Aston-built Products Installation, Operation and

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Aston-built Products Installation, Operation and
Aston-built Products
Custom-built Dedicated Outdoor Air Systems
Installation, Operation and Maintenance Instructions Manual
Capacities: 1,000 to 300,000+ cfm
Model: EnergyPack®, ERV5000–10000 (indoor/outdoor),
HRV3000–10000 (indoor/outdoor)
Table of Contents
Nomenclature.................................................................................................................................................................................. 3
Safety Considerations..................................................................................................................................................................... 8
General Information......................................................................................................................................................................... 8
Recommended Spare Parts...................................................................................................................................................... 8
Unit Inspection on Arrival.......................................................................................................................................................... 9
Unit Application Limitations...................................................................................................................................................... 9
Installation....................................................................................................................................................................................... 9
Unit Location Requirements..................................................................................................................................................... 9
Roofcurbs Supplied by Venmar CES (External Applications Only)......................................................................................... 10
Roofcurbs Supplied by Others............................................................................................................................................... 11
Rigging, Lifting and Assembling............................................................................................................................................. 11
Hood Installation..................................................................................................................................................................... 21
Indoor Suspended Installation................................................................................................................................................ 21
Field Fabricated Ductwork...................................................................................................................................................... 22
Electrical Connections............................................................................................................................................................ 24
Coil, WSHP or Humidifier Piping Connections....................................................................................................................... 25
Condensate Drain Trap and Lines.......................................................................................................................................... 26
Gas Connections.................................................................................................................................................................... 26
Refrigerant Systems................................................................................................................................................................ 26
Start-up......................................................................................................................................................................................... 26
Pre Start-up Check................................................................................................................................................................. 26
Start-up Procedure................................................................................................................................................................. 28
Airflow Balancing.................................................................................................................................................................... 30
Maintenance.................................................................................................................................................................................. 31
Long-term Storage Maintenance Procedures........................................................................................................................ 31
Maintenance Summary Chart................................................................................................................................................. 31
Energy Recovery Wheel.......................................................................................................................................................... 31
Flat Plate Heat/Enthalpy Exchangers..................................................................................................................................... 35
Heat Pipe Heat Exchangers.................................................................................................................................................... 35
Refrigerant Systems................................................................................................................................................................ 36
Dampers.................................................................................................................................................................................. 37
Belt Driven Fans...................................................................................................................................................................... 38
FANWALL® Array.................................................................................................................................................................... 40
Motors..................................................................................................................................................................................... 46
Filters...................................................................................................................................................................................... 46
Coils........................................................................................................................................................................................ 47
Controls.................................................................................................................................................................................. 47
Troubleshooting...................................................................................................................................................................... 47
Appendix A: Roofcurb Generic Assembly Instructions................................................................................................................. 48
Appendix B: Water Source Heat Pump (WSHP) Piping, Installation, Maintenance and Troubleshooting.................................... 49
Appendix C: Positive and Negative Pressure Trapping................................................................................................................ 55
Appendix D: Gas-fired Furnace Modules Installation and Maintenance....................................................................................... 56
Tubular Gas-fired Duct Furnace Module................................................................................................................................ 56
IG Series Drum and Tube Gas-fired Duct Furnace Module.................................................................................................... 71
Appendix E: EnergyPack®, ERV5000–10000(i/e) and HRV3000–10000(i/e) Start-up Form and Checklist................................... 93
Appendix F: HEPA Filter Installation........................................................................................................................................... 103
Appendix G: Installation of Filters with a Filter Spacer on a Universal Holding Frame............................................................... 106
Appendix H: Electric Heating Coil and Controls Information...................................................................................................... 107
Appendix I: Extended Dormant Unit Maintenance Procedure.................................................................................................... 109
Appendix J: EnergyPack®, ERV5000–10000 and HRV3000–10000 Maintenance Summary Chart............................................ 112
Appendix K: Measuring and Adjusting V-belt Tension................................................................................................................ 113
Appendix L: Energy Recovery Wheel Multi-link Drive Belt Instructions...................................................................................... 114
Appendix M: Fan Bearing Lubrication Schedule......................................................................................................................... 116
Appendix N: FANWALL® Inlet Cone Alignment........................................................................................................................... 117
Appendix O: Filter Resistance and Latches................................................................................................................................ 118
Appendix P: Troubleshooting...................................................................................................................................................... 119
Appendix Q: Adjusting Refrigerant Charge................................................................................................................................. 121
VCES-ASTON-IOM-1F – EnergyPack, ERV5000–10000, HRV3000–10000
2
Nomenclature
EnergyPack® Nomenclature (1,000–300,000+ cfm)
1
2
3
1. TYPE OF HEAT OR ENERGY RECOVERY DEVICE
W – Wheel - total enthalpy
Ws – Wheel - sensible only
P – Plate - sensible only
(polypropylene or aluminum)
Pe – Plate - enthalpy (HM core)
Pa – Plate - AlphaFlowSM configuration, sensible only
H – Heat pipe heat exchanger
U – U-shaped heat pipe
A – No energy recovery device
(Make-up or Air Handling Units)
2. NUMBER OF AIRSTREAMS
3. SUPPLY CFM
Rounded to the nearest thousand
4. INDICATES UNIT INSTALLATION
e – Unit installed outdoors
i – Unit installed indoors
5. TYPE OF SUPPLY FAN/TYPE OF EXHAUST FAN
F – DWDI forward curved fan
B – DWDI backward inclined, or flat blade
P – SWSI plenum fan (backward inclined airfoil)
W – FANWALL TECHNOLOGY®
X – No fan
6. TYPE OF HEATING
HW – Hot water coil
SC – Steam coil
yTxxxx – Gas-fired serpentine heaters
(y = # of furnace sections; xxxx = heating capacity)
yRxxxx – Indirect gas-fired duct heaters
(y = # of furnace sections; xxxx = heating capacity)
ECxxx – Electric duct heater (xxx = heating capacity)
HG – Hot gas re-heat coil (condensing unit supplied by others)
HGxxxx – Hot gas re-heat coil (condensing unit supplied by Venmar CES;
xxxx = heating capacity)
IGxxxx – Indirect gas-fired heaters (xxxx = input heating capacity)
DGxxxx – Direct fired gas burner (xxxx = input heating capacity)
X – No heating
4
5
6
7
8
9
9. EXTERIOR FINISH
P – Painted finish (standard for exterior units)
C – Corrosion resistant paint
G – Galvanized metal - unpainted
(standard for interior units)
8. TYPE OF HEATING/COOLING
HWCW – Hydronic coil for hot water in heating
season and chilled water in cooling season
HPxxxy – DX coil with heat pump
(xxx = cooling capacity;
y = # of scroll compressors)
RL – Runaround loop
X – No heating/cooling
7. TYPE OF COOLING
CW – Chilled water coil
Dx – DX coil (condensing unit supplied
by others)
CSxxxy – DX coil with air cooled condensing unit
(xxx = cooling capacity;
y = # of scroll compressors)
CTxxxy – DX coil with air cooled condensing unit
(xxx = cooling capacity;
y = # of scroll compressors in tandem)
Cxxxy – DX coil with air cooled condensing unit
(xxx = cooling capacity;
y = # of semi-hermetic compressors)
EV – Evaporative cooling section
X – No cooling
© 2015 Nortek Air Solutions Canada Inc. All rights reserved throughout the world.
Illustrations cover the general appearance of Venmar CES products at the time of publication and Nortek Air Solutions
reserves the right to make changes in design and construction at any time without notice.
™® The following are trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective companies: EnergyPack from Nortek Air
Solutions Canada Inc. and FANWALL from Nortek Air Solutions, LLC.
Nortek Air Solutions, LLC d/b/a Venmar CES furnishes equipment pursuant to its then-current Terms and Conditions of Sale
and Limited Warranty, copies of which can be found under the Terms & Conditions of Sale and Warranty link at
www.nortekair.com. Extended warranties, if any, shall be as offered and acknowledged in writing by Venmar CES.
VCES-ASTON-IOM-1F – EnergyPack, ERV5000–10000, HRV3000–10000
3
ERV5000–ERV10000 Indoor Nomenclature (4,000–10,000)
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
1. FROST CONTROL
D – Recirc defrost1
E – Exhaust only2
V – VSD frost prevention
N – Non-defrost3
2. VOLTAGE/SPEED
B – 208 VAC/1/60 – one-speed8/10*
C – 230 VAC/1/60 – one-speed8/10*
D – 208 VAC/3/60 – one-speed
E – 230 VAC/3/60 – one-speed
F – 460 VAC/3/60 – one-speed
G – 575 VAC/3/60 – one-speed
N – 208 VAC/3/60 – VFD4
O – 230 VAC/3/60 – VFD4
P – 460 VAC/3/60 – VFD4
Q – 575 VAC/3/60 – VFD4/5
3. SENSOR CONTACTS
D – Dirty filter contacts
W – Wheel rotation sensor
B – Dirty filter contacts and
wheel rotation sensor
X – No contacts, no sensor
4. EXTERNAL FINISH
S – Standard galvanized package
G – Grey enamel paint finish
5. OUTSIDE AIR DAMPER
1 – Non-insulated spring return (low leak)
2 – Insulated spring return (low leak)
3 – No damper
6. EXHAUST AIR DAMPER
1 – Non-insulated spring return (low leak)
2 – Insulated spring return (low leak)
3 – No damper
7. EXTERNAL DISCONNECT
F – Fused disconnect switch7
X – No disconnect switch
8. OUTSIDE AIR INTAKE
E – End outside air intake
T – Top outside air intake
S – Side outside air intake
B – Bottom outside air intake
9. EXHAUST DISCHARGE
E – End exhaust discharge
T – Top exhaust discharge
D – Down exhaust discharge
10. SUPPLY DISCHARGE
E – End supply discharge
T – Top supply discharge
D – Down supply discharge
11. RETURN AIR
E – End return air
T – Top return air
B – Bottom return air
9
10
11
12
13
14 15
16
17
18
19
19. COIL ARRANGEMENT
H – Heating, cooling, access section
C – Cooling, heating, access section
S – Heating, cooling, no access section
X – No access section
(one coil or no coils)
18. COOLING
C – Chilled water (5 row)
W – Chilled water (6 row)
D – DX cooling (5 row, 1 circuit)
F – Dx cooling (6 row, 2 circuits)
X – No cooling
17. HEATING
ERV5000i–10000i
H – Hot water (1 row)
J – Hot water (2 row)
S – Steam heat (1 row)
G – Hot gas re-heat (2 row)
X – No heat
ERV5000i
D – Electric heat (25 kW)8/9
E – Electric heat (43 kW)8/9
F – Electric heat (78 kW)8/9
ERV6500i
D – Electric heat (35 kW)8/9
E – Electric heat (55 kW)8/9
F – Electric heat (100 kW)8/9
ERV8000i
D – Electric heat (42 kW)8/9
E – Electric heat (71 kW)8/9
F – Electric heat (128 kW)8/9
ERV10000i
D – Electric heat (54 kW)8/9
E – Electric heat (91 kW)8/9
F – Electric heat (164 kW)8/9
16. PURGE SECTION
P – Purge section
X – No purge section
15. BLOWER ISOLATION
R – Rubber in shear pads isolation
S – Spring blower isolation
14. FREE COOLING
E – Free cooling (enthalpy controller)
D – Free cooling (dry bulb)
X – No free cooling
13. HEF FILTRATION
H – High efficiency supply filter
(4” 80–85% MERV 14)6
X – No HEF filtration
12. MEF FILTRATION
B – MEF supply and exhaust filters
Note:
1 When ordering frost control, you must order outside air and exhaust air dampers. VFD motors are not available with this frost control option.
2 Outside air damper recommended. VFD motors are not available with this frost control option.
3 No dampers required.
4 All VFD options include one controller per motor.
5 All VFD options for 575 VAC/3/60 include a line reactor.
6 You must order an MEF supply filter when ordering HEF supply filtration.
7 Fused disconnect is factory installed.
8 Electric heat is not available with single-phase motor options.
9 Electric heat to be used in re-heat position only (not for frost control).
10 15 hp motor is not available with this voltage option (*ERV10000i only).
VCES-ASTON-IOM-1F – EnergyPack, ERV5000–10000, HRV3000–10000
4
ERV5000–ERV10000 Outdoor Nomenclature (4,000–10,000)
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
1. FROST CONTROL
D – Recirc defrost1
E – Exhaust only2
V – VSD frost prevention
N – Non-defrost3
2. VOLTAGE/SPEED
B – 208 VAC/1/60 – one-speed9/11*
C – 230 VAC/1/60 – one-speed9/11*
D – 208 VAC/3/60 – one-speed
E – 230 VAC/3/60 – one-speed
F – 460 VAC/3/60 – one-speed
G – 575 VAC/3/60 – one-speed
N – 208 VAC/3/60 – VFD5
O – 230 VAC/3/60 – VFD5
P – 460 VAC/3/60 – VFD5
Q – 575 VAC/3/60 – VFD5/6
3. SENSOR CONTACTS
D – Dirty filter contacts
W – Wheel rotation sensor
B – Dirty filter contacts and
wheel rotation sensor
X – No contacts, no sensor
4. EXTERNAL FINISH
G – Grey enamel paint finish
5. OUTSIDE AIR DAMPER
1 – Non-insulated spring return (low leak)
2 – Insulated spring return (low leak)
3 – No damper
6. EXHAUST AIR DAMPER
1 – Non-insulated spring return (low leak)
2 – Insulated spring return (low leak)
3 – Gravity backdraft damper (low leak)
4 – No damper
7. EXTERNAL DISCONNECT
F – Fused disconnect switch8
X – No disconnect switch
8. HOODS
H – Intake/exhaust hoods
X – No hoods4
9. SUPPLY DISCHARGE
D – Down supply discharge
E – End supply discharge
10. RETURN AIR
B – Bottom return air
E – End return air
11. MEF FILTRATION
B – MEF supply and exhaust filters
9
10
11
12
13
14 15
16
17
18
19
19. ROOFCURB
R – Insulated roofcurb
X – No roofcurb
18. COIL ARRANGEMENT
H – Heating, cooling, access section
C – Cooling, heating, access section
S – Heating, cooling, no access section
X – No access section
(one coil or no coils)
17. COOLING
C – Chilled water (5 row)
W – Chilled water (6 row)
D – DX cooling (5 row, 1 circuit)
F – DX cooling (6 row, 2 circuits)
X – No cooling
16. HEATING
ERV5000e–10000e
H – Hot water (1 row)
J – Hot water (2 row)
S – Steam heat (1 row)
G – Hot gas re-heat (2 row)
X – No heat
ERV5000e
D – Electric heat (25 kW)9/10
E – Electric heat (43 kW)9/10
F – Electric heat (78 kW)9/10
ERV6500e
D – Electric heat (35 kW)9/10
E – Electric heat (55 kW)9/10
F – Electric heat (100 kW)9/10
ERV8000e
D – Electric heat (42 kW)9/10
E – Electric heat (71 kW)9/10
F – Electric heat (128 kW)9/10
ERV10000e
D – Electric heat (54 kW)9/10
E – Electric heat (91 kW)9/10
F – Electric heat (164 kW)9/10
15. PURGE SECTION
P – Purge section
X – No purge section
14. BLOWER ISOLATION
R – Rubber in shear pads isolation
S – Spring blower isolation
13. FREE COOLING
E – Free cooling (enthalpy controller)
D – Free cooling (dry bulb)
X – No free cooling
12. HEF FILTRATION
H – High efficiency supply filter
(4” 80–85% MERV 14)7
X – No HEF filtration
Note:
1 When ordering frost control, you must order outside air and exhaust air dampers. VFD motors are not available with this frost control option.
2 Outside air damper recommended. VFD motors are not available with this frost control option.
3 No dampers required.
4 Must order hoods when ordering dampers.
5 All VFD options include one controller per motor.
6 All VFD options for 575 VAC/3/60 include a line reactor.
7 You must order an MEF supply filter when ordering HEF supply filtration.
8 Fused disconnect is factory installed.
9 Electric heat is not available with single-phase motor options.
10 Electric heat to be used in reheat position only (not for frost control).
11 15 hp motor is not available with the voltage option (*ERV10000e only).
VCES-ASTON-IOM-1F – EnergyPack, ERV5000–10000, HRV3000–10000
5
HRV3000–HRV10000 Indoor Nomenclature (2,500–11,500 cfm)
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
1. FROST CONTROL
D – Recirc defrost1/4
E – Exhaust only2/4
F – Face and bypass3
T – Traversing defrost4
N – Non-defrost5
2. VOLTAGE/SPEED
B – 208 VAC/1/60 – one-speed6/7*
C – 230 VAC/1/60 – one-speed6/7*
D – 208 VAC/3/60 – one-speed
E – 230 VAC/3/60 – one-speed
F – 460 VAC/3/60 – one-speed
G – 575 VAC/3/60 – one-speed
N – 208 VAC/3/60 – VFD8
O – 230 VAC/3/60 – VFD8
P – 460 VAC/3/60 – VFD8
Q – 575 VAC/3/60 – VFD8/9
3. ENERGY RECOVERY
P – Poly core10
A – Aluminum core
H – HM core11
4. INTERNAL PROTECTION
1 – 2” insulation, double wall
2 – Corrosion resistant interior (heresite)
3 – Pool application package12/13/14
5. SENSOR CONTACTS
D – Dirty filter contacts
X – No contacts
6. EXTERNAL FINISH
S – Standard galvanized package
G – Grey enamel paint finish
7. OUTSIDE AIR DAMPER
1 – Non-insulated spring return (low leak)
2 – Insulated spring return (low leak)
3 – No damper
8. EXHAUST AIR DAMPER
1 – Non-insulated spring return (low leak)
2 – Insulated spring return (low leak)
3 – No damper
9. EXTERNAL DISCONNECT
F – Fused disconnect switch15
X – No disconnect switch
10. OUTSIDE AIR INTAKE
E – End outside air intake
T – Top outside air intake
11. EXHAUST DISCHARGE
E – End exhaust discharge
T – Top exhaust discharge
Note:
1 When ordering frost control, you must order outside air and exhaust
air dampers.
2 Outside air damper recommended.
3 And/or free cooling (c/w dampers and actuator).
4 VFD motors are not available with this frost control option.
5 No dampers required. Non-defrost is only available if the outside air
temperature is greater than 10ºF [−17ºC].
6 Electric heat is not available with single-phase motor options.
7 15 hp motor is not available with this voltage option. (*HRV10000i only)
8 All VFD options include one controller per motor.
9 This option includes a line reactor.
10 Traversing defrost may not be suitable under all thermal conditions with a
polypropylene heat exchanger. Consult the factory.
11 Traversing defrost is not available with the HM core option.
VCES-ASTON-IOM-1F – EnergyPack, ERV5000–10000, HRV3000–10000
9
10
11
12
13
14 15
16
17
18
18. COIL ARRANGEMENT
H – Heating, cooling, access section
C – Cooling, heating, access section
S – Heating, cooling, no access section
X – No access section (one coil or no coils)
17. COOLING
C – Chilled water (5 row)
W – Chilled water (6 row)
D – DX cooling (5 row, 1 circuit)
F – DX cooling (6 row, 2 circuits)
X – No cooling
16. HEATING
HRV3000i–10000i
H – Hot water (1 row)
S – Steam heat (1 row)
J – Hot water (2 row)
X – No heat
HRV3000i
D – Electric heat (15 kW)6/16
E – Electric heat (27 kW)6/16
F – Electric heat (49 kW)6/16
HRV5000i
D – Electric heat (25 kW)6/16
E – Electric heat (43 kW)6/16
F – Electric heat (78 kW)6/16
HRV6500i
D – Electric heat (35 kW)6/16
E – Electric heat (55 kW)6/16
F – Electric heat (100 kW)6/16
HRV8000i
D – Electric heat (42 kW)6/16
E – Electric heat (71 kW)6/16
F – Electric heat (128 kW)6/16
HRV10000i
D – Electric heat (54 kW)6/16
E – Electric heat (91 kW)6/16
F – Electric heat (164 kW)6/16
15. BLOWER ISOLATION
R – Rubber in shear pads isolation
S – Spring blower isolation
14. FILTRATION
S – Standard filtration
(2” 25–30% MERV 8)
H – High efficiency filtration
(4” 80–85% MERV 14)
13. RETURN AIR
E – End return air
B – Bottom return air
12. SUPPLY DISCHARGE
E – End supply discharge
D – Down supply discharge
12 The ‘Pool application package’ requires the following nomenclature options
also be selected: ‘F – Face and bypass’ (Frost Control), ‘P – Poly core’ (Energy
Recovery), ‘2 – Insulated spring return (low leak)’ (Outside Air Damper) and
‘2 – Insulated spring return (low leak)’ (Exhaust Air Damper).
13 The ‘Pool application package’ includes: corrosion resistant (heresite) internal
unit protection, epoxy coating on the exhaust air fan, TEFC exhaust air fan
motor, liquid-tight conduit on all high voltage wiring, urethane insulation
throughout (including insulated middle partition), condensate drain pan at
exhaust air leaving station.
14 It is recommended that supply and return dampers be installed in the ductwork.
These dampers shall close when the unit is not in operation.
15 Fused disconnect switch is factory installed.
16 Electric heat to be used in re-heat position only (not for frost control).
6
HRV3000–HRV10000 Outdoor Nomenclature (2,500–11,500 cfm)
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
1. FROST CONTROL
D – Recirc defrost1/4
E – Exhaust only2/4
F – Face and bypass3
T – Traversing defrost4
N – Non-defrost5
2. VOLTAGE/SPEED
B – 208 VAC/1/60 – one-speed6/7*
C – 230 VAC/1/60 – one-speed6/7*
D – 208 VAC/3/60 – one-speed
E – 230 VAC/3/60 – one-speed
F – 460 VAC/3/60 – one-speed
G – 575 VAC/3/60 – one-speed
N – 208 VAC/3/60 – VFD8
O – 230 VAC/3/60 – VFD8
P – 460 VAC/3/60 – VFD8
Q – 575 VAC/3/60 – VFD8/9
3. ENERGY RECOVERY
P – Poly core10
A – Aluminum core
H – HM core11
4. INTERNAL PROTECTION
1 – 2” insulation, double wall
2 – Corrosion resistant interior (heresite)
3 – Pool application package12/13/14
5. SENSOR CONTACTS
D – Dirty filter contacts
X – No contacts
6. EXTERNAL FINISH
G – Grey enamel paint finish
7. OUTSIDE AIR DAMPER
1 – Non-insulated spring return (low leak)
2 – Insulated spring return (low leak)
3 – No damper
8. EXHAUST AIR DAMPER
1 – Non-insulated spring return (low leak)
2 – Insulated spring return (low leak)
3 – No damper
9. EXTERNAL DISCONNECT
F – Fused disconnect switch15
X – No disconnect switch
10. HOODS
H – Intake/exhaust hoods
X – No hoods
11. SUPPLY DISCHARGE
E – End supply discharge
D – Down supply discharge
10
11
12
13
14 15
16
17
18
18. ROOFCURB
R – Insulated roofcurb
X – No roofcurb
17. COIL ARRANGEMENT
H – Heating, cooling, access section
C – Cooling, heating, access section
S – Heating, cooling, no access section
X – No access section (one coil or no coils)
16. COOLING
C – Chilled water (5 row)
W – Chilled water (6 row)
D – DX cooling (5 row, 1 circuit)
F – DX cooling (6 row, 2 circuits)
X - No cooling
15. HEATING
HRV3000e–10000e
H – Hot water (1 row)
S – Steam heat (1 row)
J – Hot water (2 row)
X – No heat
HRV3000e
D – Electric heat (15 kW)6/16
E – Electric heat (27 kW)6/16
F – Electric heat (49 kW)6/16
HRV5000e
D – Electric heat (25 kW)6/16
E – Electric heat (43 kW)6/16
F – Electric heat (78 kW)6/16
HRV6500e
D – Electric heat (35 kW)6/16
E – Electric heat (55 kW)6/16
F – Electric heat (100 kW)6/16
HRV8000e
D – Electric heat (42 kW)6/16
E – Electric heat (71 kW)6/16
F – Electric heat (128 kW)6/16
HRV10000e
D – Electric heat (54 kW)6/16
E – Electric heat (91 kW)6/16
F – Electric heat (164 kW)6/16
14. BLOWER ISOLATION
R – Rubber in shear pads isolation
S – Spring blower isolation
13. FILTRATION
S – Standard filtration
(2” 25–30% MERV 8)
H – High efficiency filtration
(4” 80–85% MERV 14)
12. RETURN AIR
E – End return air
B – Bottom return air
Note:
1 When ordering frost control, you must order outside air and exhaust
air dampers.
2 Outside air damper recommended.
3 And/or free cooling (c/w dampers and actuator).
4 VFD motors are not available with this frost control option.
5 No dampers required. Non-defrost is only available if the outside air
temperature is greater than 10ºF [−17ºC].
6 Electric heat is not available with single-phase motor options.
7 15 hp motor is not available with this voltage option. (*HRV10000i only.)
8 All VFD options include one controller per motor.
9 This option includes a line reactor.
10 Traversing defrost may not be suitable under all thermal conditions with a
polypropylene heat exchanger. Consult the factory.
11 Traversing defrost is not available with the HM core option.
VCES-ASTON-IOM-1F – EnergyPack, ERV5000–10000, HRV3000–10000
12 The ‘Pool application package’ requires the following nomenclature options
also be selected: ‘F – Face and bypass’ (Frost Control), ‘P – Poly core’ (Energy
Recovery), ‘2 – Insulated spring return (low leak)’ (Outside Air Damper) and
‘2 – Insulated spring return (low leak)’ (Exhaust Air Damper).
13 The ‘Pool application package’ includes: corrosion resistant (heresite) internal
unit protection, epoxy coating on the exhaust air fan, TEFC exhaust air fan
motor, liquid-tight conduit on all high voltage wiring, urethane insulation
throughout (including insulated middle partition), condensate drain pan at
exhaust air leaving station.
14 It is recommended that supply and return dampers be installed in the ductwork.
These dampers shall close when the unit is not in operation.
15 Fused disconnect switch is factory installed.
16 Electric heat to be used in re-heat position only (not for frost control).
7
Safety Considerations
Warning, Caution and Important notes appear throughout this manual in specific and appropriate locations to
alert Installation Contractors and maintenance or service
personnel of potential safety hazards, possible equipment
damage or to alert personnel of special procedures or instructions that must be followed as outlined below.
Hazards may exist within this equipment because it contains electrical and powerful moving components. Only
qualified service personnel should install or service this
equipment. Untrained personnel can perform basic maintenance such as maintaining filters. Observe precautions
marked in literature and on labels attached to the unit. Follow all safety codes.
WARNING
Identifies an instruction which, if not followed, might cause
serious personal injuries including possibility of death.
CAUTION
Identifies an instruction which, if not followed, might severely damage the unit, its components, the assembly or
final installation.
IMPORTANT
Indicates supplementary information needed to fully
complete an instruction or installation.
WARNING
Disconnect the main power switch to the unit before
performing service or maintenance. Electric shock can
cause personal injury or death.
WARNING
Equipment roof, external components/assemblies
(hoods, louvers, dampers, pipe chase, etc.) and internal
components/assemblies (filter racks, fans, supports, etc.)
are unsafe surfaces to walk and work on. Proper personnel supports and ladders must be used. If not followed,
serious injuries may occur, including possibility of death.
General Information
This manual is designed to provide general information on
the common operation of all standard and optional components that may have been installed in the unit. Note that
some sections of this manual may not apply to your unit.
This manual has been designed for a general purpose and
describes all options offered by Venmar CES that could
be included in the unit. Consult the manual from the Component Manufacturer if more detailed technical information
about a specific component is required.
All documentation that was specifically designed for your
unit has been included in the pocket of the control panel,
including (and if applicable):
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Mechanical drawings
Unit nomenclature
Electrical schematics
Sequence of control
Variable Frequency Drive (VFD) manual and CD
(when supplied)
• DDC controller documentation (when supplied)
User’s manual
Communication protocol documentation
Keypad documentation
Recommended Spare Parts
Spare parts should be ordered at the time the installation is accepted by the Owner. Spare parts will reduce
the down time in the event of a failure. The list of spare
parts outlined below is considered minimal. Installation in
remote locations or when the operation of heating equipment is essential may require more spare parts than listed.
Please contact the Service Department at Venmar CES for
recommendations.
VCES-ASTON-IOM-1F – EnergyPack, ERV5000–10000, HRV3000–10000
Minimum spare parts include:
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Two sets of fuses
One matching set of fan belts (belt driven fans only)
One set of filters
One burner control relay module, flame signal amplifier and purge card (optional)
One flame sensor (optional)
One spark igniter (optional)
8
Unit Inspection on Arrival
Remove plastic wrapping, protective coverings and panels, securing latches, etc. to inspect the equipment exterior and interior for any damage that may have occurred
during unit shipment and for shipped loose parts. Ensure
there is no damage to any protruding exterior components such as door handles, disconnect switch handle,
etc., or to internal components such as fans, motors, heat
exchanger, dampers and drains. File a claim with the shipping company if the unit is damaged. Check the packing
slip against all items received. If any items are missing sign
the carrier’s bill of landing with the notation “Shipment
Received Less Item #_____.” Contact the factory immediately if damage is found. No return shipment will be accepted without authorization.
Unit Application Limitations
CAUTION
Venmar CES equipment is not designed to be used for
temporary heating, cooling and/or ventilation during
construction.
Using Venmar CES units for temporary ventilation during construction is subject to the unit warranty terms and
should be reviewed carefully before proceeding, as this
may void the standard warranty conditions.
Fine dust, larger particulate matter, solvents, varnishes
and other chemicals may cause filter clogging and elevated cabinet pressures, higher power consumption and
possible irreparable damage to the desiccant material of
the energy recovery device, which could reduce energy
recovery performance and also reduce the heat transfer
effectiveness of other components. Potential damages include, but are not limited to, these examples.
Installation
Unit Location Requirements
Consult local building codes and electrical codes for special installation requirements and note additional requirements listed in this manual. In choosing the installation
location of the unit, consider the following factors:
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The unit should be installed to allow easy access for
maintenance and for systems operation.
Clearance around the unit should be a minimum of
39” [1,000 mm] and 48” [1,219 mm] around the condenser section to allow easy access for maintenance
and for system operation. For clearances to remove
components, consult factory.
Locate the unit in an area requiring the least amount
of ductwork and direction changes to allow optimum
performance, to reduce pressure loss and to use
less electricity to achieve proper ventilation. Ductwork must be in accordance with ducting mechanical rules to prevent sound issues and system effects.
The fresh air intake hood must be positioned away
from sources of contamination such as other HVAC
unit exhaust outlets or vents, hot chimneys or
kitchen exhaust vents.
Fresh air intake must also be positioned in a direction
opposite to that of prevailing winds and clear of any
obstruction to prevent turbulence buildup to reduce
entry of snow or rain.
The unit should be mounted on a level foundation to
allow condensation to flow into internal drains. The
VCES-ASTON-IOM-1F – EnergyPack, ERV5000–10000, HRV3000–10000
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foundation must provide adequate continuous support
to the full perimeter of the base and all cross members
requiring support to minimize deflection of the unit
base frame to not more than 1/16” [1.6 mm] over the
entire length and width. In addition to these recommendations, a Structural Engineer must be involved
to properly size supporting structural elements.
When mounting the unit indoors, if drain connections
are required, mount the unit on a housekeeping pad
of sufficient height to allow for drain trap height and
condensate lines to slope toward the building drain,
install condensate pumps to reduce height of housekeeping pads or drill holes in the concrete pad or
mechanical room floor for sufficient trap height.
When mounting the unit on a roofcurb check the
height from the finished roof to the bottom of the
intake hood. Consult with Local Authorities or your
building code for minimal intake hood height for the
water-tight height from and above the finished roof,
and in snow prone areas, the buildup of snow, to
determine the height of the roofcurb. Venmar CES
optional roofcurbs measure 18” [457 mm] in height.
If additional height is required from the finished roof
to the top of the roofcurb, to the bottom of the intake
hood or if other than level, custom height roofcurbs
must be ordered.
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Roofcurbs Supplied by Venmar CES (External Applications Only)
Roofcurbs supplied by Venmar CES should be mounted
as follows:
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The roofcurb is shipped knocked-down with assembly hardware and instructions provided. The roofcurb
must be field erected, assembled and set in place by
the Installing Contractor (see Appendix A).
Roofcurb dimensions are submitted with the unit
mechanical drawings which can also be found in the
unit control panel pocket or by calling Technical Support personnel from the Venmar CES factory.
The cross members must be positioned as per the
roofcurb drawing to properly support the unit.
The building structure must provide continuous
structural support under the full perimeter of the roofcurb and under all cross members.
After the roofcurb has been assembled, ensure that
the curb dimensions suit the unit for which it is designated and also ensure that the structural supports
for the roofcurb are correct.
Ensure that the assembled curb is square, plumb
and level to within 1/16” [1.6 mm] over the entire
length. The roofcurb must be shimmed to the building structure as required to provide continuous support under its full perimeter and under all its cross
members.
Figure 1: Continuous ½” [13 mm] bead of ADBOND
1465 acoustical butyl sealant (or equivalent) applied to
top perimeter of roofcurb and ½” x 1½” [13 x 38 mm]
gasket with adhesive strip applied to the bottom duct
opening connections just prior to unit installation.
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The roofcurb must be fastened to the building structure.
The Installing Contractor is responsible for making
the curb water-tight by caulking all roofcurb joints.
See Appendix A for assembly instructions for standard design curbs or with optional wood nailer.
IMPORTANT
The following items must be completed prior to setting
the unit on the roofcurb.
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The roofcurb roofing must be completed including
insulation, cant strip, flashing and counter-flashing.
Vertical ductwork supplied by Sheet Metal Contractor must be attached to the roofcurb cross members and building structure, not to the unit. See
Field Fabricated Ductwork for suggested ductwork
attachment.
If there is no building roof access underneath the
unit, and drain or piping connections must be made
(in the roofing), it is recommended to do so before
unit installation using the appropriate materials provided by the Installing Contractor.
Use the ADBOND 1465 acoustical butyl sealant
supplied with the unit and apply a continuous ½”
[13 mm] bead to the top perimeter of the roofcurb
for a positive air- and water-tight seal and to ease
section movement when pulling modules together
(if applicable). The ADBOND 1465 acoustical butyl
sealant remains indefinitely pliable and sticky and
should only be applied just prior to unit installation
to avoid smudging.
Use the ½” x 1½” [13 x 38 mm] polyvinyl gasket with adhesive strip supplied with the unit and
apply it on top of the perimeter of the duct opening
connections.
IMPORTANT
The ADBOND 1465 acoustical butyl sealant between the
unit and the roofcurb is critical for a positive air- and water-tight seal. If improperly applied this can result in air and
water leakage and poor unit performance (see Figure 1).
Adcoustik 2465
Butyl sealer ½” bead
Roofcurb
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Roofcurbs Supplied by Others
Roofcurbs supplied by others must be designed with the
same dimensions, cross member arrangement and location as per Venmar CES roofcurb drawings and must be
designed to evenly withstand perimeter and cross section
static loads.
IMPORTANT
Venmar CES is not liable for any damages, costs or other
issues arising from roofcurbs supplied by others.
Rigging, Lifting and Assembling
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IMPORTANT
Carefully read all the instructions contained herein.
Before proceeding with any work, correlate these
instructions with the information provided on the
curb and equipment shop drawing for the specific
project.
These instructions outline the suggested method of
rigging, lifting and installing a Venmar CES unit. All
local codes and fire regulations must be verified and
adhered to by the Installing Contractor.
Before assembling, hoisting or setting any pieces of
the supporting curbs or units, verify that the proper
unit is being directed to the correct location, as
designated by the architectural and engineering design drawings.
Safety first – ensure that all safety practices recommended by local safety associations are continuously in use.
If any questions arise during the installation procedure, please contact the factory.
The Installing Contractor is responsible for the unit
being air- and water-tight at the joints between sections and between the roofcurb and the unit.
All holes that have been made by the Installing or
Electrical Contractor after receiving and installing
the unit must be well sealed to prevent air and/or
water infiltration.
Rigging, Lifting and Assembling Equipment
All rigging equipment and labor (as applicable) is provided
by the Installing Contractor as detailed below. It is highly
recommended that extra quantities of all items listed be
on hand. The rigging procedure and/or equipment used
to lift the unit may differ depending on the physical dimensions of the unit, its location, the jobsite, the Installing
Contractor and Crane Operator preferences.
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Lifting crane of the appropriate capacity
Adjustable spreader bars
Cables (cables, chains or straps)
Curb flashing (when required—based on roofing
construction)
All tools required to pull the sections together
(chains, chain blocks, chain type come alongs, etc.)
VCES-ASTON-IOM-1F – EnergyPack, ERV5000–10000, HRV3000–10000
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All construction equipment and labor required to
complete the work according to local codes
Condensate and/or P-trap piping hardware
All tools and materials required for level unit installation
½” [13 mm] wood shims required to set the gap between the unit base frame and the curb
Installation and Assembly Materials
All materials for sealing the unit to the top of a factory
supplied roofcurb, for assembling a multi-sectional unit
as detailed below and per the instructions that follow are
supplied by Venmar CES and located inside one (or more)
of the unit sections, where this yellow label, as shown
below, is applied on the door.
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IMPORTANT
Installation and assembly materials are in this section.
Before setting unit on a roofcurb or structural support, read and follow the Rigging, Lifting and Assembling Instructions in the Installation, Operation
and Maintenance Instructions Manual.
For Single Section Units
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ADBOND 1465 acoustical butyl sealant (or equivalent) (applied to top perimeter of curb just prior to
unit installation).
Polyvinyl gasket with adhesive strip (½” x 1½”
[13 x 38 mm] x required length) applied on duct
opening connections.
For Multi-section (Modular) Units
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ADBOND 1465 acoustical butyl sealant or equivalent
(applied to top perimeter of curb or to the top perimeter joint of a horizontally split indoor unit lower section just prior to unit installation). The use of ADBOND
1465 acoustical butyl sealant (or equivalent) is required
to create a proper seal to minimize the risk of water
infiltration and ease section movement when pulling
modules together. Do not use the butyl sealer on the
exterior split section joints as it remains pliable, sticky
and should it become smeared is difficult to clean.
Polyvinyl gasket with adhesive strip (½” x 1½”
[13 x 38 mm] x required length) applied between unit
sections (for split section joints and duct opening
connections).
11
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3/8” x 7” Grade 5 1¼” thread length zinc plated
bolts, with two washers and one nut each (to secure
sections together).
Adseal 1800 series (from Adchem Adhesives) clear
silicone-based sealant or equivalent (for side joint
and top joint).
Roof seam ends made of metal with applied gasket.
Roof joint caps x required length.
Self-drilling 5/16” hex head #12-14 x 1” zinc plated
screws with rubber washer.
Junction plates (already installed on the unit)
Rigging, Lifting and Assembling Instructions
Depending on size, the unit or unit sections of a multisection (modular) unit will arrive at the jobsite on a standard flatbed or special low bed trailer. Each unit or unit
section is identified with labels, as per the mechanical
drawings. At ground level, ensure that any crating used
for shipping purposes is removed if there is a possibility
that it will interfere with the placing or assembling of the
unit or unit sections on the roofcurb, structural steel or
housekeeping pad.
between the cables and the unit or unit section of at least
12” [305 mm] beyond the sides. Venmar CES will not be
responsible for any damage caused to the unit casing
during the lifting process. Main areas where damage may
occur are: electrical panels, filter gauges, rain gutters,
hoods, roofing corners, door handles and paint finish. The
lifting point must be at the center of gravity to ensure that
the unit or unit section is level during hoisting and prior to
setting. When commencing to hoist, take up the slack in
the hoisting cables slowly and gradually increase the cable
tension until the full unit or unit section weight is suspended. Avoid sudden, jerking movements. Do not permit
the unit or unit section to be suspended by the lifting lugs
for an extended period of time. Once the unit or unit section leaves the trailer ensure it is level at all times.
