Final Program and Abstracts - International Association of

Comments

Transcription

Final Program and Abstracts - International Association of
28th World Congress of the
International Association
of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
August 22-26, 2010
Athenaeum Intercontinental - Athens, Greece
Final Programme & Abstracts
Under the auspices of the
• Ministry of National Education and Religious Affairs
• Mayor of Athens
www.ialpathens2010.gr
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics 3
Table of Contents
Page
Welcome Address..........................................................................................................................................................................................4
Message of the President of the Panhellenic Association of Logopedists...............................................................................5
Organization...................................................................................................................................................................................................6
IALP Committees...........................................................................................................................................................................................6
Congress Scientific Committee................................................................................................................................................................8
Congress Main Reports...............................................................................................................................................................................9
Social Programme...................................................................................................................................................................................... 10
Special Events.............................................................................................................................................................................................. 11
Scientific Programme
Scientific Programme Overview...................................................................................................................................................... 16
Scientific Programme, Monday, August 23rd, 2010.................................................................................................................. 23
Scientific Programme, Tuesday, August 24th, 2010.................................................................................................................. 34
Scientific Programme, Wednesday, August 25th, 2010........................................................................................................... 41
Scientific Programme, Thursday, August 26th, 2010................................................................................................................ 45
Information for Presenters................................................................................................................................................................. 52
Instructions for Poster Presentations.................................................................................................................................................. 53
Main Presenters’, Discussants’ and Moderators’ Index................................................................................................................... 54
Posters List.................................................................................................................................................................................................... 55
Congress Venue Map................................................................................................................................................................................ 66
Exhibition Plan............................................................................................................................................................................................ 67
Registration Information......................................................................................................................................................................... 68
General Information.................................................................................................................................................................................. 69
Tourist Information – Transportation in Athens – How to Get Around Athens................................................................... 71
Map of Athens............................................................................................................................................................................................. 73
Public Transportation Map...................................................................................................................................................................... 74
Abstracts (Oral Presentations)............................................................................................................................................................... 77
Abstracts (Poster Presentations).........................................................................................................................................................139
Affiliated Societies Posters....................................................................................................................................................................169
Authors’ Index............................................................................................................................................................................................177
3
4 28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
Welcome Address
Dear Colleagues,
It is a great honour and privilege to hold the 28th International Congress of the International Association of
Logopedists and Phoniatrics (IALP), in Athens Greece.
IALP is the oldest organization representing persons involved with scientific, educational and professional
issues related to communication, language, voice, speech, hearing and swallowing disorders and sciences in
children and adults. IALP was founded in Vienna, Austria, by Dr Emil Froeschels, in 1924. Our members are in more
than 55 countries around the world. IALP holds its scientific congresses every three years. It is the first time that
the IALP Congress is coming to Athens, in a vibrant city with great history, and many places of interest.
The Organizing Committee and the Panhellenic Association of Logopedics have chosen as the philosophy for
the Congress to be:
“Where the sciences of communication meet the art and culture”
This reflects our philosophy that the Congress has three dimensions: sciences, art and culture.
The dimension of sciences departs from our objective that the congress is a strong meeting point for worldwide
clinicians, professionals and scientists in communication, voice, speech, language, audiology and swallowing
sciences and disorders.
The dimensions of art and culture will be met through the cultural and social activities that are planned
including a visit to the Acropolis.
The aim is to host a meeting with a very high scientific quality while the participants will enjoy the traditional
Greek hospitality in the capital of Democracy.
Mara Behlau Ilias Papathanasiou
IALP President
President of 28th IALP Congress
IALP Vice President
Chair of Organizing Committee of 28th IALP Congress
4
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics 5
Message of the President
of the Panhellenic Association of Logopedists
Dear Colleagues,
On behalf of the Governing Board and all the members of the Panhellenic Association of Logopedists (PΑL) I
welcome you to the 28th International Conference of IALP. It is our honor and great joy to host you in Greece.
Despite the difficult situation at the global level, it is our pleasure to have such distinguished scholars in the
field of speech and language pathology come to participate in this conference. Your presentations at the various
sessions will offer great value to this event.
The mission and role of PΑL from its formative stages to its present form is the exchange of scientific information
and the sharing of research results through the on-going interaction of its practitioners. In our country, the
ultimate goal is to reach the highest level of professionalism in the field which we are still striving to achieve.
We believe that the unique opportunity this conference presents will not only benefit the specialists but
ultimately the members of the public to be served by our profession.
We thank all those who are here to support and enrich this gathering, including members of the audience.
We are also grateful to the Governing Board of IALP, as well as, to members of the scientific committee and
the organizing committee of the Conference. To each of you we acknowledge the tireless efforts that went into
planning this special event.
Our best wishes to the success of the 28th IALP International Conference.
Konstandinos Rogas
President, Panhellenic Association of Logopedists
5
6 28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
Organization
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE IALP 2007-2010
President: Mara Behlau
President Elect: Tanya Gallagher
Immediate Past President: Dolores E. Battle
Vice President: Ilias Papathanasiou
Secretary: Helen Grech
Treasurer: Herman F. M. Peters
IALP BOARD AT LARGE
Per-Åke Lindestad (Sweden)
Tadeus Nawka (Germany)
Maurizio Accordi (Italy)
Li-Rong Lilly Cheng (USA)
Seiji Niimi (Japan)
Anu Klippi (Finland)
Bruce Murdoch (Australia)
Heila Joardaan (South Africa)
Philippe Paquier (Belgium)
Irma Verdonck-de Leeuw (Netherlands)
IALP Office Manager
Natascha Looyé
CONGRESS EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE
Chair: Ilias Papathanasiou (Greece)
Executive Committee Members: Athena Frangouli
(Greece), Georgia Kolintza (Greece)
LOCAL ORGANIZING COMMITTEE
Anastasia Archonti Ioanna Karavaggeli
Alexandra Aroni Nikos Litinas
Irini Drosou Vanessa Loupeli
Athanasios Bibas
Irini Moschopoulou
Nantia Karanziou
Victoria Sakellariou
Aggeliki Karantoni
Georgia Theodorou
IALP COMMITTEES
Alternative/Augmentative Communication (AAC)
Committee
Chair: Judith Montgomery (USA)
Committee Members
Martine Smith (Ireland), Permelia McCain (USA),
Gonda Pickl (Austria)
6
Aphasia Committee
Chair: Philippe Paquier - (Belgium)
Committee Members
Fofi Constandinidou (Cyprus)
Kimberley Docking (Australia)
Frances Gibson (Northern Ireland)
Yves Joanette (Canada)
Anu Klippi (Finland)
Leonard La Pointe (USA)
Helena Leheckova (Finland)
Ilias Papathanasiou (Greece)
Luise Springer (Germany)
Alessandro Tavano (Italy)
Audiology Committee
Chair: Katrin Neumann (Germany)
Committee Members
Peter Alberti (Canada)
Xingkuan Bu (China)
Renata Mota Mamede de Carvallo (Brazil)
Corina Farfán-Reyes (Chile)
Gilbert Herer (USA)
Kajsa-Mia Holgers (Sweden)
Sebastian Hoth (Germany)
Branka Mikic (Serbia)
Raghunath Rao Rangasayee (India)
Anu Sharma (USA)
Somaia Tawfik (Egypt)
Child Language Committee
Chair: Roswitha Romonath (Germany)
Committee Members
Sara Eyal (Israel)
Ana Luiza Navas (Brazil)
Leonor Scliar Cabral (Brazil)
Carol F. Westby (USA)
Yvette D. Hyter (USA)
Dysphagia Committee
Chair: Kenneth L. Watkin (USA)
Committee Members
Jeri A. Logemann (USA)
Alison Perry (Australia)
Heidrun Schröter-Morasch (Germany)
Irma Verdonck – de Leeuw (The Netherlands)
Antonio Schindler (Italy)
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
Educational Committee for Speech Language
Pathology
Chair: Lilly Cheng Li-Rong (USA)
Committee Members
Dolores Battle (USA)
Chantrain Hilde, (Belgium)
Dobrinka Georgieva (Bulgaria)
Helen Grech (Malta)
Kyoko A. Iitaka (Japan)
Margaret M. Leahy (Ireland)
Matti Lehtihalmes (Finland)
Fernanda Miranda (Brazil)
Educational Committee for Phoniatrics
Chair: Nasser Kotby (Egypt)
Motor Speech Disorders Committee
Chair: Bruce Murdoch (Australia)
Committee Members
Pamela Enderby (UK)
Lena Hartelius (Sweden)
Ben Maassen (The Netherlands)
Malcolm McNeil (USA)
Angela Morgan (Australia)
Michael Robb (New Zealand)
Gwen van Nuffelen (Belgium)
Tara Whitehill (China)
Multilingual Affairs Committee
Chair: Marion Fredman (Israel)
Committee Members
Per Åke Lindestad (Sweden)
Tadeus Nawka (Germany)
Erkki A. Vilkman (Finland)
Committee Members
Barbara Dodd (Australia)
Brian Goldstein (USA)
Yvette Hus (Canada)
Heila Jordaan (South Africa)
Fluency Committee
Chair: Hans-Georg Bosshardt (Germany)
Public Relations Committee
Chair: Lynn Goldberg (USA)
Committee Members
Claudia d’Andrade (Brazil)
Michael Blomgren (USA)
Veronique Boucand (France)
Frances M. Cook (Great Britain)
Kurt Eggers (Belgium)
Steen Fibiger (Denmark)
Ann Packman (Australia)
Yoko Wakaba (Japan)
Committee Members
Kathy L. Coufal (USA)
Bent Kjaer (Denmark)
History Committee
Chair: Margaret M. Leahy (Ireland)
Committee Members
Judith F. Duchan (USA)
Nasser Kotby (Egypt)
Harm K. Schutte (The Netherlands)
Marjorie Perlman Lorch (UK)
Scientific Journal Affairs Committee
Chair: Harm K. Schutte (The Netherlands)
Committee Members
Manfred Gross (Germany)
Matti Lethihalmes (Finland)
Voice Committee
Chair: Jan Svec (Czech Republic)
Committee Members
Ofer Amir (Israel)
Aliaa Ali Khidr (USA)
Anne-Maria Laukkanen (Finland)
Estella Ma (Hong Kong)
Jennifer Oates (Australia)
Edwin Yiu (Hong Kong)
Eiji Yumoto (Japan)
7
8
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
CONGRESS SCIENTIFIC COMMITTEE
Alternative and
Augmentative Communication
Judith Montgomery (USA)
Martine Smith (Ireland)
Gonda Pickl (Austria)
Aphasia
Philippe Paquier (Belgium)
Luise Springer (Germany)
Fofi Constandinidou (Cyprus)
Kimberley Docking (Australia)
Audiology
Katrin Neumann (Germany)
Peter Alberti (Canada)
Sebastian Hoth (Germany)
Xingkuan Bu (China)
Athanasios Bibas (Greece)
Child Language
Roswitha Romonath (Germany)
Annette V. Fox (Germany)
Ana Luiza Navas (Brazil)
Dysphagia
Kenneth L. Watkin (USA)
Jeri A. Logemann (USA)
Alison Perry (Australia)
Education for Speech Language Pathology
Lilly Cheng Li-Rong (USA)
Helen Grech (Malta)
Hilde Chantrain (Belgium)
Fluency
Hans-George Bosshardt (Germany)
Kurt Eggers (Belgium)
Margaret Leahy (Ireland)
Frances Cook (UK)
Motor Speech Disorders
Bruce Murdoch (Australia)
Michael Robb (New Zealand)
Pamela Enderby (UK)
Gwen van Nuffelen (Belgium)
Multilingual Affairs
Marion Fredman (Israel)
Barbara Dodd (Australia)
Heila Jordaan (South Africa)
Educational Committee for phoniatrics
Mohamed Nasser Kotby (Egypt)
Per Ake Lindestad (Sweden)
Tadeus Nawka (Germany)
Frances Fook
Voice
Jan Svec (Czech Republic)
Aliaa Ali Khidr (USA)
Jennifer Oates (Australia)
Edwin Yiu (Hong Kong)
Eiji Yumoto (Japan)
The 28th World Congress of IALP Takes Place with the Support of the following
Association of Greek Speech Pathologists - Speech Therapists
Association of Psychology & Psychiatry for Adults & Children
Department of Speech & Language Therapy, Technological Educational Institute (T.E.I.) of Patras
Department of Speech & Language Therapy, Technological Educational Institute (T.E.I.) of Epirus
Greek Society of Phoniatrics and Swallowing Disorders
Hellenic Association of Ergotherapists
Hellenic Psychiatric Association
Hellenic Society of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
Hellenic Society of Physical & Rehabilitation Medicine
Institute for Language and Speech Processing
Panhellenic Physical Therapy Association
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics 9
Congress Main Reports
MONDAY, AUGUST 23rd, 2010
NEUROPLASTICITY – PLASTICITY IN THE HUMAN MOTOR
SYSTEM
John C. Rothwell, UK
Abstract: It is well recognized that the number and effectiveness of synapses in the adult brain change in response to learning and that similar processes contribute to the restoration of
function after central nervous system damage. It is possible
to use non-invasive methods of brain stimulation in humans
(transcranial magnetic stimulation or transcranial direct current
stimulation) to study and even manipulate these processes. Initial studies are now underway to test whether modification of
synaptic plasticity by neurostimulation can improve the recovery of motor function in patients after stroke.
MAIN REPORT 1
Main Presenter
John Rothwell, PhD
Professor of Human Neurophysiology, Institute of Neurology, London,
UK
Discussants
Philippe Paquier, PhD
Service de Neurologie, Hôpital Universitaire Erasme ULB, Bruxelles,
BELGIUM
Lorraine Ramig, PhD
Department of Speech Language and Hearing Sciences, University of
Colorado, Boulder, USA
TUESDAY, AUGUST 24th, 2010
THE COMPLEXITY OF SOCIAL/CULTURAL DIMENSION IN
COMMUNICATION DISORDERS
Travis T. Threats, USA
Abstract: There has been growing recognition in the field of
communication disorders concerning the importance of multicultural and diversity issues. This discussion needs to move
beyond the theoretical and descriptive stage to the clinical use
of this knowledge to improve the communicative functioning
of diverse populations. This paper argues that the tenets of
evidence-based practice and the International Classification
of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) by the World Health
Organization can be used to advance the scholarship and service concerning diversity issues. Both evidence-based practice
and the ICF are client-based approaches that can facilitate the
achievement of culturally relevant rehabilitation outcomes. This
article discusses the use of evidence-based practice and the ICF
for providing assessment and intervention that address the so-
MAIN REPORT 2
cial and cultural complexities of the persons we serve. In addition, the author states that work on diversity issues can also be
used to discover crucial underlying knowledge regarding communication and communication disorders.
Main Presenter
Travis T. Threats, PhD
Professor and Chair Department of Communication Sciences and
Disorders,
Saint Louis University, St. Louis, USA
Discussants
Linda Worrall, PhD
Department Speech Pathology & Audiology, University of
Queensland, Brisbane, AUSTRALIA
Judith F. Duchan, PhD
Department of Communicative Disorders and Sciences. University at
Buffalo, Buffalo, NY, USA
THURSDAY, AUGUST 26th, 2010
AUTISM – DEVELOPMENTAL APPROACHES TO
UNDERSTANDING AND TREATING AUTISM
Tony Charman, UK
Abstract: Over the past decade our understanding of early social communication development in young children with autism has undergone a remarkable change. We now know something about how young children with autism process the social
world in a very different way from typical children. This has led
to truly developmental models of autism. In turn, these have
had profound impacts on research and practice. Several screening instruments to prospectively identify autism have been developed. In some cases autism can be diagnosed in children as
young as 2 years of age. The study of ‘high-risk’ siblings has allowed prospective study of infants from as young as 6 months
of age. There is increasing evidence that intervention approach-
MAIN REPORT 3
es that focus on social and communication development can
ameliorate symptoms and change the developmental course of
the disorder. This article will highlight some of the key theoretical and clinical lessons learned from this decade of research.
Main Presenter
Tony Charman, PhD
Chair in Autism Education, Department of Psychology and Human
Development, Institute of Education, London, UNITED KINGDOM
Discussants
Herbert Roeyers, PhD
Ghent University, Department of Experimental Clinical and Health
Psychology
Developmental Disorders, Ghent, BELGIUM
Ioannis Vogindroukas, PhD
Child Psychiatry Unit, Psychiatric Hospital, Thessaloniki, GREECE
9
10 28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
Social Programme
CONGRESS EXCURSION: ATHENS SIGHTSEEING
TOUR, August 25th, 2010, 08.30-12.00 hrs
Coast Address: 18, Konstantinos Karamanlis Ave., Voula,
Athens - Greece
(Cost is included in the registration fee, for participants
and accompanying persons)
CONGRESS CONCERT – August 23rd, 2010, 21.30 hrs
This tour is an opportunity to observe the striking
contrasts that make Athens such a fascinating city.
Our expert guides will take you round the city centre
to see the Constitution Square (Syntagma), the House
of Parliament, the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier and
some fine examples of the 19th century neoclassical
architecture which include the Athens Academy, the
Athens University Lecture Hall and finally the National
Library. Then, while driving down Herod Atticus Street,
you will see the President of Democracy guards called
“Evzones” in their traditional uniforms in front of the
Presidential Palace. On your way to Acropolis, you
will see the Panatheinaikon Stadium (where the first
Olympic Games of modern times were held in 1896),
the Temple of Olympian Zeus and Hadrian B’s Gate.
During our ascent of the Acropolis hill, we will have
the opportunity to visit the architectural masterpieces
of the Golden Age of Athens: Propylea, the Temple of
Athena Nike, Erechtheion and, finally, Parthenon the
monument that “puts order in the mind” and where
“mind and matter is in perfect harmony”. Then we will
visit the New Acropolis Museum with its magnificent
architecture which hosts some of the findings of
the Acropolis hill recent excavations as well as its
permanent collection of classical antiquities.
CONGRESS DINNER, August 25th, 2010, 21.00 hrs
Cost per person, for Congress Dinner only, € 85
Congress Dinner and Concert ticket, €100
“COAST ” is an idyllic cottage, built by the sea,
offering a spectacular view of the surrounding coastal
area of Saronikos Gulf.
We will depart from the hotel at 19.15 and will drive
along the Athenian coastal line. When we get to the
venue you will be offered a welcome drink and enjoy
the magnificent sunset view, this wonderful venue
offers. Later on you will enjoy your dinner while a D. J
will be providing music for your entertainment. As the
night will proceed and the full moon will be high on
the sky the climax of the event will be the chance to
dance to the rhythm of Greek and International popular
songs until late hours. Coaches will start leaving from
the restaurant at 23.30 hours and there will be a new
departure every 30 minutes in order to get you back
the Intercontinental Hotel
Dress code: Business Smart
Buses will depart from hotel Athenaeum Intercontinental
at 19.15 hrs
10
Mimis Plessas in “THE POWER OF VOICE THROUGH
SINGING”
Single Concert ticket Price €30
Gala Dinner and Concert ticket at €100
Supplement for the already paid gala dinner €15
On Monday, August 23, 2010, we will hold a
concert to celebrate the 28th World Congress of
the International Association of
Logopedics & Phoniatrics at the
Theater Veakio in Piraeus Port, for all the
congress participants, but also for a few
Greeks spectators that will want to be
part of the event.
Wishing to present the power of
voice through a show purely based on
Greek culture and music, the Congress
Organizing Committee has chosen the main theme of
the concert to be entitled «The power voice through
singing». To meet its objectives the Congress the
Organisers have invited the great Greek composer,
Mimis Plessas to feature his music and songs from a
large repertoire from all kinds of music (arias, musicals,
jazz and popular songs) that have been translated into
many languages worldwide and performed by well
known artists all over the world.
The performers that will sing at the concert come
from Greece’s classical, musical, jazz and popular music
scene, so as the leading actors participating. The concert
features in alphabetical order the following artists:
Dakis, Klaudia Delmer, Sonia Theodoridou, Fide
Koksal, Zoe Kouroukli, Spyros Kleissas, Nina Lotsari,
Kostas Macedonas, Bessie Malfa, Maria Markesini,
Anastasia Moutsatsou, Panagiotis Petrakis.
The «Children’s Choir of Spyros Lambrou» will
also be performing at the concert, accompanied by
an excellent 10-member orchestra and the ensemble
«3G’S», Mimis Plessas’ jazz group.
The program includes the finest and most beloved
songs of Mimis Plessas, which will be sung in Greek
language and also in English, French, Italian,
German, Spanish, Turkish and Brazilian Portuguese
languages, in order to represent the many cultures and
languages involved in such a global event as the 28th
World Congress of the International Association of
Logopedics & PHONIATRICS!
BE THERE!!
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics 11
Special Events
ASHA Sponsored Symposium
The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA), an Affiliate Society member of IALP, is excited to
partner with the IALP to sponsor a symposium on Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) on 26th of August, following
the main report on Autism.
With funding from the National Institute for Deafness and Communication Disorders, five doctoral students
and two post docs were provided international travel awards. Additionally, international faculty representing 5
different regions of the globe were invited to participate in this event. Each travel awardee submitted applications
that included research proposals in the area of ASD and poster presentations at the IALP. The international faculty
will be paired with a travel awardee as a mentor. This is an exciting collaborative effort between ASHA and the
organizing committee of the 2010 IALP World Congress in August. This event offers an unique opportunity for the
participants to engage in networking and exchanges of research and clinical practice information with colleagues
from a myriad of countries across the globe.
This will be a wonderful and culturally rich educational experience for professionals in Communication Sciences
and Disorders!
THURSDAY 26/8/2010
11.30-13.00 SY14A
Moderators: McNeilly L. (USA), Kotsopoulos A. (Greece)
SY14A.2 SUPPORTING STUDENTS WITH AUTISM SPECTRUM DISORDERS: CHALLENGES AND DIFFICULTIES ON
THE ROAD TO INCLUSION
Sin K. F.*, (Hong Kong)
ASHA SPONSORED SYMPOSIUM: AUTISM
Moderators: McNeilly L. (USA), Kotsopoulos A. (Greece)
SY14B.1 CATTLE PRODS TO CHELATION-NAVIGATING THE MAZE OF AUTISM INTERVENTIONS AND THE ROLE
OF EVIDENCE BASED PRACTICE AND SPEECH LANGUAGE PATHOLOGY IN EARLY INTERVENTION FOR
CHILDREN WITH AUTISM
Roberts J.M.A.*, (Australia)
SY14B.2 JOINT CONSTRUCTION OF STORIES BY HIGH-FUNCTIONING CHILDREN WITH ASD, USING
TECHNOLOGICAL SETTING DESIGNED TO ENHANCE PEER INTERACTION
Yifat Rachel*, Kupersmitt J., Gal E., Bauminger N, Weiss P. L. T, Stock O., Zancanaro M., Pianesi F., (Israel)
16.00-17.30 SY14C
ASHA SPONSORED SYMPOSIUM: AUTISM
Fernandes Fernanda*, (Brazil)
BALLROOM III
SY14A.1 ASSESSING LANGUAGE THERAPY RESULTS IN ADOLESCENTS OF THE AUTISM SPECTRUM
14.00-15.30 SY14B
11.30-17.30
ASHA SPONSORED SYMPOSIUM: AUTISM
Moderators: McNeilly L. (USA), Kotsopoulos A. (Greece)
SY14C.1 GLOBAL PERSPECTIVES IN ASD: SUMMATION AND NEXT STEPS
Watson L. R.*, (USA)
11
12
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
THURSDAY 26/8/2010
10.30-11.30
PREFUNCTION BALLROOM
POSTER SESSIONS
P147
ALLIED HEALTH CARE PROVIDERS’ ROLE IN SCREENING FOR AUTISM SPECTRUM DISORDERS
Self T.*, Coufal K.L., Parhan D.F., (United States)
P148
The Nature of Verbal Communication Interactions with Toddlers in Child Care
McMillan J.K.*, Dyson A. T., Yssel N., (United States)
P150
A PRELIMINARY INVESTIGATION OF EYE-GAZE PATTERNS ON FAST-MAPPING ABILITIES OF CHILDREN WITH AUTISM
SPECTRUM DISORDER
Crumrine D.*, Self T., (United States)
P152
THE USE (OR NOT) OF PROSODY DURING SENTENCE COMPREHENSION IN CHILDREN WITH ASD
Kjelgaard-Rockcastle M.*, Geiser E., Gabrieli J., (United States)
P189
A CULTURALLY RESPONSIVE INTERVENTION PROGRAM FOR PRESCHOOLERS WITH AUTISM USING A PLAY-BASED FAMILY
SYSTEMS MODEL
Brown J.C. (USA)
P190
Word learning in children with autism: The role of attention
Bean A.*, McGregor K., (USA)
P191
peech-Language Pathologists Knowledge of Autism Spectrum Disorders and Applied Behavior
S
Analysis: A Survey
Ray J.M.*, (USA)
13
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
AFFILIATED SOCIETIES DAY
On behalf of the IALP, I am pleased to announce the first Affiliated Society Day to be held at the 28th World
Congress in Athens. The IALP has 53 affiliated societies on 5 continents representing over 250,000 professionals
concerned with communication sciences and disorders. Together they form a strong network of professionals
committed to improving communication for all.
To celebrate the importance of the affiliated societies to the IALP, the 28th IALP World Congress will host the first
Affiliated Society Day on August 25th, 2010. Members of the 53 Affiliated Societies have been invited to display
posters highlighting the work of their associations and the important issues in communication sciences and
disorders in their countries. Then they will be invited to a special reception honoring the affiliated societies for the
work that they do around the globe for persons with human communication disorders.
Please join us in recognizing the work of the affiliated societies and their commitment to human communication
sciences and disorders.
Dolores E Battle
Past President. IALP
List of Affiliated Society Day Invited posters
Australia Speech Pathology Australia
Belgium Vlaamse Vereniging voor Logopedisten Belgium (VVL)
Brazil Sociedade Brasileira de Fonoaudiologica
Canada Canadian Association of Speech-Language Pathologists and Audiologists (CASLPA)
Denmark Audiologopaedisk Forening - Denmark (ALF)
Egypt Egyptian Society for Phoniatrics and Logopedics
Germany Deutsche Gesellschaft für Sprachheilpädagogik e.V.
Germany Deutscher Bundesverband für Logopadie e.V.
Greece Panhellenic Association of Logopedics
Greece Association of Scientists of Speech Pathology and Speech Therapy of Greece
Ireland The Irish Association of Speech and Language Therapists (IASLT)
Japan
Japan Society of Logopedics and Phoniatrics (JSLP)
Lithuania Lithuanian Logopedic Association
Malta Malta Association of Speech and Language Pathologists
New Zealand New Zealand Speech Language Therapists Association
Poland Phoniatric Section of the Polish ENT Society
Portugal Associacao Portuguesa de Terapeutas da Fala
Russia The Russian Public Academy of Voice
Slovenia
Slovenian Association of Logopedics (Drustvo Logopedov Slovenije – DlogS)
Sweden Swedish Association of Phoniatrics and Logopedics (SFFL)
The Netherlands Nederlandse Vereniging voor Logopedie en Foniatrie (NVLF)
Taiwan The Speech-Language-Hearing Association of the Republic of China
USA American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA)
Aknowledgements
The Organizers wish to express sincere thanks to the following sponsors,
for their contribution to the success of the IALP 2010
• ATOS MEDICAL AB
• Cubysoft - Software Development
• Interamerican
• KayPentax
• Myofunctional Research Company
• Parisianou S.A.
• S&B Industrial Minerals S.A.
• SETON HALL UNIVERSITY
14
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics Scientific
Programme
Overview
15
BALLROOM I
BALLROOM II
BALLROOM III
YPSILON 1, 2, 3
YPSILON 4, 5
FP19: FREE
PRESENTATIONS
ON CHILD
LANGUAGE
SSY01: SHORT
SYMPOSIUM:
Supervised
Practice in
SLP Education
- A Brazilian
Experience
FP16: FREE
PRESENTATIONS:
Child language
FP20: FREE
SE02: SEMINAR ON
PRESENTATIONS: ALTERNATIVE AND
Hearing
AUGMENTATIVE
impairement COMMUNICATION
Child language
SS01: SHORT
SEMINARS:
Communication
disorders in adults
17.45-19.15
SS02: SHORT
SEMINAR
VOICE
FP05: FREE
PRESENTATIONS:
Language tests in
Greece
THETA-SIGMADELTA
SS03: SHORT
SEMINARS ON
MOTOR SPEECH
DISORDERS IN
CHILDREN
FP17: FREE
PRESENTATIONS:
Child language
FP21: FREE
PRESENTATION ON
MOTOR SPEECH
DISORDERS
FP17A: FREE
PRESENTATION ON
MOTOR SPEECH
DISORDERS
SY04B: IALP MOTOR
SPEECH DISORDERS
COMMITTEE
SYMPOSIUM (Part II)
FP08: FREE
FP09: FREE
FP10: FREE
FP11: FREE
SY04A: IALP MOTOR
PRESENTATIONS PRESENTATIONS: PRESENTATIONS: PRESENTATIONS: SPEECH DISORDERS
ON FLUENCY
ICF model in
Multicultural issues Child language
COMMITTEE
communication
SYMPOSIUM (Part I)
disorders
FP15: FREE
FP14: FREE
SY05:
PRESENTATIONS PRESENTATIONS:
SYMPOSIUM:
SLP Clinical
ON CHILD
Global Literacy:
Practice
LANGUAGE
The role of
AND SPEECH
phonological
DISORDERS
awareness in
striving for early
reading success for
all children
SSY001: SHORT
SYMPOSIUM ON
CHILD LANGUAGE
SY03B: IALP
CHILD LANGUAGE
COMMITTEE
SYMPOSIUM:
(Part II)
BREAK
FP13: FREE
PRESENTATIONS:
Aphasia and related
communication
disorders
SE01:
SEMINAR ON
VOICE
OMEGA
FP01: FREE
FP02: FREE
FP03: FREE
FP04: FREE
SY03A: IALP
CHILD LANGUAGE PRESENTATIONS PRESENTATIONS: PRESENTATIONS: PRESENTATIONS:
ON FLUENCY
Education in SLP Multicultural issues Alternative and
COMMITTEE
Augmentative
SYMPOSIUM:
Communication
Language and
literacy in School Age - Children and
Adolescents (Part I)
16.00-17.30
SY02B:
IALP VOICE
COMMITTEE
SYMPOSIUM:
PART II
SY02A:
IALP VOICE
COMMITTEE
SYMPOSIUM:
PART I
COFFEE BREAK
FP07: FREE
PRESENTATIONS ON
APHASIA
SY01: IALP Aphasia
Committee
Symposium:"Diagnostic
and Therapeutic
Intervention
Approaches to Acquired
Neurogenic Language
and Communication
Disorders"
VIP LOUNGE
COFFEE BREAK / POSTER SESSION (P001-P057)
15.30-16.00
14.00-15.30
13.00-14.00
11.30-13.00
10.30-11.30
08.30-10.30 MR01: Main report: NEUROPLASTICITY - PLASTICITY IN THE HUMAN MOTOR SYSTEM
TIME M O N D AY 2 3 r d A U G U S T 2 0 1 0
FP22: FREE
PRESENTATIONS:
VOICE
FP18: FREE
PRESENTATIONS
ON VOICE
FP12: FREE
PRESENTATIONS:
Child language
FP06: FREE
PRESENTATIONS:
Child language
OMIKRON
BALLROOM I BALLROOM II
BALLROOM III YPSILON 1,2,3
YPSILON 4, 5
16.00-17.30
15.30-16.00
14.00-15.30
13.00-14.00
11.30-13.00
10.30-11.30
FP23: FREE
PRESENTATIONS:
Child Motor
Speech Disorders
FP32: FREE
PRESENTATIONS ON
VOICE
SS04: SHORT
SEMINAR ON
FLUENCY
SS05: SHORT
SEMINARS ON
MOTOR SPEECH
DISORDERS
FP27: FREE
SY06B: IALP
PRESENTATIONS:
FLUENCY
Child Language
COMMITTEE
SYMPOSIUM:
Treatment DecisionMaking in stuttering:
The THREE W's
(Whether, When,
What)( Part II)
SY06A: IALP
FLUENCY
COMMITTEE
SYMPOSIUM:
Assessment
Framework with
People who stutter
( Part I)
VIP LOUNGE
SS06: SHORT SEMINAR:
Auditory event-related
potentials as a measure
of central auditory
processing
SY10: IALP AUDIOLOGY
COMMITTEE
SYMPOSIUM: Assessing
and Treating a Hearing
Loss Appropriately:
Practical Know-How
for Phoniatricians and
Logopedists
SY07: IALP AUDIOLOGY
COMMITTEE
SYMPOSIUM: The WHO
Team for prevention
of Deafness & Hearing
Impairment, the
WorldWideHearingGroup
and the Global Burden
of Disease Hearing
Loss Group work on
the improvement fo
quality of life of hearing
impaired people
SY09A: IALP
EDUCATION IN
SLP COMMITTEE
SYMPOSIUM Educating
SLP's for the Global
Community (PART I)
SY09B: IALP
EDUCATION IN
SLP COMMITTEE
SYMPOSIUM Educating
SLP's for the Global
Community (PART II)
SE03: SEMINAR
ON DYSPHAGIA
SE04: SEMINAR
ON EDUCATION
FOR SPEECH
AND LANGUAGE
PATHOLOGY
COFFEE BREAK
SS03A: SHORT
SEMINAR ON
DYSPHAGIA
FP28: FREE
PRESENTATIONS:
DYSPHAGIA
BREAK
SY08: IALP
DYSPHAGIA
COMMITTEE
SYMPOSIUM:
Current topics in
Dysphagia and
Management
OMEGA
OMIKRON
SE05: SEMINAR ON
CHILD LANGUAGE
FP29: FREE
PRESENTATIONS:
Voice
SE06: SEMINAR ON VOICE
FP30: FREE
PRESENTATIONS: CHILD
LANGUAGE
FP25: FREE
PRESENTATIONS: Oral
motor skills and their
disorders
SS07: SHORT
SEMINAR:
Voice evaluation
Protocol in
Greek
SSY03: SHORT
SYMPOSIUM ON
VOICE
FP31: FREE
PRESENTATIONS:
VOICE
SSY02: IALP AAC
FP26: FREE
FP24: FREE
COMITTEE SYMPOSIUM: PRESENTATIONS:
PRESENTATIONS:
Assessment, Intervention
VOICE
Communication
disorders in genetic and Educational Programs
syndromes and
other medical
conditions
COFFEE BREAK / POSTER SESSION (P058-P125)
08.30-10.30 MR02: Main report: THE COMPLEXITY OF SOCIAL/CULTURAL DIMENSION IN COMMUNICATION DISORDERS
TIME T U E S D AY 2 4 t h A U G U S T 2 0 1 0
BALLROOM I
BALLROOM II
BALLROOM III
18.00 GENERAL ASSEMBLY
16.00-17.30 SE10: SEMINAR
SE11:
ON EDUCATION SEMINAR ON
FOR SPEECH
MULTILINGUAL
AND LANGUAGE
AFFAIRS
PATHOLOGY
15.00-16.00 SE12: SEMINAR ON
MOTOR SPEECH
DISORDERS
13.30-15.00 SE08: SEMINAR
SY11:
FP33: FREE
ON EDUCATION SYMPOSIUM
PRESENTATIONS:
FOR SPEECH
ON
COGNITIVE LINGUISTIC
AND LANGUAGE MULTILINGUAL
IMPAIRMENTS
PATHOLOGY
AFFAIRS
TIME 08.30-12.00 CONFERENCE EXCURSION
FP35: FREE
PRESENTATIONS: VOICE
YPSILON 4,5
SY13: IALP HISTORY
COMMITTEE SYMPOSIUM
SE13: SEMINAR ON
CHILD LANGUAGE
COFFEE BREAK
FP34: FREE
PRESENTATIONS:
DYSPHAGIA
YPSILON 1,2,3
VIP LOUNGE
SE14: SEMINAR ON
AUDIOLOGY
SY12: IALP PUBLIC
RELATIONS COMMITTEE
SYMPOSIUM: Marketing our
Professions
W E D N E S D AY 2 5 t h A U G U S T 2 0 1 0
SS10: SHORT
SEMINAR ON
CHILD LANGUAGE
SSY04: SHORT
SYMPOSIUM:The
language
development of
prematurely born
children
SE09: SEMINAR
ON MOTOR
SPEECH
DISORDERS
OMEGA
SS09: SHORT
SEMINAR ON
ALTERNATIVE AND
AUGMENTATIVE
COMMUNICATION
SS08: SHORT
SEMINAR ON
EDUCATION
FOR SPEECH
AND LANGUAGE
PATHOLOGY
THETA-SIGMADELTA
17.30
16.00-17.30
15.30-16.00
14.00-15.30
13.00-14.00
11.30-13.00
10.30-11.30 08.30-10.30
TIME BALLROOM II
BALLROOM III
YPSILON 1,2,3
YPSILON 4, 5
AUGUST 2010
FP46: FREE
PRESENTATIONS ON
VOICE
CLOSING
CEREMONY
SSY06: SHORT
SYMPOSIUM ON
CHILD LANGUAGE
FP43: FREE
PRESENTATIONS:
Aphasia
and Related
Communication
Disorders
FP45: FREE
PRESENTATIONS
ON DYSPHAGIA &
PHONIATRICS
FP39: FREE
PRESENTATIONS ON
DYSPAGIA
SE16: SEMINAR ON
DYSPHAGIA
COFFEE BREAK
FP44: FREE
PRESENTATIONS ON
AUDIOLOGY
BREAK
FP38: FREE
PRESENTATIONS ON
AUDIOLOGY
SY14C: ASHA
SE15: SEMINAR ON
SPONSORED
MULTILINGUAL AFFAIRS
SYMPOSIUM AUTISM
SY14B: ASHA
SPONSORED
SYMPOSIUM: AUTISM
FP36: FREE
FP37: FREE
SY14A: ASHA
PRESENTATIONS ON PRESENTATIONS ON
SPONSORED
VOICE
APHASIA
SYMPOSIUM: AUTISM
FP42: FREE
PRESENTATIONS ON
VOICE
VIP LOUNGE
SE17: SEMINAR ON
VOICE
SS12: SHORT
SEMINARS ON VOICE
FP40: FREE
PRESENTATIONS:
CHILD LANGUAGE
COFFEE BREAK / POSTER SESSION (P126-P191)
MR03: Main report: AUTISM - DEVELOPMENTAL APPROACHES TO UNDERSTANDING AND TREATING AUTISM
BALLROOM I
T H U R S D AY 2 6 t h
SE18: SEMINAR
ON VOICE
SS14: SHORT
SEMINAR ON
VOICE
SS13: SHORT
SEMINAR ON
PHONIATRICS
SS11: SHORT
SEMINAR
ON CHILD
LANGUAGE
SSY05: SHORT
SYMPOSIUM:
The
psychological
impact of
stuttering
OMEGA
SS17: SHORT
SEMINAR ON
ALTERNATIVE AND
AUGMENTATIVE
COMMUNICATION
SS16: SHORT
SEMINAR ON
EDUCATION
FOR SPEECH
AND LANGUAGE
PATHOLOGY
SS15: SHORT
SEMINARS ON
EDUCATION
FOR SPEECH
AND LANGUAGE
PATHOLOGY
IALP COMMITTEES
CHAIRS MEETING
FP41: FREE
PRESENTATIONS ON
VOICE
OMIKRON
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics Scientific
Programme
August 23 - August 26, 2010
21
Main Report - MR
Symposium – SY
Short Symposium – SSY
Seminar - SE
Short Seminar – SS
Free presentation - FP
Codes marked with letters A, B, and C after their numbering
indicate continuous sessions on the same topic
Names marked with an asterisc (*) are presenting authors
23
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
Monday 23/8/2010
08.30-10.30
MONDAY 23/8/2010
BALLROOM I, ii, iii
08.30-10.30 MR01
NEUROPLASTICITY – PLASTICITY IN THE HUMAN MOTOR SYSTEM
Main Presenter: John Rothwell, PhD
Discussants: Philippe Paquier, PhD
Moderators: Murdoch B. (Australia), Papathanasiou I. (Greece)
Professor of Human Neurophysiology, Institute of Neurology, London, UK
Service de Neurologie, Hôpital Universitaire Erasme ULB, Bruxelles, BELGIUM
Lorraine Ramig, PhD
Department of Speech Language and Hearing Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder, USA
MONDAY 23/8/2010
10.30-11.30
10.30-11.30
PREFUNCTION BALLROOM
POSTER SESSION P001-P057
MONDAY 23/8/2010
11.30-12.45
BALLROOM I
11.30-12.45 SY01IALP APHASIA COMMITTEE SYMPOSIUM: “Diagnostic and Therapeutic
Intervention Approaches to Acquired Neurogenic Language and Communication
Disorders”
Moderators: Paquier P. (Belgium), Karamitsou Ch. (Greece)
11.30 - 11.45 SY01.1
CHALLENGES OF APHASIA INTERVENTION: TOWARDS BEST PRACTICE
11.45 - 12.00 SY01.2
INTERVENTION APPROACHES TO APHASIA IN CZECH
12.00 - 12.15 SY01.3
CROSSCULTURAL COMMUNICATIVE CLUSTERS FOLLOWING A RIGHT-HEMISPHERE STROKE
Klippi A.*, Sellman J., Heikkinen P., Laine M., (Finland)
Leheckova H.*, (Finland)
Ferre P. (Canada), Paz Fonseca R.*, (Brazil), de Mattos Pimenta Parente M.A.(Brazil), Abusamra V.
(Argentina), Ferreres A. (Argentina), Giroux F. (Canada), Ska B. (Canada) Joanette Y. (Canada)
12.15 - 12.30 SY01.4THE ROLE OF EXECUTIVE FUNCTIONING IN COGNITIVE PERFORMANCE: IMPLICATIONS FOR APHASIA
12.30 - 12.45 SY01.5
MANAGEMENT
Constantinidou F.* (Cyprus)
DEVELOPING A VIDEO-RETELLING TASK AS A MEASURE OF CONVERSATION IN APHASIA
Hilari K.*, Marshall J., (United Kingdom) Papathanasiou I. (Greece)
MONDAY 23/8/2010
11.30-13.00 SY02A
11.30-13.00
BALLROOM II
IALP VOICE COMMITTEE SYMPOSIUM (Part 1)
Moderators: Svec J. (Czech Republic), Gika A. (Greece)
11.30 - 11.45 SY02A.1
FROM VOCAL FOLD VIBRATION TO VOICE ACOUSTICS
11.45 - 12.00 SY02A.2
FROM VOICE ACOUSTICS TO VOICE PERCEPTION
12.00 - 12.15 SY02A.3
Designing voice assessment protocols: the basics
12.15 - 12.30 SY02A.4
USING PERCEPTUAL AND ACOUSTIC EVALUATION TOOLS IN ONGOING VOICE THERAPY
12.30 - 12.45 SY02A.5
NEW RECOMMENDATIONS FOR ACOUSTIC VOICE MEASUREMENTS
12.45 - 13.00 SY02A.6
PANEL DISCUSSION, PART 1
Deliyski D.* (USA)
Shrivastav R.* (USA)
Oates J.M.* (Australia)
Amir O.* (Israel)
Svec J. G.* (Czech Republic), Granqvist S. (Sweden)
Svec J. G.*, (Czech Republic)
23
24
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
MONDAY 23/8/2010
11.30-13.00
BALLROOM III
11.30-13.00 SY03AIALP CHILD LANGUAGE COMMITTEE SYMPOSIUM: Language and literacy in
School -Age-Children and Adolescents (Part I)
Moderators: Romonath R. (Germany), Martin A. (Greece)
11.30 - 11.45 SY03A.1
CHALLENGES OF INTERVENTION WITH SCHOOL-AGE CHILDREN AND ADOLSESCENTS
11.45 - 12.00 SY03A.2
INTERVENTION PROGRAMS IN THE PROMOTION OF ARABIC WRITING IN PRESCHOOLERS
12.00 - 12.15 SY03A.3
SYSTEMATIC ENGAGING EARLY LITERACY: A DYNAMIC SYSTEMS APPROACH
12.15 - 12.30 SY03A.4
EVALUATING EXPOSITORY TEXT SUMMARIES
Romonath R.* (Germany)
Sara Eyal*, Hanan Jamalye, Jaklin Sakran-Mansour & Dorit Ravid
Westby C.*, Culatta B., Hall K., (USA)
Westby C*, Culatta B., Hall K., (USA)
12.30- 12.45 SY03A.5DEVELOPMENT OF SUBORDINATING CONJUNCTIONS IN GERMAN ADOLESCENTS WITH AND
WITHOUT LANGUAGE LEARNING DISORDERS
Romonath R.* (Germany)
MONDAY 23/8/2010
11.30-13.00
YPSILON 1,2,3
11.30-13.00 FP01
FREE PRESENTATIONS ON FLUENCY
11.30-11.45 FP01.1 WORD-FINAL PROLONGATIONS IN AN ADULT MALE WITH NEUROFIBROMATOSIS TYPE 1
Moderators: Fibiger S. (Germany), Psalida I. (Greece)
Cosyns M.*, Mortier G., Corthals P., Janssens S., Van Borsel J., (Belgium)
11.45-12.00 FP01.2 PRESCHOOL CHILDREN’S CONVERSATIONAL SPEECH AFTER STUTTERING TREATMENT: MEASURING
12.00-12.15 FP01.3 LANGUAGE USE IN MULTIPLE ENVIRONMENTS.
Brown L.*, Wilson L., Packman A., Trajkovski N., Onslow M., Menzies R. G., (Australia)
REPORTING MEAN VOWEL DURATION: AN INNOVATIVE PERSPECTIVE
Brown L.*, Wilson L., Packman A., (Australia)
12.15-12.30 FP01.4 THE EFFECT OF SYNTACTIC COMPLEXITY AND LENGTH UTTERANCE ON SPEECH FLUENCY IN
PERSIAN ADULTS WHO STUTTER
Vahab M.*, Nilipour R., Yadegari F., (Iran)
12.30-12.45 FP01.5 LIP-EMG DURING SENTENCE PRODUCTION OF PERSONS WHO DO AND DO NOT STUTTER
12.45-13.00 FP01.6 CAN STUTTERING BE CURED THROUGH THE INDUCTION OF PLASTIC CHANGE IN THE BRAIN?
Bosshardt H.-G.*, (Germany)
Soensterud H.*, Henriksen K., Dietrichs E., (Norway)
MONDAY 23/8/2010
11.30-13.00 FP02
11.30-13.00
YPSILON 4,5
FREE PRESENTATIONS : Education in SLP
Moderators: Cruice M. (United Kingdom), Kalomiris G. (Greece)
11.30-11.45 FP02.1 EXPLORING GOAL SETTING PRACTICES IN ADULT NEUROLOGY SETTINGS: A REPORT ON THE
11.45-12.00 FP02.2 PROCESSES AND EVOLUTION OF THE PROJECT AND THE OUTCOMES FOR CLINICIANS AND STUDENTS
Cruice M.*, Barnard R. (United Kingdom)
ASSESSING AND GRADING SPEECH THERAPY TRAINEES CONSISTENTLY AND OBJECTIVELY
Simoens L. A.*, (Belgium)
12.00-12.15 FP02.3 COMPARISON OF IALP’s EDUCATIONAL DIRECTIVES WITH THE CURRENT PROGRAMS IN EUROPE AND
12.15-12.30 FP02.4 GREECE- THE EFFECTS OF THE BOLOGNA DIRECTIVE
Kalomoiris G.*, Frangouli A., Lambrinou A., Athanassiadi C., (Greece)
SURVEY ON THE PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE OF THE EUROPEAN SPEECH AND LANGUAGE THERAPISTS
Kaufmann-Meyer M., Citro R*, Rousseau T., Miettinen L., Raudsalu V., Peeva M., (Italy)
12.30-12.45 FP02.5 EVALUATING STUDENTS’ LEARNING IN ADULT NEUROLOGY SETTINGS USING AN INTENSIVE CLINICAL
EDUCATION APPROACH
Farrington-Douglas C.*, Cruice M., (United Kingdom)
12.45-13.00 FP02.6 CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES FOR SPEECH AND LANGUAGE THERAPY: THE EUROPEAN
DIMENSION
Patterson A.*, Lowit A., (United Kingdom)
25
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
MONDAY 23/8/2010
11.30-13.00 FP03 11.30-13.00
VIP LOUNGE
FREE PRESENTATIONS: Multicultural Issues
Moderators: Battle D. (USA), Minaidou D. (Greece)
11.30-11.45 FP03.1 INITIAL FIELD TRIAL DEVELOPMENT OF THE COMPREHENSIVE ASSESSMENT OF SPANISH
ARTICULATION-PHONOLOGY (CASA-P): CULTURAL AND LINGUISTIC VALIDITY
Brice A. E.*, Brice R. G., (USA)
11.45-12.00 FP03.2 LINGUISTIC ETHNOGRAPHY APPROACHES TO COMMUNICATION DISABILITY IN MULTILINGUAL
FAMILIES
Stokes J.*, Martin D. (United Kingdom)
12.00-12.15 FP03.3 PSYCHOMETRIC VALIDATION OF THE TEST OF READING & PHONOLOGICAL PROCESSING AND
12.15-12.30 FP03.4 MEMORY (TORPAM) - A DYSLEXIA DIAGNOSTIC ASSESSMENT BATTERY FOR MALTESE-ENGLISH
SPEAKING CHILDREN
Xuereb R., Grech H.* (Malta), Dodd B. (UK)
DOES DIGLOSSIA IN ARABIC INFLUENCE PERFORMANCE IN NAMING TASKS?
Mahajna S.*, Ferman S., Eyal S., (Israel)
12.30-12.45 FP03.5 NONWORD REPETITION AND SENTENCE IMITATION AND MONOLINGUAL AND BILINGUAL CHILDREN
12.45-13.00 FP03.6 WITH AND WITHOUT PRIMARY LANGUAGE IMPAIRMENT
Thordardottir E.*, (Canada)
erformance of Bilingual Children from Migration Background on a Test of
P
German Morphological Paradigms
Scharff Rethfeldt W.*, Bilda K., (Germany)
MONDAY 23/8/2010
11.30-12.45 FP04
11.30-12.45
OMEGA
FREE PRESENTATIONS ON ALTERNATIVE AND AUGMENTATIVE COMMUNICATION
Moderators: Bartolotta T.E. (USA), Litinas N. (Greece)
11.30-11.45 FP04.1 AUGMENTATIVE AND ALTERNATIVE COMMUNICATION: SLP INTERVENTION OF NEUROLOGICAL
DISORDERS IN A DYSPHAGIA AMBULATORY
Tainara Lemes Conde Nandin, Regina Yu Shon Chun, Lucia Figueiredo Mourão* (Brazil)
11.45-12.00 FP04.2 COMMUNICATION AND SPEECH & LANGUAGE GROUP THERAPY IN ADULTS SUFFERING FROM
SEVERE MENTAL HEALTH DISORDERS
Tzimara A.*, Antoniou A., Frangouli A., Lazogiorgou-Kousta I., Zaharopoulou Chr. (Greece)
12.00-12.15 FP04.3 THE EFFECTS OF COMMUNICATION INTERVENTION DURING MEALTIME IN RETT SYNDROME.
12.15-12.30 FP04.4 DISTASTER PREPAREDNESS FOR PEOPLE WITH MOBILITY AND/OR COMMUNICATION CHALLENGES
12.30-12.45 FP04.5 DEVELOPMENT OF ALTERNATIVE AND AUGMENTATIVE COMMUNICATION IN KOSOVO.
Bartolotta T.E.*, Remshifski P.A. (USA)
Currier S.*, Cooley Hidecker M.J. (USA)
Behluli Kabashi L., Dragaj A., Brestovci B. (Serbia Montenegro)
MONDAY 23/8/2010
11.30-12.45
THETA - SIGMA - DELTA
11.30-12.45 FP05
FREE PRESENTATIONS: Language Test in Greece
11.30-11.45 FP05.1 MULTICULTURAL ISSUES IN GREECE
11.45-12.00 FP05.2 THE STANDARDIZATION AND USE OF A SCREENING TOOL FOR FOUR-YEAR-OLDS IN GREECE
Moderators: Kotsopoulos A., Vogindroukas I. (Greece)
Frangouli A.*, (Greece)
Vlassopoulos M. (Greece)
12.00-12.15 FP05.3 A TOOL FOR THE ASSESSMENT OF THE LEVEL OF FUNCTIONING OF CHILDREN WITH AUTISM
SPECTRUM DISORDERS BY THE INTERDISCIPLINARY TEAM (EDALFA)
Kotsopoulos A.*, (Greece)
12.15-12.30 FP05.4 TEST OF RECEPTIVE AND EXPRESSIVE LANGUAGE ABILITIES - PRELIMINARY DATA OF GREEK
12.30-12.45 FP05.5 PRESCHOOL AGE CHILDREN
Vogindroukas I.*, Grigoriadou E., (Greece)
METAFON TEST: A PHONOLOGICAL AWARENESS ASSESSEMENT FOR THE GREEK POPULATION
Giannetopoulou A., Kirpotin L., Skourogianni P.*, (Greece)
26
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
MONDAY 23/8/2010
11.30-13.00
FP06
11.30-11.45 FP06.1 11.30-13.00
OMIKRON HALL
FREE PRESENTATIONS: Child Language
Moderators: Eyal S. (Israel), Lefteri K. (Greece)
SENSORY-PERCEPTUAL IMPAIRMENTS IN PERSONS WITH INTELLECTUAL DISABILITY AND AUTISM
De Bal C.*, (Belgium)
11.45-12.00 FP06.2 PROGRAM OF INTERVENTION IN DEAFBLIND STUDENTS: THE FRAMEWORK OF THE COGNITIVE AND
12.00-12.15 FP06.3 COMMUNICATIVE PROFILE OF DEAFBLIND STUDENTS AND THE APPLICATION OF EDUCATIONAL
PLAN OF INTERVENTION
Zeza M.*, Stavrou P.-D., (Greece)
PRAGMATIC, LEXICAL AND GRAMMATICAL ABILITIES IN AUTISTIC SPECTRUM CHILDREN
Fernandes F.*, Miilher L.P. (Brazil)
12.15-12.30 FP06.4 THE APPLICATION OF THREE DIFFERING THEORETICAL PERSPECTIVES IN AN EXAMINATION OF
LANGUAGE SKILLS IN ASPERGER SYNDROME AND HIGH FUNCTIONING AUTISM
Lewis Fiona M.*, Woodyatt Gail C., Murdoch B., (Australia)
12.30-12.45 FP06.5 COGNITIVE DEVELOPMENT IN APERT SYNDROME AND CROUZON SYNDROME PATIENTS- A
12.45-13.00 FP06.6 MULTIDISCIPLINARY MODEL FOR EVALUATION
Yacubian-Fernandes A., Abramides D.*, Maximino L.P., (Brazil)
LANGUAGE THERAPY AND AUTISM: RESULTS OF INTERVENTION
Fernandes F.*, Molini-Avejonas D.R., Amato C.A.H., (Brazil)
MONDAY 23/8/2010
14.00-15.00
BALLROOM I
14.00-15.00 FP07
FREE PRESENTATIONS ON APHASIA
14.00-14.15 FP07.1 RELIABILITY AND VALIDITY OF THE MANDARIN TOKEN TEST WITH THREE SCORING METHODS
Moderators: Paquier P. (Belgium), Karamitsou Ch. (Greece)
Tseng C.H.*, (Taiwan)
14.15-14.30 FP07.2 THE ORTHOGRAPHIC OUTPUT LEXICON IS INDEPENDENT FROM THE PHONOLOGICAL PROCESS:
EVIDENCE FROM JAPANESE PEOPLE WITH APHASIA IN HIRAGANA WRITING
Nagatsuka N.* (Japan), Yoshida T. (Japan), Howard D. (UK)
14.30-14.45 FP07.3 PRODUCTION AND COMPREHENSION OF SPATIAL LANGUAGE IN FRENCH AGRAMMATIC AND
ANOMIC APHASICS: CROSS-LINGUISTIC PERSPECTIVES
Soroli E.*, Hickmann M., Nespoulous J.L., Tran T. M., (France)
14.45-15.00 FP07.4 THE SPEECH LANGUAGE THERAPEUTIC GROUP IN THE APHASIC`S CONTEXT: DISCUSSION ABOUT
GROUP CONSTITUITION
Santana A. P.*, (Brazil)
MONDAY 23/8/2010
14.00-15.30
14.00-15.30 SY02B
IALP COMMITTEE VOICE SYMPOSIUM (Part II)
14.00-14.15 SY02B.1
PSYCHOLOGICAL FACTORS IN RELATION TO VOICE DISORDERS-THE BASICS
BALLROOM II
Moderators: Svec J. (Czech Republic), Gika A. (Greece)
Baker J.*, (Australia)
14.15-14.30 SY02B.2 VOICE SELF-ASSESSMENT: BASICS AND CLINICAL EXPERIENCE
Behlau M.* (Brazil), Nawka T., (Germany)
14.30-14.45 SY02B.3 THE USE OF ELECTROGLOTTOGRAPHY FOR VOICE AND SPEECH EVALUATION: AN UPDATE
Ma EPM*, (Hong Kong)
14.45-15.00 SY02B.4 TRENDS IN OCCUPATIONAL VOICE MEASUREMENTS: USING THE AMBULATORY PHONATORY
ANALYZER
Yiu E.*, (Hong Kong)
15.00-15.15 SY02B.5 LARYNGEAL REINNERVATION; NEW HORIZONS IN TREATMENT OF VOCAL FOLD PARALYSIS
Yumoto E.*, (Japan)
15.15-15.30 SY02B.6 PANEL DISCUSSION, PART 2
Svec J. G., (Czech Republic)
27
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
MONDAY 23/8/2010
14.00-15.30
BALLROOM III
14.00-14.45 SY03BIALP CHILD LANGUAGE COMMITTEE SYMPOSIUM: Language and literacy in
School -Age-Children and Adolescents (Part II)
Moderators: Romonath R. (Germany), Martin A. (Greece)
14.00-14.15 SY03B.1 ENCOUNTERS BETWEEN COLONIAL AND LOCAL LANGUAGES: CONSEQUENCES FOR KNOWLEDGE
PRODUCTION AND LITERACY
Hyter Y.D.*, (USA)
14.15-14.30 SY03B.2 RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN THE HOME LITERACY ENVIRONMENT AND SCHOOL-ENTRY
PHONOLOGICAL AWARENESS IN CHILDREN WITH AND WITHOUT SPEECH DELAY
Carson K.*, Gillon G., Boustead T., (New Zealand)
14.30-14.45 SY03B.3 EFFECTS OF LENGTH AND LEXICALITY ON READING KANA STIMULI IN JAPANESE FIFTH OR SIXTH
GRADE CHILDREN WITH OR WITHOUT DEVELOPMENTAL DYSLEXIA
Sambai A.*, Uno A., Haruhara N., Kaneko M., Awaya N., Wydell T.N., Kozuka J., Gotoh T., Tsutamori E., (Japan)
14.45-15.30 SSY001 SHORT SYMPOSIUM ON CHILD LANGUAGE
14.45-15.30 SSY001.1CHILDREN’S PRAGMATIC LANGUAGE DISORDERS: THEORETICAL PERSPECTIVES AND CLINICAL
APPLICATIONS
Gallagher T. M.*, (USA)
MONDAY 23/8/2010
14.00-15.30 FP08
14.00-15.30
YPSILON 1,2,3
FREE PRESENTATIONS ON FLUENCY
Moderators: Peters H. (Netherlands), Psalida I. (Greece)
14.00-14.15 FP08.1 Parent-Child Interaction after Treatment of Stuttering: A Comparison between the
Lidcombe Program and the Demands and Capacities Model-based Treatment
14.15-14.30 Oonk L C*, Koedoot C., Franken M.C., (Netherlands)
FP08.2 THE SPEECH SITUATION CHECKLIST©: NORMATIVE AND COMPARATIVE STUDY OF ITALIAN CWS AND CWNS
Bernardini S., Zmarich C., Vanryckeghem M., Brutten G. J., (Italy)
14.30-14.45 FP08.3 BEHAVIOR ASSESSMENT BATTERY© (BAB): EVIDENCE- BASED APPROACH TO THE ASSESSMENT AND
TREATMENT OF CHILDREN WHO STUTTER. NORMATIVE AND COMPARATIVE STUDY OF ITALIAN CWS
AND CWNS
Cocco L.*, Bernardini S., Zmarich C., Vanryckeghem M., Brutten G. J., (Italy)
14.45-15.00 FP08.4 A TRAINING TO SUPPORT ADOLESCENTS WHO STUTTER IN THEIR COMMUNICATION AT SCHOOL: AN
EVALUATION OF EFFECTIVENESS.
Capparelli E.*, Falcone P., Tomaiuoli D., (Italy)
15.00-15.15 FP08.5 THE DEFECTIVE LANGUAGE AUTOMATION HYPOTHESIS OF CLUTTERING
15.15-15.30 FP08.6 APPLICATION OF THE DIGITAL SPEECH AID IN STUTTERERS
van Zaalen Y.*, (Netherlands)
Ratynska J.*, Szkielkowska A, Markowska R., Skarzynski H., (Poland)
MONDAY 23/8/2010
14.00-15.30 FP09 14.00-15.30
YPSILON 4,5
FREE PRESENTATIONS: ICF model in communication disorders
Moderators: Worrall L. (Australia), Kotsopoulos A. (Greece)
14.00-14.15 FP09.1 Assessing voice activity and participation in dysphonic children
Ma EPM*, (Hong Kong)
14.15-14.30 FP09.2 USING THE ICF AS A CLINICAL FRAMEWORK: PARENTS’S AND PROFESSIONALS’ PERSPECTIVES OF
THE IMPACT OF SPEECH IMPAIRMENT IN EARLY CHILDHOOD
McOormack J.*, McLeod S., Harrison L., McAllister L., (Australia)
14.30-14.45 FP09.3 THE DEVELOPMENT OF ICF INSPIRED ASSESSMENTS FOR ADULTS WITH ACUTE STROKE, TRAUMATIC
BRAIN INJURY AND PARTNERS OF HEARING IMPAIRED OLDER PEOPLE
Worrall L.E*, O’Halloran R., Scarinci N.A., Larkins B., Hickson L.M.H., (Australia)
14.45-15.00 FP09.4 CONSIDERING THE ICF AS A CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK FOR UNDERSTANDING QUALITY OF LIFE OF
ADULTS WITH ACQUIRED COMMUNICATION DISORDERS: STRENGTHS AND LIMITATIONS
Cruice M.*, (United Kingdom)
15.00-15.15 FP09.5 THE FOCUS (FOCUS ON THE OUTCOMES OF COMMUNICATION UNDER SIX) A MEASURE OF
15.15-15.30 FP09.6 COMMUNICATIVE PARTICIPATION
Thomas-Stonell N.*, Oddson B., Robertson Bernadette, Rosenbaum P., (Canada)
Considering context in the evaluation of intelligibility
McLeod S.*, McCormack J., Harrison L., (Australia)
28
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
MONDAY 23/8/2010
14.00-15.15
14.00-15.15 FP10
FREE PRESENTATIONS: Multicultural Issues
14.00-14.15 FP10.1 BILINGUALISM AND SPECIFIC LANGUAGE IMPAIRMENT
VIP LOUNGE
Moderators: Grech H. (Malta), Minaidou D. (Greece)
Bontsiou Th., Frangouli A., Giaxoglou K.*, (Greece)
14.15-14.30 FP10.2 Lexical Diversity and Language Sample Elicitation Effects in Spanish-Speaking
Children with and without Language Impairment
Kapantzoglou M.*, Fergadiotis G., Restrepo M.A., (USA)
14.30-14.45 FP10.3 BILINGUAL INTERVENTION: PARENTS’ PERCEPTION ON CHANGES COMMUNICATION WITH THEIR
DEAF CHILDREN
Yue A.H., Lichtig I.*, (Brazil)
14.45-15.00 FP10.4 The Influence of Creative Engagement on Speech and Language Improvement:
15.00-15.15 FP10.5 Observations from a Multilingual Private Practice in Montreal
Simard I.*, Kharkhurin A. V., (Canada)
LANGUAGE INTERVENTION PROGRAM TO CHILDREN OF MINORITY GROUPS IN NORTHERN GREECE
Strobolakos P., Sali A., Housseinoglou E., Frangouli A.*, Dimakis I., Omeroglou A., Karandoni A., (Greece)
MONDAY 23/8/2010
14.00-15.30
14.00-15.30 FP11
FREE PRESENTATIONS: Child Language
14.00-14.15 FP11.1
SLI: AN INDEPENDENT ENTITY OR PART OF A CONTINUUM?
OMEGA
Moderators: Vlassopoulos M. (Greece)
Kotsopoulos A.,*, Gyftogianni M., Troupou A., (Greece)
14.15-14.30 FP11.2 Development of episodic structure of narratives in finnish children with SLI
playing a pretend play: an intervention study
Suvanto A.*, Yliherva A., Lehtihalmes M. (Finland)
14.30-14.45 FP11.3 THE ROLE OF MORPHO-PHONOLOGICAL SALIENCE IN TENSE MARKING IN GREEK AND CYPRIOT
CHILDREN WITH SLI
Mastropavlou M. (Greece), Petinou K.* (Cyprus), Tsimpli L. M., (Greece)
14.45-15.00 FP11.4 EVALUATING EXPRESSIVE-GRAMMAR SKILLS FOR PRESCHOOL SLI IN MULTIPLE CONTEXTS
15.00-15.15 FP11.5 CHILDRENS' RETRIEVING STRATEGIES IN WORD FLUENCY TASKS
15.15-15.30 FP11.6 Lexical and Semantic Ability in Younger School Children with Cochlear Implants
Washington K.*, Warr-Leeper G. (Canada)
Tallberg I.M.*, (Sweden)
Lofkvist U.*,Tallberg I.M., (Sweden)
MONDAY 23/8/2010
14.00-15.15 SY04A
14.00-15.15
THETA - SIGMA - DELTA
IALP MOTOR SPEECH DISORDERS COMMITTEE (Part I)
Moderators: Murdoch B. (Australia), Vogindroukas I. (Greece)
14.00-14.15 SY04A.1 SHORT-TERM EFFECTS OF REPETITIVE TRANSCRANIAL MAGNETIC STIMULATION (rTMS) ON SPEECH
AND VOICE IN INDIVIDUALS WITH PARKINSON’S DISEASE
Hartelius L.*, Svantesson P., Hedlund A., Holmberg B., Revesz D., Thorlin T., (Sweden)
14.15-14.30 SY04A.2 AN ELECTROMYOGRAPHIC EXAMINATION OF LIP ASYMMETRY DURING SPEECH AND NON-SPEECH
MOVEMENTS IN ADULTS WHO STUTTER
Choo Ai L. (USA), Robb M.*, (New Zealand)
14.30-14.45 SY04A.3 Guidance for Commissioners of Speech and Language Therapy Services for
Dysarthria
Enderby P.M., Pickstone C, John A. J., Palmer R.* (United Kingdom)
14.45-15.00 SY04A.4 Dysarthria in Friedreich’s ataxia: a perceptual analysis
Folker J.*, Murdoch B., Rosen K., Cahill L., Delatycki M., Corben L., Vogel A., (Australia)
15.00-15.15 SY04A.5 EFFECTS OF ON-LINE AUGMENTED KINEMATIC AND PERCEPTUAL FEEDBACK ON TREATMENT OF
SPEECH MOVEMENTS IN APRAXIA OF SPEECH
McNeil M.*, Katz W., Fossett T., Garst D., Szuminsky N., Carter G.,
Lim K.-Y. (USA)
29
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
MONDAY 23/8/2010
14.00-15.00 FP12
14.00-15.00
OMIKRON HALL
FREE PRESENTATIONS: Child Language
Moderators: Westby C. (USA), Lefteri K. (Greece)
14.00-14.15 FP12.1 ECHOLALY AND COMMUNICATIVES SITUATIONS IN AUTISTIC ESPECTRUM: ALTERATION OR
COMMUNICATIVE HABILITIE?
Cardoso C., Cruz Faislon I., Rocha J., Molini-Avejonas D.R., (Brazil)
14.15-14.30 FP12.2 PRAGMATIC ASPECTS OF LANGUAGE IN CHILDREN WITH ADHD
14.30-14.45 FP12.3 DELIVERING EFFECTIVE SUPPORT AND THERAPEUTIC INTERVENTION PROGRAMS TO PDD CHILDREN
14.45-15.00 FP12.4 THREE CHILDREN WITH AUTISM SPECTRUM DISORDERS ENTER GRADE 1 REGULAR CLASSES
Papaeliou C.F.*, Maniadaki K., Kakourou N., Dalapa P., Kourou M.G, (Greece)
Kalos E.*, Frangouli A., Sarella A., Papadimas P., Mantzioura S., Koutri I., (Greece)
Gyftogianni M.*, Georgiou A., Kolosioni D., Sakellari M., Kotsopoulos S., (Greece)
MONDAY 23/8/2010
16.00-17.15 FP13
16.00-17.15
BALLROOM I
FREE PRESENTATIONS: Aphasia and related communication disorders
Moderators: Hilari K. (UK), Mandaka E. (Greece)
16.00-16.15 FP13.1 PORTUGUESE TRANSLATION AND ADAPTATION OF THE COMMUNICATION DISABILITY PROFILE
16.15-16.30 FP13.2 (CDP) AND THE PARTICIPATION OBJECTIVE, PARTICIPATION SUBJECTIVE (POPS) TOOLS
Matos M.A.* (Portugal), Jesus Luis M. (Portugal), Cruice M. (UK), Allen Gomes A., (Portugal)
NUMERICAL PROCESSING AND CALCULATION IN APHASIC PATIENTS
De Luccia G., Ortiz K.Z.* (Brazil)
16.30-16.45 FP13.3 Collecting a RCT data - A gauntlet to take! The challenges of consistent
selectivity in data collection
Kukkonen T.*, Korpijaakko-Huuhka A-M., (Finland)
16.45-17.00 FP13.4 THE STROKE AND APHASIA QUALITY OF LIFE SCALE (SAQOL-39) IN GREEK: CULTURAL ADAPTATION,
17.00-17.15 FP13.5 RELIABILITY AND PROXY AND SELF-REPORT AGREEMENT
Hilari K.*, Christaki V., Ignatiou M., Kartsona A. (U.K.)
The comprehension of speech prosody test for Farsi speaking individuals
Torke Ladani N.* (IRAN)
MONDAY 23/8/2010
16.00-17.30
16.00-17.30 SE01
SEMINAR ON VOICE
16:00-17:30 SE01.1 VOICE REHABILITATION IN A GROUP SETTING
BALLROOM II
Moderators: Svec J. (Czech Republic), Apostolopoulos A. (Greece)
Kling I.F.*, Stewart C.F., (USA)
MONDAY 23/8/2010
16.00-17.30
BALLROOM III
16.00-17.30 SY05SYMPOSIUM: Global Literacy: The role of phonological awareness in striving for
early reading success for all children
Moderators: Gallagher T. (USA) Desylla V. (Greece)
16.00-16.15 SY05.1 PHONOLOGICAL AWARENESS: DO EDUCATORS NEED PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT?
16.15-16.30 SY05.2 The Global Literacy Challenge
16.30-16.45 SY05.3 COMPUTER-BASED PHONOLOGICAL AWARENESS ASSESSMENT AT SCHOOL-ENTRY: A PILOT STUDY
16.45-17.00 SY05.4 Enhancing phonological awareness within the classroom context
Caroll J.*, Gillon G., (New Zealand)
Gillon G.*, (New Zealand)
Carson K.*, Gillon G., Boustead T., (New Zealand)
Good V.P., Gillon G.*, Socklingham R., (New Zealand)
17.00-17.15 SY05.5 Phonological awareness intervention maintenance for children with childhood
17.15-17.30 SY05.6 apraxia of speech
McNeill B.C.*, Gillon G., Dodd B., (New Zealand)
A HOME LITERACY STRATEGY TO SUPPORT YOUNG CHILDREN WITH DOWN SYNDROME
van Bysterveldt A.K.*, Gillon G., Foster-Cohen S., (New Zealand)
30
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
MONDAY 23/8/2010
16.00-17.00
YPSILON 1,2,3
16.00-17.00 FP14
FREE PRESENTATIONS ON CHILD LANGUAGE AND SPEECH DISORDERS
16.00-16.15 FP14.1 THE INFLUENCE OF CLINICAL EXPERIENCE ON THE PERCEPTION OF ?R? PRODUCTIONS IN CHILDREN
16.15-16.30 FP14.2 MODIFIED AUDITORY INPUTS FOR SPEECH PRODUCTION
16.30-16.45 FP14.3 SPEECH THERAPY IN CHILDREN WITH CLEFT PALATE SPEECH: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW
Moderators: Cabral S.L. (Brazil), Kambanaros M. (Greece)
Klein H.*, Grigos M., (USA)
Kariyasu M.*, (Japan)*
Neumann S.*, Romonath R., (Germany)
16.45-17.00 FP14.4 A TREATMENT PROGRAM FOR NASAL FRICATIVES - COMPARING TREATMENT OUTCOMES USING
SINGLE SUBJECT DESIGN
Raud Westberg L.*, Svensson L., (Sweden)
MONDAY 23/8/2010
16.00-17.00
16.00-17.00 FP15
FREE PRESENTATIONS: SLP Clinical Practice
16.00-16.15 FP15.1 THE EFFECT OF FEEDBACK ON AUDITORY-PERCEPTUAL TRAINING
YPSILON 4,5
Moderators: Georgieva D. (Bulgaria), Dimitraki V. (Greece)
Chan K.M.K.* (Hong Kong), Chan E. (USA), Kwok T.Y., (Hong Kong)
16.15-16.30 FP15.2 A SURVEY OF PUBLIC AWARENESS AND PERCEPTION REGARDING SPEECH / LANGUAGE THERAPY IN
16.30-16.45 FP15.3 GREECE
Vlassopoulos M.*, Desylla V., (Greece)
PARENTS’ PERCEPTIONS OF SPEECH-LANGUAGE THERAPY
Washington K.*, Thomas-Stonell N., McLeod S., Warr-Leeper G., A, Oddson B.,
Robertson B., (Canada)
16.45-17.00 FP15.4 VOICE COACHING - COMPARISON OF MENTAL PROCESSING STRATEGIES IN LEADING VOICE
INSTRUMENT BETWEEN TEACHER STUDENTS AND MASTER MODEL
Perko R.*, (Finland)
MONDAY 23/8/2010
16.00-17.30- FP16
16.00-17.30
VIP LOUNGE
FREE PRESENTATIONS: Child language
Moderators: Schulman B. (USA), Arsenopoulos V. (Greece)
16.00-16.15 FP16.1 PROCESSING SPEED AND LANGUAGE OUTCOMES FOLLOWING RISK-ADAPTED TREATMENT FOR
16.15-16.30 FP16.2 MEDULLOBLASTOMA
Lewis Fiona M.*, Murdoch B., (Australia)
Nonverbal Children with Autistic Spectrum Disorders: How do they Communicate?
Agius K.*, (Malta)
16.30-16.45 FP16.3 Profiles of the intentional communication acts of young pre-verbal children
with developmental disabilities
Keidar N.*, Eyal S., (Israel)
16.45-17.00 FP16.4 DEVELOPMENTAL LANGUAGE DISORDERS: A CASE STUDY OF A MIXED TYPE (RECEPTIVE AND
EXPRESSIVE) LANGUAGE DISORDER
Koiliari G.*, (Greece)
17.00-17.15 FP16.5 TICL - THE TRIAD OF SUCCESS LEADING TO POSITIVE OUTCOMES IN LANGUAGE AND PRE-LITERACY
FOR CHILDREN
El-Choueifati N.*, Munro N., McCabe P.J., Purcell A., Galea R., (Australia)
17.15-17.30 FP16.6 Spelling errors in the Greek Language. Can be described in terms of phonological
processes?
Grammenou A.*, (Greece)
MONDAY 23/8/2010
16.00-17.30 FP17
16.00-17.30
OMEGA
FREE PRESENTATIONS : Child Language
Moderators: Bartolotta T.E. (USA), Karakoulakis H. (Greece)
16.00-16.15 FP17.1 The relation between receptive and expressive language in Down’s syndrome
children with mental age ranged 4-5 years old
Ebrahimian Dehaghani SH.*, (Iran)
31
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
16.15-16.30 FP17.2 Predictors of language-based learning difficulties in Japanese children at age
16.30-16.45 FP17.3 three and five
Tanaka Welty Y.*, Aoki S., (Japan)
EFFECTS OF MATERNAL DEPRESSION ON A CHILD’S LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT
Kavvada A.*, Konstantaki E., (Greece)
16.45-17.00 FP17.4 Language Disorders in Children conceived by The Assisted Reproductive
Technologies(ART)
Abou El Ella M.Y.A*, ElAssal N.N.E, Aboulghar H.M A., Shoeib R.S.M, Efat Ahmad Zaky E.A.Z, Saber A.S.S.,
(Egypt)
17.00-17.15 FP17.5 EFFECT OF DIFFERENT TREATMENTS IN YOUNG CHILDREN WITH LANGUAGE PROBLEMS
17.15-17.30 FP17.6 EFFECTIVENESS OF AUDITORY PROGRAM IN BRAZILIAN STUDENTS WIT LEARNING DISABILITIES
Keegstra A.L.*, Post W.J., Goorhuist-Brouwer S.M. (Netherlands)
Pinheiro F.H.*, Capellini S.A., (Brazil)
MONDAY 23/8/2010
16.00-17.15
THETA - SIGMA - DELTA
16.00-17.15 SY04B IALP MOTOR SPEECH DISORDERS COMMITTEE (Part II)
Moderators: Murdoch B. (Australia), Koutsoumbakis E. (Greece)
16.00-16.15 SY04B.1 RE-THINKING DIAGNOSTIC CLASSIFICATION OF THE DYSARTHRIAS: A DEVELOPMENTAL PERSPECTIVE
Morgan A.T. (Australia), Liegeois F.* (UK)
16.15-16.30 SY04B.2 COMPUTATIONAL MODELLING OF NEUROMOTOR SPEECH DISORDERS IN CHILDREN: GENERATING
TESTABLE HYPOTHESES IN CHILDHOOD APRAXIA OF SPEECH
Maassen B.A.M.*, Terband H. (Netherlands)
16.30-16.45 SY04B.3 EFFECT OF RATE CONTROL ON SPEECH PRODUCTION AND INTELLIGIBILITY IN DYSARTHRIA
Van Nuffelen G.*, De Bodt M., Vanderwegen J., Van de Heyning P., Wuyts F., (Belgium)
17.00-17.15 SY04B.4 Lingual kinematics in dysarthric speakers with Parkinson’s Disease: An
electromagnetic articulograph study
Wong M.N., Murdoch B.*, Whelan B-M., (Australia)
16.45-17.00 FP17A FREE PRESENTATION ON MOTOR SPEECH DISORDERS
FP17A.1 The effect of compressed speech in ataxic dysarthria
Woisard-Bassols V.*2, Espesser R.1, Ghio A.1, Nguyen N.1, Duez D.1, ( France)
MONDAY 23/8/2010
16.00-17.00
OMIKRON HALL
16.00-17.00 FP18
FREE PRESENTATIONS ON VOICE
16.00-16.15 FP18.1 A VOICE CASE STUDY: WHEN THE DOCTORS SAID THERE WAS NOTHING MORE THEY COULD DO
16.15-16.30 FP18.2 VOICE DISORDERS IN TEACHERS AND GENERAL POPULATION IN BRAZIL
16.30-16.45 FP18.3 THE QUALITY OF LIFE IN DIFFERENT VOICE DISORDERS AMONG EGYPTIAN POPULATION
Moderators: Hyter Y. (USA), Skourogiannis P. (Greece)
Davis D.*, (USA)
Behlau M.* (Brazil), Zambon F. (Brazil), Guerrieri A.C. (Brazil), Roy N. (USA)
Aboras Y.*, Elbana M., (Egypt)
16.45-17.00 FP18.4 SUBJECTIVE EVALUATION OF VOICE AND WORKING CONDITIONS AND PHONIATRIC EXAMINATION IN
KINDERGARTEN TEACHERS
Kankare E.*, Geneid A., Laukkanen A-M., Vilkman E., (Finland)
MONDAY 23/8/2010
17.45-19.15
BALLROOM I
17.45-19.15 SS01
SHORT SEMINARS: Communication disorders in adults
17.45-18.30 SS01.1 A MODEL FOR COMMUNICATION INTERVENTION WITH THE ELDERLY
18.30-19.15 SS01.2 A model for treatment planning when working with adults with brain injury.
Moderators: Hilari K. (UK), Mandaka E. (Greece)
Lubinski R.*, (USA)
O’Callaghan A. M.*, (Australia)
MONDAY 23/8/2010
17.45-18.30
17.45-18.30 SS02
SHORT SEMINAR ON VOICE
17:45-18:30 SS02.1 LOW COST SOFTWARES SOLUTIONS FOR CLINICAL VOICE
Moderators: Svec J. (Czech Republic), Apostolopoulos A. (Greece)
Behlau M.*, Moraes M., Oliveira G., (Brazil)
BALLROOM II
32
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
MONDAY 23/8/2010
17.45-19.15 FP19
17.45-19.15
BALLROOM III
FREE PRESENTATIONS ON CHILD LANGUAGE
Moderators: Desylla V. (Greece)
17.45-18.00 FP19.1 Phonological Short-Term Memory in Mandarin Chinese-Speaking Children with
Specific Language Impairment
Chi P.-H.*, (Taiwan)
18.00-18.15 FP19.2 EFFICACY OF THREE DIFFERENT MODELS OF REMEDITION PROGRAM FOR BRAZILIAN STUDENTS
WITH DYSLEXIA
Capellini S.A.*, Santos L.C.A, Lorenceti M.D., Padula N.A.M.R., (Brazil)
18.15-18.30 FP19.3 HYPERDIACTIVE NO TENSION DISORDER’ OR AM I ‘DEAF’?: CHILDREN?S ACCOUNTS OF ATTENTION
DEFICIT (HYPERACTIVITY) DISORDER AND ASSOCIATED COMMUNICATION CHALLENGES
Mac Evilly D.*, Walsh I.P., (Ireland)
18.30-18.45 FP19.4 LETTER KNOWLEDGE, PHONOLOGICAL AWARENESS AND SENSITIVITY TO THE SYBLEXICAL UNITS IN
18.45-19.00 FP19.5 INVENTED SPELLING: EVIDENCE FROM THE YEAR-LONG KINDERGARTEN STUDY.
Zaretsky E.*, Core C., Currier A., (USA)
DYSLEXIA, ALSO DEALING WITH READING COMPREHENSION PROBLEMS?
Van Vreckem C.*, Vanderswalmen R., Desoete A., Van Keer H., (Belgium)
19.00-19.15 FP19.6 Similarities and differences between Japanese children with developmental
dyslexia and dysgraphia for Kanji
Uno A.*, Haruhara N., Kaneko M., Awaya N., Gotoh T., Kozuka J., (Japan)
MONDAY 23/8/2010
17.45-18.45
YPSILON 1,2,3
17.45-18.45 SSY01SHORT SYMPOSIUM: Supervised Practice In SLP Education - A Brazilian
Experience
Moderators: Cabral S.L. (Brazil), Kambanaros M. (Greece)
17.45-18.00 SSY01.1 SUPERVISED PRACTICE IN SLP EDUCATION - A BRAZILIAN EXPERIENCE
Fernandes F.*, Befi-Lopes D.M., Wertzner H.F., Limongi S.C.O., Andrade C.R.F., (Brazil)
18.00-18.15 SSY01.2 MAINSTREAMING AND SUPERVISED PRACTICE IN SLP EDUCATION
Fernandes F.*, Befi-Lopes D.M., (Brazil)
18.15-18.30 SSY01.3 EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE - EXPERIENCE WITH UNDERGRADUATED STUDENTS
Andrade C.R.F.*, (Brazil)
18.30-18.45 SSY01.4 SUPERVISED PRACTICE IN SLP EDUCATION - THE AREA OF CHILD?S SPEECH AND LANGUAGE
Wertzner H.F.*, Limongi S.C.O., (Brazil)
MONDAY 23/8/2010
17.45-19.00 FP20
17.45-19.00
YPSILON 4,5
FREE PRESENTATIONS: Hearing impairment - Child language
Moderators: Neumann K. (Germany), Dimitraki V. (Greece)
17.45-18.00 FP20.1 NARRATIVE STRUCTURE OF CHILDREN WITH LANGUAGE IMPAIRMENT IMPROVE WITH SHORT TERM
INTERVENTION
Hautala J.*, Heinanen K., Lehtihalmes M., (Finland)
18.00-18.15 FP20.2 Attending to the discourse of the SLT-AD(H)D clinic: Revealing clinical stances in
interaction
McCluskey J., Walsh I.P.*, Mac Evilly D., Scullion M., Burns S., Brosnan G., (Ireland)
18.15-18.30 FP20.3 EFFECTIVENESS OF AUDIO-VISUAL COMPUTER REMEDIATION PROGRAM IN BRAZILIAN STUDENTS
WITH DYSLEXIA
Germano G.D.*, Capellini S.A., (Brazil)
18.30-18.45 FP20.4 MULTISENSORY CHANNEL STIMULATION APPROACH ASSISTED WITH COMPUTER SOFTWARE IN
18.45-19.00 FP20.5 SPECIFIC LANGUAGE IMPAIRMENT “SLI” HABILITATION
Darwish A.*, (Egypt)
The Relation between Language Development and Social Skills development
Vahab M.*, Faham M., Dehghani M., (Iran)
33
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
MONDAY 23/8/2010
17.45-19.15
VIP LOUNGE
17.45-19.15 SE02
SEMINAR ON ALTERNATIVE AND AUGMENTATIVE COMMUNICATION
17:45-19:15 SE02.1
GETTING STARTED WITH AAC
Moderators: Bartolotta T.E. (USA), Arsenopoulos V. (Greece)
McCain P.*, (USA)
MONDAY 23/8/2010
17.45-19.15 SS03
17.45-19.15
OMEGA
SHORT SEMINARS ON MOTOR SPEECH DISORDERS IN CHILDREN
Moderators: McNeilly L. (USA), Karakoulakis H. (Greece)
17:45-18.30 SS03.1 USING THE COMMUNICATION FUNCTION CLASSIFICATION SYSTEM TO CATEGORIZE
COMMUNICATION PERFORMANCE OF CHILDREN WITH CEREBRAL PALSY
Hidecker M.J.C.*, Taylor K. F., Poole M. L., Paneth N., Rosenbaum P., Kent R.D., (USA)
18.30-19:15 SS03.2SPEECH AND LANGUAGE THERAPY FOR MOTOR SPEECH IMPAIRMENT IN CHILDREN WHO HAVE
CEREBRAL PALSY: EXPLORING COMPARATIVE APPROACHES TO PRACTICE
Roddam H.* (UK), Adams C. (UK), Csefalvay Z. (Slovak Republic)
MONDAY 23/8/2010
17.45-19.15 FP21
17.45-19.15
THETA - SIGMA - DELTA
FREE PRESENTATIONS ON MOTOR SPEECH DISORDERS
Moderators: Schindler A. (Italy), Koutsoubakis E. (Greece)
17.45-18.00 FP21.1 SPEECH RATE, ARTICULATION RATE AND INTELLIGIBILITY OF SPEECH IN PATIENTS WITH ALS
18.00-18.15 FP21.2 QUALITY INDICATORS FOR SPEECH-LANGUAGE THERAPY IN PARKINSON’S DISEASE
Makkonen T.*, Puhto R., Korpijaakko-Huuhla A.-M., (Finland)
Kalf J.G.*, Munneke M., (Netherlands)
18.15-18.30 FP21.3 VARIABILITY OF FUNDAMENTAL FREQUENCY IN THE DIFFERENTIATION OF NEUROLOGICAL
DYSPHONIA
Padovani M.*, Moraes M., Madazio G., Lorenzon P., Korn G., de Biase N. (Brazil)
18.30-18.45 FP21.4 LIVING WITH DYSARTHRIA SELF-REPORTED QUESTIONNAIRE IN PARKINSON'S DISEASE
18.45-19.00 FP21.5 DYSARTHRIA AND QUALITY OF LIFE IN PATIENTS WITH AMYOTROPHIC LATERAL SCLEROSIS (ALS)
19.00-19.15 FP21.6 BIOFEEDBACK IMPROVES DIADOCHOKINESIS OF PATIENT WITH APHASIA (CASE STUDY)
Puhl A., Diaferia G., Padovani M.*, Behlau M., (Brazil)
Ginocchio D., Merlo A., Bottari S., Banfi P., Corbo M., Schindler A.*, (Italy)
Vezenkov S. R.*, Goranova E. G., (Bulgaria)
MONDAY 23/8/2010
17.45-19.15
17.45-19.15
OMIKRON HALL
FP22 - FREE PRESENTATIONS ON VOICE
Moderators: Bibas A., Skourogiannis P. (Greece)
17.45-18.00 FP22.1 SIGNIFICANCE OF VIDEOKYMOGRAPHY FOR PHONIATRIC PRACTICE AND BASIC VOICE RESEARCH
18.00-18.15 FP22.2 LISTENING ABILITY AND AUDITORY LATERALITY IN DYSPHONIC CHILDREN
Sram F.*, Svec J. G., Vydrova J., (Czech Republic)
Szkielkowska A*, Ratynska J., Markowska R, Skarzynski H., (Poland)
18.15-18.30 FP22.3 TAPE AUTHENTICATION AND VOICE IDENTIFICATION: A CASE STUDY IN FORENSIC ACOUSTIC
PHONETICS.
Corthals P.*, Van Borsel J., Van Lierde K., (Belgium)
18.30-18.45 FP22.4 Voice after supracricoid partial laryngectomy: comparison of two phonatory
18.45-19.00 FP22.5 mechanisms
Crestani S.*, Woisard V., Puech M., Serrano E ., (France)
Development and Validation of Questionnaire of Voice Affecting Factors
Trinite B.*, (Latvia)
19.00-19.15 FP22.6 Standardization of the Arabic Version of the Voice Handicap Index: An
Investigation of Validity and Reliability
Saleem A.F.*, Natour Y.S., (Jordan)
34
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
Tuesday 24/8/2010
08.30-10.30
TUESDAY 24/8/2010
BALLROOM I, ii, iii
08.30-10.30 MR02THE COMPLEXITY OF SOCIAL/CULTURAL DIMENSION IN COMMUNICATION
DISORDERS
Moderators: Battle D. (USA), Frangoulis A. (Greece)
Main Presenter: Travis T. Threats, PhD
Discussants: Linda Worrall, PhD
Professor and Chair Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Saint Louis University, St. Louis, USA
Department Speech Pathology & Audiology, University of Queensland, Brisbane, AUSTRALIA
Judith F. Duchan, PhD
Department of Communicative Disorders and Sciences. University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY, USA
TUESDAY 24/8/2010
10.30-11.30
10.30-11.30
PREFUNCTION BALLROOM
POSTER SESSION P058-P125
TUESDAY 24/8/2010
11.30-13.00
BALLROOM I
11.30-13.00 SY06AIALP FLUENCY COMMITTEE SYMPOSIUM: Assessment Framework with People
who stutter (Part I)
Moderators: Bosshardt H.-G. (Germany), Fourlas G. (Greece)
11.30-11.45 SY06A.1 IALP STUTTERING ASSESSMENT SURVEY
Blomgren M.* (USA), Bosshardt H.-G. (Germany), Eggers K. (Belgium), Packman A. (Australia), Cook F. (UK),
Leahy M. (Ireland), Fibiger S. (Denmark), Boucand V. (France)
11.45-12.00 SY06A.2 ASSESSMENT FRAMEWORKS FOR WORKING 1 WITH PEOPLE WHO STUTTER
Andrade C.R.F.* (Brazil)
12.00-12.15 SY06A.3 WHAT IS NORMAL DYSFLUENCY AND WHY MEASURE IT: BRAZIL
Eggers K.* (Belgium)
12.15-12.30 SY06A.4 SETTING STUTTERING THERAPY GOALS AND MEASURING OUTCOMES
Cook F.* (UK), Packman A. (Australia), Blomgren M. (USA)
12.30-12.45 SY06A.5 STUTTERING RATE, STUTTERING SEVERITY: PSYCHOMETRIC CRITERIA AND THERAPY USE
Bosshardt H.-G.* (Germany), Cook F. (UK), Packman A. (Australia)
12.45-13.00 SY06A.6 ASSESSMENT FRAMEWORKS: FUTURE DIRECTIONS
Bosshardt H.-G.* (Germany), Blomgren M. (USA), Andrade C.R.F. (Brazil), Eggers K. (Belgium), Cook F.
(UK), Boucand V. (France), Fibiger S. (Denmark), Leahy M. (Ireland), Neumann K. (Germany), Packman A.
