Journal IA - GIG Concepts Publications

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Journal IA - GIG Concepts Publications
I
A
A
Issue 455
INTERNATIONAL AMMUNITION
ASSOCIATION, INC.
Journal
May/June, 2007
IAA Journal
Official Publication of The International Ammunition Association, Inc.
In This Issue:
From the President .................................................................................... 3
WRACo 303 Service Cartridges, Brian Oldfield ...................................... 4
Book Review: 20mm Suomessa (Pitkaenen/Simpanen) .......................... 7
From the Editor ........................................................................................ 7
In Other Publications ............................................................................... 8
Swiss Chargers, Harrie Telkamp ............................................................... 9
.300 Target Cartridge, John Pople-Crump ............................................... 10
Patents & Trademarks, John Kuntz ....................................................... 13
Budd/Petmecky Bore Cleaner ................................................................ 14
Holecek Cartridges, Vít Krcma .............................................................. 18
Company Histories (Hamilton Watch Co.), George Kass ........................ 20
Polte 9mm Pb Iron Core (mE) Bullets, Lew Curtis ................................ 22
USCCo Headstamps, Gary Muckel ........................................................ 26
The Better Half, Paul Smith ..................................................................... 27
Coming Events ........................................................................................ 29
Disposing of Collections, Will Adye-White ............................................ 30
.450 Roumanian ....................................................................................... 34
Schlesinger & Wells, 1854 ...................................................................... 36
Romanian Headstamps - Addendum 3, Liviu Stoica ............................ 39
S-Ball Plastik Czech Shotgun Slugs, Vít Krcma ..................................... 40
Cartridge Prices (US CF Rifle) .............................................................. 42
Benchrest Cartridge Old/New, Ray Meketa ............................................ 44
New members ........................................................................................... 45
Letters to the Editor ................................................................................ 46
Black Mesa Ammunition ........................................................................ 52
Advertisements ......................................................................................... 55
Headstamps, Otto Witt ............................................................................ 59
Front Cover: Swiss chargers courtesy of Harrie Telkamp. See page 9.
Change of address: Please allow a minimum of two weeks notice on all address changes.
Send old address as well as new address to IAA Membership, 6531 Carlsbad Dr., Lincoln,
NE 68510,, U.S.A. Postmaster: send address changes to IAA at above address.
Advertising
Address all correspondence pertaining to this publication to: Chris Punnett, 996248 RR#1,
Mansfield, Ont L0N 1M0, Canada. Voice: 705-435-3527, Fax: 705-435-0892.
Display rate-sheet available upon request. Non-display advertisements free to members;
nonmembers $0.50 per word. All payments (U.S. funds) must accompany advertisements.
Visit the IAA Website: http://cartridgecollectors.org
2
Editor
Chris Punnett
996248, RR1, Mansfield,
Ontario, L0N 1M0, CANADA
Tel: 705-435-3527, Fax: 705-435-0892.
Email: [email protected]
Membership
Individual: (includes Journal subscription) $30 USA; $35 Canada and
Mexico; $45 overseas.
Corporate/Institutional: (includes
Journal subscription) $30 USA; $35,
Canada and Mexico; $45 overseas.
Address all membership matters to:
Gary Muckel, IAA Membership, 6531
Carlsbad Dr., Lincoln, NE 68510,
U.S.A. Tel: 402-483-2484
Payment (U.S. funds only) must accompany application.
We regret that we cannot provide free
replacement issues due to non-delivery.
Material and advertisements published
are the opinions of the authors and are
not necessarily endorsed or supported
by the IAA, its staff or administration.
The International Ammunition Association, Inc., is a non-profit corporation
whose purpose is to foster interest and
knowledge in ammunition of all type and
forms.
©2007, The International Ammunition
Association, Inc. Published bimonthly,
the 1st of every odd-numbered month.
Copy Deadlines:
#456 (Jul/Aug 07)
#457 (Sep/Oct 07)
#458 (Nov/Dec 07)
Deadline Jun 1
Deadline Aug 1
Deadline Oct 1
IAA Journal Issue 455, May/Jun ‘07
IAA ADMINISTRATION
From The President
President: Lewis Curtis, PO Box
133193, Atlanta, Georgia 30333, USA,
Tel/Fax: 404-248-9468
Email: [email protected]
This is the awkward message that I
write before SLICS and you read after
SLICS. At the IAA Membership Meeting in St Louis, I will share my thoughts
on the state of the IAA today and how I
see the future. I am writing this before
the Board Meeting at SLICS where
some of the issues below will be voted
on and approved as written, disapproved
or changed, so this is only a snapshot.
The next From the President will give
you the decisions of the Board.
First, membership! Our membership has only increased by 100 from Jan
2003 to Jan 2007. We are growing but
very slowly. About half of all new members join through the website. Just over
80% of our dues paying members are
in the US, with about 7% in Canada and
the remaining 13% overseas.
Financially we are healthy with
slightly over $10K profit last year, but
about 40% of that was in donations, so
our basic profitability continues to decline as the expense of the Journal increases due to improvements and postal
increases. We estimate we will loose a
small amount in 2007 because it is time
to reprint the Guide we give new members. We expect to break even in 2008
and probably loose money in 2009 and
beyond, partially driven in expected
increases in the printing costs in 2008
and the postage increase announced for
mid-2007. Because of these cost increases, I’m recommending to the
Board that we increase IAA dues to $35/
year for US members and $40 & $55 a
year for Canadian and overseas members respectively beginning in 2008.
This is the first dues increase since
1999, and these increases should carry
us for another 10 years without another
dues increase. Those who have already
paid more than one year ahead will not
be effected by the increase until it is
time to renew again.
Our Vice President and Editor,
Chris Punnett has discovered a way to
create an electronic copy of the IAA
Journal that is compact enough to distribute electronically. I believe this is a
major breakthrough, and will recom-
Executive Vice President: Chris
Punnett, 996248 RR#1, Mansfield, Ont
L0N 1M0, Canada, Voice: 705-4353527, Fax: 705-435-0892.
Secretary: John L. Moss, 1033
Gilman Drive, Colma, CA 94015,
USA, Voice: 650-992-2829.
Treasurer: John F. Scott, 3027 Hilltop Drive, Murrysville, PA 15668,
USA, Voice: 724-327-5565.
Directors:
Will Adye-White, 15 Core Cres.,
Brampton, ON L6W 2G6, Canada
Pepper Burruss, 4199 Willow Brook
Rd., De Pere, WI 54115, USA
Jon Cohen, 273 Beacon Dr.,
Phoenixville, PA 19460, USA.
Gene Whitehead, 2425 N. Wheeler
Ave., Grand Island, NE 68801, USA.
Membership Chairman:
Gary Muckel, 6531 Carlsbad Dr., Lincoln, NE 68510, U.S.A.
Tel: 402-483-2484
Email: [email protected]
European Representative:
Martin Golland, Chapel House,
Deepdale, Barton-on-Humber,
N. Lincs DN18 6ED, UK
Research Chairman:
Paul Smith, 4301-42B Ave., Leduc,
AB T9E 4R6, Canada.
Tel: 780-986-9631
Email: [email protected]
Back Issues:
Dennis Trump, 5032 Grave Run Road,
Lineboro, MD 21102. U.S.A.
Email: [email protected]
IAA Webmaster: John Spangler
[email protected]
IAA Journal Issue 455, May/Jun ‘07
mend to the Board that we test the eJournal this year and offer the option
of receiving an e-Journal instead of a
printed Journal in 2008. The paper Journal will continue to be available to
members who want it like me. The recommendation is that e-Journal membership would be $25/year worldwide, and
could offset the impact of the dues
changes for many overseas members,
and make IAA membership more attractive to new overseas members. More on
the e-Journal later.
Both our Journal and our website
are wonderful. Hats off to Chris Punnett
and our webmaster, John Spangler and
his team who have done yeoman work
combating SPAM on the Forum, and
have implemented an excellent new
Forum that is very SPAM resistant. We
continue to need your support in both
areas. Keep the quality material coming in for the Journal, and we continue
to need introductory material on collecting specialties for the Web. In addition,
give the Forum a try. It is working great,
and registration is simple, requiring
only your username (which you make
up), your email address and a password
which you also make up. Everything
else is optional.
We still need people with web site/
internet skills to help us grow and
evolve the web site which is our face to
non-members and a major recruiting
tool, particularly for the younger collectors. If you have these skills and are
willing to help, please get in contact
with me.
Finally, there will be an election for
officers this year. I urge anyone who is
interested in holding office to volunteer.
Having someone else win the office of
President would not hurt my feelings.
The Nominating committee will soon
be looking for nominees.
I will report to you in the next issue
on the results of the board meeting, but
wanted to share with you the material I
will be giving the members who attend
SLICS. Good cartridge hunting
........... Lew Curtis
3
W.R.A.Co. & the .303 British Service Cartridges (1897 through 1916)
by Brian A. Oldfield
The .303 British cartridges were first produced by
Winchester in the year 1897, for the Model 1895 Winchester
rifle. Bullets were either Soft Point or Full Patch and weighed
215gr. The 215gr weight came from the English load then in
use for the Lee-Metford service rifle (known in England as,
“Cartridge Small Arms, Ball MK VI”). Early British loads
for this cartridge had been, at first, compressed blackpowder.
Later loads used Cordite powder, spaghetti-like in form that
was placed in the cartridge case before the case was necked
down (as was the blackpowder loading). Winchester never
used cordite or blackpowder in any of its .303 ball loadings;
all used nitrocellulose powder.
The first or pilot run of this cartridge had the headstamp
.303 ENGLISH.
Winchester appears to have had great interest in this
cartridge because, as early as 1907, they had broken down
.303 cartridges by other makers. These cartridges were either
sent or taken to the ballistics laboratory at New Haven. .303
cartridges by Eley Brothers, King’s Norton, Kynoch and the
Dominion Cartridge Company were all fired or taken apart
and measured. Copies of the ballistics lab cards show this
practice ongoing until at least 1916. Even U.M.C. cartridges
were subjected to this. Winchester took great interest in the
“Palma Match” .303 cartridges supplied to the Canadian team
by the Ross Rifle Co. These cartridges had a much longer,
all steel, needle-pointed bullet. Results of these tests led
Winchester to adjust their own version of the .303 British
cartridges. Cartridge length was just one of the many changes
they made.
215gr soft-point loading for the
Model 1895 and Lee Rifles.
215gr full-patch loading also for the Model
1895 and Lee Rifles. This is a more or
less direct copy of the British MK VI
service loading.
4
Front box label from what may well be Winchester’s
first .303 British label. This is a round-corner box
with a green label and a “sun burst” smokeless
powder sticker. Note the headstamp on the cartridge
shown on this label.
Introduced in 1916, this is the 174gr full
patch MK VII loading for civilian use.
This one comes from a box, purple labeled
and marked 215gr full patch with an oversticker saying 174gr pointed.
In 1914, Britain and her allies entered WW1. Finding
themselves short of both rifles and cartridges, they turned to
North America. Winchester was, at that time, producing
Model 1895 rifles for the Russian Czar chambered for the
7.62 Russian cartridge. This was a large contract supplied to
the WRACo (in two parts) by the Baldwin Locomotive Co.
(who had close contact with the Russian Government). Upon
being approached by the British Government through JP
Morgan & Co (who handled all Allied contracts), Winchester
offered to turn over as much as possible of their plant. They
also offered to build new premises and re-tool to meet all
demands, which they subsequently did. At this time
Winchester offered the British Government “A Mauser type
bolt rifle which we are now working on”, capable of being
adapted to the .303 British service cartridge. This was not
the Enfield Model 1914 rifle. I wonder what rifle this could
have been. The contract for the .303 service cartridge came
to a total of 44 million MK VI cartridges.
On October 27th 1914, the WRACo did start production
of .303 service cartridges for England. This was done as a
sub-contractor to the Remington Arms, U.M.C. Company on
a contract supplied to REM-UMC by the Baldwin
Locomotive Co. (Harold F Williams, his book, Winchester).
This contract ran on into early 1915. The load consisted of
38.2gr of Improved Military #18 DuPont powder and the
174gr MK VII bullet.
IAA Journal Issue 455, May/Jun ‘07
WRACo subcontract
with REM-UMC?
Although I cannot prove this, I believe the above two
headstamps were used by the WRACo to fill the
aforementioned sub contract with REM-UMC. These are
the only two known headstamps by the WRACo that show
VII (Mark 7 bullet). All other WW1 Allied contract .303
British cartridges made by the WRACo just show a “W” and
the last two year digits. The W 14 VII above came from
England out of a red labeled 215gr box with an over sticker
saying “174gr” and a black ink stamping over the front label
of the letters VII.
A Remington Arms UMC cartridge
from the Baldwin contract. Note
the similarity of headstamp layout.
Winchester did get into producing both the Model 1914
Enfield service rifle (P 14) and many millions of .303 British
service cartridges. Of note is the fact that all the .303 service
cartridges supplied by the WRACo on contracts through J P
Morgan were for the MK VI (Mark 6) loading only. These
cartridges were for use in the older Lee rifles (and others).
Winchester “took care” of all England’s needs for this loading.
This is one of the many millions of
MK VI loads produced by the
WRACo and known with both W 15
and W 16 headstamps.
WRACo records show that Winchester had acquired
IAA Journal Issue 455, May/Jun ‘07
Also supplied to England were empty
primed cases like this one. These empties
were used for a variety of tasks, one
being for pressure testing of the case itself.
“Standard” cartridges from the Royal Laboratory at Woolwich
in London, England. These cartridges are a ballistic standard
in both velocity and pressure generated on firing. One of the
many uses of these cartridges is the setting and or testing of
gun sights. Winchester copied the Standard cartridges and
then produced their own version for use in North America.
These cartridges were known as “American Standard” hence
the “AS” in the headstamp below.
American Standard
According to loading and test firing cards from WRACo,
this cartridge was just about dead on for pressure and within
10fps of those supplied by Royal Laboratory. As both Colt
and Savage Arms Co. were involved in production of .303
British chambered guns, Winchester is thought to have
supplied these cartridges to both of the above companies.
As near as I can gather, the WRACo was the only company
who made Standard .303 Service cartridges in North America.
The British Government officially recognized these cartridges
made by the WRACo - a first for a non British
Commonwealth country.
On Dec 12th 1916 the WRACo tested their first batch of
.303 service cartridges for the U S Government. This was a
contract with the WRACo for 3 million cartridges loaded
with the MK VII bullet.
While I can’t prove this either, I think this
may have been for the U S contract of 1916.
This was not for England, as it has the MK
VII bullet. The U S contract was for use in
the Lewis machine gun.
5
W 15 with MK VII bullet. Factory
loading cards show this cartridge being
loaded on several occasions during 1915,
but not for whom.
This one dental x-rays to show an early form
of tracer bullet. Factory loading cards for
cartridges like this are first dated 1922.
I doubt if the above is from that era.
Wood rod dummy with hole at shoulder,
like the .236 USN?
The above are three cartridges made by the WRACo that
I have not much information on. Winchester is known to
have supplied “Dummy Drill” cartridges to England, but
again, these had MK VI bullets, not the MK VII (they also
have four holes in the casing).
Primers used in all the Allied contract .303 service
cartridges made by the WRACo were made of copper to meet
British specifications and were the NF (non-fulminate) series.
Sadly, due to delays and a very “picky” English inspection
team, Winchester fell behind on all their Allied contracts with
J P Morgan. Due to contract wording, England could back
out of all rifle contracts with the WRACo as of June 1916.
This they did on September 21 st 1916. Winchester,
Remington and Eddystone all stopped production of both
the P 14 rifle and the .303 service cartridge on that date. The
loss of these contracts plus much of the Baldwin / Russian
contracts put Winchester in a financial position that it just
never recovered from (They had the same “picky” problems
building the P 17 and the .30-06 cartridge for the US
Government - Williams, his book, Winchester).
Test rifles used during the above time frame included
several Model 1895 rifles; a small quantity of Number one
Mark three, British Lee-Enfield’s. Several new P 14 rifles
and at least one Winchester Hi-Wall.
Winchester kept on producing the .303 British cartridges
in sporting form and still does today. They have also made
Ball MK VII on several occasions both during and after
WW2, but that is another story. Only the 180gr soft point
loading is made nowadays. Greatly missed by me and many
others is the 215gr soft-point loading. This loading was just
the ticket for those old Martini Henrys or Lee Speeds etc.
I would like to give special thanks to Dan Shuey of WCF
Publications for supplying a great number of Winchester
documents regarding all aspects of the WRACo’s
involvement with the .303 Service cartridges – thanks Dan; I
couldn’t have done it without you!
I’m only a mere cartridge collector, so any corrections
or additional information you may have can be sent to me at,
[email protected]
[Editor’s Note: Headstamp illustrations shown enlarged for
clarity]
East Coast Cartridge Show
June 15-16, 2007
Lycoming College, Williamsport, PA
Thursday 7-9pm - set up, Friday 8am-8pm, Saturday 8am-2pm
Tables $25. College dorm rooms available
Contact: Victor Engel, 1815 Ginny Lane, Williamsport, PA 17701
Tel: (570)322-4283; Fax: (570)326-9811; e-mail: [email protected]
6
IAA Journal Issue 455, May/Jun ‘07
Book Review:
20mm Suomessa (20mm in Finland, Weapons & Ammunition prior to 1945)
by: Mika Pitkaenen und Timo Simpanen
Reviewed by Chris Koll
Hard bound, premium quality, glossy
colour cover. A4 size, 264 pages.
ISBN: 978-952-5026-59-7. It is
available from the publisher Apali
Oy, Finland (see details below).
Price: Euros 49.50 (currently US $
65.00) plus shipping.
If you have ever wondered about
the large variety of Finnish 20mm
ammunition, this brand new book
from early 2007 is a must-have for
you! The authors Mika Pitkaenen
and Timo Simpanen have done a
great job in compiling a comprehensive study on all 20mm ammunition
used in Finland prior to 1945. This
includes three anti-tank guns and
rifles, seven anti-aircraft guns, one
naval gun and five aircraft guns,
chambered in a total of eleven different calibres. The guns and ammunition used in Finland include types
from Switzerland, Germany, Denmark, Italy and the Soviet Union, as
well as numerous domestic designs. Hereby, also a number
of experimental weapons like 13.2mm and 20mm designs of
Aimo Lahti are described in detail. Because the scope of a
book on just 20mm ammunition would be too narrow, the
authors have included the developmental history and technical information of the corresponding guns as well. We also
learn more about ammunition production in Finland, as well
as about the economic relations between Finland and other
European countries in the difficult times of World War Two.
The authors have thoroughly researched Finnish military archives, a job that is impossible to do for anybody not
capable of understanding the Finnish language. By including English summaries at the end of every chapter, this information is now available for international readers. All headings and captions are in English as well. The book starts
with a historical overview about 20mm weapons and has consecutive chapters describing every calibre in detail. It is richly
illustrated with many black and white pictures and original
blueprint drawings. In the back of the book all 20mm car-
IAA Journal Issue 455, May/Jun ‘07
tridges are displayed in perfect, full
colour drawings. These drawings are
described in English as well and also
show the headstamps of the cartridges. The book is written in Finnish and has detailed chapter summaries in English. The publisher’s
webpage http://www.apali.fi is in the
Finnish language only, but orders in
English are welcome through their
email address: [email protected] Additionally, communication in basic
German and French is possible
through this email address as well.
Please note, that the book is not available from the authors. The authors
previously wrote a book on Finnish
small arms ammunition up to 20mm
calibre, which is available from the
same publisher. It has the title
Suomalaiset Sotilas-patruunat 19181945 and has English summaries included as well.
From the Editor
The last issue (#454) broke all records for delivery with
many in the US taking over 3 weeks and some overseas members having to wait 4 weeks. Our Russian members seem to
have got theirs before anyone else. Why, remains one of
life’s mysteries!
