dancing with joseph campbell

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dancing with joseph campbell
DANCING WITH
JOSEPH CAMPBELL
MARCH 21—26, 2004
“The heroic
life is living
the individual
adventure.”
A CENTENARY CELEBRATION BENEFIT FOR ESALEN INSTITUTE
PROGRAM
INDEX
1
WELCOME
2-7
DAILY
8
FILM
9-13
PRESENTER
13-16
TRIBUTES
SCHEDULE OF EVENTS
SCHEDULE
BIOS
TO
JOSEPH CAMPBELL
Dear Friends,
It is with great pleasure I welcome you to Esalen for this very special centenary
celebration honoring the life and work of Joseph Campbell.
We are honored the Joseph Campbell Foundation has recognized that Esalen held
a very special place in Joe Campbell’s heart, and are offering this centenary event
as a benefit for Esalen.
Bob Walter and his team have worked very hard to bring you an outstanding
program, one Joe would be proud of! Our thanks to all the presenters who are
here to support Joe and Esalen Institute, and our thanks to you for supporting this
special occasion.
Best wishes,
Andy Nusbaum.
Executive Director
Esalen institute
~
My friends,
On behalf of the Joseph Campbell Foundation I want to welcome everyone to
what promises to be a “once in a lifetime event,” or, incontrovertibly, a “once-ina-century celebration.”
Given the impact that Joe’s scholarship has had on contemporary arts and culture,
it is sometimes hard for me to believe that when I began working with him some
twenty-five short years ago, we were unable to find a publisher who was willing
to print his books. In those days, while facing continuous literary rejection, Joe
continued to craft his redaction of “humankind’s One Great Story,” ever optimistic
and confident that “if my work enables one person to live a more enriched and
fulfilling life, it will have all been worth it.”
Looking back, I think it safe to say that, for all the wisdom Joe has imparted, little
did he know how many lives he would, in fact, transform.
I want to thank Joe’s friends and my colleagues who have given of their time and
creativity to make this unique event possible. I also want to thank everyone at
Esalen for enfolding Joe and all of us in such a warm and hospitable embrace.
And, finally, I want to thank each one of you for taking time from your busy
life to gather with us to celebrate the centennial of Joseph Campbell, arguably
one of the most informed and informative, focused yet eclectic, intellects of the
twentieth century.
Enjoy.
Bob
Bob Walter
President / Executive Director
Joseph Campbell Foundation
1
DANCING WITH JOSEPH CAMPBELL
A CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION, MARCH 21—26, 2004
SUNDAY, MARCH 21
WELCOME
ARRIVALS
2:00
PM
CHECK
4:00
PM
ROOMS AVAILABLE
5:00-6:00
PM
COCKTAIL GREETINGS
6:00–7:30
PM
DINNER
7:45–8:15
PM
INTRODUCTION
8:30–10:30
PM
OPENING CELEBRATION
IN
TO
ESALEN
WELCOME
TO OUR LAND: Indigenous Blessing
outside Huxley)
FIRELIGHT PROCESSIONAL
TO
(on Lawn
DANCE DOME: Welcome from Esalen Staff
CELEBRATING JOSEPH CAMPBELL: Stories/Anecdotes/Memories
(in Dance Dome)
A
10:30–10:50
PM
PREVIEW OF THE
WEEK’S ACTIVITIES
OUR PLANET EARTH
a film by Mickey Lemle
Our Planet Earth, produced for the United Nations, is a love poem to our home by those
who have seen it from space. Seventeen astronauts and cosmonauts from 10 countries
share their experiences and insights in the hope that all humanity will see the wonder and
fragility of our planet, as they have, from beyond political and geographical boundaries.
ON-GOING ACTIVITIES
ALL
WEEK
ART BARN:
Making Masks and Prayer Flags
Gerald McDermott
MEDIA ROOM
Film & Video Screenings
Jasmine Kazaria
EVERYWHERE
Musical Interludes
David Darling, Paul Horn, Terry Lupton
2
DANCING WITH JOSEPH CAMPBELL
A CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION, MARCH 21—26, 2004
MONDAY, MARCH 22
MYTH
8:30–9:45
AM
BREAKFAST
10:00–10:10
AM
GOOD MORNING
10:10–12:00
AM
A CONVERSATION
12:30–1:45
PM
LUNCH
2:00–3:45
PM
FUN & GAMES
4:00–6:00
PM
BREAKOUT SESSIONS
Dome)
AND THE
BODY
David Darling, Paul Horn, Chungliang Al Huang (in Dance
OF A HIGHER ORDER Steve Aizenstat, host; Rebecca
Armstrong; Maren Hansen; Chungliang Al Huang (in Dance Dome)
Bob Walter & Lynne Kaufman
Dream, Myth, and Body
Steve Aizenstat
The Mything Body (workshop)
MythBody to Live By (workshop)
PM
(in Dance Dome)
Rebecca Armstrong
Mother Mysteries: Myths of Embodiment
6:00–7:30
(in Big Yurt)
(in Little House)
Maren Hansen
Chungliang Al Huang
(in Big House )
(in Huxley)
DINNER
EVENING CELEBRATION
(in Dance Dome)
8:00–8:30
PM
REVIEWING
8:30–10:00
PM
HEROIC WOMEN - A musical performance by Susannah Self &
10:00–10:15
PM
PREVIEWING TOMORROW
10:30–12:00
PM
RAM DASS FIERCE GRACE
THE
DAY
Michael Christie
A film by Mickey Lemle
(in Huxley)
This documentary feature film is a portrait of Ram Dass, the highly influential author of the 70s classic, Be
Here Now—a book that changed the lives of millions and set a whole generation on a quest for expanded
consciousness and meaningful spirituality. By tracing the life journey of this extraordinary and controversial
author / seeker / teacher, the film also explores the evolution of the movement Ram Dass helped to create—from
the counter-culture’s experimentation with psychedelic drugs to the evolving and now widespread embrace
of Eastern religion, mediation, yoga, environmental awareness, social activism, and alternative healing.
