our reporting units. In the event the fair value determined using the market multiples approach is close to
the carrying value, we may also supplement our fair value determination using discounted cash flows. Management believes the assumptions
used for the impairment test are consistent with those utilized by a market participant performing similar valuations for our reporting units.
Similarly, impairment testing of indefinite-lived intangible assets requires a comparison of carrying value to fair value of that particular asset. Fair
values of non-goodwill intangible assets are based primarily on projections of future cash flows to be generated from that asset. For instance, cash
flows related to a particular trademark would be based on a projected royalty stream attributable to branded product sales discounted at rates
consistent with rates used by market participants. These estimates are made using various inputs including historical data, current and anticipated
market conditions, management plans, and market comparables.
43
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
We also evaluate the useful life over which a non-goodwill intangible asset with a finite life is expected to contribute directly or indirectly to our
cash flows. Reaching a determination on useful life requires significant judgments and assumptions regarding the future effects of obsolescence,
demand, competition, other economic factors (such as the stability of the industry, known technological advances, legislative action that results in
an uncertain or changing regulatory environment, and expected changes in distribution channels), the level of required maintenance expenditures,
and the expected lives of other related groups of assets.
At January 2, 2016, goodwill and other intangible assets amounted to $7.2 billion, consisting primarily of goodwill and brands associated with the
2001 acquisition of Keebler Foods Company and the 2012 acquisition of Pringles. Within this total, approximately $2.2 billion of non-goodwill
intangible assets were classified as indefinite-lived, comprised principally of Keebler and Pringles trademarks. We currently believe that the fair
value of our goodwill and other intangible assets exceeds their carrying value and that those intangibles so classified will contribute indefinitely to
our cash flows. The percentage of excess fair value over carrying value of the U.S. Snacks reporting unit was approximately 43% and 59% in
2015 and 2014, respectively. However, if we had used materially different assumptions, which we do not believe are reasonably possible, regarding
the future performance of our business or a different market multiple in the valuation, this could have resulted in significant impairment losses.
Additionally, we have $25 million of goodwill related to our 2008 acquisition of United Bakers in Russia. Fair value of the intangibles for this
business exceeded carrying value in 2015. If we used modestly different assumptions regarding sales multiples and EBITDA in the valuation, this
could have resulted in an impairment loss. Management will continue to monitor the situation closely.
Retirement benefits
Our company sponsors a number of U.S. and foreign defined benefit employee pension plans and also provides retiree health care and other
welfare benefits in the United States and Canada. Plan funding strategies are influenced by tax regulations and asset return performance. A
substantial majority of plan assets are invested in a globally diversified portfolio of equity securities with smaller holdings of debt securities and
other investments. We recognize the cost of benefits provided during retirement over the employees’ active working life to determine the
obligations and expense related to our retiree benefit plans. Inherent in this concept is the requirement to
use various actuarial assumptions to predict and measure costs and obligations many years prior to the settlement date. Major actuarial
assumptions that require significant management judgment and have a material impact on the measurement of our consolidated benefits expense
and accumulated obligation include the long-term rates of return on plan assets, the health care cost trend rates, the mortality table and
improvement scale, and the interest rates used to discount the obligations for our major plans, which cover employees in the United States, United
Kingdom and Canada.
Our expense recognition policy for pension and nonpension postretirement benefits is to immediately recognize actuarial gains and losses in our
operating results in the year in which they occur. Actuarial gains and losses are recognized annually as of our measurement date, which is our
fiscal year-end, or when remeasurement is otherwise required under generally accepted accounting principles.
Additionally, for purposes of calculating the expected return on plan assets related to pension and nonpension postretirement benefits we use the
fair value of plan assets.
To conduct our annual review of the long-term rate of return on plan assets, we model expected returns over a 20-year investment horizon with
respect to the specific investment mix of each of our major plans. The return assumptions used reflect a combination of rigorous historical
performance analysis and forward-looking views of the financial markets including consideration of current yields on long-term bonds, priceearnings ratios of the major stock market indices, and long-term inflation. Our U.S. plan model, corresponding to approximately 68% of our trust
assets globally, currently incorporates a long-term inflation assumption of 2.5% and an active management premium of 1% (net of fees) validated
by historical analysis and future return expectations. Although we review our expected long-term rates of return annually, our benefit trust
investment performance for one particular year does not, by itself, significantly influence our evaluation. Our expected rates of return have
generally not been revised, provided these rates continue to fall within a “more likely than not” corridor of between the 25th and 75th percentile of
expected long-term returns, as determined by our modeling process. Our assumed rate of return for U.S. plans in 2016 of 8.5% equates to
approximately the 57th percentile expectation of our model. Similar methods are used for various foreign plans with invested assets, reflecting
local economic conditions. Foreign trust investments represent approximately 32% of our global benefit plan assets.
Based on consolidated benefit plan assets at January 2, 2016, a 100 basis point increase or decrease in the assumed rate of return would
correspondingly increase or decrease 2016 benefits expense by approximately
44
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
$55 million. For each of the three fiscal years, our actual return on plan assets exceeded (was less than) the recognized assumed return by the
following amounts (in millions): 2015-$(666); 2014-$(41); 2013–$545.
To conduct our annual review of health care cost trend rates, we model our actual claims cost data over a five-year historical period, including an
analysis of pre-65 versus post-65 age groups and other important demographic components in our covered retiree population. This data is adjusted
to eliminate the impact of plan changes and other factors that would tend to distort the underlying cost inflation trends. Our initial health care cost
trend rate is reviewed annually and adjusted as necessary to remain consistent with recent historical experience and our expectations regarding
short-term future trends. In comparison to our actual five-year compound annual claims cost growth rate of approximately 4.95%, our initial trend
rate for 2016 of 5.00% reflects the expected future impact of faster-growing claims experience for certain demographic groups within our total
employee population. Our initial rate is trended downward by 0.25% per year, until the ultimate trend rate of 4.5% is reached. The ultimate trend
rate is adjusted annually, as necessary, to approximate the current economic view on the rate of long-term inflation plus an appropriate health care
cost premium. Based on consolidated obligations at January 2, 2016, a 100 basis point increase in the assumed health care cost trend rates would
increase 2016 benefits expense by approximately $4 million and generate an immediate loss recognition of $89 million. A 100 basis point excess
of 2016 actual health care claims cost over that calculated from the assumed trend rate would result in an experience loss of approximately
$4 million and would increase 2016 expense by $0.2 million. Any arising health care claims cost-related experience gain or loss is recognized in
the year in which they occur. The experience loss arising from recognition of 2015 claims experience was approximately $3 million.
Assumed mortality rates of plan participants are a critical estimate in measuring the expected payments a participant will receive over their lifetime
and the amount of expense we recognize. At the end of 2014, we revised our mortality assumption after considering the Society of Actuaries'
(SOA) updated mortality tables and improvement scale, as well as other mortality information available from the Social Security Administration to
develop assumptions aligned with our expectation of future improvement rates. In determining the appropriate mortality assumptions as of January
2, 2016, we considered the SOA's 2015 updated improvement scale and believe our assumption remains appropriate.
To conduct our annual review of discount rates, we selected the discount rate based on a cash-flow matching analysis using Willis Towers
Watson’s proprietary RATE:Link tool and projections of the future benefit payments constituting the projected benefit obligation for the plans.
RATE:Link establishes the uniform discount rate that produces the same present value of the estimated future benefit payments, as is generated
by discounting each year’s benefit payments by a spot rate applicable to that year. The spot rates used in this process are derived from a yield
curve created from yields on the 40th to 90th percentile of U.S. high quality bonds. A similar methodology is applied in Canada and Europe, except
the smaller bond markets imply that yields between the 10th and 90th percentiles are preferable. We use a December 31 measurement date for our
defined benefit plans. Accordingly, we select discount rates to measure our benefit obligations that are consistent with market indices during
December of each year.
Based on consolidated obligations at January 2, 2016, a 25 basis point decline in the weighted-average discount rate used for benefit plan
measurement purposes would decrease 2016 benefits expense by approximately $2 million and would result in an immediate loss recognition of
$222 million. All obligation-related actuarial gains and losses are recognized immediately in the year in which they occur.
Despite the previously-described rigorous policies for selecting major actuarial assumptions, we periodically experience material differences
between assumed and actual experience. During 2015, we recognized a net actuarial loss of approximately $418 million compared to a net
actuarial loss of approximately $918 million in 2014. Of the total net loss recognized in 2015, approximately $(245) million was related primarily to
favorable changes in the discount rate and other assumptions and $666 million was related to asset losses and $(3) million was related to a
discrete benefit resulting from certain events affecting our benefit programs. Of the $918 million net loss recognized in 2014, approximately $911
million was related to unfavorable changes in the discount rate and mortality assumptions, and $41 million was related to asset losses, and $(34)
million was related to a discrete benefit resulting from certain events affecting our benefit programs.
During 2015, we made contributions in the amount of $19 million to Kellogg’s global tax-qualified pension programs. This amount was mostly nondiscretionary. Additionally we contributed $14 million to our retiree medical programs.
Income taxes
45
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
Our consolidated effective income tax rate is influenced by tax planning opportunities available to us in the various jurisdictions in which we
operate. The calculation of our income tax provision and deferred income tax assets and liabilities is complex and requires the use of estimates
and judgment. Income taxes are provided on the portion of foreign earnings that is expected to be remitted to and taxable in the United States.
We recognize tax benefits associated with uncertain tax positions when, in our judgment, it is more likely than not that the positions will be
sustained upon examination by a taxing authority. For tax positions that meet the more likely than not recognition threshold, we initially and
subsequently measure the tax benefits as the largest amount that we judge to have a greater than 50% likelihood of being realized upon ultimate
settlement. Our liability associated with unrecognized tax benefits is adjusted periodically due to changing circumstances, such as the progress of
tax audits, new or emerging legislation and tax planning. The tax position will be derecognized when it is no longer more likely than not of being
sustained. Significant adjustments to our liability for unrecognized tax benefits impacting our effective tax rate are separately presented in the rate
reconciliation table of Note 12 within Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.
ACCOUNTING STANDARDS TO BE ADOPTED IN FUTURE PERIODS
Recognition and measurement of financial assets and liabilities. In January 2016, the FASB issued an ASU which primarily affects the accounting
for equity investments, financial liabilities under the fair value option, and the presentation and disclosure requirements for financial instruments.
The ASU is effective for fiscal years, and interim periods within those years, beginning after December 15, 2017. Early adoption can be elected for
all financial statements of fiscal years and interim periods that have not yet been issued or that have not yet been made available for issuance.
Entities should apply the update by means of a cumulative-effect adjustment to the balance sheet as of the beginning of the fiscal year of
adoption. We will adopt the updated standard in the first quarter of 2018. We do not expect the adoption of this guidance to have a significant
impact on our financial statements.
Balance sheet classification of deferred taxes. In November 2015, the FASB issued an ASU to simplify the presentation of deferred income taxes.
The ASU requires that deferred tax liabilities and assets be classified as noncurrent in a classified statement of financial position. The ASU is
effective for fiscal years, and interim periods within those years, beginning after December 15, 2016. Entities should apply the new guidance either
prospectively to all deferred tax liabilities and assets or retrospectively to all periods presented. Early adoption is permitted. We are currently
evaluating when we will adopt the updated standard and whether to use the prospective or retrospective method. Our year-end 2015 balance for
current deferred tax assets and liabilities was $227 and $9 million, respectively. Please see Note 12 for more information on our deferred tax
assets and liabilities.
Simplifying the accounting for measurement-period adjustments. In September 2015, the FASB issued an ASU to simplify the accounting for
measurement-period adjustments for items in a business combination. The ASU requires that an acquirer recognize adjustments to provisional
amounts that are identified during the measurement period in the reporting period in which the adjustment amounts are determined. The ASU is
effective for fiscal years, and interim periods within those years, beginning after December 15, 2015. Entities should apply the new guidance
prospectively to adjustments to provisional amounts that occur after the effective date of the ASU with earlier application permitted for financial
statements that have not been issued. We will adopt the updated standard in the first quarter of 2016. We do not expect the adoption of this
guidance to have a significant impact on our financial statements.
Simplifying the presentation of debt issuance costs. In April 2015, the FASB issued an ASU to simplify the presentation of debt issuance costs.
The ASU requires that debt issuance costs related to a recognized debt liability be presented in the balance sheet as a direct deduction from the
carrying amount of that debt liability, consistent with debt discounts. The recognition and measurement guidance for debt issuance costs are not
affected by the amendments in this ASU. The ASU is effective for fiscal years, and interim periods within those years, beginning after
December 15, 2015. Early adoption is permitted. Entities should apply the new guidance on a retrospective basis. We will adopt the updated
standard in the first quarter of 2016. We do not expect the adoption of this guidance to have a significant impact on our financial statements.
Customer's accounting for fees paid in a cloud computing arrangement. In April 2015, the FASB issued an ASU to help entities evaluate the
accounting for fees paid by a customer in a cloud computing arrangement. The ASU is effective for fiscal years, and interim periods within those
years, beginning after December 15, 2015. Early adoption is permitted. Entities should apply the new guidance either; 1) prospectively to all
arrangements entered into or
46
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
materially modified after the effective date or 2) retrospectively. We will adopt the updated standard prospectively in the first quarter of 2016. We
do not expect the adoption of this guidance to have a significant impact on our financial statements.
Revenue from contracts with customers. In May 2014, the FASB issued an ASU which provides guidance for accounting for revenue from
contracts with customers. The core principle of this ASU is that an entity should recognize revenue to depict the transfer of promised goods or
services to customers in an amount that reflects the consideration the entity expects to be entitled to in exchange for those goods or services. To
achieve that core principle, an entity would be required to apply the following five steps: 1) identify the contract(s) with a customer; 2) identify the
performance obligations in the contract; 3) determine the transaction price; 4) allocate the transaction price to the performance obligations in the
contract and 5) recognize revenue when (or as) the entity satisfies a performance obligation. When the ASU was originally issued it was effective
for fiscal years, and interim periods within those years, beginning after December 15, 2016, and early adoption was not permitted. On July 9, 2015,
the FASB decided to delay the effective date of the new revenue standard by one year. The updated standard will be effective for fiscal years, and
interim periods within those years, beginning after December 15, 2017. Entities will be permitted to adopt the new revenue standard early, but not
before the original effective date. Entities will have the option to apply the final standard retrospectively or use a modified retrospective method,
recognizing the cumulative effect of the ASU in retained earnings at the date of initial application. An entity will not restate prior periods if it uses
the modified retrospective method, but will be required to disclose the amount by which each financial statement line item is affected in the current
reporting period by the application of the ASU as compared to the guidance in effect prior to the change, as well as reasons for significant
changes. We will adopt the updated standard in the first quarter of 2018. We are currently evaluating the impact that implementing this ASU will
have on our financial statements and disclosures, as well as whether we will use the retrospective or modified retrospective method of adoption.
FUTURE OUTLOOK
We expect during 2016 that Project K and zero-based budgeting savings will enable us to continue to invest in our businesses, our foods, and the
categories in which we compete. We expect currency-neutral comparable net sales growth to be in the range of 1 to 3 percent. While our original
2016 guidance always included pricing to cover the impact of inflation in Venezuela, our latest outlook includes more pricing to offset inflation.
While it is difficult to predict pricing actions that will be required in Venezuela, it is possible that currency-neutral comparable net sales growth
could exceed our guidance range due to Venezuela.
We also expect currency-neutral comparable gross margin to be up slightly due to deflation resulting from material costs, savings from Project K
and zero-based budgeting. This expectation for currency-neutral comparable gross margin excludes the impact of highly inflationary economies.
Finally, we expect currency-neutral comparable operating profit growth in the range of 4 to 6 percent and currency-neutral comparable EPS to
increase in the range of 6 to 8 percent.
We expect that full-year operating cash flow will be approximately $1.1 billion, including capital spending in the range of 4 to 5 percent of net sales.
This capital spending expectation reflects much lower capital spending for Project K, but increased capital spending to support growth in our
Pringles business.
ITEM 7A. QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK
Our company is exposed to certain market risks, which exist as a part of our ongoing business operations. We use derivative financial and
commodity instruments, where appropriate, to manage these risks. As a matter of policy, we do not engage in trading or speculative transactions.
Refer to Note 13 within Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements for further information on our derivative financial and commodity instruments.
Foreign exchange risk
Our company is exposed to fluctuations in foreign currency cash flows related primarily to third-party purchases, intercompany transactions, and
when applicable, nonfunctional currency denominated third-party debt. Our company is also exposed to fluctuations in the value of foreign currency
investments in subsidiaries and cash flows related to repatriation of these investments. Additionally, our company is exposed to volatility in the
translation of foreign currency denominated earnings to U.S. dollars. Primary exposures include the U.S. dollar versus the euro, British pound,
Mexican peso, Australian dollar, Canadian dollar, Venezuelan bolivar fuerte, and Russian ruble, and
47
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
in the case of inter-subsidiary transactions, the British pound versus the euro. We assess foreign currency risk based on transactional cash flows
and translational volatility and may enter into forward contracts, options, and currency swaps to reduce fluctuations in long or short currency
positions. Forward contracts and options are generally less than 18 months duration. Currency swap agreements may be established in
conjunction with the term of underlying debt issuances.
The total notional amount of foreign currency derivative instruments at year-end 2015 was $1.2 billion, representing a settlement receivable of
$13 million. The total notional amount of foreign currency derivative instruments at year-end 2014 was $764 million, representing a settlement
receivable of $23 million. All of these derivatives were hedges of anticipated transactions, translational exposure, or existing assets or liabilities,
and mature within 18 months. Assuming an unfavorable 10% change in year-end exchange rates, the settlement receivable would have become a
settlement obligation of $77 million at year-end 2015 and the settlement receivable at year-end 2014 would have become a settlement obligation of
$53 million. These unfavorable changes would generally have been offset by favorable changes in the values of the underlying exposures.
Venezuela is considered a highly inflationary economy. As such, the functional currency for our operations in Venezuela is the U.S. dollar, which
in turn, requires bolivar denominated monetary assets and liabilities to be remeasured into U.S. dollars using an exchange rate at which such
balances could be settled as of the balance sheet date. In addition, revenues and expenses are recorded in U.S. dollars at an appropriate rate on
the date of the transaction. Gains and losses resulting from the remeasurement of the bolivar denominated monetary assets and liabilities are
recorded in earnings.
During 2015 we have experienced an increase in the amount of time it takes to exchange bolivars for U.S. dollars through the CENCOEX
exchange. Given this economic backdrop, and upon review of current U.S. dollar cash needs in our Venezuela operations as of the quarter ended
July 4, 2015, we concluded that we are no longer able to obtain sufficient U.S. dollars on a timely basis through the CENCOEX exchange to
support our Venezuela operations, resulting in a decision to remeasure our Venezuela subsidiary's financial statements using the SIMADI rate.
Please refer to Note 15 for more information regarding our operations in Venezuela and our change in foreign exchange rates.
As of July 4, 2015, certain non-monetary assets related to our Venezuelan subsidiary continued to be remeasured at historical exchange rates.
As these assets were utilized by our Venezuelan subsidiary during the second half of 2015 they were recognized in the income statement at
historical exchange rates resulting in an unfavorable impact. During 2015, we recognized expense related to the utilization of a portion of these
non-monetary assets, resulting in an unfavorable impact of approximately $17 million. We expect an additional unfavorable impact of
approximately $4 million in 2016 related to the utilization of these remaining non-monetary assets. Including these impacts, the total impact of
moving from the CENCOEX official rate to the SIMADI rate is anticipated to be $173 million, on a pre-tax basis, with $169 million recognized in
2015, or approximately $.42 on a fully-diluted EPS basis, plus an additional $4 million expected to be recognized in 2016.
In February 2016, the Venezuelan government announced a 59% devaluation of the CENCOEX official rate from 6.3 bolivars to 10.0 bolivars to the
U.S. dollar. Additionally the SICAD exchange rate was eliminated. These changes are not expected to have a material impact on our results as
we are currently using the SIMADI rate to remeasure our Venezuelan subsidiary’s financial statements.
Interest rate risk
Our company is exposed to interest rate volatility with regard to future issuances of fixed rate debt and existing and future issuances of variable
rate debt. Primary exposures include movements in U.S. Treasury rates, London Interbank Offered Rates (LIBOR), and commercial paper rates.
We periodically use interest rate swaps and forward interest rate contracts to reduce interest rate volatility and funding costs associated with
certain debt issues, and to achieve a desired proportion of variable versus fixed rate debt, based on current and projected market conditions.
During 2014, we entered into forward starting interest swaps with notional amounts totaling €500 million, as a hedge against interest rate volatility
associated with a forecasted issuance of fixed rate debt to be used for general corporate purposes. These swaps were designated as cash flow
hedges. During 2015 these forward starting interest swaps were settled and additional forward starting interest rate swaps with a notional amount
totaling €600 million were entered into and were designated as cash flow hedges. These forward starting interest rate swaps were settled in March
2015, upon the issuance of fixed rate debt. A resulting aggregate loss of $12 million was recorded in accumulated other comprehensive income
(loss) and will be amortized as interest expense over the life
48
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
of the related fixed rate debt. Refer to Note 7 within Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements for further information related to the fixed rate debt
issuance.
During 2015 we entered into new interest rate swaps with notional amounts totaling approximately $2.0 billion that were designated as fair value
hedges of certain U.S. Dollar Notes. Additionally during 2015 we terminated interest rate swaps with notional amounts totaling approximately $4.3
billion which were previously designated as fair value hedges of certain U.S. Dollar Notes. Refer to Note 7 within Notes to Consolidated Financial
Statements.
There were no outstanding interest rate swaps as of year-end 2015. The total notional amount of interest rate swaps at year-end 2014 was
$3 billion, representing a settlement obligation of $12 million. As there were no interest rate swaps or variable rate debt outstanding at year-end
2015, changes in interest rates would have no impact to annual interest expense. Assuming average variable rate debt levels during the year, a
one percentage point increase in interest rates would have increased interest expense by approximately $36 million at year-end 2014.
Price risk
Our company is exposed to price fluctuations primarily as a result of anticipated purchases of raw and packaging materials, fuel, and energy.
Primary exposures include corn, wheat, potato flakes, soybean oil, sugar, cocoa, cartonboard, natural gas, and diesel fuel. We have historically
used the combination of long-term contracts with suppliers, and exchange-traded futures and option contracts to reduce price fluctuations in a
desired percentage of forecasted raw material purchases over a duration of generally less than 18 months.
The total notional amount of commodity derivative instruments at year-end 2015 was $470 million, representing a settlement obligation of
approximately $43 million. The total notional amount of commodity derivative instruments at year-end 2014 was $492 million, representing a
settlement obligation of approximately $56 million. Assuming a 10% decrease in year-end commodity prices, the settlement obligation would have
increased by approximately $27 million at year-end 2015, and $31 million at year-end 2014, generally offset by a reduction in the cost of the
underlying commodity purchases.
In addition to the commodity derivative instruments discussed above, we use long-term contracts with suppliers to manage a portion of the price
exposure associated with future purchases of certain raw materials, including rice, sugar, cartonboard, and corrugated boxes. It should be noted
the exclusion of these contracts from the analysis above could be a limitation in assessing the net market risk of our company.
Reciprocal collateralization agreements
In some instances we have reciprocal collateralization agreements with counterparties regarding fair value positions in excess of certain
thresholds. These agreements call for the posting of collateral in the form of cash, treasury securities or letters of credit if a net liability position to
us or our counterparties exceeds a certain amount. As of January 2, 2016 and January 3, 2015, we had no collateral posting requirements related
to reciprocal collateralization agreements. As of January 2, 2016 and January 3, 2015, we posted $51 million and $50 million, respectively, in
margin deposits for exchange-traded commodity derivative instruments, which was reflected as an increase in accounts receivable, net on the
Consolidated Balance Sheet.
49
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
ITEM 8. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTARY DATA
Kellogg Company and Subsidiaries
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF INCOME
2015
(millions, except per share data)
Net sales
$
2014
13,525
$
2013
14,580
Cost of goods sold
8,844
9,517
Selling, general and administrative expense
3,590
4,039
Operating profit
$
1,091
$
1,024
$
14,792
8,689
3,266
$
2,837
Interest expense
227
209
Other income (expense), net
(91)
10
4
Income before income taxes
773
825
2,606
Income taxes
159
186
792
Earnings (loss) from unconsolidated entities
Net income
—
$
Net income (loss) attributable to noncontrolling interests
Net income attributable to Kellogg Company
614
235
(6)
$
—
633
(6)
$
1,808
1
1
$
614
$
632
$
1,807
Basic
$
1.74
$
1.76
$
4.98
Diluted
$
1.72
$
1.75
$
4.94
$
1.98
$
1.90
$
1.80
Per share amounts:
Dividends per share
Refer to Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.
50
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
Kellogg Company and Subsidiaries
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME
Pre-tax
amount
(millions)
2015
2014
Tax
(expense)
benefit
Tax
(expense)
benefit
After-tax
amount
$
Net income
Pre-tax
amount
2013
After-tax
amount
614
$
Tax
(expense)
benefit
Pre-tax
amount
633
After-tax
amount
$
1,808
Other comprehensive income:
Foreign currency translation adjustments
$
(170) $
(26)
8
(3)
(23)
3
(196)
$
(231) $
(32)
(263)
5
(35)
18
(17)
(20)
(10)
2
(8)
$
(24) $
—
(24)
11
(1)
10
(6)
—
(6)
Cash flow hedges:
Unrealized gain (loss) on cash flow hedges
Reclassification to net income
Postretirement and postemployment benefits:
Amounts arising during the period:
Net experience gain (loss)
—
—
—
(8)
3
(5)
17
(6)
11
Prior service credit (cost)
63
(24)
39
10
(3)
7
9
(2)
7
Net experience loss
3
(1)
2
3
(1)
2
5
(2)
3
Prior service cost
9
(3)
6
10
(3)
7
13
(4)
Reclassification to net income:
Other comprehensive income (loss)
$
(110) $
Comprehensive income
(54) $
$
450
$
(261) $
(16) $
$
—
Net income (loss) attributable to noncontrolling interests
Other comprehensive income (loss) attributable to
noncontrolling interests
Comprehensive income attributable to Kellogg Company
(164)
451
356
$
25 $
9
(15) $
10
$
1,818
1
(1)
$
(277)
1
—
$
355
—
$
1,817
Refer to notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.
51
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
Kellogg Company and Subsidiaries
CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEET
2015
(millions, except share data)
2014
Current assets
Cash and cash equivalents
$
251
$
443
Accounts receivable, net
1,344
1,276
Inventories
1,250
1,279
Other current assets
391
342
Total current assets
3,236
3,340
Property, net
3,621
3,769
Goodwill
4,968
4,971
Other intangibles, net
2,268
2,295
Investment in unconsolidated entities
456
1
Other assets
716
777
Total assets
$
15,265
$
15,153
$
1,266
$
607
Current liabilities
Current maturities of long-term debt
Notes payable
1,204
828
Accounts payable
1,907
1,528
Other current liabilities
1,362
1,401
Total current liabilities
5,739
4,364
Long-term debt
5,289
5,935
Deferred income taxes
685
726
Pension liability
946
777
Other liabilities
468
500
—
—
Common stock, $.25 par value, 1,000,000,000 shares authorized
Issued: 420,315,589 shares in 2015 and 420,125,937 shares in 2014
105
105
Capital in excess of par value
745
678
6,597
6,689
Treasury stock, at cost
70,291,514 shares in 2015 and 64,123,181 shares in 2014
(3,943)
(3,470)
Accumulated other comprehensive income (loss)
(1,376)
(1,213)
2,128
2,789
Commitments and contingencies
Equity
Retained earnings
Total Kellogg Company equity
Noncontrolling interests
Total equity
Total liabilities and equity
$
10
62
2,138
2,851
15,265
$
15,153
Refer to Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.
52
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
Kellogg Company and Subsidiaries
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF EQUITY
Common
stock
(millions)
Balance, December 29, 2012
shares
420
Capital in
excess of
par value
amount
$
105
$
573
Treasury stock
Retained
earnings
$
5,615
Common stock repurchases
shares
58
9
Net income (loss)
amount
$ (2,943) $
28
Stock options exercised and other
25
420
$
105
$
626
(20)
$
6,749
Common stock repurchases
(10)
57
11
Net income (loss)
488
$ (2,999) $
(690)
(277)
29
Stock options exercised and other
23
420
$
105
$
678
(12)
$
6,689
Common stock repurchases
(4)
64
11
Net income (loss)
219
$ (3,470) $
$
1
(653)
10
10
28
28
3,545
(731)
62
$
633
(680)
(1)
(681)
(277)
(277)
29
29
62
$
(163)
Stock options exercised and other
—
420
105
$
745
(6)
$
6,597
(5)
70
258
$ (3,943) $
(163)
2,128
$
356
614
(58)
(1)
(164)
(164)
51
268
(1,376) $
2,851
(700)
51
16
$
(277)
7
(700)
51
1,818
633
614
(58)
Stock compensation
$
(731)
VIE deconsolidation
Other comprehensive loss
10
230
$
614
(700)
3,607
1
7
Dividends
1,808
(690)
(731)
614
1,021
493
$
632
2,789
$
1,808
(653)
230
(1,213) $
2,465
(544)
Acquisition of noncontrolling interest
Balance, January 2, 2016
61
(690)
(680)
Other comprehensive loss
Stock compensation
$
Total
comprehensive
income (loss)
Total
equity
493
(936) $
632
Dividends
2,404
Noncontrolling
interests
1,807
10
Stock compensation
Total
Kellogg
Company
equity
(544)
(653)
Other comprehensive income
Balance, January 3, 2015
(946) $
(544)
1,807
Dividends
Balance, December 28, 2013
Accumulated
other
comprehensive
income (loss)
268
$
10
$
2,138
$
450
Refer to Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.
53
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
Kellogg Company and Subsidiaries
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF CASH FLOWS
2015
(millions)
2014
2013
Operating activities
Net income
$
614
$
633
$
1,808
Adjustments to reconcile net income to operating cash flows:
Depreciation and amortization
534
503
Postretirement benefit plan (income) expense
320
803
(169)
(254)
317
51
37
34
Venezuela remeasurement
169
—
15
VIE deconsolidation
(49)
—
Other
(13)
(125)
(15)
(33)
(53)
(48)
Deferred income taxes
Stock compensation
Postretirement benefit plan contributions
532
(1,078)
—
Changes in operating assets and liabilities, net of acquisitions:
Trade receivables
(127)
131
(50)
Inventories
(42)
(30)
112
Accounts payable
427
96
31
29
87
4
5
(2)
(9)
(32)
Accrued income taxes
Accrued interest expense
Accrued and prepaid advertising, promotion and trade allowances
Accrued salaries and wages
All other current assets and liabilities
Net cash provided by (used in) operating activities
$
7
(21)
20
(7)
61
(52)
(5)
125
1,691
$
1,793
$
1,807
Investing activities
Additions to properties
$
(553)
$
(582)
$
(637)
Acquisitions, net of cash acquired
(161)
—
—
Investments in unconsolidated entities
(456)
(6)
(6)
43
15
Other
Net cash provided by (used in) investing activities
$
(1,127)
$
(573)
2
$
(641)
Financing activities
Net increase (reduction) of notes payable, with maturities less than or equal to 90 days
443
183
Issuances of notes payable, with maturities greater than 90 days
214
1,030
640
Reductions of notes payable, with maturities greater than 90 days
(283)
(1,124)
(442)
(524)
Issuances of long-term debt
696
952
645
Reductions of long-term debt
(606)
(960)
(762)
Net issuances of common stock
261
217
475
Common stock repurchases
(731)
(690)
(544)
Cash dividends
(700)
(680)
(653)
Other
Net cash provided by (used in) financing activities
—
$
(706)
$
(192)
Effect of exchange rate changes on cash and cash equivalents
Increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents
$
(50)
Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of period
Cash and cash equivalents at end of period
9
(1,063)
24
$
13
$
443
170
(1,141)
(33)
$
273
(8)
281
$
251
$
443
$
273
Interest paid
$
228
$
209
$
234
Income taxes paid
$
337
$
414
$
426
$
147
$
136
$
135
Supplemental cash flow disclosures:
Supplemental cash flow disclosures of non-cash investing activities:
Additions to properties included in accounts payable
Refer to Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
54
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
Kellogg Company and Subsidiaries
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements
NOTE 1
ACCOUNTING POLICIES
Basis of presentation
The consolidated financial statements include the accounts of the Kellogg Company, those of the subsidiaries that it controls due to ownership of
a majority voting interest and the accounts of the variable interest entities (VIEs) of which Kellogg Company is the primary beneficiary (Kellogg or
the Company). The Company continually evaluates its involvement with VIEs to determine whether it has variable interests and is the primary
beneficiary of the VIE. When these criteria are met, the Company is required to consolidate the VIE. The Company’s share of earnings or losses
of nonconsolidated affiliates is included in its consolidated operating results using the equity method of accounting when it is able to exercise
significant influence over the operating and financial decisions of the affiliate. The Company uses the cost method of accounting if it is not able to
exercise significant influence over the operating and financial decisions of the affiliate. Intercompany balances and transactions are eliminated.
The Company’s fiscal year normally ends on the Saturday closest to December 31 and as a result, a 53rd week is added approximately every
sixth year. The Company’s 2015 and 2013 fiscal years each contained 52 weeks and ended on January 2, 2016 and December 28, 2013,
respectively. The Company’s 2014 fiscal year ended on January 3, 2015, and included a 53rd week. While quarters normally consist of 13-week
periods, the fourth quarter of fiscal 2014 included a 14th week.
Use of estimates
The preparation of financial statements in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America requires
management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities, the disclosure of contingent liabilities
at the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the periods reported. Actual results could differ
from those estimates.
Cash and cash equivalents
Highly liquid investments with remaining stated maturities of three months or less when purchased are considered cash equivalents and recorded
at cost.
Accounts receivable
Accounts receivable consists principally of trade receivables, which are recorded at the invoiced amount, net of allowances for doubtful accounts
and prompt payment discounts. Trade receivables do not bear interest. The allowance for doubtful accounts represents management’s estimate of
the amount of probable credit losses in existing accounts receivable, as determined from a review of past due balances and other specific account
data. Account balances are written off against the allowance when management determines the receivable is uncollectible. The Company does not
have off-balance sheet credit exposure related to its customers.
Inventories
Inventories are valued at the lower of cost or market. Cost is determined on an average cost basis.
Property
The Company’s property consists mainly of plants and equipment used for manufacturing activities. These assets are recorded at cost and
depreciated over estimated useful lives using straight-line methods for financial reporting and accelerated methods, where permitted, for tax
reporting. Major property categories are depreciated over various periods as follows (in years): manufacturing machinery and equipment 5-30;
office equipment 4-5; computer equipment and capitalized software 3-7; building components 15-25; building structures 30-50. Cost includes
interest associated with significant capital projects. Plant and equipment are reviewed for impairment when conditions indicate that the carrying
value may not be recoverable. Such conditions include an extended period of idleness or a plan of disposal. Assets to be disposed of at a future
date are depreciated over the remaining period of use. Assets to be sold are written down to realizable value at the time the assets are being
actively marketed for sale and a sale is expected to occur within one year. As of year-end 2015 and 2014, the carrying value of assets held for
sale was insignificant.
55
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
Goodwill and other intangible assets
Goodwill and indefinite-lived intangibles are not amortized, but are tested at least annually for impairment of value and whenever events or
changes in circumstances indicate the carrying amount of the asset may be impaired. An intangible asset with a finite life is amortized on a
straight-line basis over the estimated useful life.
For the goodwill impairment test, the fair value of the reporting units are estimated based on market multiples. This approach employs market
multiples based on earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization and earnings for companies that are comparable to the
Company’s reporting units. In the event the fair value determined using the market multiple approach is close to carrying value, the Company may
supplement the fair value determination using discounted cash flows. The assumptions used for the impairment test are consistent with those
utilized by a market participant performing similar valuations for the Company’s reporting units.
Similarly, impairment testing of other intangible assets requires a comparison of carrying value to fair value of that particular asset. Fair values of
non-goodwill intangible assets are based primarily on projections of future cash flows to be generated from that asset. For instance, cash flows
related to a particular trademark would be based on a projected royalty stream attributable to branded product sales, discounted at rates consistent
with rates used by market participants.
These estimates are made using various inputs including historical data, current and anticipated market conditions, management plans, and
market comparables.
Accounts payable
Beginning in 2014, the Company has an agreement with a third party to provide an accounts payable tracking system which facilitates participating
suppliers’ ability to monitor and, if elected, sell payment obligations from the Company to designated third-party financial institutions. Participating
suppliers may, at their sole discretion, make offers to sell one or more payment obligations of the Company prior to their scheduled due dates at a
discounted price to participating financial institutions. The Company’s goal in entering into this agreement is to capture overall supplier savings, in
the form of payment terms or vendor funding, created by facilitating suppliers’ ability to sell payment obligations, while providing them with greater
working capital flexibility. We have no economic interest in the sale of these suppliers’ receivables and no direct financial relationship with the
financial institutions concerning these services. The Company’s obligations to its suppliers, including amounts due and scheduled payment dates,
are not impacted by suppliers’ decisions to sell amounts under this arrangement. However, the Company’s right to offset balances due from
suppliers against payment obligations is restricted by this agreement for those payment obligations that have been sold by suppliers. As of
January 2, 2016, $501 million of the Company’s outstanding payment obligations had been placed in the accounts payable tracking system, and
participating suppliers had sold $407 million of those payment obligations to participating financial institutions. As of January 3, 2015, $236 million
of the Company’s outstanding payment obligations had been placed in the accounts payable tracking system, and participating suppliers had sold
$184 million of those payment obligations to participating financial institutions.
Revenue recognition
The Company recognizes sales upon delivery of its products to customers. Revenue, which includes shipping and handling charges billed to the
customer, is reported net of applicable provisions for discounts, returns, allowances, and various government withholding taxes. Methodologies for
determining these provisions are dependent on local customer pricing and promotional practices, which range from contractually fixed percentage
price reductions to reimbursement based on actual occurrence or performance. Where applicable, future reimbursements are estimated based on a
combination of historical patterns and future expectations regarding specific in-market product performance.
Advertising and promotion
The Company expenses production costs of advertising the first time the advertising takes place. Advertising expense is classified in selling,
general and administrative (SGA) expense.
The Company classifies promotional payments to its customers, the cost of consumer coupons, and other cash redemption offers in net sales.
The cost of promotional package inserts is recorded in cost of goods sold (COGS). Other types of consumer promotional expenditures are
recorded in SGA expense.
Research and development
The costs of research and development (R&D) are expensed as incurred and are classified in SGA expense. R&D includes expenditures for new
product and process innovation, as well as significant technological improvements to existing products and processes. The Company’s R&D
expenditures primarily consist of internal salaries, wages, consulting, and supplies attributable to time spent on R&D activities. Other costs include
depreciation and
56
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
maintenance of research facilities and equipment, including assets at manufacturing locations that are temporarily engaged in pilot plant activities.
Stock-based compensation
The Company uses stock-based compensation, including stock options, restricted stock, restricted stock units, and executive performance
shares, to provide long-term performance incentives for its global workforce.
The Company classifies pre-tax stock compensation expense principally in SGA expense within its corporate operations. Expense attributable to
awards of equity instruments is recorded in capital in excess of par value in the Consolidated Balance Sheet.
Certain of the Company’s stock-based compensation plans contain provisions that accelerate vesting of awards upon retirement, disability, or
death of eligible employees and directors. A stock-based award is considered vested for expense attribution purposes when the employee’s
retention of the award is no longer contingent on providing subsequent service. Accordingly, the Company recognizes compensation cost
immediately for awards granted to retirement-eligible individuals or over the period from the grant date to the date retirement eligibility is achieved,
if less than the stated vesting period.
The Company recognizes compensation cost for stock option awards that have a graded vesting schedule on a straight-line basis over the
requisite service period for the entire award.
Corporate income tax benefits realized upon exercise or vesting of an award in excess of that previously recognized in earnings (“windfall tax
benefit”) is recorded in other financing activities in the Consolidated Statement of Cash Flows. Realized windfall tax benefits are credited to capital
in excess of par value in the Consolidated Balance Sheet. Realized shortfall tax benefits (amounts which are less than that previously recognized
in earnings) are first offset against the cumulative balance of windfall tax benefits, if any, and then charged directly to income tax expense. The
Company currently has sufficient cumulative windfall tax benefits to absorb arising shortfalls, such that earnings were not affected during the
periods presented. Correspondingly, the Company includes the impact of pro forma deferred tax assets (i.e., the “as if” windfall or shortfall) for
purposes of determining assumed proceeds in the treasury stock calculation of diluted earnings per share.
Income taxes
The Company recognizes uncertain tax positions based on a benefit recognition model. Provided that the tax position is deemed more likely than
not of being sustained, the Company recognizes the largest amount of tax benefit that is greater than 50 percent likely of being ultimately realized
upon settlement. The tax position is derecognized when it is no longer more likely than not of being sustained. The Company classifies income
tax-related interest and penalties as interest expense and SGA expense, respectively, on the Consolidated Statement of Income. The current
portion of the Company’s unrecognized tax benefits is presented in the Consolidated Balance Sheet in other current assets and other current
liabilities, and the amounts expected to be settled after one year are recorded in other assets and other liabilities.
Income taxes are provided on the portion of foreign earnings that is expected to be remitted to and taxable in the United States.
Derivative Instruments
The fair value of derivative instruments is recorded in other current assets, other assets, other current liabilities or other liabilities. Gains and
losses representing either hedge ineffectiveness, hedge components excluded from the assessment of effectiveness, or hedges of translational
exposure are recorded in the Consolidated Statement of Income in other income (expense), net (OIE). In the Consolidated Statement of Cash
Flows, settlements of cash flow and fair value hedges are classified as an operating activity; settlements of all other derivative instruments,
including instruments for which hedge accounting has been discontinued, are classified consistent with the nature of the instrument.
Cash flow hedges. Qualifying derivatives are accounted for as cash flow hedges when the hedged item is a forecasted transaction. Gains and
losses on these instruments are recorded in other comprehensive income until the underlying transaction is recorded in earnings. When the hedged
item is realized, gains or losses are reclassified from accumulated other comprehensive income (loss) (AOCI) to the Consolidated Statement of
Income on the same line item as the underlying transaction.
57
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
Fair value hedges. Qualifying derivatives are accounted for as fair value hedges when the hedged item is a recognized asset, liability, or firm
commitment. Gains and losses on these instruments are recorded in earnings, offsetting gains and losses on the hedged item.
Net investment hedges. Qualifying derivative and nonderivative financial instruments are accounted for as net investment hedges when the
hedged item is a nonfunctional currency investment in a subsidiary. Gains and losses on these instruments are included in foreign currency
translation adjustments in AOCI.
Derivatives not designated for hedge accounting. Gains and losses on these instruments are recorded in the Consolidated Statement of Income,
on the same line item as the underlying hedged item.
Other contracts. The Company periodically enters into foreign currency forward contracts and options to reduce volatility in the translation of
foreign currency earnings to U.S. dollars. Gains and losses on these instruments are recorded in OIE, generally reducing the exposure to
translation volatility during a full-year period.
Foreign currency exchange risk. The Company is exposed to fluctuations in foreign currency cash flows related primarily to third-party purchases,
intercompany transactions and when applicable, nonfunctional currency denominated third-party debt. The Company is also exposed to
fluctuations in the value of foreign currency investments in subsidiaries and cash flows related to repatriation of these investments. Additionally,
the Company is exposed to volatility in the translation of foreign currency denominated earnings to U.S. dollars. Management assesses foreign
currency risk based on transactional cash flows and translational volatility and may enter into forward contracts, options, and currency swaps to
reduce fluctuations in long or short currency positions.
Forward contracts and options are generally less than 18 months duration. Currency swap agreements are established in conjunction with the term
of underlying debt issues.
For foreign currency cash flow and fair value hedges, the assessment of effectiveness is generally based on changes in spot rates. Changes in
time value are reported in OIE.
Interest rate risk. The Company is exposed to interest rate volatility with regard to future issuances of fixed rate debt and existing and future
issuances of variable rate debt. The Company periodically uses interest rate swaps, including forward-starting swaps, to reduce interest rate
volatility and funding costs associated with certain debt issues, and to achieve a desired proportion of variable versus fixed rate debt, based on
current and projected market conditions.
Fixed-to-variable interest rate swaps are accounted for as fair value hedges and the assessment of effectiveness is based on changes in the fair
value of the underlying debt, using incremental borrowing rates currently available on loans with similar terms and maturities.
Price risk. The Company is exposed to price fluctuations primarily as a result of anticipated purchases of raw and packaging materials, fuel, and
energy. The Company has historically used the combination of long-term contracts with suppliers, and exchange-traded futures and option
contracts to reduce price fluctuations in a desired percentage of forecasted raw material purchases over a duration of generally less than 18
months.
Certain commodity contracts are accounted for as cash flow hedges, while others are marked to market through earnings. The assessment of
effectiveness for exchange-traded instruments is based on changes in futures prices. The assessment of effectiveness for over-the-counter
transactions is based on changes in designated indices.
Pension benefits, nonpension postretirement and postemployment benefits
The Company sponsors a number of U.S. and foreign plans to provide pension, health care, and other welfare benefits to retired employees, as
well as salary continuance, severance, and long-term disability to former or inactive employees.
The recognition of benefit expense is based on actuarial assumptions, such as discount rate, long-term rate of compensation increase, long-term
rate of return on plan assets and health care cost trend rate, and is reported in COGS and SGA expense on the Consolidated Statement of
Income.
Postemployment benefits. The Company recognizes an obligation for postemployment benefit plans that vest or accumulate with service.
Obligations associated with the Company’s postemployment benefit plans, which are unfunded, are included in other current liabilities and other
liabilities on the Consolidated Balance Sheet. All gains and losses are recognized over the average remaining service period of active plan
participants.
58
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
Postemployment benefits that do not vest or accumulate with service or benefits to employees in excess of those specified in the respective
plans are expensed as incurred.
Pension and nonpension postretirement benefits. The Company recognizes actuarial gains and losses in operating results in the year in which
they occur. Experience gains and losses are recognized annually as of the measurement date, which is the Company’s fiscal year-end, or when
remeasurement is otherwise required under generally accepted accounting principles. The Company uses the fair value of plan assets to calculate
the expected return on plan assets.
Reportable segments are allocated service cost and amortization of prior service cost. All other components of pension and postretirement benefit
expense, including interest cost, expected return on assets, and experience gains and losses are considered unallocated corporate costs and are
not included in the measure of reportable segment operating results. See Note 17 for more information on reportable segments.