(Australia)
TUESDAY 24/8/2010
11.30-12.30 FP23
11.30-12.30
BALLROOM II
FREE PRESENTATIONS: Child Motor Speech Disorders
Moderators: Rosenfield S. (USA), Martin A. (Greece)
11.30-11.45 FP23.1 RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN ABNORMAL SPEECH SOUNDS DEVELOPMENT AND SWALLOWING
DISORDERS IN YOUNG CHILDREN
Plaza E.* (Chile)
11.45-12.00 FP23.2 COMMUNICATION PERFORMANCE OF CHILDREN WITH CEREBRAL PALSY APPLYING A WHO ICF
12.00-12.15 FP23.3 MODEL
Scott M., Hidecker M.J.C.* (USA)
NEW PERSPECTIVES IN TREATING PEDIATRIC MOTOR SPEECH DISORDERS
Fox Cynthia* (USA), Boliek Carol (Canada), Ramig Lorraine (USA)
12.15-12.30 FP23.4 INTERNET-BASED ASSESSMENT OF SPEECH INTELLIGIBILITY AND OROMOTOR FUNCTION IN
34
CHILDREN
Waite M., Theodoros D.G.*, Russell T., Cahill L. (Australia)
35
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
TUESDAY 24/8/2010
11.30-12.45
BALLROOM III
11.30-12.45 SY07IALP AUDIOLOGY COMMITTEE SYMPOSIUM: The WHO Team for prevention of
Deafness & Hearing Impairment, the WorldWideHearingGroup and the Global
Burden of Disease Hearing Loss Group work on the improvement of quality of
life of hearing impaired people
Moderators: Neumann K. (Germany), Kambanaros M. (Greece)
11.30-11.45 SY07.1 INITIAL RESULTS FROM A LOW COST HEARING AID PROJECT IN THE PHILIPPINES’ FACTORS
AFFECTING OUTCOMES
Newall P. 1,4 (AUSTRALIA) Martinez N.2 (PHILIPPINES), Searles G.1 , Lum D.1, Peitersen S.3 (AUSTRALIA)
11.45-12.00 SY07.2 INTRODUCTION OF CHINA’S NATIONAL PLAN OF PREVENTION AND REHABILITATION OF HEARING
IMPAIRMENT (2007-2015)
Bu X.* (China)
12.00-12.15 SY07.3 NEWBORN HEARING SCREENING AROUND THE WORLD: A REPORT OF THE AUDIOLOGY COMMITTEE
OF THE INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF LOGOPEDICS AND PHONIATRICS
Neumann K.* (Germany), Bu X. (China), Chiong C. (Philippines), Herer G. (USA), Holgers K.M. (Sweden),
Lewis D. (Brazil), Mikic B. (Serbia), Newall P. (Australia), Rangasayee R. (India), Thomson V. (USA)
12.15-12.30 SY07.4 EPIDEMIOLOGY OF HEARING AND EQUILIBRIUM DISORDERS IN GERMAN SCHOOLCHILDREN, THEIR
HEARING HABITS AND THE EFFECTS ON SCHOOL PERFORMANCE
Hoffmann E.* (Germany)
12.30-12.45 SY07.5 CELLPHONES, PERSONAL MUSIC PLAYERS AND TEMPORARY THRESHOLD SHIFTS IN 16-YEAR-OLD
STUDENTS
Holgers K.M.* (Sweden)
TUESDAY 24/8/2010
11.30-12.45
YPSILON 1,2,3
11.30-12.45 SY08IALP DYSPHAGIA COMMITTEE SYMPOSIUM: Current topics in Dysphagia and
Management
Moderators: Watkin K.L. (USA), Litinas N. (Greece)
11.30-11.45 SY08.1 11.45-12.00
RECENT ADVANCES IN DYSPHAGIA DIAGNOSTICS
Watkin K.L.* (USA)
SY08.2 THE CRITICAL NATURE OF 30 FRAMES PER SECOND FOR VIDEOFLUOROSCOPIC STUDIES OF SWALLOW
Logemann J.A.* (USA)
12.00-12.15 SY08.3 DIAGNOSTICS OF LINGUAL BIOMECHANICS DURING SWALLOWING
12.15-12.30 SY08.4 PATIENT REPORTED SWALLOWING OUTCOME IN HEAD AND NECK CANCER
Ono T.* (Japan)
Verdonck-de Leeuw I.M.* (Netherlands)
12.30-12.45 SY08.5 APPLICABILITY OF FIBEROPTIC ENDOSCOPIC EVALUATION OF SWALLOWING (FEES) IN PAEDIATRIC
POPULATION
Schindler A.* (Italy)
TUESDAY 24/8/2010
11.30-13.00
YPSILON 4,5
11.30-13.00 SY09AIALP EDUCATION IN SLP COMMITTEE SYMPOSIUM: Educating SLP”s for the
Global Community (PART I)
Moderators: Cheng L.L.-R. (USA), Kotsopoulos A. (Greece)
11.30-12.15 SY09A.1 EDUCATION OF SLPs FOR THE GLOBAL COMMUNITY
Cheng L.R.L.* (USA), Grech H. (Malta), Fernandes F. (Brazil), Andrade C.R.F. (Brazil)
12.15-13.00 SY09A.2 ADOPTION OF THE IALP EDUCATION GUIDELINES IN SOME EUROPEAN COUNTRIES OF BULGARIA,
GREECE, TURKEY,POLAND,AND RUSSIA
Georgieva D.* (Bulgaria), Topbas S. (Turkey), Wosniak T. (Poland), Filatova Y. (Russia), Kotsopoulos A. (Greece)
TUESDAY 24/8/2010
11.30-12.45
VIP LOUNGE
11.30-12.45 FP24FREE PRESENTATIONS: Communication disorders in genetic syndromes and
other medical conditions
11.30-11.45 FP24.1
Moderators: Kalf J.G. (USA), Papaliou M. (Greece)
PHONOLOGICAL PROFILES AND OUTCOMES OF DUPLICATION 7Q11.23 SYNDROME
Currier A.*, Velleman S. L., Mervis C. (USA)
36
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
11.45-12.00 FP24.2
EARLY PHONOLOGY IN WILLIAMS VERSUS DUPLICATION 7Q11.23 SYNDROMES
12.00-12.15 FP24.3
VELOPHARYNGEAL ACTIVITY AFTER USE OF SPEECH BULB IN CLEFT PALATE PATIENTS
12.15-12.30 FP24.4 NASAL VENTILATION IN ASTHMATIC CHILDREN
12.30-12.45 FP24.5 FACIAL ANTHROPOMETRY IN ASTHMATIC CHILDREN
O’Connor K., Velleman S.L.*, McGloin S., Mervis C. (USA)
Pegoraro-Krook M.I.*, Souza O.M.V., Rodrigues R., Dutka J., (Brazil)
DA.Cunha, E.G.F. Silva, G.K.B.O. Nascimento, G.M. Andrade*, K.J.R. Moraes, R.A. Cunha, R.M.F.L. Régis, S.R.A.
Moraes, C.M.M.B. Castro, H.J. Silva (Brazil)
Cunha D.A., Cunha R.A, Régis R.M.F.L., Nascimento G.K.B.O., Silva E.G.F., Moraes K.J.R., Moraes S.R.A., Castro
C.M.M.B., Silva H.J, (Brazil)
TUESDAY 24/8/2010
11.30-13.00
OMEGA
11.30-12.00 SSY02IALP AAC COMITTEE SYMPOSIUM: Assessment, Intervention and Educational
Programs
Moderators: Pickl G. (Austria), Vlassopoulos M.. (Greece)
11.30-11.45 SSY02.1 SERVING FAMILIES OF CHILDREN WITH SEVERE AND MULTIPLE DISABILITIES AND COMPLEX
COMMUNICATION NEEDS
Pickl G.B.* (Austria)
11.45-12.00 SSY02.2
ENGINEERING THE ENVIRONMENT FOR SUCCESSFUL AAC
12.00-13.00 FP25
12.00-12.15 FP25.1 FREE PRESENTATIONS: Oral Motor Skills and their Disorders
12.15-12.30 FP25.2 SPEECH THERAPY IN PALLISTER-KILLIAN SYNDROME: CASE STUDY
12.30-12.45 FP25.3 MYOFUNCTIONAL INFLUENCE ON THE FACIAL GROWTH IN THE PRIMARY AND MIXED DENTITION
McCain P.* (USA)
CHILDREN WITH COMPLEX COMMUNICATION NEEDS - THE PARENTS’ PERSPECTIVE
Pickl G. B.* (Austria)
Giacchini V.*, Oneda F.F. (Brazil)
Hulsink N.* (Netherlands)
12.45-13.00 FP25.4 VOCAL PERCEPTION, ACOUSTIC MEASURE SKULL PERIMETER IN SHORT STATURE WITH OR WITHOUT
GROWTH HORMONE DEFICIENCY
Valenca H.E., Herminio A.M.O., Salvatori R., Oliveira Souza A.H., Alves L.O.N. (Brazil)
TUESDAY 24/8/2010
11.30-12.45 FP26
11.30-13.00
OMIKRON HALL
FREE PRESENTATIONS: Voice
Moderators: Yiu E. (Hong Kong), Chelidoni M. (Greece)
11.30-11.45 FP26.1 COMBINING SUSTAINED VOWEL AND CONTINUOUS SPEECH IN AUDITORY-PERCEPTUAL
EVALUATION OF DYSPHONIA SEVERITY: WHAT DETERMINES THE FINAL RATING?
Maryn Y.* (Belgium)
11.45-12.00 FP26.2 12.00-12.15
COMPARISON OF V-RQOL, VHI AND VAPP SCORES FOR TEACHERS
Oliveira G.*, Tutya A.S., Behlau M. (Brazil)
FP26.3ACOUSTIC AND HEMODYNAMIC EVALUATIONS OF ACUPUNCTURE FOR HYPERFUNCTIONAL DYSPHONIA
Jie Jie Xu*, Mei Ping Lu, Xi Chen (China)
12.15-12.30 FP26.4SELF-ASSESSMENT PROTOCOLS FOR MODERN AND CLASSICAL SINGING VOICE: BRAZILIAN
VERSIONS OF MSHI AND CSHI
Moreti F., Ávila M.E.B., Rocha C., Borrego M.C.M., Oliveira G.*, Behlau M. (Brazil)
12.30-12.45 FP26.5A RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN VOICE ERGONOMIC RISK FACTORS AND VOICE PROBLEMS AND
12.45-13.00 FP26.6 ACOUSTIC FEATURES. A STUDY MADE IN A CLASSROOM ENVIRONMENT
Rantala L.M.*, Sala E., Hakala S. (Finland)
RESPIRATORY FUNCTION AFTER THYROPLASTIC SURGERIES
Miyamaru S.*, Yumoto E. (Japan)
TUESDAY 24/8/2010
14.00-15.30
BALLROOM I
14.00-15.30 SY06BIALP FLUENCY COMMITTEE SYMPOSIUM: Treatment Decision-Making in
Stuttering: The three W's (Whether, When, What) (Part II)
Moderators: Bosshardt H.-G. (Germany), Fourlas G. (Greece)
14.00-14.15 SY06B.1 IMPLICATIONS OF NATURAL RECOVERY FOR THE ‘WHEN’ OF EARLY STUTTERING INTERVENTION
Packman A.* (Australia), Cook F. (UK), Neumann K. (Germany)
14.15-14.30 SY06B.2 NATURAL RECOVERY FROM STUTTERING IN ADULTHOOD: WHAT CAN WE LEARN FROM SELF
REPORTED STRATEGIES AND FROM NEUROIMAGING FINDINGS?
Neumann K.* (Germany)*, Gebert R. (Germany), Euler H.A. (Germany), Packman A. (Australia)
37
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
14.30-14.45 SY06B.3 WHAT MAY WE LEARN ABOUT PRIMARY PREVENTION AND EARLY INTERVENTION DECISION-MAKING
FROM TWIN STUDIES
Fibiger S.* (Denmark), Fagnani Corrado (Italy), Skytthe Axel (Denmark), Hjelmborg Jacob v. B. (Denmark)
14.45-15.00 SY06B.4 IMPORTANCE OF INDIVIDUAL DIFFERENCES IN TREATMENT AND OUTCOMES
Eggers K. (Belgium), Leahy M.* (Ireland)
15.00-15.15 SY06B.5 RATIONALE FOR TREATMENT DECISION-MAKING IN OLDER CHILDREN AND ADULTS
Eggers K.* (Belgium), Leahy M. (Ireland)
15.15-15.30 SY06B.6 TREATMENT DECISION MAKING: FUTURE DIRECTIONS
Bosshardt H.-G.* (Germany), Packman A. (Australia), Neumann K. (Germany), Eggers K. (Belgium), Fibiger
S. (Denmark), Leahy M. (Ireland), Andrade C.R.F. (Brazil), Blomgren M. (USA), Boucand V. (France), Cook F.
(UK)
TUESDAY 24/8/2010
14.00-15.15 FP27
14.00-15.15
BALLROOM II
FREE PRESENTATIONS: Child Language
Moderators: Fernandes F. (Brazil), Giouvanis E. (Greece)
14.00-14.15 FP27.1 OBJECT AND ACTION NAMING PATTERNS IN CHILDREN WITH SLI AND WFD: A NEW LINGUISTIC
PERSPECTIVE FROM CYPRIOT GREEK
Kambanaros M.* (Cyprus), Grohmann K.K. (Cyprus)
14.15-14.30 FP27.2 EVALUATING THE MORPHOSYNTACTIC DEVELOPMENT OF CHILDREN SPEAKING AN INFLECTED
14.30-14.45 FP27.3 LANGUAGE: WORD AND PARADIGM (WP) MODEL VERSUS MEAN LENGTH OF UTTERANCE (MLU)
Leventi Irini* (Greece)
THE ROLE OF LANGUAGE EXPOSURE: BILINGUAL PERFORMANCE ON A NONWORD REPETITION TASK
Brandeker Myrto*, Thordardottir Elin (Canada)
14.45-15.00 FP27.4 INFANTS’ LISTENING BIAS TO THE COMMON STRESS-PATTERN IN HEBREW:AN EVIDENCE FOR
LANGUAGE SPECIFIC INFLUENCE
Segal O.*, Kishon-Rabin L. (Israel)
15.00-15.15 FP27.5 THE ROLE OF MORPHO-PHONOLOGICAL SALIENCE IN TENSE MARKING IN GREEK AND CYPRIOT SLI
CHILDREN
Mastropavlou M. (Greece), Petinou K.* (Cyprus), Tsimpli Ianthi Maria (Greece)
TUESDAY 24/8/2010
14.00-15.15
BALLROOM III
14.00-15.15 SY10IALP AUDIOLOGY COMMITTEE SYMPOSIUM: Assessing and Treating a Hearing
Loss Appropriately: Practical Know-How for Phoniatricians and Logopedists
Moderators: Neumann K. (Germany), Kambanaros M. (Greece)
14.00-14.15 SY10.1 OBJECTIVE AUDIOLOGIC ASSESSMENT OF HEARING DISORDERS IN EARLY CHILDHOOD
14.15-14.30 SY10.2 PRESBYCUSIS INVESTIGATION AND PREVENTION STRATEGIES IN CHINA
Hoth S.H.* (Germany)
Li X.L.* (China)
14.30-14.45 SY10.3 AUDITORY PROCESSING DISORDERS IN THE BLUE MOUNTAINS HEARING STUDY - POSSIBLE
14.45-15.00 SY10.4 IMPLICATIONS FOR HEARING AID FITTINGS IN AN OLDER POPULATION
Newall P.*, Newall C., Hartley D., Golding M., Mitchell P. (Australia)
PHONOLOGICAL AWARENESS IN COCHLEAR IMPLANTED CHILDREN
Mikic B.*, Miric D., Ostojic S., Mikic M., Arsovic N. (Serbia)
15.00-15.15 SY10.5 AN EVIDENCE-BASED REVIEW OF THE BENEFITS OF COMPUTER-BASED AUDITORY TRAINING (CBAT)
FOR CHILDREN WITH LANGUAGE, LEARNING AND READING DIFFICULTIES AND WITH AUDITORY
PROCESSING DEFICITS
Bamiou D.-E.* (UK), Loo J. (Singapore), Campbell N. (UK), Luxon L. (UK)
TUESDAY 24/8/2010
14.00-14.45 FP28
14.00-15.30
YPSILON 1,2,3
FREE PRESENTATIONS: Dysphagia
Moderators: Watkin K.L. (USA), Litinas N. (Greece)
14.00-14.15 FP28.1 ADDRESSING OROPHARYNGEAL DYSPHAGIA POST STROKE WITH NEUROSTIMULATION
INTERVENTIONS: A PRELIMINARY STUDY
Michou E.*, Mistry S., Jefferson S., Singh S., Rothwell J., Hamdy S. (UK)
38
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
14.15-14.30 FP28.2 THE EFFECTS OF TRANSIENT CORTICAL DISRUPTION ON SWALLOWING PHYSIOLOGY
Humbert I.A.* (USA)
14.30-14.45 FP28.3 REVERSAL OF A UNILATERAL FOCAL “VIRTUAL LESION” ON HUMAN SWALLOWING MOTOR CORTEX
BY PAIRED PERIPHERAL AND CORTICAL STIMULATION: FURTHER EVIDENCE ON SWALLOWING
PERFORMANCE
Michou E.*, Mistry S., Jefferson S., Rothwell J., Hamdy S. (UK)
14.45-15.30 SS03
SHORT SEMINAR ON DYSPHAGIA
14.45-15.30 SS03.1PHARYNGEAL MIS-SEQUENCING AS A PATHOPHYSIOLOGIC FEATURE OF DYSPHAGIA: IMPLICATIONS
FOR MOTOR CONTROL, DIAGNOSIS AND REHABILITATION
Huckabee M.L.*, Collings A. B. (New Zealand)
TUESDAY 24/8/2010
14.00-15.30
YPSILON 4,5
14.00-15.30 SY09BIALP EDUCATION IN SLP COMMITTEE SYMPOSIUM: Educating SLP’s for the Global
Community (PART II)
Moderators: Cheng L.L.-R. (USA), Kotsopoulos A. (Greece)
14:00-15:30 SY09B.1 ADVANCED EDUCATION AND SPECIALIZATION IN SPEECH-LANGUAGE PATHOLOGY
Lehtihalmes M.* (Finland)
TUESDAY 24/8/2010
14.00-15.30
14.00-15.30 FP29
FREE PRESENTATIONS: Voice
14.00-14.15 FP29.1 STROBOSCOPICAL EXAMINATION WITH FIBERSCOPE,TRICKS AND PITFALLS
VIP LOUNGE
Moderators: Svec J. (Czech Republic), Papaliou M. (Greece)
Lindestad P.A.* (Sweden)
14.15-14.30 FP29.2 MEASURES OF FUNDAMENTAL FREQUENCY AND VOICE INTENSITY IN MALE-TO-FEMALE
TRANSSEXUAL CLIENTS USING AN AMBULATORY PHONATION MONITOR IN DAILY LIFE
Sodersten M.*, Larsson H., Nygren U., Holmberg EB (Sweden)
14.30-14.45 FP29.3 QUALITATIVE AND QUANTITATIVE ASPECTS OF THE ELECTROGLOTTOGRAPHY IN SINGERS WITH
DIFFERENT GLOTTIC CONTACT PATTERNS
Cecconello L.A.* (Argentina)
14.45-15.00 FP29.4 PHONATORY DEVIATION DIAGRAM - PDD IN CLINICAL VOICE
15.00-15.15 FP29.5 THE APPLICATION OF ACUPUNCTURE TO DIFFERENT TYPES OF PHONOTRAUMATIC LESIONS
Pifaia L.R., Madazio G.*, Behlau M. (Brazil)
Kwong E. Y.-L., Yiu E. M.-L*., Tse F. W., Lin Z.-X. (Hong Kong)
15.15-15.30 FP29.6 CHARACTERISTICS OF SINGER’S FORMANT IN PROFESSIONAL OPERATIC SINGERS VS. PROFESSIONAL
JAZZ SINGERS
DeJonckere P.H. (Belgium)
TUESDAY 24/8/2010
14.00-15.15 FP30
14.00-15.15
OMEGA
FREE PRESENTATIONS: Child Language
Moderators: Westby C. (USA), Vlassopoulos M. (Greece)
14.00-14.15 FP30.1 NOUN INFLECTION MORPHOLOGY IN THE GREEK LANGUAGE. A COMPARISON STUDY OF DYSLEXICS
AND NORMALLY DEVELOPING CHILDREN
Grammenou A.* (Greece)
14.15-14.30 FP30.2 THE EXPERIENCE AND IMPACT OF SPEECH IMPAIRMENT IN CHILDHOOD THROUGH THE EYES OF
CHILDREN AND THEIR FAMILIES
Mc Cormack J.*, McLeod S., McAllister L., Harrison L. (Australia)
14.30-14.45 FP30.3 SPONTANEOUS AND ELICITED NARRATIVES OF CHILDREN WITH AUTISM SPECTRUM DISORDERS:
COMPARATIVE DATA.
Andrianopoulos M.V.*, Zaretsky E., Velleman S.L., Boucher M.J., Pecora L., Felton J. (USA)
14.45-15.00 FP30.4 READING COMPREHENSION AND FLUENCY VALUES IN BRAZILIAN STUDENTS WITH READING
15.00-15.15 FP30.5 COMPLAINTS
Nascimento T.A., Arnaut M.A.*, Kida A.S.B., Carvalho C.A., Avila C.R.B. (Brazil)
AUTISM SPECTRUM DISORDERS SCREENING AND DIAGNOTIC PRACTICES: A SURVEY OF PHYSICIANS
39
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
Coufal K.L.*, Self T., Rajagopalan J. (USA)
TUESDAY 24/8/2010
14.00-15.30
OMIKRON HALL
14.00-15.30 FP31
FREE PRESENTATIONS: Voice
14.00-14.15 FP31.1 METAPHORS IN VOCAL PEDAGOGY: A RESEARCH ON IMAGERY IN DIFFERENT STYLES OF SINGING
14.15-14.30 FP31.2 AN EFFECTIVE VOICE TRAINING PROTOCOL FOR FUTURE TEACHERS
14.30-14.45 FP31.3 COPING STRATEGIES IN VOICE DISORDERS
14.45-15.00
Moderators: Khidr A.A. (USA), Chelidoni M. (Greece)
Sousa J.M.* (Brazil)
Timmermans B.*, Coveliers Y., Van Looy L. (Belgium)
Oliveira G.* (Brazil), Epstein Ruth (UK), Hirani S. (UK), Behlau M. (Brazil)
FP31.4 BODY PAIN RELATED WITH VOICE USAGE IN CLASSICAL CHORAL SINGERS AND GENERAL POPULATION
Behlau M.*, Guerrieri A.C., Vaiano T. (Brazil)
15.00-15.15 FP31.5 VOCAL ABUSE IN SINGERS, DUE TO PERFORMING ENVIRONMENT AND LIFESTYLE. A COMPARISON
15.15-15.30 FP31.6 BETWEEN GREEK ENTERTAINMENT AND GREEK MUSICAL SINGERS’
Prachali A.* (Greece), Epstein Ruth (UK), Newman S. (UK), Hirani S. (UK)
THE TEACHER’S VOICE: 15 YEAR ANALYSIS OF SLP CONTRIBUTION TO THE FIELD
Dragone M.L.S., Ferreira L.P., Gianinni S.P.P., Zenari M.S., Vieira V.P., Behlau M*. (Brazil)
TUESDAY 24/8/2010
16.00-16.45 SS04
16.00-17.30
BALLROOM I
SHORT SEMINAR ON FLUENCY
Moderators: Bosshardt H.-G. (Germany), Fourlas G. (Greece)
16.00-16.45 SS04.1 GENETIC AND ENVIRONMENTAL RISK FACTORS FOR DEVELOPMENT OF STUTTERING, CLUTTERING
AND CHILDHOOD SPEECH-LANGUAGE DISORDERS
Fibiger S.* (Denmark), Fagnani Corrado (Italy), Skytthe Axel (Denmark), Hjelmborg Jacob v. B. (Denmark)
16.45-17.30 FP32
16.45-17.00 FP32.1 FREE PRESENTATIONS ON VOICE
VOICE PROBLEM AND ITS SYMPTOMS IN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL TEACHERS
Faham Maryam*, Jalile vand Nahid, Torabi Nejad Farhad (Iran)
17.00-17.15 FP32.2 COMPARATIVE STUDY OF INTENTION OF TV REPORTERS’ VOICES IN READING TWO NEWS TEXTS
17.15-17.30 FP32.3 WITH DIFFERENT INTENTIONS
Torres M.L.G.M.*, Behlau B. (Brazil)
REHABILITATION OF VOICE AND SPEECH AT THE LARINGECTOMY'S
Vasiljevic S.*, Pantelic N., Filipovic V., Savic M., Nikolic S., Petrovic J., Savic V. (Serbia)
TUESDAY 24/8/2010
16.00-17.30
16.00-17.30 SS05
SHORT SEMINAR ON MOTOR SPEECH DISORDERS
16:00-16.45 SS05.1 DELIVERY OF SPEECH-LANGUAGE THERAPY IN PARKINSON’S DISEASE
BALLROOM II
Moderators: Goldberg L. (USA), Giouvani E. (Greece)
Kalf J.G.*, de Swart B.J.M., Bloem B.R., Munneke M. (Netherlands)
16.45-17:30 SS05.2 ASSESSING AND TREATING MOTOR SPEECH DISORDERS VIA TELEREHABILITATION: BENEFITS AND
BARRIERS
Theodoros D.G.*, (Australia)
TUESDAY 24/8/2010
16.00-16.45
BALLROOM III
16.00-16.45 SS06SHORT SEMINAR: Auditory Event-Related Potentials as a Measure of Central
Auditory Processing
Moderators: Neumann K. (Germany), Kambanaros M. (Greece)
16.00-16.15 SS06.1 AUDITORY BRAIN EVENT-RELATED POTENTIALS (ERPs), CENTRAL AUDITORY PROCESSING, AND
LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT IN CHILDREN
Jansson-Verkasalo E.*, Korpilahti P., (Finland)
16.15-16.30 SS06.2 ABERRANT AUDITORY AND SPEECH PROCESSING LINKED WITH DYSLEXIA – A LONGITUDINAL
FOLLOW-UP OF BRAIN RESPONSES
40
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
Leppanen P.H.T.*, Hamalainen J., Guttorm T.K., Torppa M., Puolakanaho A., Poikkeus A-M., Eklund K.M.,
Lyytinen P., Lyytinen H., (Finland)
16.30-16.45 SS06.3 EFFICACY OF AUDITORY TRAINING ON CENTRAL AUDITORY PROCESSING DISORDER IN CHILDREN
WITH SLI
Ervast L.M.*, Leppanen P.H.T., Heinanen K., Zachau S., Rytky S., Luotonen M., Korpilahti P., (Finland)
TUESDAY 24/8/2010
16.00-17.30
YPSILON 1,2,3
16.00-17.30 SE03
SEMINAR ON DYSPHAGIA
16.00-17.30 SE03.1 EARLY INTERVENTION: ORAL PLACEMENT THERAPY FOR CHILDREN WITH DOWN SYNDROME
Moderators: Huckabee M.L (New Zealand), Sidera V. (Greece)
Rosenfeld-Johnson S.*, Bahr D., (USA)
TUESDAY 24/8/2010
16.00-17.30 SE04
16.00-17.30
YPSILON 4,5
SEMINAR ON EDUCATION FOR SPEECH AND LANGUAGE PATHOLOGY
Moderators: Grech H. (Malta), Kalomiris G. (Greece)
16.00-17.30 SE04.1 THE UNITED NATIONS CONVENTION ON THE RIGHTS OF PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES (UN-CRPD):
THE FIRST HUMAN RIGHTS TREATY OF THE 21ST CENTURY AND ITS RELEVANCE TO SPEECHLANGUAGE-HEARING PROFESSIONALS
Yee M. J.*, Tan G. T., Galera R., Cheng L.R.L., Tom K., (USA)
TUESDAY 24/8/2010
16.00-17.30
VIP LOUNGE
16.00-17.30 SE05
SEMINAR ON CHILD LANGUAGE
16.00-17.30 SE05.1 UTILIZING CRITERION-REFERENCED ASSESSMENTS AS A BASELINE FOR NARRATIVE INTERVENTION
Moderators: Coufal K.L. (USA), Papaliou M. (Greece)
Klecan-Aker Joan S.*, (USA)
TUESDAY 24/8/2010
16.00-17.30 SE06
16.00-17.30
OMEGA
SEMINAR ON VOICE
Moderators: Oates J. (Australia), Kolintza G. (Greece)
16.00-17.30 SE06.1 ACOUSTIC MEASUREMENT OF DYSPHONIA SEVERITY: INTRODUCING THE ACOUSTIC VOICE QUALITY
INDEX
Maryn Y.*, (Belgium)
TUESDAY 24/8/2010
16.00-17.30
16.00-16.45 SS07
SHORT SEMINAR: Voice Evaluation Protocol in Greek
16.00-16.45 SS07.1
VOICES EVALUATION PROTOCOL IN GREEK
OMIKRON HALL
Moderators: Amir O. (Israel), Papathanasiou I. (Greece)
Papathanasiou I.*, Protopapas A. (Greece)
16.45-17.30 SSY03 SHORT SYMPOSIUM ON VOICE
16.45-17.00 SSY03.1 VOCAL FATIGUE IN TEACHERS
Koloni E.*, Pomoni M., Protopapas A., Papathanasiou I., (Greece)
17.00-17.15 SSY03.2 EFFECT OF DEEP BRAIN STIMULATION ON VOICE AND SPEECH IN PATIENTS WITH PARKINSON’S
DISEASE
Deligiorgi G.*, Lolakidou A., Protopapas A., Themistocleous M., Kasselimis D., Boviatsis E.,
Sakkas D., Papathanasiou I. (Greece)
17.15-17.30 SSY03.3 VOICES AND SPEECH CHANGES PRE AND POST MENOPAUSE WOMEN
Papathanasiou I.*, Kassimati A., Gioti M., Protopapas A. (Greece)
41
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
Wednesday 25/8/2010
WEDNESDAY 25/8/2010
13.30-15.00
BALLROOM I
13.30-15.00 SE08
SEMINAR ON EDUCATION FOR SPEECH AND LANGUAGE PATHOLOGY
13.30-15.00 SE08.1 CENTER OF EXCELLENCE IN EARLY INTERVENTION
Moderators: Chantrain H. (Belgium), Kotsopoulos A.(Greece)
Higdon CW*, Ivy L., Vaughan L., Moore L., (USA)
WEDNESDAY 25/8/2010
13.30-15.00
BALLROOM ΙI
13.30-15.00 SY11
SYMPOSIUM ON MULTILINGUAL AFFAIRS
13.30-15.00 SY11.1 Communication Disorders in Multicultural International Populations
Moderators: Grech H. (Malta), Kitsona M. (Greece)
Battle Dolores* (USA), Robinson Tommie (Brazil), Qualls Constance (Brazil), Wilson Freda (Brazil),
Behlau M. (Brazil), Grech H. (Malta)
WEDNESDAY 25/8/2010
13.30-14.45 FP33
13.30-14.45
BALLROOM ΙΙI
FREE PRESENTATIONS: Cognitive Linguistic Impairments
Moderators: Worrall L.(Australia), Karakoulaki H. (Greece)
13.30-13.45 FP33.1 PROGRESSION OF LINGUISTIC AND OTHER NEUROPSYCHOLOGICAL DEFICITS IN A PHONOLOGICAL
13.45-14.00 FP33.2 VARIANT OF PRIMARY PROGRESSIVE APHASIA
Ogawa N.*, Nishio Y., Takagi M., Iizuka O., Endo K., Mori E., (Japan)
Factors affecting access to care following traumatic brain injury
O’Callaghan A. M.*, (Australia)
14.00-14.15 FP33.3 EFFECTIVENESS OF A LANGUAGE AND COGNITIVE STIMULATION PROGRAM FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH
MILD COGNITIVE IMPAIRMENT
Karpathiou N.*, Efthymiou A., Dimakopoulou E., Nikolaou C., Sakka P., Bersimis S., (Greece)
14.15-14.30 FP33.4 FLUENCY RATES FOR NEUROLOGICALLY TYPICAL AND ATYPICAL ADULTS
14.30-14.45 FP33.5 Stimulation of auditing verbal perception at awake craniotomy
İ. Maviş*, (Turkey)
Kluzova M.*, Galanda M., Galanda T., Donath V., Bullova J., (Slovakia)
WEDNESDAY 25/8/2010
13.30-14.45 FP34
13.30-14.45
YPSILON 1,2,3
FREE PRESENTATIONS:Dysphagia
Moderators: Watkin K. (USA), Lambou M. (Greece)
13.30-13.45 FP34.1 PATIENT REPORTED SPEECH AND SWALLOWING OUTCOME AFTER CHEMORADIATION FOR HEAD
13.45-14.00 FP34.2 AND NECK CANCER
Rinkel R.N.P.M., Verdonck-de Leeuw I.M.*, Buter J., Doornaert P., Langendijk JA., de Bree R., Leemans CR., (Netherlands)
SWALLOWING DIFFICULTIES IN PATIENTS WITH DEMENTIA
Sakellariou V.*, Matiatou A., Giannika P., Sakka P., Papathanasiou I., (Greece)
14.00-14.15 FP34.3 PROSPECTIVE SCREENING FOR PATIENT REPORTED SPEECH AND SWALLOWING PROBLEMS IN HEAD
AND NECK CANCER PATIENTS VIA A TOUCH SCREEN COMPUTER ASSISTED DATA COLLECTION
SYSTEM
Cnossen I.C.*, de Bree R., Rinkel R.N.P.M., Leemans CR., Verdonck-de Leeuw I.M., (Netherlands)
14.15-14.30 FP34.4 THE ‘DEGLUTITION HANDICAP INDEX’ A SELF-ADMINITRATED DYSPHAGIA-SPECIFIC QUALITY OF LIFE
14.30-14.45 FP34.5 QUESTIONNAIRE: TEMPORAL RELIABILITY
Woisard V.*, (France)
CLINICAL MANAGEMENT OF DYSPHAGIC PATIENTS WITH KNOWN ASPIRATION OF THIN LIQUIDS
Karagiannis M. JP*, (Australia)
41
42
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
WEDNESDAY 25/8/2010
13.30-14.45
YPSILON 4,5
13.30-14.45 FP35
FREE PRESENTATIONS:Voice
13.30-13.45 FP35.1 FEMALE VOICE IN PUBERTY: THE CHANGES OF VOICE PITCH RANGE AND USUAL SPOKEN PITCH
13.45-14.00 FP35.2 CORRELATION OF VOCAL TRACT CROSS SECTIONAL PLANES WITH VOICE AND THROAT SYMPTOMS
14.00-14.15 FP35.3 VOICE PROBLEMS AND ASSOCIATED DISEASES IN PROFESSIONAL VOICE USERS
14.15-14.30 FP35.4 THE VOCAL FUNCTION OF THE PATIENTS AFTER COBLATION MICROSURGERY OF THE LARYNX
Moderators: Svec J. (Czech Republic), Papaliou M. (Greece)
Yoshioka H.*, (Japan)
Geneid A.*, Ronko M., Vuotilainen R., Airaksinen L., Toskala E., Alku P., Vilkman E., (Finland)
Markowska R., Szkielkowska A., Ratynska J., Wlodarczyk E., Skarżyński H., (Poland)
Svistushkin V.M., Isaev V.M., Osipenko E.V.*, Mustafaev D.M., Akhmedov I.N., (Russian Federation)
14.30-14.45 FP35.5 THE DETERMINATION OF THE TYPE OF THE HUMAN VOICE ON THE BASIS OF THE LUNG FUNCTIONAL
DIAGNOSTIC TESTS AND OF THE BASIS OF THE VOLUME OF THE LARYNX, THE TRACHEA AND BIG
BRONCHIAL TUBES
Sumerags Dins*, (Latvia)
WEDNESDAY 25/8/2010
13.30-15.00 SY12
13.30-15.00
VIP LOUNGE
IALP PUBLIC RELATIONS COMMITTEE SYMPOSIUM: Marketing our Professions
Moderators: Goldberg L. (USA), Frangoulis A. (Greece)
13.30-13.45 SY12.1 MARKETING OUR PROFESSIONS: CHANGING STRATEGIES - MARKETING AND NEGOTIATING FROM
13.45-14.00 SY12.2 ONE YEAR TO ANOTHER
Kjaer B.*, (Denmark)
MARKETING OUR PROFESSIONS: FACILITATING GLOBAL OUTREACH AND CULTURAL COMPETENCY
Tullos D.*, (USA)
14.00-14.15 SY12.3 MARKETING OUR PROFESSIONS: EXPLORING A MULTIDISCIPLINARY APPROACH: ONE UNIQUE
SYSTEM
Kalf J.G.*, (Netherlands)
14.15-14.30 SY12.4 MARKETING OUR PROFESSIONS: CREATING A GLOBALLY-CONNECTED ENVIRONMENT: HOW WE CAN
WORK TOGETHER
Coufal K.L.*, (USA)
14.30-14.45 SY12.5 MARKETING OUR PROFESSIONS: A Framework for Discussion
14.45-15.00 SY12.6 Increasing Inter-Professional Education: The CLARION example
Goldberg L.*, (USA)
Goldberg L.*, (USA)
WEDNESDAY 25/8/2010
13.30-15.00 SE09
13.30-15.00
OMEGA
SEMINAR ON MOTOR SPEECH DISORDERS
Moderator: Leftheri K. (Greece)
13:30-15:00 SE09.1 TREATMENT OF CHILDREN WITH SPEECH ORAL PLACEMENT DISORDERS (OPDS): A PARADIGM
EMERGES (BAHR & ROSENFELD-JOHNSON, IN PRESS)
Bahr D., Rosenfeld-Johnson S.*, (USA)
WEDNESDAY 25/8/2010
13.30-15.00
THETA - SIGMA - DELTA
13.30-15.00 SS08SHORT SEMINAR ON EDUCATION FOR SPEECH AND LANGUAGE PATHOLOGY
Moderator: Cheng L.L.-R., (USA), Litinas N. (Greece)
13.30-15.00 SS08.1 LANGUAGE INTERVENTION TECHNICIANS A SOLUTION TO THE GLOBAL PAUCITY OF SPEECH
LANGUAGE PATHOLOGY SERVICES
Hus Y.*, (Canada)
13.30-15.00 SS09SHORT SEMINAR ON ALTERNATIVE AND AUGMENTATIVE COMMUNICATION
14.15-15.00 SS09.1 WHAT CAN YOU DO WITH A COMPUTER FOR AAC AND LITERACY
McCain P.*, (USA)
43
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
WEDNESDAY 25/8/2010
16.00-17.30 SE10
16.00-17.30
BALLROOM I
SEMINAR ON EDUCATION FOR SPEECH AND LANGUAGE PATHOLOGY
Moderators: Cheng L.L.-R., (USA), Kotsopoulos A.(Greece)
16:00-17:30 SE10.1 EMBEDDING EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE: WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS FOR SLT PROFESSIONAL
EDUCATION AND TRAINING?
Roddam Hazel*, Skeat J., Leslie P., McCurtin A., Citro R., (United Kingdom)
WEDNESDAY 25/8/2010
16.00-17.30
BALLROOM ΙI
16.00-17.30 SE11
SEMINAR ON MULTILINGUAL AFFAIRS
16:00-17:30 SE11.1 Narrative Language Skills of Bilingual Children: The BLLP Project
Moderators: Grech H., (Malta), Kitsona M., (Greece)
Iglesias A.*, Miller J., Rojas R., Nockerts A., (USA)
WEDNESDAY 25/8/2010
16.00-17.30
BALLROOM IΙΙ
16.00-17.30 SE12
SEMINAR ON MOTOR SPEECH DISORDERS
16:00-17:30 SE12.1 EVOLUTION OF EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE: LESSONS LEARNED FROM LSVT LOUD
Moderators: Murdoch B, (Australia), Karakoulaki H..(Greece)
Ramig Lorraine*, Fox Cynthia, (USA)
WEDNESDAY 25/8/2010
16.00-17.15 SY13
16.00-17.15
YPSILON 1,2,3
IALP HISTORY COMMITTEE SYMPOSIUM
Moderators: Duchan J. (USA), Lambou M. (Greece)
16.00-16.15 SY13.1 THE SOCIAL CONSTRUCTION OF COMMUNICATION DISORDERS: AN EXAMPLE FROM ANCIENT
16.15-16.30 SY13.2 GREECE
Duchan Judith*, (USA)
LOGOS, VERBAL AND WRITTEN: A CONCISE APPROACH
Kalomoiris George*, (Greece)
16.30-16.45 SY13.3 HERITABILITY OF DISABILITY TO READ SUBTITLES - 33,000 ADULT TWINS SELF-REPORTED THEIR
DISABILITY WITH A DICHOTOMOUS ANSWER
Fibiger S.* (Denmark), Hjelmborg Jacob v. B. (Denmark), Skytthe Axel (Denmark),
Fagnani Corrado (Italy)
16.45-17.00 SY13.4 QUALITY OF LIFE OF CHILDREN WITH SPECIFIC DEVELOPMENTAL LANGUAGE DISORDERS: PARENTS’
ESTIMATES
Rotsika V., Vlassopoulos M.*, Ginieri-Coccossis M., (Greece)
17.00-17.15 SY13.5 LINGUISTIC AND ACADEMIC SKILLS OF YOUNG ADULTS WITH LANGUAGE OR OTHER DISORDERS IN
CHILDHOOD
Seni M.*, Vlassopoulos M., Rotsika V., Sakellariou A., Yannakis R., (Greece)
WEDNESDAY 25/8/2010
16.00-17.30 SE13
16.00-17.30
YPSILON 4,5
SEMINAR ON CHILD LANGUAGE
Moderators: Romonath R.(Germany), Papaliou M. (Greece)
16:00-17:30 SE13.1 CONSTRUCTIVIST/PLAY BASED PROGRAMS: HOW THEY WORK AND PROBLEMS WITH PROVING
EFFECTIVENESS
Torres I.G.* (USA), Bukhman V. (USA), Westby C. (USA), Rodriguz Garcia L., (New Mexico, USA),
de las Heras Minguez G. (Spain), Calvo J. A ., (Spain)
44
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
WEDNESDAY 25/8/2010
16.00-17.30
VIP LOUNGE
16.00-17.30 SE14
SEMINAR ON AUDIOLOGY
16:00-17:30 SE14.1 (C)APD MANAGEMENT: HOW TO CREATE STRATEGIES FOR AUDITORY TRAINING
Moderators: Neumann K. (Germany), Dimitraki V. (Greece)
gielow I.*, Carvalho L.R.L, Couto M.I.V., Lichtig I. (Brazil)
WEDNESDAY 25/8/2010
16.00-17.30 SSY04
16.00-17.30
OMEGA
SHORT SYMPOSIUM: The language development of prematurely born children Moderators: Gillon G. (New Zealand), Lefteri K. (Greece)
16.00-16.15 SSY04.1 DIFFICULTIES IN CENTRAL AUDITORY PROCESSING AND NAMING ABILITY REMAIN UP TO SCHOOLAGE IN CHILDREN BORN PRETERM
Jansson-Verkasalo E.*, Haverinen S., Suominen K., Valkama A-M., (Finland)
16.15-16.30 SSY04.2 LANGUAGE SKILLS OF THE PREMATURELY BORN VERY-LOW-BIRTH-WEIGHT CHILDREN AT THE END
OF THE SECOND YEAR - FOCUS ON SPONTANEOUS SPEECH AND ON THE EMERGENCE OF GRAMMAR
Stolt S.*, Lehtonen L., Haataja L., Lapinleimu H., (Finland)
16.30-16.45 SSY04.3 LANGUAGE SKILLS OF FINNISH-SPEAKING PRETERM SINGLETONS AT THE CORRECTED AGE OF TWO
YEARS - OUTCOME AFTER CLINICAL TRIALS DURING NEONATAL INTENSIVE CARE
Yliherva A.*, Kuukasjarvi L.,Ylisuvanto M ., Peltoniemi O.M., (Finland)
16.45-17.30 SS10
SHORT SEMINAR ON CHILD LANGUAGE
16.45-17.30 SS10.1 SPEECH UNDER THREE: BUT I CAN’T UNDERSTAND HER
Moderators: Gillon G. (New Zealand), Lefteri K. (Greece)
McCain P.*, (USA)
45
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
Thursday 26/8/2010
08.30-10.30
THURSDAY 26/8/2010
BALLROOM I, ii, iii
08.30-10.30 MR03AUTISM – DEVELOPMENTAL APPROACHES TO UNDERSTANDING AND TREATING
AUTISM
Moderators: Gallagher T. (USA), Kotsopoulos A. (Greece)
Main Presenter: Tony Charman, PhD
Discussants: Herbert Roeyers, PhD
Chair in Autism Education, Department of Psychology and Human Development, Institute of Education,
London, UNITED KINGDOM
Ghent University, Department of Experimental Clinical and Health Psychology Developmental Disorders,
Ghent, BELGIUM
Ioannis Vogindroukas, PhD
Child Psychiatry Unit, Psychiatric Hospital, Thessaloniki, GREECE
THURSDAY 26/8/2010
10.30-11.30
10.30-11.30
PREFUNCTION BALLROOM
POSTER SESSION P126-P191
THURSDAY 26/8/2010
11.30-13.00
BALLROOM I
11.30-13.00 FP36
FREE PRESENTATIONS ON VOICE
11.30-11.45 FP36.1 FONMEDIA, A COMPUTER PROGRAM AND DATABASE FOR PATIENT RECORDINGS
Moderators : Nawka T. (Germany), Mandaka E. (Greece)
Larsson H*, (Sweden)
11.45-12.00 FP36.2 ACOUSTIC, SPECTRAL, TEMPORAL, AND SPEECH CHARACTERISTICS IN YOUNG CHILDREN WITH
12.00-12.15 FP36.3 AUTISM
Andrianopoulos M.V.*, Velleman S. L., Boucher M.J., (USA)
NUMERICAL DESCRIPTION OF THE VOICE RANGE PROFILE BY VOCAL EXTENT MEASURE
Nawka T.*, Moller Andreas, (Germany)
12.15-12.30 FP36.4 ACOUSTIC ANALYSIS OF SUBSTITUTION VOICES : DIFFERENTIATION BETWEEN TRACHEO
ESOPHAGEAL VOICES AND VOICING WITH A VOICE-PRODUCING ELEMENT
Moerman M.B.J*, Wiersma A.L., Martens J.P., DeJonckere P.H., (Belgium)
12.30-12.45 FP36.5 LARYNGOTOPOGRAPH FOR HIGH-SPEED DIGITAL IMAGES OF NORMAL AND PATHOLOGICAL VOCAL
12.45-13.00 FP36.6 FOLD VIBRATORY PATTERNS
Sakakibara K.-I.*, Imagawa H., Yokonishi H., Tayama N., (Japan)
EMOTION AND VOICE: ACOUSTICS AND ELECTROGLOTTOGRAPHIC CHARACTERISTICS
Cecconello L.A.*, Dajer M.E., Golub N., Becerra M., (Argentina)
THURSDAY 26/8/2010
11.30-13.00 FP37
11.30-13.00
BALLROOM II
FREE PRESENTATIONS ON APHASIA
Moderators: Worrall L. (Australia), Vogindroukas I. (Greece)
11.30-11.45 FP37.1 AUDITORY PROCESSING DEFICITS AND DISABILITIES IN PATIENTS WITH STROKE OF THE CENTRAL
AUDITORY PATHWAY
Bamiou D.-E.*, Cox K., Stevens J., Brown M., Luxon L., (United Kingdom)
11.45-12.00 FP37.2 THE EFFECTS OF LOW FREQUENCY REPETITIVE TRANSCRANIAL MAGNETIC STIMULATION (rTMS)
AND SHAM CONDITION rTMS ON BEHAVIOURAL LANGUAGE AND NEUROPHYSIOLOGICAL
MEASURES IN CHRONIC NON-FLUENT APHASIA: CASE STUDY EVIDENCE
Barwood C.H.S, Murdoch Bruce E.*, Riek S., Lloyd D., O’Sullivan J., Wong A., (Australia)
12.00-12.15 FP37.3 EFFECTS OF COMPUTERIZED ANOMIA TREATMENT FOR PERSONS WITH APHASIA: A PRELIMINARY
INVESTIGATION
Corwin M.*, Wells M., Koul R., Dembowski J., (USA)
45
46
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
12.15-12.30 FP37.4 APHASIA AND COMMUNICATION BY MEANS OF CONTEXT BASED HAND HELD COMMUNICATION
BOOK
Myhlendorph L.*, Kirkegaard C., (Denmark)
12.30-12.45 FP37.5 A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW OF COMMUNICATION PARTNER TRAINING IN APHASIA: CLINICAL
RECOMMENDATIONS
Cherney L. R.* (USA), Simmons-Mackie N. (USA), Raymer A. M. (USA), Armstrong E. (Australia),
Holland A. L. (USA)
12.45-13.00 FP37.6 THE DEVELOPMENT OF A TOOL TO GATHER INFORMATION REGARDING THE ACTIVITIES AND
PARTICIPATION OF PERSONS WITH APHASIA IN PORTUGAL
Matos M.A.* (Portugal), Jesus Luis M. (Portugal), Cruice M. (UK), Allen Gomes A., (Portugal)
THURSDAY 26/8/2010
11.30-12.45 SY14A
11.30-12.45
BALLROOM III
ASHA SPONSORED SYMPOSIUM: Autism
Moderators: McNeilly L. (USA), Satzaklis S. (Greece)
11.30-12.15 SY14A.1 ASSESSING LANGUAGE THERAPY RESULTS IN ADOLESCENTS OF THE AUTISM SPECTRUM
Fernandes Fernanda*, (Brazil)
12.15-12.45 SY14A.2 SUPPORTING STUDENTS WITH AUTISM SPECTRUM DISORDERS: CHALLENGES AND DIFFICULTIES ON
THE ROAD TO INCLUSION
Sin K. F.*, (Hong Kong)
THURSDAY 26/8/2010
11.30-12.30 FP38
11.30-12.30
YPSILON 1,2,3
FREE PRESENTATIONS ON AUDIOLOGY
Moderators: Neumann K. (Germany), Kitsona M. (Greece)
11.30-11.45 FP38.1 DETECTING HEARING LOSS IN PERSONS WITH INTELLECTUAL DISABILITIES AT THE SPECIAL
OLYMPICS NATIONAL GAMES IN JAPAN
Itoh H.1 (Japan), Takeuchi H.2 (Japan), Nishiwaki K.3 (Japan), Kojima T.4 (Japan), Herer G.R.5 (USA),
Montgomery J.K.6 (USA)
11.45-12.00 FP38.2 AUDITORY PROCESSING AND SUBJECTIVE BENEFIT OF HEARING AID IN ELDERLY USERS
12.00-12.15 FP38.3 PARENTS’ SUPPORT AND DEVELOPMENT OF NEW LISTENING SKILLS IN CI PRESCHOOL CHILDREN
12.15-12.30 FP38.4 OUTCOMES IN IMPLANTATION OF PATIENTS WITH PRELINGUAL LONG-TERM DEAFNESS
Guedes M. C., Alvarez A.M.M.*, Weber R., Bottino C. M. C., (Brazil)
Dionissieva K.*, (Bulgaria)
Radulescu L. R.*, (Romania)
THURSDAY 26/8/2010
11.30-13.00 FP39
11.30-13.00
YPSILON 4,5
FREE PRESENTATIONS ON DYSPHAGIA
Moderators: Watkin K. (USA), Sidera V. (Greece)
11.30-11.45 FP39.1 EVALUATION OF AN EXERCISE PROTOCOL DURING RADIOTHERAPY TO PREVENT SPEECH,
SWALLOWING AND SHOULDER PROBLEMS IN POSTOPERATIVE ORAL AND OROPHARYNGEAL
CANCER PATIENTS
Cnossen I.C.*, (Netherlands)
11.45-12.00 FP39.2 EVALUATION OF THE EFFECTS OF DYSPHAGIA AND OTHER SYMPTOMS AS THE HERALDS OF
RECURRENCE OF HYPOPHARYNGEAL CANCER
Wang-yu S.W. *, Ko J. Y., Wang C. P., Lou P. J., (Taiwan)
12.00-12.15 FP39.3ENDOSCOPIC DIVERTICULOESOPHAGOSTOMY FOR ZENKER’S DIVERTICULUM: EFFECTS ON SWAL
QOL AND CORRELATION OF VIDEOFLUOROSCOPIC MEASUREMENTS WITH COMPLAINTS CLUSTERS.
Vanderwegen J.*, Van Laer C., (Belgium)
12.15-12.30 FP39.4 CORRELATION STUDY BETWEEN ALTERNATING MOTION RATE AND DURATION OF MOTOR EVENTS
OF SWALLOWING TO LIQUID AND PUDDING CONSISTENCIES
Dias D.A.B, Mourao L.F.*, Guariento M.E., Barcelos I., (Brazil)
12.30-12.45 FP39.5 SELECTING QUALITY INDICATOR FOR INTEGRATED CARE OF SWALLOWING REHABILITATION
PROGRAMS IN HOSPITAL SETTINGS: A PROPOSAL OF PANEL OF INDICATORS
Moraes P.D.*, Andrade C.R.F., (Brazil)
12.45-13.00 FP39.6 OROPHARYNGEAL SCINTIGRAPHY : INDICATION FOR ASSESSING THE RISK OF DEVELOPPING
PNEUMONITIS IN SWALLOWING DISORDERS WITH CHRONIC INHALATIONS
Crestani S.*, Woisard V., Victor G., (France)
47
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
THURSDAY 26/8/2010
11.30-12.45 FP40
11.30-12.45
VIP LOUNGE
FREE PRESENTATIONS: Child Language
Moderators: Fox A.(Germany), Giaouris G. (Greece)
11.30-11.45 FP40.1 PROFILE OF METALINGUISTIC AND READING SKILLS OF BRAZILIAN STUDENTS FROM 1st to 4th
GRADES
Cunha V.L.O.*, Capellini S.A., (Brazil)
11.45-12.00 FP40.2 SOCIAL AND EMPLOYMENT INTEGRATION OF ADOLESCENTS WITH AUTISM: AN EDUCATIONAL
TEACHING PROGRAM MOVING FROM SCHOOL TO WORKING PLACE
Bovoli A.*, (Greece)
12.00-12.15 FP40.3 DYSLEXIA: FACT OR FICTION? COMORBIDITY IN LEARNING DISABILITIES
12.15-12.30 FP40.4 AN ALTERNATIVE METHOD OF READING «IMAGE-VOICE-GRAPHEME»
Vanderswalmen R.*, Van Borsel J., Desoete A., (Belgium)
Bougiotopoulou V.*, Andreopoulou A., (Greece)
12.30-12.45 FP40.5 THE NEW VENEZUELAN UNDERGRADUATE CURRICULUM STRATEGY FOR MASSIVE FORMATION ON
PHONOAUDIOLOGY
Hernandez V.R.*, (Venezuela)
THURSDAY 26/8/2010
11.30-12.15 SSY05
11.30-13.00
OMEGA
SHORT SYMPOSIUM: The psychological impact of stuttering
Moderators: Eggers K. (Belgium), Mitropoulou E. (Greece)
11.30-11.45 SSY05.1 EVALUATING THE PSYCHOLOGICAL IMPACT OF STUTTERING
Iverach L., O’Brian S., Block S.*, Menzies R. G., Packman A., Onslow M., (Australia)
11.45-12.00 SSY05.2 MANAGING THE PSYCHOLOGICAL IMPACT OF STUTTERING: A TREATMENT TRIAL
Block S.*, Bryant C., Atkins J., Menzies R. G., St Clare T., Onslow M., Packman A., O’Brian S., Iverach L.,
(Australia)
12.00-12.15 SSY05.3 THE PSYCHOLOGICAL IMPACT OF STUTTERING: IMPLICATIONS FOR TREATMENT OUTCOME AND
12.15-13.30 SS11
RELAPSE
Iverach L., O’Brian S., Block S.*, Menzies R. G., Packman A., Onslow M., (Australia)
SHORT SEMINAR ON CHILD LANGUAGE
Moderators: Eggers K. (Belgium), Mitropoulou E. (Greece)
12.15-13.30 SS11.1 THE PHYSIOPATHOLOGICAL BASIS OF DYSLEXIA AS A GUIDE TO AN INTERDISCIPLINARY
INDIVIDUALIZED APPROACH OF DYSLEXICS
Pinto-De-Almeida A. F.*, (Portugal)
THURSDAY 26/8/2010
11.30-13.00
11.30-13.00 FP41
FREE PRESENTATIONS ON VOICE
11.30-11.45 FP41.1 VOICE (VRP) AND SPEECH RANGE PROFILE (SRP) IN THE VOICE CLINIC
OMIKRON HALL
Moderators: Behlau M. (Brazil), Karakoulakis E. (Greece)
Moraes M.*, Behlau M., (Brazil)
11.45-12.00 FP41.2 CORRELATION BETWEEN VOICE VARIABILITY MEASURES AND PERCEPTUAL ANALYSIS IN MOTOR
SPEECH DISORDERS, ELDERLY AND YOUTH.
Moraes M.*, Padovani Marina, Madazio G., Gielow I., Behlau M., (Brazil)
12.00-12.15 FP41.3 BENEFITS OF THE FIBER OPTIC VERSUS THE ELECTRET MICROPHONE IN VOICE AMPLIFICATION
12.15-12.30 FP41.4 QUALITATIVE AND QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS OF VOCAL DYNAMIC VISUAL PATTERS
12.30-12.45 FP41.5 “SINGING LIFE” GALA’S CHORAL – LARYNGECTOMIZED SUPPORT GROUP
12.45-13.00 FP41.6 VOCAL TRACT MORPHOMETRY OF ADULT WOMEN WITHOUT VOCAL COMPLAINTS: AN MRI STUDY
Kyriakou K.*, Fisher H., (USA)
Dajer M.E.*, Andrade Sobrinho F.A., Pereira J.C., (Brazil)
Martins V.*, Santana M., Bastos J.R., Brito E., Sehn F., Gadenz S., Sbaraini L., Macedo T., Sperb D.,
Fontana C., (Brazil)
Yamasaki R.*, Behlau M., Yamashita H., do Brazil O., (Brazil)
48
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
THURSDAY 26/8/2010
14.00-15.30 FP42
14.00-15.30
BALLROOM I
FREE PRESENTATIONS ON VOICE
Moderators: Behlau M. (Brazil), Mandaka E. (Greece)
14.00-14.15 FP42.1 ACOUSTIC AND NEUROMOTOR SPEECH CHARACTERISTICS OF AUTISM, CHILDHOOD APRAXIA OF
SPEECH AND NEUROTYPICALLY DEVELOPING CHILDREN
Andrianopoulos M.V.*, Velleman S. L., Boucher M.J., Perkins J., Pecora L., Zaretsky E., (USA)
14.15-14.30 FP42.2 VOICE CHARACTERISTICS IN WOMEN WITH CONGENITAL ADRENAL HYPERPLASIA DUE TO 21
HYDROXYLASE DEFICIENCY
Nygren U.*, Sodersten M., Falhammar H., Thoren M., Hagenfeldt K., Nordenskjold A., (Sweden)
14.30-14.45 FP42.3 TASK-SPECIFIC RESPONSES IN PATIENTS WITH SPASMODIC DYSPHONIA
14.45-15.00 FP42.4 DO CLIENT BEHAVIORAL AND LEARNING SKILLS AFFECT VOICE THERAPY OUTCOMES?
Kariyasu M.*, Nishizawa N., Tsuda M., (Japan)
Khidr Aliaa*, (USA)
15.00-15.15 FP42.5 DESCRIPTION OF THE FUNDAMENTAL FREQUENCY BETWEEN MEN AND WOMEN LARYNGECTOMY
15.15-15.30 FP42.6 WITH TRACHEOESOPHAGEAL.
Reis N.*, Marcos A.R.H., Neto A.R.L., (Brazil)
VOCAL PROFILE RANGE OF TELEVISION NEWSCASTERS
Stier M.A.*, Feijo D., Madazio G., (Brazil)
THURSDAY 26/8/2010
14.00-15.15
BALLROOM II
14.00-15.15 FP43
FREE PRESENTATIONS: Aphasia and Related Communication Disorders
14.00-14.15 FP43.1 APHASIC GROUP: LANGUAGE PRACTICES
14.15-14.30 FP43.2 USING THE SOCIAL MODEL TO MAKE SENSE OF MENTAL HEALTH DISORDERS: AN SLP PERSPECTIVE
Moderators: Corthals P. (Belgium), Vogindroukas I. (Greece)
Santana AP*, Guarinello AC, Berberian AP, Massi G, (Brazil)
Walsh I.P., (Ireland)
14.30-14.45 FP43.3 WORKING ALONGSIDE PEOPLE WITH SCHIZOPHRENIA: DIRECTIONS FOR SPEECH AND LANGUAGE
THERAPY PRACTICE.
Brophy J.*, Walsh I.P., (Ireland)
14.45-15.00 FP43.4 VERB DEFICIT IN PD PATIENTS
15.00-15.15 FP43.5 A REVIEW OF THE PROMPTING PHENOMENA IN APHASICS PATIENTS
Rodrigues I.T*, Castro-Caldas A., Coelho M., Rosa M.M., (Portugal)
Marinho J.M,*, (Brazil)
THURSDAY 26/8/2010
14.00-15.30 SY14B
14.00-15.30
BALLROOM III
ASHA SPONSORED SYMPOSIUM: AUTISM
Moderators: McNeilly L. (USA), Satzaklis S. (Greece)
14.00-14.45 SY14B.1 CATTLE PRODS TO CHELATION-NAVIGATING THE MAZE OF AUTISM INTERVENTIONS AND THE ROLE
OF EVIDENCE BASED PRACTICE AND SPEECH LANGUAGE PATHOLOGY IN EARLY INTERVENTION FOR
CHILDREN WITH AUTISM
Roberts J.M.A.*, (Australia)
14.45-15.30 SY14B.2 JOINT CONSTRUCTION OF STORIES BY HIGH-FUNCTIONING CHILDREN WITH ASD, USING
TECHNOLOGICAL SETTING DESIGNED TO ENHANCE PEER INTERACTION
Yifat Rachel*, Kupersmitt J., Gal E., Bauminger N, Weiss P. L. T, Stock O., Zancanaro M., Pianesi F., (Israel)
THURSDAY 26/8/2010
14.00-15.30
YPSILON 1,2,3
14.00-15.30 FP44
FREE PRESENTATIONS ON AUDIOLOGY
14.00-14.15 FP44.1 PROOF OF COMMUNICATION AND LANGUAGE FOR BETTER QUALITY OF LIFE
Moderators: Neumann K. (Germany), Kitsona M. (Greece)
Lima Santos T.*, (Brazil)
14.15-14.30 FP44.2 RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT OF A NEW TYPE OF MODERN STANDARD CHINESE SPEECH TEST
MATERIALS WITH MALE AND FEMALE TALKER
Li X.L.*, (China)
49
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
14.30-14.45 FP44.3 HEARING AIDS: VALIDATION OF THE BRAZILIAN VERSION OF THE LISTENING SITUATIONS
QUESTIONNAIRE (LSQ) FOR DEAF CHILDREN
Carvalho L.r.l., Couto M.i.v, Lichtig I.*, (Brazil)
14.45-15.00 FP44.4 PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT EXERCISES FUNCTIONS LISTENING AND SPEAKING
15.00-15.15 FP44.5 SPEECH ADJUSTMENTS TO THE ELDERLY IN COGNITIVELY DEMANDING SITUATION
Nikolic S.*, Savic M., Filipovic V., Petrovic J., Savic M., Savic V., (Serbia And Montenegro)
Hautala T. E.*, (Finland)
15.15-15.30 FP44.6 AUDITORY AND LANGUAGE OUTCOMES IN CHILDREN WITH EARLY DIAGNOSTIC AND TREATMENT
FOR CONGENITAL TOXOPLASMOSIS
Resende L.M.*, Andrade G. M. Q., Azevedo M.F., Perissinoto J., Vieira A.B.C., (Brazil)
THURSDAY 26/8/2010
14.00-15.30 FP45
14.00-15.30
YPSILON 4,5
FREE PRESENTATIONS ON DYSPHAGIA & PHONIATRICS
Moderators: Watkin K. (USA), Sidera V. (Greece)
14.00-14.15 FP45.1 CARBONATED LIQUIDS: HELPING CLINICIANS UNDERSTAND THEIR VALUE AND USE IN DYSPHAGIA
MANAGEMENT
Goldberg L.*, Rajagopalan J., (USA)
14.15-14.30 FP45.2 INCIDENCE OF VOCAL FOLDS PARALYSIS IN PATIENTS WITH BRAIN INSULT IN PHYSICAL MEDICINE &
REHABILITATION HOSPITAL IN KUWAIT
Darwish A.*, (Egypt)
14.30-14.45 FP45.3 SWALLOWING REHABILITATION DATA FROM A BRAZILIAM TEACHING HOSPITAL
14.45-15.00 FP45.4 TREATMENT OF VOCAL FOLD PARALYSIS AFTER THYROIDECTOMY
Moraes P.D.*, Andrade F.C.R., (Brazil)
Konoiko N.*, Romanova Z., (Belarus)
15.00-15.15 FP45.5 ASSESSMENT AND BEHAVIOR THERAPY FOR SWALLOWING PROBLEMS IN BRAIN DAMAGED MOTOR
15.15-15.30 FP45.6 HANDICAPPED CHILDREN
Abou-Elsaad T.*, ElSady S., Abdel-Latif G., (Egypt)
CHARACTERISTICS OF LIPOID PROTEINOSIS
Xu W.*, Han D., Zeng W., (China)
THURSDAY 26/8/2010
14.00-15.30 SS12
14.00-15.30
VIP LOUNGE
SHORT SEMINARS ON VOICE
Moderators: Oates J. (Australia), Giaouris G. (Greece)
14.00-14.45 SS12.1 SPEECH LANGUAGE PATHOLOGIST ACTING AS A MULTI-DIMENSIONAL GUIDE FOR TELEVISION
14.45-15.30 SS12.2 NEWSCASTERS IN BRAZIL
Feijo D.*, (Brazil)
FUNCTIONAL DYSPHONIA AND (C)APD: CLINICAL APPLICATIONS.
Gielow I.*, (Brazil)
THURSDAY 26/8/2010
14.00-15.30
14.00-14.45 SS13
SHORT SEMINAR ON PHONIATRICS
14.00-14.45 SS13.1 VOICE QUALITY ASSESSMENT AMONG PROFESSIONALS
14.45-15.30 SS14
SHORT SEMINAR ON VOICE
OMEGA
Moderators: Nawka T. (Germany), Mitropoulou E. (Greece)
Osipenko E.V.*, Mescherkin A.P., (Russian Federation)
Moderators: Nawka T. (Germany), Mitropoulou E. (Greece)
14.45-15.30 SS14.1 PERCEPTUAL-AUDITORY ANALYSIS OF NORMAL AND DEVIANT VOICES: PRACTICE WITH NUMERICAL
AND VISUAL ANALOG SCALES
Yamasaki R.*, Madazio G., Behlau M., (Brazil)
50
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
THURSDAY 26/8/2010
14.00-15.30
OMIKRON HALL
14.00-15.30 SS15
SHORT SEMINARS ON EDUCATION FOR SPEECH AND LANGUAGE PATHOLOGY
14.00-14.45 SS15.1 EXPLORING STUDENT LEARNING EXPERIENCES IN SPEECH AND LANGUAGE THERAPY
14.45-15.30 SS15.2 THE EFFECT OF INTEGRATED ASSESSMENTS IN COMPETENCY BASED LEARNING OF SLT-STUDENTS
Moderators: Grech H. (Malta), Karakoulakis E. (Greece)
O’Toole C.*, Egan C., Dowds T., (Ireland)
Peek M.*, van Zaalen Y., (Netherlands)
THURSDAY 26/8/2010
16.00-17.30 FP46
16.00-17.30
BALLROOM I
FREE PRESENTATIONS ON VOICE
Moderators: Yiu E. (Hong Kong), Lambou M. (Greece)
16.00-16.15 FP46.1 COMPARISON OF VOCAL OUTCOME BEFORE AND AFTER MEDIALIZATION THYROPLASTY USING A
SILICONE OR TITANIUM IMPLANT
Vanderwegen J.*, van Ardenne N., Van Nuffelen G., De Bodt M., Van de Heyning P., (Belgium)
16.15-16.30 FP46.2 A NEW PROTOCOL FOR AUDIO - PERCEPTUAL ASSESSMENT OF TRACHEO-ESOPHAGEAL SPEECH
AND CORRELATIONS WITH ACOUSTIC MEASUREMENTS
Lundstrom E.*, Hammarberg B., (Sweden)
16.30-16.45 FP46.3 THE RELIGIOUS ORATORY: CASE STUDY
16.45-17.00 FP46.4 PHONATORY DEVIATION DIAGRAM IN VOICE CLINIC
Leite C.*, Barja P., (Brazil)
Madazio G.*, Behlau M., (Brazil)
17.00-17.15 FP46.5 NEURAL NETWORK ANALYSIS TO ASSESS HYPERNASALITY IN PATIENTS TREATED FOR ORAL OR
OROPHARYNGEAL CANCER
de Bruijn MJ., ten Bosch L., Kuik DJ., Langendijk JA., Verdonck-de Leeuw I.M.*, (Netherlands)
17.15-17.30 FP46.6 OBJECTIVE ASSESSMENT OF SPEECH QUALITY IN PATIENTS TREATED FOR A TUMOUR IN THE ORAL
CAVITY OR OROPHARYNX
de Bruijn MJ., Quene H., Langendijk JA., Leemans CR., Verdonck-de Leeuw I.M.*, (Netherlands)
THURSDAY 26/8/2010
16.00-16.45 SSY06
16.00-16.45
BALLROOM II
SHORT SYMPOSIUM ON CHILD LANGUAGE
Moderators: Fox J. (Germany), Vogindroukas I. (Greece)
16.00-16.45 SSY06.1 RATIONALE, PROCEDURES AND PATIENT-REPORTED OUTCOMES OF A DRAMA CLASS FOR
INDIVIDUALS WITH CHRONIC APHASIA
Cherney L. R.*, Oehring A., Whipple K., Rubenstein T., (USA)
THURSDAY 26/8/2010
16.00-17.30 SY14C
16.00-17.30
BALLROOM III
ASHA SPONSORED SYMPOSIUM: AUTISM
Moderators: McNeilly L. (USA), Satzaklis S. (Greece)
16:00-17:30 SY14C.1 GLOBAL PERSPECTIVES IN ASD: SUMMATION AND NEXT STEPS
Watson L. R.*, (USA)
THURSDAY 26/8/2010
16.00-17.30 SE15
16.00-17.30
YPSILON 1,2,3
SEMINAR ON MULTILINGUAL AFFAIRS
Moderators: Grech H. (Malta), Frangoulis A. (Greece)
16:00-17:30 SE15.1 FAMILY-CENTERED EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE: IS THE FAMILY PARADIGMS FRAMEWORK USEFUL TO
COMMUNICATION DISORDER PROFESSIONALS?
Hidecker M.J.C.*, (USA)
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics THURSDAY 26/8/2010
16.00-17.30
YPSILON 4,5
16:00-17:30 SE16 SEMINAR ON DYSPHAGIA
16:00-17:30 SE16.1 NEUROLOGIC DISORDERS AND DYSPHAGIA CASE MANAGEMENT USING FEES
Moderators: Watkin K. (USA), Sidera V. (Greece)
Bergin C.E.*, Gould R.L., (USA)
THURSDAY 26/8/2010
16.00-17.30
VIP LOUNGE
16.00-17.30 SE17
SEMINAR ON VOICE
16:00-17:30 SE17.1 VOICE ERGONOMIC SCREENING IN WORK ENVIRONMENT - HANDBOOK AND CHECKLIST
Moderators: Ma E. (Hong Kong), Kolintza G. (Greece)
Sala E.L.*, Rantala L.M., Hakala S., (Finland)
THURSDAY 26/8/2010
16.00-17.30
16.00-17.30 SE18
SEMINAR ON VOICE
16:00-17:30 SE18.1 EFFICIENCY OF VOICE THERAPY AND QIGONG
OMEGA
Moderators: Behlau M. (Brazil), Leftheri K. (Greece)
Haupt E.M.*, (Germany)
THURSDAY 26/8/2010
16.00-17.30
OMIKRON HALL
16.00-16.45 SS16
SHORT SEMINAR ON EDUCATION FOR SPEECH AND LANGUAGE PATHOLOGY
16.00-16.45 SS16.1 CRITICAL PERSPECTIVES FOR COMMUNICATION SCIENCES
16.45-17.30 SS17 SHORT SEMINAR ON ALTERNATIVE AND AUGMENTATIVE COMMUNICATION
16.45-17.30 SS17.1 MEASURING OUTCOMES IN SPEECH-LANGUAGE THERAPY
51
Moderators: Litinas N., Arsenopoulos V. (Greece)
Hyter Y.D.*, (United States)
Moderators: Litinas N., Arsenopoulos V. (Greece)
Washington K.N.*, Warr-Leeper G.A., (Canada)
52 28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
Information for Presenters
Thank you for sharing your expertise at IALP 2010.
Based on feedback from the most successful
IALP presentations, we would like to make some
suggestions for increasing presentation effectiveness.
These recommendations are directly from attendees’
ratings and remarks on session evaluations. While
we acknowledge that many presenters are very
experienced, we hope these suggestions will be helpful
to all presenters for optimizing presentations for the
IALP audience.
Speaker Ready Room
 The speaker ready corner is located in the ballroom
foyer (please check the “Congress Venue Map” in
order to find the specific place)
 All presentations for oral sessions will be submitted
to the Speaker Ready Corner where they will be
distributed to the appropriate computer by our
technicians.
 LCD projectors and computers will be provided for
all sessions; presentations are preloaded on the
computers inside the session room. You may not
use your own laptop. This is strictly enforced,
in order to avoid or minimize any technical
problem arise.
 There will be wireless microphones for questions,
where needed.
 The computers in the speaker ready corner and
each of the session rooms are exactly alike. If your
presentation looks good in the speaker ready
corner, it will look good in the session. Please note
that if your presentation has audio, you should
inform the technician in the speaker ready corner.
 It is strongly recommended that you deliver your
presentation 2hrs prior to the session, so please be
so kind to deliver your CD-ROM or USB flash disk
on time. Please note that the speaker ready corner
will operate as follows, so please feel free to drop
by and ask questions:
Sunday, August 22nd, 2010:
16.00-18.30
Monday, August 23rd, 2010:
08.00-19.00
Tuesday, August 24th, 2010:
08.00-17.30
Wednesday, August 25th, 2010: 13.30-17.30
Thursday, August 26th, 2010:
08.00-17.30
Presentation Tips
 Allow one-third of your overall time for sharing
ideas, experiences, and issues, as a whole audience
or in small groups.
 Please be so kind to speak slowly, simply and
52
clearly. Make it easier for non-native English
speakers to take meaningful notes and more fully
understand all the content of your presentation.
 Finish your talk on time or early. Respect the break
times. Some presenters think they are doing a
service by giving a longer talk, however, breaks
are planned carefully, and attendees expect and
want them on time.
 It will be very helpful for the attendees to give
them examples during your presentation. Pepper
your own stories and examples throughout your
presentation and describe practical applications
of your main points.
 Also, please be so kind to summarize main points.
Reprise your goal statement at the end of your talk
and link your closing remarks directly to it.
 Plan time to close your presentation with a
summary of your own main points that reflect
the goal statement from the beginning of your
session, including the most relevant points, ideas
and issues raised through audience participation.
 Use your slides as a visual tool, and to remind you
of main points and do not read the text directly off
your slides.
 Refer to points you heard during other
presentations at IALP when appropriate. This helps
promote a community feeling at the conference.
 Remind Attendees About Session Evaluations. A
volunteer will pass these out to attendees for you.
The congress will offer for up to 2.4 ASHA
CEUs (various levels; Professional area).
Proceedings
Proceedings will be available on the IALP website
after the congress, www.ialpathens2010.gr
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
53
Instruction for Poster Presenters
Please find here below important information about poster presentations:
P001-P057
They will be displayed on Monday, August 23rd, 2010
Placement: 08.00-09.00 on 23/8
Poster session: 10.30-11.30 on 23/8 (during that hours you are kindly requested to be in front of your poster)
Dismantling: 17.30-18.30 on 23/8
P058-P125
They will be displayed on Tuesday, August 24th, 2010
Placement: 08.00-09.00 on 24/8
Poster session: 10.30-11.30 on 24/8 (during that hours you are kindly requested to be in front of your poster)
Dismantling: 17.30-18.30 on 24/8
P126-P191
They will be displayed on Thursday, August 26th, 2010
Placement: 08.00-09.00 on 26/8
Poster session: 10.30-11.30 on 26/8 (during that hours you are kindly requested to be in front of your poster)
Dismantling: 17.30-18.30 on 26/8
Important:
Please note that in case you will not follow the above date/time schedule, the Organizing Committee and Triaena
Tours & Congress, are not responsible in case of loss or damage of your poster
53
54
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
Main Presenters', Discussants'
and Moderators' Index
NAME
Amir O.
Apostolopoulos A.
Arsenopoulos V.
Bartolotta T. E.
Battle D.
Behlau M.
Bibas A.
Bosshardt H.-G.
Cabral S.L
Chantrain H.
Charman T.
Chelidoni M.
Cheng L.L.-R.
Corthals P.
Coufal K.L.
Cruice M.
Desylla V.
Dimitraki V.
Duchan J.F.
Eggers K.
Eyal S.
Fernandez F.
Fibiger S.
Fourlas G.
Fox A.
Frangoulis A.
Gallagher T.
Georgieva D.
Gika A.
Giaouris G.
Gillon G.
Giouvani E.
Goldberg L.
Grech H.
Hilari K.
Huckabee M.L.
Hyter Y.
Kalf J.G.
Kalomiris G.
Kambanaros M.
Karakoulakis H.
Karamitsou Ch.
54
PAGE
40
29, 31
30, 33, 51
25, 30, 33
25, 34
47, 48, 51
33
34, 36, 39
30, 32
41
45
36, 39
35, 38, 42, 43
48
40
24
29, 32
30, 32, 44
34, 43
47
26
37
24
34, 36, 39
47, 50
34, 42, 50
29, 45
30
23, 26
47, 49
44
39
39, 42
28, 40, 41, 43, 50
29, 31
40
31
35
24, 40
30, 32, 35, 37, 39
30, 33, 41, 43, 47, 50
23, 26
Khidr A.A.
Kitsona M.
Kolintza G.
Kotsopoulos A.
Koutsoumbakis E.
Lambou M.
Leftheri K.
Litinas N.
Ma E.
Mandaka E.
Martin A.
McNeilly L.
Minaidou D.
Mitropoulou E.
Murdoch B.
Nawka T.
Neumann K.
Oates J.
Papaliou Ch.
Papathanasiou I.
Paquier P.
Peters H.
Pickl G.
Psalida I.
Ramig L.
Roeyers H.
Romonath R.
Rosenfield S.
Rothwell J.C.
Satzaklis S.
Schindler A.
Schulman B.
Sidera V.
Skourogiannis P.
Svec J.
Threats T.T.
Vlassopoulos M.
Vogindroukas I.
Watkin K.L.
Westby C.
Worrall L.
Yiu E.
39
41, 46, 48
40, 51
25, 27, 35, 38, 41, 43, 45, 46
31, 33
41, 43
26, 29, 42, 44, 51
25, 35, 37, 42, 51
51
29, 31, 45, 48
24, 27, 34, 37
33, 46, 48, 50
25, 28
47, 49
23, 28, 31, 43
45, 49
32, 35, 37, 39, 44, 46, 48
40, 49
35, 38, 40, 42, 43
23, 40
23, 26
27
36
24, 27
23
45
24, 27, 43
34
23
46, 48, 50
33
30
40, 46, 49, 51
31, 33
23, 26, 29, 31, 38, 42
34
28, 36, 38
25, 28, 45, 48, 50
35, 37, 41, 46, 49, 51
29, 38
27, 34, 41, 45
36, 50
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics 55
Posters List
P001
P009
INTERFERENCES OF VISUAL STIMULI IN THE WRITTEN
PRODUCTION OF DEAF STUDENTS USERS OF SIGN
LANGUAGE WITHOUT COMPLAINTS OF WRITING
DISORDERS
DISTORTION PRODUCT OTOACUSTIC EMISSIONS IN
CHILDREN WITH LOW AND HIGH RISK FOR HEARING LOSS.
Gomes R.M.G., Lima F.C., Rotger A.A.G., Garcia de Almeida M.L.,
Carnio M.S.*, (Brazil)
P002
Alves da Silva Carvalho Sirley*, Macedo Penna Leticia, de Oliveira
Mares Guia Ana Cristina, Macedo de Resende Luciana Nunes
Brandao Florence, Utsch Gonçalves Denise, (Brazil)
P010
THE SERBIAN SIGN LANGUAGE-FIRST STEP OF
STANDARDIZATION
TYMPANOMETRY AND LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT
IMPAIRMENT: SPECIFIC/NONSPECIFIC LANGUAGE
IMPAIRMENT (SLI/NONSLI).
Dimic N.D.*, Kasic Z, Polovina V, Isakovic, (Serbia and Montenegro)
Hernandez V.R.*, Campos de Rosete M., Calero T.V., (Venezuela)
P003
P011
SIMPLIFICATION OF SYNTACTIC ASPECTS IN PATIENTS
WITH ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE
DIFFERENCES BETWEEN FREQUENCIES OF FORMANTS
F1 AND F0 AND F2 AND F1 IN CHILDREN WITH NORMAL
HEARING AND PROFOUND OR SEVERE HEARING
IMPAIRMENT
Lira J.O, Campanha A.C, Bertolucci P.H., Ortiz K.Z.*, Minett T.S.C.
(Brazil)
Ozbic M.* (Slovenia)
P004
LEXICAL ASPECTS OF THE ORAL NARRATIVE IN PATIENTS
WITH ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE
Lira J.O, Campanha A.C, Bertolucci P.H., Ortiz K.Z.*, Minett T.S.C.
(Brazil)
P012
THE SIMULTANEOUS USE OF ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY AND
PERCEPTUAL MOTOR APPROACH IN THE ACQUISITION OF
READING AND WRITING SKILLS: A CASE STUDY.
Litinas N.*, Zergioti P. (Greece)
P005
NEUROPSYCHOLINGUISTIC ADAPTATION OF THE
MONTREAL-TOULOUSE PROTOCOL FOR BRAZILIAN
PORTUGUESE
P013
Soares-Ishigaki E.C.S. (Brazil), Fonseca R.P. (Brazil), Scherer L.C.
(Brazil), Parente M.A.M.P, (Brazil) Joanett Y. (Canada) Nespoulous
J.L. (France), Ortiz K.Z.* (Brazil)
Shtereva K.* (Bulgaria)
P006
INFLUENCE OF DEMOGRAPHIC VARIABLES ON BRAZILIAN
APHASIC AND NON-APHASIC INDIVIDUALS PERFORMANCE
IN A LIMB PRAXIS BATTERY.
Mantovani-Nagaoka J., Ortiz K.Z.*, (Brazil)
P007
CONTINUUM OF COMPLEXITY AND STRUCTURE OF
PHONOLOGICAL AWARENESS BY BULGARIAN CHILDREN
P014
A comparative analysis based on distinctive
features using the Modified Maximal Oppositions
Model in the treatment of phonological
disorder
Bolli Mota H.*, Keske-Soares M., Bagetti T., Ceron M. (Brazil)
P015
THE INTERFERENCE OF THE LANGUAGE OF MATHEMATICAL
PROCESSING IN APHASIA
ANALYSIS OF HIGHER CORTICAL FUNCTIONS IN
PRIMARY SCHOOL CHILDREN: VALIDATION OF
NEUROPSYCHOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT.
De Luccia Gabriela, Ortiz K.Z.* (Brazil)
Tabaquim M.L.M.* (Brazil)
P008
P016
USEFLNESS OF POLISH LANGUAGE LOW REDUNDANCY
AND DICHOTICH TESTS IN DYSLECTIC CHILDREN
A STUDY OF PHONOLOGICAL PROCESSES EXHIBITED
BY PRESCHOOL CHILDREN; NORMATIVE DATA FROM
HUNGARIAN
Wojnowski W. K.*, Wiskirska-Woznica B., Pruszewicz A.,
Maciejewska B., Demenko G. (Poland)
E.S. Tar (Hungary)*
55
56
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
P017
P027
WRITING AND READING SKILLS AT THE AGE OF 8-10 YEARS
IN CHILDREN WITH INTRAUTERINE GROWTH RESTRICTION
(IUGR)
ADAPTATIVE AND COMMUNICATIVE PERFORMANCES AS
MEASURES OF THE EVOLUTIONAL PATTERN IN AUTISM
SPECTRUM DISORDERS
Partanen L.A.*, Heikkinen M.K., Rissanen N., Makikallio K., Olsen P.,
Yliherva A. (Finland)
Tamanaha AC, Mercadante MT, Marteleto MRF, Perissinoto J.*,
(Brazil)
P018
P028
WORD STRUCTURE ACQUISITION IN GERMAN SPEAKING
CHILDREN WITH AND WITHOUT PROTRACTED
PHONOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENT
DYSPHAGIA IN PARKINSON?S DISEASE -A DYNAMIC
VIDEOFLUOROSCOPIC EVALUATION-
Ullrich A., Romonath R.* (Germany), Bernhardt B. M. (Canada)
P019
READING FLUENCY AND COMPREHENSION IN 8-TO 9YEAR-OLD CHILDREN BORN VERY PRETERM
Nishizawa N*, Oridate N., Mesuda Y., Kariyasu M., Kikuchi S., Takei
A., Homma S., Kudou E., Kasai S., (Japan)
P029
CAPSAICIN CAN RETRIEVES AGE-RELATED SWALLOWING
DYSFUNCTION
Nishikubo K.,* (Japan)
Heikkinen M.K.*, Partanen L.A., Mikkonen Hanna, Kaukola Tuula,
Yliherva A. (Finland)
P030
P020
REHABILITATIVE MANAGEMENT OF OROPHARYNGEAL
DYSPHAGIA IN PATIENT WITH TETANUS
ELECTROGLOTOGRAPHY IN PHONOLOGICAL DISORDERED
CHILDREN USING DEVOICING PHONOLOGICAL PROCESS
Davison M.L.*, Rodrigues P.A., Andrade F.C.R., (Brazil)
Wertzner H.F.* (Brazil)
P031
P021
WORKING INTERDISCIPLINARY IN EDUCATION: PROBLEMAND COMPETENCY- BASED LEARNING
INHIBITORY CONTROL AND NAMING ABILITY IN TYPICALLY
DEVELOPING CHILDREN AT THE AGE OF 5-7 YEARS
Vandevelde S.* (Belgium)
Heikkinen E.*, Kujala T., Jansson-Verkasalo E., (Finland)
P032
P022
THE EFFECTIVENESS OF A REMEDIAL READING TRAINING
PROGRAM WITH THE USE OF A METRONOME (RHYTHM)
FOR THE TREATMENT OF DYSLEXIA
PERFORMANCE OF CHILDREN WITH DOWN SYNDROME IN
SCRRENING TEST DEVELOPMENT DENVER-II
Lamonica D.A.C.*, Prado L.M. Geão M.G. Silva G.K., Ferreira A.T.,
(Brazil)
Katsigri P.*, Van de Craen P. (Belgium), Vakirtzidellis I. (Greece)
P033
P023
PROSODIC ASPECTS OF READING IN STUDENTS WITH
DYSLEXIA
PERFORMANCE OF ORAL AND WRITTEN COMMUNICATION
OF BROTHERS WITH MYELOMENINGOCELE
L.M. Alves1, 2, (Brazil, France) C. Reis2, A. Pinheiro2, S. Capellini3,
(Brazil), M. Lalain4, A. Ghio1 (France)
Lamonica D.A.C.*, Ferreira A.T. Prado L.M.,Crenitte P.A.P., (Brazil)
P024
RECEPTIVE VOCABULARY ABILITY IN CHILDREN WITH
PHENYLKETONURIA AND CONGENITAL HYPOTHYROIDISM
Lamonica D.A.C.*, Ferreira A.T., Silva G.K., Anastacio-Pessan F.L.,
Geão M.G., (Brazil)
P034
IDENTIFICATION OF USE OF LASER ACUPUNCTURE IN
TREATMENT OF STUTTERING
Shafiei B. (Iran)*
P035
P025
LANGUAGE SKILLS OF CHILDREN WHO STUTTER: A METAANALYTICAL REVIEW
LANGUAGE ABILITY PROFILE OF INDIVIDUALS WITH CLEFT
LIP AND PALATE
Ntourou K.*, Conture E. G., Lipsey M. W., (United States)
Maximino L.P.*, Marcelino Fabiana, Abramides Dagma, Feniman
Mariza, Carvalho Fernanda, (Brazil)
P036
P026
GRAMMATICAL ASPECTS IN SPONTANEOUS
COMMUNICATION IN CHILDREN WITH DOWN SYNDROME
Limongi S.C.O.*, Carvalho AMA, Marques SF, Mello P., Andrade RV,
(Brazil)
A SINGLE SUBJECT STUDY ON THE EFFECTS OF AN
INTENSIVE GROUP THERAPY PROGRAM FOR ADULTS WHO
STUTTER
Fourlas G.*, (Greece)
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
P037
P047
DRAMA-THERAPY AS A PART OF GROUP THERAPY FOR
STUTTERING PEOPLE
EVALUATION OF EMG ACTIVITY PF MASTICATORY
MUSCLES IN THE DIFFERENT FACIAL TYPES.
Stanicek P. (PhDr.)*, (Czech Republic)
Vieira M.*, Bommarito S., Miranda A., (Brazil)
P038
EDUCATING FLUENCY SPECIALISTS IN EUROPE: AN
INNOVATIVE PROGRAM
P048
Eggers K.* (Belgium), Leahy M., (Ireland)
VOICE ACOUSTIC ANALYSIS OF PRELINGUAL SEVERE
TO PROFOUND HEARING-IMPAIRED TAIWANESE
ADOLESCENTS
P039
Wang Y.-T.*, Chung Y.-M., Lu H.-J., Hsieh W.-H., (Taiwan)
ORAL/ MOTOR- SENSORY THERAPY OF A MALE
ADOLESCENT SUFFERING FROM FACIO- SCAPULOHUMERAL MUSCULAR DYSTROPHY(FSHMD) LANDOUZYDEJERINE.
Litinas N.*, (Greece)
P040
57
P049
OUTCOME MEASUREMENTS OF VOCAL HYGIENE PROGRAM
AND RESONANT VOICE THERAPY FOR HYPERFUNCTIONAL
VOICE DISORDERED PATIENTS: A PRELIMINARY STUDY
Chen S.H.*, Hsiao T.-Y., Yang C.-C., Chang C.-W., Lin Y.-Y.,
Chiang S.-C., (Taiwan)
SURVEILLANCE OF COMMUNICATION AND EATING BY
CEREBRAL PALSY REGISTRIES
P050
Hidecker M.J.C.*, Hanna C.B., Paneth N. (United States),
Rosenbaum P. (Canada), Kent R.D. (United States)
VOICE COMPLAINTS AND VOICE DISORDERS EXPERIENCED
BY INSTRUMENTAL MUSICIANS
Tormanen H. R. M.*, Lehtihalmes M., (Finland)
P041
MEASURES OF SPEECH INTELLIGIBILITY: EFFECTS OF
TRANSCRIPTION ANALYSES AND SPEECH STIMULI
Barreto S. S., Ortiz K.Z.*, (Brazil)
P051
CHOIR SINGING IMPROVES DEPRESSIVE SYMPTOMS AND
VOCAL QUALITY IN THE ELDERLY
Cassol M.*, Bos A. J. G., (Brazil)
P042
DYSARTHRIA IS A COMMON IMPAIRMENT IN
NEUROMUSCULAR DISEASES
P052
Knuijt S., Kalf J.G.*, de Swart B.J.M., (Netherlands)
STUDY ON COMMUNICATION AND PSYCHOLOGICAL
CHARACTERISTICS IN A GROUP OF INDIVIDUALS WITH
OBSESSIVE-COMPULSIVE DISORDER
P043
Cassol M.*, Reppold C., Ferrão Y., Almada C., Gurgel L., (Brazil)
MASTICATORY PROCESS ANALYSIS OF ASTHMATIC
CHILDREN: CLINICAL AND ELECTROMYOGRAPHIC
ANALYSIS
P053
Andrade D.*, Gerlane K.B.O., Gomes F.E., Andrade R., Lima M.F.,
Arruda R.S., Barabosa M.M.C.E, Hilton J., (Brazil)
P044
TEAMING ACROSS CULTURES: PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT
FOR CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES
Roman T. R.*, (United States)
POSTSURGICAL VOCAL FUNCTION OF PATIENTS WITH
REINKE’S EDEMA TREATED BY THE MICRODEBRIDER
Haji T.*, Honda K., inami K., Maruyama H., (Japan)
P054
PERCEPTUAL-AUDITORY VOCAL ASSESSMENT AND
ITS ASSOCIATION TO OTORHINOLARYNGOLOGICAL
EVALUATION OF TEACHERS WITH VOCAL COMPLAINTS IN
THE CITY OF SÃO PAULO
P045
Ghirardi ACAM), Ferreira L.P.*, Giannini SPP., (Brazil)
IDENTIFYING BARRIERS TO COMMUNICATION: USING THE
INPATIENT FUNCTIONAL COMMUNICATION INTERVIEW
(IFCI) IN A SUBACUTE SETTING
P055
Poole S. M.*, (Australia)
THE PERSON WITH DYSPHONIA: COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS
PRE AND POST VOICE THERAPY PROGRAM
Oliveira B.I.*, (Brazil)
P046
EVALUATION OF VOCAL FUNCTION AFTER TOTAL
LARYNGECTOMY
Minami K.*, Haji T. (Japan)
P056
RELIABILITY AND VALIDITY OF VHI (VOICE HANDICAP
INDEX) AND V-RQOL (VOICE-RELATED QUALITY OF LIFE):
JAPANESE VERSION
Shiromoto O.*, Ikenaga E., Sato M., (Japan)
58
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
P057
P067
AGE-RELATED MORPHOLOGICAL CHANGES OF THE
INTRINSIC LARYNGEAL MUSCLES
THE ESTIMATION OF COGNITIVE AND REFLEX FUNCTIONS
IN DEPRESSED PATIENTS, DURING THE COURSE OF
UNIPOLAR AND BIPOLAR AFFECTIVE DISEASES
Hyodo M.*, Nishikubo K., Nishida N., Taguchi A. Desaki J., (Japan)
P058
VIOLENCE AND COMMUNICATION: WHAT THE TEACHERS
PERCEIVE.
Machado M.A.M.P.*, Rocha A.B., (Brazil)
P059
Sekula A.*, Kamińska I., Obrębowski A., Świdziński P., Suwalska A.,
(Poland)
P068
TEMPORAL RESOLUTION IN MILD HEARING LOSS
Carvallo R.M.M., Sanches S. G. G.*, Nishiyama A. K., Silva K. A. L.,
Vilela N., (Brazil)
AUGMENTATIVE AND ALTERNATIVE COMMUNICATION:
FACTORS LEADING TO ITS USE IN THE FAMILY CONTEXT
P069
Berberian A.P.*, Kruger S., Guarinello a.c., Massi G., Carnevale L.,
Santana A.P., (Brazil)
HEARING SCREENING IN PRIMARY HEALTHCARE CONTEXTS
Gomes MSR, Lichtig I*, (Brazil)
P060
P070
THE PROCESSING OF AMBIGUOUS SUBJECT PRONOUN
ANAPHORA: EVIDENCE FROM BROCA’S APHASIA IN GREEK
TREATMENT EFFICACY OF SPEECH AND LANGUAGE
INTERVENTION ACCORDING TO MORPHOLOGICAL
CHANGES FOR IRANIAN HARD OF HEARING PRIMARY
STUDENTS
Peristeri E.*, Tsimpli L.M., (Greece)
P061
SINGLE-WORD PRODUCTION IN BILINGUAL APRAXIA OF
SPEECH (AOS)
Overton Venet M.*, (Switzerland)
P062
ESCRIPTION AND ANALYSIS OF PROCESSES
CONVESACIONAIS PRESENT IN THE DISCOURSE OF A
SOCIAL GROUP OF APHASIC AND NON-APHASIC
Gurgel L.M.*, Augusto F., Kalinny B.J., (Brazil)
P063
AUDITORY COMPREHENSION TEST IN TURKISH: A PILOT
STUDY FOR THE VOCABULARY SUBTEST
Tunçer A.M*, Mavis I., (Turkey)
P064
THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE FIRST SCREENING TEST IN
MALTESE FOR ACQUIRED LANGUAGE DISORDERS
Delia K., Ellul M.E., Fiorini H., Ameen S., Micallef R., Grech H.*,
(Malta)
P065
HEARING AND OTOSCOPIC OUTCOMES CORRELATION
IN INFANTS FROM A UNIVERSAL NEONATAL HEARING
SCREENING PROGRAM
Resende L.M.*, Ferreira J., Carvalho S.A.S., Bassi I., Oliveira I.S.,
(Brazil)
P066
AUDITORY PROCESSING DISORDERS: GENDER
COMPARATIVE DATA
Sanchez M. L. Alvarez A.M.M., Chaves A.G., Tangerina R.P., (Brazil)
Salmani M.*, Sadollahi A.A., Mahmoodi Bakhtiari B., Ghorbani R,
Alebooyeh N., Mokhtarzadeh M., Alizadeh H., Ziyarati F., (Iran)
P071
USEFULNESS OF THE TEST OF EARLY LANGUAGE
DEVELOPMENT TO DETECT CHIILDREN WITH LANGUAGE
DISORDERS
Befi-Lopes D.M.*, Giusti E., Puglisi M. L., Gândara J. P., (Brazil)
P072
PERSONAL NARRATIVE SKILLS OF CHILDREN WITH DOWN
SYNDROME
van Bysterveldt A.K.*, Westerveld M.F., Gillon G., Foster-Cohen S.,
(New Zealand)
P073
COMPARISON OF WORD FINDING (RENFREW) AND
SENSORY PROFILE (SHORT FORM-DUNN 1999) SCORES
IN CHILDREN WITH HIGH FUCTIONING AUTISM AND
ASPERGER SYNDROME
Bella S.*, Kokmotos P., Alexandrou E., (Greece)
P074
THE ROLE OF HIGHER VISUAL INFORMATION PROCESSING
ABILITY IN JAPANESE CHILDREN WITH DEVELOPMENTAL
DYSLEXIA
Gotoh T.*, Uno A., Haruhara N., Kaneko M., Awaya N., Kozuka J.,
Katano S., (Japan)
P075
MULTI-FEATURE MMN PARADIGM AS A TOOL FOR
INVESTIGATING AUDITION IN TWO-YEAR-OLD CHILDREN
Niemitalo-Haapola E.*, Lapinlampi S., Remes R, Kujala T., Kujala T.,
Jansson-Verkasalo E., (Finland)
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
59
P076
P086
AGE AND GENDER EFFECTS IN SPEECH INCONSISTENCY
BRAZILIAN PORTUGUESE CHILDREN
LURIA-NEBRASKA NEUROPSYCHOLOGICAL BATTERY
FOR CHILDREN AND LONG LATENCY AUDITORY EVOKED
POTENTIAL EVALUATION IN THE DIAGNOSIS OF DYSLEXIA
AND LEARNING DISABILITIES
Castro M.M., Wertzner H.F.*, (Brazil)
P077
CHILDREN’S SENTENCE COMPREHENSION ABILITIES: THE
ROLE OF SLI AND SOCIO-ECONOMIC DIFFERENCES
Crenitte P.A.P.*, Gonçalves T.S., Ciasca S. M., (Brazil)
P087
Puglisi M. L., Befi-Lopes D.M.*, (Brazil)
ASSESSMENT INTERDISCIPLINARY NEUROPSYCHOLOGY
AND SPEECH THERAPY IN NOONAN SYNDROME
P078
Tabaquim M.L.M.*, Rodrigues, N.R.; Costa, E.G.; Daza, M.P.M.;
Lamônica, D.A.C., (Brazil)
COMPARISON OF PHONOLOGICAL PROCESSES AND
SPEECH INDEXES IN BRAZILIAN CHILDREN WITH AND
WITHOUT PHONOLOGICAL DISORDERS
Wertzner H.F.*, Galea D., Pagan-Neves L., Barroso T.f., (Brazil)
P079
THE EFFECT OF CHILDHOOD RECURRENT ACUTE OTITIS
MEDIA ON THE DEVELOPMENT OF AUDITORY PROCESSING
AND LANGUAGE
Lapinlampi S.*, Niemitalo-Haapola E., Raappana A., Kujala T.,
Remes R., Suominen K, Kujala T., Jansson-Verkasalo E., (Finland)
P080
AVERAGE TIME FOR SPEECH THERAPY DISCHARGE BASED
ON THREE PHONOLOGICAL MODELS
Bolli Mota H.*, Wiethan F.M., Melo R.M., (Brazil)
P081
THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN PAIRED ASSOCIATED
LEARNING, RAPID AUTOMATISED NAMING,
PHONOLOGICAL PROCESSING SKILLS AND SPELLING IN
TYPICAL GERMAN-SPEAKING 2ND GRADERS.
