acslpa newsletter - Alberta College of Speech

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acslpa newsletter - Alberta College of Speech
ACSLPA NEWSLETTER
Spring 2013
www.acslpa.ab.ca
Volume 38, No. 1
From the President...
Inside this Issue…
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From the President
Registrar/CEO’s Report
Council Meeting Highlights
2013 ACSLPA Conference Update
Results of Professional Conduct Hearing –
Summer 2012
Alberta Government Budget 2013 Includes
Funds for UNHS!
ACSLPA Completes Two Government
Funded Projects!
Report on Non-pharmacological Sleep
Interventions for Persons Diagnosed With
Dementia Now Available
Use of the Protected Title ‘Doctor’
Annual Continuing Competence Program
(CCP) Review
ACSLPA Council Approves Competence
Program Changes
It’s That Time of Year Again...ACSLPA
Celebrates May Month!
Do You Want to Shape the Future of Your
Profession?
Celebrating May Month
Health Council of Canada
Clinical Conundrum
A Hotspot for Contemporary SLP Practice:
Using the iPad in Therapy With Adults
Apps Update
What’s On Your Nightstand?
News from the University of Alberta
Upcoming Events
Update from CASLPA
Private Chat – ASAPP
ACSLPA
#209, 3132 Parsons Road • Edmonton, AB T6N 1L6
Ph: 780-944-1609 • 1-800-537-0589
Fax: 780-408-3925
[email protected] • www.acslpa.ab.ca
Anne Assaly, Registrar/CEO
Susan Rafaat, Director of Professional Practice
Holly Gusnowsky, Director of Professional Practice
Susan Kraft, Registration Coordinator
Jo Daugherty, Executive Assistant
Leanne Kisilevich, Administrative Assistant
I
t is with extreme gratitude that I write to you as your
current ACSLPA Council President. It has been nine
years since I last volunteered in this role and a lot has
changed:
 In 2004, Facebook was launched as a social
networking site for students at Harvard. Today,
Facebook has over 410 million users including many
people who haven’t graduated from grade school yet
let alone college, as well as folks who are well past
college dating age. The intervening years have seen
the purpose of Facebook morph and has changed
the way people network. What future are we
attempting to prepare the children and students of
today for?
 In 2004, technological advancements brought us the
fourth generation classic iPod and the first iPod mini.
Over the intervening nine years we have moved
through two more generations of Classics, two Minis,
seven Nanos, four Shuffles, and five Touch iPods.
Technology of every sort has evolved over the past
decade and it has shaped both our assessments
and our treatments; as evidenced by the fact that
many of you now use a range of ‘apps’ in your
service delivery. How will future technology changes
continue to change our work?
 In 2004, Martha Stewart was in the news as a
convicted felon sentenced to five months in prison
and Lance Armstrong was at the top of his game,
winning an unprecedented sixth consecutive Tour de
France cycling title. Of course, time has revealed a
reversal of fortunes for Martha and Lance, which
serves to remind us that you never know what life
has in store for you. In July 2012, my husband of
27 years died very unexpectedly, changing the
trajectory of my life. However, this loss also served
to remind me of how much I have to be grateful for.
Thank you to all of the amazing people who took
care of my daughter and I during this difficult time.
You will never know how much your thoughts,
prayers, and cards meant to us. What blessings are
you grateful for?
Spring 2013 ACSLPA Newsletter
(continued on p. 5)
Registrar/CEO’s Report
A
s spring approaches, ACSLPA already has a
good amount to report in terms of the many
activities and initiatives currently underway at the
College.
Registration renewal was a busy time for ACSLPA, but
overall went quite smoothly, thanks to our online
registration system. This was the second year using the
system,
with
Continuing
Competence
Program
submission being implemented with the 2013 registration
renewal. Thank you to those members who provided
valuable feedback during the registration renewal
process, allowing us to make continued improvements to
the system.
This year, ACSLPA renewed a total of 1,378 registrants,
as compared to 1,274 in 2012. Once again, the majority
of ACSLPA members (90.5%) took advantage of the
early bird rate. ACSLPA continues to grow, as shown in
the charts below.
Planning is well underway for the 2013
ACSLPA Conference being held in
Edmonton, Alberta on October 24–25.
ACSLPA staff and the Conference
Speaker Advisory Panel have been hard
at work and have already confirmed a number of leading
edge speakers who will focus on neuroplasticity, and
implications for therapy, therapists and clients. Further
information is available in this newsletter on page 4 and
will continue to be made available in upcoming
newsletters and on the ACSLPA website. Be sure to
save these dates and plan to attend!
ACSLPA was pleased to inform members that the Alberta
Government Budget 2013 committed funds for a new
Universal Newborn Hearing Screening (UNHS)
program. After many years of expressing our concerns
and presenting the evidence supporting early detection of
hearing loss, all babies and their families in Alberta will
finally benefit from a UNHS program in our province. For
further information, please see page 5.
Spring means that May Month is approaching. All
ACSLPA members are encouraged to participate in May
Month activities and to promote public awareness of
speech and hearing issues. For further information and
links to May Month resources, please see page 9.
ACSLPA registered a record number of new members in
2012, and renewed a record number of registrations for
2013. Alberta continues to be a leader in terms of
availability of employment opportunities for SLPs and
audiologists.
Detailed registration statistics will be
included in the 2012 Annual Report which is expected to
be released in late April 2013.
Shortly after registration renewal, the Continuing
Competence Committee got busy conducting the annual
random review of member programs. The results of this
review are summarized on page 7. In addition, a
comprehensive review of the entire Continuing
Competence Program (CCP) was conducted during
2012, including a literature review, benchmarking,
member survey and stakeholder consultation. A report
and recommendations for revisions to the program based
on research and evidence-based practice were
developed, and approved by Council at their January 19,
2013 meeting. Implementation of these recommendations
will ensure that the CCP, which is a requirement under
legislation, is based on the most current research, and is
relevant and meaningful to members.
For further
information, please see page 8.
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Work continues on a number of project and initiatives, as
driven by legislation and/or the strategic plan.
Examples include advanced practice, advocating for the
role of SLPs in capacity assessment, and seeking the
ability for audiologists to refer directly to ENTs. Plans are
also in place to update the standards of practice, develop
jurisprudence training materials and initiate a public
awareness campaign. Further information will become
available in the months to come.
As of December 31, 2012, I finished a three-year term as
Chair of the Canadian Alliance of Audiology and
Speech-Language Pathology Regulators (CAASPR).
Diane O’Connor, Registrar of the College of Speech
Hearing Health Professionals of British Columbia,
assumed the role of Chair in 2013. CAASPR has very
successfully completed the first year of a federally funded
three-year project to develop a competency assessment
framework for SLPs and audiologists. The next meeting
of CAASPR will be in Victoria, British Columbia, in
conjunction with the CASLPA Conference.
As always, I welcome your calls and emails. If you have
any issues that you would like to discuss, please feel free
to contact me at the ACSLPA office.
Anne Assaly
Registrar/CEO
Spring 2013 ACSLPA Newsletter
Council Meeting Highlights
T
he highlights from the most recent Council
Meeting, held on January 19, 2013 are as follows:
 2013 Council members were welcomed and oriented
to their role as Council members.