Figure 2: Use adjustable spreader bars, pulleys and
cables attached to all lifting lugs to apply an even
lifting force.
Adjustable
spreader bars (typ.)
IMPORTANT
For multi-section (modular) units, make certain to always
rig, lift and install an end section with bottom duct connection first.
Pulleys (typ.)
Unit or unit sections shall be lifted by cables attached to
all the lifting lugs. Consult the mechanical drawings located in the pocket of the control panel for the number of
lifting lugs, number of sections and unit weight. For multisection (modular) units, check for additional lugs located
between split sections. Lifting lugs are factory bolted to
the unit or unit section base.
Detail A
Use clevis and
clevis pin to attach
cable to lifting lugs.
See Detail A
CAUTION
All lifting lugs provided must be used when rigging units
or unit sections. Rigging and lifting unit or unit sections
without using all lifting lugs provided will compromise the
structural integrity of the unit or unit section. Never lift,
rig or ceiling suspend from the top of the unit or unit sections. Using a forklift or similar device for moving, lifting or
rigging unit or unit sections is prohibited.
12”
12”
Pulleys
When lifting the unit or unit sections, use adjustable
spreader bars, pulleys, cables (straps or chains) in order
to properly distribute the load, applying an even vertical
lifting force only at all the lifting lugs to prevent structural
damage to the unit or unit section or prevent cables from
rubbing against the cabinet (see Figure 2). Provide additional blocking and coverings (as required) to prevent
damage to the unit finish and/or components. The adjustable spreader bars are required to maintain a clearance
VCES-ASTON-IOM-1F – EnergyPack, ERV5000–10000, HRV3000–10000
Adjustable
spreader bars
12” min.
12
1. Set the unit, unit end or a bottom half of a horizontal
split unit end section with bottom duct connection of
a multi-section (modular) unit in place first.
Figure 4: Use ½” [13 mm] wood shims on outer sides
to properly position and/or to prevent movement
when pulling multi-section (modular) units together.
IMPORTANT
The unit or a unit end section with bottom duct connection of a multi-section (modular) unit must be set onto the
curb first such that a gap of ½” [13 mm] is left between
the curb and the unit base frame on all outer sides, as
shown in Figure 3. Use ½” [13 mm] wood shims to set
the gap as shown in Figure 4. This is important, as it will
later on prevent the first section from sliding on the curb
towards the next sections, when pulling the multi-section
(modular) unit together and align the duct connection of
the unit with the curb. Figure 4 shows a curb mounted
unit installation where the curb sits inside the unit perimeter base and the unit base overhangs the curb to prevent water entry.
For structural steel or pad mounting, if the dimensions of
the support is larger than the curb, then the end section
base must be positioned so the duct connection lines
up properly and then fastened to the structural steel or
pad to prevent the end section from moving when pulling sections together. Fastening method must be determined by the Installing Contractor. The lifting lugs on the
outside perimeter may be removed with bolts and internal nuts used to fasten unit to structural steel or pad. All
bolts should be returned and sealed to prevent leakage.
Temporary ½” wood shim
(supplied by contractor)
Figure 3: Set unit or an end section with bottom duct
connection of a multi-section (modular) unit first using
½” [13 mm] wood shims on outer sides to properly
position and to prevent movement when pulling
sections together.
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Assembling a Multi-section (Modular) Unit
Special attention must be taken to ensure that a multisection (modular) unit has an air- and water-tight seal at
every section split. Follow the next set of instructions for
assembling a multi-section (modular) unit.
Figure 5b: Set the upper or top section over the lower
section lining up all the bolt holes in the junction
plates.
2. For a horizontally split indoor unit or section:
a. Apply a continuous ½” [13 mm] bead of ADBOND
1465 acoustical butyl sealant on the top perimeter
of the lower or bottom section 1½” [38.1 mm]
from the outer edge as shown in Figure 5a.
Figure 5a: Apply a continuous ½” bead of butyl sealer
on the top perimeter of the lower or bottom section.
½” [13 mm] bead of ADBOND
1465 acoustical butyl sealant
1½”
1½”
c. Remove the six self-drilling 5/16” hex head #1214 x 1” screws with rubber washer and the junction plates, and use those to secure the upper
or top section to the lower or bottom section as
shown in Figure 5c.
Figure 5c: Remove the six self-drilling 5/16” hex head
#12-14 x 1” and the junction plates, and use those to
secure sections
b. Set the upper or top section over the lower section lining up the bolt holes in the junction plates
for a horizontally split indoor unit or section (see
Figure 5b).
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3. Remove the yellow lifting lugs located on the section
joint (if any) once the first section is set in place.
IMPORTANT
Yellow lifting lugs located on the section joint (if any) must
be removed once the first section is set in place to allow
the next section to be pulled to the first.
4. Set the second section approximately 6” [152 mm]
from the first section (see Figure 6). If second section has a horizontal split, the top section must be
installed as per procedure #2 above before proceeding. Use ½” [13 mm] wood shims on outer sides to
properly position and to prevent movement when
pulling multi-section (modular) unit together when
mounted on a roofcurb. Remove the yellow lifting lugs located on the section joints (if any) from
the second section to allow sections to be pulled
together.
IMPORTANT
After the corner reinforcement brackets or angle bars
have been removed from the split section, set the screws
along with the rubber washers that were holding the
brackets or angle bars back in place for water-tightness.
Figure 7: Corner reinforcement brackets or angle
bars to be removed from the split section. Reset
the screws with rubber washer in place for watertightness.
Figure 6: Set the next section approximately 6”
[152 mm] from the first section.
6” max.
6. Verify that these two sections are aligned square at
the joint in all three directions.
7. Install the ½” x 1½” [13 x 38 mm] polyvinyl gasket
with adhesive strip directly on one side of the split
section perimeter frames and middle interior partitions as shown in Figure 8a through Figure 8e.
5. Corner reinforcement brackets or angle bars may
have been used to support multi-section (modular)
unit walls during transportation, rigging and lifting
at the split. The brackets shown in Figure 7 are for
larger units. Simple angle bars are used for smaller
units (not shown). The corner reinforcement brackets
or angle bars are no longer required after rigging and
lifting and must be removed.
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Figure 8: General gasket layout
Figure 8b: Install two horizontal polyvinyl gasket strips
along the base frame, one at the top and one at the
bottom of the base frame, between the two vertical
side gasket strips so there is full contact between
gasket strips for air- and water-tightness.
Top of frame
Bottom of frame
8a, 8c
8d, 8e
8b
IMPORTANT
Figure 8c: Install one horizontal polyvinyl gasket strip
along the top frame between the two vertical side
gasket strips so there is full contact between gasket
strips for air- and water-tightness.
Make sure to have full contact between strips wherever a
discontinuity is present, for air- and water-tightness.
Figure 8a: Install a polyvinyl gasket strip on each
vertical outside wall ¼” [6.4 mm] from the outside
side edge from top to bottom of the side joint. When
compressed, a small gap will remain which will allow
the Adseal 1800 series silicone-based sealant (or
equivalent) to seal the vertical side edges (explained
in Figure 10c).
¼”
Polyvinyl 30100
FLD + 900
½” x 1½” x 25”
VCES-ASTON-IOM-1F – EnergyPack, ERV5000–10000, HRV3000–10000
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Figure 8d: Where two or more internal air tunnels/
corridors are present, install the gasket strips on the
middle internal horizontal and/or vertical partition(s)/
divider(s), between the perimeter gasket strips so
there is full contact between gasket strips for air- and
water-tightness.
Pulling Multi-section Units Together
8. Use tools (chains, chain blocks, chain type come
along, etc.) connected to the side lifting lugs (attached to the base) on both sides of the unit to pull
the second or next section to the first end section
evenly until both sections are ¼” [6.4 mm] apart on
the full joint perimeter as in Figure 9. Keep the tools
(chains, chain blocks, chain type come along, etc.)
in place until further notification. Remove any exterior
lifting lugs that interfere with the chains for pulling
sections together. When joining sections together,
always apply the pulling force to the lifting lugs attached to the unit structural base, never to the iron
angle fixed near the corner posts, and pull uniformly
from both sides of the unit section. The butyl sealer
previously applied on the roofcurb top surface will
allow the unit section to slide into position.
Middle internal
partition(s)/divider(s)
IMPORTANT
Unit sections must be drawn together using the lifting
lugs attached to the unit structural base only.
Figure 8e: Where a multi-sectional indoor unit with
vertical and additional horizontal splits join, the
middle internal horizontal partition will require three
gaskets—one at the top of the bottom section and
two at the bottom frame of the top section.
CAUTION
Do not use the roof frame iron angle to pull sections together as this may cause the corner posts to warp and
break their air- and water-tight seal.
Figure 9: Use tools (chains, chain blocks, chain type
come along, etc.) hooked to the unit lifting lugs
attached to the structural base on both sides of the
unit to pull the second or next section to the first
section evenly.
Displacement
Tools supplied by others
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9. With the sections pulled together, use the 3/8” x 7”
bolts, nuts and washers to secure the top of the sections together as in Figure 10a. Gradually tighten the
bolt until gasket is compressed within ¼” [6.4 mm].
CAUTION
Do not over tighten the side bolts as this may cause the
angle iron to bend and squeeze the 3/8” x 7” bolts inside
the angle iron.
Figure 10a: Use the 3/8” x 7” bolts, nuts and washers
to secure the top of the sections together.
11. After two sections are assembled, verify that the
assembly is level and square. If an adjustment is required, make certain to address it immediately, not at
the end of the final assembly.
12. If multi-section unit has more than two sections, follow Steps 2 through 11 for each additional section,
always pulling the next section from the first end
section.
13. Apply a generous bead of Adseal 1800 series clear
silicone-based sealant (or equivalent) to the exterior
side frame joint seams, from the roof to the junction plate fixed on the structural base, sufficiently to
completely cover the section split gasket and in such
a way that the silicone bead meets with both frames
as in Figure 10c. The bead of clear silicone-based
sealant should fill the ¼” [6.4 mm] gap, as shown in
Figure 10c.
Figure 10c: Apply a continuous bead of Adseal 1800
clear silicone-based sealant (or equivalent) to the
exterior side frame joints and for indoor units along
the top frame joints, from the roof to the junction plate
fixed on the structural base.
10. Remove the six self-drilling 5/16” hex head #12-14 x
1” screws with rubber washer and the junction plate
already installed on one of the sections’ structural
base, and use those to fix the two sections together
as in Figure 10b.
Figure 10b: Use the junction plates already installed
on one of the sections’ structural base to fix the two
sections together.
¼” bead Adseal
1800 clear
silicone-based sealant
14. Remove the six self-drilling 5/16” hex head #12-14
x 1” screws with rubber washer and the junction
plate already installed on one of the sections’ walls,
and use those to fix the two sections together as
in Figure 11a. At this moment, the tools (chains,
chain blocks, chain type come along, etc.) can be
removed.
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Figure 11a: Use the junction plates already installed
on one of the sections’ walls to fix the two sections
together.
15. Apply a generous bead of Adseal 1800 series clear
silicone-based sealant (or equivalent) around the
junction plate previously installed on the exterior
frames and the junction plate previously installed on
the structural base as in Figure 11b.
Figure 11b: Apply a generous bead of Adseal 1800
series clear silicone-based sealant (or equivalent)
around the junction plate previously installed on the
exterior frames and the junction plate previously
installed on the structural base.
See Note 1
See Note 1
See Note 1
Note 1:
Continuous ¼” bead Adseal 1800
clear silicone-based sealant
See Note 1
See Note 1
See Note 1
16. Install the roof joint caps with self-drilling screws in
all pre-punched holes for an air- and water-tight seal
as shown in Figure 12a and Figure 12b (for outdoor
units only).
Figure 12a: Install the metal roof seam end with
applied gasket by applying a 45° force to it until the
neoprene is fully compressed. Lock into position
with two self-drilling 5/16” hex head #12-14 x 1”
screws with rubber washer until the rubber washer is
compressed. Repeat for other end.
Note: Cap should be on same joint.
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Figure 12b: Always install the roof joint cap(s) end
with two side-by-side pre-punched holes on the lower
side of the roof slope. Center and install the roof
joint cap(s) with self-drilling 5/16” hex head #12-14 x
1” screws with integrated gasket until the gasket is
compressed in all pre-punched holes.
If unit is wider than 138” [3,505 mm], roof slope is
double pitched from center and two or more roof
joint caps will be supplied (see Figure 12c).
17. All lifting lugs removed on the exterior of the base for
pulling sections together must be returned, or if not
desired the bolts must be set back in place. Once
removed, the bolts must be returned and sealed with
clear silicone-based sealant for water-tightness. All
other lifting lugs from the unit base may be removed
if desired, or left in place. When removing lifting lugs
on the exterior of the base, set the bolts back in
place and seal with clear silicone-based sealant for
water-tightness.
18. Touch-up paint for scratches or marks to the external finish incurred during shipment or installation can
be obtained in the fastest amount of time in bulk or
spray cans from a local paint supplier by providing
the universally recognized RAL code. To match the
Venmar CES standard grey specify color RAL K7
Classic #RAL7001, two-component polyurethane
paint with a gloss of 30+/−4.
Paint cans (11 ounces) matching the Venmar CES
grey can also be obtained in a slower amount of
time by contacting the following paint suppliers listed
below and providing the item number, item name
and Vendor number below or through Venmar CES
After Sales Service by: email to Tech Support at
[email protected], fax 899-319-2612
or phone 1-866-483-6627.
In Canada
Sunamco
360 Gleme Rue C.P 280
Daveluyville, Quebec G0Z 1C0
Phone: 1-866-815-4080
Contact: Audrey Mallhot
Item number: 500049824
Item name: Canette peinture grise RAL7001
Vendor number: VEN00002429
In USA
Using the universally recognized RAL code
(RAL7001), Venmar CES grey paint can be obtained
from your local supplier.
Figure 12c: Install middle joint cap at each roof joint
cap junction(s).
VCES-ASTON-IOM-1F – EnergyPack, ERV5000–10000, HRV3000–10000
20
Hood Installation
If the intake or exhaust air hoods for the unit have been
shipped separately, they are assembled and fitted with
lifting plates for hoisting into position and holes are prepunched into the hood flanges for mounting. Apply a continuous length of 1/8” x 1” [3.2 x 25.4 mm] neoprene Soft
Seal gasket with adhesive strips to the hood flange perimeter and install with the 3/8” hex head #12–14 x 1” self-
drilling zinc plated screws supplied. Then apply a bead of
Adseal 1800 clear silicone-based sealant (or equivalent) to
the outside perimeter of the hood flange for a water-tight
seal to the unit casing. If the hood lifting plate extension
is not desired, remove hood lifting plates, turn 180° and
screw back in place to fill holes to maintain paint finish.
Indoor Suspended Installation
To install indoor units that will be permanently suspended,
the units must be set on structural steel beams that are
supported by vertical rods. Venmar CES recommends
beams under the full perimeter and all cross members
requiring support. In addition to these recommendations,
a Structural Engineer must be involved to properly size the
supporting structural elements. Note that the locations of
the beams shall be coordinated with the location of access doors to prevent any interference (see Figure 13).
Single section unit shown; for multi-sectional unit suspension, consult factory.
Figure 13: Indoor suspended installation
Anchor
40”
min.
40”
min.
VCES-ASTON-IOM-1F – EnergyPack, ERV5000–10000, HRV3000–10000
21
Field Fabricated Ductwork
On outdoor bottom vertical duct connections, support all
ducts to the roofcurb and building structure. Do not support ductwork from the unit.
See Figure 14a for a curb mounted outdoor unit. Suggested methods of attaching ductwork to bottom of outdoor unit are as follows.
•
•
•
Attach ½” x 1½” polyvinyl gasket with adhesive back
to ductwork flanges and fasten ductwork flanges
with self-drilling sheet metal screws to bottom frame
of unit duct opening where access to bottom of unit
is available once unit is installed. Ductwork must be
supported by building structure.
Field provide and install ductwork supports across
perimeter curb frame and/or cross members level
with top of perimeter curb, install ductwork plenums
with top perimeter flanges in supports and fasten
with self-drilling sheet metal screws. Attach ½” x 1½”
polyvinyl gasket to ductwork flanges prior to setting
unit on roofcurb.
Field provide and install ductwork curb level with
top of perimeter curb, install ductwork plenums in
ductwork curb with top perimeter flanges and fasten
with self-drilling sheet metal screws. Attach ½” x 1½”
polyvinyl gasket to ductwork flanges prior to setting
unit on roofcurb.
Figure 14a: Bottom field fabricated ductwork
connection for outdoor curb mounted units
with self-drilling sheet metal screws to the bottom frame
of unit duct opening, the pad opening must match the
ductwork opening and be raised by 1” to allow flanges on
ductwork plenums to seal to the bottom opening frame as
described for outdoor units.
Figure 14b: Bottom field fabricated ductwork
connection for indoor pad mounted units
Appropriate pads
supplied by others
For duct connection sizes, see the mechanical drawings.
Insulate and weatherproof all external ductwork, joints and
roof openings with counter-flashing and mastic in accordance with applicable codes. Ductwork running through
roof decks must comply with local fire codes. Ducts passing through unconditioned spaces must be insulated and
covered with a vapor barrier. Flexible connectors should
be installed close to the unit in the duct leading to occupied spaces to minimize noise transmission.
On horizontal or indoor vertical duct connections, make
connections to the casing by applying Adseal 1800 silicone-based sealant (or equivalent) around the connection
and screwing flanged ducts directly to the casing and/or
flange with self-drilling sheet metal screws. It is important
to seal all duct connections to prevent air leakage and
system performance problems. Ductwork must be supported by the building structure.
For bottom ductwork connections on pad or support steel
mounted indoor units, if the pad is larger than the inside
base frame of the unit, the bottom duct opening frame is
1” above the bottom base of the unit (see Figure 14b). If
there is no access available to fasten ductwork flanges
VCES-ASTON-IOM-1F – EnergyPack, ERV5000–10000, HRV3000–10000
The design of the ductwork immediately downstream of
the gas-fired furnace is critical for successful applications.
Poorly designed ductwork can contribute to excessive
temperature fluctuations. Avoid splitting or branching of
the ductwork immediately downstream or within five duct
diameters from the discharge where temperature stratifications may exist.
The design of the ductwork immediately downstream of a
double width forward curved or backward inclined fan is
critical to the performance of the fan. The velocity profile
at the outlet of the fan is not uniform and an elbow located
at or near the fan outlet will, therefore, develop a pressure
loss greater than its ”handbook” value and must be included in the external static pressure calculations. Consult
22
the AMCA Fan Application Manual publication 201 for recommendations and system static pressure losses.
The ventilation system should be designed according to
maximum airflow needs. To minimize noise level and loss
of pressure, ducts should be designed for a maximum air
velocity of 1,200 feet per minute, keeping the direction
and transition changes to a minimum. To further reduce
noise transmission, line the first 15 feet [4,572 mm] of
duct with acoustic insulation. Elbows with a turning radius
equal to or greater than one, or 90° elbows with turning
vanes, should also be used.
VCES-ASTON-IOM-1F – EnergyPack, ERV5000–10000, HRV3000–10000
When an Energy Recovery Ventilator (ERV) is installed
in conjunction with a forced air system Air Handling Unit
(AHU), the AHU and network of ducts are used to supply fresh air inside the building. In this type of system,
the main fan of the AHU must be in continuous operation
when the ERV is on. Supply air from the ERV should be
introduced into the return duct of the AHU no less than
6 feet [1,829 mm] upstream from the AHU. The ERV return duct connection should be at least 2 feet [610 mm]
upstream of the ERV supply air duct connection in the
AHU return duct.
23
Electrical Connections
WARNING
When installed, the unit must be electrically grounded in
accordance with local codes or, in the absence of local
codes, with the National Electrical Code, ANSI/NFPA70,
and/or the Canadian Electrical Code CSA C22.1. Unit cabinet must have an uninterrupted, unbroken electrical ground
to minimize the possibility of personal injury if an electrical
fault should occur. Failure to follow this warning could result in the Installer being liable for personal injury of others.
The unit is factory wired (unless otherwise specified)
except for power connections, shipping split locations,
shipped loose sensors/items or remote control options
as indicated in the electrical schematics and sequence of
control. The unit may or may not have an optional factory
installed door interlocking disconnect in the control panel.
If the unit control panel disconnect is not supplied, the
Electrical Contractor must provide and install disconnect
outside of the unit as per local electrical codes and run the
power supply wiring to the control panel.
•
For multi-section (modular) units, the Electrical Contractor must join the low and high voltage wiring
between sections at the junction boxes or extend
coiled wiring.
IMPORTANT
Wire nuts and electrical butt connectors (if required) must
be supplied by the Electrical Contractor.
•
•
•
•
•
•
Check nameplate for correct power supply
requirements.
See electrical schematics and sequence of control
located in the control panel pocket for field wiring of
power connections, shipped loose sensors, items
or remote control interlocks. The Electrical Contractor must locate, install and wire sensors, items or
remote control interlocks as per electrical schematics
and sequence of control.
Numbered terminals strips are included in the control
panel for ease of connection and service.
All field wiring and components must comply with
NEC and local requirements. In Canada, electrical
connections must be in accordance with CSA C22.1
Canadian Electrical Code Part One.
Install copper wiring of proper size to handle current
load.
The base unit control includes an external contact
and is not equipped with a remote control panel.
This contact is located in the unit control panel. The
Installer must connect the external contact to a controller normally located in the building. This controller
can be a humidistat, switch or timer, etc. Optional
controls are 24 VAC.
VCES-ASTON-IOM-1F – EnergyPack, ERV5000–10000, HRV3000–10000
•
•
The remote control panel is optional and when included has numbered terminals matching the unit
control panel terminals. Use wiring equal to AWG18
to connect like-numbered terminals.
Mounting of field provided components in the control
panel is allowed as long as their space was considered during the submittal process. Non-considered
electrical components are not allowed in the control
panel. It is the responsibility of the Control Contractor to provide his own power source(s) for any field
added electrical components. The control panel
mounted transformers are not rated for external
components power supply unless otherwise listed on
the electrical schematics.
Electrical Field Connections
CAUTION
Electrical components and contacts must be protected
from damaging metal shavings before drilling holes into
the control panel. Use liquid-tight connections through
the control panel and unit casing eliminating any water
and air penetration.
Shipped loose sensors, items or remote control wiring
can be located next to the power feed cable provided it
is inserted in shielded cable that will protect it from electromechanical interference. Ensure the power feed cable
ground is securely connected to the terminals located in
the control panel.
Electrical Contractor must provide wiring for controls that
are supplied optionally and shipped loose or field supplied.
Mark the electrical schematic with the connections completed and leave them with the unit for start-up and service.
CAUTION
High voltage power lines, shipped loose sensors, items
or remote control option field wiring entry points may
only be field extended through the cabinet within designated areas. The unit cabinet and/or floor must be wisely
penetrated in order to keep their integrity. Access openings in the floor can only be cut or drilled for piping and
wiring (high and low voltage) in the designated rectangular areas within an upturned 1” [25.4 mm] flange as provided during the submittal process and located on the
mechanical drawings. Access openings must be sized,
field cut or drilled by the Installing Contractor within the
rectangular flanged area then sealed air- and water-tight.
If insulation was removed to create floor access openings, insulation must be put back in place to avoid condensation. Do not cut or drill holes through floor of unit in
non-designated areas without consulting the factory first.
The structural integrity of the floor may be compromised
and possible leaks develop.
24
Coil, WSHP or Humidifier Piping Connections
CAUTION
Internal coil (water, steam or non-integrated direct expansion), WSHP or humidifier piping connections within
the unit may only be field extended through the cabinet
within designated areas. The unit cabinet and/or floor
must be wisely penetrated in order to keep their integrity.
Access openings in the floor can only be cut or drilled for
piping and wiring (high and low voltage) in the designated
rectangular areas within an upturned 1” [25.4 mm] flange
as provided during the submittal process and located
on the mechanical drawings. Access openings must
be sized, field cut or drilled by the Installing Contractor
within the rectangular flanged area then sealed air- and
water-tight. If insulation was removed to create floor access openings, insulation must be put back in place to
avoid condensation. Do not cut or drill holes through
floor of unit in non-designated areas without consulting
the factory first. The structural integrity of the floor may
be compromised and possible leaks develop.
Connections to the unit coil (water, steam or non-integrated direct expansion, WSHP or humidifier) are by others. Refer to the mechanical drawings and the instructions
on the casing for correct orientation of external piping.
External supply and return piping connection, provision,
design and all other safety, freeze protection or electrical
control requirements for system operation are the sole
responsibility of the Installing Contractor and/or Design
Engineer. Refer to ASHRAE handbooks and local building
codes for correct piping and electrical control for proper
installations. Refer to the mechanical drawings for coil
performance design information. Refer to the Victaulic
installation instruction manual for proper water valve and
coupling installation and assembly.
VCES-ASTON-IOM-1F – EnergyPack, ERV5000–10000, HRV3000–10000
For WSHP units see Appendix B for recommended piping
and electrical control components. See the piping schematics for optional piping components and sequence of
operation for electrical control options or interlocks supplied with the unit.
CAUTION
A water and glycol mixture is used for factory tests and
to prevent any possibility of freezing during transit and/
or storage. In units that include factory installed water
piping, some glycol may remain in the system. Flush the
system in the field, prior to installation, if no glycol traces
are desired. In low temperature applications, the water
supply line and return line should be insulated to prevent
condensate and an antifreeze solution should be used to
protect water-to-refrigerant heat exchanger from freezing
damage.
IMPORTANT
A hydrostatic test must be performed in the field by the
Installing Contractor at 1.25 times the operating pressure
on all equipment involving piping connections to verify
that the installed unit and its connections to the network
are free of leaks prior to the unit being set in operation.
This test shall be performed after the unit is completely
piped to the network and shall cover the connections
between the unit and the network, as well as all internal
components of the unit.
25
Condensate Drain Trap and Lines
Cooling coils, humidifiers, sensible heat exchangers or
other options that can produce condensation are provided
with a drain pan with a 1¼” [32 mm] MPT (Male Pipe
Thread) drain connection. A drain trap and condensate
line of equal size must be field provided by the Installing
Contractor on the drain connections and coupled to the
building drainage system to prevent air or sewer gases
from being pulled into the unit caused by the negative
(suction) pressure and forcing water out of the pan into
the unit or from air escaping into the drain caused by
positive pressure. Condensate piping can be steel, copper
or PVC. See Appendix C for illustrations and dimensional
information on positive and negative pressure trapping
height. Slope the drain lines downward in direction of flow
not less than 1/8” per foot toward the building drainage
system; otherwise use a condensate pump. Refer to local
codes for proper drainage requirements. Installing a plug
for cleaning of the trap is recommended. Fill the P-traps
with water before starting the unit. Winterize the drain line
before freezing on outdoor units. Under some conditions,
heat tracing may be required on the drain pipe.
Check and clear drains annually at start of cooling season. Drainage problems can occur should drains be inactive and dry out, or due to reduced water flow caused by
buildup of algae. Regular maintenance will prevent these
from occurring.
Gas Connections
Refer to Appendix D for gas-fired furnace installation and
maintenance information.
Refrigerant Systems
On assembled units which are split for shipment or by
customer request, where the refrigeration system is split,
the refrigerant lines are capped at the splits, factory leak
tested and charged with nitrogen. The type of refrigerant
and charge is based on calculated volumetric capacity
and stamped on the nameplate. The Installing Contractor is responsible for connecting the refrigerant lines, leak
testing, evacuation, charging the refrigerant system and
adjusting the charge.
On assembled units with split refrigerant systems where
the condenser or condenser/compressor sections are
remotely installed, the Installing Contractor is responsible
for designing and completing the refrigerant system, calculating the charge, leak testing, evacuation, charging the
refrigeration and adjusting the charge.
Refer to Appendix Q for information on adjusting the refrigerant charge.
Start-up
Pre Start-up Check
Before requesting start-up, check that the installation is
complete and unit is ready. Complete the pre start-up
below (if items are applicable) and the checklist in Appendix E for each unit. For torque values on set screws, belt
tension, energy wheel seal clearance, etc. check under
the appropriate Maintenance and/or Appendix sections.
1. Check the electrical disconnect is in the ‘Off’ position.
2. Check the split section joints are properly installed on
multi-section units.
3. Check that all holes that have been made by the
Installing Contractor after receiving the unit in the
casing, partitions or floor have been well sealed to
prevent air and/or water infiltration.
VCES-ASTON-IOM-1F – EnergyPack, ERV5000–10000, HRV3000–10000
4. Check the unit for obstructive packaging, objects
near or in fans, dampers, energy recovery wheel, etc.
a. Check that the inside of the unit has been
cleaned of all debris.
5. Remove all retaining bolts on fan isolation bases.
a. Check that the fan impellers are rotating freely.
b. Check fan impeller and drive set screws. Tighten
if required.
c. Check the fan bearing set screws or locking collars. Tighten if required.
d. Check fan belt alignment and tension.
e. Check the fan flexible joint connections are well
attached.
26
6. Check that the air filters are installed and clean.
Replace if necessary. See Appendix F for optional
downstream high efficiency HEPA filter installation (if
supplied).
a. Check all face mounted filters are attached with
four clips each.
b. Check each sliding filter has a retainer at the end
track and well attached blank-offs.
c. Check the filter pressure differential gauges,
switches or sensors are free of dirt and set at
a value satisfactory to the end user to trigger a
filter change.
7. Check coils if fins have been damaged in shipping,
installation or building construction and are clean.
Straighten fins with fin comb and clean coil if required
(not applicable to brazed aluminum heat exchangers).
a. Check all pipe connections are tight and that
no damage has occurred during shipping or
installation.
b. Check that the piping to the coils and WSHP
have been completed, piping lines have been
flushed, filled, vented and tested at 1.25 times
the operating pressure. Refer to Appendix B.
8. Scroll compressor RIS vibration isolator bolts are factory tightened to the correct torque setting for operation and do not require field adjustment.
a. Check the refrigerant components and piping are
in good condition and have no damage or leaks
from shipping and/or installation.
b. Check that the refrigerant lines are spaced at
least 1” apart and from the compressor after
shipping and installation.
c. Check that the refrigerant line clamps are still secure and have their rubber lining.
d. Check that the clearance around the air cooled
condenser is within minimum clearance and the
discharge is not blocked.
9. Check motorized damper control arms, control rods
and shafts for tightness.
a. Check that non-motorized dampers rotate freely.
10. Check the energy recovery wheel media for any defects from shipping or installation. See Maintenance
section for details.
a. Grease both pillow block bearings on the
wheel(s) when grease nipples provided.
b. Check that the wheel(s) are turning freely by
hand and do not bind.
c. Visually inspect the wheel(s) to ensure it is centered and does not tilt. If there is any indication of
a problem call Tech Support at 1-866-483-6627.
d. Check that the wheel seals are properly positioned from the face of the wheel.
e. Check that the wheel purge (if present) is set to
the default angle as specified in the submittal.
VCES-ASTON-IOM-1F – EnergyPack, ERV5000–10000, HRV3000–10000
f. Check the mounting fasteners on the wheel(s)
motor and gear reducer are tight.
g. Check the belt and pulley on the wheel drive for
correct alignment, tension and set screw tightness.
11. Check the plate media for any defects from shipping
or installation.
12. Check the heat pipe fins for any defects from shipping or installation.
a. Remove retaining bolts on heat pipe tilt mechanism.
b. Check the heat pipe flexible connection is properly attached and sealed on tilt mechanisms.
c. Check that actuator, control arm and linkages
are tight on tilt mechanism.
13. Check that ductwork is connected, complete and
free of obstructions.
14. Check that condensate drain connections have been
trapped, installed correctly and filled.
15. Check at all unit split sections that all factory internal
high and low voltage wiring connections have been
properly re-connected.
16. Check that all shipped loose or field supplied components have been correctly installed and wired.
17. Check that the wiring diagram has been marked up
accordingly and left with the unit.
18. Check that all power supplies and control wiring
have been inspected and approved by the Local Authorities having jurisdiction.
19. Check all factory and field wiring connections for
tightness. Tighten if necessary.
20. Check that all settings of control are in accordance
with the wiring schematic.
21. Check that all fuses are properly installed in holders.
22. Check the voltage at the disconnect switch against
the nameplate and against phase-to-phase readings
on three-phase. If the voltage is not within 10% of
rated or 2% of phase-to-phase, have the condition
corrected before continuing start-up.
23. Check that all field piping and venting installation and
connections for the heating and cooling options have
been completed and tested.
24. Set the heating and cooling enable switches to the
‘Off’ position.
25. Refer to Appendix D for gas-fired furnace module
and Appendix H for electric coil installation and maintenance and check that the installation is complete.
Perform all gas-fired furnace and electric coil pre
start-up checks.
26. Check that all safety switches, overloads or other
manual reset devices are reset.
27. If the unit is equipped with compressors, power must
be turned on with the unit in ‘Off’ mode for 24 hours
before start-up. This will energize crank case heaters and assure no liquid refrigerant is present which
could cause compressor damage or failure. Check
that this has been completed.
27
Start-up Procedure
To ensure proper operation of each unit, qualified personnel should perform the start-up as outlined below (based
on options included with unit) and complete the Start-up
Form and Checklist in Appendix E for permanent record.
A completed report and checklist will provide valuable information for personnel performing future maintenance.
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
IMPORTANT
A completed copy of the Start-up Form and Checklist must be sent back to the factory for warranty
validation and for factory assistance.
General information on the factory installed and programmed DDC control system regarding the navigation and monitoring of the unit with the standard
keypad are provided in separate documents. For
more specific information regarding the sequence of
control, the different options of control or network
communications, see these documents included
with the unit in the control panel pocket.
If units are equipped with compressors power must
be turned on for 24 hours prior to a call for cooling,
for the compressor crank case heaters to be energizing to prevent possible damage.
Assembled units with integrated refrigerant systems (AC, WSHP or ASHP) are factory leak tested,
charged with refrigerant based on volumetric capacity and run tested prior to shipment with the
type of refrigerant and charge stamped on the
nameplate. As part of the start-up procedure, operate the refrigerant system near full load conditions
in both heating and cooling modes and check subcooling and superheat against values in Appendix
Q, Table Q1. If readings do not match, adjust the
refrigeration charge. Refer to Appendix Q for information on adjusting the refrigerant charge.
WARNING
Electric shock can cause personal injury or death.
Only qualified service personnel should install and
service this equipment.
The keypad must be used to check operation according to sequence and to adjust setpoints while
power is on for start-up and while performing service.
All units are factory run tested. Fans, energy recovery wheel, compressors and condenser fans
(if equipped and refrigerant piping is not split for
shipment) are set up to run correct when power
is connected. If any one fan is running backwards
or compressor is making loud noises, disconnect
power and switch two leads (on three-phase power)
to ensure proper rotation and avoid damage. With
multi-section units with split wiring connections
check rotation of fans, energy recovery wheel, compressors and condenser fans for correct rotation to
ensure wiring connections are correct.
VCES-ASTON-IOM-1F – EnergyPack, ERV5000–10000, HRV3000–10000
1. Before proceeding, complete the pre start-up
checklist.
2. Check that all access panels or doors are closed.
3. If units are equipped with compressors, feel the
compressor crank cases. They should be warm if the
disconnect has been on for at least 24 hours. This
will assure that no refrigerant liquid is present in the
crank case which could cause compressor damage
or failure to occur on start-up. Otherwise turn the
main disconnect to the ‘On’ position.
4. The unit can be started by using the keypad and
selecting the mode of operation from the Keypad
Operation Guide and the Sequence of Operation.
Disable the heating and cooling functions and set
the unit to the occupied mode to bump start the fan
wheel(s) and energy recovery wheel(s) to check their
operation.
5. Check that dampers are operating properly.
6. Check that the fan wheel(s) and energy recovery
wheel(s) are rotating in the correct direction.
7. Adjust the fan motor VFD(s) to the correct air
volume/Hertz.
8. For occupied recirculation mode adjust outside, exhaust and mixed or recirculation air damper positioners to achieve the required air volumes.
9. Check amperage draw to each motor on each phase
against motor nameplate FLA. If significantly different,
check ductwork static and/or take corrective action.
10. Re-check the voltage at the disconnect switch
against the nameplate and against phase-to-phase
readings on three-phase with all blowers operating.
If the voltage is not within 10% of rated or 2% of
phase-to-phase, have the condition corrected before
continuing start-up.
11. Before activating the compressor on WSHP units,
check that the water shut-off valves are open and
water is circulating through the water-to-refrigerant
heat exchanger. Check the incoming line water pressure to ensure it is within design and acceptable
limits.
12. Enable the cooling mode of operation. Check if the
sound of the compressor is normal or if there is excessive vibration.
13. On units with integrated air cooled condensers
check condenser fans are rotating in the correct
direction.
14. Check all field and factory refrigerant and water piping connections for leaks and correct.
15. Operate the refrigerant system near full load conditions in both heating and cooling modes and check
sub-cooling and superheat against values in Appendix Q, Table Q1. If readings do not match, adjust the
refrigerant charge. Refer to Appendix Q for information on adjusting the refrigeration charge.
28
16. On units with WSHP, after a few minutes of operation:
a. Check the supply discharge temperature status
on the keypad for cooling air delivery. Measure
the temperature difference between entering and
leaving water. In cooling mode, the temperature
difference should be approximately 1.5 times
greater than the heating mode temperature difference. For example, if the cooling temperature
difference is 15°F [8.3°C], the heating temperature difference should be approximately 7°F
to 10°F [3.9°C to 5.6°C]. Alternatively, if a flow
measuring valve or pressure gauge connections
are included, take the flow reading or pressure
drop compared to the submittal information and
adjust the shut-off/balancing valve in the return
line to the correct flow/pressure drop reading.
b. Measure the temperature difference between
entering and leaving air and entering and leaving water. With entering water of 60°F to 80°F
[15.6°C to 26.7°C], leaving temperature should
rise through the unit. Should not exceed 35°F
[19.4°C]. If the air temperature exceeds 35°F
[19.4°C], then the water flow rate is inadequate
or the airflow rate may be low and a second
check may be required after airflow balancing.
17. On units with gas-fired furnace module or electric
heating coils, check supply air proving interlock
switch setting to ensure minimum supply airflow prior
to burner operation. Set the switch to open below
the minimum supply airflow on the furnace rating
plate.
VCES-ASTON-IOM-1F – EnergyPack, ERV5000–10000, HRV3000–10000
18. Enable heating options, see start-up and check-out
instructions in Appendix D for gas-fired furnace module and Appendix H for electric coil and complete.
19. For electric heating coil option, check the amp draw
on each stage, the operation of the sequence or
SCR controller and the coil for any hot spots.
20. Check the operation of the control options provided
on the unit.
21. Check the setpoints on the DDC Points Reference,
adjust and record changes as required.
22. Has air balancing been completed for both occupied
and unoccupied operation?
23. When unit has achieved steady state, take measurements and complete Start-up Readings portion of
the Start-up Form and Checklist in Appendix E. Send
a copy of the completed Start-up Report and Checklist to Venmar CES to validate warranty. Maintain a
copy of the report at the unit for future reference.
24. Once completed, return setpoints to original or required values, return the unit to the correct mode of
operation and adjust the time clock if required.
29
Airflow Balancing
IMPORTANT
Before measuring supply and exhaust flows, the building
must be in its normal state:
•
•
•
Hermetically close doors and windows.
Shut down hot air generators and combustion
water heaters.
Install all ventilation system components (filters,
grilles, diffusers, etc.).
For proper performance the unit must operate at the
specified supply and exhaust flow rates as shown in the
mechanical drawings. Unit fan speed(s) and damper positions are theoretically set at the factory based on the
ductwork static pressures and flow rates specified in the
mechanical drawings. If conditions change or verification is required, airflow measurements should be taken
using AMCA suggested methods. This would normally be
a velocity traverse measurement or flow measuring station (FMS) installed in the ducts. Where space is limited in
the outdoor air and exhaust air, pressure drop readings
can be taken across the energy recovery heat exchanger
(with economizer heat recovery bypass dampers closed,
if equipped) and compared to the submittal documents.
