special educational needs resource pack

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special educational needs resource pack
SPECIAL EDUCATIONAL NEEDS
RESOURCE PACK
Written by Sheree Vickers
For Mousetrap Theatre Projects
23 – 24 Henrietta Street, Covent Garden, London WC2E 8ND
© August 2010
Welcome to the WICKED SEN Teacher Resource Pack. The aims of this resource pack
are to help teachers prepare pupils for their visit to the show while the activities
provided can give an understanding of the story, characters and themes.
While all activities in this pack can be adapted for a wide variety of abilities, a rating
of EASY, INTERMEDIATE or CHALLENGING has been applied. It is hoped this guide will
allow teachers to quickly access the resources available in this pack that are best
suited to the needs of their group.
CONTENTS
PRE-SHOW PREPARATION ……………………………………………………………………………… 3
GOING TO THE THEATRE ……………………………………….……………………………………… 4
A ROLE-PLAY DRAMA …………………………………………………………………………………….. 4
A GLOSSARY OF THEATRE TERMS ………………………………………………………………….. 6
A SYNOPSIS OF WICKED …………………………………………………………………………………..9
A STORY TIMELINE ……………………………………………………………………………………….. 11
MAP MOMENTS …………………………………………………………………………………………….. 13
OPPOSITES ………………………………………………………………………………………..………… 15
WHAT MAKES YOU SPECIAL? ……………………………………………………………………….. 17
THE MAIN CHARACTERS ……………………………………………………………………………... 18
MUNCHKINLAND ………………………………………………………………………………………….. 20
THE EMERALD CITY ……………………………………………………………………………………… 22
EMERALD GLASSES ………………………………………………………………………………………. 25
MAKING MAGIC ……………………………………………………………………………………………. 27
PRODUCTION IMAGES …………………………………………………………………………………. 28
As an additional tool, activities throughout this pack can be accessed at a glance by
looking for the following icons:
☺
ACTIVITY Tasks
RESEARCH Tasks
PHOTOCOPIABLE Resources
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PRE-SHOW PREPARATION
For pupils who have not been to the theatre before or for those that take time to
adjust to new surroundings or get nervous easily, here are a few show moments you
might want to prepare them for.
On arrival at the theatre, pupils will notice a large dragon high above the stage. When
the show starts and the music begins, the dragon’s head moves and smoke appears
from its nostrils, however it does not move from its location and pupils can be assured
that it will not fly down over them.
To hear the opening music, and to watch clip of the show, visit the Wicked homepage:
www.wickedthemusical.co.uk
The other possibly ‘startling’ moment occurs with the booming voice of the wizard
towards the end of Act I. As preparation, pupils might want to enact their own
booming wizard voice in front of the class (using a microphone and amplifier if
available).
Finally, pupils might notice that Elphaba’s sister is given silver shoes, not ruby slippers
as seen in the 1939 film. In the original story by L.Frank Baum, the shoes were in fact
silver and the story goes that there were changed to ruby for the film to take
advantage of the new innovation called Technicolor!
-3-
GOING TO THE THEATRE
For those who have never been, a trip to the theatre is often confused with going to
the cinema. Surprisingly, the concept of seeing real people on stage is still relatively
foreign to most young people.
The following activities can be used in an introductory session explaining to the group
what to expect in a theatre environment, such as the lights going out, the audience
not talking during the show and the various aspects of putting a live show together.
For those with hearing aids, the theatre does have an induction loop and infra-red system in
the auditorium. There is also an adapted toilet off the Foyer for anyone with mobility
issues. Should you require any assistance either before or during the show, please ask the
theatre’s front of house staff.
A ROLE-PLAY DRAMA
INTERMEDIATE
The following activity can help to prepare students who are either not comfortable
with the idea of going on a theatre trip, or for those who may get over-excited (they
can practise behaviour beforehand and you can set up acceptable guidelines).
Time Allowance: 30-40minutes
You Will Need:
• a classroom or a sports hall.
• enough chairs for each student.
• some mock theatre tickets.
The Set-Up:
Explain that you are going to do some drama and go on a pretend trip somewhere.
The Activity:
Take a register of everyone’s names, asking each participant if they have ever been to
a theatre before. (You may also wish to explain the difference between a cinema and
the theatre.)