Management reviews the Company’s expected long-term rates of return annually; however, the benefit trust investment performance for one
particular year does not, by itself, significantly influence this evaluation. The expected rates of return are generally not revised provided these
rates fall between the 25th and 75th percentile of expected long-term returns, as determined by the Company’s modeling process.
For defined benefit pension and postretirement plans, the Company records the net overfunded or underfunded position as a pension asset or
pension liability on the Consolidated Balance Sheet.
New accounting standards
Practical expedient for the measurement date of an employer's defined benefit obligation and plan assets. In April 2015, the Financial Accounting
Standards Board (FASB) issued an Accounting Standards Update (ASU) to provide a practical expedient for the measurement date of an
employer’s defined benefit obligation and plan assets. For an entity with a fiscal year-end that does not coincide with a month-end, the
amendments in this Update provide a practical expedient that permits the entity to measure defined benefit plan assets and obligations using the
month-end that is closest to the entity’s fiscal year-end and apply that practical expedient consistently to all plans from year to year. The ASU is
effective for fiscal years, and interim periods within those years, beginning after December 15, 2015. Early adoption is permitted. Entities should
apply the new guidance on a prospective basis. The Company early adopted the updated standard when measuring the fair value of plan assets at
the end of its 2015 fiscal year with no impact to the Consolidated Financial Statements.
Presentation of an unrecognized tax benefit when a net operating loss carryforward, a similar tax loss, or a tax credit carryforward exists. In July
2013, the FASB issued an ASU which provides guidance on financial statement presentation of unrecognized tax benefits when a net operating
loss carryforward, a similar tax loss, or a tax credit carryforward exists. This ASU is expected to eliminate diversity in practice resulting from lack
of previously existing guidance. It applies to all entities with unrecognized tax benefits that also have tax loss or tax credit carryforwards in the
same tax jurisdiction as of the reporting date. The Company adopted the revised guidance in 2014 with no significant impact to the Consolidated
Financial Statements.
Accounting standards to be adopted in future periods
Recognition and measurement of financial assets and liabilities. In January 2016, the FASB issued an ASU which primarily affects the accounting
for equity investments, financial liabilities under the fair value option, and the presentation and disclosure requirements for financial instruments.
The ASU is effective for fiscal years, and interim periods within those years, beginning after December 15, 2017. Early adoption can be elected for
all financial statements of fiscal years and interim periods that have not yet been issued or that have not yet been made available for issuance.
Entities should apply the update by means of a cumulative-effect adjustment to the balance sheet as of the beginning of the fiscal year of
adoption. The Company will adopt the updated standard in the first quarter of 2018. The Company does not expect the adoption of this guidance to
have a significant impact on its financial statements.
Balance sheet classification of deferred taxes. In November 2015, the FASB issued an ASU to simplify the presentation of deferred income taxes.
The ASU requires that deferred tax liabilities and assets be classified as noncurrent in a classified statement of financial position. The ASU is
effective for fiscal years, and interim periods within those years, beginning after December 15, 2016. Entities should apply the new guidance either
prospectively to all deferred tax liabilities and assets or retrospectively to all periods presented. Early adoption is permitted. The Company is
currently evaluating when it will adopt the updated standard and whether to use the prospective or retrospective method. The year-end 2015
balance for current deferred tax assets and liabilities was
59
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
$227 million and $(9) million, respectively. Please see Note 12 for more information on the Company’s deferred tax assets and liabilities.
Simplifying the accounting for measurement-period adjustments. In September 2015, the FASB issued an ASU to simplify the accounting for
measurement-period adjustments for items in a business combination. The ASU requires that an acquirer recognize adjustments to provisional
amounts that are identified during the measurement period in the reporting period in which the adjustment amounts are determined. The ASU is
effective for fiscal years, and interim periods within those years, beginning after December 15, 2015. Entities should apply the new guidance
prospectively to adjustments to provisional amounts that occur after the effective date of the ASU with earlier application permitted for financial
statements that have not been issued. The Company will adopt the updated standard in the first quarter of 2016. The Company does not expect
the adoption of this guidance to have a significant impact on its financial statements.
Simplifying the presentation of debt issuance costs. In April 2015, the FASB issued an ASU to simplify the presentation of debt issuance costs.
The ASU requires that debt issuance costs related to a recognized debt liability be presented in the balance sheet as a direct deduction from the
carrying amount of that debt liability, consistent with debt discounts. The recognition and measurement guidance for debt issuance costs are not
affected by the amendments in this ASU. The ASU is effective for fiscal years, and interim periods within those years, beginning after
December 15, 2015. Early adoption is permitted. Entities should apply the new guidance on a retrospective basis. The Company will adopt the
updated standard in the first quarter of 2016. The Company does not expect the adoption of this guidance to have a significant impact on its
financial statements.
Customer's accounting for fees paid in a cloud computing arrangement. In April 2015, the FASB issued an ASU to help entities evaluate the
accounting for fees paid by a customer in a cloud computing arrangement. The ASU is effective for fiscal years, and interim periods within those
years, beginning after December 15, 2015. Early adoption is permitted. Entities should apply the new guidance either; 1) prospectively to all
arrangements entered into or materially modified after the effective date or 2) retrospectively. The Company will adopt the updated standard
prospectively in the first quarter of 2016. The Company does not expect the adoption of this guidance to have a significant impact on its financial
statements.
Revenue from contracts with customers. In May 2014, the FASB issued an ASU which provides guidance for accounting for revenue from
contracts with customers. The core principle of this ASU is that an entity should recognize revenue to depict the transfer of promised goods or
services to customers in an amount that reflects the consideration the entity expects to be entitled to in exchange for those goods or services. To
achieve that core principle, an entity would be required to apply the following five steps: 1) identify the contract(s) with a customer; 2) identify the
performance obligations in the contract; 3) determine the transaction price; 4) allocate the transaction price to the performance obligations in the
contract and 5) recognize revenue when (or as) the entity satisfies a performance obligation. When the ASU was originally issued it was effective
for fiscal years, and interim periods within those years, beginning after December 15, 2016, and early adoption was not permitted. On July 9, 2015,
the FASB decided to delay the effective date of the new revenue standard by one year. The updated standard will be effective for fiscal years, and
interim periods within those years, beginning after December 15, 2017. Entities will be permitted to adopt the new revenue standard early, but not
before the original effective date. Entities will have the option to apply the final standard retrospectively or use a modified retrospective method,
recognizing the cumulative effect of the ASU in retained earnings at the date of initial application. An entity will not restate prior periods if it uses
the modified retrospective method, but will be required to disclose the amount by which each financial statement line item is affected in the current
reporting period by the application of the ASU as compared to the guidance in effect prior to the change, as well as reasons for significant
changes. The Company will adopt the updated standard in the first quarter of 2018. The Company is currently evaluating the impact that
implementing this ASU will have on its financial statements and disclosures, as well as whether it will use the retrospective or modified
retrospective method of adoption.
60
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
NOTE 2
GOODWILL AND OTHER INTANGIBLE ASSETS
Bisco Misr and Mass Foods acquisitions
In January 2015, the Company completed its acquisition of a majority interest in Bisco Misr, the number one packaged biscuits company in Egypt,
for $125 million, or $117 million net of cash and cash equivalents acquired. In October 2015, the Company acquired additional ownership in Bisco
Misr through payment of $13 million to non-controlling interests, which is reported as financing activity on the Consolidated Statement of Cash
Flows. As of January 2, 2016, the Company owns greater than 95% of Bisco Misr outstanding shares.
In September 2015, the Company completed the acquisition of Mass Foods, Egypt's leading cereal company, for $46 million, or $44 million, net of
cash and cash equivalents acquired, subject to certain purchase price adjustments.
The acquisitions were accounted for under the purchase method and were financed through cash on hand. The assets and liabilities of Bisco Misr
and Mass Foods are included in the Consolidated Balance Sheet as of January 2, 2016 and the results of their operations subsequent to the
acquisition date, which are immaterial, are included in the Consolidated Statement of Income within the Europe operating segment. In addition, the
pro-forma effect of these acquisitions, if the acquisitions had been completed at the beginning of 2014, would have been immaterial.
The acquired assets and assumed liabilities include the following:
January 18,
2015
(millions)
Current assets
$
21
Property
90
Goodwill
81
Intangible assets and other
46
Current liabilities
(24)
Other non current liabilities, primarily deferred taxes
(33)
Non-controlling interests
(20)
$
161
Goodwill, which is not expected to be deductible for statutory tax purposes, is calculated as the excess of the purchase price over the fair value of
the net assets recognized. The goodwill recorded primarily reflects the value of providing an established platform to leverage the Company’s
existing brands in the markets served by Bisco Misr and Mass Foods as well as any intangible assets that do not qualify for separate recognition.
The allocation of purchase price for Bisco Misr was finalized in the 4th quarter of 2015. The allocation of the purchase price of Mass Foods is
subject to revision when appraisals are finalized, which is expected to occur no later than the third quarter of 2016.
61
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
Changes in the carrying amount of goodwill are presented in the following table.
Changes in the carrying
amount of goodwill
U.S.
Morning
Foods
(millions)
December 28, 2013*
U.S.
Snacks
$
131
$
131
Currency translation
adjustment
$
3,589
$
3,589
—
January 3, 2015*
North
America
Other
U.S.
Specialty
$
82
$
82
—
$
470
$
465
—
Latin
America
Europe
$
452
$
389
(5)
Asia
Pacific
$
89
$
83
(63)
Consolidated
$
238
$
232
(6)
$
5,051
$
4,971
(6)
(80)
Additions
—
—
—
—
81
—
—
81
VIE deconsolidation
—
(21)
—
—
—
—
—
(21)
Currency translation
adjustment
—
January 2, 2016
$
—
131
$
3,568
—
$
(9)
82
$
456
(39)
$
431
(7)
$
76
(8)
$
224
(63)
$
4,968
* In conjunction with the establishment of the Kashi operating segment, included within the North America Other reportable segment, certain intangible assets were reallocated. All prior period balances
were updated to conform with current presentation.
Intangible assets subject to
amortization
U.S.
Morning
Foods
(millions)
Gross carrying amount
December 28, 2013
$
Currency translation
adjustment
January 3, 2015
U.S.
Snacks
8
$
65
$
65
—
$
8
North
America
Other
U.S.
Specialty
$
—
—
$
—
$
—
5
$
42
$
38
—
$
Latin
America
Europe
5
$
(4)
Asia
Pacific
6
$
10
$
10
—
$
6
Consolidated
$
136
$
132
—
(4)
Additions
—
—
—
—
9
—
—
9
VIE deconsolidation
—
(23)
—
—
—
—
—
(23)
Currency translation
adjustment
January 2, 2016
—
$
—
—
—
8
$
42
$
—
$
8
$
11
$
—
$
(2)
—
5
$
45
$
4
$
4
$
—
(2)
6
$
10
$
116
6
$
1
$
34
$
43
Accumulated Amortization
December 28, 2013
$
Amortization
January 3, 2015
—
$
8
5
$
16
—
$
—
—
$
4
3
$
7
—
$
6
$
2
VIE deconsolidation
—
(4)
—
—
—
—
—
Amortization (a)
—
4
—
—
4
—
—
January 2, 2016
$
8
$
16
$
—
$
$
—
$
54
$
—
$
9
1
4
$
11
$
6
$
1
$
38
$
—
$
(4)
8
2
$
47
9
$
102
Intangible assets subject to
amortization, net
December 28, 2013
Amortization
—
Currency translation
adjustment
January 3, 2015
(5)
—
$
—
—
—
$
49
—
—
$
—
(3)
—
$
1
—
(4)
$
31
(1)
—
$
—
(9)
—
$
8
(4)
$
89
Additions
—
—
—
—
9
—
—
9
VIE deconsolidation
—
(19)
—
—
—
—
—
(19)
Amortization (a)
—
(4)
—
—
(4)
—
—
(8)
Currency translation
adjustment
January 2, 2016
—
$
—
—
$
26
—
$
—
—
$
1
(2)
$
34
—
$
—
—
$
8
(2)
$
69
(a) The currently estimated aggregate amortization expense for each of the next five succeeding fiscal periods is approximately $7 million per year.
62
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
Intangible assets not subject
to amortization
U.S.
Morning
Foods
(millions)
December 28, 2013*
$
Currency translation adjustment
January 3, 2015*
—
$
—
$
Additions
—
$
—
1,625
$
1,625
$
1,625
$
—
$
$
158
$
$
158
$
423
$
416
—
$
—
$
—
—
$
2,265
—
$
2,206
(59)
—
—
$
Consolidated
—
—
(43)
$
Asia
Pacific
—
36
—
—
482
(59)
—
—
$
158
Latin
America
Europe
—
—
—
$
—
—
—
—
$
North
America
Other
U.S.
Specialty
—
—
Currency translation adjustment
January 2, 2016
U.S.
Snacks
36
—
$
—
(43)
$
2,199
* In conjunction with the establishment of the Kashi operating segment, included within the North America Other reportable segment, certain intangible assets were reallocated. All prior period balances
were updated to conform with current presentation.
63
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
NOTE 3
INVESTMENTS IN UNCONSOLIDATED ENTITIES
In September 2015, the Company acquired, for $445 million, a 50% interest in Multipro Singapore Pte. Ltd. (Multipro), a leading distributor of a
variety of food products in Nigeria and Ghana and also obtained an option to acquire 24.5% of an affiliated food manufacturing entity under
common ownership based on a fixed multiple of future earnings as defined in the agreement (Purchase Option). The amount paid, which was
financed with cash on hand and commercial paper borrowings, is subject to purchase price adjustments, including the finalization of Multipro’s
2015 earnings as defined in the agreement.
The amount attributable to the Purchase Option of $77 million was recorded at cost and will be monitored for impairment through the exercise
period. The Purchase Option becomes exercisable upon the earlier of the entity achieving a minimum level of earnings as defined in the
agreement, in which case the Company has a one year exercise period, or 2020. The remaining $368 million paid for the 50% interest in Multipro is
accounted for under the equity method of accounting
The difference between the amount paid for Multipro and the underlying equity in net assets is primarily attributable to intangible assets, a portion
of which will be amortized in future periods, and goodwill.
Summarized combined financial information for the Company’s investments in unconsolidated entities is as follows (on a 100% basis):
Statement of Operations
(since time of investment in millions)
Period ended January 2, 2016
Net sales
$
289
Gross profit
$
44
Income before income taxes
$
12
Net income
$
5
Balance sheets
January 2, 2016
Current assets
$
Non-current assets
$
78
57
Current liabilities
$
(81)
Non-current liabilities
$
(25)
NOTE 4
RESTRUCTURING AND COST REDUCTION ACTIVITIES
The Company views its continued spending on restructuring and cost reduction activities as part of its ongoing operating principles to provide
greater visibility in achieving its long-term profit growth targets. Initiatives undertaken are currently expected to recover cash implementation costs
within a 5-year period of completion. Upon completion (or as each major stage is completed in the case of multi-year programs), the project begins
to deliver cash savings and/or reduced depreciation.
Project K
Project K, a four-year efficiency and effectiveness program, was announced in November 2013 and is expected to generate a significant amount of
savings that will be invested in key strategic areas of focus for the business. The Company expects that this investment will drive future growth in
revenues, gross margin, operating profit, and cash flow.
The focus of the program will be to strengthen existing businesses in core markets, increase growth in developing and emerging markets, and
drive an increased level of value-added innovation. The program is expected to provide a number of benefits, including an optimized supply chain
infrastructure, the implementation of global business services, and a new global focus on categories.
The Company currently anticipates that the program will result in total pre-tax charges, once all phases are approved and implemented, of $1.2 to
$1.4 billion, with after-tax cash costs, including incremental capital
64
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
expenditures, estimated to be $900 million to $1.1 billion. Based on current estimates and actual charges incurred to date, the Company expects
the total project charges will consist of asset-related costs totaling $400 to $450 million which will consist primarily of asset impairments,
accelerated depreciation and other exit-related costs; employee-related costs totaling $400 to $450 million which will include severance, pension
and other termination benefits; and other costs totaling $400 to $500 million which will consist primarily of charges related to the design and
implementation of global business capabilities. A significant portion of other costs are the result of the implementation of global business service
centers which are intended to simplify and standardize business support processes.
The Company currently expects that total pre-tax charges related to Project K will impact reportable segments as follows: U.S. Morning Foods
(approximately 18%), U.S. Snacks (approximately 13%), U.S. Specialty (approximately 1%), North America Other (approximately 10%), Europe
(approximately 17%), Latin America (approximately 2%), Asia-Pacific (approximately 6%), and Corporate (approximately 33%). Certain costs
impacting Corporate relate to additional initiatives to be approved and executed in the future. When these initiatives are fully defined and approved,
the Company will update estimated costs by reportable segment as needed.
Since inception of Project K, the Company has recognized charges of $817 million that have been attributed to the program. The charges were
comprised of $6 million being recorded as a reduction of revenue, $517 million being recorded in COGS and $294 million recorded in SGA.
Other Projects
In 2015 we initiated the implementation of a zero-based budgeting (ZBB) program in our North America business that is expected to deliver
visibility to ongoing annual savings. In support of the ZBB initiative, we incurred pre-tax charges of approximately $12 million in 2015.
All Projects
During 2015, the Company recorded $323 million of charges associated with all cost reduction initiatives. The charges were comprised of $4
million being recorded as a reduction of revenue, $191 million being recorded in COGS and $128 million recorded in SGA expense.
During 2014, the Company recorded $298 million of charges associated with all cost reduction initiatives. The charges were comprised of $2
million million being recorded as a reduction of revenue, $152 million being recorded in COGS and $144 million recorded in SGA expense.
The Company recorded $250 million of costs in 2013 associated with cost reduction initiatives. The charges were comprised of $195 million being
recorded in COGS and $55 million recorded in SGA expense.
65
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
The tables below provide the details for the charges incurred during 2015, 2014 and 2013 and program costs to date for all programs currently
active as of January 2, 2016.
Program costs to date
(millions)
Employee related costs
2015
2014
$
62
Asset related costs
Total
$
$
90
January 2, 2016
$
114
$
259
103
37
10
146
18
21
70
105
140
150
56
Asset impairment
Other costs
2013
323
$
298
$
250
319
$
829
Program costs to date
(millions)
U.S. Morning Foods
2015
2014
$
58
U.S. Snacks
2013
$
60
January 2, 2016
$
109
$
218
50
57
30
126
5
3
5
11
North America Other
63
18
11
90
Europe
74
80
27
173
16
U.S. Specialty
Latin America
4
8
5
Asia Pacific
13
37
32
74
Corporate
56
35
31
121
Total
$
323
$
298
$
250
$
829
Employee related costs consisted of severance and pension charges. Asset impairments were recorded for fixed assets that were determined to
be impaired and were written down to their estimated fair value. See Note 13 for more information. Asset related costs consist primarily of
accelerated depreciation. Other costs incurred consist primarily of third-party incremental costs related to the development and implementation of
global business capabilities.
At January 2, 2016 total project reserves were $88 million, related to severance payments and other costs of which a substantial portion will be
paid in 2016 and 2017. The following table provides details for exit cost reserves.
Employee
Related
Costs
(millions)
Liability as of December 28, 2013
$
2014 restructuring charges
Non-cash charges and other
$
2015 restructuring charges
Cash payments
Non-cash charges and other
Liability as of January 2, 2016
66
$
$
Asset Related
Costs
—
90
Cash payments
Liability as of January 3, 2015
Asset
Impairment
$
—
Other
Costs
$
Total
12
$
78
21
37
150
298
(84)
—
(24)
(148)
(256)
24
(21)
(13)
96
$
—
$
—
—
$
14
(10)
$
110
62
18
103
140
323
(116)
—
(34)
(121)
(271)
13
(18)
(69)
55
$
—
$
—
—
$
33
(74)
$
88
66
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
NOTE 5
EQUITY
Earnings per share
Basic earnings per share is determined by dividing net income attributable to Kellogg Company by the weighted average number of common
shares outstanding during the period. Diluted earnings per share is similarly determined, except that the denominator is increased to include the
number of additional common shares that would have been outstanding if all dilutive potential common shares had been issued. Dilutive potential
common shares consist principally of employee stock options issued by the Company, and to a lesser extent, certain contingently issuable
performance shares. Basic earnings per share is reconciled to diluted earnings per share in the following table:
Net income
attributable
to Kellogg
Company
(millions, except per share data)
Average
shares
outstanding
Earnings
per
share
2015
Basic
$
614
Dilutive potential common shares
Diluted
354
$
2
1.74
(0.02)
$
614
356
$
$
632
358
$
1.72
2014
Basic
Dilutive potential common shares
Diluted
2
1.76
(0.01)
$
632
360
$
$
1,807
363
$
1.75
2013
Basic
Dilutive potential common shares
Diluted
2
$
1,807
365
4.98
(0.04)
$
4.94
The total number of anti-dilutive potential common shares excluded from the reconciliation for each period was (in millions): 2015-2.7; 2014-5.0;
2013-5.0.
Stock transactions
The Company issues shares to employees and directors under various equity-based compensation and stock purchase programs, as further
discussed in Note 8. The number of shares issued during the periods presented was (in millions): 2015–5; 2014–4; 2013–10. The Company issued
shares totaling less than one million in each of the years presented under Kellogg Direct ™ , a direct stock purchase and dividend reinvestment plan
for U.S. shareholders.
In April 2013, the Company’s board of directors approved an authorization to repurchase up to $1 billion in shares through April 2014. In February
2014, the Company’s board of directors approved a new authorization to repurchase up to $1.5 billion in shares through December 2015. This
authorization supersedes the April 2013 authorization and is intended to allow the Company to repurchase shares to offset issuances for employee
benefit programs. In December 2015, the Company's board of directors approved an authorization to repurchase up to $1.5 billion in shares
beginning in 2016 through December 2017.
In May 2013, the Company entered into an Accelerated Share Repurchase (ASR) Agreement with a financial institution counterparty and paid $355
million for the repurchase of shares during the term of the Agreement which extended through August 2013. During the second quarter of 2013, 4.9
million shares were initially delivered to the Company and accounted for as a reduction to Kellogg Company equity. The transaction was completed
during the third quarter, at which time the Company received 0.6 million additional shares. The total number of shares delivered upon settlement of
the ASR was based upon the volume weighted average price of the Company’s stock over the term of the agreement.
During 2015, the Company repurchased 11 million million shares of common stock for a total of $731 million . During 2014, the Company
repurchased 11 million million shares of common stock for a total of $690 million . During 2013, the Company repurchased 9 million shares of
common stock at a total cost of $544 million.
67
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
Comprehensive income
Comprehensive income includes net income and all other changes in equity during a period except those resulting from investments by or
distributions to shareholders. Other comprehensive income for all years presented consists of foreign currency translation adjustments, fair value
adjustments associated with cash flow hedges and adjustments for net experience losses and prior service cost related to employee benefit plans.
During the year ended January 2, 2016, the Company amended a U.S. postretirement health plan as well as a U.S. pension plan. As a result of the
U.S. postretirement health plan amendment, a prior service credit was recognized in other comprehensive income with an offsetting reduction in
the accumulated postretirement benefit obligation. The U.S. pension plan amendment increased the Company's pension benefit obligation with an
offsetting increase in prior service costs in other comprehensive income. See Notes 9 and 10 for further details.
2015
2014
2013
Pre-tax
Tax (expense)
After-tax
Pre-tax
Tax (expense)
After-tax
Pre-tax
Tax (expense)
amount
benefit
amount
amount
benefit
amount
amount
benefit
$
Net income
614
$
After-tax
amount
633
$
1,808
Other comprehensive income:
Foreign currency translation adjustments
$
(170) $
(26)
(196) $
(231) $
8
(23)
(3)
5
(35)
3
(20)
(10)
(32) $
(263) $
(24)
—
(24)
18
(17)
2
(8)
11
(1)
10
(6)
—
(6)
Cash flow hedges:
Unrealized gain (loss) on cash flow hedges
Reclassification to net income
Postretirement and postemployment benefits:
Amounts arising during the period:
Net experience gain (loss)
—
—
—
(8)
3
(5)
17
(6)
11
Prior service credit (cost)
63
(24)
39
10
(3)
7
9
(2)
7
Net experience loss
3
(1)
2
3
(1)
2
5
(2)
3
Prior service cost
9
(3)
6
10
(3)
7
13
(4)
(164) $
(261) $
Reclassification to net income:
Other comprehensive income (loss)
Comprehensive income
$
(110) $
(54) $
$
450
$
—
Net income (loss) attributable to noncontrolling interests
Other comprehensive income (loss) attributable to
noncontrolling interests
Comprehensive income attributable to Kellogg Company
(16) $
451
356
25 $
9
(15) $
10
$
1,818
1
(1)
$
(277) $
1
—
$
355
—
$
1,817
Reclassifications out of Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income (AOCI) for the year ended January 2, 2016 and January 3, 2015, consisted of
the following:
68
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
Amount
reclassified
from AOCI
Details about AOCI
Components
2015
(millions)
Line item impacted
within Income
Statement
2014
2013
Gains and losses on cash flow hedges:
Foreign currency exchange contracts
$
(40)
$
(5)
$
(10)
COGS
Foreign currency exchange contracts
2
(3)
(2)
SGA
Interest rate contracts
3
(9)
(4)
Interest expense
Commodity contracts
12
7
10
COGS
(6)
Total before tax
—
Tax (expense) benefit
(6)
Net of tax
$
(23)
$
3
(10)
$
2
$
(20)
$
$
3
$
(8)
$
3
$
Amortization of postretirement and postemployment benefits:
Net experience loss
Prior service cost
9
$
12
10
$
(4)
Total reclassifications
13
$
(4)
5
(a)
13
(a)
18
Total before tax
(6)
Tax (expense) benefit
$
8
$
9
$
12
Net of tax
$
(12)
$
1
$
6
Net of tax
(a) See Note 9 and Note 10 for further details .
Accumulated other comprehensive income (loss) as of January 2, 2016 and January 3, 2015 consisted of the following:
January 2,
2016
(millions)
Foreign currency translation adjustments
$
Cash flow hedges — unrealized net gain (loss)
January 3,
2015
(1,314)
$
(1,119)
(39)
(24)
(16)
(18)
Postretirement and postemployment benefits:
Net experience loss
Prior service cost
(7)
Total accumulated other comprehensive income (loss)
$
(1,376)
(52)
$
(1,213)
Noncontrolling interests
In December 2012, the Company entered into a series of agreements with a third party including a subordinated loan (VIE Loan) of $44 million
which is convertible into approximately 85% of the equity of the entity (VIE). Due to this convertible subordinated loan and other agreements, the
Company determined that the entity was a variable interest entity, the Company was the primary beneficiary and the Company consolidated the
financial statements of the VIE in the U.S. Snacks operating segment. During 2015, the 2012 Agreements were terminated and the VIE Loan,
including related accrued interest and other receivables, were settled, resulting in a charge of $19 million, which was recorded as Other income
(expenses) in the year ended January 2, 2016. Upon termination of the 2012 Agreements, the Company was no longer considered the primary
beneficiary of the VIE, the VIE was deconsolidated, and the Company derecognized all assets and liabilities of the VIE, including an allocation of
a portion of goodwill from the U.S. Snacks operating segment, resulting in a $67 million non-cash gain, which was recorded within SGA expense
for the year ended January 2, 2016.
NOTE 6
LEASES AND OTHER COMMITMENTS
The Company’s leases are generally for equipment and warehouse space. Rent expense on all operating leases was (in millions): 2015-$189;
2014-$183; 2013-$174. During 2015, 2014 and 2013, the Company entered into less than $1 million in capital lease agreements.
69
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
At January 2, 2016, future minimum annual lease commitments under non-cancelable operating and capital leases were as follows:
Operating
leases
(millions)
2016
Capital
leases
$
171
$
2
2017
152
2018
119
1
2019
81
—
2020
62
—
2021 and beyond
87
Total minimum payments
$
1
1
672
$
5
Amount representing interest
—
Obligations under capital leases
5
Obligations due within one year
(2)
Long-term obligations under capital leases
$
3
The Company has provided various standard indemnifications in agreements to sell and purchase business assets and lease facilities over the
past several years, related primarily to pre-existing tax, environmental, and employee benefit obligations. Certain of these indemnifications are
limited by agreement in either amount and/or term and others are unlimited. The Company has also provided various “hold harmless” provisions
within certain service type agreements. Because the Company is not currently aware of any actual exposures associated with these
indemnifications, management is unable to estimate the maximum potential future payments to be made. At January 2, 2016, the Company had
not recorded any liability related to these indemnifications.
NOTE 7
DEBT
The following table presents the components of notes payable at year end January 2, 2016 and January 3, 2015:
2015
(millions)
Principal
amount
U.S. commercial paper
$
Europe commercial paper
Bank borrowings
Total
2014
Effective
interest rate
899
0.45%
261
0.01
Principal
amount
$
681
96
44
$
Effective
interest rate
0.36%
0.09
51
1,204
$
828
70
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
The following table presents the components of long-term debt at year end January 2, 2016 and January 3, 2015:
2015
(millions)
(a) 7.45% U.S. Dollar Debentures due 2031
$
2014
1,090
$
1,090
(b) 1.25% Euro Notes due 2025
651
—
(c) 2.75% U.S. Dollar Notes due 2023
210
210
(d) 3.125% U.S. Dollar Notes due 2022
369
357
(e) 1.75% Euro Notes due 2021
541
597
(f) 4.0% U.S. Dollar Notes due 2020
861
842
(g) 4.15% U.S. Dollar Notes due 2019
514
497
(h) 3.25% U.S. Dollar Notes due 2018
412
410
(i) 2.05% Canadian Dollar Notes due 2017
217
259
(j) 1.75% U.S. Dollar Notes due 2017
400
396
(k) 1.875% U.S. Dollar Notes due 2016
502
504
(l) 4.45% U.S. Dollar Notes due 2016
753
760
(m) 1.125% U.S. Dollar Notes due 2015
—
350
(n) Floating-rate U.S. Dollar Notes due 2015
—
250
Other
Less current maturities
35
20
6,555
6,542
(1,266)
Balance at year end
$
5,289
(607)
$
5,935
(a) In March 2001, the Company issued long-term debt instruments, primarily to finance the acquisition of Keebler Foods Company, of which $1.1 billion of thirty-year 7.45%
Debentures remain outstanding. The effective interest rate on the Debentures, reflecting issuance discount and hedge settlement, was 7.54%. The Debentures contain
standard events of default and covenants, and can be redeemed in whole or in part by the Company at any time at prices determined under a formula (but not less than
100% of the principal amount plus unpaid interest to the redemption date).
(b) In March 2015, the Company issued €600 million (approximately $651 million at January 2, 2016, which reflects the discount and translation adjustments) of ten-year
1.25% Euro Notes due 2025, using the proceeds from these Notes for general corporate purposes, which included repayment of a portion of the Company’s commercial
paper borrowings. The effective interest rate on the Notes, reflecting issuance discount and hedge settlement, was 2.07%. The Notes were designated as a net
investment hedge of the Company’s investment in its Europe subsidiary when issued.
(c) In February 2013, the Company issued $400 million of ten-year 2.75% U.S. Dollar Notes, using net proceeds from these Notes for general corporate purposes, including,
together with cash on hand, to repay a portion of the Company’s $750 million 4.25% U.S. Dollar Notes that matured in March 2013. The effective interest rate on these
Notes, reflecting issuance discount and hedge settlement, was 2.74% . In March 2014, the Company redeemed $189 million of the Notes. In connection with the debt
redemption, the Company reduced interest expense by $10 million , including $1 million of accelerated gains on interest rate swaps previously recorded in accumulated
other comprehensive income, and incurred $2 million expense, recorded in Other Income, Expense (net), related to acceleration of fees on the redeemed debt and fees
related to the tender offer.
(d) In May 2012, the Company issued $700 million of ten-year 3.125% U.S. Dollar Notes, using net proceeds from these Notes for general corporate purposes, including
financing a portion of the acquisition of Pringles. The effective interest rate on these Notes, reflecting issuance discount and interest rate swaps, was 2.69% at
January 2, 2016. In March 2014, the Company redeemed $342 million of the Notes. In connection with the debt redemption, the Company reduced interest expense by
$2 million and incurred $2 million expense, recorded in Other Income, Expense (net), related to acceleration of fees on the redeemed debt and fees related to the tender
offer. The Company entered into interest rate swaps in 2013 and 2014 with notional amounts totaling $200 million and $158 million, respectively, which effectively
converted these Notes from a fixed rate to a floating rate obligation. These derivative instruments were designated as fair value hedges of the debt obligation. During
2015, the Company entered into and terminated a series of interest rate swaps and as of January 2, 2016 had terminated all interest rate swaps. The $13 million gain on
termination at January 2, 2016 will be amortized to interest expense over the remaining term of the Notes. The fair value adjustment for the interest rate swaps was $1
million, at January 3, 2015, recorded as an increase in the hedged debt balance.
(e) In May 2014, the Company issued €500 million (approximately $541 million at January 2, 2016, which reflects the discount and translation adjustments) of seven-year
1.75% Euro Notes due 2021, using the proceeds from these Notes for general corporate purposes, which included repayment of a portion of the Company’s commercial
paper borrowings. The effective interest rate on the Notes, reflecting issuance discount and hedge settlement, was 2.18% . The Notes were designated as a net
investment hedge of the Company’s investment in its Europe subsidiary when issued.
(f) In December 2010, the Company issued $1.0 billion of ten-year 4.0% fixed rate U.S. Dollar Notes, using net proceeds from these Notes for incremental pension and
postretirement benefit plan contributions and to retire a portion of its commercial paper. The effective interest rate on these Notes, reflecting issuance discount, hedge
settlement and interest rate swaps, was 2.98% at January 2, 2016. In March 2014, the Company redeemed $150 million of the Notes. In connection with the debt
redemption, the Company incurred $12 million of interest expense offset by $7 million of accelerated gains on interest rate swaps previously recorded in accumulated
other comprehensive income, and incurred $1 million expense, recorded in Other Income, Expense (net), related to acceleration of fees on the redeemed debt and fees
related to the tender offer. The Company entered into interest rate swaps in 2013 and 2014 with notional amounts totaling $400 million and $300 million , respectively,
which effectively converted a portion of these Notes from a fixed rate to a floating rate obligation. These derivative instruments were designated as fair value hedges of
the debt obligation. During 2015, the Company entered into and terminated a series of interest rate swaps and as of January 2, 2016 had terminated all interest rate
swaps. The $14 million gain on termination at January 2, 2016 will be amortized to interest expense over the remaining term of the Notes. The fair value adjustment for
the interest rate swaps was $3 million, at January 3, 2015, and was recorded as a decrease in the hedged debt balance.
71
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
(g) In November 2009, the Company issued $500 million of ten-year 4.15% fixed rate U.S. Dollar Notes, using net proceeds from these Notes to retire a portion of its 6.6%
U.S. Dollar Notes due 2011. The effective interest rate on these Notes, reflecting issuance discount, hedge settlement and interest rate swaps was 3.52% at January 2,
2016. In 2012, the Company entered into interest rate swaps which effectively converted these Notes from a fixed rate to a floating rate obligation. These derivative
instruments were designated as fair value hedges of the debt obligation. During 2015, the Company entered into and terminated a series of interest rate swaps and as of
January 2, 2016 had terminated all interest rate swaps. The $15 million gain on termination at January 2, 2016 will be amortized to interest expense over the remaining
term of the Notes. The fair value adjustment for the interest rate swaps was $2 million at January 3, 2015, and was recorded as a decrease in the hedged debt balance.
(h) In May 2011, the Company issued $400 million of seven-year 3.25% fixed rate U.S. Dollar Notes, using net proceeds from these Notes for general corporate purposes
including repayment of a portion of its commercial paper. The effective interest rate on these Notes, reflecting issuance discount, hedge settlement and interest rate
swaps, was 2.52% at January 2, 2016. In 2011, the Company entered into interest rate swaps which effectively converted these Notes from a fixed rate to a floating rate
obligation. These derivative instruments were designated as fair value hedges of the debt obligation. During 2013, the Company terminated all of the interest rate swaps
and subsequently entered into interest rate swaps which effectively converted these Notes from a fixed rate to a floating rate obligation. These derivative instruments
were designated as fair value hedges of the debt obligation. During 2015, the Company terminated all interest rate swaps, and the resulting unamortized gain of $12
million at January 2, 2016 will be amortized to interest expense over the remaining term of the Notes. The fair value adjustment for the interest rate swaps was $3 million
at January 3, 2015, and was recorded as a decrease in the hedged debt balance.
(i) In May 2014, the Company issued Cdn. $300 million (approximately $217 million USD at January 2, 2016, which reflects the discount and translation adjustments) of
three-year 2.05% Canadian Dollar Notes due 2017, using the proceeds from these Notes, together with cash on hand, to repay the Company’s Cdn. $300 million, 2.10%
Notes due 2014 at maturity. The effective interest rate on the Notes, reflecting issuance discount and hedge settlement, was 2.10% .
(j) In May 2012, the Company issued $400 million of five-year 1.75% U.S. Dollar Notes, using net proceeds from these Notes for general corporate purposes, including
financing a portion of the acquisition of Pringles. The effective interest rate on these Notes, reflecting issuance discount and interest rate swaps, was 1.71% at
January 2, 2016. In 2013, the Company entered into interest rate swaps with notional amounts totaling $400 million, which effectively converted the Notes from a fixed
rate to a floating rate obligation. These derivative instruments were designated as fair value hedges of the debt obligation. During 2015, the Company terminated all
interest rate swaps, and the resulting unamortized gain of $1 million at January 2, 2016 will be amortized to interest expense over the remaining term of the Notes. The
fair value adjustment for the interest rate swaps was $3 million, at January 3, 2015, and was recorded as a decrease in the hedged debt balance.
(k) In November 2011, the Company issued $500 million of five-year 1.875% fixed rate U.S. Dollar Notes, using net proceeds from these Notes for general corporate
purposes including repayment of a portion of its commercial paper. The effective interest rate on these Notes, reflecting issuance discount, hedge settlement and interest
rate swaps was 1.63% at January 2, 2016. In 2012, the Company entered into interest rate swaps which effectively converted these Notes from a fixed rate to a floating
rate obligation. These derivative instruments were designated as fair value hedges of the debt obligation. In 2013, the Company terminated all of the interest rate swaps
and subsequently entered into interest rate swaps which effectively converted these Notes from a fixed rate to a floating rate obligation. These derivative instruments
were designated as fair value hedges of the debt obligation. In 2014, the Company terminated all of the interest rate swaps. The unamortized gain of $2 million at
January 2, 2016 will be amortized to interest expense over the remaining term of the Notes.
(l) In May 2009, the Company issued $750 million of seven-year 4.45% fixed rate U.S. Dollar Notes, using net proceeds from these Notes to retire a portion of its
commercial paper. The effective interest rate on these Notes, reflecting issuance discount, hedge settlement and interest rate swaps was 4.10% at January 2, 2016. The
Company entered into interest rate swaps in 2011 and 2012 with notional amounts totaling $200 million and $550 million, respectively, which effectively converted these
Notes from a fixed rate to a floating rate obligation. These derivative instruments were designated as fair value hedges of the debt obligation. In 2013, the Company
terminated all of the interest rate swaps. The unamortized gain of $3 million at January 2, 2016 will be amortized to interest expense over the remaining term of the Notes.
(m) In May 2012, the Company issued $350 million of three-year 1.125% U.S. Dollar Notes, using net proceeds from these Notes for general corporate purposes, including
financing a portion of the acquisition of Pringles. The effective interest rate on these Notes, reflecting issuance discount, was 1.16%. The Company redeemed these
Notes in May 2015.
(n) In February 2013, the Company issued $250 million of floating-rate U.S. Dollar Notes bearing interest at LIBOR plus 0.23% due February 2015. The proceeds from these
Notes were used for general corporate purposes, including, together with cash on hand, to repay a portion the Company’s $750 million 4.25% U.S. Dollar Notes that
matured in March 2013. The Company redeemed these Notes in February 2015.
All of the Company’s Notes contain customary covenants that limit the ability of the Company and its restricted subsidiaries (as defined) to incur
certain liens or enter into certain sale and lease-back transactions and also contain a change of control provision.
The Company and two of its subsidiaries (the Issuers) maintain a program under which the Issuers may issue euro-commercial paper notes up to a
maximum aggregate amount outstanding at any time of $750 million or its equivalent in alternative currencies. The notes may have maturities
ranging up to 364 days and will be senior unsecured obligations of the applicable Issuer. Notes issued by subsidiary Issuers will be guaranteed by
the Company. The notes may be issued at a discount or may bear fixed or floating rate interest or a coupon calculated by reference to an index or
formula. There was $261 million and $96 million outstanding under this program as of January 2, 2016 and January 3, 2015, respectively.
At January 2, 2016, the Company had $2.3 billion of short-term lines of credit, virtually all of which were unused and available for borrowing on an
unsecured basis. These lines were comprised principally of an unsecured Five-Year Credit Agreement, which the Company entered into in
February 2014 and expires in 2019, replacing the Company’s unsecured Four-year Credit Agreement, which would have expired in March 2015.
The Five-Year Credit Agreement
72
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
allows the Company to borrow, on a revolving credit basis, up to $2.0 billion, which includes the ability to obtain letters of credit in an aggregate
stated amount up to $75 million and swingline loans in aggregate principal amounts up to $200 million in U.S. Dollars and $400 million in Euros.
The agreement contains customary covenants and warranties, including specified restrictions on indebtedness, liens and a specified interest
coverage ratio. If an event of default occurs, then, to the extent permitted, the administrative agent may terminate the commitments under the
credit facility, accelerate any outstanding loans under the agreement, and demand the deposit of cash collateral equal to the lender’s letter of
credit exposure plus interest.
The Company was in compliance with all covenants as of January 2, 2016.
Scheduled principal repayments on long-term debt are (in millions): 2016–$1,262; 2017–$627; 2018–$407; 2019–$506; 2020–$851; 2021 and
beyond–$2,864.
Interest expense capitalized as part of the construction cost of fixed assets was (in millions): 2015–$4; 2014–$5; 2013–$2.
NOTE 8
STOCK COMPENSATION
The Company uses various equity-based compensation programs to provide long-term performance incentives for its global workforce. Currently,
these incentives consist principally of stock options, restricted stock units and, to a lesser extent, executive performance shares and restricted
stock grants. During 2015, the Company changed the mix of equity compensation, awarding an increasing number of restricted stock units and
fewer stock option awards. The Company also sponsors a discounted stock purchase plan in the United States and matching-grant programs in
several international locations. Additionally, the Company awards restricted stock to its outside directors. These awards are administered through
several plans, as described within this Note.
The 2013 Long-Term Incentive Plan (2013 Plan), approved by shareholders in 2013, permits awards to employees and officers in the form of
incentive and non-qualified stock options, performance units, restricted stock or restricted stock units, and stock appreciation rights. The 2013
Plan, which replaced the 2009 Long-Term Incentive Plan (2009 Plan), authorizes the issuance of a total of (a) 22 million shares; plus (b) the total
number of shares remaining available for future grants under the 2009 Plan. The total number of shares remaining available for issuance under the
2013 Plan will be reduced by two shares for each share issued pursuant to an award under the 2013 Plan other than a stock option or stock
appreciation right, or potentially issuable pursuant to an outstanding award other than a stock option or stock appreciation right, which will in each
case reduce the total number of shares remaining by one share for each share issued. The 2013 Plan includes several limitations on awards or
payments to individual participants. Options granted under the 2013 and 2009 Plans generally vest over three years. At January 2, 2016, there
were 16 million remaining authorized, but unissued, shares under the 2013 Plan.
The Non-Employee Director Stock Plan (2009 Director Plan) was approved by shareholders in 2009 and
allows each eligible non-employee director to receive shares of the Company’s common stock annually. The number of shares granted pursuant to
each annual award will be determined by the Nominating and Governance Committee of the Board of Directors. The 2009 Director Plan, which
replaced the 2000 Non-Employee Director Stock Plan (2000 Director Plan), reserves 500,000 shares for issuance, plus the total number of shares
as to which awards granted under the 2009 Director Plan or the 2000 Director Plans expire or are forfeited, terminated or settled in cash. Under
both the 2009 and 2000 Director Plans, shares (other than stock options) are placed in the Kellogg Company Grantor Trust for Non-Employee
Directors (the Grantor Trust). Under the terms of the Grantor Trust, shares are available to a director only upon termination of service on the Board.
Under the 2009 Director Plan, awards were as follows (number of shares): 2015-26,877; 2014-23,890; 2013-26,504.
The 2002 Employee Stock Purchase Plan was approved by shareholders in 2002 and permits eligible employees to purchase Company stock at a
discounted price. This plan allows for a maximum of 2.5 million shares of Company stock to be issued at a purchase price equal to 95% of the fair
market value of the stock on the last day of the quarterly purchase period. Total purchases through this plan for any employee are limited to a fair
market value of $25,000 during any calendar year. At January 2, 2016, there were approximately 0.3 million remaining authorized, but unissued,
shares under this plan. Shares were purchased by employees under this plan as follows (approximate number of shares): 2015–73,000;
2014–75,000; 2013–85,000. Options granted to employees to purchase discounted stock under this plan are included in the option activity tables
within this note.
73
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
Additionally, an international subsidiary of the Company maintains a stock purchase plan for its employees. Subject to limitations, employee
contributions to this plan are matched 1:1 by the Company. Under this plan, shares were granted by the Company to match an equal number of
shares purchased by employees as follows (approximate number of shares): 2015–48,000; 2014–58,000; 2013–58,000.
Compensation expense for all types of equity-based programs and the related income tax benefit recognized were as follows:
2015
(millions)
2014
2013
Pre-tax compensation expense
$
55
$
41
$
38
Related income tax benefit
$
20
$
15
$
14
As of January 2, 2016, total stock-based compensation cost related to non-vested awards not yet recognized was $62 million and the weightedaverage period over which this amount is expected to be recognized was 2 years.
Cash flows realized upon exercise or vesting of stock-based awards in the periods presented are included in the following table. Tax benefits
realized upon exercise or vesting of stock-based awards generally represent the tax benefit of the difference between the exercise price and the
strike price of the option.
Cash used by the Company to settle equity instruments granted under stock-based awards was insignificant.
2015
(millions)
Total cash received from option exercises and similar instruments
2014
2013
$
261
$
217
$
475
$
14
$
11
$
24
Tax benefits realized upon exercise or vesting of stock-based awards:
Windfall benefits classified as financing cash flow
Shares used to satisfy stock-based awards are normally issued out of treasury stock, although management is authorized to issue new shares to
the extent permitted by respective plan provisions. Refer to Note 5 for information on shares issued during the periods presented to employees and
directors under various long-term incentive plans and share repurchases under the Company’s stock repurchase authorizations. The Company
does not currently have a policy of repurchasing a specified number of shares issued under employee benefit programs during any particular time
period.