I need articles - 1 to 30 pages. I do try and balance each
issue with available material. If your particular interests are
absent, it means I haven’t got anything on file. I would like
to see some article on the larger calibers and rimfires as material in these categories seems hard to come by.
This is an IAA election year. All board positions except
the two director posts held by Will Adye-White and Pepper
Burruss are open. If you are interested in running or know
someone who is, please contact the Nominations Committee Chairman, Gary Muckel (address on page 3).
...... Chris Punnett
7
In Other Publications Chris Punnett
California Cartridge
Collectors (Feb 07)
Australian Cartridge Collectors’ Association (Issue 109)
Write: Rick Montgomery, 924 Little Joe
Write: Terry Warnock, 1 Shawbrook
Ave., Benalla, VIC 3672, Australia
Nice color cover showing a Gordon
20-gauge box and various .22 boxes.
The history of Eley Brothers, Australia
is accompanied by nice photos of their
unique products. For those favoring
larger calibers there is an article on the
40mm HEDP Grenade cartridges.
Remington raised headstamp variations
are shown as background for a piece on
the company from 1871-1885. A 100rounds tin of .577 Buckshot is opened
revealing Dum-Dum mint packets. Recently introduced cartridges are described and there’s some info on .32
rimfire & centerfire cartridges for the
Marlin rifle, plus lots more.
Lane, Hamilton, MT 59840
This issue contains a John Moss
special article on the Norwegian .45
ACP cartridge with John’s usual attention to detail. It will remain the definitive article on the subject.
Spanish Cartridge Collectors
Association. (Jan/Feb 07)
Write: Francisco Carreras Morate,
Apartado de Correos No 1086, 28800
Alcalá de Henares (Madrid), Spain.
The .357 Cabur Magnum cartridges
are covered with color photos, factory
drawings and specifications. The comprehensive article on projectiles continues with this part being on explosive and
tracer bullets. Specifications for the
12.7x99 Spanish training dummy are
provided.
Nebraska Cartridge
Collectors (Nov/Dec 06)
Write: Gary Muckel, 6531 Carlsbad
Drive, Lincoln, NE 68510
For you rimfire guys there’s a .267
Remington checklist. Portions of a
Remington catalogue and BRI
shotshells advertising material are reproduced.
The Sunflower Bullet -Kansas Cartridge Collectors’ Association (Mar/Apr 07)
Write: Vic Suelter, 2185 E. Iron Dr., Lincoln, KS 67455
There’s a multiple page summary of
military multiball cartridges from the
45-70 to modern variations. The rare
.45 Holden is discussed and there’s an
article on the 12.7x44R Remington CF.
8
Slovak Cartridge Club
(Issue #22)
Write:
Mr.
Jan
Franzen,
Brancska 7, 851 01 Bratislava, Slovak
Republik
An excellent article on the Russian
Berdan cartridges includes the
10.66x48R carbine round. The Alton
Jones series is described with color photos and dimensions. Another article on
Czech shotshells, included pinfires, has
some great illustrations. For the pistol
ammo buffs we have nice articles on the
.50 Remington pistol and the 455 Revolver. A really great issue!
The Cartridge Researcher
(Mar 07) (European Cartridge
Research Association)
12-g shotshells, Bulgarian 7.65
Parabellum, and a 13mm AT crate. Well
illustrated articles on the sabotage cartridges, the Russian 18mm “less-thanlethal” ammunition, and more info on
Zettl’s unique ammunition complete the
issue.
New Zealand Cartridge Club
Bulletin (Feb/Mar 07)
Write: Kevan Walsh, 4 Milton Road,
Northcote, Auckland 9, NZ
A piece on Collath shotshells
gauges has dimensional data and photos of some specimens. The challenges
of standardizing shot sizes is well demonstrated by information on the various
gauges used around 1900-1913. There’s
a short but interesting article on the
Adams’ “Dustbin” cartridges. The issue also has info on such diverse topics
as air pellets, paper cartridges and .50
cal ammo.
The .22 Box (Mar/Apr 07) Association for the Study & Research of .22 Cal. Rimfire
Cartridges
Write: Richard Rains, S 4321 Bluff
Road, Spokane, WA 99224
The full-color newsletter still makes
me envious! The green Montgomery
Ward series is illustrated. New products from HSM, Remington and Fiocchi
are complemented by some nice early
boxes from US manufacturers. There’s
a checklist of RWS boxes and some
great photos of “Spatterless” boxes.
Write: Martin Golland, Chapel House,
Deepdale, Barton-on-Humber, N.Lincs,
DN18 6ED UK
Information is provided on the
Hoppert 30-06/22 adaptors, transparent
IAA Journal Issue 455, May/Jun ‘07
7.5 Swiss Chargers by Harrie Telkamp
I
The K31 was succeeded by the StgW 57: this weapon
had a similar caliber: 7.5 x 55. This weapon’s magazine
could be loaded with the same clips but could also be loaded
using a quick loader. This quick loader was yellow in color
(see below). The magazine could contain 24 cartridges which
is the equivalent of 4 clips. Furthermore a loading device
was available in a wooden box. This device enabled quick
loading of the magazines (see below left).
The Chargers are provided in different colours:
Since 1880, the Swiss Army has been equipped with socalled Schmidt-Rubin rifles, named after Major Eduard Rubin
and Rudolf Schmidt. Rubin was born on 17th July 1846 in
Thun, and he developed the small caliber rifle ammunition,
such as the designs for the GP11. Schmidt – born on 28th
June 1832 in Basel – developed the straight-pull bolt-action
rifle. Typical rifle designs by Schmidt were the Model 1889
rifle and the Model 1889/96 with the newer Model 1896 action that we find in the later 1911 series.
The “Karabiner Model 1931” was a completely new design by Waffenfabrik Bern under Colonel Furrer, and the first
troop trial rifles were made in May 1931 (K31).
The Swiss straight-pull rifles (from model of 1889 to the
1931 W+F K31-Carabine) are normally loaded with ammunition supplied in 6-round chargers (strippers-clips). The
charger is made of tinned steel and pasteboard. The early
chargers had a single groove alignment at the front. Newer
models had a second groove.
IAA Journal Issue 455, May/Jun ‘07
-
Brown 1 groove:
Brown 2 grooves:
Purple 1 groove:
Purple 2 grooves:
for GP 1890 (ball)
GP as from 1900 (ball)
for old Stahlkernpatronen (A.P.)
for new Stahlkernpatronen as from
approx. 1942
Green:
Markierpatronen 1890 (blank)
Green (wooden top): Markierpatronen 1903 (blank)
White:
Markierpatronen (blank) as from
1957
White (wooden top): Markierpatronen Model 58
Red:
Manipulierpatronen (dummy)
Red (wooden top): Manipulierpatronen (dummy)
The green, white and red chargers are supplied with or
without a wooden top in the charger clip.
More colors and varieties of clips can be encountered:
these turn out to be faded by sunlight or just made from different chargers and made with different colors .
Another very rare clip was the specially-made 4-round
clip. This clip was used for the so-called International Military Match, that occurred from the late 1930’s. This required a 10-round course of fire, hence 1 charger of 6 rounds
and 1 charger of 4 rounds.
[Editor’s note #1: see also page 46, Letter to the Editor]
[Editor’s note #2: see also color pictures on front cover]
9
The .300 Target Cartridge by John Pople-Crump
An often overlooked cousin of the .300 Rook Rifle cartridge is the .300 Target, designed for mid-range target shooting up to 300 yards.1 Introduced circa 1902, the earliest reference I have to the .300 Target is a Kynoch drawing A.B.10/
37 dated 18th April 1902 (Fig 1).
Figure 1. Kynoch Drawing A.B.10/37
A longer bullet weighing 110 grains with an external lubricated cannelure gives the .300 Target round a distinctive
appearance compared to the regular .300 Rook Rifle (Fig 2).
Although the .300 Rook Rifle was itself a popular cartridge for target shooting, its 80 grain bullet was susceptible
to side winds and its muzzle velocity of 1150 fps provided a
bullet drop of 16.1 inches at 100 yards and 39 inches at 150
Figure 3.
.300 Rook 3
.300 Target 4
Mfr
Figure 2. .300 Rook Rifle
and .300 Target
10
yards (Fig 3).2 Increasing the .300 RR’s muzzle velocity to
flatten the bullet’s trajectory was not viable because 1150fps
was at the upper limit for a simple lead bullet before hot
gases damaged the base and friction caused the rifling to
strip the lead, destroying accuracy.
Kynoch transformed the .300 Rook to Target configuration by using cordite to increase muzzle velocity and a heavier
bullet incorporating Kynoch Limited & Houseman’s patent
nickel base (British Patent 8707 dated 27th April 1901).5 This
‘gas-check’ in modern terminology prevented propellant
gases squeezing past the lead bullet as it exited the muzzle at
1350 fps. The heavier 110 grain bullet was less susceptible
to wind and Kynoch advised ‘a pitch of rifling not slower
than one turn in 20 inches.’ to stabilize the Target bullet’s
flight.
The Kynoch .300 Target used the No.19 cap developed for
the .303 Adaptor cartridge, instead of the No.4 cap normally
used with the .300 Rook Rifle. With identical diameters, the
Adaptor and Rook Rifle caps also used identical primer mixtures and quantities of mixture. The only difference between
the caps were slight dimensional differences in metal thickness (.022 for No.19 and .018 inch for No.4) and heights of
the respective anvils (.040-.045 for Target and .035-.040 inch
for RR), presumably to assist combustion of the cordite propellant. The nitro-cellulose load developed by Eley Brothers
exhibited slight dimensional differences in case and O/A
length to Kynoch (Fig 4).
The .300 Target shown in (Fig 1) is without headstamp
and is loaded with a hollow-point bullet, secured with two
stab crimps and appears to be a Kynoch product. A hollowpoint load is not listed in the Eley Loading Book.
Muzzle
Velocity
(fps)
Striking
Velocity at
100yds (fps)
Height of Trajectory
at Half Range over
100yds (inches)
Deflection due to
20 mph side wind
at 100yds (inches)
1150
1350
969
1125
4.43
3.17
3.0
2.5
Case Length
Propellant
Bullet (grs)
KYNOCH 6
1.180 ins
ELEY 7
1.175 ins
5.5-grains
‘Pistol Cordite’
5-grains
RR Nitrokol
Figure 4.
Remarks
110 Solid
O/A
Length
1.60 ins
110 Solid
1.45 ins
110
Copper tubed
1.55 ins
Case cannelure .895
inches from mouth in
Feb 1910 & from base
after 24th Jan 1911.
IAA Journal Issue 455, May/Jun ‘07
Appearing first in Kynoch’s 1902/03 Price List, the .300
Target disappeared by the 1911 edition. The Eley version
appears in their 1908 Price List and disappears by the 1910/11
edition. Enjoying only a brief life-span, the .300 Target was
soon eclipsed by superior mid-range cartridges, notably the
.300 Sherwood and examples are uncommon or go unrecognized.
3
4
Footnotes
7
1
2
Introduced by Holland & Holland as .295 or .300 Rook
Rifle, the .295 designation seems to have fallen largely
into disuse by the end of the 19th century.
‘Weapons for Rifle Clubs – No 3. .300 & .297/250.’ The
Kynoch Journal, Vol. II April-May, 1901, No. 10, pp77.
5
6
Ibid.
‘Club Target Rifles’ The Kynoch Journal, Vol IV February-March 1903, No.21, pp67.
Houseman was Kynoch’s chemist and ballistics expert.
See Kynoch Price List 1902/03 and Birmingham Gun
Barrel Proof House notes, the Proof House adopted a
Proof load with the 110 grain bullet loaded with 6.6 grains
of ‘Pistol Cordite’.
Eley Loading Book, but note Eley Price List 1908 lists
4.5 grain Smokeless Powder. Also note shorter O/A length
of Eley Target cartridges, borne out by 1908 illustration
and very close to O/A length of 1.42 inches for regular
.300 Rook Rifle quoted in Eley Loading Book.
Copyright John Pople-Crump 2006.
From David Damkaer, Washington.
Several different Spanish 9mm Bergmann-Bayard boxes.
All are tan with black lettering unless otherwise stated.
Above: Top and bottom. Contents headstamped P S 45
Above: This box is sealed by paper tape that goes
around the box at the center. The paper tape is red
(on the top and bottom) and white (the center part).
On it is printed large letters “Fabrica Nacional
Palencia” and the factory crest. On the box bottom
is stamped “Cargados en Julio de 1948.” The
headstamp is F N P 48.
Below: These boxes are sealed by a paper tape that starts on the
top, continues over one end, and ends on the bottom. By showing
three boxes, you can just about see all the tape: “Fabrica Nacional
de Toledo 25 Cartuchos para Pistola Calibre 9 mm. (Largo).” There
is no printing on the boxes themselves. The ctgs are in a paper
egg-crate tray. The headstamp is FNT 1950
Above: Paper tape goes around box at middle; as before,
red on top and bottom and center part white. Printing on
tape: “Pirotecnia Militar de Sevilla.” Stamp on bottom says
“Cargados en Septiembre 1952.” The headstamp is PS 1952
IAA Journal Issue 455, May/Jun ‘07
11
EUROPEAN CARTRIDGE RESEARCH ASSOCIATION
Caliber Data Viewer 2
Dr Ph. Leclerc - 14, quai de la Carpière - F 51600 - SUIPPES - France
(+33/0) 6 15 77 47 69 - e-mail : [email protected]
-
Available since september 2006
Purpose: cartridge identification
More than 8200 calibers, based on 19000 specimens More than 5200 pictures and 8000 synonyms
5 display languages: English, French, German, Dutch,
Spanish
Measurement based on the ECRA XCR system but
possible display according to the CIP and Cartwin systems
too.
The database can be searched using any key
(measurements, countries, shapes, headstamps...)
Possible networking
Automatic data export to personal MSELECT databases
(special price for new ECDV users)
Free updates: a “Live Updater” allows easy program and
data updates (10 updates provided since september 2006)
Includes calibers up to 50mm and from 1812 to current
plus experimentals and wildcats.
-
-
Requirements: Windows 98 SE, Millenium, NT4, 2000, XP,
Vista - 1024x768 display, with 32000 colors
Required free space: mainly depending on the size of the
databases (For the moment : about 160 Mb)
Pricing:
ECRA or IAA members
1/2 workstations: EUR 95 - 3/4 workstations: EUR 185 - 5/
10 workstations: EUR 300
Forwarding charges: Free - EUR 20 if outside of Europ
Members of other associations (Czech, NZ, ZA ...)
1/2 workstations: EUR 150 - 3/4 workstations: EUR 250 - 5/
10 workstations: EUR 350
Forwarding charges: EUR 10 - EUR 20 if outside of Europ
Officials
1/2 workstations: EUR 200 - 3/4 workstations: EUR 300 5/10 workstations: EUR 400. Forwarding charges: EUR 20
Others
1/2 workstations: EUR 330 - 3/4 workstations: EUR 430 - 5/
10 workstations: EUR 530. Forwarding charges: EUR 20
Preview: http://www.ecra.info/
Contact: Dr Philippe Leclerc - [email protected]
SECCA
33rd Anniversary Trophy Cartridge Show
August 3-4, 2007
Ramkota Inn, 2400 N. Louise Ave., Sioux Falls, South Dakota (Tel: 605-336-0650)
Sponsored by the Sioux Empire Cartridge Collectors Association, and
The Association for the Study and Research of .22 Caliber Rimfire Cartridges
Show opens 8am Friday & Saturday. Table holders advance registration Thursday afternoon/evening.
Live auction Friday evening. Banquet Saturday evening. Hospitality room Friday & Saturday evenings.
First Trade Table: $40.00, 2nd Trade Table: $25.00, Display Table: $10.00, 3rd or more table: $10.00 ea
Educational and Display Awards
Contact Bob Cameron, 14597 Glendale Ave. SE, Prior Lake, MN 55372 (952-447-3624)
12
IAA Journal Issue 455, May/Jun ‘07
Patents and Trademarks John Kuntz
Patent 2,522,208
Rimfire Rim Design
Robert T. Catlin
Sept. 12, 1950
Patent 219,491
Multiball Cartridge
Henry W. Mason
Sept. 9, 1879
Quote: “My invention relates to a cartridge for breech
loading fire-arms: and consists of a peculiarly formed case to
contain a multiple of balls.” It appears this one actually
worked.
Mr. Catlin’s idea was to change the shape of the rim on
rimfire cases to enable proper headspace while retaining thinner metal for the case.
Patent 1,181,849
Projectile
Geo. F. Coomer
May 2, 1916
To provide means for projectile to spin or rotate after
leaving bore.
Patent 1,179,021
Shotgun Adaptor
Henry K. Meyer
Apr. 11, 1916
Appliance to allow shotgun to fire small caliber ball, rifled
IAA Journal Issue 455, May/Jun ‘07
13
The Budd / Petmecky Bore Cleaner
Material provided by Mark Schisler, John Kuntz and Tom Quigley
In 1876, Bern Budd of Connecticut patented a device for
cleaning cartridge shells (US patent 182,353 granted on September 19, 1876). In the words of the patent application:
“The object of my invention is to produce a suitable
instrument for cleaning the shells for cartridges, which
may be of such convenient form as to be at all times
available.
“The invention consists of a metal tube or cylinder,
a, Figure 1, provided at one end with a suitable brush,
which may be made either by filling perforations in a
suitable block or plug with bristles, in the manner in
which wooden-back brushes are ordinarily made, or, what
I prefer, by filling the tube with a bundle of bristles, b,
and securing them in the tube by a suitable cement, c,
which requires heat to render it fluid - as pitch, resin,
shellac, or the like. This tube is closed at its lower end
and terminates in a screw, d, upon which fits a suitable
handle, e. The bristles standing out at an angle with the
tube containing them, of course prevents the introduction of the brush into the shell, (a representation of which
is seen at Figure 2.) Over the tube containing the bristles
is fitted a second tube, f, provided with a flange at its
bottom, of such diameter that it will pass easily into the
cartridge-shell, open at its upper, and closed at its lower,
Budd’s Patent
end with a perforated bottom, as seen at g, which allows
the tube to play up and down upon the shank h.
“It will now be seen that if the outer tube is shoved
up so as to cover the bristles, as seen at Fig. 3, the brush
so covered may be readily introduced into the shell; then,
A 12-gauge Budd/Petmecky Bore Cleaner. The sleeve (referred to as the “cylindrical clasp” in Petmecky’s patent)
shows the remains of a FOWLER No 12 headstamp though
Petmecky used any available brass cases. Side of the bore
cleaner is stamped BUDD’S PAT. / SEP. 19. 1876 /
J.C.PETMECKY / NOV. 27. 1883
14
From an 1894 catalogue, courtesy of Jim Buchanan
IAA Journal Issue 455, May/Jun ‘07
if the outer tube or sheath is drawn back, it allows the
bristles to spread, as is seen in Fig. I and fill the cartridge shell......
In 1883, Joseph Petmecky of Austin, Texas, further develops the concept with his patent of November 27, 1883 (#
289,132) and applied it to cleaning gun barrels. His patent
states:
“My invention is an improvement in gun-cleaning
implements.
“It consists of a brush or cleaner formed in the main
of spring metal (preferably brass,) and provided with
bristles beveled at their free ends, so set in suitable holding parts as that when unconfined said bristles will move
outward from a common axis and bear against the inner
surface of a gun-barrel when placed within the same.
“It consist, also, of a metallic cylindrical clasp provided at one end with flanges adapted to fit over the body
and bristles of said cleaner to hold the latter to a confined position while the brush or cleaner is being placed
in the barrel of a gun to be cleaned.......
“In operating the cleaner or brush after the device is
placed in the barrel, the said brush A is forced outside of
the cylindrical clasp until the bristles a spring against
the inner surface of said barrel. The cleaner is now forced
inward, and then moved back and forward, in the usual
way, to free the entire barrel of lead, caked powder, and
other accumulated refuse matter.