 Council sub-committees were assigned as follows:
Internal:
 Finance Committee: Treasurer, Sara Turner
(Chair); President, Laura Manz; Councillor
without Portfolio, Naomi Beswick; Public
Member,
Pat
Eisler;
Registrar/CEO,
Anne Assaly (ex-officio)
 Executive Committee: Past President, Mandy
Watson (Chair); President,
Laura Manz;
President Elect, Cindy Pruden; Treasurer, Sara
Turner (as financial liaison)
 Nominations Committee:
President Elect,
Cindy Pruden; Councillor without Portfolio,
Sarah Blenkhorn
External:
 PanCanadian Alliance: Director of Professional
Practice, Susan Rafaat; President, Laura Manz
or designate
 CAASPR:
Registrar/CEO, Anne
President, Laura Manz or designate
Assaly;
 The financial reports for the third quarter to
September 30, 2012 were approved.
 The financial reports for the fourth quarter, to
December 31, 2012, were reviewed.
 An update was provided on the Strategic Plan
2012–2014.
 Council approved the following revised or new policies:
 Policy 5.10 Employee Leave (Revised)
 Policy 7.10 Professional Development Funding
(Revised)
 Policy 7.20 ACSLPA Conference Attendance

Expense (Revised)
Policy 7.30 Conference Speaker Designations
(Revised)
 Policy 7.40 Conference Memorial Speaker
Designations (New)
Policy 7.50 ACSLPA Conference Planning (New)

 Policy 7.60 ACSLPA Awards Program (New)
 Revisions to the ACSLPA Organization Chart were
 The report and recommendations of the Continuing
Competence Program Review were approved in
principle; Council requested an implementation plan
to address priorities and resource allocations
required to sustain the recommended program
changes.
 Council
began review of the report and
recommendations of the Advanced Practice
Committee; further discussion was deferred to the
next Council meeting.
 Council approved scheduling the 2014 ACSLPA
Conference in Banff.
 Discussion occurred surrounding some of the
challenges encountered by the Hearings Director
when attempting to find suitable hearing tribunal
members for hearings when the investigated person,
complainant and/or witnesses are all employed by
the same employer.
 The following ACSLPA members were appointed by
Council as new Hearing Tribunal Members:




Elizabeth Kelly, R.SLP
Michelle Craig, R.SLP
Anne Lopushinsky, R.SLP
Nausheen Khan, R.SLP
 Council was provided with an update regarding the
following government funded projects which were
completed:
 Development and Implementation of Online
Resources to Assist Internationally Educated
applicants in the Process of Successfully
Obtaining Registration in Alberta
 Development
of Resources to Support
Successful Outcomes for Internationally
Educated Registrants completing Supervised
Practice Requirements
 Council was provided with an update on groundwork
completed as the first phase of a public awareness
initiative. Council approved funding from the
unrestricted reserve for the purpose of implementing
a public awareness plan.
 Council approved funding from the unrestricted
reserve for the purpose of updating ACSLPA’s
standards of practice and development of
jurisprudence education materials.
 Council Meeting dates for the remainder of 2013
were set for April 6, June 8 and September 14.
approved.
Spring 2013 ACSLPA Newsletter
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2013 ACSLPA Conference Update
C
ome and meet with your colleagues from across
the province for an inspiring two days of learning,
networking, and thought-provoking discussion and
reflection! At this year’s conference we welcome an
outstanding array of speakers with a focus on
neuroplasticity and implications for SLPs and audiologists
alike. Here is a sample of our stellar line-up:
Join us in welcoming our opening keynote
speaker, Barbara Arrowsmith Young,
author of The Woman Who Changed Her
Brain: And Other Inspiring Stories of
Pioneering Brain Transformation. Barbara
was born with severe learning disabilities
and she combines her own personal tale
with riveting case histories from her more
than 30 years of working with both children
and adults. Barbara founded Arrowsmith
School in Toronto in 1980 followed by the
Arrowsmith Program to train teachers and
to implement her teaching methodology in
schools across North America. She will open our
conference with a short session that sets the tone for the
sessions to follow.
Also confirmed is Dr. Martha Burns, a clinical SLP by
training, who presents extensively within North America
and internationally on neuroplasticity and the clinical
implications for rehabilitation professionals. Dr. Burns will
address topics such as neuroplasticity and autism
spectrum disorders, auditory processing disorders,
sensory integration in children, as well as stroke and
traumatic brain injury in adults. Thursday’s program will
be devoted to pediatrics, and Friday’s program will be
devoted to adults. Audiologists may also
find Thursday’s session of interest.
Specifically in the audiology arena, we
are pleased to present Dr. Dennis
Phillips from Dalhousie University.
Dr. Phillips is a neuroscientist with a
focus on auditory processing disorders
and hearing science. Dr. Phillips recently
spoke at an American Academy of
Audiology (AAA) conference and comes
highly recommended.
And for those SLPs with a functional
bent, Dr. Teresa Ukrainetz from the
University of Wyoming joins us on Friday for a
school-aged focus on language and learning.
We hope this sampling of presenters has whet your
appetite. There is more to come!! Mark October 24
and 25 on your calendars and stay tuned for future
E-News and newsletter updates!
Results of Professional Conduct Hearing – Summer 2012
A
hearing was held into the professional conduct of
an ACSLPA member in summer 2012. The
Hearing Tribunal, consisting of two ACSLPA
registered speech-language pathologists and a public
member (from a list approved by the provincial
government) determined that the information regarding
this matter will be published in a non-identifying form in
the ACSLPA Newsletter or appropriate communication
tool for the purpose of educating ACSLPA members.
A written complaint was received in April 2011 from the
parent of a preschool client regarding the conduct of a
speech-language pathologist (SLP), alleging that the SLP
put the client in serious harm’s way. An investigation was
conducted into the matter and based on the results of the
investigation, the matter was referred to a hearing. The
Hearing Tribunal found that the following allegations were
proven: following a speech-therapy treatment session in
the home of the complainant, the member left a preschool
child in her home, unattended, without confirming that a
parent, guardian or other adult was in the house or
ensuring that a parent, guardian or other adult was aware
that the SLP was leaving.
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The Hearing Tribunal determined the following: the
member would be reprimanded; the member would be
required to provide a signed declaration confirming
review of the ACSLPA Code of Ethics and Standards of
Practice; and, the member would be required to pay
$1,500 towards the cost of the investigation and hearing.
(NOTE: Total costs for the investigation and hearing were
$18,300.51.)
The Hearing Tribunal imposed the Order with the primary
goal of public protection in mind, but also with the
important goal (providing that it would not compromise
the protection of the public) of creating conditions that
would allow the SLP to return to a full and productive
career as a SLP.
Note: Most regulatory bodies of audiology and speech-language
pathology (as well as other health professions) in Canada and
the United States publish the outcomes of Professional Conduct
Hearings in accordance with their governing legislation.
Spring 2013 ACSLPA Newsletter
From the President... (cont’d)
(continued from p. 1)
 As a college, we have matured and become a
leader provincially and nationally. Last year we
celebrated our 10th anniversary and this year we
celebrate the recent government announcement of
support for universal newborn hearing screening
in Alberta.
 As professionals, we make a good standard of
living while being able to work in service to others.
There is no nobler calling than to serve others.
 As individuals, we get the privilege of working with
people (young and old, urban and rural, directly
and indirectly, in a variety of settings) and the
possibility of having a life-altering impact on those
lives. Whose life have you touched?
In May 2013, let’s celebrate our clients, our services, our
professions, our successes, and our opportunities to
continue to grow. We have much to be proud of!
Laura Manz, R.SLP
ACSLPA President
Alberta Government Budget 2013 Includes Funds for UNHS!
A
CSLPA is pleased to inform all members that the
new Alberta Government Budget 2013, released
on March 7, 2013, has committed funds for a new
Universal Newborn Hearing Screening (UNHS) Program
for the province! A news release from the Alberta
Government stated, “The health of young Albertans will
be improved through an early childhood development
investment of $8 million, which will include a new
Universal Newborn Hearing Screening
program…”. To view the full press release
please visit: Alberta Government News
Release (http://tinyurl.com/adqczyn)
Thank you to everyone who championed this cause!