3
DANCING WITH JOSEPH CAMPBELL
A CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION, MARCH 21—26, 2004
TUESDAY, MARCH 23
MYTH
8:30–9:45
AM
BREAKFAST
10:00–10:10
AM
GOOD MORNING
10:10–12:00
AM
AND THE
SOUL
David Darling, Paul Horn, Chungliang Al Huang
(in Dance Dome)
A CONVERSATION
OF A HIGHER ORDER
Brother David Steindl-Rast, host;
Angeles Arrien; Phil Cousineau, Mickey Lemle (in Dance Dome)
12:30–1:45
PM
LUNCH
2:00–3:45
PM
FUN & GAMES
4:00–6:00
PM
BREAKOUT SESSIONS
Bob Walter & Lynne Kaufman
(in Big Yurt)
SACRED PORTALS: Myths, Symbols & Archetypes Angeles Arrien (in
Big Yurt)
THE SOUL
MYTH
PM
MYTH
AND THE
ZEN &
6:00–7:30
OF
THE
Phil Cousineau
SOUL
ART
OF
(in Little House)
Brother David Steindl-Rast
FILM-MAKING
Mickey Lemle
(in Dance Dome)
(in Huxley)
DINNER
EVENING CELEBRATION
8:00–8:30
PM
REVIEWING
8:30–9:30
PM
BEOWULF
9:30–9:45
PM
PREVIEWING TOMORROW
10:00–11:00
PM
COMPASSION
THE
(in Dance Dome)
DAY
A performance by Charlie Bethel
IN
EXILE
A film by Mickey Lemle
(in Huxley)
Compassion in Exile is an intimate portrait of Tenzin Gyatso, His Holiness the 14th Dalai Lama of Tibet.
Inherent in the story of this 1989 winner of the Nobel Peace Prize is the plight of the Tibetan people, and
the brutal genocide they have endured since the Communist Chinese invasion in 1950. For this timely
film, the Dalai Lama personally granted unprecedented access and cooperation. Many Tibetans who were
imprisoned, tortured, and forced into exile by the Chinese bear witness to their ordeals. Historic and
present-day footage open the mystery of Tibet and can tell the story of this great and inspiring teacher.
4
DANCING WITH JOSEPH CAMPBELL
A CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION, MARCH 21—26, 2004
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 24
MYTH
8:30–9:45
AM
BREAKFAST
10:00–10:10
AM
GOOD MORNING
10:10–12:00
AM
A CONVERSATION
AND THE
ARTIST
David Darling, Paul Horn, Chungliang Al Huang
(in Dance Dome)
OF A
HIGHER ORDER
(in Dance Dome)
Gerald McDermott, host; John Cleese; David Darling;
Paul Horn & special guest, Jean Erdman Campbell
12:30–1:45
PM
LUNCH
2:00–3:45
PM
FUN & GAMES
4:00–6:00
PM
BREAKOUT SESSIONS
Bob Walter & Lynne Kaufman
REMINISCENCES
(in Big Yurt)
Jean Erdman Campbell in conversation with
Lynne Kaufman & Bob Walter
FINDING YOUR LONG-LOST MUSICIAN
MUSIC
PM
David Darling
the Fundamental Substance of Creation
MURAL MAGIC
6:00–7:30
(in Dance Dome)
(Workshop)
Gerald McDermott
(in Huxley)
Paul Horn
(in Big Yurt)
(in Art Barn)
DINNER
EVENING CELEBRATION
8:00–8:30
PM
REVIEWING
8:30–9:00
PM
A VIDEO TRIBUTE
9:00–10:00
PM
CONCERT
10:00–10:15
PM
PREVIEWING TOMORROW
10:30–12:00
PM
THE OTHER SIDE
THE
(in Dance Dome)
DAY
TO
JEAN ERDMAN CAMPBELL
David Darling, Paul Horn, Chungliang Al Huang, Terry Lupton
OF THE
MOON
A film by Mickey Lemle
(in Huxley)
Dedicated to Joseph Campbell, The Other Side of the Moon features eight Apollo astronauts who share intimately their
experience of going to the moon and the effect of that journey on their lives since returning to Earth. Rigorously trained as
scientists and test pilots, these explorers found that the trip to the moon led them on a more significant inward journey.