“An important point in my cleaner is the beveling of
the free ends of the bristles a, so that a chisel-edge may
Petmecky’s Patent
be presented constantly to the inner surface of the barrel
while the said cleaner is at work....
The “Cylindrical clasp” mentioned in Petmecky’s patent
is obviously the adapted brass shotshell, though his patent
does not mention that adaptation specifically.
These bore-cleaning devices are not uncommon and can
be found in a variety of calibers.
California Cartridge
Collectors Association
30th Annual Convention and Show
June 15-17, 2007
LaQuinta Inn, 3 Centerpoint Drive, La Palma, CA 90623
(Room reservations: 714-670-1400 - mention the CCCA Annual Show for discount)
Six-ft trade tables: members in advance $30, Display tables - free with trade table.
Members paying at door $40.00. Non-members $45, based on availability
Show Chairman: Radford Magruder, POB 6637, Pahrump, NV 89041 (775-751-2969)
IAA Journal Issue 455, May/Jun ‘07
15
16
IAA Journal Issue 455, May/Jun ‘07
From Thomas E. Jones, Mississippi.
This is one of the nicest letters one could hope to receive from a major company in response to a hand-scrawled letter. I had
found an 8x57 round with a Kynoch headstamp and on a whim wrote the company as to why they produced this caliber during
the war. Mr. J. Manton told me the story of the BESA machinegun and went on to give the specs.
[Editor’s Note: I reformatted the letter to fit these pages but all information is intact]
IAA Journal Issue 455, May/Jun ‘07
17
Holecek Self-Contained Cartridges of Czechoslovakia
by
Cartridges containing all of their components in the bullet
have existed for a long time. Among the earliest examples
are the American Hunt Rocket Ball and Volcanic cartridges,
both dating to the first half of the 19th Century. Their biggest
problems were the difficulty in manufacturing them with
uniform dimensions, both of the ammunition and the rifle
chambers, and the very corrosive primers of their day.
Because of these inadequacies arms of these systems could
not be improved upon much, so little development in the
field of self-contained cartridges happened until the subject
was revisited in the 20th Century. Well-known cartridges
like the German Rocket rounds of the WWII era, and the
later American Gyrojet rounds, are examples of one road
taken by designers interested in the caseless cartridge. These
were both based on principles of rocketry, however. Germany
has produced a whole series of caseless cartridges, most
relative to the G11 rifle, which has yet to be adopted by any
military force.
Ing. Jaroslav Holecek, a Czech arms designer well known
in the West for his work on automatic weapons, such as the
famed Brno Light Machine Gun which lead to the even more
famous British Bren Gun, was one of the early developers of
caseless ammunition in the 20th Century. Ing. Holecek
worked for the well-known firm of “Zbrojovka Brno.” The
arms factory at Brno, Czechoslovakia was one of the more
important centers for arms design and production in the world.
Holecek’s interest in self-contained cartridges followed the
route taken earlier: the development of small arms types. He
knew inherently that things such as limited powder capacity,
size and weight of projectiles, etc. made large-caliber caseless
cartridges relatively impractical. Therefore he concentrated
on what he considered their only practical usage and strove
to construct pistol-type cartridges for use in a submachine
gun. His final development of a caseless cartridge was
intended as a substitute for the 9mm Luger.
Ing. Holecek’s first engineering attempt for his caseless-
cartridge submachine gun was a modified version of the
Czechoslovak submachine-gun Cz vz. 247. Proceeding from
there, he ended up with a newly-designed submachine gun
of very simple construction, having only 39 parts. This
weapon utilized a version of the blow-forward barrel for
operation, using a mobile barrel of 14.37" length. The blowforward system (used before in a manually-operated
application for anti-tank rifles by Zbrojovka Brno) enabled
a longer barrel than other systems, allowing higher velocity.
The total length of the weapon, not including stock, was
18.58" and with the shoulder stock 28.74". The empty
magazine for 32 cartridges had a weight of 0.4299 lb and
after loading reached approximately 1lb. The submachinegun
without magazine weighed 4.86 lb and with a full magazine,
5.86 lb. Bullets achieved a muzzle velocity of 1312fps and
the shooter could regulate the rate of fire at intervals 4501000 shots per minute. Bullets were well stabilized in flight,
and the barrel had a very long working life.
White colour around primers has no meaning, it is merely
residue from the buffing composition used to polish the
cartridges.
Initial development work was done with calibre .177",
but this was not a success and Holecek quickly focused his
attention on calibre .354" (9mm), which was more likely to
find practical use and employment. The cartridge was
engineered with a thick-walled self-contained bullet and case,
and was turned from steel with the front ogival in shape.
Thickness of the cartridges walls was determined for
withstanding pressures of 2549 bar. The cartridge design
included a groove and a thin rim. At firing there was sufficient
energy to collapse the rim allowing the bullet unimpeded
Gerlich Cartridge System
18
IAA Journal Issue 455, May/Jun ‘07
flight down the barrel. Powder loads consisted of nitrocellulose cube (tabular) powder - 5.6 grains. Cartridges were
primed with pressed-in express-type primers with a diameter
of .236", a type previously used in shot cartridges.
Functioning was perfect and remnants of the primers went
up the barrel and out. The form and construction of these
cartridges are best illustrated by the previously shown photo
and the drawings below.
The cartridge had a total weight of 129.9 grains, with
the weight reduced to 123.4 grains. As it passed through and
out of the barrel. The cartridge passed several developmental
stages and later was made with the steel body having two
copper guiding belts (bands). This addition greatly
heightened the working life of the barrel.
Experiments were also made with cartridges of the system
Gerlich, the weapon for which had a conical bore wherein
the bullets were reduced from .354" to .283" during boretravel. This cartridge had a weight of 83.6 grains and reached
a muzzle velocity of 1663fps. These cartridges and the arms
for them did not reach serial production as development was
not continued.
In Czechoslovakia, just as in other countries, no official
service of the country implemented these arms or their selfcontained cartridges. These systems are now part of
ammunition history, but in fact, their level of function was
superior to many later developments in the field of selfcontained (caseless) ammunition.
From Terry Warnock, Australia. An Eley 100-case box from Belgium - note gunmaker on side.
IAA Journal Issue 455, May/Jun ‘07
19
Company Histories by George Kass
Hamilton Watch Company, Lancaster, Pennsylvania
In 1892 the Hamilton Watch Company was formed
through the efforts of a group of leading Lancaster business
and professional men. Included in this group were Messrs
J.W.B. Buausman, John F. Brimmer, Harry B. Cochran, Frank
P. Coho, C.A. Fondersmith, George M. Franklin, John C.
Hager, J.P. McCaskey, H.M. North, Martin Ringwalt, J.
Fredrick Sener, William Z. Sener, James Shand, Peter T. Watt
and H.S. Williamson. Another watchmakers preceded
Hamilton Watch in Lancaster using the same factory. The
factory was originally built for Adams and Perry Company
in 1874, the Lancaster Watch Company made it home here
from 1877 to 1885 and then housed the Keystone Watch
Company from 1886 to 1890.1
Hamilton Watch Company succeeded where three others had failed by having assessed the market and determining that there was a need for a railroad watch of both accurate and dependability. Because of numerous railroad mishaps the publicity resulted in the adoption of official Railway Watch Inspection services that required employees in
charge of train operations to have a watch of approved quality and subject to frequent inspection. A large railroad watch
was built in 1893 to meet specifications of the Time Inspection rules that the railroads had established. In the short period till 1900 this watch had become a favorite of the railroad men.1
During World War I Hamilton Watch Company was a
major supplier of vital instrumentation to the government.
World War II followed the same pattern and by 1941 the
factory’s total output was devoted to military production.
Products included marine chronometers, sturdy chronometer
watches for torpedo boats and navigation master watches for
bombers.1 In addition in the field of ordnance, fuzes were
produced. An addition to the plant was built in 1942 for fuze
manufacturing. The North Plant was used solely for loading
the fuzes. The rest of the fuze was made at the main plant,
the factory on Columbia Avenue. Since the fuzes contained
clockworks, various parts were made and assembled in different departments of the factory. The Train Department
assembled the component trains of cogwheels, the Plate Department made the frames that retained the arbors and wheels,
etc.2
Because mechanical time fuzes were among the most
troublesome items in the ammunition program, their manufacture demanded some means of systematic cooperation
among contractors. In the spring of 1942, General Campbell
and Mr. Roy T. Hurley of the Bendix Aviation Corporation,
set out to form an industry integration committee for this
20
Postcard from author’s collection. 6
purpose. At the end of April 1942 they called a meeting of
representatives from the six companies, including Hamilton
Watch, holding contracts for the M43 fuze, plus Frankford
Arsenal, to discuss ways of sharing the experience of the
four firms that were already in production with the two that
were just getting started. Within four months the newly
formed M43 Mechanical Time Fuze Committee not only increased production by about 100 percent but, also introduced
improved manufacturing techniques that greatly reduced the
cost of the fuze.3
Legislative Alerts
The following is a list of Internet websites that specialize in identifying legislation that could impact our
hobby. Several of them can provide email alerts. We
apologize for the fact that it is US-centric and would be
delighted to add websites covering the topic for other countries.
www.keepandbeararms.com
www.saf.org (Second Amendment Foundation)
www.nraila.org (NRA Institute for Legislative Action)
www.gunowners.org (Gun Owners of America)
For state info (from En Garde in #436):http://www.findlaw.com (select “Search Cases & Codes,”
select state, then “Codes.”
http://www.yahoo.com (select “Government,” U.S. Government,” “State Government,” select state, then
“Law.”
IAA Journal Issue 455, May/Jun ‘07
United States War Department Supply Bulletin SB 9-35
dated 1 August 1945, List of Manufacturers and Their Symbols, lists Hamilton Watch Company, Columbia Avenue,
Lancaster, Pennsylvania, as having been assigned the letters
“HAM”.7
After World War fuze production was ceased until the
Korean Conflict (1951-1952). In 1954 the decision was made
to form an Ordnance Division. Seven men were brought in
to a Research and development group. By 1971 this division
was the major operation of the Company and thus the name
was changed to better reflect the operations, Hamilton Technology, Inc.4
[more on Hamilton Technology Inc. in the next issue]
Bibliography & References
(2) Loose, John Ward Willson, President of the Lancaster
County Historical Society, letter of March 11, 1987.
(3) Thompson, Harry C. and Mayo, Lida - United States
Army in World War II, The Technical Services, The Ordnance Department: Procurement and Supply - Office of
the Chief of Military History, Department of the Army,
Washington, DC, 1960, page 122.
(4) James, John - telephone conversation March 18, 1978.
(5) Bowman, John J. - “Lancaster’s Part in the World’s
Watchmaking Industry” - in Papers Read Before the
Lancaster County Historical Society, Vol. XLIX, No. 2,
Lancaster, PA, 1945.
(6) Postcard - Forensic Ammunition Service collection.
(7) War Department - SB 9-35 List of Manufacturers and
Their Symbols - War Department, Washington 25, D.C. 1 August 1945.
(1) “Hamilton Technology, Inc.” undated
From Dr. J.R. Crittenden
Schmitt, Maryland
Top left: 800mm shell and case for
Dora German Cannon, WW2, from the
U.S. Army Ordnance Museum.
Left and above: 90mm T22E12 Experimental Flechette Cannister, 1960s.
Showing full sectioned round plus
close-ups of the cannister.
IAA Journal Issue 455, May/Jun ‘07
21
Polte Development of 9mm Parabellum Iron Core (mE) Bullets
by Lew Curtis
Polte appears to have been the agency that
developed the German iron core 08 mE bullet. This bullet with a blackened jacket shows
up on Polte 9mm Parabellum production in
1940 and doesn’t appear in the production of
the other makers of 9mm P 08 cartridges until
1941 or 1942. The following drawings document Polte’s search for the ideal shape for the
iron core and show the effort started at least
as early as the fall of 1937. These cores are
very different from the mushroom shape of
the cores used in production mE bullets. Note
the lead is concentrated at the front of the bullet and the iron core sits at the base of the
bullet. In early 1938 it is clear that Polte was
still trying to find the ideal core shape and
location. The two bullets illustrated on the
opposite page still have the majority of the
lead near the tip of the bullet and the iron cores
toward the base. This would have the effect
of moving the center of gravity forward.
It appears that it was in late 1939 that Polte
had settled on the basic design of the mE bullet with the familiar mushroom shape core,
but the detail design was apparently still evolving. Note the two drawings on page 24 from
November 1939, one with a flat base and one
with a concave base. Note also that the core
has been moved to the front of the bullet and
the lead is in the sides and rear.
By mid-1940 the design appears to have
stabilized on the concave base (see page 25).
This design is extremely similar to the November 1939 designs and the June 1940 and
January 1941 designs appear to be basically
identical. The January 1941 design appears
to have a less concave base and more lead at
the rear of the core.
The earliest dated case I have with a mE bullet is
headstamped lot 22 of 1938, but the weight of this load falls
well within the weight range of other later mE loads in my
collection. I have not had this cartridge X-rayed so it could
be an early mE bullet, or more likely just an early case that
was loaded with a standard mE bullet in the 1940 time frame.
Since no confirmed examples of these experimental mE bullets are known, it is not known whether they had the familiar
22
Oct. 1937
black jackets or were GM colored. It is wise to weigh all
Polte 9mm P from 1936 and later to see if they may be experimental mE bullets.
Additional drawings of the cores are available on my
website at http://gigconceptsinc.com. If you have any further information on the early development of mE bullets, or
have examples of mE bullet loads from before 1940, please
contact me. My email is [email protected], and my address
is in the IAA Directory.
IAA Journal Issue 455, May/Jun ‘07
February 1938
March 1938
.
IAA Journal Issue 455, May/Jun ‘07
23
November 1939
November 1939
24
IAA Journal Issue 455, May/Jun ‘07
January 1941
July 1940
IAA Journal Issue 455, May/Jun ‘07
25
United States Cartridge Company Headstamps by Gary Muckel
U.S. 30-30.
US 15 VII (303)
US.15 VII (303)
US 16 VII (303)
US.16 VII (303)
US.17 VII (303)
.U.S. 32 A.C.P.
U.S. 32 POLICE
U.S. 32 COLT. (Colt New Police)
.U.S. 32 COLT. (Colt New Police)
U.S. 32 COLT. (32 Long Colt)
.U.S. 32 COLT. (32 Long Colt)
U.S. 32 WEBLEY
U.S. 32 S.&W.
U.S. 32 S&W.
.U.S. 32 S.&W.
U.S. 32 S&W.L.
U.S. 32 S.&W.L.
.U.S. 32 S.&W.L.
.U.S. 32 W.C.F.
.U.S. 32 WIN.C.F.
32. WINCH U.S.
.U.S. 38 A.C.P.
U.S. 38 ARMY.
U.S. 38 COLT NAVY.
U.S. 38 L.
U.S. 38 LONG.
U.S. 38 WEBLEY.
.U.S. 38 WEBLEY.
U.S. 38 S.&W.
U.S. 38 S.&W. (Large letters)
U.S. 38 S&W.
.U.S. 38 S.&W.
U.S. 38 S&W POLICE.
U.S. 38 S&W. SPECIAL.
.U.S. 38 S&W. SPECIAL.
U.S. 38 WIN. C.F.
.U.S. 38 W.C.F.
.U.S. 41 COLT S.D.A.
.U.S. 41 LONG. D.A.
U.S. 44. COLT.
U.S. 44 COLT.
.U.S. 44. COLT.
U.S. 44. AM
U.S. 44 S.&W.A.
.U.S. 44 S.&W.A.
U.S. 44 RUSSIAN.
.U.S. 44 S&W.R.
U.S. 44 BULLDOG.
.U.S. 44 BULLDOG.
U.S. 44 WEBLEY.
U.S. 44 W.C.F.
.U.S. 44 W.C.F.
26
U.S. 45 COLT.
U.S. 45-60 C.F.
U.S.C. CO. HORNET
U.S.C. CO. 22 H.P.
U.S.C. CO. 25 C.A.
U.S.C. CO. 25 REM.
U.S.C. CO. 250 SAV.
U.S.C. CO. 25-20. (Single Shot)
U.S.C. CO. 25-20
.U.S.C. CO. 25-20
U.S.C. CO. 25-20. H.V.
U.S.C. CO. 25-35.
U.S.C. CO. 6.5 M-M. (6.5 x 53R)
U.S.C. CO. 6.5 M-M. (Mannlicher)
U.S.C. CO. 280 ROSS.
U.S.C. CO. 7 M-M.
.U.S.C. CO. 7-63 MAUSER.
U.S.C. CO. 7-63 MAUSER.
.U.S.C. CO. 7-65 LUGER.
U.S.C. CO. 30 GOV. MOD 03.
U.S.C. CO. 12-05. (03)
U.S.C. CO. 11-05. (03)
U.S.C. CO. 1-06. (03)
U.S.C. CO. 2-06. (03)
U.S.C. CO. MOD. 06.
U.S.C. CO. MOD. 06
.U.S.C. CO. MOD. 06.
U.S.C. CO. 7-05.
U.S.C. CO. 9-05.
U.S.C. CO. 10-05.
U.S.C. CO. 11-05.
U.S.C. CO. 12-05.
U.S.C. CO. 1-06.
U.S.C. CO. 2-06.
U.S.C. CO. 3-09.
U.S.C. CO. 1-10.
U.S.C. CO. 2-10.
U.S.C. CO. 3-10.
U.S.C. CO. 4-10.
U.S.C. CO. 1-11.
U.S.C. CO. 2-11.
U.S.C. CO. 3-11.
U.S.C. CO. 1-12.
U.S.C. CO. 2-12.
U.S.C. CO. 3-12.
U.S.C. CO. 4-12.
U.S.C. CO. 1-13.
U.S.C. CO. 2-13.
U.S.C. CO. 3-13.
U.S.C. CO. 5-17.
U.S.C. CO. 6-17.
U.S.C. CO. 17
U.S.C. CO. 18
U.S.C. CO. * 18 *
U.S.C. CO. 19
U.S.C. CO. * 19 *
U.S.C. CO. 30-30 REM.
.U.S.C. CO. 30-30 REM.
U.S.C. CO. 30 W.C.F.
U.S.C. CO. 30-30
.U.S.C. CO. 30-30
U.S.C. CO. * 30-30 *
.U.S.C. CO. * 30-30 *
U.S.C. CO. 30 GOV.
.U.S.C. CO. 30 GOV.
U.S.C. CO. 5-07 (30-40 Krag)
U.S.C. CO. 300 SAV
.U.S.C. CO. 303 SAV.
U.S.C. CO. 303 BRITISH.
U.S.C. CO. 7.62 M-M. (Russian)
U.S.C. CO. 16
U.S.C. CO. 17
U.S.C. CO. 7.65 M-M (Mauser)
U.S.C. CO. 7.65 M/M M.A.1914
U.S.C. CO. 32 S.C.
U.S.C. CO. 32. S.C.
U.S.C. CO. 32 S&W.
U.S.C. CO. 32 S.&W.
U.S.C. CO. 32 COLT. N.P.
.U.S.C. CO. 32 COLT N.P.
U.S.C. CO. 32 A.C.P.
U.S.C. CO. .32 A.C.P.
U.S.C. CO. 32 L.C.
U.S.C. CO. 32 S&W.L.
U.S.C. CO. 32 W.C.F.
U.S.C. CO. 32 W.H.V.
U.S.C. CO. 32 SLR.
U.S.C. CO. .32 REM.
U.S.C. CO. 32 W.S.
.U.S.C. CO. 32 W.S.
U.S.C. CO. 32-40.
U.S.C. CO. 32-40. H.V.
U.S.C. CO. 33 W.C.F.
U.S.C. CO. 35 REM.
U.S.C. CO. 35 W.C.F.
U.S.C. CO. 35 S.L.R.
.U.S.C. CO. 35 S.L.R.