ACSLPA Completes Two Government Funded Projects!
D
uring 2012, ACSLPA was successful in obtaining
$120,000 in government grant funding through
the Alberta Employment and Immigration Foreign
Qualification Recognition Innovation Fund. The following
projects were completed with the grant funds:
1. Development and Implementation of Online
Resources to Assist Internationally Educated
Applicants (IEAs) in the Process of Successfully
Obtaining Registration in Alberta
2. Development of Resources to Support Successful
Outcomes for Internationally Educated Registrants
(IERs)
Completing
Supervised
Practice
Requirements
Grant funds of $34,000 were allocated to this
project; funds were used to develop a series of
learning modules and downloadable forms for both
IERs and their supervisors.
Grant funds of $86,000 were allocated to this
project; funds were used for implementation of the
online registration system and additional
enhancements that would allow IEAs to monitor
their progress in the registration application
process.
Report on Non-pharmacological Sleep Interventions for Persons
Diagnosed With Dementia Now Available
I
n March 2012, ACSLPA members were invited to
participate in a national survey of health care
providers’ use of non-pharmacological sleep
interventions for persons with dementia. The survey was
conducted by the Sleep and Function Interdisciplinary
Group (SAFIG) at the University of Alberta (with support
from Addiction and Mental Health: Alberta Health
Services).
The results have been analyzed and a report is now
available. To view the report, please visit: www.sleepdementia-resources.ualberta.ca – on the bottom left side of
the home page you will see a button labeled 'NEW..." click
here for the full report.
Spring 2013 ACSLPA Newsletter
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Use of the Protected Title ‘Doctor’
U
nder Section 128 of the Health Professions Act
(HPA) and Section 18(3) of the SpeechLanguage
Pathologists
and
Audiologists
Profession Regulation, registered audiologists and
speech-language pathologists with doctoral degrees
from approved programs may use the protected title
‘Doctor’ or ‘Dr.’ in association with providing a health
service.
Doctoral degrees should only be cited in the individual’s
professional qualifications if the area of study is in
audiology and/or speech-language pathology. The
following is strongly recommended when using an
approved
doctoral
qualification
in
written
correspondence:
For an AuD degree:
Jane Smith, AuD, R.Aud
Doctor of Audiology, Registered Audiologist
What Constitutes a Health Service?
“Health service” is defined in the HPA as follows:
“a service provided to people
(i)
(ii)
(iii)
(iv)
For other doctoral degrees:
to protect, promote or maintain their health,
to prevent illness,
to diagnose, treat or rehabilitate, or
to take care of the health needs of the ill,
disabled, injured or dying.”
What is the Process for Becoming Authorized to Use
the Protect Title ‘Doctor’?
All registered audiologists and speech-language
pathologists with doctoral degrees must provide
ACSLPA with evidence of the doctoral education and
have written authorization from the College to use the
title ‘Doctor’ or ‘Dr.’ in association with providing a health
service. The required evidence is generally in the form
of an official transcript that is sent to ACSLPA directly
from the issuing university. Following review of the
document against specific criteria, the member will be
notified as to whether or not they have been authorized
to use the protected title.
How Should the Protected Title ‘Doctor’ be Used?
In face-to-face client interactions, registered audiologists
and speech-language pathologists who have been
approved to use the protected title ‘doctor’ or ‘Dr.’ in
connection with providing a health service should state
their profession at the same time that they use the title
‘Dr.’, as in the following examples:
“Hello, I am Dr. Smith, Audiologist.”
“I am Dr. Smith, Speech-Language Pathologist.”
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Jane Smith, PhD, R.Aud
Registered Audiologist
Jane Smith, PhD, R.SLP
Registered Speech-Language Pathologist
In accordance with Section 128 of the HPA, members
with doctoral degrees may use the title ‘doctor’ in
teaching, research or administration settings.
Detailed information about professional title protection is
included in the following:

Health Professions Act http://is.gd/8HTvcB

Speech-Language Pathologists and Audiologists
Profession Regulation http://is.gd/rklYTw

Introducing the Health Professions Act (HPA): A
Guide for the Regulated Speech-Language
Pathologist and Audiologist http://tinyurl.com/
c8ywgcm

ACSLPA Guideline Use of the Protected Title
‘Doctor’ When Providing a Health Service
http://is.gd/BIwhBu
Please also see the article, Using Your Registered
Designation the Right Way on page 6 in the ACSLPA
Summer 2010 Newsletter (http://tinyurl.com/d94hmca).
For further information regarding use of the protected title
‘Doctor’, please contact the ACSLPA office.
Spring 2013 ACSLPA Newsletter
Annual Continuing Competence Program (CCP) Review
A
ccording to the Health Professions Act, ACSLPA
has the legislated responsibility to establish,
maintain, and enforce standards for the
continuing competence of all fully registered members.
As such, the CCP is a non-negotiable requirement of
registration.
This past continuing competence (CC) cycle spanned the
2011 and 2012 years as we implemented an online
submission system linked to registration renewal.
Effective this past reporting period, in order for your
registration renewal to be processed, you had to
complete the CCP reporting requirements prior to or in
conjunction with your registration renewal.
Thank you for your patience as we dealt with start-up
“bugs” and attempted to resolve a few annoying glitches.
Members should see improvements in the submission
process as they update goals and provide reflections
during the coming year. And remember, you can enter
the system at any time using your member login and
password to update or change goals, outline completed
activities towards meeting your CC goal, or provide a
reflection
(please
contact
Susan
Kraft,
Registration Coordinator at [email protected] or
Leanne
Kisilevich,
Administrative
Assistant
at
[email protected] should you require any login
information).
In keeping with the CCP requirements set out by
government, a random, anonymous review of 5% of CCP
programs was completed by the Competence Committee
in February 2013. The purpose of the annual review is
both to ensure that programs are, in fact, being
completed (that members are participating and in
compliance with the program), and also to support and
assist members in meeting the requirements of the
program. Results of this year’s review are as follows:
2011/2012 CCP Program Review Statistics
AUD
SLP
TOTAL
# required to participate
134
1095
1229
Programs Reviewed
(5% of total number
submitted)
AUD
%
SLP
%
TOTAL
%
Criteria met
43
86
82
Resubmission
required
57
14
18
Total
100
100
100
Those members whose programs were reviewed should
have received a letter that provided feedback regarding
their program, suggestions for future submissions, or a
specific request for resubmission, if required.
This was the fifth year that ACSLPA members were
required to participate in the CCP. Judging by the number
of programs that met criteria, it would appear that
members are becoming more comfortable with the
process. Feedback from the CC member survey
completed in the fall indicated that the addition of leading
statements for both the goal statement and reflection
portions of the continuing competence goal tool (CCGT)
were helpful in ensuring that the information members
provided met the requirements of the program. As in
previous years, however, concerns regarding programs
that required resubmission still related to goals being
stated in a manner that focused on the competence of
someone else versus on the member. Some reflections
also required additional information regarding how one’s
own competence was impacted as a result of targeting the
competence goal.
For further information regarding the annual review of
individual CC programs, please contact Susan Rafaat at
[email protected]
2013 ACSLPA COUNCIL MEETINGS
The following meeting dates have been set by Council for 2013.
Meetings are usually held at the ACSLPA office in Edmonton.



April 6
June 8
September 14
The AGM will be held on October 25 in conjunction with the 2013 ACSLPA Conference.