5
DANCING WITH JOSEPH CAMPBELL
A CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION, MARCH 21—26, 2004
THURSDAY, MARCH 25
MYTH
8:30–9:45
AM
BREAKFAST
10:00–10:10
AM
GOOD MORNING
10:10–12:00
AM
FUTURE
David Darling, Paul Horn, Chungliang Al Huang
(in Dance Dome)
A CONVERSATION
AND THE
OF A
HIGHER ORDER
(in Dance Dome)
Richard Tarnas, host; Stan Grof, Sam Keen; Michael Murphy
12:30–1:45
PM
LUNCH
2:00–3:45
PM
FUN & GAMES
4:00–6:00
PM
BREAKOUT SESSIONS
Bob Walter & Lynne Kaufman
(in Big Yurt)
THE DARK SIDE
OF
MYTH
PREFIGURATIONS
OF
EXTRAORDINARY HUMAN ATTRIBUTES IN FANTASY
Sam Keen
(in Dance Dome)
Literature, Cartoons, Movies & Science Fiction Michael Murphy
(in Big
House)
THE MYTH
OF
WESTERN CIVILIZATION
THE RELEVANCE
OF
MYTHOLOGY
FOR
Richard Tarnas
MODERN SOCIETY
(in Little House)
Stan Grof
(in Big Yurt)
6:00–7:30
PM
DINNER
EVENING CELEBRATION
8:00–8:30
PM
REVIEWING
8:30–9:15
PM
FUN & GAMES
9:15–9:30
PM
PREVIEWING TOMORROW
9:45–
THE
(in Dance Dome)
DAY
a performance by the Not-Ready-for-Mythic-Time players
MASKED REVEL (admission “by Mask” only)
6
Dance Until You Drop
(in Huxley)
DANCING WITH JOSEPH CAMPBELL
A CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION, MARCH 21—26, 2004
FRIDAY, MARCH 26
CLOSING CELEBRATION
8:30–9:30
AM
BREAKFAST
9:30–9:40
AM
GOOD MORNING
9:40–11:30
AM
AND
IN THE
END…
David Darling, Paul Horn, Chungliang Al Huang
(in Dance Dome)
(in Dance Dome)
JOSEPH CAMPBELL
“Happy Birthday”
REFLECTIONS/REMINISCENCES
CLOSING RITUAL
RECESSIONAL
12:30–1:45
PM
with Prayer Flags
LUNCH
DEPARTURES
7
in Small Groups
SUNDAY
MONDAY
TUESDAY
8
WEDNESDAY
THURSDAY
FRIDAY
DANCING WITH JOSEPH CAMPBELL
A CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION, MARCH 21—26, 2004
Through her own travels as a performer and minister,
and by her working association with the Joseph
Campbell Foundation since its inception, Rebecca has
continued to gather great minds and hearts together
in creative collaborations all over the world. Rebecca
holds graduate degrees from the University of
Chicago Divinity School and the Unitarian seminary
and has a public ministry in Chicago with a focus on
pilgrimage. Visit her websites at: www.ritualarts.com
and www.citysoul.net
PRESENTERS
Dancer, choreographer and
director JEAN ERDMAN CAMPBELL
occupies a unique position in
twentieth century performing
arts, and her genius for distilling
human experience into abstract
form influences American
Modern Dance to this day. A soloist with the Martha
Graham Dance Company from 1938 to 1943, she
created many roles in the reperatory of that historic
period. Later, John Cage, Merce Cunningham, Maya
Deren and other distinguished artists were among
her collaborators. Her most intimate collaboration,
that with her husband, Joseph Campbell, led to
the embrace of the mythological dimension of
her work. Turning her attention to theater in the
1960’s,Jean created The Coach With the Six Insides,
a revolutionary work that combined elements of
all the performing and visual arts - dubbed “total
theater” by the Paris press. The work, based on
James Joyce’s Finnegan’s Wake, enjoyed two New
York seasons, received Obie and Vernon Rice Awards
and then toured the U.S., Canada, Europe and Japan.
Together with Joe, Jean founded the Theater of the
Open Eye as a home for collaborative dance-based
theater works of a mytho-poetic nature. As artistic
director of the theater for 15 years, she created and
/or presented more than 100 productions. In 1985,
she was commissioned jointly by the governments
of Greece and the U.S. to create an evening of
total-theater for the Athens Festival of Myth and
Man Symposium at the ancient Herodes Atticus
Amphitheater. The same year, she staged a major
retrospective of her work which was acclaimed by
The New York Times, saying, “Anyone seeking to
find out something about where Modern Dance is
today, might well find its roots in the Jean Erdman
Retrospective.” In 1994, Dance & Myth, The World
of Jean Erdman, became available to the public. A
video series in three parts, it preserves eleven of
her works and is intercut with interviews as well as
archival and contemporary rehearsal footage.
REBECCA ARMSTRONG has been sharing
her love of myth, music and ministry
for almost three decades. Brought
up in a singing family, she learned
the traditions from the fingers and
voices of those who kept them
alive. Her parents, George and
Gerry Armstrong, were referred to
as “the mom and pop” of Chicago folk
music. Their home was a frequent stopping place
for bards traveling through the Midwest, including
Joseph Campbell, who became a close family friend.
ANGELES ARRIEN is an anthropologist,
educator, award-winning author, and
corporate consultant. She teaches
universal components of leadership
skills, communication, healthcare,
and education. She is the founder
and president of the Angeles Arrien
Foundation for Cross-Cultural
Education and Research, and a
Fellow at the Institute of Noetic Sciences.
www.angelesarrien.com
STEPHEN AIZENSTAT, PH.D., is the
founding President of Pacifica
Graduate Institute, and a clinical
psychologist. His original research
centers on a psychodynamic
process of “tending the living
image.” Recently, he brought
the insights of depth psychology
and dreamwork to the Earth Charter International
Workshop in The Hague, and continues to participate
in this ongoing United Nations project. He has
conducted dreamwork seminars for over 25 years
throughout the US, Europe, and Asia. (1997).
CHARLIE BETHEL is an actor/writer
based in Minneapolis and has
worked in theater, film, and TV
as an actor, stage manager,
electrician,
producer,
and
properties and set dressing artist.
His one-man rendering of Beowulf
was written in 1991 in Chicago.
After about 7 years rehearsing, it premiered at
the Jungle Theater in Minneapolis in 2001 and
since then has played various venues: Clay Center
for the Arts & Sciences (Charleston, WV), Raven
Theater (Chicago), Cincinnati Playhouse, and a
couple of Fringe Festivals. Upcoming gig: Cape May
Stage, Spring, 04. A native Southerner, Charlie is
a graduate of the North Carolina School of the Arts
and the South Carolina Governor’s School, and he
comes from a long line of talkers.
9
MICHAEL CHRISTIE studied cello,
composition and piano at the
Royal College of Music (197579), where he won the Bliss
Prize. As a freelance cellist he
worked with various orchestras
in the UK, including shows in the
West End. His music theatre work
with ensembles such as the Lindsay Kemp Company
took him on tours to Spain, Italy, Venezuela and the
Shetland Islands. In 1989 he was commissioned by
the Royal Opera House “Garden Venture” to write
a chamber opera, The Standard Bearer. He wrote
a number of music theatre pieces for Dartington
Summer Music and also for the company that he
co-founded with Susannah Self, Selfmade Music
Theatre. As an educationalist he has specialized in
teaching cello, recorder, composition and creative
class music. Currently teaching in North London, he
also teaches composition and musical awareness at
the Junior Guildhall. www.selfmademusic.org.
J OHN C LEESE is best known for
his contributions to the world of
comedy, through Monty Python,
Fawlty Towers, A Fish Called
Wanda, and many appearances on
programs like Cheers, Third Rock
from the Sun, and Will and Grace.
