Region 2 - Indiana University of Pennsylvania

Comments

Transcription

Region 2 - Indiana University of Pennsylvania
Indiana University of Pennsylvania • January 2010
Kennedy C enter
A merican C ollege
Theater F estival
region two
festival forty - two
January 2010
•1
2•
Kennedy Center American College Theater Festival • Region 2
Parking Meters/Pay by Space
Parking on campus is free during the Festival
except for spaces marked “Reserved” and
metered spaces along Grant Street between S.
11th St. and Oakland Avenue. Parking in handicapped spaces or tow away/no parking zones
without proper permits may result in ticketing
and/or towing.
Indiana Theater and The Coney
600 Block, Philadelphia Street
Tw o B l o c k s t o D o w n t o w n I n d i a n a / P h i l a d e l p h i a S t .
P
P
Hadley
Union Building
Pizza
House
Performing Arts Center
Festival Central
P
P
Taco Bell
Romeo’s
Sheetz
KFC
Giant Eagle
Oakland Ave./
Route 286
To Indiana Mall/
Walmart Areas
P
Sutton Hall
Blue Room
Gorell Recital Hall
University Museum
P
Commonplace
Coffee
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
To Holiday Inn/Quality Inn
Indiana University of Pennsylvania • January 2010
•3
Table of Contents
Campus Map................................................................................2
IUP Department of Theater and Dance........................................3
Support.........................................................................................3
Welcome to Festival 42................................................................4
Keynote Speaker: Bill Pullman....................................................4
Invited Productions and Performance Times...............................5
General Information
IUP Department of
Theater and Dance
Registration and Information Desk......................................6
Hospitality............................................................................6
Dining...................................................................................6
Badges and Admission to Events.........................................6
Admission to Invited Productions........................................6
Security/Emergencies...........................................................6
Transportation......................................................................6
The Department of Theater and Dance is dedicated to both theater and
dance as collaborative and highly disciplined fine arts demanding an
education that offers an extended view of the world as a part of a liberal
and humanistic education. Successful students develop an artistic sensibility and a disciplined work ethic, skills necessary in most endeavors.
The department is committed to:
Parking.................................................................................6
• Providing comprehensive course work, from introductory
Computer Access..................................................................7
Lost and Found.....................................................................7
Mission Statement
through advanced levels of study, in all major areas of theater and
dance;
•
Providing diverse production opportunities at all academic levels
to develop students as artists by developing proficiency in one
or more of the areas of playwriting, research, performance, and
production while stimulating the intellectual growth of both
students and faculty;
•
Augmenting and complementing the cultural offerings of the
university community; and
•
Establishing a work ethic of collaboration, personal discipline,
and respect.
Late Nights @ the Festival..........................................................7
Master Schedule....................................................................... 8-9
Workshops by Discipline..................................................... 10-20
Office Locations.........................................................................13
Dramaturgy................................................................................20
O’Neill Critics Institute..............................................................21
Student Directing Insitute..........................................................21
National Playwriting Program...................................................21
Support
Stage Directors & Choreographers Scholarship Competition.....22
Theater at the Kennedy Center is presented
Irene Ryan Scholarship Auditions Information.........................23
Design Exhibit Schedule............................................................24
Festival Fringe ..........................................................................24
Volunteers and Guests................................................................25
with the generous support of
Stephen and Christine Schwarzman
The Kennedy Center American College Theater
Festival is sponsored, in part, by the
Participating Productions...........................................................25
Kennedy Center Corporate Fund
Associate Productions................................................................26
U.S. Department of Education
KCACTF Staff and Coorindators..............................................27
National Committee for the Performing Arts
Presenter Profiles................................................................. 28-34
Dr. Gerald and Paula McNichols Foundation
4•
Kennedy Center American College Theater Festival • Region 2
Welcome to Festival 42
Keynote Speaker
Something Big, Something Brilliant,
Something Memorable
Bill Pullman
Isn’t this what all of us want to be a part of or, in some way, achieve
during our lives? At this festival, you will find the community, the
spirit, and the passion that is the theater of today and the theater of
tomorrow. It is here that you will be asked to look at yourselves, look
at the work of others, and engage in conversation about your craft.
Indiana University of Pennsylvania has graciously opened their doors
to us to welcome our quest, engage our community, and support our
self-reflection. Take advantage of this opportunity. Root for your friends
in the Irene Ryan competitions, design exhibits, directing competitions.
Hone your literary skills as a critic, a playwright, or a dramaturg.
View every production opportunity that comes your way including our
Invited Productions, our Fringe Shows, and our New Play Presentations.
Leave here learning something new, doing something big, experiencing
something memorable. It is yours for the taking.
Engage!
Juliet Wunsch, Region II Festival Chair
Welcome to IUP
A hearty “hello” from Indiana University of Pennsylvania! You are located at the geographic center of the “new” region II that includes our
friends in Ohio, West Virginia, and the northern part of Virginia. Our
doors are open and our winter fires burn brightly, welcoming the caffeinated excitement of KCACTF’s 42nd celebration of excellence in theater.
IUP has placed her College of Fine Arts at the center of university life.
The recent renovations of the IUP Performing Arts Center and Cogswell
Music Hall are a testament to the university’s commitment to the arts
as a fundamental component of higher education. I am pleased to see
our Fine Arts campus brimming over with your excitement and passion
for theater.
As the chairperson of the Department of Theater and Dance, I can tell
you that IUP and our surrounding Indiana County are a worthy home
to the visual and performing arts. It is a warm and hospitable place
for a mid-winter festival celebration. Here you will make new friends,
renew old acquaintances, and fire up your imaginations. I bid you a
memorable festival.
Brian Jones, Chair
IUP Department of Theater and Dance
Wednesday • 12:30 p.m.
Fisher Auditorium, IUP Performing Arts Center
Bill Pullman made his silver screen debut in the Danny DeVito-Bette
Midler comedy Ruthless People in 1986. He followed that with lead roles
in Spaceballs, The Serpent and the Rainbow, and The Accidental Tourist.
With his All-American nice guy looks, Pullman was, for many years, cast
as a decent but ineffectual man who almost inevitably got dumped on by
his significant other. This trend lasted until 1995 when Pullman starred
opposite Sandra Bullock in the crowd-pleasing While You Were Sleeping.
Born in rural Hornell, N.Y., on December 17, 1953, Pullman was the
sixth of seven children. He grew up with an interest in construction work,
and, after graduating from high school, he enrolled in a technical college
to pursue this interest. A random visit to a local drama club and subsequent meeting with a drama teacher convinced Pullman that he wanted to
perform on the stage rather than build it. He went on to earn a B.A. in theater from the State University of New York at Oneonta. After attaining an
M.F.A. degree in directing from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, Pullman joined a theater company and performed throughout South
Dakota and Montana. He later took a
job teaching drama at Montana State
University, where he became chairman of the theater department.
Pullman then moved to New York to
further his stage career. He became
very active in regional theater and
won acclaim for his work at such
places as New York’s Lincoln Center and Washington, D.C.’s Folger
Theatre. In 1985, he moved to Los
Angeles to pursue more theater work
and the following year made his film
Changes/Additions/Updates
The schedule and other information in this program
may have changed. Please check at the information/registration area in the PAC for the most current information. Also, regular updates as necessary will be posted
through Twitter.
On Twitter
For the latest updates and to share ideas
and information ...
Offical Hash Tag: #kcactf2
On Facebook
Search for “IUP Lively Arts” for major
postings.
Please refrain from the use of cell phones. including
texting, during all performances and sessions.
debut in Ruthless People. Following several other films, he was cast in 1992 in A League of Their Own,
followed by Singles, Sleepless in Seattle, Casper, Lost Highway, and as
the president in Independence Day. In addition to his work in front of
the camera, Pullman began to work behind the scenes in 1995 when he
founded his own production company, Big Town.
His television directing credits include the anthology series, Night Visions, and the TNT movie, The Virginian (Wrangler Award/Best Picture,
2000). His theater acting work includes the Broadway world premiere of
Edward Albee’s The Goat (Drama Desk nomination) as well as productions of new plays by Beth Henley (with Holly Hunter) and Thomas Babe
(with Tom Waits). He was also nominated for the Helen Hayes award for
his work in the Kennedy Center production of The Subject Was Roses.
Indiana University of Pennsylvania • January 2010
•5
Home
By Samm-Art Williams
Presented by: Arcadia University
Directed by Mark Wade
8:30 p.m. • Thursday • Fisher Auditorium
Response: 3:00-4:00 p.m., Friday
Home is the story of Cephus Miles, a young farmer in fictitious Cross
Roads, North Carolina, who is content to work the land until his life is
turned upside down by his girlfriend’s sudden departure. The play is an
exploration of the true meaning of “home” and wrestles with the notion
that it may be far more challenging to cut ourselves free from our roots
than we realize. (1 hr. 30 min.)
[email protected]
Invited Productions
A Year with Frog and Toad
By Willie and Robert Reale
Presented by Indiana University of Pennsylvania
Directed by Rob Gretta
9:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. • Wednesday • Waller Hall Mainstage
Response: 2:00-3:00 p.m., Thursday
A Year with Frog and Toad follows two great friends—the cheerful
and popular Frog and the rather grumpy Toad—through four fun-filled
seasons. Waking from hibernation in the spring, they proceed to plant
gardens, swim, rake leaves, and go sledding. Along the way, they learn
many of life’s lessons including a very important one about friendship
and rejoicing in the attributes that make each of us different and special.
(1hr. 30 min.)
A Comb and a Prayer Book:
A Survivor’s Story
Adapted for the stage by Pamela Hendrick
Presented by Richard Stockton College of New Jersey, NPP
Directed by Pamela R. Hendrick
12:30 p.m. • Wednesday • Fisher Auditorium
Response: 5:00-6:00 p.m., Thursday
A Comb and a Prayer Book: A Survivor’s Story is based on Elizabeth
Blum Goldstein’s memoir. By the age of 19, she had survived six concentration camps; and after sixty years of silence, she opens her heart to her
granddaughter Shana. What emerges is a moving and compelling chronicle of courage, endurance, and survival. What you will see is the triumph
of the human spirit rising above tremendous adversity. (1 hr. 40 min.)
Miss Witherspoon
By Christopher Durang
Presented by Keuka College
Directed by Mark Wenderlich
9:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. • Thursday • Waller Hall Mainstage
Response: 2:00-3:00 p.m., Friday
Miss Witherspoon is the story of middle-aged Veronica, who commits suicide, and the Christian secularists who reincarnate her. With the help of
Maryamma, a young Hindu woman, a female Jesus, and a wizard suspiciously named Gandalf, Veronica must journey from here to eternity and
back again to cleanse her brown tweedy aura and learn the necessity of
reengaging with life. (1 hr. 35 min.)
By Drew Aloe
Presented by Washington and Jefferson College, NPP
Directed by T.S. Frank
9:30a.m. and 4:30 p.m. • Friday • Waller Hall Mainstage
Response: 2:00-3:00 p.m., Saturday
What would happen if four college freshmen found themselves living
the plot of romantic comedy by William Shakespeare? The answer is
[email protected], a new play by Drew Aloe. This fast-paced romp is
a satire on the lives of college freshmen who fall in and out of love
faster than you can say, “It’s magical!” When the beautiful Flow hands
Michael a ball-point pen, he falls head over heels into a crazy kind of
love that blows his friendships apart, cracks open his heart, and teaches
him the value of the telling the truth, especially to yourself. (student
written) (1 hr. 45 min.)
The Increased Difficulty of
Concentration
By Vaclav Havel
Presented by Muhlenberg College
Directed by James Peck
12:30 p.m. • Friday • Fisher Auditorium
Response: 5:00-6:00 p.m., Friday
The Increased Difficulty of Concentration is an absurdist farce by Vaclav Havel—playwright, activist, dissident, and former president of the
Czech Republic—set in the midst of the Prague Spring of 1968. Havel
portrays a day in the life of Dr. Eduard Huml, a social scientist who balances a doting wife, sexy mistress and youthful secretary while trying
to write an essay on the meaning of happiness. To add to the hijinks,
four scientists bombard Dr. Huml’s home in order to test him for human
uniqueness, using their intelligent, though fussy, machine, Puzuk. To
top it all off, Havel presents this fast-paced four door farce entirely out
of order. (1 hr. 35 min.)
Shot!
Conceived by Kimmika Williams-Witherspoon, Eugene Martin, and
Douglas C. Wager
Presented by Temple University, NPP
Directed by Douglas C Wager
8:30 p.m. • Friday • Fisher Auditorium
Response: 3:00-4:00 p.m., Saturday
Shot! is a provocative, multimedia docudrama. What is the price of a
bullet? North Philadelphians may know all too well. Rioting in 1964
inadvertently triggers a fatal bullet, ripping a hole in history, echoing
though the streets of our city, cutting down generations of those who
stand, both innocent and guilty, in its terrible, destructive path. From
the glory days of a once-thriving and prosperous integrated neighborhood to the ruined apocalyptic “hood” of today; a poetic, personal theatrical foray into the historic life, death and future resurrection of North
Philadelphia. (2 hrs, 23 min.)
6•
Kennedy Center American College Theater Festival • Region 2
Widows
By Ariel Dorfman and Tony Kushner
Presented by Alfred University
Directed by Steve Crosby
9:30 a.m. and 3:30 p.m. • Saturday • Waller Hall Mainstage
Response: 7:00-8:00 p.m., Saturday
Widows is a smoldering political allegory that dramatizes—in a semimythic way—the conflict that arises out of ruthless tactics used by oppressive governments in their attempts to stifle dissent and fundamental
human rights. Set in a small, war-torn South American village, entirely
populated by women and children due to the “forced disappearances”
of their men, Widows illustrates how social change can begin with one
individual who refuses to abandon her quest for justice, but not without
a price. Struggle, pain, and tragedy go hand in hand with civil disobedience; but ultimately, the voice of the people cannot be ignored. (2 hrs.)
Rent
By Jonathan Larson
Presented by Robert Morris University
Directed by Ken Gargaro
12:30 p.m. • Saturday • Fisher Auditorium
Response: 5:00-6:00 p.m., Saturday
Rent is a period piece. Written in the late 1980s, Rent’s NYC setting is a
cauldron of poverty and disease. The country was in recession, and young
people were dying of a feared and misunderstood plague: AIDS. Young
performers, even in the best of times, struggle to survive, but being an
artist in the late 1980s in the East Village must have been daunting. Out
of this struggle, like a phoenix, grew a romanticized idealism. (2 hrs.)
General Information
Registration and Information Desk
The Registration and Information Desk will be located in the Performing
Arts Center lobby
Tuesday: 12:00-6:00 p.m. • Wednesday-Saturday: 9:00 a.m.-6:00 p.m.
Hospitality
Information regarding hospitality for VIPs and other special guests will
be provided to individuals in their “VIP Grab Bags.” If we have missed
you, please visit the Information Desk in the PAC Lobby.
Dining
For those who purchased meal plans in advance, Foster Dining Hall is
open for breakfast, lunch, and dinner (as per your meal plan previously
purchased). Restaurants are also located around campus, downtown, and
in close proximity to hotels and campus. Please see the Festival information desk for a list or check at your hotel.
Badges and Admission to Events
Festival badges will be required for all events and participants are required to have badges in their possession at all times during Festival
activities. If you lose your badge or it is damaged, please report to the
Information Desk in the lobby of the PAC. A $5.00 replacement will be
charged (cash only).
Entry to all events is on a first-come-first-served basis, and seating is by
general admission. It is highly encouraged to arrive at least 20 minutes
prior to the event start time, especially for ticketed events.
Admission to Invited Productions
Tickets will be distributed on a first-come-first-served basis starting one
hour prior to curtain time for Waller Hall productions and two hours prior
to curtain for Fisher Auditorium productions. If all seats are distributed
for any production prior to curtain time, a waiting list will be started for
that production. Any seats not filled ten minutes prior to curtain are subject to reassignment to those on the waiting list. A waiting list will not be
started more than one hour before each production. To receive a ticket or
to be placed on a waiting list, you must show your Festival badge.
Security
Emergencies
In case of extreme emergencies, medical or otherwise, always dial 911
immediately. From a campus phone, dial 9-911. In case of urgent situations, please dial 724-357-2141 to reach the IUP Campus Police.
Blue-Light Emergency Phones
There are 61 blue-light emergency phones, wall-mounted or freestanding, strategically located across campus. A bright blue light identifies
both styles. The phone is activated by simply opening the box on the wall
mount and picking up the receiver and talking or pushing the red button
on the freestanding-style phone and talking. Once an emergency bluelight phone is activated, a call is automatically made to the University
Police Dispatcher. The dispatcher will know the exact location of the
phone, even if an individual is unable to speak. A police officer will be
sent immediately to that location.
Any injury or medical situation that does not require an ambulance or
emergency medical technicians should be taken immediately to the Indiana Regional Medical Center (IRMC), 835 Hospital Road Indiana, Pa.
University Police
724-357-2141.
All Festival participants are asked to wear (or have in their possession)
their Festival badge while on campus.
Escort Service
While on campus, individuals are urged to practice personal security precautions and not to walk alone, especially during hours of darkness. When
an escort is requested, every effort is made to accommodate the request.
To request the escort service, call University Police at 724-357-2141.
Transportation
KCACTF bus shuttle schedules are posted in the lobby of Festival host
hotels and on the campus information board in the lobby of the PAC.
KCACTF bus shuttles are available in the morning and evening, Wednesday through Saturday. No buses will be provided on Tuesday. Many restaurants and businesses are within walking distance from campus.
Local public transportation (INDIGO) schedules are available at the information desk. Website: www.indigobus.com
Turbo Taxi: 724-465-8294 ; Available Monday through Saturday 8 a.m.4 a.m., Sunday 12 p.m. to 12 a.m.
Red and White Taxi: 724-463-0270; Available by appointment
Parking
Parking is available on campus free of charge to everyone. All lots and
paid spaces will be free during the KCACTF Festival. However, be aware
that you will be towed if you park in a space marked Reserved or any
other specially marked reserved or handicapped space without the proper
permits. See your campus map for lots and entrances.
Ticket Warning: The meters along Grant Street between Sprowls and Foster Dining Halls are not campus meters and, therefore, are not free. People
parking there are likely to be ticketed by the Indiana Parking Authority.
Tow Warning: The chained off area of 11th Street behind the Performing
Arts Center (Fisher and Waller Hall) is for the loading trucks of the invited
productions only. Any unauthorized vehicles will be towed.
For downtown events, there is paid parking available in the parking garage located on Water Street between 6th and 7th streets. Metered street
parking is also available, enforced Monday through Saturday between
the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 7:00 p.m.
Indiana University of Pennsylvania • January 2010
Computer Access
For VIPS and Festival Faculty/Staff
A maximum of one account per person will be assigned by local host,
Brian Jones, as needed at registration. Each person assigned an account
will sign for their unique username and are personally responsible for it.
A package will be issued to explain how to configure a wireless connection using the account information given. A maximum of 100 accounts
are available.
Sprowls Hall Lab, General Access
Internet, Computers, Printing
Sprowls Hall Lab will be available for general use Monday, January 11,
through Friday January 15, from 5:00-8:00 p.m. There will be a proctor
for the computer lab to assist with access. There are 13 Macs and 7 PCs
available in this lab.
Stapleton Library, General Access
Internet, Computer, Printing
Anyone can use Library computers using our public account information
which is posted in the Library. There will be a proctor for the Library to
assist with access. Hours are Monday, January 11, through Friday January 15, from 8:00 a.m.–4:30 p.m. The Library will be closed Saturday.
Printing
A print card will be provided to the proctors for the Library and Sprowls
Lab for printing within these venues. This does not apply to the wireless
accounts assigned through the Festival .
Lost and Found
All lost items should be turned in to the Information Desk in the PAC
Lobby. If you are missing anything, please check there first. If the item is
not there, please leave your name, phone number, and a brief description
of the lost item in case someone turns it in.
•7
Late Nights @ the Festival
Wednesday: Downtown
10:00 p.m. • Welcome Party at the Coney
Bar and Restaurant (including 21 and under)
642 Philadelphia Street, Downtown Indiana
10:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m. • Comedy at Indiana Theater
Comedy with The Company and The Troupe
Indiana Theater, 637 Philadelphia Street
Thursday: On Campus
10:15 p.m.-12:30 a.m.• DJ and Dancing
Memorial Field House Auxiliary Gym
10:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m. • Fringe Challenge
Zink Hall Gym B
Friday: On Campus
11:15 p.m. • Live Swing Band Night
Memorial Field House Auxiliary Gym
A dress-up, decked-out affair
11:30 p.m.-1:30 a.m. • Fringe Challenge
Zink Hall Gym B
Saturday: Downtown
10:30 p.m. • At the Coney: The Last Hurrah!