Stock options
During the periods presented, non-qualified stock options were granted to eligible employees under the 2013 and 2009 Plans with exercise prices
equal to the fair market value of the Company’s stock on the grant date, a contractual term of ten years, and a three-year graded vesting period.
Management estimates the fair value of each annual stock option award on the date of grant using a lattice-based option valuation model.
Composite assumptions are presented in the following table. Weighted-average values are disclosed for certain inputs which incorporate a range of
assumptions. Expected volatilities are based principally on historical volatility of the Company’s stock, and to a lesser extent, on implied
volatilities from traded options on the Company’s stock. Historical volatility corresponds to the contractual term of the options granted. The
Company uses historical data to estimate option exercise and employee termination within the valuation models; separate groups of employees
that have similar historical exercise behavior are considered separately for valuation purposes. The expected term of options granted represents
the period of time that options granted are expected to be outstanding; the weighted-average expected term for all employee groups is presented in
the following table. The risk-free rate for periods within the contractual life of the options is based on the U.S. Treasury yield curve in effect at the
time of grant.
Stock option valuation model
assumptions for grants within the
year ended:
2015
Weighted-average expected volatility
2014
2013
16.00%
15.00%
15.00%
Weighted-average expected term (years)
6.87
7.34
7.44
Weighted-average risk-free interest rate
1.98%
2.35%
1.49%
Dividend yield
3.00%
3.00%
Weighted-average fair value of options granted
$
7.21
$
6.70
2.90%
$
5.92
74
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
A summary of option activity for the year ended January 2, 2016 is presented in the following table:
Employee and
director stock
options
Outstanding, beginning of year
Granted
Weightedaverage
remaining
contractual
term (yrs.)
Weightedaverage
exercise
price
Shares
(millions)
21
$
Aggregate
intrinsic
value
(millions)
56
3
64
Exercised
(5)
53
Forfeitures and expirations
—
60
Outstanding, end of year
19
$
58
6.9
$
264
Exercisable, end of year
10
$
55
5.9
$
180
Additionally, option activity for the comparable prior year periods is presented in the following table:
2014
(millions, except per share data)
Outstanding, beginning of year
2013
20
Granted
Exercised
Forfeitures and expirations
25
6
6
(4)
(10)
(1)
(1)
Outstanding, end of year
21
20
Exercisable, end of year
10
9
Weighted-average exercise price:
Outstanding, beginning of year
$
54
$
50
Granted
60
60
Exercised
50
48
Forfeitures and expirations
58
55
Outstanding, end of year
$
56
$
54
Exercisable, end of year
$
53
$
50
The total intrinsic value of options exercised during the periods presented was (in millions): 2015–$65; 2014–$56; 2013–$139.
Other stock-based awards
During the periods presented, other stock-based awards consisted principally of executive performance shares and restricted stock granted under
the 2013 and 2009 Plans.
In the first quarter of 2015, the Company granted performance shares to a limited number of senior executive-level employees, which entitle these
employees to receive a specified number of shares of the Company's common stock upon vesting. The number of shares earned could range
between 0 and 200% of the target amount depending upon performance achieved over the three year vesting period. The performance conditions
of the award include three-year cumulative operating cash flow (CCF) and total shareholder return (TSR) of the Company's common stock relative
to a select group of peer companies.
A Monte Carlo valuation was used to determine the fair value of the awards. The TSR performance metric is a market condition. Therefore,
compensation cost of the TSR condition is fixed at the measurement date and is not revised based on actual performance. The TSR metric was
valued as a multiplier of possible levels of CCF achievement. Compensation cost related to CCF performance is revised for changes in the
expected outcome. The 2015 target grant currently corresponds to approximately 172,000 shares, with a grant-date fair value of $58 per share.
In 2014 and 2013, the Company made performance share awards to a limited number of senior executive-level employees, which entitles these
employees to receive a specified number of shares of the Company’s common stock on the vesting date, provided cumulative three-year targets
are achieved. The cumulative three-year targets involved operating profit and comparable net sales growth. Management estimates the fair value
of performance share awards based on the market price of the underlying stock on the date of grant, reduced by the present value of estimated
dividends foregone during the performance period. The 2014 and 2013 target grants (as revised for non-vested forfeitures and other adjustments)
currently correspond to approximately 202,000 and 185,000 shares, respectively, with a grant-date fair value of $54 and $54 per share. The actual
number of shares issued on the vesting date could range from 0 to 200% of target, depending on actual performance achieved.
75
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
Based on the market price of the Company’s common stock at year-end 2015, the maximum future value that could be awarded on the vesting
date was (in millions): 2015 award–$25; 2014 award–$29; and 2013 award–$27. The 2012 performance share award, payable in stock, was settled
at 35% of target in February 2015 for a total dollar equivalent of $3 million.
The Company also grants restricted stock and restricted stock units to eligible employees under the 2013 Plan. Restrictions with respect to sale or
transferability generally lapse after three years and, in the case of restricted stock, the grantee is normally entitled to receive shareholder
dividends during the vesting period. Management estimates the fair value of restricted stock grants based on the market price of the underlying
stock on the date of grant. A summary of restricted stock and restricted stock unit activity for the year ended January 2, 2016, is presented in the
following table:
Employee restricted stock and restricted
stock units
Weightedaverage
grant-date
fair value
Shares
(thousands)
Non-vested, beginning of year
346
Granted
617
59
Vested
(113)
50
Forfeited
(44)
Non-vested, end of year
806
$
54
58
$
57
Additionally, restricted stock and restricted stock unit activity for 2014 and 2013 is presented in the following table:
Employee restricted stock and restricted stock units
2014
2013
Shares (in thousands):
Non-vested, beginning of year
318
316
Granted
114
139
Vested
(65)
(117)
Forfeited
Non-vested, end of year
(21)
(20)
346
318
Weighted-average exercise price:
Non-vested, beginning of year
$
52
$
50
Granted
56
52
Vested
51
51
Forfeited
53
Non-vested, end of year
$
54
47
$
52
The total fair value of restricted stock and restricted stock units vesting in the periods presented was (in millions): 2015–$7; 2014–$4; 2013–$6.
NOTE 9
PENSION BENEFITS
The Company sponsors a number of U.S. and foreign pension plans to provide retirement benefits for its employees. The majority of these plans
are funded or unfunded defined benefit plans, although the Company does participate in a limited number of multiemployer or other defined
contribution plans for certain employee groups. See Note 11 for more information regarding the Company’s participation in multiemployer plans.
Defined benefits for salaried employees are generally based on salary and years of service, while union employee benefits are generally a
negotiated amount for each year of service. Beginning in 2015, the Company used a December 31 measurement date for these plans and, when
necessary, adjusts for plan contributions and significant events between December 31 and its fiscal year-end.
76
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
Obligations and funded status
The aggregate change in projected benefit obligation, plan assets, and funded status is presented in the following tables.
(millions)
2015
2014
Change in projected benefit obligation
Beginning of year
$
5,570
$
4,888
Service cost
114
106
Interest cost
206
225
2
2
Plan participants’ contributions
Amendments
25
4
Actuarial (gain)loss
(191)
754
Benefits paid
(262)
(281)
Curtailment and special termination benefits
(2)
Other
—
4
Foreign currency adjustments
3
(150)
End of year
(131)
$
5,316
$
5,570
$
5,028
$
5,014
Change in plan assets
Fair value beginning of year
Actual return on plan assets
Employer contributions
Plan participants’ contributions
(102)
390
19
37
2
Benefits paid
2
(235)
Other
(261)
4
Foreign currency adjustments
3
(132)
(157)
Fair value end of year
$
Funded status
$
(732)
$
(542)
$
231
$
250
4,584
$
5,028
Amounts recognized in the Consolidated Balance Sheet consist of
Other assets
Other current liabilities
Other liabilities
Net amount recognized
(17)
(15)
(946)
(777)
$
(732)
$
(542)
Prior service cost
$
67
$
59
Net amount recognized
$
67
$
59
Amounts recognized in accumulated other comprehensive income consist of
The accumulated benefit obligation for all defined benefit pension plans was $4.9 billion and $5.1 billion at January 2, 2016 and January 3, 2015,
respectively. Information for pension plans with accumulated benefit obligations in excess of plan assets were:
(millions)
2015
2014
Projected benefit obligation
$
3,769
$
3,958
Accumulated benefit obligation
$
3,574
$
3,683
Fair value of plan assets
$
2,835
$
3,179
77
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
Expense
The components of pension expense are presented in the following table. Pension expense for defined contribution plans relates to certain foreignbased defined contribution plans and multiemployer plans in the United States in which the Company participates on behalf of certain unionized
workforces.
(millions)
2015
Service cost
$
2014
114
Interest cost
Expected return on plan assets
Amortization of unrecognized prior service cost
Recognized net (gain)loss
Curtailment and special termination benefits
$
2013
106
$
133
206
225
203
(399)
(415)
(359)
13
14
16
303
782
(854)
(1)
4
34
Pension (income)expense:
Defined benefit plans
Defined contribution plans
Total
$
236
716
(827)
40
36
35
276
$
752
$
(792)
The estimated prior service cost for defined benefit pension plans that will be amortized from accumulated other comprehensive income into
pension expense over the next fiscal year is approximately $13 million.
The Company and certain of its subsidiaries sponsor 401(k) or similar savings plans for active employees. Expense related to these plans was (in
millions): 2015 – $40 million; 2014 – $43 million; 2013 – $41 million. These amounts are not included in the preceding expense table. Company
contributions to these savings plans approximate annual expense. Company contributions to multiemployer and other defined contribution pension
plans approximate the amount of annual expense presented in the preceding table.
Assumptions
The worldwide weighted-average actuarial assumptions used to determine benefit obligations were:
2015
2014
2013
Discount rate
4.1%
3.9%
4.7%
Long-term rate of compensation increase
3.9%
4.0%
4.1%
The worldwide weighted-average actuarial assumptions used to determine annual net periodic benefit cost were:
2015
2014
2013
Discount rate
3.9%
4.7%
4.1%
Long-term rate of compensation increase
4.0%
4.1%
4.1%
Long-term rate of return on plan assets
8.3%
8.5%
8.5%
To determine the overall expected long-term rate of return on plan assets, the Company models expected returns over a 20-year investment
horizon with respect to the specific investment mix of its major plans. The return assumptions used reflect a combination of rigorous historical
performance analysis and forward-looking views of the financial markets including consideration of current yields on long-term bonds, priceearnings ratios of the major stock market indices, and long-term inflation. The U.S. model, which corresponds to approximately 68% of
consolidated pension and other postretirement benefit plan assets, incorporates a long-term inflation assumption of 2.5% and an active
management premium of 1% (net of fees) validated by historical analysis. Similar methods are used for various foreign plans with invested assets,
reflecting local economic conditions. The expected rate of return for 2015 of 8.5% equated to approximately the 57th percentile expectation. Refer
to Note 1.
At the end of 2014, the Company revised their mortality assumption after considering the Society of Actuaries’ (SOA) updated mortality tables and
improvement scale, as well as other mortality information available from the Social Security Administration to develop assumptions aligned with
the Company’s expectation of future improvement rates. In determining the appropriate mortality assumptions as of January 2, 2016, the Company
considered the SOA's 2015 updated improvement scale and believes its assumption is appropriate.
To conduct the annual review of discount rates, the Company selected the discount rate based on a cash-flow matching analysis using Towers
Watson’s proprietary RATE:Link tool and projections of the future benefit payments that constitute the projected benefit obligation for the plans.
RATE:Link establishes the uniform discount rate that produces the same present value of the estimated future benefit payments, as is generated
by discounting each
78
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
year’s benefit payments by a spot rate applicable to that year. The spot rates used in this process are derived from a yield curve created from
yields on the 40th to 90th percentile of U.S. high quality bonds. A similar methodology is applied in Canada and Europe, except the smaller bond
markets imply that yields between the 10th and 90th percentiles are preferable. The measurement dates for the defined benefit plans are
consistent with the Company’s fiscal year end. Accordingly, the Company selected discount rates to measure the benefit obligations consistent
with market indices at year-end.
Beginning in 2016, the Company will change the method used to estimate the service and interest costs for pension and postretirement benefits.
The new method utilizes a full yield curve approach to estimate service and interest costs by applying specific spot rates along the yield curve
used to determine the benefit obligation of relevant projected cash outflows. Historically, the Company utilized a single weighted-average discount
rate applied to projected cash outflows. The Company made the change to provide a more precise measurement of service and interest costs by
aligning the timing of the plan's liability cash flows to the corresponding spot rate on the yield curve. The change does not impact the
measurement of the plan's obligations. The Company has accounted for this change as a change in accounting estimate.
Plan assets
The Company categorized Plan assets within a three level fair value hierarchy described as follows:
Investments stated at fair value as determined by quoted market prices (Level 1) include:
Cash and cash equivalents: Value based on cost, which approximates fair value.
Corporate stock, common: Value based on the last sales price on the primary exchange.
Investments stated at estimated fair value using significant observable inputs (Level 2) include:
Cash and cash equivalents: Institutional short-term investment vehicles valued daily.
Mutual funds: Valued at the net asset value of shares held by the Plan at year end.
Collective trusts: Value based on the net asset value of units held at year end.
Bonds: Value based on matrices or models from pricing vendors.
Limited partnerships: Value based on the ending net capital account balance at year end.
Investments stated at estimated fair value using significant unobservable inputs (Level 3) include:
Real estate: Value based on the net asset value of units held at year end. The fair value of real estate holdings is based on market data including
earnings capitalization, discounted cash flow analysis, comparable sales transactions or a combination of these methods.
Buy-in annuity contracts: Value based on the calculated pension benefit obligation covered by the non-participating annuity contracts at year-end.
Bonds: Value based on matrices or models from brokerage firms. A limited number of the investments are in default.
The preceding methods described may produce a fair value calculation that may not be indicative of net realizable value or reflective of future fair
values. Furthermore, although the Company believes its valuation methods are appropriate and consistent with other market participants, the use
of different methodologies or assumptions to determine the fair value of certain financial instruments could result in a different fair value
measurement at the reporting date.
The Company’s practice regarding the timing of transfers between levels is to measure transfers in at the beginning of the month and transfers out
at the end of the month. For the year ended January 2, 2016, the Company had no transfers between Levels 1 and 2.
79
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
The fair value of Plan assets as of January 2, 2016 summarized by level within the fair value hierarchy are as follows:
Total
Level 1
(millions)
Cash and cash equivalents
$
Total
Level 2
83
Total
Level 3
$
8
$
Total
—
$
91
Corporate stock, common:
Domestic
608
—
—
608
International
109
—
—
109
—
441
—
441
Mutual funds:
International equity
Collective trusts:
Domestic equity
—
411
—
411
International equity
—
1,130
—
1,130
Eurozone sovereign debt
—
10
—
10
Other international debt
—
368
—
368
Limited partnerships
—
455
—
455
Bonds, corporate
—
419
—
419
Bonds, government
—
157
—
157
Bonds, other
—
49
—
49
Buy-in annuity contract
—
—
135
135
Real estate
—
—
135
135
Other
—
60
6
Total
$
800
$
3,508
$
66
276
$
4,584
The fair value of Plan assets at January 3, 2015 are summarized as follows:
Total
Level 1
(millions)
Cash and cash equivalents
$
Total
Level 2
47
$
Total
Level 3
44
$
Total
—
$
91
Corporate stock, common:
Domestic
556
—
—
556
International
161
—
—
161
International equity
—
393
—
393
International debt
—
—
—
—
Mutual funds:
Collective trusts:
Domestic equity
—
594
—
594
International equity
—
1,261
—
1,261
Eurozone sovereign debt
—
11
—
11
Other international debt
—
534
—
534
Limited partnerships
—
475
—
475
Bonds, corporate
—
519
—
519
Bonds, government
—
172
—
172
Bonds, other
—
59
—
59
Real estate
—
—
130
130
Other
Total
—
$
764
64
$
4,126
8
$
138
72
$
5,028
There were no unfunded commitments to purchase investments at January 2, 2016 or January 3, 2015.
The Company’s investment strategy for its major defined benefit plans is to maintain a diversified portfolio of asset classes with the primary goal
of meeting long-term cash requirements as they become due. Assets are invested in a prudent manner to maintain the security of funds while
maximizing returns within the Plan’s investment policy. The investment policy specifies the type of investment vehicles appropriate for the Plan,
asset allocation guidelines, criteria for the selection of investment managers, procedures to monitor overall investment performance as well as
investment manager performance. It also provides guidelines enabling Plan fiduciaries to fulfill their responsibilities.
80
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
The current weighted-average target asset allocation reflected by this strategy is: equity securities–66%; debt securities–21%; real estate and
other–13%. Investment in Company common stock represented 1.4% and 1.3% of consolidated plan assets at January 2, 2016 and January 3,
2015, respectively. Plan funding strategies are influenced by tax regulations and funding requirements. The Company currently expects to
contribute approximately $28 million to its defined benefit pension plans during 2016.
Level 3 gains and losses
Changes in the fair value of the Plan’s Level 3 assets are summarized as follows:
Bonds,
corporate
(millions)
December 28, 2013
$
Real
estate
1
$
Buy-in Annuity
Contract
125
—
Other
$
Total
8
$
134
Sales
(1)
(1)
—
—
(2)
Realized and unrealized gain
—
23
—
—
23
Currency translation
January 3, 2015
—
$
—
(17)
$
130
—
$
—
Sales
—
(5)
Purchases
—
—
135
Realized and unrealized gain
—
16
Currency translation
—
(6)
January 2, 2016
$
—
$
135
—
$
—
$
8
(17)
$
(3)
138
(8)
3
138
—
(1)
15
—
(1)
135
$
6
(7)
$
276
The net change in Level 3 assets includes a gain attributable to the change in unrealized holding gains or losses related to Level 3 assets held at
January 2, 2016 and January 3, 2015 totaling $15 million and $23 million, respectively.
Benefit payments
The following benefit payments, which reflect expected future service, as appropriate, are expected to be paid (in millions): 2016–$416;
2017–$238; 2018–$243; 2019–$254; 2020–$265; 2021 to 2025–$1,501.
NOTE 10
NONPENSION POSTRETIREMENT AND POSTEMPLOYMENT BENEFITS
Postretirement
The Company sponsors a number of plans to provide health care and other welfare benefits to retired employees in the United States and Canada,
who have met certain age and service requirements. The majority of these plans are funded or unfunded defined benefit plans, although the
Company does participate in a limited number of multiemployer or other defined contribution plans for certain employee groups. The Company
contributes to voluntary employee benefit association (VEBA) trusts to fund certain U.S. retiree health and welfare benefit obligations. Beginning in
2015, the Company used a December 31 measurement date for these plans and, when necessary, adjusts for plan contributions and significant
events between December 31 and its fiscal year-end.
81
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
Obligations and funded status
The aggregate change in accumulated postretirement benefit obligation, plan assets, and funded status is presented in the following tables.
2015
(millions)
2014
Change in accumulated benefit obligation
Beginning of year
$
1,288
$
1,202
Service cost
29
Interest cost
48
55
Actuarial (gain) loss
(53)
116
Benefits paid
(57)
(62)
Curtailments
—
(28)
Amendments
(84)
(18)
(8)
(5)
Foreign currency adjustments
End of year
28
$
1,163
$
1,288
$
1,204
$
1,178
Change in plan assets
Fair value beginning of year
Actual return on plan assets
(65)
Employer contributions
Benefits paid
81
14
16
(69)
(71)
Fair value end of year
$
Funded status
$
(79)
$
(84)
$
—
$
—
1,084
$
1,204
Amounts recognized in the Consolidated Balance Sheet consist of
Other non-current assets
Other current liabilities
Other liabilities
Net amount recognized
$
(2)
(2)
(77)
(82)
(79)
$
(84)
Amounts recognized in accumulated other comprehensive income consist of
Prior service credit
(95)
Net amount recognized
$
(16)
(95)
$
(16)
Expense
Components of postretirement benefit expense (income) were:
2015
(millions)
Service cost
$
2014
29
Interest cost
Expected return on plan assets
Amortization of unrecognized prior service credit
$
34
55
50
(100)
(98)
(86)
(3)
112
Curtailment
$
48
(5)
Recognized net (gain) loss
2013
28
(3)
133
—
(28)
Defined benefit plans
84
87
Defined contribution plans
14
14
(247)
1
Postretirement benefit expense:
Total
$
98
$
101
(251)
13
$
(238)
The estimated prior service credit that will be amortized from accumulated other comprehensive income into nonpension postretirement benefit
expense over the next fiscal year is expected to be approximately $9 million.
Assumptions
The weighted-average actuarial assumptions used to determine benefit obligations were:
2015
Discount rate
2014
4.2%
2013
4.0%
4.8%
The weighted-average actuarial assumptions used to determine annual net periodic benefit cost were:
2015
2014
2013
Discount rate
4.0%
4.8%
3.9%
Long-term rate of return on plan assets
8.5%
8.5%
8.5%
82
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
The Company determines the overall discount rate and expected long-term rate of return on VEBA trust obligations and assets in the same
manner as that described for pension trusts in Note 9.
The assumed health care cost trend rate is 5.0% for 2016, decreasing gradually to 4.5% by the year 2018 and remaining at that level thereafter.
These trend rates reflect the Company’s historical experience and management’s expectations regarding future trends. A one percentage point
change in assumed health care cost trend rates would have the following effects:
One percentage
point increase
(millions)
Effect on total of service and interest cost components
$
One percentage
point decrease
4
Effect on postretirement benefit obligation
$
(3)
89
(72)
Plan assets
The fair value of Plan assets as of January 2, 2016 summarized by level within fair value hierarchy described in Note 9, are as follows:
Total
Level 1
(millions)
Cash and cash equivalents
$
Total
Level 2
9
$
Total
Level 3
13
$
Total
—
$
22
Corporate stock, common:
Domestic
International
195
—
—
195
5
—
—
5
Mutual funds:
Domestic equity
—
52
—
52
International equity
—
111
—
111
Domestic debt
—
54
—
54
Domestic equity
—
150
—
150
International equity
—
148
—
148
Limited partnerships
—
166
—
166
Bonds, corporate
—
120
—
120
Bonds, government
—
48
—
48
Bonds, other
—
12
—
12
Other
—
1
—
Collective trusts:
Total
$
209
$
875
$
1
—
$
—
$
1,084
The fair value of Plan assets at January 3, 2015 are summarized as follows:
Total
Level 1
(millions)
Cash and cash equivalents
$
Total
Level 2
6
$
Total
Level 3
27
$
Total
33
Corporate stock, common:
Domestic
214
—
—
214
17
—
—
17
Domestic equity
—
153
—
153
International equity
—
120
—
120
Domestic debt
—
63
—
63
International
Mutual funds:
Collective trusts:
Domestic equity
—
53
—
53
International equity
—
164
—
164
Limited partnerships
—
174
—
174
Bonds, corporate
—
141
—
141
Bonds, government
—
54
—
54
Bonds, other
—
17
—
17
Other
—
1
—
Total
$
237
$
967
$
—
1
$
1,204
83
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
The Company’s asset investment strategy for its VEBA trusts is consistent with that described for its pension trusts in Note 9. The current target
asset allocation is 75% equity securities and 25% debt securities. The Company currently expects to contribute approximately $15 million to its
VEBA trusts during 2016.
There were no Level 3 assets during 2015 and 2014.
Postemployment
Under certain conditions, the Company provides benefits to former or inactive employees, including salary continuance, severance, and long-term
disability, in the United States and several foreign locations. The Company’s postemployment benefit plans are unfunded. Actuarial assumptions
used are generally consistent with those presented for pension benefits in Note 9. The aggregate change in accumulated postemployment benefit
obligation and the net amount recognized were:
2015
(millions)
2014
Change in accumulated benefit obligation
Beginning of year
$
104
$
87
Service cost
7
7
Interest cost
4
4
Actuarial (gain)loss
—
8
Benefits paid
(6)
(9)
Amendments
—
8
Foreign currency adjustments
(1)
(1)
End of year
$
108
$
104
Funded status
$
(108)
$
(104)
(8)
$
Amounts recognized in the Consolidated Balance Sheet consist of
Other current liabilities
$
Other liabilities
(8)
(100)
Net amount recognized
$
(96)
(108)
$
(104)
Amounts recognized in accumulated other comprehensive income consist of
Net prior service cost
$
6
Net experience loss
$
7
27
Net amount recognized
$
30
33
$
37
Components of postemployment benefit expense were:
2015
(millions)
Service cost
$
2014
7
$
2013
7
$
7
Interest cost
4
4
3
Amortization of unrecognized prior service cost
1
—
—
Recognized net loss
3
Postemployment benefit expense
$
15
3
$
14
5
$
15
The estimated net experience loss and net prior service cost that will be amortized from accumulated other comprehensive income into
postemployment benefit expense over the next fiscal year is $3 million and $1 million, respectively.
Benefit payments
The following benefit payments, which reflect expected future service, as appropriate, are expected to be paid:
Postretirement
(millions)
2016
$
Postemployment
71
$
9
2017
72
8
2018
73
8
2019
73
8
2020
74
8
390
42
2021-2025
84
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
NOTE 11
MULTIEMPLOYER PENSION AND POSTRETIREMENT PLANS
The Company contributes to multiemployer defined contribution pension and postretirement benefit plans under the terms of collective-bargaining
agreements that cover certain unionized employee groups in the United States. Contributions to these plans are included in total pension and
postretirement benefit expense as reported in Note 9 and Note 10, respectively.
Pension benefits
The risks of participating in multiemployer pension plans are different from single-employer plans. Assets contributed to a multiemployer plan by
one employer may be used to provide benefits to employees of other participating employers. If a participating employer stops contributing to the
plan, the unfunded obligations of the plan are borne by the remaining participating employers.
The Company’s participation in multiemployer pension plans for the year ended January 2, 2016, is outlined in the table below. The “EIN/PN”
column provides the Employer Identification Number (EIN) and the three-digit plan number (PN). The most recent Pension Protection Act (PPA)
zone status available for 2015 and 2014 is for the plan year-ends as indicated below. The zone status is based on information that the Company
received from the plan and is certified by the plan’s actuary. Among other factors, plans in the red zone are generally less than 65 percent funded,
plans in the yellow zone are between 65 percent percent and 80 percent funded, and plans in the green zone are at least 80 percent funded. The
“FIP/RP Status” column indicates plans for which a financial improvement plan (FIP) or a rehabilitation plan (RP) is either pending or has been
implemented. In addition to regular plan contributions, the Company may be subject to a surcharge if the plan is in the red zone. The “Surcharge
Imposed” column indicates whether a surcharge has been imposed on contributions to the plan. The last column lists the expiration date(s) of the
collective-bargaining agreement(s) (CBA) to which the plans are subject.
Contributions
(millions)
PPA Zone Status
Expiration
Date of
CBA
EIN/PN
2015
2014
FIP/RP Status
2015
2014
2013
Surcharge
Imposed
Bakery and Confectionary Union and
Industry International Pension Fund (a)
52-6118572 /
001
Red 12/31/2015
Red 12/31/2014
Implemented
$ 5.1
$ 5.4
$ 5.2
Yes
7/31/2016 to
10/31/2017
Central States, Southeast and
Southwest Areas Pension Fund (b)
36-6044243 /
001
Red 12/31/2015
Red 12/31/2014
Implemented
4.8
4.5
4.5
Yes
4/30/2016 to
7/31/2019
Western Conference of Teamsters
Pension Trust ( c )
91-6145047 /
001
Green 12/31/2015
Green 12/31/2014
NA
1.6
1.6
1.5
No
1/31/2018 to
10/31/2018
Hagerstown Motor Carriers and
Teamsters Pension Fund
52-6045424 /
001
Red 6/30/2016
Red 6/30/2015
Implemented
0.5
0.5
0.5
No
9/28/2019
Local 734 Pension Plan
51-6040136 /
001
Red 4/30/2016
Red 4/30/2015
Implemented
0.3
0.3
0.3
Yes
4/1/2019
Twin Cities Bakery Drivers Pension
Plan
41-6172265 /
001
Green 12/31/2015
Green 12/31/2014
NA
0.2
0.2
0.2
Yes
5/31/2018
Upstate New York Bakery Drivers and
Industry Pension Fund
15-0612437 /
001
Green 6/30/2015
Green 6/30/2014
NA
0.2
0.2
0.1
No
9/10/2017
2.0
2.0
2.2
$ 14.7
$ 14.7
$ 14.5
Pension trust fund
Other Plans
Total contributions:
(a) The Company is party to multiple CBAs requiring contributions to this fund, each with its own expiration date. Over 70 percent of the Company’s participants in this fund
are covered by a single CBA that expires on 4/30/2017.
(b) The Company is party to multiple CBAs requiring contributions to this fund, each with its own expiration date. Over 40 percent of the Company’s participants in this fund
are covered by a single CBA that expires on 9/30/2018.
(c) The Company is party to multiple CBAs requiring contributions to this fund, each with its own expiration date. Over 40 percent of the Company’s participants in this fund
are covered by a single CBA that expires on 3/24/2018.
85
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
The Company was listed in the Forms 5500 of the following plans as of the following plan year ends as providing more than 5 percent of total
contributions:
Contributions to the plan
exceeded more than 5% of total
contributions
(as of the Plan’s year end)
Pension trust fund
Hagerstown Motor Carriers and Teamsters Pension Fund
6/30/2014, 6/30/2013 and 6/30/2012
Local 734 Pension Plan
4/30/2015, 4/30/2014 and 4/30/2013
Twin Cities Bakery Drivers Pension Plan
12/31/2014, 12/31/2013 and 12/31/2012
Upstate New York Bakery Drivers and Industry Pension Fund
6/30/15, 6/30/2014 and 6/30/2013
At the date the Company’s financial statements were issued, certain Forms 5500 were not available for the plan years ending in 2015.
In addition to regular contributions, the Company could be obligated to pay additional amounts, known as a withdrawal liability, if a multiemployer
pension plan has unfunded vested benefits and the Company decreases or ceases participation in that plan. The Company has recognized net
estimated withdrawal expense related to curtailment and special termination benefits associated with the Company’s withdrawal from certain
multiemployer plans aggregating (in millions): 2015 – $(2); 2014 – $0; 2013 – $0.
Postretirement benefits
Multiemployer postretirement benefit plans provide health care and other welfare benefits to active and retired employees who have met certain
age and service requirements. Contributions to multiemployer postretirement benefit plans were (in millions): 2015 – $14; 2014 – $14; 2013 – $13.
NOTE 12
INCOME TAXES
The components of income before income taxes and the provision for income taxes were as follows:
2015
(millions)
2014
2013
Income before income taxes
United States
$
Foreign
551
$
502
$
2,102
222
323
504
773
825
2,606
302
Income taxes
Currently payable
Federal
212
301
State
42
36
68
Foreign
74
103
105
328
440
475
331
Deferred
Federal
(136)
(186)
State
(14)
(14)
(2)
Foreign
(19)
(54)
(12)
(169)
(254)
317
Total income taxes
$
159
$
186
$
792
86
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
The difference between the U.S. federal statutory tax rate and the Company’s effective income tax rate was:
2015
2014
2013
U.S. statutory income tax rate
35.0
35.0 %
35.0 %
Foreign rates varying from 35%
(9.6)
(7.9)
(3.5)
2.3
1.7
1.7
Cost (benefit) of remitted and unremitted foreign earnings
(4.4)
(0.1)
(0.4)
U.S. deduction for qualified production activities
(2.3)
(2.8)
(0.9)
Statutory rate changes, deferred tax impact
(0.8)
(0.4)
(0.5)
VIE deconsolidation
(2.3)
—
—
5.0
—
—
Other
(2.3)
(2.9)
(1.0)
Effective income tax rate
20.6 %
22.6 %
30.4 %
State income taxes, net of federal benefit
Venezuela remeasurement
As presented in the preceding table, the Company’s 2015 consolidated effective tax rate was 20.6%, as compared to 22.6% in 2014 and 30.4% in
2013.
The 2015 effective income tax rate benefited due to mark-to-market loss adjustments to the Company’s pension plans in primarily higher tax
jurisdictions. This results in a greater percentage of total income being generated in lower tax jurisdictions and permanent tax differences in the
U.S. having a higher percentage impact on the tax rate. In addition, the tax rate benefited from a reduction in tax related to current year remitted
and unremitted earnings. The VIE deconsolidation, described in Note 5, included a $67 million non-cash non-taxable gain which positively
impacted the tax rate. During 2015, the Company recorded pre-tax charges of $112 million in the Latin America operating segment due to the
devaluation of the Venezuelan currency which had no associated tax benefit. As of January 2, 2016 substantially all foreign earnings were
considered permanently invested. Accumulated foreign earnings of approximately $2.0 billion, primarily in Europe, were considered indefinitely
reinvested. Due to the varying tax laws around the world and fluctuation in foreign exchange rates, it is not practicable to determine the
unrecognized deferred tax liability on these earnings because the actual tax liability, if any, would be dependent on circumstances existing when a
repatriation, sale, or liquidation occurs.
The 2014 effective income tax rate benefited due to mark-to-market loss adjustments to the Company’s pension plans in primarily higher tax
jurisdictions. This results in a greater percentage of total income being generated in lower tax jurisdictions and permanent tax differences in the
U.S. having a higher percentage impact on the tax rate. As of January 3, 2015, the Company recorded a deferred tax liability of $1 million related
to $23 million of foreign earnings not considered indefinitely reinvested. Accumulated foreign earnings of approximately $2.2 billion, primarily in
Europe, were considered indefinitely reinvested. Due to varying tax laws around the world
and fluctuations in foreign exchange rates, it is not practicable to determine the unrecognized deferred tax liability on these earnings because the
actual tax liability, if any, would be dependent on circumstances existing when a repatriation, sale or liquidation occurs.
The 2013 effective income tax rate was negatively impacted by income generated from mark-to-market adjustments for the Company’s pension
plans that was generally incurred in jurisdictions with tax rates higher than the effective income tax rate. As of December 28, 2013, the Company
recorded a deferred tax liability of $2 million related to $24 million of foreign earnings not considered indefinitely reinvested. Accumulated foreign
earnings of approximately $2.2 billion , primarily in Europe and Mexico, were considered indefinitely reinvested. Due to varying tax laws around the
world and fluctuations in foreign exchange rates, it is not practicable to determine the unrecognized deferred tax liability on these earnings because
the actual tax liability, if any, would be dependent on circumstances existing when a repatriation, sale or liquidation occurs.
Management monitors the Company’s ability to utilize certain future tax deductions, operating losses and tax credit carryforwards, prior to
expiration. Changes resulting from management’s assessment will result in impacts to deferred tax assets and the corresponding impacts on the
effective income tax rate. Valuation allowances were recorded to reduce deferred tax assets to an amount that will, more likely than not, be
realized in the future. The total tax benefit of carryforwards at year-end 2015 and 2014 were $55 million and $54 million, respectively, with related
valuation allowances at year-end 2015 and 2014 of $45 million and $39 million, respectively. Of the total carryforwards at year-end 2015,
substantially all will expire after 2019.
87
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
The following table provides an analysis of the Company’s deferred tax assets and liabilities as of year-end 2015 and 2014. Deferred tax assets on
employee benefits increased in 2015 due to lower asset returns and discount rate decreases associated with the Company’s pension and
postretirement plans.
Deferred tax
assets
2015
(millions)
U.S. state income taxes
$
Deferred tax
liabilities
2014
13
2015
$
10
$
2014
43
$
49
Advertising and promotion-related
15
21
—
—
Wages and payroll taxes
21
36
—
—
Inventory valuation
31
—
—
—
Employee benefits
366
305
—
—
Operating loss and credit carryforwards
55
54
—
—
Hedging transactions
43
48
—
—
Depreciation and asset disposals
—
—
345
352
Trademarks and other intangibles
—
—
576
555
Deferred compensation
35
35
—
—
Stock options
42
38
—
—
Unremitted foreign earnings
—
—
—
1
Other
86
84
—
—
707
631
964
957
(63)
(51)
Less valuation allowance
Total deferred taxes
$
644
$
580
Net deferred tax asset (liability)
$
(320)
$
(377)
$
227
$
184
—
$
—
964
$
957
Classified in balance sheet as:
Other current assets
Other current liabilities
(9)
Other assets
Other liabilities
Net deferred tax asset (liability)
(10)
147
175
(685)
$
(320)
(726)
$
(377)
The change in valuation allowance reducing deferred tax assets was:
2015
(millions)
Balance at beginning of year
$
2014
51
$
2013
61
$
59
Additions charged to income tax expense
23
9
Reductions credited to income tax expense
(7)
(3)
(3)
Other (a)
—
—
(10)
Currency translation adjustments
(4)
Balance at end of year
$
63
17
(16)
$
51
(2)
$
61
(a) Reduction due to the disposition of a business resulting in deferred tax asset and valuation allowance being eliminated.
Uncertain tax positions
The Company is subject to federal income taxes in the U.S. as well as various state, local, and foreign jurisdictions. The Company’s 2015
provision for U.S. federal income taxes represents approximately 50% of the Company’s consolidated income tax provision. The Company was
chosen to participate in the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) Compliance Assurance Program (CAP) beginning with the 2008 tax year. As a result,
with limited exceptions, the Company is no longer subject to U.S. federal examinations by the IRS for years prior to 2015. The Company is under
examination for income and non-income tax filings in various state and foreign jurisdictions.
As of January 2, 2016, the Company has classified $13 million of unrecognized tax benefits as a current liability. Management’s estimate of
reasonably possible changes in unrecognized tax benefits during the next twelve months is comprised of the current liability balance expected to
be settled within one year, offset by approximately $8 million of projected additions related primarily to ongoing intercompany transfer pricing
activity. Management is currently unaware of any issues under review that could result in significant additional payments, accruals, or other
material deviation in this estimate.
88
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
Following is a reconciliation of the Company’s total gross unrecognized tax benefits as of the years ended January 2, 2016, January 3, 2015 and
December 28, 2013. For the 2015 year, approximately $48 million represents the amount that, if recognized, would affect the Company’s effective
income tax rate in future periods.
2015
(millions)
Balance at beginning of year
$
2014
78
2013
$
79
$
80
Tax positions related to current year:
Additions
8
7
9
Tax positions related to prior years:
Additions
Reductions
Settlements
Lapses in statutes of limitation
Balance at end of year
$
9
10
17
(12)
(12)
(13)
(10)
(2)
(14)
—
(4)
73
$
78
—
$
79
For the year ended January 2, 2016, the Company paid tax-related interest totaling $3 million reducing the accrual balance to $17 million at year
end. For the year ended January 3, 2015, the Company recognized an increase of $3 million of tax-related interest resulting in an accrual balance
of $20 million at January 3, 2015. For the year ended December 28, 2013, the Company recognized an increase of $4 million of tax-related interest
and payments of $6 million, resulting in an accrual balance of approximately $17 million accrued at December 28, 2013.
NOTE 13
DERIVATIVE INSTRUMENTS AND FAIR VALUE MEASUREMENTS
The Company is exposed to certain market risks such as changes in interest rates, foreign currency exchange rates, and commodity prices, which
exist as a part of its ongoing business operations. Management uses derivative financial and commodity instruments, including futures, options,
and swaps, where appropriate, to manage these risks. Instruments used as hedges must be effective at reducing the risk associated with the
exposure being hedged and must be designated as a hedge at the inception of the contract.
The Company designates derivatives as cash flow hedges, fair value hedges, net investment hedges, and uses other contracts to reduce volatility
in interest rates, foreign currency and commodities. As a matter of policy, the Company does not engage in trading or speculative hedging
transactions.
Total notional amounts of the Company’s derivative instruments as of January 2, 2016 and January 3, 2015 were as follows:
(millions)
2015
Foreign currency exchange contracts
$
Interest rate contracts
2014
1,210
$
—
Commodity contracts
470
Total
$
1,680
764
2,958
492
$
4,214
Following is a description of each category in the fair value hierarchy and the financial assets and liabilities of the Company that were included in
each category at January 2, 2016 and January 3, 2015, measured on a recurring basis.
Level 1 — Financial assets and liabilities whose values are based on unadjusted quoted prices for identical assets or liabilities in an active market.
For the Company, level 1 financial assets and liabilities consist primarily of commodity derivative contracts.
Level 2 — Financial assets and liabilities whose values are based on quoted prices in markets that are not active or model inputs that are
observable either directly or indirectly for substantially the full term of the asset or liability. For the Company, level 2 financial assets and liabilities
consist of interest rate swaps and over-the-counter commodity and currency contracts.
The Company’s calculation of the fair value of interest rate swaps is derived from a discounted cash flow analysis based on the terms of the
contract and the interest rate curve. Over-the-counter commodity derivatives are valued using an income approach based on the commodity index
prices less the contract rate multiplied by the notional
89
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
amount. Foreign currency contracts are valued using an income approach based on forward rates less the contract rate multiplied by the notional
amount. The Company’s calculation of the fair value of level 2 financial assets and liabilities takes into consideration the risk of nonperformance,
including counterparty credit risk.
Level 3 — Financial assets and liabilities whose values are based on prices or valuation techniques that require inputs that are both unobservable
and significant to the overall fair value measurement. These inputs reflect management’s own assumptions about the assumptions a market
participant would use in pricing the asset or liability. The Company did not have any level 3 financial assets or liabilities as of January 2, 2016 or
January 3, 2015.
The following table presents assets and liabilities that were measured at fair value in the Consolidated Balance Sheet on a recurring basis as of
January 2, 2016 and January 3, 2015:
Derivatives designated as hedging instruments:
2015
(millions)
Level 1
2014
Level 2
Total
Level 1
Level 2
Total
Assets:
Foreign currency exchange
contracts:
Other current assets
$
—
$
11
$
11
$
—
$
29
$
29
Interest rate
contracts (a):
Other assets
Total assets
—
—
—
—
7
7
$
—
$
11
$
11
$
—
$
36
$
36
$
—
$
(10)
$
(10)
$
—
$
(6)
$
(6)
Liabilities:
Foreign currency exchange
contracts:
Other current liabilities
Interest rate contracts:
Other current liabilities
—
—
—
—
(3)
(3)
Other liabilities
—
—
—
—
(16)
(16)
Other current liabilities
—
(14)
(14)
—
(12)
(12)
Other liabilities
—
—
—
—
(11)
Commodity contracts:
Total liabilities
$
—
$
(24)
$
(24)
$
—
$
(48)
(11)
$
(48)
(a) The fair value of the related hedged portion of the Company’s long-term debt, a level 2 liability, was $2.5 billion as of January 3, 2015.
Derivatives not designated as hedging instruments:
2015
(millions)
Level 1
2014
Level 2
Total
Level 1
Level 2
Total
Assets:
Foreign currency exchange
contracts:
Other current assets
$
—
$
18
$
18
$
$
—
$
—
$
—
18
$
22
$
7
$
—
$
7
$
(6)
$
—
$
—
$
—
Commodity contracts:
Other current assets
Total assets
4
—
4
7
—
$
4
$
—
(6)
(33)
—
(33)
(36)
—
—
—
—
(4)
—
7
Liabilities:
Foreign currency exchange
contracts:
Other current liabilities
Commodity contracts:
Other current liabilities
Other liabilities
Total liabilities
$
(33)
$
(6)
$
(39)
$
(40)
$
—
(36)
(4)
$
(40)
The Company has designated a portion of its outstanding foreign currency denominated long-term debt as a net investment hedge of a portion of
the Company’s investment in its subsidiaries foreign currency denominated net
90
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
assets. The carrying value of this debt was $1.2 billion and $600 million as of January 2, 2016 and January 3, 2015, respectively.
The Company has elected to not offset the fair values of derivative assets and liabilities executed with the same counterparty that are generally
subject to enforceable netting agreements. However, if the Company were to offset and record the asset and liability balances of derivatives on a
net basis, the amounts presented in the Consolidated Balance Sheet as of January 2, 2016 and January 3, 2015 would be adjusted as detailed in
the following table:
As of January 2, 2016:
Gross Amounts Not
Offset in the
Consolidated Balance
Sheet
Amounts
Presented in
the
Consolidated
Balance
Sheet
Cash
Collateral
Received/
Posted
Financial
Instruments
Net
Amount
Total asset derivatives
$
33
$
(12)
$
—
$
21
Total liability derivatives
$
(63)
$
12
$
51
$
—
As of January 3, 2015:
Gross Amounts Not
Offset in the
Consolidated Balance
Sheet
Amounts
Presented in
the
Consolidated
Balance
Sheet
Cash
Collateral
Received/
Posted
Financial
Instruments
Net
Amount
Total asset derivatives
$
43
$
(29)
$
—
$
14
Total liability derivatives
$
(88)
$
29
$
50
$
(9)
The effect of derivative instruments on the Consolidated Statement of Income for the years ended January 2, 2016 and January 3, 2015 were as
follows:
Derivatives in fair value hedging relationships
Location of
gain (loss)
recognized in
income
(millions)
Gain (loss)
recognized in
income (a)
2015
Foreign currency exchange contracts
OIE
Interest rate contracts
Interest
expense
Total
$
2014
(4)
$
20
$
16
3
17
$
20
(a) Includes the ineffective portion and amount excluded from effectiveness testing.
91
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
Derivatives in cash flow hedging relationships
(millions)
2015
Foreign
currency
exchange
contracts
Location of
gain (loss)
reclassified
from AOCI
Gain (loss)
recognized in
AOCI
$
2014
26
$
2015
34
COGS
Location of
gain (loss)
recognized
in income (a)
Gain (Loss)
reclassified from AOCI
into income
$
Gain (loss)
recognized in
income (a)
2014
40
2015
$
5
OIE
2014
$
(3)
$
(4)
Foreign
currency
exchange
contracts
(6)
4
SGA expense
(2)
3
OIE
—
—
Interest rate
contracts
(9)
(69)
Interest
expense
(3)
9
N/A
—
—
Commodity
contracts
(3)
(4)
COGS
(12)
(7)
—
—
Total
OIE
$
8
$
(35)
$
23
$
10
$
(3)
$
(4)
(a) Includes the ineffective portion and amount excluded from effectiveness testing.
Derivatives and non-derivatives in net investment hedging relationships
Gain (loss)
recognized in
AOCI
(millions)
2015
2014
Foreign currency denominated long-term debt
$
70
$
86
Total
$
70
$
86
Derivatives not designated as hedging instruments
Location of gain
(loss)
recognized in
income
(millions)
Gain (loss)
recognized in
income
2015
Foreign currency exchange contracts
COGS
Foreign currency exchange contracts
OIE
Interest rate contracts
Interest expense
Commodity contracts
COGS
Commodity contracts
$
SGA
Total
$
2014
16
$
—
8
1
—
(4)
(63)
(73)
(5)
(5)
(44)
$
(81)
During the next 12 months, the Company expects $14 million of net deferred losses reported in accumulated other comprehensive income (AOCI)
at January 2, 2016 to be reclassified to income, assuming market rates remain constant through contract maturities.