U.S.C. CO. 351 S.L.R.
.U.S.C. CO. 351 S.L.R.
U.S.C. CO. 9M/M LUGER.
U.S.C. CO. 9M/M B.L.
U.S.C. CO. .357 S.&W.
U.S.C. CO. 38 SHORT.
.U.S.C. CO. 38 SHORT.
U.S.C. CO. 38 LONG.
U.S.C. CO. 3-09.
IAA Journal Issue 455, May/Jun ‘07
U.S.C. CO. 4-10.
U.S.C. CO. 2-11.
U.S.C. CO. 6-11.
U.S.C. CO. 3-12.
U.S.C. CO. 5-12.
U.S.C. CO. 3-13.
U.S.C. CO. 38 S&W.
U.S.C. CO. 38 S&W. (Large hs)
U.S.C. CO. 38 A.C.P.
U.S.C. CO. 38 COLT N.P.
.U.S.C. CO. 38 COLT N.P.
U.S.C. CO. 38 COLT SP’L
U.S.C. CO. .38 COLT SP’L
U.S.C. CO. 38 COLT. SP’L.
U.S.C. CO. 38 SPL. SPEED
U.S.C. CO. 38 S&W. SP’L.
U.S.C. CO. 38 S.&W. SP’L
U.S.C. CO. 380 CAPH
U.S.C. CO. 38 W.C.F.
U.S.C. CO. .38.40 H.V.
U.S.C. CO. 38-40 H.V.
U.S.C. CO. 38-40. H.V.
U.S.C. CO. 38-55
.U.S.C. CO. 38-55
U.S.C. CO. 38-55. H.V.
U.S.C. CO. 41 S.D.A. (Short case)
U.S.C. CO. 41 S.D.A. (Long case)
U.S.C. CO. 41 L.D.A.
U.S.C. CO. 44 S&W.A.
U.S.C. CO. 44 S&W.R.
U.S.C. CO. 44 COLT
U.S.C. CO. 44 S&W. SP’L.
.U.S.C. CO. 44 S.&W. SP’L.
U.S.C. CO. 44 WEBLEY.
U.S.C. CO. 44 W.C.F.
U.S.C. CO. 44-40. H.V.
U.S.C. CO. .44-40 H.V.
U.S.C. CO. 45 A.C.P.
U.S.C. CO. 17
U.S.C. CO. 3-13
U.S.C. CO. 3-17
U.S.C. CO. 4-17
U.S.C. CO. 5-17
U.S.C. CO. 6-17
U.S.C. CO. 7-17
U.S.C. CO. 18
U.S.C. CO. 45 A.R.
U.S.C. CO. 45 COLT.
.U.S.C. CO. 45 COLT.
U.S.C. CO. 45-70
.U.S.C. CO. 45-70
U.S.C. CO. 45-70. H.V.
45-70-500 OR 45-55-405 Contracts
for US Gov’t
R 5 L 79
R 6 L 79
R 7 L 79
R 8 L 79
R 9 L 79
R 11 L 79
R 12 L 79
Questionable Headstamps found
on some lists
U.S. 25-20
U.S. 41 SDA
U.S. 44 CF
U.S.C. CO. 44 HV
R 1 L 80
R 3 L 80
R 4 L 80
R 5 L 80
50-70 Gov’t Contract
R L 4 79
Contracts to S. America or Argentina
A G 93 (43 Spanish)
A G 94 (43 Spanish)
A G 95 (43 Spanish)
A P G * 08 * (38 Colt Army)
A P G m— 09 m— (38 Colt Army)
The Better Half by Paul Smith
.455 Revolver (left to right)
Mk 1. Headstamp is: R L I
Mk II. Headstamp is: K II C. Note
glazed card disc over chopped
cordite charge.
Mk II. Headstamp is: W.R.A. Co. 455
II
Mk VI. Headstamp is: DC 43 455 VI.
Note GM jacket.
Mk VI. Headstamp is: K42 VIZ. Note
CN jacket.
Target. Headstamp is: D.C.Co. .455.
IAA Journal Issue 455, May/Jun ‘07
27
28
IAA Journal Issue 455, May/Jun ‘07
Coming Events
June 15-16, 2007. East Coast Cartridge Show, Lycoming
College, Williamsport, PA. Contact; Vic Engel, 1815 Ginny
Lane, Williamsport, PA 17701 (570-322-4283)
June 15-17, 2007. California Cartridge Collectors Show,
LaPalma, CA, Contact: Radford Magruder POB 6637
Pahrump, NV 89041 (775-751-29690
July 12-14, 2007. Rocky Mountain Cartridge Collectors
Show. Ramada Plaza, Denver. Contact: John Roth, 7954
Wagon Wheel Rd, Morrison, CO 80465
August 3-4, 2007, Sioux Empire Cartridge Collectors Association Show. Ramkota Inn, Sioux Falls, South Dakota.
Contact: Bob Cameron, 14597 Glendale Ave. SE, Prior Lake,
MN 55372 (952-447-3624)
August 17-18, 2007. Pennsylvania Cartridge Collectors
Show. Holiday Inn, Morgantown, PA. Contact: Paul Callow, 19 Walnel Dr., Royersford, PA 19468 (610-948-8306)
or Jon Cohen, 273 Beacon Dr., Phoenixville, PA 19460 (610933-7318)
Sept 6-8, 2007. Northwest Cartridge Collectors Show,
Coeur d’Alene, Idaho. Contact: Dick Rainbolt, 1801 Gilbert Ave., Coeur d’Alene, ID 83815 (208-664-9907)
Sept 28-29, 2007. ECRA International Meeting, Landhorst,
The Netherlands. Details to follow.
October 26-27, 2007. North Cartridge Show at Leroy
Sportsmans Club, Leroy, Illinois. Contact: Steve Anderson,
605 Meadow Lane, Leroy, IL 61752 (309-962-7641)
And beyond.......
March 20-22, 2008 - St. Louis International Cartridge Show
April 9-11, 2009 - St. Louis International Cartridge Show
April 1-3, 2010 - St. Louis International Cartridge Show
From Keith Pagel, Ohio. 9mm Parabellum from
IMI (Israel), billed as +P and hazardous for some
9mm pistols. Tan 50 round box, Hebrew markings
in black ink, copper jacketed,
lead core, FMJ bullet, no tip
color code, brass case, brass
percussion primer, TZZ 92
headstamp, purple primer
sealant. Cartridges held in an
olive drab plastic tray
European Cartridge Research Association
From Will Adye-White. Tan label on tin.
Note “Imperial Ottoman Government”.
Opposite: from Dick Fraser,
Connecticut
IAA Journal Issue 455, May/Jun ‘07
The European Cartridge Research Association (E.C.R.A.
for short) is not quite as old as the I.A.A., but runs it a close
second, being now more than 40 years old. Its monthly bulletin The Cartridge Researcher is published in four languages, English, French, German and Dutch (your choice)
and is sent by airmail to overseas members. It contains many
Questions and Answers, plus articles and information. The
annual dues are $40 for overseas members and the subscription period is the calendar year. Those joining during the year will receive backissues of the bulletin from the start of the year.
Please contact Vic Engel, 1815 Ginny Lane, Williamsport, PA 17701, USA for a
membership application form, or write the Secretary of the English Language
Group of the E.C.R.A. - Martin Golland, Chapel House, Deepdale, Barton-onHumber, N. Lincs DN18 6ED, UK.
29
Disposing of Collections When the Collector in the Family Dies
by Will Adye-White
The purpose of this article is to give some guidance to
those who will have to deal with the disposal of our collections when we die. These people could be family members,
executors or friends. The vast majority of these people have
no idea as to the value of our collections, nor will they have
any idea as to how to dispose of them. This article is directed towards them. It is also directed at the collectors in
the family. Start to think about what you want to happen to
your collection if you were out of the picture so that you can
let the people you care about know your wishes.
Determine what is in the collection and what
it is worth.
Make an inventory of what is in the collection. If you
need help, enlist the aid of appraisers, collectors, friends,
auctioneers, etc. You may have to pay for this assistance.
Don’t accept the first offer if you don’t know what it is
that you have.
Make it clear to anyone looking at the collection, exactly what you expect of them, i.e. a written evaluation,
assistance in cataloguing the collection, an offer, etc.
Don’t sell individual items out of the collection until you
know what you have and what everything is worth. Selling the best first may make the remainder of the collection unattractive or unsaleable to a potential buyer.
Try to find the collectors notes and records if they exist.
Consult your lawyer and tax accountant.
Disposing of the Collection
(Selling the Collection)
There are 4 major avenues for selling a collection. They are:
1. Selling at Auction
2. Selling to a friend, collector or dealer
3. Having it sold on consignment by a friend or dealer
4. Selling it yourself.
1) Selling at Auction
a) If there are enough rare pieces or the collection is big
enough to attract many potential buyers, then an auction
may be in order.
30
b) Get a reputable Auction house that specializes or has the
knowledge to deal with the collection.
c) Have the auction house detail what can be expected as
to potential value of the collection and what can be anticipated (a rough estimate) for the realized value
d) Be very clear as to what the costs and expenses are that
you will be responsible for and what they will be responsible for (i.e. catalogue costs, photography costs,
etc.)
e) Understand what their cut will be on the selling price.
Also, understand what and if they will be charging the
buyers a premium.
f) Find out if they will be selling everything in one auction
or will the items be spread out over multiple auctions
(this may delay the settlement of the estate)
2) Selling to a friend, collector or dealer
Recognize that you may or may not (probably not) realize the full appraised value of the collection.
Dealers have to make a living too, so they will not offer
the highest price
Collectors may offer a high price but may only want to
buy specific items out of the collection (usually the best
and rarest pieces). However collectors will usually pay
closer to the full value than a dealer will.
Friends (usually collectors who are friends) can usually
be very helpful. However, they usually don’t collect what
your spouse collected and may or may not be interested
in buying the whole collection. Again, they may only
have interest in certain key items.
Selling parts of the collections to various interested parties (friends, collectors, dealers and auctioning some) may
be a very viable option.
3) Selling a collection by consignment
·
If you choose this route, be very careful.
·
You may end up with the highest possible price next to
auctions by this means
·
Very carefully check out the person who is going to be
selling the items. This includes the person’s reputation, competency with regards to the material in the collection and
their record regarding paying after the sales.
IAA Journal Issue 455, May/Jun ‘07
·
Be sure that both you and the seller have a detailed list
of items for sale and the estimated prices associated with
each item. This way, as items are sold, you will be able to
determine where you stand both in relation to liquidating the
collection and with regard to being paid!
4) Selling the collection by yourself
If you know the value of the items and who is interested
in purchasing them, this is a good way to deal with the
collection. However, if you don’t have an intimate detailed knowledge of the collection and you don’t personally know the potential buyers, then DON’T DO THIS!
You must track down the buyers and make all arrangements with the buyers
This may take years if you decide to break up the collection and sell it as single items.
Taxation
Taxation is a much trickier subject to address. Since the
readers of this diatribe will be scattered around the world,
providing detailed tax information is out of the question.
However, there are certain accounting and tax rules that will
be universal.
1) Where ever you live, your Government would like to tax
you on everything they can get away with. Consult a
competent tax accountant at the first opportunity. Preferably use someone with collectibles and the taxation of
collections within your tax jurisdiction.
2) The purchase price plus any costs to sell the item(s) or
collection represent the Adjusted Cost Base (what was
paid for an item plus costs of disposition). This number
is important when determining whether a profit was made
and how much taxes will be payable on that sale.
3) Some items may sell for less than the purchase price.
This generates a loss which may, or may not, be deductible against gains on other sales. Again, consult a knowledgeable tax accountant.
4) Declare the sale of the collection either to the estate of
the deceased or as your income (depending on your local rules). Failure to do so could result in criminal
charges (tax evasion) or charges under your tax act (which
may have worse consequences, just ask Al Capone!). You
do not want to upset you local tax authorities nor do you
want to appear on their radar. DO IT RIGHT the first
time.
IAA Journal Issue 455, May/Jun ‘07
Resources Available
1) Many of the members of the IAA have experience in
disposing of collections and may be of assistance. Don’t
assume that this assistance will be free. Make sure everyone understands the arrangement from the outset.
2) Financial Advisers, Tax Accountants, Estate Lawyers,
Auction houses, other collectors, friends (who are collectors), other trusted advisors.
3) The internet may be of assistance in finding valuations
and groups or organizations of collectors.
4) Your Local Tax Authority (Canada Revenue Agency, The
IRS, The Inland Revenue, etc, etc.)
5) Collectors books, publications, magazines, journals, etc.
“To Do” List for the collectors in the family:
1. Make sure your Will and Power of Attorney’s are current and up to date.
2. Talk to your spouse and executor and let them know how
to handle your collection, who to call, who to trust and
what is the value and what you paid for it.
3. Document your collection. Give as full a description as
possible with information on what you paid for the items,
and what they are currently worth. Also, who is interest
in this item, and their contact information.
4. Help your spouse and executors by leaving a detailed
plan on how to dispose of the collection. You are the
one who knows the collection the best and you know
how best to sell it and to whom to sell it too.
5. Be considerate and do a little work to save your spouse
and executor a lot of stress.
6. Get good tax advice.
One final note to spouses and executors:
If you have a funeral for the collector in the family and
you publish an obituary with the time and date of a funeral,
then hire a security guard to protect the home and collection
during that day. If the collector was well known and was
known to have a valuable collection, someone may not be
able to resist the temptation of a break-in. However, this
ALSO applies to family members (close and distant) who
might take it upon to help themselves to what in their mind
they believe should belong to them. Rightly or wrongly, this
is a job that belongs to the executor and only to the executor.
If any relative or friend takes anything from the estate, the
executor be could be financially liable if he or she did nothing to protect the estate. The executor must take immediate
possession of all property of the estate.
31
From Jim Buchanan, England: bits & pieces
THE WAR OFFICE AND THE
SMOKELESS POWDER COMPANY. 1895.
The Smokeless Powder Co., Ltd., have recently reproduced in pamphlet form, and distributed among members
of Parliament, a round of correspondence which has passed
between them and the War Office and other Government
departments on the subject of the Company’s smokeless
powders. It opens with a letter addressed on behalf of the
Company, to the Secretary of State for War, and is as follows:
My Lord,
I have the honour to submit, by the direction of my
board a copy of resolutions which were this day passed
with regard to the question of small arms ammunition.
I am also instructed to briefly recapitulate a few points
regarding to “Rifleite.”
1. It is manufactured for the .303 calibre, and gives velocities of 2,000 f.s. plus minus 40, with pressures lower
those of pellet powder.
2. The mean variation in its velocities are well within limits laid down for the Lee-Metford rifle.
3. A grade is also manufactured for the .450 calibre giving
the same velocity as 85 grs. of black powder in the Martini Henry with equal or lower pressures.
4. Both the “ Rifleite .303 “ and the “ Rifleite .450” are
remarkably successful in the Maxim and Gardner machine guns of these calibres, for which powder to load
many millions of cartridges has this year been supplied
for use in these weapons.
5. The five years during which “Rifleite “ has been sold to
the ammunition and rifle makers at home and abroad
have afforded ample proof of its stability. In no instance
has report come from any part of the world of its failing
in any respect.
6. Besides being smokeless by day it is flameless by night
as was demonstrated in 1893 at the Ash Ranges,
Aldershot when teams from about eighteen regiments
using this powder entered for the Night Firing Competition instituted by this Company.
From a catalogue dated 1915 - first mention of “Green Powder” that I have seen.
I have the honour to be, my Lord, your obedient servant.
(Signed)
L. G. DUFF GRANT, Secretary.
Lancaster Concentrator 1882
32
IAA Journal Issue 455, May/Jun ‘07
A selection of string-tied packets
from Jim Buchanan
IAA Journal Issue 455, May/Jun ‘07
33
.450 “Roumanian” Revolver Cartridge compiled by Chris Punnett
This cartridge is something of an enigma. Firstly, it isn’t
a .45 caliber cartridge and, secondly, its name - “450 Roumanian” appears to be one of convenience rather than having
any proven connection to that country.
Brandt & Müller, in their Manual of Pistol and Revolver
Cartridges, Volume III, state “All hints point at the possibility that it was intended for a Roumanian revolver”, but fail to
mention why they think that.
The cartridge appears a number of times in Robert
Buttweiler’s auction catalogues where it is referred to as the
“.450 Romanian Bottleneck Revolver” and refers also to an
SFM drawing of 1901.
The SFM drawing #10106B dated August 7, 1901 is
shown opposite where you will note the complete absence of
the word “Roumanian” (or “Romanian”). This drawing
clearly calls it a .450 Revolver cartridge and depicts the bottlenecked case holding a jacketed bullet of 11.05-11.10mm
(0.435-0.437 ins) - in other words a .44 caliber projectile.
The normal bullet diameter for an SFM-produced .450 revolver cartridge was 11.6-11.7mm (0.457-0.461 ins). See
Figure 2 below. Note also that the drawing opposite actually
shows the land and groove dimensions of the revolver involved which dictated the diameter of the bullet. The weight
of the projectile is not given. So the first question is why
SFM would call this a .45 caliber cartridge when it was clearly
a .44 caliber cartridge?
On the drawing opposite, you will note on the 3rd line:
“Commande No 5079 - Gálatzi - du 3 Juillet 1901” - Order
No 5079 - Gálatzi - of 3 July 1901. Here we have a possible
connection to Romania. IAA member Liviu Stoica, originally from Romania himself, tells us that Gálatzi was the old
spelling of the Romanian city of Galati which is on the Danube
Fig. 1. 450 “Roumanian”. Punnett collection.
Clearly showing the bottlenecked case. Scale 2:1.
not far from the Danube Delta (the word “Galati” has an accent on the “t” which looks like a comma below it, but I cannot reproduce it here). Liviu goes on to say that in 1879 a
Navy Arsenal was established at Gálatzi. His research also
indicates that the Romanian Army ordered some Spanishmade S&W revolvers in circa 1900, but these were in .44
Russian caliber.
The word “Gálatzi” on the drawing opposite could just
as easily be the name of a person who ordered the cartridge
rather than the Romanian arsenal of that name. So the 2nd
question is was it really associated with Romania at all?
There are a few variations on this round that are known
to exist:
#1 Ball - inside primed, rsd h/s GG 450, CN jacket.
#2 Dummy - hole in case, berdan primed, G* 450 headstamp,
GM jacket
#3 Dummy - hole in case, berdan primed, G* 450 headstamp,
CN jacket
Buttweiler also refers to large and small primers on items
#2 & 3 above.
Dimensions from the specimen in my collection, in inches:
Bullet dia.:
Case length:
Rim dia.:
Head dia.:
Neck dia.:
O/A length:
Fig. 2. “normal” S FM .450 caliber bullet.
From SFM Drawing #10029, Sept. 1902
34
0.419 (at case mouth)
0.684
0.505
0.475
0.453
1.113
If you have further information about this round or the
weapon for which it was intended please let us know.
I’d like to thank Liviu Stoica for his assistance, Yves
Etievant for sharing information on the rounds in his collection, and Amand Leveau for the SFM drawing.
IAA Journal Issue 455, May/Jun ‘07
Figure. 3.
.44-caliber revolver cartridge commonly referred
to as the “.450 Roumanian”.
SFM Drawing 10106B dated August 7, 1901.
IAA Journal Issue 455, May/Jun ‘07
35
Schlesinger & Wells Ammunition Works at Northfleet, Kent, 1854
Material provided by Jim Buchanan from the Illustrated London News, Oct. 1854
Extensive Contract For The Supply Of Ball
Cartridges To The Turkish Government.
enclosure.
The girls, as fast as they form the paper tubes, place them
tidily and neatly in wooden boxes which, when full are forthwith carried into drying rooms.
It is also to be observed that the whole method in this
stage of the cartridge manufacture differs from that adopted
by our Government in the arsenals. There the cartridge is
tied up with strings in brown paper.