Bar and Restaurant (including 21 and under)
642 Philadelphia Street, Downtown Indiana
Indiana’s Irish Pub
642 P h i l a d e l p h i a S t r e e t | 724-465-8082 |
www.theconey.com
8•
Kennedy Center American College Theater Festival • Region 2
Master Schedule (check at information desk for changes)
5 pm
6 pm
Tuesday, January 12
5 pm
8 pm
Show Response to Comb
and a Prayer Book
Cogswell Hall 102
Tape
Gorell Recital Hall
Cast Posted/NPP productions
Cogswell Hall 120
NPP Casts Meet: SMs,
directors, playwrights
Cogswell Hall 120
Late Night: Welcome Party
Downtown: The
Coney
The Company and The
Troupe Performance
Downtown: Indiana
Theater
12 pm
6 pm
All Area Registration Open
PAC Lobby
8:30 pm
4 pm
5 pm
Cold Reading Workshop
Cogswell Hall 120
9 pm
4 pm
7 pm
Stage Management
Interviews
Waller Hall B14
5 pm
6 pm
Cold Reading Workshop
Cogswell Hall 120
7 pm
8 pm
NPP Playwright Meet & Greet
Cogswell Hall 120
8:30 pm
9:30 pm
Opening Ceremony
Fisher Auditorium
Thursday, January 14
9:30 pm
10:30 pm
Irene Ryan Auditions
Mandatory Meeting
Fisher Auditorium
8:30 am
9:20 am
Start Your Day With Yoga
PAC Rehearsal Studio
9:30 am
10:20 am
Thumbnail Sketching
Sprowls Hall 211
9:30 am
10:20 am
Alignment for Character
PAC Rehearsal Studio
9:30 am
11:30 am
O’Neill Critics Institute, #2
Waller Hall B12
9:30 am
10:30 am
SDI Workshop
Waller Studio Theater
9:30 am
11:30 am
Commedia for the Modern
Actor
Kipp Gallery Sprowls
Hall
9:30 am
11:05 am
Miss Witherspoon
Waller Hall Mainstage
9:30 am
10:20 am
Stage Management #2
Sprowls Hall 229
9:30 am
10:20 am
Paperwork for Lighting
Sprowls Hall 118
9:30 am
10:20 am
Directing: Movement for
Directors and Actors
Waller Hall Multipurpose Room
9:30 pm
10:30 pm
DI & SDC Meeting
Waller Studio Theater
9:30 pm
10:30 pm
Guerrilla Dramaturgy Meeting
Waller Hall B- 11
9:30 pm
10:30 pm
Meeting: All Fringe
Participants
PAC Rehearsal Studio
9:30 pm
10:30 pm
Design, Tech, Management
Cogswell Hall 121
Wednesday, January 13
9 am
6 pm
Ryan Auditions, Preliminary
Round and Responses
Zink Hall
9 am
10 am
NPP Director/Playwright
meetings
Cogswell Hall Jazz
116
10 pm
10 pm
10:30 pm
12:30 am
9:30 am
10:20 am
Safety: OSHA
Sprowls Hall 118
9:30 am
10:20 am
Stage Management #1
Sprowls Hall 229
9:30 am
11:30 am
10:20 am
Quick Change Choreography
Fisher Dressing Room
2nd Floor
It’s in the Text: Unlocking
Shakespeare
Cogswell Hall 126
9:30 am
9:30 am
11:30 am
Cogswell Hall 116
9:30 am
10:30 am
SDI Workshop
Waller Hall Studio
Theater
LED Tech and High End
Control Systems
9:30 am
11:30 am
Unarmed Stage Combat
Zink Gym B
9:30 am
11 am
A Year With Frog and Toad
Waller Hall Mainstage
10:30 am
11:30 am
Storytelling
Sprowls Hall 209
9:30 am
11 am
Aesthetic and Technical
Contracts in Lighting
Sprowls Hall 211
10:30 am
11:30 am
Moving Scenery and
Automation
Sprowls Hall 213
9:30 am
11:30 am
The Play is…Text to Image
Sprowls Hall 209
10:30 am
11:30 am
11 am
Guerrilla Dramaturgs Meeting
Cogswell Hall 120
Costuming at American
Shakespeare Center
Sprowls Hall 211
10 am
10 am
11:30 am
Scenic Respondent
Roundtable
Cogswell Hall 121
10:30 am
12:20 pm
ETC
Sprowls, McVitty
12:30 pm
1:30 pm
Keynote: Bill Pullman
Fisher Auditorium
10:30 am
11:30 am
Sentence Concept
Statements
Sprowls Hall 118
1:30 pm
Following Keynote: Ryan
Auditions Semi-Finalists
Fisher Auditorium
10:30 am
11:30 am
Theater in Education: A
Foundation
Sprowls Hall 213
2 pm
2:50 pm
RoadHog Lighting Consoles
Waller Hall Mainstage
2 pm
3 pm
A Year With Frog and Toad
Show Response
Sprowls Hall 118
2 pm
4 pm
O’Neill Critics Institute,
Session #3
Waller Hall B12
10:30 am
11:30 am
Response Training Workshop
Session #1
Waller Hall
Conference Room
10:30 am
11 am
NPP Audition Pre-Meeting
Cogswell Hall 120
11 am
2 pm
NPP Auditions
Cogswell Hall 120
3 pm
5 pm
Baby with the Bathwater
Gorell Recital Hall
12:30 pm
2:10 pm
A Comb and a Prayer Book
Fisher Auditorium
3:30 pm
5:30 pm
2:30 pm
3:20 pm
Stressed Skin Decking
Waller Hall Scene
Studio
From Improvisation to
Character Movement
Kipp Gallery Sprowls
Hall
3:30 pm
4:20 pm
5 pm
O’Neill Critics Institute, #1
Waller Hall B12
Faculty Roundtable:
Selecting a Season
Sprowls Hall 229
2:30 pm
3:30 pm
4:20 pm
Costume Design
Sprowls Hall 211
3:30 pm
4:20 pm
Costume Touring
Sprowls Hall 213
3:30 pm
4:20 pm
Releasing Your Creativity
Sprowls Hall 213
3:30 pm
5:30 pm
Collaborative Play Making
Sprowls Hall 209
3:30 pm
5:30 pm
Theater Games
Sprowls Hall Kipp
Gallery
3:30 pm
5:30 pm
Mining the Script for Visual
Metaphor
Sprowls Hall
Computer Lab
3:30 pm
5:30 pm
Acting Awake
PAC Rehearsal Studio
3:30 pm
5:30 pm
I’m the Singing Actor...
Cogswell Hall 126
3:30 pm
5:30 pm
Introduction to Fitzmaurice
Voicework
University Museum,
Sutton Hall
3:30 pm
5:30 pm
Speak the Speech
Cogswell Hall 116
3:30 pm
5:30 pm
Zink Classroom 203
3:30 pm
5:20 pm
Strategies/Improving Musical
Theater Vocal
Cogswell Hall 126
Auditioning for Professional
Theater
3:30 pm
5:30 pm
PAC Rehearsal Studio
3:30 pm
5:30 pm
F#!k y*u…pause: Staging
Rhythm in Modern Drama
Sprowls Hall 118
Zen of Improvisation:
Permission to Play
4:30 pm
5:30 pm
3:30 pm
5:30 pm
Non-Drama Acting Jobs
Cogswell Hall 301
The Business of the Acting
Business
Sprowls Hall McVitty
Auditorium
3:30 pm
5:30 pm
Speak the Speech
Cogswell Hall 303
4:30 pm
5:30 pm
When Your Monologue Isn’t
Asked For...
Cogswell Hall 120
3:30 pm
5:30 pm
Art Matters
Sprowls Hall 209
4:30 pm
5:30 pm
Costume Rendering
Sprowls Hall 211
4:30 pm
5:30 pm
Freedom in Auditioning
Cogswell Hall 126
4:30 pm
6:05 pm
Miss Witherspoon
Waller Hall Mainstage
4:30 pm
6 pm
A Year With Frog and Toad
Waller Hall Mainstage
5 pm
6:30 pm
Fringe Open Mic
Gorell Recital Hall
Indiana University of Pennsylvania • January 2010
7:45 pm
8:15 pm
Costume Parade Preliminary
Round #1
PAC Upper Lobby &
Rehearsal Studio
8:30 pm
10 pm
Home
Fisher Auditorium
10:15 pm
12:30 am
Fringe Challenge
Zink Gym B
10:30 pm
12:30 am
Late Night Event: DJ
Fieldhouse Aux Gym
Friday, January 15
8:30 am
12:30 pm
Irene Ryan Auditions SemiFinals
Zink Hall Dance
Theater
•9
4:30 pm
6:15 pm
[email protected]
Waller Mainstage
5 pm
7:30 pm
Tech Olympics
Cogswell Hall 126
4:30 pm
5:30 pm
The Song is Still the Scene...
Cogswell Hall 203
5:30 pm
6:45 pm
Don’t Be That Guy
Sprowls McVitty
5 pm
6 pm
Response to Increased
Difficulty of Concentration
Cogswell Hall 116
6 pm
8:30 pm
Fringe: The Verve
Gorell Recital Hall
7:45 pm
8:15 pm
Costume Parade Preliminary
Round #2
PAC Upper Lobby &
Rehearsal Studio
11 pm
Shot!
Fisher Auditorium
Late Night Event: Live Swing
Band
Memorial Field House
Aux. Gym
Fringe Challenge
Zink Gym B
9:30 am
12 pm
O’Neill Critics Institute, #4
Waller Hall B12
9:30 am
12 pm
Invited Scenes
Gorell Recital Hall
8:30 pm
9:30 am
11:15 pm
[email protected]
Waller Hall Mainstage
11:15 pm
9:30 am
10:20 am
Stage Management #3
Sprowls Hall 209
9:30 am
10:20 am
Hosting ACTF
Waller Conference
9:30 am
10:20 am
Playwrighting History:
Plays...Pop Culture
Cogswell Hall 102
9:30 am
10:30 am
SDI Workshop
Waller Hall Studio
9:30 am
10:20 am
Suzuki Methodologies for
Directors and Actors
Cogswell Hall 116
9:30 am
11:30 pm
Yoga for Actors
PAC Reh. Studio
9:30 am
11:30 am
Shakespeare’s First Folio: an
Actor’s Resource
9:30 am
11:30 am
9:30 am
10:20 am
11:30 pm
12:30 am
Saturday, January 16
8:30 am
9:20 am
Start Your Day With Yoga
PAC Reh. Studio
9 am
12 pm
Irene Ryan Auditions Finals
Zink Hall Dance
Theater
9:30 am
11:30 am
Building a Physical Character
Cogswell Hallm126
9:30 am
12 pm
O’Neill Critics Institute, #6
Waller Hall B12
Sprowls Hall 118
9 am
10 am
NPP Roundtable: ... Salient
Issues
Cogswell Hall 102
Get movement skills…Via the
Internet
Cogswell Hall 201
9:30 am
10:30 am
SDI Workshop
Waller Hall Studio
Theater
Building a Performing Arts
Center...
Sprowls Hall 213
9:30 am
11:30 am
SFX
Waller Hall B14
9:30 am
11:30 am
Widows
Waller Hall Mainstage
10 am
12 pm
Responses to Dramaturgy
Initiative Entries
Cogswell Hall 121
9:30 am
11:30 am
USITT Workshop
Sprowls Hall 211
10 am
12:30 pm
Tomorrow and Tomorrow and
Tomorrow
Cogswell Hall 116
10:30 am
11:30 am
Seeking the Sign for the Cry...
PAC Rehearsal Studio
10:30 am
11:30 am
Supercharging Character
Work...Research
Waller Hall Multipurpose Room
10:30 am
11:30 am
Playwrighting Retreat
Cogswell Hall 102
10:30 am
12:15 pm
Design Bash
Sprowls McVitty
10:30 am
11:30 pm
Creative Approaches to
Teaching Theater History
Cogswell Hall 301
10:30 am
11:30 am
Every Song is a Monologue...
Sprowls Hall Kipp
Gallery
10:30 am
11:30 am
Role of Actors’ Equity...
Cogswell Hall 201
10:30 am
12:20 pm
Draping and Patterning
Waller Costume Shop
11:30 am
12:20 pm
AutoCAD
Waller Hall B14
11 am
12 am
Exhibit Closing Reception
Cogswell Hall 121
12:30 pm
2:05 pm
The Increased Difficulty of
Concentration
Fisher Auditorium
12:30 am
2:30 pm
Rent
Fisher Auditorium
12:30 am
5:30 pm
Reading of Full-Length
Plays...
Cogswell Hall 120
2 pm
3 pm
Show Response to
[email protected]
Cogswell Hall 203
3 pm
5 pm
Irene Ryan Auditions Final
Responses
Gorell Recital Hall,
Sutton Hall
2 pm
4 pm
Response Training Workshop
Session #2
Cogswell Hall 116
2 pm
3 pm
Show Response to Miss
Witherspoon
Cogswell Hall 116
3 pm
4:30 pm
The Embalmer
Waller Studio Theater
3 pm
6 pm
Two One-Act Readings
Cogswell Hall 120
3 pm
4 pm
Show Response to Shot!
Cogswell Hall 201
3 pm
7 pm
Irene Ryan Auditions SemiFinals Responses
Zink Hall Dance
Theater
3:30 pm
4:20 pm
Faculty Roundtable: The
Role...Response
Sprowls Hall 229
7 pm
9:30 pm
Irene Ryan Auditions Finalist
Orientation and Rehearsal
Zink Hall Dance
Theater
3:30 am
4:20 pm
Casting...
Cogswell Hall 203
3:30 pm
4:20 pm
Director/Designer
Collaboration
Sprowls Hall 118
3:30 pm
5:30 pm
Making and Feeling
Connections...
Waller Hall Multipurpose Room
3:30 pm
5:30 pm
Widows
Waller Hall Mainstage
2:30 pm
4:30 pm
O’Neill Critics Institute, #5
Waller Hall B12
3:30 pm
4:30 pm
Show Response to Home
Cogswell Hall 201
3:30 pm
4:20 pm
Faculty Roundtable: ...
Curriculum
Sprowls Hall 229
3:30 pm
4:20 pm
Automated Light Mechanics
Waller Hall Scene
Studio
3:30 pm
4:20 pm
Strategies/Improving Musical
Theater Vocal Technique
Cogswell Hall 126
3:30 pm
4:20 pm
Action Analysis—Directors
Cogswell Hall 203
4:30 pm
5:30 pm
4:20 pm
How to Dramaturg Your
Theater Major
Cogswell Hall 102
Honing Your Skills as a
Respondent
Sprowls Hall 229
3:30 pm
4:30 pm
5:30 pm
5:30 pm
Non-Drama Acting Jobs
Cogswell Hall 301
Physicalizing Shakespeare’s
Text: Get It Into Your Body
PAC Rehearsal Studio
3:30 pm
3:30 pm
5:30 pm
Physical Theater Explosion
University Museum,
Sutton Hall
5 pm
6 pm
Show Response to Rent
Cogswell Hall 102
6:30 pm
8 pm
Waller Hall Mainstage
3:30 pm
5:30 pm
It’s in the Text: Unlocking
Shakespeare
Kipp Gallery Sprowls
Hall
Ten-Minute Play Public
Readings
7 pm
8 pm
Show Response to Widows
Cogswell Hall 102
3:30 pm
5:30 pm
You want me to do WHAT?
With WHOM? …
Sprowls Hall 118
8:300 pm
10:30 pm
Closing Ceremonies
Fisher Auditorium
Closing Night Party: Last
Hurrah!
The Coney, Downtown
Indiana
3:30 pm
5:30 pm
Acting Awake
PAC Reh. Studio
3:30 pm
5:30 pm
The 411 on Grant Writing
Sprowls Hall 213
10:30 pm
Updates/corrections at Information Desk in PAC and Twitter: #kcactf2
10 •
Kennedy Center American College Theater Festival • Region 2
Directing, Theater Making
Wednesday, January 13
The Play Is…Text to Image
Wed. 9:30-11:30 a.m. • Sprowls 209
Directing
Presented by Becky Prophet
Open to all festival participants, this workshop explores the manner in
which the essence of language chosen by a playwright guides the choices
for finding central images, creating characters, and movement patterns.
Exploring rhythms, images, and feelings through meaning, specific word
choices and phrases are at the center of this workshop.
F#!k y*u … pause: Staging Rhythm in Modern Drama
Wed. 3:30-5:30 p.m. • Sprowls 118
Directing
Presented by David Schuler
This workshop is an exploration of the specific rhythmic challenges
found in the plays of Shepard, Mamet, and Pinter. Participants will work
on short scenes discovering not only how the textual demands suggest
verbal choices for timing, pace, rhythm, and tempo but also how those
textual choices translate into rhythmic physical possibilities of behavior,
movement, and blocking.
Thursday, January 14
Movement for Directors and Actors
Thurs. 9:30-10:20 a.m. • Waller Hall Multi-purpose Room
Directing amd Theater Making
Presented by J. Stanley
Collaborative Playmaking
Thurs. 3:30-5:30 p.m. • Sprowls 209
Directing and Playwrighting
Presented by Eve Muson
As theater artists, we are often asked to adapt material for the stage or
make new pieces for the ensemble. But how do we begin? Using non-verbal images and poetry as sources for inspiration, this workshop is an onyour-feet, collaborative exploration in theater making. Actors, directors,
and playwrights will be guided through a sequence of ensemble and individual exercises resulting in the creation of scenarios, characters, monologues, and dialogues. Please bring writing materials to the workshop.
The Song Is Still the Scene; but the Music or the Scene Isn’t Over
‘til the Fat Lady Sings!
Fri. 4:30-5:30 p.m. • Cogswell Hall 203
Directing
Presented by Michael O’Steen
The workshop recreates the environment of a Broadway rehearsal with
the students and the instructor working as co-directors. Participants will
examine the musical scene’s structure and story into space and time investigate the director’s use of dynamics, tempo, and rhythm from the
beginning of the scene through the transition to song, then to dance, and
on to the conclusion of the scene. We will also explore the natural employment of Stanslavski’s notion of objective within the musical scene.
Saturday, January 16
Supercharging Character Work with Personality Dimensions Research
Sat. 10:30-11:30 a.m. • Waller Hall Multi-purpose Room, 2nd fl.
Performance and Directing
Presented by Joseph Fahey
Personality Dimensions Research in Psychology—especially the “Big
Five” Personality Dimensions Model and published reactions to this
mode—offers an exciting exploratory tool for actors who wish to develop
characters that move beyond the actor’s own predispositions. The worksheet and exercises offered in this session will allow actors and directors
to structure their exploration of this technique and will point participants
toward additional resources in this area. This approach can be especially
useful for actors and directors who want to breathe new life in stagnating
scenes and audition material, for actors to conduct a self-directed exploration of their approach, and for directors who seek a clearer actor-centered vocabulary to assist them in their work. Several participants with
prepared audition material will be selected at the start of the workshop
session to demonstrate the technique with the facilitator.
Casting: A Practical Workshop
Sat. 3:30-4:20 p.m. • Cogswell Hall 203
Directing and Performance
Presented by Mark Wenderlich
This will be an auditioning workshop where actors ‘audition’ and directors ‘cast.’ Come with prepared material.
Director/Designer Collaboration
Sat. 3:30-4:20 p.m. • Sprowls Hall 118
Directing and Design
Presented by Debra Otte and Lars Tatom
Mining the Script for Visual Metaphor
Thurs. 3:30-5:30 p.m. • Sprowls Computer Lab, 1st Floor
Directing
Presented by Debra Otte and Robyn Quick
Move beyond the obvious into discovery of those visuals embedded and
implied in scripts. This session will be a primer in abstracting visuals
from written material.
Dramaturgy,
Playwrighting, Criticism
Friday, January 15
Tuesday, January 12
Suzuki Methods for Directors and Actors
Fri. 9:30-10:20 a.m. • Cogswell Hall Jazz 116
Directing
Presented by McCabe
Action Analysis for Directors
Fri. 3:30-4:20 p.m. • Cogswell Hall 203
Directing
Presented by Nathan Thomas
A hands-on demonstration of the use of Stanislavski’s Active Analysis
for directors.
NPP Playwright Meet and Greet
Tues. 7:00-8:00 p.m. • Cogswell Hall Choral 120
Playwrighting
Presented by Ruth Childs and Scott Frank
Guerilla Dramaturgy Orientation
Tues. 9:30-10:30 p.m. • Waller Hall Conference Room B11
Dramaturgy
Presented by Robyn Quick
Students may gain hands-on experience in production dramaturgy during the Festival by serving as guerilla dramaturgs. This session will
help students learn more about the exciting work of the dramaturg and
prepare them to participate in the new play development process as
guerilla dramaturgs.
Indiana University of Pennsylvania • January 2010
Wednesday, January 13
NPP Ten-Minute, One-Act, Full-Length Director/Playwrighters’
Meeting
Wed. 9:00-10:00 a.m. • Cogswell Hall Jazz 116
Playwrighting
Guerilla Dramaturgs Meet with Playwrights and Directors
Wed. 10:00-11:00 a.m. • Cogswell Hall Jazz 116
Dramaturgy
NPP Auditions
Wed. 11:00 a.m.-2:00 p.m. • Cogswell Hall Choral 120
Playwrighting
O’Neill Critics Institute, Session #1
Wed. 2:30-5:00 • Waller Hall Classroom B12
Criticism
Presented by guest critic, Wendy Rosenfield and Ralph Leary, OCI Coordinator
KCACTF, in partnership with the Eugene O’Neill Institute, sponsors
the O’Neill Critics Institute (OCI). OCI provides student critics with the
opportunity to learn and practice the craft of theater review writing by
working with a guest critic who conducts a three-day seminar on the
craft. The student critics write reviews of some of the productions at the
festival and discuss these reviews with the guest and other student critics. By the end of the festival, they submit a review that demonstrates
what they see as their best work. One student critic from each region is
selected to attend OCI workshops at the Kennedy Center.
On Twitter
For the latest updates and to share ideas
and information ...
Offical Hash Tag: #kcactf2
• 11
NPP Cast Lists Posted
Wed. 8:30 p.m. • Cogswell Hall Choral 120
Playwrighting
NPP Casts Meet with SMs, Directors, and Writers
Wed. 9:00-10:00 p.m. • Cogswell Hall Choral Room 120
Thursday, January 14
O’Neill Critics Institute, Session #2
Thurs. 9:30-11:30 a.m. • Waller Hall Classroom B12
Criticism
Storytelling: Writing with Your Voice
Thurs. 10:30-11:30 a.m. • Sprowls Hall 209
Playwrighting
Presented by Scott Frank
O’Neill Critics Institute, Session #3
Thurs. 2:00-4:00 p.m. • Waller Hall Classroom B12
Criticism
Collaborative Playmakingl
Thurs. 3:30-5:30 p.m. • Sprowls Hall 209
Directing and Playwrighting
Presented by Eve Muson
Using non-verbal images and poetry as sources for inspiration, this workshop is an on-your-feet, collaborative exploration in theater making. Actors, directors, and playwrights will be guided through a sequence of
ensemble and individual exercises resulting in the creation of scenarios,
characters, monologues, and dialogues. Please bring writing materials to
the workshop.
Friday, January 15
O’Neill Critics Institute Session #4
Fri. 9:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m. • Waller Hall Classroom B12
Criticism
Playwrighting History: Making Plays from Pop Culture
Fri. 9:30-10:20 a.m. • Cogswell Hall Music Ed. Room 102
Playwrighting
Presented by Bill Cameron
Playwrighters Retreat
Fri. 10:30-11:30 a.m. • Cogswell Hall Music Ed. Room 102
Playwrighting
Presented by Jeanette Farr
Whether you apply for opportunities to be a writer or own up to it in
your own home, we will discuss some insight into inspiration and remind
ourself that you are, indeed, a playwright and share ways to motivate you
into believing it.
O’Neill Critics Institute Session #5
Fri. 2:30-4:30 p.m. • Waller Hall Classroom B12
Criticism
Two One-Act Readings
Fri. 3:00-6:00 p.m. • Cogswell Hall Choral 120
Playwrighting
How to Dramaturg Your Theater Major
Fri. 3:30-4:20 p.m. • Cogswell Music Ed. Room 102
Dramaturgy
Presented by Lisa A. Wilde
Using Tennessee Williams’ The Glass Menagerie as a touchstone, we
will look at the various dramaturgical skills necessary in all aspects of
theater performance and theater studies focusing on text analysis, re-
12 •
Kennedy Center American College Theater Festival • Region 2
search, literary management, critical thinking and feedback, and audience development. The emphasis will be on individuals finding concrete
methods to enhance their individual programs and future artistic work.
Saturday, January 16
O’Neill Critics Institute Session #6
Sat. 9:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m. • Waller Hall Classroom B12
Criticism
NPP Roundtable: A Discussion of Salient Issues
Sat. 9:00-10:00 a.m. • Cogswell Hall Music Ed. Room 102
Playwrighting
Responses to Dramaturgy Initiative Entries
Sat. 10:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m. • Cogswell 121
Dramaturgy
Guest dramaturg, Lisa A. Wilde, will respond to the portfolios submitted
as part of the Student Dramaturgy Initiative. Student dramaturgs, faculty,
and those interested in what makes a dramaturgy project effective are all
encouraged to attend.
Presented by Lisa A. Wilde
Tomorrow and Tomorrow and Tomorrow
Sat. 10:00 a.m.-12:30 p.m. • Cogswell Hall Jazz 116
Playwrighting
Staged reading and response to this new play.
Reading of Full-length Plays and Response with NPP Respondents
Sat. 12:30 .m.-5:30 p.m. • Cogswell Hall Choral 120
Playwrighting
Ten-Minute Play Public Readings
Sat. 6:00-8:00 • Waller Hall Mainstage
Playwrighting
Presented by Scott Frank
Education, KCACTF,
Responses
Wednesday, January 13
Response Training Workshop Session #1
Wed.. 10:30-11:30 a.m. • Waller Hall Conference Room
Faculty
Presented by Elizabeth van den Berg, Region II Vice Chair and Debra
Otte, Former Region II Chair
Response training for faculty and staff who have an interest in volunteering as respondents for productions entered in Region II. The first session
will include specific approaches to response, protocols, and a guide to the
forms. All participants will be invited to see a performance of Miss Witherspoon at 4:30 p.m. Thursday and to attend Friday’s Session #2, where
we will observe the response to Miss Witherspoon.