Heat recovery performance is tested in accordance to
AHRI Standard 1060 and is accurate to within +/− 5%
if there is no dirt buildup in the heat recovery heat exchanger. Should flow rates need to be reset, adjust the
outside air, exhaust air or mixed air dampers, variable
speed sheaves, VFD fan speed setpoint positions or
change the sheaves.
VCES-ASTON-IOM-1F – EnergyPack, ERV5000–10000, HRV3000–10000
Flow measuring stations and magnehelic gauges can also
be used to measure supply and exhaust flow. It is important to locate the FMS in the “warm side” ductwork to
minimize the effect of differences in air density, especially
when balancing during extremely cold outside conditions
or to take temperature readings and make the necessary
corrections if installed in the “cold side” ductwork. Air density variations can affect the FMS by more than 15%. The
FMS should be located downstream in straight sections
of duct and not immediately after fans or obstructions that
will cause turbulent flow.
If the unit has been in operation before the air balancing,
ensure the unit filters are clean or include pressure drop
readings across the filter banks with the report.
Refer to Appendix D for gas-fired furnace module air balancing information. The installation is to be adjusted to
achieve the air throughput within the range specified on
the gas-fired furnace module rating plate.
CAUTION
Imbalanced airflows may cause supply air temperatures
to be below freezing. Adequate freeze protection, glycol, low limit temperature protection for downstream
coils or re-heat to protect building systems must be field
provided.
30
Maintenance
Long-term Storage Maintenance Procedures
WARNING
Many of the following steps need to be performed with
the unit powered off and locked out. Disconnect the
main power switch to the unit before performing service
and maintenance procedures.
Please refer to Appendix I for maintenance instructions
to follow if the unit is to be stored for a period of time exceeding one month. Following the instructions in this appendix will assist in preventing potential unit damage that
may result from an extended storage period.
Maintenance Summary Chart
Please refer to Appendix J, for a recommended list of routine maintenance items and time intervals. A more detailed
description of maintenance items follows.
Energy Recovery Wheel
The energy recovery wheel will provide years of effective
and efficient service with minimal maintenance. Basic
maintenance consists of checking parts to ensure they are
tight and working correctly. Venmar CES recommends
that the wheel be checked on a weekly basis that it is
turning under power if not equipped with a rotation detector alarm. Completing the items described further in the
Maintenance Summary Chart in Appendix J will ensure the
wheel is running at its maximum efficiency and assist with
the early detection of anything that may cause problems in
the future. If removal or replacement does become necessary contact the factory for instructions.
Figure 15: Direction of airflow through the wheel
EA
Outside side
RA
OA
Rotation
Outside/supply
air side
Spoke
Seal
Casing
Media
segment
Purge
Return/exhaust
air side
Driving
belt
Motor
base
Enthalpy
wheel
Wheel Bearing Lubrication
Purge side
Purge
Figure 16: Labeled diagram of wheel
SA
VCES-ASTON-IOM-1F – EnergyPack, ERV5000–10000, HRV3000–10000
Recommended lubrication of bearings (when grease nipples provided) varies depending on the temperature range
the wheel will be used in. For a typical temperature range
of −40°F to 130°F [−40°C to 54°C], lubrication is recommended every six months. For temperatures out of this
range, please consult Venmar CES for recommended lubrication schedules. Use a premium quality lithium based
grease conforming to NLGI Grade 2 or 3 (examples are:
Mobil – Mobilith AW2, Chevron – Amolith #2, Texaco Premium RB, Shell Alvania #2).
31
WARNING
Many of the following steps need to be performed with
the unit powered off and locked out. Disconnect the
main power switch to the unit before performing service
and maintenance procedures.
Wheel Bearing Set Screws
Bearing set screws and mounting bolts (two on each side
of the wheel) should be checked for tightness at start-up
and every six months thereafter. On wheels 10” deep a
special seal lacquer is applied to the bearing set screws
and mounting bolts. See Figure 17. This is a visual aid
that will warn you if bearing set screws or mounting bolts
have become loose during transport or over time should
cracks appear. Set screws should be torqued to 13 ft-lb
for wheels up to 78” [1,981 mm] diameter and 24 ft-lb for
wheels from 88” to 120” [2,235 to 3,048 mm] in diameter.
Figure 17: Enthalpy wheel seal lacquer
Belts
The energy recovery wheel drive belt is a strong and flexible multi-link which provides quick and easy servicing
or replacement without using special tools. The belt is
directional; it must be installed with the directional arrows
pointing in the direction of motor rotation. See Appendix L
for belt repair and replacement instructions. Checking the
belt every three months for wear is recommended.
Belt Installation
1. Consult Venmar CES for belt length (dependent
upon wheel diameter).
2. If required, remove links by twisting the link tabs
sideways and pulling the surplus out of the belt.
3. Tape one end of the new belt to the wheel and make
it turn (by hand) one complete revolution. Place tapes
on the belt to ensure its proper upright position and
hold it in place until it will be linked. The wheel should
turn freely if the belt is removed.
4. Pull the belt tightly around the wheel and reducer
sheave.
5. To connect the two free ends of the belt, hold the
belt with tabs pointing outward. Place the end tab
through two links at once. Flex the belt further and
insert the second tab through end link by twisting the
tab with your thumb. Ensure tab returns to position
across belt. Reverse belt so tabs turn to the inside of
belt.
6. Depending on type of wheel provided, install the
extension spring or pass the belt over the tensioner
idler sheave. If there is no tension in the spring or
tensioner, reduce the length of the belt. If the spring
tensioner looks permanently extended, contact the
factory for a replacement spring tensioner.
Belt Tensioner Replacement
Gearbox
The gearbox (speed reducer) on the energy recovery
wheel has been lubricated for life at the factory and requires no further lubrication. The gearbox requires no
maintenance under normal use.
1. Release the belt from the belt tensioner idler sheave,
Figure 18.
Figure 18: Release belt from belt tensioner idler sheave
Motor Bolts
Bolts securing the motor to the base plate should be
checked periodically for tightness at start-up, after one
month of operation and annually thereafter (see Table 1
for recommended torque).
VCES-ASTON-IOM-1F – EnergyPack, ERV5000–10000, HRV3000–10000
32
WARNING
Figure 20: Energy recovery wheel seal locations
Many of the following steps need to be performed with
the unit powered off and locked out. Disconnect the
main power switch to the unit before performing service
and maintenance procedures.
2. Remove the belt tensioner retaining screw and set
aside (see Figure 19).
Figure 19: Remove belt tensioner retaining screw
5. Re-install and tighten screw.
Seals
Figure 21: Energy recovery wheel seal locations
Side seal
Peripheral
seal
Airloop™
labyrinth seal
3. Remove belt tensioner and discard. Install new belt
tensioner (contact Venmar CES Tech Support at
1-866-483-6627 for parts using description and unit
serial number).
4. Ensure that the new belt tensioner line is aligned with
one of the bottom corners (see Figure 20).
IMPORTANT
The idler sheave must be pointing upwards.
VCES-ASTON-IOM-1F – EnergyPack, ERV5000–10000, HRV3000–10000
Airloop™
labyrinth seal
Depending on size and type of wheel, brush or labyrinth
seals are provided. Visually inspect the seals of the energy
recovery wheel(s) for proper operation. Brush seals for
the side and peripheral seals per Figure 21 are designed
to be durable and require no maintenance, but some
seal run-in is to be expected, so do not be alarmed by a
small amount of wear. Labyrinth seals must be adjusted
properly if the unit is to work effectively and efficiently; the
correct adjustment of the labyrinth seal is obtained by allowing it to barely touch the media before tightening the
screws (see Figure 22). If an initial gap can be seen between the seal and media, the seal is installed too far and
should be moved closer until it touches the media. On the
other hand, if any deformation to the lips can be seen, it
means the seal is installed too close and should be moved
back until the lips are straight again.
33
Wheel Media
WARNING
Many of the following steps need to be performed with
the unit powered off and locked out. Disconnect the
main power switch to the unit before performing service
and maintenance procedures.
It should be noted that the labyrinth seal is made of a special material which was specifically chosen to make sure it
could never damage the media. While the best seal is obtained when the above steps are followed, if installed too
close, the media will simply use the seal a little more.
As the wheel turns, the seal will automatically adjust itself
to the wheel’s tolerance (approximately 1/32”) for the
smallest possible air leakage and become a non-contact
seal that will last throughout the wheel life.
To ensure optimal performance, seals should be checked
at time of start-up, after one month of operation and every
three months thereafter. Labyrinth seals, if found to be out
of tolerance, should be adjusted immediately.
Figure 22: Airloop™ labyrinth seal adjustment
Periodic checking of the media, rim, spokes and shaft
is very important in maintaining optimal performance of
the wheel. To check the media, the wheel must be shut
down. The media should be checked for tightness at
start-up, after the first 30 days of operation, then by three
month intervals. The best method to test for tightness is
to place your hands against the media, near the hub, and
try to move it up and down on both sides. This procedure
should be used on all segments of the wheel. If any movement, in any direction, is detected on any segment, contact Venmar CES immediately.
The opposing airflow pattern through the wheel allows for
self-cleaning and if the air filters on both airstreams are
properly maintained there should be minimal dirt buildup.
If the wheel media has become restricted with dirt and
needs cleaning use low pressure (20 psi maximum)
compressed air or vacuum. If this is insufficient, please
contact the factory for further instructions. When cleaning
the wheel, protect the motor and other components from
contamination. Solvents or detergents are not recommended for use as they may degrade the binding used for
the desiccant in the media.
CAUTION
d2
Surface d’échange
de la roue
Correct
d2 = 0 po (démarrage)
d2 = Tolérance de la roue
Energy recovery wheel cleaning is an important part of
routine maintenance. The listed methods of cleaning
have been found effective, if done properly. However, any
method of cleaning has the potential to cause damage to
an enthalpy wheel media or desiccant if done improperly.
Venmar CES is not liable for any damage caused as a
result of energy recovery wheel cleaning.
Erroné
Trop
loin
Erroné
Trop
près
VCES-ASTON-IOM-1F – EnergyPack, ERV5000–10000, HRV3000–10000
34
Flat Plate Heat/Enthalpy Exchangers
WARNING
Many of the following steps need to be performed with
the unit powered off and locked out. Disconnect the
main power switch to the unit before performing service
and maintenance procedures.
Venmar CES offers four types of plate heat/enthalpy
exchangers. They are factory installed and ready to use
upon receipt. Based on long experience, dirt buildup
inside the plate heat exchangers installed in air handling
equipment is not expected, provided the air filters on both
airstreams are properly maintained. Plate heat exchangers
should be visually checked monthly for dirt buildup on the
entering face for the initial three months after installation
and start-up, after which checks should be carried out
every 12 months. During normal operation or when used
for special applications (e.g. welding shops, paint shops,
kitchen extracts, etc.), should dirt enter the plate heat exchanger, if pressure differential between exchanger inlet
and outlet is higher than stated at the design airflow, clean
the exchanger using techniques mentioned below. If, after
cleanup, the pressure differential is still higher than stated
at the design airflow, contact Venmar CES.
Extruded polypropylene and corrugated or embossed
aluminum plate heat exchangers should be cleaned by
removing dust and fibers with a soft brush, a vacuum
cleaner or with dry compressed air at 90–95 psi and 12”
[305 mm] from the surface. Take care when cleaning with
compressed air that the exchanger is not damaged and
that oil contained in the compressed air is not pushed
inside. Oils, solvents, etc. can be removed with hot water,
harmless grease solvents or cleansing agents by washing.
If using a high pressure device use a flat 40° nozzle (type
WEG40/04) with a maximum water pressure of 1,450 psi
[100 bar] and 12” [305 mm] from the surface. Take care
when cleaning with water, solvents or cleaning agents
that the exchanger is not damaged, either mechanically or
chemically.
Enthalpy (sensible and latent) plate heat exchanger core
is constructed of alternate layers of corrugated aluminum
material and polymeric desiccant impregnated media and
should be cleaned by removing dust with a soft brush or
with a vacuum cleaner only.
CAUTION
Do not use compressed air or water to clean an enthalpy plate heat exchanger as irreparable damage may
occur.
Heat Pipe Heat Exchangers
Heat pipes are factory installed and ready to use upon
receipt. Based on long experience, dirt buildup inside
the heat pipe heat exchangers installed in air handling
equipment is not expected, provided the air filters on
both airstreams are properly maintained. Heat pipe heat
exchangers should be visually checked monthly for dirt
buildup on the entering face for the initial three months
after installation and start-up, after which checks should
be carried out every 12 months.
During normal operation or when used for special applications (e.g. welding shops, paint shops, kitchen extracts,
etc.), should dirt enter the heat pipe heat exchanger, if
pressure differential between exchanger inlet and outlet
is higher than stated at the design airflow, clean the exchanger by removing dust and fibers with a soft brush,
or with a vacuum cleaner. Oils, solvents, etc. can be
removed with hot water, grease solvents or cleansing
agents by washing. Choose harmless grease solvents or
VCES-ASTON-IOM-1F – EnergyPack, ERV5000–10000, HRV3000–10000
cleansing agents in accordance with the heat exchanger
material (raw aluminum or coated tubes) such that they
will not contaminate or release volatile organic compounds
(VOCs) into the treated air and area(s) the unit serves. If
using a high pressure device, use a flat 40° nozzle (type
WEG40/04) with a maximum water pressure of 1,450 psi
[100 bar] and 12” [305 mm] from the surface. Take care
when cleaning with water, solvents or cleaning agents
that the exchanger is not damaged, either mechanically or
chemically. If, after cleanup, the pressure differential is still
higher than stated at design airflow, contact Venmar CES.
If the heat pipe heat exchanger is equipped with a tilting
mechanism, the linkage, actuator mounting attachments,
bearing attachments and flexible connection attachments
and condition should be checked for tightness before
start-up, after the first week of operation, then on three
month intervals.
35
Refrigerant Systems
WARNING
Many of the following steps need to be performed with
the unit powered off and locked out. Disconnect the
main power switch to the unit before performing service
and maintenance procedures.
Compressors
Scroll type compressors are the most common type of
compressor used by Venmar CES. Other types of compressors are available upon request, if required.
Maintenance and service on compressors must be completed by a licensed service mechanic. Provincial or state
regulations frequently require such qualifications for compressor maintenance.
If a compressor cycles, leaks or has any defects, contact
Venmar CES as soon as possible.
See Appendix B for compressor maintenance and troubleshooting refrigerant circuits, and Appendix Q for adjusting
refrigerant charge. Additional refrigerant troubleshooting
issues can be found in Appendix P.
Condenser
Condenser Fans and Motors, Air Cooled
The units contain direct drive condenser fan and motor
assemblies. The condenser fans are multi-blade propeller
type with die cast silumin alloy hub and glass reinforced
polypropylene or polyamide industrial quality adjustable
pitch high performance blades. The motors are threephase, 1,140 rpm and are of the heavy duty type complete with permanently lubricated ball bearings, inherent
three-phase protection and NEMA Class B insulation.
Motor shafts are coated for rust protection. Each motor
is mounted on a heavy duty bracket which is constructed
of heavy gauge steel. Fan guards are furnished on the top
for safety purposes. Fan guards are constructed of heavy
gauge close meshed steel wire. The fan outlet venturi is
constructed of galvanized steel. The condenser fan motors are cycled to provide head pressure control down to
50°F [10°C] ambient.
gaskets do not require renewing at every maintenance
operation. However, if the head gasket is physically disfigured or deteriorated in any way, the system will require
new gaskets in order to retain the water-tight seal.
Periodically, plate and coaxial heat exchangers should
be chemically cleaned to ensure optimum condenser efficiency. Frequency of cleaning will depend on individual
water conditions hence a suitable cleaning schedule
should be arranged based on experience and knowledge
of the building or local water supply loop.
Condenser Coils, Air Cooled
Condenser coils may be constructed of aluminum or copper fins that are mechanically bonded to copper tubes or
alternately may be constructed of high performance aluminum microchannel tubes, fins and manifolds that have
been brazed to form a complete refrigerant-to-air heat exchanger coil. An integral liquid sub-cooler circuit designed
for 10°F [5.6°C] sub-cooling is also provided to minimize
the possibility of liquid flashing while maximizing the cooling capacity of the system.
Evaporator Section
The direct expansion (DX) coil is constructed of seamless
copper tubing expanded into full collared aluminum fins. The
tubes are arranged for a counter-flow circuit and staggered
to provide maximum heat transfer. A pressure type distributor with hot gas inlet port and a heavy duty copper suction
header are included. Additional refrigerant circuit components include thermostatic expansion valves (TXV) with external equalizer, insulated suction lines in the airstream and
hot gas bypass valves on the full face of the leaving side of
the direct expansion coil (hot gas bypass option is removed
when optional digital scroll compressors are utilized).
Components of a Direct Expansion System
The evaporator is that part of the low pressure side of the
refrigerant system in which the liquid refrigerant boils or
evaporates, absorbing heat as it changes into a vapor.
Figure 23: Direct expansion coil
Distributor
Condensers, Water Cooled
Water cooled units may contain either plate, shell and
tube and coaxial water cooled condenser. Water source
heat pump units may contain either plate and coaxial
water cooled condenser/evaporator.
Periodically tubes in the shell and tube condenser should
be mechanically cleaned to ensure optimum condenser
efficiency. Cleaning brushes are available from most refrigeration supply outlets. For better results, always remove
both heads before cleaning water tubes. Note that head
VCES-ASTON-IOM-1F – EnergyPack, ERV5000–10000, HRV3000–10000
Liquid line
Hot gas bypass line
Suction line
Evaporator coil
Expansion valve
Check valve on remote condensing
application (optional)
36
Figure 24: Thermostatic expansion valve
WARNING
Many of the following steps need to be performed with
the unit powered off and locked out. Disconnect the
main power switch to the unit before performing service
and maintenance procedures.
Bulb clamp
Remote clamp
P1
Thermostatic Expansion Valve
Diaphram
The thermostatic expansion valve is a precision device
designed to meter the flow of refrigerant into the evaporator, thereby preventing the return of liquid refrigerant to
the compressor. By being responsive to the temperature
of the refrigerant gas leaving the evaporator and the pressure in the evaporator, the thermostatic expansion valve
can control the refrigerant gas leaving the evaporator at
a predetermined superheat. Three forces that govern the
operation of the TXV are:
•
•
•
P2
External
equilizer
port
P3
The pressure created by the remote bulb and power
assembly (P1).
The evaporator pressure (P2).
The equivalent pressure of the superheat spring (P3).
Dampers
Units from Venmar CES usually come with two sets of
dampers. However, units may have more than two sets
if the unit has been ordered with the recirculation or face
and bypass frost control options. Outside air dampers and
return air dampers can be motorized or gravity activated.
The following maintenance should occur in order to prevent the unit from working under too much pressure and
to prevent freezing issues.
Dampers must be kept free of foreign matter that might
impede normal free movement. Bearings between
blades and frames are made of polymer and require no
maintenance. Note that the damper shafts do not need
lubrication. All Venmar CES dampers and linkages are assembled with non-lubricating bearings.
VCES-ASTON-IOM-1F – EnergyPack, ERV5000–10000, HRV3000–10000
•
•
•
•
Attachment mechanism linking motors to dampers
should be checked for tightness.
Damper jackshafts (if provided) are fitted with grease
nipples and should be lubricated once a year. Use a
premium quality lithium based grease conforming to
NLGI Grade 2 or 3 (examples are: Mobil – Mobilith
AW2, Chevron – Amolith #2, Texaco Premium RB,
Shell Alvania #2).
Dampers should be inspected for dirt; check the
shaft, arms, bars and controls rod every three
months.
Inspect the seals to ensure none have pulled loose
or deteriorated. If a seal has been damaged, repair
or replace it with the same seal or same seal material. Contact Venmar CES for replacement parts.
37
Belt Driven Fans
Table 2: Wheel Set Screw Torque in lb-ft
WARNING
Many of the following steps need to be performed with
the unit powered off and locked out. Disconnect the
main power switch to the unit before performing service
and maintenance procedures.
Set Screw Size
Diameter (Inches)
Belt driven fan, motor and drive assemblies should be
checked and inspected at regular intervals per the inspection list and procedures below. Listen for vibrations or
unusual sounds. Severe damage, premature failure and
loss of airflow can be avoided by regular inspection and
maintenance.
1. Check the fan, motor and bearing mounting bolts for
tightness according to the bolt torque chart in Table
1 below at time of start up, after 24 hours, then every
three months.
Table 1: Minimum Head Bolt Torque in lb-ft
(Grade 5 Bolts)
Size (Inches)
1/4–20
1/4–28
5/16–18
5/16–24
3/8–16
3/8–24
7/16–14
7/16–20
1/2–13
1/2–20
9/16–12
9/16–18
5/8–11
5/8–18
3/4–10
3/4–16
7/8–9
7/8–14
1–8
1–14
Thread Designation
UNC
UNF
UNC
UNF
UNC
UNF
UNC
UNF
UNC
UNF
UNC
UNF
UNC
UNF
UNC
UNF
UNC
UNF
UNC
UNF
Minimum Torque
6
7
14
16
24
28
42
45
69
83
99
118
150
176
254
301
358
422
500
602
VCES-ASTON-IOM-1F – EnergyPack, ERV5000–10000, HRV3000–10000
lb-in
lb-ft
1/4
75
6.2
5/16
144
12.0
3/8
252
21.0
7/16
396
33.0
1/2
600
50.0
5/8
1,164
97.0
3/4
2,016
168.0
7/8
3,204
267.0
1
4,800
400.0
*Stainless steel set screws are not hardened and should not be
tightened to more than half the values shown.
Table 3: Bearing Set Screw Torque in lb-in
Manufacturer
Set Screw
Diameter Link Belt Sealmaster SKF McGill Dodge
#10
40
—
35
35
—
1/4
90
65
50
85
—
5/16
185
125
165
165
160
3/8
325
230
290
290
275
7/16
460
350
350
—
—
1/2
680
500
620
—
600
5/8
1,350
1,100
1,325
—
1,200
3/4
2,350
—
—
—
2,000
Split pillow block bearings are fixed to the shaft with tapered
sleeves and generally do not have set screws.
3. Check each V-belt tension and adjust the motor
base for correct amount according to the deflection
outlined in the Measuring Belt Tension procedure
below and in Appendix K for type of belt at time of
start-up, daily for the first week until they should
acquire their permanent set, then monthly. All belts
should have approximately the same amount of deflection. Be aware of mismatched or worn belt sets.
If a belt must be changed, ensure to change all belts
on the same drive at the same time. Never replace
just one belt within a set.
Soft metric conversions are not acceptable for screw and hex
sizes.
2. Check the fan wheel hub, bearings and drive
sheaves set screws for tightness according to the
set screw torque charts in Table 2 and Table 3 at
time of start-up, after 24 hours of operation, monthly
for the initial three months then every three months.
If wheel or bearing set screws have worked loose
check the wheel for any signs of movement (inlet
space clearance between the fan wheel and housing) or loose blades. If Loctite was used on any set
screws that have come loose the set screws must
be removed and cleaned before re-tightening and
Loctite must be re-applied.
Carbon Steel Set Screw Torque*
Measuring Belt Tension
a. Measure the belt span with a span scale.
b. Divide the belt span by 64 to determine the belt
deflection needed to check tension.
c. Set the O-ring on the span scale to the required
deflection value.
d. Set the small O-ring at zero on the force scale.
38
WARNING
Many of the following steps need to be performed with
the unit powered off and locked out. Disconnect the
main power switch to the unit before performing service
and maintenance procedures.
e. Place the scale end of the tension checker
squarely on one belt at the center of the belt
span. Apply force on the plunger until the bottom of the large O-ring is even with the top of the
next belt or until it is even with a straight edge
laid across the sheaves.
f. Read the force scale under the small O-ring to
determine the force required to give the needed
deflection.
g. Compare the force scale reading in Step F with
the correct value for the belt style and cross section. The force scale reading should be between
the minimum and maximum values shown in Appendix K.
h. If the deflection value is below the minimum,
tighten the belts. If the deflection value is above
the maximum, loosen the belts. The tension on
new belts should be checked during the first day
of operation, at the end of the first week and
monthly thereafter.
4. Check the fan and motor sheave alignment using a
straight edge along the outside edges of the sheaves
for equal sized fixed sheaves as shown in Figure
25 and Figure 26 at time of start-up, after 24 hours
of operation, monthly for the initial three months,
then every three months. When properly aligned,
the straight edge should touch the full face of both
sheaves. With one adjustable and one fixed sheave
with unequal sizes, use a string placed at the center
grove of both sheaves pulled tight to check alignment. Adjust sheaves for proper alignment and set
screws to proper torque.
Figure 25: Equal sheave
size alignment
5. Belt driven fan bearings are fitted with grease nipples
for lubrication. The grease quantity and lubrication interval depends on bearing (fan size) and rpm and are
indicated in the tables in Appendix L. Use a premium
quality lithium based grease conforming to NLGI
Grade 2 or 3 (examples are: Mobil Mobilith AW2,
Chevron Amolith #2, Texaco Premium RB, Shell Alvania #2 or ESSO Beacon #325). Clean the grease
nipple first, then rotate the fan shaft slowly by hand
while adding grease. The lubrication intervals are
theoretical and will depend on site conditions, hours
of operation and temperature. It is recommended
to make periodic inspections of the bearings before
these theoretical intervals.
6. Fan wheels, housings and drive assemblies should
be checked for dirt buildup annually and cleaned
if necessary to keep them from becoming unbalanced and to prevent loss of airflow. Clean with
compressed air to reduce any dirt, dust, lint or larger
particulates that have bonded to the fan impeller
housing or drive assembly. Block dirt from entering
the unit and ductwork if necessary or remove fan
assembly from unit. Alternatively use low pressure
steam, a degreaser and rag. If a sheave requires
cleaning, detergent and water can also be used. Ensure the belt is dry before starting up the unit.
IMPORTANT
Be careful not to remove or dislodge balancing clips on
the fan blades while cleaning.
Figure 26: Unequal sheave
size alignment
Center lines
must coincide
Lines must
be parallel
Fixed sheave
Straight edge
Adjustable
sheave
VCES-ASTON-IOM-1F – EnergyPack, ERV5000–10000, HRV3000–10000
39
FANWALL® Array
WARNING
Many of the following steps need to be performed with
the unit powered off and locked out. Disconnect the
main power switch to the unit before performing service
and maintenance procedures.
Maintenance Schedule
FANWALL array of multiple direct driven plenum fan and
motor “cubes” are equipped with permanently sealed
bearings and do not require lubrication. The following
maintenance schedule is recommended.
Fan Wheel and Motor Removal
1. Disconnect power to the fan array control panel
before maintenance. Follow all lockout and tag out
procedures.
2. Remove the optional safety screen (if provided) on
the motor end only of the cube in question by removing all four hex screws from the holding flange
that retains the safety screen. See Figure 28.
Figure 28: Remove safety screen on motor end
Monthly
•
Check the fan wheel to inlet cone alignment for possible noise from the wheel rubbing against the inlet
cone. See Fan Wheel/Cone Alignment below for
instructions.
Every Six Months
•
•
Check motor bearings for possible binding noise or
overheating.
Check fan wheels for dirt and grease accumulation.
Clean as necessary. Do not use any caustic cleaning
solutions.
Annually
•
Lightly lubricate damper and linkage bushings on
backdraft dampers (if equipped).
Every Two Years
•
Examine fan housings and motor pedestal for corrosion. Clean and touch up with paint as necessary.
3. Disconnect the four-wire electrical cable from the
motor junction box. Make note of wire locations for
re-installation later. See Figure 29.
Figure 29: Remove electrical cable
Figure 27: FANWALL array
VCES-ASTON-IOM-1F – EnergyPack, ERV5000–10000, HRV3000–10000
40
WARNING
Many of the following steps need to be performed with
the unit powered off and locked out. Disconnect the
main power switch to the unit before performing service
and maintenance procedures.
Figure 31: Mark location and remove trans-torque
bushing and fan wheel from motor.
4. Mark motor pedestal location on the motor pedestal
mounting angles (both sides), then loosen and remove (four) ½” bolts that retain the motor pedestal to
the mounting angles. See Figure 30.
Figure 30: Remove motor pedestal retaining bolts
7. If needed the motor may now be removed for service
by removing all (four) 3/8” motor retaining nuts and
bolts. Be sure to mark the motor base pattern and
bolt holes used on the motor pedestal. Rubber isolator pads between the motor base and the pedestal
are optional and if supplied be sure not to lose them.
See Figure 32.
Figure 32: Remove motor retaining bolts; do not lose
rubber isolator pads (if provided).
5. After removing the motor pedestal retaining bolts,
slide the motor/fan/pedestal assembly out to the
point where the motor lifting ring is clear of the cube
frame enough to use. If a mechanical device is available for use, attach it to the motor lifting ring. Lift and
remove the motor pedestal with motor and fan wheel
from the cube. The motor pedestal with motor and
fan wheel can be turned 180° and slid back into the
cube on the pedestal mounting angles or removed
from unit for further disassembly.
6. Mark the location of the trans-torque bushing on the
shaft and the fan. To remove the fan wheel from the
motor shaft, remove the trans-torque bushing retaining hex nut using a 1” socket with a 12” extension by
turning counter-clockwise. Loosen progressively until
the bushing is free from wheel hub and motor shaft.
Remove fan wheel/hub assembly. See Figure 31.
VCES-ASTON-IOM-1F – EnergyPack, ERV5000–10000, HRV3000–10000
41
WARNING
Many of the following steps need to be performed with
the unit powered off and locked out. Disconnect the
main power switch to the unit before performing service
and maintenance procedures.
8. To re-install the motor, fan wheel and fan wheel/
motor/pedestal assembly back into the cube, reverse
the steps above noting the following:
a. Insert the (four) 3/8” motor retaining bolts into the
holes in the motor pedestal from the underside;
make sure to use a standard washer on the bolt
side, install the rubber isolator pads (if supplied)
between the pedestal and motor base and only a
locknut is required on the motor side.
b. Square the motor on the pedestal according to
markings and tighten the bolts. With rubber isolator pads tighten the bolts to 20 ft-lbs. Without
rubber isolator pads tighten the bolts to 40 ft-lbs.
c. Install the fan wheel on the motor shaft with the
hub facing towards you. Line up the markings on
the hub/trans-torque bushing/shaft. Make sure
that the trans-torque bushing nut is flush to the
hub. Tighten the bushing nut progressively to 80
ft-lbs turning clockwise.
9. Lift the motor pedestal with motor and fan wheel
(turn 180° if placed on the pedestal mounting angles
for disassembly) with the fan wheel inlet toward the
inlet cone. Place motor pedestal into the cube on the
pedestal mounting angles and slide the pedestal forward to the line that you previously marked. Line the
four pedestal bolt holes up with the bolt holes on the
mounting angles. Insert (four) ½” bolts into the holes,
make sure to use a standard washer on the bolt side
and a standard washer and lock washer on the nut
side. Hand tighten the bolts for now.
10. Check the inlet cone alignment to the fan wheel.
Fan wheel should not be rubbing against the fan
inlet cone when rotated by hand. The fan wheel to
inlet cone clearance should be approximately 1/16”
gap and the overlap should be as indicated in Appendix N for the fan wheel size. Adjust the overlap of
the wheel and cone by moving the motor pedestal
forward or back. Fan wheel should not be rubbing
on the inlet cone. If cone alignment is required see
instructions for Fan Wheel/Cone Alignment below.
Once alignment and overlap are correct, tighten the
(four) ½” pedestal mounting bolts to 90 ft-lbs.
VCES-ASTON-IOM-1F – EnergyPack, ERV5000–10000, HRV3000–10000
Figure 33: Check fan wheel/cone alignment and
overlap.
11. Reconnect the four-wire electrical cable from the
motor junction box. Before operation, start the motor
slowly to ensure the fan rotation is correct. If the fan
wheel is not rotating correctly, check the motor leads
for proper installation.
a. Drive Side – Clockwise rotation when looking at
motor end
b. Inlet Side – Counter-clockwise rotation looking at
fan inlet
IMPORTANT
Before re-starting, re-balance the fan wheel once the
motor rotation and alignment have been corrected before
placing the unit in operation.
Fan Wheel/Cone Alignment
1. To align fan wheel/cone, first disconnect power to
the fan array control panel. Follow all lockout and tag
out procedures.
2. If the optional backdraft damper is furnished on the
inlet side of the fan it must be removed first. Remove
all tek screws on all sides attaching the damper
frame to the inlet side panel and remove it from the
cube. The purpose of the damper is so that maintenance staff can block the intake of a single fan to
prevent back flow until service on an inoperative assembly can be performed. Note the directions of the
damper blades are running vertical. The damper is
installed directly onto the FANWALL® cube inlet side
panel and over the optional airflow straightener (if
supplied).
42
WARNING
Many of the following steps need to be performed with
the unit powered off and locked out. Disconnect the
main power switch to the unit before performing service
and maintenance procedures.
3. If the optional airflow straighteners are furnished on
the inlet side of the fan it must be removed next. Remove all tek screws on the airflow straightener panel
frame and remove it from the cube.
Figure 36: Fan wheel/cone alignment – Step 3
Figure 34: Fan wheel/cone alignment – Step 2a
4. Gently rotate the fan wheel to verify location of adjustment required.
Figure 37: Fan wheel/cone alignment – Step 4
Figure 35: Fan wheel/cone alignment – Step 2b
VCES-ASTON-IOM-1F – EnergyPack, ERV5000–10000, HRV3000–10000
43
WARNING
Many of the following steps need to be performed with
the unit powered off and locked out. Disconnect the
main power switch to the unit before performing service
and maintenance procedures.
7. Gently rotate the fan wheel to verify cone adjustment
for proper clearance from wheel.
Figure 40: Fan wheel/cone alignment – Step 7a and
Step 9a
5. To make adjustment, loosen (do not remove) all the
cone retaining fasteners.
Figure 38: Fan wheel/cone alignment – Step 5
Figure 41: Fan wheel/cone alignment – Step 7a and
Step 9a
6. Using a rubber mallet, gently tap around the cone
until desired clearance is acquired between fan
wheel and inlet cone.
Figure 39: Fan wheel/cone alignment – Step 6
VCES-ASTON-IOM-1F – EnergyPack, ERV5000–10000, HRV3000–10000
44
WARNING
Figure 43: Blank-off plate – Step 3
Many of the following steps need to be performed with
the unit powered off and locked out. Disconnect the
main power switch to the unit before performing service
and maintenance procedures.
8. Tighten all the cone retaining fasteners.
Figure 42: Fan wheel/cone alignment – Step 8
9. Once again gently rotate the fan wheel to verify cone
alignment.
10. To install the optional airflow straightener or backdraft damper reverse the steps above.
Blank-off Plate (If Applicable)
4. Place the blank-off plate over the optional airflow
straightener panel frame (if supplied) or onto the
matching “Z” frame and pre-drilled holes and fasten
together with or remove tek screws.
Figure 44: Blank-off plate – Step 4
1. Optional blank-off plate(s) are available so that maintenance staff can block the intake of a single fan to
prevent back flow until service on an inoperative assembly can be performed or it can be mounted on
spare FANWALL® cube(s) until they are required to
be put into service.
2. First disconnect power to the fan array control panel.
Follow all lockout and tag out procedures.
3. The blank-off plate is fitted to the inlet side of the
FANWALL cube on the optional airflow straightener panel frame (if supplied) or onto a matching
“Z” frame. There are 12 pre-drilled holes which are
located in the corners and middle of the airflow
straightener panel frame or “Z” frame matching predrilled holes in the blank-off plate for fastening together with tek screws.
VCES-ASTON-IOM-1F – EnergyPack, ERV5000–10000, HRV3000–10000
45
Motors
•
WARNING
Many of the following steps need to be performed with
the unit powered off and locked out. Disconnect the
main power switch to the unit before performing service
and maintenance procedures.
•
Motors will operate effectively for years if they are kept
clean, dry and properly lubricated. An excessive running
current is a good indication of the overall condition of the
motor. Check the following items every six months (unless
otherwise indicated) for proper performance:
•
•
•
Motors must be cleaned with moderate air pressure
(around 25 to 30 psi). Dirt must be blown away from
vent fins and all other accessible areas. All areas
surrounding the motor must be kept clear so air can
circulate freely to cool the motor.
Ensure all connections are secure. Look for loose
wires and loose contacts. Repair and tighten any defective connection.
Ensure the motor is operating at the current indicated on the nameplate. If not, a physical or electrical restriction is working against the motor and it
must be repaired.
Ensure the motor is not vibrating too much. A significant vibration can come from a loose mounting bolt
or an unbalanced impeller. If significant vibration has
occurred, be sure to repair it and inspect the mounting base and the flexible duct connection for any
damage.
Motor lubrication must occur once a year when
grease nipples are provided with a premium quality lithium based grease conforming to NLGI Grade
2 or 3 (examples are Mobile AW2, Chevron Amolith#2, Texaco Premium RB, Shell Alvania #2 or Esso
Beacon #325). Clean the grease nipple first, then
rotate the motor shaft slowly by hand while adding
grease with a low pressure grease gun. Do not over
lubricate.
Filters
Standard 2” [51 mm] filters are disposable and should be
replaced every three months or sooner if pressure drop
across the filters is too great. High efficiency filters (optional) should be replaced when dirty. Use only in combination with 2” [51 mm] filters to protect them.
The tables in Appendix O provide data relative to the
pressure drop across clean filters and indicate the type of
reading that should be given on the magnehelic gauge.
VCES-ASTON-IOM-1F – EnergyPack, ERV5000–10000, HRV3000–10000
The data relative to accurate pressure drop across the filters is available in the submittal. If the system is equipped
with both prefilters and final filters, it is recommended that
prefilters be changed twice as often as final filters. Running a unit with dirty and inefficient filters will lower the
airflow and thus lower the air quality of the area.
46
Coils
WARNING
Many of the following steps need to be performed with
the unit powered off and locked out. Disconnect the
main power switch to the unit before performing service
and maintenance procedures.
Dirt on the surface of the coil reduces its ability to transfer
heat which lowers the efficiency of the unit, resulting in
poor air quality and expensive operating costs. Because
of the condensate on the coil, the dirt often becomes wet
and contributes to the growth of microbial organisms.
Negligence in maintenance may result in serious health
related indoor air quality problems.
The coil should be kept clean for maximum performance.
To achieve maximum efficiency, clean the coil often during
periods of high demand or when dirty conditions prevail.
Venmar CES recommends cleaning the coil a minimum of
once per year to prevent dirt buildup in the coil fins where
it may not be visible.
CAUTION
Coil fins can be cleaned by using steam with detergent,
hot water spray or a commercial chemical coil cleaner.
After cleaning the coil, be sure to rinse thoroughly.
Cleaning Procedure
1. Shut down the unit by closing the main disconnect at
the power inlet.
2. Open panels or doors to gain access to both sides
of the coil section.
3. Remove soft debris from both sides of the coil with a
soft brush.
4. Using a steam cleaning machine, clean the leaving
airside of the coil first (going downward) then clean
the entering airside. Use a block-off to prevent the
steam from penetrating a dry section of the unit.
5. Allow the unit to dry thoroughly before restoring
power.
6. Damaged coil fins (excluding brazed aluminum)
should be straightened by using a fin comb (not applicable to brazed aluminum heat exchangers).
7. Close all panels and doors once the coil is dry.
8. Restore electrical power to the unit.
Do not use acidic chemical coil cleaners. Do not use alkaline chemical coil cleaners with a pH value greater than
8.5 or lower than 6 (after mixing) without using an aluminum corrosion inhibitor in the cleaning solution. Using
these types of cleaners may result in unit damage.