Schellenberger L. L.*, Bendler S. (Germany),Di Betta A.M., Schaefer
B., (United Kingdom)
P082
THE DEVELOPMENT AND PREDICTIVE VALUE OF EARLY
VOCALIZATION IN VERY-LOW-BIRTH-WEIGHT CHILDREN
Stolt S.*, Lehtonen L., Haataja L, Lapinleimu H., (Finland)
P083
SPECTROGRAPHIC ANALYSIS IN THE STUDY OF
ACQUISITION OF THE CONSONANT CLUSTER AS FOR THE
VARIABLE SEX
P088
PARENTS APPROACHES TO ENGAGE THEIR CHILDREN WITH
DOWN SYNDROME IN A VISUAL-PERCEPTUAL TASK: THE
INFLUENCE OF CHILDREN’S CHARACTERISTICS
Flabiano F.C., (Brazil), Daunhauer L.A., (United States), Silva L.F.,
(Brazil), Fidler D.J., (United States), Limongi S.C.O.*, (Brazil)
P089
NEUROPSYCHOLOGICAL STUDY OF CHILDREN WITH
HEMIPARETHIC CEREBRAL PALSY AND LEARNING
DISORDERS
Tabaquim M.L.M.*, (Brazil)
P090
THE EFFECTS OF CARBONATED LIQUIDS ON SWALLOWING
IN ADULTS WITH NEUROGENIC DYSPHAGIA: A CRITICAL
APPRAISAL OF THE TOPIC.
Sdravou K.*, Walshe M., (Ireland)
P091
ASSESSMENT OF SWALLOWING AND QUALITY OF LIFE
RELATED TO SWALLOWING IN TOTAL LARYNGECTOMY
PATIENTS: A COMPARISON BETWEEN MANUAL
AND MECHANICAL (STAPLER) TECHNIQUES OF
PHARYNGOESOPHAGEAL RECONSTRUCTION
Figueiredo D.C., Gielow I.*, Takimoto R.M., Cervantes O., (Brazil)
P092
MANOMETRIC MEASURES OF HEAD ROTATION AND CHIN
TUCK IN HEALTHY PARTICIPANTS
Balou M.*, McCullough G, Aduli F, Brown D, Snoddy P., (United
States)
Giacchini V.*, Dias R.F., Mota H.B., Mezzomo C.L., (Brazil)
P093
P084
PROPOSAL OF PROTOCOL FOR ELECTROMYOGRAPHIC
EVALUATION OF MASSETER MUSCLE DURING
DEGLUTITION
ARTICULATORY INDEXES IN PHONOLOGICALLY
DISORDERED CHILDREN ACCORDING TO THE PRESENCE OF
OTITIS MEDIA HISTORY
L.A. Pernambuco, J.C. Leão, R.A. Cunha, G. M. Andrade, P.M.M.
Balata, H.J. Silva* (Brazil)
Wertzner H.F.*, Santos IP, Pagan-Neves LO, (Brazil)
P085
ASSESSMENT OF SPEECH INPUT ABILITIES IN CHILDREN
AGED 3,7-4,6 YEARS OF AGE
Geronikou E.*, Grammenou S.M., Kalogianni S., Koutsioumba G.,
(Greece)
P094
INTERVENTION ON THE NARRATIVE DEVELOPMENT IN
CHILDREN WITH SLI AT THE INCLUSIVE CONTEXTS
Acosta R.V.M.*, Moreno S.A.M., Axpe C.M.A., (Spain)
60
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
P095
P105
CD-ROM AS A TOOL FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION OF
PRIMARY SCHOOL TEACHERS IN WRITTEN LANGUAGE
THE CORRELATION BETWENN ELECTROMYOGRAPHIC AND
ULTRASONOGRAPHIC ASSESSMENT OF THE MASSETER
MUSCLE
Gonçalves T.S.*, P. A. P. Crenitte, (Brazil)
P096
PRODUCTION OF AUDIOVISUAL ABOUT DEAFNESS AND
SIGN LANGUAGE: IMPACT ON DEAF CHILDREN’S HEARING
PARENTS
Moura G.M., Lichtig I.*, (Brazil)
P097
AUTISM SPECTRUM DISORDERS (ASD): SOCIAL SKILLS IN
THE SCHOOL CONTEXT
Abramides D., Lamonica D.C.A.*, Santos L.H.Z., (Brazil)
P098
PROJECT USP IN RONDONIA: HEALTH EDUCATION FOR THE
POPULATION OF THE BRAZILIAN AMAZON.
Caldana M.*, Bastos J.R., Franco E., Bastos R., Arakawa A., Sitta E.,
Carleto N., Silva R., Zampronio K., (Brazil)
P99
DISTANCE LEARNING: DEVELOPMENT OF A CD-ROM FOR
TEACHER TRAINING ON THE HUMAN COMMUNICATION
AND ITS DISORDERS.
Caldana M., Bastos J.R., Oliveira A.*, Franco E., Bastos R., Arakawa
A., Sitta E., Carleto N., Silva R., Bassi K., (Brazil)
P100
Davison M.L.*, Chiarion S.F., Tanaka C., Sernick R.A., Andrade F.C.R.,
(Brazil)
P106
STANDARDIZATION OF A COMPUTER ARTICULATION
INSTRUMENT (CAI)
van Haaften L., Diepeveen S., van der Meulen S.j., Nijland L., de
Swart B., Maassen B.*, (Netherlands)
P107
ELECTROPALATOGRAPHY TREATMENT FOR ARTICULATION
DISORDER IN PATIENTS WITH ORAL CANCER
Nishiwaki K.*, Tamura F., Kikutani T., (Japan)
P108
MOBIUS SYNDROME: SPEECH PATHOLOGY’S
MENEGEAMENT
Guedes Z.*, Silva R., Gonçalves C., (Brazil)
P109
SPEECH AND OROFACIAL APRAXIA IN ALZHEIMER’S
DISEASE (AD)
Cera M. L., Ortiz K.Z.*, Minett T.S.C., (Brazil)
P110
ALTERATION OF LANGUAGE IN THE ALCOHOLIC GROUP OF
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS (AA)
DEVELOPING INTERNATIONAL CLINICAL, RESEARCH,
AND TEACHING COLLABORATIONS FOR STUDENTS AND
FACULTY IN THE HEALTH PROFESSIONS
Santos A., Alves S., Padovani M.*, De Luccia G., (Brazil)
Shulman B.B.*, Bartolotta T.E., (United States)
P101
P111
ATTENTION SHIFTING IN CHILDREN WHO STUTTER
MULTILINGUAL INTERVENTION WITH PRESCHOOLERS
AND SCHOOL-AGE CHILDREN: EVIDENCE FROM A PRIVATE
PRACTICE
Eggers K.*, (Belgium), De Nil L. F., (Belgium, Canada), Van den
Bergh B.R.H., (Belgium, Netherlands)
Simard I.*, (Canada)
P102
TREATMENT OF STUTTERING: FACTORS RE EDUCATION
AND PERCEPTIONS OF SPEECH & LANGUAGE THERAPISTS
EDUCATED IN GREECE
Kakkidou K.*, Leahy M., (Ireland)
P103
ELEMENTS OF HEREDITARY PREDISPOSITION THAT MAY
CONTRIBUTE TO STUTTERING
Jovanovic N*, (Serbia & Montenegro), Andreou S, (Cyprus),
Ninkovic D, Dobrota N., (Serbia & Montenegro)
P104
THE ADJUSTMENT OF DELAYED AUDITORY FEED BACK
(DAF) TO DYSARTHRIAS - EFFECT ON SPEAKING RATE AND
VOWEL LENGTH
Shimura E.*, Kakehi K., (Japan)
P112
THE ACOUSTIC PROPERTIES OF /h/ IN TURKISH
Ertan E.*, Kopkalli-Yavuz H., (Turkey)
P113
INFLUENCE OF REHEARSING NEW VOCAL MATERIAL ON
LARYNX CONDITION
Rudin L. B.*, (Russian Federation)
P114
THE UNION OF THE EUROPEAN PHONIATRICIANS (UEP) IN
THE XXI CENTURY
Schindler A.*, (Italy)
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
61
P115
P125
DEPTH OF NASOPHARYNX AND LENGTH OF VELUM FOR
A GROUP OF INDIVIDUALS WITH VELOPHARYNGEAL
DYSFUNCTION
VOCAL DISADVANTAGE AND QUALITY OF LIFE OF
PATIENTS LARYNGECTOMIZED WITH AND WITHOUT VOICE
REHABILITATION
Pegoraro-Krook M. I.*, Silva MMA, Bento-Gonçalves CGA,
Dutka J. C. R., (Brazil)
Teles L.C.S.*, Davatz G.C., Sanchez R.F., (Brazil)
P116
PARENT’S KNOWLEDGE, ATTITUDE AND PRACTICE
TOWARDS VOICE CARE FOR CHILDREN: A HONG KONG
PERSPECTIVE
Ma E.P.M.*, Mo M.N.L., (Hong Kong)
P117
EFFECTS OF SELF-CONTROLLED FEEDBACK PARADIGM ON
MOTOR LEARNING OF A “RELAXED PHONATION” TASK
Ma EPM*, Yiu G.K.Y., Yiu E.M.L., (Hong Kong)
P118
THE IMPACT OF DISTURB OF VOICE IN THE QUALITY OF
LIFE IN PATIENTS UNDERGONE A VERTICAL PARTIAL
LARYNGECTOMY.
Sanchez R.F.*, Teles L.C.S., (Brazil)
P119
VOICE ACOUSTICS CHARACTERISTICS IN DIFFERENT
CORPORAL POSTURES
Carneiro P.R., Teles L.C.S.*, (Brazil)
P120
COMMUNICATIVE SKILLS AFTER ADMISSION IN
PERFORMING ARTS AND THE USE OF VOCAL EFFORT ON
STAGE
Baravieira P. B., Teles L.C.S.*, (Brazil)
P121
GETTING TO KNOW THE SECRETS OF VOICE’: DISTANCE
COURSE FOR CHORISTERS
P126
AUGMENTATIVE AND ALTERNATIVE COMMUNICATION IN
APHASIA: LANGUAGE AND QUALITY OF LIFE OF AAC USERS
AND NON-USERS
Bahia M., Chun R., Mourao L.F.*, (Brazil)
P127
THE EVALUATION OF MEMORY FUNCTION IN APHASIC
PATIENTS
Vukovic M.*, Petrovic-Lazic M., Vukovic I., (Serbia)
P128
LANGUAGE CHARACTERISTICS OF INDIVIDUALS WITH
NEUROLOGICAL IMPAIRMENTS- A COMPARATIVE STUDY
Togram B.*, Mavis I., (Turkey)
P129
M1-ALPHA APHASIA TEST: A PROPOSAL FOR
READJUSTMENT TO PORTUGUESE
Garcia F.C.*, Takayanagui O.M., (Brazil)
P130
COGNITIVE PROCESSES AND LINGUISTIC ABILITIES IN
GROUPS OF ELDERLY – INICIAL PHASE OF THE RESEARCH*
Cardoso C.*, Aguiar A.M.A.S, Leite A., Rangel S., Silva T.G.P., Rocha
Juliana, Azevedo N., (Brazil)
P131
AUDIOLOGIC PROFILE IN ELDERLY PATIENTS LIVING ON
THE OUTSKIRTS OF AN URBAN AREA OF SOUTHEASTERN
BRAZIL
Lira J.O*, Barea K., (Brazil)
Teles L.C.S.*, Santos A.R., (Brazil)
P122
CAN THE PARALYZED VOCAL FOLD RESTORE VOCAL FOLD
VIBRATION FOR VOICE IMPROVEMENT IN UNILATERAL
RECURRENT NERVE PARALYSIS?
Iwata Y.*, Horibe S., Hattori T., Sakurai K., Naito K., Toda H., (Japan)
P123
QUALITY OF VOICE AND LIFE IN INDIVIDUALS
INTERVEIEWED BY VIVAVOZ CALL CENTER: PILOT STUDY
Campos M.T., Barros H.M.T., Fernandes S., Ferigolo M., Cassol M.*,
(Brazil)
P124
HIGH LEVELS OF NOISE IN CHILDREN EDUCATION
INSTITUTIONS AND ITS IMPACT ON THE EDUCATOR’S
VOICE
Bitar M.*, Simões-Zenari M., Nemr K., (Brazil)
P132
LEFT- EAR INEFFICIENCY: A SIGN OF EARLY AUDITORY
DETERIORATION?
Alvarez A.M.M.*, Sanchez M.L., Casella E.B., (Brazil)
P133
AUDITORY TRAINING IN ADULT WITH TRAUMATISM BRAIN
INJURY (TBI): ELECTROPHYSIOLOGICAL AND BEHAVIOR
CHANGES IN AUDITORY PROCESSING AND COGNITIVE
FUNCTIONS
Murphy C.F.B., Palma D., Zalcman T.E., Filippini R., Rocha C.N., Lima
J.P., Alonso R., Rabelo C.M., Neves I.F., Schochat E., Sanchez S.G.G.*
(Brazil)
P134
LEARNING GENERALIZATION OF AUDITORY TEMPORAL
PROCESSING SKILLS
Murphy C.F.B., Schochat E., Sanchez S.G.G.* (Brazil)
62
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
P135
P144
INVESTIGATION OF MEDIAL OLIVOCOCHLEAR BUNDLE
SYSTEM FUNCTION IN CHILDREN WITH AUDITORY
PROCESSING DISORDERS AND SPEECH LANGUAGE
IMPAIRMENT.
ASSESSMENT OF LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT IN
PRESCHOOL AGE CHILDREN WITH AUTISM
Rocha C.N., Sanches S.G.G.*, Befi-Lopes D.M., Carvallo R.M.M.,
Schochat E., (Brazil)
P145
P136
AUDIOLOGICAL FINDINGS IN PATIENTS WITH G/BBB
SYNDROME – REPORT ON 15 BRAZILIAN PATIENTS
Cassab T.V, Richieri-Costa A., Giachetti C., Zorzetto N., Zanchetta
S.*, (Brazil)
P137
FUNCTIONAL INTEGRITY OF THE AUDITORY BRAINSTEM
AND RECEPTIVE VOCABULARY IN PREMATURE INFANTS
WITH BIRTH WEIGHT GREATER THAN 1000g EVALUATED AT
AGE TWO YEARS
Zanchetta S.*, Bentlin M.R., Trindade C.E.P., Rugulo L.M.S., Resende
L.M., (Brazil)
P138
PHONOLOGICAL AWARENESS IN CHILDREN WITH
PHONOLOGICAL DISORDERS
Ghasisin L.*, (Iran)
P139
A STUDY OF COMPREHENSION OF SPECIAL PREPOSITIONS
IN NORMAL CHILDREN BETWEEN THE AGES OF 3-5 IN
PERSIAN LANGUAGE.
Ebrahimian Dehaghani SH.*, (Iran)
P140
EVALUATION AND COMPARISON OF SEMANTIC
SPECIFICATION IN 1/5-2/5 YEARS OLD NORMAL PERSIAN
CHILDREN IN TEHRAN CITY
Ghelmani P.M.*, Shirazi T.S., Nili P.R., Karimlu M., Karimi H., (Iran)
P141
RECOGNITION AND RESPONSE WITH SPANISH-SPEAKING
CHILDREN WITH LANGUAGE IMPAIRMENTS
Garcia M.E.*, (United States)
Geronikou E.*, Milathianaki M., Farmaki S., (Greece)
CHILD LANGUAGE AND SOCIAL REFERENCING IN ITALIAN
CHILDREN: A LONGITUDINAL STUDY
Majorano M.*, Cigala A., Venturelli E., Raineri C., Corsano P., (Italy)
P146
SOCIAL SUPPORT AND QUALITY OF LIFE IN FAMILIES WITH
CHILDREN OF THE AUTISM SPECTRUM
Fernandes F.*, (Brazil)
P147
ALLIED HEALTH CARE PROVIDERS’ ROLE IN SCREENING
FOR AUTISM SPECTRUM DISORDERS
Self T.*, Coufal K.L., Parhan D.F., (United States)
P148
The Nature of Verbal Communication
Interactions with Toddlers in Child Care
McMillan J.K.*, Dyson A. T., Yssel N., (United States)
P149
PARENTS’ VIEWS OF TURKISH CHILDREN WITH DOWN
SYNDROME ON SPEECH INTELLIGIBILITY
Togram B.*, Akyuz T.A., (Turkey)
P150
A PRELIMINARY INVESTIGATION OF EYE-GAZE PATTERNS
ON FAST-MAPPING ABILITIES OF CHILDREN WITH AUTISM
SPECTRUM DISORDER
Crumrine D.*, Self T., (United States)
P151
THE EFFICIENCY OF ENCODING GRAMMATICAL
MORPHEMES IN LANGUAGE IMPAIRED AND TYPICALLY
DEVELOPING CHILDREN
Hennessey N.W.*, Cowper R., Williams C., (Australia)
P152
P142
LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT OF PRETERM BORN CHILDREN:
MATERNAL FACTORS ASSOCIATES
Perissinoto J.*, Isotani S.M., (Brazil)
P143
QUALITATIVE ANALYSIS AT THE PSYCHOLOGY OF PARENTS,
WHOSE CHILD HAS BEEN DIAGNOSED WITH ‘PERVASIVE
DEVELOPMENTAL DISORDER’
Geronikou E.*, Vlachaki E., Karpouzou E., (Greece)
THE USE (OR NOT) OF PROSODY DURING SENTENCE
COMPREHENSION IN CHILDREN WITH ASD
Kjelgaard-Rockcastle M.*, Geiser E., Gabrieli J., (United States)
P153
THE RECEPTIVE AND EXPRESSIVE LANGUAGE ABILITIES
OF TYPICALLY DEVELOPING AND HEARING IMPAIRED
TURKISH CHILDREN
Topbas S., Cangokce Yasar O.*, (Turkey)
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
P154
P164
THE ESTABLISHMENT OF THE CONTRAST BETWEEN /t/ AND
/k/ IN CHILDREN WITH PHONOLOGICAL DISORDER: DATA
FROM PRODUCTION AND PERCEPTION SPEECH.
EVALUATION OF MOVIE SUBTITLE READING
COMPREHENSION IN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL CHILDREN
63
Minucci M.*, Carnio M.S., (Brazil)
Berti L.C.*, (Brazil)
P155
SOCIAL-COGNITIVE ASPECTS: COMPARISON AMONGST
THREE GROUPS OF CHILDREN AND ADOLECENTS WITH
DIFFERENTS CLINICAL DOAGNOSIS IN TWO DIFFERENT
COMUNICATIVE SITUATIONS
P165
SPEECH AND LANGUAGE THERAPY STRATEGIES FOR
CHILDREN WITH FLUENCY DISORDERS
Kairiene D., Ivoskuviene R., Gerulaitis D., Makauskiene V.*,
(Lithuania)
Cardoso C.*, Silva A., Santos I., Moreira C., Pinto A., Rocha J., (Brazil)
P166
P156
LINGUISTIC ANALYSIS OF SPEECH OF EARLY STUTTERED
AND NORMAL DISFLUENT CHILDREN
COMMUNICATIVE FUNCTIONAL PROFILE: COMPARISON
AMONGST THREE GROUPS OF CHILDREN AND
ADOLECENTS WITH DIFFERENTS CLINICAL DOAGNOSIS IN
TWO DIFFERENT COMUNICATIVE SITUATIONS
Cardoso C.*, Silva A., Santos I., Moreira C., Pinto A., (Brazil)
P157
Simonska M.*, (Bulgaria)
P167
ANALYSIS OF SPEECH LANGUAGE STATUs OF FAMILY
MEMBERS OF STUTTERER CHILDREN FROM FAMILIES WITH
HEREDITARY PREDISPOSITION
Behrakis V.B.*, (Denmark)
Jovanovic N.*(Serbia & Montenegro), Kulic M.(Serbia &
Montenegro), Ninkovic D. (Serbia & Montenegro), Andreou S.,
(Cyprus)
P158
P168
EATING DIFFICULTIES IN THE ELDERLY AND THEIR ENIGMAS
MODELS FOR MEASUREMENT OF RHYTHMIC AND
DYSRHYTHMIC FEATURES OF BULGARIAN NORMAL AND
CLUTTERED SPEECH
NATURELOGOPEDICS
Giglio V.P.*, (Brazil)
P159
ORAL AND PHARYNGEAL TRANSIT DURATION IN PATIENTS
WITH GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX DISEASE.
Cassiani RA*, Dantas R.O., (Brazil)
P160
INTERDISCIPLINARY PRACTICE IN LATE MAXILLECTOMY
REHABILITATION
Martins V.*, Santana M., Sperb L., (Brazil)
P161
COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF THE MATURITY LEVEL OF
SPEECH-LANGUAGE CAPACITY WITH PRIMARY (RETARDED
SPEECH) AND SECONDARY (DELAYED PSCYCHOLOGICAL
DEVELOPMENT) SPEECH PATHOLOGY
Goranova E. G.*, Vezenkov S. R., Karashtranova E.L., (Bulgaria)
P169
A PRELIMINARY STUDY OF STUTTERERS’ LANGUAGE
PROCESSING USING EVENT-RELATED POTENTIALS
Murase S.*, Kawashima T., Satake H., Era S., (Japan)
P170
SCREENING OF INDIVIDUALS WITH FLUENCY DISORDERS
(CLUTTERING AND STUTTERING) IN SOUTH-WESTERN
BULGARIA
Goranova E. G.*, Miliev D.M., (Bulgaria)
P171
Bezrukova O.A, Khoroshavina E.V.*, (Russian Federation)
OBJECTIVE MEASUREMENT USING CHROMOGURANIN A
TOWARD SPEECH COMMUNICATION STRESS OF NORMAL
PERSON WHO STUTTER
P162
Wakaba Y.*, Miyao M., Konjiki F., Minami M., Sakurai T.,
Tanimura M., Okuma K., (Japan)
CD-ROM AS A TOOL FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION OF
ELEMENTARY SCHOOL TEACHERS IN WRITTEN LANGUAGE
Gonçalves T.S.*, Crenitte P.A.P., (Brazil)
P163
THE LITERACY LEVEL OF DEAF UNIVERSITY STUDENTS
FROM CURITIBA AND FLORIANOPOLIS: A DISCUSSION
Santana A.P.*, Guarinello A.C., Berberian A.P., Massi G., (Brazil)
P172
DYSPHASIA SENZO-MOTORICA
Savic M.*, Nikolic S., Filipovic V., Savic V., (Serbia)
P173
RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN TOOTH LOSS AND COMPLAINTS
OF CHEWING, SWALLOWING AND SPEECH IN ADULTS.
Caldana M., Bastos J.R.*, Oliveira A., Franco E., Bastos R., Arakawa
A., Sitta E., Carleto N., Silva R., Bassi K., (Brazil)
64
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
P174
P183
THE ROLE OF NEUROPATHOPHYSIOLOGY IN THE
CORRELATION BETWEEN PHONARTICULATORY
DIADOCHOKINESIA AND DYSPHAGIA IN THE MACHADOJOSEPH AND PARKINSON DISEASE
QUALITY OF LIFE AND VOICE PROTOCOL FOR GALA’S
PATIENTS - LARYNGECTOMIZED SUPPORT GROUP
Mourao L.*, Wolf A., Machado D., Almeida P, Crespo A., (Brazil)
P184
P175
DEVELOPMENT OF ARTICULATORY GESTURES
COORDINATION IN SPEECH SOUND DISORDERS OF
UNKNOWN ORIGIN: AN ACOUSTIC STUDY ON ITALIANSPEAKING CHILDREN
Bonaventura P.*, (United States), Tomaiuoli D., Pasqua E.,
Calanca M., Massini M., (Italy), Miller L., Owens R., (United States),
Marulli M., (Italy)
P176
CORRELATION OF THE SIGNAL ELECTROMYOGRAPHIC THE
MASSETER MUSCLE RIGHT AND LEFT AND RIGHT AND LEFT
TEMPORAL IN FEMALE SUBJECTS DURING MASTICATION
Herber P.J., Juliana R.K., Milton M., Siqueira N., Benedito J.,
Hilton J.*, (Brazil)
P177
IDENTIFICATION OF PASSAVANT’S PAD WITH AND
WITHOUT THE SPEECH BULB
Pegoraro-Krook M. I.*, Almeida B.K., Dutka J.C.R., Souza O.M.V.,
Uemeoka E., Aferri H.C., (Brazil)
P178
Santana M., Martins V.*, (Brazil)
CORRELATION BETWEEN TRACHEOESOPHAGEAL VOICE
AND SPEECH PROFICIENCY AND ACOUSTIC ANALYSIS AND
INTRALUMINAL PRESSURE OF PHARYNGOESOPHAGEAL
TRANSITION IN TOTAL LARYNGECTOMIZED.
Takeshita T.K.*, Zozolotto H.C., Ricz H.M.A., Dantas R.O.,
Aguiar-Ricz L.N., (Brazil)
P185
ANY WAY OF LOVE IS WORTH IT...SEXUALITY IN PATIENTS
WITH HEAD AND NECK CANCER
Martins V.*, Santana M., Brito E., Sehn F., Gadenz S., Sbaraini L.,
Macedo T., Sperb D., Fontana C., (Brazil)
P186
LARYNGECTOMY: SECURING TRACHEOSTOMY WITH STYLE
Martins V.*, Santana M., Bastos J.R., Brito E., Sehn F., Gadenz S.,
Sbaraini L., Macedo T., Sperb D., Fontana C., (Brazil)
P187
LISTENERS’IDENTIFICATION OF TARGET SOUNDS IN CLEFT
PALATE SPEECH
Dutka J.C.R., Teles L.c.s.*, Marino V. V.C., Pegoraro-Krook M.I.,
(Brazil)
USE OF ATYPICAL ARTICULATORY PRODUCTIONS
AFTER PRIMARY PALATOPLASTY WITH FURLOW OR
VONLANGENBECK PROCEDURES
P188
Pegoraro-Krook M. I.*, Dutka J.C.R., Bento-Gonçalves C.G.A.,
Zimmermann M.C., Neves J.F.D.A., Whitaker M.E., Lauris J.R.P.,
Williams W.N., (Brazil)
Reis N.*, Ricz H.M.A., Aguiar Ricz L.N., (Brazil)
P179
DESCRIPTION OF ACOUSTIC MEASUREMENTS IN
LARYNGECTOMIZED USERS OF VOICE PROSTHESIS
P189
ACOUSTIC ANALYSIS OF VOICE: CHARACTERISTICS OF
MALE VOCAL DEVELOPMENT IN ADOLESCENCE
A CULTURALLY RESPONSIVE INTERVENTION PROGRAM
FOR PRESCHOOLERS WITH AUTISM USING A PLAY-BASED
FAMILY SYSTEMS MODEL
Teles L.c.s.*, Oliveira C.F., (Brazil)
Brown J.C. (USA)
P180
P190
AN INTERDISCIPLINARY VISION OF GALA LARYNGECTOMIZED SUPPORT GROUP
Word learning in children with autism: The role
of attention
Martins V.*, Santana M., Brito E., Sehn F., Gadenz S.,
Sbaraini L., Macedo T., Sperb D., Fontana C., (Brazil)
Bean A.*, McGregor K., (USA)
P181
P191
VARIATION IN THE TEMPORAL CHARACTERISTICS OF
PROFESSIONAL SPEAKING STYLES
peech-Language Pathologists Knowledge of
S
Autism Spectrum Disorders and Applied Behavior
Analysis: A Survey
Castro L.*, Serridge B., Moraes J., Freitas M., (Brazil)
Ray J.M.*, (USA)
P182
ELECTROMYOGRAPHIC EVALUATION OF MANEUVERS OF
SUPRAHYOID AND INFRAHYOID MUSCLES CONTRACTION
FOR SIGNAL NORMALIZATION
Mendes M.P., Oliveira K.B.G., Gomes F.E., Andrade R., Arruda R.S.,
Hilton J.*, (Brazil)
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
65
66
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
CONGRESS VENUE MAP
ATHENAEUM INTERCONTINENTAL CONFERENCE ROOMS LEVEL -2
VIP ROOM
COFFEE BREAK
STATIONS
SPEAKERS READY
CORNER
1, 2, 3
YPSILON
4, 5
Registration Desk
ATHENAEUM INTERCONTINENTAL CONFERENCE ROOMS LEVEL -1
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
6
5
4α
1
2β
2α
3
4β
1. KayPENTAX
2α. MYOFUNCTIONAL RESEARCH COMPANY
2β. CUBYSOFT - SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT
3. PARISIANOU S.A.
4α. IALP OFFICE
4β. IALP 2013
5. PANHELLENIC ASSOCIATION OF LOGOPEDISTS
6. ATOS MEDICAL AB
67
EXHIBITION PLAN
68 28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
Registration Information
Registration Fee (for participants and students)
The active participant’s registration fee includes access
to all scientific sessions, exhibition, the Opening
Ceremony and Welcome Reception, (1) one congress
bag, a copy of the Final Program & Abstracts, half day
tour of Athens (including a visit to Acropolis) and to the
Closing Ceremony.
Registration Fee (for exhibitors)
The active participant’s registration fee includes access
to the exhibition, the Opening Ceremony and Welcome
Reception, half day tour of Athens (including a visit to
Acropolis) and to the Closing Ceremony.
Registration Fee (for accompanying persons)
The active participant’s registration fee includes access
to the Opening Ceremony and Welcome Reception,
half day tour of Athens (including a visit to Acropolis)
and to the Closing Ceremony.
ON SITE REGISTRATION FEES
REGISTRATION TYPE
ON SITE
Full Congress for IALP
Individual Members
530€
Full Congress for Affiliated
Societies Members
600€
Full Congress For Non Members
700€
Students
300€
Exhibitors
250€
Accompanying Persons
150€
68
Badges
Participants, exhibitors and accompanying persons are kindly
requested to wear their badges during all congress activities
and social events. Entry will not be permitted without a badge.
In case you lose your badge, please proceed directly to the congress secretariat in order to get a new one.
Certificate of Attendance
Certificate of Attendance will be available on request at
the registration desk from 25th August 2010, at 16.30
hrs.
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics 69
General Information
Date and Congress Venue
- August 22-26, 2010
- Athenaeum Intercontinental Hotel
89-93, Syngrou Avenue, 117 45 Athens – Greece
Non-Smoking Policy
Congress Secretariat Operating Hours
The secretariat will be open during the congress, as
follows:
Sunday, August 22nd, 2010:
Monday, August 23rd, 2010:
Tuesday, August 24th, 2010:
Wednesday, August 25th, 2010:
Thursday, August 26th, 2010:
15.00-19.30
07.30-19.15
08.00-17.30
08.00-18.00
08.00-17.30
Language
The official language of the congress is English. No
simultaneous translation is provided.
Business Centre
There is a Business Centre located at the hotel’s
reception level, which provides internet access, fax,
printing and photocopying services. These services are
provided at the participant’s own expenses.
Coffee Breaks
Coffee will be offered during the coffee breaks,
according to the time schedule mentioned in the
programme. If you wish to have a coffee or a snack any
other time, please note that there is a coffee shop at
the hotel’s reception level.
Lunches
No official lunches are provided. Lunch facilities
are available in the congress venue (Athenaeum
Intercontinental Hotel).
Please note that smoking is strictly prohibited in the
session halls, as well as in the exhibition and poster
area of the congress
Dress Code
Dress is informal throughout the entire congress.
Lost & Found
Please contact the congress secretariat in the event
that personal belongings become missing or found.
After 30 days, unclaimed items will be donated to local
charities.
Banks and Currency Exchange
Greece is full member of the European Monetary Union,
thus its currency is the Euro. Most banks are open
Monday to Thursday from 08:00 am to 02:30 pm and
Friday from 08:00 am to 02:00 pm. They are closed over
the weekends and public holidays, although some banks
in the centre of Athens are open also in the afternoon
(Monday to Friday) and in the morning on Saturday.
ATMs are to be found in almost every town and in
Metro stations and certainly in all tourist areas.
Credit Cards
There are plenty of cash points for Mastercard and Visa
cardholders in Athens. All major credit cards are widely
accepted in most restaurants, shops and the congress
registration desk.
Gratuities
For taxi and restaurants the service charge is included
in the price. However, a 5-10% tip is usual if you are
satisfied with the service you have received in hotels,
taxis, restaurants, cafes, etc. The service charge is
included in all prices at hotels, restaurants and for
taxis.
69
70
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
Shopping & Local Opening Hours
Weather
Shops are normally open as follows:
The average temperature in Athens in August is usually
around 35-40°C. Please note that a raincoat or umbrella
for occasional showers may be useful.
Monday to Friday: 09.00-14.00 & 17.30-20.30
Saturday: 09.00-15.00
Department stores and many shops in the centre
of the city are open longer. Also, in the old town of
Athens (Plaka), there are shops which are also open on
Sunday.
For Tax-Free shopping, visitors from countries outside
the European Union can reclaim VAT on goods
purchased in tax-free shops when leaving the country,
either at the airport or at the border.
Hotel Accommodation
The registration desk will handle all enquiries related
to hotel accommodation.
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics 71
Tourist Information
Tourist Information – Transportation in Athens –
How to Get Around in Athens
Tourist Information Desk
The tours desk is available to provide you with more
information about the city of Athens, booking tours
(sightseeing and post-congress tours), making
restaurant reservations, or assisting you in any other
way during your stay in Athens. Please note that the
tours desk is located next to the congress secretariat,
during congress opening hours.
Where to dine out and where to do shopping.
Athens is a city full of life and energy that literary “never
sleeps” and having many places that one can entertain
oneself. There is a wide variety of restaurants, bars,
cafés, night clubs that stay open till 02.00-03.00 o’clock
after midnight. You can easily access the night life by
browsing the following sites:
Athens Time Out
http://www.timeoutathens.gr/englishnew/default.
asp or www.greece-athens.com
Back to the Athens International Airport Athens
International Airport Eleftherios Venizelos, is located
33 km southeast of Athens and is easily accessible
via Metro and buses. Public transport to the airport is
provided by express airport bus connections (Express
Line E95 Athens Airport Express/Syntagma) on a 24hour basis. You can also take the Metro (Blue line only)
to take you to the airport. A taxi from the city centre to
the airport will cost you approximately €25 - €30 Euro
(€).
Athens by Metro
Athens Metro network consists of 2 lines (Red Line
and Blue Line) with trains arriving every 3 minutes at
rush hours and every 5-10 minutes at all other times.
The Athens Metro connects Syntagma Square to the
Athens International Airport in 27 minutes.
Hours of operation: Lines operate daily from
05:30am to 00:00pm.
Useful tips: While inside the train, announcements are made
before every stop.
Metro tickets are sold at the stations cashiers and by
automatic tellers.
Remember to validate your ticket before you move on
to the platform.
Athens by Bus Tickets must be bought before boarding (from bus terminals and from the majority of kiosks) and validated
in the designated machines (orange coloured) within
the vehicles. To stop a bus for embarkation you must
make a hand signal to the driver. To disembark you
have to notify the driver by pressing the stop button
in time. The OASA Call Centre (185 dialing from within
Greece) operates from 07:00-21:00 on weekdays and
from 09:00-17:00 on weekends.
Athens by taxi
Prices may vary considerably, so you are advised to ask
for the price before entering the taxi. Please note that
the driver is obliged to give you a printed receipt upon
request. If you wish, you can call “Athens 1 Intertaxi”
Company, at +30 210 9212800, if you wish to have taxi
services.
Restaurants
In Athens you will find a wide variety of excellent
restaurants offering a diversity cuisine from around
the world. We strongly recommend local delicacies in
taverns offering Greek specialties and wines.
About Athens…
Athens - the cradle of civilization: Athens is the
capital of Greece. The city of Socrates, Pericles and
Aristotle which took its name by its protector, goddess
Athena, daughter of Zeus, the goddess of wisdom and
knowledge.
The Athenians were the first to realise the immense
cultural importance of the democratic discussion and
the creative exchange of views and ideas.
Athens is a modern metropolis, having strong links
with the past and many prospects for the future. It is a
vibrant city with great appeal and charm. It is among
the most beautiful, hospitable and exciting cities in
Europe and also one of the safest and most affordable.
It is impossible to describe all the sites of interest
and cultural opportunities offered by Athens, which
is another one good reason to participate in our
Congress. You will have the chance to visit Acropolis,
the marble temple dedicated to the goddess Athena,
built in the 5th century BC. Parthenon is one of the
most extraordinary architectural achievements in the
world.
71
72
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
The Dionyssos Theatre, built in the 4th century BC in
honour of the Greek god of food and wine, where the
plays of Sophocles, Euripides and Aristophanes were
performed.
Visiting Plaka, which lies in the shadow of the
Acropolis, a labyrinth of small streets, countless stores
and restaurants, you will have a taste of Greek vitality
and hospitality. Monastiraki flea market is truly worth
a visit, as well as the National Archaeological Museum,
the newly built Acropolis Museum and the Cycladic
Museum.
About Greece…
Greece - The land chosen by Gods. A Glorious
Past - A Prosperous Future: Greece is the land of
the twelve Olympian Gods, the cradle of the Western
civilisation, the birthplace of democracy, the origin of
drama, history, philosophy and sciences. Most modern
sciences such as medicine, history, philosophy,
geography, astronomy, physics, mathematics, as well
as artistic activities such as poetry and sculpture made
their roots back in the ancient times of Greece.
Greece has inherited a sophisticated culture and
a language that has been documented for almost
three millennia. Today’s spoken language has been an
evolution of the Ancient Language spoken at Pericles’
golden age in 5th century B.C. Very few languages
and cultures can demonstrate such continuity. Greeks
are proud of their cultural heritage, and the notion of
the unbroken continuity between their ancient and
modern culture.
For thousands of years Greece was the gate
between the east and the west. Today, it is a modern,
fast developing European country.
Greece has been moving dynamically into the new
millennium by undertaking more than 300 important
infrastructure and urban projects, as well as investment
programmes in telecommunications and information
technology. This allows the country to face the global
challenges of the twenty first century and upgrade the
services provided to millions of visitors who annually
enjoy its unique climate and lifestyle.
The ancient tradition still vivid to our days together
with the ancient monuments scattered throughout the
country, combined with the golden sun, the physical
beauty, the unique hospitality, all modern comforts,
the necessary infrastructure, the long tourism
experience, the upgraded services provided, make
Greece a particularly attractive destination for eminent
delegates.
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics 73
Map of Athens
ATHENAEUM INTERCONTINENTAL HOTEL
73
74
KIFISSIA
Lykovrysi
Zefyrion
28th World Congress
of the International Association
of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
KAT
Metamorfosi
PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION MAP
Map of Metro
Kamatero
Pefki
Nea Penteli
Melissia
MAROUSSI
Iraklio
IRAKLIO
Pentel
OTE
NERATZIOTISSA
Nea Filadelfia
Ilion
PEFKAKIA
Agii Anargyri
Maroussi
IRINI
NEA IONIA
Petroupoli
PARADISSOS
Vrilissia
Nea Ionia
PERISSOS
OLYMPIAKO STADIO
Nea Halkidona
SIDERA
ANO PATISSIA
DOUK.PLAKENTIAS
Filothei
AGHIOS ELEFTHERIOS
Galatsi
NOMISMATOKOPIO
SEPOLIA
Holargos
VICTORIA
LARISSA
PANORMOU
GOUDI
Kifissia
PANEPISTIMIO
KOLONAKI
KIFISSIA
MONASTIRAKI
Lykovrysi
Tavros
Zografou
SYNTAGMA
nt
Glyka Nera
P
en
te
li
OPERATING LINES
LINE 1, ISAP
PAGRATI / KESSARIANI
LINE 2, ATTIKO METRO
Nea Penteli
Kessariani
Melissia
LINE 3, ATTIKO METRO
METRO STATION
TAVROS
Iraklio
METRO STATION, UNDER CONSTRUCTION
NEOS KOSMOS
IRAKLIO
Vyronas
AGHIOS IOANNIS
Penteli
LINE 2, UNDER CONSTRUCTION
DAFNI
Nea Ionia
PERISSOS
ittos
Ymittos
Ym
Kallithea
Dafni
PARADISSOS
Vrilissia
nt
PEFKAKIA
Maroussi
OLYMPIAKO STADIO
ATRO
Halkidona
Filothei
IOS
(AL. PANAGOULIS)
Paleo Faliro
Halandri
HALANDRI
GALATSI
Agios Dimitrios
AGHIA PARASKEVI
FILOTHEI
LINE 4, TO BE TENDERED
PARKING FACILITY - ATTIKO METRO
Suburban Railway
Gerakas
Anthousa
Railway Station
Ilioupoli
Kallitechnoupoli
ILIOUPOLI
Agia Paraskevi
Psyhiko
NOMISMATOKOPIO
ATHENS METRO
PALLINI
HOLARGOS
Athens Metro
FAROSnetwork consists of 2 lines (Red Line and Blue Line) with trains arriving every 3 minutes at rush
KYPSELI
ETHNIKI AMYNA
hours and every 5-10 minutes at all other times.
ALIMOS The Athens Metro connects Syntagma Square to the Athens
DIKASTIRIA
International
Airport
in
27
minutes.
PANORMOU
KATEHAKI
Alimos
Hours of operation: Lines operate
daily from 05:30am
ALEXANDRAS
Argyroupolito 00:00pm.
Pallini
Pikermi
Neo Psihiko
I
P
®
"
Peania
LINE 3, TENDERED OUT
Suburban Railway Section
Also Used By Attiko Metro
DOUK.PLAKENTIAS
ALSOS VEIKOU
Galatsi
M
AGHIOS DIMITRIOS
Nea Smyrni
SIDERA
PATISSIA
o
LINE 3, UNDER CONSTRUCTION
u
FALIRO
IRINI
NEA IONIA
Moshato
rgyri
OTE
NERATZIOTISSA
EXTENSIONS
MOSHATO
Nea Filadelfia
PEANIA-KANT
LEGEND
ko
ANO ILISSIA
ACROPOLI
SYGROU-FIX
MAROUSSI
KALITHEA
ou
ZOGRAFOU
KAT
Pefki
M
MEGARO MOUSSIKIS
EVANGELISMOS
THISSIO
PETRALONA
Papagou
AMBELOKIPI
EXARHIA
OMONIA
KERAMEIKOS
Metamorfosi
KATEHAKI
ATHENS
ALEXANDRAS
METAXOURGHIO
ELEONAS
ETHNIKI AMYNA
ATTIKI
DIKASTIRIA
EGALEO
PALL
HOLARGOS
Neo Psihiko
FAROS
KYPSELI
HAIDARI
Agios Ioannis Redis
Agia Paraskevi
Psyhiko
AGHIOS NIKOLAOS
AGHIOS ANTONIOS
Egaleo
AGHIA PARASKEVI
FILOTHEI
GALATSI
KATO PATISSIA
Peristeri
dari
Gerakas
HALANDRI
ALSOS VEIKOU
ANTHOUPOLI
PERISTERI
Halandri
Holargos
VICTORIA
ATHENS
Papagou
AMBELOKIPI
EXARHIA
ONIA
PEANIA-KANTZA
Useful tips: GOUDI
ARGYROUPOLI
MEGARO MOUSSIKIS
While inside the train, announcements are made before every stop.
ZOGRAFOU
EVANGELISMOS
Metro
tickets are sold at the stations cashiers and by automatic tellers.
ANO ILISSIA
Remember to validate your ticket before you move on to the platform.
Glyka Nera
PANEPISTIMIO
KOLONAKI
RAKI
SYNTAGMA
Zografou
PAGRATI / KESSARIANI
HELLINIKO
Kessariani
NES DEVELOPMENT PLAN
Helliniko
NEOS KOSMOS
ittos
Ymittos
nt
DAFNI
o
u
AGHIOS DIMITRIOS
(AL. PANAGOULIS)
M
o
mitrios
Peania
Ym
Dafni
C0-FINANCED BY GRE
AND THE EUROPEAN U
Spata
Vyronas
AGHIOS IOANNIS
74
Ilioupoli
ILIOUPOLI
AIRPORT
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
Abstract
Book
75
77
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
Oral Presentations
MONDAY 23/8/2010
MR01
NEUROPLASTICITY – PLASTICITY IN THE HUMAN MOTOR
SYSTEM
John C. Rothwell
UK
Abstract: It is well recognized that the number and effectiveness of synapses in the adult brain change in response to learning and that similar processes contribute to the restoration of
function after central nervous system damage. It is possible
to use non-invasive methods of brain stimulation in humans
(transcranial magnetic stimulation or transcranial direct current
stimulation) to study and even manipulate these processes. Initial studies are now underway to test whether modification of
synaptic plasticity by neurostimulation can improve the recovery of motor function in patients after stroke.
Main Presenter
John Rothwell, PhD
Professor of Human Neurophysiology, Institute of Neurology, London,
UK
Discussants
SY01.3 CROSSCULTURAL COMMUNICATIVE CLUSTERS FOLLOWING
A RIGHT-HEMISPHERE STROKE
Ferre P.1, Paz Fonseca2, de Mattos Pimenta Parente M.A.3, Abusamra
V.4, Ferreres A.4, Giroux F.1, Ska B. 1, Joanette Y. 1
1
Centre de Recherche de l’Institut Universitaire de Gériatrie de
Montréal (CRIUGM), Université de Montréal, Canada;
2
Centre de Recherche de l’Institut Universitaire de Gériatrie de
Montréal (CRIUGM); 6 Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio Grande
do Sul, PUCRS
3
Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, UFRGS, Brazil.
4
Universidad de Buenos Aires, Facultad de Psicologia, Argentina
Summary: The presentation aims at describing profiles of communication impairments among right brain damaged individuals, as described by a cluster analysis, considering cultural, socio
demographic as well as clinical variables. Results show that distinctive clusters, mostly determined by the impaired communication components, can be identified.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to identify subgroups of communication impairments among the right brain
damaged adults and explain the impact of factors such as age,
education, site and type of the lesion or cultural background.
Philippe Paquier, PhD
Service de Neurologie, Hôpital Universitaire Erasme ULB, Bruxelles,
BELGIUM
Lorraine Ramig, PhD
Department of Speech Language and Hearing Sciences, University of
Colorado,
Boulder, USA
SY01.4
SY01.1 Fofi Constantinidou
Department of Psychology, University of Cyprus, Cyprus
CHALLENGES OF APHASIA INTERVENTION: TOWARDS BEST
PRACTICE
A. Klippi, J. Sellman, P. Heikkinen, M. Laine
Speech Sciences, University of Helsinki, Finland
Summary: The objective of this study was to document the
current clinical practices of SLTs in order to develop best practices for aphasia therapy in Finland.
Two surveys were recently administered in Finland which explored current clinical practices in aphasia rehabilitation and
the resources available to clinicians. The challenges of clinical
decision making will be discussed.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to discuss e.g.
the challenges of clinical decision making in aphasia intervention.
SY01.2
INTERVENTION APPROACHES TO APHASIA IN CZECH
Helena Lehečková
Department of Modern Languages, University of Helsinki, Finland
Summary: An overview paper on the assessment and treatment of aphasia in the Czech Republic.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to compare
the aphasiologic care in the Czech Republic with that in other
countries.
HE ROLE OF EXECUTIVE FUNCTIONING IN COGNITIVE
T
PERFORMANCE: IMPLICATIONS FOR APHASIA
MANAGEMENT
Summary: Normal aging affects certain aspects of cognition
such as information processing, memory and executive functioning. Manifestations of age-associated changes in executive
skills include difficulty in remembering names as well as working memory deficits. This presentation will discuss the role of
executive functioning abilities in older adults and potential implications for aphasia therapy.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to understand
how to assess executive functioning skills in older adults.
SY01.5
EVELOPING A VIDEO-RETELLING TASK AS A MEASURE OF
D
CONVERSATION IN APHASIA
K. Hilari1, J. Marshall1 and I. Papathanasiou2
1
City University London, UK;
2
Technological Educational Institute of Patras, Greece
Summary: We report the development of a video-retelling task
as a measure of connected speech, which can be used in clinical
practice. We will report on the first stage of our research which involved developing video-clips and testing them with non-neurologically impaired controls to determine the number and type of
concepts they conveyed per clip and their quality of interaction.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to discuss the
methodas of measuring connected speech in aphasia, and to
explain the use of a video retelling task to assess people with
aphasia.
78
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
SY02A.1
FROM VOCAL FOLD VIBRATION TO VOICE ACOUSTICS
D. D. Deliyski
University of South Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina, USA
Summary: Acoustic measures characterize objectively the
voice signals. But there is insufficient evidence regarding their
physiological validity and the correspondence of the acoustic features to the actual biomechanical vibration of the vocal
folds. This lecture summarizes our recent progress using technological advancements in high-speed videoendoscopy to precisely synchronize vibration to acoustic signal and provide new
evidence of these relationships.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to identify the
need for further research on the relationships between vocal
fold vibration and voice acoustics; Describe a new acousticelectroglottographic measure of vocal attack time; Describe
findings relating acoustic jitter to variations in vocal fold vibratory symmetry; Describe findings relating acoustic shimmer to
variations in the open quotient.
SY02A.2
FROM VOICE ACOUSTICS TO VOICE PERCEPTION
Rahul Shrivastav
University of Florida, Gainesville, USA
Summary: This presentation will summarize the findings of a
series of experiment done to understand how changes in vowel
acoustic signals cue the perception of dysphonic voice quality.
The three dimensions of voice quality to be discussed include breathiness, roughness and strain.
Learner Outcomes: 1. Attendees will be able to describe the
perceptual cues for breathiness and roughess. 2. Attendees will
be able to discuss limitations contemporary acoustic measures
used to describe dysphonic voice quality.
SY02A.3
DESIGNING VOICE ASSESSMENT PROTOCOLS: THE BASICS
J.M. Oates
La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia
Summary: The validity and utility of clinical voice evaluations
depend, in part, on the extent to which evaluation protocols
comprehensively sample clients’vocal behaviours. This contention applies to auditory-perceptual and instrumental evaluation as well as to self-report. This paper provides recommendations to assist clinicians design voice evaluation protocols that
sample clients’maximum vocal capabilities and their everyday
voice use patterns.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to design voice
evaluation protocols that sample their clients’ maximum vocal capabilities; Design voice evaluation protocols that sample
their client’s everyday voice use patterns.
SY02A.4
SING PERCEPTUAL AND ACOUSTIC EVALUATION TOOLS
U
IN ONGOING VOICE THERAPY
O. Amir
Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv, Israel
Summary: Perceptual indices and acoustic analysis programs
are typically used for initial/final voice evaluation. This presentation suggests applying these tools for the ongoing voice
therapy process. While these tools can be easily integrated into
the clinical setting, it should be done with caution, as the interpretation of the results obtained might not adhere to the normative expected values.
Learner Outcomes: After completing this session, participants
will be able to incorporate perceptual indices and acoustic analysis tools into voice therapy rotuine.
SY02A.5
NEW RECOMMENDATIONS FOR ACOUSTIC VOICE
MEASUREMENTS
J.G. Svec1, S. Granqvist2
1
Biophysics Lab, Department of Experimental Physics, Palacky
University, Olomouc, Czech Republic
2
Department of Speech, Music and Hearing, School of Computer
Science and Communication, Royal Institute of Technology,
Stockholm, Sweden
Summary: While acoustic voice measurements are essential
for objective voice assessment, most of these measurements
have not been well standardized. This presentation takes into
account the most fundamental device for voice measurement a microphone. Recommendations are formulated determining
which microphones are acceptable and which are not acceptable for voice measurements.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to describe
principles of correct voice recordings, choose a correct microphone for voice measurement.
SY02A.6
PANEL DISCUSSION, PART 1
J.G. Svec1, Committee Members2
Biophysics Lab, Department of Experimental Physics, Palacky
University, Olomouc, Czech Republic
2
IALP Voice Committee
1
Summary: Members of the IALP Voice Committee will exchange
their opinions and answer questions on the topics presented
during the symposium.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to discuss and
better explain the topics presented during the symposium.
SY03A.1
CHALLENGES OF INTERVENTION WITH SCHOOL-AGE
CHILDREN AND ADOLSESCENTS
Roswitha Romonath
University of Cologne, Germany
Summary: Language development is an implicit part of developmental tasks and includes complex skills regarding language
content, form and function in all language modalities. School
provides a central motor for language learning. Children with
developmental language disorder are at risk to fail in their
school career. Research questions concerning the need for a
school curriculum oriented intervention are presented.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to explain the
interaction between language development and school setting
in the framework of ecological systems theory - Characterize
different processes of language development in early childhood and school age. - Justify curriculum oriented language intervention - Develop relevant research questions for evidencebased practice in school-aged children.
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
SY03A.2
INTERVENTION PROGRAMS IN THE PROMOTION OF
ARABIC WRITING IN PRESCHOOLERS
Eyal, Hanan Jamalye, Jaklin Sakran-Mansour & Dorit Ravid
Department of Communication Disorders, Tel-Aviv University, Israel
Summary and Learner outcome: This study compared the
impact of letter naming, phonological awareness and morphological awareness interventions on to early spelling skills in 125
Arabic speaking kindergarteners. We found systematic advantages in the intervention domains, but letter naming intervention was the only one which contributed to improvement in
spelling skills.
The best way to promote spelling success is
via teaching children letter names.SY03A.3
SYSTEMATIC ENGAGING EARLY LITERACY: A DYNAMIC
SYSTEMS APPROACH
Westby C.1, Culatta B.2, Hall K.2
1
Bilingual Multicultural Services, USA
2
Brigham Young University, USA
Summary: Systematic and Engaging Early Literacy (SEEL) is a
dynamic systems approach to emergent literacy development
that has been implemented as an add in to the existing curriculum in both preschool and kindergarten. It has been proven
to be effective in teaching children phonemic awareness and
other foundational language skills that prepare them to learn
to read.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to explain the
role of dynamic systems theory in promoting emergent literacy- Plan early language and literacy activities based on an integrated meaning and skill-based curriculum.
SY03A.4
EVALUATING EXPOSITORY TEXT SUMMARIES
Westby C.1, Culatta B.2, Hall K.2
1
Bilingual Multicultural Services
2
Brigham Young University
Summary: Students in 4th and 5th grades read expository
texts and wrote summaries of the texts. The summaries were
analyzed for their syntactic microstructures (MLT, type/number
of dependent clauses and connectives) and macrostructure
organization. Results indicate patterns of development in expository text writing and offer ideas for linguistic elements to
teach to foster development of expository text structure and
content.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to explain the
role of working memory in expository text production . Analyze
micro- and macrostructure characteristics of expository text
summaries.
SY03A.5
DEVELOPMENT OF SUBORDINATING CONJUNCTIONS IN
GERMAN ADOLESCENTS WITH AND WITHOUT LANGUAGE
LEARNING DISORDERS
Roswitha Romonath
University of Cologne, Germany
Summary: During adolescence essential steps of grammar
development can be observed, including the differentiation of
79
conjunctions. Differences in the development of comprehension of subordinating conjunctions between adolescents with
and without language learning disorder (LLD vs. NLLD) in their
fifth, seventh and ninth high school year are examined.
Results indicate considerable developmental deficits in the LLD
group, compared to the NLLD group.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to describe
the differences in the learning process of subordinating conjunctions between German adolescents with and without Language Learning Disorders (LLD). The participant will be able to
distinguish conjunctions which cause most problems for the
LLD-group.
FP01.1
WORD-FINAL PROLONGATIONS IN AN ADULT MALE WITH
NEUROFIBROMATOSIS TYPE 1
M. Cosyns1, G. Mortier2, P. Corthals1,3, S. Janssens2, J. Van Borsel1
Department of Otorhinolaryngology & Logopedic and Audiological
Sciences, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium
2
Centre for Medical Genetics, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent,
Belgium
3
Department of Speech Pathology & Audiology, University College
Ghent, Ghent, Belgium
1
Summary: A case of word-final prolongations (WFP) displayed
by an adult male with neurofibromatosis type 1 is reported.
Speech samples were collected in five different speech modalities and subsequently analyzed in a semi-automatic manner
using Praat software. Results on the frequency, nature and distribution of the WFP are presented. The pathogenesis of these
WFP and their relation to stuttering is discussed.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to describe the
characteristics of word-final prolongations (WFP) as displayed
by an adult male with neurofibromatosis type 1 and to discuss
the pathogenesis of these WFP and their relation to stuttering.
FP01.2
PRESCHOOL CHILDREN’S CONVERSATIONAL SPEECH
AFTER STUTTERING TREATMENT: MEASURING LANGUAGE
USE IN MULTIPLE ENVIRONMENTS.
L. Brown1, L. Wilson1, A. Packman2, N. Trajkovski2, M. Onslow2,
R. Menzies2
1
Charles Sturt University, Albury, Australia
2
Australian Stuttering Research Centre, The University of Sydney,
Sydney, Australia
Summary: It is imperative that stuttering treatments for preschool children like the newly developed Westmead Program
do not hinder language development. This study reports a
range of pre and posttreatment linguistic analyses conducted
from conversational speech samples collected across multiple
environments for participants of the Westmead Program. It appears that language development was not impeded after treatment.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to explain the
importance of sampling preschoolers’ speech and language
from a range of representative conversational contexts. Describe the importance of evaluating language development
of preschool children who receive new or experimental treatments for stuttering. Discuss emerging evidence of the safety
of the Westmead Program.
80
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
FP01.3
FP01.6
REPORTING MEAN VOWEL DURATION: AN INNOVATIVE
PERSPECTIVE.
CAN STUTTERING BE CURED THROUGH THE INDUCTION OF
PLASTIC CHANGE IN THE BRAIN?
L. Brown1, L. Wilson1, A. Packman2
Charles Sturt University, Albury, Australia
2
Australian Stuttering Research Centre, The University of Sydney,
Sydney, Australia
H. Soensterud1, K. Henriksen2 E. Dietrichs2
1
Bredtvet Resource Centre, Oslo, Norway
2
University in Oslo, Norway
1
Summary: Measures of vowel duration (VD) in speech research
are traditionally reported collectively for all vowels within a
speech sample. However, in spontaneous speech samples with
high external validity, but reduced sampling control, it was hypothesised that an unequal distribution of short and long vowels may potentially obscure reported findings. This paper presents preliminary evidence to support this hypothesis.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to describe the
need for acoustic research using conversational speech samples. Discuss the need for research with high external validity
in addition to research with high internal validity. Explain the
need to separate short and long vowels when reporting mean
vowel duration and variability of vowel duration data from conversational speech samples.
FP01.4
THE EFFECT OF SYNTACTIC COMPLEXITY AND LENGTH
UTTERANCE ON SPEECH FLUENCY IN PERSIAN ADULTS
WHO STUTTER
Vahab Maryam1, Nilipour Dr Reza2, Yadegari Fariba2
1
Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran
2
University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences, Iran
Summary: The present study examined whether the syntactic
complexity and length utterance effects will continue during
adulthood and cause dysfluency among Persian stutterers.The
result of this research confirmed that :1-The type of syntactic
structure didn’t affect on Persian adults fluency.2-Length utterance effect, in Persian stutterer adults,is active at all levels and
leads to increasing dysfluency.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to explain the
probability effect of syntactic complexity and length utterance
on speech fluency in other languages.describe that stutterer
adults would not be more disfluent, by increasing one or two
syntactic nodes, in producing structures wich they are proficient enough.
FP01.5
LIP-EMG DURING SENTENCE PRODUCTION OF PERSONS
WHO DO AND DO NOT STUTTER
H.-G. Bosshardt
Faculty of Psychology, Ruhr-University Bochum, Germany
Summary: It was investigated whether during sentence production lip muscles of adult persons who do and do not stutter are differentially affected by concurrent cognitive processing and short-term memory load. The present results suggest
that cognitive processes affect the recruitment of motor units
for speech in persons who stutter but not in persons who do
not stutter.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to describe effects of processing load on speech fluency Describe effects of
processing load on the recruitment of motor units in persons
who stutter and persons who do not stutter.
Summary: Some people who stutter are more fluent when exposed to Altered Auditory Feedback (DAF/FAF). If the intervention is initiated while the brain is still plastic, it may be possible
to induce persistent fluency as the brain re-modulates to circumvent dysfunctional nerve tracts. We present a single case
study. Conversations with the boy were recorded pre, within
and post-therapy.
Learner Outcomes: The results will be presented, and are discussed in relation to fluency enhancement. Participants will be
able to know more about DAF/FAF and important professionals experiences related to the use of technical intervention and
small children.
FP02.1
EXPLORING GOAL SETTING PRACTICES IN ADULT
NEUROLOGY SETTINGS: A REPORT ON THE PROCESSES
AND EVOLUTION OF THE PROJECT AND THE OUTCOMES
FOR CLINICIANS AND STUDENTS
Madeline Cruice, Rachel Barnard
City University London, United Kingdom
Summary: This paper reports on an 11-month project exploring the goal setting practices of clinicians, educators and students in adult neurology settings in London, UK. The project
has drawn information from multiple sources and activities
(literature review; focus group discussions; hospital site visits;
clinicians’ study day with linked follow-up workshop; & expert
discussion group). Project outcomes and processes will be discussed.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to discuss the
purposes and mechanisms of goal setting; Discuss the consensus and conflicts in goal setting; Identify the processes that underpinned high stakeholder involvement and interest.
FP02.2
ASSESSING AND GRADING SPEECH THERAPY TRAINEES
CONSISTENTLY AND OBJECTIVELY
SIMOENS L. A.
University College Ghent, Faculty of Health Care Vesalius, Belgium
Summary: The presented system computes consistently and
objectively the local and the international ECTS grade for a
trainee assessment. The computerized calculation is based on
the observed achievements of the trainee as compared with
the expectations deduced from the profession profile of a starter. SASSO does not require a valuation by the coach.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to assess a
trainee more objectively and discuss the way trainees may be
graded in a consistent way.
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
FP02.3
FP02.6
COMPARISON OF IALP’s EDUCATIONAL DIRECTIVES WITH
THE CURRENT PROGRAMS IN EUROPE AND GREECE- THE
EFFECTS OF THE BOLOGNA DIRECTIVE
CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES FOR SPEECH AND
LANGUAGE THERAPY: THE EUROPEAN DIMENSION
G. Kalomoiris1, A. Frangouli2, A. Lambrinou2, C. Athanasiadi2
Hellenic-American Educational Foundation, Psychico College
2
Mental Health Institute for Children and Adults, Kallithea, Athens,
Greece
81
A. Patterson, A. Lowit
Comité Permanent de Liaison des Orthophonistes-Logopedes de
l’Union Européenne (CPLOL), UK
Summary: There is necessity for a common education for
speech and language therapists globally in order to further
develop the scientific discipline and maintain a high level of
training. A comparison has been done between education directives in use in Europe and Greece and the results showed
the enhancement of the theoretical and clinical content of the
courses offered in Greece.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to discuss the
impacts of the Bologna declaration and to support and discuss
the consolidation of continuous professional development in
accordance with IALP, CPLOL-LCSTL, PSL guidelines.
Summary: Education of speech and language therapists in Europe is diverse in level as well as in models of education, learning and teaching, regulation and accreditation. This paper summarises these variations, outlines the work of CPLOL and provides annual statistics on SLT education across Europe. It also
provides a European perspective with consensus guidelines on
practice education and continuing professional development.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to describe the
challenges of and opportunities for European collaboration in
education of SLT/logopedists who are fit for practice; 2. discuss
the similarities and differences across cultures, education and
health systems that impact on Speech and Language therapy
in Europe.
FP02.4
FP03.1
SURVEY ON THE PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE OF THE
EUROPEAN SPEECH AND LANGUAGE THERAPISTS
INITIAL FIELD TRIAL DEVELOPMENT OF THE
COMPREHENSIVE ASSESSMENT OF SPANISH
ARTICULATION-PHONOLOGY (CASA-P): CULTURAL AND
LINGUISTIC VALIDITY
M. Kaufmann-Meyer, R. Citro, T. Rousseau, L. Miettinen,
V. Raudsalu, M. Peeva
Comité Permanent de Liaison des Orthophonistes-Logopedes de
l’Union Européenne (CPLOL), Italy
Summary: The survey was carried out by a working-group of
the CPLOL, the Standing Liaison Committee of EU SLTs and
gives updated data on the professional practice in 23 european
countries: legal status, fields of work, organization of the practice, relationship with insurers, referrers, treatment patterns.
The resulting documentation is useful either in the professional
context or in the educational one.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to describe
differences and similarities in the professional practice across
Europe. Discuss the challenges that the profession has to face
in the coming years.
FP02.5
EVALUATING STUDENTS’ LEARNING IN ADULT NEUROLOGY
SETTINGS USING AN INTENSIVE CLINICAL EDUCATION
APPROACH
Claire Farrington Douglas1, Madeline Cruice2
Homerton University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London UK
2
Department of Language and Communication Science, City
University London, UK
1
Summary: This 5-day intensive programme for SLT students
targets 5 core competencies: information gathering, information giving, interaction, informal assessment, and self and peer
appraisal with adults with communication impairments, their
family members and friends, and multidisciplinary team staff in
a hospital setting. Objective (OSCE outcomes) and subjective
(self and other feedback) evaluations of this intensive approach
will be presented.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to discuss alternative ways of providing experiential student learning opportunities that benefit the student, clients and service; Discuss
principles and practicalities of using an OSCE to evaluate student SLT learning and competencies.
Brice A. E.1, Brice R. G.2
University of South Florida St. Petersburg, USA
2
University of Central Florida, USA
1
Summary: The purpose is to describe the development of the
Comprehensive Assessment of Spanish Articulation-Phonology
which measures articulation and phonology of Spanish speaking children.
Learner Outcomes: 1. Participants will explain typical and
atypical Spanish and English articulation differences. 2. Participants will explain typical and atypical Spanish and English phonological differences.
FP03.2
LINGUISTIC ETHNOGRAPHY APPROACHES TO
COMMUNICATION DISABILITY IN MULTILINGUAL FAMILIES
Stokes Jane1, Martin Deirdre2
1
University of Greenwich, UK
2
University of Birmingham, UK
Summary: The presentation will be delivered by both authors
and will cover the potential application of concepts developed
in the field of linguistic ethnography to the study of communication disability in multilingual families. A language socialisation approach offers a way of re-conceptualising language
disabilities and linguistic ethnography offers frameworks for
speech and language therapists working with multilingual
populations.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to demonstrate
understanding of the application of linguistic ethnographic approaches to the field of communication disability in multilingual families. Describe the different concepts presented and
discuss their application.
82
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
FP03.3
PSYCHOMETRIC VALIDATION OF THE TEST OF READING &
PHONOLOGICAL PROCESSING AND MEMORY (TORPAM)
- A DYSLEXIA DIAGNOSTIC ASSESSMENT BATTERY FOR
MALTESE-ENGLISH SPEAKING CHILDREN
Rachael Xuereb1, Helen Grech1, Barbara Dodd2
1
University of Malta, Malta
2
City University, London, UK
Summary: A comprehensive diagnostic assessment battery
for children with dyslexia has been developed in Maltese for
Maltese-English children. This is the first of its kind in Malta and
is currently being standardised. The validation process is described in this presentation.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to understand
the bilingual situation in Malta as well as learn about the new
assessment battery.
FP03.4
DOES DIGLOSSIA IN ARABIC INFLUENCE PERFORMANCE IN
NAMING TASKS?
mahajna SH.
Communication Disorders Department, Sackler Faculty of Medicine
Tel Aviv University, Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Israel
Summary: We investigated whether diglossia in Arabic creates
similar interference between literary and spoken glossias to that
claimed to exist in bilingualism. Forty 10-year-olds and forty 2025-year-olds,male and female, named(RAN) mono-lexical and
bi-lexical words. Mono-lexical words were named significantly
more quickly than bi-lexical ones; free naming was significantly
quicker than instructed naming; age and gender influenced the
speed of naming.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to understand
the difficulties experienced by diglossic speakers, also it’s allows
us to check interference phenomena in the same participant.
FP03.5
NONWORD REPETITION AND SENTENCE IMITATION AND
MONOLINGUAL AND BILINGUAL CHILDREN WITH AND
WITHOUT PRIMARY LANGUAGE IMPAIRMENT
Thordardottir Elin
McGill University, Canada
Summary: This study examined the diagnostic accuracy of
Nonword Repetition, Sentence Imitation, a vocabulary measure
and MLU in identifying Primary Language Impairment (PLI) in
monolingual and bilingual groups of French-speaking children,
with and without PLI (4 groups, overall n=58, mean age 59.9
months, SD 6.4). Nonword Repetition accurately separated the
groups with and without PLI regardless of bilingual status.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to gain insights
into how bilingualism affects scores on language tests and language processing tests; gain better understanding of the identification of language impairment in bilingual children.
FP03.6
PERFORMANCE OF BILINGUAL CHILDREN FROM
MIGRATION BACKGROUND ON A TEST OF GERMAN
MORPHOLOGICAL PARADIGMS
W Scharff Rethfeldt1, K Bilda2
1
University of Oldenburg, Oldenburg, Germany
2
Hochschule fuer Gesundheit, Bochum, Germany
Summary: The purpose of this presentation is to describe the
performance of a group of bilingual elementary school children from different linguistic backgrounds with and without
suspected speech and language difficulties on a standardised
test of plural marking, and to discuss the influence of their first
languages on their performance.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to discuss the
importance of knowledge about the morphosyntactic structures of the child?s languages next to detailed case history information in order to interpret bilingual children?s performance
on standardised tests.
FP04.1
AUGMENTATIVE AND ALTERNATIVE COMMUNICATION:
SLP INTERVENTION OF NEUROLOGICAL DISORDERS IN A
DYSPHAGIA AMBULATORY
Tainara Lemes Conde Nandin, Regina Yu Shon Chun, Lucia
Figueiredo Mourão
State University of Campinas, São Paulo, Brazil.
Summary: The speech and language patologist assessment
protocol from the Dysphagia Ambulatory was adapted, aiming
to investigate the use of AAC in SLP intervention of individuals
who present oral and swallowing disorders, and also estimate
the number of patient in the period of 12 weeks that received
indication for the use of AAC in the clinical intervention.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to explain the
relevance of using a adapted protocol with CSA and discuss how
to evaluate patient that present restricted communication.
FP04.2
COMMUNICATION AND SPEECH & LANGUAGE GROUP
THERAPY IN ADULTS SUFFERING FROM SEVERE MENTAL
HEALTH DISORDERS
A. Tzimara, A. Antoniou, A. Frangouli, I. Lazogiorgou-Kousta,
Chr. Zaharopoulou
Society of Social Psychiatry and Mental Health, Fokida, Greece
Summary: The Society of Social Psychiatry and Mental Health,
among other therapeutic interventions, functions psychosocial
rehabilitation units for adults suffering from severe mental illness.
Seven residents were the first study group for improving their
communication level, applying principles of alternative and
augmentative communication with appropriate therapeutic
and educative approaches. Speech and language therapists are
an unquestionable part of the multidisciplinary team.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to discover the
work with severe institutionalized psychiatric patients, ways of
promoting the re-socialization process of the individuals suffering from mental illness.
FP04.3
THE EFFECTS OF COMMUNICATION INTERVENTION
DURING MEALTIME IN RETT SYNDROME.
Bartolotta T.E., Remshifski P.A.
Seton Hall University, USA
Summary: This study determined if training feeders to respond
to behaviors of girls with Rett syndrome (RTT) as potentially
communicative resulted in an increase in communication during mealtime. Feeders of 4 girls with RTT were trained to recognize potential communication bids. Intentional communication
during mealtime increased for all girls with RTT. Implications for
intervention and future research directions are described.
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to understand
the core features of Rett syndrome; 2) understand the challenges of assessing and documenting communicative intent in
nonverbal children; and 3) appreciate the important role of the
communication partner in interactions with children with Rett
syndrome.
FP04.4
DISTASTER PREPAREDNESS FOR PEOPLE WITH MOBILITY
AND/OR COMMUNICATION CHALLENGES
Currier S.1, Cooley Hidecker M.J.2
Michigan State University, USA
2
University of Central Arkansas, USA
1
Summary: Individuals with mobility and/or communication
challenges are especially vulnerable during disasters. Individuals with mobility impairments face additional challenges during evacuation or shelter stays. People with communication
challenges may not hear or understand alerts. Limited speech
may prevent individuals from requesting help. Augmentative
and alternative communication (AAC) may be inaccessible or
inoperable. Additional considerations are needed when creating emergency plans.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to identify
additional challenges faces by individuals with mobility and/
or communication challenges during natural or human-made
disasters. Gain understanding of the need for a comprehensive
approach that includes emergency planners, relief workers and
the individuals with the mobility and/or communication challenges for emergency planning.
FP04.5
DEVELOPMENT OF ALTERNATIVE AND AUGMENTATIVE
COMMUNICATION IN KOSOVO
Behluli Kabashi Luljeta, Dragaj Afredita, Brestovci Behlul
Albania
Summary: Usage of methods of nonverbal communication
for individuals who have disabilities in speech and language or
whose language production is limited. For developing of AAC
in Kosovo we have trained teachers, used Board Maker,adapted
in Albanian Language. The usage of AAC would help children
with special needs, teachers who work with them as well as
logopedics in Kosovo.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to exchange
experience in the field of Alternative and Augmentative Communication.
FP05.1
MULTICULTURAL ISSUES IN GREECE
Frangouli Athena
Mental Health Institute For Children And Adults, Greece
Summary: Greece has been known for centuries as the country of hospitality, of philoxenia. Greece has been also known for
the immigration of its population, especially after the Second
World War. They know the pain and grief, the threat of losing
one’s dignity, the separation of families, the questions about
identity, language, culture and values.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to present and
analyse the problems of immigrants at the Greek Social and
Cultural environment.
83
FP05.2
THE STANDARDIZATION AND USE OF A SCREENING TOOL
FOR FOUR-YEAR-OLDS IN GREECE
Maria Vlassopoulos1, Prevention Committee2
1 st
1 Psychiatric Clinic, University of Athens School of Medicine, Greece
2
Panhellenic Association of Logopedists.
Summary: The adaptation and standardization of a screening
tool for 4 year-olds in the Greek language is presented. The
AnOmiLo 4 test screens for speech, language, and voice difficulties, as well as detecting early fluency problems. The test
may be administered by professionals in contact with young
children. The use of this tool is analysed and discussed.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to explain the
procedure used to standardize the AnOmiLo 4 test, to discuss
its use and to be aware of its advantages, as well as its disadvantages.
FP05.3
A TOOL FOR THE ASSESSMENT OF THE LEVEL OF
FUNCTIONING OF CHILDREN WITH AUTISM SPECTRUM
DISORDERS BY THE INTERDISCIPLINARY TEAM (EDALFA)
Kotsopoulou Angelique
Technological Educational Institute of Patras, Greece
Summary: A tool (EDALFA) for the assessment of the level of
functioning and setting therapy goals for the ASD child was
created by an interdisciplinary team. Following the observation
of the ASD child by three members of the team his functioning profile is outlined on nine measures and realistic treatment
goals are set for the team members and the parents.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to understand
a useful tool for setting realistic treatment goals by Interdisciplinary teams for early intervention for the child with ASD.
FP05.4
TEST OF RECEPTIVE AND EXPRESSIVE LANGUAGE
ABILITIES - PRELIMINARY DATA OF GREEK PRESCHOOL AGE
CHILDREN
Ioannis Vogindroukas1, Evmorfia Grigoriadou2
Medicopedagogical Center of North Greece, Psychiatric Hospital of
Thessaloniki, Greece
2
Primary Special School for Deaf Thessaloniki, Greece
1
Summary: The Test of Receptive and Expressive Language Abilities was used with two groups of typical developing children.
The first group was 60 children with average age 4,3 years and
the second group was 100 children with average age 5,5 years.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to know what
the specific test is and also the participants will has more knowledge about the greek language developmental process.
FP05.5
METAFON TEST: A PHONOLOGICAL AWARENESS
ASSESSEMENT FOR THE GREEK POPULATION
A. Giannetopoulou, L. Kirpotin, Skourogianni P.
Research Committee of the Panhellenic Association of Logopedists,
Athens, Greece
Summary: The MetaFON Test is an evaluation tool of Metaphonological Development and Reading Readiness regarding Phonological Awareness. It was developed by the Research Committee of the Panhellenic Association of Logopedists.
84
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
It is a diagnostic tool which includes a screening test for ages
3;10-7;0 consisting of three linguistic scales: rhyme, syllable and
phoneme.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to be informed
about the metaphonological acquisition of greek children and
the way to assess via a standardised test.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to discuss the
association between the development of grammatical, functional and lexical areas of language development and describe
their implications to language intervention with autistic children.
FP06.4
FP06.1
SENSORY-PERCEPTUAL IMPAIRMENTS IN PERSONS WITH
INTELLECTUAL DISABILITY AND AUTISM
C. De Bal
Lessius University College, Antwerp, Belgium
Het GielsBos, Gierle, Belgium
Summary: Sensory-perceptual impairments and unusual behavioural responses to sensory stimuli are present in a majority
of persons with an intellectual disability and autism. In our pilot
study we studied the prevalence of sensory-perceptual problems and tried to get insight in the nature of these problems.
We also examined the possible relationship between these
problems and the processing of information.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to describe the
sensory-perceptual impairments in this population and explain
the relation with information processing.
FP06.2
PROGRAM OF INTERVENTION IN DEAFBLIND
STUDENTS: THE FRAMEWORK OF THE COGNITIVE AND
COMMUNICATIVE PROFILE OF DEAFBLIND STUDENTS
AND THE APPLICATION OF EDUCATIONAL PLAN OF
INTERVENTION
M. Zeza , P. Stavrou
Doctorate PhD, Researcher of Laboratory of Special and Curative
Education, (LABESPEC), University of Ioannina, Greece
2
Clinical Psychologist, Laboratoire de Psychologie Clinique et Psychopathologie, Université Paris V - Sorbonne, France
1
2
1
Summary: Students with deaf-blindness may miss or misinterpret incidental information, which provide an understanding of
the world.
The Laboratory of Special and Curative Education (LABESPEC),of
the University of Ioannina,Greece, embarked in a research program to produce a screening inventory of the cognitive and
communication profile of deafblind students, using direct observation for informal assessment and intervention in the form
of case study.
Learner Outcomes: The implications on education and communication faced by deafblind students will be discussed and
the framework of the cognitive and communication profile, on
which the intervention program is based, will be presented.
FP06.3
PRAGMATIC, LEXICAL AND GRAMMATICAL ABILITIES IN
AUTISTIC SPECTRUM CHILDREN
Fernanda Dreux Miranda Fernandes, Liliane Perroud Miilher
University of São Paulo – School of Medicine, Brazil
Summary: Analysis of the evolution of grammatical, functional
and lexical aspects in three different moments during the first
year of language therapy of ten autistic boys, ages 2.7 to 11.2
years. Data used filmed and recorded speech samples. All data
were longitudinally compared within and between areas. There
were significant associations between the studied variables but
no significant time-associated differences.
THE APPLICATION OF THREE DIFFERING THEORETICAL
PERSPECTIVES IN AN EXAMINATION OF LANGUAGE SKILLS
IN ASPERGER SYNDROME AND HIGH FUNCTIONING
AUTISM
F. M. Lewis, G. C. Woodyatt, B. E. Murdoch
University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia
Summary: The conceptualisation of Asperger Syndrome (AS)
and high functioning autism (HFA) being variations on a theme
has provided three theoretical approaches to research. The
current study applied the three approaches when comprehensively assessing the language skills of a group of 20 children
diagnosed with AS, HFA, and/or autism spectrum disorder. The
clinical applicability of each approach is discussed.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to describe:
the three theoretical perspectives in the research literature to
date; the clinical utility of each perspective.
FP06.5
COGNITIVE DEVELOPMENT IN APERT SYNDROME AND
CROUZON SYNDROME PATIENTS- A MULTIDISCIPLINARY
MODEL FOR EVALUATION
A. Yacubian–Fernandes, D.V.M.Abramides, L.P.Maximino
University of Sao Paulo, Bauru, Brazil
Summary: The Apert Syndrome and Crouzon Syndrome are
the most common syndromic craniosynostosis. Thirty eight patients were studied by a multidisciplinary approach based on
the impact of the craniofacial surgery, the brain malformations,
the social aspects of the families and the speech and language
aspects. These factors were related to the cognitive development and quality of life of the patients.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to discuss the
importance of the multidiciplinary approach to the cognitive
development of syndromic childrens.
FP07.1
RELIABILITY AND VALIDITY OF THE MANDARIN TOKEN
TEST WITH THREE SCORING METHODS
Tseng C.H.
Graduate Institute of Audiology and Speech Therapy, National
Kaohsiung Normal University, Taiwan
Summary: Multidimensional scoring methods are exceptionally complex even for an experienced therapist. Thus, if althernative scoring methods are found to be easier to conduct
yet come to comparable outcome, they can be considered for
adoption. This study found such was the case with a Chinese
aphasia test.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to compare the
difference between multidimensional scoring and althernative
methods; identify the advantanges and disadvantages of each
of the scoring mentod discussed.
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
FP07.2
THE ORTHOGRAPHIC OUTPUT LEXICON IS INDEPENDENT
FROM THE PHONOLOGICAL PROCESS: EVIDENCE FROM
JAPANESE PEOPLE WITH APHASIA IN HIRAGANA WRITING
N. Nagatsuka1, T. Yoshida2, D. Howard3
1
Research Center for Communication Disorders, Sophia University,
Tokyo, Japan
2
Department of Medical Sciences, Aichi Shukutoku University,
Nagoya, Japan
3
School of Education, Communication and Language Sciences,
University of Newcastle, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, United Kingdom
Summary: Performance of Hiragana writing to dictation in Japanese people with aphasia who use a different writing system
from alphabetic ones gives further evidence of a dissociation
between output phonological and orthographic lexicons. Hiragana script has consistent character-sound correspondences.
The results suggest that there are people who write Hiragana
words from the orthographic output lexicon directly from semantics without phonological mediation.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to discuss
the orthographic autonomy theory looking at performance of
aphasia even in a language which has a writing system with
complete character-sound correspondences.
85
group, the image built by the aphasic individuals and the group
role for each individual.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to discuss the
aspects necessaries to the constitution of the aphasic’s groups.
SY02B.1
PSYCHOLOGICAL FACTORS IN RELATION TO VOICE
DISORDERS-THE BASICS
J. Baker
Flinders University, Australia
Summary: This presentation will focus on the available evidence for the role of psychogenic and psychosocial factors in
the development of functional and organic voice disorders.
The implications of these findings will be discussed in relation
to current clinical practice, undergraduate and post-graduate
clinical training and for future directions in research.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to recognize
the importance of psychosocial factors as these may contribute
to onset of voice disorders, and the role for clinicians in helping
patients deal with these in resolving their voice problems.
SY02B.2
FP07.3
VOICE SELF-ASSESSMENT: BASICS AND CLINICAL
EXPERIENCE
PRODUCTION AND COMPREHENSION OF SPATIAL
LANGUAGE IN FRENCH AGRAMMATIC AND ANOMIC
APHASICS: CROSS-LINGUISTIC PERSPECTIVES
M. Behlau1, T. Nawka2
1
CEV, São Paulo, Brazil
2
Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany
E. Soroli1, Maya Hickmann1, Jean-Luc Nespoulous2, Thi Mai Tran3
1
Laboratory Formal Structures of Language, French National Centre
for Scientific Research (CNRS) & University of Paris 8, France
2
Laboratory Jacques Lordat, University of Toulouse Le Mirail &
Institute of Brain Sciences of Toulouse, France
3
Laboratory Knowledge, Texts and Language, French National Centre
for Scientific Research (CNRS) & University Lille North of France
Summary: A panoramic view and clinical insights on the use of
self-assessment protocols to measure the impact of a dysphonia will be offered. The different questionnaires, such as VHI, VRQOL and VAPP are complementary and not fully replaceable.
The special population of singers needs to be assessed with
specific protocols, such as the MSHI, CSHI, S-VHI and VHI-10 S.
Learner Outcomes: Participants will be able to discuss differences among protocols; participants will be able to identify and
describe results.
Summary: The present cross-linguistic research examines the
role of universal vs. language-specific aspects of aphasics? linguistic deficits and compensatory strategies. Particular attention is placed on the domain of spatial cognition for investigating how aphasic vs. control speakers of different language
groups represent motion events, thereby providing new perspectives for language pathology and rehabilitation.
Learner Outcomes: The study provides a cross-linguistic approach to aphasia, describing the scientific questions, design,
experiments, new technologies, methods of data analysis, and
perspectives for the interpretation of the findings towards a
more complete view of aphasia within a linguistic framework.
The presentation will open inspiring discussions concerning
how to study particular aspects of aphasia in controlled settings
and to promote new perspectives for the development of efficient rehabilitation strategies in language disorders.
FP07.4
THE SPEECH LANGUAGE THERAPEUTIC GROUP IN THE
APHASIC`S CONTEXT: DISCUSSION ABOUT GROUP
CONSTITUITION
A.P. Santana
Universidade Tuiuti do Paranα, Brazil
Summary: The aims is to analyze the factors those have influence the constitution of an aphasic ‘s group. The constitution
of the aphasic individuals inside the group depend of many
factors, such as: social places, relationship between language/
subject/ symptoms, discursive practices inside and outside the
SY02B.3
THE USE OF ELECTROGLOTTOGRAPHY FOR VOICE AND
SPEECH EVALUATION: AN UPDATE
Ma EPM
Voice Research Laboratory, Division of Speech and Hearing Sciences,
The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong
Summary: This paper will present a study which examined the
effects of age and gender on vocal fold contact behaviors during sustained vowel prolongation and connected speech using
an electroglottographic perspective. Results support the use
of connected speech in electroglottographic evaluation for a
more representative measure of vocal fold vibratory behaviors.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to discuss the
clinical implications of using connected speech tasks in electroglottographic evaluations.
SY02B.4
TRENDS IN OCCUPATIONAL VOICE MEASUREMENTS: USING
THE AMBULATORY PHONATORY ANALYZER
Yiu E.
University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong
Summary: The vocal dosimetry is a useful tool in measuring
phonatory function in a natural environment as it is not af-
86
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
fected by the presence of background noise. This presentation
will describe the use of the Kay-Pentax Ambulatory Phonatory
Anlyzer and the vocal pitch and loudness of speakers speaking
under different levels of background noises.
Learner Outcomes: Participants will be able to discuss updated
use of vocal dosimetry.
SY03B.2
SY02B.5
Summary: Unilateral vocal fold paralysis (UVFP) severely compromises patients’vocal function, significantly impacting their
general health status and social activities. The author will mention the importance of laryngeal reinnervation to retrieve ‘nearnormal’ voices of patients suffering from severely breathy dysphonia due to UVFP, indications of each reinnervation procedures and arytenoid adduction, and results of the surgeries.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to be convinced of the importance and excellent results of laryngeal reinnervation procedures as the treatment for breathy dysphonia
due to unilateral vocal fold paralysis.
Summary: This presentation will discuss differences in the
home literacy experiences of a group of children with and without moderate-severe speech delay, and how these differences
impact upon the degree of phonological awareness and letter
knowledge aptitude these children bring to beginning literacy
instruction. The importance of promoting phonological awareness development in children at-risk for literacy disorder before
school-entry is discussed.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to describe
differences between the home literacy experiences of children
with and without moderate-severe speech delay. Describe
differences in the types of reading skills emphasized during
shared-book reading by parents of children with and without
moderate-severe speech delay. Explain ways in which preventative and early interventions can be tailored to ensure parents of
at-risk children can use home literacy resources to effectively to
promote phonological awareness development prior to schoolentry.
SY02B.6
SY03B.3
LARYNGEAL REINNERVATION; NEW HORIZONS IN
TREATMENT OF VOCAL FOLD PARALYSIS
Yumoto E.
Otolaryngology-Head and neck Surgery, Kumamoto University,
Japan
PANEL DISCUSSION, PART 2
J.G. Svec1, Committee Members2
1
Biophysics Lab, Department of Experimental Physics, Palacky
University, Olomouc, Czech Republic
2
IALP Voice Committee, Czech Republic
Summary: Members of the IALP Voice Committee will exchange
their opinions and answer questions on the topics presented
during the symposium.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to discuss and
better explain the topics presented during the symposium.
SY03B.1
ENCOUNTERS BETWEEN COLONIAL AND LOCAL
LANGUAGES: CONSEQUENCES FOR KNOWLEDGE
PRODUCTION AND LITERACY
Hyter Y.D.
Western Michigan University, United States
Summary: Globalization results in increased opportunities for
encounters between colonial and local languages, particularly
in the global South. Using Critical Social Theory and case examples from sub-Saharan Africa, the author argues that these
unequal linguistic encounters have implications for literacy
definitions and practices, the production of culturally relevant
knowledge supporting problem solving strategies, and the
practice of communication scientists.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to, 1. explain
the consequences of globalization on language and literacy
practices in not only West Africa but how to apply this explanation to work with migrants in Europe and North America; 2. begin to identify ways that communication scientists can facilitate
local language and literacy practices in the site of this research,
as well as Europe, North America and industrialized enclaves in
Asia and Latin America.
RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN THE HOME LITERACY
ENVIRONMENT AND SCHOOL-ENTRY PHONOLOGICAL
AWARENESS IN CHILDREN WITH AND WITHOUT SPEECH
DELAY
Carson K., Gillon G., Boustead T.
University of Canterbury, New Zealand
EFFECTS OF LENGTH AND LEXICALITY ON READING KANA
STIMULI IN JAPANESE FIFTH OR SIXTH GRADE CHILDREN
WITH OR WITHOUT DEVELOPMENTAL DYSLEXIA
Sambai A.1, Uno A.1, Haruhara N.2, Kaneko M.3, Awaya N.4, Wydell
T.N5, Kozuka J6, Goto T.7, Tsutamori E.1
1
Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, University of
Tsukuba, Japan
2
Faculty of Health Science, Mejiro University, Japan
3
Faculty of Medical Science for Health, Teikyo Heisei University, Japan
4
Saiseikai Central Hospital, Japan
5
School of Social Sciences, Brunel University, Japan
6
Saitama Children’s Medical Center, Japan
7
LD/Dyslexia centre, Japan
Summary: The aim of this study was to investigate the effects
of length and lexicality on the reading of Kana stimuli in Japanese fifth or six grade children with or without developmental
dyslexia. The dyslexic children could read neither Kana words
nor nonwords fluently. This study suggests that reading speed
deficit may result from problems in both lexical and non-lexical
processing.
Learner Outcomes: After completing this session, participants
will be able to know the following. Japanese children with developmental dyslexia may show reading speed deficit for Japanese Kana stimuli, although their reading ability in accuracy is
almost intact. The reading speed deficit may result from problems in both lexical and non-lexical processing. These findings
are consistent to results from previous studies about developmental dyslexia in language with regular orthographies, such
as Italian.
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
87
SSY001
FP08.3
CHILDREN’S PRAGMATIC LANGUAGE DISORDERS:
THEORETICAL PERSPECTIVES AND CLINICAL
APPLICATIONS
BEHAVIOR ASSESSMENT BATTERY © (BAB): EVIDENCEBASED APPROACH TO THE ASSESSMENT AND TREATMENT
OF CHILDREN WHO STUTTER . NORMATIVE AND
COMPARATIVE STUDY OF ITALIAN CWS AND CWNS
Gallagher T. M.
University of Illinois, United States
Summary: Pragmatic language disorders have been conceptualized in fundamentally different ways, as the result of deficits in language expression and/or reception, conversational
knowledge, cognition, memory, executive function, inference,
theory of mind and social skill. This session will discuss the major theoretical perspectives that have been used to characterize
pragmatic impairments and discuss their clinical applications
and directions for future research.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to describe
major theoretical perspectives on pragmatic impairments and
Describe how pragmatics impairments has been approached in
assessment and intervention.
L. Cocco1, S. Bernardini2, C. Zmarich3, M. Vanryckeghem4,
G. Brutten4
1
Azienda Sanitaria Locale ASL TO4, Chivasso, Italy
2
Centro Medico di Foniatria, Padova, Italy
3
Istituto di Scienze e Tecnologie della Cognizione del C.N.R, sede di
Padova, Italy
4
University of Central Florida, United States
PARENT-CHILD INTERACTION AFTER TREATMENT OF
STUTTERING: A COMPARISON BETWEEN THE LIDCOMBE
PROGRAM AND THE DEMANDS AND CAPACITIES MODELBASED TREATMENT
Summary: The purpose of this study was to obtain normative
data for the Italian version of the Behavior Assessment Battery?s
(Brutten & Vanryckeghem, 2003, 2007) test procedures, so as to
determine if they can serve as diagnostic tools for differentiating the speech-associated affective, behavioural and cognitive
reactions of Italian CWS and CWNS.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to explain the
Italian version of the BAB for children, which is composed of
the Communication Attitude Test (CAT), the Behavior Checklist
(BCL) and the Speech Situation Checklist (SSC) Emotional Reaction (ER) and Speech Disruption (SD) section and discuss its
usefulness as an aid in differential diagnostic decision making
and in identification of treatment targets.