Certain of the Company’s derivative instruments contain provisions requiring the Company to post collateral on those derivative instruments that
are in a liability position if the Company’s credit rating falls below BB+ (S&P), or Baa1 (Moody’s). The fair value of all derivative instruments with
credit-risk-related contingent features in a liability position on January 2, 2016 was $14 million. If the credit-risk-related contingent features were
triggered as of January 2, 2016, the Company would be required to post collateral of $14 million. In addition, certain derivative instruments contain
provisions that would be triggered in the event the Company defaults on its debt agreements. There were no collateral posting requirements as of
January 2, 2016 triggered by credit-risk-related contingent features.
92
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
Other fair value measurements
2015 Fair Value Measurements on a Nonrecurring Basis
As part of Project K the Company will be consolidating the usage of and disposing certain long-lived assets, including manufacturing facilities and
Corporate owned assets over the term of the program. See Note 4 for more information regarding Project K.
During 2015, long-lived assets of $31 million related to a manufacturing facility in the Company's North America Other reportable segment, were
written down to an estimated fair value of $13 million due to Project K activities. The Company's calculation of the fair value of these long-lived
assets is based on level 3 inputs, including market comparables, market trends and the condition of the assets.
Additionally during 2015, the Company moved from the CENCOEX foreign currency official exchange rate to the SIMADI foreign currency
exchange rate for purposes of remeasuring the financial statements of its Venezuelan subsidiary. In connection with this change in foreign
currency exchange rates, the Company also evaluated the carrying value of the long lived assets related to its Venezuelan subsidiary. See Note
15 for more information regarding Venezuela. During 2015, long-lived assets with a carrying value of $51 million were written down to an estimated
fair value of $2 million. The Company's calculation of the fair value of these long-lived assets is based on level 3 inputs, including market
comparables, market trends and the condition of the assets.
2014 Fair Value Measurements on a Nonrecurring Basis
During 2014, long-lived assets of $24 million, related to a manufacturing facility in the Company’s U.S. Snacks segment, were written down to an
estimated fair value of $3 million due to Project K activities. The Company’s calculation of the fair value of long-lived assets is based on Level 3
inputs, including market comparables, market trends and the condition of the assets.
Financial instruments
The carrying values of the Company’s short-term items, including cash, cash equivalents, accounts receivable, accounts payable and notes
payable approximate fair value. The fair value of the Company’s long-term debt, which are level 2 liabilities, is calculated based on broker quotes
and was as follows at January 2, 2016:
Fair Value
(millions)
Current maturities of long-term debt
$
Long-term debt
Carrying Value
1,266
$
5,635
Total
$
6,901
1,266
5,289
$
6,555
Counterparty credit risk concentration
The Company is exposed to credit loss in the event of nonperformance by counterparties on derivative financial and commodity contracts.
Management believes a concentration of credit risk with respect to derivative counterparties is limited due to the credit ratings and use of master
netting and reciprocal collateralization agreements with the counterparties and the use of exchange-traded commodity contracts.
Master netting agreements apply in situations where the Company executes multiple contracts with the same counterparty. If these counterparties
fail to perform according to the terms of derivative contracts, this could result in a loss to the Company. As of January 2, 2016, there were no
counterparties that represented a significant concentration of credit risk to the Company.
For certain derivative contracts, reciprocal collateralization agreements with counterparties call for the posting of collateral in the form of cash,
treasury securities or letters of credit if a fair value loss position to the Company or its counterparties exceeds a certain amount. As of January 2,
2016, the Company had no collateral posting requirements related to reciprocal collateralization agreements. As of January 2, 2016, the Company
posted $51 million in margin deposits for exchange-traded commodity derivative instruments, which was reflected as an increase in accounts
receivable, net.
Management believes concentrations of credit risk with respect to accounts receivable is limited due to
the generally high credit quality of the Company’s major customers, as well as the large number and geographic dispersion of smaller customers.
However, the Company conducts a disproportionate amount of business with a small number of large multinational grocery retailers, with the five
largest accounts encompassing approximately 29% of consolidated trade receivables at January 2, 2016.
93
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
Refer to Note 1 for disclosures regarding the Company’s accounting policies for derivative instruments.
NOTE 14
CONTINGENCIES
The Company is subject to various legal proceedings, claims, and governmental inspections or investigations in the ordinary course of business
covering matters such as general commercial, governmental regulations, antitrust and trade regulations, product liability, environmental,
intellectual property, workers’ compensation, employment and other actions. These matters are subject to uncertainty and the outcome is not
predictable with assurance. The Company uses a combination of insurance and self-insurance for a number of risks, including workers’
compensation, general liability, automobile liability and product liability.
The Company has established accruals for certain matters where losses are deemed probable and reasonably estimable. There are other claims
and legal proceedings pending against the Company for which accruals have not been established. It is reasonably possible that some of these
matters could result in an unfavorable judgment against the Company and could require payment of claims in amounts that cannot be estimated at
January 2, 2016. Based upon current information, management does not expect any of the claims or legal proceedings pending against the
Company to have a material impact on the Company’s consolidated financial statements.
In connection with the Company’s previous labor negotiations with the union representing the work-force at its Memphis, TN cereal production
facility, the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) filed a complaint alleging unfair labor practices under the National Labor Relations Act in March
2014. In July 2014, a U.S. District Court judge ruled that the Memphis employees were entitled to return to work while the underlying litigation
continues and employees have subsequently returned to work. In August 2014, an NLRB Administrative Law Judge dismissed the complaint that
initiated the underlying litigation. In May 2015, the NLRB reversed the decision of the Administrative Law Judge in favor of the union. The
Company is appealing this decision and the case continues. This litigation is not expected to have a material effect on the production or
distribution of products from the Memphis, TN facility or a material financial impact on the Company. As of January 2, 2016, the Company has not
recorded a liability related to this matter as an adverse outcome is not considered probable. The Company will continue to evaluate the likelihood
of potential outcomes for this case as the litigation continues.
NOTE 15
VENEZUELA
Venezuela is considered a highly inflationary economy. As such, the functional currency for the Company's operations in Venezuela is the U.S.
dollar, which in turn, requires bolivar denominated monetary assets and liabilities to be remeasured into U.S. dollars using an exchange rate at
which such balances could be settled as of the balance sheet date. In addition, revenues and expenses are recorded in U.S. dollars at an
appropriate rate on the date of the transaction. Gains and losses resulting from the remeasurement of the bolivar denominated monetary assets
and liabilities are recorded in earnings.
In February 2013, the Venezuelan government announced a 46.5% devaluation of the official CADIVI (now named CENCOEX) exchange rate from
4.3 bolivars to 6.3 bolivars to the U.S. dollar. Additionally, the Transaction System for Foreign Currency Denominated Securities (SITME), used
between May 2010 and January 2013 to translate the Company’s Venezuelan subsidiary’s financial statements to U.S. dollars, was eliminated.
Accordingly, in February 2013 the Company began using the CENCOEX exchange rate to translate the Company’s Venezuelan subsidiary’s
financial statements to U.S. dollars and in 2013, the Company recognized a $15 million charge as a result of the devaluation of the CENCOEX
exchange rate.
From February 2013 through July 4, 2015, the Company used the CENCOEX official rate, which was 6.3 bolivars to the U.S. dollar, to remeasure
its Venezuelan subsidiary’s financial statements to U.S. dollars. The CENCOEX official rate is presently restricted toward goods and services for
industry sectors considered essential, which are primarily food, medicines and a few others and was still 6.3 bolivars to the U.S. dollar at January
2, 2016.
During 2013, the Venezuelan government announced a complementary currency exchange system, SICAD, followed by the establishment of
another floating rate exchange system (referred to as SICAD II) during 2014. In February 2015, the Venezuelan government announced the
addition of a new foreign currency exchange system referred to as the Marginal Currency System, or SIMADI, along with the merger of the SICAD
II system with SICAD.
94
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
As of January 2, 2016, the published SICAD and SIMADI rates offered were 13.5 and 200.0 bolivars to the U.S. dollar, respectively.
The Company continues to manufacture and sell products in Venezuela as well as import limited raw materials, packaging and spare parts, where
the Company has a history of successfully exchanging bolivars for U.S. dollars to pay certain vendors as required under the terms of the related
purchasing arrangements. While the Company continues to qualify for participation in CENCOEX at the official rate, there has been a continued
reduction in the level of U.S. dollars available to exchange, in part due to recent declines in the price of oil and the overall decline of the
macroeconomic environment within the country. During 2015, the Company has experienced an increase in the amount of time it takes to
exchange bolivars for U.S. dollars through the CENCOEX exchange. Given this economic backdrop, and upon review of U.S. dollar cash needs in
the Company's Venezuela operations as of the quarter ended July 4, 2015, the Company concluded that it is no longer able to obtain sufficient
U.S. dollars on a timely basis through the CENCOEX exchange to support its Venezuela operations resulting in a decision to remeasure our
Venezuela subsidiary's financial statements using the SIMADI rate. The Company has evaluated all of the facts and circumstances surrounding
its Venezuelan business and determined that as of January 2, 2016, the SIMADI rate continues to be the appropriate rate to use for remeasuring
its Venezuelan subsidiary’s financial statements.
In connection with the change in rates on July 4, 2015, the Company evaluated the carrying value of its non-monetary assets for impairment and
lower of cost or market adjustments. As a result of moving from the CENCOEX official rate to the SIMADI rate, the Company recorded pre-tax
charges totaling $152 million in the quarter ended July 4, 2015. Of the total charges, $100 million was recorded in COGS, $3 million was recorded
in SGA, and $49 million was recorded in Other income (expense), net. These charges consist of $47 million related to the remeasurement of net
monetary assets denominated in Venezuelan bolivar at the SIMADI exchange rate (recorded in Other income (expense), net), $56 million related to
reducing inventory to the lower of cost or market (recorded in COGS) and $49 million related to the impairment of long-lived assets in Venezuela
(recorded primarily in COGS).
For the year ended January 2, 2016, Venezuela represented approximately 2% of total net sales as the CENCOEX official rate was used to
remeasure the Venezuelan subsidiary’s income statement through July 4, 2015. As of January 2, 2016, the Company’s net monetary assets
denominated in the Venezuelan bolivar were immaterial after applying the SIMADI exchange rate. As of January 3, 2015 the Company’s net
monetary assets denominated in the Venezuelan bolivar were approximately $100 million using the CENCOEX official rate.
The Company continues to monitor and actively manage its investment and exposures in Venezuela. The Company’s Venezuelan business does
not rely heavily on imports and when items are imported, they are largely exchanged at the CENCOEX official rate however, the Company
considers it reasonably possible to utilize alternate exchange mechanisms in the future. The Company is continuing to take actions to further
reduce its reliance on imports in order to run its operations without the need for U.S. dollars, including the elimination of imported ingredients where
possible and developing a local supply for parts and materials. Less than 2% of the total raw material needs of the Company's Venezuela
operations are imported. The Company will continue to monitor local conditions and its ability to obtain U.S. dollars through the various exchange
mechanisms available to determine the appropriate rate for remeasurement.
NOTE 16
QUARTERLY FINANCIAL DATA (unaudited)
Net sales
(millions)
First
2015
$
Gross profit
2014
3,556
$
2015
3,742
$
2014
1,245
$
1,504
Second
3,498
3,685
1,241
1,411
Third
3,329
3,639
1,233
1,292
Fourth
3,142
3,514
962
$
13,525
$
14,580
$
4,681
856
$
5,063
95
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
Net income attributable
to Kellogg Company
(millions)
2015
Per share amounts
2014
2015
Basic
First
$
227
$
406
$
2014
Diluted
0.64
Basic
$
0.64
Diluted
$
1.13
$
1.12
Second
223
295
0.63
0.63
0.82
Third
205
224
0.58
0.58
0.63
0.62
Fourth
(41)
(293)
(0.12)
(0.12)
(0.82)
(0.82)
$
614
$
0.82
632
The principal market for trading Kellogg shares is the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE). At January 2, 2016, the closing price (on the NYSE) was
$72.27 and there were 35,704 shareholders of record.
Dividends paid per share and the quarterly price ranges on the NYSE during the last two years were:
Stock price
Dividend
per share
2015 — Quarter
First
$
High
0.49
$
Low
69.84
$
61.97
Second
0.49
66.38
61.31
Third
0.50
69.77
62.74
Fourth
0.50
73.51
66.03
$
1.98
$
0.46
2014 — Quarter
First
$
62.13
$
56.90
Second
0.46
69.39
62.62
Third
0.49
66.41
59.83
Fourth
0.49
67.24
59.70
$
1.90
During 2015, the Company recorded the following charges / (gains) in operating profit:
2015
(millions)
Restructuring and cost reduction charges
First
Second
$
68
$
135
(Gains) / losses on mark-to-market
adjustments
$
Third
90
67
85
$
112
$
$
92
$
$
158
(35)
$
55
Fourth
$
$
Full Year
80
27
$
323
387
446
467
$
769
74
$
298
$
1,082
During 2014, the Company recorded the following charges / (gains) in operating profit:
2014
(millions)
Restructuring and cost reduction charges
First
$
(Gains) / losses on mark-to-market
adjustments
Second
54
$
78
(116)
$
(62)
Third
12
$
90
Fourth
66
Full Year
822
$
896
784
NOTE 17
REPORTABLE SEGMENTS
Kellogg Company is the world’s leading producer of cereal, second largest producer of cookies and crackers and a leading producer of savory
snacks and frozen foods. Additional product offerings include toaster pastries, cereal bars, fruit-flavored snacks and veggie foods. Kellogg
products are manufactured and marketed globally. Principal markets for these products include the United States and United Kingdom.
Beginning in the first quarter of 2015, a new Kashi operating segment was established in order to optimize future growth potential of this business.
This operating segment is included in the North America Other reportable segment. Previously, results of Kashi were included within the U.S.
Morning Foods, U.S. Snacks, and the U.S.
96
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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Frozen operating segments. Goodwill was reallocated between operating segments on a relative fair value basis. In conjunction with the
reallocation of goodwill, an impairment analysis was performed. No impairment of the operating segments was noted. Reportable segment results
of prior periods have been recast to conform to the current presentation. The Company currently has the following reportable segments: U.S.
Morning Foods; U.S. Snacks; U.S. Specialty; North America Other; Europe; Latin America; and Asia Pacific.
The Company manages its operations through 9 operating segments that are based on product category or geographic location. These operating
segments are evaluated for similarity with regards to economic characteristics, products, production processes, types or classes of customers,
distribution methods and regulatory environments to determine if they can be aggregated into reportable segments. The reportable segments are
discussed in greater detail below.
The U.S. Morning Foods operating segment includes cereal, toaster pastries, health and wellness bars, and beverages.
U.S. Snacks includes cookies, crackers, cereal bars, savory snacks and fruit-flavored snacks.
U.S. Specialty primarily represents food away from home channels, including food service, convenience, vending, Girl Scouts and food
manufacturing. The food service business is mostly non-commercial, serving institutions such as schools and hospitals. The convenience
business includes traditional convenience stores as well as alternate retailing outlets.
North America Other includes the U.S. Frozen, Kashi and Canada operating segments. As these operating segments are not considered
economically similar enough to aggregate with other operating segments and are immaterial for separate disclosure, they have been grouped
together as a single reportable segment.
The 3 remaining reportable segments are based on geographic location — Europe which consists principally of European countries; Latin America
which consists of Central and South America and includes Mexico; and Asia Pacific which consists of Sub-Saharan Africa, Australia and other
Asian and Pacific markets.
The measurement of reportable segment results is based on segment operating profit which is generally consistent with the presentation of
operating profit in the Consolidated Statement of Income. Intercompany transactions between operating segments were insignificant in all periods
presented.
97
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
2015
(millions)
2014
2013
Net sales
U.S. Morning Foods
$
2,992
$
3,108
$
3,195
U.S. Snacks
3,234
3,329
3,379
U.S. Specialty
1,181
1,198
1,202
North America Other
1,687
1,864
1,940
Europe
2,497
2,869
2,843
Latin America
1,015
1,205
1,195
919
1,007
Asia Pacific
Consolidated
1,038
$
13,525
$
14,580
$
14,792
$
474
$
479
$
469
Operating profit
U.S. Morning Foods
U.S. Snacks
385
364
424
U.S. Specialty
260
266
265
North America Other
178
295
314
Europe
247
232
249
9
169
157
54
53
67
1,607
1,858
1,945
Latin America
Asia Pacific
Total Reportable Segments
Corporate
Consolidated
(516)
(834)
892
$
1,091
$
1,024
$
2,837
$
123
$
136
$
181
Depreciation and amortization (a)
U.S. Morning Foods
U.S. Snacks
135
166
U.S. Specialty
11
10
8
North America Other
74
32
30
Europe
144
120
92
84
Latin America
28
32
29
Asia Pacific
29
31
40
520
499
516
Total Reportable Segments
Corporate
Consolidated
14
$
534
4
$
16
503
$
532
(a) Includes asset impairment charges as discussed in Note 13.
Certain items such as interest expense and income taxes, while not included in the measure of reportable segment operating results, are regularly
reviewed by Management for the Company’s internationally-based reportable segments as shown below.
2015
(millions)
2014
2013
Interest expense
North America Other
$
5
$
6
$
6
Europe
5
5
6
Latin America
5
3
1
Asia Pacific
2
1
3
210
194
219
Corporate
Consolidated
$
227
$
$
10
$
209
$
235
$
4
Income taxes
Europe
Latin America
34
Asia Pacific
42
—
Corporate & North America
$
159
35
(1)
115
Consolidated
(3)
6
148
$
186
747
$
792
Management reviews balance sheet information, including total assets, based on geography. For all North American-based operating segments,
balance sheet information is reviewed by Management in total and not on an individual operating segment basis.
98
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
2015
(millions)
2014
2013
Total assets
North America
$
10,363
Europe
$
10,489
$
10,643
3,742
2,893
3,007
587
905
1,052
Asia Pacific
1,106
1,111
1,049
Corporate
1,198
1,796
2,583
(1,731)
(2,041)
(2,860)
Latin America
Elimination entries
Consolidated
$
15,265
$
15,153
$
15,474
$
342
$
295
$
296
Additions to long-lived assets
North America
Europe
110
129
182
Latin America
23
31
70
Asia Pacific
76
120
85
Corporate
2
7
Consolidated
$
553
$
582
4
$
637
The Company’s largest customer, Wal-Mart Stores, Inc. and its affiliates, accounted for approximately 21% of consolidated net sales during 2015,
2014, and 2013, comprised principally of sales within the United States.
Supplemental geographic information is provided below for net sales to external customers and long-lived assets:
2015
(millions)
2014
2013
Net sales
United States
$
8,560
All other countries
Consolidated
$
8,876
4,965
$
9,060
5,704
5,732
$
13,525
$
14,580
$
14,792
$
2,220
$
2,283
$
2,343
Long-lived assets
United States
All other countries
Consolidated
1,401
$
1,486
3,621
$
5,871
$
1,513
3,769
$
6,570
$
3,856
Supplemental product information is provided below for net sales to external customers:
2015
(millions)
Cereal
2014
$
2013
Snacks
6,698
7,002
Frozen
956
1,008
Consolidated
$
13,525
$
14,580
6,753
7,011
1,028
$
14,792
NOTE 18
SUPPLEMENTAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT DATA
Consolidated Statement of Income
(millions)
2015
2014
2013
Research and development expense
$
193
$
199
$
199
Advertising expense
$
898
$
1,094
$
1,131
Advertising and consumer promotions are included in total brand-building, a measure that the Company uses to determine the level of investment
it makes to support its brands. Advertising has declined in 2015 as a result of foreign currency translation as well as the implementation of
efficiency and effectiveness programs including a shift in investments to non-advertising consumer promotion programs. Total brand-building
investment has declined in 2015 approximately 50 basis points as a percentage of net sales. Brand building is down including shifts of investment
into other areas such as food, the evolving shift in media investment from TV to digital, and efficiency and effectiveness benefits.
99
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
Consolidated Balance Sheet
(millions)
2015
Trade receivables
2014
$
1,169
$
1,101
Allowance for doubtful accounts
(8)
(7)
Refundable income taxes
27
16
156
166
Other receivables
Accounts receivable, net
Raw materials and supplies
$
1,344
$
1,276
$
315
$
327
Finished goods and materials in process
935
Inventories
Deferred income taxes
952
$
1,250
$
1,279
$
227
$
184
Other prepaid assets
164
Other current assets
Land
158
$
391
$
$
142
$
342
105
Buildings
2,076
2,154
Machinery and equipment
5,617
6,017
Capitalized software
328
327
Construction in progress
694
Accumulated depreciation
692
(5,236)
(5,526)
Property, net
$
3,621
$
3,769
Other intangibles
$
2,315
$
2,338
Accumulated amortization
(47)
Other intangibles, net
Pension
(43)
$
2,268
$
2,295
$
231
$
250
Other
485
Other assets
$
Accrued income taxes
$
527
716
$
42
$
777
39
Accrued salaries and wages
325
320
Accrued advertising and promotion
447
446
Other
548
Other current liabilities
$
Nonpension postretirement benefits
$
Other
596
1,362
$
77
$
1,401
82
391
Other liabilities
$
Allowance for doubtful accounts
(millions)
468
2015
Balance at beginning of year
$
Additions charged to expense
Doubtful accounts charged to reserve
Balance at end of year
$
418
$
500
2014
7
$
2013
5
$
6
4
6
2
(3)
(4)
(3)
8
$
7
$
5
Management’s Responsibility for Financial Statements
Management is responsible for the preparation of the Company’s consolidated financial statements and related notes. We believe that the
consolidated financial statements present the Company’s financial position and results of operations in conformity with accounting principles that
are generally accepted in the United States, using our best estimates and judgments as required.
The independent registered public accounting firm audits the Company’s consolidated financial statements in accordance with the standards of the
Public Company Accounting Oversight Board and provides an objective, independent review of the fairness of reported operating results and
financial position.
The board of directors of the Company has an Audit Committee composed of five non-management Directors. The Committee meets regularly with
management, internal auditors, and the independent registered public accounting firm to review accounting, internal control, auditing and financial
reporting matters.
Formal policies and procedures, including an active Ethics and Business Conduct program, support the internal controls and are designed to
ensure employees adhere to the highest standards of personal and professional
100
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
integrity. We have a rigorous internal audit program that independently evaluates the adequacy and effectiveness of these internal controls.
101
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
Management’s Report on Internal Control over Financial Reporting
Management is responsible for designing, maintaining and evaluating adequate internal control over financial reporting, as such term is defined in
Rule 13a-15(f) under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended. Our internal control over financial reporting is designed to provide
reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of the financial statements for external purposes in
accordance with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles.
We conducted an evaluation of the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting based on the framework in Internal Control —
Integrated Framework (2013) issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission.
Because of its inherent limitations, internal control over financial reporting may not prevent or detect misstatements. Also, projections of any
evaluation of effectiveness to future periods are subject to the risk that controls may become inadequate because of changes in conditions or that
the degree of compliance with the policies or procedures may deteriorate.
Based on our evaluation under the framework in Internal Control — Integrated Framework (2013), management concluded that our internal control
over financial reporting was effective as of January 2, 2016. The effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting as of January 2, 2016
has been audited by PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP, an independent registered public accounting firm, as stated in their report which follows.
/s/ John A. Bryant
John A. Bryant
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer
/s/ Ronald L. Dissinger
Ronald L. Dissinger
Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer
102
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm
To the Shareholders and Board of Directors of Kellogg Company
In our opinion, the consolidated financial statements listed in the index appearing under Item 15(a)(1) present fairly, in all material respects, the
financial position of Kellogg Company and its subsidiaries at January 2, 2016 and January 3, 2015, and the results of their operations and their
cash flows for each of the three years in the period ended January 2, 2016 in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the
United States of America. Also in our opinion, the Company maintained, in all material respects, effective internal control over financial reporting
as of January 2, 2016, based on criteria established in Internal Control — Integrated Framework (2013) issued by the Committee of Sponsoring
Organizations of the Treadway Commission (COSO). The Company’s management is responsible for these financial statements, for maintaining
effective internal control over financial reporting and for its assessment of the effectiveness of internal control over financial reporting, included in
the accompanying Management’s Report on Internal Control over Financial Reporting. Our responsibility is to express opinions on these financial
statements and on the Company’s internal control over financial reporting based on our integrated audits. We conducted our audits in accordance
with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States). Those standards require that we plan and perform the
audits to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement and whether effective internal
control over financial reporting was maintained in all material respects. Our audits of the financial statements included examining, on a test basis,
evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements, assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates
made by management, and evaluating the overall financial statement presentation. Our audit of internal control over financial reporting included
obtaining an understanding of internal control over financial reporting, assessing the risk that a material weakness exists, and testing and
evaluating the design and operating effectiveness of internal control based on the assessed risk. Our audits also included performing such other
procedures as we considered necessary in the circumstances. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinions.
A company’s internal control over financial reporting is a process designed to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial
reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles. A
company’s internal control over financial reporting includes those policies and procedures that (i) pertain to the maintenance of records that, in
reasonable detail, accurately and fairly reflect the transactions and dispositions of the assets of the company; (ii) provide reasonable assurance
that transactions are recorded as necessary to permit preparation of financial statements in accordance with generally accepted accounting
principles, and that receipts and expenditures of the company are being made only in accordance with authorizations of management and directors
of the company; and (iii) provide reasonable assurance regarding prevention or timely detection of unauthorized acquisition, use, or disposition of
the company’s assets that could have a material effect on the financial statements.
Because of its inherent limitations, internal control over financial reporting may not prevent or detect misstatements. Also, projections of any
evaluation of effectiveness to future periods are subject to the risk that controls may become inadequate because of changes in conditions, or that
the degree of compliance with the policies or procedures may deteriorate.
/s/ PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP
Detroit, Michigan
February 24, 2016
103
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ITEM 9. CHANGES IN AND DISAGREEMENTS WITH ACCOUNTANTS ON ACCOUNTING AND FINANCIAL DISCLOSURE
None.
ITEM 9A. CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES
(a) We maintain disclosure controls and procedures that are designed to ensure that information required to be disclosed in our Exchange Act
reports is recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the time periods specified in the SEC’s rules and forms, and that such information
is accumulated and communicated to our management, including our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer as appropriate, to allow
timely decisions regarding required disclosure under Rules 13a-15(e) and 15d-15(e). Disclosure controls and procedures, no matter how well
designed and operated, can provide only reasonable, rather than absolute, assurance of achieving the desired control objectives.
As of January 2, 2016, management carried out an evaluation under the supervision and with the participation of our Chief Executive Officer and
our Chief Financial Officer, of the effectiveness of the design and operation of our disclosure controls and procedures. Based on the foregoing, our
Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer concluded that our disclosure controls and procedures were effective at the reasonable
assurance level.
(b) Pursuant to Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, we have included a report of management’s assessment of the design and
effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting as part of this Annual Report on Form 10-K. The independent registered public
accounting firm of PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP also attested to, and reported on, the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting.
Management’s report and the independent registered public accounting firm’s attestation report are included in our 2015 financial statements in
Item 8 of this Report under the captions entitled “Management’s Report on Internal Control over Financial Reporting” and “Report of Independent
Registered Public Accounting Firm” and are incorporated herein by reference.
(c) During the third quarter of 2014, we went live with the first phase of our Global Business Services (GBS) initiative, in conjunction with Project
K, which includes the reorganization and relocation of certain financial and operational service processes, internal to the organization. This
initiative is expected to continue through 2016 and will impact the design of our control framework. During the transition to GBS, we have put
additional controls in place to monitor and maintain appropriate internal controls impacting financial reporting.
There have been no other changes in our internal control over financial reporting that have materially affected, or are reasonably likely to materially
affect, our internal control over financial reporting.
ITEM 9B. OTHER INFORMATION
Not applicable.
PART III
ITEM 10. DIRECTORS, EXECUTIVE OFFICERS AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE
Directors — Refer to the information in our Proxy Statement to be filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission for the Annual Meeting of
Shareowners to be held on April 29, 2016 (the “Proxy Statement”), under the caption “Proposal 1 — Election of Directors,” which information is
incorporated herein by reference.
Identification and Members of Audit Committee; Audit Committee Financial Expert — Refer to the information in the Proxy Statement under the
caption “Board and Committee Membership,” which information is incorporated herein by reference.
Executive Officers of the Registrant — Refer to “Executive Officers” under Item 1 of this Report.
For information concerning Section 16(a) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 — Refer to the information under the caption “Security
Ownership — Section 16(a) Beneficial Ownership Reporting Compliance” of the Proxy Statement, which information is incorporated herein by
reference.
104
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
Code of Ethics for Chief Executive Officer, Chief Financial Officer and Controller —We have adopted a Global Code of Ethics which applies to our
chief executive officer, chief financial officer, corporate controller and all our other employees, and which can be found at
www.kelloggcompany.com. Any
amendments or waivers to the Global Code of Ethics applicable to our chief executive officer, chief financial officer or corporate controller may
also be found at www.kelloggcompany.com.
ITEM 11. EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION
Refer to the information under the captions “2015 Director Compensation and Benefits,” “Compensation Discussion and Analysis,” “Executive
Compensation,” “Retirement and Non-Qualified Defined Contribution and Deferred Compensation Plans,” and “Potential Post-Employment
Payments” of the Proxy Statement, which is incorporated herein by reference. See also the information under the caption “Compensation
Committee Report” of the Proxy Statement, which information is incorporated herein by reference; however, such information is only “furnished”
hereunder and not deemed “filed” for purposes of Section 18 of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934.
ITEM 12. SECURITY OWNERSHIP OF CERTAIN BENEFICIAL OWNERS AND MANAGEMENT AND RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS
Refer to the information under the captions “Security Ownership — Five Percent Holders” and “Security Ownership — Officer and Director Stock
Ownership” of the Proxy Statement, which information is incorporated herein by reference.
Securities Authorized for Issuance Under Equity Compensation Plans
(millions, except per share data)
Plan category
Number of securities to
be issued upon exercise
of outstanding options,
warrants and rights as
of January 2, 2016 (a)
Equity compensation plans approved by security holders
20.5
Equity compensation plans not approved by security holders
*
$
—
Total
20.5
Number of securities
remaining available for
future issuance under
equity compensation
plans (excluding securities
reflected in column (a) as
of January 2, 2016 (c)*
Weighted-average
exercise price of
outstanding options,
warrants and
rights as of
January 2, 2016 (b)
$
58
16.4
NA
0.3
58
16.7
The total number of shares remaining available for issuance under the 2013 Long-term Incentive Plan will be reduced by two shares for each share issued pursuant
to an award other than a stock option or stock appreciation right, or potentially issuable pursuant to an outstanding award other than a stock option or stock
appreciation right, which will in each case reduce the total number of shares remaining by one share for each share issued.
Three plans are considered “Equity compensation plans not approved by security holders.” The Kellogg Share Incentive Plan, which was adopted
in 2002 and is available to most U.K. employees of specified Kellogg Company subsidiaries; a similar plan, which is available to employees in the
Republic of Ireland; and the Deferred Compensation Plan for Non-Employee Directors, which was adopted in 1986 and amended in 1993 and 2002.
Under the Kellogg Share Incentive Plan, eligible U.K. employees may contribute up to 1,500 Pounds Sterling annually to the plan through payroll
deductions. The trustees of the plan use those contributions to buy shares of our common stock at fair market value on the open market, with
Kellogg matching those contributions on a 1:1 basis. Shares must be withdrawn from the plan when employees cease employment. Under current
law, eligible employees generally receive certain income and other tax benefits if those shares are held in the plan for a specified number of years.
A similar plan is also available to employees in the Republic of Ireland. As these plans are open market plans with no set overall maximum, no
amounts for these plans are included in the above table. However, approximately 48,000 shares were purchased by eligible employees under the
Kellogg Share Incentive Plan, the plan for the Republic of Ireland and other similar predecessor plans during 2015, with approximately an additional
48,000 shares being provided as matched shares.
The Deferred Compensation Plan for Non-Employee Directors was amended and restated during 2013. Under the Deferred Compensation Plan for
Non-Employee Directors, non-employee Directors may elect to defer all or part of their compensation (other than expense reimbursement) into
units which are credited to their accounts. The units have a value equal to the fair market value of a share of our common stock on the appropriate
date, with dividend
105
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
equivalents being earned on the whole units in non-employee Directors’ accounts. Units must be paid in shares of our common stock, either in a
lump sum or in up to ten annual installments, with the installments to begin as soon as practicable after the non-employee Director’s service as a
Director terminates. No more than 300,000 shares are authorized for use under this plan, of which approximately 1,000 had been issued as of
January 2, 2016.
ITEM 13. CERTAIN RELATIONSHIPS AND RELATED TRANSACTIONS, AND DIRECTOR INDEPENDENCE
Refer to the information under the captions “Corporate Governance — Director Independence” and “Related Person Transactions” of the Proxy
Statement, which information is incorporated herein by reference.
ITEM 14. PRINCIPAL ACCOUNTANT FEES AND SERVICES
Refer to the information under the captions “Proposal 3 — Ratification of PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP — Fees Paid to Independent Registered
Public Accounting Firm” and “Proposal 3 — Ratification of PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP — Preapproval Policies and Procedures” of the Proxy
Statement, which information is incorporated herein by reference.
PART IV
ITEM 15. EXHIBITS, FINANCIAL STATEMENT SCHEDULES
The Consolidated Financial Statements and related Notes, together with Management’s Report on Internal Control over Financial Reporting, and
the Report thereon of PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP dated February 24, 2016, are included herein in Part II, Item 8.
(a) 1. Consolidated Financial Statements
Consolidated Statement of Income for the years ended January 2, 2016, January 3, 2015 and December 28, 2013.
Consolidated Statement of Comprehensive Income for the years ended January 2, 2016, January 3, 2015 and December 28, 2013.
Consolidated Balance Sheet at January 2, 2016 and January 3, 2015.
Consolidated Statement of Equity for the years ended January 2, 2016, January 3, 2015 and December 28, 2013.
Consolidated Statement of Cash Flows for the years ended January 2, 2016, January 3, 2015 and December 28, 2013.
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.
Management’s Report on Internal Control over Financial Reporting.
Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm.
(a) 2. Consolidated Financial Statement Schedule
All financial statement schedules are omitted because they are not applicable or the required information is shown in the financial statements or
the notes thereto.
(a) 3. Exhibits required to be filed by Item 601 of Regulation S-K
The information called for by this Item is incorporated herein by reference from the Exhibit Index included in this Report.
106
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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SIGNATURES
Pursuant to the requirements of Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the Registrant has duly caused this Report to be
signed on its behalf by the undersigned, thereunto duly authorized, this 24th day of February, 2016.
KELLOGG COMPANY
By:
/s/
John A. Bryant
John A. Bryant
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, this Report has been signed below by the following persons on behalf of the
Registrant and in the capacities and on the dates indicated.
Name
Capacity
Date
John A. Bryant
John A. Bryant
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer and Director
(Principal Executive Officer)
February 24, 2016
Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer
(Principal Financial Officer and Principal Accounting
Officer)
February 24, 2016
Ronald L. Dissinger
Ronald L. Dissinger
*
Stephanie A. Burns
Director
February 24, 2016
*
John T. Dillon
Director
February 24, 2016
*
Gordon Gund
Director
February 24, 2016
*
Zachary Gund
Director
February 24, 2016
*
James M. Jenness
Director
February 24, 2016
*
Ann McLaughlin Korologos
Director
February 24, 2016
*
Donald R. Knauss
Director
February 24, 2016
*
Mary Laschinger
Director
February 24, 2016
*
Cynthia H. Milligan
Director
February 24, 2016
*
La June Montgomery Tabron
Director
February 24, 2016
*
Rogelio M. Rebolledo
Director
February 24, 2016
*
Carolyn M. Tastad
Director
February 24, 2016
*
Noel R. Wallace
Director
February 24, 2016
/s/
/s/
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
* By:
/s/
Gary H. Pilnick
Gary H. Pilnick
Attorney-in-fact
February 24, 2016
EXHIBIT INDEX
Exhibit
No.
2.01
3.01
3.02
4.01
4.02
4.03
4.04
4.05
4.06
Description
Amended and Restated Transaction Agreement between us and
The Procter & Gamble Company, incorporated by reference to
Exhibit 1.1 of our Current Report on Form 8-K dated May 31, 2012,
Commission file number 1-4171.
Amended Restated Certificate of Incorporation of Kellogg Company,
incorporated by reference to Exhibit 4.1 to our Registration
Statement on Form S-8, file number 333-56536.
Bylaws of Kellogg Company, as amended, incorporated by
reference to Exhibit 3.1 to our Current Report on Form 8-K dated
February 23, 2016, Commission file number 1-4171.
Indenture and Supplemental Indenture dated March 15 and March
29, 2001, respectively, between Kellogg Company and BNY
Midwest Trust Company, including the form of 7.45% Debentures
due 2031, incorporated by reference to Exhibit 4.01 and 4.02 to our
Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the quarter ending March 31,
2001, Commission file number 1-4171.
Form of Indenture between Kellogg Company and The Bank of New
York Mellon Trust Company, N.A., incorporated by reference to
Exhibit 4.1 to our Registration Statement on Form S-3, Commission
file number 333-159303.
Officers’ Certificate of Kellogg Company (with form of Kellogg
Company 4.450% Senior Note Due May 30, 2016), incorporated by
reference to Exhibit 4.2 to our Current Report on Form 8-K dated
May 18, 2009, Commission file number 1-4171.
Officers’ Certificate of Kellogg Company (with form of Kellogg
Company 4.150% Senior Note Due 2019), incorporated by reference
to Exhibit 4.2 to our Current Report on Form 8-K dated November
16, 2009, Commission file number 1-4171.
Officers’ Certificate of Kellogg Company (with form of Kellogg
Company 4.000% Senior Note Due 2020), incorporated by reference
to Exhibit 4.1 to our Current Report on Form 8-K dated December 8,
2010, Commission file number 1-4171.
Officers’ Certificate of Kellogg Company (with form of Kellogg
Company 3.25% Senior Note Due 2018), incorporated by reference
to Exhibit 4.1 to our Current Report on Form 8-K dated May 15,
2011, Commission file number 1-4171.
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
Electronic(E),
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Exhibit
No.
4.07
4.08
4.09
4.10
4.11
4.12
4.13
10.01
10.02
10.03
Description
Officers’ Certificate of Kellogg Company (with form of Kellogg
Company 1.875% Senior Note Due 2016), incorporated by reference
to Exhibit 4.1 to our Current Report on Form 8-K dated November
17, 2011, Commission file number 1-4171.
Officers’ Certificate of Kellogg Company (with form of 1.125%
Senior Note due 2015, 1.750% Senior Note due 2017 and 3.125%
Senior Note due 2022), incorporated by reference to Exhibit 4.1 to
our Current Report on Form 8-K dated May 17, 2012, Commission
file number 1-4171.
Indenture, dated as of May 22, 2012, between Kellogg Canada Inc.,
Kellogg Company, and BNY Trust Company of Canada and The
Bank of New York Mellon Trustee Company, N.A., as trustees,
incorporated by reference to Exhibit 4.1 to our Current Report on
Form 8-K dated May 22, 2012, commission file number 1-4171.
First Supplemental Indenture, dated as of May 22, 2012, between
Kellogg Canada, Inc., Kellogg Company, and BNY Trust Company
of Canada and The Bank of New York Mellon Trustee Company,
N.A., as trustees incorporated by reference to Exhibit 4.1 to our
Current Report on Form 8-K dated May 22, 2012, Commission file
number 1-4171.
Officer’s Certificate of Kellogg Company (with form of Floating Rate
Senior Notes due 2015 and 2.750% Senior Notes due 2023),
incorporated by reference to Exhibit 4.1 to our Current Report on
Form 8-K dated February 14, 2013, Commission file number 14171.
Second Supplemental Indenture dated as of May 22, 2014, between
Kellogg Canada Inc., Kellogg Company, and BNY Trust Company
of Canada and The Bank of New York Mellon Trustee Company,
N.A., as trustees, incorporated by reference to Exhibit 4.1 to our
Current Report on Form 8-K dated May 22, 2014, commission file
number 1-4171.
Officer’s Certificate of Kellogg Company (with form of 1.250%
Senior Notes due 2025), incorporated by reference to Exhibit 4.1 to
our Current Report on Form 8-K dated March 9, 2015, Commission
file number 1-4171.
Kellogg Company Excess Benefit Retirement Plan, incorporated by
reference to Exhibit 10.01 to our Annual Report on Form 10-K for
the fiscal year ended December 31, 1983, Commission file number
1-4171.*
Kellogg Company Supplemental Retirement Plan, incorporated by
reference to Exhibit 10.05 to our Annual Report on Form 10-K for
the fiscal year ended December 31, 1990, Commission file number
1-4171.*
Kellogg Company Supplemental Savings and Investment Plan, as
amended and restated as of January 1, 2003, incorporated by
reference to Exhibit 10.03 to our Annual Report on Form 10-K for
the fiscal year ended December 28, 2002, Commission file number
1-4171.*
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
Electronic(E),
Paper(P) or
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Exhibit
No.
10.04
10.05
10.06
10.07
10.08
10.09
10.10
10.11
10.12
10.13
10.14
Description
Kellogg Company International Retirement Plan, incorporated by
reference to Exhibit 10.05 to our Annual Report on Form 10-K for
the fiscal year ended December 31, 1997, Commission file number
1-4171.*
Kellogg Company Executive Survivor Income Plan, incorporated by
reference to Exhibit 10.06 to our Annual Report on Form 10-K for
the fiscal year ended December 31, 1985, Commission file number
1-4171.*
Kellogg Company Key Executive Benefits Plan, incorporated by
reference to Exhibit 10.09 to our Annual Report on Form 10-K for
the fiscal year ended December 31, 1991, Commission file number
1-4171.*
Kellogg Company Key Employee Long Term Incentive Plan,
incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.6 to our Annual Report on
Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 29, 2007,
Commission file number 1-4171.*
Kellogg Company Senior Executive Officer Performance Bonus
Plan, incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.10 to our Annual
Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 31, 1995,
Commission file number 1-4171.*
Kellogg Company 2000 Non-Employee Director Stock Plan,
incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.10 to our Annual Report on
Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 29, 2007,
Commission file number 1-4171.*
Kellogg Company Bonus Replacement Stock Option Plan,
incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.12 to our Annual Report on
Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 31, 1997,
Commission file number 1-4171.*
Kellogg Company Executive Compensation Deferral Plan
incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.13 to our Annual Report on
Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 31, 1997,
Commission file number 1-4171.*
Employment Letter between us and James M. Jenness,
incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.18 to our Annual Report in
Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended January 1, 2005, Commission
file number 1-4171.*
Agreement between us and other executives, incorporated by
reference to Exhibit 10.05 of our Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for
the quarter ended June 30, 2000, Commission file number 1-4171.*
Stock Option Agreement between us and James Jenness,
incorporated by reference to Exhibit 4.4 to our Registration
Statement on Form S-8, file number 333-56536.*
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
Electronic(E),
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
Exhibit
No.
10.15
10.16
10.17
10.18
10.19
10.20
10.21
10.22
10.23
10.24
10.25
Description
Kellogg Company 2002 Employee Stock Purchase Plan, as
amended and restated as of January 1, 2008, incorporated by
reference to Exhibit 10.22 to our Annual Report on Form 10-K for
the fiscal year ended December 29, 2007, Commission file number
1-4171.*
Kellogg Company 1993 Employee Stock Ownership Plan,
incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.23 to our Annual Report on
Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 29, 2007,
Commission file number 1-4171.*
Kellogg Company 2003 Long-Term Incentive Plan, as amended and
restated as of December 8, 2006, incorporated by reference to
Exhibit 10. to our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year
ended December 30, 2006, Commission file number 1-4171.*
Kellogg Company Severance Plan, incorporated by reference to
Exhibit 10. of our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year
ended December 28, 2002, Commission file number 1-4171.*
Form of Non-Qualified Option Agreement for Senior Executives
under 2003 Long-Term Incentive Plan, incorporated by reference to
Exhibit 10.4 to our Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the fiscal
period ended September 25, 2004, Commission file number 14171.*
Form of Restricted Stock Grant Award under 2003 Long-Term
Incentive Plan, incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.5 to our
Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the fiscal period ended
September 25, 2004, Commission file number 1-4171.*
Form of Non-Qualified Option Agreement for Non-Employee Director
under 2000 Non-Employee Director Stock Plan, incorporated by
reference to Exhibit 10.6 to our Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for
the fiscal period ended September 25, 2004, Commission file
number 1-4171.*
First Amendment to the Key Executive Benefits Plan, incorporated
by reference to Exhibit 10.39 of our Annual Report in Form 10-K for
our fiscal year ended January 1, 2005, Commission file number 14171.*
Restricted Stock Grant/Non-Compete Agreement between us and
John Bryant, incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 of our
Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the period ended April 2, 2005,
Commission file number 1-4171 (the “2005 Q1 Form 10-Q”).*
Executive Survivor Income Plan, incorporated by reference to
Exhibit 10.42 of our Annual Report in Form 10-K for our fiscal year
ended December 31, 2005, Commission file number 1-4171.*
Agreement between us and James M. Jenness, incorporated by
reference to Exhibit 10.2 to our Current Report on Form 8-K dated
October 20, 2006, Commission file number 1-4171.*
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
Electronic(E),
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Exhibit
No.
10.26
10.27
10.28
10.29
10.30
10.31
10.32
10.33
10.34
10.35
10.36
10.37
Description
Letter Agreement between us and John A. Bryant, dated July 23,
2007, incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.2 to our Current
Report on Form 8-K dated July 23, 2007, Commission file number
1-4171.*
Agreement between us and James M. Jenness, dated February 22,
2008, incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 to our Current
Report on Form 8-K dated February 22, 2008, Commission file
number 1-4171.*
Form of Amendment to Form of Agreement between us and certain
executives, incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 to our Current
Report on Form 8-K dated December 18, 2008, Commission file
number 1-4171.*
Amendment to Letter Agreement between us and John A. Bryant,
dated December 18, 2008, incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.2
to our Current Report on Form 8-K dated December 18, 2008,
Commission file number 1-4171.*
Form of Restricted Stock Grant Award under 2003 Long-Term
Incentive Plan, incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.2 to our
Current Report on Form 8-K dated December 18, 2008, Commission
file number 1-4171.*
Form of Option Terms and Conditions for SVP Executive Officers
under 2003 Long-Term Incentive Plan, incorporated by reference to
Exhibit 10.2 to our Current Report on Form 8-K dated February 20,
2009, Commission file number 1-4171.*
Kellogg Company 2009 Long-Term Incentive Plan, incorporated by
reference to Exhibit 10.1 to our Registration Statement on Form S-8
dated April 27, 2009, Commission file number 333-158824.*
Kellogg Company 2009 Non-Employee Director Stock Plan,
incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 to our Registration
Statement on Form S-8 dated April 27, 2009, Commission file
number 333-158826.*
Form of Option Terms and Conditions under 2009 Long-Term
Incentive Plan, incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.2 to our
Current Report on Form 8-K dated February 25, 2011, Commission
file number 1-4171.