Less well known is the fact that he
co-authored two best-selling books on psychology:
Families and How to Survive Them, and Life and How
to Survive It. He also spent twenty years helping
to run Video Arts, which was the largest producer
of management and sales training films outside the
United States. In his twilight years he passes his time
writing film scripts, making speeches to business
audiences, doing seminars on creativity, teaching at
Cornell and UCSB, playing “Q” in the Bond movies,
and trying to grow a decent tomato.
PHIL COUSINEAU is a writer, filmmaker,
worldwide lecturer and adventure
travel guide. He co-wrote The Hero’s
Journey, the documentary film about
Joseph Campbell’s life, and edited its
companion book. He is the author of
17 books, including the recent The
Olympic Odyssey: Rekindling the Spirit of the Ancient Games, which has been selected by the United
States Olympic Committee as a gift book for American
athletes at the 2004 Summer Games. He is also the
author of the best-selling Once and Future Myths:
The Power of Ancient Stories in Modern Times, The
Art of Pilgrimage, and The Book of Roads. Among his
many film credits are: Ecological Design: Inventing
the Future; Wayfinders: A Pacific Odyssey; The Peyote
Road; Forever Activists: Stories from the Abraham
10
Lincoln Brigade (1991 Academy Award nominated);
and a recent collaboration with Houston Smith: A
Seat at the Table: Struggling for American Indian
Religious Freedom. He was also featured in the BBC2 documentary, Joseph Campbell: Hollywood’s Myth
Master.
Grammy nominated Cellist and
Composer D A V I D D A R L I N G has
been presenting seminars in
music creativity and improvisation
for over 30 years. His workshops
are humorous, relaxed, and
exhilarating. He is founder of
Music For People, which has
presented his philosophy for the past 18 years in
international settings. He was awarded Artist of The
Year for his services to young people by the national
award-winning organization, Young Audiences. The
Connecticut Music Educators Association presented
him with Outstanding Music Advocate Award. He
tours internationally as a soloist and has recorded
many award winning projects. He currently is working
on a number of film scores and solo projects and will
tour England in May with performers from the Bunon
Tribe of Taiwan.
STANISLAV GROF, M.D., PH.D., is one of
the most recognized and authoritative
figures in transpersonal psychology
and consciousness research. He
was formerly assistant professor
of psychiatry at Johns Hopkins
University, Chief of Psychiatric
Research at the Maryland Psychiatric
Research Center, and scholar-in-residence at Esalen
in Big Sur, California, from 1973 to 1987. Dr. Grof’s
early research centered on the clinical uses of
psychedelic substances. Later, with his wife Christina,
he developed Holotropic Breathwork and has been
training professionals for years in this technique.
Currently, he is teaching psychology at the California
Institute of Integral Studies. His books include: The
Holotropic Mind; The Cosmic Game; Realms of the
Human Unconscious; The Human Encounter With
Death; LSD Psychotherapy; Beyond the Brain; The
Adventure of Self-Discovery; The Books of the Dead;
Beyond Death; The Stormy Search for the Self; and
Psychology of the Future. www.ITAconferences.com
and www.holotropic.com
“Eternity is a dimension of here and
now.” Joseph Campbell
MAREN HANSEN of Santa Barbara,
CA, is an ordained Unitarian
Universalist
minister,
a
psychotherapist, a founding
member of the Pacifica Graduate
Institute, and a board member of
the Joseph Campbell and Marija
Gimbutas Library and Archives.
She is the author of Mother Mysteries, published by
Shambhala, which explores pregnancy and childbirth
as personal/mythic experiences. Maren is currently
creating a template for teaching myth with the express
purpose of stimulating psychological development.
Maren’s doctoral research involves designing a
curriculum that links the psychological developmental
issues of adolescence with corresponding teaching
archetypes in specific myths. Her program, Myth
as Mentor, is a dialogical process between personal
experience and the collective wisdom encoded in myth.
collaborating with him to teach a workshop entitled
MythBody To Live By. Dedicated to fostering and
perpetuating the legacy of East-West and world
cultural synthesis, Chungliang is the author of
numerous best-selling classics, including Embrace
Tiger, Return to Mountain: The Essence of Tai Ji;
Quantum Soup; and the Essential Tai Ji Book. He
and Alan Watts co-authored Tao: The Watercourse
Way, and with Jerry Lynch, he wrote Thinking Body,
Dancing Mind; Tao Mentoring and Working Out,
Working Within: The Tao of Inner Fitness Through
Sport and Exercise. His latest book is The Chinese
Book of Animal Powers, a unique introduction to
the Chinese Zodiac for readers age 8 to infinity.
www.livingtao.org
LYNNE KAUFMAN is an accomplished
playwright, novelist, and shortstory writer. Her first novel, Slow
Hands, was published by Mira
Books in June 2003. Her second
novel, Wild Women’s Weekend,
will follow in June 2004. Lynne is
the author of eleven full-length
plays which have been produced in San Francisco,
Los Angeles, Washington D.C. and Louisville etc. at
such theatres as The Magic Theatre, Actors Theatre
of Louisville, and TheatreWorks. Her plays have won
many awards including the NEA/Kennedy Center
Fund for New American Plays and Theatreworks
Best New Play in California. Her short stories have
appeared in Cosmopolitan, Redbook, and McCalls.
P AUL H ORN has recorded over
forty albums during an illustrious
career that has spanned four
decades. He earned a Bachelor of
Music degree at the prestigious
Oberlin Conservatory of Music in
Ohio and a Master’s degree at the
Manhattan School of Music in New York. After a stint
in the Army, he briefly played in the Sauter-Finegan
big band in New York, then toured and recorded
with the famed Chico Hamilton Quintet. In 1965 he
earned two Grammy® Awards with Lalo Shifrin for
Jazz Suite on the Mass Texts and was also nominated
for Cycle in the same year. Two more nominations
followed; Traveler in 1988 and Inside Monument
Valley in 1999. His Inside The Taj Mahal sold over
one million copies and began what became New Age
music.