Show Response to A Comb and Prayer
Wed. 5:00-6:00 p.m. • Cogswell Hall Music Ed. Room
Response: Gretchen Smith and Dick Block
Thursday, January 14
Show Response to A Year with Frog and Toad
Thurs. 2:00-3:00 p.m. • Sprowls Hall 118
Response: Dick Block and Ansley Valentine
Faculty Roundtable
Thurs. 3:30-4:20 p.m. • Sprowls Hall 229
Faculty
Presented b Harvey Rovine, Michael Swanson, and Gene Terruso
“What’s in a Name?”—Selecting a Season
The production season is an integral and necessary part of every theater
department. No matter how extensive, the production component will,
at the very least, provide practical production opportunities for our students. What other considerations influence our season selection? Educational: is it important to have a “rotation” in place exposing students to a
certain range of literature and genres? Practical: are there considerations
of logistics, technical limitations, faculty interests? Financial: how much
can we spend? If we retain box office receipts, how much would we like
to make? All of us are involved our department’s season selection process. Join this faculty roundtable and share your thoughts and insights on
this most challenging topic.
Friday, January 15
Hosting KCACTF
Fri. 9:30-10:20 a.m. • Waller Hall Conference Room
Faculty
Presented by Juliet Wunsch and Elizabeth van den Berg
This meeting is directed to schools interested in hosting KCACTF and for
all who have any interest or questions regarding hosting a future festival.
Creative Approaches to Teaching Theater History
Fri. 10:30-11:30 a.m. • Cogswell Hall 301
Teaching
Presented by Kerro Knox, III
This session will be a roundtable discussion of techniques for bringing
alive the too-often dry subject.
Show Response to Miss Witherspoon
Fri. 2:00-3:00 p.m. • Cogswell Hall Jazz 116
Response: Dick Block and Kerro Knox
Response Training Workshop Session #2
Fri. 2:00-4:00 p.m. • Cogswell Hall Jazz 116
Faculty
Presented by Elizabeth van den Berg, Region II Vice Chair, and Debra
Otte, Former Region II Chair
Workshop participants will observe the Festival response to Miss Witherspoon (2:00-3:00 p.m.) and follow up with a roundtable discussion of the
response in the same location.
Show Response to Home
Fri. 3:30-4:30 p.m. • Cogswell Hall 201
Response: Ansley Valentine and Dick Block
Faculty Roundtable: Can We Agree on a Curriculum?
Fri. 3:30-4:20 p.m. • Sprowls Hall 229
Faculty
Presented by Juliet Wunsch and KCACTF Leadership Members
Presented by Harvey Rovine, P. Gibson Ralph, Tammi O’Donnell
Is there a sequence of courses that should be fundamental to every
program’s theater major? Must every major know a certain amount of
theater history? Just how many courses in dramatic literature are appropriate? Does everyone need to take the basic acting course? How
many “labs” should be required? “Curriculum,” from the Latin for “race
course,” reminds us that these issues test our intellect, creativity, and
endurance as we strive to stay current, accredited, and meaningful in a
discipline that is vastly changed from the one most of us encountered as
undergraduates. Join this faculty roundtable and share your thoughts on
this many-sided issue.
Indiana University of Pennsylvania • January 2010
The 411 on Grant Writing
Fri. 3:30-5:30 p.m. • Sprowls Hall 213
Arts Management
Presented by Janet Berry
This brief overview of grant writing for non-profit theater will inform participants about the entire process from prospect research to reporting. You
will also discover the common grant components and learn to avoid the
common mistakes of many first time grant-writers. Finally, participants
will learn about careers in grant writing and fundraising for the theater.
Show Response to The Increased Difficulty of Concentration
Fri. 5:00-6:00 p.m. • Cogswell Hall Jazz 116
Response: Kerro Knox and Dick Block
Saturday, January 16
Show Response to [email protected]
Sat. 2:00-3:00 p.m. • Cogswell Hall 203
Response: Larry Loebell and Ansley Valentine
Show Response to Shot!
3:00-4:00 p.m. • Cogswell Hall 201
Response: Gretchen Smith and Dick Block
Faculty Roundtable: Role of the Production Response in Region 2
Sat. 3:30-4:20 p.m. • Sprowls Hall 229
Faculty
Times have changed and borders have shifted. This is the opportunity
for schools hosting respondents as well as Region 2 respondents to come
together to discuss the process. Areas of conversation will include what
host schools feel might best serve their students as well as what respondents can offer students through their thoughtful reflections on a produc-
• 13
tion. Let’s remove the unspoken assumptions and create clarity in what
has been a very successful process for many years.
Honing Your Skills as a Respondent
Sat. 4:30-5:30 p.m. • Sprowls Hall 229
Faculty
Presented by Elizabeth van den Berg
For all those interested in becoming better production respondents we
will discuss best practices in the area of response.
Show Response to Rent
Sat. 5:00-6:00 p.m. • Cogswell Hall Music Ed. Room 102
Response: Ansley Valentine and Dick Block
Show Response to Widows
Sat. 7:00-8:00 p.m. • Cogswell Hall Music Ed. Room 102
Response: Ansley Valentine and Kerro Knox
Office Locations
Registration and Information............................................PAC Lobby
IUP Dept. of Theater and Dance............................... Waller Hall 104
O’Neill Critics Institute......................... Waller Hall B12, Classroom
National Playwriting Program...................Cogswell Hall Choral 120
Dramaturgy Office..................... Waller Hall B11, Conference Room
Irene Ryan Scholarship Auditions...........Zink Hall 105, HPED Dept.
Office Conference Room
Student Directing Institute......................................... Waller Hall 104
Festival Administrative Offices................................. Waller Hall 104
and PAC Lobby Ticket Office
KCACTF Coordination Office........................... Waller Hall 104 and
PAC Lobby Ticket Office
14 •
Kennedy Center American College Theater Festival • Region 2
Releasing Your Creativity
Wed. 3:30-4:20 p.m. • Sprowls Hall 213
Scenic
Presented by Keith Hight
This is about getting back to the basics. It is an hour of fun and learning
using another approach to getting the designer in you, out. Because you
spend your time creating with no judgment call, there is no right or wrong,
letting you become relaxed and getting the creating juices flowing.
Art Matters
Wed. 3:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. • Sprowls Hall 209
Design, Technical, Management
Presented by Cathy Norgren
This workshop explores color palettes, composition, and other elements
and principles of design in fine art images to use as visual anchors for
approach to production design.
Thursday, January 14
Stage Management Workshop: Session 2 of 3
Thurs. 9:30-10:20 a.m. • Sprowls Hall 229
Stage Management
Presented by Michael Allen
Keeping It Visual: Paperwork for Lighting Designers
Thurs. 9:30-10:20 a.m. • Sprowls Hall 118
Lighting
Presented by Juliet Wunsch
Thumbnail Sketching
Thurs. 9:30-10:20 a.m. Sprowls Hall 211
Scenic
Presented by Rob Berry
Tips and tricks for the much maligned thumbnail sketch. From research
through ideas, sketches to rendering techniques, this workshop will work
enhance the design student’s process through repeated ‘quick’ sketches.
LED Tech and High End Control Systems in the Entrainment Industry
Thurs. 9:30-11:30 a.m. • Cogswell Hall Jazz 116
Lighting
Presented by Vincent Lighting Systems
We will be exploring what the LED can do for your next show, event
or even architectural lighting install. We will also address the age old
question, “Hey. I bought these things, now how do I control them?” As
the entertainment industry edges more towards the green movement and
with “Green Grants” being easier to acquire, LEDs will be more and
more prevalent in the world of theater and entertainment at the college
level. The technological advancements being made every day by Color
Kinetics, Vari-Lite, and other members of the Phillips family, the LED is
quickly catching on as a must-have item.
Moving Scenery and Automation
Thurs. 10:30-11:30 a.m. • Sprowls Hall 213
Scenic
Presented by Colin Stewart
This workshop will give a brief overview of moving scenery and the
possible ways to automate it. A modern moving scenery system often involves the use of motors and other powered actuators to drive the moving
elements. It can also incorporate complex cueing or sequencing within
a scenery move or a series of scenery moves. This workshop will give
a quick discussion of the design and components used in an automated
system and how one might go about setting one up.
Costuming at the American Shakespeare Center
Thurs. 10:30-11:30 a.m. • Sprowls Hall 211
Costuming
Presented by LeVonne Lindsay
This session discusses a resourceful approach to Elizabethan costuming
during the current economic climate.
ETC
Thurs. 10:30-12:20 p.m. • Sprowls Hall McVitty Auditorium
Lighting
Presented by ETC Representative
RoadHog Lighting Consoles
Thurs. 2:00 p.m. to 2:50 p.m. • Waller Hall Mainstage
Lighting
Presented by Grace Maberg
Costume Touring
Thurs. 2:30 p.m. to 4:20 p.m. • Sprowls Hall 213
Costuming
Presented by Cheryl Randal
Rendering
Thurs. 4:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. • Sprowls Hall 211
Costuming
Presented by Tim Averill
Clear visual communication of your design ideas is essential to the collaboration with director, cast, and shop. Learn some techniques to improve your renderings.
Costume Parade Preliminary Round #1
Thurs. 7:45-8:15 p.m. • PAC Upper Lobby and PAC Rehearsal Studio
Costuming
Presented by Karen Anselm
Friday, January 15
Stage Management Workshop: Session 3 of 3
Fri. 9:30-10:20 a.m. • Sprowls Hall 229
Stage Management
Presented by Michael Allen
Building a Performing Arts Center: Is it a Theater or a Barn?
Fri. 9:30-10:20 a.m. • Sprowls Hall 213
Design
Presented by Victor Capecce
What are the issues and solutions to developing performance spaces?
Whether you are building a new theater, converting a space for performance, or renovating an existing space, there are a number of challenges
to be met. Some issues need to be solved with bricks, wood, and steel;
some with clever modifications; and some with diplomacy and political
savvy. Millersville University is about to break ground on a new Visual
and Performing Arts Center. Some of the new challenges that were met
will be reviewed along with the story of the development and the solutions found. Take this opportunity to bring your facility challenges to the
table and share the solutions.
Design Bash
Fri. 10:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m. • Sprowls Hall McVitty Auditorium
Design, Technical, Management
Presented by Lynne Koscielniak
This session is an exciting live-audience viewed stage contest. Students
will register and create teams with each team given a stock of randomly
selected supplies with which to work. The challenge is to beat the clock
and create a great original design in costumes, properties, set—anything
they chose. The finished designs will be presented before a panel of judges who will determine the best design and award the winning team.
Draping and Patterning
Fri. 10:30 a.m.-12:20 p.m. • Waller Hall Costume Shop
Costuming
Presented by Valerie Liberta
Indiana University of Pennsylvania • January 2010
Design, Technology, and
Management
Tuesday, January 12
Design, Tech, Management Orientation
Tues. 9:30-10:30 p.m. • Cogswell Hall Instrumental 121
For all students participating/presenting in the DTM exhibit.
Wednesday, January 13
Quick Change Choreography
Wed. 9:30-10:20 a.m. • Fisher Dressing Room 2nd Floor
Costuming
Presented by Cheryl Randal
Safety: OSHA
Wed. 9:30-10:20 a.m. • Sprowls Hall 118
Scenic
Presented by Johan Godwaldt
Aesthetic and Technical Contracts in Lighting
Wed. 9:30-10:20 a.m. • Sprowls Hall 211
Lighting
Presented by Lynne Koscielniak
Stage Management Workshop: Session 1 of 3
Wed. 9:30-10:20 a.m. • Sprowls Hall 229
Stage Management
Presented by Michael Allen
• 15
Sentence Concept Statements
Wed. 10:30-11:30 a.m. • Sprowls Hall 118
Design, Technical, Management
Presented by Cathy Norgren
A quick and dirty way to get to the heart of the matter. This is for all designers presenting in the Design Exhibit and open to all.
Theater in Education: A Foundation for All Disciplines
Wed. 10:30-11:30 a.m. Sprowls Hall 213
Arts Management, Education
Presented by Hank Knerr
This discussion-based session will center around the need to incorporate
theater and the arts across all curricula. It is especially geared towards
those who currently or are planning to work in educational settings whether they are K-12 classrooms, residency activities while on tour, or other
environments where the arts can be used as an educational foundation.
Stressed Skin Decking
Wed. 2:30 p.m. to 3:20 p.m. • Waller Hall Scenery Studio
Scenic
Presented by G. Patrick McCreary
At IUP, we have been using our own “brand” of decking panels for about
twenty years and feel they are indeed “ready for prime time.” This discussion and demonstration will show you how to build them and tailor them
to your own needs.
Costume Design
Wed. 3:30-4:20 p.m. • Sprowls Hall 211
Costume
Presented by Cathy Nao
Updates/corrections at Information Desk in PAC and Twitter: #kcactf2
16 •
Kennedy Center American College Theater Festival • Region 2
AutoCAD
Fri. 11:30-12:20 p.m. • Waller Hall B14
Scenic
Presented by G. Patrick McCreary
AutoCAD? Nah. Vectorworks? Nah. Both? Well, maybe. This session
will include a discussion and demonstration of the most popular Computer Aided Design software packages and how they can be used in conjunction with each other.
‘Literal’ Is a 4-Letter Word
Fri. 3:30-5:30 p.m. • Sprowls Hall 211
Design, Technical, Management
Presented by Cathy Norgren
This session centers around analogue gestures, “picture translations,” and
other strategies for thinking creatively about design.
Automated Light Mechanics
Fri. 3:30-4:20 p.m. • Waller Hall Scene Shop
Scenic
Presented by G. Patrick McCreary
Patrick McC, a factory-certified Vari-Lite repair technician, will “open the
hood” on a pair of Vari-Lite fixtures and show you what goes on inside.
The 411 on Grant Writing
Fri. 3:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. • Sprowls Hall 213
Arts Management
Presented by Janet Butler Berry
This workshop will provide a brief overview of grant writing for nonprofit theater. Participants will learn about the entire process from prospect research to reporting. You will also discover the common grant
components and learn to avoid the mistakes of many first time grantwriters. Finally, participants will learn about careers in grant writing and
fundraising for the theater.
Don’t Be That Guy
Fri. 5:30-6:45 p.m. • Sprowls Hall McVitty Auditorium
Stage Management
Presented by Johan Godwaldt and John Rikkus
Costume Parade Preliminary Round #2
Fri. 7:45-8:15 p.m. • PAC Upper Lobby and PAC Rehearsal Studio
Costuming
Presented by Karen Anselm
Saturday, January 16
SFX Sat. 9:30-11:30 a.m • Waller Hall B14
Sound
Presented by Joe Pino
USITT Workshop
Sat. 9:30-11:30 a.m. • Sprowls Hall 211
Design Technology and Management
Presented by USITT representative
Director/Designer Collaboration
Sat. 3:30-4:20 p.m. Sprowls Hall 118
Directing and Design
Presented by Debra Otte and Lars Tatom
On Facebook
Search for “IUP Lively Arts” for major postings.
No cell phones or texting during sessions or performances, please!
Performance
Tuesday, January 12
Cold Reading Workshop
Tue. 4:00-5:00 p.m. • Cogswell Hall Choral 120
Performance
Presented by Janice Goldberg
Learn techniques and better your cold reading skills.
Cold Reading Workshop
Tue. 5:00-6:00 p.m. • Cogswell Hall Choral 120
Performance
Presented by Janice Goldberg
Learn techniques and better your cold reading skills.
Wednesday, January 13
Start Your Day with Yoga
Wed. 8:30-9:30 a.m. • PAC Rehearsal Studio
Performance
Presented by Marilouise Michel
A first-thing-in-the-morning workshop to calm the mind and get the energy flowing. This will be great for those who have auditions and performances and anyone who wants to further their practice or begin to learn
about yoga and its many benefits.
Theater Games
Wed. 3:30-5:30 p.m. • Sprowls Hall Kipp Gallery
Performance
Presented by Gail Winar
In this session, we will explore theater games and improvisational exercises to wake up your creativity, imagination, and awareness during
the rehearsal process.
Acting Awake
Wed. 3:30-5:30 p.m. • PAC Rehearsal Studio
Performance
Presented by Pat Shaw
In this workshop, we explore the concept of the moment through exercises in improvised movement. We will work to build a greater awareness of and a trust in the performer’s unique physical instrument through
techniques of contact improvisation, release, and viewpoints. The goal
is to banish fear from improvisation through fostering a state of joyful
attention towards your partner and your ensemble. You will never lose
“The Moment” as long as you know it never leaves your body. This trustthyself philosophy is valuable to performers and non-performers alike
and experience is irrelevant. All you need is comfortable pants and an
open energized attitude.
Introduction to Fitzmaurice Voicework
Wed. 3:30-5:30 p.m. • Sutton Hall University Museum 1st fl.
Performance
Presented by John F. Gresh
Fitzmaurice Voicework is a comprehensive approach to the speaking
and singing voice. Developed by Catherine Fitzmaurice, the techniques
are designed to develop breath, resonance, dialects, speech, and working with text. This workshop is designed to introduce the actor to two
components of Fitzmaurice Voicework: destructuring and restructuring.
Students are required to have a Shakespearean monologue or a piece of
heightened text memorized. Students should wear warm-up clothing that
will allow them freedom of movement.
On Twitter
For the latest updates and to share ideas
and information ...
Offical Hash Tag: #kcactf2
Indiana University of Pennsylvania • January 2010
Strategies for Improving Musical Theater Vocal Technique
Wed. 3:30-4:20 p.m. • Cogswell Hall Music Theater Room 126
Performance
Presented by Margaret J. Ball
Contemporary musical theater places great demands on the singing voice.
Performers must be able to sing legit, mix and belt easily, and effortlessly
switching from one to the other. This workshop will focus on exploring
healthy strategies to approach this repertoire by improving your technique. Specific exercises to strengthen the various areas of the singing
voice will be introduced. Bring sheet music of 16 bar cuts or songs from
the musical theater repertoire on which you wish to work.
Non-Drama Acting Jobs
Wed. 3:30-5:30 p.m. • Cogswell Hall 301
Performance
Presented by Ben Fisler
This workshop explores how to prepare for a variety of jobs that actors
get but which do not necessarily involve traditional acting roles such as
industrial training films, CGI character modeling, non-traditional voiceovers, and improvisational workshops. Using hands-on practical exercises and performance work, students will learn how to handle these odd
paying gigs with their short rehearsal schedules and unusual demands.
This session will be repeated on Friday.
Speak the Speech
Wed. 3:30-5:30 p.m. • Cogswell Hall 303
Performance
Presented by Fabio Polanco
Students will explore techniques for effective vocal and rhetorical performances of Shakespearean soliloquies and speeches. Students may bring
prepared speeches or material will also be provided. This session will be
repeated on Thursday.
Freedom in Auditioning
Wed. 4:30-5:30 p.m. • Cogswell Hall Music Theater Room 126
Performance
Presented by Nick DePinto
If you have done all your prep-work and believe you have something
to offer and yet it’s two minutes to audition time and your feel like your
nervousness is going to get in the way of your work, what do you do?
This interactive workshop explores the obstacles inherent in the auditioning process as a door to greater focus and choice in your audition.
What can you, as an actor, do to maximize the audition experience
for yourself? Part philosophy, part physical/vocal, part strategic are all
practical. This session is for all experience levels, students and educators.
Thursday, January 14
Start Your Day with Yoga
Thurs. 8:30-9:20 a.m. • PAC Rehearsal Studio
Performance
Presented by Marilouise Michel
A first-thing-in-the-morning workshop to calm the mind and get the
energy flowing. This will be great for those who have auditions and
performances and anyone who wants to further their practice or begin
to learn about yoga and its many benefits.
Alignment for Character
Thurs. 9:30 to 10:20 a.m. • PAC Rehearsal Studio
Performance
Presented by Joan E. VanDyke
Actors and dancers will discover exercises in postural alignment using
muscle balance and breath work to find the character within. Be prepared
to move more efficiently and learn to communicate through movement.
Turn Your Passion Into Your Profession
With A B.A. in thEAtrE froM SAliSBury univErSity
Pre-professional
training
anchored
the classical
• Pre-professional
training
anchored
in thein
classical
traditiontradition
• Small
sizes
provide
personalized
attention
Smallclass
class
sizes
provide
personalized
attention
• Multiple
to perform,
design,
direct, manage
manage and
Multipleopportunities
opportunities
to perform,
design,
andproduce
produce
• Award-winning,
dedicated
faculty
provide
guidance
Award-winning, dedicated faculty provide guidance
• Endowed
offering
scholarships
and awards
Endowedprogram
program
offering
scholarships
and awards
www.salisbury.edu/theatreanddance
• 17
“My experience
experience in
Theatre
“My
in the
the Bobbi
Bobbi Biron
Biron Theatre
Program
gave
me
a
wealth
of
production
Program gave me a wealth of productionand
design
experience.
This helped
me tome
build
and
design
experience.
This helped
to a
portfolio
and
gain
a
larger
view
of
the
build a portfolio and gain a larger view of the
theatrical process.”
theatrical
process.”
18 •
Kennedy Center American College Theater Festival • Region 2
Directing: Movement for Directors and Actors
Performance, Acting and Directory
Thurs. 9:30-10:20 a.m. • Waller Hall Multi-purpose Room
There are three types of auditions to be prepared: the cattle call, the cold
reading, and the agent audition. This workshop will teach you what to
expect and how to survive.
It’s in the Text: Unlocking Shakespeare
Thurs. 9:30-11:30 a.m. • Cogswell Hall Music Theater Room 126
Performance
Presented by Nathaneal Johnson
Students and teachers will learn how to unlock Shakespeare’s text
so that it becomes accessible and active. Instead of the actor working on the text, the text works on the actor and directs the action line
by line, moment by moment. This technique, first developed by John
Barton of the Royal Shakespeare Company, gives the actor the necessary tools to make the words come to life and find a personal and
visceral connection to text, character, relationship, and action.
From Improvisation to Character Movement
Thurs. 3:30-5:30 p.m. • Sprowls Hall Kipp Gallery
Performance
Presented by J. Stanley
Examining a script leads to improvisation. Participants will discover physicality and movement that lead to character development.
Commedia for the Modern Actor
Thurs. 9:30-11:30 a.m. • Sprowls Hall Kipp Gallery
Performance
Presented by Laura Rikard
Unarmed Stage Combat
Thurs. 9:30-11:30 a.m. • Zink Hall Gym B
Performance
Presented by Michael Hood
This will be a workshop in unarmed combat including basic falls, punches, slaps, and chokes.
Auditioning for Professional Theater
Thurs. 3:30-5:30 p.m. • Zink Hall Classroom 203
Performance
Presented by Lester Malizia
I’m the Singing Actor You Want; or Hello and Why You Should
Hire Me
Thurs. 3:30-5:30 p.m. • Cogswell Hall Music Theater Room 126
Performance
Presented by Michael O’Steen
Participants, working with material of their own choosing, are put
through a mock audition with continuous coaching by the instructor. This
workshop recreates the environment of a Broadway Musical Theater audition with, as audition coach, a Broadway Musical Theater veteran.
Speak the Speech
Thurs. 3:30-5:30 p.m. • Cogswell Hall Jazz 116
Performance
Presented by Fabio Polanco
Students will explore techniques for effective vocal and rhetorical performances of Shakespearean soliloquies and speeches. Students may bring
prepared speeches or material will also be provided.