Letter Agreement between us and Gary Pilnick, dated May 20,
2008, incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.54 to our Annual
Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended January 1, 2011,
commission file number 1-4171.*
Kellogg Company Senior Executive Annual Incentive Plan,
incorporated by reference to Appendix A of our Board of Directors’
proxy statement for the annual meeting of shareholders held on
April 29, 2011.*
2012-2014 Executive Performance Plan, incorporated by reference
to Exhibit 10.1 of our Current Report on Form 8-K dated February
23, 2012, Commission file number 1-4171.*
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
Electronic(E),
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Exhibit
No.
10.38
10.39
10.40
10.41
10.42
10.43
10.44
10.45
10.46
10.47
10.48
Description
Form of Option Terms and Conditions, incorporated by reference to
Exhibit 10.2 to our Current Report on Form 8-K dated February 23,
2012, Commission file number 1-4171.*
Form of Restricted Stock Terms and Conditions, incorporated by
reference to Exhibit 10.45 to our Annual Report on Form 10-K for
the fiscal year ended December 31, 2011, Commission file number
1-4171.*
Form of Restricted Stock Unit Terms and Conditions, incorporated
by reference to Exhibit 10.45 to our Annual Report on Form 10-K for
the fiscal year ended December 29, 2012, Commission file number
1-4171.*
2013-2015 Executive Performance Plan, incorporated by reference
to Exhibit 10.1 to our Current Report on Form 8-K dated February
27, 2013, Commission file number 1-4171.*
Kellogg Company 2013 Long-Term Incentive Plan, incorporated by
reference to Exhibit 10.1 to our Registration Statement on Form S8, file number 333-188222.*
Kellogg Company Pringles Savings and Investment Plan,
incorporated by reference to Exhibit 4.3 to our Registration
Statement on Form S-8, file number 333-189638.*
Amendment Number 1. to the Kellogg Company Pringles Savings
and Investment Plan, incorporated by reference to Exhibit 4.4 to our
Registration Statement on Form S-8, file number 333-189638.*
Kellogg Company Deferred Compensation Plan for Non-Employee
Directors, incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.49 to our Annual
Report on Form 10-K dated February 24, 2014, Commission file
number 1-4171.*
Kellogg Company Executive Compensation Deferral Plan,
incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.50 to our Annual Report on
Form 10-K dated February 24, 2014, Commission file number 14171.*
2014-2016 Executive Performance Plan, incorporated by reference
to Exhibit 10.1 of our Current Report on Form 8-K dated February
27, 2014, Commission file number 1-4171.*
Five-Year Credit Agreement dated as of February 28, 2014 with
JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A., as Administrative Agent, Barclays
Capital, as Syndication Agent, BNP Paribas, Cooperatieve Centrale
Raiffeisen-Boerenleenbank B.A., “Rabobank Nederland”, New York
Branch and Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., as Documentation Agents,
J.P. Morgan Securities LLC, Barclays Capital, BNP Paribas
Securities Corp., Cooperatieve Centrale Raiffeisen-Boerenleenbank
B.A., “Rabobank Nederland”, New York Branch and Wells Fargo
Securities, LLC, as Joint Lead Arrangers and Joint Bookrunners,
incorporated by reference to Exhibit 4.1 to our Current Report on
Form 8-K dated March 4, 2014, Commission file number 1-4171.
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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Exhibit
No.
10.49
10.50
10.51
10.52
10.53
10.54
21.01
23.01
24.01
31.1
31.2
32.1
32.2
101.INS
101.SCH
101.CAL
101.DEF
101.LAB
101.PRE
*
Description
Kellogg Company Change of Control Severance Policy for Key
Executives, incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 to our Current
Report on Form 8-K dated December 11, 2014.*
Amendment to Change of Control between the Company and John
Bryant, dated December 5, 2014, incorporated by reference to
Exhibit 10.2 to our Current Report on Form 8-K dated December 11,
2014.*
2015-2017 Executive Performance Plan, incorporated by reference
to Exhibit 10.1 of our Current Report on Form 8-K dated
February 24, 2015, Commission file number 1-4171.*
Form of Option Terms and Conditions, incorporated by reference to
Exhibit 10.2 of our Current Report on Form 8-K dated February 24,
2015, Commission file number 1-4171.*
2016-2018 Executive Performance Plan, incorporated by reference
to Exhibit 10.1 of our Current Report on Form 8-K dated
February 23, 2016, Commission file number 1-4171.*
Form of Option Terms and Conditions, incorporated by reference to
Exhibit 10.2 of our Current Report on Form 8-K dated February 23,
2016, Commission file number 1-4171.*
Domestic and Foreign Subsidiaries of Kellogg.
Consent of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm.
Powers of Attorney authorizing Gary H. Pilnick to execute our
Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended January 3,
2015, on behalf of the Board of Directors, and each of them.
Rule 13a-14(a)/15d-14(a) Certification by John A. Bryant.
Rule 13a-14(a)/15d-14(a) Certification by Ronald L. Dissinger.
Section 1350 Certification by John A. Bryant.
Section 1350 Certification by Ronald L. Dissinger.
XBRL Instance Document
XBRL Taxonomy Extension Schema Document
XBRL Taxonomy Extension Calculation Linkbase Document
XBRL Taxonomy Extension Definition Linkbase Document
XBRL Taxonomy Extension Label Linkbase Document
XBRL Taxonomy Extension Presentation Linkbase Document
Electronic(E),
Paper(P) or
Incorp. By
Ref.(IBRF)
IBRF
IBRF
IBRF
IBRF
IBRF
IBRF
E
E
E
E
E
E
E
E
E
E
E
E
E
A management contract or compensatory plan required to be filed with this Report.
We agree to furnish to the Securities and Exchange Commission, upon its request, a copy of any instrument defining the rights of holders of longterm debt of Kellogg and our subsidiaries and any of our unconsolidated subsidiaries for which Financial Statements are required to be filed.
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
We will furnish any of our shareowners a copy of any of the above Exhibits not included herein upon the written request of such shareowner and
the payment to Kellogg of the reasonable expenses incurred in furnishing such copy or copies.
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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Exhibit 21.01
KELLOGG COMPANY SUBSIDIARIES
(COMMON STOCK OWNERSHIP)
North America
Kellogg Company Subsidiaries
• Argkel, Inc. - Delaware
• CC Real Estate Holdings, LLC - Michigan
• Kashi Company - California
• Keebler USA, Inc. - Delaware
• Kellogg Asia Inc. - Delaware
• Kellogg Chile Inc. - Delaware
• Kellogg Fearn, Inc. - Michigan
• Kellogg Holding, LLC - Delaware
• Kellogg International Holding Company - Delaware
• Kellogg Transition MA&P L.L.C. - Delaware
• Kellogg USA Inc. - Michigan
• K-One Inc. - Delaware
• K-Two Inc. - Delaware
• McCamly Plaza Hotel Inc. - Delaware
• The Eggo Company - Delaware
• Trafford Park Insurance Limited - Bermuda
• Worthington Foods, Inc. - Ohio
Kashi Company Subsidiaries
• Bear Naked, Inc. - Delaware
Kellogg USA Inc. Subsidiaries
• Keebler Holding Corp - Georgia
Keebler Holding Corp Subsidiaries
• Keebler Foods Company - Delaware
Keebler Foods Company Subsidiaries
• Austin Quality Foods, Inc. - Delaware
• BDH, Inc.- Delaware
• Keebler Company - Delaware
• Shaffer, Clarke & Co., Inc. - Delaware
Austin Quality Foods, Inc. Subsidiaries:
• AQFTM, Inc. - Delaware
• Cary Land Corporation - North Carolina
Keebler Company Subsidiaries
• Godfrey Transport, Inc.- Delaware
• Illinois Baking Corporation - Delaware
• Kellogg Business Services Company - Delaware (f/k/a Kellogg IT Services Company)
• Kellogg North America Company - Delaware
• Kellogg Sales Company - Delaware
Kellogg Sales Company Subsidiaries
(d/b/a Kellogg’s Snacks d/b/a Kellogg’s Food Away From Home d/b/a Austin Quality Sales Company)
• 545 LLC - Delaware
• Barbara Dee Cookie Company, L.L.C. - Delaware
• Famous Amos Chocolate Chip Cookie Company, L.L.C. - Delaware
• Gardenburger, LLC - Delaware
• Kashi Sales, L.L.C. - Delaware
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Little Brownie Bakers, L.L.C. - Delaware
Mother’s Cookie Company, L.L.C.- Delaware
Murray Biscuit Company, L.L.C. - Delaware
President Baking Company, L.L.C.- Delaware
Specialty Foods, L.L.C. - Delaware
Stretch Island Fruit Sales L.L.C. - Delaware
Sunshine Biscuits, L.L.C.- Delaware
K-One Inc Subsidiaries
• SIA Kellogg Latvija - Latvia
• Kellogg Latvia, Inc. - Delaware
Kellogg North America Company Subsidiaries
•
Pringles LLC - Delaware
Asia Pacific/China/Sub-Saharan
Kellogg Company Subsidiaries
• K (China) Limited - Delaware
• K India Private Limited - Delaware
• Kellogg (Thailand) Limited - Delaware
• Kellogg (Thailand) Limited - Thailand
• Kellogg Asia Marketing Inc. - Delaware
• Kellogg Asia Sdn. Bhd. - Malaysia
• Kellogg India Private Limited - India
• Kellogg Asia Pacific Pte. Ltd - Singapore
• Kellogg Tolaram Pte. Ltd. - Singapore (Joint Venture)
Kellogg Latin America Holding Company (One) Limited Subsidiaries
• Kellogg Asia Products Sdn. Bhd. - Malaysia
• Kellogg Company East Africa Limited - Kenya
• Kellogg Hong Kong Private Limited - Hong Kong
• Nhong Shim Kellogg Co. Ltd. - South Korea
• Pringles Taiwan Limited - Taiwan
Kellogg Asia Marketing Inc. Subsidiaries
• Shanghai Trading Co. Ltd. - China
Kellogg Hong Kong Private Limited Subsidiaries
• Kellogg (Qingdao) Food Co., Ltd.
• Kellogg Foods (Shanghai) Co. Ltd - China
• Wimble Manufacturing Belgium BVBA - Belgium
• Wimble Services Belgium BVBA - Belgium
• Pringles Hong Kong Limited - Hong Kong
• Yihai Kerry Kellogg Foods (Shanghai) Company Limited - China (Joint Venture)
Kellogg Tolaram Pte. Ltd. Joint Venture Subsidiaries
• Kellogg Tolaram Ghana Private Limited - Ghana
• Kellogg Tolaram Nigeria Limited - Nigeria
Canada-Australia-New Zealand
Kellogg Company Subsidiaries
• Canada Holding LLC - Delaware
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
Kellogg Australia Holdings Pty Ltd, Subsidiaries
• Kellogg (Aust.) Pty. Ltd. - Australia
Kellogg (Aust.) Pty. Ltd. Subsidiaries
• Kashi Company Pty. Ltd. - Australia
• Kellogg Superannuation Pty. Ltd. - Australia
• Specialty Cereals Pty Limited - Australia
• The Healthy Snack People Pty Limited - Australia
• Pringles Australia Pty Ltd - Australia
Canada Holding LLC Subsidiaries
• Kellogg Kayco - Cayman Islands
• Kellogg Group Limited - England and Wales
Kellogg Group Limited Subsidiaries
• Pringles Manufacturing Company - Delaware
• Gollek UK Limited - United Kingdom
Gollek UK Limited Subsidiaries
• Kellogg Latin America Holding Company (One) Limited - England and Wales
Mexico-Latin America
Kellogg Company Subsidiaries
• Gollek Inc. - Delaware
• Kelarg, Inc. - Delaware
• Kellogg Argentina S.R.L. - Argentina
• Kellogg Brasil, Inc. - Delaware
• Kellogg Caribbean Inc. - Delaware
• Kellogg Caribbean Services Company, Inc. - Puerto Rico
• Kellogg Chile Limited - Chile
• Kellogg de Centro America, S.A. - Guatemala
• Kellogg de Colombia, S.A. - Colombia
Kellogg Latin America Holding Company (One) Limited Subsidiaries
• Alimentos Kellogg de Panama SRL - Panama
• Alimentos Kellogg, S.A. - Venezuela
• Gollek Argentina S.R.L. - Argentina
• Kellogg Company Mexico, S. de R.L. de C.V. - Mexico
• Kellogg Costa Rica S. de R.L. - Costa Rica
• Kellogg de Peru, S.A.L. - Peru
• Kellogg Ecuador Compania Ltda. - Ecuador
• Pringles Serviçes e Comércio de Alimentos Ltda - Brazil
Kellogg Company Mexico, S. de R.L. de C.V. Subsidiaries
• Gollek Interamericas, S. de R.L., de C.V. - Mexico
• Gollek Services, S.A. a/k/a Gollek Servicios, S.C. - Mexico
• Kellman, S. de R.L. de C.V. - Mexico
• Kellogg de Mexico, S. de R.L. de C.V. - Mexico
• Kellogg Servicios, S.C. - Mexico
• Pronumex, S. de R.L. de C.V. - Mexico
• Instituto de Nutricion y Salud Kellogg, A.C. - Mexico
Kellogg de Mexico, S. de R.L. de C.V. Subsidiaries
• Servicios Argkel, S.C. - Mexico
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
Alimentos Kellogg, S.A. Subsidiaries
• Gollek, S.A. - Venezuela
Gollek, Inc. Subsidiaires
• Kellogg Brasil Ltda. - Brasil
• Kellogg El Salvador S. de R.L. de C.V. - El Salvador
Europe
Kellogg Company Subsidiaries
• Bisco Misr - Egypt
• Gollek B.V. - Netherlands
• Kellogg UK Minor Limited - Manchester, England
Kellogg Latin America Holding Company (One) Limited Subsidiaries
• Kellogg Company of Great Britain Limited - England
• Kellogg Hong Kong Holding Company - England and Wales
• Kellogg Latin America Holding Company (Two) Limited - United Kingdom
• Kellogg Netherlands Holding B.V. - Netherlands
• Prime Bond Holdings Limited - Cyprus
• Pringles Overseas Holding S.a.r.l. - Switzerland
Kellogg International Holding Company Subsidiaries
• Kellogg Holding Company Limited - Bermuda
• Kellogg Italia S.p.A. - Delaware
• K Europe Holding Company Limited - England and Wales
• Klux A S.a.r.l. - Luxembourg
• Prime Bond Cyprus Holding Company Limited - Cyprus
Kellogg Holding Company Limited Subsidiaries
• Kellogg Europe Company Limited - Bermuda
K Europe Holding Company Limited Subsidiaries
• Multipro Singapore Pte. Ltd. - Singapore (Joint Venture)
Klux A S.a.r.l. Subsidiaries
• Klux B S.a.r.l. - Luxembourg
Kellogg Europe Company Limited Subsidiaries
• Kellogg Lux I S.a.r.l. - Luxembourg
• Pringles S.a.r.l. - Luxembourg (f/k/a Kellogg Lux II S.a.r.l.)
• KECL, LLC - Delaware
Kellogg Lux I S.a.r.l. Subsidiaries
• Kellogg Europe Trading Limited - Ireland
• Kellogg Europe Treasury Services Limited - Ireland
• Kellogg Irish Holding Company Limited - Ireland
• Kellogg Lux V S.a.r.l. - Luxembourg
• Kellogg Malta Limited - Malta
• Kellogg Europe Emerging Markets Services (KEEM) - France
• UMA Investments sp. z o.o. - Poland
• Kellogg European Logistics Services Company Limited - Ireland (f/k/a Kellogg Europe Snacks Limited)
Kellogg Lux V S.a.r.l. Subsidiaries
• Kellogg Snacks Financing Limited - Ireland
Pringles S.a.r.l. Subsidiaries
• PRUX S.a.r.l. - Luxembourg
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
•
Pringles LP - Canada
UMA Investments sp. z o.o. Subsidiaries
• Villada sp. z o.o. - Poland
Kellogg European Logistics Services Company Limited Subsidiaries
• Pringles International Operations S.a.r.l. - Switzerland
• Kellogg Snacks Holding Company Europe Limited - Ireland (f/k/a Pactglade Limited)
Kellogg Company of Great Britain Limited Subsidiaries
• Kellogg Canada Inc. - Canada
• Favorite Food Products Limited - England
• Kelcone Limited - England
• Kelcorn Limited - England
• Kelmill Limited - England
• Kelpac Limited - England
• Saragusa Frozen Foods Limited - England
Kellogg Canada Inc. Subsidiaries
• Kellogg Australia Holdings Pty Ltd. - Australia
• Keeb Canada, Inc. - Canada
Kellogg Netherlands Holding B.V.
• Pringles Japan G.K. - Japan
Prime Bond Limited Subsidiaries
• Kellogg Europe Services Limited - Ireland
• Kellogg Lux VI S.a.r.l. - Luxemberg
• Kellogg Rus LLC - Russian Federation
Pringles Overseas Holdings S.a.r.l. Subsidiaries
• Pringles (Shanghai) Food Co. Ltd. - China
• Mass Food SAE - Egypt
•
Mass Food SAE Subsidiaries
• Mass Food International SAE - Egypt
• Mass Trade for Trade and Distribution SAE - Egypt
Pringles Japan G.K. - Japan
• Kellogg (Japan) G.K. - Japan
United Bakers LLC Subsidiaries
• LLC UNITED BAKERS-Pskov - Russian Federation
Kellogg Europe Trading Limited Subsidiaries
• Kellogg Med Gida Ticaret Limited Sirketi - Turkey (Joint Venture)
Kellogg Irish Holding Company Limited Subsidiaries
• Kellogg Lux III S.a.r.l. - Luxembourg
Kellogg Lux III S.a.r.l. Subsidiaries
• Kellogg Group S.a.r.l. - Luxembourg
• Kellogg Europe Finance Limited - Ireland
Kellogg Group S.a.r.l.
• Kellogg (Deutschland) GmbH - Germany
• Kellogg Company of South Africa (Pty) Limited - South Africa
• Kellogg Group, LLC - Delaware
• Kellogg Hellas Single Member Limited Liability Company - Greece
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
•
•
•
•
•
Kellogg Northern Europe GmbH - Germany
Kellogg U.K. Holding Company Limited - England
Kellogg's Produits Alimentaires, S.A.S. - France
Nordisk Kellogg's ApS - Denmark
Portable Foods Manufacturing Company Limited - England
Kellogg (Deutschland) GmbH Subsidiaries
• Kellogg (Schweiz) GmbH - Switzerland
• Kellogg (Osterreich) GmbH - Austria
• Kellogg Services GmbH - Austria
• Kellogg Services GmbH - Germany
• Kellogg Manufacturing GmbH & Co. KG - Germany
• Gebrueder Nielsen Reismuehlen und Staerke-Fabrik mit Beschraenkter Haftung - Germany
Kellogg U.K. Holding Company Limited Subsidiaries
• Kellogg Company of Ireland, Limited - Ireland
• Kellogg Espana, S.L. - Spain
• Kellogg Management Services (Europe) Limited - England
• Kellogg Manchester Limited - England
• Kellogg Marketing and Sales Company (UK) Limited - England
• Kellogg Supply Services (Europe) Limited - England
Kellogg's Produits Alimentaires, S.A.S.
• Kellogg Belgium Services Company bvba - Belgium
Kellogg Espana, S.L. Subsidiaries
• Kellogg Manufacturing Espana, S.L. - Spain
Kellogg Management Services (Europe) Limited Subsidiaries
• Kellogg European Support Services SRL - Romania
Kellogg Manchester Limited Subsidiaries
• KELF Limited - England
KELF Limited Subsidiaries
• Kellogg Talbot LLC - Delaware
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
Exhibit 23.01
CONSENT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM
We hereby consent to the incorporation by reference in the Registration Statements on Form S-3 (Nos. 333-72312, 333-159303, 333-160537, 333181377, 333-182641 and 333-205616) and the Registration Statements on Form S-8 (Nos. 333-56536, 333-88162, 333-109233, 333-109234, 333109235, 333-109238, 333-158824, 333-158826, 333-188222, and 333-189638) of Kellogg Company of our report dated February 24, 2016 relating to
the financial statements and the effectiveness of internal control over financial reporting, which appears in this Form 10‑K.
/s/ PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP
Detroit, MI
February 24, 2016
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
Exhibit 24.01
POWER OF ATTORNEY
KNOW ALL BY THESE PRESENTS, That I, the undersigned Director of Kellogg Company, a Delaware
corporation, hereby appoint Gary H. Pilnick, Vice Chairman, Corporate Development and Chief Legal Officer of Kellogg
Company, as my lawful attorney-in-fact and agent, to act on my behalf, with full power of substitution, in executing and
filing the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for fiscal year ended January 2, 2016, and any exhibits, amendments
and other documents related thereto, with the Securities and Exchange Commission.
Whereupon, I grant unto said Gary H. Pilnick full power and authority to perform all necessary and appropriate
acts in connection therewith, and hereby ratify and confirm all that said attorney-in-fact and agent, or his substitute, may
lawfully do, or cause to be done, by virtue hereof.
/s/ Stephanie A. Burns
Stephanie A. Burns
Dated: February 19, 2016
POWER OF ATTORNEY
KNOW ALL BY THESE PRESENTS, That I, the undersigned Director of Kellogg Company, a Delaware
corporation, hereby appoint Gary H. Pilnick, Vice Chairman, Corporate Development and Chief Legal Officer of Kellogg
Company, as my lawful attorney-in-fact and agent, to act on my behalf, with full power of substitution, in executing and
filing the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for fiscal year ended January 2, 2016, and any exhibits, amendments
and other documents related thereto, with the Securities and Exchange Commission.
Whereupon, I grant unto said Gary H. Pilnick full power and authority to perform all necessary and appropriate
acts in connection therewith, and hereby ratify and confirm all that said attorney-in-fact and agent, or his substitute, may
lawfully do, or cause to be done, by virtue hereof.
/s/ John T. Dillon
John T. Dillon
Dated: February 19, 2016
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
POWER OF ATTORNEY
KNOW ALL BY THESE PRESENTS, That I, the undersigned Director of Kellogg Company, a Delaware
corporation, hereby appoint Gary H. Pilnick, Vice Chairman, Corporate Development and Chief Legal Officer of Kellogg
Company, as my lawful attorney-in-fact and agent, to act on my behalf, with full power of substitution, in executing and
filing the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for fiscal year ended January 2, 2016, and any exhibits, amendments
and other documents related thereto, with the Securities and Exchange Commission.
Whereupon, I grant unto said Gary H. Pilnick full power and authority to perform all necessary and appropriate
acts in connection therewith, and hereby ratify and confirm all that said attorney-in-fact and agent, or his substitute, may
lawfully do, or cause to be done, by virtue hereof.
/s/ Gordon Gund
Gordon Gund
Dated: February 19, 2016
POWER OF ATTORNEY
KNOW ALL BY THESE PRESENTS, That I, the undersigned Director of Kellogg Company, a Delaware
corporation, hereby appoint Gary H. Pilnick, Vice Chairman, Corporate Development and Chief Legal Officer of Kellogg
Company, as my lawful attorney-in-fact and agent, to act on my behalf, with full power of substitution, in executing and
filing the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for fiscal year ended January 2, 2016, and any exhibits, amendments
and other documents related thereto, with the Securities and Exchange Commission.
Whereupon, I grant unto said Gary H. Pilnick full power and authority to perform all necessary and appropriate
acts in connection therewith, and hereby ratify and confirm all that said attorney-in-fact and agent, or his substitute, may
lawfully do, or cause to be done, by virtue hereof.
/s/ Zachary Gund
Zachary Gund
Dated: February 19, 2016
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
POWER OF ATTORNEY
KNOW ALL BY THESE PRESENTS, That I, the undersigned Director of Kellogg Company, a Delaware
corporation, hereby appoint Gary H. Pilnick, Vice Chairman, Corporate Development and Chief Legal Officer of Kellogg
Company, as my lawful attorney-in-fact and agent, to act on my behalf, with full power of substitution, in executing and
filing the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for fiscal year ended January 2, 2016, and any exhibits, amendments
and other documents related thereto, with the Securities and Exchange Commission.
Whereupon, I grant unto said Gary H. Pilnick full power and authority to perform all necessary and appropriate
acts in connection therewith, and hereby ratify and confirm all that said attorney-in-fact and agent, or his substitute, may
lawfully do, or cause to be done, by virtue hereof.
/s/ Donald R. Knauss
Donald R. Knauss
Dated: February 19, 2016
POWER OF ATTORNEY
KNOW ALL BY THESE PRESENTS, That I, the undersigned Director of Kellogg Company, a Delaware
corporation, hereby appoint Gary H. Pilnick, Vice Chairman, Corporate Development and Chief Legal Officer of Kellogg
Company, as my lawful attorney-in-fact and agent, to act on my behalf, with full power of substitution, in executing and
filing the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for fiscal year ended January 2, 2016, and any exhibits, amendments
and other documents related thereto, with the Securities and Exchange Commission.
Whereupon, I grant unto said Gary H. Pilnick full power and authority to perform all necessary and appropriate
acts in connection therewith, and hereby ratify and confirm all that said attorney-in-fact and agent, or his substitute, may
lawfully do, or cause to be done, by virtue hereof.
/s/ James M. Jenness
James M. Jenness
Dated: February 19, 2016
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
POWER OF ATTORNEY
KNOW ALL BY THESE PRESENTS, That I, the undersigned Director of Kellogg Company, a Delaware
corporation, hereby appoint Gary H. Pilnick, Vice Chairman, Corporate Development and Chief Legal Officer of Kellogg
Company, as my lawful attorney-in-fact and agent, to act on my behalf, with full power of substitution, in executing and
filing the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for fiscal year ended January 2, 2016, and any exhibits, amendments
and other documents related thereto, with the Securities and Exchange Commission.
Whereupon, I grant unto said Gary H. Pilnick full power and authority to perform all necessary and appropriate
acts in connection therewith, and hereby ratify and confirm all that said attorney-in-fact and agent, or his substitute, may
lawfully do, or cause to be done, by virtue hereof.
/s/ Mary A. Laschinger
Mary A. Laschinger
Dated: February 19, 2016
POWER OF ATTORNEY
KNOW ALL BY THESE PRESENTS, That I, the undersigned Director of Kellogg Company, a Delaware
corporation, hereby appoint Gary H. Pilnick, Vice Chairman, Corporate Development and Chief Legal Officer of Kellogg
Company, as my lawful attorney-in-fact and agent, to act on my behalf, with full power of substitution, in executing and
filing the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for fiscal year ended January 2, 2016, and any exhibits, amendments
and other documents related thereto, with the Securities and Exchange Commission.
Whereupon, I grant unto said Gary H. Pilnick full power and authority to perform all necessary and appropriate
acts in connection therewith, and hereby ratify and confirm all that said attorney-in-fact and agent, or his substitute, may
lawfully do, or cause to be done, by virtue hereof.
/s/ Ann McLaughlin Korologos
Ann McLaughlin Korologos
Dated: February 19, 2016
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
POWER OF ATTORNEY
KNOW ALL BY THESE PRESENTS, That I, the undersigned Director of Kellogg Company, a Delaware
corporation, hereby appoint Gary H. Pilnick, Vice Chairman, Corporate Development and Chief Legal Officer of Kellogg
Company, as my lawful attorney-in-fact and agent, to act on my behalf, with full power of substitution, in executing and
filing the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for fiscal year ended January 2, 2016, and any exhibits, amendments
and other documents related thereto, with the Securities and Exchange Commission.
Whereupon, I grant unto said Gary H. Pilnick full power and authority to perform all necessary and appropriate
acts in connection therewith, and hereby ratify and confirm all that said attorney-in-fact and agent, or his substitute, may
lawfully do, or cause to be done, by virtue hereof.
/s/ Cynthia H. Milligan
Cynthia H. Milligan
Dated: February 19, 2016
POWER OF ATTORNEY
KNOW ALL BY THESE PRESENTS, That I, the undersigned Director of Kellogg Company, a Delaware
corporation, hereby appoint Gary H. Pilnick, Vice Chairman, Corporate Development and Chief Legal Officer of Kellogg
Company, as my lawful attorney-in-fact and agent, to act on my behalf, with full power of substitution, in executing and
filing the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for fiscal year ended January 2, 2016, and any exhibits, amendments
and other documents related thereto, with the Securities and Exchange Commission.
Whereupon, I grant unto said Gary H. Pilnick full power and authority to perform all necessary and appropriate
acts in connection therewith, and hereby ratify and confirm all that said attorney-in-fact and agent, or his substitute, may
lawfully do, or cause to be done, by virtue hereof.
/s/ La June Montgomery Tabron
La June Montgomery Tabron
Dated: February 19, 2016
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
POWER OF ATTORNEY
KNOW ALL BY THESE PRESENTS, That I, the undersigned Director of Kellogg Company, a Delaware
corporation, hereby appoint Gary H. Pilnick, Vice Chairman, Corporate Development and Chief Legal Officer of Kellogg
Company, as my lawful attorney-in-fact and agent, to act on my behalf, with full power of substitution, in executing and
filing the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for fiscal year ended January 2, 2016, and any exhibits, amendments
and other documents related thereto, with the Securities and Exchange Commission.
Whereupon, I grant unto said Gary H. Pilnick full power and authority to perform all necessary and appropriate
acts in connection therewith, and hereby ratify and confirm all that said attorney-in-fact and agent, or his substitute, may
lawfully do, or cause to be done, by virtue hereof.
/s/ Rogelio M. Rebolledo
Rogelio M. Rebolledo
Dated: February 19, 2016
POWER OF ATTORNEY
KNOW ALL BY THESE PRESENTS, That I, the undersigned Director of Kellogg Company, a Delaware
corporation, hereby appoint Gary H. Pilnick, Vice Chairman, Corporate Development and Chief Legal Officer of Kellogg
Company, as my lawful attorney-in-fact and agent, to act on my behalf, with full power of substitution, in executing and
filing the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for fiscal year ended January 2, 2016, and any exhibits, amendments
and other documents related thereto, with the Securities and Exchange Commission.
Whereupon, I grant unto said Gary H. Pilnick full power and authority to perform all necessary and appropriate
acts in connection therewith, and hereby ratify and confirm all that said attorney-in-fact and agent, or his substitute, may
lawfully do, or cause to be done, by virtue hereof.
/s/ Carolyn Tastad
Carolyn Tastad
Dated: February 19, 2016
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
POWER OF ATTORNEY
KNOW ALL BY THESE PRESENTS, That I, the undersigned Director of Kellogg Company, a Delaware
corporation, hereby appoint Gary H. Pilnick, Vice Chairman, Corporate Development and Chief Legal Officer of Kellogg
Company, as my lawful attorney-in-fact and agent, to act on my behalf, with full power of substitution, in executing and
filing the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for fiscal year ended January 2, 2016, and any exhibits, amendments
and other documents related thereto, with the Securities and Exchange Commission.
Whereupon, I grant unto said Gary H. Pilnick full power and authority to perform all necessary and appropriate
acts in connection therewith, and hereby ratify and confirm all that said attorney-in-fact and agent, or his substitute, may
lawfully do, or cause to be done, by virtue hereof.
/s/ Noel Wallace
Noel Wallace
Dated: February 19, 2016
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
Exhibit 31.1
CERTIFICATION
I, John A. Bryant, certify that:
1. I have reviewed this annual report on Form 10-K of Kellogg Company;
2. Based on my knowledge, this report does not contain any untrue statement of a material fact or omit to state a material fact necessary to make
the statements made, in light of the circumstances under which such statements were made, not misleading with respect to the period covered by
this report;
3. Based on my knowledge, the financial statements, and other financial information included in this annual report, fairly present in all material
respects the financial condition, results of operations and cash flows of the registrant as of, and for, the periods presented in this report;
4. The registrant's other certifying officer and I are responsible for establishing and maintaining disclosure controls and procedures (as defined in
Exchange Act Rules 13a-15(e) and 15d-15(e)) and internal control over financial reporting (as defined in Exchange Act Rules 13a-15(f) and 15d15(f)) for the registrant and we have:
a) Designed such disclosure controls and procedures, or caused such disclosure controls and procedures to be designed under our
supervision, to ensure that material information relating to the registrant, including its consolidated subsidiaries, is made known to us by
others within those entities, particularly during the period in which this report is being prepared;
b) Designed such internal control over financial reporting, or caused such internal control over financial reporting to be designed under our
supervision, to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for
external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles;
c) Evaluated the effectiveness of the registrant's disclosure controls and procedures and presented in this report our conclusions about the
effectiveness of the disclosure controls and procedures, as of the end of the period covered by this report based on such evaluation; and
d) Disclosed in this report any change in the registrant’s internal control over financial reporting that occurred during the registrant’s most
recent fiscal quarter (the registrant’s fourth fiscal quarter in the case of an annual report) that has materially affected, or is reasonably
likely to materially affect, the registrant’s internal control over financial reporting; and
5. The registrant's other certifying officer and I have disclosed, based on our most recent evaluation of internal control over financial reporting, to
the registrant's auditors and the audit committee of the registrant's board of directors (or persons performing the equivalent functions):
a) All significant deficiencies and material weaknesses in the design or operation of internal control over financial reporting which are
reasonably likely to adversely affect the registrant's ability to record, process, summarize and report financial information; and
b) Any fraud, whether or not material, that involves management or other employees who have a significant role in the registrant's internal
control over financial reporting.
_/s/ John A. Bryant_____________________________
Name: John A. Bryant
Title: Chairman and Chief Executive Officer
Date: February 24, 2016
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
Exhibit 31.2
CERTIFICATION
I, Ronald L. Dissinger, certify that:
1. I have reviewed this annual report on Form 10-K of Kellogg Company;
2. Based on my knowledge, this report does not contain any untrue statement of a material fact or omit to state a material fact necessary to make
the statements made, in light of the circumstances under which such statements were made, not misleading with respect to the period covered by
this report;
3. Based on my knowledge, the financial statements, and other financial information included in this annual report, fairly present in all material
respects the financial condition, results of operations and cash flows of the registrant as of, and for, the periods presented in this report;
4. The registrant's other certifying officer and I are responsible for establishing and maintaining disclosure controls and procedures (as defined in
Exchange Act Rules 13a-15(e) and 15d-15(e)) and internal control over financial reporting (as defined in Exchange Act Rules 13a-15(f) and 15d15(f)) for the registrant and we have:
a) Designed such disclosure controls and procedures, or caused such disclosure controls and procedures to be designed under our
supervision, to ensure that material information relating to the registrant, including its consolidated subsidiaries, is made known to us by
others within those entities, particularly during the period in which this report is being prepared;
b) Designed such internal control over financial reporting, or caused such internal control over financial reporting to be designed under our
supervision, to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for
external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles;
c) Evaluated the effectiveness of the registrant's disclosure controls and procedures and presented in this report our conclusions about the
effectiveness of the disclosure controls and procedures, as of the end of the period covered by this report based on such evaluation; and
d) Disclosed in this report any change in the registrant’s internal control over financial reporting that occurred during the registrant’s most
recent fiscal quarter (the registrant’s fourth fiscal quarter in the case of an annual report) that has materially affected, or is reasonably
likely to materially affect, the registrant’s internal control over financial reporting; and
5. The registrant's other certifying officer and I have disclosed, based on our most recent evaluation of internal control over financial reporting, to
the registrant's auditors and the audit committee of the registrant's board of directors (or persons performing the equivalent functions):
a) All significant deficiencies and material weaknesses in the design or operation of internal control over financial reporting which are
reasonably likely to adversely affect the registrant's ability to record, process, summarize and report financial information; and
b) Any fraud, whether or not material, that involves management or other employees who have a significant role in the registrant's internal
control over financial reporting.
__/s/ Ronald L. Dissinger____________________________________
Name: Ronald L. Dissinger
Title: Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer
Date: February 24, 2016
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
Exhibit 32.1
SECTION 1350 CERTIFICATION
I, John A. Bryant, President and Chief Executive Officer, Kellogg Company, hereby certify, on the date hereof, pursuant to 18 U.S.C.
Section 1350, as adopted pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, that
(1)
the Annual Report on Form 10-K of Kellogg Company for the period ended January 2, 2016 (the “Report”) fully complies with the
requirements of Section 13(a) or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934; and
(2)
the information contained in the Report fairly presents, in all material respects, the financial condition and results of operations of
Kellogg Company.
__/s/ John A. Bryant_________________________________
Name: John A. Bryant
Title: Chairman and Chief Executive Officer
A signed copy of this original statement required by Section 906 has been provided to Kellogg Company and will be retained by Kellogg Company
and furnished to the Securities and Exchange Commission or its staff on request.
Date: February 24, 2016
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
Exhibit 32.2
SECTION 1350 CERTIFICATION
I, Ronald L. Dissinger, Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer, Kellogg Company, hereby certify, on the date hereof, pursuant to
18 U.S.C. Section 1350, as adopted pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, that
(1)
the Annual Report on Form 10-K of Kellogg Company for the period ended January 2, 2016 (the “Report”) fully complies with the
requirements of Section 13(a) or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934; and
(2)
the information contained in the Report fairly presents, in all material respects, the financial condition and results of operations of
Kellogg Company.
__/s/ Ronald L. Dissinger_________________________________________
Name: Ronald L. Dissinger
Title: Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer
A signed copy of this original statement required by Section 906 has been provided to Kellogg Company and will be retained by Kellogg Company
and furnished to the Securities and Exchange Commission or its staff on request.
Date: February 24, 2016
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
Source: KELLOGG CO, 10-K, February 24, 2016
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The information contained herein may not be copied, adapted or distributed and is not warranted to be accurate, complete or timely. The user assumes all risks for any damages or losses arising from any use of this information,
except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
EXHIBIT V
DEFINITIVE PROXY STATEMENT ON FORM DEF 14A
FILED BY KELLOGG COMPANY ON MARCH 10, 2016
Kellogg Company
Equity incentive plans
EU Prospectus
Dated: March 22, 2016
Exhibits
Morningstar® Document Research℠
FORM DEF 14A
KELLOGG CO - K
Filed: March 10, 2016 (period: April 29, 2016)
Official notification to shareholders of matters to be brought to a vote (Proxy)
The information contained herein may not be copied, adapted or distributed and is not warranted to be accurate, complete or timely. The user
assumes all risks for any damages or losses arising from any use of this information, except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be
limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549
SCHEDULE 14A
SCHEDULE 14A INFORMATION
Proxy Statement Pursuant to Section 14(a) of the
Securities Exchange Act of 1934
Filed by the Registrant ý
Filed by a Party other than the Registrant ¨
Check the appropriate box:
¨
¨
ý
¨
¨
Preliminary Proxy Statement
Confidential, for Use of the Commission Only (as permitted by Rule 14a-6(e)(2))
Definitive Proxy Statement
Definitive Additional Materials
Soliciting Material Pursuant to § 240.14a-11(c) or §240.14a-12
KELLOGG COMPANY
(Name of Registrant as Specified In Its Charter)
(Name of Person(s) Filing Proxy Statement, if other than the Registrant)
Payment of Filing Fee (Check the appropriate box):
ý
¨
¨
¨
No fee required
Fee computed on table below per Exchange Act Rules 14a-6(i)(1) and 0-11.
(1)
Title of each class of securities to which transaction applies:
(2)
Aggregate number of securities to which transaction applies:
Per unit price or other underlying value of transaction computed pursuant to Exchange Act Rule 0-11 (set forth the amount on which
(3)
the filing fee is calculated and state how it was determined):
(4)
Proposed maximum aggregate value of transaction:
(5)
Total fee paid:
Fee paid previously with preliminary materials
Check box if any part of the fee is offset as provided by Exchange Act Rule 0-11(a)(2) and identify the filing for which the offsetting fee was paid
previously. Identify the previous filing by registration statement number, or the Form or Schedule and the date of its filing.
(1)
Amount Previously Paid:
(2)
Form, Schedule or Registration Statement No.:
(3)
Filing Party:
(4)
Date Filed:
Source: KELLOGG CO, DEF 14A, March 10, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
KELLOGG COMPANY, BATTLE CREEK, MICHIGAN 49017-3534
Dear Shareowner:
It is my pleasure to invite you to attend the 2016 Annual Meeting of Shareowners of Kellogg Company. The meeting will be held at 1:00 p.m. Eastern Time
on April 29, 2016 at the W.K. Kellogg Auditorium, 50 West Van Buren Street, Battle Creek, Michigan.
The following pages contain the formal Notice of the Annual Meeting and the Proxy Statement. Please review this material for information concerning the
business to be conducted at the meeting and the nominees for election as Directors.
We are pleased to take advantage of the Securities and Exchange Commission rules that allow companies to furnish proxy materials to their shareowners on
the Internet. We believe these rules allow us to provide our Shareowners with the information they need, while lowering the costs of delivery and reducing
the environmental impact of our Annual Meeting.
Attendance at the Annual Meeting will be limited to Shareowners only. If you are a holder of record of Kellogg common stock and you plan to attend the
meeting, please save your notice of electronic availability or proxy card, as the case may be, and bring it to the meeting to use as your admission ticket. If you
plan to attend the meeting but your shares are not registered in your own name, you can obtain an admission ticket by visiting www.proxyvote.com and
following the instructions provided. You will need the 16-digit control number included on your proxy card, voter instruction form, or notice. You can also
request an admission ticket by writing to the following address: Kellogg Company Shareowner Services, One Kellogg Square, Battle Creek, MI 49017-3534.
Evidence of your stock ownership, which you may obtain from your bank, stockbroker, etc., must accompany your letter. Shareowners without tickets will
only be admitted to the meeting upon verification of stock ownership.
If any Shareowner needs special assistance at the meeting, please contact Shareowner Services at the address listed above.
Your vote is important. Whether or not you plan to attend the meeting, I urge you to vote your shares as soon as possible. You may vote your shares via a tollfree telephone number or over the Internet. If you received a paper copy of the proxy or voting instruction card by mail, you may sign, date and mail the card
in the envelope provided.
Sincerely,
John Bryant
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer
March 10, 2016
Source: KELLOGG CO, DEF 14A, March 10, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
KELLOGG COMPANY
One Kellogg Square
Battle Creek, Michigan 49017-3534
NOTICE OF THE ANNUAL MEETING OF SHAREOWNERS
TO BE HELD APRIL 29, 2016
TO OUR SHAREOWNERS:
The 2016 Annual Meeting of Shareowners of Kellogg Company, a Delaware corporation, will be held at 1:00 p.m. Eastern Time on April 29, 2016 at the
W.K. Kellogg Auditorium, 50 West Van Buren Street, Battle Creek, Michigan, for the following purposes:
1.
To elect four Directors for a three-year term to expire at the 2019 Annual Meeting of Shareowners;
2.
To vote on an advisory resolution to approve executive compensation;
3.
To ratify the Audit Committee’s appointment of PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP for our 2016 fiscal year;
4.
To consider and act upon a Shareowner proposal to recognize Kellogg's efforts regarding animal welfare, if properly presented at the meeting;
5.
To consider and act upon a Shareowner proposal to adopt simple majority vote, if properly presented at the meeting; and
6.
To take action upon any other matters that may properly come before the meeting, or any adjournments thereof.
Only Shareowners of record at the close of business on March 1, 2016 will receive notice of and be entitled to vote at the meeting or any adjournments.
We look forward to seeing you there.
By Order of the Board of Directors,
Gary Pilnick
Vice Chairman, Corporate Development and Chief Legal Officer
March 10, 2016
Source: KELLOGG CO, DEF 14A, March 10, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
TABLE OF CONTENTS
ABOUT THE MEETING
Information About this Proxy Statement
Who Can Vote - Record Date
How to Vote - Proxy Instructions
Revocation of Proxies
Quorum
Required Vote
Other Business
Costs
Directions to Annual Meeting
SECURITY OWNERSHIP
Five Percent Holders
Officer and Director Stock Ownership
Section 16(a) Beneficial Ownership Reporting Compliance
CORPORATE GOVERNANCE
Board-Adopted Corporate Governance Guidelines
Board Leadership Structure; Communication with the Board
Board Oversight of Enterprise Risk
Majority Voting for Directors; Director Resignation Policy
Director Independence
Shareowner Recommendations for Director Nominees
Attendance at Annual Meetings
Code of Conduct/Ethics
Availability of Corporate Governance Documents
BOARD AND COMMITTEE MEMBERSHIP
PROPOSAL 1 - ELECTION OF DIRECTORS
Nominees for Election for a Three-Year Term Expiring at the 2019 Annual Meeting
Continuing Directors to Serve Until the 2018 Annual Meeting
Continuing Directors to Serve Until the 2017 Annual Meeting
2015 DIRECTOR COMPENSATION AND BENEFITS
COMPENSATION DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS
COMPENSATION AND TALENT MANAGEMENT COMMITTEE REPORT
EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION
Summary Compensation Table
Grant of Plan-Based Awards Table
Outstanding Equity Awards at Fiscal Year-End Table
Option Exercises and Stock Vested Table
RETIREMENT AND NON-QUALIFIED DEFINED CONTRIBUTION AND DEFERRED COMPENSATION PLANS
Page
1
1
1
1
2
2
3
3
3
3
4
4
5
6
7
7
7
8
9
10
10
11
11
11
12
15
16
17
18
20
24
39
40
40
44
45
48
50
i
Source: KELLOGG CO, DEF 14A, March 10, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
POTENTIAL POST-EMPLOYMENT PAYMENTS
Severance Benefits
Retirement, Disability and Death
Potential Change in Control Payments
RELATED PERSON TRANSACTIONS
PROPOSAL 2 - ADVISORY RESOLUTION TO APPROVE EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION
PROPOSAL 3 - RATIFICATION OF PRICEWATERHOUSECOOPERS LLP
Fees Paid to Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm
Preapproval Policies and Procedures
Audit Committee Report
PROPOSAL 4 - SHAREOWNER PROPOSAL TO RECOGNIZE KELLOGG'S EFFORTS REGARDING ANIMAL
WELFARE
PROPOSAL 5 - SHAREOWNER PROPOSAL TO ADOPT SIMPLE MAJORITY VOTING
MISCELLANEOUS
54
54
56
57
60
61
63
63
63
64
65
66
68
ii
Source: KELLOGG CO, DEF 14A, March 10, 2016
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The information contained herein may not be copied, adapted or distributed and is not warranted to be accurate, complete or timely. The user assumes all risks for any damages or losses arising from any use of this information,
except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
PROXY STATEMENT
FOR THE ANNUAL MEETING OF SHAREOWNERS
TO BE HELD ON FRIDAY, April 29, 2016
ABOUT THE MEETING
Information About this Proxy Statement.