ACSLPA members are invited to attend any of the meetings as observers, but you must
pre-register with the ACSLPA office. The AGM is open to all members. Members on the
General Register, Inactive members and Honourary members have voting privileges at the
AGM. Please contact the ACSLPA office for further information.
Spring 2013 ACSLPA Newsletter
7
ACSLPA Council Approves Competence Program Changes
A
s mentioned in previous E-News and newsletter
articles, a review of our Continuing Competence
Program (CCP) was conducted over the past year
and a half. ACSLPA Council has approved in principle the
revisions to the program recommended by the Continuing
Competence (CC) Working Group. The table below
compares our current program with the recommended
revisions.
The recommended revisions to the program are based on
a solid foundation of evidence obtained from a
comprehensive review of CC literature, as well as
benchmarking with other SLP and Aud colleges and with
other health professions both provincially and nationally.
The full report and recommendations are available to any
interested members by contacting Susan Rafaat at
[email protected]
Any substantive changes to the program (e.g., the
external feedback options) will be piloted with a subset of
the membership prior to full implementation. At this point,
we are aiming to implement most components of the
revised program for 2015 submissions (due December 1,
2014). Some components of the revised program may
occur on a slightly shorter or longer timeline; rest assured
that the membership will be provided with a detailed
outline of requirements and advance notice of any
changes.
Current CCP
Proposed CCP
Self-assessment, using the
self-assessment tool (SAT)
Self-assessment, using a revised self-assessment tool (SAT)
Goal setting using the
Continuing Competence Goal
Tool (CCGT)
Goal setting using the Continuing Competence Goal Tool (CCGT)
Implement goals and engage in
formal and informal learning
activities as documented on the
CCGT
Implement goals and engage in formal and informal learning activities as
documented on the CCGT and obtain external feedback regarding one’s
chosen competency goal. Members would choose the external feedback
option that works for them and that addresses their own competence goal.
These could include:
 cross-referencing one’s own performance against checklists outlining college
or employer guidelines and practice standards OR
 case review of a closed file including discussion/feedback from a chosen peer
OR
 peer feedback on a specific competence goal as requested by the member
Reflection on the impact of goal
achievement on professional
practice
Reflection on the impact of goal achievement on professional practice and use
of both self-reflection and external feedback as a guide to assist with
future goal setting
Participation in problem based online learning modules to increase knowledge
about responsibilities of being a self-regulated professional on a predetermined
timeline (e.g., at registration and every five years thereafter).
Members may choose to discuss content in these modules through group
learning, but will be required to submit their own documentation.
Build an evaluation component into the revised CC model that allows us to
measure the effectiveness of the program over a 3- to 5-year period following its
inception.
Current Review Requirements
Random review of
approximately 5% of all
Programs submitted to the
College annually
8
Proposed Review Requirements
Consistent with a quality improvement model, all member programs will be
reviewed within a pre-determined number of years (e.g., 20% of the programs will
be reviewed annually over a five-year period and then the cycle repeats). The
exact timeline and numbers to be determined based on resource availability and
feasibility, etc.
Spring 2013 ACSLPA Newsletter
It’s That Time of Year Again. . . ACSLPA Celebrates May Month!
H
ard to believe that May is just around the corner!
This year, ACSLPA is partnering with other
members of the Pan Canadian Alliance of
Speech-Language and Hearing Associations (PanC) to
develop a one-page resource for provincial Members of
the Legislative Assembly (MLAs) and Members of
Parliament (MPs). The purpose of this resource will be to
introduce our professions to government officials in a way
that touches them personally. The material is under
development as we go to press, but so far we are
envisioning Talking Tips for Politicians, Volume 1, which
will include information on word-finding strategies (the
SLP angle) and effective communication tips involving
both speaking and listening (the audiology angle). The
content will be developed jointly and each PanC member
will be responsible for distributing the resource page to
the MLAs in their area. We will keep you posted
regarding the results of this first-ever joint venture.
In addition, ACSLPA has a number of items on the
website that may be of use to you and your colleagues
during May Month promotions. Check out the following:
 Communication fact sheets for both SLP and
Audiology
http://tinyurl.com/cbby3uj
May is Speech and Hearing Month
How would your life change if you could no longer speak?
What would you do if you lost your hearing overnight?
Choose a...
 Registered Speech-Language Pathologist (R.SLP)
for help with communication and swallowing problems

Registered Audiologist (R.Aud)
for help with hearing and balance problems
To learn more about speech-language pathology or
audiology, or to view the General Register of qualified
speech-language and hearing professionals in Alberta,
please visit:
www.acslpa.ab.ca
To find a Registered Speech-Language Pathologist,
please contact your local Public Health Centre or visit:
www.asapp.ca
 Communication Impairment Alert Cards
http://tinyurl.com/clemazm
 Promotional materials from the Hear Life
Audiology Awareness campaign
http://tinyurl.com/cho74nw
To find a Registered Audiologist,
please contact your local Public Health Centre or visit:
www.aaofa.ca
 Promotional ideas gathered from ACSLPA
members
http://tinyurl.com/co62qxh
www.acslpa.ab.ca
CASLPA also has an array of ready-to-use promotional
materials and May Month resources:
http://www.caslpa.ca/english/resources/maymonth.asp
Finally, as in previous years, as part of our advocacy and
public relations efforts during the month of May, ACSLPA
will be running the following announcement in select
community publications across the province. Keep an eye
out for it and drop us a line if you spot it in your corner of
the province!
Spring 2013 ACSLPA Newsletter
9
Do you want to shape the future of your profession?
C
onsider joining ACSLPA Council for an amazing
opportunity to share your perspective and
experience with colleagues and network with
others in the professions!
 The President Elect will
Did you know that as a member on ACSLPA
Council...
 You will be directly involved in the important





decisions that shape your profession;
You will learn invaluable information regarding
your College and its interactions with other
organizations;
You will gain skills in the areas of governance of
self-regulated professions, strategic planning/
monitoring, development/evaluation of policies and
programs,
financial
planning/monitoring,
leadership, collaboration and teamwork;
You can attend the ACSLPA Conference at no
cost;
Your employer will receive a letter from the CEO/
Registrar acknowledging your contributions to your
professional College; and
You can receive credit towards your CASLPA
continuing education hours.
What to expect…
 Attendance at four meetings per year, typically on
a Saturday in January, April, June and September,
9:00 a.m.–3:00 p.m. Meetings are held at the
ACSLPA office in Edmonton, but members may
opt to participate through videoconferencing.
 Attendance at the AGM held in conjunction with
the ACSLPA Conference, typically on a Thursday/
Friday in October.
 Executive members of Council (President, Past
President, President Elect and Treasurer) will also
attend 2 to 4 additional meetings during the year,
for committee-related work. Meetings are typically
held by teleconference or videoconference in the
late afternoon or evening.
 The President and President Elect will also attend
the Canadian Alliance of Audiology and
Speech-Language
Pathology
Regulators
(CAASPR) meetings held in conjunction with the
CASLPA Conference. The President will attend a
further CAASPR meeting held on a Thursday and/
or Friday in the fall. Additional teleconference
meetings may be held if required.
10


also
attend
the
Pan-Canadian Alliance
of Speech-Language
Pathology
and
Audiology
Associations
meeting
held
in
conjunction with the CASLPA Conference.
Approximately 3 to 4 additional teleconference
meetings will be held per year.
Travel and accommodation expenses for meeting
attendance are covered.
Training and support are provided.
If you are interested in this unique opportunity, have your
peers sign off a nomination form on your behalf.
