Untitled - Action Games Miniatures

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Untitled - Action Games Miniatures
DRAGONS FROM AN ANCIENT ERA HAVE RISEN FROM
A SLUMBER THAT HAS LASTED MILLIONS OF YEARS.
Their protective sleep saved them from a comet impact, yet they awoke to a changed world.
Continental drift and receding ice sheets had carved out a new continent called Dara, and
humanity had evolved to rule it. The dragons spread out into far regions of this new land and
subjugated its inhabitants through violence, diplomacy, and trickery. Now, as ancient feuds
resurface and Dara erupts into war, the dragons and their allies battle for resources and dominance.
Drake is a true scale, 28 mm fantasy miniature wargame that blends incredible dragons, horrifying
beasts, and powerful chant magic. You choose a great dragon to lead a force of servants and
monstrous creatures to battle, then craft a deck of chant magic cards to annihilate your foes. This
fast-paced and bloody gameplay experience rewards tactics, nerves of steel, and quick responsive
actions – especially on your opponent’s turn!
The following starter rules cover the basics of how to play Drake. They are written especially for
small games, either dragon vs. dragon or perhaps with a small number of chant constructions
and creations or other followers.
WHAT YOU NEED TO PLAY
Models: You will need assembled miniature
models to send into battle. Each player will need
a dragon and, optionally, an equivalent amount
of supporting units. Painting is optional but
encouraged!
Force cards: You will need force cards to consult
for each unit’s statistics, attacks, and traits.
Chant cards: Each player will need to build a
deck of chant cards to represent the spells their
dragons can cast.
Dice: You will need a handful of 10-sided dice
(D10s), around six of them at least.
Measuring tape: You will need a measuring tape.
Drake often requires players to measure distances
in inches.
Markers: You should have a number of small
items to mark game effects that persist over time.
You can use buttons, beads, coins, or whatever
you like.
Templates: Some spells and abilities use
area of effect templates, either circles of
3”, 4”, or 5” diameter or teardrop-shaped
templates that represent the area of effect
of a dragon’s breath weapon or similar effect.
Printable templates are downloadable from
www.actiongamesminiatures.com if you do not
have a Drake template set.
Battlefield: You will need a playing surface to use
as the battlefield. Dragon vs. dragon games are
recommended to be played on a battlefield that
is 2’ square. Larger games will require a larger
battlefield.
Terrain: Standard games of Drake should have
at least one feature each of water terrain, stone
terrain, and forest terrain on the battlefield. Flat
templates can be used if you don’t have miniature
terrain pieces.
READING THE CARDS
FORCE CARDS
A force card provides all the information needed
to play a game with its corresponding unit,
including that unit’s statistics, attacks, and traits.
STATISTICS
MV: Movement is the number of inches a model
can move in a normal advance.
ACT: Action is the number of action points (AP)
a model generates when selected.
CR: Courage is used for composure checks when
a model is frightened.
CON: Constitution is used for survival checks
when a model is badly wounded.
DEX: You must roll equal to or greater than a
model’s Dexterity to hit it with an attack’s hit roll.
AR: You must roll equal to or greater than a model’s
Armour to damage it with an attack’s damage roll.
HP: Hit points represent the amount of damage
a model can suffer before it must pass a survival
check or be destroyed.
2
CP: Chant power is used to pay the cost of
casting chant cards. Dragons regenerate their CP
to full when selected.
Except for MV, HP, and CP, statistics cannot
be increased beyond a maximum of 9. A model
cannot be healed to more than its maximum HP,
but it can be reduced to negative HP. A model can
gain AP and CP without limit and cannot have
negative AP or CP.
ATTACKS
Attacks are either melee attacks () or missile
attacks (
).
ATTS: The attack strength is the number of
damage dice rolled in this attack’s damage roll.
(×0), (×1), etc.: The number of extra attacks, after
the first, that a model can buy with this attack
using AP.
Range: The short and long range, in inches, of a
missile weapon.
TRAITS
Traits are the skills and powers of the unit. Many
traits are passively in effect all the time. Some
traits are triggered () when certain conditions
are met.
Some common traits are not defined on the card.
CHANT CARDS
Chant cards represent chant magic that dragons
use to summon creatures directly onto the
battlefield, enhance their troops, and blast deadly
attacks at their enemies!
Cost: The number in the top left is the amount
of CP required to cast the chant card.
R5 Flying: This model is a flying model and can
choose fly as a movement option.