Why You Received this Proxy Statement. You have received these proxy materials because our Board of Directors, which we refer to as the Board, is
soliciting your proxy to vote your shares at the 2016 Annual Meeting of Shareowners of Kellogg to be held at 1:00 p.m. Eastern Time at the W.K. Kellogg
Auditorium, 50 West Van Buren Street, in Battle Creek, Michigan, on Friday, April 29, 2016, or any adjournments thereof. This proxy statement includes
information that we are required to provide to you under the rules of the Securities and Exchange Commission and that is designed to assist you in voting
your shares. On March 10, 2016, we began to mail to our Shareowners of record as of the close of business on March 1, 2016, either a notice containing
instructions on how to access this proxy statement and our annual report online or a printed copy of these proxy materials. If you own our common stock in
more than one account, such as individually and also jointly with your spouse, you may receive more than one notice or set of these proxy materials. To
assist us in saving money and to serve you more efficiently, we encourage you to have all your accounts registered in the same name and address by
contacting our transfer agent, Wells Fargo Shareowner Services, at P.O. Box 64854, St. Paul, MN 55164-0854; phone number: (877) 910-5385.
Notice of Electronic Availability of Proxy Statement and Annual Report. As permitted by Securities and Exchange Commission rules, we are making
this proxy statement and our annual report available to our Shareowners electronically via the Internet. The notice of electronic availability contains
instructions on how to access this proxy statement and our annual report and vote online. If you received a notice by mail, you will not receive a printed copy
of the proxy materials in the mail. Instead, the notice instructs you on how to access and review all of the important information contained in the proxy
statement and annual report. The notice also instructs you on how you may submit your proxy over the Internet or by telephone. If you received a notice by
mail and would like to receive a printed copy of our proxy materials, you should follow the instructions for requesting such materials contained on the
notice.
Summary Processing. The Securities and Exchange Commission’s rules permit us to print an individual’s multiple accounts on a single notice or set of
annual meeting materials. This printing method is referred to as “summary processing” and may result in cost savings. To take advantage of this opportunity,
we have summarized on one notice or set of annual meeting materials all of the accounts registered with the same tax identification number or duplicate name
and address, unless we received contrary instructions from the impacted Shareowner prior to the mailing date. We agree to deliver promptly, upon written or
oral request, a separate copy of the notice or annual meeting materials, as requested, to any Shareowner to which a single copy of those documents was
delivered. If you prefer to receive separate copies of the notice or annual meeting materials, contact Broadridge Financial Solutions, Inc. at (800) 542-1061 or
in writing at Broadridge, Householding Department, 51 Mercedes Way, Edgewood, New York 11717.
If you are currently a Shareowner sharing an address with another Shareowner and wish to receive only one copy of future notices or annual meeting
materials for your household, please contact Broadridge at the above phone number or address.
Who Can Vote — Record Date. The record date for determining Shareowners entitled to vote at the Annual Meeting is March 1, 2016. Each of the
approximately 352,236,571 shares of Kellogg common stock issued and outstanding on that date is entitled to one vote at the Annual Meeting.
How to Vote — Proxy Instructions. If you received a notice of electronic availability, you cannot vote your shares by filling out and returning the
notice. The notice, however, provides instructions on how to vote by Internet, by telephone or by requesting and returning a paper proxy card or voting
instruction card.
1
Source: KELLOGG CO, DEF 14A, March 10, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
If your shares are registered directly in your name with our transfer agent, you are considered, with respect to those shares, the shareowner of record. As
the shareowner of record, you have the right to vote in person at the meeting. If your shares are held in a brokerage account or by another nominee or trustee,
you are considered the beneficial owner of shares held in “street name.” As the beneficial owner, you are also invited to attend the meeting. Since a beneficial
owner is not the shareowner of record, you may not vote these shares in person at the meeting unless you obtain a “legal proxy” from your broker, nominee or
trustee that holds your shares, giving you the right to vote the shares at the meeting.
Whether you hold shares directly as a registered shareowner of record or beneficially in street name, you may vote without attending the meeting. You
may vote by granting a proxy or, for shares held beneficially in street name, by submitting voting instructions to your broker, nominee or trustee. In most
cases, you will be able to do this by telephone, by using the Internet or by mail if you received a printed set of the proxy materials.
By Telephone or Internet — You may submit your proxy by following the instructions provided in the notice of electronic availability, or if you
received a printed version of the proxy materials by mail, by following the instructions provided with your proxy materials and on your proxy card or voting
instruction card. The telephone and Internet voting procedures have been set up for your convenience and have been designed to authenticate your identity,
to allow you to give voting instructions, and to confirm that those instructions have been recorded properly. The deadline for voting by telephone or via the
Internet is 11:59 p.m. Eastern Time on Thursday, April 28, 2016.
By Mail — If you received printed proxy materials, you may submit your proxy by mail by signing your proxy card if your shares are registered or, for
shares held beneficially in street name, by following the voting instructions included by your broker, nominee or trustee, and mailing it in the enclosed
envelope.
If you wish to vote using the proxy card, complete, sign, and date your proxy card and return it to us by April 28, 2016.
Whether you vote by telephone, over the Internet or by mail, you may specify: whether your shares should be voted for all, some or none of the nominees
for Director (Proposal 1); whether you approve, disapprove, or abstain from voting on the advisory resolution to approve Kellogg’s executive compensation
(Proposal 2); whether you approve, disapprove, or abstain from voting on the proposal to ratify the appointment of PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP as our
independent registered public accounting firm for fiscal year 2016 (Proposal 3); and whether you approve, disapprove, or abstain from voting on the
Shareowner proposals, if properly presented at the meeting (Proposals 4 and 5).
When a properly executed proxy is received, the shares represented thereby, including shares held under our Dividend Reinvestment Plan, will be voted
by the persons named as the proxy according to each Shareowner’s directions. Proxies will also be considered to be voting instructions to the applicable
Trustee with respect to shares held in accounts under our Savings & Investment Plans and other applicable employee benefit plans.
If the proxy is properly executed but you do not specify how you want to vote your shares on your proxy card or voting instruction card, or voting
by telephone or over the Internet, we will vote them “For” the election of all nominees for Director as set forth under Proposal 1 — Election of
Directors below, “For” Proposals 2, 3 and 4, and “Against” Proposal 5, and otherwise at the discretion of the persons named in the proxy card.
Revocation of Proxies. If you are a shareowner of record, you may revoke your proxy at any time before it is exercised in any of three ways:
•
by submitting written notice of revocation to our Secretary;
•
by submitting another proxy by telephone, via the Internet or by mail that is later dated and, if by mail, that is properly signed; or
•
by voting in person at the meeting.
If your shares are held in street name, you must contact your broker, nominee or trustee to revoke and vote your proxy.
Quorum. A quorum of Shareowners is necessary to hold a valid meeting. A quorum will exist if the holders representing a majority of the votes entitled
to be cast by the Shareowners at the Annual Meeting are present, in person or by proxy. Broker “non-votes” and abstentions are counted as present at the
Annual Meeting for purposes of determining whether a quorum exists. A broker “non-vote” occurs when a nominee, such as a bank or broker, holding shares
for a
2
Source: KELLOGG CO, DEF 14A, March 10, 2016
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beneficial owner, does not vote on a particular proposal because the nominee does not have discretionary voting power for that particular item and has not
received instructions from the beneficial owner. Under current New York Stock Exchange rules, nominees would have discretionary voting power for
ratification of PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP (Proposal 3), but not for voting on the election of Directors (Proposal 1), the advisory resolution to approve
Kellogg’s executive compensation (Proposal 2), or the Shareowner proposals (Proposals 4 and 5).
Required Vote. Our Board has adopted a majority voting policy which applies to the election of Directors. Under this policy, any nominee for Director
who receives a greater number of votes “withheld” from his or her election than votes “for” such election is required to offer his or her resignation following
certification of the Shareowner vote. Our Board’s Nominating and Governance Committee would then consider the offer of resignation and make a
recommendation to our independent Directors as to the action to be taken with respect to the offer. This policy does not apply in contested elections. For
more information about this policy, see “Corporate Governance — Majority Voting for Directors; Director Resignation Policy.”
Under Delaware law, a nominee who receives a plurality of the votes cast at the Annual Meeting will be elected as a Director (subject to the resignation
policy described above). The “plurality” standard means the nominees who receive the largest number of “for” votes cast are elected as Directors. Thus, the
number of shares not voted for the election of a nominee (and the number of “withhold” votes cast with respect to that nominee) will not affect the
determination of whether that nominee has received the necessary votes for election under Delaware law. However, the number of “withhold” votes with
respect to a nominee will affect whether our Director resignation policy will apply to that individual. If any nominee is unable or declines to serve, proxies
will be voted for the balance of those named and for such person as shall be designated by the Board to replace any such nominee. However, the Board does
not anticipate that this will occur.
The affirmative vote of the holders representing a majority of the shares present and entitled to vote at the Annual Meeting is necessary to approve the
advisory resolution on Kellogg’s executive compensation (Proposal 2), to ratify the appointment of PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP as our independent
registered public accounting firm for fiscal 2016 (Proposal 3), and to approve the Shareowner proposals (Proposals 4 and 5).
Shares present but not voted because of abstention will have the effect of a “no” vote on Proposals 2 through 5. If you do not provide your broker or
other nominee with instructions on how to vote your “street name” shares, your broker or nominee will not be permitted to vote them on non-routine matters
(a broker “non-vote”) such as Proposals 1, 2, 4 and 5. Shares subject to a broker “non-vote” will not be considered entitled to vote with respect to Proposals 1,
2, 4 and 5, and will have no effect on the outcome of Proposals 1, 2, 4 and 5. Please note that brokers may not vote your shares on the election of directors
in the absence of your specific instructions as to how to vote. We encourage you to provide instructions to your broker regarding the voting of your
shares.
Other Business. We do not intend to bring any business before the meeting other than that set forth in the Notice of the Annual Meeting and described
in this proxy statement. However, if any other business should properly come before the meeting, the persons named in the proxy card intend to vote in
accordance with their best judgment on such business and on any matters dealing with the conduct of the meeting pursuant to the discretionary authority
granted in the proxy.
Costs. We pay for the preparation and mailing of the Notice of the Annual Meeting and proxy statement. We have also made arrangements with
brokerage firms and other custodians, nominees, and fiduciaries for forwarding proxy-soliciting materials to the beneficial owners of the Kellogg common
stock at our expense. In addition, we have retained D.F. King & Co., Inc. to aid in the solicitation of proxies by mail, telephone, facsimile, e-mail and personal
solicitation. For these services, we will pay D.F. King & Co., Inc. a fee of $15,500, plus reasonable expenses.
Directions to Annual Meeting. To obtain directions to attend the Annual Meeting and vote in person, please contact Investor Relations at (269) 9612800 or at [email protected]
3
Source: KELLOGG CO, DEF 14A, March 10, 2016
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SECURITY OWNERSHIP
Five Percent Holders. The following table shows each person who, based upon their most recent filings or correspondence with the SEC, beneficially
owns more than 5% of our common stock.
Beneficial Owner/Address
Shares Beneficially Owned
W.K. Kellogg Foundation Trust(1)
c/o The Bank of New York Mellon Corporation
One Wall Street
New York, NY 10286
KeyCorp
127 Public Square
Cleveland, OH 44114-1306
Gordon Gund
14 Nassau Street
Princeton, NJ 08542-4523
Percent of Class on December
31, 2015
74,412,798
(2)
21.3%
27,155,582
(3)
7.8%
27,012,860
(4)
7.7%
(1) According to a Schedule 13G/A filed with the SEC on February 11, 2016, the W.K. Kellogg Foundation Trust (the “Kellogg Trust”) shares voting and
investment power with the W.K. Kellogg Foundation (the “Kellogg Foundation”) and the trustees of the Kellogg Trust with respect to 69,774,190 shares
of Kellogg Company, or 19.9% of our outstanding shares on December 31, 2015. As of that date, the trustees of the Kellogg Trust were John Bryant, Fred
Keller, La June Montgomery Tabron and The Bank of New York Mellon Trust Company, N.A. The Kellogg Foundation, a Michigan charitable
corporation, is the sole beneficiary of the Kellogg Trust. Under the agreement governing the Kellogg Trust (the “Agreement”), at least one trustee of the
Kellogg Trust must be a member of the Kellogg Foundation’s Board, and one member of our Board must be a trustee of the Kellogg Trust. The
Agreement provides if a majority of the trustees of the Kellogg Trust (which majority must include the corporate trustee) cannot agree on how to vote the
Kellogg stock, the Kellogg Foundation has the power to direct the voting of such stock. With certain limitations, the Agreement also provides that the
Kellogg Foundation has the power to approve successor trustees, and to remove any trustee of the Kellogg Trust. The shares of Kellogg Company owned
directly by Mr. Bryant and Ms. Montgomery Tabron are reflected in the Officer and Director Stock Ownership table below.
(2) According to a Schedule 13G/A filed with the SEC on February 4, 2016, The Bank of New York Mellon Corporation (“BONYMC”) has sole voting
power for 3,805,626 shares, shared voting power for 69,892,115 shares (including those shares beneficially owned by the Kellogg Trust), sole investment
power for 4,438,446 shares and shared investment power for 69,918,273 shares (including those shares beneficially owned by the Kellogg Trust).
BONYMC, as parent holding company for The Bank of New York Mellon Trust Company, N.A., (“BONY”), as trustee of the Kellogg Trust, shares voting
and investment power with the other three trustees with respect to the 69,774,190 shares owned by the Kellogg Trust, which shares are reflected in
BONYMC’s totals above. The remaining shares not owned by the Kellogg Trust that are disclosed in the table above represent shares beneficially owned
by BONYMC and BONY unrelated to the Kellogg Trust.
(3) According to a Schedule 13G/A filed with the SEC on February 12, 2016, KeyCorp, as trustee for certain Gund family trusts, including the trusts
discussed under (4) below, as well as other trusts, has sole voting power for 51,833 shares, shared voting power for 6,764 shares, sole investment power
for 27,118,705 shares and shared investment power for 30,667 shares.
(4) According to a Schedule 13G/A filed with the SEC on February 9, 2016, Gordon Gund has sole voting power for 26,992,753 shares, shared voting power
for 20,107 shares, sole investment power for 105,532 shares and shared investment power for 20,107 shares. Of the shares over which Gordon Gund has
sole voting power, 26,887,221 are held by various trusts for the benefit of certain members of the Gund family, as to which shares Gordon Gund disclaims
beneficial ownership.
4
Source: KELLOGG CO, DEF 14A, March 10, 2016
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Officer and Director Stock Ownership. The following table shows the number of shares of Kellogg common stock beneficially owned as of
January 15, 2016, by each Director, each executive officer named in the Summary Compensation Table and all Directors and executive officers as a group.
Name(10)
Shares(1)
Non-NEO Directors
Stephanie A. Burns
John Dillon(5)
Gordon Gund(6)
Zachary Gund(7)
Jim Jenness
Donald Knauss
Mary Laschinger
Ann McLaughlin Korologos
Cynthia Milligan
La June Montgomery Tabron(8)
Rogelio Rebolledo
Carolyn M. Tastad
Noel R. Wallace
Named Executive Officers
John Bryant (8)
Paul Norman
Ron Dissinger
Alistair Hirst
Gary Pilnick
All Directors and executive officers as a group (19
persons)(9)
*
Options(2)
Deferred Stock
Units(3)
Total Beneficial
Ownership(4)
Percentage
5,280
70,481
26,982,272
775,208
118,010
24,191
8,948
59,244
8,398
5,280
21,832
0
0
0
10,000
10,000
0
5,000
6,931
0
10,000
0
0
2,534
0
0
1,532
0
82,353
1,789
11,787
0
5,382
22,005
0
0
0
0
0
6,812
80,481
27,074,625
776,997
134,797
31,122
14,330
91,249
8,398
5,280
24,366
0
0
*
*
7.7%
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
270,895
64,469
33,726
30,985
52,349
1,264,399
410,066
299,300
106,099
283,433
7,732
0
0
0
0
1,543,026
474,535
333,026
137,084
335,782
*
*
*
*
*
28,532,769
2,528,529
132,580
31,193,878
8.8%
Less than 1%.
(1) Represents the number of shares beneficially owned, excluding shares which may be acquired through exercise of stock options and units held under our
deferred compensation plans. Includes the following number of shares held in Kellogg’s Grantor Trust for Directors and Executives related to the annual
grants of deferred shares for Non-Employee Directors, which shares are subject to restrictions on voting and investment: Dr. Burns, 5,280 shares;
Mr. Dillon, 42,669 shares; Mr. Gordon Gund, 54,499 shares; Mr. Zachary Gund, 3,351 shares; Mr. Jenness, 14,648 shares; Mr. Knauss, 24,191 shares;
Ms. Laschinger, 8,948 shares; Ms. McLaughlin Korologos, 54,199 shares; Ms. Milligan, 7,939; Ms. Montgomery Tabron, 5,280 shares; Mr. Rebolledo,
21,832 shares; and all Directors as a group, 242,836 shares.
(2) Represents options that were exercisable on January 15, 2016 and options that become exercisable within 60 days of January 15, 2016.
(3) Represents the number of common stock units held under our deferred compensation plans as of January 15, 2016. For additional information, refer to
“2015 Director Compensation and Benefits — Elective Deferral Program” and “Compensation Discussion and Analysis — Compensation Policies —
Deductibility of Compensation and Other Related Issues” for a description of these plans.
(4) None of the shares listed have been pledged as collateral.
(5) Includes 250 shares held for the benefit of a son, over which shares Mr. Dillon disclaims beneficial ownership.
5
Source: KELLOGG CO, DEF 14A, March 10, 2016
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(6) Includes: (i) 26,887,221 shares held by various trusts for the benefit of certain members of the Gund family over which shares Mr. Gordon Gund has sole
voting power; (ii) 10,107 shares held in trusts, of which Mr. Gordon Gund and his wife are co-trustees and share voting and investment power; and (iii)
10,000 shares owned by Mr. Gordon Gund’s wife. Gordon Gund disclaims beneficial ownership of the shares beneficially owned by the Gund family
trusts and his wife.
(7) Includes: (i) 218,657 shares held by a trust for the benefit of Mr. Zachary Gund and certain members of his family, of which Mr. Zachary Gund is one of
several trustees; (ii) 9,200 shares held in a trust for the benefit of certain members of Mr. Zachary Gund’s family, of which a family member of Mr.
Zachary Gund’s is the trustee; and (iii) 544,000 shares held in family partnerships, the partners of which include a trust for the benefit of Mr. Zachary
Gund and he serves as a manager of these partnerships. As a result of these relationships, Mr. Zachary Gund may have voting and dispositive power over
all such shares. Mr. Zachary Gund disclaims beneficial ownership of these shares except to the extent of his pecuniary interest.
(8) Does not include shares owned by the Kellogg Trust, as to which Mr. Bryant and Ms. Montgomery Tabron, as trustees of the Kellogg Trust as of the date
of this table, share voting and investment power, or shares as to which the Kellogg Trust or the Kellogg Foundation have a current beneficial interest.
(9) Includes 26,887,221 shares held by various trusts, over which the applicable Director has voting power; 10,107 shares held in trusts, of which the
applicable Director and spouse share voting and investment power; 10,000 shares owned by the applicable Director’s spouse; 250 shares owned by or
held for the benefit of children, over which the applicable Director, or executive officer disclaims beneficial ownership; 218,657 shares held by a trust for
the benefit of the applicable Director and certain family members, of which the applicable Director disclaims beneficial ownership except to the extent of
the applicable Director’s pecuniary interest; 9,200 shares held in a trust for the benefit of certain family members of the applicable Director, of which the
applicable Director disclaims beneficial ownership except to the extent of the applicable Director’s pecuniary interest; 544,000 shares held in family
partnerships, of which the applicable Director disclaims beneficial ownership except to the extent of the applicable Director’s pecuniary interest; and
8,110 shares held in our Savings & Investment Plans; and 13,357 restricted shares, which contain some restrictions on investment.
(10)Dr. Carson resigned from the Board during 2015.
Section 16(a) Beneficial Ownership Reporting Compliance. Section 16(a) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 requires our Directors, executive
officers, and greater-than-10% Shareowners to file reports with the SEC. SEC regulations require us to identify anyone who filed a required report late during
the most recent fiscal year. Based on our review of these reports and written certifications provided to us, we believe that the filing requirements for all of
these reporting persons were complied with during fiscal 2015.
6
Source: KELLOGG CO, DEF 14A, March 10, 2016
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CORPORATE GOVERNANCE
Board-Adopted Corporate Governance Guidelines. We operate under corporate governance principles and practices (the “Corporate Governance
Guidelines") that are designed to maximize long-term Shareowner value, align the interests of the Board and management with those of our Shareowners and
promote high ethical conduct among our Directors and employees. The Corporate Governance Guidelines include the following:
•
A majority of the Directors, and all of the members of the Audit Committee, Compensation and Talent Management Committee ("C&T Committee"),
and Nominating and Governance Committee, are required to meet the independence requirements of the New York Stock Exchange and the
Securities and Exchange Commission.
•
One of the Directors is designated a Lead Director, who chairs and may call executive session meetings of the independent, non-employee Directors,
approves proposed meeting agendas and schedules, and establishes a method for Shareowners and other interested parties to communicate with the
Board.
•
The Board reviews CEO succession planning at least once per year.
•
The Board and each Board committee have the power to hire independent legal, financial or other advisors as they may deem necessary, at our
expense.
•
Non-employee Directors meet in executive session at least three times annually.
•
The Board and Board committees conduct annual self-evaluations.
•
The independent members of the Board use the recommendations from the Nominating and Governance Committee and C&T Committee to conduct
an annual review of the CEO’s performance and determine the CEO’s compensation.
•
Non-employee Directors who change their principal responsibility or occupation from that held when they were elected shall offer his or her
resignation for the Board to consider the continued appropriateness of Board membership under the circumstances.
•
Directors have access to Kellogg officers and employees.
•
Continuing education is provided to Directors consistent with our Board education policy.
•
No Director may be nominated for a new term if he or she would be seventy-two or older at the time of election, unless the Board determines that it is
in the best interest of Kellogg to re-nominate the independent Director for additional terms due to his or her unique capabilities or special
circumstances.
•
No Director shall serve as a director, officer or employee of a competitor.
•
No Director should serve on more than four other boards of public companies in addition to Kellogg.
•
All Directors are expected to comply with stock ownership guidelines for Directors, under which they are generally expected to hold at least five
times their annual cash retainer in stock and stock equivalents.
Board Leadership Structure; Communication with the Board. The following section describes Kellogg’s Board leadership structure, the reasons why
the structure is in place at this time, the roles of various positions, and related key governance practices.
Our Board is composed of twelve independent Directors, and Mr. Bryant, our current Chairman of the Board and CEO, and Mr. Jenness (who was our
Executive Chairman until June 2014). Two of our independent directors, Mr. Gordon Gund and Ms. Ann McLaughlin Korologos, will be retiring at our 2016
Annual Meeting of Shareowners. In 2015, the Board had six standing Committees: (i) Audit, (ii) C&T, (iii) Nominating and Governance, (iv) Manufacturing,
(v) Social Responsibility and Public Policy, and (vi) Executive. The Audit, C&T, and Nominating and Governance committees are composed solely of
independent Directors, each with a different independent Director serving as committee chair. We
7
Source: KELLOGG CO, DEF 14A, March 10, 2016
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believe that the mix of experienced independent and management Directors that make up our Board, along with the independent role of our Lead Director
and our independent Board Committee composition, benefits Kellogg and its Shareowners.
The Board believes that it is beneficial to Kellogg and its Shareowners to designate one of the Directors as a Lead Director. The Lead Director serves a
variety of roles, including reviewing and approving Board agendas, meeting materials and schedules to confirm the appropriate Board and committee topics
are reviewed and sufficient time is allocated to each; serving as liaison between the Chairman and CEO and non-management Directors (however, each
Director has direct and regular access to the Chairman and CEO); presiding at the executive sessions of independent Directors and at all other meetings of the
Board of Directors at which the Chairman of the Board is not present; and calling an executive session of independent Directors at any time, consistent with
the Corporate Governance Guidelines. Gordon Gund, an independent Director and the Chairman of the Nominating and Governance Committee, is currently
our Lead Director. Mr. Gordon Gund will be retiring at our 2016 Annual Meeting of Shareowners. Don Knauss, an independent Director, will be assuming the
role of Lead Director and Chairman of the Nominating and Governance Committee upon Mr. Gordon Gund's retirement. Mr. Knauss joined the Nominating
and Governance Committee in April 2015 and, since that time, Mr. Gordon Gund and Mr. Knauss have worked together to ensure an orderly transition of the
roles of Lead Director and Chairman of the Nominating and Governance Committee. Mr. Knauss will be an effective Lead Director for Kellogg due to, among
other things, his independence, his board leadership experience as Chairman and Executive Chairman of The Clorox Company, strong strategic and financial
acumen, commitment to ethics, extensive knowledge of the retail environment and branded consumer products, and deep understanding of Kellogg and its
business obtained while serving as a Kellogg Director. Mr. Gordon Gund may be contacted at [email protected] until April 29, 2016 and Mr.
Knauss may be contacted at [email protected] Any communications which Shareowners or interested parties may wish to send to the Board may
be directly sent to Mr. Gordon Gund until April 29, 2016 or to Mr. Knauss thereafter at these e-mail addresses.
The Board regularly reviews the Company's strategy, including reviews of key components of the strategy throughout the year. In 2015, the Board
participated in the development of the 2020 Growth Strategy, which was publicly presented at Kellogg's 2015 "Day at K" Investor Day in November 2015.
The Company also regularly communicates with its Shareowners through its Shareowner outreach program. A regular topic in those discussions is Company
strategy. Shareowner insights are provided to the full Board and its Committees as part of its decision making process.
With respect to the roles of Chairman and CEO, the Corporate Governance Guidelines provide that the roles may be separated or combined, and the
Board exercises its discretion in combining or separating these positions as it deems appropriate in light of prevailing circumstances. Mr. Bryant became
CEO in January 2011 and for the first three years of his tenure as CEO, the roles of Chairman and CEO were separate. On July 1, 2014, the Chairman and CEO
roles were combined, with the Board electing Mr. Bryant as Chairman of the Board. The Board believes that the combined roles of Chairman and CEO,
together with the separate role of our Lead Director, is currently the most effective leadership structure for Kellogg for many reasons, including Mr. Bryant’s
extensive knowledge of our business, operations, and risks acquired in his various roles at Kellogg including as CEO, which gives him the insight necessary
to combine the responsibilities of strategic development along with management of day-to-day operations and execution. As stated in the Corporate
Governance Guidelines, the Board believes that the combination or separation of these offices should continue to be considered as part of the succession
planning process.
Our Board conducts an annual evaluation to determine whether it and its Committees are functioning effectively. As part of this annual self-evaluation,
the Board evaluates whether the current leadership structure continues to be appropriate for Kellogg and its Shareowners. Our Corporate Governance
Guidelines provide the flexibility for our Board to modify our leadership structure in the future as appropriate. We believe that Kellogg, like many U.S.
companies, has been well-served by this flexible leadership structure.
Board Oversight of Enterprise Risk. The Board utilizes our Enterprise Risk Management ("ERM") process to assist in fulfilling its oversight of our
risks. Management, who is responsible for day-to-day risk management, conducts a formal risk assessment of Kellogg’s business annually. The risk
assessment process is global in nature and has been developed to identify and assess Kellogg’s current and emerging risks, including the nature of the risk, as
well as to identify steps to mitigate and manage the controllable aspects of each risk. Several hundred of our key business leaders, functional heads and other
managers are surveyed and/or interviewed to develop this information.
8
Source: KELLOGG CO, DEF 14A, March 10, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
While risk oversight is a full Board responsibility, the responsibility for monitoring the ERM process has been delegated to the Audit Committee. As
such, one of the leaders of the ERM process is the Vice President, Internal Audit, who reports directly to the Chair of the Audit Committee. The Audit
Committee and the full Board at each of their regularly scheduled meetings receive an update on the key enterprise risks, including current status and action
items.
The results of the risk assessment are reviewed with the Audit Committee and the full Board. The centerpiece of the assessment is the discussion of key
risks which includes the potential magnitude and likelihood of each risk. As part of the process for assessing each risk, management identifies the nature of
the risk, the senior executive responsible for managing the risk, the potential impact of the risk, management’s initiatives to manage the risk, the most recent
Board or Committee update, and the timing of the next scheduled Board or Committee review.
The results of the risk assessment are then integrated into the Board’s processes. Oversight responsibility for each risk is allocated among the full Board
and its Committees, and specific Board and Committee agendas are developed accordingly. Each Committee chair works directly with Kellogg’s key senior
executive responsible for the matters allocated to the Committee to develop agenda topics, review materials to be discussed with the Committee, and
otherwise discuss those topics relating to the particular Committee. Through this process, each key risk is reviewed at least annually, with many topics
reviewed on several occasions throughout the year.
Due to the dynamic nature of risk and the business environment generally, at every Audit Committee meeting, the Company provides a status report on
all key enterprise risks, and periodically provides a more in depth report on select topics. In addition, adjustments are made to Board and Committee agendas
throughout the year so that enterprise risks are reviewed at the relevant times. This process facilitates the Board’s ability to fulfill its oversight responsibilities
of Kellogg’s risks.
Majority Voting for Directors; Director Resignation Policy. In an uncontested election of Directors (that is, an election where the number of
nominees is equal to the number of seats open) any nominee for Director who receives a greater number of votes “withheld” from his or her election than
votes “for” such election shall promptly tender his or her resignation to the Nominating and Governance Committee (following certification of the
Shareowner vote) for consideration in accordance with the following procedures.
The Nominating and Governance Committee would promptly consider such resignation and recommend to the Qualified Independent Directors (as
defined below) the action to be taken with respect to such offered resignation, which may include: (1) accepting the resignation; (2) maintaining the Director
but addressing what the Qualified Independent Directors believe to be the underlying cause of the withheld votes; (3) determining that the Director will not
be renominated in the future for election; or (4) rejecting the resignation. The Nominating and Governance Committee would consider all relevant factors
including, without limitation: (a) the stated reasons why votes were withheld from such Director; (b) any alternatives for curing the underlying cause of the
withheld votes; (c) the tenure and qualifications of the Director; (d) the Director’s past and expected future contributions to Kellogg; (e) our Director criteria;
(f) our Corporate Governance Guidelines; and (g) the overall composition of the Board, including whether accepting the resignation would cause Kellogg to
fail to meet any applicable SEC or NYSE requirement.
The Qualified Independent Directors would act on the Nominating and Governance Committee’s recommendation no later than 90 days following the
date of the Shareowners’ meeting where the election occurred. In considering the Nominating and Governance Committee’s recommendation, the Qualified
Independent Directors would consider the factors considered by the Nominating and Governance Committee and such additional information and factors the
Board believes to be relevant. Following the Qualified Independent Directors’ decision, Kellogg would promptly disclose in a current report on Form 8-K the
decision whether to accept the resignation as tendered (providing a full explanation of the process by which the decision was reached or, if applicable, the
reasons for rejecting the tendered resignation).
To the extent that a resignation is accepted, the Nominating and Governance Committee would recommend to the Board whether to fill such vacancy or
vacancies or to reduce the size of the Board.
Any Director who tenders his or her resignation pursuant to this provision would not participate in the Nominating and Governance Committee’s
recommendation or Qualified Independent Directors’ consideration regarding whether to accept
9
Source: KELLOGG CO, DEF 14A, March 10, 2016
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the tendered resignation. Prior to voting, the Qualified Independent Directors would afford the Director an opportunity to provide any information or
statement that he or she deems relevant. If a majority of the members of the Nominating and Governance Committee received a greater number of votes
“withheld” from their election than votes “for” their election at the same election, then the remaining Qualified Independent Directors who are on the Board
who did not receive a greater number of votes “withheld” from their election than votes “for” their election (or who were not standing for election) would
consider the matter directly or may appoint a Board committee amongst themselves solely for the purpose of considering the tendered resignations that
would make the recommendation to the Board whether to accept or reject them.
For purposes of this policy, the term “Qualified Independent Directors” means:
•
All Directors who (1) are independent Directors (as defined in accordance with the NYSE Corporate Governance Rules) and (2) are not required
to offer their resignation in accordance with this policy.
•
If there are fewer than three independent Directors then serving on the Board who are not required to offer their resignations in accordance with
this policy, then the Qualified Independent Directors shall mean all of the independent Directors and each independent Director who is required
to offer his or her resignation in accordance with this Policy shall recuse himself or herself from the deliberations and voting only with respect to
his or her individual offer to resign.
Director Independence. The Board has determined that all current Directors (other than Mr. Bryant and Mr. Jenness) are independent based on the
following standards: (a) no entity (other than a charitable entity) of which such a Director is an employee in any position or any immediate family member (as
defined) is an executive officer, made payments to, or received payments from, Kellogg and its subsidiaries in any of the 2015, 2014, or 2013 fiscal years in
excess of the greater of (1) $1,000,000 or (2) two percent of that entity’s annual consolidated gross revenues; (b) no such Director, or any immediate family
member employed as an executive officer of Kellogg or its subsidiaries, received in any twelve month period within the last three years more than $120,000
per year in direct compensation from Kellogg or its subsidiaries, other than Director and committee fees and pension or other forms of deferred compensation
for prior service not contingent in any way on continued service; (c) Kellogg did not employ such Director in any position, or any immediate family member
as an executive officer, during the past three years; (d) no such Director was a current partner or employee of a firm that is Kellogg’s internal or external
auditor (“Auditor”), no immediate family member of such Director was a current partner of the Auditor or an employee of the Auditor who personally worked
on our audit, and no Director or immediate family member of such Director was during the past three years a partner or employee of the Auditor and
personally worked on our audit within that time; (e) no such Director or immediate family member served as an executive officer of another company during
the past three years at the same time as a current executive officer of Kellogg served on the compensation committee of such company; and (f) no other
material relationship exists between any such Director and Kellogg or our subsidiaries.
The Board also considers from time to time commercial ordinary-course transactions as it assesses independence status, including transactions relating to
selling product and marketing arrangements. The Board has concluded that these transactions did not impair Director independence for a variety of reasons
including that the amounts in question were considerably under the thresholds set forth in our independence standards and the relationships were not deemed
material.
Shareowner Recommendations for Director Nominees. The Nominating and Governance Committee will consider Shareowner nominations for
membership on the Board. For the 2017 Annual Meeting of Shareowners, nominations may be submitted to the Office of the Secretary, Kellogg Company,
One Kellogg Square, Battle Creek, Michigan 49017, which will forward them to the Chairman of the Nominating and Governance Committee.
Recommendations must be in writing and we must receive the recommendation not earlier than November 10, 2016 and not later than December 10, 2016.
Recommendations must also include certain other requirements specified in our bylaws.
When filling a vacancy on the Board, the Nominating and Governance Committee identifies the desired skills and experience of a new Director and
nominates individuals who it believes can strengthen the Board’s capabilities and further diversify the collective experience represented by the then-current
Directors. The Nominating and Governance Committee may, as it has done in the past, engage third parties to assist in the search and provide
recommendations. Also, Directors are generally asked to recommend candidates for the position. The candidates would be evaluated based on the process
outlined
10
Source: KELLOGG CO, DEF 14A, March 10, 2016
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in the Corporate Governance Guidelines and the Nominating and Governance Committee charter, and the same process would be used for all candidates,
including candidates recommended by Shareowners.
Shareowner Nomination of Director Candidates for Inclusion in Proxy Statement for Annual Meeting. In February 2016, our Board amended our
bylaws to implement proxy access. As amended, our bylaws permit a Shareowner, or a group of up to 20 Shareowners, owning 3% or more of the Company’s
outstanding common stock continuously for at least three years to nominate and include in our proxy materials director candidates constituting up to the
greater of two individuals or 20% of the Board, provided that the Shareowner(s) and the nominee(s) satisfy the requirements specified in the bylaws. For the
2017 Annual Meeting of Shareowners, nominations may be submitted to the Office of the Secretary, Kellogg Company, One Kellogg Square, Battle Creek,
Michigan 49017-3534. Any such nomination must be received by us not earlier than October 11, 2016 and not later than November 10, 2016. Any such
nomination must meet the other requirements set forth in our bylaws.
Attendance at Annual Meetings. All incumbent Directors are expected to attend the Annual Meeting of Shareowners. All of our then incumbent
Directors attended the 2015 Annual Meeting of Shareowners.
Code of Conduct/Ethics. We have adopted the Code of Conduct for Kellogg Company Directors and Global Code of Ethics for Kellogg Company
employees (including the CEO, CFO, other named executive officers, and corporate controller). Any amendments to or waivers of the Global Code of Ethics
applicable to our CEO, CFO or corporate controller will be posted on www.kelloggcompany.com. There were no amendments to or waivers of the Global
Code of Ethics in 2015.
Availability of Corporate Governance Documents. Copies of the Corporate Governance Guidelines, the Charters of the Audit, C&T, and Nominating
and Governance Committees of the Board, the Code of Conduct for Kellogg Company Directors, and Global Code of Ethics for Kellogg Company employees
can be found on the Kellogg Company website at www.kelloggcompany.com under “Investor Relations”, then “Corporate Governance.” Shareowners may
also request a free copy of these documents from: Kellogg Company Consumer Affairs, P.O. Box CAMB, Battle Creek, Michigan 49016 (phone: (800) 9621413), the Investor Relations Department at that same address (phone: (269) 961-2800) or [email protected]
11
Source: KELLOGG CO, DEF 14A, March 10, 2016
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BOARD AND COMMITTEE MEMBERSHIP
The Board routinely reviews Board composition to ensure that it has the right balance of skills to fulfill its oversight obligations for Shareowners. As part
of that process, the Nominating and Governance Committee and the Board consider current tenure and potential retirements. Over the last several years our
Board has been refreshing naturally, including five new Directors since the beginning of 2014.
The Board had the following standing committees in 2015: (i) Audit; (ii) C&T; (iii) Nominating and Governance; (iv) Manufacturing; (v) Social
Responsibility and Public Policy; and (vi) Executive.
The Board held ten meetings in 2015. All of the incumbent Directors attended at least 75% of the total number of meetings of the Board and of all Board
committees of which the Directors were members during 2015 that were held while such Directors were on the Board.
The table below provides 2015 membership and meeting information for each Board committee as of January 2, 2016 (last day of fiscal year):
Name(4)
Audit
Compensation and
Talent Management
Nominating and
Governance
Manufacturing
Social Responsibility
and Public Policy
John Bryant(1)
Chair
Stephanie A. Burns
ü
John Dillon
ü
Gordon Gund
Zachary Gund
ü
ü
Chair
ü
ü
ü
Chair
ü
ü
ü
Don Knauss
ü
ü
Chair
Mary Laschinger
ü
ü
ü
Ann McLaughlin Korologos
ü
Cynthia Milligan
ü
ü
ü
Chair
ü
Carolyn M. Tastad(2)
ü
ü
ü
La June Montgomery Tabron
Chair
ü
ü
Jim Jenness
Rogelio Rebolledo
Executive
ü
ü
ü
ü
Noel R. Wallace(3)
ü
2015 Meetings Held
5
4
5
4
3
0
(1) Mr. Bryant is not a formal member of any committee (other than Executive) and attends all meetings, other than portions of those meetings held in
executive session of independent Directors.
(2) Ms. Tastad was elected as Director, and her initial term commenced on December 1, 2015.
(3) Mr. Wallace was elected as Director, and his initial term commenced on October 1, 2015.
(4) Dr. Carson resigned from the Board during 2015. Consequently, he is not included in the table above because he was not a member of the Board as of
January 2, 2016. During 2015, Dr. Carson served on the C&T, Nominating and Governance, and Social Responsibility and Public Policy Committees.
Audit Committee. Pursuant to a written charter, the Audit Committee, among other things, assists the Board in monitoring the integrity of our financial
statements, the independence and performance of our independent registered public accounting firm, the performance of our internal audit function, our ERM
process, our compliance with legal and regulatory requirements, and other related matters. The Audit Committee, or its Chair, also pre-approves all audit,
internal control-related and permitted non-audit engagements and services by the independent registered public accounting firm and their affiliates. It also
discusses and/or reviews specified matters with, and receives specified information or assurances from,
12
Source: KELLOGG CO, DEF 14A, March 10, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
Kellogg management and the independent registered public accounting firm. The Committee also has the sole authority to appoint, subject to Shareowner
ratification, or replace the independent registered public accounting firm, which directly reports to the Audit Committee, and is directly responsible for the
compensation and oversight of the independent registered public accounting firm. Mr. Rebolledo, the Chair of the Audit Committee, has been determined by
the Board to be an “audit committee financial expert,” as that term is defined in Item 407(d)(5) of SEC Regulation S-K. Each of the Committee members
meets the independence requirements of the New York Stock Exchange.
Compensation and Talent Management Committee. Pursuant to a written charter, the C&T Committee, among other things: (a) reviews and approves
the compensation philosophy and principles for senior executives; (b) reviews and makes recommendations for the compensation of senior management
personnel and monitors overall compensation for senior executives, including reviewing risks arising from Kellogg’s compensation policies and practices;
(c) reviews and recommends the compensation of the CEO; (d) reviews talent development, succession, diversity and inclusion, and employment programs;
(e) has sole authority to retain or terminate any compensation consultant or other advisor used to evaluate senior executive compensation; (f) oversees and
administers employee benefit plans to the extent provided in those plans; (g) reviews with management employment and employment-related matters; and
(h) reviews trends in management compensation. The Committee may form and delegate authority to subcommittees or the Chair when appropriate.
The C&T Committee, or its Chair, also approves all engagements and services to be performed by any consultants or advisors to the Committee. To assist
the Committee in discharging its responsibilities, the Committee has retained an independent compensation consultant — Frederic W. Cook (“Cook & Co.”).
The consultant reports directly to the C&T Committee. Prior to retaining any such consultant, or other advisor, the Committee must consider whether the
work of such consultant or other advisor would raise a conflict of interest according to the independence factors enumerated by the New York Stock
Exchange, as well as any other factors the Committee determines to be relevant. Other than the work it performs for the C&T Committee and the Board, Cook
& Co. does not provide any consulting services to Kellogg or its executive officers. For additional information about the independence of the Committee’s
consultant, refer to “Compensation Discussion and Analysis — Compensation Approach — Independence.”
The Board has determined that each member of the C&T Committee meets the definition of independence under our Corporate Governance Guidelines
and the requirements of the New York Stock Exchange and further qualifies as a non-employee Director for purposes of Rule 16b-3 under the Securities
Exchange Act of 1934. The members of the Committee are not current or former employees of Kellogg, are not eligible to participate in any of our executive
compensation programs, do not receive compensation that would impair their ability to make independent judgments about executive compensation, and are
not “affiliates” of the Company, as defined under Rule 10c-1 under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. Additionally, the composition of the Committee is
designed to meet the tax deductibility criteria included in Section 162(m) of the Internal Revenue Code.
The C&T Committee is charged with overseeing the review and assessment of risks arising from Kellogg’s compensation policies and practices. This
includes the Committee's annual review of our compensation program for design features considered to encourage excessive risk taking and Kellogg’s
approach to those features. As part of its review, the Committee also assesses perspectives from independent experts and regulators. Kellogg uses a number of
approaches to mitigate excessive risk taking, including significant weighting towards long-term incentive compensation, emphasizing qualitative goals in
addition to a variety of quantitative metrics, and equity ownership guidelines. As a result of this review, together with input from the independent
compensation consultant, the C&T Committee determined that the risks arising from Kellogg’s compensation policies and practices for our employees are
not reasonably likely to have a material adverse effect on Kellogg.
For additional information about the C&T Committee’s processes for establishing and overseeing executive compensation, refer to “Compensation
Discussion and Analysis — Compensation Approach.”
Manufacturing Committee. Pursuant to a written charter, the Manufacturing Committee, among other things, assists the Board in discharging its
oversight responsibilities with respect to topics relating to Kellogg’s manufacturing and supply chain practices, with the primary focus on Kellogg’s food
quality and safety, manufacturing facility operations, people and labor strategies, and capital projects. As it deems appropriate, the Committee reviews
policies, programs and practices, and
13
Source: KELLOGG CO, DEF 14A, March 10, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
provides strategic advice and counsel concerning the matters set forth above including, but not limited to, food safety, employee health and safety, capacity
utilization and planning, contingency planning, productivity programs, commodity purchasing and hedging programs, people utilization and people and
labor strategies.
Nominating and Governance Committee. Pursuant to a written charter, the Nominating and Governance Committee, among other things, assists the
Board by (a) identifying and reviewing the qualifications of candidates for Director and in determining the criteria for new Directors; (b) recommending
nominees for Director to the Board; (c) recommending committee assignments; (d) reviewing annually the Board’s compliance with the Corporate
Governance Guidelines; (e) reviewing annually the Corporate Governance Guidelines and recommends changes to the Board; (f) monitoring the performance
of Directors and conducting performance evaluations of each Director before the Director’s re-nomination to the Board; (g) administering the annual
evaluation of the Board; (h) providing annually an evaluation of CEO performance used by the independent members of the Board in their annual review of
CEO performance; (i) considering and evaluating potential waivers of the Code of Conduct for Directors and Global Code of Ethics for senior officers (for
which there were none in 2015); (j) making a report to the Board on CEO succession planning at least annually; (k) providing an annual review of the
independence of Directors to the Board; (l) reviewing and recommending to the Board responses to Shareowner proposals; and (m) reviewing Director
compensation. The Chair of the Nominating and Governance Committee, as Lead Director, also presides at executive sessions of independent Directors of the
Board. Each of the Nominating and Governance Committee members meets the independence requirements of the New York Stock Exchange.
Social Responsibility and Public Policy Committee. Pursuant to a written charter, the Social Responsibility and Public Policy Committee, among
other things, assists the Board in discharging its oversight responsibilities with respect to certain social and public policy issues. The Committee reviews the
Company's policies, programs and practices concerning public policy, government relations, philanthropic activities/charitable contributions, sustainability
and related topics. The Committee is particularly focused on the intersection of philanthropy, public policy, and sustainability and the Company's goals.
Executive Committee. Pursuant to a written charter, the Executive Committee is generally empowered to act on behalf of the Board between meetings
of the Board, with some exceptions.