The Zen of Improvisation: Permission to Play in Class
Thurs. 3:30-5:30 p.m. • PAC Rehearsal Studio
Performance
Presented by Karen Land
The Office of Conference Services at Indiana University of Pennsylvania (IUP) can help you plan your next event.
Let our professional staff assist you with the following to successfully accomplish your objectives:
• Year-round
events
The Office of Conference
Services at
Indiana University of Pennsylvania (IUP) can help you plan your next event. Let our professional staff
Theyou
Office
Services
at Indiana
University
of
Pennsylvania
(IUP) can help
you plan
your next event.2 to 4 people each
assist
withofthe
following
to successfully
accomplish
your
objectives:
•Conference
Campus
housing
that
includes
new,
air-conditioned
suites,
accommodating
Let our•professional
assist you with the following to successfully accomplish your objectives:
Year-round staff
events
• Catering Services from informal to elegant meals; Informal Dining Hall Meals
Campus housing
• • Year-round
eventsthat includes new, air-conditioned suites, accommodating 2 to 4 people each
• housing
Meeting
venues
with
State of
theInformal
Art
Technology
Catering
Services
from
informal
to elegant
meals;
Dining Hall Meals2 to 4 people each
• • Campus
that
includes
new,
air-conditioned
suites,
accommodating
•
Meeting
venues
with
State
of
the
Art
Technology
•
Recreational
facilities
• Catering Services from informal to elegant meals; Informal Dining Hall Meals
Recreational
facilities
• • Meeting
venues
with State of the Art Technology
•
Recreational
facilities
Coming
Soon:
Kovalchick
Convention
and Athletic
Complex
Coming Soon: Kovalchick
Convention
and Athletic
Complex
Coming Soon: Kovalchick Convention and Athletic Complex
Opening
in 2011,
this
150,000square
square
foot
venue will be home to a large-capacity arena, conference center,
Opening
this
150,000
foot
For more
information:
Opening
in 2011, in
this2011,
150,000
square
foot venue will
bevenue
home to a large-capacity
arena,
conference center,
and
auditorium,
with
adjacent
full
service
hotel.
will
be
home
to
a
large-capacity
arena,
conference
IUP Office of Conference Services
and auditorium, with adjacent full service hotel.
center,
auditorium,
with
adjacent
full
hotel.
Contact
us
now to your
schedule
your future
events
and
inquire
about
convention
Kathleen
Evanko,
Director and lodging packages!
Contact
us nowand
to schedule
future
events
and service
inquire
about
convention
and
lodging
packages!
425 Services
John Sutton Hall • 1011 South Drive • Indiana, PA 15705-1046
Contact
us
now
to
schedule
your
future
events
and
Forinformation:
more information: IUP Office of Conference
IUP OfficeServices
of Conference
For more
inquire about convention and
lodgingEvanko,
packages!
Kathleen
DirectorEvanko, Director
724-357-2227 • [email protected]
Kathleen
425 John Sutton
Hall
425
John Sutton Hall www.iup.edu/conferenceser vices • www.iup.edu/kcac
1011 South Drive
1011 South Drive
Indiana, PA 15705-1046
Indiana, PA 15705-1046
724-357-2227
Indiana University of Pennsylvania • January 2010
Although many theater practitioners use improvisation as a tool for the
actor, this workshop utilizes play and improvisation as an art in-and-of
itself. After a brief introduction of the basic principles of improv, the students spend the majority of the workshop in hands-on, heads-off play. The Business of the Acting Business
Thurs. 4:30-5:30 p.m. • Sprowls Hall McVitty Auditorium
Performance
Presented by Gina Alvarado-Otero
What makes a good headshot? What should be represented on a standard
theatrical resume? What should your cover letter say? This workshop
will be a lesson and discussion of the basic three elements of a successful
submission to casting directors, casting calls, talent agencies and casting
companies that will get you noticed by these industry professionals!
When Your Monologue Isn’t Asked For; or You Want Me to Read Cold?
Thurs. 4:30-5:30 p.m. • Cogswell Hall Choral 120
Performance
Presented by Michael O’Steen
Explore the audition process in which we as actors must read a side for clues
to and make immediate choices regarding character, relationships and situation; make an immediate choice of objective, present ourselves at the audition and discuss what the auditioner is looking for in a cold reading.
Friday, January 15
Yoga for Actors
Fri. 9:30-11:30 p.m. • PAC Rehearsal Studio
Performance
Presented by Marilouise Michel
Yoga can feed your acting not just from a movement standpoint but also
the mind and soul of the work. Come learn how the major premises of the
ancient art and science of yoga can help you with character development
and being “in the moment.”
Shakespeare’s First Folio: an Actor’s Resource
Fri. 9:30-11:30 a.m. • Sprowls Hall 118
Performance
Presented by Robert Bullington
Shakespeare’s First Folio, published in 1623, is the original source for
many of his greatest texts. Did you know that the years of editing and revision that have brought us the plays in their modern form have actually
eradicated countless clues that will help you perform them? In this part
lecture, part hands-on presentation, you will learn how to use the First
Folio to unlock the “secret” acting hints that have been waiting 400 years
for you to discover them. No prepared material necessary.
• 19
The Role of Actors’ Equity and a Practical Approach to the Business
Fri. 10:30-11:30 a.m. • Cogswell Hall 201
Performance
Presented by Tom Miller
The workshop describes Equity’s mission: to support and protect the
rights of actors and stage managers. It explains how and when to join
and outlines contracts and benefits. Additionally, the workshop offers
insights into balancing artistic and business mindsets, covers personal
negotiating skills, record keeping, networking, and more. The session
is Q&A driven and is designed to ease the transition from an academic
environment to a professional career.
Non-Drama Acting Jobs
Fri. 3:30-5:30 p.m. • Cogswell Hall 301
Performance
Presented by Ben Fisler
This workshop explores how to prepare for a variety of jobs that actors
get but do not necessarily involve traditional acting roles such as industrial training films, CGI character modeling, non-traditional voice-overs,
and improvisational workshops. Using hands-on practical exercises and
performance work, students will learn how to handle these odd paying
gigs with their short rehearsal schedules and unusual demands.
Physical Theater Explosion
Fri. 3:30-5:30 p.m. • Sutton Hall University Museum, 1st fl.
Performance
Presented by Matt Chapman
Join us for this very physical exploration of what is possible for the actor in
time and space. Improvisation, movement, ferocious play, and total availability will be the realms of investigation. Be prepared to move, laugh,
and see. This workshop is grounded in the perspectives of the Dell’Arte
International School of Physical Theater. Put the “heat” back in theater.
Updates/corrections at Information Desk in PAC and Twitter: #kcactf2
The Catholic University of America
Department of Drama
congratulates our Kennedy Center ACTF
Michael Kanin Playwriting Award winners!
Get Movement Skills…Via the Internet
Fri. 9:30-10:20 a.m. • Cogswell Hall 201
Performance
Presented by Edward Rozinsky
This session includes a presentation of a video instructor course in stage
movement with participating students performing exercises conducted
by a video instructor. Discussion of the presentation will be included.
Every Song is a Monologue; or The Broadway Singer is Always an
Actor First!
Fri. 10:30-11:30 a.m. Sprowls Hall Kipp Gallery
Performance
Presented by Michael O’Steen
Participants, working with material of their own choosing, work
through a series of exercises enabling them to analyze, personalize,
and create a performing through line within their musical monologue.
On Twitter
For the latest updates and to share ideas
and information ...
Offical Hash Tag: #kcactf2
2009 — STEPHEN SPOTSWOOD
Mark Twain Prize for Comic Playwriting for Miranda is Morning
2008 — STEPHEN LEWIS
Mark Twain Prize for Comic Playwriting for Well Plotted
2007 — STEPHEN SPOTSWOOD
Paula Vogel Playwriting Award for The Aaronsville Woman
Jon Klein, Head of M.F.A. Playwriting Program
The Catholic University of America
R E A S O N . FA I T H . S E RV I C E .
20 •
Kennedy Center American College Theater Festival • Region 2
It’s in the Text­: Unlocking Shakespeare
Fri. 3:30-5:30 p.m. • Sprowls Hall Kipp Gallery
Performance
Presented by Nathanael Johnson
Students and teachers will learn how to unlock Shakespeare’s text
so that it becomes accessible and active. Instead of the actor working on the text, the text works on the actor and directs the action line
by line, moment by moment. This technique, first developed by John
Barton of the Royal Shakespeare Company, gives the actor the necessary tools to make the words come to life and find a personal and
visceral connection to text, character, relationship, and action.
You Want Me to Do What? With Whom? Acting and Staging the
Intimate Scene
Fri. 3:30-5:30 p.m. • Sprowls Hall 118
Performance
Presented by Marilouise Michel
At times in auditions and productions, actors are asked to appear intimate
with perfect strangers or people they do not even like. This unnatural and
uncomfortable reality of the world of theater can be overcome and alleviated with a few simple techniques. Please come with a scene partner.
Acting Awake
Fri. 3:30-5:30 p.m. • PAC Rehearsal Studio
Performance
Presented by Pat Shaw
In this workshop, we explore the concept of the moment through exercises
in improvised movement. We will work to build a greater awareness of, and
a trust in, the performer’s unique physical instrument through techniques of
contact improvisation, release, and viewpoints. The goal is to banish fear
from improvisation through fostering a state of joyful attention towards
your partner and your ensemble. You will never lose “The Moment” as
long as you know it never leaves your body. This trust-thyself philosophy
is valuable to performers and non-performers alike and experience is irrelevant. All you need is comfortable pants and an open energized attitude.
Saturday, January 16
Start Your Day With Yoga
Sat. 8:30-9:20 a.m. • PAC Rehearsal Studio
Performance
Presented by Marilouise Michel
A first-thing-in-the-morning workshop to calm the mind and get the energy flowing. This will be great for those who have auditions and performances and anyone who wants to further their practice or begin to learn
about yoga and its many benefits.
Building a Physical Character
Sat. 9:30-11:30 a.m. • Cogswell Hall Music Theater Room 126
Performance
Presented by Gail Winar
We will explore techniques from Adler, Spolin, and Strasberg you can use
to help you build character. This workshop is fun, fast, and very physical.
Supercharging Character Work with Personality Dimensions Research
Sat. 10:30-11:30 a.m. • Waller Hall Multi-purpose Room
Performance and Directing
Presented by Joseph Fahey
Personality Dimensions Research in Psychology—especially the “Big
Five” Personality Dimensions Model and published reactions to this
mode—offers an exciting exploratory tool for actors who wish to develop characters that move beyond the actor’s own predispositions. The
worksheet and exercises offered will allow actors and directors to structure their exploration of this technique and will point participants toward
additional resources in this area. This approach can be especially useful
for actors and directors who want to breathe new life in stagnating scenes
and audition material, for actors to conduct a self-directed exploration
of their approach and for directors who seek a clearer actor-centered vocabulary to assist them in their work. Several participants with prepared
audition material will be selected at the start of the workshop session to
demonstrate the technique with the facilitator.
Seeking the Sign for the Cry: Finding Psychological Gesture Vie Dalcoze
Sat. 10:30-11:30 a.m. • PAC Rehearsal Studio
Performance
Presented by Pamela Chabora
This is a participatory workshop designed to assist the actor in clarifying
and connecting to the fundamental need of the character and to assist
in identifying the physical sign or ‘psychological gesture’ for this visceral—internal—cry.
Casting: A Practical Workshop
Sat. 3:30-4:20 p.m. • Cogswell Hall 203
Directing and Performance
Presented by Mark Wenderlich
This is an auditioning workshop where actors ‘audition’ and directors
‘cast.’ Come with prepared material.
Making and Feeling Connections: The Practice of Communion in
Stanislavski’s System
Sat. 3:30-5:30 p.m. • Waller Hall Multi-purpose Room
Performance
Presented by Pamela Chabora
What is a “moment?” This participatory workshop addresses the performer’s connection to “other.” Exploring the concept that acting is interacting, participants will experience exercises in heightening listening
skills, in Stanislavski’s concept of communion, and ensemble building as
taught by Slava Doglachev of the Moscow Art Theater.
Strategies for Improving Musical Theater Vocal Technique
Sat. 3:30-4:20 p.m. • Cogswell Hall Music Theater Room 126
Performance
Presented by Margaret J. Ball
Contemporary musical theater places great demands on the singing
voice. Performers must be able to sing legit, mix and belt easily, effortlessly switch from one to the other. This workshop will focus on exploring healthy strategies to approach this repertoire by improving your technique. Specific exercises to strengthen the various areas of the singing
voice will be introduced. Bring sheet music of 16 bar cuts or songs from
the musical theater repertoire that you wish to work on.
Physicalizing Shakespeare’s Text: Get It Into Your Body
Sat. 4:30-5:30 p.m. • PAC Rehearsal Studio
Performance
Presented by Lars Tatom
Actors will explore strategies for embracing Shakespeare’s verse, especially long thought speeches and soliloquies. Emphasis will be placed on
working and physicalizing the speeches into the entire body. Prior experience with Shakespeare is not a required.
Dramaturgy
KCACTF supports the development of dramaturgical skills for all students. This year’s festival will include workshops in research and script
analysis that will be of interest to a wide variety of student actors, technicians, designers, directors and playwrights. We also hope to inspire some
students to pursue production dramaturgy as a way to exercise their artistic and intellectual talents. Students can gain first-hand dramaturgical experience at the festival by becoming “guerilla dramaturgs” on scripts that
will be read as part of the region’s new playwright’s program. They can
also learn more about the art of production dramaturgy from our guest
dramaturg, Lisa A. Wilde, who will hold a public review session of the
entries in the Student Dramaturgy Initiative.
Indiana University of Pennsylvania • January 2010
The Student Dramaturgy Initiative
In recognition of the important role dramaturgy can play in college productions , the Literary Managers and Dramaturgs of America, the Association
for Theater in Higher Education, and the KCACTF have created a partnership to support dramaturgy by students. Together, these groups sponsor an
award presented in each KCACTF region to recognize the work of student dramaturgs. The winner of the award in each region receives a year’s
membership in both LMDA and ATHE. In addition, the student is invited
to the Kennedy Center for the opportunity of working with professional
dramaturgs at the national festival. In addition to competing for the award,
student dramaturgs have the opportunity to meet with a professional dramaturg and have their work critiqued. This gives the student dramaturgs
the opportunity to learn more about their craft and to leave the festival with
insights they can apply to future dramaturgical projects.
O’Neill Critics Institute
KCACTF, in partnership with the Eugene O’Neill Institute, sponsors the
O’Neill Critics Institute. OCI provides student critics with the opportunity to learn and practice the craft of theater review writing by working
with a guest critic who conducts a three-day seminar on the craft. The
student critics write reviews of some of the productions at the festival
and discuss these reviews with the guest critic and the other student critics. By the end of the festival, they submit a review that demonstrates
what they see as their best work. One student critic from each region is
selected to attend national OCI workshops at the Kennedy Center.
Beginning on the second day of the festival, students meet with the guest
critic in a seminar format where they talk about theater in general. They
also discuss the plays they have seen at the festival and share their reviews of these plays The experience is intense and time-consuming, with
five or six scheduled sessions, while the atmosphere is open and collegial. Students generally leave the festival recognizing they have learned
a great deal and grown as student critics and writers. In fact, the selection
of a person to go to the Kennedy Center experience is usually viewed as
far less important than the experience itself. We have been fortunate to have had some excellent professional critics
serve as guest critics for OCI; and we are very pleased to have Wendy
Rosenfield joining us again as this year’s guest critic. Rosenfield is a
theater reviewer for the Philadelphia Inquirer and maintains a blog as the
“Drama Queen” at www.artsjournal.com.
OCI Schedule All sessions will be held in Waller Hall Room B-12, and times are subject
to change following the first meeting.
Wednesday
Thursday
Thursday
Friday
Friday
Saturday
Session 1
Session 2
Session 3
Session 4
Session 5
Session 6
2:30-5:00 p.m.
9:30-11:30 a.m.
2:00-4:00 p.m.
9:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
2:30-4:30 p.m.
9:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
Student Directing Institute
Student Directing Institute
The Student Directing Institute, launched in 2004 as the Student Directing Initiative, is designed to give students experience in directing at the
festival. For students who do not have directing classes or opportunities on their home campuses and for students of any age or experience
who wish to re-engage in the process of directing, the series of auditions,
workshops, rehearsals, and presentations of the SDI should be challenging and invigorating.
• 21
Students who are accepted into the SDI will, before the festival, choose
a scene, do a good deal of script work, and prepare for auditions. At
the Festival, students attend four workshops, hear auditions, cast their
scenes, and continue the process of directing through rehearsals for a
staged reading. With guidance from an experienced director as a mentor,
the scenes are, at the end of the festival, presented for the public and for
a response from directors in the region.
SDI Schedule
Tuesday
9:30-10:30 p.m. • Meeting for all SDI participants • Waller Hall Studio
Theater
Wednesday
9:30 a.m.• SDI Workshop • Waller Hall Studio Theater
11:00 a.m.-2:00 p.m.• Audition • Cogswell Hall Choral 120
2:30-5:30 p.m. • Auditions • Cogswell Hall Choral 120
5:30-6:00 p.m. • Pizza Provided • Cogswell Hall Choral 120
6:00-7:00 p.m. • Casting
8:30 p.m. • Cast Lists Posted
9:00-10:00 p.m. • Casts Meet with Directors/Stage Managers • Cogswell
Hall Choral 120
Thursday
9:30 a.m.• SDI Workshop • Waller Hall Studio Theater
5:30-7:30 p.m. • Dress Rehearsal
Friday
9:30 a.m.• SDI Workshop • Waller Hall Studio Theater
4:30-7:00 p.m. • Final Scene Presentations/Responses • Waller Hall Studio Theater
Saturday
9:30 a.m.• SDI Workshop • Waller Hall Studio Theater
Rehearsal schedules for directors and their casts are available from
the SDI registration table on Tuesday or at the Information Desk
throughout the week.
National Playwriting
Program
A concert reading is a reading of the script using chairs and maybe music
stands. Actors are allowed one entrance and exit. They may also stand or sit,
but no blocking other than that is permitted (no crossing to mime opening
a door or answering a cell phone, for instance). With script in hand—or on
a music stand—the actors and directors are able to focus the reading on the
text so that the writer can hear what they have written. We follow the Actors’ Equity Staged Reading Guidelines, which are the same rules followed
by the KCACTF National Festival in Washington, D.C. All NPP scripts are
given a concert reading at the end of the regional festival.
Casting is done the second day of the regional festival. The playwright
and director will see about 160 actors audition and then, following the
Region II system, they will cast the reading and meet with the cast that
night. Auditions will be held all day Wednesday.
David Mark Cohen Nominees
Skirt by Julie Tosh, Carnegie Mellon University
The Princess Rescuers by Paige Hoke, Arcadia University
Full-Length
A Boy Named Alice by Joshua Elias Harmon, Carnegie Mellon University
Carapace by David Robinson - Ohio University
One-Act
Baggage by Dan O’Neil, Carnegie Mellon University
Terminal Condition by David Robinson, Ohio University
Whistleblower by Carolyn Kras, Carnegie Mellon University
22 •
Kennedy Center American College Theater Festival • Region 2
Ten-Minute
a brief theory of the cosmos by Molly Hagan, Ohio University
On a Clear Night by Dan O’Neil, Carnegie Mellon University
Organum by Dean Poynor, Carnegie Mellon University
Orphan Train by Julie Tosh, Carnegie Mellon University
The Field by Rachel Barclay, Catholic University of America
The Sound of Great Flags by David Robinson, Ohio University
NPP Faculty Directors
Janice Goldberg
David Pfeiffer
Frank Kuhn
Michael O’Steen
Michael Swanson
Cleo House
Laura Smiley
Julia Matthews
Mark Wade
Season Ellison
Eve Muson
NPP Respondents
Bill Cameron
Rob Zellars
Alison Currin
Larry Loebell
Gretchen Smith
NPP Schedule
Tuesday, January 12
12:00-6:00 p.m................... NPP Registration table open: audition signup; all playwrights and directors please stop by; Playwrights,
please drop off audition sides
4:00-5:00 p.m..................... Cold Reading Workshop with Janice Goldberg, Cogswell Hall Choral 120
5:00-6:00 p.m..................... Cold Reading Workshop with Janice Goldberg, Cogswell Hall Choral 120
7:00-8:00 p.m..................... Playwrights Meet and Greet, Cogswell Hall
Choral 120
8:00-10:00 p.m................... Opening Ceremony, Fisher Auditorium
Wednesday, January 13
9:00-10:30 a.m. ................. Audition set up, all stage managers, Cogswell
Hall Choral 120
9:00-10:00 a.m. ................. Ten Minute, One-Act, Full-Length director/
playwright meetings Cogswell Hall Choral 120
10:00-10:30 a.m. ............... Guerilla Dramaturg meetings with One-Act
and Full-Length playwrights and directors, Cogswell Choral 120
10:30-11:00 Audition Pre-Meeting: All playwrights, directors, stage
managers, “guerillas;” Choral 120 (holding room in Jazz 117)
11:00-2:00 p.m. ................. Auditions, Cogswell Hall Choral 120
2:30-5:30 p.m. . ................. Continue auditions, Cogswell Hall Choral
120
5:30-6:00 p.m. . ................. Pizza Delivery, audition room
6:00-7:00 p.m. . ................. Casting session. audition room
8:00-10:00 p.m................... Design Bash, playwrights and directors are
urged to attend
8:30 p.m. ........................... Cast lists posted, Cogswell Hall Choral 120
9:00-10:00 p.m................... NPP–All casts meet with stage managers, directors, and writers, Cogswell Hall Choral 120
Thursday, January 14
9:00 a.m. -12:00 p.m. ........ 2 Full-Length Plays, rehearse; Sprowls Hall
Rooms 301 and 407
9:00 a.m. -12:00 p.m.......... 3 One-Act Plays, rehearse; Cogswell Hall
Music Ed. Room 102 and 201 and Sprowls Hall 225
9:00-11:00 a.m. ................. Ten-Minute Plays 1-3, rehearse; Cogswell
Hall Rooms 203, 301, and 303
10:30-11:30 a.m. ............... NPP Workshop, Scott Frank—Storytelling:
Writing With Your Voice, Sprowls Hall 209
1:30-3:30 p.m. Ten-Minute Plays 4-6, rehearse; Cogswell Hall Rooms
203, 301, and 303
2:00-5:00 p.m..................... Rehearsals for One-Acts and Full-Length
Plays; Retain same rehearsal rooms
3:30-5:30 p.m..................... NPP Workshop; Eve Muson, Collaborative
Play Making, Sprowls Hall 209
3:30-5:30 p.m..................... Ten-Minute Plays 1-3, rehearse; retain same
rehearsal rooms
5:30-7:30 p.m..................... Ten-Minute Plays 4-6, rehearse; retain same
rehearsal rooms
Friday, January 15
8:00 a.m. -12:30 p.m.......... NPP Play Response with NPP Respondents in
Cogswell Hall 126 (Not open to the public)
Reading set-up/rehearsal: 8:00-10:00 a.m.
Readings: 10:00-11:15 a.m.
Response: 11:15 a.m.-12:25 p.m.
There will be a 10-minute break between the readings and the response
9:30-12:30 a.m. ................. One-Act Plays rehearse; each has one hour in
performance space, Cogswell Hall Choral 120
9:30-12:30 a.m. One-Act Plays; when not in performance space, will rehearse in Cogswell Hall Room 303 and Sprowls Hall Rooms 229
and 225....................
10:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m........... Full-Length rehearsals, retain same rehearsal
rooms
10:30-11:30 a.m. ............... NPP Workshop; Bill Cameron, Playwriting
History: Making Plays from Pop Culture, Cogswell Hall Music
Ed. Room 102
3:00-4:00 p.m..................... The Embalmer, Waller Hall Studio Theater
3:00-6:00 p.m..................... 3 One-Acts, public readings with NPP Respondents, Cogswell Hall Choral 120
Saturday, January 16
9:00-10:30 a.m. ................. Ten-Minute Plays 1-3 rehearse; retain same
rehearsal rooms
10:30-12:00........................ Ten-Minute Plays 4-6 rehearse; retain same
rehearsal rooms.......
9:00-10:00 a.m. ................. NPP Workshop: Round Table Discussion of
Salient Issues; Cogswell Hall Music Ed. 102
8:30 a.m. -12:30 p.m.......... Rehearsal and set-up times: Full-Length
Plays, hours each; Cogswell Hall Choral 120
12:30-2:30 p.m................... Ten-Minute Plays rehearse with Scott Frank,
Waller Hall Mainstage
12:30-5:30 p.m................... Reading of Full-length Plays and Response
with NPP Respondents, Cogswell Hall Choral 120
3:30-6:30 p.m..................... Ten-Minute Plays; rehearsals with Scott
Frank, Cogswell Hall Jazz Room 116
Stage Directors and
Choreographers Society
Scholarship Competition
The Stage Directors and Choreographers Society/Kennedy Center American College Theater Festival Scholarship Competition is an exciting opportunity for more advanced students of directing to further their skills.
Participants will interact with professional directors and educators from
within and without Region II, as well as their peers from other institutions
within the region.
The KCACTF Region II SDC experience includes workshops and roundtables designed specifically for participants in the competition. Workshops include the actor/director relationship, collaborating with designers, staging and use of space, new play development, and others. If you
accept an invitation into the SDC competition, be prepared to be busy
throughout the Festival. Our intent is to give you as much to feed your
passion for directing as the schedule allows.
All participating students will receive constructive critique of their work
intended to enhance their education from a carefully chosen panel of
professionals. Students advancing beyond the preliminary round of the
Indiana University of Pennsylvania • January 2010
competition will be expected to actively integrate feedback, under the
mentorship of members of the Directing Initiative Regional Task Force
and then present their scene a second time for additional feedback.
SDC Schedule
Tuesday
9:30-10:30 p.m.; Meeting for all SDC and DI participants; Waller Hall
Studio Theater
Wednesday
1:30-5:30 p.m.; Rehearsal; Waller Hall Multi-purpose Room and Studio
Theater
Thursday
3:00-5:30 p.m.; Preliminary Round Presentation of Scenes and Responses; Waller Hall Studio Theater
Friday
2:00-4:30 p.m.; Interviews/Portfolio Reviews; Waller Hall Conference
Room
Saturday
12:30-3:00 p.m.; Tech Rehearsal for Final Scenes; Waller Hall Studio
Theater
3:00-6:30 p.m.; Final Scene Presentations and Responses; Waller Hall
Studio Theater
4:00-5:00 p.m..................... The Embalmer Response for NPP Invitation,
Cogswell Hall Music Ed. 102
6:30-8:00 p.m..................... Ten-Minute Plays Public Readings, Waller
Hall Mainstage
8:30 p.m............................. Closing Ceremony, Fisher Auditorium
• 23
Irene Ryan Acting
Scholarship AUDITIONS
Respodents, Judges, and Assistants
Preliminary Round Respondents Selena Ambush
Margaret Ball
Barbara Burgess-LeFebrve
Mark Codson Keith Hight
Leonard Kelly
John Kuhn
Matthew Mazuroski
Tammy O’Donnell
Diane Rao
Ansley Valentine
Mark Wenderlich
Preliminary Round Judges
Dennis McLernon
Kerro Knox
Semi-final Round Judges
Maggie Lally
Final Round Judges
Tom Miller
Paula Barrett
Cornel Gabara
Jax Kubiak
Dennis McLernon
Nathan Thomas
Gail Winar
Suann Pollock
Beth McGee
Matt Chapman
Pat Shaw
Andrew Paul
Carolyn Gillespie
Assistants to the Auditions Coordinator
Krystle Seit
Jenna Rafferty
Student Assistants
Tegan McCune, Emily Shaver, Erika Scott, Donald Rider, Shannon Powlick, Leslie Palmer, Geoff Maus, Andrew Martin, Sara Kochan, Kate
Hilston, Brandy Eisenberg, Keva Colbert, Kate Carter, Brandy Bryant,
Caitlin Brennan, Colleen Alford, Rachelle Dorce
Irene Ryan Scholarship
Auditions Schedule
Wednesday
9:00 a.m.-6:00 p.m. • Zink Hall, Report to
Gym A
Irene Ryan Auditions, Preliminary Round
and Responses
Don’t Miss These
All-Conference Events
Opening Ceremonies
Tuesday, January 12 • 8:30 p.m.
Fisher Auditorium, IUP Performing Arts Center
Bill Pullman: Keynote Speaker
Thursday, January 14 • 12:30 p.m.
Fisher Auditorium, IUP Performing Arts Center
Closing Ceremonies
Saturday, January 16 • 8:00 p.m.
Fisher Auditorium, IUP Performing Arts Center
Join the entire conference for the final ceremony,
including announcements of participants selected
to attend the national festival in Washington, D.C.
Thursday
1:30 p.m. • Fisher Auditorium
Announcement of Irene Ryan Scholarship
Auditions Semi-Finalists, following keynote
address
Friday
8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. • Zink Hall Dance Theater
Irene Ryan Scholarship Auditions, Semi-Finals
3:00-7:00 p.m. • Zink Hall Dance Theater
Irene Ryan Scholarship Auditions, Semi-Finals Responses
7:00-9:30 p.m. • Zink Hall Dance Theater
Irene Ryan Scholarship Auditions, Finalist Orientation and Rehearsal
Saturday
9:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m. • Zink Hall Dance Theater
Irene Ryan Scholarship Auditions, Finals
3:00-5:00 p.m. • Sutton Hall Gorell Recital Hall, 2nd fl.
Irene Ryan Scholarship Auditions, Final Responses
On Facebook
Search for “IUP Lively Arts” for major postings.
No cell phones or texting during sessions or
performances, please!
24 •
Kennedy Center American College Theater Festival • Region 2
Design Exhibit Schedule
Tuesday, January 12
12:00-6:00 p.m.
Festival Registration
PAC Lobby
4:00- 7:00 p.m.
Stage Management Interviews
Waller B14
12:00-8:00 p.m.
8:30-10:00 p.m.
10:30 a.m.-11:00 p.m.
Exhibit Set up
Opening Ceremony
DTM Info Session all students
Cogswell Rm 121
Fisher Aud
Cogswell Rm 121
Festival Fringe
Tuesday
Wednesday, January 13
8:00-10:00 a.m.
Exhibit set up
Cogswell Rm 121
9:30 a.m.
Invited Production: A Year With Frong and Toad
Waller Mainstage
10:00-11:30 a.m.
12:30-1:30 p.m.
1:30- 2:00 p.m.
3:30-6:30 p.m.
4:30 p.m.
6:45-8:00 p.m.
Scenic Respondent Roundtable
Keynote Address
Exhibit Open to Public and Reception
Exhibit Response Session 1: Stage Management
Invited Production: A Year With Frong and Toad
Costume Parade
Fisher Aud
Meeting: All Fringe Participants (including those interested in the Fringe
Challenge), 9:30-10:30 p.m., PAC
Rehearsal Studio
Cogswell Rm 121
Wednesday
Cogswell Rm 121
Waller Mainstage
Cogswell Rm 121
The Company (sketch comedy) and The
Troupe (improv), 10:30-12:30 p.m.,
Indiana Theater Downtown
Thursday
Thursday, January 14
8:00-10:00 a.m.
Exhibit Response Session 2: Scenic
Cogswell Rm 121
10:00-11:30 a.m.
Stage Management Roundtable
Cogswell Rm 121
9:30 a.m.
12:30 p.m.
3:30-5:30 p.m.
4:30 p.m.
5:30-6:45 p.m.
6:45-8:00 p.m.
8:30 p.m.
Invited Production: Miss Witherspoon
Waller Mainstage
Fisher Aud
Fringe Open Mic, 5:00—6:30 p.m., Sutton Hall Gorell Recital Hall, 2nd fl.
Invited Production: Miss Witherspoon
Waller Hall Mainstage
Fringe Challenge, 10:30 p.m.- 12:30 a.m,
Zink Hall Gym B
Costume Parade
Cogswell Rm 121
Invited Production: A Comb and a Prayer Book
Exhibit Response Session 3: Lighting & Graphics
Portfolio Review
Invited Production: Home
Cogswell Rm 121
Cogswell Rm 121
Fisher Aud
Friday, January 15
8:00-10:00 a.m.
Exhibit Response Session 4: Costume, Makeup and Craft
10:00-11:30 a.m.
Lighting Respondent Roundtable
9:30 a.m.
Cogswell Rm 121
Invited Production: [email protected]
Waller Hall Mainstage
10:30 a.m.-12:15 p.m.
Design Bash
Sprowls McVitty Aud
4:30 p.m.
Invited Production: [email protected]
12:30 p.m.
4:30-7:30 p.m.
3:30-5:30 p.m.
5:30-6:45 p.m.
6:45-8:00 p.m.
8:30 p.m.
Invited Production: Increased Difficulty of Concentration
Tech Olympics
Exhibit Response Session 5: Sound
Portfolio Review
Costume Parade
Invited Production: Shot!
8:00-10:00 a.m.
Costume Makeup & Craft Respondent Roundtable
10:00-11:00 a.m.
Sound Respondent Roundtable
11:00-12:00 p.m.
12:30 p.m.
3:30 p.m.
3:30-7:00 p.m.
Fisher Aud
Montclair State University
Polaroid Stories
Waller Mainstage
Cogswell Rm 121
Community College of Baltimore
County-Cantonsville
Upon His Back He Carries Them
(The Prempeh Play)
Cogswell Rm 121
College at Brockport
Don’t Dress For Dinner
Cogswell Rm 126
Cogswell Rm 121
Fisher Aud
8:00-10:00 p.m.
The Embalmer, 3:00-4:30 p.m., Waller
Hall Studio Theater
Cogswell Rm 121
The Verve, 6:00-8:30 p.m., Sutton Hall
Gorell Recital Hall, 2nd fl.
Fisher Aud
Fringe Challenge, 11:30 p.m.-1:30 a.m.,
Zink Hall Gym B
Exhibit Closing Reception
Cogswell Rm 121
Exhibit Strike
Closing Ceremony
Rampapo College
Bus Stop
Cogswell Rm 121
Waller Mainstage
Invited Production: Widows
Invited Scenes, 9:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m.,
Sutton Hall Gorell Recital Hall, 2nd fl.
Arcadia University
The Princess Rescuers
SUNY Brockport
The Cover of Life
Invited Production: Widows
Invited Production: Rent
Friday
Cogswell Rm 121
Saturday January 16
9:30 a.m.
Baby with the Bathwater, 3:00-5:00 p.m.,
Sutton Hall Gorell Recital Hall, 2nd fl.
Waller Mainstage
Cogswell Rm 121
Fisher Aud
What did you think?
Tweat on the Fringe: #kcactf2
Indiana University of Pennsylvania • January 2010
• 25
Volunteers and Guests
Participating Productions
Student Volunteers
Albright College....................................................................Fish Out of Water
Albright College................................................................................ The Miser
Albright College............................................................... The Laramie Project
Albright College........................................................... The Threepenny Opera
Alfred University..................................................................................Widows
Alfred University....................................................................The Heart of Art
Alvernia University.................................................... Good Woman of Setzuan
Alvernia University...............................................................Tales of Shoogilly
Anne Arundel Community College......................Doctor Jekyll and Mr. Hyde
Arcadia University........................................................ The Princess Rescuers
Arcadia University...................................................................................Home
Bloomsburg University................................................................................ Wit
Bloomsburg University .Baby with the Bathwater and The Actor’s Nightmare
Bloomsburg University ........................................................ The Winter’s Tale
Catholic University of America.....................This Is Not My Life, the Musical
Centenary College......................................................................................Tape
Clarion University........................................ The Water Engine/Mr. Happiness
Clarion University ........................................................................... Skin Deep
College at Brockport....... A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum
College at Brockport................................................... Don’t Dress For Dinner
College of Staten Island........................................................... One Flea Spare
Community College of Baltimore County-Catonsville......... A Servant of Two
Masters
Community College of Baltimore County-Catonsville...... Upon His Back He
Carries Them (The Prempeh Play)
Fairmont State University...... Remembering #9: Stories from the Farmington
Mine Disaster
Goucher College............................PlayWorks: Three Original One-Act Plays
Grove City College.............................................................................Godspell
Indiana University of Pennsylvania.................................................. Boys’ Life
Indiana University of Pennsylvania.............................................. Saving Alice
Indiana University of Pennsylvania............. The Importance of Being Earnest
Indiana University of Pennsylvania............................. New Works/New Voices
Indiana University of Pennsylvania.......................A Year With Frog and Toad
Johns Hopkins University................ Tomorrow and Tomorrow and Tomorrow
Kean University........................................................................ The Pillowman
Kean University............................................................................ Agamemnon
Kean University.......................................................................... She Loves Me
Keuka College....................................................................... Kimberly Akimbo
Kutztown University....................................... Company by Sondheim & Firth
Long Island University, CW Post Campus....................... Batboy, the Musical
Long Island University, CW Post Campus.........................................Eurydice
Monroe Community College............................................The Boys Next Door
Monroe Community College.......................................................... Yours Anne
Morgan State University............................................. The Merchant of Venice
Muhlenberg College...............................Increased Difficulty of Concentration
Muhlenberg College........................................ Uncommon Women and Others
Muhlenberg College........................................................................ New Voices
Muhlenberg College................................................................The Possibilities
Penn State University Berks Campus.................................................. Dracula
Penn State University Berks Campus.............................The Bob and Al Show
Penn State University Altoona Campus............................. Anna in the Tropics
Richard Stockton College of New Jersey......... Chastity and Destruction, and
Doors
Richard Stockton College of New Jersey........ A Comb and a Prayer Book: A
Survivor’s Story
Robert Morris University............................................................Sweeney Todd
Robert Morris University........................................................................... Rent
Robert Morris University....................................................................Godspell
State University of New York at Oswego................................Blood Relations
State University of New York at Brockport........................... The Spitfire Grill
State University of New York at Brockport.......................... The Cover of Life
State University of New York at Brockport...............................Festival of Ten
Temple University.................... Dreaming of Diamonds: The Conwell Project
Temple University.....................................................................................Shot!
The Catholic University of America.......In Good King Charles’ Golden Days
The Ohio State University, Mansfield.Playing With Fire (After Frankenstein)
Towson University.................................................................Time of Your Life
Towson University............................................................................ Miss Julie
Washington & Jefferson College............................................. [email protected]
West Chester University.............................................The Rocky Horror Show
Wilkes University.................................................The Love of the Nightingale
Wilkes University............................................................. Pride and Prejudice
Wilkes University...............................................................Le Revue Fairytale
Indiana University of Pennsylvania
Tifanny Hall-Campbell, Hank Fodor, Caitlin Collins, Jacob Santina,
Scott Fetterman, Nate Fessler, Kaitlin LeRoy, Nicole Battestilli, Amy
Clyde, Kayleigh Thadani, Erika Pealstrom, Megan Adams, Abraham
Hoose, Lyndsey Thomas, Frank Perri, Joshua Gallagher, Emily Shaver,
Sara Kochan, Natalie Palamides, Carolyn Chiurco, Ben Savory, Emily
McGilvray, Natalie Brown, Shannon Scully, Kelsey Peterson, Chris
Anthony, Ryan Hays, Anthony Lombardi, Veronica Wilt, Andrew
Venturella, Samantha Fabiani
West Chester University
Alyssa Cole, Jessica Suda, Elena Marzolf, Brianna Choynowski,
Brendan Flaherty, Jeff Gallagher, Andrew Esposito, Peter Collier, Missy
Shoup, Emily HIldenbrand, Rebecca Righi, Frank Schierloh, Donald
Rider, Shannon Powlick, Kate Hilston, Brandy Bryant, Olivia Wiess,
Danielle Shindler, Caroline Schneider, Doug Atkins, Paige Malizia
P.G. Community College
Matilda Bangura, Juanita Avtic, Tiffany Royster, Sandy Lawson, Erika
Scott, Andrew Martin, Keva Colbert
Bloomsburg University
Marie Darenhower
Kean University
Krystle Seit, Jenna Rafferty, Rachelle Dorce
McDaniel College
Margaret Powell, Andrew Fleming, Brandy Eisenberg, Caitlin Brennan,
Colleen Alford, Julia Williams, Michelle Hierstetter
SUNY, Brockport
Vanessa Soto, Kate Carter, Angela Giuseppetti.
Westminster College
Tegan McCune
Festival Respondents and Guests
Festival Production Respondents
Dick Block, Ansley Valentine, Kerro Knox, Gretchin Smith and Larry
Loebell
Invited Guests
Irene Ryans Acting Scholarship Auditions: Dennis McLernon, Kerro
Knox, Suann Polock, Pat Shaw, Maggie Lally, Beth McGee,
Andrew Paul, Tom Miller, Matt Chapman, Carolyn Gillespie
Production Respondents: Dick Block, Ansley Valentine
O’Neill Critics Institute: Wendy Rosenfield
Dramaturgy: Lisa A. Wilde
Design/Tech/Management: Ronald Keller, Kelly Mangan, and others
Directing: Lars Tatom, Nyallis Hartman
NPP: Janice Goldberg, Rob Zellers (Pittsburgh Playwork), Larry
Loebell, Bill Cameron, Allison Curran, Gretchen Smith (Regional
exchange)
Region II Production Respondents
Andrew Ade, Matthew Allar, Michael Allen, Kevin Allen, Matthew
Ames, Lea Antolini-Lid, Michael Aulick, Naomi Baker, Barb Blackledge,
Trent Blanton, Barbar Burgess-Lefebvre, Victor Capecce, Ruth Childs,
Maureen Clark, Rev. Shawn Clerkin, Rachel Evans, Gregory Fletcher,
Scott Frank, Johan Godwaldt, Janice Goldberg, Eileen Hendrickson,
Gregg Henry, Cleo House, Leonard Kelly, Alan Kreizenbach, Maggie
Lally, Ralph Leary, Jeff Lentz, Scott Mackenzie, Ed Matthews, Georgia
McGill, Marilouise Michel, Becky Misenheimer, Eve Munson, Debra
Otte, David Pfeiffer, Becky Prophet, Robyn Quick, Trish Ralph, Bev
Redman, Robin Reese, Paul Ricciardi, Tammy Ryan, Steve Satta, Dave
Shuhy, Jim Simmonds, Roberta Sloan, N.J. Stanley, Judith Stevens-Ly,
Michael Swanson, Lars Tatom, Nathan Thomas, Elizabeth van den Berg,
Mark Wenderlich, Grechen Wingerter, Juliet Wunsch.
Region II is always looking for interested faculty to participate in
regional responses. Please look at our Festival’s Response Workshops
in this program and contact Juliet Wunsch at [email protected]
26 •
Kennedy Center American College Theater Festival • Region 2
Associate Productions
Allegheny College.................................................................... The Pillowman
American University.............................................................................Tartuffe
American University................................................................. The Wild Party
Ashland University................................................................................. Equus
Ashland University......................................................... Measure for Measure
Ashland University...........................................................The Shape of Things
Bethany College.....................................................................................Salomé
Bridgewater College........................................................................... The Visit
Bucknell University.............................. Five Women Wearing the Same Dress
Bucknell University.................................................................. Blood Wedding
Carnegie Mellon University............................The Broken Spoke, In the Know
Carnegie Mellon University.................................... Flying in Mud, Dark Eden
Carroll Community College......................................................... Incorruptible
Carroll Community College.........................................................Animal Farm
Cedarville University..................................................... Tuesdays with Morrie
Clarion University.............................................................Psycho Beach Party
Clarion University.............................................................................. Big River
Community College of Baltimore County-Catonsville....Taming of the Shrew
Community College of Baltimore County-Catonsville................Las Meninas
Community College of Baltimore County-Catonsville............. I Hate Hamlet
Corning Community College........................................................Fallen Angel
Elizabethtown College.........................................................The Memorandum
Elizabethtown College........................................................... 9 Parts of Desire
Elizabethtown College.................................................................. The Tempest
Elmira College.........................................................Les Liaisons Dangereuses
Franklin and Marshall College..........................................................The Rover
Franklin and Marshall College.....................................................Twelfth Night
Franklin and Marshall College............. Six Characters in Search of an Author
Gannon University............................................................................Noises Off
Gannon University.................................................................... The Trachiniae
Gettysburg College....................................................... The Imaginary Invalid
Gettysburg College............................................................................. The Liar
Gettysburg College............................................................................The Story
Harford Community College............................................................ Lysistrata
Harford Community College................... You’re a Good Man, Charlie Brown
Indiana University of Pennsylvania...........................................Anything Goes
James Madison University........................................................ Blood Wedding
James Madison University..........................................................City of Angels
James Madison University............................................................The Diviners
James Madison University...................................... Picasso at the Lapin Agile
Kean University............................................. Twelfth Night, or What You Will
Kent State University -- Stark Campus...................................... Tons of Money
Keuka College.......................................................................Miss Witherspoon
Kutztown University of Pennsylvania.............................. Crimes of the Heart
Kutztown University of Pennsylvania ....................................... As You Like It
Kutztown university of Pennsylvania ................................. The Bald Soprano
Lafayette College..................................Little Women: The Broadway Musical
Lehigh University............................ Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead
Lehigh University............................................................................Wintertime
Long Island University, CW Post Campus..........................The Roaring Girle
Long Island University, CW Post Campus................................... The Balcony
Lycoming College...................................................The Antigone of Sophocles
Lycoming College..........................The Great American Trailer Park Musical
Lycoming College...............................................A Midsummer Night’s Dream
McDaniel College..................................................... fThe Rocky Horror Show
McDaniel College................................................................................Reckless
Messiah College.................................... Fertile Ground: Stories from Messiah
College’s First 100 Years
Messiah College.............................................................The Comedy of Errors
Messiah College..................................................................... The Spitfire Grill
Millersville University........... Hair: The American Tribal Love-Rock Musical
Millersville University...............................................................Into the Woods
Millersville University......................................................The Shape of Things
Millersville University...................................... The Two Gentlemen of Verona
Montclair State University.......................................................... As You Like It
Montclair State University...................................................... Polaroid Stories
Montclair State University........................................ A Man of No Importance
Montclair State University....................................................................Arcadia
Montclair State University............................................... Four Short Musicals
Montclair State University............................................. Meadowlands Project
Montclair State University................................................................. Homburg
Montclair State University......................................................All in the Timing
Muhlenberg College..............................................................................Bat Boy
Muhlenberg College............................................................. A Flea in Her Ear
Muhlenberg College.................................................................................. CAW
Muskingum University.........................................The Servant of Two Masters
Muskingum University.................................................................. All My Sons
National Technical Institute for the Deaf/Rochester Institute................. Equus
Nazareth College of Rochester................................ Side by Side by Sondheim
Nazareth College of Rochester....................................... The Way of the World
Nazareth College of Rochester...................................................Sweet Charity
Nazareth College of Rochester......................................................Rabbit Hole
Nazareth College of Rochester...........................Sexual Perversity in Chicago
Penn State Altoona...................................................................................Sugar
Penn State Altoona..................................................Student Directed One-Acts
Prince George’s Community College.................................A Raisin in the Sun
Ramapo College of New Jersey............................. The Government Inspector
Ramapo College of New Jersey.....................................................Fifth of July
Ramapo College of New Jersey...................... Wood Guthrie’s American Song
Ramapo College of New Jersey.......................................................... Bus Stop
Richard Stockton College of New Jersey....................... Measure for Measure
Richard Stockton College of New Jersey........... The Fabulous Fable Factory
Rider University......................................................................................... Rent
Rider University . ..................................................................... The Pillowman
Robert Morris University.................................................. The Miracle Worker
Rowan University..................................................The Last Days of Dr. Jekyll
Rowan University............................................................ The Children’s Hour
Rowan University.............................................................Our Country’s Good
Rutgers University...................................... One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest
Rutgers University, Camden................................................................ Dracula
Slippery Rock University........................................................Inspecting Carol
Slippery Rock University........................................................... Hedda Gabler
State University of New York at Oneonta................................................ Proof
State University of New York at Oswego..................................Into the Woods
State University of New York at Oswego........................................Pera Pelas
Stevenson University.............................................................Present Laughter
Temple University.......................................................................Sweet Charity
Temple University................................................The Caucasian Chalk Circle
Temple University............................................................................. The Seven
The Catholic University of America............................................... Ngala Muti
The Catholic University of America........................................................ Squat
The College of Wooster.................................................The Comedy of Errors
The University of Akron............................................The Taming of the Shrew
Towson University................................................................ Romeo and Juliet
Towson University........................................................................ Tanya Tanya
University at Buffalo.................................................................................. Rent
University at Buffalo........................................................................Tattoo Girl
University at Buffalo...........................................The Mystery of Edwin Drood
University at Buffalo.........................................................The Cherry Orchard
University of Pittsburgh....................................................The Baltimore Waltz
University of Pittsburgh............................................................ Count Dracula
University of Pittsburgh....................... Angels in America Part 2: Perestroika
University of Pittsburgh.... Angels in America Part 1:Millennium Approaches
University of Toledo........................................ The Doctor in Spite of Himself
University of Toledo.......................................................................... Machinal
University of Toledo........................................................................... Macbeth
University of Toledo.......................................... Crumbs from the Table of Joy
University of Virginia................................................................ The Foreigner
University of Virginia....................................................... Language of Angels
University of Virginia................................................... The Imaginary Invalid
Ursinus College........................................................... Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde
Ursinus College...................................................... Picasso at the Lapin A’gile
Villanova University................................................................... As You Like It
Washington & Jefferson College.............................A Streetcar Named Desire
Washington & Jefferson College..............................Some Things You Need to
Know Before the World Ends
West Chester University.......... Original Student Written 10-Minute One-Acts
West Chester University..................................................... The Trojan Woman
West Chester University....................................................... tick...tick...Boom!