“Well, now that we are all here, how are we going to get to the theatre?”
Take some suggestions and guide the group to the mode of transport you will be using.
(For the purposes of this breakdown, I’ll use a bus.)
“How do we normally catch the bus? Do we line up or just run and grab any seat
possible? Line up? OK, who would like to be in charge of lining the group up and
getting them on the bus?”
-4-
Set up the chairs in rows to denote a bus. Cast a pupil or support worker in the role of
teacher and explain that you are going to be a naughty student. In role, demonstrate
the bad behaviour that would be unacceptable during a bus trip such as pushing in line,
yelling out, eating etc.
Once you have arrived at the theatre, resume your
normal teacher role and explain that the theatre tickets
need to be given out, checked by an usher and everyone
needs to take their seats. Re-set up the chairs in the space
to create a theatre environment before resuming the drama.
Go back into role as the naughty student character and start
misbehaving again. Inappropriate behaviour could include
talking to friends, chatting on a mobile phone or using the
phone to take photographs of the production!
If necessary, wear a
hat or scarf to denote
when you are playing
the role of the naughty
student. By removing
this, you can then
resume your teacher
role when needed.
Encourage the group to disapprove of this behaviour and suggest or show you what
behaviour would be acceptable.
End with a follow-up discussion, listing what happened in the drama and what the
naughty student did that was wrong.
Explain to the group that what you were pretending to do today is actually really going
to happen next week – without you being naughty of course!
As an extension to this drama, you might like to have someone (or a small cast)
perform their favourite song or dance in front of the group on a mock stage.
-5-
☺A
GLOSSARY OF THEATRE TERMS
Below is a glossary of theatrical terms with a few guide notes related specifically to
the production of WICKED. The questions included with each may be asked
while waiting for the performance to begin or in a follow-up session after
the theatre trip.
STAGE
The space on which the ACTORS present the show.
The Apollo Victoria has a traditional Proscenium Arch
stage, which means the audience sits facing the
performers, not unlike sitting in a cinema. The
audience can also sit quite high and look down on the
stage. The Apollo Victoria has two audience levels –
the stalls and the circle.
Often a proscenium arch theatre has a curtain,
which rises at the beginning of the performance.
Other styles of STAGE
include ‘Thrust’ (in
which the stage juts out
into the audience) and
‘The-Round’ (in which
the audience sit in a
circle with the STAGE in
the middle).
Q. Did a curtain rise at the beginning of WICKED? How did
the AUDIENCE know that the show had begun, e.g.: ACTORS
walking onto the stage, change in lighting, music playing or a
combination of all three?
LIGHTING
Lighting is very important in a theatre as it helps the audience to see the show. It can
also help to set the mood of the piece, for example, happy/sad or daytime/night-time.
The lighting in WICKED changes colour and sometimes goes out entirely. The lights are
operated by a TECHNICIAN or STAGE MANAGER.
Q. What mood does the LIGHTING create, e.g.: was the performance set at night or
during the day? Was it scary? Did the lighting change during the performance? Did the
change affect the mood? What colours did they see?
ACTORS
A person who performs for the entertainment of others. The cast of WICKED has a
number of lead roles (see the Character List in this handbook). These ACTORS play the
same part throughout the show, however there is also a CHORUS or ENSEMBLE of actors
who play a variety of different roles throughout the show.
Q. Aside from the lead actors, what other characters appeared in the show? For
example, the school pupils at Shiz University, the Munchkins, citizens of the Emerald
City and so forth.
-6-
COSTUME
The clothes worn by the ACTORS on STAGE which also help define their character. The
COSTUMES in WICKED must be hard-wearing and strong as the ACTORS/PERFORMERS
use them to create sound (such as with their shoes); use them to hang from parts of
the set (swinging from harnesses) and they must also wear them every night!
Q. How many costume changes do the lead ACTORS make in WICKED? Maybe the group
could write a letter to the cast with this question and others about the show.
PROPS & SET
A prop is any item used on STAGE by an ACTOR. This could be something as simple as a
pen or more complicated such as a flying broomstick!
The background used to represent a place on the STAGE is called the SET. The unique
SET of WICKED helps to set the scene, telling the audience where the production will
take place.