14
Source: KELLOGG CO, DEF 14A, March 10, 2016
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PROPOSAL 1 — ELECTION OF DIRECTORS
For more than 100 years, consumers have counted on Kellogg for great-tasting, high-quality and nutritious foods. Kellogg is the world’s leading
producer of cereal, second largest producer of cookies and crackers, and a leading producer of savory snacks and frozen foods. Additional product offerings
include toaster pastries, cereal bars, fruit-flavored snacks and veggie foods. Kellogg products are manufactured and marketed globally. As such, we believe
that in order for our Board to effectively guide Kellogg to long-term sustainable, dependable performance, it should be composed of individuals with
sophistication and experience in the many disciplines that impact our business. In order to best serve Kellogg and our Shareowners, we seek to have a Board,
as a whole, that is competent in key corporate disciplines, including accounting and financial acumen, business judgment, crisis management, governance,
leadership, people management, risk management, social responsibility and reputational issues, and strategy and strategic planning. In addition, the Board
must have specific knowledge related to Kellogg’s industry, such as expertise in branded consumer products and consumer dynamics, health and nutrition,
innovation / research and development, international markets, manufacturing and supply chain, marketing, regulatory and government affairs, the retail
environment, and sales and distribution.
The Nominating and Governance Committee believes that all Directors must, at a minimum, meet the criteria set forth in the Board’s Code of Conduct
and the Corporate Governance Guidelines, which specify, among other things, that the Nominating and Governance Committee will consider criteria such as
independence, diversity, age, skills and experience in the context of the needs of the Board. In addressing issues of diversity in particular, the Nominating
and Governance Committee considers a nominee’s differences in viewpoint, professional experience, background, education, skill, age, race, gender and
national origin. The Nominating and Governance Committee believes that diversity of backgrounds and viewpoints is a key attribute for a director nominee.
The Committee seeks a diverse Board that is representative of our global business, Shareowners, consumers, customers, and employees. While the
Nominating and Governance Committee carefully considers diversity when considering directors, it has not established a formal policy regarding diversity.
The Nominating and Governance Committee also will consider a combination of factors for each director, including whether the nominee (1) has the ability
to represent all Shareowners without a conflict of interest; (2) has the ability to work in and promote a productive environment; (3) has sufficient time and
willingness to fulfill the substantial duties and responsibilities of a Director; (4) has demonstrated the high level of character and integrity that we expect;
(5) possesses the broad professional and leadership experience and skills necessary to effectively respond to the complex issues encountered by a multinational, publicly-traded company; and (6) has the ability to apply sound and independent business judgment.
The Nominating and Governance Committee has determined that all of our Directors meet the criteria and qualifications set forth in the Board’s Code of
Conduct, the Corporate Governance Guidelines and the criteria set forth above for director nominees. Moreover, each Director possesses the following critical
personal qualities and attributes that we believe are essential for the proper functioning of the Board to allow it to fulfill its duties for our Shareowners:
accountability, ethical leadership, governance, integrity, risk management, and sound business judgment. In addition, our Directors have the mature
confidence to assess and challenge the way things are done and recommend alternative solutions, a keen awareness of the business and social realities of the
global environment in which Kellogg operates, the independence and high performance standards necessary to fulfill the Board's oversight function, and the
humility and style to interface openly and constructively with other Directors. Finally, the Director biographies below include a non-exclusive list of other
key experiences and qualifications that further qualify the individual to serve on the Board. These collective qualities, skills, experiences and attributes are
essential to our Board’s ability to exercise its oversight function for Kellogg and its Shareowners, and guide the long-term sustainable, dependable
performance of Kellogg.
Our amended restated certificate of incorporation and bylaws provide that the Board shall be composed of not less than seven and no more than fifteen
Directors divided into three classes as nearly equal in number as possible, and that each Director shall be elected for a term of three years with the term of one
class expiring each year. The Board prefers approximately twelve members, but is willing to expand the Board in order to add an outstanding candidate or to
prepare for departures of Directors.
Four Directors have been nominated for re-election at the 2016 Annual Meeting to serve for a term ending at the 2019 Annual Meeting of Shareowners,
and the proxies cannot be voted for a greater number of persons than the number of
15
Source: KELLOGG CO, DEF 14A, March 10, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
nominees named. There are currently fourteen members of the Board. In accordance with our retirement policy for directors, Mr. Gordon Gund and Ms.
McLaughlin Korologos are not standing for re-election and will retire from the Board in connection with the 2016 Annual Meeting. At such time, the size of
the Board will be reduced to twelve members.
The Board recommends that the Shareowners vote “FOR” the following nominees: Mary Laschinger, Cynthia Hardin Milligan, Carolyn Tastad, and
Noel Wallace. Each nominee was recommended for re-election by the Nominating and Governance Committee for consideration by the Board and proposal
to the Shareowners. If, before the Annual Meeting, any nominee becomes unable to serve, or chooses not to serve, the Board may nominate a substitute. If that
happens, the persons named as proxies on the proxy card will vote for the substitute. Alternatively, the Board may either let the vacancy stay unfilled until an
appropriate candidate is identified or reduce the size of the Board to eliminate the unfilled seat.
We have a balanced Board which individually possesses the leadership and character commensurate with the role of director, and which collectively
possesses the mix of skills necessary to provide appropriate oversight of a company the size and complexity of Kellogg. In addition, the Board possesses a
strong mix of experienced and newer directors. The following skills have been identified by the Board as core competencies:
Accounting and Financial
Acumen
Branded Consumer Products
/ Consumer Dynamics
Crisis Management
Health and Nutrition
Innovation / Research and
Development
International and Emerging
Markets
People Management
Manufacturing and Supply
Chain
Marketing
Regulatory / Government
Retail Environment
Risk Management
Sales and Distribution
Social Responsibility
Strategy / Strategic Planning
The Director biographies highlight five of these competencies that each Director possesses.
Nominees for Election for a Three-Year Term Expiring at the 2019 Annual Meeting .
MARY LASCHINGER. Ms. Laschinger, age 55, has served as a Kellogg Director since October 2012. She is Chairman of the Board and CEO of Veritiv
Corporation. Previously, Ms. Laschinger served as Senior Vice President of International Paper Company from 2007 to June 2014, and as President of the
xpedx distribution business from January 2010 to June 2014. She also served as President of the Europe, Middle East, Africa and Russia business at
International Paper, Vice President and General Manager of International Paper’s Wood Products and Pulp businesses, as well as in other senior management
roles in sales, marketing, manufacturing and supply chain at International Paper.
As a result of these professional and other experiences, Ms. Laschinger possesses particular knowledge and experience in a variety of areas, including
branded consumer products and consumer dynamics, accounting and financial acumen, international and emerging markets, manufacturing and supply chain,
sales and distribution, and has public company board experience that strengthens the Board’s collective knowledge, capabilities and experience.
CYNTHIA HARDIN MILLIGAN. Ms. Milligan, age 69, has served as a Kellogg Director since February 2013. She is Dean Emeritus of the College of
Business Administration at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. She also served as a director, Omaha Branch, of the Kansas City Federal Reserve from 2002 to
2007. Prior to joining the University of Nebraska, Ms. Milligan was past President and Chief Executive officer of Cynthia Milligan & Associates, from 1991
to 1998. She served as Director of Banking and Finance for the State of Nebraska from 1987 until 1991, and prior to that she was a senior partner at Rembolt,
Lodtke, Milligan and Berger in Lincoln, Nebraska. Ms. Milligan is a director of Wells Fargo & Company, Raven Industries, Inc., and 20 Calvert-sponsored
mutual funds. She has also served as a member of the board of trustees of W.K. Kellogg Foundation since January 1999.
As a result of these professional and other experiences, Ms. Milligan possesses particular knowledge and experience in a variety of areas, including
regulatory and government affairs, accounting and financial acumen, people management, social responsibility, strategy and strategic planning, and public
company board experience (including specific experience in credit, risk, governance, and social responsibility oversight) that strengthens the Board’s
collective knowledge, capabilities and experience.
16
Source: KELLOGG CO, DEF 14A, March 10, 2016
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CAROLYN TASTAD. Ms. Tastad, age 54, has served as a Kellogg Director since December 2015. Ms. Tastad is currently Group President, Procter &
Gamble North America and has worked at Procter & Gamble since 1983 where she previously served in executive roles in the U.S., Canada, and Switzerland.
The Nominating and Governance Committee reviewed Ms. Tastad’s professional and other experiences, including her particular knowledge and
experience in a variety of areas, including branded consumer products and consumer dynamics, people management, sales and distribution, marketing, and
strategy and strategic planning. The Nominating and Governance Committee considered Ms. Tastad a candidate for the Board as Ms. Tastad's knowledge and
experience would strengthen the Board’s collective knowledge, capabilities and experience.
NOEL WALLACE. Mr. Wallace, age 51, has served as a Kellogg Director since October 2015. Mr. Wallace is currently President of Colgate-Palmolive
Latin America and has worked at Colgate-Palmolive since 1987 where he previously served in executive roles in North America, Europe, Latin America, and
Africa.
The Nominating and Governance Committee reviewed Mr. Wallace’s professional and other experiences, including his particular knowledge and
experience in a variety of areas, including international and emerging markets, accounting and financial acumen, branded consumer products and consumer
dynamics, innovation and research and development, and risk management. The Nominating and Governance Committee considered Mr. Wallace a
candidate for the Board as Mr. Wallace's knowledge and experience would strengthen the Board’s collective knowledge, capabilities and experience.
Continuing Directors to Serve Until the 2018 Annual Meeting .
JOHN DILLON. Mr. Dillon, age 77, has served as a Kellogg Director since 2000. He is Senior Advisor of Evercore Partners. He retired in October 2003
as Chairman of the Board and CEO of International Paper Company, a position he held since 1996, and retired as Chairman of the Business Roundtable in
June 2003. He is a director of Progressive Waste Solutions, Ltd., and within the past five years, he has also served as a director of E. I. du Pont de Nemours and
Company.
As a result of these professional and other experiences, Mr. Dillon possesses particular knowledge and experience in a variety of areas, including
accounting and financial acumen, international and emerging markets, manufacturing and supply chain, sales and distribution, strategy and strategic
planning, and has public company board experience (including specific experience in auditing, compensation, governance, and manufacturing oversight)
that strengthens the Board’s collective knowledge, capabilities and experience.
ZACHARY GUND. Mr. Zachary Gund, age 45, has served as a Kellogg Director since December 2014. He is a Managing Partner of Coppermine Capital,
LLC, which he founded in 2001, where he makes investment decisions and oversees several portfolio companies across many different sectors. His work has
spanned both the manufacturing and service industries, including food manufacturing.
As a result of these professional and other experiences, Mr. Zachary Gund possesses particular knowledge and experience in a variety of areas, including
accounting and financial acumen, branded consumer products and consumer dynamics, manufacturing and supply chain, the retail environment, and sales
and distribution that strengthens the Board’s collective knowledge, capabilities and experience. Mr. Zachary Gund is the son of Mr. Gordon Gund.
JIM JENNESS. Mr. Jenness, age 69, has served as a Kellogg Director since 2000. He was our Executive Chairman from February 2005 until June 2014,
and served as our CEO from February 2005 through December 30, 2006. He also served as CEO of Integrated Merchandising Systems, LLC, a leader in
outsource management of retail promotion and branded merchandising, from 1997 to December 2004. Before joining Integrated Merchandising Systems,
Mr. Jenness served as Vice Chairman and COO of the Leo Burnett Company from 1996 to 1997 and, before that, as Global Vice Chairman North America and
Latin America from 1993 to 1996. He is lead director of Kimberly-Clark Corporation and a director of Prestige Brands Holdings, Inc. Mr. Jenness also served
as a trustee of the W.K. Kellogg Foundation Trust from 2005 to 2015.
As a result of these professional and other experiences, Mr. Jenness possesses particular knowledge and experience in a variety of areas, including
branded consumer products and consumer dynamics, health and nutrition, marketing, people management, strategy and strategic planning, and has public
company board experience that strengthens the Board’s collective knowledge, capabilities and experience.
17
Source: KELLOGG CO, DEF 14A, March 10, 2016
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DON KNAUSS. Mr. Knauss, age 65, has served as a Kellogg Director since December 2007. Mr. Knauss retired as Executive Chairman of the Board of
The Clorox Company in July 2015. He had served as Chairman and CEO of The Clorox Company from 2006 to 2014. He was Executive Vice President of
The Coca-Cola Company and President and COO for Coca-Cola North America from February 2004 until September 2006. Previously, he was President of
the Retail Division of Coca-Cola North America from January 2003 through February 2004 and President and CEO of The Minute Maid Company, a division
of The Coca-Cola Company, from January 2000 until January 2003 and President of Coca-Cola Southern Africa from March 1998 until January 2000. Prior
to that, he held various positions in marketing and sales with PepsiCo, Inc. and Procter & Gamble, and served as an officer in the United States Marine Corps.
In addition, Mr. Knauss is a director of McKesson Corporation and Target Corporation, and within the past five years, he has also served as a director of URS
Corporation.
As a result of these professional and other experiences, Mr. Knauss possesses particular knowledge and experience in a variety of areas, including the
retail environment, branded consumer products and consumer dynamics, crisis management, manufacturing and supply chain, strategy and strategic
planning, and has public company board experience (including specific experience in auditing, manufacturing, and marketing oversight) that strengthens the
Board’s collective knowledge, capabilities and experience.
Continuing Directors to Serve Until the 2017 Annual Meeting .
JOHN BRYANT. Mr. Bryant, age 50, has been Chairman of the Board of Kellogg Company since July 2014. In January 2011, he became President and
CEO after having served as our Executive Vice President and COO since August 2008. He has been a member of Kellogg Company’s Board of Directors since
July 2010. Mr. Bryant joined Kellogg in March 1998, and was promoted during the next eight years to a number of key financial and executive leadership
roles. He was appointed Executive Vice President and CFO, Kellogg Company, President, Kellogg International in December 2006. In July 2007, Mr. Bryant
was appointed Executive Vice President and CFO, Kellogg Company, President, Kellogg North America and in August 2008, he was appointed Executive
Vice President, COO and CFO. Mr. Bryant served as CFO through December 2009. He has also been a trustee of the W. K. Kellogg Foundation Trust since
2015, and is a director of Macy's Inc.
As a result of these professional and other experiences, Mr. Bryant possesses particular knowledge and experience in a variety of areas, including
accounting and financial acumen, branded consumer products and consumer dynamics, strategy and strategic planning, social responsibility, international
and emerging markets, and has public company board experience that strengthens the Board’s collective knowledge, capabilities and experience.
STEPHANIE BURNS, Ph.D. Dr. Burns, age 61, has served as a Kellogg Director since February 2014. Dr. Burns served as CEO of Dow Corning
Corporation from 2004 to 2011 and its Chairman from 2006 through 2011. She began her career with Dow Corning in 1983 and later became Dow Corning’s
first director of women’s health. Dr. Burns was elected to the Dow Corning Board of Directors in 2001 and elected as President in 2003. Dr. Burns is a director
of HP Inc., Corning Incorporated and GlaxoSmithKline plc., and within the past five years, Dr. Burns has also served as a director of Dow Corning
Corporation.
As a result of these professional and other experiences, Dr. Burns possesses particular knowledge and experience in a variety of areas, including
accounting and financial acumen, crisis management, innovation and research and development, manufacturing and supply chain, regulatory and
government affairs, and public company board experience (including specific experience in compensation, corporate relations, manufacturing, and social
responsibility oversight) that strengthens the Board’s collective knowledge, capabilities and experience.
LA JUNE MONTGOMERY TABRON. Ms. Montgomery Tabron, age 53, has served as a Kellogg Director since February 2014. Ms. Montgomery
Tabron was elected President and CEO of the W.K. Kellogg Foundation effective January 2014. She is also a member of the Board of Trustees of the W.K.
Kellogg Foundation since January 2014. During her 27 years with the W.K. Kellogg Foundation, she held various positions in finance, including Executive
Vice President of Operations and Treasurer from March 2012 to December 2013, COO and Treasurer from January 2010 to February 2012, Vice President of
Finance and Treasurer from September 2000 to December 2009, Assistant Vice President of Finance and Assistant Treasurer from September 1997 to
September 2000, and Controller from May 1987 to September 1997. Ms. Montgomery Tabron has also been a trustee of the W.K. Kellogg Foundation Trust
since 2014.
18
Source: KELLOGG CO, DEF 14A, March 10, 2016
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As a result of these professional and other experiences, Ms. Montgomery Tabron possesses particular knowledge and experience in a variety of areas,
including accounting and financial acumen, strategy and strategic planning, people management, regulatory and government affairs, social responsibility,
and private company board experience (including specific experience in social responsibility oversight) that strengthens the Board’s collective knowledge,
capabilities and experience.
ROGELIO REBOLLEDO. Mr. Rebolledo, age 71, has served as a Kellogg Director since October 2008. In 2007, Mr. Rebolledo retired from his
position as Chairman of PBG Mexico, the Mexican operations of Pepsi Bottling Group, Inc. He began his 30-year career with PepsiCo Inc. at Sabritas, the
salty snack food unit of Frito-Lay International in Mexico. He was responsible for the development of the international Frito-Lay business, first in Latin
America and then in Asia and Europe. From 2001 to 2003, he was President and CEO of Frito-Lay International. He also served as President and CEO of Pepsi
Bottling Group’s Mexico operations from January 2004 until being named Chairman. Mr. Rebolledo is a director of The Clorox Company, and within the
past five years, Mr. Rebolledo has also served as a director of Best Buy Co., Inc.
As a result of these professional and other experiences, Mr. Rebolledo has been determined to be an “Audit Committee Financial Expert” under the
SEC’s rules and regulations, possesses particular knowledge and experience in a variety of areas, including accounting and financial acumen, international
and emerging markets, marketing, the retail environment, sales and distribution, and has public company board experience (including specific experience in
auditing, compensation, and marketing oversight) that strengthens the Board’s collective knowledge, capabilities and experience.
19
Source: KELLOGG CO, DEF 14A, March 10, 2016
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2015 DIRECTOR COMPENSATION AND BENEFITS
Only non-employee Directors receive compensation for their services as Directors. For information about the compensation of Mr. Bryant, refer to
“Executive Compensation” beginning on page 40.
Our 2015 compensation for non-employee Directors was comprised of annual retainers and equity-based grants. The annual pay is designed to attract and
retain diverse, highly-qualified, seasoned, and independent professionals to represent all of our Shareowners, and is targeted at the median of our
compensation peer group. Refer to “Compensation Discussion and Analysis — Compensation Approach” for a description of the companies that make up our
compensation peer group. The Nominating and Governance Committee reviews our Director compensation program on an annual basis with Cook & Co., the
independent compensation consultant. Cook & Co. provides counsel to the Committee in a variety of ways, including an in depth study that reports and
analyzes the director compensation programs in the compensation peer group to ensure that the program is competitive, consistent with market practice, and
designed to attract qualified directors. Although the Nominating and Governance Committee conducts this review on an annual basis, it considers
adjustments to Director compensation every other year. In 2015, consistent with the findings in the Cook & Co. assessment, the Company raised the annual
cash retainer for the Chair of the C&T Committee from $15,000 to $20,000 and established a $20,000 annual cash retainer for serving as the Lead Director.
Our compensation is designed to create alignment between our Directors and our Shareowners through the use of equity-based grants. In 2015,
approximately 60% of non-employee Director pay was in equity and approximately 40% was in cash.
Compensation as of January 2, 2016 (end of fiscal year), for non-employee Directors consisted of the following:
Type of Compensation
Value
Annual Cash Retainer (paid in quarterly installments)
Annual Stock Awards Retainer (issued on May 7, 2015)
Annual Cash Retainer for Lead Director / Committee Chair:
Lead Director
Audit Committee
C&T Committee
Nominating and Governance
All Other Committees (other than Executive Committee where no retainer is paid)
$100,000
$150,000
$20,000
$20,000
$20,000
$20,000
$10,000
Actual annual pay varies somewhat among non-employee Directors based primarily on committee chair responsibilities. To the extent the dollar value of
the Annual Stock Awards Retainer exceeds $150,000 at the time of the grant, the excess amount is deducted from the Annual Cash Retainer payments.
Stock Awards. Stock awards are granted in early May and for non-employee Directors are automatically deferred pursuant to the Kellogg Company
Grantor Trust for Non-Employee Directors. Under the terms of the Grantor Trust, shares are available to a Director only upon termination of service on the
Board.
Business Expenses. Kellogg pays for the business expenses related to Directors attending Kellogg meetings, including room, meals and transportation
to and from Board and Committee meetings. At times, a Director may travel to and from Kellogg meetings on Kellogg corporate aircraft. Directors are also
eligible to be reimbursed for attendance at qualified Director education programs.
Director and Officer Liability Insurance and Travel Accident Insurance. Director and officer liability insurance (“D&O Insurance”) insures our
Directors and officers against certain losses that they are legally required to pay as a result of their actions while performing duties on our behalf. Our D&O
Insurance policy does not break out the premium for Directors versus officers and, therefore, a dollar amount cannot be assigned for individual Directors.
Travel accident
20
Source: KELLOGG CO, DEF 14A, March 10, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
insurance provides benefits to each Director in the event of death or disability (permanent and total) during travel on Kellogg corporate aircraft. Our travel
accident insurance policy also covers employees and others while traveling on Kellogg corporate aircraft and, therefore, a dollar amount cannot be assigned
for individual Directors.
Elective Deferral Program. Under the Deferred Compensation Plan for Non-Employee Directors, non-employee Directors may each year irrevocably
elect to defer all or a portion of their Board annual cash retainer payable for the following year. The amount deferred is credited to an account in the form of
units equivalent to the fair market value of our common stock. If the Board declares dividends, a fractional unit representing the dividend is credited to the
account of each participating Director. A participant’s account balance is paid in stock upon termination of service as a Director. The balance is paid in a
lump sum or in up to ten annual installments at the election of the Director. In the case of annual installments, dividend equivalents are earned and credited
to the participant’s unpaid balance on the date earned until the account is distributed in full.
Minimum Stock Ownership Requirement. All non-employee Directors are expected to comply with stock ownership guidelines, under which they are
expected to hold at least five times the annual cash retainer ($500,000 — five times the $100,000 cash retainer) in stock or stock equivalents, subject to a
five-year phase-in period for newly-elected Directors. As of January 2, 2016, all of the non-employee Directors exceeded or were on track to meet this
requirement. Mr. Bryant is expected to comply with the stock ownership guidelines described in “Compensation Discussion and Analysis — Compensation
Policies — Executive Stock Ownership Guidelines,” which is at least six times annual base salary. Mr. Bryant exceeds his stock ownership guideline.
Discontinued Program. Prior to December 1995, we had a Directors’ Charitable Award Program pursuant to which Kellogg would contribute an
aggregate of $1 million upon the death of a Director to organizations of the Directors choice (up to four). In 1995, the Board discontinued this program for
Directors first elected after December 1995. In 2015, Mr. Gordon Gund and Ms. McLaughlin Korologos continued to be eligible to participate in this
program. We funded the cost of this program for the two eligible Directors through the purchase of insurance policies prior to 2008. We will make cash
payments in the future under this program if insurance proceeds are not available at the time of the Director’s death. In 2015, we recognized nonpension
postretirement benefits expense associated with this obligation as follows: Mr. Gordon Gund — $23,808 and Ms. McLaughlin Korologos — $21,339. These
benefits are not reflected in the Directors’ Compensation Table.
21
Source: KELLOGG CO, DEF 14A, March 10, 2016
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Directors’ Compensation Table
The individual components of the total compensation calculation reflected in the table below are as follows:
Fees and Retainers. The amounts shown under the heading “Fees Earned or Paid in Cash” consist of annual retainers earned by or paid in cash to our
non-employee Directors in 2015.
Stock Awards. The amounts disclosed under the heading “Stock Awards” consist of the annual grant of deferred shares of common stock, which are
placed in the Kellogg Company Grantor Trust for Non-Employee Directors. The dollar amounts for the awards represent the grant-date fair value calculated in
accordance with Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) Accounting Standards Codification (“ASC”) Topic 718 (Compensation — Stock
Compensation).
Name
Stephanie Burns
Fees Earned or
Paid in Cash
($)(1)
Stock
Awards
($)(2)
Option
Awards
($)(3)
Non-equity Incentive
Plan Compensation
($)(4)
Change in Pension
Value and
Nonqualified Deferred
Compensation
Earnings
($)(5)
All Other
Compensation
($)
Total
($)
99,998
150,002
—
—
—
—
250,000
John Dillon
119,998
150,002
—
—
—
—
270,000
Gordon Gund
139,998
150,002
—
—
—
—
290,000
Zachary Gund
116,846
208,286
—
—
—
—
325,132 (6)
99,998
150,002
—
—
—
—
250,000
109,998
150,002
—
—
—
—
260,000
99,998
150,002
—
—
—
—
250,000
109,998
150,002
—
—
—
—
260,000
Cynthia Milligan
99,998
150,002
—
—
—
—
250,000
La June Montgomery Tabron
99,998
150,002
—
—
—
—
250,000
119,998
150,002
—
—
—
—
270,000
8,967
—
(7)
—
—
—
—
8,967
(7)
Noel R. Wallace (8)
33,424
—
(8)
—
—
—
—
33,424
(8)
Benjamin Carson Sr. (9)
50,000
—
—
—
—
—
50,000
Jim Jenness
Donald Knauss
Mary Laschinger
Ann McLaughlin Korologos
Rogelio Rebolledo
Carolyn M. Tastad (7)
(6)
(1) The amount reflects the aggregate dollar amount of all fees earned or paid in cash for services as a non-employee Director. Differences reflect time on the
Board during 2015 and cash retainers paid to Committee Chairs and the Lead Director.
(2) The amount reflects the grant-date fair value calculated in accordance with FASB ASC Topic 718 for the annual grant of 2,360 deferred shares of
common stock. Refer to Notes 1 and 8 to the Consolidated Financial Statements included in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended
January 2, 2016. The grant-date fair value of the stock-based awards will likely vary from the actual value the Director receives. The actual value the
Director receives will depend on the number of shares and the price of our common stock when the shares or their cash equivalent are distributed. As of
January 2, 2016, none of our non-employee Directors was deemed to have outstanding restricted stock awards, because all of those awards vested in prior
years. The number of shares of common stock held by each of our Directors is shown under “Security Ownership — Officer and Director Stock
Ownership” on page 5 of this proxy statement.
(3) As of January 2, 2016, these Directors and former Directors had the following stock options outstanding: Benjamin Carson 15,000 options; John Dillon
10,000 options; Gordon Gund 10,000 options; Jim Jenness 5,000 options; Don Knauss 6,931 options; Ann McLaughlin Korologos 10,000 options; and
Rogelio Rebolledo 2,534 options. The number of stock options held by our Directors is a function of years of Board service and the timing of exercise of
vested awards. These options were granted in previous years as a component of the non-employee Directors’ annual compensation. In December 2008,
the Board decided to stop granting stock options to non-employee Directors.
22
Source: KELLOGG CO, DEF 14A, March 10, 2016
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(4) Kellogg does not have a non-equity incentive plan for non-employee Directors.
(5) Kellogg does not have a pension plan for non-employee Directors and does not pay above-market or preferential rates on non-qualified deferred
compensation for non-employee Directors.
(6) Mr. Zachary Gund began his initial term as Director on December 1, 2014. The amount reflects the prorated portion of the stock awards granted to Mr.
Zachary Gund for his service as Director prior to the 2015 Annual Meeting of Shareowners and the stock awards granted in May 2015 to all of the thencurrent non-executive Directors.
(7) Ms. Tastad was elected as Director on August 25, 2015, and her initial term as Director began December 1, 2015. In May 2016, Ms. Tastad will receive a
prorated portion of the 2015 stock awards for her service as Director prior to the 2016 Annual Meeting of Shareowners.
(8) Mr. Wallace was elected as Director on August 25, 2015, and his initial term as Director began October 1, 2015. In May 2016, Mr. Wallace will receive a
prorated portion of the 2015 stock awards for his service as Director prior to the 2016 Annual Meeting of Shareowners.
(9) Dr. Carson resigned as a Director in May 2015. The amount reflects compensation he received for his service as Director until May 2015.
23
Source: KELLOGG CO, DEF 14A, March 10, 2016
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COMPENSATION DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS
2015 Performance Summary. Our overall trends in 2015 represented a significant year-over-year improvement and momentum built as the year
progressed. The Company’s projections for performance in 2016 represent further improvement, building on the foundation created over the past two years.
Specifically, the Company's performance exceeded each of the financial targets for the 2015 Annual Incentive Plan (currency-neutral comparable operating
profit, currency-neutral comparable net sales, and cash flow). The Company built momentum in our key businesses throughout the year, culminating with
fourth quarter currency-neutral comparable net sales growth of 4.2% and currency-neutral comparable operating profit growth of 2.8%. Our U.S. cereal
business saw significant improvement throughout the year and ended the year with fourth quarter consumption growth for the Kellogg brand of more than 2%
and a category share gain of 70 basis points. In addition, the Company announced 2016 guidance in line with our long-term corporate targets.
This discussion and analysis provides information regarding the compensation program in place for our CEO, CFO, and the three other most highlycompensated executive officers as of the end of fiscal 2015. In this proxy statement, we refer to our CEO, CFO, and the other three individuals as our “named
executive officers” or “NEOs.”
In order to present Kellogg’s executive compensation program in a simple and understandable manner, the Compensation Discussion and Analysis
("CD&A") has been organized into the following sections:
I.
Executive Summary – an overview of our compensation program.
II. Core Principles – the fundamental tenets upon which our compensation program is built, such as pay for performance.
III. Compensation Approach – the process used to develop plan design, set compensation, and verify that actual pay is consistent with our Core
Principles.
IV. Compensation Plans and Design – the elements of the compensation program and 2015 pay.
V. Compensation Policies – key policies that govern the operation of the plans.
It is important to read this section in conjunction with the detailed tables and narrative descriptions under “Executive Compensation” beginning on
page 40 of this proxy statement.
I. Executive Summary. This executive summary highlights core principles of our compensation program and the approach followed by the C&T
Committee.
Core Principles. We operate in a robust and challenging industry, where competitive compensation is important. We believe that our executive
compensation program for our NEOs should be designed to:
•
provide a competitive level of total compensation necessary to attract and retain talented and experienced executives;
•
appropriately motivate our NEOs to contribute to our short- and long-term success; and
•
help drive long-term total return for our Shareowners.
Accordingly, the Core Principles that underpin our executive compensation program include Pay for Performance, Shareowner Alignment, Values-Based and
Mitigating Risk. A detailed description of these principles is included in this CD&A, and the following is a brief overview of each.
Pay for Performance. Our compensation program is designed to have a significant portion of an NEO’s actual compensation linked to Kellogg’s actual
performance. We accomplish this by utilizing “performance-based” pay programs like our annual incentive plan, stock option plan and three-year executive
performance plan, and by limiting perquisites.
Shareowner Alignment. We align the interest of our NEOs with Shareowners by encouraging our NEOs to have a meaningful personal financial stake in
Kellogg. We gain this alignment by maintaining stock ownership guidelines, having a
24
Source: KELLOGG CO, DEF 14A, March 10, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
significant portion of an NEO’s target compensation stock-based, and using compensation plan goals that are tied to key financial metrics of Kellogg. In
addition, our C&T Committee reviews ‘total shareowner return’ as a key financial metric when reviewing performance to verify our pay for performance
connection.
Values-Based. Our NEOs are evaluated on the behaviors they exhibit as they drive results. The compensation program links the “what” each NEO
contributes as well as “how” an NEO makes those contributions.
Mitigating Risk. Our compensation program is designed to mitigate risks relating to our business. The program accomplishes this by balancing shortterm and rolling three-year incentives, which uses various financial metrics to ensure the business grows in a balanced manner. In addition, we use clawback
provisions to mitigate risk by creating appropriate remedies under certain circumstances.
Compensation Approach. The approach utilized by the C&T Committee is a key feature that ensures that actual compensation and plan design are
consistent with the Core Principles. Our compensation approach is a multi-step process based on (a) independent decision-making, (b) utilizing
compensation peer group data to appropriately target compensation levels, (c) targeting compensation at the 50th percentile of the compensation peer group,
(d) following a consistent, rigorous target setting process, and (e) utilizing verification tools to ensure appropriate decisions are being made.
Overview. Recently, the C&T Committee took the following actions (a more detailed discussion of each of these topics follows in this CD&A):
Performance / Payouts. Pay for performance is one of the core principles that underpin our executive compensation program. Our overall trends in
2015 represented a significant year-over-year improvement and momentum built as the year progressed. The Company’s projections for performance in 2016
represent further improvement, building on the foundation created over the past two years. Specifically, the Company's performance exceeded each of the
financial targets for the 2015 Annual Incentive Plan (currency-neutral comparable operating profit, currency-neutral comparable net sales, and cash flow).
The Company built momentum in our key businesses throughout the year, culminating with fourth quarter currency-neutral comparable net sales growth of
4.2% and currency-neutral comparable operating profit growth of 2.8%. Our U.S. cereal business saw significant improvement throughout the year and ended
the year with fourth quarter consumption growth for the Kellogg brand of more than 2% and a category share gain of 70 basis points. In addition, the
Company announced 2016 guidance in line with our long-term corporate targets. Awards for the 2015 Annual Incentive Plan ("AIP") and 2013-2015
Executive Performance Plan ("EPP") are as follows:
•
AIP Payouts (Pay for Performance). The payout factor for the 2015 AIP is 121% of target, which is the formulaic result from the targets
established at the beginning of the year for currency-neutral comparable operating profit, currency-neutral comparable net sales, and cash
flow. Actual payouts for each NEO are described below.
•
2013-2015 EPP Payouts (Pay for Performance). The Committee determined that a payout of 35% of the 2013-2015 EPP target would be made
to our NEOs for the 2013-2015 performance. The Committee concluded that a payout of 35% of target was appropriate for the Company's
performance for the three-year period after considering the financial performance against EPP targets, as well as a variety of additional
factors, including the Company's total shareowner return, payouts of similar programs for our compensation peer group, and key Company
activities during the performance period.
Program Updates. The Committee and Company engage with a variety of stakeholders to gain feedback on its compensation programs, including
discussions with Shareowners. Based on that feedback, and the Committee's reviews with Cook & Co., the following program updates were made to the
Company's executive compensation program in 2015:
•
2015-2017 EPP Metrics (Shareowner Alignment). The 2015-2017 EPP metrics are cumulative cash flow and relative total shareowner return.
Previously, the EPP metrics had been currency-neutral comparable net sales and currency-neutral comparable operating profit.
•
Long-term Incentives Mix (Pay for Performance). The long-term incentives mix for NEOs in 2015 was approximately 50% EPP and
approximately 50% options. Previously, the long-term incentives mix had been approximately 30% EPP and approximately 70% options.
25
Source: KELLOGG CO, DEF 14A, March 10, 2016
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•
Compensation Peer Group (Compensation Approach). The compensation peer group was changed for 2016 compensation decisions to include
Kraft Heinz Company, The J.M. Smucker Co. and Keurig Green Mountain. Previously, the compensation peer group had included Kraft
Foods Group and H.J. Heinz Co. as separate entities. J.M Smucker Co. and Keurig Green Mountain were added to maintain a well-balanced
peer group across company sizes and operating segments.
II. Core Principles. Our compensation program is based on the following core principles — each of which is more fully described below.
•
Pay for Performance,
•
Shareowner Alignment,
•
Values-Based, and
•
Mitigating Risk.
Pay for Performance. The fundamental principle underlying our compensation programs is pay for performance. That is, linking the amount of actual
pay to the performance of Kellogg and each NEO. We accomplish this in several ways, including ensuring that target pay levels are market based, utilizing
“performance-based” pay, and limiting perquisites (each of which is more fully described below).
Over the last three years, the Company has had below target, third or fourth quartile, payouts for its AIP and below target, fourth quartile payouts for its
EPP. In 2015, the Company's focus was on taking the necessary actions to improve business trends, build momentum, and position the Company to return to
our long-term corporate targets in 2016 for net sales, operating profit, and earnings per share. The Company achieved these goals. Our overall trends in 2015
represented a significant year-over-year improvement and momentum built as the year progressed. The Company’s projections for performance in 2016
represent further improvement, building on the foundation created over the past two years. Specifically, the Company exceeded the 2015 AIP targets for
currency-neutral comparable operating profit, currency-neutral comparable net sales, and cash flow in 2015. The Company built momentum in our key
businesses throughout the year and announced 2016 guidance consistent with our long-term corporate targets. Awards for the 2015 AIP are reflective of that
performance.
For our 2015 AIP, the formulaic result of the Company’s 2015 performance is a second quartile payout of 121% of target. In exercising its judgmentbased methodology to ensure pay is consistent with the Company's performance, the C&T Committee considered a number of factors, including: (i) actual
performance that exceeded each of the 2015 AIP targets; (ii) the Company's performance versus the performance peer group; (iii) total shareowner return
alignment between estimated quartile performance and quartile payout; and (iv) key business activities, such as launching zero-based budgeting in North
America to provide additional financial visibility for the Company in the future, refreshing our strategy in 2015 and establishing our 2020 growth plan with
specific growth goals and initiatives, and executing on Project K, Kellogg’s four-year efficiency and effectiveness program announced in November 2013.
Our NEOs received a second quartile payout of 121% of target, before consideration for individual performance. In 2015, our corporate AIP performance
target for currency-neutral comparable operating profit was a decline of 2.5%, which included a 4% negative impact from the rebasing of incentive
compensation. Without this headwind, the operating profit target would have been growth of 1.5%. The full-year performance exceeded the target and was a
decline of 2.3%. Without the impact from rebasing incentive compensation from 2014 to 2015, the Company's currency-neutral comparable operating profit
would have been growth of approximately 1.7%. The corporate AIP performance target for currency-neutral comparable net sales was 0.5% growth, while fullyear performance exceeded the target with growth of 1.2%. The AIP performance target for cash flow was $1.0 billion, while full-year performance exceeded
the target with cash flow of $1.1 billion. For more information about the AIP, see "Annual Incentives" beginning on page 31 of this proxy statement.
For the 2013-2015 EPP, the C&T Committee determined that a fourth quartile payout of 35% of the 2013-2015 EPP target was appropriate based on the
Company's performance during the performance period. The Committee reviewed the Company's performance versus the currency-neutral comparable
operating profit target established in 2013 for purposes of Section 162(m) and determined that the target had been reached. For this period, Kellogg’s
currency-neutral comparable net sales declined at a rate of 0.3% and currency-neutral comparable operating profit declined at a rate of 1.5%, which if
unadjusted, would have resulted in a payout of up to 50% of the 2013-2015 EPP target share amount. The Committee then
26
Source: KELLOGG CO, DEF 14A, March 10, 2016
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considered the following additional factors regarding company performance during the performance period in determining the payout amount: (i) the total
shareowner return for Kellogg of 41.4% from 2013 to 2015, placing Kellogg in the third quartile of our performance peer group; (ii) payouts for similar
programs for our compensation peer group; and (iii) the execution of Project K. The Committee used a judgment-based methodology in exercising its
discretion to set the actual 2013-2015 EPP payout at 35% of target.
Market Driven Compensation. All components of our executive compensation package are targeted at the 50th percentile of our compensation peer
group to ensure that our executives are appropriately compensated, and we are able to recruit and retain the right talent for the organization. Actual
compensation ranges above or below the 50 th percentile of our compensation peer group based on performance against pre-determined goals that are
designed to drive sustainable results and increase Shareowner value.
Performance-Based Compensation. A significant portion of our NEOs’ target compensation is “performance-based” pay tied to both short-term
performance (AIP awards) and long-term performance (EPP awards and stock options). For our CEO, 89% of 2015 target compensation (salary, annual
incentives and long-term incentives) was comprised of performance-based incentives.
Performance-Based Compensation
The chart above highlights the percentage contribution of each element of 2015 target compensation. The chart demonstrates how base salary (fixed
component) contributes less for the CEO from a percentage standpoint than the other NEOs.
Limited Perquisites. To further ensure pay for performance, executives receive limited perquisites, as shown on page 36. For additional information
about perquisites, refer to “Executive Compensation — Summary Compensation Table — footnote ‘f’.”
Shareowner Alignment. Aligning the interests of our executives with Shareowners is an important way to drive behaviors that will generate long-term
Shareowner value. We align these interests by using equity awards that have a long-term focus and by maintaining robust stock ownership guidelines (each
of which is more fully described below). Equity-based incentives are an effective method of facilitating stock ownership and further aligning the interests of
executives with
27
Source: KELLOGG CO, DEF 14A, March 10, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
those of our Shareowners. Consequently, a significant portion of our NEOs’ total target compensation is comprised of equity-based incentives (70% for the
CEO).
At the 2015 Annual Meeting of Shareowners, our Shareowners expressed strong support with approximately 96% of votes cast in favor of Kellogg’s
“Say-on-Pay” proposal. In addition, during the course of 2015, the Company continued its practice of engaging with our large Shareowners about various
corporate governance topics including executive compensation. When setting compensation, and in determining compensation policies and practices like
the change in long-term incentives mix, and the new 2015-2017 EPP metrics, the C&T Committee took into account feedback from Shareowners received
through the Company’s Shareowner outreach program, as well as the strong results of the 2015 Shareowner advisory resolution to approve executive
compensation.
Longer-Term Focus. Our EPP is a stock-based, pay for performance, multi-year incentive plan intended to focus senior management on achieving
critical goals over three-year periods. For the 2013-2015 EPP and 2014-2016 EPP, these goals were tied to financial metrics such as currency-neutral
comparable net sales growth and currency-neutral comparable operating profit growth. For the 2015-2017 EPP, the metrics are cash flow and relative total
shareowner return over three-year period. In addition, stock options granted in 2015 vest in three equal annual installments in 2016, 2017, and 2018 and are
exercisable until the 10 th anniversary of the grant date.
Stock Ownership Guidelines. Kellogg has established robust share ownership guidelines to strengthen the ongoing and continued link between the
interests of NEOs and Shareowners. The Chairman and CEO is expected to own shares equal to at least six times his annual base salary. The other NEOs are
expected to own shares equal to at least three times their annual base salary. The Company has a holding period which requires that all of our NEOs hold all
shares received from option or stock awards (including EPP awards) until their respective ownership guideline is met. Our NEOs currently exceed their
ownership guidelines.
Values-Based. Kellogg’s compensation program is designed to reward an executive’s performance and contribution to Kellogg’s objectives. The NEOs
are evaluated on their specific contributions, as well as the behaviors they exhibit as they drive results. In other words, our compensation is linked to “what”
each NEO contributes as well as “how” an NEO makes those contributions. The shared behaviors (what we call our “K Values”) that Kellogg expects from its
NEOs and believes are essential to achieving long-term dependable and sustainable growth and increased value for Shareowners are as follows:
•
acting with integrity and showing respect;
•
being accountable for our actions and results;
•
being passionate about our business, our brands and our food;
•
having the humility and hunger to learn;
•
striving for simplicity; and
•
loving success.
Mitigating Risk. The compensation program is designed so that it does not encourage taking unreasonable risks relating to our business. Kellogg’s
compensation program mitigates risk by balancing short-term and rolling multi-year incentives which use various financial metrics to ensure the business
grows in a balanced manner. In addition, the use of clawback provisions further drives risk mitigation by creating appropriate remedies under certain
circumstances.
In 2015, the C&T Committee reviewed our compensation program for design features considered to encourage excessive risk taking and Kellogg’s
approach to those features. As a result of this review, and together with input from the independent compensation consultant, the C&T Committee determined
that the risks arising from Kellogg’s compensation policies and practices for our employees are not reasonably likely to have a material adverse effect on
Kellogg.
Clawback Policies. We maintain clawback provisions in each of our AIP, stock options, and EPP programs which give the Company the ability to
recover (“clawback”) previously granted payments. The provisions allow Kellogg to recoup performance-based gains by executive officers (and other
program participants) for fraud or misconduct causing a financial restatement.
28
Source: KELLOGG CO, DEF 14A, March 10, 2016
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III.
Compensation Approach. Our compensation approach is based on (1) independent decision making, (2) utilizing compensation peer group
data to appropriately target compensation levels, (3) targeting compensation at the 50 th percentile of the compensation peer group, (4) following a consistent,
rigorous target setting process, and (5) utilizing verification tools to ensure appropriate decisions are being made. Each is described more fully below.
Independence. Our C&T Committee is responsible for administering the compensation program for executive officers of Kellogg. The members of the
Committee are fully independent. None of the Committee members are current or former employees of Kellogg, and they are not eligible to participate in any
of our executive compensation programs. For more information, see “Board and Committee Membership — Compensation and Talent Management
Committee.” In addition, the Committee has utilized an independent compensation consultant for many years, and engaged Cook & Co. as its independent
compensation consultant for 2015.
Cook & Co. works directly for the C&T Committee, and, pursuant to Company policy, is prohibited from providing any consulting or other services to
Kellogg or our executive officers other than the work performed on behalf of the Committee or the Board. The Committee has considered the independence
of Cook & Co. in light of SEC rules and NYSE listing standards. In connection with this process, the Committee has reviewed, among other items, a letter
from Cook & Co. addressing the independence of Cook & Co. and the members of the consulting team serving the Committee, including the following
factors: (i) services provided to Kellogg by Cook & Co., (ii) fees paid by Kellogg as a percentage of Cook & Co.’s total revenue, (iii) policies or procedures of
Cook & Co. that are designed to prevent conflicts of interest, (iv) any business or personal relationships between the senior advisor of the consulting team
with a member of the Committee, (v) any Company stock owned by the senior advisor or any member of his immediate family, and (vi) any business or
personal relationships between our executive officers and the senior advisor. The Committee discussed these considerations and concluded that the work
performed by Cook & Co. and its senior advisor involved in the engagement did not raise any conflict of interest.
Peer Group. We benchmark ourselves against comparable companies (our “compensation peer group”) to ensure that our executive officer
compensation is competitive in the marketplace. The C&T Committee uses peer group data to benchmark our compensation with respect to base salary, target
annual and long-term incentives and total compensation. For 2015 compensation decisions, our compensation peer group was comprised of the following
branded consumer products companies:
Campbell Soup Co.
Clorox Co.
The Coca-Cola Co.
Colgate-Palmolive Co.
ConAgra Foods, Inc.
Dr. Pepper Snapple Grp.
Estee Lauder Cos., Inc.
General Mills, Inc.
The Hershey Co.
H.J. Heinz Co.
Hormel Foods Corp.
Kimberly-Clark Corp.
Kraft Foods Group
Mattel, Inc.
Mondelēz International
McDonald’s Corp.
NIKE, Inc.