Westminster College...........................................................................Premium
Westminster College......................................................... Pride and Prejudice
Westminster College...................................................................... Getting Out
Wilkes University.................................................. Brenda Bly, Teen Detective
On Twitter
For the latest updates and to share ideas
and information ...
Offical Hash Tag: #kcactf2
Indiana University of Pennsylvania • January 2010
• 27
KCACTF Staff and
Coordinators
Region II Leadership
Festival Host Staff
Chair
Juliet Wunsch
West Chester University
Indiana University of Pennsylvania
National Committee
Vice Chair and CFO
Elizabeth van den Berg
McDaniel College
Chair
Harry Parker
Texas Christian University
Vice Chair
Rebecca Hilliker
University of Wyoming
Members at Large
David Lee Painter
University of Idaho
Debra Bergsma Otte
Montclair State University
Steve Reynolds
Wittenberg College
Immediate Past Chair/ATHE Liaison
Mark Kuntz
Western Washington University
Chair, Design and Technologies
Karen Anselm
Bloomsburg University
Vice Chair, Design and Technologies
Gweneth West
University of Virginia
Chair, New Plays Program
Roger Hall
James Madison University
Vice Chair, New Plays Program
Georgia McGill
City University of New York/Q.C.C. USITT Representative
Holly Monsos
University of Toledo Partners of American Theater Representative
Jere Wade The John F. Kennedy
Center for the
Performing Arts
Artistic Director, KCACTF
Gregg Henry
National Playwriting Program
Ruth Childs, Chair
SUNY at Brockport
Toni Apryasz: Programs, VIP Transportation,
Department Secretary
Jessica Sabol: Scheduling, Administrative
Coordinator
Patrick McCreary: Waller Hall Technical
Director
Vice Chair, National Playwriting Program
Scott Frank
Washington and Jefferson College
David Surtasky: Fisher Auditorium Technical
Director
Chair, Design, Technology and Management
Michael Allen
Montclair State University
Bob Steineck: Production Lighting
Vice Chair, Design, Technology and
Management
Rob Berry
Anne Arundel Community College
Directing
Becky Prophet
Alfred University
SDC Coordinator
Grechen Wingerter
Lycoming College
Corey Lunchuck: Scene Shop Supervisor
Grace Maberg: Production Lighting
Hank Knerr: Director of Public Events,
College of Fine Arts
Kathy Evanko: Director of Conference
Services
C. Thomas Ault: Library Liaison
Valerie Liberta; IUP Volunteer Coordinator
Cheryl Randal: DTM Liaison
Rob Gretta: Irene Ryan Acting Scholarship
Auditions Liaison
Irene Ryan Scholarship Auditions
Rachel Evans
Kean University
Jason Chimonides: Playwrighting Liaison
Assistant, Irene Ryan Scholarship Auditions
Scott Mackenzie
Wesminster College
Special Thanks
Chair, Dramaturgy
Robyn Quick
Towson University
O’Neill Critics Institute
Ralph Leary
Clarion University
Producer, Fringe
Leonard Kelly
West Chester University
Co-Producer, Fringe Festival
Steve Satta
Towson University
Producing Director, KCACTF
Susan Shaffer
Workshop Coordinator
Debra Bergsma Otte
Montclair State University
Vice President, Education
Darrell M. Ayers
James Madison University
Immediate Past Chair
Maggie Lally
Adelphi University
National Selection Team
Regional Circuit Coordinators
Michael Swanson
OH, WV
Jeanette Farr
Gregg Henry
Paul J. Hustoles
Lynne Koscielniak
Karen Anselm, NST representative
Brian Jones: Festival Host, Department Chair
Trish Ralph
Western/Central PA, Western NY
Elizabeth van den Berg
NJ, Eastern PA, MD, DE, DC, Northern VA
Joan Van Dyke: Workshops Liaison
PNC Bank
Firestone Building Products
Focal Press
Indiana Country Tourist Bureau
Michael Hood
Dean of the College of Fine Arts
Tim Estep
Fine Arts Technology Manager
John Veilleux
Associate Vice President, Communications
IUP Office of the President
IUP Print Center
IUP Web Team and Communications Staff
28 •
Kennedy Center American College Theater Festival • Region 2
Presenter and
Guest Profiles
Michael Allen is the chair for design and technology for Region II and deputy chair of production
and assistant professor at Montclair State University. Michael has earned credits in a vaiety of areas
in theater including performance, administration,
and production. A few of his credits include working for organizations such as NJPAC in the arts
education department and production managers
for Crossroads Theater Company. His stage management credits include AEA stage management
for The Passage Theatre, African Globe Theatre,
TheatreFest, and Premiere Stages and Steel Mag-
nolias, Proof, Trojan Woman, and The Prince of
Homburg at MSU. He has directed at The Neward
Community School of the Arts, The Now Theatre,
and the 2004 NASPA national convention in Denver, CO. At MSU he has directed The Twilight of
the Golds by Jonathan Tolins, In the Blood by Suzan Lori Parks, World Goes Round, Kander and
Ebb Review for the University Players. As a designer, he was the resident lighting designer for
Essex County College and has designed lights
for the MSU dance concert Works A Foot. He has
served as scenic designer for the theater department’s production of Working, The Musical and
has designed for the African Globe Theatre. He
has written two children’s plays; an adaption of
Snow White, entitled An African Tale and an original script, Cindy and the Battle of Aspru.
Gina Alvarado-Otero was a working actor in
New York and Los Angeles and some of the top
regional theaters in the country before becoming
the Interim Theater Program Director at Prince
George’s Community College. Tim Averill, associate professor of design at
Muhlenberg College in Allentown, Pa. teaches
and designs sets and lighting during the school
year and is an organic farmer in the summer
months. Tim designed the sets for this Festival’s
invited production of The Increased Difficulty of
Concentration and was the consultant on Czech
cuisine and culture for the show. Margaret Joyce Ball is an associate professor of
theater at East Stroudsburg University where she
has directed A Funny Thing Happened on the Way
to the Forum, School House Rock Live! Goodbye Marianne, Proof, Lucky Stiff, A Midsummer
Night’s Dream, and Quilters. She has taught vocal
technique and private voice for CAP21 at NYU’s
Tisch School. Dr. Ball has presented papers and
workshops on the voice for the Voice Foundation, ATHE, VASTA, Kennedy Center American
College Theater Festival Region II, International
Voice Congress, and the Pennsylvania State Women’s Consortium.
Janet Butler Berry is grants administrator at Easter Seals Greater Washington-Baltimore Region,
where she secures grants from corporations, foundations, and government agencies and administers
everything from research to reporting. She has received millions of dollars in grants from funders
including the Shubert Foundation and the National
Endowment for the Arts. Ms. Berry worked in
non-profit theater for over ten years and held positions at Arena Stage, Round House Theater, Wayne
State University Department of Theater, and Boars
Head Theater. She holds a B.A. in English and
American literature from Brown University and an
M.B.A/M.A. in arts administration from Southern
Methodist University.
Rob Berry is a professor of theater and design at
Anne Arundel Community College. He earned a
B.F.A. in acting from Western Kentucky University and an M.F.A in scene design from Wayne State
University’s Hilberry Company. Berry has been a
professional actor, technical director, and lighting
and scenic designer for over fifteen years Robert Bullington teaches acting and voice at
Clarion University. He earned his M.F.A. in acting
at the University of Alabama and a B.F.A in acting at Ohio University and also studied voice and
acting at Shakespeare and Co.. He has performed
as Charley in Charley’s Aunt at the Virginia Stage
Company, Trinculo in The Tempest at Fort Worth
Shakespeare In The Park, Nick in The Woods at
The Source Theater in Washington, D.C., as well
as appearances at summer stock companies around
the country. He also spent five years at The Virginia Stage Company as an administrator. His productions of The Cripple of Inishmaan and Make
Sense Who May have been seen at recent festivals.
Victor Capecce is on the faculty of Millersville
University and serves as the designer and technical director for MU theater. He was previously
the technical director of Theater Harrisburg (at
the Whitaker Center) and a designer/scenic artist
(USA 829) in New York. Victor was also a project
manager for DePaul Planning and Design in Lancaster, Pa., designing and supervising residential,
commercial and hospitality projects. He was a
theater consultant for the Ephrata Performing Arts
Center, Freedom Chapel Theater (Gap, Pa.) and
has contributed renovation design work to Albright
Indiana University of Pennsylvania • January 2010
College Theater and New Jersey Institute of Technology’s Theater. He created outdoor stages and
sets for Millersville University and Hersheypark
and is instrumental in the design process of MU’s
new Visual and Performing Arts Center.
Pamela D. Chabora, Ph.D., now serves as a
performance specialist at Theater West Virginia
(TWV) and Mountain State University. In her
twenty-five years as a specialist in actor training,
she has served as a master teacher and performance specialist at North Dakota State University,
at the UNH, Susquehanna University, at the University of Toledo and UMFK. Chabora has also
maintained a parallel career in professional theater
as a performer and director/choreographer. Most
recently, she portrayed Amanda in The Glass Menagerie as a guest artist with Tin Roof Theater.
She is also currently touring throughout the U.S.
in the role of Emily Dickinson in The Belle of
Amherst. In her third season, Chabora is a master teacher and a member of the acting company
at TWV. She maintains a high profile in national
theater organizations such as ATHE, VASTA, and
ATME. As a certified practitioner of both the Lessac Voice/Movement System and of Alba Emoting, Chabor acontinues to research the application
of neuropsychology to self-use training for actors. Matt Chapman plays with physical theater and
clown. He is artistic director of Brooklyn’s Under
the Table, which he co-founded in 2001. Currently, Matt works at Dell’Arte International, through
TCG’s New Generations Future Leaders program.
He has taught at Marymount Manhattan College
and has led workshops at the Kennedy Center,
NYU, Vassar, Sarah Lawrence, and Towson.
Matt’s workshops abroad have included South Africa, Denmark, the Netherlands, and England. He
studied at Dell’Arte and the University of Kansas.
J. Stephen Crosby, professor of theater, has been
teaching at Alfred University since 1994. An Equity actor, director, and writer, Crosby has worked
professionally in New York and Los Angeles and
in regional theaters, most notably the Guthrie Theater in Minneapolis. He has appeared in film and
on PBS television, including The School for Scandal, which was part of the popular “Theater in
America” series in the mid-1970s. Stage credits include King Lear, in King Lear, Ebenezer Scrooge
in A Christmas Carol, Oedipus, in Oedipus Rex,
Harpagon, in The Miser, Banquo in Macbeth, and
Bottom in A Midsummer Night’s Dream. Crosby
received his M.F.A. in directing from Florida State
University in 1972. Prior to coming to Alfred University, he taught at Kalamazoo College, Gustavus
Adolphus College, and the University of Alaska,
where he organized a Native Alaskan theater program which toured nationally and internationally
presenting original works based on cultural and
social issues. Productions he has directed at AU
have included The Runner Stumbles, Cat on a Hot
Tin Roof, (performed at the regional KCACTF in
2006), Beyond Therapy, Into the Woods, Tartuffe,
The Bacchae: A Ritual, Buried Child, The Crucible, The Mikado, Reckless, Macbeth, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, and Translations. Crosby has
a particular interest in world theater, has taught
with Semester at Sea, and will be teaching with
a Latin American Studies Program in Costa Rica
this spring. He also performed in a production of
Henry V as part of the ’06 World Shakespeare
Congress, held in Brisbane, Australia. Allyson Currin is an artistic associate with Charter Theater, which recently premiered her new
play for young audiences, Unleashed! The Secret
Lives of White House Pets, at The John F. Ken-
nedy Center for the Performing Arts. Another new
play of hers, Love and Whiskey, was recently also
produced as a workshop by Actors Equity Members.
Her new musical, The Dancing Princesses (with
composer/lyricist Chris Youstra), is scheduled for
its world premiere production in Imagination Stage
in April 2010; and her new one-woman show about
playwright Sophie Treadwell, God’s Little Lies, will
premiere at American Century Theater in May. Her
latest comedy, The Colony, is currently in development with Charter Theater. Ally has been nominated
twice for the Helen Hayes Awards’ Outstanding New
Play (Church of the Open Mind at Charter Theater
and Amstel in Tel Aviv at Source Theater) and has
been honored by the Mary Goldwater Theater Lobby
Awards. Other works have been produced at Charter
Theater (The Subject), Theater Alliance (Radio Free
America and The Shirley Jackson Project), Washington Jewish Theater (Vaudeville!), Church Street
Theater (Crash and Burns), Source Theater (Fur
and Other Dangers and Dancing With Ourselves),
and Washington Shakespeare Theater (Learning
Curves). She has also collaborated on several operas and musical performances with the In-Series
(The Magic Flute and The Vagabond Princesses)
and Musica Aperta (Six Degrees of Hamlet at the
Shakespeare Theater). Currently, she is working on
a new musical commissioned by the Tony Awardwinning Signature Theater with composer/lyricist
Matt Conner. She is also an actor and has appeared
on many D.C./Baltimore stages including Everyman,
Round House, Rep Stage, Arena Stage, Washington
Shakespeare Theater, Olney Theater, Center, Studio
Theater, Washington Stage Guild, Catalyst, Theater
Alliance, American Century Theater, Theater J, and
Signature. Recent area performances include Actor
1 in the Charter hit F.U. (Forgive Us…What Did
You Think We Meant?) and Martha in Olney Theater
Center’s The Constant Wife. Ally is on the theater/
dance and English department faculty at The George
Washington University.
Nick DePinto is an actor and educator based in
Washington D.C. Educated at Wittenberg University, the Hilberry Theater, and the Moscow Art
Theater, he is a veteran of regional theater, national
touring productions, and D.C. stages including Olney Theater, Ford’s Theater, Constellation Theater,
Shakespeare Theater Company. He is an adjunct lecturer at Mcdaniel College in Maryland. Season Ellison received her Ph.D. from Bowling Green State University, an M.A. from Texas
State University, and a B.A. from Henderson State
University. She is a visiting assistant professor of
theater at The College of Wooster. Her artistic and
instructional specialties include directing, acting,
performance studies (solo performance, performance ethnography, performance of daily life, and
performance as a way of knowing), and qualitative
inquiry. Her research interests include directing and
acting pedagogy, performance studies, qualitative
iunquiry, women’s and queer studies, American
Western mythology (specifically “cowboy culture”),
and performing animals. Her recent directing credits
include The Comedy of Errors, The Shape of Things,
Fat Pig, All I Really Need to Know I Learned in Kindergarten, and The Laramie Project. She is the graduate student and junior faculty representative for
the Directing Forum at the Association for Theater
in Higher Education Conference and she currently
serves as conference co-chair for the Playwriting
Symposium at Mid America Theater Conference.
Joseph Fahey has trained at the American Conservatory Theater and interned as a movement coach
at the American Repertory Theater. He has taught
graduate and undergraduate courses at The Ohio
• 29
State University, Ohio Dominican College, Denison University, Ohio University, and Case Western
Reserve University. He currently serves as director
of the theater program at The Ohio State University,
Mansfield. He has taught courses in stage movement, acting, directing, multicultural theater, theater
history, script analysis, and the history of American
actor training. He has developed collaborations
with The Cleveland Public Schools, The Cleveland Playhouse, Mansfield Art Center, Mansfield
Playhouse, Richland Academy, and Renaissance
Theater. He works actively with the Association for
Theater in Higher Education and serves on the Renaissance Education Advisory Committee and the
Pioneer Career and Technology Center Performing
Arts and Communications Curriculum Committee
and serves on the board of the Ohio Theater Alliance. His work has been published in The Mime
Journal, The Journal of Dramatic Theory and Criticism, Theater Journal, Modern Drama, The Eugene
O’Neill Review, and The Pinter Review. Jeanette Farr holds an M.F.A. in theater arts with
an emphasis in playwriting from the University of
Nevada, Las Vegas. Her plays have been produced
in the U.S. and abroad including Off-off Broadway,
Canada, Edinburgh Festival Fringe in Scotland,
Singapore, and Japan. Her work has been recognized by the Nevada Arts Council, The Kennedy
Center American College Theater Festival, and the
Association for Theater in Higher Education. Her
work is published through Smith and Kraus, Dramatic Publishing, Black Box Press, originalworksonlinepublising.com and theaterhistory.com. Jeanette is an alumnus of the Kennedy Center Summer
Playwriting Intensive (2007) working with playwrights David Ives, Marsha Norman, Lee Blessing,
and Melanie Marnich. Through KCACTF, she has
responded to over 150 new plays as a regional respondent; guest respondent in Regions I, II, IV, VII;
and past chair of the National Playwriting Program
for Region VIII and was recently appointed as Regional Fellow for Region VIII. She has been commissioned by Sierra Repertory Theater to adapt Yoshiko Uchida’s children’s story, Journey to Topaz,
for touring. Her play, Blue Roses, based on the life
of Rose Williams, won the international playwriting
competition for Prospect Theater Project; and her
play, Pitchin’ Pennies At the Stars was a finalist in
the Mildred and Albert Pinowski Playwriting Competition. She was the literary associate and assistant
to the artistic director at the Pacific Conservatory
of the Performing Arts. She is currently the chair
of Theater Arts at Glendale Community College,
California, where she has produced and directed a
variety of plays including the popular series, “Motel
Chronicles,” commissioning playwrights to write
plays taking place in a motel room. In Los Angeles,
she has had new plays included for Moving Arts
in Los Angeles and the Secret Rose Theater in the
NoHo Arts District. Jeanette is a proud member of
the Dramatists’ Guild.
Ben Fisler is the advisor and lead instructor of the
Harford Community College theater program as well
as a professional actor whose recent credits include
playing Torvald in A Doll’s House for the Royal Norwegian Embassy and the independent film, Below the
Beltway, starring Sarah Clarke and Tate Donovan. T.S. Frank is a playwright and storyteller. He is the
chair of the Theater and Communication Department at Washington and Jefferson College. Frank is
vice chair of the National Playwright’s Program for
Region 2; a member of the Dramatists Guild; and a
member of Pittsburgh PlayWorks, a consortium of
writers, directors, and actors dedicated to the development of new plays. His play, Butter’s Goat, has
30 •
Kennedy Center American College Theater Festival • Region 2
been performed in New York, London, and Pittsburgh; and he has also directed for the stage in those
cities as well. He is an incurable collector and yardsale junkie. Kenneth Gargaro, Ph.D, has a career in the performing arts in Pittsburgh that spans four decades;
and his dedication to the arts and to education continues to transform the local musical theater scene.
Disciplined training leading to immediate testing
on the public stage forms the foundation of his artistic-educational philosophy. The outcome of this
artistic vision can be seen across the nation in the
Broadway, touring, TV, film, and entrepreneurial
work of those whose educational pursuits and performing careers intersected with Gargaro’s career
as a producer, director, and educator. He continues
to supply the youngest performers, local professionals, and college students access to the professional stage on a regular basis by actively producing, directing, and teaching for Pittsburgh Musical
Theater and Robert Morris University. Carolyn M. Gillespie is a professor at the University of Michigan-Flint where she has taught acting,
directing, and dramatic literature since1987. Gillespie has received several awards for teaching, service, and professional development including the
Dorothea Wyatt Award for service to women, the
Lucinda Hinsdale Stone Senior Research Award,
and the Faculty Achievement Award for Excellence
in Teaching and was recognized as UM Flint’s Distinguished Professor of the Year in 2008. A participant in the first KCACTF in 1967, Gillespie served
as served as chair and vice chair of Region III and
subsequently, was a member of National Selection
Team in 2006. She holds an M.F.A. in acting from
Stanford University and is a member of Actors’ Equity Association.
John Gresh is an actor, teacher, and pianist/vocalist
living in Pittsburgh. He directed Savage in Limbo
and The Music Lesson at Pittsburgh Playwrights
Theater Company and worked with playwright Lee
Blessing’s on the play, Flag Day, and playwright/
director Eric Simonson on his play, Carter’s Way,
as part of the Momentum Festival at City Theater.