Q. How many different locations can the group remember from WICKED and what
changed in the SET to help define this?
AUDIENCE
The people who watch the performance. Generally in the theatre, an audience quietly
watches the show, showing their appreciation through applause.
-7-
-8-
A SYNOPSIS OF WICKED
Act I
Glinda, the Good Witch of the North, announces to the citizens of Oz that Elphaba, the
greenskinned Wicked Witch of the West, is dead.
We go back in time: a young, greenskinned Elphaba and her wheelchair-bound sister
Nessarose (daughters of the Governor of Munchkinland) arrive at Shiz University.
Elphaba and Glinda clash immediately when Elphaba is invited to join headmistress
Madame Morrible’s sorcery class and Glinda is not. Elphaba, excited and surprised to
discover she might have a talent for magic, imagines what it would be like to meet the
Wizard.
The students settle into their routine at Shiz: roommates Elphaba and Glinda loathe
each other. Glinda and the other students pay little attention to their history
professor, a talking goat called Dr. Dillamond. Only Elphaba is troubled by his warning
that throughout Oz, talking animals are losing their ability to speak.
Fiyero, a Winkie Prince, arrives at Shiz, and invites Glinda to a dance. To evade Boq
(her persistent Munchkin admirer), Glinda convinces him to escort Nessarose so she is
then free to go with Fiyero. When a grateful Elphaba gets Glinda into sorcery class,
Glinda decides to give Elphaba a social makeover.
Elphaba is distraught when Dr. Dillamond is arrested and taken away by the
authorities. When she witnesses a government official experimenting on a caged lion
cub, Elphaba’s anger releases a spell that freezes everyone in the room. Elphaba and
Fiyero free the terrified lion in the woods and Elphaba learns (to her surprise) that she
is attracted to Fiyero.
Madame Morrible informs Elphaba she’s been invited to the Emerald City to meet the
Wizard; Elphaba invites Glinda along. Under the pretence of testing her magical skill,
the Wizard tricks Elphaba into creating an enchanted army of spies for him. Elphaba is
shocked to realise that the Wizard has encouraged anti-animal sentiment to strengthen
his own political support. As Madame Morrible denounces her to the public as a
“wicked witch,” Elphaba vows to fight the Wizard’s injustice.
Act II
Madame Morrible and Glinda (who is now part of the Wizard’s administration) are
announcing Glinda’s plan to marry Fiyero (who is in charge of the hunt for Elphaba).
Glinda appears happy, but has paid a price for her success.
Meanwhile, Nessarose has become Governor of Munchkinland. She has grown bitter
and cruel, earning her the nickname ‘The Wicked Witch of the East’. Elphaba comes
to Nessarose seeking aid and asylum, but they quarrel and go their separate ways.
-9-
Elphaba returns to the Emerald City, where the Wizard tries to persuade her to join
him in ruling Oz. She is tempted, but refuses.
After crossing paths in the Emerald City once again, Elphaba and Fiyero fall in love and
plan their life together. Elphaba sees a disturbing vision of a flying house and rushes to
Munchkinland, only to discover that Nessarose has been crushed.
Glinda and Elphaba confront each other; when Fiyero tries to intervene, an angry mob
rushes him off. Elphaba vows to become truly wicked, since her good intentions bring
only suffering. Meanwhile, the citizens of Oz set out to destroy her.
- 10 -
A STORY TIMELINE
INTERMEDIATE
The story of WICKED starts at the end of the well-known Wizard of Oz story with
people rejoicing over the death of the Wicked Witch of the West.
☺
To help pupils understand the concept of using flashback to tell a story, photocopy the
story timeline on the next page (you may like to blow it up to A3 size) and work
backwards, helping them to document the various moments from WICKED.
Pupils might also like to add extra details to the ‘map’ that they remember from the
show such as releasing the lion cub or Glinda giving Elphaba a makeover.
As an extension, small groups of pupils using drama strategies such as tableau,
soundscape or spoken word could then re-create key moments that are then put into
the order they appear in the show.