Opportunities for 2014
Effective January 2014, the following positions on
ACSLPA Council are up for renewal:
 President Elect*
 Councillor without
Portfolio
(two
positions
available)
(Note: Preference is given to having a minimum of one
audiologist and one speech-language pathologist within the
four total Councillor Without Portfolio positions on Council.)
*ACSLPA Bylaw 10.6 states that the committee shall
annually alternate between obtaining a nomination of a
speech-language pathologist and an audiologist for President
Elect whenever possible. For 2014, preference will be given to
an audiologist.
If you would like more information about being a Council
member, please contact the ACSLPA office or a Council
member.
Please click the link below for more information or to
nominate someone today!
2014 ACSLPA Councillor Nomination Package
(http://tinyurl.com/bv4uh8z)
This is your opportunity to make a
difference! Deadline is September 3, 2013
Spring 2013 ACSLPA Newsletter
Celebrating May Month
A
s
part
of
May
Month
last
year,
Heather Loov, R.SLP, organized a May Month
activity at her local school. She went into several
classrooms from kindergarten to Grade 3 and
brainstormed with the children about why communication
was important. Some children wrote essays while others
made artwork.
Submitted by Yolaine Poulin, R.SLP
Why is Talking, Hearing and Communicating
Important?
Talking, hearing, and communicating is important
because if you do not talk to your friends, teachers,
supervisors, or even parents then they won’t know if
you want something, if you’re hungry or even if you
have to go to the bathroom!
What if you get hurt? You
have to talk to somebody or
you will have to deal with it
yourself, and sometimes it is
not easy.
If you do not listen in the
classroom then you won’t
know what to do and you do
not want the teacher who is
speaking (to) have to repeat
everything all over again.
Same thing if you are at your house or at someone
else’s. You have to listen when someone’s speaking or
you won’t know what to do or where to go. For
example, if your mom says to pack a pair of gloves, a
helmet and a pair of skates and you are not listening
you might get left behind, or they may wait for you and
that would cut into your time. That’s why talking,
hearing and communicating is so important.
Artwork by Veronica Pedersen
Essay by Orin Zaman
Health Council of Canada
T
he Health Council of Canada (HCC) is an
independent, non-profit organization funded by
Health Canada; their mission is to report on the
renewal of Canada’s health system, focusing on best
practices and innovation.
The most recent report
released is entitled, Which Way to Quality? Key
perspectives on quality improvement in Canadian health
care systems.
2013 ACSLPA CONFERENCE
October 24 and 25, 2013
Edmonton Marriott at River Cree Resort
Edmonton, AB
Visit the HCC website at:
www.healthcouncilcanada.ca/index.php
for a variety of reports, webinars and
other information.
Connecting
Pathways
Don’t miss out! Plan to take
advantage of this great
opportunity for professional
development, networking and
information sharing.
 More conference details available – page 4 
Spring 2013 ACSLPA Newsletter
11
Clinical
Conundrum
am a speech-language pathologist working
Q :inI isolation
in rural Alberta. I routinely screen
hearing as part of the initial assessment, but there
are no audiologists in my area to provide support,
follow-up, etc. How can I provide the best services
for my clients with the limited resources that are
available?
A
: You have some very valid concerns that are
unfortunately all too common. The varied questions
received by ACSLPA in relation to hearing screening
invariably point to the bigger question, “When do I
consult an audiologist on hearing screening
matters?” The answer would be anytime you have an
audiology-related question. Find an audiologist
whom you can easily work with (near or far).
In regards to the question above, working with limited
resources poses a definite dilemma. In addition, we are
also faced with challenges related to varying practices
both within and between the professions of
speech-language pathology and audiology. In order to
both create and maintain some consistency, it is helpful
to review ACSLPA’s guidelines, which promote “best
practice” in the services we provide.
In this case, I would recommend a review of ACSLPA’s
Hearing Screening Guidelines – (http://tinyurl.com/
cjpqohc), which are based on ASHA’s guidelines, as well
as another valuable resource available to ACSLPA
members,
the
Hearing
Screening
Webinar
(http://tinyurl.com/agcc2b8). The intention of this webinar
is to refresh one’s skills in hearing screening procedures
(exception note: 500 Hz is no longer considered a
screening frequency – only 1000, 2000 and 4000 Hz,
bilaterally), but also to assist in orienting one to the task
of conditioned play audiometry for screening
preschoolers. A “hand-raising” or standard response
method is only reliable in the school-aged and adult
population and is not recommended for the younger
population.
It is recommended that an audiologist’s services be
utilized for the orientation or training of “new”
screening personnel [speech-language pathologists
(SLPs) or support personnel (SP)] in person or via
telehealth and that the audiologist run the program for
training these new personnel. Consult with your
“neighbourhood” audiologist for answers on screening
(programs, procedures or training) or hearing-related
matters. Linkages to audiologists in neighbouring or urban
areas should also be relied upon for consultation,
assessment and follow-up services.
12
Support personnel are often given the task of
performing hearing screenings. The supervising
SLP would be responsible for the actions of the SP
in practice and could be the one to determine the SP’s
proficiency in hearing screening after training has been
completed. The SP may be delegated responsibilities at
the supervisor’s discretion, given that the SLP monitors
the SP and is confident in the SP’s abilities
(competency). These activities may include:
 Obtaining consent for the screening procedure
 Determination of responses – pass/fail
(No “interpretation” made in hearing screening)
 Recording “results” on paper
 Communication of “results” (with supervisor or
parent
 Referral to audiologist for follow-up (with parent
consent)
Ideally, hearing screening should take place before
the speech-language assessment to reduce variability
in behaviours, false negatives and over-referrals to
audiology for follow-up. In a province where newborn
hearing screening has not yet been implemented, all
children demonstrating speech and language delays
should have their hearing screened as a percentage of
these kids will have permanent childhood hearing
impairment requiring treatment, likely amplification.
Conducting assessment and treatment for speech and
language delays could be counterproductive with a child
with a significant hearing loss.
In the event where a child (three to 18 years of age) has
failed the hearing screen, the Hearing Screening
Guidelines indicate a “direct referral to audiology is
recommended”. This would also apply to those under
the age of three and those deemed difficult to test
regardless of available services in the area. Again,
making linkages to audiology services within or external
to your location will assist clients and families gain
access to services. If there are no audiological
services in your area, screen hearing anyway (see
preceding paragraph). Clients can make travel
arrangements to urban centres if needed.
Healthy adults with no hearing complaints could be
screened and could be provided information about
accessing full audiological services, whereas adults in
long-term care facilities or geriatric patients should
receive full audiological workup (screening would likely
Spring 2013 ACSLPA Newsletter
be an unnecessary step with the high incidence of
hearing loss in that population.)
ACSLPA supports hearing screening programs in the
province of Alberta involving audiologists as managers or
consultants in the program. Ultimately it is the employer's
decision to determine what services are provided, but it is
the member’s responsibility to provide services based on
“best-practice” principles.
Holly Gusnowsky, R.Aud
Director of Professional Practice – Audiology
Clinical Conundrum addresses member questions
related to ethical, clinical practice issues in
speech-language pathology and audiology.
We welcome your thoughts on this or any other
clinical conundrum! Readers are encouraged to
submit both their comments and their ethical clinical
issues in question format to Susan Rafaat
([email protected]) for SLP-related issues and to
Holly
Gusnowsky
([email protected])
for
audiology-related issues.
Moving? Changing Jobs?
Keep Your College Informed
Now it’s easier than ever to inform ACSLPA about any changes to your
contact, employer and professional liability insurance information. Follow
these simple steps:
1.