He has appeared at the Pittsburgh Playhouse, Pittsburgh Irish, and Classical Theater and at CarnegieMellon’s Summer New Play Festival. He has taught
at Carnegie-Mellon University, Point Park University, and Westminster College where he is an adjunct faculty member teaching voice, speech, and
introduction to acting. Rob Gretta is assistant professor in performance
(acting/directing/musical theater) in IUP’s Department of Theater and Dance. As an alumnus, he
holds an M.F.A. in directing from Florida State
University, where he actively served as a member
of the B.F.A. Performance Faculty. While teaching
at F.S.U., he served as the associate casting director for the Southern Shakespeare Festival, as well
as the interim artistic director of Tallahassee Little
Theatre. Rob has been a professional actor since
1986, working off-Broadway in New York City,
regional theaters throughout the country, theme
parks, and national tours. Some of his favorite roles
include Herr Schultz in Cabaret, Mushnik in Little
Shop of Horrors, Magaldi in Evita, Nathan Detroit
and Nicely, Nicely in Guys and Dolls, Billis in
South Pacific, Larry Mitchell in A Point of Order,
Clive/Cathy in Cloud 9, Giles Corey in The Crucible, Mercutio in Romeo and Juliet, Don Armado
in Love’s Labor’s Lost, and Dottore Lombardi in
The Servant of Two Masters. Regionally, Rob has
directed such productions as Closer, How I Learned
to Drive, Sure Thing, Book of Days, The Woman in
Black, Always . . .Patsy Cline, Othello, Jesus Christ
Superstar, Singin’ the Rain, as well as noted chamber operas il matrimonio segreto and Amahl and
the Night Visitors. At I.U.P., in a joint production
with the Department of Music, he recently directed
Anything Goes. Guys and Dolls and The 3Penny
Opera both received the Kennedy Center/American
College Theater Festival Certificate of Merit for Direction and Ensemble work. This spring, Rob will
be directing Sweet Charity in the newly remodeled
Fisher Auditorium. Rob is a proud member of Actors’ Equity Association and the Society of Stage
Directors and Choreographers.
Pamela Hendrick is professor of theater arts at the
Richard Stockton College of New Jersey, earning
her graduate degree in directing from Northwestern University. She has directed more than forty
productions for academic and professional theater
and is featured in the book Women Stage Directors
Speak: Exploring the Influence of Gender on Their
Work, by Rebecca Daniels (McFarland, 1996). Her
research on gender and performance has been published in On Stage Studies and Theater Topics and
returned to a full-time academic career after several
years in professional theater. She was co-founder
and artistic director of Theater Three in Minneapolis from 1980-1990. She also worked as an actor
and director for several years with the Playwright’s
Center of Minneapolis, where many of the nation’s
top Playwrights developed new works.
Gregg Henry serves as artistic director of the national KCACTF. Recent productions include A
Sleeping Country by Melanie Marnich for Round
House Theater, Teddy Roosevelt and the Ghostly
Mistletoe by Tom Isbell and Mark Russell for The
Kennedy Center, the U.S. premieres of Girl in the
Goldfish Bowl by Morris Panych for MetroStage
and You Are Here by Daniel MacIvor for Theater
Alliance; Shelagh Stevenson’s An Experiment with
an Air Pump for Journeymen Theater Ensemble;
Julie Jensen’s Two-Headed and Barbara Field’s
adaptation of Scaramouche for Washington Shakespeare Company. Productions for Kennedy Center
Theater for Young Audiences include Mermaids,
Monsters and the World Painted Purple by Marco
Ramirez, Mark Russell and Tom Isbell’s Teddy
Roosevelt and the Treasure of Ursa Major, Barbara Field’s Dreams in the Golden Country and
Norman Allen’s The Light of Excalibur. He has
directed development workshops for Arena Stage’s
Downstairs and Centerstage’s First Look series.
He hosts the M.F.A. Playwrights’ Workshop at The
Kennedy Center in partnership with the National
New Play Network. He is an artistic associate for
Kennedy Center Theater for Young Audiences for
New Works and Commissions, developing projects
by Marsha Norman, Jason Robert Brown, Naomi
Iizuka, Quiara Alegría Hudes, and others. Gregg is
also the curator of the annual Page-to-Stage New
Play Festival at The Kennedy Center. He holds an
M.F.A. from the University of Michigan and has
served on the faculties of the University of Michigan, Western Michigan University, Iowa State University, and Catholic University of America. Keith Hight is currently the technical director
at College of Southern Maryland. Over the past
twenty-five years, he has been part of three world
premiers and directed/designed well over three
hundred shows. He continues to work as a designer
and a director on both east and west coast where
he produces about twelve shows a year. Over the
past year, he has worked diligently with TBA,
Nederlander, and Live Nation to find scholarship
moneys for technical students to work towards their
degrees. Last summer, he helped open The Music
Factory in Charlotte, NC.
Michael Hood (B.A. magna cum laude Arizona
State University, 1972, and M.A./M.F.A. University of New Orleans, 1975, SAFD Certified Teacher)
has worked professionally as an actor, director, and
fight arranger. He has been a member of the Society
of American Fight Directors since 1979. In addition
to many university productions and workshops, he
has staged fights for the New Orleans Opera, the
Alaska Repertory Theater, the Chekhov Center in
Yuzhno-Sakhalinsk, and the Theater for Young Audiences in Khabarovsk, Russia, and for Unseam’d
Shakespeare in Pittsburgh, among others. Michael
has been teaching combat since 1974 and continues to do so at Indiana University of Pennsylvania,
where he serves as dean of the College of Fine Arts.
Cleo House, Jr.’s credits include the Teller and
Aaron Posner Macbeth at The Folger Shakespeare
Theater in D.C. and Two River Theater Company
in N.J., Hammet in Inssurection:Holding History at
Theater Alliance in D.C., Amusa in Death and the
King’s Horseman at The Lantern Theater in Philadelphia, Aaron in Titus at the Oklahoma Shakespearean Festival, and was a participant in the Lincoln Center’s Directors Lab in New York City. He is
a two-time Helen Hayes Nominee for Outstanding
Ensemble and is a theater professor at Penn State
Berks where he serves as program coordinator. Previous productions directed include I Hate Hamlet,
The Beauty Queen of Leenane, Turandot, Bug, and
Dracula. A native Texan, Cleo received his B.S. at
Texas AandM at Commerce and his M.F.A. at Texas
Tech University.
Paul J. Hustoles is currently professor and chair of
the Department of Theater and Dance at Minnesota
State University, Mankato, where he has also been
artistic director of Highland Summer Theater since
1986. Paul received his B.F.A. from Wayne State
University, his M.A. from the University of Michigan, and his Ph.D. from Texas Tech University. A
college instructor for thirty-five years, he has taught
in Missouri, Texas, Mississippi, and Michigan. He
is the past artistic director of MandM Productions
of Ann Arbor, MI and of The Mule Barn Theater of
Tarkio, MO. He just directed his 186th show with
recent titles including Into the Woods, The History
Boys, and Miss Saigon, having produced close to
500 in his career, so far. He will celebrate his 38th
consecutive year of summer stock in 2010. Paul
began his association with The Kennedy Center
American College Theater Festival in 1983 and is
a past Region V-South vice chair, Region V chair,
and past chair of chairs. He directed the Irene Ryan
Winner’s Circle Evening of Scenes at the Kennedy
Center for Festivals 30, 34, 35 and 36; was the master of ceremonies for Festival 41; and, for the past
four years, has served as a judge for the KCACTF
National Musical Theater Award. Paul has received
personal KCACTF commendations for his directing of The Secret Garden, Medea, and Metamorphoses. At Minnesota State, Mankato, he has produced and advised five productions, all directed
by students, that have been invited to the regional
festival. Two of his students/advisees have won the
Region V Irene Ryan Acting Scholarship competition and another won the Region V Student SSDC
ten-minute scene competition. Paul currently represents Region V on the NAPAT (National Partners
American Theater) Board and has been fully committed to and engaged in the work of the KCACTF
as a director, producer, respondent, selector, adjudicator, and festival host. Nathan Johnson received his M.F.A in acting from
the Yale School of Drama. Since graduation, Nathan has performed at regional theaters across the
nation—most notably the Yale Repertory Theater,
Indiana University of Pennsylvania • January 2010
Marin Theater Company, and South Coast Repertory. He has also appeared on several television
shows including The O.C., Veronica Mars, Numb3rs, and Medium. At Yale, he was the recipient of
the Constance Welsh Memorial Scholarship and the
Oliver Thorndike Acting Award and received his
B.F.A., summa cum laude, from the University of
Evansville. He is a member of the Screen Actors
Guild and Actors’ Equity Association. Brian Jones is chair and the resident scenic and
lighting designer of the Department of Theater and
Dance here IUP. He received his M.F.A. from the
University of Florida in 1984, and since then has
designed scenery and lighting for over 150 productions across the nation. He frequently designs for
The Electric Company in Scranton, PA. His favorite
designs have been for re-imagined classics such as
Macbeth for Theater-by-the-Grove, and new plays
such as Elephant Sighs for Keystone Repertory Theater, both at IUP. His design for Zastrozzi: The Master of Discipline received a Meritorious Achievement Award from the Kennedy Center American
College Theater Festival. Since 2001, Brian has
expanded his artistic interests to include puppetry
and masks. In the fall of 2004, he was an artist in
residence with Mum Puppettheater in Philadelphia,
where he designed The Puppetmaster of Lodz. He
is also the executive director of Footlight Players,
a theater-for-youth day camp and teen academy in
residence at IUP. Brian serves on the board of the
Indiana Arts Council and is developing The Artists
Hand Gallery and Open Studio—a center for the
arts on Philadelphia Street in Downtown Indiana.
Hank Knerr serves as director of public events for
the College of Fine Arts at IUP. His duties include
presenting, producing, and promoting visual and
performing arts events as well as facilities management and web development. He also heads a
5-county arts-in-education partnership, ArtsPath,
for the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts. He received his B.A. in both theater and music performance from Lycoming College and M.F.A. in theater administration from Penn State. Before coming
to IUP, he worked in public relations and as a faculty member at the University of Northern Iowa and
Minnesota State University, Mankato. He recently
received the first Presenter of the Year award form
PA Presenters.
Kerro Knox is the co-chair of KCACTF Region
III and is theater program director at Oakland University, outside Detroit, where he teaches lighting
design and theater history. His B.A. and M.F.A.
are from Yale and has designed for Syracuse Stage,
Yale Rep, Cleveland Play House, Meadow Brook
Theater, and several dance companies. He directed
Herringbone at the Body Politic Theater in Chicago and stage managed for the national tour of
Phantom. He has also worked in the Ukraine and
Greece where he has also been in several Greek
plays. African drumming and xylophone have taken him to New York and steel pan drumming has
taken him to Trinidad and Canada. He has released
two recordings,—one with his arrangements of The
Nutcracker. His passion is the interrelatedness of
the arts. Scuba diving has also taken him to many
corners of the world, and he will let you know
when he grows up. Lynne Koscielniak’s lighting and set designs have
represented the U.S. at the Prague Quadrennial of
Stage Design and at World Stage Design Exposition. She has designed in such venues as Steppenwolf, Virginia Stage, Studio Arena Theater, Irish
Classical Theater at Buffalo, and Victory Gardens
at Chicago. Her work includes the Chicago premiere of Sarah Ruhl’s Eurydice at Piven Theater,
Chicago; The Nutcracker for Neglia Ballet Artists
featuring the Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra; lighting designs for dance including Bill Evans and Jump
Rhythm Jazz Project; and set, light, and costume designs for the world premiere of the musical, Parallel Lives, at Riverside Opera Ensemble, Theater for
the New City, New York. Based in Buffalo, N.Y.,
she is an associate professor of scenography and the
director of design and technology at the University
at Buffalo. She served as the chair of design and
technology for Region II, Kennedy Center American
Theater Festival and holds an M.F.A. in stage design
from Northwestern University. Her work has earned
her an Emerging Designer Residency (Steppenwolf),
a Joseph Jefferson Citation Nomination, and The Michael Merritt Scholarship for Excellence in Design
and Collaboration. Lynne is a member of United Scenic Artist, Local 829. Frank Kuhn is on the faculty in the Department of
Theater at The College at Brockport. He has directed
for Sacramento Opera, Delaware Theater Company,
McCarter Theater, Princeton Repertory Company,
New Stage Theater, the New American Theater,
South Jersey Regional Theater, Idaho Repertory
Theater, Virginia Opera, Opera Delaware, and the
Opera Festival of New Jersey, and most recently for
the Warehouse Theater in Greenville, S.C. He was
named Best Director of 2006 in the Denver Post’s
statewide Ovation Awards for his production of
Sweeney Todd at Creede Repertory Theater, where he
will be returning this summer to direct Nagle Jackson’s This Day and Age. He has served as producing director for Gretna Theater and artistic director
for Allegheny Highlands Regional Theater, both in
Pennsylvania. He has also stage managed regionally
and on Broadway.
Maggie Lally is immediate past chair of KCACTF
Region 2. She is an associate professor of theater arts
at Adelphi University, where she teaches acting and
cabaret theater writing and performance of sketches
and songs in the Brechtian tradition. She has directed
in New York City and regionally and has developed
numerous cabarets including three with music written by Jonathan Larson (Rent). Maggie has directed
readings of new plays at venues including The Public
Theater, Barrington Stage Company, Jewish Repertory Theater, The DR2 Theater, and through the
Kennedy Center American College Theater Festival.
Over the past few years, she is honored to have been
invited to regional Festivals as a production and Irene
Ryan judge/respondent and Design Exhibit, NPP, and
SSDC program respondent. She has taught cabaret
writing and performance workshops at colleges and
universities including New York University, Duke
University, University of Michigan, University of
Pennsylvania, and currently at Adelphi University.
She is a member of The Society of Stage Directors
and Choreographers.
Vanessa Lancellotti, a senior at Muhlenberg College
in Allentown, Pa., is honored that The Increased Difficulty of Concentration was chosen for this year’s
festival. She is an English and theater double major
with a dual concentration in directing and acting.
Last spring, Vanessa directed a studio production of
Eugene Ionesco’s The Lesson, and she served as an
assistant director on New Voices 2007, a series of
student-written and directed one acts. Last year, she
completed a semester in physical theater at the Accademia dell’Arte in Arezzo, Italy. Next semester, Vanessa will serve as assistant director for Blood Wedding
directed by Francine Roussel, at Muhlenberg. Vanessa would like to thank everyone who made it possible
to take this production to festival.
Ralph Leary is coordinator of OCI and is a professor in the English Department of Clarion University,
• 31
where he teaches modern and contemporary dramatic literature as well as Shakespeare. On occasion, he
is allowed to take small roles in campus productions,
especially when they need an old guy. He responds to
regional productions and served as chair of NCI and
the Dramaturgy Initiative. Last year, he went to the
Kennedy Center as the Faculty Fellow in Criticism.
Valerie Liberta is an assistant professor and costume designer at IUP. She holds a B.F.A. in theatrical production and design from Illinois State University and an M.F.A. in theatrical design from the
University of Texas at Austin. She has designed in
Austin, Texas, for companies such as Capitol City
Playhouse, Different Stages, and the Austin Gilbert
and Sullivan Society. Her designs have also been
seen in the Dallas-Ft. Worth area at Plano Repertory Theater, Water Tower Theater, Dallas Theater
Center, Junior Players Summer Shakespeare, and at
Kitchen Dog Theater, where she was an artistic associate. Valerie has held teaching positions at the University of Mississippi and at Texas Christian University. Nominated in both 1999 and 2000, she was
the recipient of the Dallas Theater League’s 2000
Leon Rabin Award for Outstanding Achievement
in costume design. Since joining the TBTG faculty,
Valerie has designed costumes for Scapin, Kiss Me
Kate!, A Street Car Named Desire, and You Can’t
Take it With You. Additionally, she has designed for
Three Stories for Winter and Lettuce and Lovage for
the Northeast Theater.
LeVonne Lindsay is currently an assistant professor
of costume design at James Madison University. She
holds a B.S. degree in fashion design from Philadelphia University and an M.F.A. degree in costume
design from the University of Maryland, College
Park. She spent two years as a fellow at Arena Stage
and several years as a freelance designer in the D.C.
area before accepting her first teaching position in
2004 at Valdosta State University in Valdosta, Ga.
Lindsay worked this past summer as a costume technician at American Shakespeare Center in Staunton,
Virg., and as a shopper for the Shakespeare Theater
Company in Washington, D.C.
Larry Loebell His plays include The Dostoyevsky
Man, Pride of the Lion, Girl Science, The Ballad of John Wesley Reed, La Tempestad, and the
Barrymore-nominated House, Divided. His short
plays include Angie and Arnie Sanguine, But Who’s
Counting, Edward and Ellie Supine, Emma Goldman Imagines the Millennium, Just Before the War
Between the Plates, and The Lion Eats His Lunch.
Pride of the Lion is published by Playscripts and
La Tempestad is published in the anthology Playing With Canons: Explosive New Work by America’s
Indie Playwrights. His other short plays, scenes,
and monologues are published by playscripts.com,
Applause Books, and Smith and Krause. Larry was
the literary manager and dramaturg at InterAct Theater Company from 1999 to 2005. He has worked
as a dramaturg on projects for Philadelphia Theater
Company, American Music Theater Festival, Nice
People Theater Company, New Paradise Laboratories, Seven Devils Playwrights Conference, PlayPenn, and Lark Playwright’s Week. He has an M.A.
in English and creative writing from Colorado State
University and received his B.A. in English and
M.F.A. in film and television from Temple University. Larry has written for film and television and
teaches film history as an adjunct associate professor
at the University of the Arts in Philadelphia. He also
teaches playwriting as an adjunct faculty member at
Arcadia University in Glenside, Pa.
Merethe “Grace” Maberg is a master’s degree candidate in lighting design at Illinois State University
where she is working on their winter production of
32 •
Kennedy Center American College Theater Festival • Region 2
The Birds. She received her bachelor’s degree in
theater from Indiana University of Pennsylvania
where she designed lighting for Henry IV/Part 1
and Anything Goes. She also participated in last
year’s KCACTF’s lighting design competition with
IUP’s Violet Sharp and worked as the resident designer for IUP’s Footlight Players each summer.
She is a native of Norway.
Scott Mackenzie, a recipient of the KCACTF Gold
Medallion for Excellence, is an associate professor
of theater at Westminster College. His acting experience includes film, television, and theater. Roles
in Othello, Medea, The Crucible and A Tale of Two
Cities are among his theater performance credits.
His directing credits include All My Sons; Born Yesterday; The Imaginary Invalid; Kiss Me, Kate!; The
Laramie Project; A Midsummer Night’s Dream;
Pride and Prejudice, and Rabbit Hole. While on active duty with the U.S. Army Reserve, Mackenzie
directed Bigfoot Stole My Wife, the first production
by American personnel stationed in Baghdad’s International Zone. Kelly Wiegant Mangan comes to the festival as
a representative of the Society of Prop Artisan
Managers (SPAM). She has worked professionally
in the area of props and scenic design for over 20
years, and served as properties master and resident
scenic designer at Stage One, the Louisville Children’s Theater, for eighteen years. Kelly has also
served as properties master at Shakespeare Santa
Cruz, the Utah Shakespearean Festival, and Mount
Holyoke Summer Repertory Theater. In August, she
accepted a faculty position at Bowling Green State
University in Ohio. Kelly holds a bachelor’s degree
in theater and education from the University of
Missouri-Columbia and an M.F.A. from Minnesota
State University, Mankato.
Julia Matthews is associate professor and chair of
the Department of Theater at Albright College in
Reading, Pa. A director and performer as well as
a scholar and dramaturg, Julia began her career as
an actor, earning her B.F.A. from the North Carolina School of the Arts. She continued on to earn
her M.Phil. and Ph.D. in dramatic literature from
the University of St. Andrews and the University
of Warwick, U.K. She has taught on the theater
faculties of Wesleyan College and Kennesaw State
University, Ga., and has worked as a dramaturg,
director, and teacher with several Atlanta theater
companies. Julia has served on the national executive board of the Association for Theater in Higher
Education and actively participates in the Kennedy Center American College Theater Festival.
At Albright College, Julia teaches theater history,
dramatic literature, acting, and directing. She lives
in Wyomissing, Pa, with her husband, James N.
Brown, and their two sons.
G. Patrick McCreary is an assistant professor
and technical director of the IUP Department of
Theater and Dance. His lighting design credits include Endtime, Tartuffe, Crimes of the Heart, and
A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum. His scenic design credits include Waiting for
Godot, Good Woman of Setzuan, and Extremities.
In addition, he managed both scenic and lighting
design for The Importance of Being Earnest, God’s
Favorite, and The Mouse Trap as well as sound reinforcement for Jesus Christ Superstar and Fiddler
on the Roof. Patrick earned his B.A. in theater arts
from Livingston College of Rutgers University in
1975 and served there as faculty technical director.
He received his M.F.A. in theater technology and
design from Mason Gross School of the Arts, also at
Rutgers University. Previously, he was the faculty
technical director of dance and drama at Benning-
ton College, resident designer of the NTU Repertory Company at Rutgers, and technical director/
lighting designer for the Circles and Square Dance
Company in Princeton, N.J. Patrick has also done
consultations for various theaters and universities.
Beth McGee is president of the Voice and Speech
Trainers Association, a non-profit international organization of over 500 voice and speech specialists.
An associate professor at Case Western Reserve
University, she serves as voice coach for the Case/
Cleveland Play House Professional Actor Training Program. Beth has studied with internationally known voice specialists Arthur Lessac, Kristin Linklater, and Catherine Fitzmaurice and with
London’s Royal National Theater and the Roy Hart
Theater Centre Internationale in France. Her essays
have been published in The Voice and Speech Review, and she received a New Playwright’s Award
for her play, Indian Territory. Beth is also a voice
and dialect coach for Cleveland’s professional theaters and a member of Actors’ Equity Association.
Dennis McLernon is the head of performance
in the Department of Theater at the University of
Alabama at Birmingham and a member of Actors’
Equity Association. In summer 2010, he will be appearing as Prospero in The Tempest with the Freeport Shakespeare Festival in Maine. His production
of Suzanne-Lori Park’s In the Blood was performed
at the Terrace Theater at the Kennedy Center as an
invitee for the 2008 KCACTF. Since December
2008, Dennis has had the privilege of conducting
monthly acting workshops through the Alabama Department of Corrections at the Donaldson Maximum
Security Prison in Bessemer, Ala. In April 2007, the
KCACTF awarded Dennis the Actors Center Teacher Development National Fellowship, for which he
completed two-week residencies in 2007 and 2008
in New York City at The Actors’ Center. There he
worked with Christopher Bayes, in clown and physicality; Ron Van Lieu, in contemporary scene work;
Slava Dolgachev, in Stanislavski and Chekhov; J.
Michael Miller; and William Esper. In 2009, Dennis
was invited to direct The Laramie Project Ten Years
Later: An Epilogue, a staged reading concurrent with
over 100 simultaneously staged readings coordinated internationally. In 2009, Dennis also worked with
playwright Elyzabeth Gregory Wilder and director
Nancy Rominger on the premiere of The Flagmaker
of Market Street in the featured role of George at the
Alabama Shakespeare Festival’s Southern Writers’
Project. Summer 2008, ASF audiences saw him playing a variety of roles in the Southern Writers’ Project. During 2005, Dennis was a member of the acting
ensemble with the Alabama Shakespeare Festival as
Rev. Tooker in Cat on a Hot Tin Roof and in Coriolanus as Titus Lartius. Dennis is a founding company member of Birmingham’s professional acting
company, City Equity Theater. In 2009, he directed
Frankie and Johnny in the Claire De Lune. Other
City Equity credits include American Buffalo (director), Someone Who’ll Watch Over Me (Edward), and
The Cripple Of Innishmaan (Johnny Pateen Mike).
His directing credits at UAB include The Miser, A
Streetcar Named Desire, The House of Blue Leaves,
In the Blood, The Tempest, The Piano Lesson, The
Seagull, The Body of a Woman as a Battlefield in the
Bosnian War, Falsettos, and Hay Fever.
Marilouise “Mel” Michel has been teaching at
Clarion University since 1990. She has been active in KCACTF since 1994 and helped to host
the snowy Region II Festival in Clarion in 2000.