Controls
General controls information regarding the navigation and
monitoring of your unit with the standard keypad, DDC
points list, ladder diagram and specific sequence of operation or required network communication is included in
the documentation in the control panel of your unit. Please
contact the factory if this information is missing or has
been lost.
Troubleshooting
See Appendix P for troubleshooting information. For
troubleshooting information on WSHP, compressors and
refrigeration circuits, see Appendix B; for gas-fired furnace
modules see Appendix D; and for electric heating coils,
see Appendix H.
VCES-ASTON-IOM-1F – EnergyPack, ERV5000–10000, HRV3000–10000
47
Appendix A: Roofcurb Generic Assembly Instructions
Figure A1: Roofcurb assembly – EnergyPack®, ERV5000–10000, HRV3000–10000 (outdoor units only)
2”
Wood nailer
Mineral wool
Mineral wool
2”
Standard design
Standard
design
With wood
nailer option
C
B
A
With wood
nailer option
Detail A
VCES-ASTON-IOM-1F – EnergyPack, ERV5000–10000, HRV3000–10000
Detail C
Detail B
48
Appendix B: Water Source Heat Pump (WSHP) Piping,
Installation, Maintenance and Troubleshooting
Units have the WSHP supply and return line connections
for each compressor condenser set piped to the outside
on the side of the casing as standard. An optional field
cut floor chase is available as an option, in which case
the pipe connections terminate inside the casing for each
compressor condenser set. See the submittal drawings
for number, size, location, flow rate, type of fluid, pressure
drop information and components included and factory
installed for the supply and return connections.
Water Piping Components Included
The following components are included and factory installed as standard, depending on the water conditions or
options selected.
1. A three-way modulating head pressure control valve
is included and factory installed in the compressor
compartment to maintain stable operation of the refrigeration systems when operated on ground loop
water systems when the design inlet water temperature is below 65°F in the cooling mode. A refrigerant
pressure transducer is also included and factory installed in the compressor compartment on the compressor discharge, which will modulate the water
flow to the condenser using a 2 to 10 VDC signal to
prevent the compressor discharge pressure from falling below the compressor operating limit.
2. A flow switch on the water return or leaving side of
the condenser is factory provided and installed in the
compressor compartment to monitor the presence
or absence of flow, which will shut down the compressor and unit if no flow is detected.
3. A water temperature sensor on the water return or
leaving side of the condenser is factory provided and
installed in the compressor compartment on 100%
water systems to monitor the water temperature,
which will shut down the compressor and unit for
freeze protection if the leaving water temperature
drops below 35°F.
4. An airside economizer coil, a three-way modulating
water economizer valve and a temperature sensor
are included with the WSHP WiSE coil option and
factory installed in the compressor compartment on
the water inlet or supply line and downstream of the
economizer coil for energy conservation. The water
temperature sensor is input to the DDC control system, which determines when to divert water to the
economizer coil for energy conservation in cooling
mode.
Water Piping Components Not Included
Vibration eliminators, manual or automatic shut-off valves,
pressure and temperature gauges, water strainer, vent
valves or air vents, flow measuring and balancing valves,
pressure relief valves or other safety or control piping
requirements are not provided as standard and must
VCES-ASTON-IOM-1F – EnergyPack, ERV5000–10000, HRV3000–10000
be field provided and installed outside of the unit. These
components and installation are available as an option.
See the piping schematic and submittal drawings for information on optional piping components when provided.
IMPORTANT
WSHP external water supply and return piping shall be in
accordance with National and Local Codes. Line sizing,
pressure limiting devices, back flow preventers, strainers,
valves, flow temperature and pressure measuring, freeze
protection, all other safety or control piping requirements
for system operation are the sole responsibility of the
Installing Contractor and/or Design Engineer. The water
supply must be sized for the maximum flow as indicated
on the submittals.
Recommended Piping, Components and
Installation
Recommended and required WSHP water line piping and
components with a detailed functional description are outlined below:
1. All WSHP should be connected to supply and return
piping in a two-pipe reverse return configuration. A
reverse return system is inherently self-balancing and
requires only trim balancing where multiple quantities
of heat pumps with different flow and pressure drop
characteristics exist in the same loop.
2. The water line piping may be steel, copper or PVC.
Avoid dissimilar metal fittings as they may corrode.
The piping should be installed with a minimum number of bends and elevation changes for best performances. Size piping to minimize system pressure
drop.
3. Water line piping should contain:
a. Short sections of high pressure flexible hose
or vibration eliminators to reduce vibration and
noise transmission. One end of the hose should
have a swivel fitting to facilitate removal for
service. Hard piping connections are not recommended due to the possibility of vibration
that could damage piping connections, joints
or transmit noise. Where hard piping is used,
unions should be provided in the supply and return lines for service and removal.
b. Manual shut-off valves in supply and return water
lines for isolation and service.
c. Pressure and temperature gauge connections in
the supply and return water lines to aid in startup and service.
d. A water strainer (16–20 mesh minimum) or some
means of removing foreign matter from the water.
49
e. Manual vent valves and/or automatic air vents at
the high points of the system in the supply and
return water lines to discharge non-condensable
air in order to avoid unexpected high head pressure and poor cooling/heating performance.
f. A flow balancing valve in the return water line to
set the required flow rate.
g. A flow measuring valve or pressure gauge/connections in the return water line to measure the
required flow rate.
h. A two-way motorized on/off water shut-off valve
to isolate water flowing through both the economizer coil (if equipped) and water-to-refrigerant
condenser for conservation when the unit is off.
The motorized water valve must open 90 seconds
prior to compressor start-up and remain open five
seconds after the compressor is shut off.
i. A relief valve in the water supply or inlet line if the
maximum pressure of components is less than
the water supply pressure to prevent damage,
injury or death due to instantaneous release of
high pressure water.
WARNING
To prevent injury or death due to instantaneous release
of high pressure water, provide relief valves on system
water piping. This will also help prevent water pump
damage or stoppage due to excessive system pressure.
4. WSHP should not be connected to the incoming supply and return piping until the water supply
system has been cleaned and flushed completely.
After the cleaning and flushing has taken place, the
initial connection should have all valves wide open in
preparation for the water system flushing.
5. Automatic flow controlled devices must not be installed prior to system cleaning and flushing.
Cleaning and Flushing
1. Prior to first operation of the WSHP, the water circulation system must be cleaned and flushed of all construction dirt and debris by the Installing Contractor.
2. Short circuit connect the incoming supply line to
the outgoing return line, prior to the factory installed
piping at each connection point, before flushing to
prevent the introduction of dirt into the unit from the
supply line completed on site. This will prevent the
introduction of dirt into the unit.
3. Fill the system at the city water make-up connection
with all air vents open. After filling, close all air vents.
4. Start the main circulator with the pressure reducing valve open. Check vents in sequence to bleed
off any trapped air to provide circulation through all
components of the system.
VCES-ASTON-IOM-1F – EnergyPack, ERV5000–10000, HRV3000–10000
5. While circulating water, check and repair any leaks in
the piping. Drains at the lowest point(s) in the system
should be opened for the initial flush and blow down,
making sure city water fill valves are set to make-up
water at the same rate. Check the pressure gauge at
the pump suction and manually adjust the make-up
to hold the same positive steady pressure both before and after opening the drain valves. Flush should
continue for at least two hours or longer until clean
drain water is visible.
6. Shut off the circulator pump and open all drains and
vents to completely drain down the system. Short
circuited supply and return lines coming to the unit
should now be removed and supply and return lines
connected to the unit supply and return connections.
Do not use sealers at the swivel flare connections of
the hose(s).
7. Install any automatic flow controlled devices that
were removed for flushing.
8. Refill the system with clean water. Test the water
using litmus paper for acidity, and treat as required
to leave the water slightly alkaline (pH 7.5 to 8.5).
Note that during equipment functional testing, the
factory utilizes a mixture of 50% propylene glycol and
50% water. Traces of propylene glycol/water mixture
may still be present in the equipment water system
and may require a complete water system flush
in 100% critical water applications. The specified
percentage of antifreeze may also be added at this
time. Use commercial grade antifreeze designed for
HVAC systems only. Do not use automotive grade
antifreeze.
9. Once the system has been filled with clean water
and antifreeze (if used), precaution should be taken
to protect the system for dirty water conditions. Dirty
water will result in system wide degradation of performance and solids may clog valves, strainers, flow
regulators, etc. Additionally, the heat exchangers
may become clogged which reduces compressor
service life or causes premature failure.
CAUTION
Units with WSHP installed outdoors must be protected
from freezing temperatures to prevent severe damage to
components.
10. Start the circulation pumps. After full flow has been
established through all components, air vented, lines
checked for leaks and loop temperatures stabilized,
the WSHP will be ready for check, start-up and
water balancing.
50
General Maintenance
Troubleshooting
Recording of performance measurements of volts, amps,
and water temperature difference (both heating and cooling) is recommended. A comparison of logged data with
start-up and other annual data is useful as an indicator of
general equipment condition.
Lubrication
Periodic lockouts almost always are caused by air or
water problems. The lockout (shut down) of the unit is a
normal protective result. Check for dirt in the water system, water flow rates, water temperatures, airflow rates
(may be dirty filters) and air temperatures. If the lockout
occurs in the morning following a return from the night
setback, entering air below machine limits may be the
cause.
Water treatment is important for proper condenser operation. Proper water treatment is essential to prevent
galvanic corrosion from occurring in the condenser/water
system. The proper use of corrosion inhibitors and maintaining proper pH levels are critical elements. The use of
sacrificial anodes can also be beneficial in certain water
applications. Improper water treatment will lead to equipment performance/corrosion problems and will require
frequent equipment cleaning/service. For project/site specific water treatment instruction, consult your local water
treatment specialist.
R410a should be used only with polyolester (POE) oil. The
HFC refrigerant components in R410a will not be compatible with mineral oil or alkylbenzene lubricants. R410a
systems will be charged with the OEM recommended lubricant, ready for use with R410a.
Charging
Due to the zeotropic nature of R410a, it should be
charged as a liquid. In situations where vapor is normally
charged into a system, a valve should be installed in the
charging line to flash the liquid to vapor while charging.
CAUTION
It is very important to make certain that the recycle or recovery equipment used is designed for R410a. The pressure of R410a refrigerant is approximately 60% greater
than that of R22. Pressure gauges require a range up to
800 psig high side and 250 psig low side. Recovery cylinders require a 400 psig rating.
IMPORTANT
WSHP units are designed for fail safe to heating.
Filter driers must be replaced each time a system is open
to atmosphere (i.e. for a defective component replacement, refrigerant leak, etc.).
Monthly
Compressor Burnout
•
Check condenser coil for scaling.
Quarterly
•
Check oil level in compressor (half site glass).
Semi-annually
•
•
•
Check operation of crank case heaters.
Check for broken or loose pipe clamps.
Check moisture indicator of refrigerant site glass. A
‘Caution’ or ‘Wet’ condition requires changing filter
drier. If ‘Wet’ condition does not improve, it will be
necessary to evacuate system.
Yearly
•
•
•
•
Look for any sign of oil on all refrigeration components including coils, compressors, controls, tubing,
etc. Oil would indicate a refrigerant leak.
Check water lines for leaks.
Check expansion valve bulb (properly attached to
suction line, properly isolated).
Check the condensate drain pan and clean and flush
as required.
VCES-ASTON-IOM-1F – EnergyPack, ERV5000–10000, HRV3000–10000
When a motor burnout occurs in a compressor, the resulting high temperature arc causes a portion of the refrigerant/oil mixture to break down into carbonaceous sludge,
corrosive acid and water.
Such contamination resulting from a burnout can result
in repeat failures if the contaminants are allowed to reach
and remain in the crank case of the replacement compressor. This situation can be prevented by following
proper cleanup procedures after a burnout.
To determine if a compressor burnout has actually occurred, run the proper electrical tests. This requires an accurate VOM Meter.
1. With all wires removed from the compressor terminals,
measure resistance from each terminal to the compressor casing. If any terminal shows a direct ground (zero
resistance), a failure has occurred. If not, continue.
2. With all wires removed from the compressor terminals, measure resistance from each compressor
terminal. They should read the same. If two or more
terminals show zero resistance between them, the
compressor motor has failed (for actual resistance
value, refer to the respective compressor manual or
contact the Service Department at Venmar CES).
51
3. If Steps 1 and 2 have not clearly identified a compressor failure, it will be necessary to meg the compressor motor (refer to the respective compressor
manual or contact the Service Department at Venmar
CES).
Compressor Burnout – System Cleanup
Any maintenance requiring refrigerant evacuation must be
performed using proper recovery procedures.
1. In order to avoid losing refrigerant to the atmosphere, recover refrigerant using standard recovery
procedures and equipment. Remove the inoperative
compressor and install the replacement.
2. Since the normal color of refrigerant oil varies from
oil to oil, take a sample of oil from the replacement
compressor and seal in a small glass bottle for
comparison purposes after the cleaning operation is
complete. Suitable two ounce bottles are available at
any drug store.
WARNING
Acid burns to the skin can result from touching the
sludge in the burned out compressor. Rubber gloves
should be worn when handling contaminated parts.
3. Inspect all system controls such as expansion valves,
solenoid valves, check valves, reversing valves, contactors, etc. Clean or replace if necessary, remove all
installed filter driers.
IMPORTANT
Before starting the new compressor, replace any questionable component.
VCES-ASTON-IOM-1F – EnergyPack, ERV5000–10000, HRV3000–10000
4. Install the recommended size suction line filter drier
and new size liquid line filter drier. Evacuate system
using the triple evacuation method. Re-charge the
system with new refrigerant (do not use the recovered refrigerant). See unit’s nameplate for proper
refrigerant charge.
5. Start the compressor and put the system in operation. As the contaminants in the system are filtered
out, the pressure drop across the suction line filter
drier will increase. Observe the differential across the
filter drier for a minimum of two hours. If the pressure
drop exceeds the maximum limits for a temporary
installation, replace the filter drier and re-start the
system (see literature from filter drier’s Manufacturer
for pressure drop maximum limits).
6. After the completion of Step 5, allow the unit to operate for 48 hours. Check the odor (warning – smell
cautiously) and compare the color of the oil with
the sample taken in Step 2. Use of an Acid Test Kit
is recommended to test for acid content. If the oil
is discolored, has an acid odor, is acidic, or if the
moisture indicator indicates a high moisture content
in the system, change the filter driers. The compressor oil can be changed if considered desirable. Allow
the system to operate for an additional four hours
and re-check as before. Repeat until the oil remains
clean, odor and acid free and the color approaches
that of the original sample.
7. Replace the liquid line filter drier with one of the normally recommended size. Remove the suction line
filter drier.
8. After the cleaning procedure is completed, recheck in approximately two weeks to ensure that
the system condition and operation is completely
satisfactory.
52
Table B1: Troubleshooting Refrigeration Circuit
Head
Pressure
Suction
Pressure
Compressor
Superheat
Amp Draw
Water
Air
(Loops)
Safety
Sub-cooling Temperature
Temperature Lockout
Differential
Differential
Low
Low
Low
High
Low
High
High
High
Normal
High
Low airflow heating
High
High
High
Low airflow cooling
Low
Low
Low
Low water flow
heating
Low water flow
cooling
Low
Symptom
Undercharged
system (possible
leak)
Overcharged
system
Low
Normal
Normal
High
Normal
Low
Normal
Low
Normal
Low
Low
Low pressure
Normal
High pressure
High pressure
Low
High
Low
Low
Low
Low
Low
Low
High
Low
High
Low
temperature
Low
temperature
High
High
High
High
Low
Low
High
High airflow heating Low
Low
Low
Low
High
Low
Low
High airflow cooling Low
High water flow
Normal
heating
High water flow
Low
cooling
High
Normal
High
Low
Low
Normal
Low
temperature
High pressure
Low
Low
Low
Normal
Normal
Low
High pressure
Low
Low
Low
High
Normal
Low
Low
temperature
High
High
Low
Low
TXV restricted
High
Low
Normal
VCES-ASTON-IOM-1F – EnergyPack, ERV5000–10000, HRV3000–10000
Low
High pressure
53
Table B2: Performance Troubleshooting
Performance
Troubleshooting
Insufficient capacity.
Heating Cooling Possible Cause
x
x
x
Not cooling or heating
properly.
Reduced or no airflow.
x
Reduced or no airflow.
x
x
Leaky ductwork.
x
x
Low refrigerant charge.
x
Unit does not operate in
cooling.
Replace or clean.
Check for dirty air filter and clean or replace. Check
fan motor operation and airflow restriction. Too high of
external static. Check static vs. blower performance
curve.
Check for dirty air filter and clean or replace. Check
fan motor operation and airflow restriction. Too high of
external static. Check static vs. blower performance
curve.
Check supply and return air temperature at the unit and
at the distant duct registers. If significantly different, duct
leaks are present.
Check superheat and sub-cooling; adjust charge.
x
Restricted metering device.
Check superheat and sub-cooling; replace TXV.
x
Defective reversing valve.
Perform reversing valve touch test.
x
x
Re-check loads and sizing.
x
x
x
x
Unit undersized.
Scaling in waterside heat
exchanger.
Inlet water too hot or too cold.
x
Reduced or no airflow.
x
High head pressure.
Reduced or no water flow.
x
Inlet water too hot.
x
x
x
x
Air temperature out of range.
Scaling in waterside heat
exchanger.
Unit overcharged.
x
x
Non-condensable in system.
Bring return air temperature within design parameters.
Perform scaling check and clean if necessary.
Check superheat and sub-cooling.
x
Insufficient charge.
x
x
Check load, loop sizing, loop backfill, ground moisture.
Check for dirty air filter and clean or replace. Check
fan motor operation and airflow restriction. Too high of
external static. Check static vs. blower performance
curve.
Check pump operation or valve operation/setting. Check
water flow. Adjust to proper flow rate.
Check load, loop sizing, loop backfill, ground moisture.
x
x
Low suction pressure.
Perform scaling check and clean if necessary.
Vacuum system, re-weigh in charge.
Check pump operation or valve operation/setting. Check
Reduced water flow.
water flow. Adjust to proper flow rate.
Water temperature out of range. Bring water temperature within design parameters.
Check for dirty air filter and clean or replace. Check
fan motor operation and airflow restriction. Too high of
Reduced airflow in cooling.
external static. Check static vs. blower performance
curve.
Air temperature out of range.
Bring entering air temperature within design parameters.
x
Low discharge air
temperature in heating.
Dirty filter.
Solution
Check for refrigerant leaks.
x
Too high of airflow.
Check fan’s motor speed selection and airflow.
x
Poor performance.
See insufficient capacity.
VCES-ASTON-IOM-1F – EnergyPack, ERV5000–10000, HRV3000–10000
54
Appendix C: Positive and Negative Pressure Trapping
Figure C1: Positive pressure trapping
Removable plug
Cleanout
X
K
L
H
K
H
X
L
=
=
=
=
Minimum 0.5” [13 mm]
0.5” [13 mm] + maximum total static pressure
1.9375” [49 mm] if unit has a 6” [152 mm] tubular steel base
H + K + pipe diameter + insulation − X
Figure C2: Negative pressure trapping
Removable plug
Cleanout
X
H
L
J
H
J
X
L
=
=
=
=
1” [36 mm] (for each 1“ [25 mm] of maximum negative static pressure) + 1” [25 mm]
Half of H
3.9375” [100 mm] if unit has a 6” [152 mm] tubular steel base
H + J + pipe diameter + insulation − X
VCES-ASTON-IOM-1F – EnergyPack, ERV5000–10000, HRV3000–10000
55
Appendix D: Gas-fired Furnace Modules Installation and Maintenance
Tubular Gas-fired Duct Furnace Module
WARNING
Fire or Explosion Hazard
1. Failure to follow safety warnings exactly could
cause serious injury, death or property damage.
2. Be sure to read and understand the installation,
operating and maintenance instructions in this appendix thoroughly before installing or servicing this
equipment.
3. Improper installation, adjustment, alteration, service
or maintenance can cause serious injury, death or
property damage.
4. Do not store or use gasoline or other flammable
vapors or liquids in the vicinity of this or any other
appliance.
For Your Safety – What to do if You Smell Gas
1. Open windows if appliance is indoors.
2. Do not try to light any appliance.
3. Do not touch electrical switches or use any phone
in the building.
4. Extinguish any open flame.
5. Leave the building immediately.
6. Immediately call your Gas Supplier from a phone
remote from the building. Follow the Gas Supplier’s
instructions.
7. If you cannot reach your Gas Supplier, call the fire
department.
Installation and Service
1. Installation and service must be performed by a
qualified Installer, service agency or the Gas Supplier.
Installation Requirements
1. Be sure that the unit is located with respect to building construction and other equipment to provide
ready access and clearance to access panels or
doors that must be opened to permit adjustment and
servicing of the heating section. See the required
clearances provided on the mechanical drawing.
2. Do not install the appliance where it may be exposed
to potentially explosive or hazardous atmospheres
containing flammable vapors or combustible dust.
3. Do not locate the appliance in areas or near building
ventilators or exhausts where corrosive vapors (such
as chlorinated, halogenated or acidic or airborne
substances containing silicone) are present in the
atmosphere or can be mixed with combustion air entering the furnace module.
4. Do not install the appliance in locations where flue
products can be drawn in the adjacent building
openings such as windows, fresh air intakes, etc.
5. The appliance is not certified or suitable for use in
drying or process applications. Units used in such
applications voids any warranty and Manufacturer
disclaims any responsibility for this appliance or
application.
6. If any original wire supplied with the furnace must
be replaced, it must be replaced with wiring material
having a temperature rating of at least 104°F [90°C].
7. Provide necessary support for wiring in furnace vestibule. Wiring should not contact metal surfaces that
may be hot during furnace module operation.
The furnace covered by this appendix is a component of
a “Listed” product, subject to the guidelines of application as designated by the Certifying Agency and outlined
in the Appliance Manufacturer’s installation and operation
instructions.
The information provided in this appendix applies to the
furnace module, installed in the appliance and to its operation, maintenance and service. Refer to the Appliance
Manufacturer’s instructions for information related to all
other components.
IMPORTANT
Combustion air intake and vent locations differ; see submittal drawings for actual locations.
VCES-ASTON-IOM-1F – EnergyPack, ERV5000–10000, HRV3000–10000
56
Installation
Venting
IMPORTANT
All gas furnace installations must be in accordance with
the National Fuel Gas Code ANSA Z223.1 (NFPA 54) in
the United States, to the Gas Installation Code Can/CGA
B149 in Canada and all other applicable local codes and
ordinances. These requirements include but are not limited to:
1.
2.
3.
4.
Combustion air supply to the gas furnace
Venting of the products of combustion
Gas supply piping and connections
Unit location and clearances
Verify the following before placing the gas furnace into
service:
1. Gas supply provided matches the gas type marked
on the furnace module rating plate, the gas supply
line has been completed according to the Gas Supply, Piping and Connections section and has been
cleaned, drained and purged to the external manual
shut-off valve.
2. There is an adequate supply of air for the combustion process for the furnace module according to the
type of installation.
3. There is a properly designed vent system connected
to the furnace module to convey the products of
combustion (flue gases) outdoors and are directed
away from any combustion air intakes according to
the installation.
Outdoor Installation
Air for Combustion
The furnace is power vented with a combustion air draft
inducer/blower and needs an ample supply of air for
proper and safe combustion of the fuel gas. Combustion
air inlet hoods are provided in the panel on the furnace
vestibule. Do not block or obstruct air openings to the
area where the appliance is installed. Provide at least 6 feet
[1,829 mm] clearance to side of the appliance, where the
combustion air inlet or vent (flue) gas discharge is located,
from walls, parapets or adjacent buildings or equipment.
Do not locate appliance near building ventilators or exhausts, or areas where corrosive chemical vapors can be
drawn into combustion air supply. Refer to appropriate
installation codes for required clearances to combustion
air openings and flue gas (vent) outlets.
VCES-ASTON-IOM-1F – EnergyPack, ERV5000–10000, HRV3000–10000
The venting system for outdoor appliances is a Category
III, with the vent products at positive pressure and up to
550°F [288°C]. Each furnace must be individually vented.
The venting system is designed for horizontal direct discharge to the exterior of the cabinet and provided with
factory built individual vertical exterior double wall vent
stacks that extend above the top of the appliance by
a minimum of 1 to 2 feet [302 to 604 mm], providing a
minimum 4 foot [1,016 mm] separation between flue gas
discharge and combustion air inlet. A ½” drain fitting is
provided in the bottom of the stack permitting condensate that may form to drain through. The vent stacks are
open at top but protected by ½” x ½” [12 x 12 mm] mesh
screens. The vent discharge opening should be located
to provide an unobstructed discharge to the outside (see
Figure D1).
Figure D1: Typical outdoor vertical venting
Flue gas chimney
(standard on outdoor)
Flue gas flow
unobstructed
Comb
blower
AHU cabinet
AHU cabinet
Combustion air inlet hoods
Where sufficient height for proper vertical venting must be
greater, or in jurisdictions requiring a greater separation
between flue gas discharge and combustion air inlet, the
vent stacks provided with the unit must be replaced by
separate self-supported factory built closed chimneys or
vents complying with a recognized standard to Category
III with a 90° elbow and a field supplied transition. The
closed venting system must employ a drain line in the vent
chimney and an approved rainproof vent cap must be applied to the termination.
The proper vent pipe diameter must be used for each
furnace to ensure proper venting of combustion products.
See Table D1 for required furnace vent size and submittal
for number of furnaces and Btuh input rating.
57
Indoor Installation
Air for Combustion
See Table D1 for required furnace vent size and submittal
for number of furnaces and Btuh input rating.
Locate appliance to ensure an adequate supply of fresh
air to replace air used in the combustion and ventilation
process of the furnace module. The appliance must be
installed in a location with adequate clearances to provide for an adequate combustion air space, service and
inspection and proper clearances from combustible construction. The appliance must be located in such a manner that it does not interfere with the circulation of air in
the heated space.
Table D1: Furnace, Vent Connection Size and Vent
Pipe Diameter
All fuel burning equipment must be supplied with air that
enters into the combustion process and is then vented
outdoors. Combustion air inlet hoods are provided in
the panel on the furnace vestibule. Sufficient air must
enter the appliance location to replace the air exhausted
through the vent system. Do not install appliance in a confined space without providing wall openings to and from
this space. If building construction is such that the normal
infiltration does not provide sufficient air for combustion and venting, outside air must be introduced. Install
air openings that provide a total free area in accordance
with following and to the National Fuel Gas Code Z223.1
(NFPA 54) in the US or in Canada, to the Can/CGA-B149
Installation Code:
Vertically Vented Furnaces (see Figure D2) –
Category I (per NFGC and ANSI Z21.13 is a noncondensing appliance with negative vent pressure)
1. Air from inside the building – Opening of 1 sq. inch
[645 mm2] per 1,000 Btuh [293 W] of input, but
never less than 100 sq. inch [0.06 m2].
2. Air from outside (ducted) – Opening of 1 sq. inch
[645 mm2] per 2,000 Btuh [586 W].
3. Air from outside (direct opening) – Opening of 1 sq.
inch [645 mm2] per 4,000 Btuh [1,172 W].
As an option, a combustion air opening of proper size can
be provided in the furnace enclosure and ducted directly
to outdoors. See Separated Combustion Air Intake Systems for further details.
Venting
Each furnace must be connected to a venting system to
convey flue gases outside of the heated space. Refer to
installation codes noted above for specific requirements
for the product type being installed.
The induced draft (ID) fan rectangular vent connection for
each furnace is factory fitted with a rectangular to round
transition and run to the side of the furnace vestibule.
Input Rating
Btuh [Watts]
100,000–125,000
[29,307–36,634]
200,000–400,000
[58,614–117,228]
Vent Connection
Diameter
Vent Pipe Diameter
5” [127 mm]
5” [127 mm]
6” [152 mm]
6” [152 mm]
1. Use single wall or double wall (Type B) vent pipe
diameters for the appropriate models. Use insulated
vent outdoors.
2. Maximize the height of the vertical run of vent pipe. A
minimum of 5 feet [1.5 m] of vertical pipe is required.
The top of the vent pipe must extend at least 2 feet
[0.61 m] above the highest point on the roof. Use
Listed Type B vent for external runs.
3. An approved weatherproof vent cap must be installed to the vent termination.
4. Horizontal runs must not exceed 75% of the vertical
height of the vent pipe, up to a maximum of 10 feet
[3 m]. Horizontal runs should be pitched upward ¼
inch per foot [21 mm/m] and should be supported at
3 foot [1 m] maximum intervals.
5. Design vent pipe runs to minimize the use of elbows.
Each 90° elbow is equivalent to 5 feet [1.5 m] of
straight vent pipe run.
6. Vent pipe should not be run through unheated
spaces. If such runs cannot be avoided, insulate vent
pipe to prevent condensation inside vent pipe. Insulation should be a minimum of ½” [12.7 mm] thick, foil
faced material suitable for temperatures up to 500°F.
7. Dampers must not be used in vent piping runs.
Spillage of flue gases into the occupied space could
result.
8. Vent connectors serving Category I heaters must not
be connected into any portion of a mechanical draft
system operating under positive pressure.
Each furnace must be connected to a separate factory
built chimney or vent complying with a recognized standard or a masonry or concrete chimney lined with a material acceptable to the authority having jurisdiction.
The proper vent pipe diameter must be used for each
furnace to ensure proper venting of combustion products.
VCES-ASTON-IOM-1F – EnergyPack, ERV5000–10000, HRV3000–10000
58
Figure D2: Indoor vertical venting
Exhaust vent
terminal
Roof line
B
Exhaust
¼” [6 mm] per
1 foot [305 mm]
of building material by flue gases. The vent terminal
must be located at least 1 foot [305 mm] above
grade, or in snow areas, at least 3 feet [1 m] above
snow line to prevent blockage. Additionally, the vent
terminal must be installed with a minimum horizontal clearance of 4 feet [1.2 m] from electric meters,
gas meters, regulators or relief equipment. Periodically clean the screens in the vent terminal (where
applicable).
IMPORTANT
A
Air inlet
Tee fitting with drip
leg and cleanout cap
A = 10” [3.05 m] maximum horizontal run
(not to exceed 75% of vertical run)
B = 2 ft. [0.61 m]
Horizontally Vented Furnaces (see Figure D3)
– Category III (Per NFGC and ANSI Z21.13 is
positive vent pressure and non-condensing)
Pressures in Category III venting systems are positive and
therefore, care must be taken to avoid flue products from
entering the heated space. Use only vent materials and
components that are UL listed and approved for Category
III venting systems.
WARNING
Do not use Type B vent within a building on horizontally
vented indoor furnaces.
1. All vent pipe joints must be sealed to prevent leakage
into the heated space. Follow instruction provided
with approved venting materials used.
2. The total equivalent length of vent pipe must not exceed 50 feet [15.35 m]. Equivalent length is the total
length of straight sections, plus 5 feet [1.52 m] for
each 90° elbow and 2.5 feet [0.76 m] for each 45°
elbow.
3. The vent system must also be installed to prevent
collection of condensate. Pitch horizontal pipe runs
downward ¼ inch per foot [21 mm/m] toward the
outlet to permit condensate drainage. Insulate vent
pipe exposed to cold air or routed through unheated
areas. Insulate vent pipe runs longer than 10 feet [3 m].
Insulation should be a minimum of ½” [12 mm] thick
foil faced material suitable for temperatures up to
500°F [288°C]. Maintain 6” [152 mm] clearance between vent pipe and combustible materials.
4. A vent cap approved for horizontal venting must be
provided. Vent cap inlet diameter must be the same
as the required vent pipe diameter. The vent terminal must be at least 12” [305 mm] from the exterior
wall that it passes through to prevent degradation
VCES-ASTON-IOM-1F – EnergyPack, ERV5000–10000, HRV3000–10000
Each furnace must have its own individual vent pipe and
terminal. Do not connect vent system from horizontally
vented units to other vent systems or a chimney.
5. Through the wall vents shall not terminate over public walkways, or over an area where condensate or
vapor could create a nuisance or hazard. Provide a
vent termination clearance to building or structure
features per Table D2.
Table D2: Vent Termination Clearances
Structure
Minimum Clearance
4 ft. [1.2 m] below
Door, window or gravity inlet
4 ft. [1.2 m] horizontally
1 ft. [305 mm] above
Forced air inlet within 10 ft. [3 m]
3 ft. [0.91 m] above
Adjoining building or parapet
6 ft. [1.8 m]
Adjacent public walkways
7 ft. [2.1 m] above grade
Figure D3: Indoor horizontal venting
Exterior wall
A = 12” minimum
A
Exhaust
Air inlet
Tee fitting
with drip leg
Pitch vent pipe
downward from
furnace ¼ inch
per foot
Exhaust vent
terminal
59
Separated Combustion Air Intake Systems
On indoor units for operation with separated combustion
air intake systems, the burner section is in a reasonably
air-tight vestibule compartment, as these systems provide
combustion air from outside the heated space and vent
the products of combustion outdoors. No air openings are
to be made in the vestibule to maintain a reasonably airtight seal. Additionally the unit must include the following:
1. A suitable air-tight gasket on the vestibule door or
access panel.
2. An observation window in the door to permit observation of ignition and main burner flame during operation and servicing.
3. A door or panel interlock switch to ensure that door
or panel is closed or in place during operation.
4. The induced draft fan rectangular vent connection
for each furnace is factory fitted with a rectangular
to round transition and run to the side of the furnace
vestibule.
5. A single combustion air inlet supply duct connection
is provided in the furnace vestibule for the number of
furnaces provided. See submittal drawings for location, size and number.
Proper installation of combustion air intake and flue gas
exhaust piping are essential to proper operation of the inshot gas burner module. See Figure D4 and Figure D5 for
recommended installation.
IMPORTANT
Approved combustion supply air intake and exhaust flue
gas vent piping and terminals must be used between the
unit and outdoors for combustion supply air and exhaust
flue gas. The inlet and outlet terminals must be located in
the same outdoor pressure zone to provide for safe appliance operation.
Figure D4: Separated combustion – vertical venting
6 ft. [1.8 m] min.
to wall or adjoining building
Exhaust vent
Approved vent caps
Combustion air inlet
2.5 ft. [0.75 m] min.
12” [0.3 m] min.
Exhaust
18” [0.46 m] min.
* (See note)
Figure D5: Separated combustion – horizontal venting
5 ft. [1.5 m] min. 25 ft. [15.2 m]
max. equivalent length
Pitch pipes down ¼ in./ft [21 mm/m]
toward terminal caps to allow for
condensate drainage
12” [0.3 m]
18” [0.46 m]
min. @ CL
Exhaust vent
Combustion
air inlet
Building overhang
3 ft. [0.9 m]
min.
6 ft. [1.8 m]
min.
Adjacent
building
24” 3 ft. [0.9 m] min.
[0.6 m] above grade or
expected snow
depth
Note: Be sure that the vent cap used for horizontal venting applications is
approved for horizontal application. Certain Manufacturer’s vent
terminals are approved for vertical installation only.
Gas Supply, Piping and Connections
1. All gas piping must conform with local building codes
and ordinances or, in the absence of local codes,
with ANSI Z223.1 the National Fuel Gas Code and
NFPA 54 in the US. In Canada, installation must be
in accordance with Can/CGA B149.1 for natural gas
and B149.2 for propane units.
2. Gas piping must be sized for the total Btuh input
of the appliance serviced by a single supply line.
Refer to the number of furnace(s) and the total input
of their rating plate(s). Each furnace has a ¾” NPT
piping connection extended to the exterior of the
cabinet. The gas supply line feeding more than one
furnace must be checked for size relative to the
connection at each furnace to maintain minimum required pressure to each furnace.
3. A drip leg (sediment trap) and a manual gas shut-off
valve must be field supplied and installed immediately adjacent to the point where the gas supply line
enters the cabinet. To facilitate servicing, installation
of a union is recommended (see Figure D6). The appliance must be isolated from the gas supply system
by closing its individual manual shut-off valve during
any pressure testing of the gas supply piping system
at test pressures greater than 13.5” w.c. [½ psi].
Always use clean, scale-free pipe and malleable iron
fittings, and remove all cutting and threading debris
prior to connecting pipes. Firmly support the gas piping so that it cannot be dislodged from its installed
position.
Tee with drip leg
and cleanout cap
Heating appliance
18” [0.46 m] min.
* Provides sufficient height to
exceed expected snow depth
VCES-ASTON-IOM-1F – EnergyPack, ERV5000–10000, HRV3000–10000
60
Figure D6: Union installation
WARNING
Gas supply line
1
Manual gas
shut-off valve
Ground joint union
with brass seat
Gas supply line
1. All field gas piping must be pressure/leak tested
prior to operation. Never use an open flame to
check for leaks. Use a soap solution or other leak
detecting solution for testing.
2. Gas pressure to appliance controls must never exceed 13.5” w.c. [½ psi].
WARNING
To controls
Plugged 1/8” NPT test
gauge connection
3” min.
Sediment trap
4. For the furnace(s) to operate properly, the minimum
inlet gas supply pressure to each furnace for natural
gas operation is 5.0” w.c. and for propane (LP) gas
is 11.0” w.c. with the furnace(s) operating. Maximum
inlet pressure for either gas is 13.5” w.c. [½ psi]. For
higher gas pressures, a separate field supplied and
installed high pressure regulator sized for the total
Btuh input is required to reduce pressure to within
minimum and maximum range. The high pressure
regulator used must include full internal relief or a
separate relief valve is required to prevent gas pressure exceeding the maximum 13.5” w.c. [½ psi] limit
to prevent damage to the furnace gas valve(s).
5. A 1/8” NPT tap is provided on the inlet of the gas
valve to each furnace. A fitting suitable for connection
to a pressure gauge capable of measuring gas pressure should be connected to each furnace. Check
gas inlet pressure at each furnace with all of the furnaces operating at the same time. See Figure D7.
Figure D7: Gas piping line, regulator and over
pressure relief valve must be sized to be within
the minimum and maximum pressure ratings of all
furnaces or appliances serviced.
Min. 5.0” w.c. natural gas
Min. 11.0” w.c. propane gas
Max. 13.5” w.c.
Pressure
regulator
Unit 1
Unit 2
Unit 3
Gas
supply
VCES-ASTON-IOM-1F – EnergyPack, ERV5000–10000, HRV3000–10000
1. When pressure testing at ½ psi or less, close the
manual shut-off valve on the appliance before testing.
2. When pressure testing gas supply line at ½ psi or
higher, close manual gas valve and disconnect
heater from supply line to be tested. Cap or plug
the supply line.
Airflow Considerations, Condensation and Full
Modulation Firing Rate Control
1. Airflow through the furnace is dependent on the
configuration. See the submittal drawing for airflow
configuration through the furnace.
a. For vertical downflow (see Figure D8). In this
configuration, condensate due to operation of
air conditioning system can form in the furnace
tubes and would drain through the open furnace
tubes near the base in the furnace control vestibule. A condensate drain pan should be field
provided for these applications. A condensate
drain fitting is provided in the flue box. Some
condensation may occur in the flue collector box
with 5:1 modulating control and a ¼” stainless
steel drain line is attached to the drain fitting and
extended through to the outside of the furnace
vestibule for each furnace.
b. For horizontal or down airflow through the furnace, condensate due to operation of air conditioning system can form in the furnace tubes and
would drain to the furnace flue box. A condensate drain fitting is provided in the flue box. A ¼”
stainless steel drain line is attached to the drain
fitting and extended through to the outside of the
furnace vestibule for each furnace.
2. Furnaces equipped with modulating control are capable of minimum input rates as low as 20%. Below
the minimum modulation rate the furnace will cycle
on and off to maintain the discharge air setpoint.
Consideration must be given to the vent conditions
and particularly the circulating airflow rates to ensure
that the operating air temperature rise is above the
dewpoint temperature of the flue gases in all applications and below the maximum allowable air temperature rise to limit the furnace tube temperature.