Leonoor C. Oonk, Caroline Koedoot, Marie-Christine Franken
University of Applied Sciences Utrecht, The Netherlands
FP08.4
FP08.1
Summary: This study evaluates if parents change their verbal
interaction with their stuttering child after three months of
therapy, with either the Demands and Capacities Model-based
treatment or the Lidcombe Program. It also investigates the relationship between the parental change and the change in the
childrens fluency.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to describe
and discuss the change parents of young stuttering children
make after therapy with the Demands and Capacities-based
treatment and the Lidcombe Program.
FP08.2
THE SPEECH SITUATION CHECKLIST©: NORMATIVE AND
COMPARATIVE STUDY OF ITALIAN CWS AND CWNS
S. Bernardini1, L. Cocco2, C. Zmarich3, M. Vanryckeghem4, G.
Brutten4
1
Centro Medico di Foniatria, Padova, Italy
2
Azienda Sanitaria Locale ASL TO4, Chivasso, Italy
4
Istituto di Scienze e Tecnologie della Cognizione del C.N.R, sede di
Padova, Italy
4
University of Central Florida, United States
Summary: The aim of this study was to obtain local norms
on the Italian version of the Speech Situation Checklist (SSCSpeech Disruption and SSC-Emotional Reaction) for children.
The SSC was administered to 68 CWS and 137 CWNS between
age 8 and 14. Results confirmed that CWS score statistically significantly higher compared to CWNS on both components of
the SSC.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to describe
the normative and comparative data relative to the Italian version of the Speech Situation Checklist (SSC-Speech Disruption
and -Emotional Reaction) for CWS and CWNS and discuss the
usefulness of including the SSC as part of their assessment of
speech-related concern and fluency breakdown.
A TRAINING TO SUPPORT ADOLESCENTS WHO STUTTER IN
THEIR COMMUNICATION AT SCHOOL: AN EVALUATION OF
EFFECTIVENESS
Capparelli E.1, Falcone P.2, Tomaiuoli D.2
1
CRC Balbuzie, Italy
2
University of Rome “La Sapienza”; CRC Balbuzie, Italy
Summary: Our paper is about the way teens who stutter communicate in school context and, particularly, the way they face
oral tests. Here are presented the results of an experiment involving a sample of 27 subjects, that, during the speech therapy
program, underwent a training specifically centred on how to
successfully manage this kind of verbal situations.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to improve
their know-how about how adolescents who stutter perceive
and manage school communication and specifically oral test.
They will also learn about a different integrated activity, useful
to favour the verbal facilitation techniques acquisition and generalization for their patients.
FP08.5
THE DEFECTIVE LANGUAGE AUTOMATION HYPOTHESIS OF
CLUTTERING
van Zaalen Y.
Fontys The Netherlands
Summary: Cluttering has been difficult to diagnose and treat.
In this presentation a summary of scientific research in the field
of cluttering will be presented in a model to clarify the linguistic
processes in this intriguing fluency disorder.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to understand
differences between underlying linguistic processes in cluttering and stuttering.
88
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
FP08.6
FP09.3
APPLICATION OF THE DIGITAL SPEECH AID IN STUTTERERS
THE DEVELOPMENT OF ICF INSPIRED ASSESSMENTS FOR
ADULTS WITH ACUTE STROKE, TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY
AND PARTNERS OF HEARING IMPAIRED OLDER PEOPLE
J. Ratynska, A. Szkielkowska, R. Markowska, H. Skarzynski
Institute of Physiology and Pathology of Hearing, Warsaw, Poland
Summary: Digital Speech Aid (DSA) is a novel device for stuttering treatment. It incorporates delayed auditory feedback
(DAF), and frequency-shifted auditory feedback (FAF). The aim
of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of the device as a
method of stuttering treatment, as well as to determine the factors influencing the benefit from the device.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to know the
usefulness of the digital speech aid in stutterers.
FP09.1
CONSIDERING THE ICF AS A CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK
FOR UNDERSTANDING QUALITY OF LIFE OF ADULTS WITH
ACQUIRED COMMUNICATION DISORDERS: STRENGTHS
AND LIMITATIONS
Cruice M.
City University, London, UK, united kingdom
Summary: This presentation explores the strengths and limitations of using the ICF as a conceptual framework to understand
quality of life by comprehensively reviewing qualitative and
quantitative research published in adult acquired communication disorders in English over the past two decades. Research
that links the ICF to the content of existing quality of life measures will also be reviewed.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to describe the
associations amongst activity, participation, and quality of life in
adult acquired communication disorders; Discuss the strengths
and limitations of using the ICF framework for clinical thinking
and decision making about client’s quality of life.
FP09.2
USING THE ICF AS A CLINICAL FRAMEWORK: PARENTS’S
AND PROFESSIONALS’ PERSPECTIVES OF THE IMPACT OF
SPEECH IMPAIRMENT IN EARLY CHILDHOOD
J. McCormack1, S. McLeod1, L. J. Harrison1, L. McAllister2
1
Charles Sturt University, Bathurst, Australia
2
The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia
Summary: The ability to participate in society is impacted by
childhood speech impairment according to 205 speech-language pathologists and 86 parents. Using the framework of the
International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health
(ICF) the domains of Communication, Learning and Applying
Knowledge, Interpersonal Interactions and General Tasks and
Demands were difficult for children as a result of their speech
impairment.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to a) Discuss
the potential use of the ICF in speech-language pathology and
b) Describe the breadth of activities that may be difficult for
children as a result of speech impairment.
L.E. Worrall1, R. O’Halloran1,2, N.A. Scarinci1, B. Larkins1,3,
L.M.H. Hickson1
1
The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia
2
LaTrobe University, Melbourne, Australia
3
University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand
Summary: The aim of this paper is to describe the development and psychometric properties of three clinical assessment
tools for adults with communication disabilities that use the ICF
in very different ways.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to describe
how the ICF has been incorporated into assessments of adult
communication disability. - Discuss the benefits and limitations
of using the ICF as a common framework.
FP09.4
ASSESSING VOICE ACTIVITY AND PARTICIPATION IN
DYSPHONIC CHILDREN
Ma EPM
Voice Research Laboratory, Division of Speech and Hearing Sciences,
The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong
Summary: Children with voice problems can suffer from significant functional impacts in their daily and social voice activities. Such functional impacts can be considered at the levels of
activity limitation and participation restriction according to the
ICF framework. This paper discusses the issues involved in developing tools for assessing voice activity and participation in
dysphonic children.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to discuss issues involved in developing tools for assessing voice activity
and participation in dysphonic children.
FP09.5
THE FOCUS (FOCUS ON THE OUTCOMES OF
COMMUNICATION UNDER SIX) A MEASURE OF
COMMUNICATIVE PARTICIPATION
N. Thomas-Stonell1, B. Oddson2, B. Robertson1 P. Rosenbaum3
1
Bloorview Research Institute, Bloorview Kids Rehab, Canada
2
School of Human Kinetics, Laurentian University, Canada
3
CanChild Centre for Childhood Disability Research, Canada
Summary: The FOCUS, a new communication outcome measure for preschool children is based on the ICF-CY framework.
Developed from prospective observations of change during
speech-language therapy, it was subsequently evaluated with
165 families of preschool children. Factor analysis demonstrated that the FOCUS was measuring a single construct -communicative participation.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to discuss the
benefit of outcome measures in speech-language treatment;
Describe the association between speech-language treatment
and improvements in Activities and Participation, Personal Factors.
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
89
FP09.6
FP10.3
CONSIDERING CONTEXT IN THE EVALUATION OF
INTELLIGIBILITY
BILINGUAL INTERVENTION: PARENTS’ PERCEPTION ON
CHANGES COMMUNICATION WITH THEIR DEAF CHILDREN
McLeod S., McCormack J., Harrison L.
Charles Sturt University, Australia
A.H.Yue, I. Lichtig
Department of Physiotherapy, Speech Therapy and Occupational
Therapy - University of São Paulo Medical School, São Paulo, Brazil
Summary: Childrens Intelligibility in Context (CIC) is a new tool
that measures intelligibility in a range of contexts and is framed
around the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF-CY). Parents of 120 preschool children
with speech impairment used the CIC rating scales. The CIC was
found to have good internal reliability and moderate-high correlation with traditional measures of severity.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to discuss the
role of context in perceptions of intelligibility of children with
speech impairments; and Describe the association between intelligibility and severity of childhood speech impairment.
Summary: This research analyzed a bilingual program for deaf
children from the point of view of their hearing parents, concerning professional support received and changes that took
place in the communication with their children after they had
taken part in the program.Interviews were conducted with 18
parents.The program led to positive changes in deaf childrens
communication with their hearing families members.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to understand
the importance of Sign Language in Deaf children born to hearing parents’ life.
FP10.1
FP10.4
BILINGUALISM AND SPECIFIC LANGUAGE IMPAIRMENT
Th. Bontsiou , A. Frangouli , Kika Giaxoglou
Special Primary School “Maraslio” of the Pedagogy Department of
Athens University, Greece
2
Mental Health Institute for Children and Adults, Kallithea, Athens,
Greece
3
Children’s Foundation “Pammakaristos”, N. Makri, Greece
1
2
3
1
THE INFLUENCE OF CREATIVE ENGAGEMENT ON SPEECH
AND LANGUAGE IMPROVEMENT: OBSERVATIONS FROM A
MULTILINGUAL PRIVATE PRACTICE IN MONTREAL
Simard I.1*, Kharkhurin A. V.2
SLP clinic Ortho Fun I: Les petits Cocos, 2American University of
Sharjah, Canada
1
Summary: Four children took part in pilot research concerning
the question on how bilingual children with SLI can improve
comprehension and narration of a text with the use of visual
aids accompanied by the mother language. Two children were
bilingual diagnosed with SLI and two with standard development. During the speech and language therapeutic intervention the parents were involved as co-therapists.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to think to
conduct research and studies on the narrative skills of bilingual
children with SLI and see ways of involving bilingual parents to
the speech and language therapy sessions.
Summary: This study presents observational data from a
speech/language pathology private practice in Montreal. Multilingual preschoolers and school-age children receive intervention in all their receptive/expressive languages. Therapies are
dispensed through game playing. The children are encouraged
to express their creative thinking using games presumably
stimulating their speech/language production. A suggested
link between creative engagement and speech/language improvement will be discussed.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to discuss the
methodoloy of individual intervention in a multilingual manner.
FP10.2
FP10.5
LEXICAL DIVERSITY AND LANGUAGE SAMPLE ELICITATION
EFFECTS IN SPANISH-SPEAKING CHILDREN WITH AND
WITHOUT LANGUAGE IMPAIRMENT
LANGUAGE INTERVENTION PROGRAM TO CHILDREN OF
MINORITY GROUPS IN NORTHERN GREECE
Kapantzoglou M., Fergadiotis G., Restrepo M.A.
Arizona State University, United States
Summary: The purpose of this study was to examine whether
language elicitation procedures affect lexical diversity, D, and
mean length of utterance in Spanish-speaking children with
and without language impairment, and to assess the classification accuracy of the combination of D and MLU measures. Results revealed that story retelling impacts D and the combination of measures is adequate for diagnosing SLI.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to use and
discuss an alternative method of assessing lexical diversity and
language skills in bilingual children for the diagnosis of language impairment.
P. Strobolakos1, A. Sali1, E. Housseinoglou1, A. Frangouli1, I.
Dimakis1, A. Omeroglou1, A. Karandoni2
1
Mental Health Institute for Children and Adults, Komotini, Greece
2
Mental Health Institute for Children and Adults, Kallithea, Athens,
Greece
Summary: The multidisciplinary team of the Mental Health
Institute for Children and Adults in Northern Greece, realized
a project of adopting therapeutic materials to the reality of
school-aged children of minority groups. The books used for
language lessons of the minority schools were gathered and
studied. The research group was Greek speech and language
therapists and Turk psychologists.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to explain the
transdisciplinary-bilingual approach to children with speech
and language problems and to get acquainted with interdisciplinary multicultural team serving the needs of the particular
community.
90
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
FP11.1
SLI: AN INDEPENDENT ENTITY OR PART OF A CONTINUUM?
Kotsopoulou A1, Gyftogianni M2, Gasteratos A2, Troupou A2
Technological Educational Institute of Patras, Greece
2
Day Treatment Centre, Greece
1
Summary: The present investigation examined the association
between SLI and speech disorders in sample of preschool children. Forty-two children referred consecutively to an Outpatient Clinic from semi-urban and rural communities were examined on variety of speech and language tests.The severity of SLI
varied with coexisting dyspraxia or with serious phonological
disorder. SLI appears to be part of a continuum.
Learner Outcomes: The results will asist the therapist that to
undersand the relatonshil between speech disorders and SLI.
FP11.2
DEVELOPMENT OF EPISODIC STRUCTURE OF NARRATIVES
IN FINNISH CHILDREN WITH SLI PLAYING A PRETEND PLAY:
AN INTERVENTION STUDY
A. Suvanto, A. Yliherva, M. Lehtihalmes
University of Oulu, Logopedics, Finland
Summary: In the present study, the effect of 20 weeks intervention on the improvement of episodic structure in play-promted
narratives of Finnish children with SLI was analysed. The intervention had a positive effect on the oral narratives of children
with SLI but they still used much more nonverbal means than
their typically developed controls in play context.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to describe the
episodic structure of play-promted narrative and intervention
model which was used in the study.
FP11.3
THE ROLE OF MORPHO-PHONOLOGICAL SALIENCE IN
TENSE MARKING IN GREEK AND CYPRIOT CHILDREN WITH
SLI
Maria Mastropavlou1, Kakia Petinou2, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli3
1
University of Ioannina, Greece
2
European University of Cyprus, Cyprus
3
Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece
Summary: This presentation provides empirical findings on
the acquisition of past tense by Greek and Cypriot Greek children with SLI. The hypothesis tested maintains that children are
aided by the morphophonological salience of grammatical features, which is confirmed through the findings obtained from
both dialects investigated.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to explain the
role of morphophonological salience on SLI performance; describe patterns of acquisition of past tense by Greek children
with SLI.
FP11.4
EVALUATING EXPRESSIVE-GRAMMAR SKILLS FOR
PRESCHOOL SLI IN MULTIPLE CONTEXTS
K. Washington1, G. Warr-Leeper2
1
Bloorview Research Institute, Bloorview Kids Rehab, Canada
2
School of Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of
Western Ontario, Canada
Summary: Measuring outcomes for children with SLI is important. Use of formal and informal assessment contexts is suggested to capture a complete representation of childrens performance following intervention. In this study, children receiv-
ing intervention for expressive-grammar deficits experienced
significantly greater outcomes compared to controls in formal
and informal contexts at post-intervention and at follow-up.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to discuss the
use of formal and informal contexts for evaluating expressivegrammar and describe outcomes of expressive-grammar intervention in multiple contexts.
FP11.5
CHILDRENS-RETRIEVING STRATEGIES IN WORD FLUENCY
TASKS
Tallberg I.M.
Karolinska Institutet, Sweden
Summary: The objective of the present study was to study
retrieving strategies and occurrence of erroneous responses
in word fluency tasks. 130 healthy Swedish-speaking children
from 6 to 15 years of age participated in the study.The examination of error types and various types of clustering in fluency
tasks provided new potentially information about childrens
word retrieval processes.
Learner Outcomes: The learner will be able to discuss word fluency strategies in children. The learner will know about possible
explanations to successful word retrieval.
FP11.6
LEXICAL AND SEMANTIC ABILITY IN YOUNGER SCHOOL
CHILDREN WITH COCHLEAR IMPLANTS
Lofkvist Ulrika, Tallberg Ing-Mari
PhD-Student, Sweden
Summary: Lexical and semantic ability in young school children with cochlear implants (CI) compared with age-matched
normal hearing children will be presented. It’s the first of four
studies in a PhD-project which aim to examine the lexical and
semantic development in CI-children and how it’s related to
cognitive function and exposure of verbal stimulation from
their parents.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to describe
and explain some aspects of the lexical and semantic ability in
children with cochlear implants (CI) compared to normal hearing age-matched children.
SY04A.1
SHORT-TERM EFFECTS OF REPETITIVE TRANSCRANIAL
MAGNETIC STIMULATION (rTMS) ON SPEECH AND VOICE IN
INDIVIDUALS WITH PARKINSON’S DISEASE
L.Hartelius1, P. Svantesson1, A. Hedlund1, B. Holmberg2, D. Revesz2,
T. Thorlin2
1
Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Division of Speech and
Language Pathology, Sweden
2
Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Division of Neurology
Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Sweden
Summary: Nine individuals with mild Parkinson’s disease and
no or minimal dysarthria were treated with rTMS in a placebocontrolled experiment. Recordings were evaluated acoustically
using MDVP. The results of acoustic analyses showed above all
an effect of placebo; there was a significant change in several of
the MDVP parameters as a result of sham stimulation.
Learner Outcomes: The participants will be able to describe
and discuss the possible uses of rTMS in the treatment of individuals with neurogenic speech disorders.
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
91
SY04A.2
SY04A.5
AN ELECTROMYOGRAPHIC EXAMINATION OF LIP
ASYMMETRY DURING SPEECH AND NON-SPEECH
MOVEMENTS IN ADULTS WHO STUTTER
EFFECTS OF ON-LINE AUGMENTED KINEMATIC AND
PERCEPTUAL FEEDBACK ON TREATMENT OF SPEECH
MOVEMENTS IN APRAXIA OF SPEECH
A.L. Choo1, M.P. Robb2
University of Illinois, Ubana-Champaign, IL, USA
2
University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand
McNeil Malcolm1, Katz William2, Fossett Tepanta3, Garst Diane4,
Szuminsky Neil5, Carter Gregory6, Lim Kyoung-Yuel7
1
VA Pittsburgh Healthcare System, United States
2
University of Texas at Dallas, United States
3
Mayo Clinic-Rochester, MN, United States
4
University of Texas at Dallas,United States
5
Veterans Administration Pittsburgh Healthcare System, United States
6
Veterans Administration Hospital Dallas, United States
7
Veterans Administration Pittsburgh Healthcare System, United States
1
Summary: This study examined whether abnormal cerebral
control was evident in the lip movements of AWS compared
to AWNS. Electromyographic (EMG) activity during production
of words, single sentence production and lip pursing was measured. Differences between AWS and AWNS were evident in all
tasks. These results support the hypotheses of reversed lateralization for speech and non-speech processing in AWS.
Learner Outcomes: The participants will be able to describe
the EMG differences found people who stuttering compared to
those who do not stutter.
SY04A.3
GUIDANCE FOR COMMISSIONERS OF SPEECH AND
LANGUAGE THERAPY SERVICES FOR DYSARTHRIA
Enderby P.M, Pickstone C., John A.J., Palmer R.
University of Sheffield, United Kingdom
Summary: Commissioners of speech and language therapy
services require more explicit information to inform purchasing
decisions. The Royal College of Speech and Language Therapists in the United Kingdom commissioned work to identify the
needs of commissioners and supply core information to support managers of speech and language therapy services in the
tendering process.
Learner Outcomes: The participants will be able to understand
information required by commissioners of services.
SY04A.4
DYSARTHRIA IN FRIEDREICH’S ATAXIA: A PERCEPTUAL
ANALYSIS
J. Folker1, B. Murdoch1, K. Rosen1, L. Cahill1, M. Delatycki2,
L. Corben2, A. Vogel2
1
The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia
2
Murdoch Children’s Research Institute, Melbourne, Australia
Summary: This paper will outline the results of perceptual
analysis on 38 individuals with dysarthria associated with Friedreich’s ataxia. Cluster analysis was performed to investigate
the presence of subgroups according to the perceptual speech
profile. The findings support the notion of subgroups in FRDA
dysarthria, representing distinct impairments of the speech
mechanism and perhaps reflective of differing evolutions beyond the cerebellum.
Learner Outcomes: The participants will be able to describe
the main perceptual speech features of the dysarthria associated with Friedreich’s ataxia; explain the perceptual features
that differentiate the subgroups identified.
Summary: This study examined the presence and frequency
of on-line augmented visual kinematic feedback using Electromagnetic Midsagittal Articulography and clinician provided
feedback on speech accuracy in two adults with acquired apraxia of speech (AOS). Visual inspection and effect sizes revealed
positive acquisition, generalization and maintenance effects for
both participants supporting augmented feedback in treating
speech movements in AOS.
Learner Outcomes: The participants will be able to 1. Identify
the criteria for the diagnosis of Apraxia of Speech. 2. Explain the
evidence for EMA treatment in AOS in the two subjects in the
study.
FP12.1
ECHOLALY AND COMMUNICATIVES SITUATIONS IN
AUTISTIC ESPECTRUM: ALTERATION OR COMMUNICATIVE
HABILITIE?
Carla Cardoso, Ivy Cruz Faislon, Juliana Rocha, Daniela Regina
Mlini-Avejonas Daniela
Centro Universitário Jorge Amado, Brazil
Summary: The echolaly, defined as the repetition of someone
else’s speech, words and expressions heard before. A purpose
to verify possible alterations in the functional profile of the
communication in result of the presence of the characteristic of
the ecolaly in children and adolescents with diagnosis inserted
in the autism spectrum, considing different interlocutors and
communicative situations.
Learner Outcomes: The participants will be able to learn about
characteristic of the ecolaly, withconsiding different interlocutors and communicative situations.
FP12.2
PRAGMATIC ASPECTS OF LANGUAGE IN CHILDREN WITH
ADHD
C. Papaeliou1, K. Maniadaki2, N. Kakourou3, P. Dalapa3, M.G. Kourou3
University of the Aegean, Greece
2
TEI of Athens, Greece
3
Psychological Center for Developmental and Learning Disabilities,
ARSI, Greece
1
Summary: The present study investigated the ability of children
with ADHD to interpret figurative language in relation to other
linguistic abilities. Results demonstrated that the abatement of
symptoms of inattentiveness may improve childrens ability to
interpret figurative language out of context. Discussion emphasizes that intervention programs for ADHD should include the
improvement of pragmatic skills.
Learner Outcomes: The participants will be able to (1) Describe abilities for interpreting figurative language in children
with ADHD (2) Explain deficits in pragmatic skills in children
with ADHD.
92
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
FP12.3
FP13.2
DELIVERING EFFECTIVE SUPPORT AND THERAPEUTIC
INTERVENTION PROGRAMS TO PDD CHILDREN
NUMERICAL PROCESSING AND CALCULATION IN APHASIC
PATIENTS
E. Kalos, A. Frangouli, A.Sarella, P.Papadimas, S. Mantzioura,
I. Koutri
Mental Health Institute for Children and Adults, Lamia, Greece
G.C.P. De Luccia, K. Z. Ortiz
UNIFESP, São Paulo, Brazil
Summary: The symptoms related to speech and language,
usually prompt parents to ask for therapeutic intervention. This
reality puts a demand on speech and language therapists not
only to know very good their profession, but to have a good
knowledge of the other professions as well, especially, when
functioning in a multidisciplinary team.
47 cases of PDD are studied and analyzed.
Learner Outcomes: The participants will be able to discuss the
therapeutic procedures taken and how speech and language
therapists contribute to the planning of the overall case management.
Summary: The change in the ability to calculate, subsequent to
brain a lesion, is known as acalculia. This change can be defined
as a complete or partial disability to deal with numbers and
represents compromised numerical processing and calculation. Several authors have reported that aphasic patients present with changes in numerical processing and calculation and
these are being investigated more frequently in both national
and international literature (studies). In this study, the objective
was to verify the performance of aphasic subjects in numerical
tasks and in calculation through the use of the EC301 battery.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to discuss the
changes of mathematical calculations in patients with aphasia.
FP12.4
FP13.3
THREE CHILDREN WITH AUTISM SPECTRUM DISORDERS
ENTER GRADE 1 REGULAR CLASSES
Gyftogianni M., Georgiou A., Kolosioni D., Sakellari M., Kotsopoulos S.
Day Centre for Children with Developmental Disorders, Greece
Summary: Three children with ASD of ages 6yrs 3mnths to 6yrs
11mnths after a long period of intensive outpatient treatment
(number of sessions ranged from 166 to 450 to 694 per child)entered successfully grade 1 regular classes. Treatment had been
targeted to specific areas of cognitive and other deficits using
an obervation instrument (EDALFA) developed by the Centre.
Learner Outcomes: The participants will be able to intensive
early start treatment focused on specific deficits may lead to
successful school integration for ASD children.
FP13.1
PORTUGUESE TRANSLATION AND ADAPTATION OF THE
COMMUNICATION DISABILITY PROFILE (CDP) AND THE
PARTICIPATION OBJECTIVE, PARTICIPATION SUBJECTIVE
(POPS) TOOLS
Matos, M.1, Jesus, Luis M. T.2, Cruice, M.3, Allen Gomes, A.4
1
ESSUA, Universidade de Aveiro, Portugal
2
IEETA, Universidade de Aveiro, Portugal
3
City University, London, UK
4
DCE, Universidade de Aveiro, Portugal
Summary: Recent literature on aphasia stresses the need of
considering a biopsychosocial model of intervention, as considered in the ICF. In Portugal, there is a tradition of using the
Medical Model of intervention and existing assessment tools
are centred in language disorders caused by stroke. Translation
and adaptation of CDP and POPS and preliminary results will
be presented.
Learner Outcomes: Participants will be able to explain and discuss the methodology used to translate and adapt both tools
(CDP and POPS) to the Portuguese clinical practice as well as
the main modifications suggested to their adaptation.
COLLECTING A RCT DATA - A GAUNTLET TO TAKE! THE
CHALLENGES OF CONSISTENT SELECTIVITY IN DATA
COLLECTION
Tarja Kukkonen, Anna-Maija Korpijaakko-Huuhka
University of Tampere, Department of Voice and Speech, Tampere,
Finland
Summary: Only radically reorganized provision of aphasia therapy can be effective. The current practice is to spread treatment
sessions over a long time period. This convention is not easy to
question inside the rehabilitation system and complicates collection of RCT datas.This presentation provides one example of
challenges for the consistent selectivity of RCT data collection
for the evaluation aphasia therapy.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to discuss the
problems of clinical efficacy RCT data collection, problematize
the established practices of RCT in speech and lagugage therapy.
FP13.4
THE STROKE AND APHASIA QUALITY OF LIFE SCALE
(SAQOL-39) IN GREEK: CULTURAL ADAPTATION,
RELIABILITY AND PROXY AND SELF-REPORT AGREEMENT
Hilari K., Christaki V., Ignatiou M., Kartsona A.
City University London, UK
Summary: Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQL) measures are
becoming increasingly popular in evaluating health care interventions and services. The Stroke and Aphasia Quality of Life
scale-39 item (SAQOL-39) is an English questionnaire that measures HRQL in people with stroke and aphasia.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to develop an
understanding of:
- An established process of translating and culturally adapting a
measure for use into a different culture.
- Appropriate ways of testing a measure’s psychometric properties
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
- The Greek Stroke and Aphasia Quality of Life scale (SAQOL-39)
and what information it can provide about clients with aphasia
- The Greek SAQOL-39’s acceptability, reliability and proxy and
self-report agreement
- Considerations before using a measure as a clinical outcome
measure
FP13.5
THE COMPREHENSION OF SPEECH PROSODY TEST FOR
FARSI SPEAKING INDIVIDUALS
Narges Torke Ladani1, Zahra Agha Rasuli1, Hassan Ashayeri2,
Behrooz Bakhtyari3, Mohamad Kamali4
1
Department of Speech Therapy,Faculty of Rehabilitation
Sciences,Iran University of Medical Sciences,Tehran,Iran
2
Department of neurorehabilitation, Faculty of Rehabilitation
Sciences,Iran University of Medical Sciences,Tehran,Iran
3
Department of Theater Fine Art,Tehran University of Medical
Sciences,Tehran,Iran
4
Department of Biostatistics, Faculty of Rehabilitation Sciences, Iran
University of Medical Sciences,Tehran,Iran
Summary not provided at the time of printing
SE01.1
VOICE REHABILITATION IN A GROUP SETTING
Kling I.F., Stewart C.F.
New York University, USA
Summary: Traditionally voice rehabilitation takes place in a
one-to-one setting. Despite the counseling offered in individual sessions, patients don’t have the opportunity to discuss
their feelings with peers or use the voice in diverse situations
that played a role in the development of their voice problem. A
group setting allows for peer modeling, feedback, support, and
generalization.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to identify appropriate candidates for a group interaction. Describe and label
categories of interaction. Develop goals for group sessions.
SY05.1
PHONOLOGICAL AWARENESS: DO EDUCATORS NEED
PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT?
J. Carroll, G. Gillon
University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand
Summary: This paper will explore the need for an initial teacher
education strategy to ensure graduating teachers understand
phonological awareness development and its importance to
literacy as well as ensuring teachers have competent phonological awareness skills. The study summarises educators’ phonological awareness abilities on a range of tasks designed to
test adults phonological knowledge.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to discuss the
need to consider the phonological awareness knowledge of
teachers and adults involved in literacy instruction. Describe
tasks suitable to assess adults’ phonological awareness knowledge in a group setting.
SY05.2
THE GLOBAL LITERACY CHALLENGE
Gillon G.T.
University of Canterbury, New Zealand
Summary: This presentation will introduce the symposium
through highlighting challenges we currently face in our desire
93
for global literacy. The presentation will discuss a framework
that integrates a variety of research informed strategies including home literacy, initial teacher education, specific intervention and progress monitoring strategies to promote early reading success for children most at risk of underachievement.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to describe
current challenges in enhancing reading achievement at an
international level. Describe general characteristics of a framework that includes the integration of a variety of strategies to
enhance reading success in children most at risk for reading
underachievement.Discuss the importance of using research
evidence to strongly influence our educational practices and
government funding to ensure long term improved literacy
outcomes for all children and particularly for those at risk for
literacy underachievement.
SY05.3
COMPUTER-BASED PHONOLOGICAL AWARENESS
ASSESSMENT AT SCHOOL-ENTRY: A PILOT STUDY
K. Carson, G. Gillon,T. Boustead
College of Education, University of Canterbury, New Zealand
Summary: This presentation will discuss the importance of
screening and progress monitoring of early phonological awareness ability within the classroom and how computer-based assessments can be of benefit to this process. The presentation
will present findings from a study that examined the use of a
computer-based assessment for measuring school-entry phonological awareness aptitude in comparison to conventional
assessment methods.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to discuss the
importance of assessment in the identification and monitoring
of literacy growth during the early school years. Describe the
advantages of using computer-based phonological awareness
assessment within the classroom setting.
SY05.4
ENHANCING PHONOLOGICAL AWARENESS WITHIN THE
CLASSROOM CONTEXT
V.P. Good, G.T. Gillon, R. Socklingham
University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand
Summary: This paper will contribute to the symposium from
the perspective of a classroom based strategy to improve phonological awareness in young children at risk. The paper will
summarise the findings from a study that examined whether
phonological awareness in addition to sound-field amplification in the classroom is useful for young school aged children
from low socioeconomic backgrounds.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to understand
the importance of the classroom accoustic environment when
implementing phonological awareness interventions.
SY05.5
PHONOLOGICAL AWARENESS INTERVENTION
MAINTENANCE FOR CHILDREN WITH CHILDHOOD
APRAXIA OF SPEECH
B. C. McNeill1, G. T. Gillon1, B. Dodd2
University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand
2
City University London, UK
1
Summary: This presentation will describe the longer term effectiveness of a specific phonological awareness intervention
strategy for children with childhood apraxia of speech (CAS).
Implications for phonological awareness intervention for this
94
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
population will be highlighted. The importance of integrating
phonological awareness interventions with other key literacy
strategies to ensure long-term gains in literacy skills for this
population will be discussed.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to describe essential principles of implementing a phonological awareness
intervention programme for children with childhood apraxia of
speech. 2. Describe factors making children with CAS an at risk
group for reading disorder.
SY05.6
A HOME LITERACY STRATEGY TO SUPPORT YOUNG
CHILDREN WITH DOWN SYNDROME
A K. van Bysterveldt1,2, G.T. Gillon1, S.Foster-Cohen2
1
University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand
2
Champion Centre, Christchurch, New Zealand
Summary: This two part presentation reports on the home literacy environments of 85 New Zealand primary school children
with Down syndrome whereby survey data were gathered from
participants’ parents via questionnaire. Additionally the presentation examines the effectiveness of a home literacy strategy to
enhance the HLE for this population.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to describe
a home literacy strategy for preschool children with Down
syndrome. Explain the importance of early intervention in facilitating reading developing in young children with Down syndrome.
FP14.1
THE INFLUENCE OF CLINICAL EXPERIENCE ON THE
PERCEPTION OF “R” ERRORS IN CHILDREN
H.B. Klein, M.I. Grigos,
New York University, New York, USA
Summary: This study examined perception of “r” productions
among twelve graduate students and between these students
and experienced listeners. Listeners were asked to identify accurate productions, substitutions and distortions of vocalic
and consonantal “r”. Percent agreement was highest among
accurate productions and least among distortions. There was
more agreement for vocalic than consonantal “r”. Implications
of these findings are discussed.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to describe the
differences in “r” perception between graduate students and
experienced clinicians. (2) describe the differences in perception between vocalic and consonantal “r” productions.
FP14.2
MODIFIED AUDITORY INPUTS FOR SPEECH PRODUCTION
Kariyasu M.
Department of Communication Disorders, School of Psychological
Sciences, Health Sciences University of Hokkaido, Sapporo, Japan
Summary: This study is aimed to examine the effect of auditory
input with systematic increment of stop gap (SG) on the temporal domain of concurrent production of VCV token. Each of
eight adult speakers produced /apa/ under SG-modified feedback. Percent SG (SG relative to total duration) in feedback conditions deceased relative to START and END baselines.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to explain the
logic of modified sensory input for speech production, (2) describe the effect of modified auditory feedback on the temporal domain of VCV production, and (3) discuss possible uses of
modified sensory feedback for speech therapy.
FP14.3
SPEECH THERAPY IN CHILDREN WITH CLEFT PALATE
SPEECH: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW
S. Neumann, R. Romonath
University of Cologne, Cologne, Germany
Summary: The objective of this systematic review was to assess the quantity and quality of published evidence regarding
applied speech therapy methods for treating cleft type characteristics (CTC?s) in children (0-18y.) with repaired cleft lip and/or
palate. Publications from 1980 till 2009 were included. Preliminary results show (serious) limitations in design, evidence-level
and group size in most of the studies.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to give an overview of internationally applied speech therapy approaches in
children with cleft palate speech and to evaluate their quality.
FP14.4
A TREATMENT PROGRAM FOR NASAL FRICATIVES COMPARING TREATMENT OUTCOMES USING SINGLE
SUBJECT DESIGN
Raud Westberg L1, Svensson L.2
1
Dept of Reconstructive Plastic Surgery, Karolinska University
Hospital, Sweden
2
Astrid Lindgren Childrens Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden
Summary: At Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, nasal
fricatives are treated according to a 10-step treatment program.
In order to document treatment effects, the method was evaluated in a single-subject-study with an ABA-design. Two 5-year
old patients with nasal articulation of /s/ were included. The results of this study indicate that the treatment was effective for
these patients.
Learner Outcomes: After completing this session the participants
will be able to discribe what nasal articulation of fricatives means
and also describe how single subject study design easily can be
used by in the clinic to show evidence for treament results.
FP15.1
THE EFFECT OF FEEDBACK ON AUDITORY-PERCEPTUAL
TRAINING
K.M.K. Chan1, E. Chan2, T.Y. Kwok1
Division of Speech & Hearing Sciences, The University of Hong Kong,
Hong Kong
2
Department of Psychology, Colorado College, Colorado Springs, U.S.A.
1
Summary: This paper presents the use of feedback in auditoryperceptual training, which is commonly used across different
disciplines in speech and language pathology. The study trained
non-tonal language speakers to identify Cantonese tones with
and without the use of feedback during training. The results supported the use of feedback during auditory-perceptual training.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to describe the
effect of feedback on auditory-perceptual learning; 2. discuss
how current auditory-perceptual training paradigms may be
modified to better facilitate learning.
FP15.2
A SURVEY OF PUBLIC AWARENESS AND PERCEPTION
REGARDING SPEECH / LANGUAGE THERAPY IN GREECE
M. Vlassopoulos1, V. Desylla2, Prevention Committee2
Psychiatric Clinic, University of Athens School of Medicine, Greece
2
Panhellenic Association of Logopedists (PAL), Greece
1
Summary: Public perception and awareness of the field of speech
and language therapy is investigated through a survey. A ques-
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
95
tionnaire is applied to 320 adults in four major greek cities. Results
show that although the majority are aware of SLTs and their work,
fewer know that SLTs work with voice disorders or with adults. Consequent public preventive interventions are discussed.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to become
aware of the importance of preventive campaiagns to promote
SLT goals.
in the treatment of MB; the deleterious effects successful treatment may have upon neurocognitive development; the limitations of previous studies investigating language outcomes following treatment for MB; the general and high level language
skills and information processing skills of a 14; 1 year old female
successfully treated for MB four years prior to a comprehensive
behavioural and neurophysiological assessment.
FP15.3
FP16.2
PARENTS’ PERCEPTIONS OF SPEECH-LANGUAGE THERAPY
K. Washington , N. Thomas-Stonell , S. McLeod , G. Warr-Leeper ,
B. Oddson4, B. Robertson1
1
Bloorview Research Institute, Bloorview Kids Rehab, Canada;
2
School of Teacher Education, Charles Sturt Education, Australia;
3
School of Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of
Western Ontario, Canada; 4School of Human Kinetics, Laurentian
University, Canada
1
1
2
3
Summary: There is limited information describing the connection between parents’ perceptions of the therapeutic relationship between their child and the treating clinician and post-intervention outcomes. It is suggested that parents’ perceptions
are related to outcomes. The relationship between parents’
perceptions and post-intervention outcomes is explored in this
project. Results suggest that parents’ perceptions are related to
intervention outcomes.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to discuss the
role of the ICF-CY for involving parents in the assessment and intervention process; -Describe the relationship between parents’
perceptions of the therapeutic relationship in speech-language
association and outcomes of speech-language therapy.
FP15.4
VOICE COACHING - COMPARISON OF MENTAL PROCESSING
STRATEGIES IN LEADING VOICE-INSTRUMENT BETWEEN
TEACHER STUDENTS AND MASTER MODEL
R. Perko
Department of Education/ Early Childhood Education, University of
Jyväskylä, Finland
Summary: This presentation aims at stimulating discussion on
the meaning of mental aspects of voice production and to introduce lines of a model of a master voice user.
Students found new functioning strategies to lead own voiceinstrument when comparing own mental processing strategies
to some of the lines and directions of a master model.
Learner Outcomes: Learner will be able to model mental strategies in leading voice-instrument. Learner gets a new tool for
voicecoaching by master model.
FP16.1
PROCESSING SPEED AND LANGUAGE OUTCOMES
FOLLOWING RISK-ADAPTED TREATMENT FOR
MEDULLOBLASTOMA
F. M. Lewis, B. E. Murdoch
University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.
Summary: This study reports on the information processing,
general, and high level language skills of a child whose treatment for medulloblastoma four years prior to assessment was
based on risk-adapted strategies. The findings of intact information processing skills and general language skills, but compromised high level language skills are discussed.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to describe: the
current risk-adapted treatment protocols used internationally
NONVERBAL CHILDREN WITH AUTISTIC SPECTRUM
DISORDERS: HOW DO THEY COMMUNICATE?
K. Agius
Communication Therapy Division, Institute of Health Care, University
of Malta, Malta
Summary: This study examined patterns of spontaneous and
intentional nonverbal communication in young nonverbal children with autistic spectrum disorders (ASDs). Eleven nonverbal
children with ASDs, aged between 3 to 5,6 years, were observed
during meal times, at home and at school. A wide range of nonverbal communicative behaviours were recorded, the most frequent being vocalizations and eye contact.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to discuss the
communicative style of nonverbal children with autism and
whether these children are always understood by their communicative partners.
FP16.3
PROFILES OF THE INTENTIONAL COMMUNICATION ACTS
OF YOUNG PRE-VERBAL CHILDREN WITH DEVELOPMENTAL
DISABILITIES
N. Keidar¹, S. Eyal²
¹Beit Issie Shapiro, Ra’anana, Israel
²Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel
Summary: This study assessed the profiles of the intentional
communication acts of eight young pre-verbal children with
developmental disabilities.It used a structured procedure developed especially for this study.
The results of the study indicate a wide range of variability in
the frequency of communication initiations, as well as unique
profiles of intentional communication in the population.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to describe
more specifically the characteristics of communication initiations of young pre-verbal children with developmnetal disabilities. Further more, they will be able to discuss the advantages of
this kind of assessment.
FP16.4
DEVELOPMENTAL LANGUAGE DISORDERS: A CASE
STUDY OF A MIXED TYPE (RECEPTIVE AND EXPRESSIVE)
LANGUAGE DISORDER
Koiliari G.
Private Practice, Greece
Summary: A case study of 6 year-old P. is presented, who has
been diagnosed with D.L.D. and has been attending S.L.T. sessions for the last two years. Initial evaluation, his inclussive curriculum and a re- evaluation are presented. The case of 6 yearold P. offers a chance to discuss the obstacles during therapeutic intervention.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to describe the
nature of Mixed type (Receptive and Expressive) Developmental Language Disorders, evaluate cases of D.L.D. and discuss the
obstacles during therapeutic intervention.
96
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
FP16.5
FP17.2
TICL - THE TRIAD OF SUCCESS LEADING TO POSITIVE
OUTCOMES IN LANGUAGE AND PRE-LITERACY FOR
CHILDREN
PREDICTORS OF LANGUAGE-BASED LEARNING
DIFFICULTIES IN JAPANESE CHILDREN AT AGE THREE AND
FIVE
1
N. El-Choueifati1, N. Munro2, P.McCabe2, A. Purcell2, R. Galea1
Bankstown Community Resource Group, Sydney, Australia
2
University of Sydney, Faculty of Health Sciences, Sydney, Australia
Tanaka Welty Yumiko1, Aoki Satsuki2
1
Osaka University of Arts, Japan
2
Meirin Collage Dental Clinic, Japan
Summary: This paper reports on the child outcomes following
the implementation of an Australian project titled Training in
Interaction, Communication and Literacy (TICL) project. TICL
is a training program focused around collaboration between
families, ECPs and SPs. The results emphasise the importance of
family collaboration to maximize the outcomes for children in
the area of language and pre-literacy.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to describe the
strategies used in collaboration between Speech pathologists,
Early childhood professionals and families that contribute to
postive outcomes for preschool children.
Summary: This study reports results of a longitudinal study of
324 children in Japan, examining predictors at ages 3 and 5.
Parent evaluation at age3 had poor sensitivity for risk of later
LLD. The SLP and teachers identified about 20% of the 5-yearolds as having language problems, and their evaluations were
predicted by expressive vocabulary size at age 3.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to discuss
about how early identification of children with normal IQ but
affected by language-based difficulties can be challenged by
SLPs, and how SLPs can work with other professionals to support children with LLD.
FP16.6
FP17.3
SPELLING ERRORS IN THE GREEK LANGUAGE. CAN BE
DESCRIBED IN TERMS OF PHONOLOGICAL PROCESSES?
EFFECTS OF MATERNAL DEPRESSION ON A CHILD’S
LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT
Grammenou Anastasia
Democritus University Of Thrace, Department Of Primary Education,
Greece
UA. Kavvada1, E. Konstantaki2
1
Social Intervention Center of Municipality of
Korydallos,Korydallos,Greece
2
EPSYPE hospice MELIA,Athens,Greece
Summary: A basic question that linguists and psychologists
have articulated is whether these two communication skills
share common processes. This study describes the spelling errors, in term of linguistic processes, in thirty dyslexics who attend second grade, thirty normally developing children of the
same chronological age and twenty five reading age control
students.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to describe the
spelling errors of dyslexics and normallly developing children in
terma of liguistic processes. Participatnts will be able to infer the
infer children developmental stage in written language aquisition so as to help children to improve their spelling ability.
FP17.1
THE RELATION BETWEEN RECEPTIVE AND EXPRESSIVE
LANGUAGE IN DOWN’S SYNDROME CHILDREN WITH
MENTAL AGE RANGED 4-5 YEARS OLD
Ebrahimian Dehaghani SH.
Faculty member of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Iran
Summary: Pediatricians in clinical trials face to children who
have difference between comprehension and expression and
in spite of high ability in comprehension, they cannot convey
via expression.
the relationship between receptive and expressive language
was determined in Down’s syndrome children. The results
showed significant difference between vocabulary and grammatical comprehension and between vocabulary expression
and grammatical completion.
Learner Outcomes: The reader will be able to understand the
affective factor in relation between expression and reception is
short term auditory memory. And because of the role of Broca
in phonological programming and auditory information reception, Working on comprehension forces Broca more organized
for expressing.
Summary: Primary mutuality between mother and infant is fundamental for language development. In cases of disrupted primary mutuality, such as chronic maternal depression, children
who are exposed to it may have diminished language skills.
Mitigation of the effects of maternal depression on an individual child is possible through an interdisciplinary approach to the
management of communication disorders.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to consider the
association of parental mental disorders and children’s communication disorders and focus on the need for interdisciplinary
approach to the management of communication disorders.
FP17.4
LANGUAGE DISORDERS IN CHILDREN CONCEIVED BY THE
ASSISTED REPRODUCTIVE TECHNOLOGIES(ART)
Abou-El-Ella MY1, El-Assal NN1, Aboulghar HM2, Shoeib RM1, Zaky
EA3, Saber A.S.S.
1
Unit of Phoniatrics, Department of Otolaryngology, Ain Shams
University.
2
Department of Pediatrics, Cairo University.
3
Unit of Phoniatrics, Department of Otolaryngology, Minia University
Summary: Objective: The aims of this work were to estimate
the size of language disorders and detect the factors influencing language acquisition in the ARTs conceived children in
comparison to the naturally conceived children.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to know about
assisted reproductive technologies and that it has no dramatic
effect on language development.
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
97
FP17.5
SY04B.2
EFFECT OF DIFFERENT TREATMENTS IN YOUNG CHILDREN
WITH LANGUAGE PROBLEMS
COMPUTATIONAL MODELLING OF NEUROMOTOR SPEECH
DISORDERS IN CHILDREN: GENERATING TESTABLE
HYPOTHESES IN CHILDHOOD APRAXIA OF SPEECH
A.L. Keegstra, Child Psychologist*, W.J. Post, Bio-statistician**, S.M.
Goorhuis-Brouwer, Child Psychologist/Speech Pathologist*, A.L.
Keegstra***
*Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University Medical Center
Groningen, University of Groningen, the Netherlands
**Department of Epidemiology, University Medical Center Groningen,
University of Groningen, The Netherlands
Summary: 123 children, diagnosed as having a language problem were followed for one year. By means of monthly questionnaires, the form of intervention received was recorded.
All distinguished forms of treatment were effective. However,
only for a proportion of the children this meant a clinical relevant improvement. For the improvement of language comprehension targeted language therapy seems essential.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to discuss the
effect of different treatments in young children with language
problems and explain why an MDD-procedure is important.
FP17.6
EFFECTIVENESS OF AUDITORY PROGRAM IN BRAZILIAN
STUDENTS WIT LEARNING DISABILITIES
F.H.Pinheiro1, S.A. Capellini2
UNESP (Universidade Estadual Paulista Júlio de Mesquita Filho),
Marília, Brazil
2
UNESP (Universidade Estadual Paulista Júlio de Mesquita Filho), Botucatu, Brazil
1
Summary: The present study aimed to verifying the efficacy of
the auditory training program in Brazilian students with learning disabilities. The performance of the students with learning
disabilities in auditory and phonological tasks is lower in relation to the students without learning disabilities. The use of the
auditory training program was effective and allowed the students to develop these skills.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to know about
the therapeutic efficacy of auditory training in Brazilian students with dyslexia.
SY04B.1
RE-THINKING DIAGNOSTIC CLASSIFICATION OF THE
DYSARTHRIAS: A DEVELOPMENTAL PERSPECTIVE
A.T. Morgan1-3, F. Liegeois4
1
Murdoch Children’s Research Institute, Melbourne, Australia
2
University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia
3
Royal Children’s Hospital, Melbourne, Australia
4
University College London Institute of Child Health, London, United
Kingdom
Summary: Acquired childhood dysarthria (ACD) receives little
attention in the research literature in contrast with the adult
correlate of the disorder. Clinicians find diagnosis and management challenging, arguably because there is no child-based
dysarthria diagnostic classification. Here we consider the necessary elements for developing a clinically useful and empirically
driven diagnostic classification system for ACD.
Learner Outcomes: Participants will be able to describe the
limitations of current approaches to motor speech classification for children with acquired brain injury. They will be able
to discuss the benefits and difficulties posed by one proposed
approach to address this problem.
B.A.M. Maassen1,2, H.Terband1,2
University of Groningen & University Medical Center, Groningen, The
Netherlands
2
Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen, The
Netherlands
1
Summary: A modeling approach to childhood apraxia of
speech is presented, in which a computational neural model of
speech acquisition and production is utilized aiming to find the
neuromotor deficits that underlie the diversity of phonological
and speech-motor symptoms.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to understand
the diversity of developmental effects of single underlying deficits.
SY04B.3
EFFECT OF RATE CONTROL ON SPEECH PRODUCTION AND
INTELLIGIBILITY IN DYSARTHRIA
G. Van Nuffelen1,2, M. De Bodt1, J. Vanderwegen1, P. Van de
Heyning1,2, F. Wuyts1,2
1
Antwerp University Hospital, Antwerp, Belgium
2
University of Antwerp, Antwerp, Belgium
Summary: This study investigated the effect of 7 rate control
methods (slower on demand, pacing board, hand tapping, alphabet board and delayed auditory feedback with a delay of
50, 100 and 150 ms) on various speech variables and speech
intelligibility in dysarthria.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to discuss the
different effect of various rate control methods on articulation
rate, speaking rate, pause frequency and pause duration and
thus on speech intelligibility.
SY04B.4
THE EFFECT OF COMPRESSED SPEECH IN ATAXIC
DYSARTHRIA
Virginie Woisard-Bassols1, 2,Robert Espesser1, Alain Ghio1, Noël
Nguyen1, Danielle Duez1,
1
Laboratoire parole et Langage, UMR6057 CNRS, Université de
Provence, Aix en Provence, France
2
Unité de la voix et de la déglutition, service d’Otorhinolaryngologie
et de chirurgie cervicofaciale, centre hospitalo-universitaire de
Toulouse, France
Summary: In two cases of ataxic dysarthria, the perceived intelligibility was improved by a temporal acceleration of the speech
disorders.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to describe the
experimentation of accelareted speech signal and discuss the
clnical implication for dysarthria.
FP17A.1
LINGUAL KINEMATICS IN DYSARTHRIC SPEAKERS
WITH PARKINSON’S DISEASE: AN ELECTROMAGNETIC
ARTICULOGRAPH STUDY
M.N. Wong, B.E. Murdoch, B-M. Whelan
The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia
Summary: Limited studies have investigated lingual function
during speech production in PD. This study investigated lingual
kinematics during speech production using electromagnetic
98
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
articulography (EMA). The tongue movements of eight dysarthric speakers with PD and eight control participants during
sentence production were recorded using EMA. The results of
the present study suggest the presence of impaired lingual
control in individuals with PD.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to describe
tongue kinematics in dysartric speakers with Parkinson’s disease; explain the differences between the findings of the current study and previous studies.
FP18.1
A VOICE CASE STUDY: WHEN THE DOCTORS SAID THERE
WAS NOTHING MORE THEY COULD DO
D.S. Davis
The Davis Center, Succasunna, NJ. USA
Summary: After a thyroidectomy, VS1 lost her ability to speak
well and articulate clearly. By using The Davis Model of Sound
Intervention, VS1 regained her ability to speak clearly well articulated and understood, and improved her voice quality.
Sound-based therapy helped her regain use of her voice when
her physicians said nothing more could be done.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to hear how
change was made in the vocal qualities and control of the client. 2. discuss an alternative approach to vocal improvement.
FP18.4
SUBJECTIVE EVALUATION OF VOICE AND WORKING
CONDITIONS AND PHONIATRIC EXAMINATION IN
KINDERGARTEN TEACHERS
E. Kankare1, A. Geneid2,3, A-M Laukkanen1, E. Vilkman2
1
Department of Speech Communication and Voice Research,
University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland
2
Department of Otolaryngology and Phoniatrics, Helsinki University
Central Hospital, Helsinki, Finland
3
Department of Otolaryngology, Suez Canal University Hospital,
Ismailia, Egypt
Summary: This study concerns the vocal well-being of kindergarten teachers. 119 female kindergarten teachers answered
to a questionnaire and a phoniatric examination was carried
out. Remarkable number of kindergarten teachers suffers from
voice fatigue symptoms. A majority of the subjects reported to
recover well from vocal loading. From working conditions noise
was considered to be the most harmful to voice.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to discuss
about the vocal well-being of kindergarten teachers. 2. Describe what relationship there have been found between kindergarten teachers’ voice symptoms, working conditions and
phoniatric examination.
SS01.1
FP18.2
VOICE DISORDERS IN TEACHERS AND GENERAL
POPULATION IN BRAZIL
M Behlau , F Zambon , A.C. Guerrieri , N. Roy
1
CEV, São Paulo, Brazil
2
SINPRO-SP, São Paulo, Brazil
3
University of Utah, Utah, USA
1
1,2
1
3
A MODEL FOR COMMUNICATION INTERVENTION WITH THE
ELDERLY
Lubinski R.
Uiversity at Buffalo, United States
Summary: The goal is to collect information about voice of 1651
teachers and 1614 individuals from all Brazilian states: teachers
have higher vocal signs/symptoms job related, perceive the adverse effects of a vocal problem in the job performance, miss
more work days and consider changing their occupation in the
future.
Learner Outcomes: Participants will be able to describe voice
problems in teachers and general population; participants will
be able to discuss similarities on teachers’ voice problems in
Brazil and USA.
Summary: As persons age, communication success becomes
increasingly important for both those with adequate communication skills and those with communication disorders.This seminar presents a model for working with elders and their caregivers. Definitions, assessment tools, and intervention strategies
for improving communication skills, effectiveness, and opportunities are presented. Emphasis is placed on creating a positive
physical and social communication environment.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to understand
a tripartite model for assessment and intervention in working
with the elderly in a variety of settings. Generate strategies for
improving the physical and social environment of elderly clients.
FP18.3
SS01.2
THE QUALITY OF LIFE IN DIFFERENT VOICE DISORDERS
AMONG EGYPTIAN POPULATION
A MODEL FOR TREATMENT PLANNING WHEN WORKING
WITH ADULTS WITH BRAIN INJURY
Yehia Abou Ras, Manal El-Banna
The Unit of Phoniatrics, ENT Department, Faculty of Medicine,
Alexandria University, Egypt
O’Callaghan A. M.
Charles Sturt University, Australia
Summary: The questionnaire Voice Problem Symptoms Scale
(VPSS) was applied on dysphonic patients with different pathologies. The scores of VPPS and its cluster showed the pattern of
patients’problem in differnt voice disorders.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to identify the
items and the clusters of the questionnaire that reveal the patient problem. 2- determine the pattern of the patients’ problems in different voice disorders.
Summary: The aim of this seminar is to present a model to aid
treatment planning for adults and their family following brain
injury. This model will take into account current best practice
guidelines, consumers-experiences of care, and factors which
affect consumers-abilities to access services.
Learner Outcomes: This model has a dual purpose. It can be
used by managers when planning services or by clinicians in
determining clients-readiness to engage with therapy.
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
SS02.1
LOW COST SOFTWARES SOLUTIONS FOR CLINICAL VOICE
M. Behlau1,2, G., Moraes M.1,2, Oliveira1,2
1
CEV, São Paulo, Brazil
2
UNIFESP, São Paulo, Brazil
Summary: The goal is to share the experience of developing
a family of softwares to assist the average clinician in the management of voice problems. A 5-program series will be demonstrated: VOXMETRIA, FONOVIEW, FONOTOOLS, VOXGAMES and
VOCALGRAMA. All softwares are available in Portuguese, English, Spanish and Korean, except from VOCALGRAMA. Practical
cases and applications will be discussed with the audience.
Learner Outcomes: Participants will be able to discuss options
in acoustic analysis for clinical voice problems; participants will
be able to appoint main advantages and limitations.
FP19.1
PHONOLOGICAL SHORT-TERM MEMORY IN MANDARIN
CHINESE-SPEAKING CHILDREN WITH SPECIFIC LANGUAGE
IMPAIRMENT
Chi Pao-Hsiang
National Taipei University of Education, Taiwan
Summary: The current study tried to explore whether Mandarin-speaking children with SLI in Taiwan evidenced phonological short-term memory deficit.
Learner Outcomes: Participants will learn to explain SLI children’s lexical learning problems in terms of phonological shortterm memory.
FP19.2
EFFICACY OF THREE DIFFERENT MODELS OF REMEDITION
PROGRAM FOR BRAZILIAN STUDENTS WITH DYSLEXIA
Capellini S.A., santos L.C.A, lorenceti M.D., padula N.A.M.R.
UNESP, Brazil
Summary: The present study aims to verify the therapeutic efficacy of phonological remediation program, reading program,
and phonological and reading remediation program in Brazilian
students with dyslexia. The better performance of the students
with dyslexia submitted to the remediation programs show the
necessity of phonological instruction or phonological instruction with reading to learn the alphabetic basis of the Brazilian
Portuguese.
Learner Outcomes: Participants will be able to know about
the therapeutic efficacy of phonological remediation program,
reading program, and phonological and reading remediation
program in Brazilian students with dyslexia.
FP19.3
HYPERDIACTIVE NO TENSION DISORDER’ OR AM I
‘DEAF’?: CHILDREN?S ACCOUNTS OF ATTENTION
DEFICIT (HYPERACTIVITY) DISORDER AND ASSOCIATED
COMMUNICATION CHALLENGES
D. Mac Evilly, 2I. P. Walsh
1
Lucena Services, Dublin, Ireland
2
Trinity College Dublin, Ireland
1
Summary: Children with Attention Deficit (Hyperactivity) Disorder and concomitant language difficulties may fail to understand the nature of AD(H)D and how their communication can
be affected, leading to confusion and frustration. This paper
presents children’s accounts of ADHD highlighting the need for
SLTs to consider enhancing children’s understanding- through
99
building meta-communicative awareness- as part of a multidisciplinary team approach to treatment.
Learner Outcomes: Participants will be able to discuss issues
pertaining to children’s understanding of AD(H)D; Describe the
role of the SLT as part of a MDT approach to AD(H)D treatment.
FP19.4
LETTER KNOWLEDGE, PHONOLOGICAL AWARENESS
AND SENSITIVITY TO THE SYBLEXICAL UNITS IN
INVENTED SPELLING: EVIDENCE FROM THE YEAR-LONG
KINDERGARTEN STUDY
Zaretsky E.,1 Core C. 2, Currier A. 1
1
University of Massachusetts Amherst, United States
2
George Washington University (Previously Florida Atlantic
University), United States
Summary: This study examines the development of early spelling skills in kindergarten and relative contribution of phonological awareness (PA) and alphabet knowledge to children?s
ability to represent onsets and rimes. Our results indicate that
PA becomes the influential factor at the end of the kindergarten
year, while alphabet knowledge remains a strong predictor for
spelling development throughout the year.
Learner Outcomes: After completing this session, participants
will be able to discuss various key components of spelling development and identify specific predictors for the sensitivity
to the word structure. participants will be able to identify the
developmental trajectory of early spelling development during
kindergarten year with emphasis on specific PA skills that are
better predictors for spelling development, as well as understand the role of alphabet knowledge in this process.
FP19.5
DYSLEXIA, ALSO DEALING WITH READING
COMPREHENSION PROBLEMS?
Van Vreckem1 C., Desoete A.1, Vanderswalmen R.1, Van Keer H.2
1
University College Arteveldehogeschool Ghent Belgium Department: Speech and Language Pathology - PWO-Research
Arteveldehogeschool Ghent and Association Research Group
Learning Disability, Belgium
2
University Ghent, Belgium
Summary: This study on 17 primary school children (grade 4
to 6) with dyslexia revealed that these children encounter more
problems with reading comprehension (measured with the
Flemish Test for Reading Comprehension), as compared to the
control group. Scores of children with dyslexia were significantly lower than their control group peers on the complete test
and on some subskills.
Learner Outcomes: Participants will be able to make a more
profound assessment of reading comprehension within primaryschool children.
FP19.6
SIMILARITIES AND DIFFERENCES BETWEEN JAPANESE
CHILDREN WITH DEVELOPMENTAL DYSLEXIA AND
DYSGRAPHIA FOR KANJI
A. Uno1, N. Haruhara2, Kaneko M.3, N. Awaya 4, T. Gotoh 2 and
J. Kozuka 5
1
University of Tsukuba, Japan, 2Mejiro University, Japan
3
Teikyo Heisei University, Japan, 4Saiseikai Tokyo Hospital, Japan
5
Saitama children Medical Hospital, Japan
Summary: This study suggested that vocabulary size is one of
the very important contribution factor for Kanji reading in nor-
100
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
mal and dyslexic group, while visual memory ability is related
to the attainment of writing especially in children with writing
disorders with/without reading disorders.
Learner Outcomes: Participants will be able to recognize the
similarities and differences among Japanese children with developmental dyslexia and dysgraphia for Kanji.
SSY01.1
SUPERVISED PRACTICE IN SLP EDUCATION - A BRAZILIAN
EXPERIENCE
Fernanda Dreux M. Fernandes, Debora M. Befi-Lopes, Haydée F.
Wertzner, Suelly C. O. Limongi, Claudia R. F. de Andrade
Department of Physiotherapy, Communication Sciences and
Disorders and Occupational Therapy School of Medicine. University
of Sao Paulo, Brazil
Summary: This symposium discusses the experience developed in the Speech and Language Pathology-Audiology course
of the School of Medicine of the University of Sao Paulo. The
presentations will focus mainly in the area of child?s speech and
language, the structure and alternatives provided to the undergraduate student, the pedagogical proposal based in active
methodologies and the focus in evidence-based practice.
Learner Outcomes: Participants will be able to describe alternatives to formal practice training and discuss active methology aplied to the education of SLPs.
SSY01.2
MAINSTREAMING AND SUPERVISED PRACTICE IN SLP
EDUCATION
Fernanda Dreux M. Fernandes, Debora M. Befi-Lopes
Department of Physiotherapy, Communication Sciences and
Disorders and Occupational Therapy, School of Medicine. University
of Sao Paulo, Brazil
Summary: It is frequently mentioned that the complete professional SLP is ethical, expert, scientific, reflexive, has practical
experience, acts based in evidences and respects differences.
Therefore, teaching strategies should provide opportunities of
development for each one of these qualities. Mainstreaming is
a pedagogical proposal that is favored by clinical and hospital
environments because of their inherent comprehensive contexts.
Learner Outcomes: Participants will be able to discuss alternatives to clinical practice training and describe active methologies in supervised practice.
SSY01.3
EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE - EXPERIENCE WITH
UNDERGRADUATED STUDENTS
Andrade C.R.F.
University of Sao Paulo, Brazil
Summary: The learning promotion of EBP offers a great opportunity for the students because they have to: search the current
theoretical best evidence about the disorder; seek evidences
choosing and applying objectives tests and make treatment
decisions. In our undergraduate course, all students are initiated on their practical experience on the second semester.
Learner Outcomes: Participants will be able to discuss the use
of EBP in the education of SLPs and describe pedagogical alternatives to formal supervised practice.
SSY01.4
SUPERVISED PRACTICE IN SLP EDUCATION - THE AREA OF
CHILD'S SPEECH AND LANGUAGE
Wertzner H.F., Limongi S.C.O.
University of Sao Paulo, Brazil
Summary: In Speech and Language Pathology-Audiology
course of the School of Medicine of the University of Sao Paulo
undergraduate students dedicate near 990 hours to child language and speech studying the most common manifestations
related to primary health care attention.
These aspects support an integrated knowledge in different
areas of child development and fully prepairs the future professional.
Learner Outcomes: Participants will be able to discuss the
formal aspects of practice training and describe alternatives to
provide oportunities to undergraduate students.
FP20.1
NARRATIVE STRUCTURE OF CHILDREN WITH LANGUAGE
IMPAIRMENT IMPROVE WITH SHORT TERM INTERVENTION
J. Hautala, K. Heinänen, M. Lehtihalmes
Faculty of Humanities, Logopedics, University of Oulu, Finland
Summary: The aim of the study was to examine the effect of
short intervention on narrative structure in children with language impairment. The story structure was analysed in terms of
story grammar units, episodic structures, and information units.
Number of story grammar units and complete episodes was
higher after the intervention. As a conclusion, narrative structure can improve after narrative intervention.
Learner Outcomes: Participants will be able to discuss the deficiencies in narrative skills of language impaired children, and
to describe one intervention method to improve the content
structure of narratives.
FP20.2
LANGUAGE THERAPY AND AUTISM: RESULTS OF
INTERVENTION
Fernandes F.D.M., Molini-Avejonas D.R., Amato C.A.L.H.
Dept. of Physiotherapy, Communication Sciences and Disorders and
Occupational Therapy, School of Medicine,University of São Paulo, Brazil
Summary: The purpose of this study was to identify differences
in the functional communicative profile and social cognitive
performance of 36 autistic children and adolescents receiving
language therapy in three different models (language workshop, mother-child dyads and individual therapy). The situation
that produced the best results was the Language Workshop.
Individual results indicate that subjects continued to show improvements afterwards.
Learner Outcomes: Participants will be able to discuss the possible results of alternative models of language therapy with
autistic children and describe important issues involving language therapy for autistic children.
FP20.3
ATTENDING TO THE DISCOURSE OF THE SLT-AD(H)D CLINIC:
REVEALING CLINICAL STANCES IN INTERACTION
J. Mc Cluskey1, I. P. Walsh1, D. Mac Evilly2, M. Scullion3, S. Burns2,
G. Brosnan3
1
Trinity College Dublin, Ireland, 2Lucena Services, Wicklow, Ireland
3
Lucena Services, Dublin, Ireland
Summary: Discourse from SLT assessment sessions, involving a
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
clinician, student clinician and each of three children with AD(H)
D, was transcribed and analysed. Both impairment- and socialoriented approaches to intervention were identified within the
sessions, and were seen to be in complementary relationship,
revealing the clinical stance(s) of those involved, along with the
discourse ability of the children with AD (H)D.
Learner Outcomes: Participants will be able to describe how
models of intervention can be identified in discourse; Describe
how models of intervention can have a bearing on client-clinician performance and co-operation.
FP20.4
EFFECTIVENESS OF AUDIO-VISUAL COMPUTER
REMEDIATION PROGRAM IN BRAZILIAN STUDENTS WITH
DYSLEXIA
Germano G.D., Capellini S.A.
UNESP, Brazil
Summary: The present study aimed to get to know the efficacy
of the audio-visual computerized remediation program in Brazilian students with developmental dyslexia. The data showed lower
performance of the Brazilian students with developmental dyslexia in auditory and phonological tasks. The use of the program
was effective and allowed the students to develop these skills.
Learner Outcomes: Participants will be able to know the efficacy of the audio-visual computerized remediation program in
Brazilian students with developmental dyslexia and studentscontrol, and the performance these students in auditory and
phonological tasks.
FP20.5
MULTISENSORY CHANNEL STIMULTION APPROACH
ASSISTED WITH COMPUTER SOFTWARE IN SPECIEFIC
LANGUAGE IMPAIRMENT “SLI” HABILITATION
Darwish Amal
Phoniatrist, Egypt
Summary: Study to help the Speciefic language impaired children, with computerized software to accelerate their language
development with multisensory channel augmented audiovisual signals concerning the child general developmental parameter as influncing factor for complicated complex mobility
of the vocal tract to start speech production.
results was signficantly encourging to start appliance as one of
the favrouble programs.
Learner Outcomes: Learner could start applience the computers software to improve the language state of the children as
well as the phonology, prosody and pragmatic of speech.
FP20.6
THE RELATION BETWEEN LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT AND
SOCIAL SKLILLS DEVELOPMENT
Maryam Vahab, Maryam Faham, Marzieh Dehghan
Shyraz University of Medical Sciences, Shyraz, Iran
Summary: The aim of this study is determine the relation between language development and social skills in 5-6 years Old
Persian language children. We use TOLD-P3 for language assessment and Vinland Social Maturity Scale for social development.
The results show that language development has great correlation with social skills development. This correlation should be
considered in treatment of language disorders.
Learner Outcomes: Participants will be able to discuss about
the correlation between language development and social skills
development and its benift for language disoreders therapy.
101
SE02.1
GETTING STARTED WITH AAC
McCain P.
Sunny Days Incorporated, United States
Summary: This presentation will demonstrate how the use of
easy to provide augmentative alternative communication materials help speech pathologist meet four goals : communication of needs and wants: transfer of information: development
of social closeness: development social etiquette. Material,
websites, and ideas will demonstrate how these systems were
used to develop communication that meets these goals.
Learner Outcomes: After completing this session, participants
will be able to discuss the use of an AAC system that is developmentally appropriate for young students. After completing this
session, participants will be able to explain and describe ideas they
could use in their program to provide AAC. After completing this
session, participants will be able to provide students with a simple
inexpensive AAC system within their natural environment.
SS03.1
USING THE COMMUNICATION FUNCTION CLASSIFICATION
SYSTEM TO CATEGORIZE COMMUNICATION PERFORMANCE
OF CHILDREN WITH CEREBRAL PALSY
M.J.C. Hidecker1, K.F. Taylor1, M.L. Poole1, N. Paneth2, P.
Rosenbaum3, R. Kent4
1
University of Central Arkansas, Conway, United States
2
Michigan State University, East Lansing, United States
3
CanChild Centre for Childhood Disability Research, McMaster University, Hamilton, Canada
4
Waisman Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, United
States
Summary: The Communication Function Classification System
(CFCS) classifies communication into one of five levels from an ICF
activity and participation perspective (i.e., sending and receiving
messages with familiar and unfamiliar partners). We will present
the CFCS development and describe CFCS levels by communication modes, GMFCS, MACS, cerebral palsy types, and comorbidities in a convenience sample of 72 children with cerebral palsy.
Learner Outcomes: Participants will be able to discuss the
WHO ICF model and how it applies to the communication of
children with CP. Classify children by CFCS level. Describe how
communication modes, cerebral palsy types, and comorbidities
vary by CFCS level.
SS03.2
SPEECH AND LANGUAGE THERAPY FOR MOTOR SPEECH
IMPAIRMENT IN CHILDREN WHO HAVE CEREBRAL PALSY:
EXPLORING COMPARATIVE APPROACHES TO PRACTICE
H. Roddam1, C. Adams2, Z. Cséfalvay3
1
University of Central Lancashire, Preston, United Kingdom
2
University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom
3
Comenius University, Bratislava, Slovak Republic
Summary: This seminar will present the initial findings from a
small scale comparative study between UK and the Slovak Republic of SLT intervention approaches to motor speech work
with this group. There will be a structured discussion to explore
the prevalent therapy approaches from the world-wide experience of the participants. Interest in further comparative studies
will be invited.
Learner Outcomes: Participants will be able to discuss prevalent therapy approaches to motor speech work with children
who have cerebral palsy.
102
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
FP21.1
SPEECH RATE, ARTICULATION RATE AND INTELLIGIBILITY
OF SPEECH IN PATIENTS WITH ALS
T. Makkonen1,2, R. Puhto1, A-M. Korpijaakko-Huuhka1
1
University of Tampere, Finland
2
Tampere University Hospital, Finland
Summary: This study explores how differences in speech and
articulation rates are reflected in differences in speech intelligibility of spontaneous speech. Eighteen patients were divided
into two groups based on intelligibility rankings. Speech rate
and articulation rate were estimated with PRAAT. The results
indicate that decreased articulation rate affects speech intelligibility more than speech rate in patient with ALS.
Learner Outcomes: After completing this session, participants
will be able to estimate speech and articulation rates from spontaneous speech and to describe their contribution to speech
intelligibility.
FP21.2
QUALITY INDICATORS FOR SPEECH-LANGUAGE THERAPY
IN PARKINSON’S DISEASE
J.G. Kalf, M. Munneke
Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen, The
Netherlands
Summary: Based on the guideline -Speech-language therapy
in Parkinsons disease, quality indicators were extracted and
validated using the scores of trained and untrained Dutch SLTs.
This resulted in 5 indicators being a valid quality measure of SLT
for PD patients. Training, but also treating more PD patients and
participating in a network of dedicated professionals adds to
quality of care.
Learner Outcomes: Participants will be able to 1. describe 5 indicators that are a valid quality measure for speech therapy in
Parkinson’s disease; 2. discuss variables that are predictive for
good adherence to the PD guideline in the Netherlands.
FP21.3
VARIABILITY OF FUNDAMENTAL FREQUENCY IN THE
DIFFERENTIATION OF NEUROLOGICAL DYSPHONIA
Padovani M., Moraes M., Madazio G., Lorenzon P., Korn G., de Biase N.
Universidade Federal de São Paulo, Brazil
Summary: The study aims to verify if the measure of the variability of the fundamental frequency is capable to differentiate
neurological disorder. Values were significantly higher for focal
laryngeal dystonia, followed by the vocal tremor and, at last, by
normal voices. It is possible to differentiate the groups by the
measure of the variability of the fundamental frequency.
Learner Outcomes: Participants will be able to apply a simple
measure to differentiate neurological disorders.
FP21.4
LIVING WITH DYSARTHRIA SELF-REPORTED
QUESTIONNAIRE IN PARKINSON'S DISEASE
Puhl A 1,2, Diaféria G1,2, Padovani M1, Behlau M1,2
Centro de Estudos da Voz, Brazil
2
Associação Brazil Parkinson, Brazil
LwD can be considered a complement to the clinic evaluation.
Learner Outcomes: Participants will be able to analyze the selfreported impact of dysarthria in Parkinson’s disease; use this
protocol as a complement to the clinic evaluation.
FP21.5
DYSARTHRIA AND QUALITY OF LIFE IN PATIENTS WITH
AMYOTROPHIC LATERAL SCLEROSIS (ALS)
Daniela Ginocchio1,Alice Merlo2, Stefania Bottari2, Paolo Banfi3,
Massimo Corbo3, Antonio Schindler2
1
Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Ospedale Ca’ Granda, Milano, Italy
2
Department of Clinical Sciences “L. Sacco”, University of Milano, Italy
3
NEuroMuscolar Omnicenter, Milano, Italy
Summary: This prospective, cross-sectional study evaluated
the impact of dysarthria on quality of life (QOL) in subjects with
Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) using the Quality of Life in
the Dysarthric speaker (QOL-DyS) questionnaire. The correlations between QOL-DyS and speech measures were strong,
suggesting factors different from speech impairment play a minor role in QOL of the patients with ALS.
Learner Outcomes: Participants will be able to recognize the
perceived quality of life in patients with Amyotrophic Lateral
sclerosis and the correlations with dysarthria measures.
FP21.6
BIOFEEDBACK IMPROVES DIADOCHOKINESIS OF PATIENT
WITH APHASIA (CASE STUDY)
S.R. Vezenkov, E.G. Goranova
South West University Neofit Rilski, Blagoevgrad, Bulgaria
Summary: Biofeedback improved the diadochokinesis of the
left-handed patient, 5 months after a right middle cerebral
artery stroke and diagnosis mild expressive aphasia. The final
scores of the diadochokinetic assessments (scale of Riley&Riley,
1985) were compared before and after biofeedback training.
Our results showed that biofeedback could be applied successfully as an additional therapy in mild expressive aphasia treatment.
Learner Outcomes: Participants will be able to assess diadochokinesis, describe biofeedback protocols and training, discuss the prognosis of mild expressive aphasia.
FP22.1
SIGNIFICANCE OF VIDEOKYMOGRAPHY FOR PHONIATRIC
PRACTICE AND BASIC VOICE RESEARCH
F. Sram1, J. G. Svec2, J. Vydrova1
1
IVoice Centre Prague, Prague, Czech Republic
2
Biophysics Lab, Department of Experimental Physics, Palacky
University, Olomouc, Czech Republic
Summary: The paper reviews basic information on the highspeed videolaryngoscopic method of videokymography for advanced diagnosis of functional and organic voice disorders.
Learner Outcomes: Participants will be able to describe videokymography, distinguish features of normal and abnormal
vocal fold vibration in voice disorders.
1
Summary: This research aims to analyze the self-reported dysarthria impact in Parkinson;s disease by a self-report questionnaire, ‘Living with Dysarthria’. 32 individuals, stages 2-3 in Hoehn
& Yahr Scale, 1,6 dysarthria’s degree answered the protocol. The
mean overall score was 170 correlated to Hoehn & Yahr scale.
FP22.2
LISTENING ABILITY AND AUDITORY LATERALITY IN
DYSPHONIC CHILDREN
A. Szkielkowska, J. Ratynska, R. Markowska, H. Skarzynski
Institute of Physiology and Pathology of Hearing, Warsaw, Poland
Summary: The authors assumed that improper voice produc-
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
tion may origin in abnormal auditory perception. The aim of
the study was to evaluate listening ability in children with voice
disorders secondary to improper voice emission.
Learner Outcomes: Participants will be able to discuss the role
of auditory self-control in voice disorders.
103
Learner Outcomes: Participants will be able to explain two
mecanisms in a type of partial laryngectomy, describe this
mecanisms.
FP22.5
FP22.3
DEVELOPMENT AND VALIDATION OF QUESTIONNAIRE OF
VOICE AFFECTING FACTORS
TAPE AUTHENTICATION AND VOICE IDENTIFICATION:
A CASE STUDY IN FORENSIC ACOUSTIC PHONETICS
Trinite B.
Riga Stradins University, Latvia
Paul Corthals1,2, John Van Borsel2, Kristiane Van Lierde2
1
Faculty of Health Care Vesalius, University College Ghent, Belgium
2
Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Ghent University, Belgium
Summary: The purpose of study was to develop and validate
questionnaire for investigation of teacher’s voice disorders. To
establish prevalence of voice problems and risk factors affecting voice producing were main objectives of questionnaire.
Learner Outcomes: Participants will be able to determin a presence and onset of voice problems or disorders also recognize all
factors affecting voice production.
Summary: Classic voice and speech pathology metrics can be
relevant in the realm of forensic science. This report is about a
case of threatening telephone calls. Tape authentication was
done by visual and statistical analysis of pitch and loudness contours. Voice identification was done by means of a ‘voice lineup’ (judging differences and similarities in a series of matched
voices).
Learner Outcomes: Participants will be able to describe the
relevance of voice well known diagnostic voice metrics in a new
context (in the realm of forensic expertise), to pinpoint some
speaker-specific features in a recording and to suggest feasible
methods to reveal them.
FP22.4
VOICE AFTER SUPRACRICOID PARTIAL LARYNGECTOMY:
COMPARISON OF TWO PHONATORY MECHANISMS
Crestani Sabine, Woisard V, Puech M, Serrano E
CHU Larrey, Toulouse, France
Summary: The aim of the study is to determine if the voice
outcome is different between two kinds of mechanisms after
supracricoid laryngectomy.
FP22.6
STANDARDIZATION OF THE ARABIC VERSION OF THE VOICE
HANDICAP INDEX: AN INVESTIGATION OF VALIDITY AND
RELIABILITY
Saleem A.F.1 Natour Y.S.2
Amman University, Jordan
2
University of Jordan, Jordan
1
Summary: The original English form of the Voice Handicap
Index (VHI) was translated into Arabic then completed by 112
participants. Its validity and reliability was investigated and
found to be both valid and reliable. In addition, it was found to
be applicable to both genders and across a wide age range.
Learner Outcomes: Participants will be able to 1) discuss the
validity of the voice handicap index (arabic version); 2) Discuss
the reliability of the the VHI-Arabic version.
TUESDAY 24/8/2010
MR02
THE COMPLEXITY OF SOCIAL/CULTURAL DIMENSION IN
COMMUNICATION DISORDERS
Travis T. Threats
USA
There has been growing recognition in the field of communication disorders concerning the importance of multicultural and
diversity issues. This discussion needs to move beyond the theoretical and descriptive stage to the clinical use of this knowledge to improve the communicative functioning of diverse
populations. This paper argues that the tenets of evidencebased practice and the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) by the World Health Organization
can be used to advance the scholarship and service concerning
diversity issues. Both evidence-based practice and the ICF are
client-based approaches that can facilitate the achievement
of culturally relevant rehabilitation outcomes. This article discusses the use of evidence-based practice and the ICF for pro-
viding assessment and intervention that address the social and
cultural complexities of the persons we serve. In addition, the
author states that work on diversity issues can also be used to
discover crucial underlying knowledge regarding communication and communication disorders.
Main Presenter
Travis T. Threats, PhD
Professor and Chair Department of Communication Sciences and
Disorders,
Saint Louis University, St. Louis, USA
Discussants
Linda Worrall, PhD
Department Speech Pathology & Audiology, University of
Queensland, Brisbane, AUSTRALIA
Judith F. Duchan, PhD
Department of Communicative Disorders and Sciences. University at
Buffalo, Buffalo, NY, USA
104
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
SY06A.1
SY06A.4
IALP STUTTERING ASSESSMENT SURVEY
SETTING STUTTERING THERAPY GOALS AND MEASURING
OUTCOMES
Blomgren M., Bosshardt H.-G., Eggers K., Packman Ann, Cook
Frances, Leahy Margaret, Fibiger Steen, Boucand V.
Dept of Communication Science and Disorders, University of Utah,
USA Ruhr-University Bochum, Germany
Lessius University College, Antwerp, Belgium and University of
Leuven, Leuven, Belgium
Australian Stuttering Research Centre, The University of Sydney,
Australia
Michael Palin Centre for Stammering, London, UK
Trinity College Dublin, Ireland
Rehabilitation Centre, Odense, Region of Southern Denmark
University of Paris, France
Summary: The results of an online international survey on stuttering assessment protocols will be presented. Results from
405 speech-language pathologists from 19 countries will be
discussed in terms of common assessment approaches, instruments used, and salient theoretical perspectives.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to (1) Describe
a range of stuttering assessment measures in relation to behavioural, cognitive, and affective areas, (2) Describe common
theoretical perspectives in the assessment of stuttering.
SY06A.2
ASSESSMENT FRAMEWORKS FOR WORKING WITH PEOPLE
WHO STUTTER
Andrade C.R.F.
University of Sao Paulo, Brazil
Summary: The purpose of this research was to obtain the speech
fluency profile of fluent children, with no stuttering complaints in
terms of: speech disruption typology; speech rate (words and syllables per minute) and frequency of speech disruptions (number
of disfluencies per minute and percentage of stuttered syllables).
The study was developed with 200 participants, of both genders.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to describe the
fluency profile of normal speaker children.
SY06A.3
WHAT IS NORMAL DYSFLUENCY AND WHY MEASURE IT:
BELGIUM
Eggers K.
Lessius University College, Antwerp, Belgium and University of
Leuven, Leuven, Belgium
Summary: Present study obtained data on normal dysfluencies
in CWNS and their evolution over time. Participants were 100
Flemish speaking children(3;0-12;0y). Speech samples were collected in a standardized manner.
Of each participant 50 utterances were randomly selected,
transcribed, and dysfluencies in these utterances were coded
in several dysfluency categories. The duration of the utterances
and dysfluencies was measured by Praat.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to 1) Describe
the prevalence of different categories of disfluencies in typically
developing children, and 2) Describe the evolution of these disfluencies as function of increasing age.
Cook Frances, Packman Ann, Blomgren M.
Michael Palin Centre for Stammering, London, UK
Australian Stuttering Research Centre, The University of Sydney,
Australia Dept of Communication Science and Disorders, University
of Utah, USA
Summary: Theoretical perspectives on the nature and complexity of stuttering and empirical evidence guide clinicians’ choice
of treatment programmes and goals. This paper will provide an
overview of a range of treatment outcome measures that reflect behavioural, affective and cognitive aspects of stuttering;
these will be described and discussed in relation to establishing
therapeutic goals, planning treatment and guiding therapy.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to discuss formal and informal outcome measures in setting treatment goals,
monitoring progress, reviewing goals and demonstrating that
agreed goals have been achieved.
SY06A.5
STUTTERING RATE, STUTTERING SEVERITY:
PSYCHOMETRIC CRITERIA AND THERAPY USE
Bosshardt H.-G., Cook Frances, Packman Ann
Ruhr-University Bochum, Germany
Michael Palin Centre for Stammering, London, UK
Australian Stuttering Research Centre, The University of Sydney,
Australia
Summary: It will be discussed which procedural and psychometric requirements measures of speech disfluency must fulfill
in order to be functional for diagnostic classifications and for
documenting changes in speech fluency. Suggestions will be
proposed about how even in the absence of psychometric information - the quality of measures of stuttering rate and severity can be enhanced.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able describe which
psychometric criteria must be met so that measures of speech
disfluency are functional for diagnostic classifications and for
determining changes in speech fluency. Discuss some ways to
improve the precision of informal measures of stuttering and
severity.
SY06A.6
ASSESSMENT FRAMEWORKS: FUTURE DIRECTIONS
Bosshardt H.-G., Blomgren M., Andrade C.R.F., Eggers K., Cook
Frances, Boucand V., Fibiger Steen, Leahy Margaret, Neumann K.,
Packman Ann Ruhr-University Bochum, Germany
Dept of Communication Science and Disorders, University of Utah,
USA University of Sao Paulo, Brazil
Lessius University College, Antwerp, Belgium and University of
Leuven, Leuven, Belgium
Michael Palin Centre for Stammering, London, UK
University of Paris, France
Rehabilitation Centre, Odense, Region of Southern Denmark
Trinity College Dublin, Ireland
Dept. of Phoniatrics and Pediatric Audiology, University of Frankfurt/
Main, Germany
Australian Stuttering Research Centre, The University of Sydney
Summary: This presentation will provide a summary of the previous five presentations in this symposium. To stimulate discussions with the participants, suggestions will be made as to how
the available evidence can and should be used in therapy and
how further research can extend our knowledge in the areas of
the symposium.
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to list formal
and informal measures of speech fluency and therapy outcome
Discuss the relevance of normative information for diagnosis
and therapy Evaluate existing knowledge for its practical usefulness.
FP23.1
RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN ABNORMAL SPEECH SOUNDS
DEVELOPMENT AND SWALLOWING DISORDERS IN YOUNG
CHILDREN
Plaza E.
Universidad de Talca, Chile
105
summarize preliminary speech outcome data from an intensive
voice treatment protocol (LSVT LOUD) in children with spastic
CP and Down syndrome, and 4) apply this information to other
pediatric motor speech disorders in clinical practice.
FP23.4
INTERNET-BASED ASSESSMENT OF SPEECH
INTELLIGIBILITY AND OROMOTOR FUNCTION IN CHILDREN
Waite Monique, Theodoros Deborah G., Russell Trevor, Cahill
Louise University of Queensland
Royal Childrens’ Hospital & University of Queensland, Australia
Summary: The purpose of this early study was to obtain information on how disordered swallowing mechanism can be associated to abnormal speech sound production in young children
with neurological disorders. A follow up design study resulted
in a revealing form to identify features of speech that may be
affected by abnormal oral movements in the presence of disordered swallowing mechanism.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to identify ealy
findings of abnormal speech development in the presence of
swallowing disorders in neurologically impaird young children.
Summary: The study examined the validity and reliability of
assessing speech intelligibility and oromotor function in 20
children with disordered speech. Results revealed high levels
of agreement between online and face-to-face speech intelligibility ratings. Overall level of agreement for oromotor function
reached 73% with variablity evident. Reliability was comparable across environments. Results confirmed validity of online
assessment.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to describe
telerehabilitation research methodology. Discuss the feasibility
and logistics of online assessment.
FP23.2
SY07.1
COMMUNICATION PERFORMANCE OF CHILDREN WITH
CEREBRAL PALSY APPLYING A WHO ICF MODEL
INITIAL RESULTS FROM A LOW COST HEARING AID
PROJECT IN THE PHILIPPINES - FACTORS AFFECTING
OUTCOMES.
Scott M., Hidecker M.J.C.
Speech-Language Pathology, University of Central Arkansas, United
States
Newall P.
Centre for Language Sciences, Macquarie University, Sydney,Australia
FP23.3
Summary: This study describes some aspects of a low cost
hearing aid program in a province in the Philippines.
The hearing aid fittings made by professional staff and local
health care workers were compared to see if there were any differences in their outcomes. Cases with poorer outcomes were
also assessed to see which factors were important in such cases.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to describe the
challenges faced by those attempting to provide hearing aids
at low cost in developing countries, consider the feasibility of
providing services by local health care workers which are usually provided by audiologists, discuss the issues affecting poor
outcomes and what might be done to minimize such cases.
NEW PERSPECTIVES IN TREATING PEDIATRIC MOTOR
SPEECH DISORDERS
SY07.2
Summary: Using the WHO ICF framework, the Communication
Function Classification System (CFCS) was used to classify children with CP into one of five levels based on their communication activity and participation. These children were video-taped
during language samples with a familiar and unfamiliar partner
and transcripts were analyzed for intelligibility, semantic content, syntactic structure, and social language.
Learner Outcomes: Findings of this study will be described to
participants and the results will be discussed. The CFCS model
will be introduced and the role partner familiarity plays in communication will be discussed in respect to these findings.
Fox Cynthia, Boliek Carol, Ramig Lorraine
National Center for Voice and Speech, a division of the University of
Colorado, Boulder, United States
Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, University of
Alberta, Edmonton, Canada
Department of Speech, Language, Hearing Sciences, University of
Colorado, Boulder, United States
Summary: This seminar will discuss historical and emerging
theories of motor development in relation to pediatric motor
speech disorders, describe key elements of exercise/rehabilitation that drive activity dependent neural plasticity, and discuss
outcome data from LSVT LOUD as an example of how theories
of motor development and principles of neural plasticity can be
embedded into protocols and tested systematically.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to, 1) discuss
theories of motor development and their impact on speech
treatment delivery models, 2) explain what aspects of exercise
(e.g. speech exercise) are important to drive neural plasticity, 3)
INTRODUCTION OF CHINA’S NATIONAL PLAN OF
PREVENTION AND REHABILITATION OF HEARING
IMPAIRMENT (2007-2015)
Bu Xingkuan
Jiangsu Province Hosp. (China)
Summary: China’s National plan of prevention and rehabilitation of hearing impairment (2007-2015)’ covered present status,
policies, aims, management and evaluation. To implement the
plan, MOH China issued ‘Administration of newborn screening’
in 2009. Government also initiated ‘National rescue program of
cochlear implant and hearing aids services for poor deaf children 2009-2012’.
Learner Outcomes: After completing this session, participants
will be able to discuss the national PDH program and it’s implementing in China. It will be useful model for WHO PDH and
other developing countries.
106
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
SY07.3
NEWBORN HEARING SCREENING AROUND THE WORLD:
A REPORT OF THE AUDIOLOGY COMMITTEE OF THE
INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF LOGOPEDICS AND
PHONIATRICS
Neumann K1., Bu X.2, Chiong C.3, Herer G.4, Holgers K-M.5, Lewis D.6,
Mikic B.7, Newall P.8, Rangasayee R.9, Thomson V.10
Dept. of Phoniatrics and Pediatric Audiology, University of Frankfurt/
Main, Germany1, ORL Dept. Jiangsu Province Hospital, Nanjing
Medical University, China2, Dept. of ORL, University of the Philippines,
Manila, Philippines3, Children’s Hearing and Speech Center, Children’s
National Medical Center, Washington, DC, USA4, Department of
Audiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, Goteborg University, Sweden5,
Centro Audicao na Crianca, Pontificia Universidade Catolica de Sao
Paulo, Brazil6, Audiology Rehabilitation Department Clinical Centre
of Serbia, Beograd, Serbia7, Centre for Language Sciences, Macquarie
University, Sydney, Australia8, AYJNIHH Campus, Mumbai, India9,
Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment, Denver, CO,
USA10
Summary: Because the prevalence of congenital or early acquired permanent hearing loss is high, Newborn Hearing
Screening programs are implemented in an increasing number
of countries. Other countries or regions are still in a planning or
pilot phase with this process.
This presentation describes the status of the implementation of
Newborn Hearing Screenings in some industrialized, threshold,
and developing countries.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to estimate the
status of Newborn Hearing Screening of large parts in the world
including industrialized, threshold, and developing countries,
consider the necessity to build up and stabilize Newborn Hearing
Screening programs globally, if possible under participation of
the WHO, discuss the necessity of unifying the benchmarks of the
Newborn Hearing Screening and the structure of the data which
are collected, analyze the extent of implementation of a Newborn
Hearing Screening in the home country of a participant.
SY07.4
EPIDEMIOLOGY OF HEARING AND EQUILIBRIUM
DISORDERS IN GERMAN SCHOOLCHILDREN, THEIR
HEARING HABITS AND THE EFFECTS ON SCHOOL
PERFORMANCE
Hoffmann E.
Aalen University of Applied Sciences, Germany
Summary: A screening of more than 7,000 German schoolchildren revealed that sensory disorders are correlated with a
poorer school achievements. Equilibrium disorders can be observed in more than two thirds of all primary school students.
The results indicate that a screening of schoolchildren is needed
regulary because interface losses can clearly impair the learning process.
Learner Outcomes: After completing this session, participants
will be able to explain the need of a regulary sensory screening
at school and to discuss the effects of hearing and equilibrium
disorders on school performance.
hearing symptom and hearing in young people in relation to
leisure noise, for instance mobile phone and mp3 players.
Learner Outcomes: The importance to be aware of the effect
of noise of any kind in young people.
SY08.1
RECENT ADVANCES IN DYSPHAGIA DIAGNOSTICS
Watkin K. L.
University of Illinois, United States
Summary: In this presentation we will review new dysphagia
diagnostic imaging technologies, optical imaging advances,
manometric technologies and the utilization of remote diagnostic and treatment methods that provide advanced information to assist the clinicians. Recent technological advances in
pervasive health technologies with an emphasis on the diagnosis of dysphagia will also be explored.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to identify basic diagnostic tools used when assessing dysphagia; recognize
the types of information provided by each tool; learn the advantages and disadvantages of the tools.
SY08.2
THE CRITICAL NATURE OF 30 FRAMES PER SECOND FOR
VIDEOFLUOROSCOPIC STUDIES OF SWALLOW
Logemann J.A.
Northwestern University, United States
Summary: Recently, there has been a shift from analog to digital fluoroscopy equipment, impacting clinicians and investigators who use the modified barium swallow to investigate swallow. Digital fluoroscopy units and videorecorders must operate
at 30 frames per second to visualize swallow abnormalities,
which may last only 1/15 of a second. Slower speed risks accuracy of the swallow study.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to conduct an
accurate modified barium swallow examination; select best fluoroscopy equipment for use in the modified barium swallow.
SY08.3
DIAGNOSTICS OF LINGUAL BIOMECHANICS DURING
SWALLOWING
Ono T.
Osaka University, Japan
Summary: Tongue motor biomechanics during swallowing
will be analysed on the waveform of tongue pressure against
hard palate, which was recorded by novel sensor sheet system.
Relationship between tongue motor deficits and dysphagia in
stroke patients also will be discussed in this presentation.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to understand
the lingual biomechanics during swallowing and oral-stage
pathophysiology of dysphagia in stroke patients.
SY08.4
SY07.5
PATIENT REPORTED SWALLOWING OUTCOME IN HEAD
AND NECK CANCER
CELLPHONES, PERSONAL MUSIC PLAYERS AND
TEMPORARY THRESHOLD SHIFTS IN 16-YEAR-OLD
STUDENTS.
Verdonck-de Leeuw I.M.
Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, VU
University Medical Center, Amsterdam, Netherlands
Holgers K.M.
Sahlgrenska Academy, Sweden
Summary: The aim is to describe the outcome of subjective
Summary: The aims of the present study are to assess psychometric characteristics of the SWAL-QOL in patients with oral
or oropharyngeal cancer and laryngeal cancer and to define a
clinical relevant cut-off score.