Access your online account using the Member Login button on the
ACSLPA website.
2.
Enter your User ID (your ACSLPA registration number) and your
password (which will be the same one you used for renewal or
received in an email if you are a new member).
3.
4.
Select View/Update Profile.
Enter your changes and save.
Please note that name changes cannot be completed online. Please
forward a copy of legal documentation indicating proof of name
change to the ACSLPA office. This may include a marriage certificate,
driver’s license, passport or other legal documentation.
Please feel free to contact the ACSLPA office at (780) 944-1609 | 1-800537-0589 | [email protected] if you have any questions.
Spring 2013 ACSLPA Newsletter
13
A Hotspot for Contemporary SLP Practice: Using the iPad
in Therapy With Adults
Research Summary
he use of technology in
speech-language
pathology
has greatly increased over the
past 30 years, especially since
technological devices have become
smaller, faster, and more reliable. As
technology becomes more prevalent
in health care, as well as within the
everyday lives of clients, it becomes necessary to
consider the appropriate and effective use of
technologies in the work of speech-language pathologists
(SLPs). Currently, no research exists examining use of
the iPad with adult clients. A large percentage of older
adults are not presently familiar with this technology;
however, within a few decades, the majority of adults who
develop a communication disorder will understand the
basic use of this technology. Using the ICF as a
framework, this project focused on whether the iPad and
associated apps facilitate therapy with adults, and how it
can be successfully integrated into speech-language
pathology.
T
Practicing clinicians, along with speech-language
pathology students, were involved in two focus groups,
where they had the opportunity to discuss the use of
iPads and apps in therapy. Some themes that were
deliberated included the positive and negative features of
the tool, and strategies for selecting, evaluating, and
learning to use new apps. The participants also attended
learning sessions where a variety of apps were
presented, and participants evaluated apps based on
previously determined best-practice principles.
While clinicians who were just beginning to implement the
iPad in their clinical practice tended to focus more on the
obvious, tangible aspects of the device (e.g., portability)
and reflected general stereotypes about technology
(e.g., the fear that technology will replace people in the
workforce, and fear of the tool breaking down), they
identified many benefits to using an iPad, such as the fact
that clients are now coming to therapy equipped with this
new technology, and are ready and willing to use the tool
in any way possible.
The learning sessions proved to be an invaluable method
for helping emerging iPad users understand the many
ways in which the tool can be used in their practice, by
encouraging the participants to think critically about the
apps, and different ways to adapt non-speech apps
(e.g., YouTube) for use in speech activities. A popular
theme that emerged included the importance of
maintaining clinical judgment when deciding which apps
to use, and how to target different impairments as well as
activities and participation with the tool.
14
In the final focus groups, it became evident that once
clinicians had hands-on experience using the iPad, they
identified limitations that needed to be addressed in order
to incorporate the tool in a more successful manner. It
was mentioned that it was difficult to conduct a natural
communication activity with the iPad, and this may be
corrected if app developers had more education. This, in
addition to the clinicians’ low ratings of some of the apps,
calls for a collaborative effort between app developers
and clinicians to develop appropriate, effective apps.
iPads are likely to be highly integrated in health care
services in the future. If an agency wants to adopt the use
of such technology into their setting, it is important that
administration does its part by supplying them to their
employees, providing the IT support necessary for
non-users to gain more confidence in the device, and
adopt measures to satisfy security and infection control
policies within their agency.
Overall, clinicians feel that the iPad is a viable tool in
speech-language pathology, but it is necessary to keep in
mind that technology is a supplement to therapy, and
does not replace clinicians’ skills and training.
Participants emphasized that the most important tool at a
clinician’s disposal when selecting apps and using the
iPad with a client, is clinical judgment. This information
can be helpful for app developers to guide their
development of apps to better serve SLPs.
Researchers
Mary Gibson, Erin Humphreys, Pamela Miller,
Jenna Palmer, Graduate Students, Department of Speech
Pathology and Audiology, University of Alberta
Lu-Anne McFarlane, Associate Professor and Project
Supervisor, Department of Speech Pathology and
Audiology, University of Alberta
Sue Decker, Clinical Assistant Professor and Project
Supervisor, Department of Speech Pathology and
Audiology, University of Alberta
For more information about the study, please contact:
Lu-Anne McFarlane, Associate Professor, Department of
Speech Pathology & Audiology, University of Alberta
[email protected] | (780) 492-5907
Spring 2013 ACSLPA Newsletter
Apps Update
H
ere are some technology-related websites that
may have information of benefit to ACSLPA
members:
w AAC Tech Connect
www.aactechconnect.com – AAC Tech Connect
offers an AAC (Alternative & Augmentative
Communication
–
http://tinyurl.com/b5nx4gc)
Apps Assistant for evaluating apps and other
diagnostic tools.
w AppsForAAC
appsforaac.net – AppsForAAC, based in England,
strives to be “the definitive collection of AAC
(Alternative & Augmentative Communication) Apps
for the iPod, iPhone & iPad.” It has a search engine
to filter and target apps based on iOS device, type
of app, and price.
w Boston Children’s Hospital
Boston Children’s Hospital’s website offers a
valuable resource for comparing features of AAC
apps (http://tinyurl.com/cpptuqk). Instead of listing
their favorite apps, their Feature Matching
Communication Applications Chart (PDF) provides
clinicians with a framework with which to make their
own comparisons of apps based on the features
such as: purpose of use, output type, speech
settings, symbol or text representation, display
characteristic, customization and programming,
feedback to user, access and navigation, and
support.
w BridgingApps
bridgingapps.org – Apps from this
website can be used by teachers,
parents, therapists, and people with
disabilities. Insignio offers “… a
powerful mechanism for searching apps and lists,
saving searches … you can create and organize
apps in a list, add notes (and) comment and rate
apps … Insignio allows users to access app
reviews conducted by therapists and special
education teachers.”
w Closing the Gap
closingthegap.org – This website
assistive technology webinars for a fee.
provides
w Spectronics
www.spectronicsinoz.com/article/iphoneipadapps-for-aac – Many apps are available on this
website. Some have recorded speech in American,
British or Australian English. Some resources on
the website (e.g., lending equipment) are only
available locally in Australia or New Zealand.
w TherapyApp411
www.therapyapp411.com
There are many reviewed apps available at this
weblink.
Note: All weblinks were active as of March 2013.
Submissions provided by Chamine Meghji, R.SLP,
and the Communications Committee
Please Note: ACSLPA and the Communications Committee
do not in any way endorse these apps. These weblinks are
provided for information purposes only.
What’s On Your Nightstand?
Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That
Can’t Stop Talking (Susan Cain, Crowne Publishers,
NY, 2012)
F
inally, a book that celebrates the 30 percent of us
who call ourselves introverts. In this well
researched book, introvert Susan Cain convincingly
argues that, despite the Western “extrovert ideal,” the
world needs to value and celebrate its introverts: people
like Rosa Parks, Albert Einstein, Frederic Chopin and
J.K. Rowling. Cain’s chapters on temperament, creativity,
the dangers of groupthink and the powers of working
alone, are compellingly written. Of particular interest to
me were sections on work and introversion, how
introverts and extroverts think (and process dopamine)
differently, and her discussions of the relationships
between reactivity, sensitivity and temperament. As Cain
says,
“love
is
essential;
gregariousness is optional. The
secret to life is to put yourself in the
right lighting. Use your natural
powers
–
of
persistence,
concentration, insight and sensitivity
– to do work you love and work that
matters. Solve problems, make art,
think deeply.”