When dry, they receive the powder. We understand that
the girls roll an average of from 1000 to 1500 of these paper
tubes per day each. For this paper department of the complicated manufacture of ball cartridges women are the most
efficient, they do work of that description both more neatly
and more rapidly than men could.
The tubes when completed are stored in racks and carried from the room which we have now examined, through a
passage leading into another building apart altogether from
the manufactory.
In this new building we find about a hundred men and
women sitting before copper bowls, which contain the powder.
These copper bowls are appropriately fixed for the purpose of filling the tubes with powder, which is done by means
of small scoops, measuring 4 1/2 drachms each. The quantity will seem enormous to our military friends, but they must
remember that the Turkish muskets have still the old flint
It almost sounds like a joke to say that any contractor
should undertake to manufacture, and, out of his own establishment alone, to deliver in five months, thirty five million
ball cartridges.
Let us imagine that we are taking the reader through the
busy scene into the midst of which he rather suddenly comes
after passing the quiet village of Northfleet, on the south
bank of the Thames, and a few minutes, as Londoners know,
this side of Gravesend.
The first point of attraction in the Works is the department where the bullets are cast and clipped.
The portion of the premises set apart for this purpose is
about a hundred feet long, and contains two large smelting
furnaces, which feed fifteen others of smaller dimension.
Here, in the furnaces 200 pigs of lead (100 cwt. to each
divisional quantity) are daily used and transformed into bullets by the moulds. The moulds into which the molten lead is
poured, contain, every mould eighteen bullet holes, and when
the mould opens the bullets drop to the ground in clusters,
like bunches of grapes.
Troops of boys are ever busily employed in carrying these
strings of bullets to the other part of the room, where sixty
other boys are seated before bench- desks; these are so many
clipping machines for disencumbering
the bullets from that spray of lead by
which on issuing from the moulds, they
are still attached together. The bullets
thus manipulated are then collected in
barrels and subjected to a rotary motion
by steam, to clean off the burr and to render them perfectly round.
They are next carried across a yard
into the main building. Here you behold
sitting at benches from three hundred to
four hundred young women whose occupation it is to roll on brass tubes, slips
of cartridge paper, previously cut for that
purpose by machines. The bullet,
brought to them from the other building,
is placed into the further end of the tubular paper, which is at that end pasted together so as to hold securely its metallic
Ammunition Works at Northfleet - Ball Cartridge Making
36
IAA Journal Issue 455, May/Jun ‘07
and steel locks, and are made with very long
barrels. The length of the instrument requires a strong charge; and even further
provision or allowance must be given for
the waste which its structure notoriously
entails.
We noticed the extreme care taken in
this room to prevent accidents with regard
to the powder. Two foremen who have filled
military capacities, are here expressly engaged to open the powder barrels, and to
serve out their contents.
The barrels contain one hundred
pounds each, and are brought in proportion
as they are needed, from the powder magazine, built purposely for the reception of
these barrels, in a remote part of the premises. And even this magazine itself, which
is literally a sunken pit under a chalk cliff,
properly covered with a slate roof and constructed of boards fastened with copper nails even this magazine, we say, never contains more than a few barrels at a
time, the great bulk of the powder being stored in a barge on
the river.
From the filling room the filled tubes are passed into
another room for the purpose of being folded down. In this
room are employed about 200 more young women, who by a
peculiar process fold the bottoms of the tubes so as to prevent the powder from escaping. The piece folded down forms
a lappet, which is bitten off by the soldier before loading his
musket.
Ten of the cartridges thus formed are placed in a paper
case, and a hundred of these paper cases, or 1000 cartridges
are packed in an oblong deal box.
In this room the constant carriage to and fro of the paper
cases containing filled paper tubes or completed cartridges
forms a scene as busy as any beehive.
We were much amused in another room, where these
paper envelopes or cases are made by means of ingenious
wooden forms. The operatives here are little girls under the
age of twelve who earn each about 4s. 6d. a week and who
never before earned anything in their lives. In this envelope
room a cutting machine is worked to cut up the paper, and
here also are stored many hundred reams of paper awaiting
the knife.
To reach next the packing room we passed through a
yard where lay heaps of lead ready to be moulded into bullets. Thence we entered the packing room at the extremity of
the premises adjacent to the wharf, on the banks of the river.
IAA Journal Issue 455, May/Jun ‘07
Ammunition Works at Northfleet - Bullet Casting
More women are employed to sew a white canvas covering on the deal cases in which the cartridges are finally
packed, those deal cases having been previously covered by
a waterproof tarpaulin to preserve the cartridges from damp.
Here also about twenty retired soldiers are employed to
pack the cartridges in the deal cases, to nail them up and
mark them with a “Crescent and a Star”. Four hundred of
these packages are daily put on board a barge, ready to receive them at the wharf for Tilbury Fort.
We have noticed the employment of paste instead of
strings for the fastening of the tubular papers of the cartridge.
It may be useful to indicate another peculiarity in the finishing off the deal boxes containing each a thousand of these
cartridges, a peculiarity dictated by the caution of Messrs
Schlesinger and Wells. At the top, where they must be opened
on the field of battle they are not nailed down, as they are on
the other three sides; but the lid is made to fit by compression; and then, in the lid, there is the convenience of a string
handle, by which it can be lifted with a good pull out of the
box. The hammering out of the nails hurriedly, in proximity
to the foe if not in his presence, has before now blown a
brave sergeant into the air, and sacrificed valuable ammunition and more valuable lives. We are far from wishing to
disguise our admiration of the minutely forethoughtful spirit
in which Messrs. Schlesinger and Co. conduct their whole
manufacture.
With our own inspection we were delighted. Good order
reigns in the whole establishment; and we were especially
struck and charmed with the great care taken to prevent acci-
37
dents in the management of the powder. All the rooms are
thickly strewn with sawdust, which is watered every morning for the purpose of rendering harmless any loose powder
which may have been spilt upon the floor. Dozens of sacks
of sawdust are daily used for this end.
There is a large outbuilding where the deal cases are
made, and where the clatter of the carpenters’ hammers
quickly drives away an ordinary dilettante visitor. Here are
piled hundreds of half finished cases, and thousands of pieces
of wood ready cut, in sizes from the sawmills and desiccated
by a patent process, awaiting their conversion into cases. Here
also are heaps of iron (used to strengthen the cases), and a
machine for cutting the lengths and for punching the holes.
In another shed, we observed piles of empty powderbarrels:
when full they would have sufficed to blow up Sebastopol.
If but one in a thousand of the cartridges which will be delivered on the completion of this contract, takes effect, they
will cost Russia 35,000 of her soldiers.
The war is a calamity which the nation tried to avoid by
prudence, But as the proverb says, it is an ill wind that blows
nobody good, and the inhabitants of Northfleet, at least may
felicitate themselves that, in so poor a village these enormous works have, in winter, brought abundance or relief to
so many indigent families, and raised the siege of the workhouse.
It is said that some of the inhabitants are apprehensive
of danger from an explosion and, after the awful catastrophe
at Newcastle, this apprehension is not surprising. But the
two cases are not alike, At Newcastle many thousand tons of
1. The bullet mould open. 2. Packet of 10 Cartridges, as served
out to the soldiers. 3. Cartridge. 4. Section of ditto.
explosive material were deposited, whereas at the factory of
Messrs. Schlesinger and Wells there is never at any one time
sufficient powder to do mischief beyond the sheds in which
it is used, even in the hypotheses of an explosion. But from
the careful distribution of powder in the copper bowls, and
the many other precautions observed we should deem the
risk of an explosion extremely remote. Even a pipe, a cigar,
or a Lucifer match - are all strictly banned from the premises
by strong prohibitory notices.
The Annual Northwest Cartridge Collectors Show
Sept 6-8, 2007
Kootenai County Fairgrounds
4060 Government Way, Coeur d’Alene, Idaho 83815
Set up: 2pm - 6pm Thursday
Show Open: Friday 8am - 5pm, Saturday 8am to 12pm
Trade Tables: $20 Display Tables: free
Cartridges and related items only
Show Chairman: R.E. Rainbolt, 1801 Gilbert Ave., Coeur d’Alene, Idaho 83815
(208) 664-9907
38
IAA Journal Issue 455, May/Jun ‘07
Romanian Headstamps Since the Beginning of World War Two
by Liviu Stoica - Addendum 3
The original article was published in Issue 433 (Sep/Oct.
2003) with addenda in Issues 434 and 440.
An important Romanian infantry ammunition plant has
been "U.M. Sadu" (Uzina Mecanica Sadu - "Mechanic Plant
Sadu"). Established by a Royal Decree in 1939 as an "Army
Pyrotechny", the facility started to manufacture infantry ammunition a few years after that. Located in the town of
Bumbesti-Jiu on the River Jiu from Gorj county that lies in
the south-western part of Romania, U.M. Sadu plant is wellknown for the variety of small arms ammunition manufactured there (5.45x39, 7.62x39, 7.62x54R, 7.65x17/.32 Auto,
9x18 Makarov, 9mm Parabellum). In the year 2002 Romania joined the NATO forces and U.M. Sadu plant also recently made 5.56x45 and 7.62x51 ammunition.
Romanian cartridges with green lacquered steel cases
having a double or triple element headstamp showing the factory codes "321", "322" and "323" (see Figure 1) were manufactured at U.M. Sadu plant which also made a variety of
infantry weapons, hunting cartridges, detonators for the mining industry, pyrotechnical priming devices and products for
the civil market (small capacity refrigerators).
7.62x39
7.62x39
5.45x39
Figure 3. .22LR cartridge made at the U.M. Sadu Plant
Rimfire .22LR cartridges made at U.M. Sadu plant have
knurled brass cases and lead bullets with the headstamp showing the letter "S" inside a hexagon with radiating lines (see
Figure 3). Fifty .22LR cartridges (known in Romania as
5.6mm) are packed in a cardboard box with a white label.
The ammunition maker is marked on the white label as "Uzina
321" (Plant 321) but it was corrected and updated with a ballpoint pen by the packer as "Uzina 322" (Plant 322). The
white label also reads: "Cartridges for target shooting with
Sinoxid, cal. 5.6mm, 50 rounds" and "Maximum range 1750
meters" (1.087 mile), "lot number 01", "packer number 1"
and "Date of manufacture January- 2002" (see Figure 4).
"Sadu" is the name of a river that springs from Parang
Mountains and flows into the River Jiu at Bumbesti-Jiu.
Today U.M. Sadu plant is known as "S.C. U.M. Sadu S.A."
[NOTE: All the pictures and drawings used in this addendum
were taken or made by the author and cannot be used without the author's permission.]
7.62x39
Figure 1. Headstamps of cartridges made at the
U.M. Sadu Plant in 1996-7 and 2003.
Figure 2 shows a label for "Primer with Sinoxid Cal.
6.05mm (0.238-inch) for Shotshells" made at U.M. Sadu plant
in the year 1994 having the lot number 01. The box that
contains 100 primers.
Figure 2. Primers made at the U.M. Sadu Plant in 1994
IAA Journal Issue 455, May/Jun ‘07
Figure 4. .22LR box made at the U.M. Sadu Plant in 2002
39
S-Ball Plastik - Czech Shotgun Slug by
During the 1970s and 1980s in what is now the Czech
Republic, a new type of shotgun slug was developed. This
slug attained an almost dominant position, with other types
of shotgun slugs being used, during that period, only in a
limited way.
For a long time, there was no Czech domestic production
of shotgun slug projectiles. Those in use were either imported
or hand-cast by individual users. In the period between WWI
and WWII, the slug types most frequently used were the
Brenneke and Ideal types. The first slug of native design
and construction appeared c.1948, the creation of Victor
Hampl, who worked as designer at Sellier & Bellot. He
created, step by step, an entire series of lead bullets of
different forms, which were stabilized on the “arrow
principle” - all had, in the rear part of the slug, fins of different
forms. Some of these types achieved serial production.
In the year 1971, Sellier & Bellot began to supply the
market with cartridges loaded with Plastic S-Ball slugs. The
designation was derived from many former models of slug
bullets, becoming the name “S-Ball Plastik,”, as shown on
box labels. In common language, the designation “S-Ball”
and/or also “Brenek” (spelled phonetically) became the
popular title for whatever other slug bullets were in use.
The designer of the specific projectile “S-Ball Plastik”
was Sellier & Bellot’s employee Josef Hrdina. Initially these
bullets were supplied under the marketing title “Model 71”
and they were used for some time under that designation.
The projectile is formed with an iron core, encapsulated
within a plastic cover. This shotgun slug was introduced to
serial production after trials of many different evolutionary
types. These can be seen in Sellier & Bellot’s company
museum that is located in a chateaux in the city of Vlasim
(residential town of the firm Sellier & Bellot).
Construction of these bullets can be seen and understood
Slug in 12-gauge
40
Slug in 16-gauge
from drawings and photography. The cylindrical iron core
has deep striae around its perimeter, which facilitates fixing
of the plastic cover onto the core. The cavity in the rear of
the core has technological reasons, including lightening of
the projectile. At the front of the core is the nose, which
protrudes from the plastic cover. On the nose it is possible
to see the plated iron core - for the longest production time
made of white metal and by the close of production also
yellow metal.
The design of the plastic cover has made it possible to
use the S-Slug projectile in barrels of any choke.
The forms of both the metal core and the plastic cover
have joined to produce a very well-stabilized projectile in
flight. At the rear of the plastic cover is a hemispherical
lightening cavity, that is linked with a central hole in the iron
core. On the front surface of the plastic portion of the
projectile are the raised markings “* SBALL * PAT.+CSSR”.
These slugs were manufactured in 12
and 16 gauges. There was no factory
manufacture of them in 20 gauge, although
some individuals have altered the diameter
of the 16 gauge slugs to work in 20 gauge
cartridges. The slugs in 16 gauge were
initially manufactured to the same
longitudinal proportion as those of 12
gauge, with only the diameter reduced for
use in the smaller 16 gauge.
However, this design did not
achieve the required ballistic
parameters so, before long, the
projectile was shortened as shown
in the drawings. This design has
been the standard supplied on the
market for the rest of production.
It is necessary to stress here that
using slug bullets in Czechoslovakia as well as in the present
Czech Republic is licensed only for the hunting of wild pigs.
Other animals cannot be hunted with them. These cartridges,
with a different crimp, were also used by Police for their
high-penetration capability. However, this same highpenetration core, in the end, caused the ending of production
here of ammunition loaded with this bullet, in the mid-1990s.
The bullet is capable of complete penetration of police bulletproof vests. In the phase of development of this type of
cartridge in the 1970s and 1980s, the relative safeness against
possible misuse wasn’t at all taken into account.
IAA Journal Issue 455, May/Jun ‘07
Left: Cut-away cartridge. Right: Illustration of the
longest manufactured variant shells. Orange paper
shells with white printing. [see also back page]
These projectiles have been loaded in shells with
universal length of 67.5 mm (2.657 inches) and were used in
a variety of cartridge cases. For a long time paper shells
with no or relatively little printing on them were used. At a
later time, plastic shells with various sorts of printing such
as forms only noticing the S-Ball loading, or with a picture
of a wild-boar on the case, were manufactured. Some these
variants are shown below. It should be mentioned that this is
not a full selection of all known variants. In 1992 cartridges
marked “S-Ball Plastic Super” were marketed. These
difference being merely the use of plastic shells and the thennew primer type V.
The fruitfulness of the cartridge design shows in the fact
that these bullet were often copied. For example, in Ukraine
these bullets were factory-manufactured in Gauges 12, 16
and 20 and their production without any license from Sellier
& Bellot continues till now. These bullets are different in
some details and are not marked on the front as are those that
were made by S&B. Hunting experience in Ukraine with
these has been judged very positive and they are always in
demand by both dealers and their customers.
Sellier & Bellot packaged these shells over a long period
of time in boxes of various designs. This is the packaging for
10 shells in which these cartridges were supplied for the
longest time, to the trade. Colour is white and orange, with
the wording, trade mark, calibre-designating numerals and
silhouette cartridges in black. The cartridge head is illustrated
in yellow. [see back page]
In 12-gauge the bullet weight is 380 +/- 11 grains and the
weight of the iron core is 321 grains. In 16-gauge the bullet
weight is 278 grains (first variant had 363 grain) and the
weight of the core is 221 grains.
Accuracy of the bullet and its hunting capabilities has
been very good. Cartridges were popular with hunters and
achieved wide use. Ballistic examination of this ammunition
has been made several times, not only in Czech Republic,
but also abroad. Results, of course, show minute differences
according
to
the
measurement methods,
criteria classification and
the circumstances of
testing – temperature,
altitude, etc. Below is
some data shown for the
12 gauge version:
Muzzle velocity 1542 fps, maximum
range - 1720 yards.
Impact velocity at the
point of maximum range
is 738 fps. Grouping of
shots is an average 1.96
inch, with also some
results with a dispersion
of only 1.25 inch, all
fired at a distance of 55
yards. These results are
generally superior to
1-4: paper shells; 5-6: plastic. The 6th cartridge is the variant marketed as “S-Ball Plastic Super”.
other known slugs such
[shown in color on the back page]
as the Brenneke.
IAA Journal Issue 455, May/Jun ‘07
41
Collector Cartridge Prices
Robert F. Cameron
14597 Glendale Ave., S.E.
Prior Lake, MN 55372
Printed with permission of the WorldWide Gun Report, Aledo, IL.
U.S. Centerfire Rifle (Part 2)
This issue completes the section on U.S.
Centerfire Rifle cartridge prices. A section on
45-70 cartridges is also included. We appreciate
the assistance of Ray Giles in preparing this
column.