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to use and interpretate patient reported swallowing outcomes.
SY08.5
APPLICABILITY OF FIBEROPTIC ENDOSCOPIC EVALUATION
OF SWALLOWING (FEES) IN PAEDIATRIC POPULATION
Schindler A.
Universita di Milano, Italy
Summary: Indications and limitations of fiberoptic endoscopic
evalutation of swallowing (FEES) in paediatric patients will be
presented. The effect of age and etiology of dysphagia on FEES
will be discussed. In addition the role of FEES in the diagnostic
work-up of children with dysphagia will be presented.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to understand
the limitation of FEES in children; recognize the children populations for which FEES is indicated; learn the role of FEES in the
diagnostic work-up of children with dyspahgia.
SY09A.1
EDUCATION OF SLPs FOR THE GLOBAL COMMUNITY
Li-Rong Lilly Cheng1, Helen Grech2, r Fernanda Fernandes3, Claudia Andrade 4 University of São Paulo
1
San Diego StateUniversity, San Diego, U.S.A.
2
University of Malta, Msida, Malta
3
University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
4
University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
Summary: Education of SLPs for the global community is a task
that requires the work of many. The Education guidelines have
been revised and will be presented in this session along with
other emerging topics.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to learn about
the Education Guidelines for SLPs; Learn about emerging issues
in educatiion globally.
SY09A.2
ADOPTION OF THE IALP EDUCATION?S GUIDELINES IN
SOME EUROPEAN COUNTRIES OF BULGARIA, GREECE,
TURKEY,POLAND,AND RUSSIA
Georgieva D., Topbas S., Wosniak T., Filatova Y., Kotsopoulos A.
South West University, Bulgaria
Anadolu University, Turkey
Lublin University, Poland
Moscow State Pedagogical University, Russia
TEI Patras, Greece
Summary: This paper provides an overview of the adoption
of the IALP education guidelines in Logopedics in Bulgaria,
Greece,Turkey, Poland, and Russian Federation; and reports on
the development of the specialty in these countries. The data
were collected using a special questionnaire developed by
Soderpalm (2006) and supplemented by the authors.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to know more
about IALP guidelines adoption in some of the Balkan countries
and Russia and Poland.
FP24.1
PHONOLOGICAL PROFILES AND OUTCOMES OF
DUPLICATION 7Q11.23 SYNDROME
Currier A., Velleman S. L., Mervis C.
Univ. of Massachusetts - Amherst
Univ. of Louisville, United States
Summary: Duplication 7q11.23 (DUP7), a duplication of ge-
107
netic material in the Williams-Beuren region that has only been
documented since 2005, typically results in mild-profound
speech sound disorder. We compare the phonological profiles
and outcomes of two boys with this syndrome.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to, 1. describe
typical symptoms of DUP7 2. describe the effects of level of intervention on two otherwise similar children with DUP7.
FP24.2
EARLY PHONOLOGY IN WILLIAMS VERSUS DUPLICATION
7Q11.23 SYNDROMES
O’Connor K., Velleman S. L.,, McGloin S., Mervis C.
Univ. of Massachusetts - Amherst
Univ. of Louisville, United States
Summary: 7q11.23 duplication syndrome (DUP7) results from
a duplication of the genetic material deleted in Williams syndrome (WS). We compare the phonological profiles of five pairs
of young children with these syndromes; two pairs are analyzed
twice each. At both 24 and 36 months, WS utterances are more
phonetically complex than are DUP7 utterances; differences are
more pronounced at 36 months.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to 1. compare
typical symptoms of WS versus DUP7 2. compare phonological
profiles of children with the two syndromes at 21-24 months
and at 3 years.
FP24.3
VELOPHARYNGEAL ACTIVITY AFTER USE OF SPEECH BULB
IN CLEFT PALATE PATIENTS
Pegoraro-Krook M. I., Souza OMV., Rodrigues R., Dutka J. C. R.
Speech Language Pathologist, University Of Sao Paulo,Brazil
Summary: There are clinical evidence that movements of velopharyngeal mechanism can increase with the use of speech
bulbs to the point of elimination of that or until the maximum
reduction of the velopharyngeal gap is achieved.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to discuss the
use of speech bulb to stimulate the movement of pharyngeal
walls during speech.
FP24.4
NASAL VENTILATION IN ASTHMATIC CHILDREN
DA.Cunha1, E.G.F. Silva1, G.K.B.O. Nascimento1, G.M. Andrade1,
K.J.R. Moraes1, R.A. Cunha1, R.M.F.L. Régis1, S.R.A. Moraes1, C.M.M.B.
Castro1; H.J. Silva1,
1
Universidade Federal of Pernambuco, Recife, Brazil
Summary: There is an interrelation between the upper and
lower airways in healthy individuals, asthmatic and rhinitis patients that can cause nasal obstruction and this research was realized to evaluate the exhalation of asthmatic children by nasal
ventilation. No signs of changes in the exhalation were found to
asthmatics, being necessary a more specific study of nasal and
pulmonary function.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to evaluate the
expiration of asthmatic children by nasal ventilation.
FP24.5
FACIAL ANTHROPOMETRY IN ASTHMATIC CHILDREN
D.A. Cunha1, R.A. Cunha1, R.M.F.L. Régis1, G.K.B.O. Nascimento1, E.G.F.
Silva1, K.J.R. Moraes1, S.R.A. Moraes1, C.M.M.B. Castro1. H.J, Silva1,.
1
Universidade Federal of Pernambuco, Recife, Brazil
Summary: This research characterized the face standards of an-
108
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
thropometry in asthmatic children; identified the facial asymmetry presence and related orofacial anthropometric measures
in asthmatic and non-asthmatics. The non-asthmatic group
had inferior third greater than upper, middle, respectively. In
asthmatics, middle third was minor than inferior and left commissure was minor than right, suggesting a presence of facial
asymmetry in asthmatics.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to characterize
the face standards of anthropometry in asthmatic children.
SSY02.1
SERVING FAMILIES OF CHILDREN WITH SEVERE AND
MULTIPLE DISABILITIES AND COMPLEX COMMUNICATION
NEEDS
Pickl G. B.
osterr. Gesellschaft für Sprachheilpadagogik, Austria
Summary: The presentation is based on a study focusing on
parents of children with multiple disabilities and complex communication needs, who are using different modes of AAC.
It contributes to a deeper understanding of the challenges parents are facing in their daily life with a non speaking child and
the consequences for assessment and intervention.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to discuss the
challenges parents of children with complex communication
needs and multiple disabilities are facing and to identify situations when families benefit from the use of communication
aids.
SSY02.2
ENGINEERING THE ENVIRONMENT FOR SUCCESSFUL AAC
McCain P.
Sunny Days Incorporated, United States
Summary: Alternative and Augmentative communication can
be enhanced and more productive if the environment can be
engineered with multiple opportunities to communication
daily. But to be successful you must address communication,
receptive and expressive language, communicable moments,
visual strategies that cue individuals, accomodations, developmental levels, challenging behaviors, social behaivors and 24
hour a day opportunities.
Learner Outcomes: After completing this session, participants
will be able to discuss the specific concepts. After completing
this session, participants will be able to explain the importance of making AAC available at all times and in all ways. After
completing this session, participants will be able to apply the
concepts for a communication rich environment that supports
AAC.
challenges parents of children with complex communication
needs and multiple disabilities are facing and to identify situations when families benefit from the use of communication
aids.
FP25.2
SPEECH THERAPY IN PALLISTER-KILLIAN SYNDROME: CASE
STUDY
Giacchini Vanessa, V., Oneda Francinete, F.
Universidade Federal de Santa Maria
APAE, Brazil
Summary: Show the benefits of speech therapy in the long
term in cases of Pallister-Killian Syndrome. Being able to see
progress with the case presented.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to promote
better progress in patients with Pallister-Killian syndrome.
FP25.3
MYOFUNCTIONAL INFLUENCE ON THE FACIAL GROWTH IN
THE PRIMARY AND MIXED DENTITION
Hulsink Niels, Netherlands
Summary: Incorrect Myofunctional habits are often the cause
of a malocclusion. Because of this, we have to try to correct not
only the dental problem but also the cause. If we are not able
to correct the cause, the results won’t be as stable and good as
we would.
In this presentation most of the incorrect Myofunctional habits
will be shown.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to recognise
the incorrect habits and finding the relationship between the
function and the form (malocclusion).
FP26.1
COMBINING SUSTAINED VOWEL AND CONTINUOUS
SPEECH IN AUDITORY-PERCEPTUAL EVALUATION OF
DYSPHONIA SEVERITY: WHAT DETERMINES THE FINAL
RATING?
Maryn Y.
Sint-Jan General Hospital, Belgium
FP25.1
Summary: The participants will be confronted will original,
however preliminary, research findings regarding the auditory-perceptual evaluation of overall voice quality in different
sample types. Discussion on the so-called ‘ecological’ validity of
these perceptual ratings will be encouraged.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to (a) explain
the nature of including both sample types in the auditoryperceptual rating of dysphonia severity, (2) refer to data that
strengthen such a method.
CHILDREN WITH COMPLEX COMMUNICATION NEEDS - THE
PARENTS’ PERSPECTIVE
FP26.2
Pickl G. B.
SPZ Graz, Austria
COMPARISON OF V-RQOL, VHI AND VAPP SCORES FOR
TEACHERS
Summary: The study is based on interviews with parents of
non speaking children with multiple disabilities, who are using
different modes of AAC.
It contributes to a deeper understanding of how parents experience their children’s communication and of the discrepancy
between the desire for supplying the children with technical
communication aids and the actual use of these aids.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to discuss the
Oliveira G., Tutya A.S., Behlau Mara
CEV and UNIFESP, CEV, UNIFESP / CEV, Brazil
Summary: The purpose is to check the impact of a voice problem in dysphonic teachers using V-RQOL, VHI and VAPP. Findings
show that instruments are complementary. V-RQOL functioning and VHI physical domains provided similar results. V-RQOL
emotional domain exhibited more evidently the impact. VAPP
supply information that the others don’t contemplate.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to use the self-
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
109
assessment protocols with a better understanding of the information provided; explain differences and similarity in results of
the protocols.
Learner Outcomes: Listeners will be able discuss about the relationship of voice ergonomic risk factors to symptoms of voice
disorders and acoustic features of voice.
FP26.3
FP26.6
ACOUSTIC AND HEMODYNAMIC EVALUATIONS OF
ACUPUNCTURE FOR HYPERFUNCTIONAL DYSPHONIA
RESPIRATORY FUNCTION AFTER THYROPLASTIC
SURGERIES
Xu Jie Jie, Lu Mei Ping, Chen Xi,
Department of Otorhinolaryngology, the First Affiliated Hospital of
Nanjing Medical University, China
Miyamaru S., Yumoto E.
Otolaryngology-Head and neck Surgery, Kumamoto University, Japan
Summary: Forty Chinese females with hyperfunctional dysphonia received acupuncture on three pairs of acupoints.Acoustic
measurement was performed before and after the treatment. A
RT-2D CDFI was used to measure the blood flow of the larynx.
The acoustics analysis revealed that acupuncture is an effective
treatment for hyperfunctional dysphonia. CDFI suggested that
acupuncture has a remarkable influence on improving laryngeal blood flow.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to discuss the
effectiveness of acupuncture for hyperfunctional dysphonia
and explain why the acupuncture is effective for benign vocal disorders by investigating its influence on laryngeal blood
flow.
FP26.4
SELF-ASSESSMENT PROTOCOLS FOR MODERN AND
CLASSICAL SINGING VOICE: BRAZILIAN VERSIONS OF MSHI
AND CSHI
F. Moreti1, M.E.B. Ávila1, C. Rocha1, M.C.M. Borrego1, G. Oliveira1,2, M.
Behlau1,2
1
CEV, São Paulo, Brazil, 2UNIFESP, São Paulo, Brazil
Summary: The relationship between voice disorder and quality
of life in professional voice is complex; specific instruments such
as the MSHI and CSHI are essential for assessing singers. Voice
complaint was decisive for differentiating the groups. Classic
singers perceive more handicap than modern ones. Therefore,
modern and classical singers need to be evaluated with specific
protocols.
Learner Outcomes: Participants will be able to explain the results provided by the two protocols. Participants will be able to
discuss voice-related quality of life in singers.
FP26.5
A RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN VOICE ERGONOMIC RISK
FACTORS AND VOICE PROBLEMS AND ACOUSTIC
FEATURES. A STUDY MADE IN A CLASSROOM
ENVIRONMENT
Rantala L.M.1, Sala E.2, Hakala S3
Department of Speech Communication and Voice Research,
University of Tampere, Finland1
Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck surgery. Turku
University Hospital. Turku, Finland2
Department of Speech Communication and Voice Research
University of Tampere, Finland
Summary: The relationship of voice ergonomic risk factors
in classrooms to teachers? (12 teachers) voice symptoms and
acoustic features will be examined. Voice ergonomic factors (noise, air quality, posture, working culture, aids) will be
screened by means of Voice Ergonomic Screening Handbook.
Teachers’ voice symptoms will be charted and text reading recorded. Connections will be analyzed with Pearson Correlation
Coefficient.
Summary: Thyroplastic surgeries in patients who had suffered
from dysphonia due to unilateral vocal fold paralysis cause a
certain degree of the upper airway stenosis from the viewpoint
of the respiratory function, although none of the patients report the presence of dyspneic symptoms in their normal daily
lives.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to explain the
effect of thyroplastic surgeries on respiratory function and describe the correlation between respiratory function and aerodynamic vocal function.
SY06B.1
IMPLICATIONS OF NATURAL RECOVERY FOR THE ‘WHEN’
OF EARLY STUTTERING INTERVENTION
Packman A1, Cook Frances 2, Neumann Katrin3
The University of Sydney1
Michael Palin Centre for Stammering, London, UK2
Goethe University of Frankfurt, Frankfurt am Main, Germany3
Summary: The aim of this presentation is to unravel as much as
possile the tangled web of evidence and theory about the implications of natural recovery for early stuttering intervention.
Natural recovery, known predictors of natural recovery and the
implications of these for early interventions will be overviewed
and discussed.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to 1. Discuss
the implications of natural recovery for early stuttering intervention 2. Explain guidelines for the timing of different early
interventions.
SY06B.2
NATURAL RECOVERY FROM STUTTERING IN ADULTHOOD:
WHAT CAN WE LEARN FROM SELF-REPORTED STRATEGIES
AND FROM NEUROIMAGING FINDINGS?
Neumann K1., Gebert R.2,, Euler H.A.1, Packman A.3
1.Dept. of Phoniatrics and Pediatric Audiology, University of
Frankfurt/Main, Germany
2.Dept. of Phoniatrics and Pediatric Audiology, University of Frankfurt
am Main, Frankfurt am Main, Germany; Medical Faculty, University of
Marburg, Germany
3.Australian Stuttering Research Centre, University of Sydney,
Lidcombe, Australia
Summary: In a recent fMRI study we have found in recovered
former stutterers a single neural landmark adjacent to a region
of white matter anomalies in persistent stutterers which correlated with long-term recovery. In this presentation this knowledge will be integrated with strategies which have been reported by recovered former stutterers as having been successful in
overcoming stuttering.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to describe the
way how the brain compensates not very effectively for stuttering (persistent stuttering), and how it manages a (mostly)
short-term, partial repair (therapy) and a stable long-term repair (recovery), compare the cerebral strategies with the strat-
110
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
egies former stutterers describe as having been successful for
them to get rid of stuttering, discuss the implementation of
this knowledge into therapy concepts such as rhythmic speech,
training of sensorimotor-integration, direct brain stimulation,
basal ganglia/dopamin system approach, auditory feedback
approach.
SY06B.5
SY06B.3
Summary: The intervention plan for older children/adults, developed in consultation with the client, should include treatment goals focusing on both the level of impairment as well
as daily functioning, complying with the principles of ?stepped
care?. We will focus on the rationale for clinical decision-making
based on a functional analysis of both overt and covert stuttering-related behaviors.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to (1) Describe
the rationale for a well-founded clinical decision-making in older
children and adults, and (2) Describe how treatment goals can be
approached in a structured and methodological manner.
WHAT MAY WE LEARN ABOUT PRIMARY PREVENTION AND
EARLY INTERVENTION DECISION-MAKING FROM TWIN
STUDIES
Steen Fibiger, Corrado Fagnani, Axel Skytthe, Jacob v. B. Hjelmborg
Rehabilitation Centre, Odense, Region of Southern Denmark
Italian National Institute of Health, Rome, Italy
Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark
Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark
Summary: Genetic factors seem to be a risk factor for speechlanguage disorders in childhood, stuttering and cluttering.
Unique and unshared environmental factors may also contribute to development of the traits. We recommend preventing
children with this family disposition from factors affecting the
brain. Early intervention is strongly recommended for children with genetic disposition in combination with affection of
brain.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to, be aware
of the importance of primary prevention from factors affecting
the brain in children with a family risk for communication disorders, describe the importance of guidance or early intervention
for children from families with persisting stuttering, cluttering
and speech-language disorders, explain why our results give no
support for a diagnosogenic hypothesis, discuss why we should
be attentive on stuttering and cluttering when dealing with
children having speech-language problems.
SY06B.4
IMPORTANCE OF INDIVIDUAL DIFFERENCES IN TREATMENT
AND OUTCOMES
Eggers K. Leahy Margaret
Lessius University College, Antwerp, Belgium and University of
Leuven, Leuven, Belgium
Trinity College Dublin, Belgium
Summary: The aim of the presentation is to provide data regarding individual differences, such as cultural, linguistic, family-related or personal psychological influences, that may account for differences in the therapy process, and especially with
regard to treatment goals and outcomes.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to (1) describe
important individual differences in children who stutter; and (b)
discuss unique factors that contribute to therapy outcomes.
RATIONALE FOR TREATMENT DECISION-MAKING IN OLDER
CHILDREN AND ADULTS
Eggers K., Leahy Margaret
Lessius University College, Antwerp, Belgium and University of
Leuven, Leuven,
Trinity College Dublin, Belgium
SY06B.6
TREATMENT DECISION MAKING: FUTURE DIRECTIONS
H-G. Bosshardt1, A. Packman2; K. Neumann3, K. Eggers4,5, S. Fibiger6,
M. Leahy7, C. Andrade8, M. Blomgren9, V. Boucand10, & F.M. Cook11
1
Ruhr-University Bochum, Germany
2
The University of Sydney, Australia
3
Goethe University of Frankfurt, Frankfurt am Main, Germany
4
Lessius University College, Antwerp, Belgium
5
University of Leuven, Leuven, Belgium
6
Rehabilitation Centre, Odense, Denmark
7
Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland
8
University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
9
Dept of Communication Science and Disorders, University of Utah,
USA
10
University of Paris, France
11
Michael Palin Centre for Stammering, London, UK
Summary: This presentation will provide a summary of the previous five presentations in this symposium and suggestions will
be made as to how the available evidence about recovery rates,
genetic basis of stuttering, and individual differences can and
should be used in therapy and how further research can extend
our knowledge in the areas of the symposium.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to discuss decision schemata about the timing of early intervention and about
the treatment of adults Describe the relevance of genetic information for diagnosis and therapy Evaluate existing knowledge
about recovery rates and genetic dispositions for their practical
usefulness.
FP27.1
OBJECT AND ACTION NAMING PATTERNS IN CHILDREN
WITH SLI AND WFD: A NEW LINGUISTIC PERSPECTIVE
FROM CYPRIOT GREEK
Kambanaros M., Grohmann K. K.
European University, University of Cyprus, Cyprus
Summary: This paper reports on the first picture-naming study
involving children with specific language impairment (SLI) that
investigates the lexical category of verbs (actions) and compares performances for the same children with noun retrieval
(objects). The study also included another impaired/delayed
population: children with word-finding difficulties (WFD). All
children tested are monolingual speakers of Cypriot Greek.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to understand
the manifestations of specific language impairment and word-
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
111
finding difficulties in Modern Greek, applied to the Cypriot dialect, for school-age children on a picture-based naming task.
FP27.5
FP27.2
Mastropavlou M., Petinou K. Tsimpli Ianthi Maria
University of Ioannina, Greece, European University Cyprus,Cyprus,
Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece
EVALUATING THE MORPHOSYNTACTIC DEVELOPMENT OF
CHILDREN SPEAKING AN INFLECTED LANGUAGE: WORD
AND PARADIGM (WP) MODEL VERSUS MEAN LENGTH OF
UTTERANCE (MLU).
Levanti Irini, Self Practice, Greece
Summary: Language typology influences the process of Morphosyntactic Development. Speech and language practitioners
use Mean Length of Utterance (Brown, 1973) in morphemes or
in words as a clinical index for identifying language delay or disorder. The present study aims to identify why M.L.U. is unsuitable for inflected languages and to propose the model ‘Word
and Paradigm’ (Hockett, 1954).
Learner Outcomes: Participants will be able to understand why
synthetic (inflected) and analytical languages should be treated
differently and therefore the limitations from using data from
studies conducted in languages with different typology. In addition, they will be familiar with the Word and Paradigm Model.
FP27.3
THE ROLE OF LANGUAGE EXPOSURE: BILINGUAL
PERFORMANCE ON A NONWORD REPETITION TASK
Brandeker Myrto, Thordardottir Elin
McGill University, Canada
Summary: Nonword repetition (NWR) is a promising diagnostic
tool, though not well understood with bilinguals children. This
study examined how language exposure affects NWR in typically developing preschoolers (n=53) with varying degrees of
bilingualism. Receptive/expressive language, NWR and amount
of input were measured in English and French. In each language, NWR correlated with language measures, but was not
correlated with exposure.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to discuss the
role of language exposure on bilingual assessment and describe
the influence of bilingualism on nonword repetition.
FP27.4
INFANTS’ LISTENING BIAS TO THE COMMON STRESSPATTERN IN HEBREW:AN EVIDENCE FOR LANGUAGE
SPECIFIC INFLUENCE
Segal O. (Doctorial student), Kishon-Rabin L. (Prof.), Israel
Summary: Thirty 9- month-old Hebrew learning infants were
tested on their preference to the common weak-strong stress
pattern versus the less common strong-weak one. Infants
showed listening preference for the common weak-strong
stress pattern of their language. The results suggest that infants
learn the regularities of the stress patterns of their language,
for developing language specific stress-based segmentation
procedures.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to explain the
role of language specific exposure on the development of segmentation strategies.
THE ROLE OF MORPHO-PHONOLOGICAL SALIENCE IN
TENSE MARKING IN GREEK AND CYPRIOT SLI CHILDREN
Summary: The study presents results from children with SLI
in Greek and Cypriot Greek. The focuse is on the use of imperfective inflections ir eeal word and pseudo word paradigms.
Overall SLI performance is wprse as compared to controls. The
results are variable and are discussed vis-a-vis morphophonological saliency and grammatical productions.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to 1. Explain
the the theoretical backround of grammatical morphology in
SLI and (2) Discuss inflectional morphology in SG and CYG.
SY10.1
OBJECTIVE AUDIOLOGIC ASSESSMENT OF HEARING
DISORDERS IN EARLY CHILDHOOD
Hoth SH
Univ.-HNO-Klinik Heidelberg, Germany
Summary: The problem of objective determination of a frequency specific hearing threshold in children is at present not
yet solved. New techniques like the recording of amplitude
modulation following responses are promising. Their application under routine conditions yields acceptable results but
there is still a need for further improvements.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to estimate the
practical value of ASSR and to describe the test results.
SY10.2
PRESBYCUSIS INVESTIGATION AND PREVENTION
STRATEGIES IN CHINA
Li X.L.
Dept. of Otolaryngology, the 1st Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing
Medical University, China
Summary: Based on the population-based statistics from Jiangsu Province in the Second China National Sample Survey
on Disability, this research performed analysis to: 1) the hearing disability incidence in the survey sample; 2) factors leading
to hearing disability; and 3) the current status for preventing
presbycusis.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to discuss the
prevalence and factors of presbycusis, and discuss the rehab
and current surpport policy for them.
SY10.3
Auditory Processing Disorders in the Blue
Mountains Hearing Study – Possible Implications
for Hearing Aid Fittings in an Older Population
P. Newall1,2, Cristina Newall3, David Hartley4, Maryanne Golding4,2,
Paul Mitchell5
1
Renwick Centre/University of Newcastle, Royal Institute for Deaf and
Blind Children, Sydney
2
Centre for Language Sciences, Macquarie University, Sydney
3
Audiology Department, Concord Hospital Sydney
4
National Acoustic Laboratories, Sydney
5
Department of Ophthalmology, University of Sydney
Summary: Results from auditory processing tests carried out on
1576 older adults living in Sydney are described. Some subjects
showed marked dominance in one ear and/or poorer speech
112
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
discrimination on one side. The possible implications for hearing aid fittings in such an older population are discussed.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to describe the
incidence of auditory processing disorders in an older population as indicated by two test procedures, consider the effect
which this may have on hearing aid fittings for individual clients, discuss the implications for hearing aid fitting services.
SY10.4
PHONOLOGICAL AWARENESS IN COCHLEAR IMPLANTED
CHILDREN
B. MIkic.,D. Miric, S. Ostojic.,M. Mikic, N. Arsovic
Institute of ENT&HNS,Clinical Center of Serbia, Belgrade, Serbia
Faculty for Special Education and Rehabilitation, Belgrade, Serbia
Summary: Bimodal stimulation by the use of cochlear implant
and hearing aid could contribute to auditory perception and
phonological awareness due to advantages of binaural hearing. Results of Ling 6 and Global articulation test for Serbian
language have proven that bimodal listening is superior to listening with cochlear implants alone.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to learn the
importance of binaural listening in cochlear implanted, prelingually deaf children.
SY10.5
AN EVIDENCE-BASED REVIEW OF THE BENEFITS OF
COMPUTER-BASED AUDITORY TRAINING (CBAT) FOR
CHILDREN WITH LANGUAGE, LEARNING AND READING
DIFFICULTIES AND WITH AUDITORY PROCESSING DEFICITS
Bamiou Doris-Eva, Loo J., Campbell N., Luxon Linda
(ISVR), (UCL), United Kingdom
Summary: An evidence based review found that FFW and Earobics programmes may improve phonological awareness skills,
but do not seem to have much effect on the language, spelling
and reading skills of children. There is some initial but inconclusive evidence to indicate that computer based auditory training
programmes may also remediate auditory processing deficits.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to understand
the value of computer based auditory training.
FP28.1
ADDRESSING OROPHARYNGEAL DYSPHAGIA POST STROKE
WITH NEUROSTIMULATION INTERVENTIONS:
A PRELIMINARY STUDY
Emilia Michou1, Satish Mistry1, Samantha Jefferson1, Salil Singh1,
Rothwell J. 2, Shaheen Hamdy1
1The University of Manchester, Salford Royal NHS Trust, Stott Lane,
M6 8HD
2Sobell Department of Motor Neuroscience and Movement Disorders,
Institute of Neurology, University College London, Queen Square,
London WC1N 3BG, UK
Summary: The immediate effects of the application of neurostimulation techniques in chronic dysphagic patients with
stable swallowing problems are investigated in a blinded randomised study in terms of cortical excitability and swallowing
performance and safety.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to neurophysiology of swallowing, behavioural effects of neurostimulation.
FP28.2
THE EFFECTS OF TRANSIENT CORTICAL DISRUPTION ON
SWALLOWING PHYSIOLOGY
Humbert I. A.
Johns Hopkins University, United States
Summary: Neurological diseases that disrupt the cortex often
cause delayed pharyngeal swallow onset, yet the cortex’s role
in swallow initiation remains unknown in healthy adults. To examine this directly, we are temporarily disrupting the primary
sensory-motor area (SM1) in healthy adults. Initial results show
delayed onset of isolated pharyngeal swallows with disruption
via TMS as compared to sham swallows.
Learner Outcomes: Participants will be able to explain the
role of temporary disruption of SM1 on swallowing initiation in
healthy adults.
FP28.3
REVERSAL OF A UNILATERAL FOCAL ?VIRTUAL LESION?
ON HUMAN SWALLOWING MOTOR CORTEX BY PAIRED
PERIPHERAL AND CORTICAL STIMULATION: FURTHER
EVIDENCE ON SWALLOWING PERFORMANCE
Michou E.1, Mistry S. 1, Jefferson S. 1, Rothwell J. 2, Hamdy S. 1
1The University of Manchester, Salford Royal NHS Trust, Stott Lane,
M6 8HD
2Sobell Department of Motor Neuroscience and Movement Disorders,
Institute of Neurology, University College London, Queen Square,
London WC1N 3BG, UK.
Summary: In this study, the effects of a novel technique, Paired
Associative Stimulation (PAS), which combines the pharyngeal
electrical stimulation and cortical Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation pulses, after a unilateral virtual lesion are investigated
with a novel behavioural swallowing reaction times task.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to neurophysiology of swallowing, behavioural effects of neurostimulation.
SS03A.1
PHARYNGEAL MIS-SEQUENCING AS A PATHOPHYSIOLOGIC
FEATURE OF DYSPHAGIA: IMPLICATIONS FOR MOTOR
CONTROL, DIAGNOSIS AND REHABILITATION
Huckabee M. L.,Collings A. B.
Van der Veer Institute, University of Canterbury, New Zealand
Summary: This seminar will present a previously unreported
pathophysiologic feature of impaired swallowing: Pharyngeal
mis-sequencing. A case series of four patients will provide a
platform for an analysis of underlying neurophysiology, clinical
presentation, diagnostic sensitivity and possible rehabilitation
approaches and implications. Newly acquired pharyngeal motility normative data will be presented to highlight deviation
from normal swallowing.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to 1. List the
clinical features and underlying neuropathology of pharyngeal
mis-sequencing. 2. Describe the concept of skill training in dysphagia management.
SY09B.1
ADVANCED EDUCATION AND SPECIALIZATION IN SPEECHLANGUAGE PATHOLOGY
Lehtihalmes M.
University of Oulu, Finland
Summary: The education in speech-language pathology (SLP)
has become more harmonized after the work of international
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
scientific and professional committees like IALP and CPOL
and official statements like Bologna declaration. International
evaluation will help to compare the level of doctoral degrees
between the universities. However, due to lack of consensus
concerning the specialization in SLP, these programmes show
enormous variation.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to describe the
variation in specialty education in SLP and explain reasons for
that situation.
FP29.1
STROBOSCOPICAL EXAMINATION WITH
FIBERSCOPE,TRICKS AND PITFALLS
Lindestad P.A.
Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Karolinska
University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden
Summary: There are When problems arise during the stroboscopical examinations it is important to know why. This workshop will concentrate on the following: Rotation of the image,
bad triggering of the vibratory slow motion, unstable voice,
supraglottal structures obstructing the view, vocal fold closure,
pain and gaging.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to perform an
indepentent and qualified stoboscopic examination at specialist level.
FP29.2
MEASURES OF FUNDAMENTAL FREQUENCY AND VOICE
INTENSITY IN MALE-TO-FEMALE TRANSSEXUAL CLIENTS
USING AN AMBULATORY PHONATION MONITOR IN DAILY
LIFE
Sodersten M., Larsson H.,Nygren U., Holmberg E.B.
Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden
Summary: Four male-to-female transsexual clients were recorded using an Ambulatory Phonation Monitor to document
F0 variations in daily life. Preliminary results showed that the
clients spoke with lower F0 as compared to a clinical setting,
and varied F0 depending on communication situations. It was
concluded that APM is useful in voice therapy and for outcome
measures for male-to-female transsexual clients.
Learner Outcomes: The participants will be able to describe
how the Ambulatory Phonation Monitor can be used in clinical work with transsexual (TS) clients. They will also be able to
explain why APM is useful for TS clients.
FP29.3
QUALITATIVE AND QUANTITATIVE ASPECTS OF THE
ELECTROGLOTTOGRAPHY IN SINGERS WITH DIFFERENT
GLOTTIC CONTACT PATTERNS
Cecconello L.A.
Fundacion Iberoamericana de voz cantada y hablada (F.I.V.C.H.),
Cordoba, Argentina
Summary: In this work it has been assessed the efficiency of
the qualitative and quantitative parameters of the electroglottography in the differentiation of singers with different glottic
contact patterns. Utility was found in all the qualitative parameters, and the most significative quantitative parameters were:
Contact quotient, Contact index, Contact quotient perturbation,
113
Contact index perturbation, Closure rate and Opening rate.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to discuss about
the efficiency of the qualitative and quantitative parameters of
the electroglottography to differentiate singers with different
glottic contact patterns -explain the relation between qualitative and quantitative aspects of the electroglottography.
FP29.4
PHONATORY DEVIATION DIAGRAM - PDD IN CLINICAL
VOICE
Pifaia L.R., Madazio G., Behlau Mara
(UNIFESP / CEV), (CEV), Brazil
Summary: This study compared perceptual auditory analysis
with acoustic data using Phonatory Deviation Diagram (PDD),
in 34 dysphonic patients. The results showed a relationship between degree of dysphonia and location on the PDD in pre and
post-vocal therapy. There was a movement towards normality
in the post-therapy condition.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to discuss and
to explain use of Phonatory Deviation Diagram in clinical use.
FP29.5
THE APPLICATION OF ACUPUNCTURE TO DIFFERENT TYPES
OF PHONOTRAUMATIC LESIONS
E. Y.-L. Kwong1, E. M.-L. Yiu1, F. W. Tse2, Z.-X. Lin3
1
Voice Research Laboratory & Center for Communication Disorders,
The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong
2
Hospital Authority, Hong Kong
3
School of Chinese Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong,
Hong Kong
Summary: In this paper, the use of acupuncture for voice disorders will be explained from a Traditional Chinese Medicine
perspective. The methodology and results of a randomized
controlled trial on a standardized acupuncture protocol for different types of phonotraumatic lesions will be described and
discussed. The clinical implications of acupuncture for voice disorders will also be discussed.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to explain the
use of acupuncture for voice disorders from a Traditional Chinese Medicine perspective; and, discuss the treatment effect of
acupuncture for different types of phonoatraumatic lesions.
FP29.6
CHARACTERISTICS OF SINGER’S FORMANT IN
PROFESSIONAL OPERATIC SINGERS VS. PROFESSIONAL
JAZZ SINGERS
DeJonckere P.H.
Utrecht Univ. Catholic Univ. Leuven, Belgium
Summary: The singer’s formant is widely used in western operatic singing, as well for enhancing acoustic power as for esthetic
purposes (‘ring of the voice’). The current study shows that the
singing style and its specific conditions, as electronic amplification, is more important than the level of singing education for
eliciting or not a singer’s formant.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to explain the
acoustic background of the singer’s formant, and to quantify its
magnitude.
114
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
FP30.1
FP30.4
NOUN INFLECTION MORPHOLOGY IN THE GREEK
LANGUAGE. A COMPARISON STUDY OF DYSLEXICS AND
NORMALLY DEVELOPING CHILDREN.
READING COMPREHENSION AND FLUENCY VALUES IN
BRAZILIAN STUDENTS WITH READING COMPLAINTS
Grammenou A.
Greece
Summary: This study describes spelling ability of noun inflections in the Greek language comparing performance of dyslexics (N=30) to chronological age (N=30) and reading age (N=25)
controls, on three different task (identification of orthographic
violation, stress violation, and combined type violation in words,
nonwords and production of these type of errors in a sentence
completion task).
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to describe
dyslexic’s and normally developing children’s profile on spelling noun inflections. The study explains possible restrictions
in cognitive domain which result in dyslexic’s poor spelling of
noun inflections.
FP30.2
THE EXPERIENCE AND IMPACT OF SPEECH IMPAIRMENT IN
CHILDHOOD THROUGH THE EYES OF CHILDREN AND THEIR
FAMILIES
McCormack J., McLeod S., McAllister L., Harrison L.
Charles Sturt University, The University of Queensland, Australia
Summary: The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child recognized all children capable of forming views should have the right
to express those views. This paper reports on 34 interviews with
children with speech impairment and their significant others,
which enabled them to express their views of communication.
Participants described the speech problem, but also a listening
problem and frustration.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to discuss how
children’s perspectives of the experience of speech impairment
can be incorporated into assessment and intervention and - Describe the association between childhood speech impairment
and Activity Limitations and Participation Restrictions.
FP30.3
SPONTANEOUS AND ELICITED NARRATIVES OF CHILDREN
WITH AUTISM SPECTRUM DISORDERS: COMPARATIVE
DATA
Andrianopoulos M.V.,Zaretsky E., Velleman S. L., Boucher M.J.,
Pecora L. Felton J.
MGH Institute of Health Professions
University of Massachusetts Amherst, United States
Summary: This study provides a comparative analysis of narrative abilities in children with Autism Spectrum Disorders compared to neurotypically developing controls. The narratives,
collected under controlled conditions, were analyzed for morphosyntactic structure, lexical variety, and emotional language
(theory of mind, ToM). Word types and lexical variety were most
related to language complexity and ToM in children with ASD.
Learner Outcomes: After completing this session, participants
will be able to discuss various key components of narrative development and identify specific predictors of theory of mind
development. After completing this session, participants will
be able to identify the developmental trajectory of narrative
skills in children with ASD compared to neurotypically developing children matched for age and gender, along lexical, morphosyntactic and emotional language parameters.
Nascimento T.A., Arnaut M.A., Kida A.S.B., Carvalho C.A., Avila CRB
Federal University of Sso Paulo, Brazil
Summary: Poor comprehension abilities are sometimes justified by word recognition deficits and poor values of fluency.
Sixty students, with (Research Group) and without reading complaints, from 3rd to 5th grades (public schools were assessed in
oral and silent readings. The Research Group showed lower fluency and comprehension values and evidence that decoding
deficits may be correlated with reading comprehension ability.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to describe
reading characteristcs of public schools brazilian students and
discuss relations between rate and accuracy values and comprehension in readers with reading complaints.
FP30.5
AUTISM SPECTRUM DISORDERS SCREENING AND
DIAGNOTIC PRACTICES: A SURVEY OF PHYSICIANS
Coufal K.L., Self T., Rajagopalan J.
Wichita State University, United States
Summary: In 2007, the American Academy of Pediatrics issued
a policy statement recommending physicians screen all children for autism spectrum disorders (ASD) two times prior to
their second birthday. The purpose of this survey is to identify
Kansas physicians’ professional training and continuing medical education in the area of ASD, as well as their screening and
diagnostic practices for ASD.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to describe current practices among physicians in one midwest state regarding screening for ASD. discuss how medical school education
and CME prepare physicians to serve the needs of children with
ASD.
FP31.1
METAPHORS IN VOCAL PEDAGOGY: A RESEARCH ON
IMAGERY IN DIFFERENT STYLES OF SINGING
Mariz de Joana Sousa*
Brazil
Summary: This study sought to find out which metaphoric
expressions are most used by a group of 20 singing teachers
to teach vocal resonance, and which are the purposes of their
using metaphors.88,8% were not able to describe what they
wanted to achieve with their metaphors in terms of physiology,
and mixed physiological goals with acoustic sensations or with
musical purposes.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to discuss the
matter of the language used by singing teachers as opposed to
the present scientific environment of voice; on the other hand,
describe a series of scientific facts that help understand why metaphors continue to be a major tool in the teaching of singing.
FP31.2
AN EFFECTIVE VOICE TRAINING PROTOCOL FOR FUTURE
TEACHERS.
Timmermans B., Coveliers Y.,Van Looy L.
(Rits, VUB), (VUB), Belgium
Summary: Looking for a cost-effective voice training for future
teachers. In a first study six hours of group training was given,
in the second study, 30’ individual coaching was added. Twice,
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
a controlled study design and a multidimensional test battery
was used. Significant differences were found for objective measurements only. This outcome favours a systematic voice training for future teachers.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to discuss the
difference between group and indivicual training and participants will be able to design their own effective training program.
FP31.3
COPING STRATEGIES IN VOICE DISORDERS
Oliveira G. Epstein Ruth, Hirani S., Behlau Mara
(UNIFESP / CEV), Speech-language pathology, Brazil
Summary: This paper explores coping strategies of 178 individuals with and without vocal complaint. People with vocal
complaint use a variety of coping strategies, especially problem-focused, to deal with voice problems. Coping appears to
be associated with vocal-perceptual characteristics and some
psychological traits, such as depression, anxiety and locus of
control.
Learner Outcomes: Participants will be able to describe types
of coping strategies; participants will be able to explain non adaptative coping actions.
FP31.4
BODY PAIN RELATED WITH VOICE USAGE IN CLASSICAL
CHORAL SINGERS AND GENERAL POPULATION
Behlau Mara, Guerrieri A.C. Vaiano T. (CEV and ATIVOX)
(UNIFESP / CEV), (CEV and ATIVOX), Brazil
Summary: Using voice on a wrong way may cause pain which
is called odynophonia. This study identified the presence of 13
types of body pain related to voice (larynx proximal ache and
distal ache) in singers and general population. Singers present
less pain than the general population, probably due to proper
training effects.
Learner Outcomes: Participants will be able to discuss the relationship between pain and voice problems; participants will be
able to describe proximal and istal pain in the general population and singers.
FP31.5
115
FP31.6
THE TEACHER’S VOICE: 15 YEAR ANALYSIS OF SLP
CONTRIBUTION TO THE FIELD
M.L. Dragone1, L.P.Ferreira2, S.P. Giannini2,3, M.S.Zenari3, V.P.Vieira4,5,
M. Behlau5
1
UNIARA, São Paulo, Brazil, 2PUC-SP, São Paulo, Brazil, 3USP, São
Paulo, Brazil, 4Cochrane, São Paulo, Brazil, 5CEV, São Paulo, Brazil
Summary: This bibliographical study is a descriptive analysis of
the Brazilian SLP publications related to teacher’s voice, during
the period of 1994-2008. The majority of publications analyzed
were related to voice or working conditions and a smaller percentage to outcomes. While voice assessment has been the focus of Brazilian researches, treatment outcome represents the
recent direction.
Learner Outcomes: Participants will be able to discuss the development of research on teachers’ voice; participants will be
able to describe options for future research.
SS04.1
GENETIC AND ENVIRONMENTAL RISK FACTORS FOR
DEVELOPMENT OF STUTTERING, CLUTTERING AND
CHILDHOOD SPEECH-LANGUAGE DISORDERS
Steen Fibiger1, Corrado Fagnani2, Axel Skytthe3, Jacob v. B. Hjelmborg3
Rehabilitation Centre, Odense, Region of Southern Denmark1
Italian National Institute of Health, Rome, Italy 2
Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark 3
Summary: Based on 35,000 dichotomous answers from twins
on lifetime experience of stuttering, biometric models were created to estimate the heritability of stuttering. The genes seem
to affect liability with an estimated heritability of 0.85. The environmental factors are unique (unshared) components. High
genetic and substantial unique environmental correlations
between childhood speech-language disorders, stuttering and
cluttering were also found.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to discuss the
heritability of stuttering and the environmental factor which
might be of some importance in the development of stuttering. We will describe the importance of primary intervention for
some children and explain why our results give no support for
diagnosogenic hypothesis.
VOCAL ABUSE IN SINGERS, DUE TO PERFORMING
ENVIRONMENT AND LIFESTYLE. A COMPARISON BETWEEN
GREEK ENTERTAINMENT AND GREEK MUSICAL SINGERS’
FP32.1
Prachali A. (Private Practicing)*, Epstein Ruth (speech-language
pathology), Newman S., Hirani S., Greece
Faham M*1, Jalilevand N2, Torabi Nejad3
1* Shyraz University of Medical Sciences (S.U.M.S), Department of
speech-language pathology
2 Iran University of Medical Sciences (I.U.M.S), Department of speechlanguage pathology
3 Iran University of Medical Sciences (I.U.M.S), Department of speechlanguage pathology
Summary: This study was performed in order to describe the
voice problems of Greek singers, and the factors that may contribute to them. It focuses on two particular groups that perform
in different environments and under different circumstances
and discusses the possible effects of working environment and
lifestyle in their voice.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to discuss the
effect of environmental factors and lifestyle in singers.
VOICE PROBLEM AND ITS SYMPTOMS IN ELEMENTARY
SCHOOL TEACHERS
Summary: The aim of this study is to investigating about voice
problems and frequent symptoms in teachers. perceptual and
instrumental assessment were donne. The results show that
24.37% had self-reported voice problems,53.27% of teachers in
perceptual assessment and 68.09% in instrumental assessment
had voice problems. Hoarseness and vocal fatigue were the frequent symptoms.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to discuss
about the voice problems in proffesional voice users and describe the side effects of teaching on voice.
116
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
FP32.2
ogy in the management of motor speech disorders.
COMPARATIVE STUDY OF INTENTION OF TV REPORTERS’
VOICES IN READING TWO NEWS TEXTS WITH DIFFERENT
INTENTIONS
SS06.1
Torres M.L.G.M. (UnB, CEV)*, Behlau B. (UNIFESP, CEV), Brazil
Summary: With two distinct intentions, reporters read two
texts containing editorial and sports semantic content. SLP
and natiuml;ve listeners analyzed intent through auditory perceptual analysis. Acoustic analysis was performed. F0 aspects
of were the most representative. SLP and naïve listeners
accurately identify intent, regardless of content, despite the displacement of acoustic parameters in situations in which intention diverges from content.
Learner Outcomes: DF
FP32.3
REHABILITATION OF VOICE AND SPEECH AT THE
LARINGECTOMY'S
Vasiljevic Snezana1, Pantelic Natasa1, Filipovic Verica1, Savic
Mirjana2, Nikolic Slavka3, Petrovic Jelena4, Savic Marija5, Savic
Vesna5 (student anglistike Faculty, Novi Sad, Serbia)
1
General Hospital Sabac, Serbia
2
Specialist surdology General Hospital Sabac, Sabac, Serbia
3
M.A. Primary School for Children with Damaged Hearing Zemun,
Belgrade, Serbia
4
Specialist surdology DZ, Sabac, Sabac, Serbia
5
student anglistike Faculty, Novi Sad, Serbia
Summary not provided at the time of printing
SS05.1
DELIVERY OF SPEECH-LANGUAGE THERAPY IN
PARKINSON’S DISEASE
J.G. Kalf, B.J.M. de Swart, M. Munneke, B. R. Bloem
Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen, the
Netherlands
Summary: Parkinson’s disease (PD) is known for its highly
prevalent speech and swallowing disorders. Evidence-based
treatment options are available and in the Netherlands speech
therapy for PD patients is supported by a guideline and courses. However, treatment intensity is still less than optimal. This
seminar aims to discuss delivery of SLT for PD patients with an
international audience.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to 1. describe
the treatment delivery of SLT for PD patients in the Netherlands
in comparison with other countries; 2. discuss a realistic future
perspective of SLT delivery for PD patients.
SS05.2
ASSESSING AND TREATING MOTOR SPEECH DISORDERS
VIA TELEREHABILITATION: BENEFITS AND BARRIERS
Theodoros Deborah G.
University of Queensland, Australia
Summary: Telerehabilitation is the delivery of rehabilitation
services at a distance using telecommunications technology.
This seminar will address the benefits and barriers to the use
of telerehabilitation in the assessment and treatment of motor
speech disorders. Essential technology will be discussed. Ways
in which to use telerehabilitation in the management of motor
speech disorders will be highlighted.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to describe the
benefits and barriers to using telerehabilitation as a method of
service delivery and discuss possible ways of using this technol-
AUDITORY BRAIN EVENT-RELATED POTENTIALS (ERPs),
CENTRAL AUDITORY PROCESSING, AND LANGUAGE
DEVELOPMENT IN CHILDREN
E. Jansson-Verkasalo 1 & P. Korpilahti 2
Faculty of Humanities, Logopedics, University of Oulu and Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, Neurocognitive Unit, Oulu University Hospital, Finland, 2 Department of Behavioral Sciences and
Philosophy, University of Turku, Finland
1
Summary: Central auditory processing (CAP) refers to the efficiency and effectiveness by which the central nervous system
utilizes auditory information. Auditory event-related potentials
(ERPs) can be used to investigate CAP. Data concerning CAP,
ERPs, and language development, is scattered. The aim is summarize recent findings on this topic, and to shed light on this
topic by our research results.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to explain what
central auditory processing and auditory event-related potentiasl mean.
SS06.2
ABERRANT AUDITORY AND SPEECH PROCESSING LINKED
WITH DYSLEXIA – A LONGITUDINAL FOLLOW-UP OF BRAIN
RESPONSES
P.H.T. Leppänen 1, J. Hämäläinen 2, T.K. Guttorm 3, 4, M. Torppa 1, A.
Puolakanaho 4, 5, A-M Poikkeus 6, K.M. Eklund 1, P. Lyytinen 2 & H.
Lyytinen1, 2
1
Jyväskylä Longitudinal Study of Dyslexia (JLD), Finnish Center of
Excellence for Learning and Motivation, Department of Psychology,
University of Jyväskylä, University of Jyväskylä, Finland
2
Department of Psychology, University of Jyväskylä, University of
Jyväskylä, Finland
3
Oulu Applied University, Oulu, Finland
4
Agora Center (JyU) and
5
Niilo Mäki Institute, Jyväskylä
6
Department of Education, University of Jyväskylä, Finland.
Summary: Findings from Jyvaskyla Longitudinal Study of Dyslexia (JLD) show that dyslexic children with familial risk show
atypical auditory/speech processing and brain responses (ERPs)
already at infancy, and that infant ERPs are related to later prereading cognitive skills and literacy outcome. Brain responses
also differ at school-age, suggesting persistent developmental
differences in the organization of the neural networks sub-serving speech perception.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to Disuss on
early indicis of language development and dyslexia.
SS06.3
EFFICACY OF AUDITORY TRAINING ON CENTRAL AUDITORY
PROCESSING DISORDER IN CHILDREN WITH SLI
L. Ervast.1, P.H.T. Leppänen 2, K. Heinänen 1, S. Zachau 1, S. Rytky 3,
M. Luotonen 4 & P. Korpilahti 5
Neurocognitive Unit, Logopedics, Faculty of Humanities,
University of Oulu, Finland
2
Department of Psychology, University of Jyväskylä, Finland
3
Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, Oulu University Hospital,
Finland
4
Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Phoniatrics, Oulu
University Hospital, Finland
5
Logopedics, Department of Psychology, University of Turku, Finland
1
Summary: Three SLI-children participated to the intensive com-
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
puter-based auditory training. The performance of the children
was assessed by using behavioral and neurophysiological measurements (event-related potentials (ERPs)). Training effects in
children with SLI can be seen in both durational and frequency
discrimination at the neurofunctional level. The relationship between these neurofunctional changes, language skills and the
behavioral performance will be discussed.
Learner Outcomes: The participants will be able to discuss on
central auditory processing deficits in specific language disorder. Furthermore, they can discuss on possibilities of of intensive training program on central auditory processing disorder.
SE03.1
EARLY INTERVENTION: ORAL PLACEMENT THERAPY FOR
CHILDREN WITH DOWN SYNDROME
ROSENFELD-JOHNSON S. (TalkTools Therapies)*, BAHR D. (Ages
and Stages, LLC)
USA
Summary: Down syndrome (DS) occurs in approximately one in
800 live births. Speech therapists treat infants and toddlers with
DS through early intervention. Historically, language development and social play have been targeted in treatment. Oral
placement therapy used in conjunction with language-based
interventions can facilitate more typical feeding development
and support improved speech clarity.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to identify
characteristics of motorically untreated children with DS, Discuss feeding methods used in OPT, Discuss outcomes of treatment vs. non-treatment.
SE04.1
THE UNITED NATIONS CONVENTION ON THE RIGHTS
OF PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES (UN-CRPD): THE FIRST
HUMAN RIGHTS TREATY OF THE 21ST CENTURY AND
ITS RELEVANCE TO SPEECH-LANGUAGE-HEARING
PROFESSIONALS
Michelle J. Yee, M.A., CCC-SLP, University of San Francisco and
Operations Coordinator for the American Speech-LanguageHearing Association’s (ASHA’s) Asian-Pacific Islander (API) Caucus
Greta Tan, M.A., CCC-SLP, API Caucus Chair of the AmericanSpeech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA)
Rhona Galera, M.S., CCC-SLP, Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh and
University of Pittsburgh
Li-Rong Lilly Cheng, Ph.D., Director of the Confucius Institute at
San Diego State University, Chair of the Asia Desk for the San
Diego World Trade Center, and Chair of the Education Committee
for the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
Kenneth Tom, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, California State University Fullerton,
United States
Summary: The United Nations Convention on the Rights of
Persons with Disabilities (UN-CRPD) is the first legally binding
international instrument on disability. An overview of the UNCRPD will be presented, including the treaty?s guiding principles, seminal approach to disability, and relevance to speechlanguage-hearing professionals.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to (1) Define
and describe at least two features of the UN-CRPD?s seminal
approach to disability (2) Briefly describe an example of how
the UN-CRPD may be used as an advocacy tool on behalf of clients with communicative disorders in countries that have ratified the treaty.
117
SE05.1
UTILIZING CRITERION-REFERENCED ASSESSMENTS AS A
BASELINE FOR NARRATIVE INTERVENTION
Klecan-Aker Joan S, Texas Christian Universtity, United States
Summary: The purpose of the proposed presentation is to discuss the use of criterion-referenced assessment as a baseline for
intervention when teaching children the narrtive genre. The assessment and intervention program will be described in detail.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to 1. use criterion-referenced assessments to demonstrate evidence-based
practice. 2. design an intervention program to improve narrative ability in school-age children with language disabilities.
SE06.1
ACOUSTIC MEASUREMENT OF DYSPHONIA SEVERITY:
INTRODUCING THE ACOUSTIC VOICE QUALITY INDEX
Maryn Y.
Sint-Jan General Hospital, Belgium
Summary: During this seminar, participants will be confronted with findings from our meta-analytic and original research
regarding the acoustic analysis of overall voice quality in sustained vowels as well as continuous speech. Furthermore, a
new method called the ‘Acoustic Voice Quality Index’ (AVQI) will
demonstrated and its relevance in clinical voice assessment will
be discussed.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to (1) discuss
the validity of several popular and less popular acoustic measures, (2) explain the notion of ecological validity in voice quality assessment, (3) explain the method and the outcome of the
Acoustic Voice Quality Index.
SS07.1
VOICES EVALUATION PROTOCOL IN GREEK
Papathanasiou Ilias1*, Protopapas Athanasios (ILSP),
1
TEI Patras, Greece
Summary: Till now, there has been no data on the coustic
properties of voice and speech in Greek. In this seminar we will
present a protocol, its rational and its parameters, that has been
designed to assess a variety of voice and speech in Greek. Normative data for native greek speaking adults will be presented
and discussed.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to describe the
paremeters of the Greek Voice protocol, - will be able to discuss
the rationale and the parmeters of the Greek Voice protocol.
SSY03.1
VOCAL FATIGUE IN TEACHERS
Koloni Elina1*, Pomoni Maria1, Protopapas Athanasios (ILSP,
Greece), Papathanasiou Ilias1
1
TEI Patras, Greece
Summary: The present study investigates the differences on
acoustic parameters of voice in female teachers, as an impact
of voice fatigue. Our result showed increased fundamental frequency in our subjects indicating a growing strain in vocal folds
and the region of the larynx, while increased formants may indicate a different placement of the larynx and articulators as
compensatory startegies.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to decribe the
effects of vocal fatigue on voice. - will able to identify the acoustic parameters of voice related to vocal fatigue.
118
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
SSY03.2
SY11.1
EFFECT OF DEEP BRAIN STIMULATION ON VOICE AND
SPEECH IN PATIENTS WITH PARKINSON’S DISEASE
COMMUNICATION DISORDERS IN MULTICULTURAL
INTERNATIONAL POPULATIONS
Deligiorgi G,1 Lolakidou A,1 Protopapas A,2 Themistocleous M,3
Kasselimis D,4 Boviatsis E,3 & Sakkas D3 & Papathanasiou I,1
1
Department of Speech & Language Therapy, TEI Patras Greece
2
Institute for Language & Speech Processing / Athens, Greece
3
Department of Neurosurgery, Medical School, University of
Athens, Greece
4
Department of Psychology, University of Crete, Greece
Battle Dolores1, Robinson Tommie2, Qualls Constance 1, Wilson
Freda 3, Behlau Mara 4, Grech Helen5
Buffalo State/State University of New York1
Children’s National Medical Center, Washington D.C.2
VisionScope, Inc.3
Center for Voice, Sao Paula Brazil4
University of Malta5
Summary: In the present study, we discuss in detail the acoustic characteristics in relation with articulatory and other cognitive motor executive tasks of speech of eight patients with PD,
before and six months after surgical STN-DBS. treatment.Our
data demonstrate no significant changes in specific speech
parameters in pre- and post-operational PD patients. However,
cognitive tasks related to speech have changed.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to decribe the
acoustic parameters of speech of patients with Parkinson’s Disease - Will be able to explain the changes in speech in patients
with Parkinson’s Disease after treatment with Deep Brain Stimulation.
SSY03.3
VOICES AND SPEECH CHANGES PRE AND POST
MENOPAUSE WOMEN
Papathanasiou Ilias*, Kassimati Alexandra , Gioti Maria ,
Protopapas Athanasios (ILSP), (TEI Patras) Greece
Summary: This study investigates the effects that menopause
has on acoustics characteristics of voice and speech in two
groups of women, one who is premenopause and one post
menopause. Our results confirm findings about changes in the
acoustic properties in post menopause women, but we also report changes in speech characteristics. These is considered as
compensatory mechanisms to voice production.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to describe the
vocal changes in women post menopause, - will be able to discuss the role of hormones in voice production.
Summary: This symposium will present an overview of communication disorders in various parts of the world including the
Middle East and South America as well as an overview of international issues in disorders of fluency, voice, language development, and neurological disorders.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to identify issues impacting the assessment and intervention of communication disorders in various populations throughout the world
and 2) will be able to discuss communication disorders the
impact of communication disorders on various populations
throughout the world.
FP33.1
PROGRESSION OF LINGUISTIC AND OTHER
NEUROPSYCHOLOGICAL DEFICITS IN A PHONOLOGICAL
VARIANT OF PRIMARY PROGRESSIVE APHASIA
N. Ogawa1, Y. Nishio1, M. Takagi1, O. Iizuka1, K. Endo1, 2, E. Mori1
Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai, Japan
2
Tohoku University Hospital, Sendai, Japan
1
Summary: A longitudinal case study of a patient with a progressive loss of phonology with preserved semantic and syntax was presented. These findings provide new opportunities
for assessing neuropsychological, especially language function
in logopenic progressive aphasia that recently proposed as the
third variant of progressive aphasia of degenerative origin following progressive non-fluent aphasia and semantic dementia.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to explain neuropsychological deficits in logopenic progressive aphasia and
discuss the progression.
SE08.1
CENTER OF EXCELLENCE IN EARLY INTERVENTION
FP33.2
Higdon CW, Ivy L., Vaughan L., Moore L.
University of Mississippi, United States
Factors affecting access to care following
traumatic brain injury
Summary: This proposal will explain the development of a
comprehensive plan to establish an Early Intervention Center
of Excellence based on best practices and evidence based research with the Early Intervention population. The presentation
will include a profile of current training needs identified and relevant data to project for future planning. Attendees will receive
an outline of the Center proposal.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to (1) explain
the current research evidence in early intervention. (2) be able
to explain current training needs in early intervention. (3) be
able to develop a Center of Excellence in Early Intervention.
O’Callaghan A. M.
Charles Sturt University, Australia
Summary: Factors affecting adults with TBI and their family
members’ capacity and wish to access services are uncovered.
These factors include: accessing the right service at the right
time, matched expectations, access to support, acceptance and
readiness, and access to advocacy. The importance of considering these factors when planning treatment options for adults
with TBI and their family will be discussed.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to identify factors which impact upon adults abilities to access speech pathology services. Use factors identified to help determine the most
appropriate utilisation of services for adults with TBI.
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
119
FP33.3
FP34.1
EFFECTIVENESS OF A LANGUAGE AND COGNITIVE
STIMULATION PROGRAM FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH MILD
COGNITIVE IMPAIRMENT
PATIENT REPORTED SPEECH AND SWALLOWING OUTCOME
AFTER CHEMORADIATION FOR HEAD AND NECK CANCER
N. Karpathiou1, A. Efthymiou1, E. Dimakopoulou1, C. Nikolaou1, P.
Sakka1, S. Bersimis
Dementia Day Care Centre, Athens Association of Alzheimer’s Disease
and Related Disorders, Athens, Greece
R.N. Rinkel1, I.M. Verdonck-de Leeuw1, J. Buter2, P. Doornaert3, J.A.
Langendijk4, R. de Bree1, C.R. Leemans1
1
Department of Otolaryngology/Head and Neck Surgery, VU
University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
2
Department of Medical Oncology, VU University Medical Center,
Amsterdam, The Netherlands
³ Department of Radiation Oncology, VU University Medical Center,
Amsterdam, The Netherlands
4
Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen
Medical Center, Groningen, The Netherlands
Summary: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a language and cognitive stimulation program
provided to individuals with MCI twice a week for 8 months. The
program was run in a day care center. The intervention group
showed significant improvement in language and visual memory tasks, whereas subjects in the control group remain stable.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to (1) describe
the difference between MCI and Alzheimer disease (2) explain
the goal of intervention in MCI and early Alzheimer disease (3)
discuss about cognitive-linguistic tasks which can be used in
MCI and early Alzheimer disease.
Summary: The aim is to assess the prevalence of patient reported swallowing and speech outcome after chemoradiation
therapy for head and neck cancer.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to describe
speech and swallowing problems in patients after chemoradiation.
FP33.4
FP34.2
FLUENCY RATES FOR NEUROLOGICALLY TYPICAL AND
ATYPICAL ADULTS
İ. Maviş
Anadolu University, DILKOM-Eskişehir, Turkey
Summary: In this study, fluency rates have been determined
for neurologically typical and aphasic individuals. 64 typical individual and 16 aphasics participated in the experiment. Words
per minute and syllables per minute were the parameters by
which fluency rates were measured. Different speech rate ratios
were found for the participant groups.
Learner Outcomes: The learner will think about the differences
in speech fluency in a syllable time language. The learner will
learn if speech rate ratios will be a real distinguisher between
aphasia types in patients speaking Turkish.
FP33.5
Stimulation of auditing verbal perception at
awake craniotomy
Kluzova Maria, Galanda M., Galanda T., Donath V., Bullova J.
Roosevelt University Hospital Banska Bystirca, Slovakia
Summary: Presentation summaries experiences with stimulation of auditing perception during awake craniotomy. During
the time limit dedicated to the stimulation, we found problems
to apply frequent diagnostic methods. Considering this issues
we arranged the system of auditory-verbal incentives for stimulations. We completed and developed this system for indicator
of quantity, and ability to evaluate the status of perception.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to understand
our system of auditory verbal incentives for stimulation of craniotomy performed patients.
SWALLOWING DIFFICULTIES IN PATIENTS WITH DEMENTIA
Sakellariou Victoria1, Matiatou Anna1, Giannika Patricia2,
Sakka Paraskevi2, Papathanasiou Ilias1
1
TEI Patras, Greece, 2Ygeia Hospital
Summary: The aim of this study was to examine the relation
between the type and severity of swallowing impairment with
the cognitive impairment in patient with dementia.Our results
have verified that cognitive impairment, such the one observed
in patients with dementia, does have effect on swallowing ability and functioning, which is direct related to the severity of
cognitive impairment.
Learner Outcomes: The participant - will be able to decribe the
effects of cognitive impiarment in swallowing function. - will
able to identify the type and severity of swallowing disorder in
patients with dementia.
FP34.3
PROSPECTIVE SCREENING FOR PATIENT REPORTED
SPEECH AND SWALLOWING PROBLEMS IN HEAD AND
NECK CANCER PATIENTS VIA A TOUCH SCREEN COMPUTER
ASSISTED DATA COLLECTION SYSTEM
Ingrid C. Cnossen SLP MSc1, Remco de Bree MD PhD1, Rico N.
Rinkel SLP MD1, C. René Leemans MD PhD1, Irma M. Verdonck-de
Leeuw SLP PhD1
1 Department of Otolaryngology / Head and Neck Surgery, VU
University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Summary: Head and neck cancer (HNC) patients often have to
deal with speech and swallowing problems, negatively affecting
health-related quality of life. Before attending the clinician, patient reported speech and swallowing problems are monitored
via OncoQuest, a touch screen computer system, enabling early
detection and if necessary, referral to speech and swallowing
rehabilitation.
Learner Outcomes: After completing the session, participants
will be able to describe how head and neck cancer patients can
be screened by a touch screen computer system (OncoQuest),
linked to the hospital patient information system hospital, enabling early detection and if necessary, referral to speech and
swallowing rehabilitation.
120
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
FP34.4
THE ‘DEGLUTITION HANDICAP INDEX’ A SELFADMINITRATED DYSPHAGIA-SPECIFIC QUALITY OF LIFE
QUESTIONNAIRE: TEMPORAL RELIABILITY
Woisard V.
Voice and deglutition unit ENT department, France
Summary: The aim of this study is to contribute to the psychometric validation of the self-administrated dysphagia-specific
quality of life questionnaire. A test retest performed in an interval of 2 weeks, allowed the measure of the intraclasse correlation coefficient and the limits of agreement. Already validated
in term of content, concurrent and construct validity, is now
validated for temporal reliability.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to describe the
several kinds of dysphagia-specific quality of life questionnaire
and discuss the degree of psychometric validity of each one.
FP34.5
CLINICAL MANAGEMENT OF DYSPHAGIC PATIENTS WITH
KNOWN ASPIRATION OF THIN LIQUIDS
Karagiannis M. JP
West Wimmera Health Service, Australia
Summary: We designed clinical trials to investigate the effects
of oral intake of water in patients with identified aspiration. We
recommend that subacute mobile patients be allowed access
to water after being informed of the risk.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to 1. Safely determine and select appropriate patients or residents for placement on a Free Water Policy using a standardised test.
FP35.1
FEMALE VOICE IN PUBERTY: THE CHANGES OF VOICE PITCH
RANGE AND USUAL SPOKEN PITCH
Yoshioka H.
University of Tsukuba, Japan
Summary: The temporal changes of the voice pitch range and
the fundamental frequency of 98 schoolgirls were assessed, together with a questionaire including the establishment of the
menstrual function. The results indicate that the lowering of the
usual spoken pitch takes place prior to the menarche. As for the
pitch range, temporal narrowing often occurs, followed by the
re-widening.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to explain the
mutation of voice in female is characterized as the temporal
narrowing of he voice pitch range. Therefore, school educators
should pay attention to the possible trouble of female in puberty over the loss of ease in singing high and low tones.
FP35.2
CORRELATION OF VOCAL TRACT CROSS SECTIONAL
PLANES WITH VOICE AND THROAT SYMPTOMS
A. Geneid¹‘², M. Rönkkö¹, R. Voutilainen³, L. Airaksinen³, E. Toskala³,
P. Alku & E. Vilkman¹
¹ Department of Otolaryngology and Phoniatrics, Helsinki University
Central Hospital, Helsinki, Finland.
² Department of Otolaryngology, Suez Canal University Hospital,
Ismailia, Egypt.
³ Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland.
Department of Signal Processing and Acoustics, Helsinki University of
Technology, Espoo, Finland.
Summary: Correlation of vocal tract cross sectional planes
with voice and throat symptoms studied through sound level
controlled voice samples recoreded before and after a placebo
controlled exposure to organic dust through using inverse filtering.
Learner Outcomes: Participants will be able to describe the
possibility of using inverse filtering in developing vocal tract
cross sectional planes and correlating them with voice and
throat symptoms.
FP35.3
VOICE PROBLEMS AND ASSOCIATED DISEASES IN
PROFESSIONAL VOICE USERS
Markowska R., Szkielkowska A., Ratynska J., Wlodarczyk E.,
Skarzynski H.
Institute of Physiology and Pathology of Hearing, Warsaw, Poland
Summary: The research showed that diseases of accompanying voice disorders in professional voice users occur more often
than incidence of chronic diseases in human population. That
means that chronic diseases of people professionally using
their voice may significantly affect voice disorders, which in this
particular group is overloaded.
Learner Outcomes: The aim of this report was to assess frequency of occurrence of the chronic diseases affecting voice
quality in randomly selected group of patiens professionally
using their voice.
FP35.4
THE VOCAL FUNCTION OF THE PATIENTS AFTER
COBLATION MICROSURGERY OF THE LARYNX
V.M. Svistushkin, V.M. Isaev, E.V. Osipenko, D.M. Mustafaev, I.N.
Akhmedov
Moscow regional research clinical institute named after M.F. Vladimirsky, Russian Federation
Summary: The developed technique of endolaryngeal microsurgery with the application of Coblation surgery in the treatment of benign lesion in the larynx allows improving the results
of the vocal function. These results are evident in the statistically authentic improvement of the data of the acoustic indicators
of a voice in comparison with the tool and laser methods.
Learner Outcomes: The learner will be able to understand how
to estimate the vocal function of the patients suffered from the
benign lesion in the larynx before and after coblation microsurgery of the larynx.
FP35.5
THE DETERMINATION OF THE TYPE OF THE HUMAN VOICE
ON THE BASIS OF THE LUNG FUNCTIONAL DIAGNOSTIC
TESTS AND OF THE BASIS OF THE VOLUME OF THE LARYNX,
THE TRACHEA AND BIG BRONCHIAL TUBES
Sumerags Dins
Paul Stradins Clinical University Hospital, Riga, Latvia, Latvia
Summary: The aim of the research is to determine the type of
the human voice on the basis of differences in the measurements of the lung functional diagnostic tests’ FVC, PEF, larynx
length, diameter and volume, volume of larynx, the trachea and
the big bronchial tubes together of different vocal groups.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to Knowledge
about determination of voice types.
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
SY12.1
SY12.5
MARKETING OUR PROFESSIONS: CHANGING STRATEGIES
- MARKETING AND NEGOTIATING FROM ONE YEAR TO
ANOTHER
MARKETING OUR PROFESSIONS: A Framework for
Discussion
Kjaer B.
Funen Speech-Language-Hearing Rehabilitation Center, Denmark
Summary: Marketing and public relations should always be
a part of our strategic plan. In this interactive session, participants will explore strategies for increasing the visibility of what
we do, and how we can work together to reach out to those
who need our services.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to 1. Understand the role of economics in any clinical decision.
SY12.2
MARKETING OUR PROFESSIONS: FACILITATING GLOBAL
OUTREACH AND CULTURAL COMPETENCY
Tullos D.
Harding University,United States
Summary: Marketing and public relations should always be
a part of our strategic plan. In this interactive session, participants will explore strategies for increasing the visibility of what
we do, and how we can work together to reach out to those
who need our services.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to 1. Examine
the uniqueness of their own programs.
SY12.3
MARKETING OUR PROFESSIONS: EXPLORING A
MULTIDISCIPLINARY APPROACH: ONE UNIQUE SYSTEM
Kalf J.G.
Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen Centre
of Evidence-Based Practice, Department of Rehabilitation/Speech
Pathology, Netherlands
Summary: Marketing and public relations should always be
a part of our strategic plan. In this interactive session, participants will explore strategies for increasing the visibility of what
we do, and how we can work together to reach out to those
who need our services.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to 1. Discuss
the value of regional multidisciplinary cooperation between
parkinsonian patients, allied health professionals and neurologists.
SY12.4
MARKETING OUR PROFESSIONS: CREATING A GLOBALLYCONNECTED ENVIRONMENT: HOW WE CAN WORK
TOGETHER
Coufal K.L.
Wichita State University, United States
Summary: Marketing and public relations should always be
a part of our strategic plan. In this interactive session, participants will explore strategies for increasing the visibility of what
we do, and how we can work together to reach out to those
who need our services.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to 1. Synthesize the major points made by the presenters.
121
Goldberg L.
Wichita State University, United States
Summary: Marketing our practice, professions, and organizations involves what we do and know best communication.
Marketing and public relations should always be a part of our
strategic plan. In this interactive session, participants will explore strategies for increasing the visibility of what we do, and
how we can work together to reach out to those who need our
services.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to 1. Discuss
the importance of marketing and public relations strategies.
SY12.6
INCREASING INTER-PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION: THE
CLARION EXAMPLE
Goldberg L.
Wichita State University, United States
Summary: During a recent 12-day on-line interactive Health
Professionals Global Network forum, discussions focused on
the importance of increasing inter-professional collaboration
and education. Almost 1,000 professionals from 100 countries
participated in this on-line forum.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to appreciate
the issues that are involved in establishing inter-professional
education, Understand the nuances of the issues involved in establishing inter-professional education, and Critically appraise
the CLARION initiative for future application.
SE09.1
TREATMENT OF CHILDREN WITH SPEECH ORAL
PLACEMENT DISORDERS (OPDS): A PARADIGM EMERGES
(BAHR & ROSENFELD-JOHNSON, IN PRESS)
Bahr D. (Ages and Stages, LLC), Rosenfeld-Johnson S. (TalkTools
Therapies)
United States
Summary: This seminar is designed to stimulate an international idea exchange regarding a treatment paradigm to expand and refine the Speech Disorders Classification System diagnostic model. Children with speech oral placement disorders,
speech oral placement therapies, motor learning theories, oral
motor treatment (beyond non-speech oral exercise), and the
crucial need for appropriately designed, systematic research
will be explored.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to 1. identify
and describe children who have speech oral placement disorders (OPDs, a new term suggested by the authors), 2. identify
current types of speech oral placement therapy (OPT, Rosenfeld-Johnson, 2009) used to treat children with OPDs, 3. discuss
the relationship of OPT to motor learning theories and oral motor treatment, 4. problem solve the initiation of processes to
resolve the critical need for appropriately designed, systematic
research on OPT.
122
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
SS08.1
SE11.1
LANGUAGE INTERVENTION TECHNICIANS A SOLUTION TO
THE GLOBAL PAUCITY OF SPEECH-LANGUAGE PATHOLOGY
SERVICES
NARRATIVE LANGUAGE SKILLS OF BILINGUAL CHILDREN:
THE BLLP PROJECT
Hus Y.
College Marie-Victorin, Canada
Summary: A Quebec one year college program graduating
Language Intervention Technicians, a complementary service
to Speech-language pathology (SLP), is an economic and viable
solution to a global shortage of SLPs, especially in remote and
developing regions. The seminar will advocate the establishment of such programs to help alleviate the suffering of families
whose children are deprived of adequate SLP services.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to describe the
language intervention technician’s comprehensive knowledgebase, and practice requirements, designed to provide, under
the auspices of qualified SLPs, quality services to affected children and their families, and be prepared to advocate for educating such professionals in their own regions.
SS09.1
WHAT CAN YOU DO WITH A COMPUTER FOR AAC AND
LITERACY
McCain P.
Sunny Days Incorporated, United States
Summary: Many programs have minimal funds and often feel
they have no possibility for a system. This presentation will demonstrate ways that a computer and software such as PowerPoint
and Microsoft Word with access to the Internet can become the
AAC communication system you need and support literacy.
Learner Outcomes: After completing this session, participants
will be able to discuss ways to use their computers to develop
AAC and literacy programs for their clients. After completing
this session, participants will be able to explain and describe
possible software and ways to use it for AAC programming. After completing this session, participants will be able to provide
students with a computer based AAC system.
SE10.1
EMBEDDING EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE: WHAT ARE THE
IMPLICATIONS FOR SLT PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION AND
TRAINING?
Roddam Hazel, Skeat J., Leslie P., McCurtin A., Citro R.
University of Central Lancashire, Murdoch Childrens Research
Institute, University of Pittsburg, University of Limerick, United
Kingdom, Federazione Logopedisti Italiani, Italy
Summary: For EBP to become embedded as a fundamental
strand of our professional identity there are inherent implications for both pre-registration education and for continuing
professional development. Every SLT needs to be able to identify their own skills gaps and training needs for EBP, as well as
to be more aware of the factors that influence their clinical decision-making processes.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to identify relevant strategies that may support the embedding of EBP in SLT
education and training.
Iglesias A., Miller J., Rojas R., Nockerts A.
Temple University, University of Wisconsin, SALT Software, United
States
Summary: In the last decade, researchers and practitioners
have shown a great deal of interest in the narrative skills of sequential bilinguals. This seminar will present information on the
findings and lessons learned from our multi-year project on the
oral and written narrative skills of bilingual (Spanish-English)
and monolingual (Spanish) children in the United States.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to 1. Describe
protocol for eliciting, transcribing, and coding narratives from
bilingual children. 2. Identify valid measures for the assessment
of narratives in bilingual populations. 3. Discuss advantages
and disadvantages of bilingual databases. 4. Discuss the heterogeneity of the bilingual population. 5. Describe and explain
the developmental trajectory of language skills in the bilingual
population.
SE12.1
EVOLUTION OF EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE: LESSONS
LEARNED FROM LSVT LOUD
Ramig Lorraine, Fox Cynthia
Department of Speech, Language, Hearing Sciences, University of
Colorado, Boulder, National Center for Voice and Speech, a division of
the University of Colorado, Boulder, United States
Summary: Evidenced-based practice is at the forefront of clinical practice. LSVT LOUD is the speech treatment with Level 1
evidence for Parkinson disease. This presentation will describe
phases of treatment research from efficacy to effectiveness of
LSVT LOUD, discuss challenges of treatment research, and demonstrate insights treatment efficacy research can provide into
mechanisms of change and pathophysiology of speech disorders.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to 1) discuss
the five phases of treatment research, 2) explain the progression of LSVT LOUD through these phases, 3) summarize key
challenges and considerations when conducting behavioral
speech treatment research, and 4) review the clinical discovery
that occurred and expansion of our understanding of Parkinson
disease and motor speech disorders as a result of this work.
SY13.1
THE SOCIAL CONSTRUCTION OF COMMUNICATION
DISORDERS: AN EXAMPLE FROM ANCIENT GREECE
Duchan Judith
State University of New York at Buffalo, United States
Summary: Ancient Greeks recognized communication disorders, but in ways different from today. Their religion and theories about the body framed their ideas about communication
breakdown. This paper examines how the beliefs of ancient
Greeks influenced their ideas of communication and its disorders. The aim is to illustrate how communication disorders have
been socially constructed, both then and now.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to describe
how religion and its associated rituals offered ancient Greeks
a way of treating people with communication disorders. Participants will be able to discuss how humor theory served as
a social construction of communication disorders in ancient
Greece. Participants will be able to argue that today’s versions
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
of communication disorders, like those of the past, are socially
constructed.
SY13.2
LOGOS, VERBAL AND WRITTEN: A CONCISE APPROACH
Kalomoiris George
Hellenic-American Educational Foundation, Psychico College, Greece
Summary: We shall see how a fragment of poetry written in
the 6th century b.C can be read differentially to reveal its true
meaning and beauty just like symptoms must be differentially
interpreted if we are to reach a solid clinical conclusion.
Learner Outcomes: The participants will be able to understand
how can a fragment of Greek Ancient Poetry can be read and
differentially reveal its true meaning and beauty.
SY13.3
HERITABILITY OF DISABILITY TO READ SUBTITLES - 33,000
ADULT TWINS SELF-REPORTED THEIR DISABILITY WITH A
DICHOTOMOUS ANSWER
Steen Fibiger1, Jacob v. B. Hjelmborg2, Axel Skytthe2, Corrado Fagnani3
Rehabilitation Centre, Odense, Region of Southern Denmark1
123
Summary: This study investigates the long-term academic and
linguistic outcomes of young adults who had presented specific developmental language disorders (SDLD) in childhood.
This group’s performance is compared to that of peers who
had presented other psychopathologies in childhood. Results
show that both groups have persistent linguistic or academic
difficulties, with the SDLD group showing lower performance
in all measures.
Learner Outcomes: Become aware of the persistent academic
and linguistic difficulties of young adults with specific developmental language disorders, as well as those with other psychopathologies, thus taking these long-term outcomes into account when planning remediation procedures.
SE13.1
CONSTRUCTIVIST/PLAY BASED PROGRAMS: HOW THEY
WORK AND PROBLEMS WITH PROVING EFFECTIVENESS
Torres I.G.1, Bukhman V1, Westby C, Rodriguz Garcia L, de las Heras
Minguez3, Calvo J. A .
1
HASC, Brooklyn, NY, USA
2
Bilingual Multicultural Services, New Mexico, USA
3
UCLM Talavera, Spain
4
Exposito
Summary: Based on 33,000 dichotomous answers from Danish
twins on difficulties in reading subtitles on TV, biometric models
were created to estimate the heritability of reading difficulties.
The genes were additive, and the same genes seem to affect
liability in males and females with an estimated heritability of
0.63. The environmental factors are unique (unshared) components, specific to an individual.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to discuss the
heritability of reading difficulties and the environmental factor
which might be of some importance for reading difficulties and
to describe the importance of intervention for children at risk
for developing difficulties with their reading ability.
Summary: Seminar will discuss special education programs
from the US and Spain that utilize Constructivist and/or Play
approaches to improve language and literacy outcomes in
children of various ages and diagnoses. After presentation of
the program features and outcomes, the research difficulties in
evaluating such programs and suggestions for replicating research and programs will be discussed. Practical solutions will
be offered.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to 1.describe
4 different Constructivist/play based intervention programs
for different ages and populations. 2. Discuss the research outcomes of these programs. 3. Explain the theoretical basis for the
programs. 4. Describe the role of teacher/parent training in the
effectiveness of these programs. 5. Identify and discuss various
research problems in intervention programs.
SY13.4
SE14.1
Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark2
Italian National Institute of Health, Rome, Italy 3
QUALITY OF LIFE OF CHILDREN WITH SPECIFIC
DEVELOPMENTAL LANGUAGE DISORDERS: PARENTS’
ESTIMATES
Rotsika V., Vlassopoulos M., Ginieri-Coccossis M.
University of Athens, Greece
Summary: Quality of life is investigated in 50 parents of children
with specific developmental language impairments through
the WHOQOL-BREF questionnaire and the ΚΙΝDLR questionnaire for their children. Measures include emotional well-being,
self-esteem, and social functionning. Compared to the general
population, participants report lower measures for themselves
on all dimensions and lower measures for their children in emotional well-being and social funcioning.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to include quality of life measures when investigating the general functionning
of children with specific developmental language disorders.
SY13.5
LINGUISTIC AND ACADEMIC SKILLS OF YOUNG ADULTS
WITH LANGUAGE OR OTHER DISORDERS IN CHILDHOOD
SENI M., Vlassopoulos M., Rotsika V., Sakellariou A., Yannakis R.
University of Athens, Greece
(C)APD MANAGEMENT: HOW TO CREATE STRATEGIES FOR
AUDITORY TRAINING
Gielow I., gielow I.*, Carvalho L.R.L, Couto M.I.V., Lichtig I.
UNIFESP/CEV, Brazil
Summary: The auditory training consists in intensive experiences to improve the auditory abilities, allowing the processes
and skills involved to become stronger and to develop compensatory mechanisms. Based on theoretic fundamentals and
using softwares and simple resources, the creation of monotic
and dichotic strategies will be demonstrated, correlating them
to its clinical application and considering the patient’s context
and settings.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to create
monotic and dichotic strategies for central auditory stimulation, considering the patient’s auditory abilities deficits and his
or her field of interests, and to correlate the auditory strategies
to metalinguistic and metacognitive activities.
SSY04.1
DIFFICULTIES IN CENTRAL AUDITORY PROCESSING
AND NAMING ABILITY REMAIN UP TO SCHOOL-AGE IN
CHILDREN BORN PRETERM
124
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
Jansson-Verkasalo E., Haverinen S., Suominen K., Valkama A-M
University of Oulu, University of Oulu, Logopedics and Oulu University
Hospital, Neurocognitive Unit, Oulu, Finland
Summary: Prematurely born children have deficits in central
auditory processing (CAP) and language development early in
life. The main aim of the present study was to investigate CAP
and naming ability at school-age. The preliminary results suggest that deficits in CAP and in naming sustain, and may partly
explain learning difficulties in children born prematurely with
very low birth weight.
Learner Outcomes: After completing this session the participants will become aware of the possible association between
the deficits in central auditory processing and weak naming
skills in prematurely born children.
SSY04.2
LANGUAGE SKILLS OF THE PREMATURELY BORN VERYLOW-BIRTH-WEIGHT CHILDREN AT THE END OF THE
SECOND YEAR - FOCUS ON SPONTANEOUS SPEECH AND
ON THE EMERGENCE OF GRAMMAR
Stolt S., Lehtonen L., Haataja L ., Lapinleimu H.
PIPARI Study Group (Turku University Hospital), Finland
Summary: Word and inflectional types used by 32 very-lowbirth-weight (VLBW) and 35 full-term children at 1;6 and at 2;0
in a videotaped interactions were analysed and compared. The
Communicative Development Inventory was used to collect the
data of grammatical development, and the language skills were
assessed using a test. The most significant differences between
the groups were detected at 2,0.
Learner Outcomes: After completing this session, participants
will become aware of the most significant differences in the
spontaneous speech between the groups of the VLBW and fullterm children at the end of the second year.
SSY04.3
LANGUAGE SKILLS OF FINNISH-SPEAKING PRETERM
SINGLETONS AT THE CORRECTED AGE OF TWO YEARS OUTCOME AFTER CLINICAL TRIALS DURING NEONATAL
INTENSIVE CARE
Yliherva A., Kuukasjarvi L., Ylisuvanto M., Peltoniemi O.M.
Faculty of Humanities, Logopedics, University of Oulu, Oulu,
University of Oulu, Finland
Summary: Language skills of preterm children at two
years of corrected age were assessed after clinical trials
(Hydrocortisone=HC, Antenatal corticosteroids=ANC). According to the results HC and ANC treatments did not have an effect
on language outcome at two years of age. Instead language
skills of the total group of HC (incl. placebo treated) children
differed significantly from the full-term children.
Learner Outcomes: After completing this session, participants
will be able 1) to learn about the possible long-term effect of
medical treatments during neonatal intensive care on preterm
children?s later neurodevelopmental outcome such as language skills, and 2) to understand the consequences of the degree of prematurity on language skills.
SS10.1
SPEECH UNDER THREE: BUT I CAN’T UNDERSTAND HER
McCain P.
Sunny Days Incorporated, United States
Summary: Parents whose children are involved in early intervention often are very concerned that they cannot understand
their children even though speech is developing. To make early
intervention effective for these families a program that helps
the family to learn how to encourage speech development as
well as better sound production through simple changes and
sound play.
Learner Outcomes: After completing this session, participants
will be able to discuss the how using simple sound practice in
play improves speech intelligibility. After completing this session, participants will be able to explain and describe ideas they
could use with families that have youngster that are difficult to
understand. After completing this session, participants will be
able to provide youngsters and families with early intervention
skills that will assist their youngster in developing both speech
and improved sound production.
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
125
THURSDAY 26/8/2010
MR03
AUTISM – DEVELOPMENTAL APPROACHES TO
UNDERSTANDING AND TREATING AUTISM
Tony Charman
UK
Over the past decade our understanding of early social communication development in young children with autism has
undergone a remarkable change. We now know something
about how young children with autism process the social world
in a very different way from typical children. This has led to
truly developmental models of autism. In turn, these have had
profound impacts on research and practice. Several screening
instruments to prospectively identify autism have been developed. In some cases autism can be diagnosed in children as
young as 2 years of age. The study of ‘high-risk’ siblings has allowed prospective study of infants from as young as 6 months
of age. There is increasing evidence that intervention approaches that focus on social and communication development can
ameliorate symptoms and change the developmental course of
the disorder. This article will highlight some of the key theoretical and clinical lessons learned from this decade of research.
Main Presenter
Tony Charman, PhD
Chair in Autism Education, Department of Psychology and Human
Development,
Institute of Education, London, United Kingdom
Discussants
Herbert Roeyers, PhD
Ghent University, Department of Experimental Clinical and Health
Psychology
Developmental Disorders, Ghent, Belgium
Ioannis Vogindroukas, PhD
Child Psychiatry Unit, Psychiatric Hospital, Thessaloniki, Greece
FP36.1
FONMEDIA, A COMPUTER PROGRAM AND DATABASE FOR
PATIENT RECORDINGS
Larsson H.
Karolinska Institutet, Sweden
Summary: A database program, called Fonmedia, facilitating
patient recordings and play-back of patient sound- and video
recordings was developed. The program can work both on a
single PC and server-based for a clinic. A click on the recording date plays the video or the sound file. The basic module of
Fonmedia is freeware.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to understand
how simple and practical a database program can be to use.
The importance of document the clinical results.
FP36.2
ACOUSTIC, SPECTRAL, TEMPORAL, AND SPEECH
CHARACTERISTICS IN YOUNG CHILDREN WITH AUTISM
Andrianopoulos M.V.,Velleman S. L., Boucher M.J., Pecora L.
University of Massachusetts Amherst, MGH Institute of Health
Professions, United States
Summary: This study compared the prosodic characteristics of spontaneous speech of children with autism spectrum
disorders (ASD) versus neurotypically developing children. A
standardized objective voice protocol was administered under
controlled conditions to ensure reliability and validity. Results
indicate that rate, pitch, formants, and levels of variability differentiate the two groups.
Learner Outcomes: After completing this session, participants
will be able to discuss the key components of a comprehensive
acoustic and prosodic speech evaluation, such as formants,
pitch, and spectral speech characteristics. After completing
this session, participants will be able to identify acoustic, prosodic and temporal characteristics of the speech patterns noted in young children with ASD compared to age- and gendermatched neurotypically developing children.
FP36.3
NUMERICAL DESCRIPTION OF THE VOICE RANGE PROFILE
BY VOCAL EXTENT MEASURE
Nawka T., Charite Universitatsmedizin Berlin, Moller Andreas,
University of Applied Sciences, Stralsund, Germany
Summary: The numerical description of the voice range profile
by the vocal extent measure (VEM).
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to understand
the necessity of registering the voice range profile; interpret numerical data of voice examination.
FP36.4
ACOUSTIC ANALYSIS OF SUBSTITUTION VOICES :
DIFFERENTIATION BETWEEN TRACHEO-ESOPHAGEAL
VOICES AND VOICING WITH A VOICE-PRODUCING
ELEMENT
M.Moerman1,2, L.Wiersma1, J.P.Martens3, P.H.Dejonckere1
1
Institute of Phoniatrics, Utrecht University, the Netherlands
2
AZ Maria Middelares and Jan Palfijn, Ghent, Belgium
3
Electronics and Information Systems Department, Ghent University,
Belgium
Summary: An alternative acoustic analysis program (AMPEX)
was used to analyse two varieties of substitution voices in 17
female laryngectomised patients. This program seems to accurately differentiate between tracheo-esophageal speech and
speech with a voice-producing element. However, diplophonia
may trouble the outcome.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to explain the
difficulties in analysing severe deviant voicing.
FP36.5
LARYNGOTOPOGRAPH FOR HIGH-SPEED DIGITAL IMAGES
OF NORMAL AND PATHOLOGICAL VOCAL FOLD VIBRATORY
PATTERNS
Sakakibara K.-I., Imagawa H., Yokonishi H., Tayama N.
Health Science University of Hokkaido, University of Tokyo,
International Medical Center of Japan, Japan
Summary: In this study, we present the laryngotopographic
method which is a new method to analyze the high-speed images of the vocal fold vibrations and report the results of modal-analysis of normal and pathological vocal fold vibratory patterns by the laryngotophgraph.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to understand
the detailed profile of normal and pathological vocal fold vibratory patterns.
126
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
FP36.6
FP37.3
EMOTION AND VOICE: ACOUSTICS AND
ELECTROGLOTTOGRAPHIC CHARACTERISTICS
EFFECTS OF COMPUTERIZED ANOMIA TREATMENT FOR
PERSONS WITH APHASIA: A PRELIMINARY INVESTIGATION
L.A. Cecconello1, M.E. Dajer2, N. Golub1, M. Becerra1
1
Fundación Iberoamericana de voz cantada y hablada (F.I.V.C.H.),
Córdoba, Argentina
2
Universidad de São Paulo- Escola de Engenharia de São Carlos, USPEESC,São Carlos- SP- Brazil
Corwin M., Wells M., Koul R., Dembowski J.
Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, The Transitional
Learning Center of Lubbock, United States
Summary: The aims of the study was provide an acoustic characterization of seven emotional voices and find out whether
there are acoustic features distinguishing different vocal emotional states. However individual variability in the data set was
large; the seven emotional inflections can be characterized by
specific acoustic profiles, differentiating that emotional meaning from all others.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to describe
the acoustic and electroglottographic characteristics in seven
emotional voices -discuss about the influence of the emotional
states in the vocal quality.
Summary: Individuals with aphasia often exhibit expressive
word-finding difficulties, or anomia. This study proposed to create an anomia treatment program from commercially-available
computer software, determine effects of this treatment during
confrontational naming tasks, and determine if participants experienced satisfaction with the treatment. Results were promising for improved confrontational naming at the single word
level and participant satisfaction with the treatment.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to 1. Describe
a set of commercially-available computer treatment programs
for anomia in persons with aphasia. 2. Identify a potential treatment program for improving confrontational naming in persons with aphasia.
FP37.1
FP37.4
AUDITORY PROCESSING DEFICITS AND DISABILITIES IN
PATIENTS WITH STROKE OF THE CENTRAL AUDITORY
PATHWAY
APHASIA AND COMMUNICATION BY MEANS OF CONTEXT
BASED HAND HELD COMMUNICATION BOOK
Bamiou Doris-Eva, Cox Karen, Stevens John, Brown Martin, Luxon
Linda
(UCL), (NHNN), United Kingdom
Summary: Patients with a focal ischemic lesion of the central
auditory pathway report significantly greater difficulties with a
range of perceptual auditory abilities than age- and hearingmatched normal controls. It is important to consider and evaluate auditory processing in these patients and to appreciate that
it is not just peripheral loss which may yield auditory difficulties.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to understand
the importance to consider and evaluate auditory processing in
the patient with a lesion of the auditory brain and to appreciate that it is not just peripheral loss which may yield auditory
difficulties.
FP37.2
THE EFFECTS OF LOW FREQUENCY REPETITIVE
TRANSCRANIAL MAGNETIC STIMULATION (rTMS) AND
SHAM CONDITION rTMS ON BEHAVIOURAL LANGUAGE
AND NEUROPHYSIOLOGICAL MEASURES IN CHRONIC NONFLUENT APHASIA: CASE STUDY EVIDENCE
Barwood C.H.S, Murdoch Bruce E., Riek S., Lloyd D O’Sullivan J,
Wong A.,
University of Queensland, Australia
Summary: This presentation provides information regarding
the techniques and methods involved in administering repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) to neurologically
impaired populations e.g. left hemisphere stroke population.
Longitudinal data collection informs evidence regarding the
the short and long term outcomes and effects of rTMS on behavioural language and neurophysiology, as well as considerations and recommedations for future rTMS research.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to discuss theories of how rTMS induces neuromodulation of language in nonfluent aphasia, Explain the significance of using neuronavigational techniques in TMS research, Discuss the ethical considerations of stimulating language impaired patients, Describe the
limitations of current rTMS research on aphasic populations.
Myhlendorph Lone (Taleinstituttet)*, Kirkegaard Christian
(C-Innovation)
Denmark
Summary: A review of the empirical results from speech and
language training of persons with aphasia and their direct communication using a context based virtual graphic environment
that provides a simple, delimited and yet individually tailored
access to words and phrases, presented via simple or electronic
handheld communicationbooks.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to a deper perspective on how to use a virtual graphic enviroment in creating dynamic communication books and the practical use of the
methode in speech training.
FP37.5
A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW OF COMMUNICATION PARTNER
TRAINING IN APHASIA: CLINICAL RECOMMENDATIONS
L. R. Cherney1,2, N. Simmons-Mackie3, A.M. Raymer4, E. Armstrong5,
A. L. Holland6
1
Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, Chicago, USA
2
Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, USA
3
Southeastern Louisiana University, Hammond, USA
4
Old Dominion University, Norfolk, USA
5
Edith Cowan University, Perth, Australia
6
University of Arizona, Tucson, USA
Summary: We summarize procedures, results and clinical recommendations of a systematic review of the literature on communication partner training in aphasia. Counseling and educational approaches had insufficient data to support clinical
recommendations. Direct communication training of partners
may be effective for improving both partner use of positive
communication strategies and the communication of adults
with aphasia during conversations with trained partners.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to describe the
procedures of a systematic review of communication partner
training in aphasia; discuss recommendations for clinical practice
regarding the use of communication partner training in aphasia.