CHALLENGING
- 11 -
MAP MOMENTS
CHALLENGING
On arrival at the theatre, pupils will notice a beautiful ‘map curtain’ with a
shimmering Emerald City in the centre. This map is the land of Oz as re-imagined by
Gregory Maguire and holds some intriguing drama possibilities. Looking closely at the
map, what other stories could develop surrounding places such as:
•
•
•
•
The Tomb of the Unsung Munchkin
The Truth Pond
The Great Gillikin Forest
Bridge of Teeth
Strategies to help pupils develop their own stories, drama scenarios or ‘map moments’
could include:
• A newspaper article or television news broadcast, interviewing people who worked
on the construction of the Yellow Brick Road.
• Hotseating of characters, such as those that coped during the Great Drought and
what they did to survive?
• Creating tableaux of key moments to physically show the development of and
possible destruction of the Forest of Fighting Trees.
• A collection of shared stories, poems and artwork showing how the Bridge of Teeth
got it’s name.
• Pictures and art work that are submitted as contendors for the Unsung Munchkin
monument.
• A soundscape (with voices, instruments, objects and/or personal communication
devices) to hear what the Great Gillikin Forest sounds like during the day (and
during the night)!
OPPOSITES
In WICKED, most of of the characters are not what they seem. Elphaba is green and
her appearance means she is condemned as ‘The Wicked Witch of the West’ despite
her intentions actually being good. Fiyero is originally thought to be shallow and
spoiled, however he turns out to also care for the ‘greater good’, while Glinda, who is
thought to be sweet and popular by everyone is actually quite selfish at the beginning
of the show.
☺ Activity 1
EASY
Cut out the individual symbols on the following worksheet and ask pupils to match up
their opposites.
Activity 2
CHALLENGING
For more able pupils, you might like to lead a discussion exploring the impact rumour
and gossip can have on people and how what people say about someone or something
might not always be true.
Taking on the characters from WICKED, pupils could set up a drama scenario in which
Elphaba is being gossiped about for being green. Once rehearsed and presented, pupils
could discuss, draw or replay the drama scene showing how they might change either
the behaviour of the pupils involved in the gossiping or the Elphaba’s response to what
was being said.
N.B. Social perception can be a particularly significant theme for people with learning
disabilities and/or sensory impairments. Therefore it is important to use your own
discrestion when working through this activity.
WHAT MAKES YOU SPECIAL?
EASY
Each of us is special in some way. It could be a special talent or hobby or a physcial
trait such as a beaming smile!
Pupils might like to discuss, draw or show what makes them special to the rest of the
class. Alternatively, others might like to tell their classmates what they like about
them. This could also be done using the following call and response chant:
[NAME] has [brown] eyes.
[NAME] has [brown] eyes.
And he has [black] hair.
And he has [black] hair.
[NAME] like [jumping].
[NAME] like [jumping].
Without a care.
Without a care.
He is special.
He is special.
As are we.
As are we.
We are special.
We are special.
You and me.
You and me.
THE MAIN CHARACTERS
ELPHABA
GLINDA
(also known as the Wicked Witch of the East)
(also known as Galinda the Good)
NESSAROSE
(A student at Shiz University and a
‘Munchkin’)
BOQ
(Elphaba’s sister)
- 18 -
MADAME MORRIBLE
DOCTOR DILLAMOND
(Head Mistress at Shiz University)
(Instructor at Shiz University and the ‘token
goat’)
FIYERO
THE WONDERFUL WIZARD
(A student at Shiz University and a ‘Winkie
Prince’)
(Leader of Oz)
As a follow-up activity, pupils might want to discuss who their favourite character was
from the show and what it was they liked about them, such as the way they acted,
their costumes or the songs they sang.
- 19 -
MUNCHKINLAND
EASY
to colour or collage.
☺ Photocopy the following images for pupils
www.kids-n-fun.com
More images can be downloaded from:
- 20 -
THE EMERALD CITY
“There are wonders like I’ve never seen. It’s all grand and it’s all green!”
Activity 1
EASY
Pupils might like to explore the colour green by creating a list of other green things
(see a sample below). More on the colour green can be found at:
www.enchantedlearning.com/colors/green.shtml
Activity 2
EASY
Decorate the classroom with green streamers and/or scarves (covering lamps with
green scarves can also create a wonderful effect). You might also want to collect a
number of different green objects or have the class decorate some clear plastic
bottles with green paint and glitter to display. To do this, ensure the bottles have
lids that can be secured. Pour some paint and glitter into each plastic container. Put
the lids on and shake the bottles until the paint and glitter covers the inside.