The selection software limits the furnace input to be
below the maximum temperature rise of 90°F [50°C]
61
and the discharge sensor limits the maximum supply
air leaving temperature. In the event of a heat recovery failure where the furnace design temperature rise
may be insufficient, the low limit function will shut
down the unit to reduce the possibility of condensation. Condensation of the flue gas is corrosive and
will result in shortened heat exchanger life and is not
permitted. The materials used for furnace tubes and
vent connectors are designed for non-condensing
operation during the heating cycle.
3. The heat capacity of the furnace is controlled by
the burner orifices and the gas manifold pressure.
The manifold pressure is factory set but should be
checked at the time of start-up as described below.
It is important not to change the design conditions
or airflow, to measure the minimum and maximum
temperature rise sufficiently far enough downstream
(where the temperature is uniform) and make the
proper adjustments.
WARNING
Operation of the furnace module at vent temperatures
below that specified for a Category III could result in
condensation during operating cycles causing premature
failure of the vent connections or heat exchanger and
hazardous operation. Operation of the furnace module
above the maximum air temperature rise could result in
excessive tube temperatures, premature failure and high
limit switch shut down.
Figure D8: Vertical airflow configuration
VCES-ASTON-IOM-1F – EnergyPack, ERV5000–10000, HRV3000–10000
62
WARNING – FOR YOUR SAFETY
The use and storage of gasoline or other flammable vapors and liquids in open containers in the vicinity of this
appliance is hazardous.
Operating and Safety Instructions
1. See Figure D8 for component locations.
2. This furnace module does not have a pilot. It is
equipped with a direct spark ignition device that automatically lights the gas burner. Do not try to light
burners by hand.
3. Before operating, leak test all gas piping up to heater
gas valve. Smell around the unit area for gas. Do not
attempt to place heater in operation until source of
gas leak is identified and corrected.
4. Use only hand force to push and turn the gas control
knob to the ‘On’ position. Never use tools. If knob
does not operate by hand, replace gas valve prior to
starting the unit. Forcing or attempting to repair the
gas valve may result in fire or explosion.
5. Do not attempt to operate unit if there is indication
that any part or control has been under water. Any
control or component that has been under water
must be replaced prior to trying to start the unit.
Start-up
1. Turn thermostat or temperature controller to its lowest setting.
2. Turn off gas supply at the manual shut-off valve.
3. Turn off power to the appliance at the disconnect
switch.
4. Remove access panel or open door to appliance
vestibule housing the gas furnace.
5. Move gas control knob to ‘Off’ position. The furnace
module is provided with a supply air proving interlock
switch to ensure minimum supply airflow prior to
burner operation. Set the switch after ductwork has
been completed to open just below the minimum
supply airflow on the furnace rating plate.
6. Install a tapped fitting for attachment to a manometer
(or other gauge suitable for 14” w.c.) in the inlet pressure tap and for 10” w.c. in the manifold pressure
tap.
7. Wait five minutes for any gas to clear out. If you smell
gas, see Step 2 above and correct leak. If you do not
smell gas or have corrected any leaks, go to the next
step.
8. Turn gas control knob to ‘On’ position.
9. Open all manual gas valves.
10. Turn power on at disconnect switch.
11. For start-up, temporarily set the DDC Control System for heating and to its highest position to initiate
call for heat and maintain operation of furnace. Continue start-up following the Sequence of Operation,
VCES-ASTON-IOM-1F – EnergyPack, ERV5000–10000, HRV3000–10000
LED Flash Code Key and Trouble Shooting Guide for
Fenwal 35-61 Series Direct Ignition Control based on
the burner firing rate control (on/off, two-stage or full
modulation) and Troubleshooting Guide provided on
the furnace at the end of this appendix.
12. Check and adjust manifold pressure (see Figure D9).
a. The correct heat capacity of the furnace is controlled by the burner orifices and the gas manifold pressure. The manifold pressure is factory
set but should be checked at the time of start-up
as described below. For modulation control the
analog input signal could also be limited by the
control system depending on the airflow rate.
See Airflow Considerations, Condensation and
Full Modulation Firing Rate Control above.
b. For two-stage and full modulation control systems manifold pressure should be 1.2” w.c. for
natural gas and 3.5” w.c. for propane during the
90 second warm-up period. Adjust low regulator on two-stage gas valve, if necessary. After
90 seconds, manifold pressure should increase
to 3.5” w.c. for natural gas and 10.5” w.c. for
propane within 30 to 45 seconds for two-stage
units. For modulating units, after 90 seconds,
the manifold pressure will vary depending on the
analog input signal. At 10 VDC, pressure should
be 3.5” w.c. for natural gas and 10.5” w.c. for
propane; at 0 volts the manifold pressure should
be 0.3” w.c. for natural gas and 1.1” w.c. for
propane.
c. For on/off units, the manifold pressure should
be 3.5” w.c. for natural gas and 10.5” w.c. for
propane.
Figure D9: Gas valve
13. Prior to completing the start-up, check the appearance of the main burner flame. See Figure D10 and
Figure D11 for flame characteristics of properly adjusted natural gas systems.
a. The burner flame should be predominantly blue
in color, well defined and centered at the tube
entry. Distorted flame, yellow tipping of natural
gas flame or a long yellow flame on propane,
63
may be caused by lint and dirt accumulation
inside burner or at burner ports, at air inlet between burner and manifold pipe, or debris in the
main burner orifice. Soft brush or vacuum clean
affected areas.
b. Poorly defined, substantially yellow flames or
flames that appear lazy indicate poor air supply
to burners or excessive burner input. Verify gas
supply type and manifold pressure with rating
plate.
c. Poor air supply can be caused by obstructions
or blockage in heat exchanger tubes or vent discharge pipe. Inspect and clean as necessary to
eliminate blockage. Vacuum any dirt or loose debris. Clean heat exchanger tubes with stiff brush.
Poor flame characteristics can also be caused by
undersized combustion air openings or flue gas
recirculation into combustion air supply. Increase
air opening size or re-direct flue products to prevent recirculation.
d. Reduced air delivery can also be the result of fan
blade slippage, dirt accumulation in the fan blade
or low voltage to draft inducer motor. Inspect
draft fan assembly and be sure fan blade is secure to motor shaft. Check line voltage to heater.
Figure D10: Burner flame at start-up 1.2” w.c.
manifold pressure draft inducer – high speed
Figure D11: Burner flame at high fire 3.5” w.c.
manifold pressure draft inducer – high speed
Shut Down
1.
2.
3.
4.
Set thermostat or controller to lowest setting.
Turn off electrical supply to unit at disconnect switch.
Turn off manual gas supply.
Disconnect manifold and inlet pressure taps and reinstall pipe plugs.
5. Replace vestibule access panel or close door.
Normal Operation
1. Turn on electrical supply to unit at disconnect switch.
2. Turn on manual gas supply.
3. Set thermostat or temperature controller to desired
temperature.
4. Information outlining the normal Sequence of Operation and Wiring Diagram for the control system
supplied with the furnace model is enclosed with this
instruction.
Figure D12: Flame sensor current check
Multi-purpose meter
Use microamp scale
FC− FC+
Red (+)
Black (−)
Series 35-61 Module
VCES-ASTON-IOM-1F – EnergyPack, ERV5000–10000, HRV3000–10000
64
Fenwal Series 35-6 Ignition Control
Fault Conditions and LED Key
LED steady on
1 Flash
2 Flashes
3 Flashes
Internal control fault
Combustion airflow fault
Flame with no call for heat
Ignition lockout
LED flashes on for ¼ second and off for ¼ second during fault condition. Pause between fault codes is three
seconds.
Service Checks
Flame current is the current which passes through the
flame from the sensor to ground. The minimum flame
current necessary to keep the system from lockout is 0.7
microamps. To measure flame current, connect analog
DC microammeter to the ‘FC−’ and ‘FC+’ terminals per
Figure D12. Meter should read 0.7 uA or higher. If the
meter reads below 0 on scale, meter leads are reversed.
Disconnect power and re-connect meter leads for proper
polarity.
Security Device Operation
1. A combustion air pressure switch is provided as part
of the control system to verify airflow through draft
inducer by monitoring the difference in pressure
between the draft inducer and the atmosphere. If
sufficient negative pressure is not present, indicating
lack of proper air movement through furnace heat
exchanger, the switch opens shutting off gas supply
through the ignition control module. On furnaces with
two-speed draft inducer operation, a dual air pressure switch is used, monitoring high and low speed
pressures. The air pressure switches have fixed settings and are not adjustable.
2. The furnace is equipped with manual reset rollout
switch(es) in the event of burner flame rollout. The
switch will open on temperature rise and shut off gas
supply through the ignition control module. Flame
rollout can be caused by insufficient airflow for the
burner firing rate (high gas pressure), blockage of the
vent system or in the furnace heat exchanger. The
furnace should not be placed back in operation until
the cause of rollout condition is identified. The rollout
switch can be reset by pressing the button on top of
the switch.
3. The furnace is equipped with a fixed temperature
high limit switch mounted on the vestibule panel that
shuts off gas to the heater through the ignition control module in the event of reduced circulating airflow
over the heat exchanger. Reduced airflow can be
caused by motor failure of the circulating air blower,
dirt, blockage or restriction of the air inlet or outlet to
the unit. The high limit switch will automatically reset
VCES-ASTON-IOM-1F – EnergyPack, ERV5000–10000, HRV3000–10000
when the temperature drops to 30°F [16.7°C] below
the setpoint. Determine the cause of the reduced
airflow and correct.
WARNING
A secure and effective functioning gas burner requires
sufficient combustion gas exhaust discharge. Disabling a
security device such as a pressure sensitive switch on a
gas device is dangerous and can be fatal. This can also
prevent proper functioning of the device and will result in
the guarantee being void. Do not attempt to disable the
pressure switch to place the heater in operation. Contact
a qualified service agency.
4. A circulating blower air proving pressure switch is
installed that breaks power to the burner circuit to
disable the furnace in the event of loss of circulating
airflow over the heat exchanger. Loss of airflow can
be caused by a motor failure, broken fan drive belt or
restriction of the air inlet or outlet to the unit. A loss
in circulating airflow, if not detected early, can cause
the furnace to cycle on high limit which can cause
overheating and damage to internal components.
WARNING
The circulating blower air proving switch is adjustable
and must be set properly to avoid damage due to furnace cycling on high limit.
Maintenance
Furnace Module Inspection
Turn off all electrical power to the unit before inspection
and servicing.
1. The furnace should be inspected annually by a qualified service agency. The condition of the burners,
heat exchanger, draft inducer, vent system, operating controls and wiring should be determined. Check
for obvious signs of deterioration, accumulation of
dirt and debris and any heat or water related damage. Any damaged or deteriorated parts should be
replaced before the unit is put back into service.
CAUTION
If any of the original wiring needs to be replaced, it must
be replaced with wiring materials suitable for 221°F
[105°C]. Label all wires prior to disconnection when servicing unit. Wiring errors can cause improper or dangerous operation. Verify proper operation after servicing.
65
2. Clean burners, heat exchanger, draft inducer and
vent ducts. Periodically clean the screens in the vent
terminal (where applicable).
3. Check heat exchanger for cracks. If any are present,
replace heat exchanger before putting unit back into
service.
4. Check the attachment point of the furnace module to
the cabinet or ducts to verify that they are air-tight.
5. Check the automatic gas valve to ensure that the
gas valve seat is not leaking.
Furnace Module Operation Check
1. Turn on power to the unit and set thermostat or heat
controller to call for heat, allowing furnace module to
operate.
2. Check for proper start-up and ignition as outlined in
the Start-up section.
3. Check the appearance of the burner flame (see Figure D10 and Figure D11).
4. Return thermostat or heat controller to normal
setting.
5. Refer to the Appliance Manufacturer’s instructions
for annual maintenance procedures on the complete
unit.
Replacement Parts
Replacement parts for the gas-fired furnace module are
available through our Parts and Service Department at:
Nortek Air Solutions Canada Inc.
200 Carter
St-Leonard-d’Aston, QC J0C 1M0
Email: [email protected]
Phone: 1-866-483-6627
Fax: 1-819-399-2612
SN Sequence of Operation – On/off
Operation
Fenwal 35-61 Series Direct Ignition Control with
Two-stage Gas Valve
When system is powered up 24 VAC will be applied to the
ignition control (‘IC’) terminals ‘24 VAC/R’. The control will
reset, perform a self-check routine, initiate full time flame
sensing, flash the diagnostic LED for up to four seconds
and enter the thermostat scan standby state.
Call for Heat
1. Thermostat (controller) closes on call for heat powering terminal ‘T2’.
2. 24 VAC to is supplied to ‘IC’ terminal ‘TH’, provided
limit switch is in closed position.
3. The control will check that pressure switch contacts
are open (‘IC’ terminal ‘PSW’ is not powered).
4. Combustion blower is then energized at high speed
through ‘IC’ terminal ‘IND’.
VCES-ASTON-IOM-1F – EnergyPack, ERV5000–10000, HRV3000–10000
5. When the air switch (‘APS-1’) closes, a 15-second
pre-purge period begins.
6. At end of pre-purge period, the spark commences
and the gas valves (both first and second stage) are
energized for the trial for ignition period.
7. Burners ignite and cross light, operating at maximum
input rate (manifold pressure set at 3.3” to 3.5” w.c.).
8. When flame is detected by flame sensor the spark is
shut off immediately and gas valve(s) and combustion blower remain energized.
9. During heating operation, the thermostat, pressure
switch and main burner flame are constantly monitored to assure proper system operation.
10. When the thermostat (controller) is satisfied and
the demand for heat ends, the main valves are deenergized immediately, the control senses loss of
flame and a 30-second post-purge occurs before
de-energizing the combustion blower.
11. If flame is lost during an operational cycle, the control
will respond within 0.8 seconds. The spark will be
energized for a trial for ignition period to attempt to
re-light burners and prove flame sensor. If flame is
re-established, normal operation resumes.
Ignition and Operational Failures During a Call for
Heat Result in Lockout of the Ignition Control
1. If the burners fail to light or carryover during a trial
for ignition, the control will attempt two additional
ignition trials. If no flame is present at the flame sensor within 10 seconds, the spark and gas valve will
be de-energized. A 15-second inter-purge period
begins and the combustion blower continues to run.
After the inter-purge period another ignition trial will
take place.
2. If burner fails to light or prove the flame sensor following the two additional trials the control will go
into lockout. The valve relay in the ‘IC’ will be deenergized shutting of the gas valve immediately and
the combustion blower following a 30-second postpurge period.
Recovery from Lockout
1. If the thermostat is still calling for heat one hour after
a lockout occurs, the control will automatically reset
and initiate a call for heat sequence.
2. The ignition control may also be manually reset, by
turning the thermostat down and back up to previous temperature setting or removing power (24V) to
‘IC’ terminal ‘24 VAC’.
Fault Conditions and LED Key
LED Steady On
1 Flash
2 Flash
3 Flash
Internal control fault
Combustion airflow fault
Flame with no call for heat
Ignition lockout
66
LED flashes on for ¼ second and off for ¼ second during fault condition. Pause between fault codes is three
seconds.
1. If during the initial call for heat, the air switch contacts are closed for 30 seconds without an output to
the combustion blower, an airflow fault occurs (one
LED flash) and control will remain in this mode.
2. If the airflow switch remains open (or a rollout switch
is open) for more than 30 seconds after the combustion blower output (‘IND’) is energized, an airflow
fault occurs (one LED flash) and control will stay in
this mode with combustion blower on, waiting for
airflow switch (or rollout) to close.
3. If the airflow signal is lost during operation, the control immediately de-energizes the gas valve and
maintains blower operation. If the call for heat remains and proper airflow is not detected, airflow fault
occurs (one LED flash). If proper airflow is detected
at any time, the normal sequence will begin with
pre-purge.
4. If the main valve fails to close properly at the end of
a heating cycle and a flame is maintained, the combustion blower will continue in operation. If the valve
does close completely later removing the flame signal, the blower will run for the post-purge period and
shut off.
5. Refer to Table D3 for further LED code
troubleshooting.
HF Sequence of Operation – Two-stage
Operation with Two-speed Controller
Fenwal 35-61 Series Direct Ignition Control with
‘TR1’ Timer Relay Control
When system is powered up 24 VAC will be applied to
the ignition control (‘IC’) terminals ‘24 VAC/R’ and to the
Timer Relay Control (‘TR1’). The ignition control will reset,
perform a self-check routine, initiate full time flame sensing, flash the diagnostic LED for up to four seconds and
enter the thermostat scan standby state. The amber light
on the ‘TR1’ will be lit indicating it is in the ready position.
Call for Heat
1. Thermostat (controller) (first stage or first and second
stage) closes on call for heat.
2. 24 VAC to is supplied to ‘IC’ terminal ‘TH’, provided
limit switch is in closed position.
3. The control will check that pressure switch contacts
are open (‘IC’ terminal ‘PSW’ is not powered).
4. Combustion blower is then energized at high speed.
5. When the air switch (‘APS1’) closes, a 15-second
pre-purge period begins.
6. At end of pre-purge period, the spark commences
and the first and second stage gas valves are energized for the trial for ignition period.
VCES-ASTON-IOM-1F – EnergyPack, ERV5000–10000, HRV3000–10000
7. Burners ignite and cross light, operating at maximum
input rate (manifold pressure 3.5” w.c.).
8. ‘TR1’ is powered (terminal ‘7’) simultaneously (‘SR’
LED lit) and begins timing a 90-second warm-up period while maintaining the combustion blower at high
speed (‘FR’ LED lit). The ‘TR1’ will maintain this mode
of operation, regardless of status of thermostat second
stage.
9. When flame is detected by flame sensor, the spark is
shut off immediately and gas valves and combustion
blower remain energized.
10. When the initial timer in ‘TR1’ times out, it defaults
the gas valve to low fire and the combustion blower
to low speed and returns control of the operating
mode to the temperature controller. The ‘SR’ LED
turns off and the ‘MR’ LED is lit.
11. If the controller is calling for second stage heat ‘TR1’
terminal ‘6’ is powered. After a short time delay (approximately 15 seconds), the system switches the
combustion blower to high speed (‘FR’ LED lit) and
the second stage gas valve at 3.5” w.c. manifold
pressure (‘CR’ LED lit), provided the high air pressure
switch (‘APS2’) is proved.
12. During heating operation, the thermostat, pressure
switch and main burner flame are constantly monitored by the ‘IC’ to assure proper system operation.
13. Operation continues on high fire until the second
stage thermostat is satisfied, opening the second
stage contact and de-energizes terminal ‘6’ on the
‘TR1’, turning off the second stage gas valve and returning the combustion blower to low speed.
14. When the thermostat (controller) is satisfied and the
demand for heat ends, the first stage valve is de-energized immediately, the control senses loss of flame
and a 30-second post-purge occurs (at high speed)
before de-energizing the combustion blower.
Ignition and Operational Failures During a Call for
Heat Result in Lockout of the Ignition Control
1. If flame is lost during an operational cycle, the control
will respond within 0.8 seconds. The spark will be
energized for a trial for ignition period to attempt to
re-light burners and prove flame sensor. If flame is
re-established, normal operation resumes
2. If the burners fail to light or carryover during a trial for
ignition, the control will attempt two additional ignition
trials. If no flame is present at the flame sensor within
10 seconds, the spark and gas valve will be de-energized. A 15-second inter-purge period begins and
the combustion blower continues to run. After the
inter-purge period another ignition trial will take place.
3. If burner fails to light or prove the flame sensor following the two additional trials the control will go
into lockout. The valve relay in the ‘IC’ will be deenergized shutting of the gas valve immediately and
67
the combustion blower following a 30-second postpurge period.
Recovery from Lockout
1. If the thermostat (controller) is still calling for heat one
hour after a lockout occurs, the control will automatically reset and initiate a call for heat sequence.
2. The ignition control may also be manually reset, by
turning the thermostat (controller) down and back up
to previous temperature setting or removing power
(24V) to ‘IC’ terminal ‘24 VAC’.
Fault Conditions and LED Key
LED Steady On
1 Flash
2 Flash
3 Flash
Internal control fault
Combustion airflow fault
Flame with no call for heat
Ignition lockout
LED flashes on for ¼ second, and off for ¼ second during fault condition. Pause between fault codes is three
seconds.
1. If during the initial call for heat the air switch contacts
are closed for 30 seconds without an output to the
combustion blower, an airflow fault occurs (one LED
flash) and control will remain in this mode.
2. If the airflow switch remains open (or a rollout switch
is open) for more than 30 seconds after the combustion blower output (‘IND’) is energized, an airflow
fault occurs (one LED flash) and control will stay in
this mode with combustion blower on, waiting for
airflow switch (or rollout) to close.
3. If the airflow signal is lost during operation, the
control immediately de-energizes the gas valve
and maintains blower operation. If the call for heat
remains and proper airflow is not detected, and airflow fault occurs (one LED flash). If proper airflow is
detected at any time, the normal sequence will begin
with pre-purge.
4. If the main valve fails to close properly at the end of
a heating cycle and a flame is maintained, the combustion blower will continue in operation. If the valve
does close completely later removing the flame signal, the blower will run for the post-purge period and
shut off.
5. Refer to Table D3 for further LED code
troubleshooting.
MH Sequence of Operation – 20–100%
Modulation with Two-speed Controller
Fenwal 35-61 Series Direct Ignition Control, ‘TR1’
Timer Relay Control and SC30 Modulation Control
When system is powered up 24 VAC will be applied to
the ignition control (‘IC’) terminals ‘24 VAC/R’ and to the
Timer Relay Control (‘TR1’). The ignition control will reset,
perform a self-check routine, initiate full time flame sensing, flash the diagnostic LED for up to four seconds and
VCES-ASTON-IOM-1F – EnergyPack, ERV5000–10000, HRV3000–10000
enter the thermostat scan standby state. The amber light
on the ‘TR1’ will be lit indicating it is in the ready position.
Call for Heat
1. Thermostat (heat enable) closes on call for heat.
2. 24 VAC to is supplied to ‘IC’ terminal ‘TH’, provided
limit switch is in closed position.
3. The control will check that pressure switch contacts
are open (‘IC’ terminal ‘PSW’ is not powered).
4. Combustion blower is then energized at high speed.
5. When the air switch (‘APS1’) closes, a 15-second
pre-purge period begins.
6. At end of pre-purge period, the spark begins and the
first stage and second stage gas valves are energized for the trial for ignition period.
7. ‘TR1’ is powered (terminal ‘7’) simultaneously (‘SR’
LED lit) and begins timing a 90-second warm-up period while maintaining the combustion blower at high
speed (‘FR’ LED lit) and powers the SC30. The SC30
will output 12 to 13 VDC to the modulating control
valve during the timing duration (90 seconds) of
‘TR1’, regardless of the analog input signal to SC30
terminals ‘7’ and ‘8’.
8. Burners ignite at an intermediate high fire condition
(manifold pressure 2.5” w.c. or higher; the SC30
control provides 12.5 to 13.0 VDC to modulating
valve) and cross light.
9. When flame is detected by flame sensor, the spark
is shut off and gas valve(s) and combustion blower
remains energized.
10. When the initial timer in ‘TR1’ times out, it defaults
the gas valve to low fire and the combustion blower
to low speed and returns control of the operating
mode to the building temperature controller. The
‘SR’ LED turns off and the ‘MR’ LED is lit.
11. If the controller is providing an analog signal between
0.5 and 5.3 VDC to the SC30 control, the system will
continue to run at low speed combustion blower and
with only the first stage valve open. The modulating
valve will be powered proportional to the input voltage signal from the controller, and will open or close
changing the gas manifold pressure. Manifold pressure will vary from 0.3” to 1.2” w.c. operating in this
mode.
12. If the signal increases above 5.3 VDC, the SC30
relay closes powering terminal ‘6’ on the ‘TR1’ and
starts a second time delay of 15 seconds. At the
end of this time delay the fan switches to high speed
(‘FR’ LED lit) and the second stage gas valve opens
(‘CR’ LED lit) through the ‘TR1’ (terminal ‘9’) provided
the high air switch contacts are closed. The manifold
pressure will vary from 1.4” to 3.5” w.c. in this mode.
13. During heating operation, the thermostat, pressure
switch and main burner flame are constantly monitored by the ‘IC’ to assure proper system operation.
68
14. Operation continues in the high fire mode until the
controller input signal to the SC30 control drops to
4.7 VDC. At this point the SC30 relay circuit opens
(SC30 terminal ‘5’ has no output) de-energizing
the second stage valve and the ‘TR1’ switches the
combustion blower to low speed operation. Low fire
modulation will continue as in Step 11.
15. When the thermostat (temperature controller) is satisfied and the demand for heat ends, the heat enable
contact opens and the first stage valve is de-energized immediately, the control senses loss of flame
and a 30-second post-purge occurs (at high speed)
before de-energizing the combustion blower.
Ignition and Operational Failures During a Call for
Heat Result in Lockout of the Ignition Control
1. If flame is lost during an operational cycle, the control
will respond within 0.8 seconds. The spark will be
energized for a trial for ignition period to attempt to
re-light burners and prove flame sensor. If flame is
re-established, normal operation resumes
2. If the burners fail to light or carryover during a trial
for ignition, the control will attempt two additional
ignition trials. If no flame is present at the flame sensor within 10 seconds, the spark and gas valve will
be de-energized. A 15-second inter-purge period
begins and the combustion blower continues to run.
VCES-ASTON-IOM-1F – EnergyPack, ERV5000–10000, HRV3000–10000
After the inter-purge period another ignition trial will
take place.
3. If burner fails to light or prove the flame sensor following the two additional trials the control will go
into lockout. The valve relay in the ‘IC’ will be deenergized, shutting of the gas valve immediately and
the combustion blower following a 30-second postpurge period.
Recovery from Lockout
1. If the thermostat (controller) is still calling for heat one
hour after a lockout occurs, the control will automatically reset and initiate a call for heat sequence.
2. The ignition control may also be manually reset, by
turning the thermostat (controller) down and back up
to previous temperature setting or removing power
(24V) to ‘IC’ terminal ‘24 VAC’.
Fault Conditions and LED Key
LED Steady On
1 Flash
2 Flash
3 Flash
Internal control fault
Combustion airflow fault
Flame with no call for heat
Ignition lockout
LED flashes on for ¼ second, and off for ¼ second during fault condition. Pause between fault codes is three
seconds.
Refer to Table D3 for further LED code troubleshooting.
69
Table D3: LED Code Troubleshooting
LED
Code
System
None
No power
On call for heat, nothing happens.
to ‘T1’
Steady on
Description
No
24 VAC across terminal ‘24 VAC/V2-Gnd’ when
operation thermostat calling for heat.
Actions
Check for open fuse or circuit breaker.
Check for poor wiring connection.
Check for failed 24V transformer.
System fault. Repeated lockouts (five) during continuous call
for heat.
Check input voltage and inlet gas pressure during operation.
Check for condensate or blockage in air tube or pressure switch.
Check for blocked vent condition or obstruction in heat
exchanger tubes.
Control fault; replace ignition control.
Check for proper operation of circulating air supply system and
for air filter blockage.
Check manifold pressure when limit cools and closes. Natural
Open limit Thermostat call for heat. No power across
gas 3.5” w.c./LP gas 10” w.c.
2 Flashes
switch
terminals ‘V1/V2’ on control.
Low combustion blower air output. Flue gas temperature
exceeds 550°F [288°C]. Inspect for debris accumulation,
proper wheel attachment, proper voltage to blower.
Check for short in wiring to pressure switch.
Pressure switch contacts in closed position for 30
Check pressure switch for closed contacts (with leads
Airflow
seconds with no output to combustion blower.
1 Flash
disconnected).
fault
Remains in this mode with combustion blower off.
Replace pressure switch.
1 Flash
2 Flashes
Flashes
Airflow
fault
Failed combustion blower.
Check connections and air tube from draft inducer to air switch
Open pressure switch or flame rollout switch when for leaks.
inducer (‘IND’ terminal) is energized. If switch
Check rollout switch manual reset; depress reset.
remains open for more than 30 seconds after
Check supply tube from draft inducer housing to pressure
combustion blower is energized, control will remain
switches for condensate; drain line and re-connect.
in this mode with ‘IND’ terminal (blower) energized.
Check pressure switch for condensate accumulation.
Flame
fault
Flame sensor failure/flame present with no call for
heat.
Lockout
Failure to light or carryover. Loss of flame or flame
signal during ignition or operating cycle. Control
will initiate up to three ignition re-trials before
lockout.
Replace pressure switch.
Check for voltage to gas valve with thermostat in ‘Off’ position.
Valve should not be powered.
If valve is not energized, check for gas flow (manifold pressure
reading greater than 0). If gas flow is present, turn off main
shut-off valve and replace gas valve.
Verify gas supply available and operation of gas valve –
manifold pressure at start of ignition cycle. Check for power to
valve terminals ‘Low’ and ‘Com’ while spark is energized.
Is spark present? If no, check igniter for debris between
electrodes, cracked ceramic and check ignition wire for short
to ground.
Check flame sensor wiring connections to electrode and
control and for any abrasions.
Check for cracked ceramic on flame sensor or grounded
sensor rod.
Verify that ample air supply and proper venting of flue gases
occurs during operating cycle.
Check for circulating air leaks into burner compartment during
operation.
Check for recirculation of flue gases into combustion air supply.
If all conditions satisfactory, replace ignition control.
VCES-ASTON-IOM-1F – EnergyPack, ERV5000–10000, HRV3000–10000
70
IG Series Drum and Tube Gas-fired Duct Furnace Module
WARNING – FOR YOUR SAFETY
The use and storage of gasoline or other flammable vapors and liquids in open containers in the vicinity of this
appliance is hazardous.
If you smell gas:
1.
2.
3.
4.
Open windows.
Do not touch electrical switches.
Extinguish any open flame.
Immediately call your Gas Supplier.
•
Improper installation, adjustment, alteration, service
or maintenance can cause property damage, injury
or death. Read the Installation, Operating and Maintenance Instructions thoroughly before installing or
servicing this equipment.
Gas-fired appliances are not designed for use in
hazardous atmospheres containing flammable vapors or combustible dust, in atmospheres containing chlorinated or halogenated hydrocarbons, or in
applications with airborne silicone substances.
•
WARNING
WARNING
1. Provincial/state regulations require that service mechanics that work on combustion equipment must
be licensed.
2. Contact with moving parts can cause injury or property damage. Automatic control devices may start
the duct furnace without warning. To prevent accidental start-up, the maintenance personnel should
always lockout all power supplies before working
on the duct furnace. A duct furnace will often have
more than one power connection point; disconnect
all sources of power before servicing.
3. Refer to the rating plate for fuel input and supply
pressures.
4. Do not attempt to start the burner if the duct furnace is full of vapor or gas, or if the combustion
chamber is very hot.
5. Do not use gasoline, crank case oil or any oil containing gasoline for fuel.
6. Do not burn garbage or paper in this duct furnace.
Never leave paper or combustible material near the
duct furnace.
7. Shut off the manual fuel supply valve if the burner is
shut down for an extended period of time.
Introduction
General
1. These manuals have been prepared to assist in the
installation, operation and maintenance of your duct
furnace. It is good practice to know as much as possible about your duct furnace before trying to install
or operate it. Read the contents carefully before
proceeding. Due to the custom nature of this duct
furnace, not all possibilities are addressed in this
manual. In cases where a special application is not
covered, the Customer or Installer can obtain information from a Venmar CES Sales Representative or
the factory.
Notes
1. Please disregard any information and/or data covering optional components not supplied with the duct
furnace.
2. Do not destroy or remove information from this instruction manual. Leave this instruction in the electrical enclosure of the duct furnace.
VCES-ASTON-IOM-1F – EnergyPack, ERV5000–10000, HRV3000–10000
Warranty
Coverage and Terms
1. Venmar CES standard warranty applies, provided
the duct furnace has been connected in accordance
with these instructions and operated under normal
conditions. Venmar CES will, at its option, repair or
replace any defective component.
Exclusions
1. Except as herein expressly stated, Venmar CES
does not warrant this product in any manner. There
are no other expressed or implied warranties, including any warranty of merchantability or fitness for a
particular purpose. This warranty does not cover
damage, which occurs in transit, or resulting from
alteration, accident, misuse or abuse from failure
to carry out recommended normal maintenance.
Any Technician’s travel and labour expenses, which
result from claims against this warranty, are the responsibility of the Purchaser. In addition, it does not
cover any proximate, incidental or consequential
damages resulting from the failure of defective components workmanship. Venmar CES’ sole obligation
and the Purchaser’s exclusive remedy for breach of
any warranty shall be, at Venmar CES’ option, to repair or replace any defective component.
71
2. Venmar CES warranty is void if:
a. The duct furnace is not installed by a qualified
Heating Contractor in accordance with provisions of this service manual and safe practices.
b. The duct furnace was not subject to only normal
use in service and was misused, neglected, altered or otherwise damaged.
c. The duct furnace is allowed to operate during
building construction period.
d. The duct furnace is installed without proper
clearance to combustible materials or located in
a confined space without proper ventilation for
combustion.
e. The duct furnace is operated in atmospheres
containing flammable vapors, chlorinated or halogenated hydrocarbons.
f. The temperature rise across the duct furnace is
in excess of that shown on the duct furnace rating plate.
g. The duct furnace was operated at any time outside its published capacity and/or with any other
fuel than prescribed.
h. Field wiring is not in accordance with the wiring
diagram furnished with the heater.
i. Any automatic controls were inoperative during
duct furnace operation.
j. Proper maintenance is not provided on a regular
basis as outlined.
k. The Start-up Form, which is in the envelope inside the control panel, is not returned.
Return Procedures
1. To return defective products under these warranty terms, please contact your supplier or a
Venmar CES Customer Service Representative at
1-800-563-6695.
2. Products returned to the factory must first be authorized and a return authorization number provided.
Return transfer must be prepaid.
Installation Instructions
WARNING
This duct furnace must be installed by a qualified, licensed fitter in accordance with local building codes and
the current edition of CAN\CGA-B149 (1,2) for installation in Canada and applicable provincial regulations
for the class; which should be carefully followed in all
cases. Authorities having jurisdiction should be consulted
before installations are made. In the United States, the
duct furnace should be installed in accordance with
Z223.1 for the installation of Gas Burning Appliances and
Equipment.
Installation Clearances
1. The duct furnace is designed to be installed within an
Air Handler cabinet within the airstream with the duct
furnace burner wall forming part of the airstream
wall and with the burner and controls outside of the
airstream.
2. Check that the duct furnace is installed in accordance with the allowable clearances from unprotected combustibles as shown on the duct furnace
nameplate. The Air Handler enclosing the duct furnace in the airstream should have insulated walls,
floor and ceiling.
3. For safety and service, the following minimum clearances and guidelines shall be observed:
Table D4: Minimum Clearance Requirements
Minimum Clearance
Clearance
from Combustible
Requirement
Construction
Top
6” [15.2 cm]
0”
Minimum Clearance
for Accessibility
Burner side
24” [61 cm]
39” [100 cm]
Flue
Opposite
burner side
Front/back
18” [45.7 cm]
24” [61 cm]
6” [15.3 cm]
0”
6” [15.3 cm]
24” [61 cm]
Type of floor
Non-combustible
0”
4. The National Electrical Code (NEC or CEC) requires a
minimum of 39” [1 m] service space between the face
of any electrical enclosure and any wall or obstruction.
5. Provide sufficient clearance to open doors, install
piping and ducting, flame observation port, high limit
switch, control panel, main fan motor and all access
panels/doors.
VCES-ASTON-IOM-1F – EnergyPack, ERV5000–10000, HRV3000–10000
72
General Installation
1. Safety considerations to determine if the duct
furnace is equipped with all of the safety devices
required for the particular application is the responsibility of the Air Handler Manufacturer. Safety considerations include the accessibility of the equipment
to non-service personnel, the provision of electrical
lockout switches, maintenance procedures and automatic control sequences.
2. Clearly identify all emergency shut-off devices.
3. The duct furnace must not be operated in the presence of chlorinated vapors. When such vapors mix
with the products of combustion, highly corrosive
compounds result, which will cause the premature
failure of the heat exchanger and other components.
4. Check that there are, or will be, no explosive, flammable or toxic vapors, or abnormal dust in the area
where the duct furnace is located or operated.
5. It is important to seal all connections to prevent air
leakage and system performance problems. Provide
removable access panels on both the upstream and
downstream sides of the duct furnace in the Air Handler or ductwork. These openings shall be accessible
when the duct furnace is installed and shall be sized
to allow the observation of smoke or reflected light
inside the casing to indicate the presence of leaks
in the heat exchanger. The covers for the openings
shall be attached in such a manner as to prevent
leaks.
6. Seal the perimeter of the duct furnace between the
outside casing and the inside of the Air Handler to
prevent air bypassing or leakage.
7. When the duct furnace is installed in an enclosed
heater room, it is imperative that the heater room
itself is not used as an air plenum. Ductwork must
be used for all supply and return air to and from the
duct furnace Air Handler, as well as any other fans,
which may be installed in the same room.
8. Particular attention should be given to service access
to all operating controls.
9. If Air Handlers are mounted indoors, ensure that any
exposed electrical controls and automatic gas ignition control systems are not exposed to water spray,
rain or dripping water.
10. If Air Handlers are mounted outdoors, provide an enclosure to protect the burner and electrical controls
from the elements. This enclosure must be sealed
from the airstream and provided with air intakes for
combustion. Air intakes should be a minimum of 12”
[305 mm] from the base of the Air Handler to prevent
blockage by snow and be sized per Combustion Air
Requirements and Exhaust Stacks and Venting. If
the furnace is equipped with an induced draft fan,
increase air intakes by 25%. The enclosure access
must be sized to allow for easy access and removal
VCES-ASTON-IOM-1F – EnergyPack, ERV5000–10000, HRV3000–10000
of the burner and controls. The enclosure venting
must be sized to prevent the ambient temperature
from exceeding 125°F [52°C] or the maximum rating
for components.
11. Check that the duct furnace is securely mounted,
level and braced and will not be subject to swaying
or movement, which would put a stress on electrical
connections.
Drains and Traps
1. Heat Exchanger Condensate – The duct furnace
is supplied with a condensation removal pipe
connection(s). Condensate from the heat exchanger
and stack is acidic (pH value approximately 3) and
may contain chemical compounds requiring special
drainage. Both indoor and outdoor units must have
the duct furnace condensate drain connections
piped to a sanitary sewer.
The drain must be installed in accordance with all
plumbing codes. The condensate is to be drained via
½” PVC or steel pipe with an indirect connection to
the plumbing wastes.
WARNING
Do not drain into the building or onto the roof. Failure
to connect the condensate drain to a sanitary sewer can
result in combustion gases entering the space, uncontrolled water flow into the building or onto the roof resulting in standing water or large amounts of ice buildup,
building damage, injury or death.
Figure D13: Condensate trap – positive gas-fired
furnace
K
H
Pour les appareils de chauffage au gaz à pression positive
(sans système de ventilation d’évacuation à tirage induit)
K = Minimum 0,5 po [13 mm]
H = Pression de surchauffe indiquée sur la plaque signalétique,
en pouces d’eau + 1 pouce
Le niveau d’eau devrait être un pouce au-dessus de la partie
supérieure du U du siphon
73
Figure D14: Condensate trap – negative gas-fired
furnace
H
IMPORTANT
Outdoor installations may require special attention to prevent freezing and clogging of the drain line. Insulate and
heat trace the condensate line portion that is outdoors.
Combustion Air Requirements
J
For negative gas-fired furnace (with induced draft exhauster)
H = Minimum 8.5” [216 mm]
J = Half of H or 4.25” [108 mm]
The water level would be 1” below the bottom of the entrance to the drain.
2. Since the condensate is drained by gravity, avoid
long runs of drain piping. If a long run of trapping
cannot be avoided or the piping has water flow restrictions such as several elbows, add extra height
to provide enough hydrostatic head to overcome the
frictional losses. Always slope piping down a minimum of 1/8” per foot [10 mm/m] in the direction of
the flow.