SAM KEEN was, in his words,
“overeducated at Harvard and
Princeton” and was a professor
of philosophy and religion at
“various legitimate institutions”
and a contributing editor of
Psychology Today for 20 years
before becoming a free-lance
thinker, lecturer, seminar leader
and consultant. He is the author
of a baker’s dozen books, and a co-producer of an
award winning PBS documentary, Faces of the
Enemy. His work was the subject of a sixty-minute
PBS special, Bill Moyers—Your Mythic Journey with
Sam Keen.
Philosopher, performing artist
and internationally acclaimed
Tai Ji master, C HUNGLIANG A L
HUANG is the founder-president
of the International Living Tao
Foundation, and director of
its Lan Ting Institute. He is a
research scholar of the Academia
Sinica and a fellow of the World
Academy of Art and Science. He has received the
highest rated Speaker’s Award from the Young
Presidents’ Organization, the New Dimensions
Broadcaster Award, and the prestigious Gold Medal
from the Ministry of Education of the Republic of
China. Chungliang was a close colleague of Joseph
Campbell, and each year from 1978 until 1987,
Campbell celebrated his birthday at Esalen by
“You become mature when you become
the authority for your own life.”
Joseph Campbell
11
Producer/Director MICKEY LEMLE
has been making feature films,
television series and documentary
specials since 1968. In 1977 he
founded Lemle Pictures, Inc. His
film and television works have been
shown theatrically, on television
and at film festivals around the
world. He holds a B.A. from
Brandeis University. Mickey
served in the U.S. Peace Corps
in Nepal and currently holds the position of Chairman
of the Board of the Tibet Fund. www.Lemlepictures.com.
MICHAEL MURPHY is the co-founder
and chairman of Esalen Institute
and the author of both fiction and
non-fiction books that explore
evidence for extraordinary human
capacities: The Kingdom of Shivas
Irons, Golf in the Kingdom, Jacob
Atabet, and An End to Ordinary
History. His latest nonfiction work is God and the Evolving
Universe co-authored with James Redfield and Sylvia
Timbers. Other nonfiction work includes: In the Zone,
an anthology of extraordinary sports experiences, coauthored with Rhea White; The Life We Are Given, a book
about transformative practice, co-authored with George
Leonard; and The Future of the Body. During his fortyyear involvement in the human potential movement, he
and his work have been profiled in the New Yorker and
featured in many magazines and journals worldwide.
After graduating from Stanford University, he did
graduate work there in philosophy, practiced meditation
at the Sri Aurobindo Ashram in South India in 1956 and
1957, co-founded Esalen and founded its Center for
Theory and Research in 1962. In the 1980s, he helped
organize Esalen’s pioneering Soviet-American Exchange
Program, which became a premiere vehicle for citizento-citizen relations between Russians and Americans. In
1990, Boris Yeltsin’s first visit to America was initiated by
Esalen — a trip that would contribute to Yeltsin’s change
of heart regarding the United Sates and capitalism and
become part of changing the course of world history.
Most recently, Murphy’s and George Leonard’s Integral
Transformative Practices (ITP) program has been
researched by Stanford Medical School. With final results
in all areas still pending, it has been concluded thus far
that the ITP participants’ in Stanford’s research made
measurable and considerable gains in IQ.
"I found my bliss in ’66. Ever
since I follow it…"
TERRY LUPTON Is a songwriter by
trade with credits by popular
recording artists including the
platinum charting Swedish
band Michael Learns To Rock.
He is a self-taught musician with a 20-year plus
career, in writing, producing, movies, and TV,
performing in the bands, Angel, and Iron Butterfly.
The muse continues to move in all directions. In
2001 the opportunity to join the Los Angeles Unified
School District (LAUSD) was presented, opening the
door to reach children in creative ways.
Through bold, graphic renderings of
timeless tales, Caldecott Medalist
GERALD MCDERMOTT communicates
an understanding of the transformative power of mythology.
McDermott’s color magic, stylized
figures and abstract motifs
combine ancient imagery with
contemporary design. He was a protégé of the late
mythologist Joseph Campbell. His rare ability to
evoke the power of myth through simple language
and brilliant art has garnered him a large international
following and many awards including a Caldecott
Medal for Arrow to the Sun and Caldecott Honors for
Raven and Anansi the Spider. His most recent book
is Creation. Mr. McDermott is a Joseph Campbell
Foundation Fellow. www.geraldmcdermott.com
“The privilege of a lifetime is being who
you are.” Joseph Campbell
12
SUZIE SELF is an internationally
known mezzo-soprano. She trained
in voice, composition and lute at the
Royal College of Music, London and
won scholarships to study Strauss
roles in Germany and at the Banff
Centre, Canada with John Cage. She
studied voice with Josephine Veasey
and composition with Stephen Dodgson. She has sung for the Royal Opera House Covent
Garden, Glyndebourne, Opera Factory, Transparant, Berliner Kammeroper, Scottish Opera, The Vlaamse Opera,
and The Opera du Rhin. As a composer, she has written
in a variety of genres, from chamber music to modern
music theatre and beyond. Following the success of her
first symphony, Hokusai Says, based on the famous Japanese woodcuts, her current project is another symphony,
Memories, Dreams, Reflections, based on the life and work
of Carl Jung. As an educationalist, Suzie runs voice and
composition workshops for English Sinfonia, Dartington
Summer School, Opera North, Junior Guildhall and the
Skyros Centre (Greece). www.selfmademusic.org.