R5 Aquatic: This model ignores the movement
penalty of shallow water and treats deep
water as difficult rather than impassable
terrain. While completely within deep water,
this model is obscured and gets hard cover
even without a cover marker (see Missile
Attacks).
R5 Trailblazer: This model ignores the
movement penalty of all difficult terrain
other than water.
Synergy: Some chant cards, especially chant
creations or constructions, have a synergy rating.
If such a card is targeted by a chant card while
waiting to resolve, the targeting card’s controller
immediately makes a synergy check by rolling a
D10. It passes if the roll is equal to or greater
than the synergy rating of the targeted card. If
failed, the targeting card immediately goes to the
dead pile and has no effect.
Traits with a cost listed after their name are
abilities that can be used by paying their cost.
Certain types of abilities differ from mundane
abilities (which have no symbol) in terms of how
and when they can be used.
Range: Many chant cards have a range, in inches.
Some of those specify that the range is a radius,
and some specify that the caster must also have
LOS to the target.
`
When to use
How often
Mundane
Only in the
unit’s action step
Once per round
Snap ()
Whenever a
snap can be used
Once per round
Chant ()
Only in the
unit’s action step
As often as the
cost can be paid
Snap chant ()
Whenever a
snap can be used
As often as the
cost can be paid
Element: Every chant card has an element, such
as Earth, Life, Spirit, or Sun.
Type: The type of the chant card – enhancement,
flow, or snap – affects when it can be cast and
what it does (see Chant Magic).
Chant abilities () and snap chant abilities
() go into the chant order (use a placeholder
card) and can be responded to with snap chant
cards or snap chant abilities. Snap abilities ()
that are not also chant abilities cannot be used
while a chant order is waiting to resolve (see
Chant Magic).
Some abilities are additional movement options
()that a unit can choose instead of the standard
movement options.
3
BASIC GAME CONCEPTS
GENERAL RULES
DICE ROLLS
When a die is rolled to determine success or
failure, generally the result must be equal to or
greater than or equal to or less than a target
number.
Rolling a natural 1 or 10 (that is, where the die
roll is 1 or 10 before applying modifiers) counts
as automatic success or failure. A roll is therefore
never made impossible by modifiers. When you
must roll high to succeed, 10 is a success and 1 is
a failure. When you must roll low to succeed, 1 is
a success and 10 is a failure.
If a model or unit must make a statistic check,
like a DEX check or a CR check, roll one D10.
The check passes if the roll is equal to or less than
the statistic.
Some effects require a perilous check or
advantage check. These effects will provide a
target number, like 6+. Roll one D10. The check
passes if the roll is equal to or greater than the
target number. For perilous and advantage checks,
the consequences for passing or failing the roll
will be stated in the effect.
If an effect requires players to make an opposing
roll, each player rolls a D10, and the winner is the
one with the higher result. Ties are won by the
controller of the effect.
DIVISION
Always round up when dividing unless calculating
a measurement in inches, in which case the exact
value is used even if it is not a whole number.
For example, rolling a D10 and dividing by 3
yields the following possible results:
4
D10 roll
Divided by 3, rounded up
1–3
1
4–6
2
7–9
3
10
4
MEASURING
Any player can measure any distance at any time.
MODELS AND UNITS
A model is any game miniature on a single base of
any size: small, medium, large, or mighty. A unit
is any single model or group of models deployed
and commanded as a single entity, represented by
a single force card.
FRONT/REAR ARCS AND MELEE RANGE
The front arc of most models extends from the
front 180° of their base, which players can assume
to be centred on the point the model’s head is
facing if it is not marked or otherwise stated by
the model’s owner.
A model’s rear arc extends from the back 180° of
its base. Some models have attacks they can make
from their rear arc, such as a tail strike. These
attacks always get −1 to hit.
A model’s melee range extends out the following
distance from its front arc, depending on its base
size.
Small base
0”
Medium or large base
1”
Mighty base
2”
Small-based models have a 360° front arc and
are therefore able to make melee attacks against
anything their base is touching as well as being
able to draw LOS from any point on their base.
A model is engaged if it is within the melee range
of an enemy model.
LINE OF SIGHT
A model has line of sight (LOS) to a point if
you can draw a straight line from the front arc
of the model’s base to that point and that line
is uninterrupted by terrain that blocks LOS or
by models. A model has LOS to another model
if it has LOS to any point on its base. Models
and terrain only block LOS to models of equal
or smaller height (HT).