IMPORTANT
Where a condensate neutralizer is used, an overflow shall
be provided such that condensate will be directed to
the drain in the event the neutralizer becomes plugged.
Indoor installations typically require a condensate trap to
be installed to prevent combustion gases entering the
space, see Figure D13 for sizing, positive pressure. Outdoor installations may require special attention to drains
to prevent freezing and clogging of the drain line.
3. The condensate drain line must include a condensate trap to prevent combustion gases entering the
sewer on positive fired furnaces or sewer gases
entering the furnace on negative fired furnaces. The
discharge of the trap must be at atmospheric pressure and not tied into a pressurized line or the trap
will not function properly.
4. Never attach drain piping to a closed drain or sewer
gases may enter.
5. To function properly, a trap must always be primed.
The “U” portion of the trap must be full with water.
If the trap is not properly primed, air will be sucked
through the trap upon start-up and prevent condensate drainage on negative fired furnaces or combustion gases will be pushed into the sewer on positive
fired furnaces. Drains that are inactive will dry out
and not function properly. An open tee on the leaving
side of the trap is recommended for filling the trap
with water and for maintenance.
VCES-ASTON-IOM-1F – EnergyPack, ERV5000–10000, HRV3000–10000
1. If the duct furnace is installed in furnace rooms, confined areas or low leakage construction buildings,
provisions must be made for combustion air. The
heater shall be located such that a negative pressure
will not be created, which will starve the burner of
combustion air.
2. Air for combustion should be drawn and ducted from
outdoors where there is a possibility of exposure to
substances such as:
• Chlorinated laundry products
• Carbon tetrachloride
• Permanent wave solutions
• Halogen-type refrigerants
• Chlorinated waxes and cleaners
• Cleaning solvents (perchloroethylene)
• Chlorine based pool chemicals
• Printing inks, paint removers, etc.
• Water softening chemicals
• Cements and glues
• De-icing salts or chemicals
• Anti-static fabric softeners
• Masonry acid washing materials
• Hydrochloric acid
3. In some cases, Local Authorities require that combustion air be ducted directly to the burner. Refer
to the relevant installation standards in the current
CAN1-B149 (1,2) in Canada and Z223.1 in USA. On
outdoor Air Handlers air intakes should be a minimum of 12” [305 mm] from the base of the air handler. If the duct furnace is equipped with an induced
draft fan, increase air intakes by 25%.
Exhaust Stacks and Venting
1. Installations must be in accordance with the requirements of Authorities having jurisdiction or, in the
absence of local codes, with the relevant installation
standards in the current CAN1-B149 (1,2) in Canada
and Z223.1 in USA. Local codes may supersede any
of the provisions in the above installation standards.
2. Distances from adjacent public walkways, adjacent
buildings, openable windows and building openings,
shall conform to these codes.
3. Flue outlets must be located so as to prevent blockage by snow.
4. Building materials must be protected from degradation by flue gases.
5. Flue outlets must have a minimum horizontal clearance from electric meters, gas meters, regulators
74
and relief equipment of 6 feet [1.83 m] to CAN1B149.1 and B149.2 in Canada and 4 feet [1.22 m] to
Z223.1 in USA.
6. Flue outlet pressure must not exceed rating on the
nameplate for maximum overfire pressure on positive
fired chambers or maintain the overfire draft pressure for the heater on negative fired chambers with
induced draft fans.
7. All horizontal runs should have a minimum rise of ¼”
per foot [21 mm/m] of horizontal run in the direction of
discharge to prevent the accumulation of condensate.
8. Stacks shall have means provided for the drainage of
condensate.
9. Refer to the rating plate for the category of appliance
to select the venting. Consult the authorities having
jurisdiction and use a gas-tight, water-tight venting
system constructed of material resistant to corrosion
by condensate.
10. Do not install dampers or other restrictive devices in
the flue vent pipe.
11. Stack terminations must be kept to approved distances from fresh air intakes, rooflines, etc. Guy
wires may be required to brace the stack above
rooflines.
12. The stack should be installed in such a manner that
access to the duct furnace is not obstructed. Do not
support the weight of the stack on the flue connection of the duct furnace.
13. Approved methods must be followed when putting
the stack through walls, floors, roofs, etc.
14. The stack shall have a minimum of at least 18”
[457 mm] clearance to combustible material.
15. A duct furnace, if installed in a building, full enclosure
or in a location requiring that the vent be extended,
shall be vented as prescribed by the A uthority having jurisdiction.
16. The overfire draft measured with a manometer at
the test port in the burner compartment must be the
same as labeled ‘Overfire Draft’ or not exceed the
‘Maximum Overfire Positive’ pressure ratings on the
rating plate of the duct furnace.
17. Power Venting Adjustment – The flue draft should
be adjusted at the damper of the induced draft fan
when the duct furnace is operating on high fire.
18. Gravity Venting Adjustment – The flue draft should be
adjusted at the damper of the burner fan when the
duct furnace is operating on high fire.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Gas Connections
1. Gas-fired duct furnace shall be installed in accordance with:
a. In Canada the Installation Codes CAN/CGA
B149 (1,2) latest edition and applicable provincial
regulations for the class of heater being installed.
VCES-ASTON-IOM-1F – EnergyPack, ERV5000–10000, HRV3000–10000
6.
7.
Authorities having jurisdiction should be consulted before installations are made.
b. In the United States the National Fuel Gas Code,
ANSI Z223.1; for airplane hangers in accordance
with the Standard for Aircraft Hangers, ANSI/
NFPA 409; for public garages in accordance with
the Standard for Parking Structures, ANSI/NFPA
88A or the Standard for Repair Garages, ANSI/
NFPA 88B and applicable local codes for the
class of heater being installed. Authorities having
jurisdiction should be consulted prior to the commencement of work.
An emergency manual shut down valve should be
provided upstream of the piping to the duct furnace
and labeled for quick identification. Color coding of
pipe may be required and is recommended. Check
the duct furnace rating plate for the fuel type, supply
pressure and input rating.
Gas supply pressures higher than 14” w.c. [3.5 kPa]
require an additional field installed high pressure
regulator. The high pressure regulator should have
an internal or separate relief valve to protect components to their maximum rated pressure limits. The
high pressure regulator and relief valve should, if
possible, be mounted at least 5 to 10 feet [1.52 to
3.04 m] upstream from the appliance regulator at
the duct furnace. Run the gas line to the duct furnace and mount these items so as not to interfere
with or hinder access to the duct furnace or any of
its components. Install a 1/8” NPT plugged tapping
connection immediately upstream of the gas supply
connection to the duct furnace for test gauge connection if the duct furnace is not so equipped.
The gas line to the duct furnace should be taken off
the top of the main gas line. A drip leg with screwed
cap should be installed at the bottom of the vertical
drop in the gas line to the duct furnace.
Vent the main gas appliance regulator and the pilot
regulator to atmosphere. Gas pressure switches,
high pressure regulator, high pressure relief valve
and the normally open vent valve (if any of these
components are supplied) must be vented to atmosphere separately from all other components. Vent
lines should terminate outside the building with a
turndown elbow and birdscreen. Vent lines must be
sloped to a condensate drip leg. Locate the drip leg
ahead of the item being vented to prevent any condensate that may form from draining back into the
vented item. Bleed and vent lines shall be installed in
accordance with CAN/CGA B149 (1,2) latest edition
or the National Fuel Gas Code, ANSI Z223.1.
See Gas Manifold Piping Drawing included with submittal drawings.
Gas piping must not be used to support, hang or
steady the duct furnace.
75
8. The duct furnace and its individual main manual
shut-off valve must be disconnected (in closed position) from the gas supply piping system during any
pressure testing of the gas supply piping system at
test pressures in excess of ½ psig [3.5 kPa].
9. Duct furnaces are certified for altitudes of 0 to 2,000 feet
[0 to 610 m]. When a duct furnace is installed at elevations above 2,000 feet the input rating shall be reduced
at the rate of 4%for each additional 1,000 feet [300 m],
in accordance with standard CGA 2.17. A separate
label must be affixed next to the duct furnace nameplate indicating the adjustments as follows:
This appliance has been adjusted for use at an altitude of:
___________ feet________________ m
Adjusted maximum gas input:_________Btu/hr_________ kW
Adjusted manifold pressure:__________ ” w.c.________ kPa
Date of adjustment:_____________________________
Adjusted by:___________________________________
Electrical Connections
1. All electrical connections to the duct furnace and main
disconnect switch shall conform to local codes and:
a. In Canada the Canadian Electrical Code Part 1,
(CSA C22.1) and all local codes.
b. In the United States the National Electrical Code
ANSI/NFPA 70 and all local codes.
2. The correct power supply requirements are shown
on the duct furnace nameplate.
3. An electrical disconnect switch having adequate ampacity (see duct furnace nameplate for voltage and
ampacity), if not provided as part of the duct furnace,
shall be installed in accordance with Article 430 of
the National Electrical Code, ANSI/NFPA 70.
4. The duct furnace must be electrically grounded.
5. Mount and wire all external controls to the duct furnace (i.e. remote control panel, temperature controller, interlocks with external electrical circuits or any
other auxiliary electrical item). Numbered terminals
are provided in the remote control cabinet and on the
junction box on the duct furnace for the connection
of these controls (see wiring diagram). Check inside
the control panel for labels indicating entry location(s)
for field installed wiring and control wiring.
6. Dotted lines on a wiring diagram indicate field wiring
by the Installer.
7. Solid lines on the wiring diagram indicate factory wiring by the Manufacturer.
8. Fuses are furnished and installed in accordance with
the applicable Electrical Code. If replacement is necessary the original fuse amperage shall be adhered
to. Failure to do so may result in damage to the
components within the electrical system.
VCES-ASTON-IOM-1F – EnergyPack, ERV5000–10000, HRV3000–10000
9. If the duct furnace is to be installed to supply air to
an area where freeze-up protection is needed in the
event of burner shut down, then a low temperature
limit control is recommended.
10. When connecting a power supply to a three-phase
motor, take care that the three-phase wiring gives you
the correct motor and blower rotation on all motors.
11. Replacement wiring must be equivalent to original wire. See wiring diagram for requirements for
shielded or twisted wire.
12. If a space thermostat is used with the duct furnace,
locate the thermostat so that cold drafts and hot discharge airstreams do not affect its performance. Do
not mount the thermostat on the casing on the duct
furnace or any other location where it may be affected
by radiated and conducted heat. Refer to the instruction furnished with the thermostat for further details.
Air Distribution and Throughput
1. The duct furnace is designed for constant airflow operation. An air proving interlock switch is provided to
ensure minimum airflow over the combustion chamber prior to burner operation. The range of airflow
and the pressure drops for each frame size are given
in the submittal drawings.
2. The duct furnace must be installed on the positive or
pressure side of the air circulating blower.
3. Allow the air circulating blower to run for a sufficient
period after the burner is shut down to cool off the
heat exchanger, approximately five minutes.
4. For multi-volume applications the burner input rate
must be restricted in proportion to the airflow rate so
the maximum design temperature rise and minimum
airflow is not exceeded.
5. The duct furnace must be installed with sufficient upstream and downstream clearance to provide unobstructed and even airflow across the openings.
CAUTION
Failure to provide even airflow can cause overheating
and premature failure.
IMPORTANT
Do not split or branch off leaving ducts or mount temperature sensors directly after the duct furnace allowing sufficient distance for air temperature to blend evenly. Allow
approximately two equivalent duct diameters. Equivalent
diameter = SQRT (4 AB/PI).
76
Duct Furnace Start-up and Operation
Precautions Before Starting the Duct Furnace
1. Provincial or state regulations frequently require that
service mechanics that work on combustion equipment must be licensed. Unqualified personnel should
not start the duct furnace.
2. Refer to the notes in the Introduction, at the beginning of this manual before continuing.
WARNING
Do not attempt to start the burner if the duct furnace is full
of vapor or gas, or if the combustion chamber is very hot.
Start-up Checklist
IMPORTANT
When starting up the duct furnace for the first time or if
it has been shut down for an extended period of time
the same start-up procedures, as outlined in Start-up
Checklist, Start-up Instructions and Re-starting After Ignition Failure should be followed.
1. Set the electrical disconnect in the ‘Off’ position.
2. Set all additional switches in the ‘Off’ position.
3. Close the main manual gas valve, pilot manual gas
valve, main and pilot manual firing valves.
4. Check the supply voltage. Voltage must be within
10% of nameplate rating. If not, consult the power
company and have the voltage condition corrected
before start-up.
5. Check all electrical connections on controls and in
the control cabinet. Tighten if necessary.
6. Check all fuse holders. All fuses must be properly
installed.
7. Check all motor thermal overload settings against the
rating plate figures. Push the thermal manual reset
button on all motor starter overloads.
8. Check that all items shipped loose or unassembled
such as control panel, thermostats, etc. have been
correctly installed.
9. Check that all external electrical controls and interlocks have been correctly mounted and wired.
10. Check that all power supplies and control wiring has
been inspected and approved by the Local Authorities having jurisdiction.
11. Check setpoints of temperature controls. Refer to
the wiring diagram on the duct furnace and set to
the temperature settings indicated. The temperature
limiting control setpoints are given below for most
duct furnace installations, however refer to the wiring
diagram.
VCES-ASTON-IOM-1F – EnergyPack, ERV5000–10000, HRV3000–10000
High Limit
200°F [93°C]
Fan Switch
125°F [52°C] On
90°F [32°C] Off
A duct furnace should never be allowed to cycle over
a prolonged period on the high limit. The high limit
is not an operating but a safety control to prevent
excessive temperatures. If cycling on the high limit is
noted, corrective measures should be taken immediately. Failure to do so could cause damage to the
duct furnace.
12. Check burner and induced fan wheels set screws.
Tighten if necessary.
13. Check that the exhauster (induced draft fan) or vent
discharge is free of obstructions.
14. Check that the air inlet to and the air discharge from
the duct furnace are free of obstructions.
15. Check that the gas piping has been installed in accordance with CAN1 B149 (1,2) or NFPA 54, and
has been tested for leaks and approved.
16. Check with the local gas utility that the gas supply is
open from the street gas main to the building metering station and the metering station has been completed, tested and turned on.
17. Ensure that the type of gas (natural or propane)
supplied and the gas pressure to the duct furnace
corresponds with the type and gas inlet pressure indicated on the nameplate of the duct furnace.
18. Check the gas piping to ensure that the proper
drip legs, regulators, relief valves and vent lines are
installed.
19. On systems where a high pressure regulator and
relief valve are installed, check that the spring in the
high pressure regulator has been screwed down to
approximately the middle of its adjustment range.
20. Purge the gas line from the meter to the duct furnace.
Start-up Instructions
1. Before proceeding, complete the Start-up Checklist.
2. Read the Sequence of Operation, while at the same
time, tracing the sequence through the electrical wiring diagram.
3. Set the duct furnace disconnect switch ‘On’ (fan and
burner control switches are still ‘Off’ and burner thermostat is set for no heat with main and firing valves
still closed).
4. Set fan control switch ‘On’. Run the fans without
heat to check fan operation first.
5. The duct furnace is provided with an air proving interlock switch to ensure minimum airflow over the
combustion chamber prior to burner operation. Set
the switch to open just below the design airflow. Adjust the air throughput to be within the range specified on the duct furnace rating plate.
77
6. Set the burner operating switch, controls, remote
panel switches, etc. to ‘On’ or to the ‘Winter’ position (the main and firing valves are still closed)
to check operation of the induced draft fan (if so
equipped) and burner combustion air blower. The
high ambient thermostat, if provided, is located to
sense the inlet or outdoor air temperature and set
to shut down the burner if the inlet air rises above
setpoint. If discharge or room thermostats are used
these should be set to provide heat. If the duct
furnace is started up in warm weather it will be necessary to temporarily increase the setting of these
controls until the burner control circuit is energized to
check operation. Use a signal generator if necessary
to vary the signal to the modulating actuator. The
induced draft fan, if so equipped, and combustion air
fan should start immediately.
7. Check burner and induced draft fan (if provided)
motors for correct rotation. To reverse rotation, first
set the main electrical disconnect switch to the ‘Off’
position and then interchange any two of the three
wires feeding L1, L2 or L3 at the starter.
8. Check the amperage draw of each motor on each
phase. Refer to rating plate for Full Load Amps (FLA).
9. Check voltage at duct furnace disconnect switch. If
the power is not within 10% of rated, shut the duct
furnace down and consult the power company. Voltage should be within 2% on all phase-to-phase readings when compared to each other. A 2% voltage
difference could cause as much as a 20% current
imbalance.
10. On duct furnaces equipped with modulating controls
the modulating gas valve is linked with the combustion air blower air damper. On a start sequence the
actuator should be fully open for a portion of the
purge interval, then modulate to the low fire or light
off position before an ignition attempt is made. This
is to ensure four air changes in the combustion
chamber. Check the operation of the pre-purge timers, actuator and linkages. Timers and linkages are
preset at the factory. Check that the linkage retaining
screws are tight.
11. Ensure that the flue is in place and providing overfire
draft or positive pressure.
12. After the pre-purge, the ignition transformer and pilot
solenoid will be energized. Observe the ignition spark
for proper location and firmness. After the trial for ignition time, the ignition transformer and pilot solenoid
valve are de-energized and the burner control will
lock out. Reset the burner control.
13. Open the main and pilot gas valve (main and pilot
firing valves must still be closed) and purge the main
gas line and pilot line on the duct furnace so that gas
is supplied up to the automatic gas valve(s). Do not
purge or bleed into the combustion chamber. Check
VCES-ASTON-IOM-1F – EnergyPack, ERV5000–10000, HRV3000–10000
for leaks on duct furnace piping to the automatic
shut-off valves and correct.
14. On systems where high pressure regulator and relief
valves are installed, check the gas pressure downstream of the high pressure regulator and upstream of
the appliance regulator. It must not exceed 14” w.c.
[3.48 kPa] or the value on the duct furnace rating
plate. Adjust the regulator as necessary.
15. Check the operation of the main automatic gas
shut-off valve(s) for through-the-valve or internal seat
leakage as outlined in the valve installation and maintenance instructions provided separately.
16. If the duct furnace has high or low pressure gas
switches, press the manual reset buttons.
17. Open the pilot manual firing valve (main firing valve
must still be closed).
18. Reset the burner control.
19. The pilot should light; if not, re-check the electrical
safety circuit. Three or four trials may be needed to
purge any air from the pilot line.
20. Refer to the specific burner control in the Burner
Control Module Troubleshooting Guide for test jack
locations and flame signal reading. The Honeywell
RM7897A burner control has an expected DC voltage of between 1.25 and 5 VDC using a 20 kohm
per volt meter. The Honeywell S89F burner control
should have a flame sensor current reading of at
least 0.8 µA and steady. If the flame signal reading
is less, then re-adjust the pilot flame or realign the
flame detector. If the burner control is equipped with
the optional display module the signal can be displayed. Reset the burner control and repeat the ignition cycle several times to ensure a fast igniting and
stable pilot flame. Contact Venmar CES Customer
Service at 1-866-483-6627 or email Tech Support
at [email protected] for a copy of the
burner control technical manual for further information if required.
21. Open the main manual firing valve. Once the main
automatic valve(s) are energized and after the low fire
timing relay has elapsed, the control valve actuator
will modulate to the setpoint temperature.
22. Check for leaks on duct furnace piping after the automatic shut-off valves and correct.
23. Check combustion air and firing rate settings. The
unit has been test fired in the factory for firing rate and
combustion. Combustion air and gas linkages have
been preset for proper combustion and high and low
fire positions have been factory preset. Field conditions, vibration, loose, damaged or replacement parts
may require adjustments to be made. These checks
should be done by a qualified Service Technician.
a. Remove the signal wire to the burner modulating actuator (Terminals ‘G+’ and ‘G−’, refer to
the electrical diagram for accurate information)
78
and install a 0–10V signal generator if this has
not been done per Item 6 in the Start-up Instructions. Dial the signal generator to 10V. Check the
burner manifold pressure at the test point nearest
the burner, downstream of the gas control valve
against the nameplate for the correct pressure
and adjust the appliance regulator if necessary.
b. Check the temperature rise across the heat exchanger against the nameplate. The downstream
measurement should be done sufficiently far
downstream where the air temperature readings
are even. If the temperature rise is off from the
nameplate, then the airflow should be corrected.
Note mass flow is affected by temperature and
temperature rise should be corrected accordingly. The duct furnace should not be allowed to
operate above a maximum temperature rise of
115°F [64°C]. Temperature rise is based on 70°F
[21.1°C] or standard air conditions. This is a constant volume fan, therefore if the air temperature
to the supply fan is less than 70°F [21.1°C] the
air will be denser and the mass flow rate will increase which will result in a smaller temperature
rise according to the perfect gas law formula:
TRa = TRd * (460 + 70)/(460 + Ti)
Where:TRa = temperature rise actual (°F)
TRd = Temperature rise design (°F)
Ti = Inlet temperature at the supply fan (°F)
460 = Absolute temperature (°F)
e. Set the signal generator to a midpoint then minimum temperature rise. Repeat Step D above.
f. If the AFCO is over the acceptable limit or if there
is any burner performance problem, refer to
Burner Linkage and Low Fire Adjustment.
24. When the duct furnace installation is complete, start
and stop the burner several times to ensure proper
operation. Check the amperage draw of each motor.
25. Check operation of the burner control by simulating a flame failure making certain the burner control
locks out within the proper time. Contact Venmar
CES Customer Service at 1-866-483-6627 or email
Tech Support at [email protected] for
a copy of the burner control technical manual for further information if required.
26. Ensure all safety controls are operative (i.e. burner
control, high limit, air proving switches, etc.).
27. Reset all operating controls back to proper setpoints
for normal running conditions.
28. Initial start-up has a tendency to relieve the tightness
of nuts, bolts and setscrews. Re-check for tightness
of hold down bolts, all set screws and keys, and
tighten if necessary after approximately eight hours
of continuous operation.
Re-starting After Ignition Failure
WARNING
Do not attempt to start the burner if the duct furnace is full
of vapor or gas, or if the combustion chamber is very hot.
IMPORTANT
This is an approximation as the airflow increase will
cause an increase in static pressure and hence reduce
the mass flow slightly and the motor and fan input will
also provide a slight increase in temperature rise.
c. Check the overfire draft or positive pressure at
maximum input against the nameplate. Make
certain that it does not exceed the maximum
shown on the nameplate. For power venting the
overfire draft should be adjusted at the damper
of the induced draft fan when the duct furnace is
operating on high fire.
d. Check the CO (Carbon Monoxide) and O2 (Oxygen) reading at maximum input. O2 readings typically range from 3% to 16%. Calculate the AFCO
(Air Free CO) reading using the formula: AFCO =
(20.9 *COppm)/(20.9–O2%). Adjust the air/gas
ratios with the control linkages to keep the AFCO
reading below 400. Refer to Burner Linkage and
Low Fire Adjustment for the adjustment procedure based on the type of linkage supplied with
the duct furnace.
VCES-ASTON-IOM-1F – EnergyPack, ERV5000–10000, HRV3000–10000
1. Consult the burner control technical manual for
troubleshooting information. If the duct furnace is
equipped with the electronic burner control check
the status lights on the face of the control. The optional keyboard display module can also provide a
wealth of control information and fault history.
2. Set burner control switches to the ‘Off’ position.
3. Set the electrical disconnect to the ‘Off’ position.
4. Check for fuel supply.
5. Check the components in the electrical circuit to the
burner control. Check that all screws and connections are tight on the burner control.
6. Close the main manual firing valve.
7. Check the flame detector and flame ignitor. The
flame detector and ignitor are located on the combustion head assembly inside the burner and are accessible through the housing cover as shown in the
figures below.
8. Check the condition of the electrical connections and
the condition and positioning of the flame rod and
spark ignitor. On C4 burners the flame rod protrudes
in the center of the retention plate hole and the porcelain should be flush with the retention plate as in
79
Figure D15 and Figure D16. The flame rod protrudes
in the center of the retention plate hole and extends
3-5/8” [92 mm] past on size C6 to C10 burners as in
Figure D17 and Figure D18.
9. The spark ignitor is bent at 900 at the tip. On C4
burners the ignitor tip is within 1/16” to 1/8” [1.6 to
3.2 mm] of the pilot gas deflector plate as in Figure
D15 and Figure D16. On C6 to C10 burners the perpendicular tip portion should be flush with the retention plate and within 1/16” to 1/8” [1.6 to 3.2 mm] of
the retention plate as in Figure D17 and Figure D18.
10. Follow the procedures for start-up. Should there be
a demand for heat, the duct furnace should attempt
to start.
11. Observe the operation very carefully to determine at
what point the trouble occurs if it still exists. Consult
the burner control technical manual for further troubleshooting procedures.
12. Burner parts for C4 burner outlined in Figure D15:
1 Combustion head
9 Burner housing
10 Air damper
11 Damper shaft
12 Back plate
14 Air inlet cone and screen
15 Motor mounting plate
16 Retention plate
20 Electric motor
21 Ignition transformer
22 Airflow switch
26 Linkage arm
27 Control quadrant
28 Site glass retainer
29 Site glass
30 Site glass gasket
31 Ignition electrode
32 Flame rod
33 Junction box
45 Blower wheel
Figure D15: C4 burner description
12
29
30
PN 033
PN 022-1
T68-7C
PN 042
PN 036
PN 044
PN 029
PN 035 for 5½” nose
PN 035-1 for 8” nose
Flame rod holder
PN 043
0.500 NY
PN 040-1 for 5½” nose
PN 040-2 for 8” nose
FW 375-125
Figure D17: C6–C10 burner description
29
30
12
28
30
33
22
21
17
32
11
10
26
14
45
15
20
16
19
1
27
25
9
23
2
18
31
24
5
Figure D18: C6–C10 burner combustion head
¼”
3-5/8”
27
26
30
29
30
9
10
22
33
11
6
45
14
47
51
19
46
32
50
18
15
20
Figure D16: C4 burner combustion head assembly
48
4
1/16”–1/8”
1
31
49
16
21
VCES-ASTON-IOM-1F – EnergyPack, ERV5000–10000, HRV3000–10000
80
Shut Down Instructions
General
1. Set the burner operating switch, controls, remote
panel switches, etc. to ‘Off’ or to the ‘Summer’
position.
2. To prevent possible gas leaks, close the main manual gas valve.
3. If the duct furnace was firing at the time of shut down
allow the supply fan blower to run for a sufficient
period to cool off the heat exchanger, approximately
five minutes.
4. Set the duct furnace disconnect switch to ‘Off’.
Emergency Shut Down Only
1. Set the duct furnace disconnect switch to ‘Off’.
2. Close the main manual gas valve.
Summer Shut Down
1. If the duct furnace is not required during periods
when summertime temperatures drop, then set the
burner operating switches, controls, remote panel
switches, etc. to ‘Off’. Set the duct furnace disconnect switch to ‘Off’ and close the main manual gas
valve.
2. If the duct furnace is to be used for short periods
of heating, then set the operating switches, controls, remote panel switches, etc. to the desired
position(s).
Maintenance
WARNING
Provincial or state regulations frequently require that
Service Mechanics that work on electrical equipment
must be licensed. Although many maintenance items
do not require the service of a licensed Mechanic, it is
recommended that a licensed Mechanic supervise any
work done on the duct furnace by unlicensed personnel. Unqualified personnel should not be allowed to work
unsupervised.
Recommended Maintenance
IMPORTANT
The following recommended maintenance schedule
should be followed every four months unless otherwise
specified below. It is highly recommended to schedule
the maintenance of the duct furnace in the spring and
fall as demands are commonly most critical after these
periods and serve as good prevention practice. Where
the duct furnace is operating under unusual amounts of
dust or if other impurities are contained in the air, more
frequent inspections are recommended.
VCES-ASTON-IOM-1F – EnergyPack, ERV5000–10000, HRV3000–10000
1. Inspect the area and make certain that no combustible or hazardous material has been stored within
the clearances as shown on the nameplate.
2. Inspect the stack to make certain there are no obstructions. Check for carbon deposits, soot, scale or
rust.
3. Inspect the condensate and drain connections and
disposal systems. Check for blockage and trap operation. Clean as applicable.
4. Ensure that there are no obstructions blocking the air
supply to the duct furnace or the air discharge from
the duct furnace.
5. Check for any vibration or unusual noise. If any are
observed, locate the cause and correct.
6. Electrical – Check all wiring for loose connections.
Check voltage at the unit (while in operation). Check
amperage draw against nameplate ratings. All contactors should be inspected to ensure that contacts
are clean and are making good contact. If contacts
are pitted or burned badly, replace contactor points.
Single phasing and motor burn out may result from
bad contacts. Check all fuses and replace blown
fuses with equivalent size and type.
7. Controls – Clean and recalibrate all controls and
check for proper operation. Repair or replace any
controls found faulty.
8. Gas Piping – Check all fittings, valves and lines for
leaks. Ensure all vents to atmosphere are clean and
free from obstruction. Inspect and clean all drip legs
in the fuel line. Inspect all regulators, relief valves,
vent valves, manual shut-off valves and gas pressure switches. Check their operation and clean or
replace as necessary. Check the operation of the
main automatic gas shut-off valve(s) for through-thevalve or internal seal leakage as outlined in the valve
installation and maintenance instructions provided
separately. Check the fuel supply pressure to the
duct furnace.
9. Motors – Inspect motors every three months or
500 hours of operation, whichever is less. Keep the
motor clean and the ventilation openings clear. Make
certain the mechanical installation is secure and all
bolts and nuts are tightened. Check all electrical
connectors to be certain that they are tight. Use a
Megger periodically to ensure that the integrity of the
winding insulation has been maintained. Record the
readings and investigate any significant drop in insulation resistance.
10. Motor Lubrication – Some motors are complete with
permanently lubricated and sealed bearings, which
do not require lubrication. Motors with grease nipples
and drain plugs have been filled by the Manufacturer
and should always be checked before start-up and
at regular intervals.
81
a. A recommended lubrication schedule for motors
is given in Table D3 for normal operation. Where
conditions are more severe or abnormal the re-lubrication interval should be reduced. Refer to the
Motor Manufacturer’s instructions. Motors that
run in hot, severe dirt or wet conditions should be
lubricated at least every six months.
Burner Linkage and Low Fire Adjustment
WARNING
Do not attempt to start the burner if the duct furnace is full
of vapor or gas, or the combustion chamber is very hot.
General
Table D5: Re-lubrication Schedule
Hours of
Service
(hours/day)
Less than 12
Up to 7.5 HP
10–40 HP
Over 40 HP
5 years
3 years
1.5 years
More than 12
2 years
1 year
9 months
Re-lubrication Interval
b. Be sure the grease that is being added to the
motor is compatible with the grease already in the
motor. Consult the Motor Manufacturer if grease
other than Mobil or Polyrex EM is to be used.
c. Clean the grease nipple. Remove the outlet plug.
With motor stopped, add grease slowly until new
grease appears at the shaft hole in the end plate
or purge outlet plug. Re-install outlet plug.
11. Burner – Inspect the burner and combustion air
blower, clean if necessary. See Figure D15 to Figure
D18. To clean the combustion air blower, disconnect
the wiring on the burner motor, remove the blower/
motor assembly and vacuum the blades or blast with
compressed air to remove any dirt buildup. Inspect
the flame sensor and ignition electrode and check for
cracks, positioning and gap. Test the ignition spark
and flame signal. Check that the modulating actuator
linkages are tight and operate freely. Perform the final
combustion check per Start-up Instructions, Item 24.
1. The procedure in this section needs to be performed
only if the performance of the burner is not satisfactory. Refer to Start-up Instructions for directions on
how to determine if this procedure is needed.
2. Refer to the notes in the Introduction, at the beginning, and the Duct Furnace Start-up and Operation
sections before continuing.
3. Determine the type of linkage employed on the duct
furnace and proceed to the corresponding section
below.
Cam Linkage
1. A cam linkage is used on positive fired combustion
chambers up to and including 1,400 mbh with natural gas and for 7” w.c. inlet pressures only to provide
optimum air and gas ratios for combustion throughout its firing range and provides maximum turndown
of the burner. The combustion air damper control
arm is fitted with a roller bearing and follows a characterized cam as shown in Figure D19. The gas butterfly valve is fitted with adjustable control arms and
fixed linkages to the actuator.
Figure D19: Cam linkage
Recommended Spare Parts – General
1. Spare parts should be ordered at the time of installation if accepted by the Owner. Spare parts will reduce the down time in the event of a failure.
2. The list of spare parts outlined below is considered
minimum. Installations in remote locations or where
duct furnace operation is essential may require more
spare parts than listed. Please contact our Service
Department for recommendations.
3. Minimal spare parts list:
• Two sets of fuses
• One burner control relay module, flame signal
amplifier and purge card
• One flame sensor
• One spark igniter
VCES-ASTON-IOM-1F – EnergyPack, ERV5000–10000, HRV3000–10000
82
2. For your safety and to avoid damaging the equipment, start the linkage and low fire adjustment procedure without gas or power to the duct furnace.
3. Make certain all the joints on the control arms and linkages are tight to begin with. Loose joints could make
the adjustment slip and create an unsafe condition.
4. Remove the signal wire to the burner modulating actuator (terminals ‘G+’ and ‘G−’, refer to the electrical
diagram for accurate information) and install a 0–10V
signal generator if this has not been done per Item
6, Start-up Instructions. Dial the signal generator to
2V or less. With power off the actuator and linkage
should position the combustion air damper to an
opened position for maximum air throughput.
5. Close the manual firing valve (‘M4’, refer to the piping diagram), power up the unit and open the main
manual gas shut-off valve (‘M1’) to the unit.
6. Start the burner and wait for the purge to complete.
During the purge, the combustion air damper should
move from maximum purge position (opened position for maximum air throughput) to low fire (closed
position for light off). At the same time, the gas butterfly valve should rotate from high fire (open position
for maximum gas throughput) to low fire (closed position for light off).
7. After the purge, the pilot will ignite. Once the pilot is
lit, slowly open the manual firing valve (‘M4’); at the
same time look into the burner view port and watch
for any flame rolling back around the burner profile
plate. If this happens, the amount of gas should
be reduced at the butterfly valve before continuing.
Loosen the swivel joint on the connecting rod at the
butterfly crank arm and slide the rod to close the
valve very slightly. Flame rolling back into the burner
could damage some internal burner components. A
yellow flame is normal on low fire.
8. Once you have successfully established low fire, start
to modulate the burner slowly to high fire, taking a
close look at the flame to make sure it runs smoothly
and does not roll back into the burner. Once the full
modulation (10V to the actuator) is reached, verify
the gas supply pressure to the unit to make sure it
is at least equal to the minimum rated pressure on
the nameplate. Please note that the cam follower is
not necessarily going to reach the high fire end of the
cam profile as the cam can be adjusted for a partial
input.
Verify the manifold and overfire pressures (chamber
pressure). The differential between the manifold and
the overfire should be the same as what can be calculated from the values indicated on the nameplate.
If it is not correct, increase or decrease the manifold
by adjusting the appliance pressure regulator (‘M3’
or ‘SV1’). Verify the temperature rise as per the instructions under Start-up Instructions, Item 23b.
VCES-ASTON-IOM-1F – EnergyPack, ERV5000–10000, HRV3000–10000
Return to the low fire position (less than 2V modulation signal). Verify the position of the air damper in
the burner. The cam follower, mounted on the gas
butterfly valve, should be at one end of cam profile.
See Figure D20.
Figure D20: Low fire typical cam positioning
9. Adjust the gas butterfly valve opening to obtain a
clean combustion on the low fire position. Make sure
the Air Free CO (AFCO) is maintained below 400 ppm.
10. Verify the combustion to make sure it is clean in the
intermediate range and on high fire.
11. When the duct furnace adjustment procedure is
complete, start and stop the burner several times to
insure proper operation.
Fixed Linkage
1. A fixed linkage is used where cam linkage conditions
are not met to provide proper air and gas ratios for
combustion throughout its firing range and provides
limited turndown of the burner. Both the combustion air damper and the gas butterfly valve are fitted
with adjustable control arms and fixed linkages to the
actuator.
2. For your safety and to avoid damaging the equipment, start the linkage and low fire adjustment procedure without gas or power to the duct furnace.
3. Make certain all the joints on the control arms and linkages are tight to begin with. Loose joints could make
the adjustment slip and create an unsafe condition.
83
4. Remove the signal wire to the burner modulating actuator (Terminals ‘G+’ and ‘G−’, refer to the electrical
diagram for accurate information) and install a 0–10V
signal generator if this has not been done per Startup Instructions, Item 6. Dial the signal generator to
2V or less. With power off, the actuator and linkage
should position the combustion air damper to an
opened position for maximum air throughput.
5. Close the manual firing valve (‘M4’, refer to the piping diagram), power up the unit and open the main
manual gas shut-off valve (‘M1’) to the unit.
6. Start the burner and wait for the purge to complete.
During the purge, the combustion air linkage should
move from maximum purge position (opened position for maximum air throughput) to low fire (closed
position for light off).
7. After the purge, the pilot will ignite. Once the pilot is
lit, slowly open the manual firing valve (‘M4’). Look
into the burner view port at the same time and watch
for any flame rolling back around the burner profile
plate. If this happens, the amount of gas should
be reduced at the butterfly valve before continuing.
Loosen the swivel joint on the connecting rod at the
butterfly crank arm and slide the rod to close the
valve very slightly. Flame rolling back into the burner
could damage some internal burner components. A
yellow flame is normal on low fire.
8. Once you have successfully established low fire, start
to modulate the burner slowly to high fire, taking a
close look at the flame to make sure it runs smoothly
and does not roll back into the burner. Verify that
the notch on the end of the shaft of the gas butterfly
valve (‘M5’) does not go past the maximum opening
(notch parallel to the gas line). If it does, reduce the
span on the burner actuator. Once the full modulation (10V to the actuator) is reached, verify the gas
supply pressure to the unit to make sure it is at
least equal to the minimum rated pressure on the
nameplate.
9. Verify the manifold and overfire pressures (chamber
pressure). The differential between the manifold and
the overfire should be the same as what can be calculated from the values indicated on the nameplate.
If it is not correct, increase or decrease the manifold
by adjusting the appliance pressure regulator (‘M3’
or ‘SV1’). The burner air damper opening should
also be adjusted to get a clean combustion. When
it is done, indicate the high fire air damper position
on the slotted quadrant attached to the burner air
damper rod. Verify the temperature rise as per the
instructions under Start-up Instructions, Item 23b.
10. Return to the low fire position (less than 2V modulation signal). Verify the position of the air damper in
the burner. It should be at the mark indicated on the
slotted quadrant from factory adjustments.
VCES-ASTON-IOM-1F – EnergyPack, ERV5000–10000, HRV3000–10000
11. Adjust the butterfly valve opening to obtain a clean
combustion on low fire position. Make sure the Air
Free CO (AFCO) is maintained below 400 ppm. If you
cannot obtain a clean combustion on low fire, you
might have to change the burner air damper opening. Put a reference mark of the low fire air damper
position on the slotted quadrant.
12. Shut the burner and the entire unit off and turn the
power to the unit off. If you do not turn the power off,
the burner actuator will continue to modulate and will
make the adjustments harder to perform.
13. Use the manual override push button on the burner
modulating actuator and make sure the linkage is
on the low fire position. Verify that the mark on the
quadrant still matches. Rotate the linkage to the
high fire position (the notch on the butterfly valve
should be parallel to the gas train). Verify the position
reached on the air damper quadrant versus the mark
on the quadrant.
14. If the position was not as expected on high fire,
some adjustment will have to be made. Follow these
steps:
a. Make sure the linkage is on the low fire position.
b. Tighten the burner air damper quadrant at the
screw in the slot so the linkage cannot move.
c. Loosen the rod at one of the two ball joints on
the air linkage.
d. You will now have to perform the adjustment itself.
Choose the proper adjustment, depending if the
damper was not opening enough or too much:
Damper does not open enough
Move the ball joint installed on the driver shaft
further from the shaft.
Move the ball joint installed on the driver shaft
closer to the shaft.