PepsiCo Inc.
Whirlpool Corp.
Yum! Brands, Inc.
The Committee periodically reviews the compensation peer group to confirm that it continues to be an appropriate benchmark for our program. The
Committee determines the compensation peer group, taking into account input from the independent compensation consultant whose viewpoints are based
on objective screening criteria for a variety of factors. The Committee considers a variety of criteria to determine our compensation peer group, including
companies that (i) are in the same or similar lines of business, (ii) compete for the same customers with similar products and services, (iii) have comparable
financial characteristics that investors view similarly, (iv) consider Kellogg a peer, (v) proxy advisory firms consider Kellogg’s peers, and (vi) are within a
reasonable range in terms of percentile rank of Kellogg for key financial metrics such as revenue, pre-tax income, total assets, total equity, total employees,
market capitalization, and composite percentile rank. The compensation peer group was changed for 2016 compensation decisions to include Kraft Heinz
Company, The J.M. Smucker Co. and Keurig Green Mountain. Previously, the compensation peer group had included Kraft Foods Group and H.J. Heinz Co.
as separate entities. J.M Smucker Co. and Keurig Green Mountain were added to maintain a well-balanced peer group across company sizes and operating
segments.
We believe that our compensation peer group is representative of the market in which we compete for talent. The size of the group has been established
so as to provide sufficient benchmarking data across the range of senior positions in Kellogg. Our compensation peer group companies were chosen because
of their leadership positions in branded consumer products
29
Source: KELLOGG CO, DEF 14A, March 10, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
and their overall relevance to Kellogg. The quality of these organizations has allowed Kellogg to maintain a high level of continuity in the compensation
peer group, providing a consistent measure for benchmarking compensation.
As reflected in the changes for 2016 compensation decisions, the composition of our compensation peer group has changed over time based on market
events such as mergers and other business combinations.
50 th Percentile. All components of our executive compensation package are targeted at the 50th percentile of our compensation peer group. We
believe targeting the 50 th percentile allows Kellogg to recruit the best talent for the organization, while providing a good balance between paying for
performance and controlling our compensation expense. Once we set compensation at the 50 th percentile, actual pay will depend largely upon Kellogg’s
performance versus our operating plan budgets and in part upon our performance peer group. Again, the design drives pay for performance. Our 2015
“performance peer group” consists of food companies in the broader compensation peer group (Campbell Soup Co., ConAgra Foods, Inc., General Mills, Inc.,
The Hershey Co., Kraft Foods Group, Mondelēz International and PepsiCo Inc.), plus Danone S.A., The J.M. Smucker Co., McCormick & Co., Nestlé S.A. and
Unilever N.V. The performance peer companies were chosen because they most closely compete with Kellogg in the consumer marketplace and for investors’
dollars, and face similar business dynamics and challenges.
Process. Each year, the C&T Committee follows a consistent, rigorous process to determine compensation for the NEOs and other senior executives.
The following process occurs during several meetings over several months.
•
The independent compensation consultant presents the Committee with relevant compensation information such as a market assessment,
compensation peer group benchmarking data, information about other relevant market practices, and emerging trends.
•
The independent consultant makes recommendations to the Committee regarding target levels for total compensation and each pay element for the
CEO.
•
The CEO makes recommendations to the Committee regarding the performance and compensation for each NEO (other than himself).
•
The Committee reviews the information provided by the independent compensation consultant and the compensation recommendations at regular
meetings and in Executive Session.
•
Based on its review of performance versus our operating plan, performance against the performance peer group, individual performance, input from
the independent compensation consultant and other factors, the Committee makes recommendations to the independent members of the Board
regarding the compensation for the CEO and the other NEOs.
•
The independent members of the Board determine the compensation of the CEO and the other NEOs.
Verification Tools. The C&T Committee utilizes several tools to help verify that the design of our program is consistent with our Core Principles and
that the amount of compensation is within appropriate competitive parameters. For example, each year, the Committee reviews “pay tallies,” which includes a
detailed analysis of each NEO’s target and actual annual cash compensation, equity awards, retirement benefits, perquisites, change-in-control and severance
payments. The Committee also reviews wealth accumulation, which includes the projected value of each NEO’s equity awards and retirement benefits. This
analysis describes the amount of compensation each NEO has accumulated to date. In connection with this review, no unintended consequences or other
concerns of the compensation program design were discovered. In addition, the Committee concluded that the total compensation of the NEOs aligns pay
with performance and is appropriate and reasonable. In addition, our Committee uses a key financial metric, total shareowner return, as a tool to verify our
pay for performance connection.
IV. Compensation Plans and Design. NEO compensation includes a combination of annual cash and long-term incentive compensation. Annual cash
compensation for NEOs is comprised of base salary and the AIP. Long-term incentives consist of stock option grants and three-year EPP awards.
Total Compensation. The target for total compensation and each element of total compensation is the 50th percentile of our compensation peer group.
In setting the compensation for each NEO, the C&T Committee considers individual performance, experience in the role and contributions to achieving our
business strategy. We apply the same Core Principles
30
Source: KELLOGG CO, DEF 14A, March 10, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
and Compensation Approach in determining the compensation for all of our NEOs, including the CEO. The Committee also exercises appropriate business
judgment in how it applies the standard approaches to the facts and circumstances associated with each NEO.
At the time we set compensation, actual compensation percentiles for the preceding fiscal year are not available, so we are unable to compare actual to
target compensation on a percentile basis for our NEOs because of timing. The companies in our compensation peer group do not all report actual
compensation on the same twelve month basis. Even if this information were available, we do not believe it would provide Shareowners with a fair
understanding of our executive compensation program because actual compensation can be impacted by a variety of factors, including changes in stock
prices, company performance and vesting of retirement benefits.
Key elements of our 2015 NEO compensation program are as follows.
Performance /
Vesting Period (yrs.)
Element
Fixed
Performance Based
Other
Purpose
Compensates executives for their level of
responsibility and sustained individual
performance. Also, helps attract and retain
strong talent.
Characteristics
Base Salaries
—
Fixed component; evaluated annually.
Retirement Plans
Long-Term
Annual Incentives
(AIP)
1
Promotes achieving our annual corporate and
business unit financial goals, as well as
people safety, food safety and diversity and
inclusion.
Performance-based cash opportunity;
amount varies based on company and
business results, and individual
performance.
Long-Term
Incentives
(EPP and Options)
3
Promotes (a) achieving our long-term
corporate financial goals through the EPP and
(b) stock price appreciation through stock
options.
Performance-based equity opportunity;
amounts earned/realized will vary from
the targeted grant-date fair value based
on actual financial and stock price
performance.
Post-Termination
Compensation
—
Facilitates attracting and retaining high
caliber executives in a competitive labor
market in which formal severance plans are
common.
Contingent component; only payable if
the executive’s employment is
terminated under certain circumstances.
Provides an appropriate level of replacement Fixed component; however,
income upon retirement. Also, provides an
contributions tied to pay vary based on
incentive for a long-term career with Kellogg, performance.
which is a key objective.
Base Salaries. Base salaries for NEOs are targeted at the 50 th percentile of the compensation peer group, and are set based on an NEO’s experience,
proficiency, and sustained performance in role. The C&T Committee judged each NEO’s base salary for 2015 to be appropriately positioned relative to the
50th percentile based on this analysis. Annually, the C&T Committee evaluates whether to award base salary merit increases, including considering changes
in an NEO’s role and/or responsibility. In 2015, the NEOs received base salary merit increases that in the Committee’s view correctly positioned each NEO’s
salary relative to the 50 th percentile based on sustained performance.
Annual Incentives. Annual incentive awards to the NEOs are paid under the terms of the Kellogg Senior Executive Annual Incentive Plan ("AIP"),
which was approved by the Shareowners and is administered by the C&T Committee. Awards granted to NEOs under the terms of the AIP are intended to
qualify as performance-based compensation under Section 162(m) of the Internal Revenue Code. Once the targets for purposes of Section 162(m) are reached,
as was the case for fiscal 2015, the Committee uses a judgment-based methodology in exercising its discretion from the maximum payout
31
Source: KELLOGG CO, DEF 14A, March 10, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
level permitted under Section 162(m) to determine the actual payout for each NEO. Over the three performance years preceding 2015, the Company's
corporate AIP payouts have been below target, third or fourth quartile, payouts.
As part of its AIP methodology, at the beginning of fiscal 2015, the Committee established annual incentive opportunities for each NEO as a percentage
of the executive’s base salary (“AIP Target”). The AIP Targets for each NEO are based on the 50th percentile of the compensation peer group. Each year, the
Committee sets performance ranges (which we refer to as “bandwidths”) centered on performance targets for currency-neutral comparable operating profit,
currency-neutral comparable net sales, and cash flow to help determine what percentage of the AIP Target would be paid out to each NEO. The targets and
bandwidths are based on our operating plan for the fiscal year and are designed to achieve our objectives for sustainable, dependable growth. Targets are then
compared with the forecasted performance of the performance peer group to ensure that our operating plan targets are reasonable and challenging relative to
the forecasted performance for the performance peer group. Operating plan targets generally fall within the median range of forecasted performance for the
performance peer group with the maximum and minimum of the bandwidth falling generally within the top and bottom quartiles, respectively, of the
performance peer group forecast.
The actual percent of the AIP Target paid to our NEOs each year can range from 0% to 200% of the target opportunity, based primarily upon performance
against currency-neutral comparable operating profit, currency-neutral comparable net sales, cash flow, safety and diversity. Consistent with the 0% to 200%
bandwidth for the AIP payout relative to AIP Target, each performance metric similarly can have an impact above or below the 100% target depending on
performance against that metric, with the actual AIP payout capped at 200% of AIP Target.
The C&T Committee and management believe that by using the financial metrics of operating profit, net sales, and cash flow, Kellogg is encouraging
profitable top line growth and cash generation for Shareowners. The Committee and management further believe that the financial metrics should measure
comparable operating performance, as such measures provide a clearer view into the Company's underlying performance. Consequently, our measures of
currency-neutral comparable operating profit and currency-neutral comparable net sales used for the AIP exclude the impact of foreign currency translation,
mark-to-market adjustments, acquisitions, dispositions, transaction and integration costs associated with the acquisitions and investments in joint ventures,
costs related to Project K, and differences in shipping days. We also measure cash flow by reducing operating cash flow by an amount equal to Kellogg’s
capital expenditures. Currency-neutral comparable operating profit, currency-neutral comparable net sales, and cash flow are non-GAAP measures which will
differ from, for example, the GAAP measures of operating profit or net sales growth. In addition, the performance targets for currency-neutral comparable
operating profit growth and currency-neutral comparable net sales growth used in the AIP reflect certain budgeted assumptions relating to integration costs
and shipping day differences in our operating plan to facilitate year-to-year comparisons. As a result of the budgeted assumptions, performance reported in
our financial statements may differ from performance against our AIP performance targets.
In addition to operating results, each NEO is held accountable for achieving annual goals set at the start of the fiscal year relating to current
organizational capabilities and future organizational requirements. Consistent with our commitment to a balanced approach between individual performance
and adherence to our Core Principles, the NEOs are assessed both against their level of individual achievement against these agreed upon goals and the
alignment of their behavior in achieving those goals with our core values. We refer to this as balancing the “what” and the “how” of individual performance.
2015 AIP Payouts. The payout factor for the 2015 AIP is 121% of target, which is the formulaic result of the Company's performance against the targets
established at the beginning of the year for operating profit, net sales and cash flow. For our NEOs, 90% of their target opportunity consisted of currencyneutral comparable operating profit growth, currency-neutral comparable net sales growth and cash flow performance and are weighted 50%, 30% and 20%,
respectively. People safety, food safety and quality, and diversity and inclusion comprise the remaining 10% of target opportunity.
In 2015, the Company's focus was on taking the necessary actions to improve business trends, build momentum, and position the Company to return to
our long-term corporate targets in 2016 for net sales, operating profit, and earnings per share. The Company achieved these goals. Our overall trends in 2015
represented a significant year-over-year improvement and momentum built as the year progressed. The Company’s projections for performance in 2016
represent further improvement, building on the foundation created over the past two years. Specifically, the Company exceeded the 2015 AIP
32
Source: KELLOGG CO, DEF 14A, March 10, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
targets for currency-neutral comparable operating profit, currency-neutral comparable net sales, and cash flow. The Company built momentum in our key
businesses throughout the year, culminating with fourth quarter currency-neutral comparable net sales growth of 4.2% and currency-neutral comparable
operating profit growth of 2.8%. Our U.S. cereal business saw significant improvement throughout the year and ended the year with fourth quarter
consumption growth for the Kellogg brand of more than 2% and a category share gain of 70 basis points. The Company also announced 2016 guidance
consistent with our long-term corporate targets. Awards for the 2015 AIP are reflective of that performance.
•
Operating profit. The AIP performance target for currency-neutral comparable operating profit was a decline of 2.5%, which included a 4% negative
impact from the rebasing of incentive compensation. Without this headwind, the performance target would have been growth of 1.5%. The full-year
performance exceeded the target and was a decline of 2.3% which, without the impact from rebasing incentive compensation, would have been
growth of approximately 1.7%.
•
Net sales. The AIP performance target for currency-neutral comparable net sales was 0.5% growth, while full-year actual performance exceeded the
target with 1.2% growth.
Cash flow. The AIP performance target for cash flow was $1.0 billion, which took into account an approximately $350 million cash flow impact from
the execution of Project K. The Company's 2015 full-year performance exceeded the target with cash flow of $1.1 billion.
Overall, currency-neutral comparable operating profit, currency-neutral comparable net sales, and cash flow were all above expectations, and the
resulting AIP payout factor for the financial metrics was 124% of target.
For the non-financial metrics, objective and challenging performance targets were set at the beginning of the fiscal year for:
•
Food safety and quality measures. The Company was above target for the food safety and quality measures, with strong performance in quality and
food safety audits and a reduction in consumer complaints.
•
Diversity and inclusion. The Company continues its focus on diversity and inclusion as an important enabler to its business. In 2015, the Company
improved representation in key areas of the business and was recognized as a top company for diversity. Despite that, the Company was slightly
below target on the metrics established for this area.
•
People safety. The Company was below target on its challenging people safety metrics, but continues to see world-class levels of performance in
total recordable incidents and loss time incidents.
The AIP payout factor for the non-financial metrics was 90% of target.
The formulaic result of Kellogg’s performance against its financial and non-financial metrics is a payout factor of 121% of target. In exercising its
judgment-based methodology to ensure appropriate pay for the Company’s performance, the C&T Committee considered a number of factors, including:
•
actual performance against the targets;
•
performance versus the performance peer group;
•
total shareowner return;
•
alignment between estimated quartile performance and quartile payout;
•
launching zero-based budgeting in North America to provide additional financial visibility for the Company in the future; and
•
refreshing our strategy in 2015 and establishing our 2020 growth plan with specific growth goals and initiatives.
The 2015 performance is reflected in the fact that the Committee determined that our NEOs should receive a second quartile payout of 121% of target for
the 2015 AIP, before consideration for individual performance. The C&T Committee considered Mr. Norman’s individual performance in 2015, and awarded
him an AIP payout equal to 156% of his AIP Target. The Committee considered a number of factors in assessing Mr. Norman's individual performance,
including: his role in improving trends in the U.S. cereal business; his contributions to the Company’s overall growth strategy; and his leadership in the
Company’s implementation of zero-based budgeting in North America. The Committee also considered Mr. Pilnick's
33
Source: KELLOGG CO, DEF 14A, March 10, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
individual performance in 2015, and awarded him an AIP payout equal to 156% of his AIP Target. The Committee considered a number of factors in
assessing Mr. Pilnick's individual performance, including: his leadership role in refreshing the Company's strategy and establishing the 2020 growth plan
with specific growth goals and initiatives; the successful completion of several corporate development activities, including the Company's transformative
transaction in Western Africa; and his important role in key Project K initiatives.
The chart below includes information about the 2015 AIP for each NEO.
AIP Target
% of Base
Salary(1)
Name
John Bryant
Paul Norman
Ron Dissinger
Alistair Hirst
Gary Pilnick
165%
105%
100%
85%
90%
AIP Maximum
Amount($)
Amount($)
1,980,000
798,000
689,000
474,100
605,900
3,960,000
1,596,000
1,378,000
948,200
1,211,800
2015 AIP Payout (Paid in March 2016)
% of AIP
Target
121%
156%
121%
121%
156%
Amount of AIP
Payout ($)
2,395,800
1,244,900
833,700
573,700
945,200
(1) For AIP purposes, incentive opportunities are based on executives’ salary levels at the last day of the calendar year. Annual salary increases become
effective in April of each year.
Long-Term Incentives. Long-term incentives are provided to our executives under the 2013 Long-Term Incentive Plan ("LTIP"), which was approved
by our Shareowners. These incentives are intended to promote achieving our long-term corporate financial goals and earnings growth. The LTIP allows for
grants of stock options, stock appreciation rights, restricted shares and units and performance shares and units (such as EPP awards), and is intended to meet
the deductibility requirements of Section 162(m) of the Internal Revenue Code as performance-based pay (resulting in paid awards being tax deductible to
Kellogg). The total amount of long-term incentives for the NEOs (based on the grant date expected value) is targeted at the 50th percentile of the
compensation peer group.
All of the 2015 long-term incentive opportunity for the NEOs was provided through equity-based awards, which the C&T Committee believes best
achieves several of the Core Principles, including Pay for Performance and Shareowner Alignment. For 2015, the Committee determined that the NEOs would
receive approximately 50% of their total long-term incentive opportunity in stock options and the remaining 50% in performance shares (granted under the
EPP, as discussed below). The Committee established this mix of awards after considering our Core Principles, compensation peer group practices and cost
implications.
Executive Performance Plan. The EPP is a stock-based, pay for performance, multi-year incentive plan intended to focus senior management on
achieving critical multi-year operational goals. Performance under EPP is measured over a three-year performance period based on performance levels set at
the start of the period. The performance levels are based on our long-range operating plan, and are intended to be realistic and reasonable, but challenging, in
order to drive sustainable growth. The EPP contemplates the use of various metrics, as determined by the C&T Committee from time to time. The Committee
periodically changes the metrics as a way to ensure the business focuses on driving long-term value for our Shareowners. For the 2010-2012 EPP, 2011-2013
EPP, and 2012-2014 EPP, the payouts were below target, fourth quartile payouts.
•
2013-2015 EPP. The payout for the 2013-2015 EPP is 35% of target. For the 2013-2015 EPP, the metrics were currency-neutral comparable net
sales and currency-neutral comparable operating profit, which were chosen to drive key business goals and increase Shareowner value. Currencyneutral comparable net sales and currency-neutral comparable operating profit exclude the impact of foreign currency translation, mark-to-market
adjustments, acquisitions, dispositions, transaction and integration costs associated with acquisitions and investments in joint ventures, costs related
to Project K, and differences in shipping days. Vested EPP awards are paid in Kellogg common stock.
The 2013-2015 EPP performance period ended on January 2, 2016 (the last day of fiscal 2015). In February 2016, after Kellogg’s 2015 annual
audited financial statements were completed, the C&T Committee reviewed our
34
Source: KELLOGG CO, DEF 14A, March 10, 2016
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performance versus the net sales and operating profit growths target established in 2013 for purposes of Section 162(m). The Committee determined
that the target set for purposes of Section 162(m) had been reached. The Committee then considered other aspects of company performance and used
a judgment-based methodology in exercising its discretion to determine the actual payout for each NEO.
For the period covering fiscal years 2013-2015, Kellogg’s currency-neutral comparable net sales declined at a rate of 0.3% and currencyneutral comparable operating profit declined at a rate of 1.5%, which if unadjusted, would have resulted in a payout of up to 50% of the 2013 -2015
EPP target share amount. The Committee concluded that a payout of 35% of target was appropriate for the Company's performance during this
period after considering the financial performance as well as the following factors:
•
the total shareowner return for Kellogg of 41.4% from 2013 to 2015, placing Kellogg in the third quartile of our performance peer group;
•
payouts for similar programs for our compensation peer group; and
•
the execution of Project K, Kellogg’s four-year efficiency and effectiveness program announced in November 2013.
The 2013-2015 EPP awards vested in February 2016.
The chart below includes information about 2013-2015 EPP opportunities and actual payouts:
2013-2015 EPP Payout
(Paid in February 2016)
EPP Target Share
Amount (#)
Name
EPP Maximum Share
Amount (#)
% of EPP Target
Share Amount (#)
John Bryant
46,700
93,400
35%
16,345
Paul Norman
8,100
16,200
35%
2,835
Ron Dissinger
8,100
16,200
35%
2,835
Alistair Hirst
3,900
7,800
35%
1,365
Gary Pilnick
5,400
10,800
35%
1,890
Pre-tax Value
Realized ($)(1)
1,234,374
214,099
214,099
103,085
142,733
(1) The payout is calculated by multiplying the earned shares by the closing price of our common stock on February 19, 2016, which was $75.52 per share.
•
2015-2017 EPP. The C&T Committee reviews the EPP metrics annually and receives input on the metrics from Cook & Co. and through the
Company's Shareowner outreach program. For the 2015-2017 EPP, the metrics were changed to cumulative cash flow and relative total shareowner
return, which tie directly to the creation of Shareowner value.
Awards granted to NEOs under the terms of the EPP are intended to qualify as performance-based compensation under Section 162(m) of the Internal
Revenue Code. Once the Committee confirms the performance level delivered is at the level for which the NEOs are eligible to receive a payout
under the EPP, the Committee uses a judgment-based methodology in exercising its discretion to determine the actual payout for each NEO. The
Committee does not consider individual performance in determining payouts and instead weighs only Company performance when determining
actual payouts under the EPP.
In 2015, the Committee also set each individual’s target at 50% of his or her total long-term incentive opportunity. Participants in the EPP have the
opportunity to earn between 0% and 200% of their EPP target, however, dividends are not paid on unvested EPP awards. For the 2015-2017 EPP, the
erformance target for cumulative cash flow is $3.1 billion and total shareowner return relative to the relevant peer group at the 50th percentile. The
2015-2017 EPP cycle began on January 4, 2015 (first day of fiscal 2015) and concludes on December 30, 2017 (last day of fiscal 2017). The 20152017 EPP award opportunities, presented in number of potential shares that can be earned, are included in the Grant of Plan-Based Awards Table on
page 44 of this proxy statement.
35
Source: KELLOGG CO, DEF 14A, March 10, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
Stock Options. The C&T Committee believes stock options align NEOs with Shareowners because the options provide value to the NEO only if our
stock price increases after the grants are made. Stock option awards for our NEOs are determined on a position-by-position basis using proxy and survey data
for corresponding positions in our compensation peer group. Individual awards may vary from target levels based on the individual’s performance, ability to
impact financial performance and future potential. The exercise price for the options is set at the closing trading price on the date of grant. The minimum
vesting period for stock option awards to our NEOs is three years, with one-third of the stock option award vesting each year over the three-year period. Stock
options are exercisable for ten years after grant, which further drives Shareowner alignment by encouraging a focus on long-term growth and stock
performance.
The options granted in 2015 vest and become exercisable in three equal annual installments with one-third vesting on February 20, 2016 (the first
anniversary of the grant date), one-third vesting on February 20, 2017 (the second anniversary of the grant date) and the final third vesting on February 20,
2018 (the third anniversary of the grant date). The per-share exercise price for the stock options is $64.09, the closing trading price of Kellogg common stock
on the date of the grant. Approximately 84% of the stock options covered by the 2015 grant were made to employees other than the NEOs.
Other Long-Term Incentives.
•
Restricted Stock and Restricted Stock Units. We award restricted stock and restricted stock units from time to time to selected executives and
employees based on a variety of factors, including facilitating recruiting and retaining key executives. The Company’s practice when granting any
of these awards to NEOs is to provide a grant approximately equal to one times the employee’s base salary. For grants to NEOs, restricted stock
awards vest and become unrestricted after a three year post-grant holding period. In 2015, there were no restricted stock or restricted stock units
issued to the NEOs.
•
Post-Termination Compensation. The NEOs are covered by arrangements which specify payments in the event the executive’s employment is
terminated. These severance benefits, which are competitive with the compensation peer group and general industry practices, are payable if and
only if the executive’s employment is terminated without cause. The Kellogg Severance Benefit Plan and the Change of Control Policy have been
established primarily to attract and retain talented and experienced executives and further motivate them to contribute to our short- and long-term
success for the benefit of our Shareowners. Kellogg’s severance program is consistent with market practices, and cash severance for our grandfathered
NEOs is payable in the amount of two times the current annual salary plus two times target annual incentive awards prior to separation. In 2011, the
C&T Committee modified severance benefits for newly-named senior executives to more closely align with the 50 th percentile of our compensation
peer group. Cash severance for newly-named senior executives is now payable in the amount of two times the current annual salary. The potential
severance amount no longer includes annual incentive awards for newly-named senior executives. Cash compensation following a change in control
for NEOs is payable in the amount of two times the current annual salary plus two times the current target annual incentive award and a prorated
portion of the target annual incentive award for the current year. For more information, please refer to “Potential Post-Employment Payments,” which
begins on page 54 of this proxy statement.
•
Retirement Plans. Our NEOs are eligible to participate in Kellogg-provided pension plans which provide benefits based on years of service and pay
(salary plus annual incentive only) to a broad base of eligible employees. The amount of an employee’s base salary and annual incentive payout are
integral components of determining the benefits provided under pension and savings plan formulas, and thus, an individual’s performance over time
will influence the level of his or her retirement benefits. Amounts earned under long-term incentive programs such as EPP awards, gains from stock
options and awards of restricted stock or restricted stock units are not included when determining retirement benefits for any plan participants. In
addition, we do not pay above-market interest rates on amounts deferred under either our qualified or non-qualified savings and investment plans.
For more information, please refer to “Retirement and Non-Qualified Defined Contribution and Deferred Compensation Plans,” which begins on
page 50 of this proxy statement.
•
Perquisites. The C&T Committee believes that it has taken a conservative approach to perquisites. The Summary Compensation Table beginning on
page 40 of this proxy statement contains itemized disclosure of all perquisites to our NEOs, regardless of amount.
36
Source: KELLOGG CO, DEF 14A, March 10, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
•
Employee Stock Purchase Plan. We have a tax-qualified employee stock purchase plan that is made available to substantially all U.S. employees,
which allows participants to acquire Kellogg stock at a discounted price. The purpose of the plan is to encourage employees at all levels to purchase
stock and become Shareowners. The plan allows participants to buy Kellogg stock at a 5% discount to the market price. Under applicable tax law, no
plan participant may purchase more than $25,000 in market value, as defined in the plan, of Kellogg stock in any calendar year.
V. Compensation Policies.
Executive Stock Ownership Guidelines. In order to preserve the linkage between the interests of senior executives and those of Shareowners, senior
executives are expected to establish and maintain a significant level of direct stock ownership. This can be achieved in a variety of ways, including by
retaining stock received upon exercise of options or the vesting of stock awards (including EPP awards), participating in the Employee Stock Purchase Plan
and purchasing stock in the open market. The stock ownership requirement for our Chairman and CEO is six times annual base salary. The stock ownership
requirement for our other NEOs under our stock ownership guidelines is three times annual base salary. Our current stock ownership guidelines (minimum
requirements) are as follows:
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer
6x annual base salary
Named Executive Officers (other than the CEO)
3x annual base salary
Other senior executives
2-3x annual base salary depending on level
These executives have five years from the date they first become subject to a particular level of the guidelines or from the date of a material increase in
their base salary to meet them. For purposes of complying with our guidelines, stock considered owned includes shares owned outright, shares acquired
through the employee stock purchase plan, and 60% of unvested restricted stock and restricted stock units, and excludes unexercised stock options and
unvested EPP awards.
The Company has a holding period which requires that all of our NEOs hold all shares received from option or stock awards (including EPP awards) until
their respective ownership guideline is met. All of our NEOs currently meet their ownership guideline. The C&T Committee reviews compliance with the
guidelines on an annual basis.
Practices Regarding the Grant of Equity Awards. The C&T Committee has generally followed a practice of making all option grants to executive
officers on a single date each year. Prior to the relevant Committee meeting, the Committee reviews an overall stock option pool for all participating
employees and recommendations for individual option grants to executives. Based on this review, the Committee approves the overall pool and the
individual option grants to executives.
The Board grants these annual awards at its regularly-scheduled meeting in February. The February meeting usually occurs within a few weeks following
our final earnings release for the previous fiscal year. We believe that it is appropriate that annual awards be made at a time when material information
regarding our performance for the preceding year has been disclosed. We do not otherwise have any program, plan or practice to time annual option grants to
our executives in coordination with the release of material non-public information. EPP awards are granted at the same time as options.
While most of our option awards to NEOs have historically been made pursuant to our annual grant program, the Committee and Board retain the
discretion to make additional awards of options or restricted stock to executives at other times for recruiting or retention purposes. We do not have any
program, plan or practice to time “off-cycle” awards in coordination with the release of material non-public information.
All option awards made to our NEOs, or any of our other employees, are made pursuant to our LTIP. The exercise price of options under the LTIP is set at
the closing trading price on the date of grant. We do not have any program, plan or practice of awarding options and setting the exercise price based on the
stock’s price on a date other than the grant date, and we do not have a practice of determining the exercise price of option grants by using average prices (or
lowest prices) of our common stock in a period preceding, surrounding or following the grant date. All grants to NEOs are made by the Board itself and not
pursuant to delegated authority. Pursuant to authority delegated by the Board and subject to the Committee-approved allocation, awards of options to
employees below the executive level are made by our CEO or his delegates.
37
Source: KELLOGG CO, DEF 14A, March 10, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
Securities Trading Policy. Our securities trading policy prohibits our Directors, executives and other employees from engaging in any transaction in
which they may profit from short-term speculative swings in the value of our securities. This includes “short sales” (selling borrowed securities which the
seller hopes can be purchased at a lower price in the future) or “short sales against the box” (selling owned, but not delivered securities), “put” and “call”
options (publicly available rights to sell or buy securities within a certain period of time at a specified price or the like) and hedging transactions, such as
zero-cost collars and forward sale contracts. In addition, this policy is designed to ensure compliance with relevant SEC regulations, including insider trading
rules.
Clawback Policies. We maintain clawback provisions relating to stock options, AIP awards and EPP awards. Under the clawback provisions for stock
options, if an executive voluntarily leaves our employment to work for a competitor within one year after any option exercise, then the executive must repay
to Kellogg any gains realized from such exercise (but reduced by any tax withholding or tax obligations). Beginning with our stock option grants in 2009,
we have expanded the scope of our clawback provisions. In the event of fraud or misconduct causing a financial restatement, any gains realized from the
exercise of stock options are now subject to recoupment depending on the facts and circumstances of the event. Similarly, under our AIP and EPP terms and
conditions, in the event of fraud or misconduct causing a financial restatement, the AIP or EPP awards for the plan year of the restatement are subject to
recoupment depending on the facts and circumstances of the event.
Deductibility of Compensation and Other Related Issues. Section 162(m) of the Internal Revenue Code includes potential limitations on the
deductibility of compensation in excess of $1 million paid to the Company’s CEO and three other most highly compensated executive officers (other than
our principal financial officer) serving on the last day of the year. Based on the regulations issued by the Internal Revenue Service, we believe we have taken
the necessary actions to ensure the deductibility of payments under the AIP and with respect to stock options and performance shares granted under our plans,
whenever possible. We intend to continue to take the necessary actions to maintain the deductibility of compensation resulting from these types of awards. In
contrast, restricted stock and units granted under our plans generally do not qualify as “performance-based compensation” under Section 162(m). Therefore,
the vesting of restricted stock and units in some cases will result in a loss of tax deductibility of compensation. While we view preserving tax deductibility as
an important objective, we believe the primary purpose of our compensation program is to support our strategy and the long-term interests of our
Shareowners. In specific instances we have and in the future may authorize compensation arrangements that are not fully tax deductible but which promote
other important objectives of Kellogg and of our executive compensation program.
We require any executive base salary above $950,000 (after pre-tax deductions for benefits and similar items) to be deferred into deferred stock units
under our Executive Deferral Program. This policy ensures that all base salary will be deductible under Section 162(m) of the Internal Revenue Code. The
deferred amounts are credited to an account in the form of units that are equivalent to the fair market value of our common stock. The units are payable in
stock upon the executive’s termination from employment. The only NEO affected by this policy in 2015 was Mr. Bryant who deferred $158,000 of his salary.
The C&T Committee also reviews projections of the estimated accounting (pro forma expense) and tax impact of all material elements of the executive
compensation program. Generally, accounting expense is accrued over the requisite service period of the particular pay element (generally equal to the
performance period) and Kellogg realizes a tax deduction upon the approval of the payout or payment to the executive.
38
Source: KELLOGG CO, DEF 14A, March 10, 2016
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COMPENSATION AND TALENT MANAGEMENT COMMITTEE REPORT
As detailed in its charter, the C&T Committee oversees our compensation program on behalf of the Board. In the performance of its oversight function,
the Committee, among other things, reviewed and discussed with management the Compensation Discussion and Analysis set forth in this proxy statement.
Based upon the review and discussions referred to above, the Committee recommended to the Board that the Compensation Discussion and Analysis be
included in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended January 2, 2016 and our proxy statement to be filed in connection with our 2016
Annual Meeting of Shareowners, each of which will be filed with the SEC.
COMPENSATION AND TALENT MANAGEMENT COMMITTEE
John Dillon, Chair
Gordon Gund
Ann McLaughlin Korologos
Cynthia Milligan
Rogelio Rebolledo
Carolyn Tastad
39
Source: KELLOGG CO, DEF 14A, March 10, 2016
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EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION
Summary Compensation Table.
The following narrative, tables and footnotes describe the “total compensation” earned during 2015, 2014 and 2013 by our NEOs. The total
compensation presented below does not reflect the actual compensation received by our NEOs or the target compensation of our NEOs in 2015, 2014 and
2013. The actual value realized by our NEOs in 2015 from long-term incentives (options and 2012-2014 EPP) is presented in the Option Exercises and Stock
Vested Table on page 48 of this proxy statement. Target annual and long-term incentive awards for 2015 are presented in the Grant of Plan-Based Awards
Table beginning on page 44 of this proxy statement.
The individual components of the total compensation calculation reflected in the Summary Compensation Table are broken out below:
Salary. Base salary earned during 2015. Refer to “Compensation Discussion and Analysis — Compensation Plans and Design — Base Salaries.”
Bonus. We did not pay any discretionary bonuses to our NEOs in 2015. Each NEO earned an annual performance-based cash incentive under our AIP,
as discussed below under “Non-Equity Incentive Plan Compensation.” Refer to “Compensation Discussion and Analysis — Compensation Plans and Design
— Annual Incentives.”
Stock Awards. The awards disclosed under the heading “Stock Awards” consist of EPP awards and restricted stock unit awards. The dollar amounts for
the awards represent the grant-date fair value calculated in accordance with FASB ASC Topic 718 for each NEO. Refer to Notes 1 and 8 to the Consolidated
Financial Statements included in our annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended January 2, 2016. Details about the EPP awards granted in 2015 are
included in the Grant of Plan-Based Awards Table below. Refer to “Compensation Discussion and Analysis —Compensation Plans and Design — Long-Term
Incentives” for additional information. The grant-date fair value of the stock-based awards will likely vary from the actual amount the NEO receives. The
actual value the NEO receives will depend on the number of shares earned and the price of our common stock when the shares vest.
Option Awards. The awards disclosed under the heading “Option Awards” consist of annual option grants (each an “option”). The dollar amounts for
the awards represent the grant-date fair value calculated in accordance with FASB ASC Topic 718 for each NEO. Refer to Notes 1 and 8 to the Consolidated
Financial Statements included in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended January 2, 2016. Details about the option awards made during
2015 are included in the Grant of Plan-Based Awards Table below. Refer to “Compensation Discussion and Analysis —Compensation Plans and Design —
Long-Term Incentives — Stock Options” for additional information. The grant-date fair value of the stock option awards will likely vary from the actual
value the NEO receives. The actual value the NEO receives will depend on the number of shares exercised and the price of our common stock on the date
exercised.
Non-Equity Incentive Plan Compensation. The amount of Non-Equity Incentive Plan Compensation consists of the Kellogg Senior Executive AIP
awards granted and earned in 2015, 2014 and in 2013. At the outset of each year, the C&T Committee grants AIP awards to the NEOs. Such awards are based
on our performance each year and are paid in March following the completed year. For information on these awards refer to “Compensation Discussion and
Analysis — Compensation Plans and Design — Annual Incentives.”
Change in Pension Value. The amounts disclosed under the heading “Change in Pension Value and Non-Qualified Deferred Compensation Earnings”
represent the actuarial increase during 2015, 2014 and 2013 in the pension value provided under the pension plans. Kellogg does not pay above-market or
preferential rates on non-qualified deferred compensation for employees, including the NEOs. A detailed narrative and tabular discussion about our pension
plans and non-qualified deferred compensation plans, our contributions to our pension plans and the estimated actuarial increase in the value of our pension
plans are presented under the heading “Retirement and Non-Qualified Defined Contribution and Deferred Compensation Plans.”
40
Source: KELLOGG CO, DEF 14A, March 10, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
Director and Officer Liability, Travel Accident and Group Personal Excess Insurance. Director and officer liability insurance (“D&O Insurance”)
insures our NEOs against certain losses that they are legally required to pay as a result of their actions while performing duties on our behalf. Travel accident
insurance provides benefits to our NEOs in the event of death or disability (permanent and total) during travel on Kellogg corporate aircraft. Group personal
excess insurance insures our NEOs for damages that an NEO is required to pay for personal injury or property damage in excess of damages covered by
underlying insurance. Our D&O Insurance, travel accident insurance, and group personal excess insurance cover employees and others in addition to NEOs
and do not break out the premium by covered individual or groups of individuals and, therefore, a dollar amount cannot be assigned for individual NEOs.
All Other Compensation. Consistent with our emphasis on performance-based pay, perquisites and other compensation are limited in scope and in
2015 were primarily comprised of retirement benefit contributions and the cost of death benefits.
41
Source: KELLOGG CO, DEF 14A, March 10, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
Summary Compensation Table
It is important to note that the information required by the Summary Compensation Table does not necessarily reflect the target or actual compensation
for our NEOs in 2015, 2014 and 2013.
Name and Principal Position
John Bryant
Chairman and Chief
Executive Officer
Paul Norman
Senior Vice President,
President, Kellogg North
America
Ron Dissinger
Senior Vice President and
Chief Financial Officer
Alistair Hirst
Senior Vice President,
Global Supply Chain
Gary Pilnick
Vice Chairman, Corporate
Development and Chief
Legal Officer
Year
Salary
($)
Bonus
($)
Stock Awards
($)(1)(2)
Option Awards
($)(3)
Non-Equity
Incentive Plan
Compensation
($)
Change in Pension
Value and NonQualified Deferred
Compensation
Earnings
($)(4)
2015
1,200,004
—
3,293,528
2,034,560
2,395,800
821,000
2014
1,192,156
—
2,443,060
2,475,876
1,386,000
1,629,000
2013
1,150,768
—
2,525,069
2,038,456
1,591,600
544,000
2015
751,630
—
963,256
593,912
1,244,900
2014
718,838
—
448,615
598,968
557,200
2013
698,950
—
1,055,060
472,234
681,600
2015
684,500
—
784,448
484,704
833,700
2014
665,000
—
443,210
592,596
515,500
2013
638,462
—
1,011,372
469,119
2015
552,770
—
507,584
2014
513,838
—
2013
424,998
2015
All Other
Compensation
($)(5)
Total ($)
126,315
9,871,207
137,009 (7)
9,263,101
113,979
7,963,872
1,387,000
168,683
5,109,381
1,353,000
1,211,094
4,887,715
1,515,908
4,423,752
1,080,000
132,073
3,999,425
1,465,000
176,948
3,858,254
689,000
1,207,000
127,403
4,142,356
312,664
573,700
842,000
57,364
2,846,082
308,085
408,516
510,300
2,097,000
58,710
3,896,449
—
210,873
228,641
496,400
1,182,000
49,983
2,592,895
670,540
—
599,872
368,764
945,200
429,000
71,947
3,085,323
2014
659,000
—
345,920
458,784
458,500
526,000
72,675
2,520,879
2013
635,228
—
865,383
312,746
532,400
54,133
2,399,890
— (6)
— (6)
(1) Reflects the grant-date fair value of stock awards calculated in accordance with FASB ASC Topic 718 for each NEO. Refer to Notes 1 and 8 to the
Consolidated Financial Statements included in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended January 2, 2016 for a discussion of the relevant
assumptions used in calculating the fair value. The table below presents separately the grant-date fair value for our EPP awards and restricted stock unit
awards:
Name
Year
John Bryant
2015
2014
2013
2015
2014
2013
2015
2014
2013
2015
2014
2013
2015
2014
2013
Paul Norman
Ron Dissinger
Alistair Hirst
Gary Pilnick
EPP ($)
3,293,528
2,443,060
2,525,069
963,256
448,615
437,967
784,448
443,210
437,967
507,584
308,085
210,873
599,872
345,920
291,978
RSU ($)
—
—
—
—
—
617,093
—
—
573,405
—
—
—
—
—
573,405
Total ($)
3,293,528
2,443,060
2,525,069
963,256
448,615
1,055,060
784,448
443,210
1,011,372
507,584
308,085
210,873
599,872
345,920
865,383
42
Source: KELLOGG CO, DEF 14A, March 10, 2016
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except to the extent such damages or losses cannot be limited or excluded by applicable law. Past financial performance is no guarantee of future results.
(2) If the highest level of performance conditions are achieved, then the grant-date fair value of the stock awards for each NEO is as follows, Mr. Bryant:
$6,587,056, $4,886,120, and $5,050,138 for 2015, 2014, and 2013, respectively; Mr. Norman: $1,926,512, $897,230, and $875,934 for 2015, 2014, and
2013, respectively; Mr. Dissinger, $1,568,896, $886,420, and $875,934 for 2015, 2014, and 2013, respectively; Mr. Pilnick: $1,199,744, $691,840, and
$583,956 for 2015, 2014, and 2013, respectively; and Mr. Hirst: $1,015,168, $616,170 and $421,746 for 2015, 2014 and 2013, respectively.
(3) Represents the grant-date fair value calculated in accordance with FASB ASC Topic 718 for each NEO for stock option grants. Refer to Notes 1 and 8 to
the Consolidated Financial Statements included in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended January 2, 2016 for a discussion of the
relevant assumptions used in calculating the grant-date fair value.
(4) Solely represents the actuarial increase during 2015 (for 2015 compensation), 2014 (for 2014 compensation) and 2013 (for 2013 compensation) in the
pension value provided under the U.S. Pension Plans for each NEO as we do not pay above-market or preferential earnings on non-qualified deferred
compensation. The calculation of actuarial present value is generally consistent with the methodology and assumptions outlined in our audited financial
statements, except that benefits are reflected as payable as of the date the executive is first entitled to full unreduced benefits (as opposed to the assumed
retirement date) and without consideration of pre-retirement mortality. A variety of factors impact the actuarial increase in present value (pension value).
In 2015, the primary factors impacting the pension value include increases in age, service, and pay, and changes in the discount rate.
(5) The table below presents an itemized account of “All Other Compensation” provided in 2015 to the NEOs. Consistent with our emphasis on
performance-based pay, perquisites and other compensation are limited in scope.
Name
Kellogg
Contributions to
S&I and
Restoration
Plans(a) ($)
John Bryant
Paul Norman
Ron Dissinger
Alistair Hirst
Gary Pilnick
103,440
52,353
48,000
42,523
45,162
Company Paid
Death Benefit (b)
($)
Financial
Planning
Assistance(c) ($)
16,875
16,259
77,448
11,934
13,365
6,000
6,000
2,975
2,907
6,000
NonBusiness
Aircraft
Usage(d)
($)
—
—
—
—
—
Physical
Exams(e)
($)
—
14,930
3,650
—
7,420
International
Relocation and
Assignment (f)($)
—
79,141
—
—
—
Total
($)
126,315
168,683
132,073
57,364
71,947
(a) For information about our Savings & Investment Plan and Restoration Plan, refer to “Retirement and Non-Qualified Defined Contribution and
Deferred Compensation Plans — Non-Qualified Deferred Compensation” beginning on page 52.
(b) Annual cost for Kellogg-paid life insurance, Kellogg-paid accidental death and dismemberment, and Executive Survivor Income Plan (Kellogg
funded death benefit provided to executive employees). This benefit has not been provided to new participants after December 31, 2010.
(c) Reflects reimbursement for financial and tax planning assistance.
(d) The incremental cost of Kellogg aircraft used for a non-business flight is calculated by multiplying the aircraft’s hourly variable operating cost by a
trip’s flight time, which includes any flight time of an empty return flight. Variable operating costs include: (1) landing, parking, passenger ground
transportation, crew travel and flight planning services expenses; (2) supplies, catering and crew traveling expenses; (3) aircraft fuel and oil
expenses; (4) maintenance, parts and external labor (inspections and repairs); and (5) any customs, foreign permit and similar fees. Fixed costs that
do not vary based upon usage are not included in the calculation of direct operating cost. On certain occasions, an NEO or an NEO’s spouse or other
family member may fly on the corporate aircraft as additional passengers. No additional direct operating cost is incurred in such situations under the
foregoing methodology because the costs would not be incremental. Kellogg does not pay its NEOs any amounts in respect of taxes (so called gross
up payments) on income imputed to them for non-business aircraft usage.
43
Source: KELLOGG CO, DEF 14A, March 10, 2016
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(e) Actual cost of a physical health exam.
(f) As a global organization, senior executives are located in key business centers around the world. To facilitate the assignment of experienced
employees to support the business, we provide for the reimbursement of certain expenses incurred as a result of their international relocation and
assignment. The objective of this program is to manage through disruption and ensure that the employees not be financially disadvantaged or
advantaged in a meaningful way as a result of the relocation. Mr. Norman was relocated to our offices in Switzerland in September 2012 to manage
our European operations and has returned to the U.S. The payment of the following expenses is pursuant to our reimbursement policy on relocation
and temporary international assignment, applicable to eligible employees who relocate at the request of Kellogg: relocation related payments
($11,128) to address the incremental cost of moving, housing, living and other associated costs; and tax equalization and other payments ($68,013)
to ensure that Mr. Norman bears a tax burden that would be comparable to his U.S. tax burden on income that is not related to the international
relocation and temporary assignment. Mr. Norman remains financially responsible for the amount of taxes he would have incurred if he had
continued to live and work in the U.S.
In addition to the foregoing compensation, the NEOs also participated in health and welfare benefit programs, including vacation and medical, dental,
prescription drug and disability coverage. These programs are generally available and comparable to those programs provided to