D AVID S TEINDL -R AST was born
July 12, 1926, in Vienna,
Austria, where he studied art,
anthropology, and psychology,
receiving an MA from the Vienna
Academy of Fine Arts and a PhD
from the University of Vienna. In
1952 he moved with his family
to the U.S.A. In 1953 he joined
a newly founded Benedictine
community in Elmira, NY,
Mount Saviour Monastery, of which he is now a
senior member. In 1958/59, after twelve years of
monastic training and studies in philosophy and
theology, Brother David was sent by his abbot to
participate in Buddhist-Christian dialogue, for which
he received Vatican approval in 1967. He co-founded
the Center for Spiritual Studies in 1968 and received
the 1975 Martin Buber Award for his achievements
in building bridges between religious traditions.
as literary executor of his estate, completing and
publishing portions of his Historical Atlas. When the
Joseph Campbell Foundation was formed in 1990, he
was named executive director. As executive editor of
the Collected Works of Joseph Campbell, he continues
to oversee the publication of Campbell’s oeuvre, and
is project director of both the video series Joseph
Campbell’s Mythos and the Joseph Campbell Audio
Collection. He was appointed Foundation president
in 1998. Over the years, Bob has presented papers
and seminars on several continents at numerous
colleges, universities and at such venues as the
New York Open Center, the Aspen Institute, Palais
Athena Cultural Centre (Sao Paulo), Esalen Institute
(Big Sur), the Smithsonian Institution, and for two
Parliaments of the World’s Religions (Chicago, 1993,
& Cape Town, 1999), where he was also a member
of the Assembly. A follower of the Tao, Bob was a
founding Trustee of United Religions Initiative (URI)
and has served that organization as Treasurer and
as a member of its Global Council.
R I C H A R D T A R N A S , P H .D.is
professor of philosophy and
psychology at CIIS in San
Francisco, where he founded
the graduate program in
Philosophy, Cosmology, and
Consciousness.
He also
teaches at Pacifica Graduate
Institute in Santa Barbara.
Formerly the director of
programs at Esalen Institute, he is the author of
The Passion of the Western Mind, a narrative history
of the Western world view from the ancient Greek to
the postmodern. His next work, Cosmos and Psyche:
Intimations of a New World View, will be published
by Viking in early 2005.
ROBERT WALTER
P R E S I D E N T /E X E C U T I V E D I R E C T O R
JOSEPH CAMPBELL FOUNDATION
During the 1970’s, Bob co-founded
the American Theater Institute;
was a founding Faculty Fellow at
California Institute of the Arts;
lectured widely on experiential
education; and worked as a
director, production manager, and playwright with
such groups as the Royal Shakespeare Company, the
Repertory Theater of Lincoln Center, and with Hume
Cronyn and Jessica Tandy on numerous productions
in New York and internationally. In 1979 Bob began
working with Joseph Campbell, who subsequently
named him editorial director of his Historical Atlas
of World Mythology. In 1982, he co-founded Van der
Marck Editions to publish, not only Campbell’s Atlas,
but also more than thirty titles by such renowned
luminaries as Marija Gimbutas and Albert Hofmann.
Following Campbell’s death in 1987, Bob served
SPECIAL THANKS TO PRODUCTION COORDINATORS
GINA AND MANNY OTTO
“What you have to do, you do with
play.”
“If you find you are trying, go back to
school. You’re not ready yet.”
“Awe is what moves us forward.”
“A bit of advice given to a young Native
American at the time of his initiation:
‘As you go the way of life you will see a
great chasm. Jump. It is not as wide as
you think.’”
“As you proceed through life, following
your own path, birds will shit on
you. Don’t bother to brush it off.”
Joseph Campbell
13
TRIBUTES TO JOSEPH CAMPBELL
REMEMBER
THE
and repeatedly requested lectures, so that we could
again and again re-capture fresh insights and penetrate
deeper meanings from them.
Joseph was more than gracious about my bringing
the Tai Ji metaphors to illustrate his lectures on the
Kundalini, The Dance of Shiva and The Hero’s Journey.
We mimed the metaphors and incarnated ourselves, in
the dancing re-creation of Krishna, Kali, Buddha, Kwan
Yin and other mythical deities. We told cosmic jokes,
sang mythological ditties, and hopped about on one
leg, being “Shiva Nataraja”, the Lord of the Dance, with
multiple pairs of arms, harmonizing the diverse forces
of the universe. We were truly a lively group of happy
students of lifelong learning, “joyfully participating in
the ecstasies and sorrows of the world!”
DRAGON
I
“
met Joseph Campbell the first time in New York
in the late 60s while conducting a seminar with Alan
Watts. Joe and Jean Erdman (Mrs. Campbell), the
dancer came to one of those famous Watts’ ‘bring
my favorite friends together’ dinners one evening.
Although I had known Jean well (she had been my
teacher, later a colleague), it was my first face to
face encounter with Joseph who was one of my
heroes since I read his famous book, The Hero with
A Thousand Faces in college. I was visibly awestruck
and self-intimidated about my pitiful vocabulary and
scholarship. Sensing this unease, Joe reached out to
hold my hand and assured me that my dancing body
language was more eloquent than all the words both
he and Alan Watts could spout together. Alan Watts
and Joseph Campbell were giant human beings,
extremely gregarious and perceptive; they bestowed
their nurturance on us like sun and rain upon plants.
To help us acknowledge our often sheltered selfawareness, Joseph, with good humor always, teased and
jolted the narrow minded and insipid to open our eyes
and laugh at our follies. He knew well that “Life feeds
on life” and reminded the overly zealous vegetarians to
wake up and see themselves as those who “cannot hear
the tomatoes scream!”; he warned the career driven
macho men to foresee that the ladder they clawed their
way to the top may end up against the wrong wall; and
behaved even more gentlemanly when militant feminists
resented him for graciously treating them as ladies.
Most importantly, Joseph ignited the fire in the bellies
of us all, so we may find our true “bliss” and have the
courage and wisdom to follow it!
Joe was a treasure of a teacher who mesmerized us
with his tales of the Homeric Odysseys, the Arthurian
Romances, along with his special insights on James
Joyce, Thomas Mann, C.G. Jung, Paul Klee and Pablo
Picasso. Although Indology had been one of his early
focused works in editing his mentor, Heinrich Zimmer’s
legacy, Joe’s wealth of knowledge embodies his initial
passion in primal cultures, especially with the American
Indians; and later across the globe to Japan and China.
And to be perfectly in tune with the future, he opened
our minds to embrace the journey of Man into the
Unknown, and guided us back safely to our “Inner
Reaches” from the exploration of the “Outer Space.”