44-50 Stevens ........................................ 40.00
44-60 Sharps & Remington bn, 1.9" ......... 20.00
44-65 Stevens Everlasting, 2-1/2" ............ 35.00
44-75 Ballard Everlasting ......................... 40.00
44-77 Remington Reloadable, 2-1/4" ..... 450.00
44-77 Sharps, WRACo HS ...................... 35.00
44-77 Sharps & Remington bn, 2-1/4" ...... 25.00
44-90 Sharps & Remington bn, 2-1/4" ...... 20.00
44-90 Sharps & Remington bn,
2 1/4" WRACo h/s ........................... 30.00
44-90 Sharps & Remington bn,
2-7/16" ............................................. 35.00
44-90 Sharps & Remington bn, 2-5/8" ...... 30.00
44-105 Sharps & Remington bn,
2-7/16" ............................................. 40.00
44-105 Remington Spl bn, 2-7/16",
ppl, raised HS ................................... 60.00
44-(90-100)-2.6" Remington Straight,
ppl ................................................... 30.00
44-95 What Cheer, ppl............................ 150.00
44-100 2-13/16" Ballard Everlasting, ppl . 25.00
444 Marlin ............................................... 1.00
45 Ballard, 2-13/16", Hart 2-pc case ......... 75.00
45 Peabody Carbine ................................ 12.00
45 Roumanian Peabody-Martini, US mfg . 40.00
45-50 Peabody Sporting, 1-1/2" ............... 10.00
45-60 Wesson Straight Target, 2" ............. 10.00
45-60 WCF, 1.9" ...................................... 6.00
45-60 WCF, raised HS .............................. 20.00
45-70 Van Choate, 2-1/4" ....................... 150.00
45-70 USG, 2.1" (Commercial) .................. 1.00
45-70 Multiball, UMC SH ......................... 5.00
45-70 Sharps, 2.1", ppl ........................... 40.00
45-75 WCF ........................................... 10.00
45-75 WCF, Farrington primed ................ 15.00
45-75 WCF, Milbank primed ................. 125.00
45-75 WCF, DCCo 99 45-75 .................... 25.00
45-75 WCF, DCCo 00 45-75 .................... 25.00
45-75 Sharps, 2.1", ppl ........................... 40.00
45-78 Wolcott ......................................... 70.00
45-80 Sharpshooter .................................10.00
45-82 WCF ............................................ 15.00
42
Dale J. Hedlund
Monticello, MN
45-85 Bullard, 2.1" ................................12.00
45-85 Bullard, wood rod dummy .............. 30.00
45-85 Bullard, raised HS .......................... 20.00
45-85 Marlin,
WRACO 45-85 MAR HS ................. 45.00
45-85 Marlin, rsd UMC ........................... 50.00
45-85 Ward-Burton ................................. 75.00
45-85 WCF, 2.4" ................................... 12.00
45-85 WCF, DCCo 45-85 W .................... 15.00
45-85 WCF Express ................................. 15.00
45 Peabody-Martini ................................. 8.00
45-90 Sharps, 2.4", ppl............................ 35.00
45-90 WCF, 2.4" ...................................... 5.00
45-90 WCF, dummy, solid bullet .............. 15.00
45-90 WCF, DCCo 45-90 ......................... 12.00
45-90 WCF, HV ..................................... 10.00
45-90 WCF, HV, FMJ............................... 20.00
45-100 Ballard, 2-13/16",ppl ................... 25.00
45-100 Pacific Ballard Everlasting,
2-9/16" ............................................. 50.00
45-100 Rem. Creedmore, 2.6" .................. 35.00
45-100 Sharps, 2.4", Berdan, ppl ............. 25.00
45-100 Sharps, 2.6", raised HS ................. 75.00
45-100 Sharps, WRACo 45S 2-6/10" ...... 50.00
45-100 Sharps, WRACo board dummy .... 35.00
45 Brown Standard ................................. 85.00
45-105 Sharps, 2-7/8", Berdan, ppl ......... 30.00
45-105 Sharps, 2-7/8", WRACo 45S ........ 40.00
45-120 Sharps, UMC SH 45 - 3-1/4" ........ 85.00
45-125-550 Sharps Spl, 3-1/4" ................. 85.00
45-125 Winch. Express,
UMC SH 45-125 .............................. 35.00
45-125 Winch. Express,
WRACo 45 EX ................................ 50.00
450 Watts Magnum, SPEER 450 WATTS ... 5.00
458 Winchester Magnum .......................... 2.00
46 WCF M1886 ..................................... 750.00
460 Weatherby Magnum ............................ 4.00
50 Meigs, with patent date ........................ 65.00
50-50 Meigs Rifle, plain .......................... 35.00
50 Meigs Rimless .................................. 85.00
50-45 Carbine, 1.3" ................................. 7.00
50-70 Govt, lead ...................................... 5.00
50-70 Govt, Benet primed .......................... 8.00
50-70 Govt, Benet primed, steel anvil ....... 10.00
50-70 Govt, wood b’t dummy,
copper cs ......................................... 75.00
50-70 Govt,
rsd E.REMINGTON&SONS ............ 35.00
50-70 Govt, Farrington primed ................. 20.00
50-70 Govt, DCCo 50-70 ......................... 20.00
50-70 Govt, Milbank primed .................. 275.00
50-70 Govt, Rodman-Crispin patent ......... 65.00
John F. Kuntz
7850 County Road 6
Maple Plain, MN 55359
50-70 Govt, wood rod dummy, UMC ....... 15.00
50-70 Govt, buck & ball, UMC ................ 60.00
50-70 Govt, wood shot, UMC 50-70 .......... 7.00
50-70 Govt, shot - grey wad, WRACo ...... 5.00
50-70 Sharps, 1-3/4", No HS, ppl ............. 60.00
50-70 Sharps, 1-3/4", No h/s, ppl,
by Sharps ......................................... 85.00
50-70 Sharps, 1-3/4", UMC HS, ppl ......... 50.00
50-70 Sharps, 1-3/4", WRACO HS,ppl .... 60.00
50-90-473 Sharps, 2-1/2", plain ............... 25.00
50-90-473 Sharps, 2-1/2", by Winchester . 40.00
50-90-473 Sharps, 2-1/2",
UMC SH 50-2 1/2" .......................... 50.00
50-90 Sharps, Winchester board dummy .. 45.00
50-95 WCF, WRACo 50-95 WCF ........... 25.00
50-95 WCF, WRACo 50-95 EX ............... 20.00
50-95 WCF, shot, WRACo 50-95 EX ...... 15.00
50-95 WCF, UMCCo 50 EX .................... 15.00
50-95 WCF, CCC 50-95 .......................... 10.00
50-95 WCF, DCCo ................................... 75.00
50-95 WCF, ELEY 50 WIN ...................... 20.00
50-95 WCF, ELEY 50-95-300 .................. 50.00
50-100 Sharps, No HS .............................. 40.00
50-100-450 Winchester,
WRACo 50-100-450 ........................ 30.00
50-100-450 Winchester, Shot,
WRACo HS ..................................... 50.00
50-100 Winchester, fmj,
WRACo 50-100-450 ........................ 40.00
50-105-450 WCF, board dummy ........... 750.00
50-110 WCF, proof-tinned,
WRACo WHV ................................. 25.00
50-110 Express, WRACo 50-110 EX ...... 20.00
50-110 Express, shot, 50-110 EX ............. 20.00
50-110 Express,
ELEY 50 WINCHESTER ................ 20.00
50-110-450, CCC 50-110 .......................... 8.00
50-115 Bullard, lead .............................. 15.00
50-115 Bullard, lead, copper tube ............ 20.00
50-120-473 Sharps Spl, Berdan ................ 50.00
50-140 Express, lead, WRACo 50-140 EX,
Board Dummy ............................... 600.00
50-140 Express, lead,
WRACo 50-140 EX ....................... 800.00
50-140 Sharps, ppl ............................... 125.00
50-140 Sharps, UMC SH 50 - 3-1/4" ...... 140.00
52-70 Sharps, 1.75", plain ..................... 300.00
54 Sharps .............................................. 60.00
58 Carbine, lead .................................... 15.00
58 Berdan Musket, lead ............................ 15.00
58 Berdan Musket, magnetic head ............ 30.00
58 Musket, Milbank primed ................... 300.00
58 Musket, Orcutt primed ......................... 50.00
IAA Journal Issue 455, May/Jun ‘07
58 Musket, WRACo 58 MUSKET ........... 25.00
58 Musket, Martin “button” head ............. 60.00
58 Musket Serb. Peabody ........................ 50.00
58 Meigs Madrid ................................... 75.00
58 Rem. Carbine, copper case ................... 25.00
58 Roberts CF, lead, plain ........................ 20.00
58 Turkish Snider, lead ........................... 35.00
58 Dangerfield & Lefever ....................... 150.00
70-150 Winchester, thick rim ................ 1250.00
70-150 Winchester, board dummy,
thick rim ...................................... 1000.00
70-150 Winchester, reproduction,
thin rim ............................................ 50.00
75 Gatling, board dummy ....................... 250.00
1" Gatling, wood rod dummy ................ 2000.00
1" Gatling, lead, WRACo HS ................. 600.00
1" Gatling, lead, Benet primed ................ 150.00
1" Gatling, lead, Bar primed ................... 200.00
1" Gatling, Canister ............................. 275.00
45-70
1873 Inside Primed, NHS ........................... 5.00
1877 Inside Primed, NHS ........................... 5.00
1877 IP, RF 3 77 ................................. 200.00
1877 IP, other HS .................................. 25.00
1878 Inside Primed ................................ 15.00
1879 Inside Primed ................................ 20.00
1880 Inside Primed ................................. 5.00
1881 Inside Primed ................................. 5.00
1882 Inside Primed ................................. 5.00
1883 External Primed ............................... 5.00
1884 External Primed ............................... 5.00
1885 External Primed ............................... 8.00
1886 Esternal Primed ............................... 2.00
1887 External Primed ............................... 2.00
1888 External Primed ............................... 2.00
1889 External Primed ............................... 2.00
1890 External Primed ............................... 2.00
1891 External Primed ............................... 2.00
1892 External Primed ............................... 2.00
1893 External Primed ............................... 2.00
1894 External Primed ............................... 4.00
1895 External Primed ............................... 4.00
IAA Journal Issue 455, May/Jun ‘07
1896 External Primed ............................... 4.00
1897 External Primed ............................... 4.00
1898 External Primed .............................. 10.00
1898 Smokeless Powder .......................... 15.00
U.S. Carbine, raised HS .......................... 125.00
U.S. Centennial 1776-1876 .................... 175.00
USCCO Thick Rim .................................. 10.00
USCCO Thin Rim .................................... 10.00
R/F 3-77-405 Berdan ............................. 200.00
R/F 4-77-405 Berdan ............................... 35.00
R/F 9-78-405 Boxer ................................ 20.00
R/F 7-79-500 Boxer ................................ 20.00
R/F 9-79-500 Boxer ................................ 12.00
R/F 10-79-500 Boxer ............................... 12.00
R/F 1-81-405 Boxer ................................ 10.00
R/F 1-81-500 Boxer ................................ 10.00
R/F 4-81-500 ......................................... 10.00
R/F 6-81-500 ......................................... 10.00
R/F 1-82-500 ........................................... 5.00
C/F 2-82-405 ......................................... 10.00
R/F 2-82-500 ........................................... 8.00
R/F 3-82-500 ......................................... 15.00
R/F 4-82-500 ......................................... 10.00
R/F 5-82-500 ......................................... 15.00
R/F 6-82-405 ........................................... 5.00
Misc. Inside Primed
45-70 Multiball, NHS .............................. 20.00
45-70 Phoenix Multiball
(paper sabot, NHS) .......................... 50.00
Sharpshooter 2.4" Mod.81
R/F
R/F
R/F
R/F
R/F
R/F
R/F
R/F
R/F
R/F
4-80-500 ......................................... 25.00
6-80-500 ......................................... 25.00
9-80-500 ......................................... 25.00
3-81-500 ........................................... 8.00
4-81-500 ........................................... 5.00
6-81-500 ........................................... 5.00
9-82-500 ........................................... 5.00
3-83-500 ........................................... 8.00
6-83-500 ........................................... 5.00
4-84-500 ........................................... 5.00
Military Loadings - UMC Contract
R/B 9-78-405 or 500 ................................ 8.00
R/B 10-78-405 or 500 ............................... 8.00
R/B 45-70-405 or 500 (large HS letters) ..... 5.00
R/B 45-70-405 or 500 (small HS letters) .... 8.00
R/B 45-70, 2.5" Gatling Blank .................. 20.00
WRACo Contract
R/W (Date)-405 ....................................... 8.00
R/W (Date) blank ..................................... 5.00
U.S.C.Co. Contract
R/L (date) Thin Rim ............................... 10.00
R/L (date) Thick Rim ............................... 8.00
Morse Patent Mod.’86-87
R/F 3-86-500 ......................................... 50.00
F 8-86-500 ............................................ 30.00
F 9-86-500 ............................................. 15.00
F 10-86-500 ........................................... 10.00
F 11-86-500 ........................................... 10.00
F 1-87-500 ............................................... 7.50
F 2-87-500 ............................................... 7.50
Ceremonial & Function Dummies
USC 405-2.1" Ball ................................ 175.00
USC 405-1.6" ........................................ 75.00
RW 4-83-405 FMJ ................................... 15.00
RW 9-83-405 & 500 FMJ ......................... 15.00
RW 9-84-405 FMJ ................................... 15.00
RW 10-86-405 FMJ ................................. 15.00
RW 8-88-405 FMJ ................................... 15.00
RW 1-90-405 FMJ ................................... 15.00
RW 2-90-405 FMJ ................................... 15.00
RW 1-91-405 FMJ ................................... 15.00
Frankford Arsenal Blanks
F 10-80 through F 11-82 ............................ 5.00
F 3-81 through F 12-82 ............................. 5.00
All others ................................................. 2.00
43
Benchrest Cartridges - Something Old, Something New
by Ray Meketa
Something Old
L-R: 219 Gipson Wasp, 219 Gipson Wasp
(30-06 Rim), 6x47 H&H, The Eraser
219 Gipson Wasp
Gunsmith Vernor Gipson's version of the Wasp cartridge.
1.715" CL, 28-degree shoulder. Used primarily by shooters
using Gipson's custom made rifles.
219 Gipson Wasp - 30-06 Case Head
Cartridge rim turned to .470" for rifles with '06 bolt face.
Something New
L-R: 30 PI - III, 30 PI - II, 30 U Name It, 6 SMC
30 PI - III
A Hunter Benchrest (HBR) cartridge. 30 WSM brass, 1.8"
CL, 40-degree shoulder, 60-grain capacity. Has potential as
a possible long-range cartridge.
30 PI -II
HBR cartridge. 30 WSM brass, 1.4" CL, 40-degree shoulder, 46-grain capacity. Will probably be seen in the new
WSSM brass when high quality cases become available.
6 x 47 H&H
30 U Name It
Standard cartridge but with 40-degree shoulder. Not much
else that could be done to this diminutive cartridge. H&H
stands for the "designers" Harvey and Henrikson, not Holland and Holland.
Another HBR cartridge. 30 SAUM brass, 1.5" CL, 30degree shoulder, 50-grain capacity, rim turned to 308W size.
Still under development, not yet named. WSSM brass would
make a better case.
The Eraser
6 SMC
6mm caliber using 220 Swift case with 30-degree shoulder, 1.5" CL. Was a varmint cartridge but was a grandparent
of the 6 PPC so deserves recognition.
44
Some shooters call this the 6mm Smack. 30 SAUM brass,
1.8" CL, futuristic convex shoulder. Designed as a long range
cartridge but its potential as an HBR round is obvious. Touted
to be the ballistically ideal capacity and shape for 6mm with
heavy bullets at long range. T his and other SMC calibers are
still under development.
IAA Journal Issue 455, May/Jun ‘07
Welcome New Members (since February 1)
Jerry Kowalsky, 3943 Irvine Blvd, #91, Irvine, CA 92602
[email protected],
Allen G. Avinger, PO Box 354, Delta Jct, AK 99737
Specialty: 34, 5
Greg Rucker, 1916 Cottonwood Drive, Aiken, SC 29803
[email protected] Specialty: 16
Jacques Fischweiler, 313 Avenue de la Basilique, Boite 80, 1081
Bruxelles, BELGIUM, [email protected]
Specialty: 43
Tony Edwards, 275 Haydons Road, Wimbledon, London SW19
8TX [email protected] Specialty: 23
Yves Etievant, 44, quai Nicolas Rolin, Dijon 21000, FRANCE
[email protected] Specialty: 24, 30, 3, 61
Richard Bushman, Box 157 - 609 Holcomb, Milledgeville, IL 61051
Specialty: 5, 34, 28
Edward J. Rempfer, 1172 Emma Lane, Warminster, PA
18974 [email protected] Specialty: 23 US military
Ferris Jackson, PO Box 1572, Livingston, MT 59047
Causie Crane, 1560 Ozora Rd, Loganville, GA 30052
[email protected] Specialty: 5
Edward Hoch, 36 Waterloo Ave, Berwyn, PA 19312
[email protected]
Jeff Balliew, 2803 Shelterwood Lane, Arlington, TX 76016
[email protected] specialty: 55 Kynoch, 35 Weatherby, 62
Victoria Guerrero, c/o B. Simborio, 12801 S. Figueroa St., Los
Angeles, CA 90061
Fred Donley, 4737 S. Jefferson Rd, Wooster, OH 44691
specialty: 34
Walter Shipman, 623 Tulane Ave, Big Spring, TX 79720
Douglas H. Boxler, Crime Lab - 40 S. Alabama St., Indianapolis,
IN 46204 [email protected] Specialty: 28, 8, 55
Robin Johnson, 7 Hilda Road, Chatham, Kent ME4 5PX, UK
Brad Dixon, 13 Turi Ave, Whenuapai, Auckland 1250, New Zealand
[email protected] specialty: 21, 52
John Ayers, 936 Rowe Street, Akron, OH 44306
Rune Vikeby, Agmund Bolts vei 15, OSLO 0664, Norway
[email protected] Specialty: 24, 43, 62, 68
Russell Brownson, 1294 Armour Rd RR 9, Peterborough,
ON K9J 6Y1, Canada [email protected]
Specialty: 7 Dominion, 35 obsolete
New Address
Allen Porter: 630 H St, Sparks, NV 89431
Lowell Warren: 10316 Elliott Rd Snohomish, WA 98296
Email Change
John Williamson: [email protected]
Dave Clemence: [email protected]
Peter Dissegna: [email protected]
Andrew Smith: [email protected]
Dave Nelson: d[email protected]
Pennsylvania Cartridge Collectors’ Show
August 17-18, 2007 (Set-up on the 17th)
Holiday Inn, Morgantown, PA
PA Turnpike Exit 298
1-610-286-3000 for reservations and directions
8-ft tables are $35.00 each for both days
Show Times: Friday 8:00am - 9:00pm, Saturday 8:00am - 2:00pm
For Table Reservations or Show Information, contact:
Jon Cohen
273 Beacon Drive
Phoenixville, PA 19460
(610) 933-7318
IAA Journal Issue 455, May/Jun ‘07
Paul Callow
19 Walnel Drive
Royersford, PA 19468
(610) 948-8306
45
Letters to the Editor
From Dimi Goulas, Switzerland
Ref: Journal #451, Pg 48. Swiss 4-round Charger
This Swiss clip was
made for the International Military Match
with ordnance rifles.
Since the Swiss K31
rifle (Karabiner Model
1931) for the GP11
(Gewehr Patrone 1911)
cartridge 7.5 x 55 has a
load capacity for 6
rounds, and for the rapid fire in the military competition you
need 10 rounds, this 4-round clip facilitated the quick loading in the K31 with the 6-round and the 4-round clips. This
started in 1936 and ended in 1962, when more appropriate
rifles like the Standard Rifle, with a magazine capacity of 10
rounds were allowed by the C.I.S.M. (Compétition International de Sport Militer) in the strict military competition. So
clip became obsolete. It is though a very good collector’s
item.
At right and below a typical HS and a
cartridge. Note the grease/wax on the bullet
is not like the normal GP11, it covers 2/3 of
the bullet, not just the case-mouth and part
of the bullet.
From Pete deCoux, Arizona
Ref: “.30 Blake” Box
A “.30 Blake” box. It is (slightly soiled) textured, light
tan paper with pencil. The box is by U.M.C.Co., and unmarked other than the pencil. If we knew when U.M.C. used
this textured paper box we could probably date the box, as I
think it was used only for a reasonably short time. Perhaps a
reader knows?
Box is empty, & doesn’t appear to have ever had any
other labeling. Wear marks in the lid somewhat closely match
the size head of a “.30 Blake” if the rim bevel is taken into
account, and I see bullet nose marks in the bottom which
would seem to conform to those a “Blake” or Krag-style bullet would make. The exterior soil marks match the line of the
unsoiled (found under the top) when the box has “.30 Blake”
46
rounds in it. So it appears to have originally held rounds
similar to a “.30 Blake’s” overall length.
This “Blake” box, by U.M.C. Co., is of a short lived /
used hard paper material, with a light tan colored, textured
outer, and inner surface. Perhaps manufactured by molding
and pressing, and not seen, by me, on any other ammo makers boxes.
Another similar (in construction/material/color) empty
box, we are aware of, by U.M.C. Co. for the .25-36-86 Marlin Smokeless Short Range round has a 7/8" x 7/8", red and
black printed white “UMC SMOKELESS” sticker on the
back, showing the logo in the form of a shield. I understand
this sticker was also only used for a short time. (See The .22
Box, Volume 22, No. 2. pg. 7 for this sticker, and no reply, as
yet, from Rich about the time of that box). This Marlin box
has an under label for the .25-36-117 Marlin Smokeless round.
So the U.M.C. Co. Marlin box is a contemporary, and I
thought that this box might be helpful in dating the “30 Blake”
box, by knowing when these Marlin load(s) were offered, or
the “SMOKELESS” sticker was used. HELP ?