Damper opening too much
Move the ball joint installed on the driver shaft
closer to the shaft.
Move the ball joint installed on the driver shaft
further from the shaft.
e. Tighten the rod at the ball joint and loosen the air
damper.
f. Use the manual override push button on the
actuator to verify if the linkage is now correct. If
not, go through the steps above until you get a
satisfactory setup.
15. Bring back the power to the unit and turn it on. Verify
the combustion to make sure it is clean on low, mid
and high fire. Fine tune as necessary.
16. When the duct furnace adjustment procedure is
complete, start and stop the burner several times to
insure proper operation.
84
Figure D21: Flame signal measurement location
Run/test switch
Captive
mounting screw
Plugin
purge card
Dust cover
Sequence
status LEDs
Relay module
Reset push
button
Flame
simulator input
Flame amplifier
Flame current
test jacks
Burner Control Module Troubleshooting
Guide
RM7897A Burner Control Module
Troubleshooting
The power LED provides fault identification when the relay
module locks out on an alarm. Fault identification is a
series of fast and slow blinking LED lights. The fast blinks
identify the tens portion of the fault code (three fast blinks
is 30), while the slow blinks identify the units portion of
the fault code (two slow blinks is two). Three fast blinks
followed by two slow blinks would be fault code 32. This
identifies a running interlock on during standby (see Table
D4 for Blinking Fault Code List.)
The LED code repeats as long as the fault exists. To clear
the fault, press the Reset button.
IMPORTANT
Blink codes do not match fault codes viewed by an
S7800 KDM.
VCES-ASTON-IOM-1F – EnergyPack, ERV5000–10000, HRV3000–10000
85
Table D6: Blinking Fault Codes and Recommended Troubleshooting
Fault Code
System Failure
Code 1-1: Low AC
Low AC line detected.
line voltage
Recommended Troubleshooting
1. Check the relay module and display module connections.
2. Reset and sequence the relay module.
3. Check the 7,800 power supply and make sure that frequency and
Code 1-2: AC
Excessive noise or device running on slow,
voltage meet specifications.
quality problem
fast or AC line dropout detected.
4. Check the backup power supply, as appropriate.
1. Check that flame is not present in the combustion chamber,
correct any errors.
2. Make sure that the flame amplifier and flame detector are compatible.
3. Check the wiring and correct any errors.
Code 2-1:
Flame sensed when no flame is expected
4. Remove the flame amplifier and inspect its connections. Reset the
Unexpected flame
during standby or purge.
amplifier.
signal
5. Reset and sequence the relay module.
6. If the code reappears, replace the flame amplifier and/or the flame
detector.
7. If the fault persists, replace the relay module.
1. Measure the flame signal. If one exists, verify that it meets
specifications.
2. Make sure that the flame amplifier and flame detector are compatible.
3. Inspect the main fuel valve(s) and valve connection(s).
4. Verify that the fuel pressure is sufficient to supply fuel to the combustion chamber. Inspect the connections to the fuel pressure
switches. Make sure they are functioning properly.
No flame time present at the end of the pilot
Code 2-2: Flame
flame establishing period; lost during the
5. Inspect the airflow switch and make sure that it is functioning
signal absent
main flame establishing period or during run.
properly.
6. Check the flame detector sighting position; reset and recycle.
Measure the flame signal strength. Verify that it meets specifications. If not, refer to the flame detector and/or flame amplifier
checkout procedures in the installation instructions.
7. Replace the flame amplifier and/or the flame detector, if necessary.
8. If the fault persists, replace the relay module.
1. Make sure the flame detector and flame amplifier are compatible.
2. Remove the flame amplifier and inspect its connections. Reset the
flame amplifier.
3. Reset and sequence the relay module.
4. Check the flame detector sighting position; reset and recycle.
Code 2-3: Flame
Flame signal value is too high to be valid.
Measure flame strength. Verify that it meets specifications. If not,
signal over range
refer to the flame detector and/or flame amplifier checkout procedures in the installation instructions.
5. If the code reappears, replace the flame amplifier and/or the flame
detector.
6. If the fault persists, replace the relay module.
1. Check wiring; correct any errors.
2. Inspect the fan; make sure there is no air intake blockage and that
it is supplying air.
3. Make sure the lockout interlock switches are functioning properly
Code 3-1:
and the contacts are free from contaminants.
Running or lockout interlock fault during preRunning/interlock
4. Reset and sequence the relay module to pre-purge (place the test/
purge.
switch problem
run switch in the ‘Test’ position, if available). Measure the voltage
between terminal ‘7’ and ‘G’ (Ground); 120 VAC should be present. Switch test/run back to ‘Run’.
5. If Steps 1 through 4 are correct and the fault persists, replace the
relay module.
VCES-ASTON-IOM-1F – EnergyPack, ERV5000–10000, HRV3000–10000
86
Table D6: Blinking Fault Codes and Recommended Troubleshooting
Fault Code
System Failure
Recommended Troubleshooting
1. Check wiring to make sure that the lockout interlocks are connected properly between terminals ‘6’ and ‘7’. Correct any errors.
2. Reset and sequence the relay module.
3. If the fault persists, measure the voltage between terminal 6 and
‘G’ (Ground), then between terminal ‘7’ and ‘G’. If there is 120
Code 3-2:
VAC at terminal ‘6’ when the controller is off, the controller switch
Lockout interlock powered at improper point
Running/interlock
may be bad or is jumpered.
in sequence or on in standby.
on during standby
4. If Steps 1 through 3 are correct and there is 120 VAC at terminal
‘7’ when the controller is closed and the fault persists, check for
a welded or jumpered running interlock or airflow switch. Correct
any errors.
5. If Steps 1 through 4 are correct and the fault persists, replace the
relay module.
1. Check wiring, making sure upstream valve is connected to terminal ‘9’ and downstream valve is connected to terminal ‘17’.
2. Conduct valve seat leakage test using a manometer.
3. Reset and sequence the relay module; if fault repeats, test VPS
Code 3-3: VPS in VPS (valve proving switch) in wrong state
(connected to terminal ‘16’) is functioning properly; replace if
improper state
during VPS test.
necessary.
4. Reset and sequence the relay module.
5. If fault persists, replace the relay module.
1. Make sure the purge card is seated properly.
2. Inspect the purge card and the connector on the relay module for
any damage or contaminants.
Code 4-1: Purge
No purge card or the purge card timing has
3. Reset and sequence the relay module.
card problem
changed from the original configuration.
4. If the fault code reappears, replace the purge card.
5. Reset and sequence the relay module.
6. If the fault code persists, replace the relay module.
WARNING
Code 4-2: Wiring
problem/internal
fault
Code 4-3: Flame
amplifier problem
Code 4-4:
Configuration
jumper problem
Code 5-1:
Pre-ignition
interlock
Electrical shock hazard/fire or explosion hazard – Can cause severe
injury, death or property damage. Remove system power and turn off
Pilot (ignition) valve terminal, main valve, igni- power supply.
tion or main valve 2 was on when it should
1. Remove system power and turn off fuel supply.
be off.
2. Check wiring; correct any errors.
3. Inspect pilot fuel valve(s) (both places) and connections.
4. Reset and sequence the relay module.
5. If the fault persists, replace the relay module.
1. Check wiring; correct any errors.
2. Make sure the flame amplifier and flame detector are compatible.
3. Remove the flame amplifier and inspect the connections. Reset
the amplifier.
Flame not sensed or sensed when it should
be on or off.
4. Reset and sequence the relay module.
5. If the code reappears, replace the flame amplifier and/or the flame
detector.
6. If the fault persists, replace the relay module.
1. Inspect the jumper connections. Make sure the clipped jumpers
were completely removed.
The configuration jumpers differ from the
sample taken at start-up.
2. Reset and sequence the relay module.
3. If the fault persists, replace the relay module.
1. Inspect the jumper connections. Make sure the clipped jumpers
were completely removed.
Pre-ignition interlock fault.
2. Reset and sequence the relay module.
3. If the fault persists, replace the relay module.
VCES-ASTON-IOM-1F – EnergyPack, ERV5000–10000, HRV3000–10000
87
Table D6: Blinking Fault Codes and Recommended Troubleshooting
Fault Code
System Failure
Recommended Troubleshooting
1. Check wiring and correct any errors.
2. Reset and sequence the relay module.
Code 5-2: High fire
3. Use manual motor potentiometer to drive the motor open and
switch or low fire
Either high fire switch or low fire switch failure.
closed. Verify at motor switch that the end switches are operating
switch
properly. Use run/test switch if manual potentiometer is not available.
4. Reset and sequence the relay module.
5. If the fault persists, replace the relay module.
1. Check wiring and correct any errors.
2. Make sure that the manual open valve switch, start switch and
control are operating properly.
Code 5-3: Manopen switch, start Man-open switch, start switch or control on 3. Stat switch held ‘On’ too long.
in the wrong operational state.
switch or control
4. Reset and sequence the relay module.
on
5. Reset and sequence the relay module. If the fault persists, replace the relay module (RM7838A1014; RM7838B1013 or
RM7838C1004 only).
1. Reset and sequence the relay module.
2. If fault re-appears, remove power from the device, re-apply power,
Code 6-1: Internal
Relay module self-test failure.
then reset and sequence the relay module.
faults
3. If the fault persists, replace the relay module.
1. Reset and sequence the relay module.
2. If fault re-appears, remove power from the device, re-apply power,
then reset and sequence the relay module.
Code 6-2: Internal
Relay module self-test failure.
3. If fault does not repeat on the next cycle, check for electrical noise
faults
being copied into the relay module through the external loads or
possibly an electrical grounding issue.
4. If the fault persists, replace the relay module.
1. Check wiring and operation of special OEM inputs.
2. Reset and sequence the relay module.
3. If fault re-appears, remove power from the device, re-apply power,
Code 6-3: Device
then reset and sequence the relay module.
Fault with special OEM input circuits.
specific
4. If the fault does not repeat on the next cycle, check for electrical noise being copied into the relay module through the external
loads or possibly an electrical grounding issue.
5. If the fault persists, replace the relay module.
Code 6-4:
Unused at this time.
—
Accessory fault
Cod 7-7: Unused Unused at this time.
—
VCES-ASTON-IOM-1F – EnergyPack, ERV5000–10000, HRV3000–10000
88
S89 Burner Control Module
Figure D23: Check burner flame condition
Measure Flame Current
Check burner flame condition
The S89 provides AC power to the flame sensor which
the flame rectifies to direct current. If the flame signal back
to the S89 is less than 0.8 µA, the S89 will shut down the
system.
Noisy lifting flame
Check for:
• High gas pressure
• Excess primary air or draft
To measure the flame current:
1. Connect a meter, set to the dc microammeter scale,
in series with the flame sensor as shown in Figure
D22. Use the Honeywell W136 Test Meter or equivalent. Connect the meter as follows:
a. Disconnect the sensor lead at the S89.
b. Connect the red (positive) meter lead to the S89
sense terminal.
c. Connect the black (negative) meter lead to the
free end of the sensor lead.
2. Re-start the system and read the meter. The flame
sensor current must be at least 0.8 µA and steady.
3. If the meter reads less than 0.8 µA or reading is unsteady, re-check points under Check Flame Sensor
and Igniter.
Figure D22: S89 flame current measurement
Flame sensor current check – use µA scale
Burner
Waving flame
Check for:
• Poor draft
• Excess draft
• High velocity or secondary air
Install shield if necessary
Small blue flame
Check for:
• Clogged ports or orifice filter
• Wrong size orifice
Lazy yellow flame
Check for lack of air from:
• Dirty primary air opening
• Large ports or orifices
To sensor
W136 (or equivalent)
multi-purpose meter
Valve
Valve (Gnd)
24V
24V (Gnd)
Sense
Disconnect
wire from
sense terminal
Good rectifying flame
Gnd (burner)
Black (−)
1” [25.4 mm]
Red (+)
0.8 µA DC min.
(and steady)
VCES-ASTON-IOM-1F – EnergyPack, ERV5000–10000, HRV3000–10000
¼–½” [6.4–12.7 mm]
89
Operation
Figure D24: Normal sequence of operation
The S89 is powered by a 24V transformer. It operates in
response to a call for heat from the thermostat.
Start
On every call for heat, the S89 performs a safe start check.
If a flame or a flame simulating condition is present, the S89
locks out without starting the igniter and must be reset.
Following the safe start check and, on the S89F, a valve
on delay period, the S89 spark generator contacts close
to energize the spark generator and the igniter. At the
same time the gas control, powered through the gas
valve relay contacts in the S89, opens so gas can flow to
the burner. The igniter is on during approximately the first
80 percent of the ignition, or lockout timing, period. During the balance of the lockout timing period, the ignition
is off and the flame sensor attempts to prove the flame.
The flame is proved when current from the flame sensor
through the burner flame to ground reaches 0.8 µA dc.
Safe start
check
Valve on delay
(S89F only)
Trial for
ignition
If flame is lost after being proved, the S89 will close the
gas control, perform a safe start check, and, on the S89F,
valve on delay, then return ignition as described above.
The S89 is reset by turning the thermostat below room
temperature or removing power to the system for 45
seconds.
VCES-ASTON-IOM-1F – EnergyPack, ERV5000–10000, HRV3000–10000
2. Safe start check.
2A. Valve on delay
(S89F only)
combustion air
blower starts.
3. Spark generator
powered. Ignition
begins and gas control
opens.
4. Burner lights.
Ignition stops and
flame current is sensed.
If flame is proved, the gas control remains open and the
burner on until the call for heat ends.
If flame is not proved, the gas control closes and the system is locked out until the S89 is reset.
1. Thermostat calls for
heat.
Burner
operation
5. Burner runs, S89
monitors flame
current.
Power interruption.
System shuts off.
Restarts when power is
restored.
If flame simulation
condition is present,
system will not start.
If no spark, S89 locks
out and shuts down
system. Must be reset.
If flame current is
absent, weak or
unsteady, S89 locks
out and shuts down
system. Must be reset.
If flame is lost, S89
closes gas control, then
restarts safe start
check and trial for
ignition.
6. Thermostat satisfied.
Gas control closes,
burner goes off.
End
90
Troubleshooting
Check Spark Ignition Circuit
WARNING
Fire or explosion hazard. Can cause severe injury, death,
or property damage.
The S89 spark generator relay switches 120 VAC to the
remote mounted spark generator, which, in turn, powers
the spark igniter at the burner. Check as follows:
Any replacement S89 must have the same or shorter
lockout timing and the same or longer delay timing as the
original control.
1. Shut off gas supply to the gas control.
2. Disconnect the ignition cable at the spark generator
stud terminal.
3. Set the thermostat to call for heat.
4. Reset the S89 by removing power to the module for
45 seconds.
Before beginning troubleshooting, review the normal operating sequence of the S89. See the Operation section. Then
follow the steps in Figure D25 to identify the source of the
problem. Some steps are explained in greater detail below.
Electrical shock hazard. Can cause severe injury, death,
or property damage.
IMPORTANT
1. The following service procedures are provided as a
general guide. Follow Appliance Manufacturer service instructions, if available.
2. All meter readings must be taken within the trial for
ignition period. Once the ignition period ends, the
system must be reset by setting the thermostat
down for at least 45 seconds before continuing.
3. If any component does not function properly, make
sure it is correctly installed and wired before replacing it.
4. The ignition module cannot be repaired. If it malfunctions, it must be replaced.
5. Only trained, experienced service technicians
should service direct spark ignition systems.
Besides standard hand tools, you will need the following
to complete the troubleshooting:
1. Honeywell W136 Test Meter or equivalent.
2. Test Lead – A length of ignition cable or other heavily
insulated wire with both ends stripped ½” [13 mm].
Check Ignition System Grounding
Nuisance shut downs are often caused by a poor or erratic ground.
A common ground is required for the module, igniter,
flame sensor and main burner.
1. Check for good metal-to-metal contact between the
igniter bracket and the main burner.
2. Check the ground lead from the ‘GND’ (burner)
terminal on the module to the igniter bracket. Make
sure connections are clean and tight. If the wire is
damaged or deteriorated, replace it with 14 to 18
gauge, moisture resistant, thermoplastic insulated
wire with a 221°F [105°C] minimum rating. Use a
shield if necessary to protect the ground wire from
radiant heat.
VCES-ASTON-IOM-1F – EnergyPack, ERV5000–10000, HRV3000–10000
WARNING
In the next step, do not touch either the stripped end of
the test lead or the stud terminal.
5. Restore power. Before the S89 locks out, touch one
end of the test lead firmly to the S89 ‘GND’ terminal.
Do not remove the existing ground lead.
6. Slowly move the other end of the test lead toward the
stud terminal on the spark generator until sparking stops.
7. Slowly pull the wire away from the stud terminal and
note the size of the gap when sparking stops.
8. Follow instructions in Table D7.
Table D7: Spark Ignition Troubleshooting
If the gap was
Then
1/8” [3 mm] or more Generator output voltage is okay.
Less than 1/8”
Check for 120 VAC at the spark generator
[3 mm] or no spark terminals. If okay, replace the spark generator.
Check Flame Sensor and Igniter
1. Make sure burner flame is capable of providing a
good rectification signal. See Figure D23.
2. Make sure about ¾” to 1” [19 to 25 mm] of the flame
sensor is continuously immersed in the flame for best
flame signal. See Figure D23. Bend the bracket or
flame sensor, or relocate the sensor as necessary.
Do not relocate the igniter.
3. Make sure flame does not touch sensor or ignitor
ceramic insulator and that insulators are below he
flame. Excessive heat (over 1,000°F [538°C]) will
cause short to ground. Move sensor to cooler location or shield insulators if excessive heat is suspected. Do not relocate the igniter.
4. Check for cracked igniter or sensor ceramic insulator, which can cause short to ground, and replace
unit if necessary.
5. Make sure electrical connections are clean and tight.
6. Replace damaged wire with moisture resistant number
18 wire rated for continuous duty up to 221°F [105°C].
91
Figure D25: Troubleshooting S89E,F
Start
Review normal operating
sequence. Turn gas supply
on. Turn thermostat up to call
for heat.
Power to S89 (24 VAC and
120 VAC Normal).
No
Check line voltage power. Low voltage transformer, limit controller, thermostat and
wiring. Also, air proving switch on pre-purge systems (see wiring hookups).
Yes
S89E – 10 second max.
Delay for safe start check.
No
Replace S89.
S89F only – 38 second max.
Valve-on delay.
Yes
Spark across igniter gap.
No
Check spark ignition circuit.
See component checks.
Spark ok?
No
•
•
•
Check for 120V to spark generator.
Replace spark generator if voltage ok.
If no voltage, replace S89.
Yes
Make sure ignition cable:
• Provides electrical continuity.
• Does not touch any metal surfaces.
• Connections are metal surfaces.
• Shows no signs of melting or buckling. Replace and shield cable if necessary.
Yes
Make sure burner spark igniter and S89 ground (burner) terminal have effective
common ground. Poor or erratic ground will cause nuisance shut-downs.
Check for cracked insulator on igniter or flame sensor. Replace device with
cracked insulator to prevent short to ground.
Main burner lights.
No
Note: If S89 locks out, reset before continuing.
•
•
Yes
•
Spark stops before end of
igniter timing.
No
Check for 24 VAC across valve and valve (ground) terminals on S89. If no
voltage, replace S89.
Make sure igniter and sensor are properly positioned. See component
checks.
Check electrical connections between S89 and gas control. If ok, replace
gas control.
Replace S89.
Yes
System runs until call for
heat ends.
No
Note: If S89 locks out, reset before continuing.
•
•
•
Yes
•
Call for heat ends; system
shuts off.
Yes
No
•
•
Make sure flame current is at least 0.8 micro amps. See component checks.
Make sure L1 and L2 are connected to the proper terminals.
Make sure flame does not touch sensor insulator and that sensor insulator
is below flame. Excessive heat (over 1,000ºF [538ºC] will cause short to
ground. Relocate sensor or shield insulator if excess heat is suspected.
If checks are ok, replace S89 module.
Check for proper temperature controller operation.
Remove valve lead at S89; if valve closes, recheck temperature
controller and wiring. If not, replace gas control.
Repeat procedure until trouble free operation is obtained.
Troubleshooting ends.
VCES-ASTON-IOM-1F – EnergyPack, ERV5000–10000, HRV3000–10000
92
Appendix E: EnergyPack®, ERV5000–10000(i/e) and
HRV3000–10000(i/e) Start-up Form and Checklist
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
IMPORTANT
Complete all forms under this appendix for each unit and email, fax or mail to Venmar CES immediately after start-up
to validate warranty and to provide valuable information for personnel performing future maintenance or for factory assistance to address below.
Read the Installation, Operation and Maintenance Instruction Manual and the Venmar CES Control System Keypad
Operation Guide and the Sequence of Operation before proceeding.
Leave a copy of this report with the Owner and at the unit for future reference and permanent record.
To ensure proper operation of each unit, qualified personnel should perform the start-up, complete the checklist and
report.
All units are functionally tested except when shipped in multiple pieces. Start-up adjustments may be required. If the
unit is shipped as a single piece, blowers, enthalpy wheel and compressors (if equipped) are set up to run correctly
when power is connected. If any blower is running backwards or compressor is making loud noises, disconnect power
and switch two leads (on three-phase power) to ensure proper rotation and avoid damage.
If units are equipped with compressors, power must be turned on for 24 hours prior to a call for cooling, for the compressor crank case heaters to be energizing to prevent possible damage.
The Bacview keypad located at the control panel will allow for manual override for start-up, mode of operation selection
and includes an internal time clock if remote interlocks are not provided.
Nortek Air Solutions Canada Inc.
200 Carter
St-Leonard-d’Aston, QC
Canada J0C 1M0
Email to Tech Support: [email protected]
Fax: 899-319-2612
Phone: 1-866-483-6627
VCES-ASTON-IOM-1F – EnergyPack, ERV5000–10000, HRV3000–10000
Unit Identification Information
Project:____________________________________________
Job Name:_________________________________________
Job Address:
__________________________________________________
__________________________________________________
__________________________________________________
Model Number:_____________________________________
Serial Number:______________________________________
Tag:_______________________________________________
Jobsite Contact:____________________________________
Email:_____________________________________________
Telephone:_________________________________________
93
Serial Number:______________________________________
Table E1: Pre Start-up Checklist
Checklist Item
1
Check the electrical disconnect set to the ‘Off’ position.
2
Check the split section joints are properly installed on multi-sectional units.
Check that all holes that have been made by the Installing Contractor after receiving the unit in the
casing, partitions or floor have been well sealed to prevent air and/or water infiltration.
Check the unit for obstructive packaging, objects near or in fans, dampers, energy recovery wheel, etc.
3
4
Yes
N/A
a. Check that the inside of unit has been cleaned of all debris.
Remove all retaining bolts on fan isolation bases.
a. Check that the fan impellers are rotating freely.
5
b. Check fan impellers and drive set screws. Tighten if required.
c. Check the fan bearing set screws or locking collars. Tight if required.
d. Check fan belt alignment and tension.
6
7
8
9
10
e. Check the fan flexible joint connections are well attached.
Check that the air filters are installed and clean. Replace if necessary. See Appendix F for optional
downstream high efficiency HEPA filter installation (if supplied).
a. Check all face mounted filters are attached with four clips each.
b. Check each sliding filter has a retainer at the end track and well attached blank-offs.
c. Check the filter pressure differential gauges, switches or sensors are free of dirt and set at a
value satisfactory to the end user to trigger a filter change.
Check coils if fins have been damaged in shipping, installation or building construction and are
clean. Straighten fins with a fin comb and clean coil if required (not applicable to brazed aluminum
heat exchangers).
a. Check all pipe connections are tight and that no damage has occurred during shipping or
installation.
b. Check that the piping to the coils and wshp have been completed, piping lines have been
flushed, filled, vented and tested at 1.25 times the operating pressure. Refer to Appendix B.
Scroll compressor RIS vibration isolator bolts are factory tightened to the correct torque setting for
operation and do not require field adjustment.
a. Check the refrigerant components and piping are in good condition and have no damage or
leaks from shipping or installation.
b. Check that the refrigerant lines are spaced at least 1” apart and from the compressor after
shipping and installation.
c. Check that the refrigerant line clamps are still secure and have their rubber lining.
d. Check that the clearance around the air cooled condenser is within minimum clearance and
the discharge is not blocked.
Check motorized damper control arms, control rods and shafts for tightness.
a. Check that non-motorized dampers rotate freely.
Check the energy recovery wheel media for any defects from shipping or installation. See
Maintenance section for details.
a. Grease both pillow block bearings on the wheel(s) when grease nipples provided.
b. Check that the wheel(s) are turning freely by hand and do not bind.
c. Visually inspect the wheel(s) to ensure it is centered and does not tilt. If there is any indication
of a problem call Venmar CES Tech Support at 1-866-483-6627.
d. Check that the wheel seals are properly positioned from the face of the wheel.
e. Check that the wheel purge (if present) is set to the default angle as specified in the submittal.
f. Check the mounting fasteners on the wheel(s) motor and gear reducer are tight.
g. Check the belt and pulley on the wheel drive for correct alignment, tension and set screw
tightness.
VCES-ASTON-IOM-1F – EnergyPack, ERV5000–10000, HRV3000–10000
94
Serial Number:______________________________________
Table E1: Pre Start-up Checklist
Checklist Item
11
Yes
N/A
Check the plate media for any defects from shipping or installation.
Check the heat pipe fins for any fin defects from shipping or installation.
12
a. Remove retaining bolts on heat pipe tilt mechanism.
b. Check the heat pipe flexible connection is properly attached and sealed on tilt mechanism.
c. Check the actuator control arm and linkages are tight on tilt mechanism.
13
Check that ductwork is connected, complete and free of obstructions.
14
Check that condensate drain connections have been trapped, installed correctly and filled.
Check at all unit split sections that all factory internal high and low voltage wiring connections have
been properly re-connected.
Check that all shipped loose or field supplied components have been correctly installed and wired.
15
16
17
19
Check that the wiring diagram has been marked up accordingly and left with the unit.
Check that all power supplies and control wiring have been inspected and approved by the Local
Authorities having jurisdiction.
Check all factory and field wiring connections for tightness. Tighten if necessary.
20
Check that all settings of control are in accordance with the wiring schematic.
21
Check that all fuses are properly installed in holders.
Check the voltage at the disconnect switch against the nameplate and against phase-to-phase
readings on three-phase. If the voltage is not within 10% of rated or 2% of phase to phase, have
the condition corrected before continuing start-up.
Check that all field piping and venting installation and connections for heating and cooling options
have been completed and tested.
Set the heating and cooling enable switches to the ‘Off’ position.
Refer to Appendix D for gas-fired furnace module and Appendix H for electric coil installation and
maintenance and check that the installation is completed. Perform all gas-fired furnace and electric
coil pre start-up checks.
Check that all safety switches, overloads or other manual reset devices are reset.
If the unit is equipped with compressors, power must be turned on with the unit in ‘Off’ mode for
24 hours before start-up. This will energize crank case heaters and assure no liquid refrigerant is
present which could cause compressor damage or failure. Check that this has been completed.
18
22
23
24
25
26
27
VCES-ASTON-IOM-1F – EnergyPack, ERV5000–10000, HRV3000–10000
95
Serial Number:______________________________________
Table E2: Start-up Checklist
Checklist Item
1
Before proceeding, complete the pre start-up checklist.
2
5
Check that all access panels or doors are closed.
If units are equipped with compressors, feel the compressor crank cases. They should be warm
if the disconnect has been ‘On’ for at least 24 hours. This will assure that no refrigerant liquid is
present in the crank case which could cause compressor damage or failure to occur on start-up.
Otherwise, turn the main disconnect to the ‘On’ position.
The unit can be started by using the keypad and selecting the mode of operation from the Keypad
Operation Guide and the Sequence of Operation. Disable the heating and cooling functions and
set the unit to the occupied mode to bump start the fan wheel(s) and energy recovery wheel(s) to
check their operation.
Check that dampers are operating properly.
6
Check that the fan wheel(s) and energy recovery wheel(s) are rotating in the correct direction.
7
Adjust the fan motor VFD(s) to the correct air volume/Hertz.
For occupied recirculation mode, adjust outside, exhaust and mixed or recirculation air damper
positioners to achieve the required air volumes.
Check amperage draw to each motor on each phase against motor nameplate FLA. If significantly
different, check ductwork static and/or take corrective action.
Re-check the voltage at the disconnect switch against the nameplate and against phase-to-phase
readings on three-phase with all blowers operating. If the voltage is not within 10% of rated or 2%
of phase-to-phase have the condition corrected before continuing start-up.
Before activating the compressor on WSHP units, check that the water shut-off valves are open
and water is circulating through the water-to-refrigerant heat exchanger. Check the incoming line
water pressure to ensure is within design and acceptable limits.
Enable the cooling mode of operation. Check if the sound of the compressor is normal or if there is
excessive vibration.
On units with integrated air cooled condensers check condenser fans are rotating in the correct
direction.
Check all field and factory refrigerant and water piping connections for leaks and correct.
Operate the refrigerant system near full load conditions in both heating and cooling modes
and check sub-cooling and superheat against values in Appendix Q, Table Q1. If readings do
not match, adjust the refrigerant charge. Refer to Appendix Q for information on adjusting the
refrigeration charge.
On units with wshp, after a few minutes of operation:
a. Check the supply discharge temperature status on the keypad for cooling air delivery.
Measure the temperature difference between entering and leaving water. In cooling mode,
the temperature difference should be approximately 1.5 times greater than the heating mode
temperature difference. For example, if the cooling temperature difference is 15°F [8.3°C],
the heating temperature difference should be approximately 7°F to 10°F [3.9°C to 5.6°C].
Alternatively, if a flow measuring valve or pressure gauge connections are included, take the
flow reading or pressure drop compared to the submittal information and adjust the shut-off/
balancing valve in the return line to the correct flow/pressure drop reading.
b. Measure the temperature difference between entering and leaving air and entering and leaving
water. With entering water of 60°F to 80°F [15.6°C to 26.7°C], leaving temperature should
rise through the unit. Should not exceed 35°F [19.4°C]. If the air temperature exceeds 35°F
[19.4°C], then the water flow rate is inadequate or the airflow rate may be low and a second
check may be required after airflow balancing.
On units with gas-fired furnace module or electric heating coils, check supply air proving interlock
switch setting to ensure minimum supply airflow prior to burner operation. Set the switch to open
below the minimum supply airflow on the furnace rating plate.
Enable heating options, see start-up and check out instructions in Appendix D for gas-fired furnace
module and Appendix H for electric coil and complete.
3
4
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
VCES-ASTON-IOM-1F – EnergyPack, ERV5000–10000, HRV3000–10000
Yes
N/A
96
Serial Number:______________________________________
Table E2: Start-up Checklist
20
Checklist Item
For electric heating coil option check the amp draw on each stage, the operation of the sequence
or SCR controller and the coil for any hot spots.
Check the operation of the control options provided on the unit.
21
Check the setpoints on the DDC Points Reference, adjust and record changes as required.
22
Has air balancing been completed for both occupied and unoccupied operation?
When unit has achieved steady state, take measurements and complete Start-up Readings portion
of the Start-up Form and Checklist in Appendix E. Send a copy of the completed Start-up Form
and Checklist to Venmar CES to validate warranty. Maintain a copy of the report at the unit for
future reference.
Once completed, return setpoints to original or required values, return the unit to the correct mode
of operation and adjust the time clock if required.
19
23
24
VCES-ASTON-IOM-1F – EnergyPack, ERV5000–10000, HRV3000–10000
Yes
N/A
97
Serial Number:______________________________________
Start-up Readings
•
•
Allow unit to reach steady state before taking readings.
Complete based on options included with unit.
Nameplate voltage
Input voltage
L1–L2
L2–L3
L1–L3
Table E3: Start-up Readings – Supply Fan
Rotation
Correct
Full Load Amps
(Nameplate Amps)
Amp Draw
L1
L2
L3
O/L Amp
Setting
Hertz
RPM
L3
O/L Amp
Setting
Hertz
RPM
Fan 1
Fan 2
Fan 3
Fan 4
Fan 5
Fan 6
Fan 7
Fan 8
Fan 9
Fan 10
Fan 11
Fan 12
Table E4: Start-up Readings – Exhaust Fan
Rotation
Correct
Full Load Amps
(Nameplate Amps)
Amp Draw
L1
L2
Fan 1
Fan 2
Fan 3
Fan 4
Fan 5
Fan 6
Fan 7
Fan 8
Fan 9
Fan 10
Fan 11
Fan 12
VCES-ASTON-IOM-1F – EnergyPack, ERV5000–10000, HRV3000–10000
98
Serial Number:______________________________________
Table E5: Start-up Readings – Condenser Fan
Rotation Correct
Amp Draw
Full Load Amps
(Nameplate Amps)
L1
L2
L3
O/L Amp Setting
Fan 1
Fan 2
Fan 3
Fan 4
Fan 5
Fan 6
Fan 7
Fan 8
Fan 9
Fan 10
Fan 11
Fan 12
Fan 13
Fan 14
Fan 15
Fan 16
Table E6: Start-up Readings – Compressors
Full Load
Amps
(Nameplate
Amps)
L1
Amp Draw
After compressor has been running for 15 minutes check the following:
L2
Outdoor
Hot Gas
Ambient Temp.
Suction Discharge
Liquid
Superheat
Bypass
During AC
Pressure Pressure
Sub-cooling
Functioning Cooling Startup (°F/°C)
L3
Compressor 1
Compressor 2
Compressor 3
Compressor 4
Compressor 5
Compressor 6
Compressor 7
Compressor 8
Compressor 9
Compressor 10
Compressor 11
Compressor 12
Compressor 13
Compressor 14
Compressor 15
Compressor 16
VCES-ASTON-IOM-1F – EnergyPack, ERV5000–10000, HRV3000–10000
99
Serial Number:______________________________________
Table E7: Start-up Readings – WSHP
Waterside Cooling Mode
Entering
Leaving
Temp.
Temp.
Temp.
Difference
(°F/°C)
(°F/°C)
(°F/°C)
Entering
Temp.
(°F/°C)
Leaving
Temp.
(°F/°C)
Waterside Heating Mode
Temp.
Entering
Difference Pressure
(°F/°C)
(PSI)
Leaving
Pressure
(PSI)
US GPM
Condenser 1
Condenser 2
Condenser 3
Condenser 4
Condenser 5
Condenser 6
Condenser 7
Condenser 8
Condenser 9
Condenser 10
Condenser 11
Condenser 12
Condenser 13
Condenser 14
Condenser 15
Condenser 16
Table E8: Start-up Readings – Electric Heating Coil
Stage
L1 Amps
L2 Amps
L3 Amps
Check for Hot Pots
1
2
3
4
5
6
Table E9: Start-up Readings – Energy Recovery Wheel (ERW)
Full Load Amps
(Nameplate Amps)
Amp Draw
L1
L2
L3
O/L Amp Setting
ERW 1
ERW 2
ERW 3
ERW 4
VCES-ASTON-IOM-1F – EnergyPack, ERV5000–10000, HRV3000–10000
100
Serial Number:______________________________________
Table E10: Start-up Readings – Gas-fired Duct Furnace
Fuel
___ Natural Gas
____ Propane
Furnace #1
Furnace #2
Rotation correct2
Combustion air fan
Full load amps (nameplate amps)2
Amp draw L1/L2/L32
O/L amp setting2
Rotation correct
Induced draft fan motor
Full load amps (nameplate amps)
Amp draw L1/L2/L3
O/L amp setting
Inlet gas pressure – in. w.c.
Regulator outlet pressure – in. w.c.
Manifold press – in. w.c.
Stack CO2 – %2
Stack O2 – %2
Low fire
Net stack temperature – °F/°C2
Efficiency – %2
Flame signal – mA/VDC
Supply air inlet temperature – °F/°C
Supply air discharge temperature – °F/°C1
Supply air temperature rise – °F/°C
Inlet gas pressure – in. w.c.
Regulator outlet pressure – in. w.c.2
Manifold press – in. w.c.
Stack CO2 – %2
Stack O2 – %2
High fire
Net stack temperature – °F/°C2
Efficiency – %2
Flame signal – mA/VDC
Supply air inlet temperature – °F/°C
Supply air discharge temperature – °F/°C1
Supply air temperature rise – °F/°C
1. Measure downstream where temperature is even in duct.
2. For IG series drum and tube gas-fired duct furnace models only.
This unit has been checked out and started according
with the above procedures and completed forms and is
operating satisfactorily. After 24 hours of satisfactory operation shut down the unit and check all foundation bolts,
shaft bearings, drive set screws, valve train and terminals.
Tighten where required.
Additional Comments:
__________________________________________________
__________________________________________________
__________________________________________________
__________________________________________________
VCES-ASTON-IOM-1F – EnergyPack, ERV5000–10000, HRV3000–10000
Start-up
By:________________________________________________
Company Name:____________________________________
Date:______________________________________________
Email:_____________________________________________
Telephone:_________________________________________
Email to Tech Support: [email protected]
or Fax to: 819-399-2612.
101
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VCES-ASTON-IOM-1F – EnergyPack, ERV5000–10000, HRV3000–10000
102
Appendix F: HEPA Filter Installation
These instructions are for installing AAF HEPA filters (11½”
depth) into AAF HEPA holding frames. The holding frames
are available in multiple sizes and materials, but include
the PN series of 30619XX-XXX, where the X’s vary with
frame size and material. All frames, latches, extension
legs and filters are sold separately. Please read the entire
installation instructions before beginning the installation
process.
Step 1
At the inside corner of each frame are four tabs, two per
side. Place a leg extension over the four tabs as shown in
Figure F2 below, then pull back on the leg extension locking it into place.
Figure F2: Place leg extensions over the frame tabs,
then pull back to lock the leg extension into place
Install filters into the HEPA holding frames only after the
frames have been securely installed into existing ductwork
or housing. Frames should be bolted or pop riveted together into the permanent structure through the pre-drilled
holes around the outside perimeter of the frames. Frames
should be sufficiently caulked and sealed to prevent any
air bypass or leakage.
Required Tools for Filter Installation
• T-handle Hexkey, size 5/32”
Framing Components Required
• AAF HEPA holding frames – PN 30619XXXXX
• Leg extensions, four per frame – PN 3061991- 00X
• Latches, four per frame – PN 3062007-00X
Repeat Step 1 with each of the four corners. The frame
with leg extensions should look like Figure F3.
Figure F3: Frame with leg extensions installed
Figure F1: Leg extensions and latches
VCES-ASTON-IOM-1F – EnergyPack, ERV5000–10000, HRV3000–10000
103
Step 2
Insert the HEPA filter into the HEPA holding frame. The
HEPA should be installed with the gasket side of the filter
facing the frame. Insert the filter as far into the frame as
possible, so that the gasket material is contacting the
frame. See Figure F4 below.
The filter should now be resting inside of the holding frame
as shown to the left. When installing the filters into a frame
bank of multiple frames, install the lower filters first so that
the upper filters can rest on the lower filters.
Figure F5: Filter placed inside of frame
Figure F4: Insert HEPA filter into frame, until the
gasket comes in contact with the holding frame
Step 3
Place a latch so that it overlaps the leg extension, as
shown below in Figure F6. Align the latch’s cap screw
with the threaded coupling on the end of the leg extension
and tighten using the hexkey. Tighten the cap screw until
there is an approximately ¼” gap between the latch and
the leg extension coupling as shown below in Figure F7.
Repeat this step with all four corners.
Figure F6: Latch overlapping leg extension
VCES-ASTON-IOM-1F – EnergyPack, ERV5000–10000, HRV3000–10000
104
Figure F7: Tighten cap screw to ¼” of the coupling
Once all four corners have been tightened the filter should
now be properly seated and sealed.
Repeat the process with all remaining filters working from
the bottom to the top.
Figure F9: Properly installed filter
Step 4
Once all four corner latches have been tightened within
¼” of the leg extension coupling, complete the installation
by tightening each corner until the latch and leg extension
coupling meet. This is illustrated in Figure F8.