Her production of Songs for a New World was performed at the Kennedy Center in April of 2002.
Mel is a member of Actors’ Equity Association
and the Society for Stage Directors and Choreogra-
phers and has directed at educational and regional
theaters across Pennsylvania, Virginia, Tennessee,
Texas, and Louisiana. Mel recently received her
Yoga Teacher Training certification from the Mt.
Nittany Institute of Natural Health and has actively
been researching and teaching yoga and its connection to acting for the past three years. She steadfastly insists that her two best productions are her
children: Emily (13) and Marshall (9). Tom Miller was, prior to joining the staff of Actors’
Equity Association, Tom an actor for over twentyfive years, performing in national tours, regional
theater, off-Broadway, and in Europe. Additionally,
he performed with the Atlanta Ballet, Ballet Florida, and Carl Radcliff Dance Theater and at Opryland, U.S.A. He can be seen in the documentary
Show Business–The Road to Broadway, hosting a
Broadway opening night Gypsy Robe presentation.
For over a decade, Tom was honored to serve as a
voter for the annual Tony Awards and has been a
proud AEA member since 1983.
Eve Muson is an assistant professor of theater at
University of Maryland, Baltimore County, where
she teaches acting, directing, and other performance
courses. She is a professional stage director and theater educator; and her particular research interests
include collaborative playmaking, the development and production of new works, the adaptation
of mythological and archetypal stories in contemporary settings, and theater for young audiences.
From 1991-2007, she was an assistant professor
at Boston University’s School of Theater. Professional directing credits include Venus, Godspell,
Big River, and Peter Pan, all at Olney Theater
Center, Md., and plays at Boston Playwrights Theater, American Stage Festival in New Hampshire,
and Edinburgh Festival Fringe. At university level,
she has directed dozens of plays including Metamorphoses, The Cripple of Inishmaan, Arcadia,
Slavs!, The Trojan Women, Two Shakespearean Actors, On the Razzle, The Three Sisters, and Orpheus
Descending. As a writer and director, she has led
collaborations of many ensemble-created works for
projects including Cinderella and Her Sisters and
Pearls From Salt, The Other Side, Call of the Wild,
James Joyce’s A Portrait of the Artist as a Young
Man, J.D. Salinger’s Just Before the War with the
Eskimos, and How Do I Keep From Singing, based
on the life of a student with a traumatic brain injury.
She was twice cited for Outstanding Direction by
the KCACTF for her work on two new plays, Un
Tango En La Noche and a musical version of Jack
London’s Call of the Wild.
Cathy Norgren has served KCACTF in a number of administrative capacities for over twenty
years. She is a former national chair of KCACTF
and she is happy to conclude her official service to
KCACTF by being on the National Selection Team.
In civilian life, Cathy teaches design at the University at Buffalo, where she is professor and associate
chair of theater and dance. She teaches playwriting
at the KC Summer Intensives each July. Cathy is
also a member of United States Scenic Artists, local 829. As a freelance designer, she has designed
costumes for Theater for Young Audiences at the
Kennedy Center, Actors Theater of Louisville, Humana Festival of New American Plays, the Cleveland Playhouse, the former Studio Arena Theater
in Buffalo; Alabama Shakespeare Festival, North
Carolina Shakespeare Festival, the National Shakespeare Company, Indiana Repertory Theater, Virginia Stage, Vermont Stage, Pennsylvania Center
Stage, and Arden Theater of Philadelphia. Cathy
has upcoming designs at the Roundhouse Theater,
Indiana University of Pennsylvania • January 2010
Bethesda, Md.; and GEVA Theater in Rochester,
N.Y. Cathy holds a B.A., cum laude, from Mount
Holyoke College and an M.F.A. from Carnegie
Mellon University. Michael O’Steen, a native of Pittsburgh, is an associate professor of acting and directing at the University of Scranton. Michael’s directing and choreography credits include the off-Broadway production
of Just Feet From Broadway, A Tribute To Michael
Bennett for Kansas City cable television; Anything Goes and The Sound of Music at Westchester
Broadway Theater; both Guys and Dolls and Little
Shop of Horrors at Struthers Library Theater, where
he was artistic director; You’re a Good Man, Charlie Brown at Pittsburgh Musical Theater; and Annie
Get Your Gun at Cidermill Playhouse; among many
others, including dozens of productions at the University of Scranton, Carnegie Mellon University,
and Missouri State University. In addition, Michael
performed on Broadway in Meet Me in St. Louis
and Starlight Express and in the National Companies of Cats, Sayonara, Fame, and Guys and Dolls.
His film and television appearances include Woody
Allen’s film Everyone Says I Love You. Michael
has also performed at many of the country’s most
renowned regional theaters including The Manhattan Theater Club, Goodspeed Opera House, Papermill Playhouse, Walnut Street Theater, The Studio
Arena, and others. He also has taught at Missouri
State University, Carnegie Mellon University, Lee
Strasburg Theater Institute, and New York University. He holds both a B.F.A. and M.F.A. in drama
and directing from Carnegie Mellon.
Debra Bergsma Otte (Design/Tech/Management
Task Force and Project Management Initiator) is
a faculty member in theater and fashion studies at
Montclair State University. She previously served
as director of both theater arts management programs at Long Island University and as resident
costume designer. Her design credits include costume designs for CBS, the Joffrey Ballet, Linda
Tarnay, Merce Cunningham, as well as many regional, off-Broadway, and university productions,
puppet design for Henson Associates, and industrial
design. In the past ten years, she has produced and
costumed six productions that performed at the
KCACTF Region II Festival including Skriker,
which performed at the National Festival in 1998.
She is serving on the national festival as a Memberat-Large and previously served as Chair of Chairs,
Festival Production Respondent in Region V and
Regional Design Respondent in Regions I, II, IV,
V, and VI. She was chair of Region II from 2002
to 2005 and was design co-chair prior to that. In
1999 and again in 2005, she was honored to receive
the Kennedy Center Gold Medallion for her work
with KCACTF. She holds an M.F.A. in design from
Tisch School of the Arts, New York University.
Andrew Paul is originally from Philadelphia but
grew up in Rome, Italy, and trained as an actor at
the Guildford School of Acting, London, England.
He is the founding artistic director of the Pittsburgh
Irish and Classical Theater and has directed several of the company’s productions including The
Constant Couple, Faith Healer, The Seagull, The
Gigli Concert, Aristocrats, Hamlet, The School for
Scandal, and The Shaughraun. Under his leadership, PICT has produced thirty-six productions and
two successful international tours. In 2006, PICT’s
BeckettFest was named Performance of the Year by
the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette and Theater Event of
the Year by the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review. Fabio Polanco most recently performed the role of
Frank Butler in Annie Get Your Gun at Porthouse
Theater. He also performed in the Broadway Na-
tional Tour of Les Miserables as Thénardier, as well
as in Missionaries at the Brooklyn Academy of Music, The Life of Galileo at Berkeley Repertory, and
Nine at Cain Park. He is assistant professor of theater
at Ashland University.
Suann Pollock is the general manager of the twotime Tony Award winning Cincinnati Playhouse in
the Park, where her stage managing credits include
the world premiere of Notebook of Trigorin with
Lynn Redgrave, and John Doyle’s Company, winner of the 2007 Tony Award for Outstanding Musical
Revival on Broadway, as well as the recent critically
acclaimed collaboration with Sarah Ruhl on a new
version of Chekov’s Three Sisters. Directing credits
include The Phantom Tollbooth at Cincinnati Playhouse in the Park; Urinetown and Seussical at Miami
University; and Bat Boy, The Musical at Stage One of
Wichita. Suann is a proud member of AEA.
Becky Prophet, Ph.D, (Student Directing Institute/
SDC, Workshop Leader, Regional Selection Committee, Regional Executive Committee) is a professor of
theater at Alfred University has taught and directed for
thirty-some years in the Boston area, Michigan, Wisconsin, Atlanta, and most recently, Virginia. She has
often worked with new plays and developing directors.
From a festival of readings of women’s plays to the
Association of Theater in Higher Education, Becky
has worked with dozens of new plays and playwrights.
Six years ago, with the launch of the Student Directing
Institute, she found great satisfaction in bringing directing opportunities to students at the festival. In addition, she serves Region II as a regular festival workshop instructor, a production respondent, occasional
director for NPP, and an aide in planning the festival.
In 2006, Becky was the Directing Faculty Fellow at
the Kennedy Center from Region II. In 2009, she was
named a Region 2 Teaching Artist. Becky lives in Alfred, N.Y., with her artist-husband and is trying to recover from “Empty Nest Syndrome.” Robyn Quick is an associate professor and coordinator of the theater studies track in the Theater Arts
Department at Towson University. She serves as the
KCACTF Region II chair of criticism and dramaturgy. She has been published in several journals,
including American Theater and has served recently
as a production dramaturge for the Maryland Arts
Festival and the Baltimore Shakespeare Festival. The
most recent project she initiated is the collaboration
between the Center for International Theater Development and the Theater Arts Department at Towson
University to translate and produce new Russian dramas in the 2009-2010 season.
Cheryl Randal is the IUP Department of Theater
and Dance costume shop supervisor. She previously
toured as a professional wardrobe supervisor and has
traveled the world with a variety of Broadway musicals including Footloose, 42nd Street, Blast, Annie,
Annie Get Your Gun, and many more. She has had
the pleasure of working in all fifty states and on three
different continents. She has acted as a costume coordinator and assistant director and as a costume shop
manager in a vast array of venues. Cheryl has also
designed productions for many local, regional, and
off-off-Broadway theaters, including IUP, when she
was a student here. Her favorite show to be a part of
is the Radio City Christmas Spectacular, featuring the
world famous Rockettes, which she had the pleasure
of working on as wardrobe supervisor for eight years.
Edward Rozinsky, stage director, choreographer,
and physical theater specialist has over forty years
of experience in various aspects of theater. He has
taught acting and stage movement at the University
of Miami, FIU, and New World School of the Arts.
He also was an artistic director of Chamber Theater,
• 33
a professional theater for young audiences in Coral
Gables, FL. His extensive research in the area of theater has resulted in a series of articles published in
Russia, Canada, and the U.S., as well as a published
book, The Silent Art, and a video instructor course in
essential stage movement. Wendy Rosenfield is a freelance arts and lifestyle
features writer and theater critic for the Philadelphia
Inquirer. She was previously chief theater critic for
the Philadelphia Weekly, where she also wrote a
monthly column covering the area’s theater scene.
Her “Drama Queen” blog for artsjournal.com is an
outgrowth of that column. She was chosen as a Fellow for the 2008 NEA Arts Journalism Institute in
Theater and Musical Theater at USC/Annenberg and
was a participant in the 1992 Bennington Writer’s
Workshop. She was also proof reader to a swami
(not a job she’d recommend). She is a graduate of
Bennington College and is a wife, mother of two,
vegan, occasional fiction writer, publications editor
for the Women’s International League for Peace and
Freedom, and a Brownie Girl Scout troop leader.
Harvey Rovine, Ph.D., is the current chair of the
Department of Theatre and Dance at West Chester
University where he teaches theater history, dramaturgy, and playwriting. He is the author of Silence in
Shakespeare: Drama, Power and Gender, as well as
articles and study guides on Shakespeare. At WCU,
Dr. Rovine supervises the student-written one act
play program, an annual festival of student-written
and produced work.
Steven J. Satta is assistant coordinator of Fringe at
KCACTF and past coordinator of SDC Scholarship
Competition. He is an associate professor and coordinator of the acting track at Towson University
where he teaches all levels of voice, speech, dialect,
verse technique, and scene study. Also a director, he
recently initiated Towson Theater Infusion, an outreach program which trains undergraduate theater
majors as teaching artists, and sends them to local
high schools under the mentorship of local arts-ineducation organizations. He is a founding member
of Iron Crow Theater in Baltimore, which celebrates
the voices of those who, through choice or necessity, live in the margins of mainstream society with
special emphasis on LGBT/queer voices. He works
professionally as an actor, director, and dialect coach
for such companies as the Baltimore Shakespeare
Festival, Everyman Theater, the Olney Theater Center and Maryland Ensemble Theater.
David Schuler is an assistant professor of theater
at the University of Wisconsin-Platteville, where he
teaches upper-level courses in acting, theater history, dramatic literature, and theater theory, as well as
play analysis, and voice and diction. He received his
Ph.D. in theater from the University of Colorado and
has taught previously at Genesee Community College in New York, the University of Colorado, and
Binghamton University. His research interests also
involve circumpolar indigenous theater and living
history characterization. Recent directing credits include The Marriage of Bette and Boo, The Laramie
Project, Dancing at Lughnasa, The Last Five Years,
and Anything Goes. He remains active in KCACTF
and the Society for the Advancement of Scandinavian Studies.
Pat Shaw lives in Brooklyn where he writes, acts,
dances, and paints. In the past few years, he has
performed in a number of plays including Negative
Space, The Essentials of Flor, and Gone Eatin and
two films: Parallel Play, and Kitchen Hamlet. As a
playwright, he has won the James E. Michael Prize
for Playwriting and the Graham Gund Award for A
Miracle Study, which was also selected as a semifi-
34 •
Kennedy Center American College Theater Festival • Region 2
nalist for the O’Neill Playwright’s Conference. Another of his works, Girl Words, has been produced
in New York. A graduate of Kenyon College and the
National Theater Institute, Pat regularly performs
with Spessard Dance and is a founding member of
Fourth River Theater Ensemble in Pittsburgh and
FullStop Collective in N.Y.
Colin Stewart is the assistant professor of technical direction at Ithaca College, where he has taught
since 1995, serving as technical director or technical director mentor for over 100 productions. Professionally, he has recently been a technical director
for the Hanger Theater and Williamstown Theater
Festival. His thirty-year career has included positions as production manager, technical director, or
master carpenter for numerous professional theaters
and scene shops including Studio Arena Theater,
Berkshire Theater Festival, Long Wharf Theater,
Shea’s Theater, North Carolina Shakespeare Festival, Backstage Productions and North Carolina
Scenic Studios, where he has worked on sets for
numerous operas, theaters, theme shows, industrial
presentations and television. He received his B.A.
from Trent University and his M.F.A. from North
Carolina School of the Arts. Michael Swanson is coordinator of theater and
dance and associate professor of theater at Elizabethtown College in Pennsylvania. Swanson’s
teaching career includes stints at Western Illinois
University, Fresno City College, the University of
Arizona, and Franklin College where he was director of theater and first chair of the fine arts department. Swanson was co-founder and artistic director
of the Shakespeare and More Theater Company of
Central Indiana. He is an associate member of the
Society of Stage Directors and Choreographers and
has directed in Minnesota, Michigan, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Arizona, California, Utah, and Pennsylvania. Last year, he directed the staged reading
of Stephen Spotiswood’s Achieving Escape Velocity
for NPP at the Region II festival in Philadelphia. As
a past chair of KCACTF Region III, Swanson was
awarded the KCACTF Gold Medallion for his efforts. He serves on the selection team in Region II
and has served on the selection committee and as
circuit and workshop coordinator for Region VIII.
Michael co-hosted Region III’s festivals in Indianapolis in 1998 and 1999 and has been a judge or
a respondent in Regions I, II, III, IV, VII, and VIII.
Michael earned his Ph. D. at The Ohio State University, an M.F.A. in directing at Wayne State University, and B.A. from Hamline University. Lars Tatom is a professional director and educator
and has directed and taught, Shakespeare all over
America, and in such far off places as Cairo, Egypt
and Bangkok, Thailand. He is currently the head of
the theater program at Anne Arundel Community
College located in Annapolis, Md. Nathan Thomas, Ph.D., serves as director of theater at Alvernia University in Reading, Pa. His
academic focus is on Russian Theater History; and
he has studied at the Vakhtangov Theater in Moscow, Russia. Elizabeth van den Berg is Region II vice chair and
associate response circuit coordinator. As an actor
she has toured the U.S. with Oliver!, and been seen
on many D.C. stages, including Signature Theater,
Studio Theater, the Kennedy Center, and the Warner Theater. KCACTF named her a top teaching artist in 2005. She performed with Synetic Theater in
D.C. as Ugolino in Dante last spring. She received a
Gold Medallion award for her service to KCACTF
in 2006. She is an associate professor and chair of
the Theater Arts Department at McDaniel College
in Westminster, Md. Elizabeth is a proud member of
Actors’ Equity Association, AFTRA, and SAG, as
well as the Voice and Speech Trainers Association,
and is a graduate of NYU’s Tisch School of the Arts
Gradudate Acting program.
Joan E. Van Dyke holds an M.S. degree in ballet from Indiana University and an M.FA. in dance
from Arizona State University, where she performed,
taught and conducted extensive research on The Effect of Climate on Young Ballet Dancers. Van Dyke
has choreographed numerous productions for Indiana University of Pennsylvania Department of
Theater and Dance and IUP Dance Theater for the
past twelve years. She has served as vice president of
dance for the Pa. State Association of Health, Physical Education, Recreation, and Dance and is a member of the National Dance Association and Corps de
Ballet. She was awarded outstanding professional of
the year award in 2006 and was appointed ballet master for the Pennsylvania Governor’s School for the
Arts from 2001-2007. Presently, she is an associate
professor of dance at IUP and the artistic director and
director of curriculum for Van Dyke and Company
and the Mahoning Valley Ballet. She is the founder
and director of Forest Dancing and serves as assistant
director for IUP Dance Theater. Most recently, Van
Dyke was the invited guest choreographer for Darsa/
Farsa written and directed by Matko Srsen, which
premiered at the 59th anniversary of the Dubrovnik
International Festival Croatia in 2008. Mark Wade is the director of the theater arts program at Arcadia University. An actor and director,
Mark is a graduate of the Yale School of Drama in
acting and The Neighborhood Playhouse, where he
studied with Sanford Miesner. His acting and directing credits include work for The Westport Country
Playhouse, The Long Wharf Theater, and Trinity
Repertory Theater. Mark was a creative consultant
for Joanne Woodward and, with her, produced two
television movies for The Hallmark Hall of Fame. He
also had the honor of working with Lloyd Richards
and August Wilson on the Hallmark Hall of Fame
production of The Piano Lesson. Mark directed the
New York premiere of The Sirens by Darrah Cloud.
Before moving to Philadelphia, Mark taught acting
for ten years at Wesleyan University in Middletown,
Conn. He moved to Philadelphia eight years ago with
his wife, Kelly. He is the proud dad of two boys: Jamieson, age 8 and Grayson, age 6.
Douglas C. Wager currently serves as a full tenured
professor, artistic director, and head of directing for
Temple University. Prior to that, he spent several
years working in Los Angeles in film and television
after spending more than twenty years as a resident
director and producer with the renowned Arena Stage
in Washington, D.C. Wager served as Arena’s artistic
director of Arena Stage from 1991 to 1998, participating in over two hundred productions, beginning
his distinguished career there as an intern in 1974.
During his tenure, he directed over fifty plays in the
main season, including world and American premieres, and produced over sixty productions while
artistic director. For his work as a director in D.C.,
Wager has received three Helen Hayes awards and
thirteen nominations for Outstanding Director. His
copious and nationally celebrated work as a director has been seen in New York both on Broadway
and off-Brodway and regionally at major theaters
across the country such as The Mark Taper Forum,
The Guthrie Theater, Seattle Repertory Theater,
Pasadena Playhouse, and The Shakespeare Theater
in D.C., Oregon Shakespeare Festival, Yale Repertory Theater, and Washington Opera. In 2002, he was
invited to direct The Front Page as the opening production of England’s acclaimed Chichester Festival
Theater’s 40th anniversary season. For television,
Wager directed the series premier and several episodes of The Lot, produced by the AMC Network.
In the fall of 2007, Wager adapted and directed the
highly acclaimed world premiere of In Conflict for
Temple Theaters, based on the book by journalist
Yvonne Latty, In Conflict: Iraq War Veterans Speak
Out on Duty, Loss and the Fight to Stay Alive. The
show was subsequently invited to perform at the Region II Kennedy Center American College Theater
Festival, The Long Wharf Theater in New Haven,
Conn., and the Edinburgh Fringe Festival (garnering
a coveted Fringe First Award) and had its New York
Off Broadway premiere in late September of 2008,
opening the new fall season for The Culture Project. Lisa A. Wilde holds a doctorate in dramaturgy and
dramatic criticism from the Yale School of Drama.
She is the director of theater arts and an associate
professor of theater at Howard Community College.
She also works at Rep Stage in Columbia, Md., as
the resident literary manager/dramaturg. She has
worked as a dramaturg and education director at
Center Stage in Baltimore and Young Playwrights
Inc. in New York City. Lisa has also taught theater
as an adjunct at Towson University, Johns Hopkins
University, and Goucher College. She made her directorial debut at Rep Stage with Vita and Virginia
in January 2003. Gail Winar currently teaches at Kean University
and New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts
for the Lee Strasberg Institute of Acting for Stage
and Film. She also serves as a master teaching artist,
lecturer and dramaturg for the Roundabout Theater
Company on Broadway in New York City. She has
over twenty years of experience as an actress and director in regional and New York theaters and earned
her M.F.A. from the Shakespeare Theater Company’s Academy for Classical Acting at the George
Washington University. Juliet Wunsch is Region II Chair and the associate
professor of set and lighting design at West Chester
University, Pennsylvania. She has designed for the
Walnut Street Theater, Freedom Theater, Philadelphia Arts Bank, Society Hill Playhouse, Irongate
Theater, the Merriam Theater, and the Mount Gretna
Playhouse. In the academic arena, Julie has designed
lighting for the University of Delaware Professional
Theater Training Program, The University of the
Arts, and Evansville University. Prior to relocating
to the Philadelphia area, she worked extravaganzas
in Atlantic City and designed in New York, Pittsburgh, and D.C. Julie holds an M.F.A. from Carnegie Mellon University.
Chris Zaccardi, is a proud member of Actors’ Equity Association. His Broadway credits include All
Shook Up, Lestat, A Chorus Line (the new one),
Wicked, and 9 to 5: The Musical. Off-Broadway
credits include Playwrights Horizon, Theater for a
New Audience. For regional theaters, he has performed with Center Theater Group, Goodspeed Opera House, Coconut Grove Playhouse, Walt Disney
World, and the United States Marine Corps.
On Twitter
For the latest updates and to share ideas
and information ...
Offical Hash Tag: #kcactf2
On Facebook
Search for “IUP Lively Arts” for major postings.
No cell phones or texting during sessions or
performances, please!
Indiana University of Pennsylvania • January 2010
• 35
36 •
Kennedy Center American College Theater Festival • Region 2
Indiana University of Pennsylvania
ExPlorE
Your
Passion
TheaTer and dance
B.A.
Music/Music educaTion
B.A., B.S.Ed., B.F.A., M.A.
arT/arT educaTion
B.A., B.S.Ed. B.F.A., M.A., M.F.A.
I ntEr - dIScIplInAry F InE A rtS
c EntEr
turnIng
F urnIturE d ESIgn
For
And
T he L iveLy A rTs • A rTs P ATh
U niversiTy M UseUM • K iPP G ALLery
A n A ll -S teinwAy S chool
nASAD, nASM, nASt A ccr eDit eD
IUP is a member of the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education
inforMaTion
oFFIcE oF thE dEAn
collEgE oF FInE ArtS
IndIAnA unIvErSIty oF pEnnSylvAnIA
110 SprowlS hAll
IndIAnA, pEnnSylvAnIA 15705
(724) 357-2397 • www.arts.iup.edu

Similar documents