So I’m trying to find out if this could perhaps be another
“.30 Blake” box, or perhaps a variation of the box as recalled by Graham Burnside, but without the printed label
which could, or could not, have been added for convenience
by the dealers, McDaneld & Wheeler (See the Blake article
in the IAA, March 2004, issue 436, pg. 34).
Knowing I’ll very probably prove nothing, but by tying
the box time line, to the cartridge time line something might
be added to our knowledge. Plus the box material might help
others in dating other U.M.C. Co. boxes. I’m just fishing for
the information, that this might be a possible .30 Blake variation box, and thought a time line of the box material might
be helpful, knowing the pencil “30 Blake” could very well
not be contemporary to the box.
IAA Journal Issue 455, May/Jun ‘07
From Lew Curtis, Georgia: an interesting letter about German Caseless Cartridges
IAA Journal Issue 455, May/Jun ‘07
47
From Dave Birkin, Wales
Ref: Journal #446, Pg 46. 57mm Littlejohn
Further to the very informative data that Paul Smith
kindly included in November/December 2005 Journal I eventually managed to get hold of a 6pr 6cwt case.
The mystery of the 60mm rear skirt on the projectile is
solved. Although the round is referred to as a 57x512, the
case mouth is in fact 60mm in diameter to accommodate the
driving band on the projectile that, with the HE projectile fit
partly inside the case.
The attached photograph shows
the complete 6pr 6cwt round next to
a 6pr 7cwt round for scale. NOTE
that the rear skirt of the projectile
would fit inside the case but the photograph shows it resting on top, it is a
tight fit (unfired case) and I don’t want
to damage the rear of the projectile
by forcing it in. [see also back cover]
a picture. When this one was made he used Bertram’s 505
brass but is getting properly headstamped brass from Otto
Planyavsky Munitions (OPM) in the future.
Bullet dia.:
Case Length:
Rim dia.:
Head dia.:
Neck dia.:
O/A length:
9.48mm (0.373 ins)
76.25mm (3.002 ins)
16.21mm (0.638 ins)
16.2mm (0.637 ins)
10.25mm (0.404 ins)
94.23mm (3.710 ins)
From Dr. J.R. Crittenden Schmitt, Maryland
Ref: Journal #454, Pg 49. Russian Trench Art
I have two of these which were given to me by the director of a Soviet museum when I was in the SU for the
Smithsonian. I showed them on the IAA Forum earlier this
year and recalled the story (they were used in medal ceremonies - medal at the bottom of the tankard and vodka to the
top. Drink your way to the medal). A Russian replied that
these are current-day souvenirs being made
and sold in Moscow. I have had mine since
the early 1970s so they certainly are not
current. Mine are both made from FAmade 40mm BOFORS Lend-Lease cases
dated in the 1940s. Those shown are also
40mm Bofors cases.
Comment from Mike Carrick:
I bought mine in 1990 and never saw another for sale at the flea markets from 1990
to 1997 during which time I was there ten
visits.
From Martin Andrew, Australia
Ref: New Chinese Ammunition
From Will Reuter, South Africa
Ref: Journal #454, Pg 52. Fred Wells .505/.375
It looks like, yet again, the wheel is being re-invented. A
local fellow (to South Africa) has developed a 505 necked
down to 375. He is Jacobus FOURIE. He is calling his
caliber the .375 Oryxx. It was supposed to be the .377 Oryxx
but the name got mixed up at Clymer when they made the
reamer for him and the rifle is also marked .375. Attached is
48
1. 14.5mm Anti-Aircraft Machine Gun and Ammunition
China has developed a lightweight 14.5mm anti-aircraft
machine gun designated the QJG02. It has a rate of 600rpm
and an effective range of 2,000m, however its effective rate
of fire is 100rpm. It was introduced with two new
14.5x114mm rounds, the DGJ02 APDS-T and the DGE02
APHEI-T. The DGJ02 uses a green-coloured sabot pro-
jectile with a 45-gram tungsten penetrator using a dual
colour tracer to aid ranging. From the JQG02 it has a
muzzle velocity of 1,250m/sec and is quoted as being
able to penetrate 20mm of armour plate set at an angle
of 500 at 1000m. The DGE02 cartridge weighs between
IAA Journal Issue 455, May/Jun ‘07
SLICS 2006
175 and 188grams. At 800m it is quoted as having a
90% chance of being able to penetrate 15mm of armour
plate at 300. When the incendiary material explodes there
are over 20 pieces between 1.2mm and 2mm.
2. 5.8x21mm Pistol Cartridges
The 5.8x21mm DAP92 cartridge is
33.5mm in length, weighs 7.5grams complete with the projectile weighing 3.1grams
and 16.3mm long. The quoted muzzle
velocity is 390m/sec. At 50m it can penetrate a steel helmet or 50mm of wood.
There is also a subsonic round, the Courtesy Dr. J.R.
DCV05, available in 5.8x21mm but I can- Crittenden Schmitt
not find any details other than it would be
33.5mm in length and that is effective range when fired from
the QCW05 5.8mm Silenced Sub-machine Gun is 100 metres.
which is obviously what this caliber is. The second scan
shows a 12-gauge box: Vulcano is obviously the trade name
of the shotshells and they were manufactured by INDÚSTRIA
METALÚRGICA GAZOLA in CAXIAS DO SOL (there is
another Caxias in Brazil, so they have a “Caxias in the South”
to differentiate between the two). [see also on back page]
3. Chinese S&W Model 10 Revolver and Ammunition
The new Chinese police revolver being introduced into
the Public Security Bureau is a butchered copy of the Smith
and Wesson (S&W) Military and Police/Model 10 revolver.
The major differences are an enclosed ejector rod, ramp front
side and a rear sight, which the S&W Model 19, an improved
version of the Mode1 10 incorporated.
There two types of service ammunition identified and
the best description would be 9x19mm Rimmed to replicate
the old .38 S&W cartridge. The first is a duplex rubber round
which looks the same size and shape as the old 38/200 and
designed for internal security use during riots. This is 30mm
long and weighs in at 12.6 grams. The rubber projectiles
will be low velocity otherwise they would foul the rifling.
The second cartridge is a copper-jacketed semi-wadcutter
round. Both have a heavy roll crimp at the mouth of the
case.
4. 9x19mm Cartridges
There is a new Chinese 9x19mm low impact and wounding cartridge with the projectile weighing 7 grams with a
muzzle velocity of 378 m/sec. The cartridge is 29.9mm long
overall.
The 9x19 mm DAP92A round is 29.95mm long with its
8-gram projectile being 19mm long. With a muzzle velocity
of 360m/sec it also can penetrate 50mm of timber at 50m
also, but the type of timber is not disclosed.
From Will Reuter, South Africa
Ref: Journal #454, Pg 46. 9.1x40R
Attached are 2 scans, one from the RWS/Utendoerffer
catalogue of about 1898 showing a 40-gauge shotshell case,
IAA Journal Issue 455, May/Jun ‘07
49
From Jose Luis Rubio, Uruguay
Ref: Early Shotshell ID Required.
A close friend and new collector came
to me with an iron primed shell, for classification. The shell has some corrosion
and is headstamped DELMARD No
PATENT 12. Can you help, as I could
not find it in my files.
Jim Buchanan’s response - an English patent abridgment from October 24, 1879.
From Don MacChesney, Missouri
Ref: Journal #454, Pg 47. 9mm Nagant Designation.
The “Pistolet” referred to on the box is the Nagant doublebarrel rolling-block
constabulary pistol,
M1877. I was recently able to cast the
chambers and slug
the bores of pistol
number 169x. It is in
excellent interior
condition, so the
measurements are reliable. The bore diameter is .3555" 9mm. The groove diameter is .3685" - 9.3mm. The chamber
length is not well defined, as is appropriate for a paperpatched bullet, but is about .870" - 22.1mm. The breech can
be closed on the short version of the 9.4mm Dutch cartridge.
However, the Dutch bullet is too fat by .016" - 0.4mm.
[Editor’s note: thanks, Don, that addresses the “Pistolet”.
Now can anyone tell us why it is “99”?]
From Ray Meketa, Arizona
Ref: Wartime .22 Bullets.
Another great box of “Wartime” .22 bullets. These are
made from fired copper cased .22 LR and have the Remington
“U” on the base. Tan label over a green box.
50
IAA Journal Issue 455, May/Jun ‘07
From Liviu Stoica, Tennessee
Ref: 20 x 138B Finnish Headstamp.
This picture shows the impressed headstamp markings for a
brass shell case 20x138B Long
Solothurn made in Finland. The
belted bottle-necked case with a
length of 138mm (5.433inch) has
a rim diameter of 26.9mm
(1.059inch). The round was used
by the Finnish 20mm Lahti
Mod.39 antitank rifle and by the
German antiaircraft 2cm FlaK 30-38.
Starting from the 9 o'clock position and going clockwise,
the headstamp markings are: "E4", circle with two crossed
arrows, "20/40", "T" and "41". I assume this 20x138B brass
shell case from Finland was manufactured in 1941 ("41") at
Tikkakoski ("T") arsenal. I do not know the meaning of the
other headstamp markings. Anyone who can help?
Note that a small oval mark overlaps the number 2 from
the "20/40" stamp. Around the 12 o'clock and 7 o'clock positions the markings left on this shell case head during the
extraction and ejection process are clearly visible.
in place by a dimple. The powerful 30x155B round was
used by the Russian 30mm NR-30 aircraft gun which had
been introduced in mid-1950s. A gas-operated gun, the NR30 (Nudelman & Richter) with a high rate of fire (approx.
800-900 rds/min) was used by some Soviet and Chinese aircraft.
The Russian 30x165mm rimless round with a 164.8mm
(6.488inch) long bottlenecked thick zinc-clad steel case has
a rim diameter of 39.9mm (1.570inch). The impressed
headstamp markings are: "581-87" (shell case lot number
581 and two digit date 87 for the year of manufacture) over
"184-3" (State factory number 184, Zelenodolsk Factory
Associates and quality control stamp 3). The KV-3 percussion primer with a diameter of 10.5mm (0.413inch) is used
by the 30x165mm rounds fired at light-armored targets by
the 2A42, 2A72 and 2A38M 30mm automatic guns.
Note: 30x165 rounds having electrical primers are used
by Navy and aircraft 30mm guns.
“HOW IT ALL STARTED”
The cowboy hero and his grizzled sidekick came
riding over the hill and discovered a poor homesteader with a long arrow sticking out of him, lying
beside a burned-out wagon. Silently, the sidekick
dismounted, pulled out the arrow, and examined it
slowly, end to end.
From Liviu Stoica, Tennessee
Ref: Russian 30mm Headstamps
“Cheyenne” he said finally.
“How do you know for sure?” the hero asked,
leaning forward.
30x155B
30x165
The Russian 30x155B round with a 154.5mm (6.082inch)
long belted bottlenecked brass case has a rim diameter of
39.8mm (1.566inch). Clockwise from the 9 o'clock position, the impressed headstamp markings are: "271" (lot number) over "K" (Cyrillic letter code "K" for the year of shell
case manufacture 1956), various Cyrillic letters and "184"
(shell case maker's code, Zelenodolsk Factory Associates)
over "0" (quality control stamp). The KV-30 percussion
primer screw (marked in Cyrillic "KB-30") with 3 wrench
holes has a diameter of 16.5mm (0.649inch) and it is locked
IAA Journal Issue 455, May/Jun ‘07
“Well,” the grizzled old timer began. “Yah see
this here little circle on the end, with the C.A. in it?”
“Well,” he drawled. “Thet stands fer Cheyenne Arsenal. “Thet 66 is fer 1866, and thet H./M. means
fer Homesteader or Match use.”
As they rode into the sunset , the hero mused, “I
always wondered how you could do that.”
THINGS HAVEN’T BEEN THE SAME
SINCE!
Provided by John Kuntz
(who lives in Cheyenne country?)
51
Black Mesa Express Ammunition - compiled by Lew Curtis
The Black Mesa Rifle Company was founded in 1992
by Ronald Brian McDaniels in Kenton Oklahoma. Mr.
McDaniels fell in love with the land while flying over the
Black Mesa area of Oklahoma on a trip home from Alaska.
Black Mesa is the highest point in Oklahoma and was the
inspiration for naming the company and remains a symbol
of beauty combined with rugged resilience that is expected
of Black Mesa Rifles. Mr McDaniels began his early life as
a machinist instructor in the military, later he became a pilot
and a Professional Engineer. He spent time as an Alaskan
bush pilot with extensive target shooting and hunting experience.
In 1992 Mr McDaniels began designing and building firearms and ammunition in Kenton, Oklahoma. In 1993 he introduced the .375 Black Mesa Express rifle and cartridge.
The cartridge was based on the .404 Jeffrey necked down to
.375 and with the rim turned down. The cartridge propelled
a 300 gr bullet at about 3000 ft/sec with an energy of roughly
6200 ft lbs. A short time later he introduced the .338 Black
Mesa Express. These cartridges were in a class of their own
until 1999 when Remington released their line of Ultra Magnum cartridges. At about this same time, Mr McDaniels introduced the 6.5mm and 7mm Black Mesa Express cartridges.
Mr McDaniels continued to build and customize firearms
until 2004 when he retired due to health problems. During
2004 he sold the Black Mesa Rifle Company to Craig Smith.
The sale included an apprenticeship agreement to ensure the
quality and technology of the Black Mesa products would
continue to meet the absolute standards established by Mr
52
McDaniels. Mr Smith now operates the company which is
located at 600 Hamilton St, Mason City, Nebraska 68855.
He is continuing to improve and upgrade the products of the
company.
The information above was kindly provided by Mr Craig
Smith.
Illustrated are the Black Mesa cartridges, headstamps and
box labels. The cases are manufactured by MAST Technologies.
IAA Journal Issue 455, May/Jun ‘07
.375 Black Mesa
.338 Black Mesa
IAA Journal Issue 455, May/Jun ‘07
6.5mm Black Mesa
7mm Black Mesa
53
From Zac Weighman, Michigan. Above: Turkish Snider
box, tan label, box contents unknown
Below: .303 British packet. Tan paper wrapper with red
lettering. Rounds headstamped MAXIM 1895
From Terry Warnock, Australia,
a J. Paxton Moir Shot bag.
From Mark Newcomer, Maine. A nice round-cornered
UMC box. Red UMC logo on off-white box. Contents
unknown
54
From Woodin Laboratory Reference Collection.
Photo labeled: “German small caliber taper-bore ammunition. left to right: 14/9mm; 14/9mm MG131; 13/?; .280
Ultra H.V. Halger”
IAA Journal Issue 455, May/Jun ‘07
WANTED: .44 Henry Cartridges. Any
raised headstamp or any no headstamp. Also
any cartridge with “US” headstamp. Also
any empty boxes. Will buy outright or trade.
I have a large collection of .44 Henrys and
other cartridges, many rare.
Paul Bennett, 2400 Blossom St.,
Columbia, SC 29205 803-799-4323
[email protected] [457,w]
For Sale: After 56 years as a general car-
FOR SALE or TRADE: 50 Cal BMG
tridge collector, I am beginning to liquidate
my collection. I am now offering European
sporting and some military cartridges. All
are single specimens. There are many semirare and rare items. Prices range from $1
to $300. Eventually I will publish a list,
but for now, please send your want list to
John Heyman: [email protected] [458,w]
(12.7x99), new revised list, of over 150
cartridges, from around the world. All reasonably priced. Send a self-addressed
stamped business size envelope to: Ron
Fuchs, 5118 W. Windrose, Glendale, AZ
85304, 602-938-0875,
[email protected] [457,w]
Early Percussion Primer Identification:
Here for the first time is a manual to aid in
the identification of early primers with color
illustrations or patent drawings/text of 80
percussion pellets, powder, etc., 34 percussion tubes and 83 (The “up-date” has now
been expanded to 90) percussion cap designs. This manual has been compiled using a cataloguing system that can be expanded and new discoveries will be sent to
subscribers when warranted, as new variations are recorded. Included also is an article on the history of percussion priming
development and a growing bibliography of
priming related books and articles. Fiftyfour custom binders were produced; only
17 copies (with current up-date) remain.
Priced with postage paid at US$70.00 domestic; US$80.00 overseas air; Cdn$80.00
(GST/post included). S. J. Gooding, P.O.
Box 70, Alexandria Bay, NY 13607-0070;
or P.O. Box 390, Bloomfield, Ont. Canada
K0K 1G0. Phone 613-393-2980; Fax 613393-3378; E-mail [email protected] [457]
FOR SALE or TRADE: 5.56x45 (.223
HELP! Please make a lad’s Holiday Sea-
REM), list includes over 800 different
cartridges from around the world, even rare
and hard to find rounds, all reasonably
priced, will also sell one of each as a starter
collection if interested at a discount, for 40
page list send $1.25, Ron Fuchs, 5118 W.
Windrose, Glendale, AZ 85304, 602-9380875, [email protected] [457,w]
son complete: I need a cartridge box to fill
an empty spot in a pistol case. The case is
cut out for a round-cornered box of .50 .450 Revolver or .450 Colt cartridges. A
full or partial box, an empty box, or even
just a box top would do. Circa 1900 box
preferred, but not necessary. I will even pay
in fresh, appreciating Euros (instead of old,
depreciating dollars) if you like, for this
trivial bauble which would hardly be missed
from your collection. Peter DeRose, pderose
@ crocker.com, (413 584-3820) [456,w]
Advertisements
Advertisements in this section are
FREE to members and will be run for four
consecutive issues.
Advertisements by non-members will
be at the rate of $0.50 per word per issue.
The number in square brackets after your
ad is the last issue in which it will appear
unless you let us know that you wish to
continue it. The”w” indicates you have
asked for it to be included on the IAA
web-site.
INFORMATION WANTED: I am
compiling a checklist of all known 8-gauge
and 14-gauge cartridges as part of an article for the IAA Journal. Please send me
the details of any 8 or 14 ga. cartridges in
your collection. I am interested in all variations including, pinfire, sporting, industrial,
special purpose, brass, paper or plastic, NPE
or loaded. Also need copies of any catalog
pages which list 8- or 14-gauge. As I already have some catalog pages, please contact me for a list of what I currently have. I
prefer email to [email protected] if
possible. If not, send information to Ron
Merchant, 1023 Hickory St., Lansing, MI
48912. Phone (517) 267-1980 [458,w]
WANTED: Empty or inert German Flak
41 88mm or any other German 88mm
rounds. Send price and condition. I prefer
email to [email protected] if possible. If not, send information to Ron Merchant, 1023 Hickory St., Lansing, MI
48912. Phone (517) 267-1980 [458,w].
Wanted: Herter’s, Savage, Browning,
headstamps. One of a kind collector. Shipping to a ND address. Victor Trautman
[email protected] [457,w]
IAA Journal Issue 455, May/Jun ‘07
Wanted: 40-90 and 44-75 Ballard Everlasting cases made by Geo. Hart.
Howard Hoovestol, 4131 Selkirk Road, Bismarck, ND 58503 (701) 221-2669
[email protected] [456,w]
WANTED: 9x19mm (9mm Luger) box,
full, partial or empty, for Polish VISRADOM pistol as issued from 1936-1939
to the Polish military. Richard Atkinson,
620-231-9256
[email protected] [457,w]
FOR SALE: Back issues of the IAA
Journal and ECRA. Have IAA from May/
June 1998 to present, issues 401-451. ECRA
May 1998 to Nov 2006, issues 396-499. All
are in like new condition. Offers? If you buy
all will include a copy of the Pete DeCoux
Auction Catalog of my collection in 1998.
Please send offers to Alan Merriman
[email protected] [456,w]
Wanted: Back issues 356 thru 395 of the
ICCA (IAA) Journal. Vernon Knapp, email:
[email protected] [455,w]
WANTED: Mark VII FMJ (.311) bullets. About 500 for a replica of the 7.65mm
M1914 Argentine Match cartridge. Must
have cupro-nickel jacket. Stephen L. Fuller,
Apt #1, 508 S. Willard Ave., San Jose, CA
95126-3333 [456]
Wanted .577 Snider Cartridges.
singles, boxes/packages - empty or full.