Many years later, after his retirement from Sarah
Lawrence College, Joe came to Esalen and visited a
joint seminar I was conducting with Gregory Bateson
entitled “Giant Dancing Steps To An Ecology of
Mindbody”, a paraphrase from Bateson’s well-known
book. Joe suggested that we share a series of seminars,
and re-named the title of one of his books, to be called
“Mythbody To Live By”. That week-long seminar we
taught became the most celebrated annual event at
Esalen, always right around Easter on Joe’s birthday
week.
During those fertile, inspirational eight consecutive
years, I had been blessed with his quintessential
intellect, the depth and breadth of his scholarship, his
enormous wit and generosity of heart and mind; and I
never ceased to marvel at his genius in transmitting so
effortlessly the most essential and the ineffable. Those
of us, who proudly called ourselves “Joe’s groupies”,
persisted on being there with Joe year after year. We
were the blessed ones. Joseph opened our minds and
hearts, rekindled our innocence and enthusiasm for
lifelong learning. He encouraged us to expand our
perceptivity, heighten our reaches, and to synthesize
the multi-dimensional complexity of his fathomless
offerings. Tireless and patient, he never lost his joy
and enthusiasm in reviewing many of his most potent
A world-class athlete, jazz musician and a lover of
dance, Joseph Campbell was a man of many qualities,
magnificently being wholly himself, who enthralled and
enlightened us. He was without a doubt, the Dragon of
a mythic dimension; the sage Confucius once described
the great Lao Tzu to be.”
CHUNGLIANG AL HUANG
J
~
“ oseph Campbell’s teachings and philosophy have
been instrumental in shaping my own approach to
life and teaching. It was a great blessing to have his
presence on this planet for a short but meaningful time.”
14
PAUL HORN
“Joe gave an immense number of lectures over the
At one point, I was feeling the warm haziness of the
double scotch at noon on an empty stomach. I looked
over at Joe through the scotch fog and he was saying,
“You know what the meaning of life is, don’t you?”
There was a pause. I was fighting my way through the
haze. “Mickey,” I said to myself, “pay attention! One
of the great minds on the planet is about to tell you
the meaning of life. Pay attention!” I leaned forward
hoping that would help me get through some of the
fog. “The meaning of life,” Joe said, his eyes fierce and
piercing, “is what ever you define it to be.”
half century that he was a teacher, and some of
those lectures he gave a great number of times. Not
surprisingly, he often used the exact same phrases or
sentences as he recounted a particular idea or story.
But he always managed to speak those familiar words
with a certain freshness each time, as if he had not
spoken them a hundred times before.
No doubt part of this freshness was due to the
emotional power that these topics continued to
hold for him. For example, his inner battle with the
Judaeo-Christian religious tradition was a lifelong
one, and certainly inspired much of his sustained
interest in and embrace of the world’s vast range of
mythologies. I particularly recall how in his lectures
on Gnosticism, he would build up to and then deliver
the great punch line quotation he paraphrased from
the Gnostics: “The only trouble with Yahweh is that
he thinks he’s God.” In the many times I heard
him say this, it seemed to me he never failed to
take a kind of youthfully rebellious delight in this
witty deconstruction of the entire religious tradition
into which he had been born, and against which he
defined himself throughout his life.”
RICK TARNAS
JOSEPH CAMPBELL
~
AND THE
MEANING
OF
When I was about to get married, the Rabbi told us
that marriage was just the two of us standing up before
our friends and families and saying: “This is a special
relationship.” By saying it, it became so. He went on
to explain that one of the great contributions of the
Jewish tradition is the concept of the Sabbath. By
saying a day is special it becomes so.
That was what Joe was revealing to me as the meaning
of life, a big idea, but Joe never shrank away from big
ideas, nor from sharing them with enthusiasm.
While I was making a movie about His Holiness The
Dalai Lama, at one point he said to me that the
meaning of life was “happiness.” Happiness defined
not as getting more stuff, but as serving others.
LIFE
Sir Laurens van der Post told me it was finding meaning
in your life: that happiness comes and goes but if your
life has meaning then you belong.
T
“
he bar at the Century Club was empty except for
Joe and me. It was noon on a weekday and we met
there before going on to the dining room for lunch. I
sank back into the overstuffed leather chair. The whole
place felt like it was from another time, so much so
that I expected that if I closed by eyes I might hear
horses’ hoofs on the cobblestones just outside the large
double windows.
Ram Dass told me that the meaning of life is to go to
God.
I can hold all of them because as Joe told me that
noon in the bar: whatever you define it to be, thus it
becomes.”
MICKEY LEMLE
The ancient bartender saw Joe come in and, unbidden,
brought him a glass of The Glenlivet scotch - a double,
no ice. He put it down in front of Joe, who smiled, and
politely thanked the bartender. Joe looked at me and
asked, “Do you like single malt scotch?” “Why yes,
Joe. It’s my drink of choice,” I answered, leaving off
that I really never drank during the day and that I had
not had breakfast that morning.
“Would you like it neat, or ruined?” he asked.
“Neat,” I responded. “A double for my friend,” Joe told
the bartender, who nodded and went off behind the
bar.
The first sip was warm and smoky. I settled back into
the chair and Joe and I proceeded to have the kind of
wide ranging conversations that one could only have
with Joe. We talked of myths and movies and heroes
and stories and books and art. I never tired of talking
with Joe. Even if I had heard him tell a story before,
it was always seemed fresh and vital. We drank our
scotches.
MMIII
I
~
“ n one of the seminars at Esalen, as an invited
Guest, I was accompanying the Tai Chi movements
led by Chungliang after he had appropriately asked
Joseph to give all of us some time to release our minds
from the spectacular and profound information that
Joseph was creating. As usual, we were all totally
spellbound by his enormous depth and feeling of
exuberance as he wove his way through history and
ideas. I was almost not ready to play the cello I was
so caught up in his way and words. However, as soon
as we began Joseph began to participate with such
a big smile and a look of joy at Chungliang, that I
was even more amazed by this great humanitarian
and genius that we were privileged to be with.”