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
127
FP37.6
FP38.1
THE DEVELOPMENT OF A TOOL TO GATHER INFORMATION
REGARDING THE ACTIVITIES AND PARTICIPATION OF
PERSONS WITH APHASIA IN PORTUGAL
DETECTING HEARING LOSS IN PERSONS WITH
INTELLECTUAL DISABILITIES AT THE SPECIAL OLYMPICS
NATIONAL GAMES IN JAPAN
Matos, M.; Jesus, Luis M. T.; Cruice, M.; Allen Gomes, A.
ESSUA, Universidade de Aveiro, Portugal
IEETA, Universidade de Aveiro, Portugal
City University, London, UK
DCE, Universidade de Aveiro, Portugal
H. Itoh1, H. Takeuchi2, K. Nishiwaki3, T. Kojima4, G.R. Herer5,
J.K. Montgomery6
1
Bunkyo Gakuin University, Saitama, Japan
2
Kiso Hospital, Nagano, Japan
3
Nippon Dental University, Tokyo, Japan
4
Shinshu University, Nagano, Japan
5
Children’s National Medical Center, Washington, DC, USA
6
Chapman University, Orange, USA
Summary: The most recent directives on working with people
with aphasia (PWA) propose that Speech and Language Therapists consider in their intervention the effects of a client’s disorder on his/her everyday life. The purpose of this paper is to
present a tool, The Activities/Participation Profile, which allows
clinicians to understand the consequences of stroke and aphasia in the life of PWA.
Learner Outcomes: Participants will be able to discuss the Activities/Participation Profile (TAPP) and define the activities and
participation profile of Portuguese PWA.
SY14A.1
ASSESSING LANGUAGE THERAPY RESULTS IN
ADOLESCENTS OF THE AUTISM SPECTRUM
F.D.M. Fernandes
Department of Physiotherapy, Communication Sciences and
Disorders and Occupational Therapy
School of Medicine. University of São Paulo
Summary: The developmental disorders demand different
consideration of language therapy processes with adolescents
with autism. This presentation discusses the results of two studies with adolescents and the results of language therapy.The results reinforce the notion that, although the early intervention
is the best alternative to autistic children, autistic adolescents
should also be included in language intervention programs.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to describe
the possible intervention outcomes of language therapy with
adolescents with autism and discuss alternatives for language
assessment with adolescents with autism.
Summary: We have administered the Healthy Hearing Screening Program at every National Games. Hearing loss was confirmed in an average of 18.1% (14.2,21%) of the Japanese athletes with intellectual disabilities. Hearing loss that has been
detected in the study population is much higher than the 2%
in a typical population.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to discuss hearing loss of person with intellectual disabilities. Discuss screening system for person with intellectual disabilities.
FP38.2
AUDITORY PROCESSING AND SUBJECTIVE BENEFIT OF
HEARING AID IN ELDERLY USERS
M. C.Guedes 1, A. M. M. A. Alvarez 2, R. Weber 3, B. B. Teles 1; C. M. C.
Bottino 2
1
Centro Universitário São Camilo
2
Old Age Research Group – PROTER - Institute of Psychiatry - Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo.
3
Otolaryngology department - Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade
de São Paulo, Brazil
SUPPORTING STUDENTS WITH AUTISM SPECTRUM
DISORDERS: CHALLENGES AND DIFFICULTIES ON THE
ROAD TO INCLUSION
Summary: The present study evaluated the correlation between the results of central auditory tests and hearing aid use
among elderly individuals. Our results showed that dichotic
procedures are useful in the investigation of alterations in central auditory processing in individuals with peripheral hearing
loss. Thus, moderate correlation was found between results of
dichotic tests and subjective benefit of the hearing aid.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to 1) To know
when (and how) investigate the central auditory processing and
cognitive skills in individuals who have peripheral hearing loss.
2) To understand the need for auditory-cognitive rehabilitation
in old-aged individuals using hearing aid devices.
Sin K. F.
The Hong Kong Institute of Education, Hong Kong
FP38.3
SY14A.2
Summary: Students diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorders are the major group to be included in schools. Research
and studies have identified the characteristics, deficiencies and
strengths of students with ASD. With reference to the education
and services for Autism in China and Hong Kong, the areas of
services, support and research for these students in the regions
will be explored.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to understand
the services and support for students with Austic Spectrum Disorder in Hong Kong and China and recognize the professional
needs for teacher education.
PARENTS’ SUPPORT AND DEVELOPMENT OF NEW
LISTENING SKILLS IN CI PRESCHOOL CHILDREN
Dionissieva K.
South-West University, Blagoevgrad, Bulgaria, Bulgaria
Summary: Children with severe to profound hearing disorders
are offered cochlear implants at very young age. Professionals
in early intervention programs rely on understanding and active support of parents for development of new listening as a
basis for spoken language acquisition. This paper explores how
supportiveness of parents influences the progress in development of auditory skills of CI children.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to describe
parents’ support during intervention and discuss its effect on
listening progress.
128
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
FP38.4
FP39.3
OUTCOMES IN IMPLANTATION OF PATIENTS WITH
PRELINGUAL LONG-TERM DEAFNESS
ENDOSCOPIC DIVERTICULOESOPHAGOSTOMY FOR
ZENKER’S DIVERTICULUM: EFFECTS ON SWAL-QOL AND
CORRELATION OF VIDEOFLUOROSCOPIC MEASUREMENTS
WITH COMPLAINTS CLUSTERS.
Radulescu L. R.
University of Medicine and Pharmacy, “Gr. T. Popa” Iasi, Romania
Summary: In the last years the improvements after cochlear
implantation have improved in spite of the great variability in
outcomes. There are many factors that influence the results
with the cochlear implant in teenagers and young adults with
prelingual deafness. The differences encountered in the same
group are to be evaluated.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to discuss
about the many factors that influence the results with the cochlear implant in teenagers and young adults with prelingual
deafness and about the benefit of an improvement after cochlear implantation for all patients.
FP39.1
EVALUATION OF AN EXERCISE PROTOCOL DURING
RADIOTHERAPY TO PREVENT SPEECH, SWALLOWING AND
SHOULDER PROBLEMS IN POSTOPERATIVE ORAL AND
OROPHARYNGEAL CANCER PATIENTS
Cnossen I.C.
Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, VU
University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Summary: We developed a website and a DVD with speech,
swallowing and shoulder exercises for postoperative patients
treated with radiotherapy for head and neck cancer. The present study investigates the feasibility of postoperative exercising
during six weeks of radiotherapy on patient reported speech
and swallowing outcome and global quality of life, and objectively assessed oral function.
Learner Outcomes: After completing the session and after
demonstration of a website and DVD, participants will have
more insight into the speech and swallowing problems of head
and neck cancer patients and the role of the speech language
pathologist in a disease management approach.
FP39.2
EVALUATION OF THE EFFECTS OF DYSPHAGIA AND
OTHER SYMPTOMS AS THE HERALDS OF RECURRENCE OF
HYPOPHARYNGEAL CANCER
William Wang-yu Su1,2,3, Jenq-Yuh Ko3, Cheng-Ping Wang3, Pei-Jen
Lou3
1
Department of Otolaryngology Head & Neck Surgery, Buddhist Tzu
Chi General Hospital, Taipei Branch, Taipei, Taiwan.
2
Buddhist Tzu Chi University, School of Medicine, Hualien, Taiwan.
3
Department of Otolaryngology, National Taiwan University Hospital
and National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan.
Summary: With analysis the impact of the newly developed
symptoms in the group of recurrent hypopharyngeal cancer,
the participants would be more alert to these heralds of recurrence. Instead of continuing the speech and swallowing therapy, prompt arrangement of check-up by the otolaryngologists
is suggested for definitive diagnosis.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to (1) be familiar with the symptoms that herald the recurrence of hypopharyngeal cancer; (2) be alert and make referral promptly to
shorten the delay in definitive diagnosis.
Vanderwegen J., Van Laer Carl
Antwerp University Hospital, Belgium
Summary: Endoscopic surgical correction through diverticuloesophagostomy of Zenker’s diverticulum restores a significant reduction in swallowing-related quality-of-life, even in advanced age or multiple concomitant medical problems.
Learner Outcomes: This study describes the gain in quality of
life after endoscopic repair of Zenker’s diverticulum.
FP39.4
CORRELATION STUDY BETWEEN ALTERNATING MOTION
RATE AND DURATION OF MOTOR EVENTS OF SWALLOWING
TO LIQUID AND PUDDING CONSISTENCIES
Dias D.A.B., Mourao L.F., Guariento M.E., Barcelos Y.
State University of Campinas (UNICAMP), Brazil
Summary: The aim of this work is correlate measures of alternating motion rate (AMR) and duration of motor events of swallowing to liquid and pudding consistencies in the elderly. The
acquired results allow us to discuss the possibility of variations
in motor agility of tongue interfere in the duration of mechanisms of airway protection.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to describe correlation between alternating motion rate and duration of some
motor events of swallowing and discuss some aspects that can
interfere with the mechanism of swallowing, especially, in motor control.
FP39.5
SELECTING QUALITY INDICATOR FOR INTEGRATED
CARE OF SWALLOWING REHABILITATION PROGRAMS
IN HOSPITAL SETTINGS: A PROPOSAL OF PANEL OF
INDICATORS
Pedroni Danielle Moraes1, Furquim Claudia Regina de Andrade 2
1
Department of Physiotherapy, Communication Science & Disorders,
Occupational Therapy. Hospital of Clinics. Faculty of Medicine.
University of São Paulo. São Paulo, Brazil
2
Department of Physiotherapy, Communication Science & Disorders,
Occupational Therapy. Faculty of Medicine. University of São Paulo
São Paulo, Brazil
Summary: Rehabilitation programs have been required to
show that they could effectively and efficiently meet services
outcome goals. The panel of indicator proposed aimed help the
managers to identify and properly use performance measures
to monitor the status and quality improvement of important
processes developed in Hospital Settings by Speech Therapist
Team.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to discuss regarding to performance outcome measures for swallowing rehabilitation program management.
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
FP39.6
OROPHARYNGEAL SCINTIGRAPHY: INDICATION FOR
ASSESSING THE RISK OF DEVELOPPING PNEUMONITIS IN
SWALLOWING DISORDERS WITH CHRONIC INHALATIONS
S Crestani1, G.Victor2, V. Woisard1
1
CHU Larrey, Toulouse, France
2
CHU Rangueil, Toulouse, France
Summary: The aim of this retrospective study is to assess the
predictive value of of the oropharyngeal or deglutition scintigraphy on the risk of pneumonitis in swallowing disorders.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to explain the
interest of the scintigraphy for deglutition assessment. discuss
the indications of scintigraphy.
FP40.1
PROFILE OF METALINGUISTIC AND READING SKILLS OF
BRAZILIAN STUDENTS FROM 1st to 4th GRADES
V.L.O. Cunha1, S.A. Capellini2.
1
UNESP (Universidade Estadual Paulista Júlio de Mesquita Filho),
Marília, Brazil
2
UNESP (Universidade Estadual Paulista Júlio de Mesquita Filho),
Marília, Brazil
Summary: The present study aimed to verify the profile of Brazilian students from 1st to 4th grades in their metalinguistic and
reading skills. The data showed the performance in all the tests
became gradually superior according to the school level of the
students, being that initial grades use the phonological route
and the last grades, the lexical route.
Learner outcomes: The participant will be able to know the
profile of the metalinguistic and reading skills as well the relationship between these skills in Brazilian studants.
FP40.2
SOCIAL AND EMPLOYMENT INTEGRATION OF
ADOLESCENTS WITH AUTISM: AN EDUCATIONAL
TEACHING PROGRAM MOVING FROM SCHOOL TO
WORKING PLACE
Bovoli A.
E.E.E.E.K., Greece
Summary: This pilot program aims to teach students with autism vocational skills and to apply them in a working practical
experience. This practical experience had 6 months duration
with weekly visits in the working place. For the transition of the
vocational skills from the school environment to the working
place, the principles of Supported Employment and Structured
Teaching were applied.
Learner outcomes: The participant will be able to a) discuss
the outcomes and b)make suggestions for further application.
FP40.3
LEARNING DISORDERS +: FACT OR FICTION? COMORBIDITY
IN LEARNING DISABILITIES
Vanderswalmen R.1, Van Borsel J.2, Desoete A.2
University College Arteveldehogeschool Ghent, Belgium
2
University Ghent, Belgium
1
Summary: Of 121 children with dyslexia 41% only had dyslexia, 30% also had dyscalculia and comorbitdity with ADHD was
found in 33% . There was no significant difference in scores between the children with isolated dyslexia (and no comorbid disorders) and the children with dyslexia and ADHD or dyslexia and
dysalculia, neither on reading, spelling or mathematic tasks.
129
Learner outcomes: The participant will be able to describe
comorbidity in dyslexia, describe the profile of children with
dyslexia compared with children with dyslexia and ADHD or
dyscalculia, enumerate the percentages of comorbidity with
dyslexia.
FP40.4
AN ALTERNATIVE METHOD OF READING «IMAGE-VOICEGRAPHEME»
V. Bougiotopoulou1, A.Andreopoulou2
1
Logopedist, private practice, Athens
2
Logopedist, public practice, Kozani
Summary: Aim: method of teaching children with speech and
language disorders reading.
The Method is based on the theoretical theses of Vygotski, Yegorof, Galperin etc.
It was developed progressively during 10 years through daily
logotherapy practice.
Conclusions:”image-voice-grapheme” method of reading constitutes functional, essential tool, teaching with fun.
Learner outcomes: Describe the stages of reading acquisition
Discuss on the alternative “image-voice-grapheme” reading
method.
FP40.5
THE NEW VENEZUELAN UNDERGRADUATE
CURRICULUM STRATEGY FOR MASSIVE FORMATION ON
PHONOAUDIOLOGY
R. Hernandez Villoria1,2
Instituto Venezolano de la Audición y el Lenguaje, Caracas,
Venezuela
2
Ministerio del Poder Popular para la Salud, Caracas, Venezuela
1
Summary: Venezuela needs increase logopedics professionals
from 1/71.611 to 1/8.148 in a time limit of ten years. In order to
achieve this goal there is an official propose to initiate on 2010 a
curriculum strategy for massive formation. This curriculum covers and exceeds 1995 IALP suggestions on the issue. The strategy could be adapted by countries with similar needs.
Learner outcomes: The participant will be able to appreciate
and discuss a strategy for massive education on speech, language pathology and hearing.
SSY05.1
EVALUATING THE PSYCHOLOGICAL IMPACT OF
STUTTERING
L. Iverach1, S. O’Brian1, S. Block2, R. G. Menzies1, A. Packman1, M.
Onslow1
1
Australian Stuttering Research Centre, The University of Sydney,
Sydney, Australia
2
School of Human Communication Sciences, La Trobe University,
Melbourne, Australia
Summary: The negative consequences associated with stuttering can result in psychological problems. In this study, 92 adults
who stutter were found to demonstrate significantly higher
rates of anxiety, mood and personality disorders than matched
controls. This demonstrates the psychological impact of stuttering, with implications for the assessment and treatment of
anxiety and other mental health disorders among adults who
stutter.
Learner outcomes: The participant will be able to discuss the
130
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
negative psychological impact of stuttering, and describe the
assessment and prevalence of anxiety and other mental health
disorders among adults who stutter.
SSY05.2
MANAGING THE PSYCHOLOGICAL IMPACT OF STUTTERING:
A TREATMENT TRIAL
S. Block1, C. Bryant1, J. Atkins1, R. G. Menzies2,. T. St Clare2, M.
Onslow2, A. Packman2, S. O’Brian2, L. Iverach2
1
School of Human Communication Sciences, La Trobe University,
Melbourne, Australia
2
Australian Stuttering Research Centre, The University of Sydney,
Sydney, Australia
Summary: A relationship between anxiety and stuttering has
been established. In this study, adults who stutter were randomized to receive speech restructuring only or speech restructuring
plus CBT for anxiety. All participants demonstrated significantly
improved fluency post-treatment. Addition of CBT resulted in
reduced anxiety, but did not impact speech outcomes. Further
trials of CBT for adults who stutter are warranted.
Learner outcomes: The participant will be able to consider the
broader aspects of stuttering and its implications for quality of
life, and differentiate between treatment strategies that address
the various needs of individual clients.
SSY05.3
THE PSYCHOLOGICAL IMPACT OF STUTTERING:
IMPLICATIONS FOR TREATMENT OUTCOME AND RELAPSE
L. Iverach1, S. O’Brian1, S. Block2, R. G. Menzies1, A. Packman1, M.
Onslow1
1
Australian Stuttering Research Centre, The University of Sydney,
Sydney, Australia
2
School of Human Communication Sciences, La Trobe University,
Melbourne, Australia
Summary: No previous studies have investigated the impact
of anxiety, mood and personality disorders on stuttering treatment outcomes. In this study, adults who stutter with any anxiety, mood or personality disorder demonstrated poorer treatment outcomes in terms of stuttering severity and avoidance of
speaking situations than adults who stutter with no disorders.
These findings have important implications for relapse prevention.
Learner outcomes: The participant will be able to explain the
impact of anxiety and other mental health disorders on stuttering treatment outcomes for adults who stutter, and discuss the
implications of this for relapse prevention of anxiety management.
SS11.1
THE PHYSIOPATHOLOGICAL BASIS OF DYSLEXIA AS A
GUIDE TO AN INTERDISCIPLINARY INDIVIDUALIZED
APPROACH OF DYSLEXICS
Pinto-De-Almeida A. F.
University Fernando Pessoa, Portugal
Summary: The physiopathological basis of dyslexia includes
factors affecting either the input, processing or the output
when reading difficulties occur. This should be a guide for an
individualized approach of dyslexics - including their evaluation and intervention - within an interdisciplinary team. Some
physiopathological criteria were systematically checked in a
multidisciplinary clinical centre, in order to individualize and
optimize treatment.
Learner outcomes: The participant will be able to recognize
the most important physiopathological patterns of dyslexia
and select more adequate techniques to individualize evaluation and treatment of dyslexics.
FP41.1
VOICE (VRP) AND SPEECH RANGE PROFILE (SRP) IN THE
VOICE CLINIC
Moraes, M.1,2, Behlau, M.1,2
1. Universidade Federal de São Paulo–UNIFESP, Brazil
2. Centro de Estudos da Voz–CEV, Brazil
Summary: This study intends to discuss the use of VRP and SRP
in voice clinics. Three groups were studied: control group, behavioral dysphonia, neurologic dysphonia. VRP was built using
a singing vowel while SRP used counting numbers from 20 to
30. The results showed the possibility to distinguish groups by
semitones in SRP and intensity in VRP.
Learner outcomes: The participant will be able to discuss the
use of VRP and SRP in voice clinic.
FP41.2
CORRELATION BETWEEN VOICE VARIABILITY MEASURES
AND PERCEPTUAL ANALYSIS IN MOTOR SPEECH
DISORDERS, ELDERLY AND YOUTH
Moraes M.1,2, Padovani M.1,2, Madazio G.1,2, Gielow I.1,2, Behlau M.1,2
1.Universidade Federal de São Paulo –UNIFESP, Brazil
2. Centro de Estudos da Voz, Brazil
Summary: To determine the frequency variability and amplitude tremor in neurologic (Parkinson’s disease and essential
voice tremor) and normal subjects (young and elderly) and
to correlate with perceptual auditory analysis on stability. The
perceptual analysis on vocal stability has properly reflected the
acoustic values on tremor measures.
Learner outcomes: The participant will be able to discuss the
use of tremor measures in voice clinics, specially in neurologic
cases.
FP41.3
BENEFITS OF THE FIBER OPTIC VERSUS THE ELECTRET
MICROPHONE IN VOICE AMPLIFICATION
K. Kyriakou, H. Fisher
Nova Southeastern University, Fort Lauderdale, USA
Summary: The study will examine the benefits of the fiber optic versus the electret microphone in terms of performance and
patient satisfaction in the amplification of a patient’s voice with
reduced loudness. Results will indicate that the fiber optic microphone has better performance and patient satisfaction than
the electret microphone. Consequently, patients will more frequently use it and more frequently socialize.
Learner outcomes: The participant will be able to 1. Increase
knowledge about the benefits and weaknesses of the fiber optic and electret microphones in the amplification of a patient’s
voice with reduced loudness. 2. Potentially recommend a microphone to be used with amplification systems in place of or
in combination with skilled training that will enable patients
with reduced loudness to more confidently and frequently be
involved in social situations.
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
FP41.4
QUALITATIVE AND QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS OF VOCAL
DYNAMIC VISUAL PATTERS
M.E. Dajer, F.A. Sobrinho, J.C. Pereira
Electrical Engineering Department -School of Engineering of São Carlos
(EESC), University of São Paulo (USP), São Carlos, São Paulo, Brazil
Summary: The purpose of this paper is to assess and characterize normal and nodules voices using qualitative and quantitative analysis of Vocal Dynamic Visual Pattern (VDVP), acoustic
perturbation measures and perceptual analyzes. VDVP analysis
is based on nonlinear dynamic techniques -Phase Space Reconstruction and Poincare Section - and describes the underlying
dynamic of the vocal system.
Learner outcomes: Participants will be able to give details
about the application of the new techniques. They will be able
to discuss some interesting topics of nonlinear methods and
correlate the relevant issues with others similar researches.
FP41.5
“SINGING LIFE” GALA’S CHORAL – LARYNGECTOMIZED
SUPPORT GROUP
Martins, VB., Santana, MG., Santos, JB., Brito, ES., Sehn, FC., Gadenz,
SD., Sbaraini, L., Macedo, TL., Sperb, D., Fontana, C.
Santa Rita Hospital / Women´s League Against Cancer/RS, Brazil
Summary: The Gala-Laryngectomized Supporting Group,
which aims at global rehabilitation of patients, has used the
group singing (Choral) as a way of training to acquire these individuals new voice.
The maximum phonation time increased slightly and it was
observed the improvement of coordination and dissociation of
pulmonary air.
The singing is good for the laryngectomized and the improvement of their self-esteem.
Learner outcomes: The participant will be able to add knowledge and expand the practical theoretical knowledge.
FP41.6
VOCAL TRACT MORPHOMETRY OF ADULT WOMEN
WITHOUT VOCAL COMPLAINTS: AN MRI STUDY
Rosiane Yamasaki , Mara Behlau , Hélio Yamashita , Osíris de
Oliveira Camponês do Brazil4
1,3,4
Federal University of São Paulo – UNIFESP, São Paulo, Brazil
2
Federal University of São Paulo – UNIFESP, CEV, São Paulo, Brazil
1
2
3
Summary: The objective of this study was to provide a setting of
morphometric variables from the vocal tract of 10 young adult
women without vocal complaints, by means of MRI data, at rest
position. Morphometric variables of the tract were obtained from
the determination of 12 anatomical landmarks and this is likely to
be interesting in further studies with dysphonic patients.
Learner outcomes: The participant will be able to discuss the
theme; discuss about the measurements.
FP42.1
ACOUSTIC AND NEUROMOTOR SPEECH CHARACTERISTICS
OF AUTISM, CHILDHOOD APRAXIA OF SPEECH AND
NEUROTYPICALLY DEVELOPING CHILDREN
Andrianopoulos M.V.*1, Velleman S. L.1, Boucher M.J.1, Perkins J.2,
Pecora L.3, Zaretsky E.1, (USA)
1
University of Massachusetts Amherst, 2California State University,
Northridge CA, 3MGH Institute of Health Professions
Summary: This study compared acoustic and neuromotor char-
131
acteristics of elicited speech of children with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD), children with childhood apraxia of speech
(CAS) and neurotypically developing children (NTD). Results of
a standardized voice and neuromotor speech protocol indicate
atypical voice (shimmer, jitter) and speech (F0, formants, timing) characteristics in children with ASD.
Learner Outcomes: After completing this session, participants will be able to discuss the key components included in
the standardized acoustic and neuromotor speech evaluation.
After completing this session, participants will be able to identify acoustic and neuromotor characteristics of speech found in
children with ASD, CAS and age- and gender-matched neurotypically developing children.
FP42.2
VOICE CHARACTERISTICS IN WOMEN WITH CONGENITAL
ADRENAL HYPERPLASIA DUE TO 21-HYDROXYLASE
DEFICIENCY
U. Nygren1, M. Södersten1, H. Falhammar2, M. Thorén2, K.
Hagenfeldt3, A. Nordenskjöld3
1
Dept of Clinical Sciences, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska
Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden
2
Dept of Endocrinology, Metabolism and Diabetes, Karolinska
University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden
3
Dept of Women and Child Health, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm,
Sweden
Summary: Thirty-eight women with CAH and 24 age-matched
controls participated with the aim to investigate voice characteristics. Women with CAH spoke with significantly lower mean
F0 and darker voice quality as compared to controls. Voices in
women with CAH can be virilized due to late diagnosis or suboptimal treatment with glucocorticoids.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to describe
voice characteristics in women with Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia.
FP42.3
TASK-SPECIFIC RESPONSES IN PATIENTS WITH SPASMODIC
DYSPHONIA
M Kariyasu, N Nishizawa, M Tsuda
Hokkaido Health Sciences University, University Hospital @Sapporocity, JAPAN
Summary: To determine task-specific responses in persons
with spasmodic dysphonia (SD), perceptual evaluation of voice
difficulties was performed for sixteen SD patients. Certain patterns of responses (RT and slow DDK being less difficult than
monologue and fast DDK for some cases and no voice arrest in
RT for patients within 2 years post-onset) were found, suggesting stages of SD.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to (1) identify
the issues of evaluation and treatment of spasmodic dysphonia (SD), (2) describe speech-voice tasks and variable responses
observed in SD, and (3) discuss a stage model of SD.
FP42.4
DO CLIENT BEHAVIORAL AND LEARNING SKILLS. AFFECT
VOICE THERAPY OUTCOMES?
Aliaa Khidr, M.D., Ph.D. Professor of Phoniatrics, Communication
Disorders Program, University of Virginia
Communication Disorders Program, Curry School of Education,
University of Virginia, USA
Summary: The outcomes of voice therapy are affected by sev-
132
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
eral client related behavioral and learning skills. Phoniatricians
rate them throughout therapy but rarely report them in our scientific literature. The goal of this presentation is to define some
client related behavioral skills that may affect the outcomes of
‘The Smith Accent Technique’ of voice therapy.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to assess the
effect of client related behavioral and learning skills on the outcomes of voice therapy.
FP42.5
DESCRIPTION OF THE FUNDAMENTAL FREQUENCY
BETWEEN MEN AND WOMEN LARYNGECTOMY WITH
TRACHEOESOPHAGEAL.
N. Reis1, H.M.A. Ricz1, L.N. Aguiar Ricz1
1
Faculdade of Medicine of Ribeirão Preto, University of São Paulo,
Ribeirão Preto, Brazil
Summary: The literature reports differences in fundamental
frequency (f0) between men and women with normal larynges,
but this is not well established for the population of total laryngectomy. In the acoustic analysis, although the type of signal 3
found in the voices of laryngectomy can be seen that the values
of f0 found in men and women seem to differ.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to understand
the acoustic measurements of men and women with total laryngectomy with tracheoesophageal.
FP42.6
VOCAL PROFILE RANGE OF TELEVISION NEWSCASTERS
M.A. Stier1, D. Feijo2, G. Madazio3
Instituto Cida Stier Curitiba Brazil
2
Sao Paulo Federal University, Brazil
3
Centro de Estudos da Voz, Brazil
1
Summary: This study evaluates the vocal profile range of two
groups of television newscasters, with different training and
experience. The results showed a statistically significant difference between the two groups in different degrees of loudness.
The trained group, with more than 5 years of experience, has a
significantly better vocal control and ability to use frequency
and loudness variation.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to discuss the
vocal profile range of two groups of television newscasters.
FP43.1
APHASIC GROUP: LANGUAGE PRACTICES
Ana Paula Santana, Ana Cristina Guarinello, Ana Paula Berberian,
Giselle de Athaíde Massi,
Universidade Tuiuti do Paranα
Summary: This study intend to analyze an intervention speech
therapy model in a group of aphasic people that uses public
health services. The results suggest that the group therapies
with aphasic patients are an efficient therapy, it produces relevant results for the language use of this population, as well for
the social and subjective implications that it can promote.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to Discuss the
factors that involved clinics practices of aphasy.
FP43.2
USING THE SOCIAL MODEL TO MAKE SENSE OF MENTAL
HEALTH DISORDERS: AN SLP PERSPECTIVE
I.P. Walsh1, J. Felson Duchan2,
1
Trinity College, Dublin, 2SUNY at Buffalo
Summary: Mental health disorders (MHDs), long neglected in
speech-language therapy practice, need to be reconceptualized within the social model. We show that people with MHDs
throughout history have described their disability as involving
communication and identity. We argue that communication
needs a broader definition, one that regards meaning and sense
making as shared and that includes negotiations of identity.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to Describe the
role of communication in mental health disorders (MHDs); Describe how the social model can lead to a redefinition of communication; Describe the relationship between identity and
communication; Describe the SLP’s role in supporting people
with MHDs.
FP43.3
WORKING ALONGSIDE PEOPLE WITH SCHIZOPHRENIA:
DIRECTIONS FOR SPEECH AND LANGUAGE THERAPY
PRACTICE
J. Brophy, MSc.1, I.P. Walsh, Phd2
Adelaide and Meath Hospital, Tallaght, Dublin, Ireland
2
Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland
1
Summary: In an attempt to develop an appropriate SLT service
for people with Mental Health Disorders, this paper presents
findings from consultations with people with schizophrenia,
as they discuss their experiences of language and communication difficulties. Emergent themes, particularly with regard to
partnership-difference and recovery-have the power to inform
practice with this client group, and will be discussed.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to (i) Describe
how a “partnership approach” to SLT practice relates to working
with people with Mental Health Disorders (ii) Understand how
insights gained from hearing the voice of the person with the
illness can inform SLT service provision (iii) Discuss the role of
‘difference’ and ‘Recovery’ in SLT practice for people with Mental
Health Disorders.
FP43.4
VERB DEFICIT IN PD PATIENTS
Rodrigues, I.T. *, Ferreira, J.J.**; Coelho, M.**; Rosa, M.M**, CastroCaldas, A.*
* Institute of Health Sciences – The Catholic University of Portugal,
Lisbon, Portugal
** Neurological Clinical Research Unit, Institute of Molecular
Medicine, Lisbon, Portugal
Summary: We evaluate the performance of Parkinson’s disease
(PD) patients in an action (verb) fluency task and compare to
controls. A significant difference was observed between the
two groups on the action verbal fluency task (U = 406.5 p <
0.01) that was not found on the other (classical) fluency tasks.
Learner Outcomes: With this work we will describe the data
of our study about action verbal fluency in Parkinson’s disease
patients.
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
133
FP43.5
FP44.1
A REVIEW OF THE PROMPTING PHENOMENA IN APHASICS
PATIENTS
PROOF OF COMMUNICATION AND LANGUAGE FOR BETTER
QUALITY OF LIFE
J.M. Author1
1
Universidade Estadual de Campinas, São Paulo , Brazil.
Tatiana Lima Santos 1, Rayana Mara de Sousa 1, Karine Medeiros
Coelho Carvalho 2
1
NOVAFAPI, Teresina, Brazil
2
NOVAFAPI, Teresina, Brazil
Summary: We will investigate the prompting phenomena implications for the understanding of what occurs specifically in
the context of aphasia, so that we can establish the necessary
relations with it and thereby make a contribution to the area of
interactional and conversational studies in Linguistics, by serving to investigations which intend to assist aphasics in their difficulties in communication and comprehension.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to set better
conceptual contours to the phenomenon of prompting in its
various configurations and registers.
SY14B.1
CATTLE PRODS TO CHELATION?; NAVIGATING THE MAZE
OF AUTISM INTERVENTIONS AND THE ROLE OF EVIDENCE
BASED PRACTICE AND SPEECH LANGUAGE PATHOLOGY IN
EARLY INTERVENTION FOR CHILDREN WITH AUTISM
Jacqueline Roberts Associate Professor
University of Canberra, Australia
Summary: This presentation outlines the range of interventions for young children with autism, evidence, challenges for
researchers and practical application of an evidence-based approach to treatment decisions.
The focus is the role of the SLP in a collaborative team, in assessment, diagnosis and management of autism. The presentation
will include information about initiatives in autism, including
research, in Australia.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to describe the
range of interventions for young children with autism and the
evidence base, explain the concept to families and other professionals and guide them to make informed decisions about
intervention.
SY14B.2
JOINT CONSTRUCTION OF STORIES BY HIGH-FUNCTIONING
CHILDREN WITH ASD, USING TECHNOLOGICAL SETTING
DESIGNED TO ENHANCE PEER INTERACTION
Rachel Yifat, Judy Kupersmitt, Eynat Gal, Nirit Bauminger, Patrice
L (Tamar) Weiss, Oliviero Stock, Massimo Zancanaro, and Fabio
Pianesi
University of Haifa
Summary: This study examined the joint construction of stories by three pairs of high-functioning children with ASD, aged
9-11, using a technological setting designed to enhance peer
collaboration. Children engaged collaboratively in a task-oriented joint activity, and were aware of the communicative requirements involved in storytelling. However, the stories were
enacted rather than narrated and lacking temporal or causal
connections.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to describe
the benefits of technological settings to promote various pragmatic dimensions of language, and assess the children’s storytelling performance from a dual perspective that considers the
children’s efforts to bring about co-constructed narratives and
the actual narrative outcome.
Summary: Analyze the published literature the link between
quality of life and possibilities hearing.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to discuss the
interference of deafness in the communicative capacity.
FP44.2
RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT OF A NEW TYPE OF
MODERN STANDARD CHINESE SPEECH TEST MATERIALS
WITH MALE AND FEMALE TALKER
Li X.L. (Dr.)
Dept. of Otolaryngology, the 1st Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing
Medical University, China
Summary: To develop a new set of speech test materials used
for Mandarin Chinese, including monosyllabic and disyllabic
lexical and syntactic lists. They were further digitally recorded
into Wav. format documents seperately, which ensured freedom in randomly arranging their playing sequence and facilitated random clinical test. And it was the first time in China to
record both male and female voices.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to intruduce a
new kind of morden Chinese speech test materials to the world,
and know something about the difference in speech test between Chinese and English.
FP44.3
HEARING AIDS: VALIDATION OF THE BRAZILIAN VERSION
OF THE LISTENING SITUATIONS QUESTIONNAIRE (LSQ) FOR
DEAF CHILDREN
L.R.L. Carvalho, M.I.V. Couto, I. Lichtig
University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil
Summary: The aims of this study were to perform the Brazilian
Listening Situations Questionnaire (LSQ) version and to check
the effects of amplification offered by hearing aids upon deaf
children. The results suggest that the Brazilian version is valid
and reliable so it can play an important role in the evaluation of
the amplification offered by hearing aids upon this population.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to Evaluate the
amplification offered by hearing aids using the Listening Situations Questionnaire (LSQ); how to perform a questionnaire.
FP44.4
PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT EXERCISES FUNCTIONS
LISTENING AND SPEAKING
Slavka Nikolic1, Savic Mirjana 2, Filipovic Verica3, Petrovic Jelena 4,
Savic Marija5, Savic Vesna5
Primary School for Children with Damaged Hearing Zemun, Belgrade,
Serbia1
Specialist Surdology General Hospital Sabac, Sabac, Serbia2
Ph D General Hospital Sabac, Serbia3
DZ Sabac, Serbia4
Student anglistike Faculty, Novi Sad, Serbia5
Summary: The monograph provides the physiological basis
of hearing and speech development of hearing, speech, and
speech and language levels of children hearing demages. The
134
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
terms are a prerequisite in lexicon, speech and language. Key
wards: Monography, physiological, development, levels, lexicon.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to 1. Discuss
the topic and 2. Answer to questions.
FP44.5
SPEECH ADJUSTMENTS TO THE ELDERLY IN COGNITIVELY
DEMANDING SITUATION
T.E. Hautala1
University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland
1
Summary: The aims of the study were: clarify how the features
of different speakers’ affected the performance of the elderly
in user-trial study and how the speakers evaluated. Only slight
differences were found in performance. The speakers adjusted
their speech and the elderly seem to benefit from it, but the
speaker which adjusted his speech least was the most preferred.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to describe the
features of the so-called elderspeak; to discuss benefits and disadvantages of it.
FP44.6
AUDITORY AND LANGUAGE OUTCOMES IN CHILDREN WITH
EARLY DIAGNOSTIC AND TREATMENT FOR CONGENITAL
TOXOPLASMOSIS
L.M. Resende1, G.M.Q. Andrade1, M.F. Azevedo2, J. Perissinoto2,
A.B.Q. Vieira1, CTBG – Congenital toxoplasmosis Brazilian Group1
1
Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Brazil
2
Universidade Federal de São Paulo, Belo Horizonte, Brazil
Summary: Follow-up results from children diagnosed and
treated early for congenital toxoplasmosis are described and
associated. Significant central auditory problems with consequent language delays are present in this study, raising the
question upon the virulence of toxoplasma parasite in this particular region studied in Brazil.
Learner Outcomes: After the presentation, participants should
be able to discuss the implications of congenital toxoplasma infection for childrens development, specially what concerns to
language and hearing aspects. Participants should also be able
to describe the differe.
FP45.1
CARBONATED LIQUIDS: HELPING CLINICIANS
UNDERSTAND THEIR VALUE AND USE IN DYSPHAGIA
MANAGEMENT
Goldberg L., Rajagopalan J.
Wichita State University
Summary: Bulow, Olsson, and Ekberg (2003) documented the
positive effect of carbonated liquids for adults with dysphagia
following neurological injury. Many clinicians were sceptical.
They reasoned that thickening carbonated liquids would work
better than carbonation alone. Results of the current study
validate Bulow et al. and show why it is counterproductive to
thicken carbonated liquids.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to understand
the rationale for the inclusion of thickened liquids in the management of dysphagia.
FP45.2
INCIDENCE OF VOCAL FOLDS PARALYSIS IN PATIENTS WITH
BRAIN INSULT IN PHYSICAL MEDICINE & REHABILITATION
HOSPITAL IN KUWAIT
Amal Salaheldin Darwish
Hearing & Speech Institution Embaba, Egypt.
Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation Hospital, Kuwait
Summary: The study is for discussing the medical staff to consider the applience of direct or indirect laryngostroboscopic
evalution as part of thier routine evaluation of the patients with
brain insults to avoid unnessesary tracheostomy and Gastrostomy intubation.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to Know when
to apply the proper invetigation & rehabilitating program for
brain insult, dysphagic & dysphonic patients.
FP45.3
SWALLOWING REHABILITATION DATA FROM A BRAZILIAM
TEACHING HOSPITAL
Pedroni Danielle Moraes1, Furquim Claudia Regina de Andrade2
Department of Physiotherapy, Communication Science & Disorders,
Occupational Therapy. Hospital of Clinics. Faculty of Medicine.
University of São Paulo. São Paulo, BRAZIL
2
Department of Physiotherapy, Communication Science & Disorders,
Occupational Therapy. Faculty of Medicine. University of São Paulo
São Paulo, BRAZIL
1
Summary: A high incidence of oropharyngeal dysphagia (OD)
in hospital settings has been reported and the presence of the
speech therapist contributes to better patient prognosis, potential rehabilitation and quality of life improvement. This sutdy
aimed to characterize the swallowing rehabilitation program
managment in a large Braziliam Teaching Hospital.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to discuss regarding the main inpatients characteristics referred to the swallowing rehabilitative program at hospital settings.
FP45.4
TREATMENT OF VOCAL FOLD PARALYSIS AFTER
THYROIDECTOMY
Konoiko Natalia 1, Romanova Zhanna 2
National Theoretical and Practical Otorhinolaryngologic Center,
Belarus1
Belarusian Medical Academy of Postgraduate Education2
Summary: Injury of recurrent nerve during thyroid surgery is
a dangerous complication. Even the light hoarseness and dyspnea make difficulties for communication abilities. For a voice
expert it can lead to the professional impropriety. The article
is concerning urgent topicality of this problem - the causes of
nervus laryngeus recurrens injury during surgery. The course of
rehabilitation is suggested.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to discuss the
problems of hoarseness and dyspnea to get more practical
skillsand get more practical experience in the field of functional
dysphonia.
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
FP45.5
SS12.2
ASSESSMENT AND BEHAVIOR THERAPY FOR SWALLOWING
PROBLEMS IN BRAIN DAMAGED MOTOR HANDICAPPED
CHILDREN
FUNCTIONAL DYSPHONIA AND (C)APD: CLINICAL
APPLICATIONS
Tamer Abou-Elsaad1 MD, PhD, Safaa El-Sady2 MD, PhD and
Gehan Abdel-Latif1 MD, PhD.
Units of Phoniatrics, ORL Departments, Faculty of Medicine,
Mansoura University, Mansoura1 and Ain Shams University, Cairo2,
Egypt.
Summary: The Swallowing functions of 50 Brain Damaged Motory Handicapped children with different degrees of severity
were studied. Behavioral Re-Adjustment Therapy (BRAT) was
used to correct the most evident breakdown of their swallowing problems. They demonstrated impairment in various swallowing domains especially with the moderate and severe degrees. BRAT has improved the swallowing function especially
with the mild and moderate degrees.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to 1) explain
the impairment of swallowing functions in BDMH children and
2) discuss the effect of behavioral therapy on their swallowing
problems.
FP45.6
CHARACTERISTICS OF LIPOID PROTEINOSIS
Wen Xu, MD; Demin Han, MD Wotan Zeng, ph.D
Department of Otorhinolaryngology Head Neck Surgery, Beijing
Tongren Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100730, China
Summary: As lipoid proteinosis shows protean clinical manifestations, the diagnosis is often difficult and therefore delayed.
Typical characteristics of LP included hoarseness in infancy,
beaded papules along the eyelid margins, and histopathological changes that aid in the diagnosis. Microlaryngosurgery excision of deposits could improve voice function.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to learn about
Lipoid proteinosis which is a rare disorder characterized by
involvement of multiple systems. Infantile hoarseness of the
voice is the most common feature and the first manifestation
of the disease. The diagnosis can be established on the basis of
characteristic clinical symptoms and confirmed by histopathology, laryngeal endoscopy et.c. Microlaryngosurgery excision of
deposits could improve voice function.
SS12.1
SPEECH LANGUAGE PATHOLOGIST ACTING AS A MULTIDIMENSIONAL GUIDE FOR TELEVISION NEWSCASTERS IN
BRAZIL
Feijo Deborah
TV Globo, Brazil
Summary: This course presents the multi-dimensional work
of a SLP with television newscasters. The work is develop in a
nation-wide Brazilian TV network. In this setting, the role of the
SLP combines the skills of a voice specialist, a speech trainer
and a presentation skills coach. The professionals have raised
the awareness of their voice, speech and communications.
Learner outcomes: The participant will be able to describe the
possible functions and activities that a SLP can develop with
newscasters at a television.
135
I. Gielow
CEV - Centro de Estudos da Voz, São Paulo, Brazil
Summary: Subjects with functional dysphonia may present
difficulties with frequency patterns discrimination and/or tonal
memory, thus affecting voice monitoring. Even so, the assessment of auditory processes is not a routine in the field of voice
therapy. However, if there is a (C)APD, the failing auditory skills
may be trained by strategies to improve the auditory abilities
related to voice perception.
Learner outcomes: The participant will be able to explain the
relation between functional dysphonia and (central) auditory
processes (CAP), to identify when a given patient might be referred to a specific CAP assessment and to apply the principles
of CAP management to the voice therapy.
SS13.1
VOICE QUALITY ASSESSMENT AMONG PROFESSIONALS
Osipenko E.V.1, Mescherkin A.P. 2
Federal centre of ENT of Russia, Russian Federation
2
Moscow State Humanitarian University named after M.A. Sholokhov,
Russian Federation
1
Summary: Nowadays there is a large number of professions
connected with considerable voice load. For today for the objective description of a voice the method of an estimation of
spectral structure of a voice. We have developed the technique
of voice recording and its subsequent computer analysis depending on the professional group, the algorithm of the definition of the voice type.
Learner outcomes: Learner will be understand how leads to
the wrong voice analysis, to attempt the main positions leading
to incorrect acoustic voice analysis, to learn of the our model of
voice recording and the algorithm of the definition of the voice
type.
SS14.1
PERCEPTUAL-AUDITORY ANALYSIS OF NORMAL AND
DEVIANT VOICES: PRACTICE WITH NUMERICAL AND
VISUAL ANALOG SCALES
Rosiane Yamasaki, Glaucya Madazio, M. Behlau
UNIFESP, São Paulo, Brazil
Summary: The numerical scales are frequently used to evaluate
the degree of dysphonia. However, depending on the required
task, these scales are not accurate enough. The employment
of visual analog scales has grown, since it provides 100 possibilities of gradation. The aim of this workshop is to develop
a perceptual auditory training of 30 voice samples using both
scales.
Learner outcomes: The participant will be able to discuss, describe and evaluate the perceptual-auditory analysis of normal
and deviant voices.
SS15.1
EXPLORING STUDENT LEARNING EXPERIENCES IN SPEECH
AND LANGUAGE THERAPY
O’Toole C., Egan C., Dowds T.
University College Cork, Ireland
Summary: This symposium will present three papers looking at
different aspects of student learning, from academic and theo-
136
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
retical areas of the curriculum, to more practice-based learning opportunities. The papers will explore how learning styles
might affect performances in different areas of the curriculum;
how students learn about interpersonal communication skills
from interacting with clients and alternative models of placement provisions.
Learner outcomes: The participant will be able to describe
different student learning styles and how these might affect
teaching and learning; Recognise the importance of providing
a variety of learning experiences for all students.
SS15.2
THE EFFECT OF INTEGRATED ASSESSMENTS IN
COMPETENCY BASED LEARNING OF SLT-STUDENTS
Ms. Marjon Peek, Dr. Yvonne van Zaalen
Fontys University of applied sciences, department of Speech
Language Therapy, Eindhoven The Netherlands
Summary: In competency based learning assessments of students competencies is best integrated within different domains
of Speech Language Therapy. Diversity in assessment and integration of methods in different disorders is important, but
assessment within a reflection of the clinical professional situation is critical. Results will be presented on a study on student
and lecturers satisfactory in using this assessment line.
Learner outcomes: The participant will be able to discuss the
effect of integrated assessments & to create integrated assessments.
FP46.1
COMPARISON OF VOCAL OUTCOME BEFORE AND AFTER
MEDIALIZATION THYROPLASTY USING A SILICONE OR
TITANIUM IMPLANT
N. van Ardenne, J. Vanderwegen, M.De Bodt, P. Van de Heyning
Department of Otorhinolaryngology & Head and Neck Surgery,
Antwerp University Hospital, Antwerp, Belgium
Summary: Different medialization implant materials are available, but very few data exist comparing two materials. The results of are study support the use of a titanium vocal fold medialization implant since vocal outcome is superior to silicone
implant.
Learner Outcomes: This study describes the results of using
two different medialization implant materials allowing to make
optimal choices.
FP46.2
A NEW PROTOCOL FOR AUDIO - PERCEPTUAL ASSESSMENT
OF TRACHEO-ESOPHAGEAL SPEECH AND CORRELATIONS
WITH ACOUSTIC MEASUREMENTS
E Lundström, B Hammarberg
Division of Speech and Language Pathology, Karolinska Institutet,
Stockholm, SWEDEN
Summary: The aim of the study was to perform perceptual and
acoustical analyses of tracheoesophageal (TE) speech, and to
explore aspects contributing to listeners’ perception of overall
degree of deviation from normal in TE-speech. The results show
that deviation in both voice quality and temporal speech parameters influenced the listeners’ ratings of the speakers’ overall
degree of deviation.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to Describe
different ways of making audio-perceptual assessment of TEspeech and also to discuss some aspects of TE-speech that are
relevant to assess and measure.
FP46.3
THE RELIGIOUS ORATORY: CASE STUDY
Leite, C.M.B 1 ;Barja, P.R2
1-2
Universidade do Vale do Paraíba, São José dos Campos/SP, Brazil
Summary: The interest of this study rose because of the inquisitive that tries to understand the notability of the charismatic
speech that made different this leader in a national identity.
The aim of this work is to describe the persuasive strategies of
the oral speech in composing the massage’s sense. The bases of
the studies were the public presentation.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to iIdentify the
strategies of religious discourse and the importance of the use
of acoustic analysis in clinical speech.
FP46.4
PHONATORY DEVIATION DIAGRAM IN VOICE CLINIC
Madazio G.*, Leão S, Behlau M.
Unifesp; CEV, Brazil
Summary: This study compared perceptual auditory analysis
with acoustic data using the PDD, in 198 voices predominantly
adapted, rough, breathy and tense. The PDD could discriminate
normal from dysphonic voices and the distribution was related
to the type and degree of voice alteration.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to discuss and
discriminate normal from dysphonic voices.
FP46.5
NEURAL NETWORK ANALYSIS TO ASSESS HYPERNASALITY
IN PATIENTS TREATED FOR ORAL OR OROPHARYNGEAL
CANCER
M. de Bruijn1, L. ten Bosch2, D.J. Kuik3, J.A. Langendijk4, C.R.
Leemans1, I.M. Verdonck-de Leeuw1
1
Department of Otolaryngology/Head and Neck Surgery, VU
University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
2
Department of Language and Speech, University of Nijmegen,
Nijmegen, The Netherlands
³ Department of Epidemiology & Biostatistics, VU University Medical
Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
4
Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen
Medical Center, Groningen, The Netherlands
Summary: Hypernasality is common in patients treated for oral
or oropharyngeal cancer. The purpose of the study is to investigate feasibility of neural network feature analysis of nasalance
in the speech signal to assess hypernasality.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to to describe
objective speech analyses.
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
FP46.6
OBJECTIVE ASSESSMENT OF SPEECH QUALITY IN PATIENTS
TREATED FOR A TUMOUR IN THE ORAL CAVITY OR
OROPHARYNX
M. de Bruijn1, L. ten Bosch2, H. Quené3, D.J. Kuik4, J.A. Langendijk5,
C.R. Leemans1, I.M. Verdonck-de Leeuw1
1
Department of Otolaryngology/Head and Neck Surgery, VU
University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
2
Department of Language and Speech, University of Nijmegen,
Nijmegen, The Netherlands
³ Utrecht Institute of Linguistics OTS, Utrecht University, Utrecht, The
Netherlands
4
Department of Epidemiology & Biostatistics, VU University Medical
Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
5
Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen
Medical Center, Groningen, The Netherlands
Summary: Subjective speech evaluation is often used to assess
speech quality of head and neck cancer patients. This study investigates to what extent acoustic-phonetic analysis contribute
to objective assessment of speech quality.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to describe
speech assessment methods in patients with head and neck
cancer.
SSY06.1
RATIONALE, PROCEDURES AND PATIENT-REPORTED
OUTCOMES OF A DRAMA CLASS FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH
CHRONIC APHASIA
L. R. Cherney1,2, A. Oehring3, K. Whipple4, T. Rubenstein4,5
Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, Chicago, USA
2
Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine, USA
3
Chicago Speech and Language Services, Chicago, USA
4
Institute for Therapy through the Arts, Evanston, USA
5
Chicago School of Professional Psychology, Chicago, USA
1
Summary: Drama therapy offers an authentic medium through
which people with aphasia can interact and share their experiences. Using video-taped examples, we describe the rationale,
procedures and patient-reported outcomes of a drama therapy
class in which individuals with chronic aphasia conceptualized,
wrote and produced a play addressing their experiences of living and coping with the effects of aphasia.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to discuss the
rationale for using creative arts therapy with individual with
aphasia; describe the communication strategies and drama
therapy techniques used in a theater class for participants with
aphasia; summarize the patient-reported outcomes of a theater
class for participants with aphasia.
SY14C.1
137
need for improving international collaboration related to autism research and clinical practice; and (3) identify one or more
possible steps to improve international collaboration.
SE15.1
FAMILY-CENTERED EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE: IS
THE FAMILY PARADIGMS FRAMEWORK USEFUL TO
COMMUNICATION DISORDER PROFESSIONALS?
M.J.C. Hidecker
Speech-Language Pathology, University of Central Arkansas, Conway,
AR USA
Summary: This seminar will consider the usefulness of family
paradigms in family-centered evidence-based practice. Family paradigms describe how families’ views may affect their resources and goals. Possible applications in communication disorders with culturally-diverse families will be discussed.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to 1. Outline
steps to family-centered evidence-based practices. 2. Differentiate the four family paradigms of closed, random, open, and
synchronous. 3. Discuss how recommendations may affect families using different family paradigms.
SE16.1
NEUROLOGIC DISORDERS AND DYSPHAGIA CASE
MANAGEMENT USING FEES
C.E. Bergin1, R.L. Gould2
Naples Medical Center, Department of Otolaryngology, Naples,
Florida, USA
2
Voice and Swallow Center, Inc., Med Speech, Inc., Palm Beach
Gardens, Florida, USA
1
Summary: This seminar will demonstrate an approach to dysphagia case management using flexible endoscopic evaluation
of swallowing (FEES) with neurologic patients. Topics will comprise neurologic diagnosis, FEES interpretation, FEES evaluation
outcomes, clinical management, and treatment recommendations. Case overviews will include clinical history, symptoms,
and therapeutic interventions. Discussion will include swallowing safety, oral feeding, and strategies for efficient swallowing
practices.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to 1. Analyze a
neurologic dysphagia case, observe and interpret a FEES exam,
provide FEES exam findings, and consider an appropriate treatment approach for a dysphagic patient.
SE17.1
VOICE ERGONOMIC SCREENING IN WORK ENVIRONMENT HANDBOOK AND CHECKLIST
Watson L. R.
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, United States
E Sala1, L Rantala2, S Hakala 2,
1
Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Turku
University Hospital,Turku, Finland
2
Department of Speech Communication and Voice Research,
University of Tampere Finland, Finland
Summary: Reflecting on the presentations of the other speakers in Symposium on Autism Spectrum Disorders, this presentation will identify the common themes, as well as differences in
perceptions and practices in different parts of the globe. The
presentation will conclude with recommendations for next
steps to promote international collaboration to achieve better
outcomes for individuals with autism and their families.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to (1) Describe
commonalities and differences in perceptions and practices related to autism in different parts of the world; (2) discuss the
Summary: Voice Ergonomic Screening in Work Environment
- Handbook and Checklist has been constructed for occupational health care. By means of it, the voice ergonomic factors,
like noise, indoor air quality, working posture, culture and aids
can be measured. The book contains detailed instructions for
screening operation. The handbook also gives suggestions for
solving problems and planning corrective operations.
Learner outcomes: Listeners will be able to explain how to
assess and measure systematically voice ergonomic factors in
working environments.
GLOBAL PERSPECTIVES IN ASD: SUMMATION AND NEXT
STEPS
138
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
SE18.1
EFFICIENCY OF VOICE THERAPY AND QIGONG
Eva Maria Haupt
Deutscher Bundesverband für Logopädie, Germany
Summary: Qigong belongs to the “Complementary Medicine”
and is proved as an useful toll in the Therapy of Communication
disorders (Bahme 2010). Information about Qigong history and
Qigong-exercises and their therapeutic efficiency will be given
and the possibility to get some own experiences with Qigong
and the speaking and singing voice.
Learner outcomes: The participant will be able to explain why
Qigong can be useful in combination with classical voice therapy.
SS16.1
CRITICAL PERSPECTIVES FOR COMMUNICATION SCIENCES
Yvette D. Hyter
Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI USA
Summary: Consequences of the current stage of globalization
challenges the field of communication sciences to be more socially/culturally relevant. This presentation proposes a critical
approach that examines reciprocal relations among communication processes and historical, economic, political and cultural
structures, providing examples of how this approach can shape
new research questions, course content, pedagogical methods
and clinical practices.
Learner outcomes: The participant will be able to 1. define a
critical approach to speech-language pathology; 2. define the
concepts that are consisten with a critical approach to communication sciences and disorders; 3. develop research questions,
course units, pedagogical or clinical methods based on the critical perspective.
SS17.1
MEASURING OUTCOMES IN SPEECH-LANGUAGE THERAPY
K. Washington1, G. Warr-Leeper2
1
Bloorview Research Institute, Bloorview Kids Rehab, Canada
2
School of Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of
Western Ontario, Canada
Summary: Speech-language therapists require evidentiary
support establishing the effectiveness of interventions for their
clients. To address this need, outcomes of intervention in four
target-contexts were established for emergent-literacy, orallanguage, communicative-participation, and speech-sound
production in the current study. The ICF-CY facilitated selection
of outcome measures for each target-context. The effectiveness
of speech-language intervention was established for a variety
of interventions for children.
Learner outcomes: The participant will be able to 1) Discuss
the importance of outcomes measurement research; 2) Describe outcomes of various speech-language interventions for
children with communication disorders or at risk for slower language development.
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
139
Poster Presentations
MONDAY 23/8/2010
P001
P004
INTERFERENCES OF VISUAL STIMULI IN THE WRITTEN
PRODUCTION OF DEAF STUDENTS USERS OF SIGN
LANGUAGE WITHOUT COMPLAINTS OF WRITING
DISORDERS
LEXICAL ASPECTS OF THE ORAL NARRATIVE IN PATIENTS
WITH ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE
Gomes Rodrigues Maria Gloria, Lima Ferreira Carolina, Rotger
Abdo Anila Gabriela, Garcia de Almeida Maria Lucia, Carnio Maria
Silvia
Universidade de São Paulo – USP, Brazil
Summary: Aim: to compare the written production of deaf
subjects users of Brazilian Sign Language, with no writing disorders complaints. Fourteen deaf students of primary school were
assessed regarding their communicative competences in the
Portuguese language written production based on different
figures. Deaf subjects presented written productions different
from the Portuguese structure, and the action figure provided
more creative narratives.
Learner Outcomes: After completing this session, participants
will be able to:discuss, explain and describe the process of writting production of deaf who use sign language.
P002
THE SERBIAN SIGN LANGUAGE-FIRST STEP OF
STANDARDIZATION
Dimic N.D1, Kasic Z2, Polovina V3, Isakovic Lj1, Kovacevic T1
1
University of Belgrade, Faculty of Special Education and
Rehabilitation, Department of Special Education and Rehabilitation
of Deaf and Hard of Hearing Persons, 2 University of Belgrade, Faculty
of Special Education and Rehabilitation, 3 University of Belgrade,
Faculty of Philology, Serbia and Montenegro
Summary: For the initial standardization of the language from
the aspect of grammar, in the first phase we had to gather material relating to the Serbian Sign Language (1000 sentences). Our
informants were bilingual individuals who were equally familiar
with the Serbian language and the Serbian Sign Language and
informants to whom sign language is the primary language of
communication.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to describe
and discuss about serbian sign language.
P003
SIMPLIFICATION OF SYNTACTIC ASPECTS IN PATIENTS
WITH ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE
Lira J.O1, Campanha A.C1, Bertolucci P.H.2, Ortiz K.Z.3, Minett T.S.C.4
1
Department Of Speech Therapy, 2 Sector of Behavioural Neurology,
Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery,3 UNIFESP, 4 Department
of Preventive Medicine, Brazil
Summary: Syntactic complexity of an oral narrative discourse
was analyzed in 121 elderly patients with Alzheimer’s disease
(AD) with more than 4 years of education level. It was found
that individuals with AD produced simpler clauses than healthy
older adults.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to learn about
syntactic complexity in Alzheimer’s disease.
Lira J.O1, Campanha A.C1, Bertolucci P.H.2, Ortiz K.Z. 3, Minett T.S.C.4
Department Of Speech Therapy, 2 Sector of Behavioural Neurology,
Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery,3 UNIFESP,4 Department
of Preventive Medicine, Brazil
1
Summary: Lexical aspects (word finding difficulties, revisions,
repetitions, semantic paraphasias and phonemic paraphasias)
of an oral narrative were evaluated in 121 elderly patients with
Alzheimer’s disease (AD) with more than 4 years of education
level. The individuals with DA presented worse performance
than healthy older adults in most of the items.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to learn about lexical aspects in oral narrative of patients with Alzheimer’s disease.
P005
NEUROPSYCHOLINGUISTIC ADAPTATION OF THE
MONTREAL-TOULOUSE PROTOCOL FOR BRAZILIAN
PORTUGUESE
Soares-Ishigaki E.C.S1., Fonseca R.P.2, Scherer L.C.3, Parente
M.A.M.P.4
Joanett Y5., Nespoulous J.L.6, Ortiz K.Z.1
1
UNIFESP, 2PUCRS, 3UNISC,4UFRGS, (Brazil),
5
University of Montreal, (Canada),
6
University Of Toulouse Le Mirail, France
Summary: The aim of this study is to describe the neuropsycholinguistical adaptation of the Montreal-Toulouse Protocol
for Brazilian Portuguese. The protocol was adapted according
to translations and back-translations, materials adjustments,
collections and collective decisions made by specialists. Figures, words, sentences and textual structures were adjusted.
Studies such as these may contribute to the development of
multicenter researches with aphasic patients.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to describe the
complexity neuropsycholinguistical adaptation of the evaluation protocol for language investigation.
P006
INFLUENCE OF DEMOGRAPHIC VARIABLES ON BRAZILIAN
APHASIC AND NON-APHASIC INDIVIDUALS PERFORMANCE
IN A LIMB PRAXIS BATTERY
Mantovani-Nagaoka J.1, Ortiz K.Z.2
1
Federal University of São Paulo, 2 UNIFESP, Brazil
Summary: This study aimed to characterize and to compare
the performances of Brazilian aphasic and non-aphasic participants in a battery for assessment of limb praxis, searching for
the role played by demographic variables on their performances. Educational background showed to play an important role
on the praxic abilitties assessed, while age and brain damage
interfered in a less impactant way.
Learner Outcomes: Participants will be able to discuss the effects of demographic variables and brain damage in Brazilian
aphasic and non-aphasic individuals performances in a battery
for assessment of limb praxis.
140
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
P007
P010
THE INTERFERENCE OF THE LANGUAGE OF MATHEMATICAL
PROCESSING IN APHASIA
TYMPANOMETRY AND LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT
IMPAIRMENT: SPECIFIC/NONSPECIFIC LANGUAGE
IMPAIRMENT (SLI/NONSLI)
De Luccia Gabriela1, Ortiz K.Z. 2
1
UNIVAG, 2 UNIFESP, Brazil
Summary: The ability to calculate a cognitive process is extremely complex. This study aims to determine the correlation
between changes in numerical processing and calculation with
language disorders in aphasic patients. We evaluated patients,
through the battery EC 301 and language tests. The performance of aphasic patients demonstrated a deleterious effect
on the occurrence of lesion and consequently of aphasia.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to discuss the
association between language and mathematical calculation in
aphasic patients.
P008
USEFLNESS OF POLISH LANGUAGE LOW REDUNDANCY
AND DICHOTICH TESTS IN DYSLECTIC CHILDREN
Wojnowski W.1*, Wiskirska-Woznica B1., Pruszewicz A.1,
Maciejewska B.1, Demenko G.2
1
Department of Phoniatrics and Audiology K. Marcinkowski
University School of Medical Sciences, Poznan, 2Insitute of Phonetics
University A. Mickiewicz, Poznan, Poland
Summary: The aim of the study was to assess the usefulness of
low redundancy and dichotic tests in the diagnosis of dyslexia
in children. 20 children aged 7-15 were tested.. The experiments
have shown that the dyslectic group achieved worse results in
mentioned tests in comparison with the control group.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to discuss the
usefulness of low redundancy and dichotic tests in the diagnosis of dyslexia in children. They will be able to apply such tests
in examination and diagnosis of dyslexia.
P009
DISTORTION PRODUCT OTOACUSTIC EMISSIONS IN
CHILDREN WITH LOW AND HIGH RISK FOR HEARING LOSS.
Sirley Alves da Silva Carvalho , Letícia Macedo Penna , Ana Cristina
de Oliveira Mares Guia 2, Luciana Macedo de Resende1, Florence
Nunes Brandão3, Denise Utsch Gonçalves1
1Faculty of Medicine, Federal University of Minas Gerais, Brazil
2Hospital das Clinicas, Federal University of Minas Gerais, Brazil
3Hospital Santa casa of Minas Gerais, Brazil
1
2
Summary: The objective of this work was analyze and to compare the amplitude of the DPOAE in children of low and high
risk to hearing loss and to verify the occurrence of differences
of this parameter of the responses between the sexes and side
of ear.This study was conducted in the program of Screening
Neonatal of the HC/UFMG.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to to explain
the results of a research program of newborn hearing screening
in the clinical hospital of the Federal University of Minas Gerais
Brazil.
Hernandez Villoria R.1, Campos de Rosete M.2, Calero Tablante V.2
1
Instituto Venezolano de Audicion y Lenguaje/Ministerio del Poder
Popular para la Salud, 2Instituto Venezolano de Audicion y Lenguaje,
2
Instituto Venezolano de la Audicion y el Lenguaje, Venezuela
Summary: It was studied Tympanogram/Language Impairment relationship in 120 cases from 3 to 7 years old. Type of
curve would be used as specificity (or not) index of language
impairment, because children with SLI and bilateral type A
curves have more linguistics failures than childrens with SLI
and bilatera curves types B or C. This was not founded in nonSLI
children.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to appreciate
and discuss the usefulness of tympanometry on diagnosys of
SLI- non-SLI.
P011
DIFFERENCES BETWEEN FREQUENCIES OF FORMANTS
F1 AND F0 AND F2 AND F1 IN CHILDREN WITH NORMAL
HEARING AND PROFOUND OR SEVERE HEARING
IMPAIRMENT
Ozbic M.
Faculty Of Education, University of Ljubljana, Slovenia
Summary: The purpose of the present study was to discover
the differences in the frequencies of vowel formant production
in 33 children, aged 5-9 years, with a different hearing status.
The aim is to document contrasts in differences of formant frequencies in three groups with a different hearing status.Differences in front high and back rounded vowels occur.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to comprehend the importance of the differences betwwen formants and
not only of the absolute values.
P012
THE SIMULTANEOUS USE OF ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY AND
PERCEPTUAL MOTOR APPROACH IN THE ACQUISITION OF
READING AND WRITING SKILLS: A CASE STUDY
Litinas N., Zergioti P.
Private Practice, Greece
Summary: In this case study the collaboration of a speech/
language pathologist using assistive technology and of an occupational therapist using perceptual motor approach will be
presented. B.C. is a seven year old male with a developmental
delay. Emphasis will be given on how the work of the two therapists helped the patient acquire reading and writing skills.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to understand
the usefulness of the collaboration of two therapists in treating
developmental and/ or acquired disorders.
P013
CONTINUUM OF COMPLEXITY AND STRUCTURE OF
PHONOLOGICAL AWARENESS BY BULGARIAN CHILDREN
Shtereva K.
University of Sofia, Bulgaria
Summary: This study examines the components of phonological awareness of the Bulgarian children and the factor structure
of this phenomenon. The following characteristics of the Bulgarian children are: lower scores of rhyming, almost identical
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
results for segmentation of words and sentences, and high average results by the items of manipulation. Results: Rapid naming is a separate factor in phonological structure.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to 1) compare
the results of studied of the components that form the phonological awareness of the Bulgarian children with others; 2) discuss the factor structure of the studied 18 subtests of phonological awareness.
P014
A comparative analysis based on distinctive
features using the Modified Maximal Oppositions
Model in the treatment of phonological
disorder
Bolli Mota H., Keske-Soares M., Bagetti T., Ceron M.
UFSM, Brazil
Summary: This study aims to compare the phonological changes after the application of an approach based on distinctive features, using two types of target sounds (‘contrast’ and ‘reinforce’
the distinctive features) in treatment of phonological disorder.
It was verified that both groups have presented changes in
their phonological systems and that both groups presented differences regarding the kinds of generalizations.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to compare
diferent aproaches of targeting distintive features in speech
therapy; know more about maximal oppostions models in phonological therapy.
P015
ANALYSIS OF HIGHER CORTICAL FUNCTIONS IN
PRIMARY SCHOOL CHILDREN: VALIDATION OF
NEUROPSYCHOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT
TABAQUIM, M.L.M.
Universidade Sagrado Coração, Bauru-SP, Brazil
Summary: This study aimed to investigate the neuropsychological functions, and specific cortical areas of language and
memory in children with complaints in learning. The study includes the possible dysfunctions that interfere with school performance and validate the reliability of the instrument.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to using the
tool for neuropsychological analysis and hiring rehabilitation
strategies more focused.
P016
A STUDY OF PHONOLOGICAL PROCESSES EXHIBITED
BY PRESCHOOL CHILDREN; NORMATIVE DATA FROM
HUNGARIAN
E. S. Tar
Department of Psychology and Special Needs Education, University
of Kaposvar, Kaposvar, Hungary
Summary: The study focuses on the phonological skills of children acquiring Hungarian as first. It provides normative data
concerning the type and the occurrence of phonological processes used by 191 3-, 4-, and 5-year-old children. It also compiles an age range to present the variability of gradual disappearance of processes.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to estimate
typical phonological patterns concerning Hungarian and to
identify and describe the stage of phonological development
between 3-6 years of age.
141
P017
WRITING AND READING SKILLS AT THE AGE OF 8-10 YEARS
IN CHILDREN WITH INTRAUTERINE GROWTH RESTRICTION
(IUGR)
Partanen L.A1., Heikkinen M.K. 1, Rissanen N.2, Makikallio K.2, Olsen
P.3, Yliherva A.1
1
Faculty of Humanities, Logopedics, University of Oulu, 2 Faculty of
Medicine, Departments of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of
Oulu, 2 Dept. Obstetrics and Gynecology, Oulu, 3Faculty of Medicine,
Department of Pediatrics, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland
Summary: Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) is recognized
to be a risk for non-optimal neurological development and
poor learning skills later at school-age. The preliminary results
of our study indicate that IUGR children experience more writing and reading problems at school age compared to their AGA
counterparts.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to discuss
about IUGR, what it means and what kind of influences it has
on child’s reading and writing skills. They can think over how to
prevent the learning disabilities with early intervention.
P018
WORD STRUCTURE ACQUISITION IN GERMAN SPEAKING
CHILDREN WITH AND WITHOUT PROTRACTED
PHONOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENT
Ullrich A.1, Romonath R.1, Bernhardt B. M.2
1
University of Cologne, Germany,
2
University of British Columbia, Canada
Summary: Children with protracted phonological development
(PPD) may show patterns of difference from the adult target that
are delayed for their chronological age or patterns infrequently
observed in normal development, The study compares word
structure acquisition of 22 German-speaking children with PPD,
and an age-matched control group. Results provide a basis for
identification of word structure patterns indicative of PPD.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to 1. Characterize similarities and differences in acquisition of word structures
between German children with and without PPD 2. Identify
word structure patterns indicative of protracted phonological
development in clinical contexts.
P019
READING FLUENCY AND COMPREHENSION IN 8-TO 9YEAR-OLD CHILDREN BORN VERY PRETERM
Heikkinen M.K.1, Partanen L.A.1, Mikkonen Hanna 2, Kaukola Tuula2,
Yliherva A.1,
1
Faculty of Humanities, Logopedics, University of Oulu, 2 University of
Oulu, Oulu, Finland
Summary: Very preterm birth associates with neurodevelopmental delay. The purpose of this study was to assess reading
fluency and comprehension skills in very preterm children at
the age of 8 to 9-years.33 VPT children was evaluated comparing scores to the YTTE test norms. The study indicates the VPT
children to have both poor reading fluency and comprehension
when compared test norms.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to discuss
about reading skills in VPT group, learner will also notice some
deficit scores of VPT group.
142
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
P020
P023
ELECTROGLOTOGRAPHY IN PHONOLOGICAL DISORDERED
CHILDREN USING DEVOICING PHONOLOGICAL PROCESS
PERFORMANCE OF ORAL AND WRITTEN COMMUNICATION
OF BROTHERS WITH MYELOMENINGOCELE
Wertzner H.F.
University of São Paulo, Brazil
Lamonica D.A.C., Ferreira A.T., Prado L.M., Crenitte P.A.P.
Department of Speech and Language Pathology, Faculty of Dentistry
of Bauru, University of São Paulo, Bauru, Brazil
Summary: Aim: to compare opening quocient values in children with and without phonological disorder using an electroglottograph equipment. Results indicated that the opening
quocient presented higher values to phonologically disordered
group. Maybe this difference in opening quocient time is why
listeners can hear as voiced the sound produced by CG but as
devoiced the ones produced by PDG.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to explain a
possible reason why brazilian portuguese most frequent difficulty in children’s speech is devoicing phonological process;
explain the importance of using objective methods to evaluate
phonologically disordered children.
Summary: This study describes the psycholinguistic and school
performance of the siblings with low lumbar myelomeningocele using standardized instruments for this purpose. The communicative behavior and receptive vocabulary are without evident alterations. Alterations were verified in the psycholinguistic abilities that contemplated in the learning process, causing
impact in the academic abilities, demonstrating cerebral vulnerability in the support system for learning activity.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to reflect about
de development of oral and written language in children with
myelomeningocele.
P021
P024
INHIBITORY CONTROL AND NAMING ABILITY IN TYPICALLY
DEVELOPING CHILDREN AT THE AGE OF 5-7 YEARS
RECEPTIVE VOCABULARY ABILITY IN CHILDREN WITH
PHENYLKETONURIA AND CONGENITAL HYPOTHYROIDISM
Heikkinen E.1, Kujala T. 2, Jansson-Verkasalo E.1
1
University of Oulu, Logopedics and Oulu University Hospital,
Neurocognitive Unit, Oulu, Finland, 2University of Oulu, Institute of
Clinical Medicine, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Oulu, Finland
Lamonica D.A.C.1, Ferreira A.T. 1, Silva G.K. 2, Anastacio-Pessan F.L.3,
Gejao M.G.1
Department of Speech and Language Pathology, Faculty of Dentistry
of Bauru, University of São Paulo, Bauru, Brazil1
Prefecture of Uru, Uru, Brazil2
Neonatal Screening Laboratory of Association of Parents and Friends
of Exceptional, Bauru, Brazil 3
Summary: Inhibitory control contribute to the ability to select
and focus on relevant stimuli. It has been shown, that well developed inhibitory control and linguistic ability contribute to
each other. This study investigates the development of inhibitory control and naming skills in children before school-age. We
hypothesize that naming skills are well developed in children
with good inhibitory control.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to discuss
about the contribution of inhibitory control and naming skills.
discuss about the development of inhibitory control skills.
P022
PERFORMANCE OF CHILDREN WITH DOWN SYNDROME IN
SCRRENING TEST DEVELOPMENT DENVER-II
Lamonica D.A.C.1, Prado L.M.1, Geão M.G.1, Silva G.K.2 (Prefecture of
Uru, Uru, Brazil), Ferreira A.T. 1
Department of Speech and Language Pathology, Faculty of Dentistry
of Bauru,
University of São Paulo, Bauru, Brazil 1
Prefecture of Uru, Uru, Brazil2
Summary: Describe the performance in development abilities
through the Screening Test Development Denver-II of nine children with Down syndrome, aged between 41 and 69 months.
It was verified that children showed poor performance in all
evaluated abilities. It is stood out that 3 children presented
compatible performance with their chronological ages in the
personal-social area.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to study the
development with Down syndrome from the most tender childhood will favor that the involved professionals can plan strategies and contribute for these children’s full development.
Summary: This study describes the receptive vocabulary comprehension of children with phenylketonuria and congenital
hypothyroidism using a standardized instrument. Attention and
hyperactivity flaws were found in children of the two groups.
There were found alterations of the receptive vocabulary in
both groups and children with PKU showed more impairment
in the receptive vocabulary acquisition and development than
children with CH.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to reflect about
the language development in children with Phenylketonuria
and Congenital Hypothyroidism.
P025
LANGUAGE ABILITY PROFILE OF INDIVIDUALS WITH CLEFT
LIP AND PALATE
Maximino L.P.1, Marcelino Fabiana2, Abramides Dagma3, Feniman
Mariza3, Carvalho Fernanda2
1
University of São Paulo,2 Hospital for Rehabilitation of Craniofacial
Anomalies, 3Departament of Speech and Language Pathology, Faculty of Dentistry of Bauru, University of São Paulo, Brazil
Summary: Objectives: To characterize the language ability profile (oral and written) of individuals with cleft lip and palate, by
clinical observation, and tests.
Results: difficulties in most of the assessed abilities.
Conclusions: Written, auditory association, receptive language,
visual association, reading and, arithmetic abilities were the
most damaged. The evaluated auditory attention and processing abilities were lowered in almost all the assessed individuals.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to the learner
will be able to discuss the language ability profile and auditory
and visual of individuals with cleft lip and palate.
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
143
P026
P029
GRAMMATICAL ASPECTS IN SPONTANEOUS
COMMUNICATION IN CHILDREN WITH DOWN SYNDROME
CAPSAICIN CAN RETRIEVES AGE-RELATED SWALLOWING
DYSFUNCTION
Limongi S.C.O.1, Carvalho Ama 2, Marques SF2, Mello P2, Andrade
RV2
1
University of São Paulo, 2University of São Paulo, Brazil
Nishikubo Kaori
Department of Otolaryngology, Kochi University Medical School,
Japan
Summary: The aim of this study was to verify and characterize the grammatical aspects in spontaneous communication
in children with Down syndrome using the MLU measures and
word classes. They presented specific difficulties with the use
of grammatical morphemes and closed class words, whereas
words of higher semantic value were produced more frequently. These findings are important for directing speech-language
therapy.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to discuss
grammatical aspects in spontaneous communication in children with Down syndrome.
Summary: Aging causes swallowing dysfunction. To develop
therapeutic management for it, the present study was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of capsaicin administration for
age-related swallowing dysfunction.
These results showed that disturbed swallowing function in elderly adults were improved by an administration of capsaicin
troche and supported the possible therapeutic effectiveness of
it for age-related swallowing dysfunction.
Learner Outcomes:There is a possibility of therapeutic effectiveness of capsaicin troche for age-related swallowing dysfunction.
P027
P030
ADAPTATIVE AND COMMUNICATIVE PERFORMANCES AS
MEASURES OF THE EVOLUTIONAL PATTERN IN AUTISM
SPECTRUM DISORDERS
Tamanaha AC1, Mercadante MT1, Marteleto MRF1, Perissinoto J.2
1
UNIFESP, 2 Universidade Federal de São Paulo, Brazil
Summary: The aim of this apresentation will be to use the adaptative and communicative performances as measures of the
evolutional pattern in autism spectrum disorders.
Learner Outcomes: autism spectrum disorders, adaptative and
communicative performances.
P028
DYSPHAGIA IN PARKINSON?S DISEASE -A DYNAMIC
VIDEOFLUOROSCOPIC EVALUATIONNishizawa N1, Oridate N.2, Mesuda Y.3, Kariyasu M.4, Kikuchi S.5,
Takei A.6, Homma S.6, Kudou E.7, Kasai S. 2
1
Health Sciences University of Hokkaido, 2 Department of
Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery Hokkaido University Graduate
School of Medicine,
3
Department of Otolaryngology, Institute of Personalized Medical
Science, Health Sciences University of Hokkaido, 4 Department
of Communication Disorders, School of Psychological Sciences,
Health Sciences University of Hokkaido, 5Department of Neurology,
Sapporo Minami National Hospital, National Hospital Organization.
6
Hokuyukai Neurological Hospital, 7Shinsapporo Neurosurgical
Hospital, Sapporo, Japan
Summary: In an attempt to evaluate the timing of the swallowing events and displacement of the pharyngeal organs of
patients with Parkinson?s disease (PD), 17 videofluoroscopic
records from seven patients with idiopathic PD were analyzed
using UC Davis Dynamic Swallow Study approach. Increase in
oropharyngeal transit time and pharyngeal constriction ratio
was compatible with the motor disturbances associated with
PD.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to describe the
dynamics of swallowing disorder in PD in quantitative terms.
They will also be able to explain how DSS is useful to analyze
minor and multi-centric swallowing disorders.
REHABILITATIVE MANAGEMENT OF OROPHARYNGEAL
DYSPHAGIA IN PATIENT WITH TETANUS
Davison Mangilli Laura1, Rodrigues Padovani Aline2, Furquim de
Andrade Claudia Regina3
1
University of São Paulo, School of Medicine, 2University of São
Paulo, School of Medicine, Hospital das Clinicas,3Department
of Physiotherapy, Speech-language and Hearing Sciences, and
Occupational Therapy, University of São Paulo, School of Medicine,
São Paulo, Brazil
Summary: The purpose of this study was to characterize the
clinical management of dysphagia in tetanus? patients. Twentyeight patients underwent a clinical swallowing assessment and
treatment of dysphagia (mean age: 52 years; 89.3% male). All
patient received tracheostomy; the prevalence of oropharyngeal dysphagia was 78.6%; most of which were classified as moderate and moderate-severe; 85.7% was eligible to treatment of
dysphagia.
Learner Outcomes: The characterization of the dysphagia of
patients with tetanus provides medical teams, patients and
families with a wider and better description of the clinical situation, giving support to the diagnosis, prognostics and treatment. Given the current trend of having an evidence-based
practice, the characterization of the dysphagia of patients with
tetanus can contribute to the design of more effective procedures when evaluating, treating, and monitoring individuals
with this type of disorder.
P031
Working interdisciplinary in education:
problem- and competency- based learning
Vandevelde S.
University College Ghent, Belgium
Summary: In our program, students learn to work interdisciplinary in a team in a context of problem- and competencybased learning. Students from seven different programmes
work in teams. Starting from a case-study, they have to gather
knowledge about the other disciplines, analyse the care situation, make a interdisciplinary care intervention plan and present this plan.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to describe
how interdisciplinary work is organized in the speech-language
pathology and audiology program; explain how this course
helps students to obtain certain competencies, for example being able to work in a team setting.
144
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
P032
empirical evidence regarding the language abilities, measured
by norm-referenced tests and measures derived from analyses of spontaneous language samples, of children who stutter
(CWS) when compared to those of children who do not stutter
(CWNS). Results indicate that CWS score significantly lower than
CWNS on a broad range of different language skills.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to describe
differences in the various language domains (e.g., expressive
vocabulary) between young CWS and CWNS and also discuss
possible contributions of those reported differences to childhood stuttering.
THE EFFECTIVENESS OF A REMEDIAL READING TRAINING
PROGRAM WITH THE USE OF A METRONOME (RHYTHM)
FOR THE TREATMENT OF DYSLEXIA
Katsigri P.1, Van de Craen P.1 Vakirtzidellis I.2
1
Vrije Universitieit Brussel, Belgium, 2Athens Neurolinguistics Center,
Greece
Summary: Eight dyslexic French speaking subjects aged 8-10
were administered the Alouette reading test before and after
they received a Remedial Reading Training Program, based
on phonemic awareness specific training, with the use of a
metronome(rhythm). All subjects demonstrated significant
progress in reading when pretest and posttest results were
compared.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to discuss that
reading, with specific frequency rhythms, with the use of a metronome, enables dyslexic children to overcome reading and
learning disorders.
P033
PROSODIC ASPECTS OF READING IN STUDENTS WITH
DYSLEXIA
L.M. Alves*1C. Reis 2, Belo Horizonte A. Pinheiro3,Belo Horizonte S.
Capellini4, Marília M. Lalain5, A. Ghio6
1
LPL (Laboratoire Parole et Langage) - CNRS, Aix en Provence, 2 UFMG
(Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais), 3UFMG (Universidade Federal
de Minas Gerais), 4 UNESP (Universidade Estadual Paulista Júlio de
Mesquita Filho), 5Gipsa-lab, DPC (Département Parole et Cognition)
– CNRS, Grenoble, 6LPL (Laboratoire Parole et Langage) - CNRS, Aix en
Provence, Brazil, France
Summary: This project aims to understand the role of prosody
in reading aloud. The utterances of dyslexics and control children during reading and recalling tasks were analysed both perceptually and acoustically. The data identified unique prosodic
characteristics in dyslexic children who had significant difficulty
with the intonational and temporal structure of speech during
the interpretation task.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to describe the
prosodic and temporal aspects of reading aloud by dyslexics
and control children as well as the relationship between reading and interpreting.
P034
IDENTIFICATION OF USE OF LASER ACUPUNCTURE IN
TREATMENT OF STUTTERING
Shafiei Bijan
Isfahan university of medical sciences, Iran
Summary: The laser acupuncture therapy is a way to treatment of stuttering but there is no enough published scientific
research around it. The aim of the present research was to explore the effects of laser acupuncture on treatment or decrease
of severity of stuttering.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to discuss
about the new ways of treatment of stuttering.
P035
LANGUAGE SKILLS OF CHILDREN WHO STUTTER: A METAANALYTICAL REVIEW
Ntourou K., Conture E. G., Lipsey M. W.
Vanderbilt University, United States
Summary: The purpose of this meta-analysis was to integrate
P036
A SINGLE SUBJECT STUDY ON THE EFFECTS OF AN
INTENSIVE GROUP THERAPY PROGRAM FOR ADULTS WHO
STUTTER
Fourlas G.
Stuttering Research & Therapy Center, Greece
Summary: We are evaluating the effects of an intensive group
therapy program for a 29 year old man who stutters. Therapy
focuses on communication change and is based on principles
of block modification, avoidance reduction therapy, brief therapy, PCP and self organized learning. Pre- and post- therapy
measurements indicate significant communicative change and
changes in both overt and covert stuttering characteristics.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to discuss the
effects of an intensive group therapy program on adults who
stutter and to explain how group therapy may result in changes
on the clients communication.
P037
DRAMA-THERAPY AS A PART OF GROUP THERAPY FOR
STUTTERING PEOPLE
Stanicek Petr (PhDr.)
Czech Republic
Summary: We use drama therapy mainly with stuttering clients with great success for many years. This therapy has also a
very strong effect on clients with other fluency disorders. We
teach stuttering clients to use techniques of fluent speech in
stressed situations. We found drama therapy as a very good way
to achieve these aims.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to explain
meaning of drama-therapy during speech therapy.
P038
EDUCATING FLUENCY SPECIALISTS IN EUROPE: AN
INNOVATIVE PROGRAM
Eggers K.1, Leahy M.2
1
Lessius University College, Antwerp, Belgium and University of
Leuven, Leuven, Belgium, 2Trinity College Dublin, Ireland
Summary: The ECSF-project consists of a harmonized graduate fluency program and a one-year post-qualification specialization training. Developed by eight European universities, it
provides the means whereby graduates will achieve equal standards of competence to practice in the field of fluency disorders.
We will describe the criteria that guided the consortium in their
decision making process for an optimal learning environment.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to (1) understand the rationale for development of the ECSF-course, and (2)
have insight in the content of both the undergraduate as the
post-qualification specialisation course.
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
P039
P042
ORAL/ MOTOR- SENSORY THERAPY OF A MALE
ADOLESCENT SUFFERING FROM FACIO- SCAPULOHUMERAL MUSCULAR DYSTROPHY(FSHMD) LANDOUZYDEJERINE
DYSARTHRIA IS A COMMON IMPAIRMENT IN
NEUROMUSCULAR DISEASES
Litinas N.,
Private Practice, Greece
Summary: FSHMD is an autosomal dominant form of muscular
dystrophy that affects the skeletal muscles of the face (facio),
scapula (scapulo) and upper arm (humeral). Speech therapy
applied icing and brushing techniques and transferred those
techniuqes in real life activities(straw sipping, whistling, blowing candles.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to describe, explain and use oral motor- sensory techniques in patients suffering from degenerative and acquired motor speech disorders.
P040
SURVEILLANCE OF COMMUNICATION AND EATING BY
CEREBRAL PALSY REGISTRIES
Hidecker M.J.C.1, Hanna C.B.2, Paneth N.3, Rosenbaum P.4, Kent R.D.5
1
Speech-Language Pathology, University of Central Arkansas, United
States, 2Communicative Disorders and Sciences, University of Buffalo,
United States,
3
Epidemiology, Michigan State University, United State,s
4
CanChild Centre for Childhood Disability Research, McMaster
University, Hamilton, Canada,
5
Waisman Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison, United States
Summary: Introduction: This study surveyed CP registries to
ascertain types of communication and eating data collected,
collection frequency, and operational definitions.
Methods: Registries completed a 21-question survey.
Results: Registries used different data collection formats and
different definitions for hearing, speech, eating, swallowing,
and language data.
Conclusion: Communication disorder professionals should
partner with registries, improving population-based prevalence
estimates and advancing appropriate service delivery.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to describe
registries surveillance of communication and eating disorders
and discuss possible roles for communication disorder professionals in cerebral palsy surveillance.
P041
MEASURES OF SPEECH INTELLIGIBILITY: EFFECTS OF
TRANSCRIPTION ANALYSES AND SPEECH STIMULI
Barreto S. S.1, Ortiz K.Z.2
1
Federal University of São Paulo, 2UNIFESP, Brazil
Summary: The present study investigated the influence of type
of stimuli and transcription analysis on speaker intelligibility
measures for speakers with no communication disorders. The
study involved 30 speakers and 60 listeners. Speech stimuli consisted of sentences, words and pseudowords. It was concluded
that both transcription analysis and stimuli types influenced
the intelligibility scores of the population studied, especially for
pseudowords.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to discuss the
effects of the variables on intelligibility scores of speech by
transcription.
145
Knuijt S., Kalf J.G., de Swart B.J.M.
Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen Centre
of Evidence-Based Practice, Department of Rehabilitation/Speech
Pathology, The Netherlands
Summary: The prevalence of dysarthria was assessed in two
large groups of Dutch patients with neuromuscular disorders.
Prevalence rates up to 70% were found. Dysarthria can be present in all disease categories (motor neuron diseases, neuropathies, neuromuscular junction diseases and muscle diseases).
Although severe dysarthria’s do occur, the majority of the dysarthria’s in this study was mild.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to understand
the prevalence of dysarthria as assessed in patients with neuromuscular disorders.
P043
MASTICATORY PROCESS ANALYSIS OF ASTHMATIC
CHILDREN: CLINICAL AND ELECTROMYOGRAPHIC
ANALYSIS
Andrade Daniele Cunha*, Karla Bezerra Oliveira Gerlane Nascimento, Gomes Fernandes Elthon Silva, Andrade Renata Cunha,
Milena Freire Lima Renata Regis, Regina Arruda Silvia Moraes,
Maria Machado Barabosa C&E Castro, Justino Hilton Silva
Brazil
Summary: This research was realized to verify the clinical and
electromyographic characteristics related to the masticatory
process in asthmatic children and to relate the electrical activity of masseter and anterior temporal. No significant differences
in this process between asthmatic and non-asthmatic children
were found but in asthmatics, the masticatory process may
have some alterations inherit of anatomo-functional changes.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to verify the
clinical and electromyographic characteristics related to the
masticatory process in asthmatic children and to relate the
electrical activity of masseter and anterior temporal.
P044
TEAMING ACROSS CULTURES: PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT
FOR CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES
Roman T. R.
Bilingual Multicultural Services, Inc, United States
Summary: In the 21st century, speech-language pathologists/
audiologists are serving culturally and linguistically diverse
population. The poster will show how understanding of Bolivian values and beliefs regarding communication and impairments influences the specific strategies used in assessment
and intervention. Such information is essential if professionals/
paraprofessionals are to provide that will enable individuals to
participate in the activities of their family and community.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to recognize
participants’ rights as well as language and cultural differences
and identify the ways that restrictions in activities and contextual factors influence children’s participation in life activities.
146
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
P045
and normal controls; (2) the hearing-impaired group had larger
means and standard deviations of the absolute difference between the two trials of sustained vowel phonation; and (3)voice
dysfunction of the hearing-impaired group was evident.
Learner Outcomes: After completing this session, participants
will be able to describe the acoustic features in speakers with
hearing-impairment.
IDENTIFYING BARRIERS TO COMMUNICATION: USING THE
INPATIENT FUNCTIONAL COMMUNICATION INTERVIEW
(IFCI) IN A SUBACUTE SETTING
Poole S. M.
Heidelberg Repatriation Hospital, Austin Health, Australia
Summary: A series of patients in an aged care subacute setting
was interviewed using the Inpatient Functional Communication Interview. Several barriers to communication were identified. Speech pathologists initiated ten changes in the aged care
wards, including initiation of routine multidisciplinary assessments with interpreters for Culturally and Linguistically Diverse
patients. These changes have been sustained over a five year
period.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to - describe
a method of identifying barriers to communication in an inpatient setting; - explain how speech pathologists have a role in
improving communication for all patients, including those who
are not referred for assessment.
P046
EVALUATION OF VOCAL FUNCTION AFTER TOTAL
LARYNGECTOMY
Minami K.1, Haji T.2
1
Kurashiki Central Hospital, 2 Otolaryngology, Kurashiki Central
Hospital, Japan
Summary: Indwelling Groningen voice prostheses were placed
in tracheo-esophageal shunt of 20 patients during laryngectomy in Kurashiki Central Hospital. Ten patients were available
for follow-up studies in January 2010, and all succeeded in prosthetic voice.
Vocal function, vocal quality and Voice Handicap Index-10 were
assessed in these ten patients with voice prostheses.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to discuss the
vocal function, vocal quality and VHI-10 in laryngectomees.
P047
EVALUATION OF EMG ACTIVITY PF MASTICATORY
MUSCLES IN THE DIFFERENT FACIAL TYPES
Vieira Marilena, Bommarito Silvana, Miranda Andre
UNIFESP, Brazil
Summary: Objective: to evaluate electromyographic activity in
the different facial types. Surface EMG was performed in 47 subjects (mean age = 29.5 years). Temporal, masseter and digastric
were assessed at reast, during teeth clenching and mastication
activity. Correlations with facial types were observed for certain
muscles and some functions.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to describe the
activity of masticatory muscles in the different facial types.
P048
VOICE ACOUSTIC ANALYSIS OF PRELINGUAL SEVERE
TO PROFOUND HEARING-IMPAIRED TAIWANESE
ADOLESCENTS
Wang Yu-Tsai1, Chung Yuh-Mei2, Lu Hsiu-Jung3, Hsieh Wen-Hua2
1
School of Dentistry National Yang-Ming University, 2Department
of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Taipei Veterans General
Hospital, 3School of Dentistry National Yang-Ming University, Taiwan
Summary: This study reported acoustic analysis of voice dysfunction in speakers with hearing-impairment. Results showed
that (1) the suitability was fairly good for both hearing-impaired
P049
OUTCOME MEASUREMENTS OF VOCAL HYGIENE PROGRAM
AND RESONANT VOICE THERAPY FOR HYPERFUNCTIONAL
VOICE DISORDERED PATIENTS: A PRELIMINARY STUDY
Chen Sheng Hwa1, Hsiao Tzu-Yu2, Yang Cheng-Chien3, Chang ChinWen4, Lin Yuh-Yu5, Chiang Shu-Chiung4
1
Department of Speech and Hearing Disorders and Sciences, National
Taipei College of Nursing, 2Department of Otolaryngology, National
Taiwan University,
3
Department of Otolaryngology, Mackay Memorial Hospital,
4
Department of Informatics, Veterans General Hospital-Taipei,
5
Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Speech Therapy Division, 4
Department of Informatics, Veterans General Hospital-Taipei, Taiwan
Summary: The study is to investigate short term outcome of
vocal hygiene program and resonant voice therapy for hyperfunctional voice disordered patients. The results revealed that
both methods can improve communication function for the patients. Resonant voice therapy can further improve voice characteristics and vocal function for the patients.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to 1. learn the
methods of vocal hygiene program and resonant voice therapy;
and 2. the outcome of the 2 methods for hyperfunctional voice
disordered patients.