Submitted by Elizabeth Haynes, R.SLP
Communications Committee
The above recommendation was submitted by a member
of ACSLPA and does not necessarily represent
recommendations of the College.
Spring 2013 ACSLPA Newsletter
15
News from the University of Alberta
DEPARTMENT OF SPEECH PATHOLOGY AND
AUDIOLOGY
What’s New in the Department?
Research Grants
Congratulations go out to Dr. Carol Boliek for receiving a
grant from the Cerebral Palsy International Research
Foundation (CPIRF). The Foundation is “dedicated to
funding research and educational activities directly
relevant to discovering the cause, cure and
evidence-based care for those with cerebral palsy and
related developmental disabilities.”
Dr. Boliek’s grant is among seven new awards. The grant
is entitled, Neural correlates of intensive voice treatment
on children with cerebral palsy. The primary focus of her
proposed research is to begin to understand the
mechanisms underlying the changes in voice and speech
that follow intensive behavioural treatment in children with
dysarthria secondary to CP. This study will be the first to
investigate neuroplasticity in the pediatric CP population
in the context of how the brain encodes specific treatment
experiences and how it learns new behaviours designed
to alter voice and speech function.
Want to know more? See the CPIRF website
at www.cpirf.org to learn more about the organization and
also www.cpirf.org/stories/2825 to learn more about this
year’s awards.
Awards
Dr. Stuart Cleary received a Faculty Teaching Award at
the Rehabilitation Medicine Student Association (RMSA)
Winter Gala in February. Cleary was praised for making
“intimidating” classes, such as Anatomy and Physiology
and Dysphagia, an enjoyable experience for the students.
Dr. Teresa Paslawski also received an RMSA Teaching
Award from the students, who said she fostered a
positive environment in her classes and demonstrates a
genuine interest in the students, both in and out of class.
The Organization of Alberta Students in Speech
(OASIS) is receiving an award from the National Student
Speech Language Hearing Association (NSSLHA), the
American Speech and Hearing Association’s (ASHA)
national student association. OASIS is the winner of a
second-place award of $750, given in recognition of
having students travel the furthest distance to attend the
ASHA convention.
Clinic News
Corbett Clinic once again offered an intensive treatment
program for clients with aphasia and dysarthria in the
winter term. The program provided a total of 13–15 hours
per week of individual, group and family sessions for
16
clients with aphasia and 4–5 hours per week of individual
and group sessions for the clients with dysarthria in
addition to daily home practice and assignments. The
clinical team included two clinical educators, four student
clinicians and, for the first time, volunteers were brought
on board to work with clients. The volunteers included
three individuals with higher-level communication skills
who were recruited from the Corbett Clinic caseload and
trained to work one-to-one with the clients attending the
program. The volunteers completed activities assigned by
the student clinicians and supervision and support was
provided by the clinical educators and students.
Innovative
treatment
approaches,
such
as
Constraint-Induced Aphasia Treatment-II (CIAT-II) and
Expiratory Muscle Strength Training (EMST) were
implemented for the first time at Corbett Clinic during the
program as well. CIAT-II is an expanded protocol based
on the original CIAT program, which includes five
treatment activities rather than one, and incorporates
strategies to promote carryover into everyday life. EMST
is a treatment currently receiving a lot of attention from
researchers, and is showing potential for improvement in
speech for people with inadequate respiratory support for
speech secondary to neurological impairments. Finally,
an existing treatment program for stuttering was trialled
with a client who has fluency difficulties secondary to
Parkinson’s disease. The Camperdown Program for
Stuttering was developed by researchers at the
Australian Stuttering Research Centre (http://tinyurl.com/
c7rdmh5). Personal communication with one of the
researchers indicated that the program has been tried in
limited cases with people who have Parkinson’s, but
there are no published reports of application to the
Parkinson’s population.
As a university clinic, we are excited to give these
opportunities to students on placement with us, bringing
research to practice while developing their clinical skills.
For more information about these programs, please
contact Randa Tomczak ([email protected]) or
Sue Decker ([email protected]).
Student News
We are proud to showcase a special cohort of PhD
students, all of them speech-language pathologists with a
burning desire to answer clinically relevant questions in
order to make an impact in their chosen fields of clinical
practice.
Leah Dagenais graduated in 2000 from the UBC School
of Audiology and Speech Sciences. In her PhD research
at the University of Alberta, she will compare two
approaches to treating aphasia: the Intensive Therapy for
Aphasia in Western Canada (iTAWC) and the Halvar
Jonson Centre for Brain Injury (HJCBI) stroke streaming
program. The iTAWC is an intensive, five-week aphasia
therapy
program,
which
includes
modified
Spring 2013 ACSLPA Newsletter
constraint-induced
language
therapy.
Treatment
outcomes from the iTAWC program will be compared to
outcomes from a comparison group who will receive
treatment using the HJCBI slow-stream stroke protocol, a
six-month program which includes interdisciplinary team
goals developed to target the specific rehabilitation needs
of patients with strokes. The clients from both programs
will receive speech-language therapy for a minimum of
175 hours, across two different intensities (five weeks
versus six months).
Gabriela Constantinescu graduated from the Speech
Pathology and Audiology Program at the University of
Alberta in 2007. Although she’s been cautioned that she
may still find herself in the “honeymoon phase” of the
program, she’s excited to be back in school, exposed to
new ideas and challenged to problem-solve creatively.
She plans to study social gaming and mobile health in the
rehabilitation of patients with severe swallow and speech
impairments following head and neck cancer treatment.
The use of games to engage and motivate is not a new
concept and this field has recently thrived with the
increased popularity of smartphones and applications;
however, research in this area is only beginning to
emerge. Gabi would like to use her clinical expertise to
develop and test a game that provides effective therapy,
engages patients in their own health, and improves
access to care. Her hope is that the PhD program will
teach her the scientific rigour required to test this method
of treatment delivery and help her create lasting
collaborations with biomedical engineers, software
developers, behavioural psychologists, patients and
clinicians. She’s looking forward to the journey ahead!
Teresa Hardy graduated from the Speech Pathology and
Audiology Program at University of Alberta in 2004 and
worked as a clinician, largely with the transgender
population. She’s planning to investigate the most salient
factors in predicting communicative success, as
measured by accurate perceptual judgment of listeners,
in male-to-female transgender individuals. Her research
will attempt to determine the most important
characteristics for being perceived as a woman by
measuring a combination of acoustic, linguistic, and nonverbal variables. Teresa is hoping that what she learns
from her research can be translated directly into the clinic
in order to make treatment for transgender individuals
more effective.
Salima Suleman graduated from the Speech Pathology
and Audiology Program at University of Alberta in 2011.
Upon completing her master’s thesis, Salima knew she
was bound for a career in research. She returned to the
University of Alberta in January 2012 to pursue doctoral
work with Dr. Tammy Hopper. Her research will focus on
the ethics of assessing decision-making in older adults
affected by communication disorders, specifically
aphasia. This complex and timely research topic will
examine the interconnected constructs of cognition,
communication, and decision making capacity. As the
newest member of the ACSLPA Ad Hoc Capacity
Assessment Committee, Salima will strive to further
current understanding of capacity assessment and the
process of determining whether individuals affected by
communication disorders are able to make important life
decisions.
Spring 2013 ACSLPA Newsletter
17
Upcoming Events
CASLPA
The Hanen Centre
Centennial Centre for Mental
Health and Brain Injury
CASLPA’s 38th Annual
Conference
Learning Language and
Loving It
Visual Processing
Impairment in Adult
Acquired Brain Injury
April 24–27, 2013
April 30 – May 2, 2013
June 1–2, 2013
Calgary, AB
Ponoka, AB
For more information
or to register:
For more information
or to register:
For more information
or to register:
www.caslpaconference.ca
www.hanen.org
Kathy Olsen
Ph: (403) 783-7842
Victoria, BC
[email protected]
Need to get the word out?