Manufacturing tools, etc. Want all loadings,
variations, sporting, military, contractors
contemporary and modern. Excellent trades
in most fields. John A. Belton, Box 425
Merrickville, Ontario Canada K0G 1N0
Tel: 613-926-2469
email: [email protected] [457]
55
Wanted: Shot concentrators, boxes,
WANTED: 58 Cal. Roberts cartridge
WANTED: Artillery rounds. 12.7x104
advertising, or catalog pictures of same.
Contact Gary Muckel 6531 Carlsbad Drive
Lincoln, NE 68510 402-483-2484
[email protected] [456,w]
or empty case. Gordon Thruston, 138 Shannon Lake Cir., Greenville, SC 29615 864288-1588 [email protected] [457,w]
rimless, 12.7x110 French, 12.7x108
Rimmed Russian, 16mm VEGA.The following cases: 85mm Russian, 88mm German, 100mm Russian. Felipe Gardyn, 1703
S.W. 10th St., Miami FL 33135-5103 [455]
Wanted: Photo or photocopy of old
WANTED: “HOXIE” boxes, full, partial, or empty. Mike Cobine, 2870 Kings
Valley HWY. Dallas, OR 97338, PH: 503623-6718, E-mail: [email protected]
[455]
Chinese manuscript by Wu Ching Tsug
Yao from ca. 1044 a.d. (First printed reference on blackpowder). André Johansen,
Lisa Sass Gata 14, 42253 Gothenburg, Sweden. [456]
WANTED: “Special Purpose” .22 to
Looking for .450 Revolver Ctgs. (not
.50 BMG “color tipped” rounds, (avoiding
most blanks, wood & paper bullets) but to
include other specialized rounds; A/P, KTW
Teflon variations (seek KTW rifle rounds),
A/P saboted rounds, tracers, incendiary variants, flechettes, all flares, “less lethal” items
bean bag, rubber ball, buck, baton, teargas
variations, launching cartridges. Misc.
items on “to find list” (the more specialized the better); 7.92 German wire defense
load, military CADS (cartridge activated
devices), Hollifield Dotter (seek .30 Krag,
.38 short, 45 ACP) I have good special
purpose trade stock. Pepper Burruss Cell/
desk 920-660-7704, e-photos welcomed,
[email protected] [455,w]
.455s) for my collection. I have a good selection of trade items in various calibers and
categories. Send me a list of what you have.
Chris Punnett, 996248 RR#1, Mansfield,
Ontario L0N 1M0, Canada.
[email protected] [455,w]
FOR SALE: Large quantity of cartridge/
gun reprint advertising. Includes a complete
set of the Peters/Remington calendar reprints from the Country Gallery starting with
the first Peters in 1975 thru this year’s. All
are in good to excellent condition but they
were used and have only December left
from the calendar pad. Also several Winchester calendar reprints. Have the large
“Double W” Winchester Cartridge Board
print and it is framed. Also 2 smaller Winchester board prints. Have the 3 broadsheets
c1880 that were reprinted by Jim Tillinghast
- UMC, USCCO, WRACO and these are
framed. Also numerous paper/cardboard/tin
poster reprints. And several early 1980s
Remington Calendars sold by Kansas Cartridge Collectors and the 2000 New Zealand
Cartridge Collectors Club calendar. Would
like to sell as a group and am open to offers
as I have no idea what this is worth. The
framed items are large and are not shippable
in the frames. Contact me for more info if
interested. Alan Merriman
[email protected] [456,w]
56
For Sale: American brass shotshells.
New list, new items, new prices. Send for
list. Don Herbers, 700 E. Marlin,
McPherson, KS 67460 [455]
Box of red-white-blue Peters 22 RF
Magnum. Excellent condition. Trade for
Japanese 9mm Revolver and 7.7 (.303 Brit.)
Japanese dummies. George Koller, 1265
Elm, No 22, Clarkston, WA 99403 (509758-3782) [455]
Wanted: 22 boxes singles or collections.
Dave Nelson 320-763-4987 Evenings or
[email protected] [458,w]
Wanted: 2 stripper clips for the RothSteyr Repeating Pistol, Model 1907. Call
or e-mail me with you price.
Will Adye-White (905) 459-3080,
[email protected] [455]
From the recent sale of Winchester30-06 - The Book: Hardbound, 384
pages, hundreds of quality illustrations covering the history, development and production of the .30-06 in 48 countries. Organized for easy reference. Price $59 including S&H (overseas: price on request). Available from the author: Chris Punnett, RR#1,
Mansfield, Ont. L0N 1M0, Canada [455]
WANTED: Following R.S.A. Cartridges
Collectors Association back issues: 1
through 148, and 151, 152, 153, 154, 170,
171, 179, 190, 200, 201. Contact Eduard
Peris, [email protected] [455]
WANTED: the following rifle cartridges:
.30 Adolph, .303 Elliot, .44-90-550
Remington Straight, .22/30-06 Duplex, .27/
7.62NATO, .276 Pedersen Colt Industries
7.62mm/cal.220 Salvo Squeeze bore,
9.53x76mm Multi flechette, 335 HalgerSupermagnum, 7.62x62 Sjogren,
9.3x86mm, 7.62x40 IWK wildcats. Felipe
Gardyn, 1703 S.W. 10th St., Miami FL
33135-5103 [455]
FREE. Complete directory to the Robert
T. Buttweiler auctions. Does NOT include
prices realized. Email only. Contact John
Witzel at [email protected] [455]
Western (US Repeating Arms Co), all the
action-proving, shotshell and cartridges,
now available. Boxes sealed from the
1930’s to closing 2006. All are mint, +
single cartridges from loose boxes. This is
the largest group of cartridges, dummies,
proof and regular ammo I have ever seen.
Send an SASE for a list, or call for more
details 401-728-8976. John Lussier, Apt 4,
201 Reservoir Ave., Lincoln, RI 028653331 [445]
LINKS: MG disintegrating belt links
bought, sold, traded, identified, appraised.
Ted Bradstreet, PO Box 182, Albion, ME
04910-0182 (207)437-9378
[email protected] [455]
Wanted: Back issues of the Cartridge
Trader, Jan 1966 through Dec 1975 (#’s
123-240) E. Wayne Martin, 14600 W.
Whispering Wind Trail, Surprise, AZ 85374
[455]
For Sale or Trade: Lots of wildcat, commercial and military cartridges for sale or
trade. For those outside U.S., many are available with inert filler or as dummies. Email
[email protected] for listing.
[456,w]
IAA Journal Issue 455, May/Jun ‘07
Wanted: English Cartridge Boxes.
Full or empty. Pre-1917 - pistol only.
Rimfire: .22, .230, .297, .300, .320 (short
& long), .380 (short & long), .41 Der..
Centerfire: .320 (short & long), .380 (short
& long),, .41 Der. & Short, .45 Long Colt,
.450, .455 (short & long case), .476, .2520, .32-20, .38-40, .44-40. Automatic: .25
Auto, .32 Auto, .380 Auto, .38 Auto, .45
Auto, .455 Auto, and all Winchester rifle
calibers. C.R. Ford, 5518 So. Lewis Ave.,
Tulsa, OK 74105. [email protected]
(918-743-4056) [457,w]
For Sale: UMC hollow dummies, 4590, 45-70-500, 45-70-405 flat bullet, 4565, 40-82, 41 L.C. All in excellent condition, no dents. Would like to sell as agroup,
but will sell individually. Prices are negotiable. John Lussier, 201 Reservoir Ave.,
#4, Lincoln, RI 02865-3331
(401-728-8976) [455]
Wanted: 10-gauge Winchester Metal
Lined Shotshell H/S “Winchester No 10
Metal Lined”. Loaded, fired or NPE is Ok.
Please call Joe Sutphin at 410-529-0792
(6-9 EST)or E-Mail me at
[email protected] Yes, I still
collect flechettes, saboted, and experimental cartridges. [457,w]
Wanted - .25 ACP / 6.35 mm auto pistol cartridges. I collect all headstamps and
variations (U.S. and Foreign), boxes (full,
partial and empty), advertising and misc. information. Send me a list of what you have.
Bob Ruebel, 37752 880th Ave., Olivia, MN
56277. 320-522-0230
[email protected] [457,w]
Wanted “Tear Gas” Seek vintage tear
gas items, primarily US. Seek cartridges
larger than .38, (all shot shell calibers thru
.410 and up to 37/40 mm). Interested in
early “beer can” sized “grenade” canisters
as well, “the earlier the better” Lake Erie,
Federal, S & W, etc.. Reference material,
instructions, packaging, advertising. Also
interested in adding to an ever growing collection of “pen gun” launchers & rounds
(both tear gas & flare). (buy, sell, trade)
Pepper Burruss Cell/desk 920-660-7704, ephotos welcomed, [email protected]
[455,w]
IAA Journal Issue 455, May/Jun ‘07
WANTED: Wrapped - Metal or PaperMetal-Wrapped early experimental .50-60
caliber, .50-70 caliber, or .56-50 Spencer
cartridges by Col. T. J. Treadwell at
Frankford Arsenal from 1860 to 1873 (see
Metallic Cartridges Manufactured and
Tested at the Frankford Arsenal, Philadelphia, PA by Col. T. J. Treadwell or IAA Journal, #453, pgs 8-11). Please call Joe Sutphin
at 410-529-0792 (6-9 EST) or Email
[email protected] [457,w]
Wanted: Winchester 2-pc boxes, especially M76, Hi-Wall Express, M86 and M73/
92 calibers. Also early (pre-1900) boxes in
Win, Sharps, Colt, M&H and Bullard calibers by other makers. Prefer full of orig
rounds. Ray Giles, Box 670894, Dallas, TX
75367-0894. Tel: 214-361-6577. email:
[email protected]
Website: www.rtgammo.com [458,w]
For Sale: E-mail [email protected] for
lists of singles, small lots, and large lots of
North American shotshells or send $5.00
(Applied to first order.) to Ron Stadt, 609
S. Terrace Dr., Carbondale, IL 62901. State
which brands are of special interest. [455]
WANTED: Any type of cartridge made in
Romania from any period of time. Also want
empty cartridge boxes having Romanian labels or markings. Write to Liviu Stoica, PO
Box 5, Calhoun, TN 37309-0005 or
[email protected] [455]
WANTED: 7.62x25 Tokarev/Mauser
Cartridges. I collect all lots, dates, variations,
boxes, packets, and info. All responses answered. Jon Cohen, 273 Beacon Dr.
Phoenixville, PA 19460. 610-933-7318
[email protected] or
[email protected] [458,w]
WANTED: 50 BMG singles or collections,
223, gyrojets, lockless, folded, caseless,
trounds, telescoped, wildcats, Experimental
cartridges, flechettes, depleted uranium
rounds, and ordnance up to 40mm. Contact
Keith Lampear, 23748 Scott Drive,
Framington Hills, MI 48336 248-478-7818
[email protected] [458,w]
Wanted: 50 Spotter, 40-75 Bullard, 38
Casull, 55 Maynard, 30-357 AET, 9mm
FAR, 4.6x30 HK, 224 BOZ, 450 SMC, 457
Wildwest, 414 ET Gates, 7.82SX24 LietnerWise, 10mm Rocky Mtn.
Grady Mitchell, PO Box 62, Cookeville, TN
38503-0062. Ph 931-432-5588 email
[email protected] [457]
W.R.A.Co. Cartridges for Sale: Presenting the Dan Shuey W.R.A.Co. Single
cartridge collection. All cartridges are listed
with headstamp & primer variations as in
the Shuey two volume W.R.A.Co. books.
Mike Cobine 2870 Kings Valley Hwy. Dallas, Oregon 97338. 503-623-6718
[email protected] [455]
* * * Classifieds for the IAA Website - Policy * * *
The IAA has developed a website and we are prepared to accept classified
ads from members with certain stipulations.
„ You must request that your ad be put on the website (it will not go on
the website otherwise)
„ No classified ad will go on the web site unless it is also published in
the Journal, but not all Journal ads need appear on the website.
„ Classifieds will be removed from the website after 8 months (or before, if requested)
„ Web site classifieds must include an email address, but NO POSTAL
MAIL ADDRESS for security/privacy/legal reasons
„ Text of ad must not be open to negative interpretations. e.g.- “Demented .30-06 collector seeking.....”
„ We reserve the right to reject any ad for any reason.
The IAA website address may be found on page 2.
57
AAA&A: Original Catalogs , Gun
Manuals, Hang Tags, Posters, Signs, Labels,
Calendars, Books, Guns, Ammo, Fishing
Items & More. Original company literature
from over 1,500 companies. We currently
have in excess of 50,000 pieces in inventory. Call (716) 434-5928, M-F, 10:00-3:00,
EST. Fax (716) 438-9883.
Email [email protected]
Website: www.sportingadvertising.com.
Write: 5679 S. Transit Rd. #298, Lockport,
NY, 14094. [455]
FREE. Complete directory to the Pete
deCoux auctions 1 through 9. Includes prices
realized. Email only. Contact John Witzel
at [email protected] [455]
WANTED, any gyrojet item, including
cartridges, lancejets, finjets, flares, literature,
etc.. Any caliber, any country. Have good
gyrojet items for trade. Mel Carpenter, 288
Glenlyon Dr., Orange Park, FL 32073.
[email protected]
(904) 272-5070. [455,w]
Military Gun & Ammunition Books
by IAA member Anthony G Williams: Assault Rifle: the Development of the Modern Military Rifle and its Ammunition (coauthor Maxim Popenker). This provides a
comprehensive account of the development
of the military assault rifle and its ammunition from the Second World War to the
present day. It is well illustrated and contains much information about experimental
cartridges and their performance. All three
volumes of the book series Flying Guns:
Development of Aircraft Guns, Ammunition
and Installations (co-author Emmanuel
Gustin) are now available as follows: World
War 1: 1914-32, World War 2: 1933-45, The
Modern Era: since 1945. All of the volumes are well illustrated and contain much
information about the ammunition used in
the period as well as details of the weapons, their installations and effectiveness.
Rapid Fire: The Development of Automatic
Cannon, Heavy Machine Guns and their
Ammunition for Armies, Navies and Air
Forces Includes scale drawings, basic measurements and ballistic data of 92 cartridges
for automatic weapons between 12.7 and
57mm calibre. Also provides data on experimental and comparable cartridges, plus
illustrates and describes the guns which
fired them and how they were used. Available in hardback or softback. All of these
58
books are published by The Crowood Press,
The Stable Block, Crowood Lane,
Ramsbury, Wiltshire, SN8 2HR, UK. They
can be ordered from your local bookseller,
online booksellers or the publisher at http:/
/www.crowood.com Tel +44 (0)1672
520320. Fax +44 (0)1672 520280. More
details on Tony Williams’ website at: http:/
/www.quarry.nildram.co.uk [455,w]
50 Caliber military cartridge collector buy, sell, or trade. Looking for singles,
boxes, collections, etc. of .50 caliber BMG,
BAT, Gyrojet, Lockless, Folded, Caseless,
Tround, Telescoped etc., including issued
rounds, experimentals, and derivatives (.30/
.50, .60/.50, .50/20mm, etc). Send $1.00 for
latest Want and Duplicates lists. Finder’s
fee paid for tips leading to specimens for
my collection. Keith Pagel, 21 Kennedy Dr.,
Shelby, OH 44875 (419) 347-3235 Email:
[email protected] embarq.com [457,w]
www-ammo-one.com, Single Cartridges, Books, Plastic Ammunition Sleeves,
cleaning equipment, We also deactivate to
ship World Wide! 1,000s of calibers in
stock! Buy, Sell, Trade. Dave @ 207-6427980 [457,w]
Wanted: Imperial Brand shotshells.
Purple or red cases with copper primers, all
shot sizes and loadings. Also want two-piece
Imperial shotshell boxes. Buy or trade. John
A. Belton. Box 425, Merrickville, Ontario,
Canada K0G 1N0. Tel: 613-926-2469.
email [email protected] [457]
History of Modern U.S. Military
Small Arms Ammunition: From time to
time we are asked about the availability of
our two volumes. For those interested, listed
below are the publisher and book dealer with
price for Vol. I (Revised) and Vol. II. Both
books are still currently in stock and available as indicated: Vol. I (Revised) from:
Thomas Publications, 3245 Fairfield Rd.,
Gettysburg, PA 17325, (717) 642-6600,
price $49.95, if Vol. I (R) is purchased from
Thomas Publications the Addendum is included free of charge. If the Addendum is
purchased separately the price is: $7.95.
S&H charges are $5.00 for the book. Vol. II
from The Gun Room Press, 127 Raritan
Ave., Highland Park, NJ 08904 (732) 5454344, price $39.95 S&H charges are $5.00.
Frank Hackley [email protected] [455]
FOR SALE: Cal. 30 Mod 1901, 1903
and 1906 single specimens: 1901 no-hole
& 1-hole dummies; 1901 Ball FA 2 03 &
FA 4 03; 1903 Dummy FA 2 03; 1903 Ball
FA 12 03; FA Rimless-Grooveless barrel
proof circa 1907-1911; Arsenal volume test
cases (2 variations); M1906 Exper. ball,
primer, machine gun, Garand, plate test, salt
spray, Salvo, others; M1917, 1918, 1922
AP; M1917 and 1918 Incendiary; also
match, special purpose and miscellaneous;
about 100 cartridges on 3-page list. I will
fax or mail list on request. Larry Duddy, PO
Box 666, Atwater, CA 95301. Tel: 209-3587400, Fax 209-358-7456 [455]
Sporting Collectibles by Ward’s Auctions Inc. We hold four auctions each year.
They are held on the third Friday of February, May, August & November. To sign up
& order your catalog, just contact:
Ward’s Auctions Inc. 1808 37th Ave. NW
Salem, OR 97304.
Phone: 503-566-8800 Fax: 503-566-8596.
[email protected]
www.wardscollectibles.com [455]
Books for Sale: Suydam: The American
Cartridge, Suydam: US Cartridges and
Their Handguns, US Army: Small Caliber
Ammunition Guide, Vol. 1 & 2, Datig: Cartridges for Collectors, Vols 1, 2, & 3, Hogg:
The Cartridge Guide, White and Munhall:
Pistol and Revolver Cartridges, Vols 1 & 2
in one book, Buttweiler: American Rimfire
Boxes, Hoyem: History and Development
of Small Arms Ammunition, Vol 1 w/cartridge value guide & Vol 2, Barber: The
Rimfire Cartridge 1857-1984, Marcot:
Spencer Rimfire Cartridges softcover w/letter from James Sones on identification procedures, Elias: Article on Henry Cartridges
from Texas Cartridge Journal 1989, Cartridges of the World, Eds. 1, 3, 4 & 5.
Dick Fawcett, 1449 Valaria Dr. Highland,
CA 92346 909-241-0738 (days),
[email protected] [457]
Follow my Ammunition Auctions on the
internet at www.auctionarms.com/search/
SellerSearch.cfm?UserNum=25476.0
Thank you, Dick Fraser. [455,w]
IAA Journal Issue 455, May/Jun ‘07
Witt’s End - by Otto Witt
Smith & Wesson and
Smith & Wesson - Fiocchi
headstamp checklist
Additional Jarrett headstamps (see Issue #448)
Quality Cartridge Co. headstamps (see issue #445)
CCI Christmas
2006 headstamp
Independance Brand ammunition by CBC (see issues #s 440 & 441)
IAA Journal Issue 455, May/Jun ‘07
Headstamps on these pages
are not all to the same scale
59
From Gene Walker,
Idaho. This 1927
“Rustless” issue is
hard to complete.
Missing is the green
Long Rifle
Above: See Will Reuter’s letter page 49
Right: See Dave Birkin’s letter page 48
Above & below: See article on Czech shotgun slugs - page 40
60
IAA Journal Issue 455, May/Jun ‘07