Figure F8: Tighten until latch and coupling meet
VCES-ASTON-IOM-1F – EnergyPack, ERV5000–10000, HRV3000–10000
105
Appendix G: Installation of Filters with a Filter Spacer on a
Universal Holding Frame
IMPORTANT
Step 1
These instructions are a general guideline for the installation of filters with a filter spacer for pressure measurement. The filters and latches size and style may differ
from those shown in figure.
Locate the universal holding frame the closer to the pressure gauge tube already installed in the system. This is
where the filter spacer has to be installed.
Step 2
Components required:
•
•
•
•
•
Install the latches in the appropriate embossment on the
universal holding frame. Place one latch at each corner of
the universal holding frame.
Prefilter
Final filter
Metal filter spacer
Latches, four per frame
Universal holding frames (already installed in the unit)
Step 3
In order, place the prefilter, the filter spacer and the final
filter on the universal holding frame and hold them all in
place with the latches. Make sure that the filter spacer
sensing point is on the same side as the pressure gauge
tube.
IMPORTANT
There is only one filter spacer for the whole set of filters.
Figure G1: Installation of filters with a filter spacer on a universal holding frame
Pressure sensing point
Prefilter
Filter spacer
Filter
Latch (4x)
Frame
VCES-ASTON-IOM-1F – EnergyPack, ERV5000–10000, HRV3000–10000
106
Appendix H: Electric Heating Coil and Controls Information
This electric heating coil module covered by this appendix is a component of a “Listed” product, subject to the
guidelines of application as designated by the Certifying
Agency and outlined in the Appliance Manufacturer’s installation and operation instructions.
2 – Electrical Installation of Electric Coil Heaters
The information provided in this appendix applies to the
electric heating coil module, installed in the appliance and
to its operation, maintenance and service. Refer to the
Appliance Manufacturer’s instructions for information related to all other components.
2.2 Read Nameplate
1 – Mechanical Installation of Electric Coil
Heaters
Use only wires suitable for 167°F [75°C]. Wires shall be
sized according to the Canadian Electrical Code requirements. All wires must be brought in through knockouts.
1.1 Handling
1.1.1Remove the shipping covers just before installation.
1.1.2Inspect the heater carefully and report any damage to the Manufacturer.
Do not install a damaged heater.
2.1 Disconnect Power Source
Disconnect all power sources before opening the control
box and working within.
Read the nameplate carefully and consult wiring diagram
before starting to wire.
2.3 Supply Wires
2.4 Disconnecting Means
Install a disconnect switch close to the heater according
to the code unless a disconnect switch is already built into
the heater.
1.2 Installation
2.5 Control Circuit Wiring
Heater Position
1.2.1The axis of the duct must always be perpendicular to the face of the heater.
1.2.2The heating elements must always be installed
horizontally.
Model SC or ST (Slip-in Type)
Use Class II wiring for control circuit connections to the
duct heater.
1.2.3 Cut an opening in the side of the duct.
1.2.4Slip the heater into the duct until the hole is completely covered by flanges around the heater.
1.2.5Fasten the heater to the duct with sheet metal
screws and seal openings with a suitable sealing
compound.
1.2.6If the heater is heavy, use additional hangers to
support the heater.
Model FC or FT (Flanged Type)
1.2.7Flange both ends of the duct outwards on three
sides to match the heater’s flanges.
1.2.8Fasten the heater to the duct with sheet metal
screws (for heavy heaters, use nuts and bolts and
additional hangers to support the heater).
1.2.9 Seal openings with a suitable sealing compound.
•
•
•
•
IMPORTANT
Do not install spray humidifiers upstream of duct.
Install it downstream instead.
Do not cover the control box with thermal insulating
materials.
Use special air intake louvers of weatherproof construction for pre-heat duct heaters to avoid intake of
water or snow particles.
Make sure that motorized damper blades are not
blocked with snow or dirt. Inspect the dampers
regularly to ensure a suitable airflow.
VCES-ASTON-IOM-1F – EnergyPack, ERV5000–10000, HRV3000–10000
2.6 Magnetic Contactors
If magnetic contactors are mounted outside of the duct
heater, use only contactors approved for:
•
•
•
•
250,000 operations when controlled by auto-reset
thermal cut-out (A) and by other switching devices in
series with this cut-out (thermostat, step controller,
airflow switch, etc.).
100,000 operations when controlled by auto-reset
thermal cut-out (A) alone.
100,000 operations when controlled by auto-reset
thermal cut-out (A) plus manual reset cut-out in series (A & M).
6,000 operations when controlled by manual reset
cutout (M) alone.
2.7 External Controls Ratings
Rating of external control devices shall be suitable for handling the VA ratings as marked on the nameplate; otherwise, a backup relay must be used.
2.8 Airflow Interlock
Heaters are generally supplied with one extra terminal
marked for fan interlock or air sensing device connection.
Remove jumper between terminals ‘I’ and ‘C’ before connecting the fan interlock. Select a suitable airflow sensing
device of the differential pressure sensing type, with snap
acting contacts. A slow make, slow brake device may
cause undue cycling and in some instances chattering of
the contactors. When fresh air dampers are used, make
sure the heater is properly interlocked to prevent it from
being energized before the damper is fully open.
107
3 – Operating Electric Coil Heaters
4.2 Electrical Inspection
3.1 Minimum Airflow
Two weeks after start-up, all electric connections to contactors should be checked and tightened up. Before each
heating season, check the resistance between the heating
elements and ground. It is also recommended to check
the electrical connections to heating elements, magnetic
contactors and main power lugs. This inspection is recommended monthly during the first four months of operation.
After that, two inspections per heating season are sufficient.
Ensure that sufficient airflow as marked on the nameplate
is passing through the heater. Airflow should be evenly distributed across the entire face of the heater. Use air turning
vane at duct elbows and splitter damper at duct branchoffs to streamline the airflow in the heater. Use suitable
airflow sensing device or interlock the heater with fan. An
insufficient airflow will lead to the opening of the auto-reset
thermal cut-out or damage to the heating elements.
3.2 Warning
The air flowing through the duct where the heater is installed shall not contain any combustible particles, nor any
flammable vapor or gas.
3.3 Air Temperature
The air temperature should not exceed 120°F [49°C] at
the heater outlet.
3.4 Minimum Static Pressure and Air Direction
The heater is protected by a differential pressure switch.
To keep the contact of this switch closed, it is necessary
to maintain a minimum total pressure of 0.07” of water for
a constant flow.
3.5 Manual Reset Thermal Cut-out
This protection device is standard on all heaters of less
than 300V and 30 kW and is optional on all other heaters. Please check the auto-reset thermal cut-out before
resetting the manual thermal cut-out. If any defect has
been detected in the auto-reset thermal cut-out, it will be
necessary to replace it before resetting the manual reset
thermal cut-out.
4.3 Checkpoints
•
•
•
•
•
Check all fuses.
Check the resistance to ground for each circuit.
Check the resistance phase-to-phase for each
circuit.
Check the tightening of connections at all contactors
and heating elements.
Check all contactors.
4.4 Off-season Maintenance
Where tubular heating elements are used, it is strongly
recommended that you start the heating system from time
to time. This precaution will prevent moisture from percolating through the terminal gaskets into the heating element and accumulating in the insulating powder. Should
a heater be shut off for a long period, we recommend that
you check carefully the resistance to ground for each circuit. It is important not to power a heater when too low a
resistance to ground has been measured. It is also recommended to pay attention to any other heater operating in
normal conditions. Control components such as step controllers or modulating valves (SCR) should be maintained
and checked according to respective Manufacturer’s instructions. Any defective components should be replaced
only with identical original parts.
4 – Maintenance
All electric coil heaters have been designed to operate
long term without problems. Those responsible for equipment and maintenance should be aware of the following
suggestions.
4.1 Visual Inspection
It is strongly recommended to complete a periodic inspection. This precautionary step will help to keep your installations operating well. Note these eventual first signs of
problems:
•
•
•
Accumulation of dust on the heating elements.
Signs of overheating on the heater frame.
Traces of water or rust on the control box.
VCES-ASTON-IOM-1F – EnergyPack, ERV5000–10000, HRV3000–10000
108
Appendix I: Extended Dormant Unit Maintenance Procedure
The following procedures must be applied to any unit
which is stored for a period exceeding one month, which
are required in order to maintain our warranty. Failure to
comply with the procedures outlined below may result in
damage and will void unit warranty.
1. Unit must be stored indoors in a clean, dry and
tempered environment, heated in the winter and air
cooled in the summer. Ambient air conditions should
be from 50°F to 75°F with % RH from 10% to 50%.
The unit needs to be stored in a warehouse (or some
type of enclosure). Storing units outdoors is contraindicated and will void our warranty.
2. Unit must be stored on a level surface with the
weight of the equipment evenly distributed through
its base. The unit location must be free from excessive vibration and accidental impacts.
3. Once the unit has been unloaded in its resting location, the plastic wrapping must be removed from the
unit by cutting along the corner edges in order
to perform proper inspections and maintenance on
the equipment. The plastic wrapping should be kept
and re-applied to the unit when the unit will finally be
shipped to the jobsite.
4. If applicable, a certified/qualified Refrigeration
Technician should record refrigerant pressures on
all compressors at time of storage. Each compressor
must maintain refrigerant pressure in the system.
5. If applicable, a certified/qualified Refrigeration
Technician should check refrigerant pressure in
each compressor every three months. Refrigerant
pressure must be maintained in the system. If zero
pressure is found, this indicates a leak in the system.
Leak(s) must be identified and repaired. A holding
pressure must then be re-installed.
•
•
IMPORTANT
Complete the Extended Dormant Unit Maintenance
Checklist below, send a copy to Venmar CES Service Department at the below email address or fax
every six months and when unit is put into service,
to validate warranty and to provide valuable information to personnel performing future maintenance
or for factory assistance.
Leave a copy of this report with the Owner and at
the unit for future reference and permanent record.
Additional Comments:_______________________________
__________________________________________________
__________________________________________________
__________________________________________________
__________________________________________________
__________________________________________________
__________________________________________________
__________________________________________________
VCES-ASTON-IOM-1F – EnergyPack, ERV5000–10000, HRV3000–10000
6. Rotate blower impellers by hand every two months;
grease fan bearings as required following proper
practices. Do not over grease the bearings as this
may rupture the seals and lead to premature bearing
failure during operation.
7. Rotate the energy recovery wheel rotor by hand
once per month.
8. Ensure that all unit doors are kept closed.
9. Continue above maintenance schedule until unit
start-up.
For all checks listed above please complete the Extended
Dormant Unit Maintenance Checklist below and send a
copy to the Venmar CES Service Department every six
months and when unit is put into service.
If the unit has been dormant for an extended period after
initial start-up, all start-up checks should be repeated
before operating the unit. Refer to the Start-up Form and
Checklist in Appendix E and complete these checks.
Failure to comply with the above recommendations may
result in component failure and surface corrosion on the
interior and exterior of the unit.
Please note that if the unit is being stored outdoors or remains dormant for an extended period after initial start-up,
this may result in condensation within the unit which could
result in premature degradation of the unit and potential
issues within the control panel. In this event, the installation of a desiccant pouch in the control cabinet is highly
recommended; all ventilation ducts should be capped/
covered to prevent chimney effect, all liquid pipes (water
or glycol mixture) should be drained or capped off if necessary and all peripheral electrical penetrations should be
properly sealed.
Email to Tech Support: [email protected]
Fax: 899-319-2612
Unit Identification Information
Project____________________________________________
Job Name__________________________________________
Job Address________________________________________
Model Number______________________________________
Serial Number ______________________________________
Tag_______________________________________________
Jobsite Contact_____________________________________
Email______________________________________________
Telephone_________________________________________
Maintenance
By________________________________________________
Company Name____________________________________
Date______________________________________________
Email______________________________________________
Telephone_________________________________________
109
Serial Number:______________________________________
Table I1: Extended Dormant Unit Maintenance Checklist
Item
Description
Yes
No
Is the unit stored indoors in a clean, dry environment?
1
Is the unit storage facility temperature regulated to within 50°F to 75°F?
Is the indoor storage facility humidity regulated to within 10% to 50% RH?
Is the unit mounted on a level surface along the perimeter of the base with weight evenly
2
distributed?
Has the plastic wrapping been removed from the unit to perform inspection and
maintenance?
3
Has the plastic wrapping been saved for future use?
Has the plastic wrapping been re-applied to the unit when the unit has been shipped to
jobsite?
Recommend Has a desiccant pouch been placed in the control panel?
Item
Description
Inspection Date/Reading
Refrigerant pressure at
Date
PSIG
storage
Compressor 1
Compressor 2
Compressor 3
Compressor 4
Compressor 5
Compressor 6
4
Compressor 7
Compressor 8
Compressor 9
Compressor 10
Compressor 11
Compressor 12
Compressor 13
Compressor 14
Compressor 15
Compressor 16
VCES-ASTON-IOM-1F – EnergyPack, ERV5000–10000, HRV3000–10000
110
Serial Number:______________________________________
Table I1: Extended Dormant Unit Maintenance Checklist
Item
Description
Refrigerant pressure
every three months
Compressor 1
Inspection Date/Reading
Date
PSIG
Date
PSIG
Date
PSIG
Compressor 16
Rotate blower impellers
Date
every two months
Supply
Date
Date
Date
Date
Date
Date
Date
Date
Date
Date
Compressor 2
Compressor 3
Compressor 4
Compressor 5
Compressor 6
5
Compressor 7
Compressor 8
Compressor 9
Compressor 10
Compressor 11
Compressor 12
Compressor 13
Compressor 14
Compressor 15
Exhaust
6
Other
Grease fan bearings as
required
Supply
Exhaust
7
Other
Rotate energy recovery
Date
rotor every one month
Enthalpy
Sensible
VCES-ASTON-IOM-1F – EnergyPack, ERV5000–10000, HRV3000–10000
111
Appendix J: EnergyPack®, ERV5000–10000 and HRV3000–10000
Maintenance Summary Chart
Table J1: Maintenance Summary Chart – EnergyPack, ERV5000–10000, HRV3000–10000
Item
General
Fans
Dampers
No. Description
Note
Monthly Quarterly
1
Inspect the general condition of the unit.
x
2
Remove any dirt or debris.
x
3
Check for unusual noise or vibration.
x
4
Lubricate the door latch mechanisms.
5
Clean fans with stream of water.
x
6
Align or replace belts and drives.
x
7
Adjust belt tension.
x
8
Check motor voltage and current.
x
9
Lubricate the motor and shaft bearings.
x
10 Lubricate motor base adjusting screws.
x
x
11 Visual inspection for dirt or leakage.
x
12 Lubricate damper linkage.
x
13 Clean and replace prefilters.
Air filters
SemiAnnually
annually
x
14 Clean and replace final filters.
x
15 Inspect holding frames/sliding rack.
Coils
16 Clean the coils.
Plate heat
exchanger
x
17 Winterize the water coil.
18 Verify that the wheel is rotating freely.
Wheel
x
x
x
19 Lubricate bearings.
x
20 Inspect bearing bolts.
x
21 Tighten bearing set screws.
x
22 Tighten motor bolts (inspect one month after start-up).
x
23 Inspect seals (inspect one month after start-up).
x
24 Inspect belt.
Inspect media, rim, spokes and shaft (inspect one month after
25
start-up).
26 Inspect the general condition of the plate heat exchanger.
x
27 Measure pressure drop across the plate heat exchanger.
x
x
If needed
28 Inspect the burner area for hazardous material.
Burner
Electric
Condenser
fans
Cooling
section
x
29 Inspect the stack.
x
30 Inspect condensate drain connections and disposal system.
x
31 Clean and recalibrate all controls.
x
32 Inspect the gas piping.
x
33 Inspect burner motor (or every 500 hours, whatever comes first).
x
34 Verify all electrical connections, tighten if necessary.
x
35 Verify all fuse holders.
x
36 Verify all motor overload settings.
x
37 Inspect fan blades for cracks.
x
38 Inspect for wear and tension.
Look for oil on all refrigeration components (including coils,
39
compressors, etc.) to indicate a refrigerant leak.
40 Verify for proper superheat.
Verify each circuit refrigerant site glass when the circuit is
41 operating under steady state, full load conditions. It should be full
and clear. If not, look for refrigerant leaks.
x
VCES-ASTON-IOM-1F – EnergyPack, ERV5000–10000, HRV3000–10000
x
x
x
112
Appendix K: Measuring and Adjusting V-belt Tension
Table K1: Measuring V-belt Tension
V-belt Cross Section
A
B
C
D
E
AX
BX
CX
3V
5V
8V
3VX
5VX
Recommended Deflection Force (lbs)
Small Sheave Diameter
Range (Inches)
Initial Installation
3.0 to 3.4
3.6 to 4.2
4.6 to 6.0
4.6 to 5.4
5.6 to 7.4
8.6 to 9.4
7.0 to 8.5
9.0 to 12.0
13.0 to 16.0
12.0 to 15.5
16.0 to 18.0
22.0 to 27.0
17.7 to 23.6
23.7 to 31.5
31.6 to 39.6
2.1 to 3.4
3.6 to 4.2
4.6 to 6.0
3.7 to 5.4
5.6 to 7.4
8.6 to 9.4
5.8 to 8.5
9.0 to 12.0
13.0 to 16.0
2.65 to 3.35
3.65 to 4.12
4.5 to 5.6
6.0 to 10.6
7.1 to 8.5
9.0 to 11.8
12.5 to 16.0
12.5 to 16.0
17.0 to 20.0
21.0 to 24.8
2.20 to 3.35
3.65 to 4.12
4.50 to 5.60
6.00 to 10.60
4.4 to 8.5
9.0 to 11.8
12.5 to 16.0
3.3
3.5
3.7
6.0
6.3
6.6
13.2
13.9
14.6
26.5
27.8
29.1
39.7
41.7
43.7
4.4
4.6
4.9
7.7
8.2
8.6
17.2
18.1
19.0
5.5
6.4
7.5
8.6
19.2
23.3
27.3
50.9
57.1
61.3
5.5
6.4
7.5
8.6
19.2
23.3
27.3
Retensioned
Maximum
Minimum
2.9
3.1
3.3
5.1
5.5
5.7
11.5
12.1
12.6
22.9
24.3
25.6
34.4
36.2
37.9
3.7
4.0
4.2
6.6
7.1
7.5
15.0
15.7
16.5
4.8
5.7
6.6
7.5
16.7
20.3
23.8
44.3
49.8
53.3
4.8
5.7
6.6
7.5
16.7
20.3
23.8
2.2
2.4
2.5
4.0
4.2
4.4
8.8
9.3
9.7
17.6
18.7
19.6
26.5
27.8
29.1
2.9
3.1
3.3
5.1
5.5
5.7
11.5
12.1
12.8
3.9
4.4
5.1
5.7
13.0
15.6
18.5
34.4
38.6
41.4
3.9
4.4
5.0
5.7
13.0
15.6
18.5
Figure K1: Belt tension adjustment
Plunger with deflection
force scale (lbs)
Body with deflection
distance scale (inches)
Belt sp
an
deflect
ion
Force
Small O-ring
VCES-ASTON-IOM-1F – EnergyPack, ERV5000–10000, HRV3000–10000
Large O-ring
113
Appendix L: Energy Recovery Wheel
Multi-link Drive Belt Instructions
How to Measure, Assemble and Install
How to Measure
Assembly
1. Hold belt with tabs pointing outward.
Figure L1: Multi-link
drive belt
Pull belt tight around sheaves to
check hand tight length, overlapping the last two tabs with two
holes in matching links as shown.
Count the number of links and
remove one link for every 24 of
O/3L, A/4L and B/5L sections,
and one link for every 20 of C and
D sections. This gives the correct
installed belt length and will ensure optimum belt tension when running.
Figure L3: Assemble multi-link drive belt
IMPORTANT
Every tenth link is designated with an arrow (←). For
multiple belt drive, ensure that each belt has the same
number of links.
Disassembly
1. Hold belt upside down. Bend back as far as possible; hold with one hand. Twist one tab 90° parallel
with slot.
2. Pull end of link over tab.
3. Rotate belt end with tab 90°.
4. Pull belt end through two links.
Figure L2: Disassemble multi-link drive belt
2. Place end tab through two links at once.
3. Flex belt further and insert second tab through end
link by twisting tab with thumb.
4. Ensure tab returns to position across belt. Reverse
belt so tabs run inside.
IMPORTANT
Turn belt inside out (as shown) to ensure easy assembly
and disassembly.
VCES-ASTON-IOM-1F – EnergyPack, ERV5000–10000, HRV3000–10000
114
Installation
Alternative Installation Method
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Turn belt with tabs to the inside before installing.
Determine direction of drive rotation.
Align belt directional arrow (←) with drive rotation.
Fit belt in nearest groove of smaller sheave.
Roll belt onto larger sheave, turning the drive slowly.
Belt may seem very tight; this is okay. Do not jog
motor.
6. Check to see all tabs are still in their correct position
and are not twisted out of alignment.
7. For multiple belt drives, work belt from groove to
groove. On particularly wide drives, it may be easier
to install half the belts from the inboard side and half
from the outboard.
IMPORTANT
With drive ratios around 1:1, it may be necessary to add
back one link to allow belts to be rolled on. This does not
apply if using Alternative Installation Method.
VCES-ASTON-IOM-1F – EnergyPack, ERV5000–10000, HRV3000–10000
1. Set motor in mid position of adjustment range and
mark base clearly.
2. Determine required belt length as described in How
to Measure section.
3. Push motor forward to minimum center distance.
4. Install belts as in Installation section.
5. Pull motor back to previously marked mid position.
Retensioning
Like all high performance V-belts, PowerTwist Plus Vbelts require the maintenance of correct drive tension to
operate efficiently. Experience indicates that drive tension
should be checked after 24 hours running at full load. A
retension may be necessary depending on the severity of
the drive. Any initial belt stretch is then taken up. Subsequently, belt tension should be checked periodically and
adjusted when necessary.
115
Appendix M: Fan Bearing Lubrication Schedule
Table M1: Recommended Grease Quantity
Shaft Size
Inches
Maximum Grease Capacity of Bearing Chamber
Millimeters
Ounces
Kilograms
0.50 to 0.75
13 to 19
0.125
0.004
0.875 to 1.187
25 to 31
0.375
0.011
1.25 to 1.50
32 to 38
0.625
0.018
1.687 to 1.937
43 to 49
0.875
0.025
2.00 to 2.437
51 to 62
1.250
0.035
2.50 to 2.937
63 to 75
2.000
0.056
3.00 to 3.437
76 to 87
3.500
0.098
3.50 to 4.00
89 to 102
6.000
0.168
4.187 to 4.937
106 to 125
10.000
0.280
Table M2: Generally Recommended Relubrication Frequency in Months
Operating Speed (RPM)
Up to 500
500–1,000
1,000–1,500
1,500–2,000
2,000–2,500
2,500–3,000
3,000–3,500
3,500–4,000
4,000–4,500
4,500–5,000
0.5–1.0”
[13–35 mm]
6
—
6
—
5
—
5
—
4
—
4
—
3
—
3
—
2
—
2
—
1.125–1.5”
[28–38 mm]
6
6
6
4
5
4
4
2
4
2
3
1
2
1
2
1
1
1
1
½
Bearing Shaft Size
1.625–1.937”
2.0–2.5”
[41–49 mm]
[50–63 mm]
6
6
6
4
6
5
4
2
5
4
2
2
4
3
1
1
3
2
1
1
2
1
1
½
2
2
½
—
1
—
½
1
—
—
—
—
2.687–3.187”
[68–81 mm]
3.437–3.937”
[87–100 mm]
5
4
4
4
4
3
2
3
2
3
1
2
1
1
1
1
½
—
½
2
½
½
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
Ball bearings
Roller bearings
All bearings are filled with grease before leaving the factory. Bearings may discharge through the seals when first started and run hotter for
a short period of time until excess grease is discharged. Do not replace the initial discharge.
Intervals assume a clean environment with a temperature range of 0°F to 120°F [−18°C to 49°C]. Lubricate more frequently under dirty
conditions and higher temperatures.
VCES-ASTON-IOM-1F – EnergyPack, ERV5000–10000, HRV3000–10000
116
Appendix N: FANWALL® Inlet Cone Alignment
Table N1: FANWALL Wheel/Cone Alignment Dimensions
Wheel Size
Backplate OD
Blade Width
Backplate Extension
Wheel/Cone Overlap
10
10.375
3.495
0.700
0.250
12
12.500
4.280
0.700
0.250
14
13.750
4.720
0.700
0.250
16
16.750
5.760
0.700
0.250
20
20.451
6.990
0.700
0.400
22
22.701
7.780
0.700
0.400
Figure N1: FANWALL inlet cone alignment
Blade width
(100% wide)
Backplate
extension
Wheel/cone
overlap
VCES-ASTON-IOM-1F – EnergyPack, ERV5000–10000, HRV3000–10000
Backplate OD
117
Appendix O: Filter Resistance and Latches
Table O1: Prefilters
Depth
Capacities (CFM)
Nominal Size
2” [51 mm]
4” [102 mm]
12” x 24” x 2” [305 x 610 x 51 mm]
24” x 24” x 2” [610 x 610 x 51 mm]
12” x 24” x 4” [305 x 610 x 102 mm]
24” x 24” x 4” [610 x 610 x 102 mm]
Medium
500
1,000
600
1,200
High
1,000
2,000
1,200
2,400
Resistance @ Capacity (in. w.g.)
Medium
0.08
0.08
0.12
0.12
High
0.28
0.28
0.36
0.36
Final
0.90
0.90
0.90
0.90
Table O2: 12” [ 305 mm] Final Filters
Filter Efficiency
60–65%
80–85%
90–95%
Nominal Size
Capacities (CFM)
12” x 24” [305 x 610 mm]
24” x 24” [610 x 610 mm]
12” x 24” [305 x 610 mm]
24” x 24” [610 x 610 mm]
12” x 24” [305 x 610 m]
24” x 24” [610 x 610 mm]
1,000
2,000
1,000
2,000
1,000
2,000
Resistance (in. w.g.)
Initial
0.29
0.29
0.50
0.50
0.68
0.68
Final
1.5
1.5
1.5
1.5
1.5
1.5
Table O3: Filter Latches for Front or Upstream Access
Final Filter
1” nominal or single header
2” nominal
4” nominal
Prefilter
Latch
Venmar CES PN
None
C-70
207312240
2”
C-86
19516104
4”
C-89
19516106
None
C-70
207312240
2”
C-86
19516104
None
C-86
19516104
1”
Knock-on (4” + 1” or header)
500026047
2”
Knock-on (4” + 2”)
500026048
4”
Knock-on (4” + 4”)
500026049
None
12” nominal HEPA
12” double header
6” (M-pack) single header
HEPA frame
2”
VP-2
208290023
4”
VP-4
19516310
2”
C-80/VP-2
19516103 / 208290023
4”
C-80/VP-4
19516103 / 19516310
2”
C-70/C-86
207312240 / 19516104
VCES-ASTON-IOM-1F – EnergyPack, ERV5000–10000, HRV3000–10000
118
Appendix P: Troubleshooting
Table P1: Troubleshooting – EnergyPack®, ERV5000–10000, HRV3000–10000
Symptom
Possible Cause
Corrective Action
General
Blower wheel is rubbing on other parts.
Check filters and enthalpy wheel for blockage. Balance flow of
supply and exhaust air so that exhaust air is equal or greater
than supply air. Install a post-heat module.
Adjust wheel or replace defective part.
Blower wheel is out of alignment.
Remove the motor/blower assembly. Adjust the blower wheel.
Sheaves are out of alignment.
Verify wheel alignment. Align belt using a straight edge.
Enthalpy wheel wiper seal is not properly installed.
Check for proper seal operation.
Excessive belt tension causes bearings to screech.
Adjust belt tension.
Low belt tension causes belts to squeal.
Adjust belt tension.
Ducts are vibrating.
Install flexible connections.
Unit is too close to occupants.
Install a silencer.
Excessive vibration.
Replace shaft and bearings. Verify wheel alignment.
Belt too tight.
Adjust belt tension.
Balance flow of supply and exhaust air so that exhaust air is
equal to or greater than supply air.
Verify damper actuator operation.
Air supply too cold. Supply and exhaust air are unbalanced.
Noisy unit.
Bearings wear
down too quickly.
Supply and exhaust air are unbalanced.
Defrost damper is not working.
Wheel freezing.
Poor airflow.
Pre-heater is not working.
Check the heat module circuit breaker.
Shorten defrost cycle period by modifying the delay setpoint
Time between defrost cycle is too long.
on DDC.
Thermostat set too low for pre-heat or variable wheel Set thermostat at a higher defrost setting by modifying the
speed frost prevention systems.
defrost setpoint on the DDC. See Controls section of this manual.
Reverse rotation or motor so that wheel turns in the direction
Fan wheel is turning the wrong direction.
of the arrows shown on the fan.
Increase speed by increasing the diameter of motor sheave or
Rotation speed is too low.
installing a smaller fan sheave.
Filters are blocked.
Replace filters.
Air leakage.
Exchanger does not perform as per submittal.
Fan belt is slipping.
Low static pressure.
Fan motor overload. Electric tension of motor is too low/high.
Excessive fan speed.
Exhaust fan not
working.
Low motor power.
Unit equipped with recirculation defrost system is in
defrost mode.
A wire is disconnected.
Reduce blower speed.
Install more powerful motors.
Wait until the defrost cycle is over.
Drive motor failure.
Connect the wire.
Check unit circuit breaker. Verify wire service connector on
the motor.
Check the capacitor connections. Check the motor operation
with a new capacitor.
Verify the drive motor operation.
Drive motor relay in control box.
Check relay wiring. Verify relay operation.
Drive belt failure.
Check for drive belt derailment or failure.
Drive pulley failure.
Check for securely fastened pulley on motor shaft.
Electrical supply is interrupted.
Drive motor capacitor failure (in small units only).
Wheel not running.
Seal all leaks in ducts and unit walls.
Verify pressure drop of both airflows and compare to the
submittal. Contact Venmar CES if a significant difference is
noted.
Adjust belt tension.
Verify presence of filters and other duct components. Set
balancing damper so that it reduces the passage of air.
Adjust tension.
VCES-ASTON-IOM-1F – EnergyPack, ERV5000–10000, HRV3000–10000
119
Table P1: Troubleshooting – EnergyPack®, ERV5000–10000, HRV3000–10000
Symptom
Possible Cause
Filters are too dirty and have been sucked into the
unit.
Filters are out of
filters rack.
Filters are wet.
Filter rack is damaged.
Some filter clips are missing.
Corrective Action
Clean or change the filters and consider revising maintenance
schedule.
Water infiltration or condensation. See Water Issues section
below.
Repair filter racks and re-install filters.
Order new clips from Venmar CES.
Water Issues
Water carryover
from wet cooling
coil onto the
floor, motor or fan
housing.
Water inside the
unit.
Airflow is too high.
Lower airflow by adjusting the drive.
Drain pan not properly draining.
Clean drain pan and ensure suction into the unit is not too high.
Coil bulkhead penetration.
Be sure any field penetrations are sealed.
Missing or improper intermediate drain pan.
Install or clean the intermediate drain pan.
Seal all section joints. Sections under negative pressure
require special attention to sealing.
Inspect and seal any holes made for electrical wires or piping
conduits.
Revise trap installation and dimensions.
Unit was not properly sealed when installed.
Electrical or piping conduits not properly sealed.
Trap is not properly installed.
Drain pan not
properly draining.
Prefilter is wet.
Unit is not installed on level.
Pressure exceeds the design.
Outside air hood is shipped loose and was not well
Re-install hood, ensuring the flange is properly sealed.
sealed when installed.
Airflow exceeds design conditions and sucks water
Re-design the hood or lower the CFM of the unit.
into the unit.
Refrigerant Issues
Solenoid valve does No power to coil.
not open.
Defective solenoid coil.
Dirt or foreign material lodged in thermostatic
Too much
expansion valve.
refrigerant is
being fed to the
evaporator and
the superheat is
Defective thermostatic expansion valve.
too low (cannot be
adjusted).
Insufficient fluid flow across condenser coil.
Condenser fan failure.
Compressors lock
out on high head
pressure or run at
higher than design
head pressure.
High pressure control.
Service valve failure.
Check circuit connections.
Replace solenoid coil.
Disassemble valve, remove dirt and re-verify superheat.
Replace thermostatic expansion valve.
Clean dirty condenser coil. Comb damaged fin surface with fin
comb. Tighten loose fan belt(s).
Verify fan rotation. Verify fan RPM. Check fuses. Verify
overload. Check fan controls. Check for motor burnout.
Check for proper setting.
Water control valves not operating properly.
Discharge valve fully back sealed.
Verify condenser subcooling (15°F [−9°C]). If above 15°F [−9°C],
adjust charge based on maintaining suction pressure.
Verify water temperature rise entering and leaving unit to
determine if adequate water is flowing.
Verify and repair water control valves.
Improperly set sequencing control.
Set for correct pressure and differential.
Refrigerant overcharge.
Supply water temperature may be too high.
Condenser fan(s)
short cycling.
Revise the level of curbs.
Verify design pressure versus unit pressure and check the
segment which houses the drain pan.
VCES-ASTON-IOM-1F – EnergyPack, ERV5000–10000, HRV3000–10000
120
Appendix Q: Adjusting Refrigerant Charge
CAUTION
The Clean Air Act of 1990 bans the intentional venting of refrigerant (CFCs and HCFCs) as of July 1, 1992.
Approved methods of recovery, recycling or reclaiming
must be followed. Fines and/or incarceration may be levied for non-compliance.
CAUTION
It is very important to make certain that the recycle or recovery equipment used is designed for R410a. The pressure of R410a refrigerant is approximately 60% greater
than that of R22. Pressure gauges require a range up to
800 psig high side and 250 psig low side. Recovery cylinders require a 400 psig rating.
Adjusting the refrigerant charge of a system in the field
must be based on determination of liquid sub-cooling and
evaporator superheat. On a system with a TXV liquid subcooling is more representative of the charge than evaporator superheat but both measurements must be taken.
Before Charging
1. Unit being charged must be at or near full load conditions before adjusting the charge.
2. Units equipped with hot gas re-heat must be
charged with the hot gas re-heat valves closed while
the unit is in cooling mode to get the proper charge.
After charging, unit must be operated in re-heat (dehumidification) mode to check for correct operation.
3. Units equipped with heat pump options must be
charged in heating mode to get the proper charge.
After charging, unit must be operated in cooling
mode to check for correct charge. Charge may need
to be adjusted for cooling mode. If adjustments are
made in the cooling mode heating mode must be
rerun to verify proper operation.
4. After adding or removing charge the system must be
allowed to stabilize, typically 10–15 minutes, before
making any other adjustments.
5. The type of unit and options determine the ranges
for liquid sub-cooling and evaporator superheat.
Refer to Table Q1 when determining the proper subcooling and superheat.
Checking Liquid Sub-Cooling
1. Measure the temperature of the liquid line as it leaves
the condenser coil.
2. Read the gauge pressure at the liquid line close to
the point where the temperature was taken. One
must use liquid line pressure as it will vary from
discharge pressure due to condenser coil pressure
drop.
VCES-ASTON-IOM-1F – EnergyPack, ERV5000–10000, HRV3000–10000
3. Convert the pressure obtained to a saturated temperature using the R410a refrigerant temperature
verses pressure Table Q2. Subtract the measured
liquid line temperature from the saturated temperature to determine the liquid sub-cooling.
4. Compare calculated sub-cooling to Table Q1 for the
appropriate unit type and options.
Checking Evaporator Superheat
1. Measure the temperature of the suction line close to
the compressor.
2. Read gauge pressure at the suction line close to the
compressor.
3. Convert the pressure obtained to a saturated temperature using the R410a refrigerant temperature
verses pressure in Table Q2.
4. Subtract the saturated temperature from the measured suction line temperature to determine the
evaporator superheat.
5. Compare calculated superheat to Table Q1 for the
appropriate unit type and options.
Table Q1: Acceptable Refrigeration Circuit Values
Air Cooled Condenser or Air Source Heat Pump
Sub-cooling
12–18°F
Sub-cooling with hot gas re-heat
15–22°F
Superheat
8–15°F
Water Cooled Condenser or Water Source Heat Pump
Sub-cooling
4–8°F
Superheat
8–15°F
CAUTION
Thermal expansion valve must be adjusted to approximately 8–15°F of suction superheat. Failure to have sufficient superheat will damage the compressor and void
the warranty.
Adjusting Sub-cooling and Superheat
Temperatures
1. The system is overcharged if the sub-cooling temperature is too high and the evaporator is fully loaded
(low loads on the evaporator result in increased
sub-cooling) and the evaporator superheat is within
the temperature range as shown in Table Q1 (high
superheat results in increased sub-cooling).
CAUTION
Do not overcharge!
Refrigerant overcharging leads to excess refrigerant in
the condenser coils resulting in elevated compressor discharge pressure.
121
2. Correct an overcharged system by reducing the
amount of refrigerant in the system to lower the
sub-cooling.
3. The system is undercharged if the superheat is too
high and the sub-cooling is too low
4. Correct an undercharged system by adding refrigerant to the system to reduce superheat and raise
sub-cooling.
5. If the sub-cooling is correct and the superheat is too
high, the TXV may need adjustment to correct the
superheat.
Table Q2: R410a Refrigerant Temperature vs. Pressure
°F
PSIG
°F
PSIG
°F
PSIG
°F
PSIG
°F
PSIG
20
78.3
47
134.7
74
213.7
101
321.0
128
463.2
21
80.0
48
137.2
75
217.1
102
325.6
129
469.3
22
81.8
49
139.7
76
220.6
103
330.2
130
475.4
23
86.6
50
142.2
77
224.1
104
334.9
131
481.6
24
85.4
51
144.8
78
227.7
105
339.6
132
487.8
25
87.2
52
147.4
79
231.3
106
344.4
133
494.1
26
89.1
53
150.1
80
234.9
107
349.3
134
500.5
27
91.0
54
152.8
81
238.6
108
354.2
135
506.9
28
92.9
55
155.5
82
242.3
109
359.1
136
513.4
29
94.9
56
158.2
83
246.0
110
364.1
137
520.0
30
96.8
57
161.0
84
249.8
111
369.1
138
526.6
31
98.8
58
163.8
85
253.7
112
374.2
139
533.3
32
100.9
59
166.7
86
257.5
113
379.4
140
540.1
33
102.9
60
169.6
87
261.4
114
384.6
141
547.0
34
105.0
61
172.5
88
265.4
115
389.9
142
553.9
35
107.1
62
175.4
89
269.4
116
395.2
143
560.9
36
109.2
63
178.4
90
273.5
117
400.5
144
567.9
37
111.4
64
181.5
91
277.6
118
405.9
145
575.1
38
113.6
65
184.5
92
281.7
119
411.4
146
582.3
39
115.8
66
187.6
93
285.9
120
416.9
147
589.6
40
118.1
67
190.7
94
280.1
121
422.5
148
596.9
41
120.3
68
193.9
95
294.4
122
428.2
149
604.4
42
122.7
69
197.1
96
298.7
123
433.9
150
611.9
43
125.0
70
200.4
97
303.0
124
439.6
44
127.4
71
203.6
98
307.5
125
445.4
45
129.8
72
207.0
99
311.9
126
451.3
46
132.2
73
210.3
100
316.4
127
457.3
VCES-ASTON-IOM-1F – EnergyPack, ERV5000–10000, HRV3000–10000
122
[email protected]
www.venmarces.com
Nortek Air Solutions has a policy of continuous improvement and reserves the right to change
design and specifications without notice. FANWALL TECHNOLOGY® and FANWALL® are
trademarks of Nortek Air Solutions, LLC. Products in this literature are covered by one or
more of the patents listed on www.nortekair.com/patents.
©2015 Nortek Air Solutions Canada Inc.
VCES-ASTON-IOM-1F
June 2015

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