DAVID DARLING
15
I
honorariums. His wishes were for Pacifica to succeed
as a place of excellent scholarship in the fields of
psychology and culture. Without his encouragement,
Pacifica would not be what it is today. His gifts live
forever in the soul of our Institution. The Joseph
Campbell Library and Archives and the Graduate
Degree Program in Mythological Studies live
at Pacifica as a tribute to his warm embrace.”
"
was thirty-six years old when I first met Joseph
Campbell, although his writings on mythology had
captured my imagination much earlier in graduate
school. My favorite memories of him include his
insatiable love of the writings of James Joyce; his
enormous delight, as a gentleman, in honoring
the feminine ––expecially his talented wife, his
students at Sarah Lawrence, and his respect
and friendship for Marija Gimbutas; and most
of all, I remember his extraordinary gifts as a
master story-teller, whose style was spontaneous,
fluid, and laced with wit and insightful brilliance.
STEVE AIZENSTAT
“J
oe changed my life. I was fortunate enough to
meet Joe Campbell at Esalen in 1965 and begin a
friendship that lasted until his death. There’s not
a day that I don’t think of him. He was my most
important teacher and his wisdom continues to be an
inspiration for my creative life. Some of my happiest
memories include:
• After that first seminar at Esalen on Myths of
the Underworld my asking him to lecture at
U.C.Extension and, to my amazed delight, Joe
saying yes.
• Joe lecturing at Extension every fall and spring.
After a lecture on the Eleusinian Mysteries, over
a glass of scotch, my suggesting that he lead a
travel/study program to Greece and Joe saying
yes. That became the first of three wonder filled
trips to Greece, South East Asia, and Mexico and
Guatemala, sacred sites every day and Joe’s
mesmerizing talks in the evening.
• Joe sitting beside me at the Magic Theatre
during a performance of my first play The Couch,
about Jung and Freud, and pronouncing it in his
most avuncular manner, “world class theatre,
darling.”
• Organizing a celebration for his 80th birthday with
guests, Maria Gimbutas, Robert Bly, and Barbara
Myerhold at the Palace of Fine Arts and the sold
out audience singing happy birthday as hundreds
of colored balloons cascaded from the ceiling.
And that evening, at a star studded dinner, I sat
between Joe and George Lucas as Joe belted out
his own re-written mythological lyrics to Give me
that old time religion.
• Receiving a hand written letter the next week:
“One week after the noble event, and if I had
not Jean beside me to assure me that it actually
took place, I would have to think it had all been
a vast dream. What a way to go! And like
everything else that you have done for me, it
so perfectly matched my readiness for precisely
that experience, that I have passed through it
as through a looking glass to the next room of
my ordained destiny. I cannot even thank you,
because for such a gift of love and understanding,
words do not count: only something in the pulse
of the heart. Yours ever, Joe.”
It was a privilege to cross his path many times before
his death, and to help insure the preservation of his
wisdom through books, tapes and films. In the 1980’s
many of us gathered together several times at Esalen
to dialogue with him…Stan and Christina Grof, Robert
Bly, Jamake Highwater, Stephen Larsen, Rick Tarnas,
Gregory Bateson, Michael Murphy, Michael and Justine
Toms, Phil Cousineau and many others who came
to honor him and his work. Joseph Campbell was a
consummate raconteur, scholar and master teacher
with boundless energy, who regaled us all for hours
and changed many lives for the better.
His conversations with me around mythology
a n d
tarot ultimately influenced and encouraged me to write
The Tarot Handbook. And his impact on me instilled
into my work, as a cultural anthropologist, a deeper
love of world-wide mythology and perennial wisdoms.
Joseph Campbell was a generous man, who
consistently modeled an irrepressible love of
his work and who believed in living his life fully.
For all of this and his outstanding legacy and
contribution, I am eternally grateful."
ANGELES ARRIEN
"
M
ore than anyone else, Joseph Campbell has
introduced the comparative study of symbol and
myth to people around the world. In so doing, he has
opened countless men and women to new visions of
heaven and Earth and to deeper understandings of self
in relation to society, nature, and cosmos. At Esalen,
he has dramatized the spiritual quest as central to the
world’s unfoldment. He is our friend, our guide, and a
hero on the greater frontiers now opening around us."
MICHAEL MURPHY
I
“ n the early days of Pacifica Graduate Institute,
when our legs were still wobbly, Joseph Campbell
would come to Santa Barbara and offer seminars and
conferences to the community. These events were
well attended and produced income and recognition
for what was then only a seed idea for a School. In
his generosity, Joseph would take the smallest of
~
LYNNE KAUFMAN
16
QUOTES
BY
JOSEPH CAMPBELL
“If you follow your bliss, the universe will open doors where there were
only walls.”
“If you follow your bliss, you will always have bliss, money or not. If you
follow money, you may lose it and you will have nothing.”
“When the world seems to be falling apart, you must hang onto your own
bliss. It’s that life that survives.”
“The privilege of a lifetime is being who you are.”
“You must be willing to get rid of the life you’ve planned, so as to have
the life that is waiting for you.”
“The world is a match for us. We are a match for the world.”
“Eternity is a dimension of here and now.”
“The heroic life is living the individual adventure.”
“You must enter the forest at the darkest point, where there is no path.
Where there is a way or path, it is someone else’s path.”
“If you want the whole thing, the gods will give it to you. But you must be
ready for it.”
“Ideas are dangerous. Don’t take them seriously. You can get by on a few.”
“The goal of life is to make your heartbeat match the beat of the universe,
to match your nature with Nature.”
“You become mature when you become the authority for your own life.”
“The god you worship is the god you deserve.”
"Happy Birthday, Joe!"
Pernod Ricard,the American distributor of The Glenlivet has
generously provided Joseph Campbell’s favorite Scotch for
this centenary celebration. Thank you!
55000 HIGHWAY ONE
BUG SUR CA 93920
TEL: 831.667.3000
[email protected]
www.esalen.org
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