P050
VOICE COMPLAINTS AND VOICE DISORDERS EXPERIENCED
BY INSTRUMENTAL MUSICIANS
Tormanen H. R. M., Lehtihalmes M.
University of Oulu, Finland
Summary: The purpose of this study was to 1) determine the
prevalence of voice complaints experienced by violinists and pianists and 2) identify variables associated with voice disorders.
Forty-eight piano or violin students and teachers, and orchestral violinists responded to the Internet-based questionnaire.
22.9% of the respondents had current voice disorder. Mental
and physical health was associated with voice complaints.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to discribe
instrumental musicians health status and its relation to vocal
health.
P051
CHOIR SINGING IMPROVES DEPRESSIVE SYMPTOMS AND
VOCAL QUALITY IN THE ELDERLY
Cassol M.1, Bos A. J. G.2
1
Federal University of Heath Sciences of Porto Alegre,.2 Pontifical
Catholic University of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil
Summary: The objective of this research is therefore to observe
the relationship between choir singing and the possible changes in vocal quality and in the prevalence of depressive symptoms in healthy elders.The results corroborate our hypothesis
that choir singing would improve depressive symptoms, the
study showed a gradual reduction of the symptoms initially detected during the two years choir singing activities.
Learner Outcomes: This study describes that choir singing
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
would improve vocal quality and depressive symptoms, discussing and showing a gradual reduction of the symptoms of
depression and vocal aging process during the choir singing
activities.
P052
STUDY ON COMMUNICATION AND PSYCHOLOGICAL
CHARACTERISTICS IN A GROUP OF INDIVIDUALS WITH
OBSESSIVE-COMPULSIVE DISORDER
Cassol M.1, Reppold C.2,Ferrão Y.3,Almada C.4, Gurgel L.5
Federal University of Heath Sciences of Porto Alegre - Brazil
2
Federal University of Heath Sciences of Porto Alegre – Brazil
3
Methodist University of Porto Alegre – Brazil
4
Federal University of Heath Sciences of Porto Alegre - Brazil
5
Federal University of Heath Sciences of Porto Alegre – Brazil
1
Summary: Auditory, acoustic and psychological aspects of
voice self-assessment of patients with obsessive-compulsive
disorder were compared to those of healthy individuals. The
clinical group attributed voice characteristics ‘sad’ and ‘bad’,
hoarse with changes in resonance focus, changes in speed of
speech. The study concluded that the combined intervention of
speech therapy and psychology is promising in the treatment
of this pacients.
Learner Outcomes: In the attempt to understand the Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder patient’s, psychiatrists and speech
therapists will discuss one form of combined intervention of
speech therapy and psychology is promising to get improved
quality of life and communication for patients with this kind of
psychiatric disorder.
P053
POSTSURGICAL VOCAL FUNCTION OF PATIENTS WITH
REINKE’S EDEMA TREATED BY THE MICRODEBRIDER
Haji T.1, Honda K.2, Minami K.3, Maruyama H.3
1
Otolaryngology, Kurashiki Centarl Hospital, 2Kyoto Medical
Center,3Kurashiki Central Hospital, Japan
Summary: Twenty patients with severe Reinke?s edema were
managed surgically using the microdebrider. Pre- and post-operative vocal function were evaluated by auditory perceptual
GRBAS scale and phonatory parameters calculated by Multi-Dimensional Voice Program in KAY-PENTAX Computerized Speech
Lab. Significant improvement was observed in GRBAS scale and
phonatory parameters. Favorable postoperative vocal function
was obtained by the use of the microdebrider.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to use a microdebrider in treating Reinke’s edema with confidence and
estimate improvement of postsurgical vocal function.
P054
PERCEPTUAL-AUDITORY VOCAL ASSESSMENT AND
ITS ASSOCIATION TO OTORHINOLARYNGOLOGICAL
EVALUATION OF TEACHERS WITH VOCAL COMPLAINTS IN
THE CITY OF SAO PAULO
Ghirardi ACAM1, Ferreira L.P. 2, Giannini SPP1
1
Catholic University of São Paulo PUC-SP, 2Pontificia Universidade
Catolica de São Paulo, Brazil
Summary: This study presents a significant statistical association between perceptual-auditory vocal assessment and ENT
evaluation in female teachers in São Paulo, Brazil. Therefore,
147
the GRBASI scale can be considered as an efficient and low-cost
tool for screening teachers for vocal disorders in school environment, so professionals can refer them to specialized exams/
treatment when necessary.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to discuss the
validity of using the GRBASI scale as a screening tool for vocal
disorders in teachers in school environment, and discuss an association between medical and perceptual-auditory vocal assessments.
P055
THE PERSON WITH DYSPHONIA: COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS
PRE AND POST VOICE THERAPY PROGRAM
Bittante de Oliveira I.
IALP membership, Brazil
Summary: Vocal therapy program based in cognitive conceptions may provide better understanding of the optimal communication standards. This study analyzes the efficacy of a cognitive voice therapy program stablishing comparisons with a
traditional voice therapy. Perceptual-auditory, acoustic analysis
and protocols of quality of life and voice were used in order to
investigate the results.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to improve
their knowledge about cognitive voice therapy efficacy.
P056
RELIABILITY AND VALIDITY OF VHI (VOICE HANDICAP
INDEX) AND V-RQOL (VOICE-RELATED QUALITY OF LIFE):
JAPANESE VERSION
Shiromoto O.1, Ikenaga E.1, Sato M.2
1
Prefectural University of Hiroshima), 2Hiroshima City University,
Japan
Summary: The purpose of this study is to examine reliability
and validity of the Japanese version of VHI and V-RQOL. VHI and
V-RQOL in the Japanese version showed a high level of reliability and the presence or absence of dysphonia can be predicted
through VHI and V-RQOL.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to discuss
about reliability and validity of VHI and V-RQOL.
P057
AGE-RELATED MORPHOLOGICAL CHANGES OF THE
INTRINSIC LARYNGEAL MUSCLES
Hyodo M.1, Nishikubo Kaori2, Nishida N.3, Taguchi A.3, Desaki J.3
1
Kochi University Medical School,2 Department of Otolaryngology,
Kochi University Medical School, 3Ehime University School of
Medicine, Japan
Summary: Age-related morphological changes of the intrinsic laryngeal muscles were studied to clarify the feature and
mechanism with aging of the laryngeal function. The cricothyroid muscle showed significant morphological changes with
aging, however, the thyroarytenoid or posterior cricoarytenoid
muscles lacked these changes. This may reflect the difference in
the role of individual laryngeal function.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to explain functional changes of the intrinsic laryngeal muscles and describe
why aging leads to hoarse voice and misswallowing.
148
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
TUESDAY 24/8/2010
P058
VIOLENCE AND COMMUNICATION: WHAT THE TEACHERS
PERCEIVE
Learner Outcomes: We draw implications for bilingual aphasia
assessment and treatment practice, and relate to current psycholinguistic theory.
Machado M.A.M.P., Rocha A.B.
University of São Paulo, Brazil
P062
Summary: Children are vulnerable to violence and it may cause
physical / mental development problems. This study aimed
to identify learning disabilities in students who suffered it by
a form filled out by teachers of public schools. All speech difficulties were noted. The performance of students who suffer
violence as well as those that cause it were worse compared to
others.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to identify
learning problems who suffer domestic violence or violence in
the school or provoke violence in schools; and to discuss differences and similarities among the symptons.
P059
AUGMENTATIVE AND ALTERNATIVE COMMUNICATION:
FACTORS LEADING TO ITS USE IN THE FAMILY CONTEXT
Berberian AP1, Kruger S1, Guarinello AC1, Massi G1, Carnevale L2,
Santana AP1
1
University Tuiuti of Paranα, 2Unicentro, Brazil
Summary: The participants after the presentation will be able
to clarify and analyze the factors that contribute for the use of
AAC in the family context, focusing on communication boards.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to discuss about
AUGMENTATIVE AND ALTERNATIVE COMMUNICATION in Brazil.
P060
THE PROCESSING OF AMBIGUOUS SUBJECT PRONOUN
ANAPHORA: EVIDENCE FROM BROCA’S APHASIA IN GREEK
Peristeri Eleni, Tsimpli Ianthi Maria
Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece
Summary: In this study we report two sets of experiments,
which have investigated how discourse-level information interacts with grammatical choices in on-line sentence processing
in a group of eight Greek-speaking agrammatic patients with
Broca’s aphasia and a group of fifteen age-matched languageunimpaired controls.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to conceptualize Broca’s aphasia in terms of a processing deficit rather than a
syntactic breakdown.
P061
SINGLE-WORD PRODUCTION IN BILINGUAL APRAXIA OF
SPEECH (AOS)
Overton Venet M.
University of Geneva, Switzerland
Summary: A single-case experimental study of a bilingual Tagalog-English speaker with acquired AOS. 3 single-word production tasks were designed, relating to current debates about levels
of breakdown in the AOS speech production process, either of
phonological encoding or in the initiation-realization of phonetic
planning. We propose phonetic analysis of latencies and qualitative analysis of performance in 3 speech production situations.
ESCRIPTION AND ANALYSIS OF PROCESSES
CONVESACIONAIS PRESENT IN THE DISCOURSE OF A
SOCIAL GROUP OF APHASIC AND NON-APHASIC
Lucia Gurgel da Maria Costa*, Augusto Fernando Pacifico,
Kalinny Batista Jessika Sobral
Brazil
Summary: According Coudry (1988) and Morato et al. (2002),
aphasia is a language disorder in which there are changes in
linguistic processes, both in terms of production, and interpretation of language caused by injury received in the central
nervous system due to cerebrovascular accidents (CVA), head
trauma (TCEs) or tumors.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be enabled to understand the proposed issue, seeking a better tool for therapeutic
intervention speech therapy successful. To foster among students of speech debate and the study of texts relevant to the
subject, as a means of extending knowledge.
P063
AUDITORY COMPREHENSION TEST IN TURKISH: A PILOT
STUDY FOR THE VOCABULARY SUBTEST
Tunçer A. M., Mavis I.
Anadolu University, Turkey
Summary: The aphasia test in Turkish does not allow the clinician to evaluate patients’ comprehension in detail. Thus we
aimed to do a frame study of a subtest of a planned auditory
comprehension tool. 15 aphasic and 15 healthy adults will participate this study. Words, word combinations and sentences
have been developed. The data is being collected.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to discuss a developing comprehension assessment tool in Turkish for aphasic patients. We will describe word comprehension abilities of
healthy and aphasic adults.
P064
THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE FIRST SCREENING TEST IN
MALTESE FOR ACQUIRED LANGUAGE DISORDERS
Delia Kenneth1, Ellul Mercer E, Fiorini H, Ameen S, Micallef R, Grech
Helen2
1
Speech Language Department, 2University of Malta, Malta
Summary: The study aimed at creating a screening tool for Maltese elderly with language difficulties based on normative data.
This was collected and variables included gender, educational
background, literacy, bilingualism, history of neurological disorders, cognitive, sensory impairments. Data was also collected
from 10 persons with aphasia. A cut-off point was established.
Education level, reading ability and bilingualism influenced results positively.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to determine
the need for normative data collection prior to collection of
data from clients as well as variables that need to be considered
prior to test administration.
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
P065
HEARING AND OTOSCOPIC OUTCOMES CORRELATION
IN INFANTS FROM A UNIVERSAL NEONATAL HEARING
SCREENING PROGRAM
Resende L.M., Ferreira J., Carvalho S.A.S., Bassi I., Oliveira I.S.
Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Brazil
Summary: Double-blinded study correlating neonatal auditory
brainstem responses, timpanometry and otocospic examinations aiming to describe prevalence of conductive hearing conditions in infants as well as determine the agreement between
routine evaluation procedures such as pass/fail criteria in the
screening and posterior medical and clinical evaluations (otoscopy and timpanometry).
Learner Outcomes: After the presentation, participants should
be albe to discuss prevalence of conductive hearing disorders in
infants from newborn nursery, as well as describe the usefulness
and correlations among screening and diagnostic procedures.
P066
AUDITORY PROCESSING DISORDERS: GENDER
COMPARATIVE DATA
Sanchez M. L.1, Alvarez A.M.M.2 Chaves A.G.1 Tangerina R.P.1
1
Fleury Medicina e Saude,2 Ambulatório de distúrbios de aprendizagem do Instituto da Criança HCFMUSP e do Laboratório de Atenção,
São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
Summary: The investigation of Auditory Processing Disorders
prevalence between male and female population in a retrospective study of 656 evaluations including 6-to-14 year-old individuals referred upon medical recommendation for a behavioral
central auditory function assessment in order to determine the
existence of auditory deficits underlying speech language impairment, learning disability, and attention deficit complaints.
Learner Outcomes: Learners will be able to discuss the importance of gender when analysing central auditory disorders
symptons and manifestations.
P067
THE ESTIMATION OF COGNITIVE AND REFLEX FUNCTIONS
IN DEPRESSED PATIENTS, DURING THE COURSE OF
UNIPOLAR AND BIPOLAR AFFECTIVE DISEASES
Sekula Alicja1, Kamińska Ilona, Obrębowski Andrzej, Świdziński
Piotr, Suwalska Aleksandra2
1
Dep.of Phoniatry and Audiology, 2Medical University in Pozna,
Department of Psychiatry, Poland
Summary: Were undertaken multidirectional research of the
clinical symptoms (reduce of hearing, smell, taste and balance),
which sick people suffer from depression during the treatment of
the following return of the disease report. Material concerns 26
sick people, aged 22-65 (the average age is 45), who suffered from
the endogenic depression in the course of affective diseases.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to undestand
the communiction disorders.
P068
TEMPORAL RESOLUTION IN MILD HEARING LOSS
Carvallo R.M.M.1, Sanches S. G. G.2, Nishiyama A. K., Silva K. A. L.,
Vilela N.
1
School of Medicine of the University of São Paulo), 2University of São
Paulo, Brazil
Summary: The aim was to evaluate the influence of pure-tone
thresholds on temporal resolution task. 51 adults, divided into 3
149
groups: Control Group - normal hearing without tinnitus; Study
Group I - normal hearing and tinnitus complaints; Study Group
II- sensorineural hearing loss. They underwent pure-tone audiometry and Gaps-in-noise Test. Hearing loss may affect the performance in the Gaps-in-Noise Test.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to discuss about
the influence of hearing loss on auditory temporal resolution.
P069
HEARING SCREENING IN PRIMARY HEALTHCARE CONTEXTS
Gomes MSR, Lichtig I
University of São Paulo, Brazil
Summary: Aim: to train community agents to apply a parental
questionnaire to identify hearing loss in children aged 0 to 3
years old; and to compare the questionnaire results with otoacoustic emissions screening (TOAE). Parents of 238 children
responded to the questionnaire and 222 children wee audiologically screened. Questionnaire presented low sensibility and
specificity, however demonstrated contribution for hearing
health promotion.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to discuss alternative methods for mass hearing screening in developing
countries considering the participation of community agents;
verify the benefits of a community based hearing screening
program in primary healthcare contexts.
P070
TREATMENT EFFICACY OF SPEECH AND LANGUAGE
INTERVENTION ACCORDING TO MORPHOLOGICAL
CHANGES FOR IRANIAN HARD OF HEARING PRIMARY
STUDENTS
Salmani M.1, Sadollahi A.A.1, Mahmoodi Bakhtiari B.2, Ghorbani R.1,
Seyed S.1, Alebooyeh N.1, Mokhtarzadeh M.1, Alizadeh H.1 (Semnan
University Of Medical Sciences), Ziyarati F.
1
Semnan University Of Medical Sciences, 2 Tehran University, Iran
Summary: this paper is about treatment efficacy for hard of
hearing children. it compared two intervention approaches regard to their morphological changes. of course many aspects
were analyzed to survey expansion.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to 1- they learn
about treament approaches and their worthy for treatment.
P071
USEFULNESS OF THE TEST OF EARLY LANGUAGE
DEVELOPMENT TO DETECT CHIILDREN WITH LANGUAGE
DISORDERS
Befi-Lopes D.M., Giusti E., Puglisi M. L., Gândara J. P.
University of São Paulo, Brazil
Summary: This study analyzed TELD-3’s sensitivity to detect
language impairments in developmental associate disorders.
The test was administered to 79 children from different groups:
Preterm, Specific Language Impairment, Mild Intellectual Disability and Down Syndrome. Results showed that the Brazilian
version of the TELD-3 was useful to detect language impairments and to discriminate developmental associate disorders.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to discuss the
usefulness of TELD-3 to detect Language Impairments and discriminate Child Language Disorders.
150
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
P072
P075
PERSONAL NARRATIVE SKILLS OF CHILDREN WITH DOWN
SYNDROME
MULTI-FEATURE MMN PARADIGM AS A TOOL FOR
INVESTIGATING AUDITION IN TWO-YEAR-OLD CHILDREN
van Bysterveldt A.K.1, Westerveld M.F.1, Gillon G.1, Foster-Cohen S.
1
University of Canterbury, 2The Champion Centre, New Zeland
Niemitalo-Haapola E.1, Lapinlampi S.1, Remes R.1, Kujala T.2,
Jansson-Verkasalo E.3
1
University of Oulu, Faculty of Humanities; Oulu University Hospital,
Neurocognitive Unit, Oulu, 2University of Oulu, Institute of Clinical
Medicine, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Oulu, 3 University of
Oulu, Logopedics and Oulu University Hospital, Neurocognitive Unit,
Oulu, Finland
Summary: This poster reports the personal narrative skills of 26
children with Down syndrome attending mainstream primary
schools in New Zealand. Spoken samples were elicited using a
standard protocol which prompts the child to provide personal
narratives, using photos and short scripts. The findings highlight the difficulties these children have in producing personal
narratives both at micro- and macrostructure levels.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to demonstrate
an increased understanding of aspects of narrative language;
demonstrate an understanding of the clinical implications for
children with Down syndrome and their teachers and therapists.
P073
COMPARISON OF WORD FINDING (RENFREW) AND
SENSORY PROFILE (SHORT FORM-DUNN 1999) SCORES
IN CHILDREN WITH HIGH FUCTIONING AUTISM AND
ASPERGER SYNDROME
Bella Stavroula, Kokmotos Panagiotis, Alexandrou Efstratios
Proseggisi Special Education Centre, Greece
Summary: We discover a correlation between High Functioning Autism and Asperger Syndrome and a given control group.
The visual-acoustic, the vestibular-kinetic system and low energy-weakness affect the development of active vocabulary in
children with HFA and Asperger Syndrome. Children with HFA
and Asperger’s present larger difficulties in active vocabulary.
Sensory difficulties is the common trait of both groups.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to draw comparisons of word finding (renfrew) and sensory profile (short
form-dunn 1999) scores in children with high fuctioning autism
and asperger syndrome.
Summary: The mismatch negativity (MMN) can be elicited by
using multi-feature paradigm. It has been used with adult subjects, but not with children under the age of three years. The
aim of this ongoing study is to evaluate the applicability of the
multi-feature paradigm in investigating two-year-old children.
The results will be presented and discussed.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to describe the
basic idea of the multi-feature MMN paradigm; evaluate the applicability of the multi-feature paradigm in the MMN recordings
in children at the age of two years.
P076
AGE AND GENDER EFFECTS IN SPEECH INCONSISTENCY
BRAZILIAN PORTUGUESE CHILDREN
Castro M.M., Wertzner H.F.
University of São Paulo, Brazil
Summary: Speech inconsistency is characterized by variable
productions of the same lexical items within the same context.
Inconsistency has been associated with phonological planning.
This study describes how age and gender affect inconsistency
of Brazilian Portuguese speaking children with and without
phonological disorder.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to discuss
speech inconsistency in phonological disorder.
P077
CHILDREN’S SENTENCE COMPREHENSION ABILITIES:
THE ROLE OF SLI AND SOCIO-ECONOMIC DIFFERENCES
P074
THE ROLE OF HIGHER VISUAL INFORMATION PROCESSING
ABILITY IN JAPANESE CHILDREN WITH DEVELOPMENTAL
DYSLEXIA
T. Gotoh , A. Uno , N. Haruhara , M. Kaneko , N. Awaya , J.
Kozuka1,2,6, S. Katano1,2
1
Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, University of
Tsukuba
2
LD/Dyslexia Centre
3
Faculty of Health Sciences, Mejiro University
4
Faculty of Medical Science for Health, Teikyo Heisei University
5
Department of Rehabilitation, Tokyo Saiseikai Central Hospital
6
Saitama Children’s Medical Center, Japan
1,2
1,2
2,3
2,4
2,5
Summary: We analyzed visual information processing from
lower to higher part of function in fifty-nine normal and twenty
developmental dyslexic children. All children with developmental dyslexia showed significantly lower scores in both line
orientation and visual memory task. Our results suggest that
higher visual information processing deficits could be one of
the causes of developmental dyslexia in Japanese speaking
children.
Learner Outcomes: After completing this session, participants
will be able to discuss higher visual information processing deficits could be one of the causes of developmental dyslexia in
Japanese speaking children.
Puglisi M. L., Befi-Lopes D.M.
University of São Paulo, Brazil
Summary: This study analyzed the influences of Specific Language Impairment (SLI) and Socio-economic Status (SES) on
sentence comprehension abilities. Two hundred and six children from different SES (low and high) and diagnosis (normal
and SLI) performed both the singular/ plural detection task and
a sentence comprehension test. SLI effects were stronger and
broader than SES effects, particularly, for the youngest group.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to discribe SES
and SLI influences on sentence comprehension abilities and
discuss the role of both conditions on language development.
P078
COMPARISON OF PHONOLOGICAL PROCESSES AND
SPEECH INDEXES IN BRAZILIAN CHILDREN WITH AND
WITHOUT PHONOLOGICAL DISORDERS
Wertzner H.F., Galea Des, Pagan-Neves Lo, Barroso Tf
University of São Paulo, Brazil
Summary: Aim was to compare typically developing and
phonological disordered children according to phonological
processes and speech measures. Measures were different, indicating better performance of the control group. This group
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
also presented lower occurrence of: Velar and palatal fronting,
liquid and cluster simplification, final consonant simplification,
fricative and stop devoicing and ‘others’. Backing to palatal was
different in naming test.
Learner Outcomes: Explain Differences Between Typically Developing And Phonological Disorderd Children According To
Phonological Processes And Speech Indexes; Explain The Importance Of Using Objective Methods To Evaluate Phonologically Disordered Children; Get To Know The Most Used Phonological Processes By Brazilian-Portuguese Speaking Children.
P079
THE EFFECT OF CHILDHOOD RECURRENT ACUTE OTITIS
MEDIA ON THE DEVELOPMENT OF AUDITORY PROCESSING
AND LANGUAGE
Lapinlampi S.1, Niemitalo-Haapola E.1, Raappana A.2, Kujala T.2,
Remes R.1, Suominen K3, Kujala T.2, Jansson-Verkasalo E.4
1
University of Oulu, Faculty of Humanities, Oulu University Hospital,
Neurocognitive Unit, Oulu, 2University of Oulu, Institute of Clinical
Medicine, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Oulu, 3University of
Oulu, 4University of Oulu, Logopedics and Oulu University Hospital,
Neurocognitive Unit, Oulu, Finland
Summary: Speech perception skills in infancy predict later language development. There are still great controversies about
the consequences of temporary fluctuating hearing loss caused
by recurrent acute otitis media (RAOM) for the later language
outcomes. In the ongoing study auditory event-related potentials (ERPs) and language development of two-year old children
with RAOM and age-matched controls will be evaluated.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to describe how
mismatch negativity brain response indexes auditory discrimination and sensory memory and discuss the consequenses of
childhood recurrent acute otitis media to the central auditory
processes.
P080
AVERAGE TIME FOR SPEECH THERAPY DISCHARGE BASED
ON THREE PHONOLOGICAL MODELS
Bolli Mota H., Wiethan F.M., Melo R.M.
UFSM, Brazil
Summary: This study aimed to compare the average time for
speech therapy discharge between three therapy models for
phonological disorders - Modified Cycles; ABAB-Withdrawal
and Multiple Probes, and Maximal Oppositions. The sample
consisted of 38 children with mild or mild-moderate deviation,
aged between 5:0 and 6:11. There was no statistically difference
between the number of sessions in the therapy models.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to kwow more
about phonological models to therapy of phonological disorders; compare different models of therapy regarding time of
therapy.
P081
THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN PAIRED ASSOCIATED
LEARNING, RAPID AUTOMATISED NAMING,
PHONOLOGICAL PROCESSING SKILLS AND SPELLING IN
TYPICAL GERMAN-SPEAKING 2ND GRADERS.
Schellenberger L. L.1 Bendler S.2 Di Betta A.M.3 Schaefer B.4
1
University of Tuebingen, Germany, 2University of Hanover, Germany,
3
University of Derby, United Kingdom, 4University of Newcastle upon
Tynem United Kingdom
Summary: The relationship between a large range of cogni-
151
tive skills and spelling skills were explored in a cross-linguistic
group study. Correlations and hierarchical regression analysis
revealed that these cognitive skills predicted significantly reading and writing.
The theoretical and clinical relevance of paired associated
learning (i.e. the ability associate a picture with a spoken/written word) for literacy/spelling acquisition will be discussed.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to 1. The participants will be able to describe the influence of the cognitive
skills (phonological processing, rapid automatised naming and
paired associated learning) on literacy and 2. the participants
will be able to discuss the particular importance of paired associated learning on spelling.
P082
THE DEVELOPMENT AND PREDICTIVE VALUE OF EARLY
VOCALIZATION IN VERY-LOW-BIRTH-WEIGHT CHILDREN
Stolt S.1, Lehtonen L.2,Haataja L2, Lapinleimu H.2, the PIPARI Study
Group2
1
University of Turku, 2Turku University Hospital, Finland
Summary: The rate of early vocalization development and its
predictive value to language performance, was analysed in 32
very low birth weight (VLBW) and 35 full-term children. There
was no significant difference between the groups in the rate of
vocalization development, if age was corrected for VLBW children. The rate of vocalization development associated significantly with language performance in VLBW children.
Learner Outcomes: After completing this session, participants
will become aware of early vocalization development and its
predictive value to language skills at 2,0 in very low birth weight
children.
P083
SPECTROGRAPHIC ANALYSIS IN THE STUDY OF
ACQUISITION OF THE CONSONANT CLUSTER AS FOR THE
VARIABLE SEX
Giacchini Vanessa, V, Dias Roberta Freitas, R.F., Mota Helena Bolli,
H.B., Mezzomo Carolina Lisboa, C.L.
Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Brazil
Summary: Discusses the use of compensatory strategy of extending the sexes occurs in different ways. As also the phonological acquisition is normal and deviant uses this strategy in
a similar way. So can infer whether boys and girls with normal
acquisition or phonological acquire and use strategies to repair
the same.
Learner Outcomes: The participants will be able to understand
that boys and girls both normal phonological development, deviant, behave similarly to the employment strategy of compensatory lengthening.
P084
ARTICULATORY INDEXES IN PHONOLOGICALLY
DISORDERED CHILDREN ACCORDING TO THE PRESENCE OF
OTITIS MEDIA HISTORY
Wertzner H.F., Santos I.p., Pagan-Neves L.o.
University Of São Paulo, Brazil
Summary: Aim: to describe and to quantify different index types
in phonological disordered children according to the presence
or absence of otitis media history. Comparisons among relative
and absolute indexes measuring distortions, omissions and
substitutions were applied. Results indicated that all indexes
(except ACI) were able to differentiate children’s articulatory
152
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
performance. Otitis history caused more substitutions and distortions than omissions.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to discuss The
Use Of Indexes Applied To Phonological Disorders; Discuss The
Interference Of Otitis Media History In Phonological Development.
P085
ASSESSMENT OF SPEECH INPUT ABILITIES IN CHILDREN
AGED 3,7-4,6 YEARS OF AGE
Geronikou E.1 Grammenou S.M.2, Kalogianni S., Koutsioumba G.
1
ATEI Patras, Dept. of Speech Therapy, 2ATEI Patras, Greece
Summary: In this survey, Greek children’s skills of speech input
processing were assessed. The children were aged 3,7-4,6 years
and as expected, there were developmental changes in performance. Older children seem to have better input abilities, use
their lexical representations for speech processing and threesyllable words and words with changes in place and manner of
articulation are easier perceived.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to discuss
speech processing abilities of pre-school age children and explain better the nature of a speech disorder.
P086
LURIA-NEBRASKA NEUROPSYCHOLOGICAL BATTERY
FOR CHILDREN AND LONG LATENCY AUDITORY EVOKED
POTENTIAL EVALUATION IN THE DIAGNOSIS OF DYSLEXIA
AND LEARNING DISABILITIES
Crenitte P.A.P.1, Gonçalves T.S.2, Ciasca S. M.3
1
Department of Speech and Language Pathology, Faculty of
Dentistry of Bauru, University of São Paulo, Bauru, 2University of São
Paulo, 3 State University of Campinas, Brazil
Summary: This study describes the application of the LuriaNebraska Neuropsychological Battery for Children (LNNB-c)
as a tool in the differential diagnosis of Dyslexia and Learning
Disabilities. The findings of this evaluation were compared with
data from Long Latency Auditory Evoked Potential (P300) evaluation.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to Discuss the
data from the reading and writing skills evaluation through the
use of the Luria-Nebraska Neuropsychological Battery for Children in cases of Dyslexia and Learning Disabilities, and the use
of Long Latency Auditory Evoked Potential (P300) evaluation in
the differential diagnosis of these cases.
P087
ASSESSMENT INTERDISCIPLINARY NEUROPSYCHOLOGY
AND SPEECH THERAPY IN NOONAN SYNDROME
Tabaquim, M.L.M.; Rodrigues, N.R.; Costa, E.G.; Daza, M.P.M.;
Lamônica, D.A.C.
Universidade Sagrado Coração, Brazil
Summary: We report a patient of 04 years with a diagnosis of
Noonan syndrome to describe the syndrome, focusing mainly
on aspects of speech therapy, and to make a contrast with the
clinical case described in the literature.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to replicate the
neuropsychological assessment procedures and speech therapy; understand the neuropsychological features of children
with Noonan syndrome.
P088
PARENTS APPROACHES TO ENGAGE THEIR CHILDREN WITH
DOWN SYNDROME IN A VISUAL-PERCEPTUAL TASK: THE
INFLUENCE OF CHILDREN’S CHARACTERISTICS
Flabiano F.C.1, Daunhauer L.A.2, Silva L.F.1, Fidler D.J.2, Limongi
S.C.O.1
1
University of São Paulo, Brazil, 2Colorado State University, United
States
Summary: This study was designed to examine parents’ approaches to engage their child with Down syndrome in a
visual-perceptual task, as well as the influence of children’s
characteristics (chronological, mental and vocabulary ages) on
parent’s approaches. Task approaches were more effective to
engage children into the task than social approaches. Parents’
approaches were influenced by children’s chronological and
mental ages.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to discuss the
relation between parent-child interaction characteristics and
language outcomes in children with Down syndrome.
P089
NEUROPSYCHOLOGICAL STUDY OF CHILDREN WITH
HEMIPARETHIC CEREBRAL PALSY AND LEARNING
DISORDERS
Tabaquim M.L.M.
Universidade Sagrado Coração, Brazil
Summary: This comparative study of children with brain damage and learning disabilities, examined the cognitive processes
of language, memory, perception and motor function through
neuropsychological assessment.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to identify neuropsychological assessment procedures; analyze the neuropsychological features of child abuse in learning.
P090
THE EFFECTS OF CARBONATED LIQUIDS ON SWALLOWING
IN ADULTS WITH NEUROGENIC DYSPHAGIA: A CRITICAL
APPRAISAL OF THE TOPIC
Sdravou K., Walshe M.
Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland
Summary: Carbonated liquids have been proposed as a sensory intervention to eliminate thin liquid aspiration. Thus, this critical appraisal of the topic (CAT) sought to answer the following
question: do carbonated thin liquids affect swallowing physiology in adults with neurogenic oropharyngeal dysphagia? It
appears that there is weak evidence to support or refute the
effects of carbonated liquids on swallowing.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to discuss the
evidence existed in the area, the clinical implications and the
need for further studies.
P091
ASSESSMENT OF SWALLOWING AND QUALITY OF LIFE
RELATED TO SWALLOWING IN TOTAL LARYNGECTOMY
PATIENTS: A COMPARISON BETWEEN MANUAL
AND MECHANICAL (STAPLER) TECHNIQUES OF
PHARYNGOESOPHAGEAL RECONSTRUCTION
Figueiredo D.C.1, Gielow I.2, Takimoto R.M.1, Cervantes O.1
Unifesp, 2Unifesp/Cev, Brazil
1
Summary: This study compared the swallowing and the quality of life related to swallowing of 30 patients submitted to to-
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
153
tal laryngectomy, according to the pharyngeal closing method
technique used: 15 manual versus 15 stapler. The stapler group,
even presenting more complaints, showed a more discrete impact on quality of life.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to discuss the
advantages and the disadvantages of the mechanical pharyngeal closure technique for total laryngectomy considering
swallowing and the quality of life related to swallowing, when
compared to the traditional manual technique; and to consider
swallowing assessment for laryngectomized patients.
sample consisted of 3 SLI children. Results show that SLI children improve on scripts and only some advance is produced in
narrative development.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to explain the
intervention process on narrative skills in inclusive practice with
SLI children.
P092
T. S. Gonçalves, P. A. P. Crenitte,
University of São Paulo, Bauru, Brazil
MANOMETRIC MEASURES OF HEAD ROTATION AND CHIN
TUCK IN HEALTHY PARTICIPANTS
Balou M.1, McCullough G.2, Aduli F.1, Brown D.1, Snoddy P.1
1
UAMS, 2UCA, United States
Summary: A number of compensatory and rehabilitative strategies have been developed to improve swallowing function in
patients with dysphagia.However, few data exist defining the
effects of those techniques on neurophysiologic measures in
persons with normal swallowing.Such maneuvers are head rotation and chin tuck.Thus,the objective was to determine the
effects of each of these maneuvers on pharyngeal swallowing
coordination in healthy individuals.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to discuss
whether head rotation and chin tuck affect in pharyngeal pressures as well as the coordination of UES opening. They will also
be able to discuss whether the degree of head rotation (45 vs.
90) affects coordination of UES relaxation time.
P093
PROPOSAL OF PROTOCOL FOR ELECTROMYOGRAPHIC
EVALUATION OF MASSETER MUSCLE DURING
DEGLUTITION
L.A. Pernambuco1, J.C. Leão2, R.A. Cunha2, G. M. Andrade2, P.M.M.
Balata3, H.J. Silva2
1
Cancer Hospital of Pernambuco, Recife, Brazil; 2Federal University of
Pernambuco, Recife, Brazil; 3Institucional Human Resources of Pernambuco, Recife, Brazil
Summary: This is a research to propose a protocol for electromyographic evaluation of masseter muscle during deglutition.
The protocol was based on studies published in scientific literature and from the discussions and experience of a research
group. The electrodes placement position, the tasks to be performed and the parameters to be extracted from the electromyographic signal were considered.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to discuss the
methodology for evaluating the electromyographic signal of
the masseter muscle during swallowing; systematize the electromyographic signal of the masseter muscle during swallowing based on the proposal of a protocol.
P094
INTERVENTION ON THE NARRATIVE DEVELOPMENT IN
CHILDREN WITH SLI AT THE INCLUSIVE CONTEXTS
Acosta Rodriguez Victor M., Moreno Santana Ana M.,
Axpe Caballero Maria A.
Universidad de La Laguna, Spain
Summary: The aim of this research is to analyze the effects of
an intervention program with inclusive practice in the narrative
skills, in children with Specific Language Impairment (SLI). The
P095
CD-ROM AS A TOOL FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION OF
PRIMARY SCHOOL TEACHERS IN WRITTEN LANGUAGE
Summary: This study describes the development of a CD-ROM
to be used as a tool for continuing education of primary school
teachers in relation to aspects of acquisition and development
of written language, strengthening the partnership between
teachers and speech therapists for the initial detection and
early treatment of disorders of written language.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to know a little
about the advantages of distance education in the continuing
education of elementary school teachers and the importance
of partnership between the therapist and teacher, in relation to
the acquisition and development of written language and the
detection of their disorders.
P096
PRODUCTION OF AUDIOVISUAL ABOUT DEAFNESS AND
SIGN LANGUAGE: IMPACT ON DEAF CHILDREN’S HEARING
PARENTS
Moura G.M., Lichtig I
University of São Paulo, Brazil
Summary: To develop a DVD about Deafness and Sign Language and to ascertain the impact of this material exhibition
upon deaf children’s hearing families. The video produced a
positive impact upon subjects’ opinion, indicating that it fulfilled its role as an informative educative material, evidencing
its relevance in the health area.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to learn more
about Brazilian Deaf people life, born to hearing parents and
to be informed about their reality. The presentation describes
as well how a low cost media can provide useful information in
Health Promotion and Prevention.
P097
AUTISM SPECTRUM DISORDERS (ASD): SOCIAL SKILLS IN
THE SCHOOL CONTEXT
Abramides D.1, Lamonica D.C.A.2, Santos L.H.Z.3
1
Departament of Speech and Language Pathology, Faculty of Dentistry of Bauru, University of São Paulo, 2University of São Paulo, 3University of State of São Paulo, Brazil
Summary: Educational programmers targeting at individuals
with ASD should promote the social skills. This study discovered that school activities most useful for developing their skills
were ‘Music classes’ and ‘Sensory space integration’, in which the
most frequently used skills was ‘follow instruction’, and ‘playing
with the other’. The review of the activities in school should be
used to improve SS.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to explain, and
discuss about educational activities to disorders of communication associated with ASD.
154
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
P098
P101
PROJECT USP IN RONDONIA: HEALTH EDUCATION FOR THE
POPULATION OF THE BRAZILIAN AMAZON
ATTENTION SHIFTING IN CHILDREN WHO STUTTER
Caldana Magali, Bastos Jose Roberto, Oliveira Ariadnes,
Franco Elen, Bastos Roosevelt, Arakawa Aline, Sitta Erica,
Carleto Natalia, Silva Ricardo, Zampronio Karolina
Faculty of Dentistry of Bauru - Universidade of São Paulo, Brazil
Summary: The project USP in Rondonia began in 2002 as a proposal for an interdisciplinary work of the School of Dentistry of
Bauru, University of São Paulo. It’s held the job of welfare and
education with the local population for the actions of teaching,
research and extension, with undergraduates and post-graduate students of the University.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to know the extension activities of the University of São Paulo in the Brazilian
Amazon; To discuss the actions of health education in Speech
Pathology and Audiology; To reflect on the work of Health Education and conducted training local human resources.
P099
DISTANCE LEARNING: DEVELOPMENT OF A CD-ROM FOR
TEACHER TRAINING ON THE HUMAN COMMUNICATION
AND ITS DISORDERS
Caldana Magali, Bastos Jose Roberto, Oliveira Ariadnes, Franco
Elen, Bastos Roosevelt, Arakawa Aline, Sitta Erica, Carleto Natalia,
Silva Ricardo, Bassi Karolina, Caldana M. L. C.
Faculty of Dentistry of Bauru - University of São Paulo, Brazil
K. Eggers1,2, L. F. De Nil2,3, & B.R.H. Van Den Bergh2,4,5
1
Lessius University College, Antwerp, Belgium
2
University of Leuven, Leuven, Belgium
3
University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada
4
Tilburg University, Tilburg, The Netherlands
5
Department Welfare Flemish Community, Brussels, Belgium
Summary: Current study investigates if previously found differences between CWS and CWNS on attention-related functioning
can be confirmed by a behavioural task, a computerized visual
attention-shifting task. Participants are 40 Dutch-speaking children who stutter (4;00-9;00y.) and an age- and gender-matched
control group. The results of this study will be interpreted within
existing etiological models for stuttering development.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to (1) describe
the functioning of different attentional networks, (2) describe
possible attentional-shifting differences between CWS and
CWNS, and (3) interpret the possible role of attentional shifting
in developmental stuttering.
P102
TREATMENT OF STUTTERING: FACTORS RE EDUCATION
AND PERCEPTIONS OF SPEECH & LANGUAGE THERAPISTS
EDUCATED IN GREECE
Kakkidou K., Leahy M. M*.
Clinical Speech & Language Studies, Trinity College Dublin, Ireland
Summary: Using multimedia, distance education has been a
common reality, in which various technologies of communication and information are used in professional and human development. The objective was to prepare and submit a CDROM
in the field of Speech Therapy for teachers of elementary and
child school, focusing on development and possible disorders
in Human Communication.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to describe the
steps of the development of a tele-education material about
the speech and language disorders; To discuss the involvement
of the teacher with the therapists in research activities and
knowledge construction.
Summary: The purpose of this survey was to obtain information on the Greek Speech & Language Therapists’(SLTs) training,
confidence and perceptions associated with treating people
who stutter. Findings are interpreted as confirming and extending the growing body of literature that documents the need for
the improvement and expansion of educational and clinical opportunities in stuttering for SLTs.
Learner Outcomes: Participants will be able to discuss the academic and clinical training of Greek Speech-Language Therapists in the area of fluency disorders. Participants will also be
able to describe how confident Greek SLTs feel when treating
people who stutter and their perceptions about them.
P100
P103
ALTERATION OF LANGUAGE IN THE ALCOHOLIC GROUP OF
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS (AA)
ELEMENTS OF HEREDITARY PREDISPOSITION THAT MAY
CONTRIBUTE TO STUTTERING
A.C.M. Santos1, S.R. Alves2, M Padovani 3 G.C.P. De Luccia 4,
1-2-4
UNIVAG-, Mato Grosso, Brazil
3-4
UNIFESP- São Paulo- Brazil
Jovanovic, N.*, Andreou, S.**, Ninkovic, D.*, Dobrota, N.*
* Faculty of Special Education and Rehabilitation, University of
Belgrade, Serbia
** Ministry of education, Cyprus
Summary: Introduction: Alcohol abuse causes cognitive changes that compromise the language. Objective: To investigate the
performance of alcoholic individuals in cognitive and linguistic abilities. Methods: 30 volunteers alcoholics. Questionnaire
was used evaluative tests of language and memory: Results:
Alterations of memory and language, detected by the tests and
group. Conclusion: Prolonged use of alcohol negatively intervene in communication and daily activities.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to describe the
language deficits in alcoholic.
Summary: Subjects were 80 children who stutter. Tests for stuttering assessment and the special designed questionnaire for
parents has been used. Results suggest that 65% of children
who stutter have close relatives who have had stuttering in
past, or still stutter. Stuttering appear in successive generations.
The heredity in the family background is one of the most significant factors for stuttering.
Learner Outcomes: Our resultes should contribute to explanation of influence of heredity for stuttering, and to lead to fundamental genetics researc.
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
P104
THE ADJUSTMENT OF DELAYED AUDITORY FEED BACK
(DAF) TO DYSARTHRIAS - EFFECT ON SPEAKING RATE AND
VOWEL LENGTH
Eiji Shimura1, Kazuhiko Kakehi2
1
Niigata University of Health and Welfare, Niigata, Japan
2
Chukyo University, Toyota, Japan
Summary: It is rported that DAF is effective only for some patients with hypokinetics.
A new adjustment method of DAF to dysarthrias is proposed.
Using the method.
it is proved that DAF is also effective for dysarthrias other than
hypokinesia type.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to explain voice
treatment of disarthrias, and segmental and suprasegmental
aspects of normal speech and dysarthric speech.
P105
THE CORRELATION BETWENN ELECTROMYOGRAPHIC AND
ULTRASONOGRAPHIC ASSESSMENT OF THE MASSETER
MUSCLE
Mangilli LD1, Sassi FC2; Tanaka C3, Sernick RA4; Andrade CRF5
1
Speech Language Pathologist.University of São Paulo, School of
Medicine, São Paulo, Brazil
2
Speech Language Pathologist.Department of Physiotherapy,
Speech-language and Hearing Sciences, and Occupational Therapy,
University of São Paulo, School of Medicine, São Paulo, Brazil
4
Doctor.Department of Radiology. University of São Paulo, School of
Medicine, Hospital das Clínicas, São Paulo, Brazil
3,5
Full Professor.Department of Physiotherapy, Speech-language and
Hearing Sciences, and Occupational Therapy, University of São Paulo,
School of Medicine, São Paulo, Brazil
Summary: Aim: to characterize muscle control and the morphology of the masseter muscle in normal individuals, and also
to verify the compatibility between surface electromyographic
and ultrasonographic data. Five individuals with no alterations
of the stomatognathic system were evaluated for the electromyographic and ultrasonographic assessments. A high correlation was observed when comparing both hemifaces in the
ultrasonographic assessment.
Learner Outcomes: the results of our study suggest that the
meaningful interpretation of repeated masseter muscle thickness requires accurate repositioning of the transducer. The results of this study do not indicate any correlation between the
tested methods, suggesting that these provide complementary
but not excluding data.
P106
STANDARDIZATION OF A COMPUTER ARTICULATION
INSTRUMENT (CAI)
L. van Haaften1, S. Diepeveen2, Sj. van der Meulen3, L. Nijland1, B.
de Swart1,2, B. Maassen*
1
Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen, The
Netherlands
2
HAN University of Applied Sciences, Nijmegen, The Netherlands
3
University Medical Centre Utrecht, The Netherlands
4
University of Groningen, The Netherlands
Summary: A Dutch norm-referenced speech production tests
for children is developed. The Computer Articulation Instrument for children of 2 to 7 years of age contains subtests which
can help to differentiate between speech production disorders. At the conference, results of 75% of the norm data will
be presented, compared with different groups of children with
speech-language difficulties.
155
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to discuss the
importance of a norm-referenced standardized speech production test and the differentiation between speech production
disorders in children.
P107
ELECTROPALATOGRAPHY TREATMENT FOR ARTICULATION
DISORDER IN PATIENTS WITH ORAL CANCER
K. Nishiwaki, T. Kikutani and F. Tamura
Clinic for Speech and Swallowing Disorders, Nippon Dental University
Hospital at Tokyo, Tokyo, JAPAN
Summary: Severe articulation disorder is a common following
after treatment with oral cancer.The object of the present study
is to explore the technique of EPG as a therapeutic intervention to treat the articulation disorder with oral cancer. 2 patients
were participated. This study indicates that EPG therapy may be
effective for improving tongue movement and speech function
with oral cancer.
Learner Outcomes: Electropalatography (EPG) is an instrumental treatment technique allowing visual feedback of tongue to
palate movement during real time articulation. This study indicates that EPG therapy may be effective for improving tongue
movement and speech function with oral cancer.
P108
MOBIUS SYNDROME: SPEECH PATHOLOGY’S
MENEGEAMENT
Guedes Z., Silva R., Goncalves C.
Universidade federal de São Paulo, Brazil
Summary: Introduction: Mobius Syndrome is characterized by
impairment of VI, VII cranial nerves. Aim: This work shows the
characteristics of children with misoprostol as etiology. Methods: 10 male and 3 female were evaluated by SLP. Results: The
patients until 12 months had difficulty to swallowing. The 2 to
5 years showed speech difficulty. Conclusion: The children had
swallowing and speech difficulties.
Learner Outcomes: the participants have to discuss the characteristics of the congenital facial palsy (Mobius Syndrome) such
as speech and swallowing difficulty. After reading this poster,
the participants will describe what Mobius Syndrome is and the
sequelae.
P109
SPEECH AND OROFACIAL APRAXIA IN ALZHEIMER’S
DISEASE (AD)
M. L. Cera1, K. Z. Ortiz1, T. S. C. Minett1
Federal University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
1
Summary: Discuss about the apraxia in Alzheimer’s disease, especially of verbal and orofacial apraxia.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to describe the
clinical manifestations of Alzheimer’s disease and discuss the
early evaluation of communication difficulties, in patient follow
up, and in rehabilitation.
P110
DEVELOPING INTERNATIONAL CLINICAL, RESEARCH,
AND TEACHING COLLABORATIONS FOR STUDENTS AND
FACULTY IN THE HEALTH PROFESSIONS
Brian B. Shulman, PhD, Theresa E. Bartolotta
Seton Hall University, U.S.A.
Summary: This poster presentation illustrates the implemen-
156
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
tation of multiple international collaborative relationships between the School of Health and Medical Sciences at Seton Hall
University and universities across the globe. The shared vision
of faculty and administrators in establishing, developing and
maintaining these relationships is highlighted. The value of
international education for students in healthcare and faculty
research collaboration is described.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to 1) understand the role of faculty and administration in establishing
international clinical, research and teaching collaborations; 2)
identify strategies for successful implementation of international collaborations for students and faculty; 3) understand
the value of providing students and faculty in the health professions with experiential education in global healthcare systems and collaborative research opportunities with university
colleagues overseas.
P111
MULTILINGUAL INTERVENTION WITH PRESCHOOLERS
AND SCHOOL-AGE CHILDREN: EVIDENCE FROM A PRIVATE
PRACTICE
Simard I.
SLP clinic Ortho Fun I: Les petits Cocos, Canada
Summary: Multilingual Intervention With Preshoolers And
School-Age Children.
This study presents data from a speech/language pathology private practice in Montreal. Multilingual preschoolers and schoolage children receive intervention in their receptive/expressive
languages. Clinical findings will validate speech and/or language progress according to the number of therapies needed
to achieve goal attainment. A comparison between successful
multilingual and monolingual intervention will be discussed.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to discuss the
efficacy of multilingual SLP intervention; compare with sucessful monolingual SLP intervention.
P112
THE ACOUSTIC PROPERTIES OF /h/ IN TURKISH
Ertan Esra, Kopkalli-Yavuz Handan
Anadolu University, Eskisehir, Turkey
Summary: Fricative sounds, on the basis of their manner of articulation, are made when two organs come close together that
air moves between them produces audible friction.Acoustically,
fricative sounds display little or nothing of the formant structure. In the IPA Chart (2005), /h/ was represented as a glottal
fricative.
Learner Outcomes: The learner will learn the acoustic characteristics of /h/ in Turkish. The learner will have an opportunity
to compare the descriptive results in Turkish with different languages.
P113
INFLUENCE OF REHEARSING NEW VOCAL MATERIAL ON
LARYNX CONDITION
Lev B. Rudin
Russian Public Academy of Voice,Russian Federetation
Summary: Rehearsing new vocal material is an integral part
of any singer’s professional life. Based on conducted research,
we proved that this occupation should conform to certain protective principles to preserve vocal apparatus health. The principles are presented in this article. We also define approximate
norms of voice load during rehearsing new vocal material and
suggest methods of medicated support.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to (1) explain
the influence of rehearsing new vocal material on condition of
larynx and human organism as a whole, with necessity of following voice hygiene principles when rehearsing new vocal
material; (2) discuss importance of balancing the work-rest routine and norms of vocal cords capacity.
P114
THE UNION OF THE EUROPEAN PHONIATRICIANS (UEP) IN
THE XXI CENTURY
Antonio Schindler
Union of the European Phoniatricians, Italy
Summary: The history and activities of the Union of the European Phoniatricians (UEP) will be presented. In particular the
training of the Phoniatrician will be outlined and his role in
communication and swallowing assessment and rehabilitation
planning will be discussed.
Learner Outcomes: The learner will know the history of the
UEP and will be aware of the major activities of this society. The
learner will also learn the complex traing of the Phoiniatrician
and his acitivities in daily practice.
P115
DEPTH OF NASOPHARYNX AND LENGTH OF VELUM FOR
A GROUP OF INDIVIDUALS WITH VELOPHARYNGEAL
DYSFUNCTION
Pegoraro-Krook MI1, Silva, MMA2, Bento-Gonçalves CGA3, Dutka
JCR4
1 Phonoaudiology Department, College of Dentistry, University of
São Paulo, Bauru-SP, Brazil
2 Graduate Program in Bioengineering, University of São Paulo, São
Carlos-SP, Brazil
3 Phonoaudiology Department, Hospital for Rehabilitation of Cleft
Lip and Palate, Bauru-SP, Brazil
4 Phonetic Laboratory, Hospital for Rehabilitation of Cleft Lip and
Palate, Bauru-SP, Brazil
Summary: Videofluoroscopy is an useful tool during decision
making process for treatment of velopharyngeal dysfunction.
Measures of the size of the velum and depth of the nasopharynx can guide decisions involving physical management. This
study described and compared length and width of the velum
and depth of the nasopharynx for children with VPD after primary repair of cleft palate.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to understand
the use of videofluoroscopy in the diagnostic of velopharyngeal dysfunction.
P116
PARENT’S KNOWLEDGE, ATTITUDE AND PRACTICE
TOWARDS VOICE CARE FOR CHILDREN: A HONG KONG
PERSPECTIVE
Estella Ma P.-M. (Ph.D.) & Moly Mo N.-L.
Voice Research Laboratory, Division of Speech and Hearing Science,
The University of Hong Kong
Summary: This is a cross-sectional survey on parents’ knowledge, attitude and practice towards voice care for children.
Barriers that hindered implementation of voice care in children
were also reported and ranked by parents. The results provide
healthcare workers with empirical data to develop strategies
to promote voice care in children according to the consumer’s
needs.
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to develop
strategies to plan and implement preventive voice care services
for children appropriately and effectively.
P117
EFFECTS OF SELF-CONTROLLED FEEDBACK PARADIGM ON
MOTOR LEARNING OF A “RELAXED PHONATION” TASK
Estella Ma P.-M., Gigi Yiu K.-Y., & Edwin Yiu M.-L.
Voice Research Laboratory, Division of Speech and Hearing Sciences,
The University of Hong Kong
Summary: This study aims to investigate whether self-controlled feedback paradigm facilitates better “relaxed phonation”
learning when compared to an externally, clinician-controlled
feedback paradigm. Twenty-eight vocally healthy participants
were randomly assigned into the self-controlled feedback
group (SELF) and yoked feedback control group (YOKED). Voice
motor learning between the two groups of participants was
compared using the performance in the delayed retention test.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to discuss the
application of general motor learning principles in voice motor
learning.
P118
THE IMPACT OF DISTURB OF VOICE IN THE QUALITY OF
LIFE IN PATIENTS UNDERGONE A VERTICAL PARTIAL
LARYNGECTOMY
Sanchez, R.F.,Teles, L.C.S
University of São Paulo, Brazil
Summary: This study was research the impact of dysphonia
in the quality of life in patients undergone a vertical partial laryngectomy. The results demonstrated the negative impact of
dysphonia in the quality of life in patients undergone a vertical partial laryngectomy, how at higher the grade of dysphonia,
in self-rating voice and in the GRBAS, worse is the scores of VRQOL.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to discuss the
relationship between quality of life and voice in laryngectomized patients. Describe methods of assessing quality of life
and voice.
P119
VOICE ACOUSTICS CHARACTERISTICS IN DIFFERENT
CORPORAL POSTURES
P.R. Carneiro1, L.C.S. Teles2
PhD candidate in Science (Bioengineering Area) from the University
of São Paulo and professor of the University of Anhanguera de Bauru
(Brazil)
2
Departament of Speech Pathology and Audiology - University of São
Paulo (USP), Bauru, Brazil
1
Summary: The influence of the different corporal postures in
the voice production is very important for those who use their
voice professionally. The aim of the present investigation is to
identify the influence of the different corporal postures, evaluated by the computadorized photogrammetry method, in the
voice. The postural alterations influenced directly on the vocal
pitch, quality and resonance.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to discuss the
influence of the posturais alterations in the production of the
voice. To describe the method of the photogrammetry.
157
P120
COMMUNICATIVE SKILLS AFTER ADMISSION IN
PERFORMING ARTS AND THE USE OF VOCAL EFFORT ON
STAGE
Paula Belini Baravieira1, Lídia Cristina da Silva Teles2
Speech Pathologist, graduated at University of São Paulo, Bauru,
Brazil
2
Departament of Speech Pathology and Audiology – Faculty de
Odontologia de Bauru - University of São Paulo (USP), Bauru, Brazil
1
Summary: To identify theatrical actors acquire greater skill in
their social communication, which intonation parameter are
most used by actors during a scene, and also what are the care
and habits harmful to their voice. The findings suggest that
theatrical actors have gained greater skill in their media, with
a decrease of shyness (p<0.05) and increase communicative expressiveness (p<0.05%).
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to discuss if the
theater can be considered a laboratory of communication skills.
To explain what are the most used intonation parameters and
what cares do the actors have with their voice.
P121
GETTING TO KNOW THE SECRETS OF VOICE’: DISTANCE
COURSE FOR CHORISTERS
Teles L.c.s., Santos A.r.
University of São Paulo, Brazil
Summary: To criate a distance course of voice and voice health
to chorists, to acess your capacity to promote knowledge and
satisfaction for users. The course “Getting to Know the Secrets of
Voice”, was developed and available for choristers in 3 modules
and proved to be a material capable of providing significant increase in knowledge and brought satisfaction to the choristers.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to discuss how
criate a distance course and how to promote knowledge and
satisfaction for users.
P122
CAN THE PARALYZED VOCAL FOLD RESTORE VOCAL FOLD
VIBRATION FOR VOICE IMPROVEMENT IN UNILATERAL
RECURRENT NERVE PARALYSIS?
Iwata Yoshihiro, HOribe Seiji1, Hattori Tadao, Sakurai Kazuo, Naito
Kensei, Toda Hitoshi
Fujita Health University School of Medicine Department of
Otolaryngology
Summary: We present our newly devised thyroplasty which
enables the paralyzed vocal fold to vibrate in patients with recurrent nerve paralysis and the post-operative examination of
phonation. The paralyzed vocal fold was expanded in front and
in the rear by the Gore-Tex roll. The paralyzed vocal fold gained
muscle tonus and paralyzed vocal fold vibrated in the middle
with normal cycle.
Learner Outcomes: The audience can learn techniques simple
and effective, sustained and effective thyroplasty.
P123
QUALITY OF VOICE AND LIFE IN INDIVIDUALS
INTERVEIEWED BY VIVAVOZ CALL CENTER: PILOT STUDY
T.Campos Moreira, H.M.T.Barros, S.Fernandes, M.Ferigolo, M.Cassol
Federal University of Heath Sciences of Porto Alegre - Brazil
Summary: The voice’s and life’s quality was investigated on drug
and non-drug users which have called to call center VIVAVOZ,
158
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
trough the Voice-Related Quality of Life (VRQL). It could be noticed that there were changes in quality of life of this patients,
especially when it comes to the psychoactive substances.
Learner Outcomes: This study will contribute to the knowledge of vocal problems that affect quality of life of users of drug
abuse in Brazil.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to discuss the
paper, give details, provide informations.
P124
Teles L.c.s., Davatz G.c., Sanchez R.f.
University of São Paulo, Brazil
HIGH LEVELS OF NOISE IN CHILDREN EDUCATION
INSTITUTIONS AND ITS IMPACT ON THE EDUCATOR’S
VOICE
M. L. Bitar1, M. Simões –Zenari1, K. Nemr1
1
Department of Physiotherapy, Communication Science and
Disorders, Occupational Therapy, University of São Paulo Medical
School, Brazil
Summary: The teacher’s voice was focus of surveys for preventing occupational risks. Vocal abuse and environment noise
stand out as aspects that favor voice alterations. A study analyzed the relation environmental noise/educators’ vocal. Findings indicate noise high levels and voice alterations on most the
educators who have few resources for voice projection required
at the work place.
P125
VOCAL DISADVANTAGE AND QUALITY OF LIFE OF
PATIENTS LARYNGECTOMIZED WITH AND WITHOUT VOICE
REHABILITATION
Summary: The aim of this study was to compare the rate of vocal handicap and quality of life of l patients undergone a total
laryngectomy with and without voice rehabilitation. The voice
handicap index of rehabilitated patients showed higher scores
than the non-rehabilitated and as indicators of quality of life
both groups, mostly, tackle high scores after treatment for cancer.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to discuss the
importance of the questionnaires for quality of life and voice
in patients undergoing total laryngectomy.To describe the importance of voice rehabilitation on quality of life of laryngectomized.
THURSDAY 26/8/2010
P126
P128
AUGMENTATIVE AND ALTERNATIVE COMMUNICATION IN
APHASIA: LANGUAGE AND QUALITY OF LIFE OF AAC USERS
AND NON-USERS
LANGUAGE CHARACTERISTICS OF INDIVIDUALS WITH
NEUROLOGICAL IMPAIRMENTS- A COMPARATIVE STUDY
M. M. Bahia, R. Y. S. Chun, L.F. Mourão
State University of Campinas, Campinas, Brazil
B. Toğram, İ. Maviş
Anadolu University DILKOM, Eskisehir, Turkey
THE EVALUATION OF MEMORY FUNCTION IN APHASIC
PATIENTS
Summary: The goal of the study was to determine and to compare language characteristics of individuals with neurological
impairments by the standardized Language Assessment Test in
Aphasia. A total of 114 subjects participated in this study. All
participants were tested on the ADD. Results indicated that
there is difference among participant groups (dementia, RHD,
TBI and healthy).
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to 1. The learner will describe language characteristics of Turkish individuals
with neurological impairments (i.e. aphasia, right hemisphere
damage, traumatic brain injury and dementia) according to results of the standardized Language Assessment Test in Aphasia.
2. The learner will explain that results related to language skills
found in individuals with neurological impairments are consistent with the related literature.
M. Vukovic1, M. Petrovic-Lazic1, I. Vukovic
1
University of Belgrade – Faculty of Special Education and
Rehabilitation, Belgrade, Serbia
P129
Summary: Augmentative and Alternative Communication
(AAC) plays an important role improving the aphasics’ language.
It is important to evalute the impact of aphasia due to its consequences in daily life. The aims are to investigate quality of life of
a group of aphasics AAC users and non-users and the processes
of signification in language after the introduction of AAC.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to discuss the contribution of AAC in aphasia improving language and quality of life
of the subjects, correlating to the findings from the SSQOL.
P127
Summary: The aims of this study were the assessment of memory in aphasic patients.
Methods: The sample was consisted of 30 adult subjects with
aphasia following a stroke.
Memory assessment included Rey Auditory-Verbal Learning
Test and Rey-Osterrieth Complex Figure Test.
Results: Memory testing revealed significant differences in the
memory ability of aphasic patients compared to the control
group of subjects.
Learner Outcomes: Discussion of the raletionsheep between
impairment of memory function and aphasia.
M1-ALPHA APHASIA TEST: A PROPOSAL FOR
READJUSTMENT TO PORTUGUESE
F.C. Garcia, O.M. Takayanagui
School of Medicine at Ribeirão Preto of São Paulo University, Ribeirão
Preto/SP, Brazil
Summary: The M1-Alpha Aphasia Exam presents some imperfections related to cultural and linguistic characteristics, requiring some adaptations to the Portuguese language.
The analysis of 35 subjects without any neurological disturbances showed that 97,1% oh participants committed some
mistake in the M1-Alpha test.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to describe and
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
to discuss the imperfections of the M1-Alpha Aphasia Exam; to
conduct the clinical assessment in aphasia with more caution;
to have a better conduction in the elaboration of future exams
to assess the aphasia.
P130
COGNITIVE PROCESSES AND LINGUISTIC ABILITIES IN
GROUPS OF ELDERLY – INITIAL PHASE OF THE RESEARCH*
Carla Cardoso, Andressa Michelly de Andrade Silva Aguiar, Adriana
Leite, Sara Barbosa Rangel, Tatiane Gois Pita da Silva, Julian Rocha
Nadia Azevedo
Universidade Federal da Bahia (UFBA), Centro Universitário Jorge
Amado (UNIJORGE) e Universidade Católica de Recife (UNICAP)
Summary: Theory of Mind is fundamental for the individual to understand a set of phenomena related to the mental entities, such
as intentions, desires and beliefs. The present study is intended to
trace the profile of the metacognitive and linguistic skills of a group
of elderly and another of elderly with a history of aphasia.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to analyzing
the attribution of mental states in the speech.
P131
AUDIOLOGIC PROFILE IN ELDERLY PATIENTS LIVING ON
THE OUTSKIRTS OF AN URBAN AREA OF SOUTHEASTERN
BRAZIL
J.O. Lira, K.S. Barea
São Paulo Institute of Geriatrics and Gerontology, São Paulo, Brazil
Summary: Audiological assessment was analyzed in 358 elderly patients of a healthcare center in the outskirts of a brazilian
urban area. A high prevalence of hearing loss was identify and
only a small percentage of the sample has used hearing aids.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to identify audiological profile of elderly patients living on the outskirts of a
brazilian urban area.
P132
LEFT- EAR INEFFICIENCY: A SIGN OF EARLY AUDITORY
DETERIORATION?
A.M.M.Alvarez, M.L.Sanchez, E.B. Casella
Learning Disabilities Unit and Attention Laboratory - Instituto da
Criança HC-Faculdade de Medicina – Universidade de São Paulo - São
Paulo, Brazil
Summary: This investigation was carried to analyze and describe the efficiency of right ear and left ear under auditory divided/shared attention task in a free condition response. Left
ear behavior under dichotic stimulation may be considered as
an index of maturational process in children population and of
inefficiency in auditory pathways in the adult population.
Learner Outcomes: Learners will discuss the importance of dichotic listening task results and its relationship with maturation
and deterioration processes.
P133
AUDITORY TRAINING IN ADULT WITH TRAUMATISM BRAIN
INJURY (TBI): ELECTROPHYSIOLOGICAL AND BEHAVIOR
CHANGES IN AUDITORY PROCESSING AND COGNITIVE
FUNCTIONS
C.F.B. Murphy, D.Palma, T.E.Zalcman, R. Filippini, C.N. Rocha, J.P. Lima,
R. Alonso, C.M. Rabelo, I.F. Neves, E. Schochat, Sanchez S.G.G.*
University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
Summary: The purpose of this single-subject case study was
159
to investigate auditory processing and cognitive functions of
an adult with traumatism brain injury after auditory training.
The results showed evidence of plasticity after auditory training
with improvement in both auditory abilities and cognitive function. Future studies are needed to investigate more precisely
the influence of auditory training on cognitive functions.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to develop an
understanding of the phenomenon of cortical plasticity.
P134
LEARNING GENERALIZATION OF AUDITORY TEMPORAL
PROCESSING SKILLS
C.F.B. Murphy, E. Schochat, Sanchez S.G.G.*
University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
Summary: Two experiments were carried out to investigate
learning generalization of temporal processing in children with
dyslexia. The frequency order training was applied and its effect
was analyzed in a different task. Study II results suggest learning generalization based on the improvement in duration order discrimination and the Study I results suggest task learning,
with no improvement in the duration task.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to develop an
understanding of the phenomenon of learning generalization.
P135
INVESTIGATION OF MEDIAL OLIVOCOCHLEAR BUNDLE
SYSTEM FUNCTION IN CHILDREN WITH AUDITORY
PROCESSING DISORDERS AND SPEECH LANGUAGE
IMPAIRMENT
Rocha CN, Sanches SGG, Befi-Lopes DM, Carvallo, RMM, Schochat E
School of Medicine of the University of São Paulo, Brazil
Summary: The purpose of this study was investigating MOCB
system function through contralateral white noise suppression
of TEOAEs in children with APD and SLI.The results suggest abnormal TEOAE suppression in the APD and SLI groups than in
comparison to the control group. Statistical differences were
not found between APD and SLI groups. Left/right asymmetries
of TEOAE suppression effect were not found.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to describe the
relationship between development of auditory-language abilities and medial olivocochlear system function.
P136
AUDIOLOGICAL FINDINGS IN PATIENTS WITH G/BBB
SYNDROME – REPORT ON 15 BRAZILIAN PATIENTS
Cassab TV1; Richieri-Costa A1, Giachetti C2, Zorzetto N2, Zanchetta S3
HRAC-USP, Bauru, S.P., Brazil
2
UNESP, Marília, S.P., Brazil
3
FMRP- USP, Ribeirão Preto, S.P., Brazil
1
Summary: We studied 15 patients with syndrome G/BBB under
the terms of audiological profile. Evaluations were conducted
to measure the sensitivity and integrity of the auditory neural
conduction with ABR. We hope to contribute to a better understanding of this rare syndrome.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to Know the
audiological manifestations of the syndrome G / BBB.
160
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
P137
tures in 1/5-2/5 years normal children evaluated.tense verb,type
verb,negative verb,plural signe are varible that in 4 age groups
(18-21,21-24,24-27,27-30 months).this study shows development in first & second groups, in third & forth groups this varible
didnt change but freqency of this variable in complex sentencese have been seen.
Learner Outcomes: participants will be able to comparision
this result with other language and in experimental practical it
will be useful for speech thrapist.
FUNCTIONAL INTEGRITY OF THE AUDITORY BRAINSTEM
AND RECEPTIVE VOCABULARY IN PREMATURE INFANTS
WITH BIRTH WEIGHT GREATER THAN 1000g EVALUATED AT
AGE TWO YEARS
S. Zanchetta*; M.R. Bentlin**, C.E.P.Trindade**L.M.S.
Rugulo**L.A.L.Resende**
FMRP-USP, Ribeirão Preto, S.P, Brazil
FMB-UNESP, Botucatu, S.P., Brazil
Summary: The functional integrity of the auditory brainstem and
receptive vocabulary in infants born preterm with normal hearing were investigated. The gestational age of the subjects ranged
from 28 to 34 weeks, with birth weights of 1000 to 2495g. Infants
who had peri, neo e postnatal complications or problems that
might affect the functional integrity of the CNS were exclude.
Learner Outcomes: The results suggest that normal functional integrity of the auditory brainstem in infants preterm with gestational age from 28 to 34 weeks and birth weights to 1000 to 2495g.
P138
PHONOLOGICAL AWARENESS IN CHILDREN WITH
PHONOLOGICAL DISORDERS
Leila Ghasisin, Sara Mirany, Mehdi Tazhibi
Esfahan University of Medical Sciences, Iran
Summary: Relation between Phonological Awareness and Phonological Disorders was the main concern in recent decades.
A big possibility that the children with Phonological Disorders,
have more difficulties in phonological awareness and then in their
readings phonological awareness.The study was to investigate the
relationship between Awareness and Phonological Disorders.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to Relate phonological awareness to phonological disorders-Find out the importance of treating phonological disorders before beginning school.
P139
A STUDY OF COMPREHENSION OF SPECIAL PREPOSITIONS
IN NORMAL CHILDREN BETWEEN THE AGES OF 3-5 IN
PERSIAN LANGUAGE
Ebrahimian Dehaghani SH.
Shiraz University of Medical sciences, Iran
Summary: The method of appearing comprehension milestons
in children who suffer from comprehension disorders is similar
to normal children.this method use as a pattern in treatment.
this study showed the method for comprehension of special
prepositions in normal children.The easiest special prepositions
were ‘Up/Down’ and the most difficult were ‘Right/Left’ without
any regard to sex and education of nursery school.
Learner Outcomes: The therapists will learn how to write
their plan based on the method of appearing comprehension
milestons in normal children.
P140
EVALUATION AND COMPARISON OF SEMANTIC
SPECIFICATION IN 1/5-2/5 YEARS OLD NORMAL PERSIAN
CHILDREN IN TEHRAN CITY
Ghelmani Pour Maryam1, Shirazi Tahere sima2 (rehabilitation
university), Nili Pour Reza2, Karimlu Masoud2, Karimi Hossein3
1
Welfar & rehabilitation university
2
Rehabilitation University
3
zafar rehabilitation center, Iran
Summary: in this research development some semantic fea-
P141
RECOGNITION AND RESPONSE WITH SPANISH-SPEAKING
CHILDREN WITH LANGUAGE IMPAIRMENTS
Garcia M.E.
(Bilingual Multicultural Services)*, United States
Summary: Recognition & Response (R&R) is an approach to
assessment and intervention designed for preschool children
who struggle with learning and who might be at risk for having
learning disabilities. This poster describes the principles of R&R
and displays strategies for differentiating instruction for Spanish-speaking preschool children with language impairments in
general education classrooms.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to 1. Explain
the principles of Recognition and Response, an approach for
addressing the assessment and intervention needs of preschool
children at risk for language/learning difficulties, 2. Describe a
Recognition and Response intervention approach for preschool
Spanish-speakers with language differences and disorders.
P142
LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT OF PRETERM BORN CHILDREN:
MATERNAL FACTORS ASSOCIATES
Perissinoto J., Isotani S.M.
Universidade Federal de São Paulo (UNIFESP), Brazil
Summary: Language Development Of Preterm Born Children:
Maternal Factors Associates.
Objective: To verify the relevance of maternal age, social economic and schooling level in language development of preterm
born children.
Conclusion: The mother schooling level is relevant factor in
language development of preterm born children with weight
below of 2000g.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to Describe
and think about risk and protect factors to language development; Discuss language development in preterm born children;
discuss the ritm of evaluation in preterm and lowbirth weigh
children.
P143
QUALITATIVE ANALYSIS AT THE PSYCHOLOGY OF PARENTS,
WHOSE CHILD HAS BEEN DIAGNOSED WITH “PERVASIVE
DEVELOPMENTAL DISORDER”
Geronikou E. ATEI Patras, Dept. of Speech Therapy*, Vlachaki E.,
Karpouzou E. (ATEI Patras, Dept of Speech Therapy), Greece
Summary: The impact of the diagnosis of a child with autism to
parents is discussed based on a questionnaire completed both
by mothers and fathers. Their reactions, psychology, factors
that influenced and helped them cope are discussed. It seems
that it is crucial to the acceptance and good psychological status of parents, whether a child communicates, either verbally
or nonverbally.
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to describe the
psychological state of parents and work with families of children with autism more effectively.
P144
ASSESSMENT OF LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT IN
PRESCHOOL AGE CHILDREN WITH AUTISM
Geronikou E., Milathianaki M., Farmaki S.
ATEI Patras, Dept of Speech Therapy, Greece
Summary: In this paper we present the use of proper grammar,
syntax, and message clarity of children with autism compared
with typically developing children of the same age. The clinical
group differed significantly from the control group in the formation and use of proper grammar while there were no differences in vocabulary.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to describe
language development of children with autism compared with
typically developing children and design appropriate intervention.
P145
CHILD LANGUAGE AND SOCIAL REFERENCING IN ITALIAN
CHILDREN: A LONGITUDINAL STUDY
M. Majorano, A. Cigala, E. Venturelli, C. Raineri, P. Corsano
Department of Psychology, Parma, Italy
Summary: The purpose of the present research is to examine
the relationship between child language and social referencing
in Italian children. 36 families composed by father, mother and
child were longitudinally observed during laboratory sessions
and during free-play interactions. Data analysis suggest a relationship between parents’ communicative functions, children
vocabulary and behaviour regulation.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to have informations about relation between social referencing and language development and parents’ communicatiove functions.
P146
SOCIAL SUPPORT AND QUALITY OF LIFE IN FAMILIES WITH
CHILDREN OF THE AUTISM SPECTRUM
Fernandes Fernanda
University of São Paulo, Brazil
Summary: Evidence suggest that the parents of autistic individuals are at considerably more risk of experiencing psychological impairments that are completely related to the assistance they receive. 150 caretakers of ASD children answered a
questionnaire about the social support available and Quality of
Life. Results show that social support is associated with better
Quality of Life.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to discuss quality of life of familiees with ASD children. Discuss the social support provided to famnilies with ASD children.
P147
ALLIED HEALTH CARE PROVIDERS’ ROLE IN SCREENING
FOR AUTISM SPECTRUM DISORDERS
Self T., Coufal K.L., Parhan D. F.
Wichita State University, United States
Summary: There is evidence documenting that children are not
being diagnosed with ASD early enough. This study surveyed
allied health care providers to determine whether they had received training on ASD characteristics and screening strategies
161
through their pre-professional education. These results provide
support for allied health care providers to become more active
in screening children who present with symptoms of ASD.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to discuss the
current screening practices for children with ASD and the potential role allied health care providers can play in this process.
P148
THE NATURE OF VERBAL COMMUNICATION INTERACTIONS
WITH TODDLERS IN CHILD CARE
J. McMillan, A. Dyson, N. Yssel
Ball State University, Muncie, USA
Summary: Study: Investigated quality/differences in verbal interactions of toddlers developing atypically with care providers.
Methods: Coded observations/frequency counts were utilized
to examine data. Results: Highlight areas in need of increased
attention/provider training. Conclusion: Care providers/toddlers would benefit from additonal langauge development
training.
Learner Outcomes: After completing this session, participants
will be able to describe predominant types of verbal interactions occuring in child care with toddlers. Participants will be
able to discuss implications of limited language exposure in
child care settings.
P149
PARENTS’ VIEWS OF TURKISH CHILDREN WITH DOWN
SYNDROME ON SPEECH INTELLIGIBILITY
B. Toğram1, A. Akyüz Toğram2
Anadolu University, Eskisehir, Turkey
2
Dost Yasam Down Syndrome Foundation, Istanbul, Turkey
1
Summary: This study used a parent survey to learn more about
factors that affect speech intelligibility in Turkish children with
DS. Down Syndrome Speech Intelligibility Survey was adapted
into Turkish. The survey was administered to approximately
120 parents having a child with DS. Results showed that Turkish children with DS seems to have difficulty in oral motor skills
mostly.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to 1. The learner will think about the speech characteristics of Turkish children
with Down Syndrome according to their parents’ views. 2. The
learner will explain how to determine treatment goals for children with Down Syndrome with speech difficulty.
P150
A PRELIMINARY INVESTIGATION OF EYE-GAZE PATTERNS
ON FAST-MAPPING ABILITIES OF CHILDREN WITH AUTISM
SPECTRUM DISORDER
D. Crumrine1, T. Self1
1
Wichita State University, Wichita, USA
Summary: Limited research has been conducted on fastmapping (FM) and orthographic skills of children with autism
spectrum disorder (ASD). The purpose of this study was to investigate eye-gaze patterns of children with ASD in relation to
orthographic and FM abilities. FM skills were assessed by presenting novel words and pictures via a computer. Eye-gaze patterns were analyzed using Tobii Studio program.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to discuss the
potential contributing factors associated with literacy development in children with ASD. describe the written fast-mapping
and eye-gaze patterns of children with ASD.
162
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
P151
tory difficulties with phonological disorder, the use of perceptual testing on the same children who produce speech data is
relatively rare. Thus, the purpose of this research was examines
both: the production and perception (specifically, of the acoustic phonetic characteristics) of contrast between /t/ and /k/ in
Brazilian Portuguese-speaking children with PD.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to discuss aspects envolved to speech production and speech perception in
children with phonological disorder.
THE EFFICIENCY OF ENCODING GRAMMATICAL
MORPHEMES IN LANGUAGE IMPAIRED AND TYPICALLY
DEVELOPING CHILDREN
N.W. Hennessey1, R. Cowper1, C. Williams1
Curtin University of Technology, Perth, Western Australia
1
Summary: The hypothesis that children with SLI have difficulty
with verb morphology because of a processing capacity limitation was examined through comparing SLI and controls on
the speed and accuracy of production of past test and passive
participle “ed” inflected word forms. As predicted SLI children
showed not only more omission errors but correct word form
production was less efficient.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to Explain how
a processing capacity limitation can impede the development
of gramatical morphonology in children with SLI. Describe how
children with SLI differ from controls in terms of encoding grammatical morphemes during sentence completion tasks.
P152
THE USE (OR NOT) OF PROSODY DURING SENTENCE
COMPREHENSION IN CHILDREN WITH ASD
Kjelgaard Rockcastle Margaret1, Geiser Eveline2, Gabrieli John2
MGH Institute of Health Professions Department of Communication
Sciences and Disorders1, MIT Department of Brain and Cognitive
Sciences2, United States
Summary: Typical children rely on prosody to organize speech.
This study examines the use of prosody in on-line sentence
comprehension of typical children aged 5-9. The sentence comprehension of typical children is compared to high functioning children on the spectrum to demonstrate whether or not
children with ASD use prosody to organize speech during the
comprehension of sentences.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to understand
the relationship between prosodic structure and syntactic
structure, how that relationship is used in typical school aged
children during sentence comprehension and whether (or not)
children with ASD use prosody in a similar manner.
P153
THE RECEPTIVE AND EXPRESSIVE LANGUAGE ABILITIES
OF TYPICALLY DEVELOPING AND HEARING IMPAIRED
TURKISH CHILDREN
Topbas S., O.C Yasar
Anadolu University, Turkey
Summary: In this study, we aimed to focus on the pilot sampling data based on the results of adapted Turkish-LARSP. the
participants were 40 children (normal and hearing impaired)
The receptive and expressive language abilities will be explored
and compared by using LARSP Turkish adaptation.
Learner Outcomes: Participants will be able to learn about the
language characteristics of hearing impaired Turkish children.
Participants may be able to compare the language abilities of
hearing impaired children speaking different languages.
P154
THE ESTABLISHMENT OF THE CONTRAST BETWEEN /t/ AND
/k/ IN CHILDREN WITH PHONOLOGICAL DISORDER: DATA
FROM PRODUCTION AND PERCEPTION SPEECH
L. C. Berti1
São Paulo State University, Marília, Brazil
1
Summary: Despite some studies related to perceptual audi-
P155
SOCIAL-COGNITIVE ASPECTS: COMPARISON AMONGST
THREE GROUPS OF CHILDREN AND ADOLECENTS WITH
DIFFERENTS CLINICAL DOAGNOSIS IN TWO DIFFERENT
COMUNICATIVE SITUATIONS
C. Cardoso, A. Santos da Silva, I. Alves de Miranda Santos, C.
Santana Moreira, A. Luz Pinto, J. Rocha
Universidade Federal da Bahia e Centro Universitário Jorge Amado,
Brazil
Summary: The considerations on the context where the communication occurs, as well as the participants of this process,
can bring important contributions for the performance.
A purpose was verify how performance relates with the sociocognitive abilities in three groups of children and adolescents
with different pathologies in two distinct communicative situations.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to understand
how performance relates with the socio-cognitive abilities in
three groups of children and adolescents.
P156
COMMUNICATIVE FUNCTIONAL PROFILE : COMPARISON
AMONGST THREE GROUPS OF CHILDREN AND
ADOLECENTS WITH DIFFERENTS CLINICAL DOAGNOSIS IN
TWO DIFFERENT COMUNICATIVE SITUATIONS
C. Cardoso, A. Santos da Silva, I. Alves de Miranda Santos, C.
Santana Moreira, A. Luz Pinto, J. Rocha
Centro Universitário Jorge Amado, Brazil
Summary: The communicative procession understanding in
diferents contexts permisse, to the language professional, a
wide margin perspective in intervention process, favoring a
better prognosis. A purpose was Identify the communicative
function profile in three groups of children and adolescents
with different patologies in two communicative situations.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to identify the
communicative function profile in three groups of children and
adolescents with different patologies in two communicative
situations.
P157
NATURELOGOPEDICS
Behrakis V.B.
PPR Faxe kommune, Denmark
Summary: Nature affects mental health, wellbeing and development. In the fields of pedagogy and education there is an
increasing focus on the benefits and advantages of nature.
This thesis argues for the implication of nature as intervention
method in the treatment of speech and language impairments.
Two kinds of interventional methods are suggested:
1.The nature-based intervention 2.The natural-assisted intervention.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to descibe the
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
benfts of naturelogopedics and discuss natures affects in connection with the science of speech and language pathology.
P158
EATING DIFFICULTIES IN THE ELDERLY AND THEIR ENIGMAS
Giglio V.P.
Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil
Summary: Information about feeding difficulties daily faced by
dysphagics elderly people was collected to check the limitations
in their quality of life. Dysphagia causes changes in their feeding habits, leading to segregation effects. The study claims to
the recovering of dysphagics elderly people as a way to restore
their good nutritional condition, health and quality of life.
Learner Outcomes: After completing this session, participants
will be able to describe the limitations in the quality of life of
dysphagics elderly people and discuss about organic and social
aspects of dysphagia.
P159
ORAL AND PHARYNGEAL TRANSIT DURATION IN PATIENTS
WITH GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX DISEASE
R A Cassiani, R.O. Dantas
Medical School of Ribeirão Preto USP, Faculdade De Medicina De
Ribeir&Atilde; O Preto Da Universidade De São Paulo, Brazil
Summary: Our aim in this investigation was to evaluate the oral
and pharyngeal transit duration in patients with GERD. We performed videofluoroscopic evaluation of swallowing in 31 patients
with GERD, and in 26 asymptomatic controls. Patients with GERD
had a longer duration of oral and pharyngeal transit after swallows of a liquid and paste bolus compared to normal subjects.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to understand
the alterations of swallowing in patients with gastroesophageal
reflux disease.
P160
INTERDISCIPLINARY PRACTICE IN LATE MAXILLECTOMY
REHABILITATION
Martins V.B., Santana M.G., Sperb L.C.
Speech Center of Porto Alegre / Private Clinic, Brazil
Summary: Patient after of maxillectomy presenting as sequelae after surgery and radiotherapy: severe hypernasality joint
locked, muscle fibrosis, decreased mobility of lips and mouth
opening (24mm) and changes in chewing and swallowing. It
was proposed total dentures implant supported and Speech
Therapy rehabilitation. After had mild hypernasality, effective
swallowing and chewing and mouth opening of 33mm.
Learner Outcomes: Add knowledge and expand the practical
theoretical.
P161
COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF THE MATURITY LEVEL OF
SPEECH-LANGUAGE CAPACITY WITH PRIMARY (RETARDED
SPEECH) AND SECONDARY (DELAYED PSCYCHOLOGICAL
DEVELOPMENT) SPEECH PATHOLOGY
163
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to discuss the
speech-language development of children with norm and
the systematin speech impairements taking into accoung age
specificity.Describe children’s speech-language development
in terms of certain parameters.
P162
CD-ROM AS A TOOL FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION OF
ELEMENTARY SCHOOL TEACHERS IN WRITTEN LANGUAGE
T. S. Gonçalves1, P.A.P. Crenitte1
University of São Paulo, Bauru, Brazil
1
Summary: This study describes the development of a CD-ROM
to be used as a tool for continuing education of elementary
school teachers about aspects of the acquisition and development of written language, strengthening the partnership between teachers and speech therapists for the initial detection
and early treatment of written language disorders.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to discuss
about the advantages of distance education in the continuing
education of elementary school teachers, the development of
didactical material for distance education and the importance
of partnership between speech therapist and teacher, in relation to the acquisition and development of written language
and the detection of their disorders.
P163
THE LITERACY LEVEL OF DEAF UNIVERSITY STUDENTS
FROM CURITIBA AND FLORIANOPOLIS: A DISCUSSION
A.P. Santana, A.C. Guarinello, A.P. Berberian, G. Massi
University Tuiuti of Paranα, Brazil
Summary: In this session participants will be able to discuss
about the literacy level of deaf brazilians university students.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to discuss
about the literacy level of deaf brazilians university students.
P164
Evaluation of movie subtitle reading
comprehension in Elementary School children
Minucci M.V.*, Carnio M.S.
Universidade de São Paulo – USP, Brazil
Summary: Aim: Evaluate the movie subtitle reading comprehension in Brazilian Elementary School children. 30 schoolchildren from the 2nd grade and 30 from the 4th grade took part.
They watched the movie with subtitles and without sound in
two situations: without interruption, and with the option of
pausing the subtitles. The results show correlation between
reading comprehension and school level.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to understand
more about the reading process of moviesubtitles in beginning
readers.
P165
SPEECH AND LANGUAGE THERAPY STRATEGIES FOR
CHILDREN WITH FLUENCY DISORDERS IN LITHUANIA
O.A.Bezrukova, E.V.Khoroshavina
Moscow City Pedagogical University, Moscow, the Russian Federation
D. Kairiene, R. Ivoskuviene, D. Gerulaitis, V. Makauskiene
Siauliai University, Siauliai, Lithuania
Summary: The focus of the paper is the study of the specific
peculiarities of speech-language defects in children of 4-5, 5-6
and 6-7 years old with primary (RS) and secondary (MR) speech
pathology. We have studied the speech of the children of the
special kindergartens of compensating type.
Summary: In research are presenting data of SLTs’ survey about
the features of cluttering and stuttering, which professionals
take into account indentifying fluency disorders, also efficient
strategies which they use in therapy. Considering to the data
can be maintained, that SLTs apply variety of intervention strat-
164
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
egies in treatment of fluency disorders, seeking both medical
and psychological impact.
Learner Outcomes: discuss about differentiation features of
cluttering and stuttering and efficient strategies of fluency disorders.
P166
LINGUISTIC ANALYSIS OF SPEECH OF EARLY STUTTERED
AND NORMAL DISFLUENT CHILDREN
Simonska M.
South West University, Blagoevgrad, Bulgaria
Summary: The main purpose of this study is a comparative
analysis regarding loci of disfluencies and type of disfluent
morphemes between early stuttered and normal disfluent
children. Eighty preschool children were involved in the study.
Significant difference was found between the groups concerning some type of morphemes and number of disfluencies in the
beginning of the words.
Learner Outcomes: The participant will be able to describe the
Bulgarian experience regarding diagnosis of early stuttering. A
comparative analysis concerning other similar investigations
will be discussed.
P167
ANALYSIS OF SPEECH LANGUAGE STATU OF FAMILY
MEMBERS OF STUTTERER CHILDREN FROM FAMILYES WITH
HEREDITARY PREDISPOSITION
Jovanovic, N.*, Kulic, M.**, Ninkovic, D.*
* Faculty of Special Education and Rehabilitation, University of
Belgrade, Serbia
** Faculty of Medicine Foca, University of East Sarajevo, Republika
Srpska
Summary: Heredity factor in the family background seems to
be important for stuttering. In subjects of 38 children who stutter, 18(47,36%) had 27 close relatives stutter. The percentage of
47%, which represents the heredity trait on stuttering in children shows that heredity is one of the most significant factors
for the creation and development of this speech disorder.
Learner Outcomes: The result will be useful for other similar
research in the future. The role that the heredity factor plays in
the appearance of stuttering seems to be important.
P168
MODELS FOR MEASUREMENT OF RHYTHMIC AND
DYSRHYTHMIC FEATURES OF BULGARIAN NORMAL AND
CLUTTERED SPEECH
E.G. Goranova, 1S.R.Vezenkov, 1E.L. Karashtranova
South West University Neofit Rilski, Ivan Mihailov str. 66,
Blagoevgrad, Bulgaria
1
1
Summary: The present study was focused on the revealing and
analyzing of measurable, reliable and significant phonological
and phonetic correlates of rhythmic and dysrhythmic Bulgarian
speech by the resources of modern statistics in order to shed
light on the cluttering as fluency disorder. We proposed other
unknown dysrhythmic features of cluttering using objective
markers based on the speech rhythm.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to describe
models for measurment speech rhythm, explain speech
rhythms, discuss dysrhythmic speech.
P169
A PRELIMINARY STUDY OF STUTTERERS’ LANGUAGE
PROCESSING USING EVENT-RELATED POTENTIALS
S. Murase1,2, T. Kawashima3, H. Satake3, S, Era2
1
Department Education, 2Department of Physiology and Biophysics,
3
Department of Neurobiology, Gifu University Graduate School of
Medicine, Gifu, Japan
Summary: ERPs were recorded from adult stutterers and fluent speakers with syntactically and semantically correct and
incorrect Japanese sentences. The results of the experiments
revealed abnormal patterns of N400 and P600 among stutterers. Functional differences in language processing activation in
the stutterers-brain were speculated.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to explain stutterers’ language proccesing abilities.
P170
SCREENING OF INDIVIDUALS WITH FLUENCY DISORDERS
(CLUTTERING AND STUTTERING) IN SOUTH-WESTERN
BULGARIA
E.G. Goranova, 1D.M. Miliev
South West University Neofit Rilski, Blagoevgrad, Bulgaria
1
1
Summary: The investigation aims at conducting a screening in
the region of the south-west of Bulgaria in order to differentiate
the types of fluency disorders (cluttering and stuttering). Our
data confirmed that the rapid rate with poor articulation should
be put into additional feature of cluttering. The observed significant and additional symptoms have different severity rates
among the different clutterers.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to describe
most typical symptoms of cluttering; discuss the definition of
cluttering.
P171
OBJECTIVE MEASUREMENT USING CHROMOGURANIN A
TOWARD SPEECH COMMUNICATION STRESS OF NORMAL
PERSON WHO STUTTER
Y. Wakaba1,2,4, M. Miyao2, F. Konjiki3, M. Minami4, T. Sakurai4, M.
Tanimura4, K. Ookuma4
1
Tokyo University and Graduate School of Social Welfare, Isesaki City,
2
National Center for Child Health and Development: Hospital, Tokyo,
3
Tokyo Kasei University, Tokyo,
4
National Center for Child Health and Development: Research
Institute, Tokyo, Japan
Summary: Salivary Chlomogranin A (CgA) is a index to know
reaction of human feeling toward psychosomatic stress. An experiment had done on normal and stuttering parsons to evaluate sress reaction toward speech-communication stress. 5 or 6
evaluations after experiment during 2 days conducted.
Amount of CgA of subjects after Speech-cmmunication stress
were biggest.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to Know how
to use Chromoguranin A (CgA) as a tool for stress major and
influence of stress to stuttering.
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
165
P172
P175
DYSPHASIA SENZO-MOTORICA
DEVELOPMENT OF ARTICULATORY GESTURES
COORDINATION IN SPEECH SOUND DISORDERS OF
UNKNOWN ORIGIN: AN ACOUSTIC STUDY ON ITALIANSPEAKING CHILDREN
Savic M., Nikolic S., Filipovic V., Savic M., Savic V.
General Hospital Sabac, Sabac, M.A. Primary School for Children with
Damaged Hearing Zemun, Belgrade, Anglistike Faculty, Novi Sad,
Serbia and Montenegro
Summary: Cause senzo-motor dysphasia the damage left/
right center for the speech in the brain.There are unintelligible
speech, motor skills disorder and social behavior. Mobility, language and face are harder movable, on the face of the “mask”,
does not pay, the speech was agrammatic, rhythm damaged,
without attachments, monotone. The child is possible to regular education.
Keywords: senzo-motor dysphasia, NMR, CT.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to 1. Discuss
the topic. 2. A nswers to questions.
P173
RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN TOOTH LOSS AND COMPLAINTS
OF CHEWING, SWALLOWING AND SPEECH IN ADULTS.
Caldana M., Bastos J.R., Oliveira A., Franco E., Bastos R., Arakawa A.,
Sitta E.,
Carleto N., Silva R., Bassi K.
Faculty of Dentistry of Bauru - University of São Paulo, Brazil
Summary: The study aimed to investigate whether tooth loss
in adults is correlated with symptoms of speech, chewing and
swallowing. We evaluated 50 individuals aged 18 and 52 years.
The study found that tooth loss in adults is related with difficulty and pain during mastication.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to better understand the relationship between tooth loss and changes in
chewing and swallowing; To discuss the relationship between
tooth loss and speech disorders.
P174
THE ROLE OF NEUROPATHOPHYSIOLOGY IN THE
CORRELATION BETWEEN PHONARTICULATORY
DIADOCHOKINESIA AND DYSPHAGIA IN THE MACHADOJOSEPH AND PARKINSON DISEASE
L. Figueiredo Mourão, D. Garcia Machado, A. Epiphanio Wolf, P.
Almeida Rocha, A. Nubiato Crespo
UNICAMP, Brazil
Summary: The aim was analyze the correlation between phonarticulatory diadochokinesia (DDK) and oropharyngeal dysphagia in Machado-Joseh and Parkinson’s Disease.
Eighteen PD patients, seventeen MJD patients, and 20 subjects
in the control group were submitted to phonoarticulatory diadochokinesia and Fibroendoscopic Evaluation of Swallowing.
The neuropathophisiology of the cerebellum may be responsible to the correlation between speech and swallowing problems.
Learner Outcomes: The participants will be able to understand
and reflect on the role of neuropathophysiology in the Machado-Joseph and Parkinson’s disease.