Activity 3
INTERMEDIATE
Have fun with an Emerald City Fashion Parade. Ask pupils to come dressed in green
or provide a collection of green material, hats and scarves (they might even like to
wear their Emerald City Glasses, page 25). Put on some favourite music as each pupil
shows off their newly created outfit. This could also be worked into a wonderful
assembly presentation by creating score cards and casting those watching as judges.
☺ Activity 4
EASY
Using the following template, pupils can colour their own Emerald City using a
number of different shades of green. They might like to colour with pencils, pens,
crayons, paint or even strips of green wrapping paper. The artwork could be finished
off with a dusting of glitter. As an extension, pupils might like to name some of the
streets in their Emerald City with green-reflecting names, such as Grass Grove or
Froggy Meadows.
☺ Activity 5
INTERMEDIATE
As an extension to the Fashion Parade activity or to advertise another Emerald City
event (such as a dance at the Ozdust Ballroom), pupils might like to design a poster.
A template has been provided on page 24 for pupils to expand on with their own
photographs or drawings.
THE EMERALD CITY
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☺
EMERALD GLASSES
INTERMEDIATE
YOU WILL NEED
scissors
cellotape
thin cardboard
green acetate
marker pens, glue and glitter
•
•
•
•
•
INSTRUCTIONS
1. Photocopy the glasses template on the following page onto the thin cardboard. (If
this is not possible you can stick a photocopy onto card.)
2. Cut around the edges.
3. Cut out the eye-holes and black-slits.
4. Stick green squares of acetate on the inside of the glasses.
5. Slide the ear rests into the cut out black-slits and secure with cellotape.
6. Decorate glasses to personal taste!
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MAKING MAGIC
EASY / INTERMEDIATE
Early on in WICKED, Madame Morrible discovers Elphaba has a gift for sorcery and
invites her to attend special classes designed to improve this skill. To expand on this
idea, pupils might like to have some fun creating spells of their own.
Time Allowance: 20-30minutes
You Will Need:
• a collection of musical instruments or CD player
• pens and paper (optional)
• a box of sensory items such as scarves, ribbons, bubbles and glow sticks (optional)
The Set-Up:
Sit the class in a circle. Give each a musical instrument (or put some music on)
and/or something from the sensory box.
The Activity:
Tell the group that you are going to make a spell together. Ask them:
• What type of spell would they like to create?
For example, a spell that produces a chocolate cake out of thin air, or one that
could allow you to travel back in time.
• What ingredients would they need to include?
For example, a clock or a wooden spoon. It could also be something like a storm
cloud or the smell of freshly cut grass! (You might like to ask pupils to draw their
special ingredient.)
Explain that in order to create this spell, they will need to develop a special dance or
musical jamboree. Starting off as slowly and quietly as possible, allow each pupil to
put their imaginary ingredient (or drawn representation) into the centre of the circle.
Encourage movement and/or sound from each as they do this, that can be copied by
the rest of the group.
Once all of the ingredients have been placed in the circle, get the group to start
making sounds with their instruments, bodies or sensory objects. Acting as a
conductor, encourage them to play quietly (by crouching down low) or loudly (by
stretching up high). Eventually bring the musical mayhem to a stop by either
signalling for silence or one-by-one taking the objects/instruments away.
N.B. Don’t be afraid to practise this a couple of times should you be concerned that
the group might not understand your conducting signals. Before you begin you might
even like to ask the group how they think you should conduct the spell making!
Pupils might want to spend time researching other well-known witches and wizards
such as those from Harry Potter, the Grand High Witch from Roald Dahl’s book The
Witches or even Gandalf from The Lord Of The Rings.
CHALLENGING
27
PRODUCTION IMAGES
INTERMEDIATE / CHALLENGING
All photographs by Tristram Kenton
Rather than just looking at the photographs, pupils might like to physically re-create
the following images in small groups and speculate on what might happen next. This
can be done through discussion or by ‘bringing the re-created image to life’ with
sound and/or movement. Consider also the looks on the characters faces and how
these might help to tell the story.
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