Newsletter & Website Advertising Available
Advertise in the ACSLPA Newsletter for
one issue and on the ACSLPA website
www.acslpa.ab.ca for two months:
RATES
$100 – ¼-page (3.75" w x 5" h)
$200 – ½-page (vertical: 3.75" w x 10" h
or horizontal: 7.5" w x 5" h)
$300 – full page (7.5" w x 10" h)
DEADLINES
March 1 – Spring Issue
June 1 – Summer Issue
November 1 – Fall/Winter Issue
SEND YOUR ADVERTISEMENT TO:
ACSLPA
#209, 3132 Parsons Road
Edmonton, Alberta T6N 1L6
Ph: (780) 944-1609 | 1-800-537-0589
Fax: (780) 408-3925
[email protected]
18
Spring 2013 ACSLPA Newsletter
Private Chat
Update from CASLPA
C
ASLPA is involved in many exciting
initiatives right now! CASLPA’s 2013
Conference will take place in Victoria, BC from
April 24–27. You can find information on registration,
the professional development program, social events
and more on the newly designed CASLPA conference
website (caslpaconference.ca). I’m especially excited to
hear the keynote address from Silken Laumann! Hope
to see you at the conference!
CASLPA was thrilled to be the recipient of the
Canadian Society of Association Executives’ 2012
Award of Excellence for Best Electronic Publication
for our quarterly e-publication, Communiqué.
As you may have heard, CASLPA and our partners in
the CISG (Canadian Interorganizational Steering Group
for Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology)
released new Canadian guidelines for auditory
processing
disorder
(http://tinyurl.com/bghxwtu).
CASLPA thought that the launch of these guidelines
presented a great opportunity to both raise awareness
of auditory processing disorder (APD) with the general
public and to highlight the role that audiologists, speech
-language pathologists and supportive personnel play in
its diagnosis and treatment. So we decided to hold a
press conference and make ourselves available to give
interviews on APD. The response was fantastic with the
story of auditory processing disorder and the need for
parents, caregivers, doctors and educators to be aware
of the signs and know who to go to for help was picked
up in publications nationwide. You can download the
guidelines and learn more on CASLPA’s public website:
www.speechandhearing.ca.
In January, CASLPA released our position paper: Early
Identification of Speech & Language Disorders (http://
tinyurl.com/crsavo3). This spring, the position paper will
serve as part of our strategy when we meet with
Members of Parliament. It will also serve as the
rationale for our federal budget recommendations,
which we will submit to the government this summer.
CASLPA continues to move forward with the
governance review process, website refresh and brand
refresh. For more information on these initiatives and
highlights of CASLPA’s accomplishment from midOctober 2012 to mid-January 2013 check out our fourth
quarter Management Report (http://tinyurl.com/bzgjofx).
The Alberta Speech-Language Association of
Private Practitioners is pleased to announce that the
2013 Private Practice Roster
is available on our website www.asapp.ca
There are a total of 95 speech-language
pathologist members on the roster. ASAPP
has welcomed two new members and two
returning members.
Employing agencies in Alberta will be sent a
notice of how to access the 2013 Private Practice
Roster in order to assist any clients in need.
Considering membership?
Your ASAPP membership…
 supports the SLP profession both locally





and provincially
gives access to a recommended rate and
rationale for the cost
offers information regarding Starting a
Private Practice
enables you to refer clients to fellow
members
allows you to ask questions of fellow
members
informs you of events and networking
opportunities through Interest Group
meetings and other media
www.asapp.ca • [email protected]
It is an honour to serve on CASLPA’s Board of
Directors and I welcome your questions, suggestions or
feedback. Please feel free to contact me at
[email protected] or (780) 926-8865.
Melanie Osmond, R.SLP
Alberta Director, CASLPA
Spring 2013 ACSLPA Newsletter
19
2013 ACSLPA Representatives
ACSLPA COUNCIL
President
Laura Manz
Phone: 780-906-4912
[email protected]
Past President
Mandy Watson
Phone: 403-402-5035
[email protected]
President Elect
Cynthia Pruden
Phone: 780-736-3740
[email protected]
Treasurer
Sara Turner
Phone: 403-943-9724
Fax:
403-943-9745
[email protected]
Councillor without Portfolio
Naomi Beswick
Phone: 780-293-1607
[email protected]
Councillor without Portfolio
Sarah Blenkhorn
Phone: 403-228-4124
[email protected]
Hearings Director
Jo Daugherty
Phone: 780-944-1609
Fax:
780-408-3925
[email protected]
MEMBER SERVICES
COMMITTEES
COMMUNICATIONS
Elizabeth Haynes, Chair
Phone: 403-283-1233
[email protected]
Committee Members:
Carol Dearden
Chamine Meghji
Sandra Vandenhoff
ACSLPA STAFF
#209, 3132 Parsons Road
Edmonton, AB T6N 1L6
Phone:
780-944-1609
Toll-free: 800-537-0589
Fax:
780-408-3925
www.acslpa.ab.ca
Registrar/CEO
Anne Assaly
[email protected]
Councillor without Portfolio
Shanda Duggleby Wenzel
Phone: 780-735-3039
[email protected]
Director of Professional
Practice – SLP
Susan Rafaat, R.SLP
[email protected]
Councillor without Portfolio
Karen Nolan
Phone: 403-343-4445 Ext. 1
[email protected]
Director of Professional
Practice – Audiology
Holly Gusnowsky, R.Aud
[email protected]
Public Members
Melvin (Pat) Eisler
Doug Schindeler
Lynne Davies
Registration Coordinator
Susan Kraft
[email protected]
REGULATORY
COMMITTEES
Executive Assistant
Jo Daugherty
[email protected]
REGISTRATION
Joanne Palamarchuk, Chair
Phone: 780-467-5549
Fax:
780-449-1476
[email protected]
healthservices.ca
OTHER INFORMATION
GROUPS
Alberta Association of
Audiologists (AA of A)
Larena Lewchuk
[email protected]
www.aaofa.com
Alberta Speech-Language
Association of Private
Practitioners (ASAPP)
Bonnie Chappell
Phone:
780-988-2217
[email protected]
www.asapp.ca
Canadian Association of
Speech-Language
Pathologists and
Audiologists (CASLPA)
#1000, 1 Nicholas Street
Ottawa, ON K1N 7B7
Phone:
613-567-9968
Toll-free: 800-259-8519
Fax:
613-567-2859
[email protected]
www.caslpa.ca
Canadian Academy of
Audiology
Box 54541
1771 Avenue Road
Toronto, ON M5M 4N5
Phone:
416-494-6672
Toll-free: 800-264-5106
Fax:
416-495-8723
[email protected]
Administrative Assistant
Leanne Kisilevich
[email protected]
Committee Members:
Teresa Gagnon
Pat Grotkowski
Anne Lopushinsky
COMPETENCE
Wendy Mitchell, Chair
Phone: 780-460-8015
[email protected]
healthservices.ca
20
Spring 2013 ACSLPA Newsletter
Vision
ACSLPA is a leader in
regulating audiologists and
speech-language
pathologists.
Mission
ACSLPA protects and serves
the public by regulating and
ensuring competent, safe,
ethical practice of
audiologists and speechlanguage pathologists in
Alberta.
While ACSLPA
encourages you to
hold onto this
newsletter for
reference, please
recycle responsibly.

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