Bonaventura P.1, Tomaiuoli D.2, Pasqua E.2, Calanca M.2, Massini M.2,
Miller L.1, Owens R.1, Marulli M. 2
1.Case Western Reserve University, 2. Centro Ricerca e Cura Balbuzie e
disturbi della voce e del linguaggio
United States – Italy
Summary: This study aimed to test whether, and in what aspects, development of coordination of vocalic and consonantal
gestures within words, is affected by Speech Sound Disorders of
Unknown Origin, and deviates from normal production. Acoustic analyses of stop-vowel sequences in 16 Italian children at
childhood and school-age, revealed differences in transitional
and formants patterns between SSDUO and N.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to Describe
patterns of development of articulatory gestures coordination
in Italian SSDUO children at childhood and school-age; describe
differences between SSDUO and normal patterns of acquisition of motor coordination in production of sequences of stop
consonant+vowel gestures.
P176
CORRELATION OF THE SIGNAL ELECTROMYOGRAPHIC THE
MASSETER MUSCLE RIGHT AND LEFT AND RIGHT AND LEFT
TEMPORAL IN FEMALE SUBJECTS DURING MASTICATION
H. Profiro Jabson Oliveira, J. Rocha Klyvia Moraes, M. Milton Filho,
S. Niedje Lima, B. Jaciel Oliveira, J. Hilton Silva
Federal University of Pernambuco, Brazil
Summary: It is a study that aims to show the correlation of the
electromyographic signal of the right and left masseter and
temporal muscles in womem during chewing. The maximum
voluntary contraction was considered for 4 seconds, for the
normalization of the electromyographic signal and then the
supply of food such as bread, apples, filled cookie and peanuts,
respectively.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to study the
electrical activity of masseter and temporal muscles during
chewing of different foods; Correlate the electromyographic
signal of the masseter and temporal muscles bilaterally in female subjects during mastication.
P177
IDENTIFICATION OF PASSAVANT’S PAD WITH AND
WITHOUT THE SPEECH BULB
Pegoraro-Krook MI1,2,3,4, Almeida BK2, Dutka JCR3, Souza OMV2,
Uemeoka E4, Aferri HC2,4
1
Speech, Language and audiology Department, College of Dentistry,
2
Graduate Program in Communication Process and Disorders,
3
Phonetic Laboratory, Hospital for Rehabilitation of Cleft Lip and
Palate, 4Speech Appliances Department, Hospital for Rehabilitation of
Cleft Lip and Palate, University of São Paulo, Bauru-SP, Brazil
Summary: Lack of movement of the velopharyngeal structures
during speech is known as hypodynamic velopharynx and is
found in individuals with velopharyngeal dysfunction. Use of
speech bulb may stimulate the movement of the pharyngeal
walls. When elicited together, the movement of the posterior
and lateral walls resembles a ring known as Passavant’s Pad.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to discuss the
indication of speech bulb to stimulate pharyngeal walls in patients with velopharyngea dysfunction.
166
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
P178
P181
USE OF ATYPICAL ARTICULATORY PRODUCTIONS
AFTER PRIMARY PALATOPLASTY WITH FURLOW OR
VONLANGENBECK PROCEDURES
VARIATION IN THE TEMPORAL CHARACTERISTICS OF
PROFESSIONAL SPEAKING STYLES
Pegoraro-Krook M.I., Dutka J.C.R., Bento-Gonçalvez C.G.A.,
Zimmermann M.C., Neves J.F.D.A., Whitaker M.E., Lauris J.R.P.,
Williams W.N.
Departamento de Saúde Coletiva da Faculdade de Odontologia de
Bauru, Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciências da Reabilitação do
Hospital de Reabilitação de Anomalias Craniofaciais,
Laboratório de Fonética do Hospital de Reabilitação de Anomalias
Craniofaciais, Setor de Fonoaudiologia do Hospital de Reabilitação
de Anomalias Craniofaciais da Universidade de São Paulo, Centro
Craniofacial da Universidade da Florida em Gainesville, Brazil
Summary: Use of atypical place of production (AP) such as
pharynx or glottis has been described for patients with cleft lip
and palate (CLP). APs affect speech intelligibility leading to the
need for speech therapy. Surgical technique and timing of primary palatoplasty have been suggested as important variables
for the development of AP.
Learner Outcomes: Implications for cleft palate treatment will
be discussed.
P179
ACOUSTIC ANALYSIS OF VOICE: CHARACTERISTICS OF
MALE VOCAL DEVELOPMENT IN ADOLESCENCE
L.C. da S. Teles , C.F. de Oliveira
1
Departament of Speech Pathology and Audiology, 2 Postgraduation
Program Interunits in Bioengineering, University of São Paulo (USP),
São Carlos, Brazil
1
2
Summary: This study it identified the characteristics of vocal
development in adolescence on male individuals by phonetography. With voice development there was a significant decrease
(p<0.01) of F0 of speech (approximately one octave). With regard to the phonetography, there was a decrease of minimum
and maximum frequencies (p<0.01) and an increase, not significant, of the vocal range and the phonetogram area.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to explain the
characteristics of male vocal development through objective
measurements. To describe which the acoustic parameters of
phonetography that changes most during male vocal development.
P180
AN INTERDISCIPLINARY VISION OF GALA LARYNGECTOMIZED SUPPORT GROUP
Martins, VB.; Santana, MG.; Santos, JB..; Brito, ES.; Sehn, FC.;
Gadenz, SD.; Sbaraini, L.; Macedo, TL.; Sperb, D., Fontana, C.
Hospital Santa Rita / Liga Feminina de Combate ao Câncer/RS, Brazil
Summary: The total laryngectomy causing definitive tracheostomy and loss of laryngeal voice. The GALA (support group to
the laryngectomized) is coordinated by speech pathologists;
psychologists, physiotherapists, nutritionist and head and neck
surgeons. The objective to demonstrate the importance of support groups, interdisciplinary work and their influence in general rehabilitation.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to add knowledge and expand the practical theoretical.
L. Castro, B. Serridge, J. Moraes, M. Freitas
Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
Summary: The objective of this study is to evaluate whether
metrics that quantify the temporal characteristics of speech
exhibit statistically significant variations across speaking styles.
Measurements were taken from a corpus representing four Brazilian Portuguese speaking styles: television news broadcasts,
political speeches, religious sermons, and the speech of interview subjects on a television talk show.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to explain what
temporal characteristics of speaking styles are statistically significant.
P182
ELECTROMYOGRAPHIC EVALUATION OF MANEUVERS OF
SUPRAHYOID AND INFRAHYOID MUSCLES CONTRACTION
FOR SIGNAL NORMALIZATION
P.M.M. Balata1,2, G.K.B.O. Nascimento1, E.G.F. Silva1, S.R.A. Moraes1,
R.A. Cunha1, H.J. Silva1
1
Federal University of Pernambuco, 2 Institute of Human Resources of
Pernambuco, Recife, Brazil
Summary: This research is about of study of surface electromyography evaluation of suprahyoid and infrahyoid muscles
to signal standardization. In 12 individuals were tested 06 maneuvers: ‘dry deglutition’, ‘tongue against the palate with mouth
open and closed’, ‘tongue retracted with open mouth and
closed’, and ‘pushing the wall’. The ‘tongue retracted with open
mouth’ was efficient to normalize the signal.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to credit more
reliability to surface electromyography (SEMG) to evaluate
muscles supra and infra hyoid, not just for to study functions
like swallowing and chewing as the vocal function and its disorders; Recommend additional studies about maneuvers to signal normalization by the SEMG.
P183
QUALITY OF LIFE AND VOICE PROTOCOL FOR GALA’S
PATIENTS - LARYNGECTOMIZED SUPPORT GROUP
Santana, MG.; Martins VB.
Santa Rita Hospital / Liga Feminina de Combate ao CÂncer/RS, Brazil
Summary: On Total Laryngectomy the removal of the larynx,
and directly interfere with their quality of life and communication. Data were collected through the questionnaire Measurement of Quality of Life and Voice (V-) of Hogikyan and Sethuraman (1999) translated and adapted by Behlau (2001). Males
aged over 65 had a better percentage of quality of life related
to voice.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to add knowledge and expand the practical theoretical.
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
167
P184
P187
CORRELATION BETWEEN TRACHEOESOPHAGEAL VOICE
AND SPEECH PROFICIENCY AND ACOUSTIC ANALYSIS AND
INTRALUMINAL PRESSURE OF PHARYNGOESOPHAGEAL
TRANSITION IN TOTAL LARYNGECTOMIZED
LISTENERS’ IDENTIFICATION OF TARGET SOUNDS IN CLEFT
PALATE SPEECH
T.K. Takeshita1, H.C. Zozolotto1, H.M. Ricz1, R.O. Dantas1, L.N. AguiarRicz1
1
Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto da Universidade de São
Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, Brazil
Summary: The study had as objective to relate the tracheoesophageal voice and speech proficiency with the acoustic measures and intraluminal pressure of pharyngoesophageal transition in rest and during the phonation, by means of the acoustic
computerized analysis, generality judgment of the tracheoesophageal communication and esophageal manometry.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to discuss the
morphophisiology of pharyngoesophageal transition with the
tracheoesophageal communication of the total laryngectomized, users of speech prosthesis.
P185
ANY WAY OF LOVE IS WORTH IT...SEXUALITY IN PATIENTS
WITH HEAD AND NECK CANCER
Martins V.B., Santana M.G., Santos J.B., Brito E.S., Sehn F.C., Gadenz
S.D., Sbaraini L.,
Macedo T.L., Sperb D., Fontana C.
Santa Rita Hospital / Liga Feminina de Combate ao Câncer/RS, Brazil
Summary: The laryngectomized experience periods lack of
sexual interest. To return to normal life it becomes difficult the
resumption of sexual activity, often for lack of information or
communication. Therefore, it is desirable that laryngectomized
patients receive guidance on this subject, so that their sexual
life takes over because the sexuality is very important to improve quality of life.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to add knowledge and expand the practical theoretical.
P186
LARYNGECTOMY: SECURING TRACHEOSTOMY WITH STYLE
Martins V.B., Santana M.G., Santos J.B., Brito E.S., Sehn F.C., Gadenz
S.D., Sbaraini L., Macedo T.L., Sperb D., Fontana C.
Santa Rita Hospital / Liga Feminina de Combate ao Câncer/RS, Brazil
Summary: In total laryngectomy the individual starts to breathe
tracheostomy and should be protected to prevent entry of dirt
and to avoid secretion output. Thus, in a meeting of the Laryngectomized Support Group, was performed a workshop on the
use of accessories protecting tracheostomy with style, thereby
regain their self-esteem and socialization.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to add knowledge and expand the practical theoretical.
J.C.R. Dutka 1, L.C. Teles 2, V.C.C. Marino 3, M.I. Pegoraro-Krook 4
1
Speech-Language Pathologist at the Experimental Phonetics Laboratory at the Hospital for Research and Rehabilitation of Craniofacial
Anomalies, 2,4 Departament of Speech Pathology and Audiology
- University of São Paulo (USP), Bauru, 3 Departament of Speech
Pathology and Audiology - University Estadual Pulista (USP), Bauru,
Brazil
Summary: The purpose was to identify listeners’ agreement
during identification of target sound before and after speech
therapy for cleft palate speech. Ten listeners participated in an
auditory-perceptual rating task listening to samples combining
pre- and post-therapy recordings. Findings revealed low mean
listeners’ agreement during identification of therapy targets
(61%). An intrajudge reliability measure of 92% was found.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to discuss difficulties with identification of target sounds before and after
speech therapy.
P188
DESCRIPTION OF ACOUSTIC MEASUREMENTS IN
LARYNGECTOMIZED USERS OF VOICE PROSTHESIS
N. Reis1, H.M.A. Ricz1, L.N. Aguiar Ricz1
1
Faculdade of Medicine of Ribeirão Preto, University of São Paulo,
Ribeirão Preto, Brazil
Summary: The acoustic measurements have now been employed in describing and monitoring of pathological. Despite
the aperiodicity of the signal received by the tracheoesophageal voice this is one of the few resources available to quantify
the acoustic signal in an objective way.
Learner Outcomes: The Participant will be able to know the
acoustic measures of men with total laryngectomy with tracheoesophageal.
P 189
A CULTURALLY RESPONSIVE INTERVENTION PROGRAM
FOR PRESCHOOLERS WITH AUTISM USING A PLAY-BASED
FAMILY SYSTEMS MODEL
J.C. Brown
North Carolina Central University, Durham, USA
Summary: This research study explores the family systems and
child engagement model for methods of early intervention. Do
these models promote play and social communicative skills for
culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) children with autism?
Learner outcomes: The participant will be able to discuss the
efficacy of various intervention models for autism; describe the
advantages and limitations of play-based intervention.
168
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
P190
WORD LEARNING IN CHILDREN WITH AUTISM: THE ROLE
OF ATTENTION
Bean A., McGregor K.
The University of Iowa, United States
Summary: In this study, we manipulating the attention scaffolding provided by the examiner and the environment within
a novel word learning task. The children with autism did not
perform significantly different than their receptive-vocabulary
mates. These results support recent research suggesting that
children with ASD are capable of using social information to
guide their word learning.
Learner Outcomes: Participants will discuss the role of attention in learning. Participants will explain how attention scaffolding impacts learning.
FP191
SPEECH-LANGUAGE PATHOLOGISTS KNOWLEDGE OF
AUTISM SPECTRUM DISORDERS AND APPLIED BEHAVIOR
ANALYSIS: A SURVEY
J.M. Ray
University of North Texas, Denton, USA
Summary: Speech-language pathologists work closely with
students who have Autism Spectrum Disorders. Though some
research has been conducted regarding speech-language pathologist’s knowledge of Autism Spectrum Disorders, it is unknown to what extent speech-language pathologists have
knowledge about Applied Behavior Analysis. Education, training, experience, and knowledge of Autism Spectrum Disorders
were analyzed. Survey results and future implications will be
discussed.
Learner Outcomes: After completing this session, participants
will be able to identify variables that contribute to a SpeechLanguage Pathologist being most knowledgeable about Autism Spectrum Disorders. After completing this session, participants will be able to discuss the differences in responses among
SLPs with and without behavioral training.
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
169
Affiliated Societies Posters
28th WORLD CONGRESS OF IALP 2010 – ATHENS, GREECE
AFFILIATED SOCIETY DAY INVITED POSTER
SPEECH PATHOLOGY IN AUSTRALIA – FROM STANDARDS TO PRACTICE
Speech Pathology Australia
Christine Stone, President
The Australian speech pathology profession has a long established commitment to ensuring speech pathologists practise at a high
standard which meets both the profession’s and community’s expectations.
Speech Pathology Australia (SPA) is the national peak body for speech pathologists in Australia and is recognised by the Federal
Government of Australia as the assessing authority for speech pathology qualifications.
Underpinning professional practice in Australia is SPA’s Competency Based Occupational Standards (CBOS). This core Association
document was first established in 1996, having been part of the Australian government’s focus on developing competency standards
across professions. Extensive consultation with the speech pathology profession lead to the first set of standards which identified
what is required for clinical and professional practice at an entry level. CBOS was reviewed in 2001 with updates incorporated to
ensure that it reflected the changing scope of practice and current health and education environments.
The standards have progressively been applied to a range of core Association functions including the accreditation of speech
pathology programs offered by Australian universities and the assessment of those who have trained overseas, and those previously
recognised speech pathologists who have not maintained currency of practice and wish to re-enter the profession.
Of significance in recent times, is the further adaptation of CBOS 2001, along with identified generic competencies, for the
development of a tool to support the valid assessment of students undertaking undergraduate clinical placements. COMPASS® Competency Assessment in Speech Pathology was launched in 2006 and is now available in an online version. This tool has not only
been adopted across Australian speech pathology programs to underpin their student clinical training but has received significant
international interest.
CBOS is currently under a further review to ensure our standards are current, relevant and will support a modern and flexible speech
pathology workforce into the future.
This poster will outline the evolution of Australian speech pathology competency standards and showcase how they have been
integrated into a range of core functions to affirm and support appropriate standards of professional practice.
The Flemish Association for Speech-Language Therapists taking logopedics serious
Pol De Meyere, Louis Heylen, Chris De Bal, Ronny Boey, Stefaan Lefevere, Marleen D’hondt, Youri Maryn*
The ‘Vlaamse Vereniging voor Logopedisten (i.e., VVL or The Flemish Association for Speech-Language Therapists) is the only officially recognized association for logopedics in the Flemish part of Belgium, currently representing about 1600 members. Its main
activities are centered around four central pillars. The first pillar is ‘advocacy’, for which VVL-representatives are engaged to optimize
professional issues for all logopedic settings (independent, institutes, etc.).The second pillar is ‘service’, for which the VVL has installed a telephone service (to directly answer the many questions of its members), a website (www.vvl.be) and a partnership with
companies specialized in social, legal, financial and insurance-related advise. For the third pillar ‘information’, VVL publishes the
journal ‘Logopedie’ every two months with scientific as well as association-related contributions. Furthermore, the VVL distributes a
newsletter on a regular basis and it also publishes books and materials that can be used in the daily assessment and management
of various logopedic disorders. The fourth pillar is ‘education’, for which the VVL annualy organizes a general logopedic congress
as well as a selected set of seminars and post-academic courses concerning a variety of logopedic topics. In the margin of all these
activities, the VVL is involved in discussions regarding quality of care and professional services, and as such it has many partners/
contacts in different governments, universities and colleges, etc. Finally, to enhance its efficiency, the VVL is currently modernizing
its structures and professionalizing its operations.
BRAZILIAN SOCIETY OF SPEECH-LANGUAGE PATHOLOGY AND AUDIOLOGY “SOCIEDADE BRASILEIRA DE
FONOAUDIOLOGIA – SBFa”
M. Behlau, President of SBFa
Brazil has 33,400 SLP and Audiologists (4,522 specialists, 1,200 master and 507 PhD holders) registered at the “Conselho Federal
de Fonoaudiologia – CFFa”, the institution responsible for monitoring the practice. The profession is called “Fonoaudiologia” and it
was officially recognized as an independent health profession in December 9th, 1981 (Law # 6965/81). The “fonoaudiólogo” is the
170
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
professional with full university education in both SLP and Audiology that acts in research, prevention, evaluation, habilitation and
rehabilitation. According to a recent definition “SLP and Audiology is the study of human communication, as far as development,
training, disorders and differences are concerned, related to aspects involving peripherical and central hearing, vestibular functions,
cognitive functions, oral and written language, speech fluency, voice, oral myology functions and swallowing” (CFFa 2004). Brazil has
one professional board (CFFa) and two scientific societies (SBFa and ABA), besides other specific and multiprofessional associations.
The SBFa is the major scientific organization for the profession, which has been organizing national and international congresses
since 1989. In 2001, the Brazilian Academy of Audiology (“Academia Brasileira de Audiologia - ABA) was founded with the main
goal of interchanging knowledge in Audiology. There are almost one-hundred undergraduate programs (4-year duration, full
time), heavily concentrated at the south of Brazil. Graduate programs are limited to 6 for master and 3 for PhD level. The main
current concerns are: to improve quality of the undergraduate programs, to open new possibilities for graduate programs with a
fair geographical distribution, to ensure quality of services and wages, to be properly covered by health insurance companies, to
widen up actions on health and education, to ensure continuing education for SLP and to extend the scope of practice with new
specialization areas.
CANADIAN ASSOCIATION OF SPEECH-LANGUAGE PATHOLOGISTS AND AUDIOLOGISTS
Gillian Barnes, President, CASLPA
The Canadian Association of Speech-Language Pathologists and Audiologists (CASLPA), representing more than 5,600 members,
is the single national body that supports the needs, interests and development of speech-language pathologists, audiologists and
supportive personnel across Canada. The poster will highlight:
n The CASLPA certification program - The CASLPA clinical certification exam is offered to students who have completed all course
work requirements and are anticipating graduation in the calendar year of the exam and to members whose applications are in
the process of evaluation. To maintain clinical certification status, members must accrue 45 continuing education equivalents
(CEEs) over a 3-year period.
n International Mutual Recognition Agreements – CASLPA has signed an international mutual recognition agreement with
the professional associations in the United States, United Kingdom, Australia, New Zealand and Ireland in speech-language
pathology. The Associations endorse each other’s certification/full membership requirements in the profession of speechlanguage pathology under terms and conditions as providing substantially equivalent determination for recognition, and…
n Media relations activities: CASLPA developed television, radio and print public service announcements over a 3-year period.
This campaign produced remarkable results with an audience reach of 24,291,435 and yielding attainment of $3,423,910 in
free advertising space.
n Recent position papers and guidelines – including dysphagia and infection prevention and control and the professional
doctorate in audiology
n Special interprofessional project - such as a Caseload Management Planning Tool
n CASLPA Resources – Canadian Journal of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, Communiqué, E-news, information
sheets – highlights of key communication vehicles
n Membership – CASLPA accepts international speech-language pathology and audiology members who meet membership
requirements
Audiologopædisk Forening
Birthe Høier, speech therapist and Inge Malmberg, speech therapist
The Danish Speech, Language and Hearing Society was founded in 1923. It is an umbrella organization for speech therapists with
different specific interests: stuttering, dyspraxia, aphasia, dyslexia, hearing problems etc.
The society has app. 950 members, which is the majority of the Danish speech therapists.
Main objectives:
n Continuing education: courses, journals, books
n Continued pressure on the authorities for improving the education of speech therapists
n Communicate information to professionals and to the public through homepage
n Information about the importance of adequate and sufficient treatment to people who need special care.
Member of different international logopedic associations.
The Egyptian Society for Phoniatrics and Logopedics
M. N. Kotby, M.Y. Aboul Ella, M. Hegazi
The new specialty of Phoniatrics was born in January 1974. This was followed by the specialty of Logopedics in 1976. The Egyptian
Society for Phoniatrics and Logopedics [ESPL] was established in 1976. It was the main professional organization among the Arabic
speaking countries of the Middle East gathering people serving children and adults with communicative disorders. The number of
members has gradually increased along the years to reach a total number of 165 members. The ESPL was affiliated to IALP in 1977.
It has hosted the World Congress of the IALP in Cairo, Egypt in 1995.
The activities of the Society span a broad range including increasing public awareness of the scope of communicative disorders
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
171
and the needs of the communicatively disabled patient. Since its establishment, the academic calendar has been busy with several
yearly seminars where national and international speakers in the field have enriched its members with state-of-art knowledge in
related fields. Members have also had the opportunity to make their achievements known at such academic forums, publishing in
known periodicals in the field, in order to maximize the benefits to all members. The latest such academic event was the Composium
on Central Auditory Processing Disorders, organized in association with IALP. This took place in March, 2009.
In striving to become an organization attractive for all its members, the Society is stepping the first steps to establish local periodical
to encourage and assist outstanding research in the field of children and adult communicative disorders. Under construction is also
a website that can help all members to remain linked and updated with the news and knowledge from the mother association
(IALP) and all related societies. It can also help the public reach their desired services through lists of reliable centers and personnel
working in the field.
Deutscher Bundesverband für Logopädie e.V. - dbl
Dr. Monika Rausch
Founded in 1964, the Deutscher Bundesverband für Logopädie e.V. (dbl) is the professional association of logopedists (SLT) in
Germany representing actually about 10.000 members. Its purpose is to promote and ensure its members’ proactive, responsible
and independent exercise of their profession and to safeguard their economic interests.
The poster presents the objectives of dbl as constituted in the Bylaws and describes the functioning of the office, federal executive
board, committees and regional associations of dbl. The poster presentation will give priority to the dbl-Guidelines of the profession,
that are proposed to be adopted at the General Assembly in June 2010. These guidelines emphazises the development of the
profession in the future that is to guide the activities of the dbl throughout the next ten years.
The poster presents also the national and international network activities of the dbl, one of the founder members of CPLOL (Comité
Permanent de Liaison des Orthophonistes-Logopèdes de l’Union Européenne), member of IALP and BIAP (Bureau International
d’Audio-Phonologie) and also an active part of national networks with physicians, physiotherapists, occupational therapists,
midwives and other professional groups.
The German Speaking Society of Speech-, Language-, and Voice Pathology
(Deutschsprachige Gesellschaft für Sprach- und Stimmheilkunde, DGSS)
Rainer Schönweiler, Prof. Dr. med. (M.D., Ph.D.), University of Lubeck (Germany) and Katrin Neumann, Prof. Dr. med. (M.D.,
Ph.D.), University of Frankfurt a.M. (Germany)
Abstract: The DGSS was founded one year after the IALP, in 1925, and was the first German speaking society of speech-, language-,
and voice pathology. The foundation was promoted by renowned phoniatricians such as Rudolf Schilling, Hermann Gutzmann jun.,
Julius and Anita Berendes, Helmut Loebell, Emil Fröschels, Miroslav Seemann, Max Nadoleczny, and Richard Luchsinger. Though
they were physicians, the DGSS was from the beginning a true interdisciplinary society by inviting also educational professions
and psychologists to participate. Today, the DGSS has members of all medical, educational, and psychological professions of
Germany, Austria, and Switzerland focusing on diagnosis, treatment, and research of speech-, language-, and voice disorders. Also,
professional societies for phoniatrics, pediatric audiology, education, psychology, logopedics, and music are affiliated members
and have (very active) delegates in the DGSS board. Interestingly, some of them you can also find on the list of IALP affiliated
members, e.g. DGPP (phoniatricians) and dbl (logopedics). The DGSS has many activities to promote science and public health
issues. First of all, the DGSS held biannual congresses in Germany, Austria, and Switzerland focusing on all interdisciplinary aspects
of speech, language, and voice sciences. In the past, more and more hands-on-seminars were attached to the program. Many
papers of the congresses were published in the Folia Phoniatrica et Logopedica (Karger, Basel), Sprache Stimme Gehör (Thieme),
and L.O.G.O.S. Interdisziplinär (Elsevier, Munich). The upcoming congress 2011 will focus on language development and reading/
writing disorders. As a second field of activity, the DGSS initiates, supports, or participates in consensus and guideline committees,
such for voice disorders in children, developmental language disorders in children, stuttering, and professional voice care issues.
Third, like the IALP, the DGSS publishes a newsletter containing comprehensive information about what is going on in the affiliated
German speaking societies in order to promote a better understanding across the disciplines.
PRESENTING THE PANHELLENIC ASSOCIATION OF LOGOPEDISTS – LOGOTHERAPISTS (PSL), HELLAS – GREECE
K. Rogas, G. Kolintza, A. Frangouli , Panhellenic Association of Logopedists – Logotherapists (PSL), Athens, Greece
The PSL was founded in 1982. It is an affiliated member of IALP and a founding member of CPLOL-LCSLT. There are 500 registered
members all of whom have studied in Universities abroad (Russia, America, United Kingdom, Argentina, Canada, France, Bulgaria,
Australia, Italy, Germany, Belgium, The Netherlands, Romania) and recently from the Greek TEI.
As the professionals in Greece, have not an official licenship, PSL evaluates the diplomas – degrees of candidates according to
CPLOL – LCSLT’s criteria and guarantees the good relations and cooperation with the Public Security Agencies for the benefit of
individuals in need of speech and language therapy (children, adolescents, adults).
The Statute, the inner regulations, and the code of Ethics offer the framework in which the general assembly, the executive
committee, the regional representatives, the scientific committee, the professional – syndical committee, the communication and
promotion committee function by its members on a voluntary basis, to update the continuous education of its members so that
they can match the services offered to the needs of the population in the area of communication disorders. Moreover, PSL is
supported by the management – secretarial office, the financial office and the legal office. Every six years PSL realizes an evaluation
of the association through the method of SWOT Analysis.
172
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
GENERAL ASSEMBLY
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE
REGIONAL REPRESENTATIVES
- MANAGEMENT/SECRETARIAT - ADVISORY BODY-OFFICE - CONTINUOUS DEVELOPMENT OF PSL - LEGAL OFFICE
1. Scientific Committees
Special interest groups
Prevention
Research
Journal Publication
Program for observation in clinical practice
Development of screening and evaluation tools
Congress organization
2. Educational Committees
Training
Continuous Education
3. Professional Committees
Supervision
Code of Ethics
Professional Standards
European issues (CPLOL) – international issues (IALP)
4. Public Relations
Information Technology (IT)
Information Office and media
Newsletter
Association of Scientists of Speech Pathology/Speech Therapy of Greece
Marousa Feidantsi, SLT MSc, President of the Scientific Committee of SELLE
The Association of Scientists of Speech Pathology/Speech Therapy of Greece (SELLE) was founded at 2002 by the 22 first graduates
of the Department of Speech and Language Therapy, TEI Patras. Currently, the association has more than 600 members all over
Greece, and is officially recognized by the Greek Government.
The mission statement of SELLE is based on both scientific and professional principles. Its first objective is to set up and promote
among its members the ethical, professional and standards of practice and second, to support their educational and scientific needs.
Moreover, the association provides a forum for collaboration among its members and takes initiatives to identify and promote
scientific activities of the profession in Greece. Finally, one of its activities is to promote and support international initiatives and
collaboration within eth field of communication sciences and disorders.
The association is governed by a 5-member board which is elected every 3 years by the members of the association at their General
Assembly. The role of the Board is to represent the association members in all governmental and nongovernmental activities as
well as to take initiatives in all professionals issues and clinical practices. The association also has an Ethics Committee which
ascertains that the decisions and actions taken by the Board as well as the professional activities of its members are in accordance
to the Code of Ethics.
Furthermore, on February 2009, the association formed its scientific committee to overlook the scientific activities. These activities
are organized in four groups (continuing education activities group, scientific journal group, research activities group, and
assessment and therapy material group). The most recent activity of the Scientific Committee involves establishing and publishing
the first Greek Scientific Journal of Speech Therapy in Greece within 2010, with the title “Hellenic Journal of Speech Therapy”, and
to organize many continuing education activities (congresses and seminars) during 2010-2011.
The Irish Association of Speech and Language Therapists (IASLT)
Dr. Ciara O’Toole and Ms. Aoife McGuire
The Irish Association of Speech and Language Therapists (IASLT) is the recognised professional body for speech and language therapists in Ireland. It was founded in 1970, initially comprising of just 30 members. Today there are over 450 members and 150 student members. The 12 member IASLT Council is the governing body of IASLT, and is responsible for a number of functions including
safeguarding the principles of IASLT and upholding its Constitution and Code of Ethics. The council also has two student observers
who are representatives from the Student Committee. IASLT is charged with a number of responsibilities, including accrediting
university courses leading to a professional qualification in speech and language therapy and validating the professional qualifications of therapists who qualified outside the Republic of Ireland and who wish to work in Ireland. In addition, the IASLT supports
Continual Professional Development (CPD) through education and research by ensuring that members submit evidence of their
CPD on an annual basis. Another role is coordinating and disseminating information regarding speech and language therapy and
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
173
promoting the exchange of professional information. IASLT has published a number of clinical guidelines and position statements
for best practice including Guidelines for Speech and Language Therapists Working with Deafness/Hearing Impairment (2004);
in Adult Mental Health (2006); on the Management of Feeding, Eating, Drinking and Swallowing Disorders (2006) and on Specific
Language Impairment (2007). Consensus document on terminology for modified food and fluids; The IASLT also issues a number of
regular publications, including UPDATE, a biannual magazine/newsletter, and an annual journal, The Journal of Clinical Speech and
Language Studies. IASLT play a key role in influencing national health policy through involvement in working and advisory groups
in health service reform, graduate employment and education and training of health professionals.
JAPAN SOCIETY OF LOGOPEDICS AND PHONIATRICS
Etsuyo Tamura,M.D. 1, Eiji Yumoto, M.D.2, Seiji Niimi, M.D.3 and Hajime Hirose, M.D.4
Professor, Department of Otolaryngology, Tokai University School of Medicine, Kanagawa Japan
Professor and Chairman, Department of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery
Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto Japan
3)
Professor and Chairman, Speech-Language and Hearing Center, International University of Health and Welfare, Tochigi Japan
4)
Prof. Emeritus, University of Tokyo
1)
2)
[Purpose and Concept] To contribute to advancement and development of Logopedics and Phoniatrics [Historical background]
Established on November 25, 1956; affiliated to IALP in 1962 [Members] Doctors, dentists, speech therapists, other teaching staffs
and research staffs [Number of members] Official members 1734; student members 43, subscribing members 279, supporting
members 6 facilities, honorary members 5 [Activities] Publishing of the Journal of JSLP; Quaternary
(1) Scientific lecture meeting and general meeting: Once annually. Symposia, panel discussions, and oral and poster presentations
are held, attended by approximately 500-600 individuals.
(2) Post-congress seminar: Once annually held following the annual meeting of the JSLP.
(3) Organizing of the specialized committees: Editing, problems in social medicine, regulations, logopathy, voice information,
swallowing, public relations
(4) Publishing activities of educational purpose for professionals in related fields:
Book: “Evaluation of Voice”: first published in 1979 and revised twice in 1994 and 2008. This work has contributed greatly to
popularizing and standardizing pathologic voice examinations in Japan.
Tape: “Sample of GRBAS for Training” was published in 1981 and the method for evaluation of pathologic voice has been widely
used all over the world.
CD: “Speech Problems in Cleft Palate Cases” appeared in 1989 presenting typical distorted sounds.
DVD:“Voice Disorders shown by Motion Pictures.”was released in 2005.
(5) Research subsidy system: Two or three future-directed research projects are awarded every year since 2006. This system was
introduced to stimulate research mind of the members.
Since the time of establishment, JSLP has been continuously trying to contribute to the advancement and the development – not
only in the fields relating to voice and phonation but also in wider range such as brain functions, articulation, swallowing, stuttering
and hearing in Japan through unique interdisciplinary efforts, making earnest discussions on the problems among the members
including medical doctors, speech therapists and other specialists.
Lithuanian Speech and Language Therapists’ Association
Ivoskuviene, R., Makauskiene, V., Kairiene, D.
Regarding presentation of professional association is presented the system of SLT’s work in Lithuania: Education, Health Care, Social
Care sectors. There is presented the main areas of SLTs’ practice (SLT’s distribution among different types of institutions).
Also, information in poster presents the history of SLT in Lithuania and history of association, from it’s established in 1991 and registering
in the Ministry of Justice of the Republic of Lithuania in 1996, regarding the law of Social organizations.
There are presented the main aims of association (to concentrate speech therapists, which works in various areas and to analyze
the important, actual theoretical-practical issues of speech therapy, to participate in projects, to take care and help the members
to update their qualifications, develop and improve their knowledge and bid for a higher qualification category, to improve the
SLT provision, to solve the problems of SLT’s) and peculiarities of activity, which usually are organized, seeking these aims (inservice training seminars, collaborative relationship with other associations, publication of scientific – methodical literature, preparation
of educational equipments).
Poster presents the main problems of SLT’s work at the practical level and systems’ level. Also there are presented activities, regarding
participation in national and international projects.
Association for Speech-Language Pathologists (ASLP) Malta
Dr Helen Grech (Head of Communication Therapy Division, Institute of Health Care, University of Malta)
The Association for Speech-Language Pathologists (ASLP) Malta was founded in 1985, and was immediately recognised as a full
member of the Federation of Professional Bodies.
The Association’s main aims include, safeguarding the profession and its code of ethics, keeping up to standards with current
developments and research and to create public awareness on the profession and communication difficulties.
174
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
The Association’s committee consists of the president, vice-president, secretary, treasurer, Ethics officer and two members.
The ASLP organises Continuous Professional Development (CPD) evenings which include talks on various topics of interest for
Speech-Language Pathologists. It is a member of the CPLOL (Standing Liaison Committee of E.U. Speech and Language Therapists
and Logopedists) and also participates in their meetings. The ASLP is an affiliate member of the International Association of
Logopedics and Phoniatrics (IALP). In Malta the ASLP is a recognized non-governmental organisation (NGO) and is registered with
the Commissioner for NGOs in line with Maltese legislation. Besides being a member of the Federation of Professional Associations
the ASLP is also affiliated with the Malta Health Network. The ASLP celebrates various events important to the profession on a
regular basis, such as the Speech Therapy Day on 6 March in collaboration with CPLOL.
New Zealand Speech-language Therapists’ Association
Dr Dean Sutherland, Executive Committee
The New Zealand Speech-language Therapists’ Association (NZSTA) was established in 1946. It is the professional association
and regulatory body for speech-language therapists in New Zealand. At December 2009, the Association had approximately
650 members. Our members work in a range of settings including; early childhood education, school-age education, health and
rehabilitation. Members are employed by the central government-funded Ministry of Education and District Health Boards. A
number of members also work in the charity sector and in private practice. The NZSTA is a signatory to the Agreement for the
Mutual Recognition of Professional Association Credentials 2008.
New Zealand, like many other countries, is a multi-cultural society. However, it is unique in having a formal bicultural agreement. Te
Tiriti o Waitangi (The Treaty of Waitangi) is Aotearoa New Zealand’s founding document and provides the framework within which
Maori and other New Zealanders agree to work together in partnership.
Key current issues for the Association at the time of writing include:
n securing registration of the profession at a national level;
n review of Programme Accreditation frameworks for the three New Zealand University Speech-language therapy training
programmes;
n Recruitment and retention of members;
n Governance of the Association.
The Phoniatric Section of the Polish ENT Society
The history and activity of the Phoniatric Section of the Polish ENT Society as a IALP
affiliated society
Ass.Prof. Bozena Wiskirska-Woznica, president of the society Bożena Wiskirska –Woźnica, Andrzej Obrębowski, Antoni
Pruszewicz
The Phoniatric Section of the Polish ENT Society was establish on 1965 with the first president Aleksandra Mitrinowicz – Modrzejewska.
At the same time new for ENT subspecialties phoniatrics and audiology were create. There were scientific meetings organized two
times per year until 2006, when this conference were arranged annually together with Audiological Section. Our society prepared
three international UEP (Union of European Phoniatricians) congresses, the 4th - in 1975 (Wroclaw), the 12th in 1985 and the 25th in
2008 both in Poznan. In years 1966 – 1972 Pruszewicz and Obrebowski in the name of the Phoniatric Section were editors of the
periodic called “ Phoniatric Information”, after 1972 due Phoniatric Section activity all phoniatric scientific papers were published
on “Otolaryngologia Polska” offcial journal of Polish ENT Society in.
The Phoniatric Section was admitted to affiliated membership of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
(IALP) about 30 years ago and actively took part in IALP congresses. On the XXI IALP Congress in Prague ( 1989) for the new board
members - the Members at Large, Antoni Pruszewicz was elected.
From the history of the Polish phoniatrics – it starts in XVIII century from Jan Siestrzynski (1788-1824) the author of “The theory
and mechanism of speech” and the pioneer of Polish phoniatrics Wladyslaw Oltuszewski (1855-1922) the author of “Psychology
and philosophy of speech” (1898), “Speech and its deviations.” (1905). Wladysław Oltuszewski was the organizer of the first Polish
phoniatrics institute in Poland - “The Warsaw Institute of Speech Deviation”. Actually the Phoniatric Section has about 200 members
– phoniatricians and audiologists, the president is Bozena Wiskirska-Woznica.
Associação Portuguesa de Terapeutas da Fala (APTF) - Portugal
Inês Tello Rodrigues, Vice-president of APTF
The poster will describe the history of SLT in Portugal, since it’s beginning in 1962, enhancing the role of the APTF, the only Portuguese association for SLT, created in 1978. Present professional and educational issues will be presented and discussed, namely
the new professional challenges and the initial and graduated education of SLT with the implementation of Bologna Process in
Europe.
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
175
OF ALL-RUSSIAN PUBLIC ORGANIZATION “THE RUSSIAN PUBLIC ACADEMY OF VOICE”
M.P. Ossovskaya
All-Russian public organization “The Russian public academy of voice” (hereinafter – Academy) is the voluntary scientific association
of phoniatrists, concerned otorhinolaryngologists, phonopedists, vocal and speech teachers, as well as specialists of allied subjects
(speech therapy, occupational pathology, medicine of work, hygiene, neurology, psychiatry, endocrinology, psycholinguistics,
psychology, acoustics), whose research, teaching, theoretical and practical activities can promote the subsequent accumulation of
knowledge about voice, elaboration of integrated methodological principles from the positions of interdisciplinary integration, as
well as specialists, who develop new medical equipment and agents.
The Academy solves following problems:
n assistance to the development of scientific researches in the field of physiology, phonation, phoniatrics, vocal and speech
pedagogy;
n improvement of the phoniatrical help organization, solution of actual problems of phoniatrics, introduction of advanced
achievements of science and technology into the practice of phoniatrics;
n participation in elaboration and realization of the international scientific programs and projects;
n elaboration of the modern methods of training and specialization of doctors in the area of phoniatrics, participation in
improvement of curricula and teaching programs for phoniatrics, voice-training;
n involvement of scientific groups by contract basis into the process of accomplishment of research tasks, elaboration of scientific
and theoretical and practical projects and programs together with research institutes and scientific centers;
n creation of members of Academy’s collected papers library;
n elaboration and introduction of new technologies into the process of persons of vocal and actor’s professions training;
n implementation of actions for increase of professional skill and culture of Academy’s members.
The academy carries out next activities:
n conduction of interdisciplinary congress “VOICE” («the Congress of the Russian public academy of voice»), the main scientific
event of the Academy;
n organization and conduction of other congresses, symposiums, conferences, seminars, councils, meetings, master classes,
concerts-reviews, festivals, competitions, etc. according to charter activity.
Slovenian Association of Logopedics – SAL Dru tvo logopedov Slovenije – DlogS
Nada Zemva, President of SAL
Slovenian Association of Logopedics - SAL, was founded on May, 20th 2004. There are proximately 140 logopedists in Slovenia and
103 of them are members of SAL. It is the only national body, which represents the needs and interests of logopedists in Slovenia.
The aim of the Association is to connect members and to facilitate their opportunities to pursue knowledge and develop
professionally. In the process of creation of legislature, regulations and professional recommendations it promotes the interests
and views of members of the Association. Members of the Association play an important role in graduate and post-graduate
education of speech therapists.
Slovenian Association of Logopedics joined CPLOL (Standing Liaison Committee of Speech and Language Therapists/ Logopedists
in the European Union) on May, 7th 2005.
The charter, the inner regulations, and the Code of Ethics offer the framework in which the members of Association function on a
voluntary basis.
The charter of Slovenian Association of Logopedics includes the principles of professional independence and representation. Our
charter complies with CPLOL charter, from which it was developed.
The organizational bodies of the Association are General Assembly, Executive Board, Supervisory Board, Honorary Court of
Arbitration, Scientific Committee, president, vice - president, secretary, and treasurer.
Association operates under the terms of the Law on Associations of the Republic of Slovenia
In the past the SAL participated in organization of the 13th International Aphasia Rehabilitation Conference in 2008 in Ljubljana and
the 7th CPLOL Congress in 2009 in Ljubljana with the theme Speech – Language therapy in Europe: sharing good clinical practice.
The upcoming congress of SAL in 2011 will focus on early intervention in speech and language disorders. The SAL organizes
numerous events important for the profession, such as the European Speech Therapy Day on 6 March every year in collaboration
with CPLOL.
WITHOUT HISTORY – NO FUTURE
SWEDISH ASSOCIATION OF LOGOPEDICS AND PHONIATRICS (SFFL) 50 YEARS
Frylmark A., Swedish Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
Logopedics and phoniatrics are young disciplines. Fifty years ago, when our organization was founded, these disciplines were quite
unknown.
In 1959, there were a few private clinics in Sweden. The people who worked there had studied abroad. Dr. Björn Fritzell, former
President of IALP, was one ofthe persons who initiated SFFL.
176
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
The first meeting took place in November 1959. In those days, Sweden was far behind our Nordic neighbours in logopedics and
phoniatrics. The initiative to start the education of SLPs came from Dr. Gunnar Bjuggren. He insisted that the SLP students right
from the beginning should get their training in the university. The two formal educations in logopedics, either with focus on health
care or work in schools, were both founded in the 1960’s, but still in 2010 there are few speech- and language pathologists and
speech therapists in Sweden compared to many other European countries.
The Nordic cooperation was vivid at the start, e.g. with yearly symposia in Kungälv, Sweden. We still carry on a Nordic board
meeting every year and visit each other’s congresses. There are also numerous examples of cooperation, both in research and
clinical, between the Nordic countries.
Today, SFFL has around 700 members. We arrange a yearly 2-day congress with different themes. Our journal, Tal & Språk, is
published four times/year and we have a website where our members can keep informed.
An organization should keep to its goals but be able to change with the world around it. Being the board of SFFL, we are proud of
our organization’s history and looking forward to the future.
Nederlandse Vereniging voor Logopedie en Foniatrie (NVLF)
Marjolein Coppens MSc., Responsible for NVLFThe NVLF is the Dutch professional association for 4000 members who are Speech and Language Therapists. The NVLF sets and
promotes high standards in clinical practice and ethical conduct and aims to improve services for people with speech, language,
communication and swallowing needs. Main goals in policy are quality, professional practice and the influencing of health,
education and social care policies.
In the Netherlands Speech and Language Therapists are working in education, independent practice, health care
centers, hospitals, rehabilitation centers, nursing homes, in institutions for people with intellectual development
disorders and so on. Seven institutes of higher education offer professional speech and language therapy education.
The NVLF, empowering and supporting Speech and Language Therapists, is focusing on the individual and collective interests of its
members and is engaged at a professional as well as a social-economic level. In 2012 the NVLF will exist 85 years.
The Speech-Language-Hearing Association of the Republic of China (TAIWAN)
The Speech-Language-Hearing Association of Taiwan is the professional and scientific association for1282 members and affiliates
who are speech-language pathologists, audiologists, and speech, language, and hearing scientists in Taiwan.
Purpose: The association was established in 1986, and our purpose is to provide quality service to our people and enhance
professional expertise in the field of speech-language and hearing in Taiwan , and to have academic exchange with others
internationally.
Mission: Empowering and supporting speech-language pathologists, audiologists, and speech, language, and hearing scientists by:
Advancing communication science. Enhancing the professional expertise.
Having academic exchange with other professions in Taiwan and internationally. Researching and creating the assessment and
diagnosis tools and therapeutic instruments for speech-language and hearing disorder that best meet local demands.
Scope of practice in SLP: Speech-language pathologists provide assessment, intervention and counseling that include the following
areas: Speech:Articulation disorder, Fluency disorder, Voice disorder, and Motor speech disorder. Language disorder:Preschool/
School age child language disorder and Aphasia. Swallowing and feeding disorder.
Clinical services: Speech-language pathologists serve individuals, families, and groups from diverse linguistic and cultural
backgrounds. We provide intervention and support services for children and adults from neonate to elders diagnosed with speech,
language and swallowing disorders.
SLP training program: We have 1 undergraduate and 3 graduate schools of speech, language and hearing sciences and disorders
in Taiwan. The curriculum includes classroom teaching, clinical observation and clinical practicum. All students have to obtain
requires 375 hours or do at least 6 months clinical practicum for graduation. Only if the students get license, they will provide
clinical services.
The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA)
Tommie L. Robinson, Jr., PhD, CCC-SLP – 2010 ASHA President
Arlene A. Pietranton, PhD, CAE – ASHA Executive Director
ASHA is a professional, scientific and credentialing society representing over 135,000 speech-language pathologists, audiologists,
and speech-language and hearing scientists. Although most ASHA members are located in the United States, several thousand
ASHA members reside and/or practice in countries around the world.
As an association, ASHA is committed to the interchange with our counterparts and colleagues in other countries of knowledge,
information, and education related to common areas of professional interest such as: ethics; evidence-based clinical practice;
clinical education; supervision; clinical research; service delivery systems; public awareness; and prevention of communication
disorders.
This poster presentation will provide an overview of ASHA’s membership and organizational history and an update of recent
initiatives and current resources that are available to and may be of interest to international colleagues.
177
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
Authors' Index
A
Abdel Latif G.
Aboras Y.
Abou El Ella M. Y. A.
Abou Elsaad T.
Aboulghar H. M. A.
Abramides D.
Abusamra V.
Acosta Rodriguez V. M.
Adams C.
Aduli F.
Aferri H.
Agius K.
Aguiar A. M. A. S.
Aguiar Ricz L. N.
Airaksinen L.
Akhmedov I. N.
Akyuz Togram A.
Alebooyeh N.
Alexandrou E.
Alizadeh H.
Alku P.
Allen Gomes A.
Almada C.
Almeida B.K
Almeida P.
Alonso R.
Alvarez A. M. M.
Alves Da Silva Carvalho S.
Alves S.
Amato C. A. H.
Ameen S.
Amir O.
Anastacio Pessan F. L.
Andrade C. R. F.
Andrade D.
Andrade G. M. Q.
Andrade R.
Andrade Sobrinho F. A.
Andreopoulou A.
Andreou S.
Andrianopoulos M. V.
Antoniou A.
Aoki S.
Arakawa A.
Armstrong E.
Arnaut M.
Arsovic N.
Athanassiadi C.
Atkins J.
Augusto F.
Avila C.
Avila M. E. B.
FP45.5
FP18.3
FP17.4
FP45.5
FP17.4
FP06.5, P025, P097
SY01.3
P094
SS03.2
P092
P177
FP16.2
P130
P184
FP35.2
FP35.4
P149
P070
P073
P070
FP35.2
FP13.1, FP37.6
P052
P177
P174
P133
FP38.2, P066, P132
P009
P100
FP06.6
P064
SY02A.4
P024.
SY06A.2, SSY01.1, SSY01.3,
SY06A.6, SY06B.5, SY09A.1
FP24.4, FP24.5, P043
FP44.6
FP24.4, FP24.5, P026, P043,
P093, P182
FP41.4
FP40.4
P103, P167
FP30.3, FP36.2, FP42.1
FP04.2
FP17.2
P098, P099, P173
FP37.5
FP30.4
SY10.4
FP02.3
SSY05.2
P062
FP30.4
FP26.4
Awaya N.
Axpe Caballero M. A.
Azevedo M. F.
Azevedo N.
B
Bagetti T.
Bahia M.
Bahr D.
Baker J.
Balou M.
Bamiou D. E.
Banfi P.
Baravieira P. B.
Barcelos I.
Barea K.
Barja P.
Barnard R.
Barreto S. S.
Barros H. M. T.
Barroso T.
Bartolotta T. E.
Barwood C. H. S.
Bassi I.
Bassi K.
Bastos J. R.
Battle D.
Bauminger N.
Bean A.
Becerra M.
Befi Lopes D. M.
Behlau M.
Behluli Kabashi L.
Behrakis V. B.
Bella S.
Bendler S.
Benedito J.
Bentlin M. R.
Bento Gonçalves C.
Berberian A.
Bergin C. E.
Bernardini S.
Bernhardt B. M.
Bersimis S.
Berti L. C.
Bertolucci P. H.
Bezrukova O. A.
Bilda K.
Bitar M.
Bittante De Oliveira I.
SY03B.3, FP19.6, P074
P094
FP44.6
P130
P014
P126
SE09.1, SE03.1
SY02B.1
P092
FP37.1, SY10.5
FP21A.5
P120
FP39.4
P131
FP46.3
FP02.1
P041
P123
P078
FP04.3, P110
FP37.2
P065
P099, P173
FP41.5, P098, P099, P173,
P180, P185, P186
SY11.1
SY14B.2
P190
FP36.6
SSY01.1, SSY01.2, P071, P077,
P135
FP18.2, FP21A.4, FP26.2,
FP26.4, FP29.4, FP31.3, FP31.4,
FP31.6, FP32.2, FP41.1, FP41.2,
FP41.6, FP46.4, SS02.1, SS14.1,
SY11.1, SY02B.2
FP04.5
P157
P073
P081
P176
P137
P115, P178
FP43.1, P059, P163
SE16.1
FP08.2, FP08.3
P018
FP33.3
P154
P003, P004
P161
FP03.6
P124
P055
177
178
Block S.
Bloem B.R.
Blomgren M.
Boliek C.
Bolli Mota H.
Bommarito S.
Bonaventura P.
Bontsiou T.
Borrego M.C.M.
Bos A.J.G.
Bosshardt H.G.
Bottari S.
Bottino C.M.C.
Boucand V.
Boucher M. J.
Bougiotopoulou V.
Boustead T.
Boviatsis E.
Bovoli A.
Brandeker M.
Brestovci B.
Brice A. E.
Brice R. G.
Brito E.
Brophy J.
Brosnan G.
Brown D.
Brown J. C.
Brown L.
Brown M.
Brutten G. J.
Bryant C.
Bu X.
Bukhman V.
Bullova J.
Burns S.
Buter J.
C
Cahill L.
Calanca M.
Caldana M.
Calero Tablante V.
Calvo J. A.
Campanha A. C.
Campbell N.
Campos De Rosete M.
Campos Moreira T.
Cangokce Yasar O.
Capellini S. A.
Capparelli E.
Cardoso C.
Carleto N.
Carneiro J.
Carneiro P. R.
Carnevale L.
Carnio M. S.
Caroll J.
Carson K.
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
SSY05.1, SSY05.3, SSY05.2
SS05.1
SY06A.1, SY06A.4, SY06A.6,
SY06B.5
FP23.3
P014, P080
P047
P175
FP10.1
FP26.4
P051
SY06A.1, SY06A.5, SY06A.6,
SY06B.5, FP01.5
FP21A.5
FP38.2
SY06A.1, SY06A.6, SY06B.5
FP30.3, FP36.2, FP42.1
FP40.4
SY05.3, SY03B.2
SSY03.2
FP40.2
FP27.3
FP04.5
FP03.1
FP03.1
FP41.5, P180, P185, P186
FP43.3
FP20.2
P092
P189
FP01.2, FP01.3
FP37.1
FP08.2, FP08.3
SSY05.2
SY07.2, SY07.3
SE13.1
FP33.5
FP20.2
FP34.1
SY04A.4, FP23.4
P175
P098, P099, P173
P010
SE13.1
P003, P004
SY10.5
P010
P123
P154
FP17.6, FP19.2, FP20.3, FP40.1,
P033,
FP08.4
FP12.1, P130, P155, P156
P098, P099, P173
P093
P119
P059
P001, P164
SY05.1
SY05.3, SY03B.2
Carter G.
Carvalho A.
Carvalho C.
Carvalho F.
Carvalho L.
Carvalho S. A. S.
Carvallo R. M. M.
Casella E. B.
Cassab T. V.
Cassiani R.
Cassol M.
Castro Caldas A.
Castro L.
Castro M. M.
Cecconello L. A.
Cera M. L.
Ceron M.
Cervantes O.
Chan E.
Chan K. M. K.
Chang C. W.
Charman T.
Chaves A. G.
Chen S. H.
Chen X.
Cheng L. R. L.
Cherney L. R.
Chi P. H.
Chiang S. C.
Chiarion Sassi F.
Chiong C.
Choo A. L.
Chun R.
Chung Y. M.
Ciasca S. M.
Cigala A.
Citro R.
Cnossen I. C.
Cocco L.
Coelho M.
Collings A. B.
Committee Members
Constantinidou F.
Conture E.G.
Cook F.
Cooley Hidecker M.J.
Corben L.
Corbo M.
Core C.
Corsano P.
Corthals P.
Corwin M.
Cosyns M.
Coufal K. L.
Couto M.
Coveliers Y.
Cowper R.
Cox K.
Crenitte P. A. P.
Crespo A.
Crestani S.
SY04A.5
P026
FP30.4
P025
FP44.3
P065
P068, P135
P132
P136
P159
P051, P052, P123
FP43.4
P181
P076
FP29.3, FP36.6
P109
P014
P091
FP15.1
FP15.1
P049
MR03
P066
P049
FP26.3
SE04.1, SY09A.1
SSY06.1, FP37.5
FP19.1
P049
P105
SY07.3
SY04A.2
FP04.1, P126
P048
P086
P145
FP02.4, SE10.1
FP34.3, FP39.1
FP08.2, FP08.3
FP43.4
SS03A.1
SY02A.6, SY02B.6
SY01.4
P035.
SY06A.1, SY06A.4, SY06B.1,
SY06A.5, SY06A.6, SY06B.5
FP04.4
SY04A.4
FP21A.5
FP19.4
P145
FP01.1, FP22.3
FP37.3
FP01.1
FP30.5, SY12.4, P147
FP44.3
FP31.2
P151
FP37.1
P023, P086, P162
P174
FP22.4, FP39.6
179
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
Cruice M.
Crumrine D.
Csefalvay Z.
Culatta B.
Cunha V. L. O.
Currier A.
Currier S.
FP02.1, FP02.5, FP09.1, FP13.1,
FP37.6
P150
SS03.2
SY03A.3, SY03A.5
FP40.1
FP19.4, FP24.1
FP04.4
D
Dajer M. E.
Dalapa P.
Dantas R. O.
Darwish A.
Daunhauer L. A.
Davatz G.
Davis D.
Davison Mangilli L.
De Bal C.
De Biase N.
De Bodt M.
De Bree R.
De Bruijn M.
De Las Heras Minguez G.
De Luccia G.
De Mattos Pimenta Parente M. A.
De Nil L. F.
De Oliveira Mares Guia A. C.
De Swart B. J. M.
Dehghani M.
Dejonckere P. H.
Delatycki M.
Delia K.
Deligiorgi G.
Deliyski D.
Dembowski J.
Demenko G.
Desaki J.
Desoete A.
Desylla V.
Di Betta A. M.
Diaferia G.
Dias D. A. B.
Dias R. F. R. F.
Dietrichs E.
Dimakis I.
Dimakopoulou E.
Dimic N. D.
Dionissieva K.
Do Brasil O.
Dobrota N.
Dodd B.
Donath V.
Doornaert P.
Dowds T.
Dragaj A.
Dragone M.
Duchan J.
Dutka J. C. R.
Dyson A. T.
FP36.6, FP41.4
FP12.2
P159, P184
FP20.4, FP45.2
P088
P125
FP18.1
P030, P105
FP06.1
FP21A.3
FP46.1, SY04B.3
FP34.1, FP34.3
FP46.5, FP46.6
SE13.1
FP13.2, P007, P100
SY01.3
P101
P009
P042, SS05.1
FP20.5
FP29.6, FP36.4
SY04A.4
P064
SSY03.2
SY02A.1
FP37.3
P008
P057
FP19.5, FP40.3
FP15.2
P081
FP21A.4
FP39.4
P083
FP01.6
FP10.5
FP33.3
P002
FP38.3
FP41.6
P103
SY05.5, FP03.3
FP33.5
FP34.1
SS15.1
FP04.5
FP31.6
FP43.2, SY13.1
FP24.3, P115, P177, P178, P187
P148
E
Ebrahimian Dehaghani S.
Efat Ahmad Zaky E. A. Z.
Efthymiou A.
Egan C.
Eggers K.
FP17.1, P139
FP17.4
FP33.3
SS15.1
SY06A.1, SY06A.3, P038,
SY06B.6, SY06B.4, SY06A.6,
SY06B.5, P101
Eklund K. M.
El Choueifati N.
Elassal N. N. E.
Elbana M.
Ellul Mercer E.
Elsady S.
Enderby P. M.
Endo K.
Epstein R.
Era S.
Ertan E.
Ervast L. M.
Euler H. A.
Eyal S.
SS06.2
FP16.5
FP17.4
FP18.3
P064
FP45.5
SY04A.3
FP33.1
FP31.3, FP31.5
P169
P112
SS06.3
SY06B.2
FP03.4, FP16.3, SY03A.2
F
Fagnani C.
Faham M.
Faislon I.
Falcone P.
Falhammar H.
Farmaki S.
Farrington Douglas C.
Feijo D.
Felton J.
Feniman M.
Fergadiotis G.
Ferigolo M.
Ferman S.
Fernandes F.
Fernandes S.
Ferrão Y.
Ferre P.
Ferreira A. T.
Ferreira J.
Ferreira L. P.
Ferreres A.
Fibiger S.
Fidler D. J.
Figueiredo D. C.
Filatova Y.
Filipovic V.
Filippini R.
Fiorini H.
Fisher H.
Flabiano F. C.
Folker J.
Fonseca R. P.
Fontana C.
Fossett T.
Foster Cohen S.
Fourlas G.
SY06B.3, SS04.1, SY13.4
FP20.5, FP32.1
FP12.1
FP08.4
FP42.2
P144
FP02.5
FP42.6, SS12.1
FP30.3
P025.
FP10.2
P123
FP03.4
FP06.3, FP06.6, SY14C.1,
SSY01.1, SSY01.2, SY09A.1,
P146
P123
P052
SY01.3
P022, P023, P024
FP43.4, P065
FP31.6, P054
SY01.3
SY06A.1, SY06B.3, SS04.1,
SY13.4, SY06A.6, SY06B.5
P088
P091
SY09A.2
FP32.3, FP44.4, P172
P133
P064
FP41.3
P088
SY04A.4
P005.
FP41.5, P180, P185, P186
SY04A.5
P072, SY05.6
P036
180
Fox C.
Franco E.
Frangouli A.
Franken M. C.
Freitas M.
Furquim C. R.
Furquim De Andrade C. R.
G
Gabrieli J.
Gadenz S.
Gal E.
Galanda M.
Galanda T.
Galea D.
Galea R.
Galera R.
Gallagher T. M.
Gândara J. P.
Garcia De Almeida M. L.
Garcia F. C.
Garcia M. E.
Garst D.
Gasteratos A.
Geão M.G.
Gebert R.
Geiser E.
Geneid A.
Georgieva D.
Georgiou A.
Germano G. D.
Geronikou E.
Gerulaitis D.
Ghasisin L.
Ghelmani Pour M.
Ghio A.
Ghirardi A.
Ghorbani R.
Giacchini V. V.
Giachetti C.
Gianinni S.
Giannetopoulou A.
Giannika P.
Giannini S.
Giaxoglou K.
Gielow I.
Giglio V. P.
Gillon G.
Ginieri Coccossis M.
Ginocchio D.
Gioti M.
Giroux F.
Giusti E.
Goldberg L.
Golding M.
Golub N.
Gomes Fernandes E.
Gomes M.
Gomes Rodrigues M. G.
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
SE12.1, FP23.3
P098, P099, P173
FP02.3, FP04.2, FP05.1, FP10.1,
FP10.5, FP12.3
FP08.1
P181
FP39.5, FP45.3
P030, P105
P152
FP41.5, P180, P185, P186
SY14B.2
FP33.5
FP33.5
P078
FP16.5
SE04.1
SY03B.4
P071
P001
P129
P141
SY04A.5
FP11.1
P022, P024
SY06B.2
P152
FP18.4, FP35.2
SY09A.2
FP12.4
FP20.3
P085, P143, P144
P165
P138
P140
P033
P054
P070
FP25.2, P083
P136
FP31.6
FP05.5
FP34.2
P054
FP10.1
FP41.2, SS12.2, SE14.1, P091
P158
SY05.2, SY05.5, SY05.3,
SY03B.2, SY05.4, SY05.1, SY05.6
P072
SY13.5
FP21A.5
SSY03.3
SY01.3
P071
FP45.1, SY12.5, SY12.6
SY10.3
FP36.6
FP24.4, FP24.5, P043, P182
P069
P001
Gonçalves C.
Gonçalves T. S.
Good V. P.
Goranova E. G.
Gotoh T.
Gould R. L.
Grammenou A.
Grammenou S. M.
Granqvist S.
Grech H.
Grech H.
Grigos M.
Grogoriadou E.
Grohmann K. K.
Guariento M. E.
Guarinello A.
Guedes M. C.
Guedes Z.
Guerrieri A. C.
Gurgel L.
Guttorm T. K.
Gyftogianni M.
P108
P086, P095, P162
SY05.4
FP21A.6, P168, P170
FP19.6, SY03B.3, P074
SE16.1
FP16.6, FP30.1
P085
SY02A.5
FP03.3, SY09A.1, SY11.1
P064
FP14.1
FP05.4
FP27.1
FP39.4
FP43.1, P059, P163
FP38.2
P108
FP18.2, FP31.4
P052
SS06.2
FP11.1, FP12.4
H
Haataja L.
Hagenfeldt K.
Haji T.
Hakala S.
Hall K.
Hamalainen J.
Hamdy S.
Hammarberg B.
Han D.
Hanna C. B.
Harrison L.
Hartelius L.
Hartley D.
Haruhara N.
Hattori T.
Haupt E. M.
Hautala J.
Hautala T. E.
Haverinen S.
Hedlund A.
Heikkinen E.
Heikkinen M. K.
Heikkinen P.
Heinanen K.
Hennessey N. W.
Henriksen K.
Herber Profiro J.
Hernandez Villoria R.
Hickmann M.
Hickson L. M. H.
Hidecker M. J. C.
Higdon C.
Hilari K.
Hilary K.
Hirani S.
Hjelmborg J. V. B.
Hoffmann E.
SSY04.2, P082
FP42.2
P046, P053
FP26.5, SE17.1
SY03A.3, SY03A.5
SS06.2
FP28.1, FP28.3
FP46.2
FP45.6
P040
FP09.2, FP09.6, FP30.2
SY04A.1
SY10.3
FP19.6, SY03B.3, P074
P122
SE18.1
FP20.1
FP44.5
SSY04.1
SY04A.1
P021
P017, P019
SY01.1
FP20.1, SS06.3
P151
FP01.6
P176
FP40.5, P010
FP07.3
FP09.3
FP23.2, SS03.1, SE15.1, P040
SE08.1
FP13.4
SY01.5
FP31.3, FP31.5
SY06B.3, SS04.1, SY13.4
SY07.4
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
Holgers K. M.
Holland A. L.
Holmberg B.
Holmberg E.
Homma S.
Honda K.
Horibe S.
Hoth S.
Housseinoglou E.
Howard D.
Hsiao T. Y.
Hsieh W. H.
Huckabee M. L.
Hulsink N.
Humbert I. A.
Hus Y.
Hyodo M.
Hyter Y. D.
SY07.5, SY07.3
FP37.5
SY04A.1
FP29.2
P028
P053
P122
SY10.1
FP10.5
FP07.2
P049
P048
SS03A.1
FP25.3
FP28.2
SS08.1
P057
SS16.1, SY03B.1
I
Iglesias A.
Ignatiou M.
Iizuka O.
Ikenaga E.
Imagawa H.
Isaev V. M.
Isakovic L.
Isotani S. M.
Itoh H.
Iverach L.
Ivoskuviene R.
Ivy L.
Iwata Y.
SE11.1
FP13.4
FP33.1
P056
FP36.5
FP35.4
P002
P142
FP38.1
SSY05.1, SSY05.3, SSY05.2
P165
SE08.1
P122
J
Jalile Vand N.
Jamalye H.
Janssens S.
Jansson Verkasalo E.
Jefferson S.
Jesus L. M.
Joanett Y.
Joanette Y.
John A. J.
Jovanovic N.
Juliana Rocha K.
Juliana Roocha K.
Justino H.
K
Kairiene D.
Kakehi K.
Kakkidou K.
Kakourou N.
Kalf J. G.
Kalinny Batista J.
Kalogianni S.
Kalomoiris G.
Kalomoiris G.
Kalos E.
FP32.1
SY03A.2
FP01.1
SSY04.1, SS06.1, P021, P075,
P079
FP28.1, FP28.3
FP13.1, FP37.6
P005
SY01.3
SY04A.3
P103, P167
P176
FP24.4, FP24.5
FP24.4, FP24.5, P043, P093,
P176, P182
P165
P104
P102
FP12.2
FP21A.2, SS05.1, SY12.3, P042
P062
P085
FP02.3
SY13.3
FP12.3
Kambanaros M.
Kamińska I.
Kaneko M.
Kankare E.
Kapantzoglou M.
Karagiannis M. J.
Karandoni A.
Karashtranova E. L.
Karimi H.
Karimlu M.
Kariyasu M.
Karla Bezerra Oliveira G.
Karpathiou N.
Karpouzou E.
Kartsona A.
Kasai S.
Kasic Z.
Kasselimis D.
Kassimati A.
Katano S.
Katsigri P.
Katz W.
Kaufmann Meyer M.
Kaukola T.
Kavvada A.
Kawashima T.
Keegstra A. L.
Keidar N.
Kent R. D.
Keske Soares M.
Kharkhurin A. V.
Khidr A.
Khoroshavina E. V.
Kida A.
Kikuchi S.
Kikutani T.
Kirkegaard C.
Kirpotin L.
Kishon Rabin L.
Kjaer B.
Kjelgaard Rockcastle M.
Klecan Aker J. S.
Klein H.
Kling I. F.
Klippi A.
Kluzova M.
Knuijt S.
Ko J. Y.
Koedoot C.
Koiliari G.
Kokmotos P.
Koloni E.
Kolosioni D.
Konjiki F.
Konoiko N.
Konstantaki E.
Kopkalli Yavuz H.
Korn G.
Korpijaakko Huuhka A. M.
Korpilahti P.
Kotsopoulos A.
181
FP27.1
P067
FP19.6, SY03B.3, P074
FP18.4
FP10.2
FP34.5
FP10.5
P168
P140
P140
FP14.2, FP42.3, P028
FP24.4, FP24.5, P043, P182
FP33.3
P143
FP13.4
P028
P002
SSY03.2
SSY03.3
P074
P032
SY04A.5
FP02.4
P019
FP17.3
P169
FP17.5
FP16.3
SS03.1, P040
P014
FP10.4
FP42.4
P161
FP30.4
P028
P107
FP37.4
FP05.5
FP27.4
SY12.1
P152
SE05.1
FP14.1
SE01.1
SY01.1
FP33.5
P042
FP39.2
FP08.1
FP16.4
P073
SSY03.1
FP12.4
P171
FP45.4
FP17.3
P112
FP21A.3
FP13.3, FP21A.1
SS06.1, SS06.3
SY09A.2
182
Kotsopoulos S.
Kotsopoulou A.
Koul R.
Kourou M. G.
Koutri I.
Koutsioumba G.
Kovacevic T.
Kozuka J.
Kruger S.
Kudou E.
Kuik D.
Kujala T.
Kukkonen T.
Kulic M.
Kupersmitt J.
Kuukasjarvi L.
Kwok T. Y.
Kwong E. Y. L.
Kyriakou K.
L
Laine M.
Lalain M.
Lamonica D.C.A.
Lambrinou A.
Lamônica D.A.C.
Langendijk J.
Lapinlampi S.
Lapinleimu H.
Larkins B.
Larsson H.
Laukkanen A. M.
Lauris J.
Lazogiorgou Kousta I.
Leahy M.
Leão S.
Leemans C.
Leheckova H.
Lehtihalmes M.
Lehtonen L.
Leite A.
Leite C.
Leppanen P. H. T.
Leslie P.
Levanti I.
Lewis D.
Lewis F. M.
Li X. L.
Lichtig I.
Liegeois F.
Lim K. Y.
Lima Ferreira C.
Lima J. P.
Lima Santos T.
Limongi S. C. O.
Lin Y. Y.
Lin Z. X.
Lindestad P.
Lipsey M. W.
Lira J. O.
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
FP12.4
FP05.3, FP11.1
FP37.3
FP12.2
FP12.3
P085
P002
FP19.6, SY03B.3, P074
P059
P028
FP46.5, FP46.6
P021, P075, P079,
FP13.3
P167
SY14B.2
SSY04.3
FP15.1
FP29.5
FP41.3
SY01.1
P033
P097
FP02.3
P022, P023, P024
FP34.1, FP46.5, FP46.6
P075, P079
SSY04.2, P082
FP09.3
FP29.2, FP36.1
FP18.4
P178
FP04.2
SY06A.1, SY06B.6, SY06B.4,
SY06A.6, SY06B.5, P038, P102
FP46.4
FP34.1, FP34.3, FP46.6
SY01.2
FP11.2, FP20.1, SY09B.1, P050
SSY04.2, P082
P130
FP46.3
SS06.2, SS06.3
SE10.1
FP27.2
SY07.3
FP06.4, FP16.1
FP44.2, SY10.2
FP10.3, FP44.3, P069, P096
SY04B.1
SY04A.5
P001
P133
FP44.1
SSY01.1, SSY01.4, P026, P088
P049
FP29.5
FP29.1
P035
P003, P004, P131
Litinas N.
Lloyd D.
Lofkvist U.
Logemann J. A.
Lolakidou A.
Loo J.
Lorenceti M. D.
Lorenzon P.
Lou P. J.
Lowit A.
Lu H. J.
Lu M. P.
Lubinski R.
Lucia Gurgel Da M.
Lundstrom E.
Luotonen M.
Luxon L.
Lyytinen H.
M
Ma E.
Maassen B. A. M.
Mac Evilly D.
Macedo De Resende L.
Macedo Penna L.
Macedo T.
Machado D.
Machado M. A. M. P.
Maciejewska B.
Madazio G.
Mahajna S.
Mahmoodi Bakhtiari B.
Majorano M.
Makauskiene V.
Makikallio K.
Makkonen T.
Maniadaki K.
Mantovani Nagaoka J.
Mantzioura S.
Marcelino F.
Marcelino M.
Marcos Alves Ricz H.
Marcos Alvez Ricz H.
Maria Machado Barabosa C.
Maria Mendes P.
Marinho J. M.
Marino V. V. C.
Mariz De J.
Markowska R.
Marques S.
Marshall J.
Marteleto M.
Martens J. P.
Martin D.
Martins V.
Marulli M.
Maruyama H.
Maryn Y.
Massi G.
Massini M.
P012, P039
FP37.2
FP11.6
SY08.2
SSY03.2
SY10.5
FP19.2
FP21A.3
FP39.2
FP02.6
P048
FP26.3
SS01.1
P062
FP46.2
SS06.3
FP37.1, SY10.5
SS06.2
FP09.4, SY02B.3, P116, P117
SY04B.2, P106
FP19.3, FP20.2
P009
P009
FP41.5, P180, P185, P186
P174
P058
P008
FP21A.3, FP29.4, FP41.2,
FP42.6, FP46.4, SS14.1
FP03.4
P070
P145
P165
P017
FP21A.1
FP12.2
P006
FP12.3
P025
P176
P188
FP42.5
FP24.4, FP24.5, P043
P093, P182
FP43.5
P187
FP31.1
FP08.6, FP22.2, FP35.3
P026
SY01.5
P027
FP36.4
FP03.2
FP41.5, P160, P180, P183, P185,
P186
P175
P053
FP26.1, SE06.1
FP43.1, P059, P163
P175
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
Mastropavlou M.
Matiatou A.
Matos M. A.
Mavis I.
Maximino L. P.
Mcallister L.
Mccabe P. J.
Mccain P.
Mccluskey J.
Mccormack J.
Mccullough G.
Mccurtin A.
Mcgloin S.
Mcgregor K.
Mcleod S.
Mcmillan J. K.
Mcneil M.
Mcneill B. C.
Mcoormack J.
Mello P.
Melo R. M.
Mendonca Alves L.
Menzies R. G.
Mercadante M.
Merlo A.
Mervis C.
Mescherkin A. P.
Mesuda Y.
Mezzomo C. L. C. L.
Micallef R.
Michou E.
Miettinen L.
Miilher L. P.
Mikic B.
Mikic M.
Mikkonen H.
Milathianaki M.
Milena Freire Lima R.
Miliev D. M.
Miller J.
Miller L.
Minami K.
Minami M.
Minett T. S. C.
Minucci M.
Miranda A.
Miric D.
Mistry S.
Mitchell P.
Miyamaru S.
Miyao M.
Mlini Avejonas D.
Mo M.
Moerman M. B. J.
Mokhtarzadeh M.
Molini Avejonas D. R.
Moller A.
Moore L.
Moraes J.
Moraes M.
FP11.3, FP27.5
FP34.2
FP13.1, FP37.6
FP33.4, P063, P128
FP06.5, P025
FP09.2, FP30.2
FP16.5
SE02.1, SS10.1, SS09.1, SSY02.2
FP20.2
FP09.6, FP30.2
P092
SE10.1
FP24.2
P190
FP09.2, FP09.6, FP15.3, FP30.2
P148
SY04A.5
SY05.5
FP09.2
P026
P080
P033
FP01.2, SSY05.1, SSY05.3,
SSY05.2
P027
FP21A.5
FP24.1, FP24.2
SS13.1
P028
P083
P064
FP28.1, FP28.3
FP02.4
FP06.3
SY10.4, SY07.3
SY10.4
P019
P144
FP24.4, FP24.5, P043
P170
SE11.1
P175
P046, P053
P171
P003, P004, P109
P164
P047
SY10.4
FP28.1, FP28.3
SY10.3
FP26.6
P171
FP12.1
P116
FP36.4
P070
FP06.6
FP36.3
SE08.1
P181
FP21A.3, FP41.1, FP41.2, SS02.1
Moreira C.
Moreno Santana A. M.
Moreti F.
Morgan A. T.
Mori E.
Mortier G.
Mota H. B. H. B.
Moura G. M.
Mourao L. F.
Munneke M.
Munro N.
Murase S.
Murdoch B. E.
Murphy C. F. B.
Mustafaev D. M.
Myhlendorph L.
N
Nagatsuka N.
Naito K.
Nandin T. L. C.
Nascimento T.
Natour Y. S.
Navas A. L.
Nawka T.
Nemr K.
Nespoulous J. L.
Neto Aguiar Ricz L.
Neumann K.
183
P155, P156
P094
FP26.4
SY04B.1
FP33.1
FP01.1
P083
FP24.4, P093, P096
FP04.1, FP39.4, P126, P174
FP21A.2, SS05.1
FP16.5
P169
FP06.4, FP16.1, FP37.2,
SY04A.4, SY04B.4
P133, P134
FP35.4
FP37.4
Neumann S.
Neves I. F.
Neves J.
Newall C.
Newall P.
Newman S.
Niemitalo Haapola E.
Nikolaou C.
Nikolic S.
Nili Pour R.
Nilipour D. R.
Ninkovic D.
Nishida N.
Nishikubo K.
Nishio Y.
Nishiwaki K.
Nishiyama A. K.
Nishizawa N.
Nockerts A.
Nordenskjold A.
Ntourou K.
Nunes Brandao F.
Nygren U.
FP07.2
P122
FP04.1
FP30.4
FP22.6
SY03A.2
FP36.3, SY02B.2
P124
FP07.3, P005
FP42.5, P188
SY06B.1, SY06A.6, SY06B.5,
SY06B.2, SY07.3
FP14.3
P133
P178
SY10.3
SY07.1, SY10.3, SY07.3
FP31.5
P075, P079
FP33.3
FP32.3, FP44.4, P172
P140
FP01.4
P103, P167
P057
P029, P057
FP33.1
P107
P068
FP42.3, P028
SE11.1
FP42.2
P035
P009
FP29.2, FP42.2
O
Oates J. M.
Obrębowski A.
Obrian S.
Ocallaghan A. M.
Oconnor K.
Oddson B.
SY02A.3
P067
SSY05.1, SSY05.3, SSY05.2
FP33.2, SS01.2
FP24.2
FP09.5, FP15.3
184
Oehring A.
Ogawa N.
Ohalloran R.
Okuma K.
Oliveira A.
Oliveira C. F.
Oliveira G.
Oliveira I. S.
Olsen P.
Omeroglou A.
Oneda F. F.
Ono T.
Onslow M.
Oonk L. C.
Oridate N.
Ortiz K. Z.
Osipenko E. V.
Ostojic S.
Osullivan J.
Otoole C.
Overton Venet M.
Owens R.
Ozbic M.
P
Packman A.
Padovani M.
Padula N. A. M. R.
Pagan Neves L.
Palma D.
Palmer R;
Paneth N.
Pantelic N.
Papadimas P.
Papaeliou C. F.
Papathanasiou I.
Parente M. A. M. P.
Parhan D. F.
Partanen L. A.
Pasqua E.
Patterson A.
Paz Fonseca R.
Pecora L.
Pedroni D.
Peek M.
Peeva M.
Pegoraro Krook M. I.
Peltoniemi O. M.
Pereira J. C.
Perissinoto J.
Peristeri E.
Perkins J.
Perko R.
Pernambuco L.A
Petinou K.
Petrovic J.
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
SSY06.1
FP33.1
FP09.3
P171
P098, P099, P173
P179
FP26.2, FP26.4, FP31.3, SS02.1
P065
P017
FP10.5
FP25.2
SY08.3
FP01.2, SSY05.1, SSY05.3,
SSY05.2
FP08.1
P028
FP13.2, P003, P004, P005, P006,
P007, P041, P109
FP35.4, SS13.1
SY10.4
FP37.2
SS15.1
P061
P175
P011
FP01.2, FP01.3, SY06A.1,
SY06A.4, SSY05.1, SSY05.3,
SSY05.2, SY06B.1, SY06A.5,
SY06A.6, SY06B.5, SY06B.2
FP21A.3, FP21A.4, FP41.2, P100
FP19.2
P078, P084
P133
SY04A.3
SS03.1, P040
FP32.3
FP12.3
FP12.2
FP34.2, SSY03.1, SSY03.2,
SSY03.3, SS07.1, SY01.5
P005.
P147
P017, P019
P175
FP02.6
SY01.3
FP30.3, FP36.2, FP42.1
FP39.5, FP45.3
SS15.2
FP02.4
FP24.3, P115, P177, P178, P187
SSY04.3
FP41.4
FP44.6, P027, P142
P060
FP42.1
FP15.4
P093
FP11.3, FP27.5
FP32.3, FP44.4
Petrovic Lazic M.
Pianesi F.
Pickl G. B.
Pickl G. B.
Pickstone C.
Pifaia L. R.
Pinheiro A.
Pinheiro F. H.
Pinto A.
Pinto A.
Pinto De Almeida A. F.
Pipari Study Group
Plaza E.
Poikkeus A. M.
Polovina V.
Pomoni M.
Poole M. L.
Poole S. M.
Prachali A.
Prado L. M.
Prevention Committee
Protopapas A.
Pruszewicz A.
Puech M.
Puglisi M. L.
Puhl A.
Puhto R.
Puolakanaho A.
Purcell A.
P127
SY14B.2
FP25.1
SSY02.1
SY04A.3
FP29.4
P033
FP17.6
P155
P156
SS11.1
SSY04.2
FP23.1
SS06.2
P002
SSY03.1
SS03.1
P045
FP31.5
P022, P023
FP05.2
SSY03.1, SSY03.2, SSY03.3,
SS07.1
P008
FP22.4
P071, P077
FP21A.4
FP21A.1
SS06.2
FP16.5
Q
Qualls C.
Quene H.
SY11.1
FP46.6
R
Raappana A.
Rabelo C. M.
Radulescu L. R.
Raineri C.
Rajagopalan J.
Ramig L.
Rangasayee R.
Rangel S. B.
Rantala L. M.
Ratynska J.
Raud Westberg L.
Raudsalu V.
Ravid D.
Ray J. M.
Raymer A. M.
Regina Arruda S.
Reis C.
Reis N.
Remes R.
Remshifski P. A.
Reppold C.
Resende L. M.
Restrepo M. A.
Revesz D.
Richieri Costa A.
Ricz H. M. A.
P079
P133
FP38.4
P145
FP30.5, FP45.1
FP23.3, SE12.1
SY07.3
P130
FP26.5, SE17.1
FP08.6, FP22.2
FP14.4
FP02.4
SY03A.2
P191
FP37.5
FP24.4, FP24.5, P043, P182
P033
FP42.5, P188
P075, P079
FP04.3
P052
FP44.6, P065, P137
FP10.2
SY04A.1
P136
P184
185
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
Riek S.
Rinkel R. N. P. M.
Rissanen N.
Robb M. P.
Roberts J. M. A.
Robertson B.
Robinson T.
Rocha A. B.
Rocha C. N.
Rocha J.
Roddam H.
Rodrigues I. T.
Rodrigues Padovani A.
Rodrigues R.
Rodriguz Garcia L.
Rojas R.
Roman T. R.
Romanova Z.
Romonath R.
Ronko M.
Rosa M. M.
Rosen K.
Rosenbaum P.
Rosenfeld Johnson S.
Rotger Abdo A. G.
Rothwell J.
Rotsika V.
Rousseau T.
Roy N.
Rubenstein T.
Rudin L. B.
Rugulo L. M. S.
Russell T.
Rytky S.
S
Saber A. S. S.
Sadollahi A. A.
Sakakibara K. I.
Sakellari M.
Sakellariou A.
Sakellariou V.
Sakka P.
Sakkas D.
Sakran-Mansour J.
Sakurai K.
Sala E. L.
Saleem A. F.
Sali A.
Salmani M.
Sambai A.
Sanches S. G. G.
Sanchez M. L.
Sanchez R.
Santana A.
Santana A. P.
Santana M.
Santos A.
Santos I.
Santos L. C. A.
Santos L. H. Z.
FP37.2
FP34.1, FP34.3
P017.
SY04A.2
SY14B.1
FP09.5, FP15.3
SY11.1
P058
FP26.4, P133, P135
FP12.1, P130, P155
SS03.2, SE10.1
FP43.4
P030
FP24.3
SE13.1
SE11.1
P044
FP45.4
FP14.3, SY03A.6, SY03A.1, P018
FP35.2
FP43.4
SY04A.4
FP09.5, SS03.1, P040
SE09.1, SE03.1
P001
FP28.1, FP28.3, MR01
SY13.5, SY13.6
FP02.4
FP18.2
SSY06.1
P113
P137
FP23.4
SS06.3
FP17.4
P070
FP36.5
FP12.4
SY13.6
FP34.2
FP33.3, FP34.2
SSY03.2
SY03A.2
P122, P171
FP26.5, SE17.1
FP22.6
FP10.5
P070
SY03B.3
P068, P135
P066, P132
P118, P125
FP43.1, P059, P163
FP07.4
FP41.5, P160, P180, P183, P185,
P186
P084, P100, P121
P155, P156
FP19.2
P097
Sarella A.
Satake H.
Sato M.
Savic M.
Savic V.
Sbaraini L.
Scarinci N. A.
Schaefer B.
Scharff Rethfeldt W.
Schellenberger L. L.
Scherer L. C.
Schindler A.
Schochat E.
Scliar Cabral L.
Scott M.
Scullion M.
Sdravou K.
Segal O.
Sehn F.
Sekula A.
Self T.
Sellman J.
Seni M.
Sernick R. A.
Serrano E.
Serridge B.
Seyed S.
Shafiei B.
Shimura E.
Shirazi T. S.
Shiromoto O.
Shoeib R. S. M.
Shrivastav R.
Shtereva K.
Shulman B. B.
Silva A.
Silva G. K.
Silva K. A. L.
Silva L. F.
Silva M.
Silva R.
Silva T. G. P.
Simard I.
Simmons Mackie N.
Simoens L. A.
Simões Zenari M.
Simonska M.
Sin K. F.
Singh S.
Siqueira N.
Sitta E.
Ska B.
Skarzynski H.
Skeat J.
Skourogianni P.
Skytthe A.
Snoddy P.
Soares Ishigaki E. C. S.
Socklingham R.
Sodersten M.
Soensterud H.
FP12.3
P169
P056
FP32.3, FP44.4, P172,
P172, FP32.3, FP44.4
FP41.5, P180, P185, P186
FP09.3
P081
FP03.6
P081
P005
FP21A.5, SY08.5, P114
P133, P134, P135
SY03A.4
FP23.2
FP20.2
P090
FP27.4
FP41.5, P180, P185, P186
P067
FP30.5, P147, P150
SY01.1
SY13.6
P105
FP22.4
P181
P070
P034
P104
P140
P056
FP17.4
SY02A.2
P013
P110
P155, P156
P022, P024
P068
P088
P115
P098, P099, P108, P173
P130
FP10.4, P111
FP37.5
FP02.2
P124
P166
SY14A.1
FP28.1
P176
P098, P099, P173
SY01.3
FP08.6, FP22.2
SE10.1
FP05.5
SY06B.3, SS04.1, SY13.4
P092
P005
SY05.4
FP29.2, FP42.2
FP01.6
186
Soroli E.
Souza O.
Sperb D.
Sperb L.
Sram F.
St Clare T.
Stanicek P.
Stavrou P. D.
Stevens J.
Stewart C. F.
Stier M. A.
Stock O.
Stokes J.
Stolt S.
Strobolakos P.
Su W. W. Y.
Sumerags D.
Suominen K.
Suvanto A.
Suwalska A.
Svantesson P.
Svec J. G.
Svensson L.
Svistushkin V. M.
Świdziński P.
Szkielkowska A.
Szuminsky N.
T
Tabaquim M. L. M.
Taguchi A.
Takagi M.
Takayanagui O. M.
Takei A.
Takeshita T. K.
Takimoto R. M.
Tallberg I. M.
Tallberg I. M.
Tamanaha A.
Tamura F.
Tan G. T.
Tanaka C.
Tanaka Welty Y.
Tangerina R. P.
Tanimura M.
Tar E.S
Tayama N.
Taylor K. F.
Teles B. B.
Teles L.
Ten Bosch L.
Terband H.
The Pipari Study Group
Themistocleous M.
Theodoros D. G.
Thomas Stonell N.
Thomson V.
Thordardottir E.
Thoren M.
Thorlin T.
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
FP07.3
FP24.3, P177
FP41.5, P180, P185, P186
P160
FP22.1
SSY05.2
P037
FP06.2
FP37.1
SE01.1
FP42.6
SY14B.2
FP03.2
SSY04.2, P082
FP10.5
FP39.2
FP35.5
SSY04.1, P079
FP11.2
P067
SY04A.1
FP22.1, SY02A.5, SY02A.6,
SY02B.6
FP14.4
FP35.4
P067
FP08.6, FP22.2
SY04A.5
P015, P087, P089
P057
FP33.1
P129
P028
P184
P091
FP11.5
FP11.6
P027
P107
SE04.1
P105
FP17.2
P066
P171
P016
FP36.5
SS03.1
FP38.2
P118, P119, P120, P121, P125,
P179, P187
FP46.5, FP46.6
SY04B.2
P082
SSY03.2
FP23.4, SS05.2
FP09.5, FP15.3
SY07.3
FP03.5, FP27.3
FP42.2
SY04A.1
Threats T.T.
Timmermans B.
Toda H.
Togram B.
Tom K.
Tomaiuoli D.
Topbas S.
Torabi Nejad F.
Torke Ladani N.
Tormanen H. R. M.
Torppa M.
Torres I. G.
Torres M. L. G. M.
Toskala E.
Trajkovski N.
Tran T. M.
Trindade C. E. P.
Trinite B.
Troupou A.
Tse F. W.
Tseng C. H.
Tsimpli I. M.
Tsuda M.
Tsutamori E.
Tullos D.
Tun&ccedil;er A. M.
Tutya A. S.
Tzimara A.
MR02
FP31.2
P122
P128, P149
SE04.1
FP08.4, P175
SY09A.2, P154
FP32.1
FP13.5
P050
SS06.2
SE13.1
FP32.2
FP35.2
FP01.2
FP07.3
P137
FP22.5
FP11.1
FP29.5
FP07.1
FP11.3, FP27.5, P060
FP42.3
SY03B.3
SY12.2
P063
FP26.2
FP04.2
U
Uemeoka E.
Ullrich A.
Uno A.
Utsch Gon&#231;alves D.
P177
P018
FP19.6, SY03B.3, P074
P009
V
Vahab M.
Vaiano T.
Vakirtzidellis I.
Valkama A. M.
Van Ardenne N.
Van Borsel J.
Van Bysterveldt A. K.
Van De Craen P.
Van De Heyning P.
Van Den Bergh B. R. H.
Van Haaften L. L.
Van Keer H.
Van Laer C.
Van Lierde K.
Van Looy L.
Van Nuffelen G.
Van Vreckem C.
Van Zaalen Y.
Vanderswalmen R.
Vanderwegen J.
Vandevelde S.
Vanryckeghem M.
Vasiljevic S.
Vaughan L.
Velleman S. L.
FP01.4, FP20.5
FP31.4
P032
SSY04.1
FP46.1
FP01.1, FP22.3, FP40.3
SY05.6, P072
P032
FP46.1, SY04B.3
P101
P106
FP19.5
FP39.3
FP22.3
FP31.2
FP46.1, SY04B.3
FP19.5
FP08.5, SS15.2
FP19.5, FP40.3
FP39.3, FP46.1, SY04B.3
P031
FP08.2, FP08.3
FP32.3
SE08.1
FP24.1, FP24.2, FP30.3, FP36.2,
FP42.1
187
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
Venturelli E.
Verdonck De Leeuw I. M.
Vezenkov S. R.
Victor G.
Vieira A. B. C.
Vieira M.
Vieira V.
Vilela N.
Vilkman E.
Vilkman E.
Vlachaki E.
Vlassopoulos M.
Vogel A.
Vogindroukas I.
Vrticka K.
Vukovic I.
Vukovic M.
Vuotilainen R.
Vydrova J.
W
Waite M.
Wakaba Y.
Walsh I. P.
Walshe M.
Wang C. P.
Wang Y. T.
Warr Leeper G. A.
Washington K. N.
Watkin K. L.
Watson L. R.
Weber R.
Weiss P. L. T.
Wells M.
Wertzner H. F.
Westby C.
Westerveld M. F.
Whelan B. M.
Whipple K.
Whitaker M.
Wiersma A. L.
Wiethan F. M.
Williams C.
Williams W.
Wilson F.
Wilson L.
Wiskirska Woznica B.
Woisard V.
Woisard V.
Woisard V.
Wojnowski W.
Wolf A.
P145
FP34.1, FP34.3, FP46.5, FP46.6,
SY08.4
FP21A.6, P168
FP39.6
FP44.6
P047
FP31.6
P068
FP18.4
FP35.2
P143
FP05.2, FP15.2, SY13.5, SY13.6
SY04A.4
FP05.4
FP2.2
P127
P127
FP35.2
FP22.1
FP23.4
P171
FP19.3, FP20.2, FP43.2, FP43.3
P090
FP39.2
P048
FP11.4, FP15.3, SS17.1
FP11.4, FP15.3, SS17.1
SY08.1
SY14A.2
FP38.2
SY14B.2
FP37.3
SSY01.1, SSY01.4, P020, P076,
P078, P084
SY03A.3, SE13.1, SY03A.5
P072
SY04B.4
SSY06.1
P178
FP36.4
P080
P151
P178
SY11.1
FP01.2, FP01.3
P008
FP21.1
FP34.4
FP22.4, FP39.6
P008
P174
Wong A.
Wong M. N.
Woodyatt G. C.
Worrall L. E.
Wosniak T.
Wuyts F.
Wydell T. N.
FP37.2
SY04B.4
FP06.4
FP09.3
SY09A.2
SY04B.3
SY03B.3
X
Xu J. J.
Xu W.
Xuereb R.
FP26.3
FP45.6
FP03.3
Y
Yacubian Fernandes A.
Yadegari F.
Yamasaki R.
Yamashita H.
Yang C. C.
Yannakis R.
Yee M. J.
Yifat R.
Yiu E.
Yiu E.
Yiu E. M. L.
Yiu G.
Yliherva A.
Ylisuvanto M.
Yokonishi H.
Yoshida T.
Yoshioka H.
Yssel N.
Yue A. H.
Yumoto E.
FP06.5
FP01.4
FP41.6, SS14.1
FP41.6
P049
SY13.6
SE04.1
SY14B.2
P117
SY02B.4
FP29.5
P117
FP11.2, P017, P019, SSY04.3
SSY04.3
FP36.5
FP07.2
FP35.1
P148
FP10.3
FP26.6, SY02B.5
Z
Zacharopoulou C.
Zachau S.
Zalcman T. E.
Zambon F.
Zampronio K.
Zancanaro M.
Zanchetta S.
Zaretsky E.
Zenari M.
Zeng W.
Zergioti P.
Zeza M.
Zimmermann M.
Ziyarati F.
Zmarich C.
Zorzetto N.
Zozolotto H. C.
FP04.2
SS06.3
P133
FP18.2
P098
SY14B.2
P136, P137
FP19.4, FP30.3, FP42.1
FP31.6
FP45.6
P012.
FP06.2
P178
P070
FP08.2, FP08.3
P136
P184
188
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
Notes
...............................................................................................................................................................................................................................
............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
189
............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ...............................................................................................................................................................................................................................
190
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ...............................................................................................................................................................................................................................
28th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics
191
............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ...............................................................................................................................................................................................................................
This publication was sponsored by
PARISIANOU S.A.
21, Ioannou Ralli Str.
144 52 Metamorfosi-Attiki-Greece
Tel.: +30210 2815902, Fax: +30210 2817264

Similar documents