NO OVERLAPPING MODELS
A model can never end its movement or be placed
in a location where its base overlaps another
model’s base or impassable terrain. If a model
must be placed in such a location, it is instead
placed in the next closest location. If a model
must end its movement in such a location, it
instead backs up to the last legal location it could
have ended its movement.
CHANT MAGIC
THE CHANT ORDER
When casting a chant card, identify its caster (but
not its target) and pay its cost, and then place it in
the chant order, which is where chant cards wait
to resolve. Once a card is in the chant order, it can
only be responded to by snap chant cards or snap
chant abilities. No other abilities or cards can be
used while a chant order is waiting to resolve.
New cards added to an existing chant order go on
top of the other cards. When no player wishes to
respond to the chant order, all cards and abilities
in the chant order resolve in order, starting at
the top (the most recently played). No cards or
abilities can be used while the chant order resolves.
Players choose targets and make other decisions
required by their cards when each card resolves.
THE DEAD PILE
Chant cards that have been countered, discarded,
or no longer have an effect on the game go to the
dead pile. Force cards for destroyed units also go
to the dead pile.
RUNNING OUT OF CARDS
If a player is supposed to draw a chant card but
cannot because there are no chant cards left in their
deck, the draw is ignored and nothing happens.
TYPES OF CHANT CARDS
Flow cards can only be cast during the caster’s
action step while there is no chant order waiting
to resolve. Flow cards go to the dead pile after
they resolve unless they have a persistent effect
on the battlefield.
Enhancement cards have persistent effects
on the units they enhance. Enhancements also
can only be cast during the caster’s action step
while there is no chant order waiting to resolve.
However, instead of going to the dead pile,
enhancements are placed on the force card of the
unit they targeted and remain until destroyed or
otherwise removed.
At any time, each player can only have a single
enhancement on any unit. If a player controls an
enhancement on a unit, that player cannot target
that unit with another enhancement unless one
of them is a halo enhancement, which allows a
player to have up to two different enhancements
on the enhanced unit.
Snap cards can be played at almost any time,
including while a chant order is waiting to resolve.
Any time that a snap can be used, the active player
gets the first opportunity to do so.
Snaps can be used by any player at the end of
each of the following phases and steps of the turn:
R5 the beginning phase
R5 the selection step of each operation
R5 the movement step of each operation (after
the unit ends its movement)
R5 the end step of each operation
R5 the end phase
During the action step of an operation, snaps can
only be used by the active unit or by any player in
response to a chant order begun by the active unit.
Chant creations and chant constructions can
only be cast during the caster’s action step while
there is no chant order waiting to resolve. When
one of these cards resolves, it summons a unit to
the battlefield, which must be placed in a manner
specified on the card.
Chant creations do not get an operation the turn
they are created unless cast in overdrive, where
the caster pays an additional 1+X CP and then
rolls a D10 and adds X when the card resolves. If
the result is equal to or greater than 8, the chant
creation gets a normal operation that turn. The
chant creation loses 1 HP upon creation when cast
in overdrive, whether or not the roll was successful.
Chant constructions are inanimate objects that do
not operate and never make survival or composure
checks. They are destroyed immediately when
reduced to zero HP, and they do not need to be in
coherency with other models in their unit.
5
HEROIC CHANTS
A chant card must be cast as a heroic chant if cast
in the following circumstances:
Dangerous terrain: A model suffers an attack at
the end of a movement step in which it was within
dangerous terrain at any point. Small- and mediumbased models suffer an ATTS 1 attack. Large- and
mighty-based models suffer an ATTS 2 attack.
R5 the caster is engaged by an enemy model; or
R5 the caster has just ended a run or fly move
or another move that would otherwise cause
it to skip its action step.
Impassable terrain: A model cannot be moved
through or placed on impassable terrain.
After making a heroic chant, that caster cannot cast
snap cards in that chant order unless it contains
an enemy snap. Immediately after a chant order
resolves, casters who made a heroic chant lose all CP.
Here are some examples of how common kinds of
terrain pieces affect the game.
TERRAIN
Terrain adds tactical depth and excitement to
the game. Especially in dragon vs. dragon games,
terrain is important to give the dragons cover from
each other while they angle for position and cast
chant cards in hopes of getting the advantage. Here
are the standard effects of different types of terrain.
Open ground: Has no effect on gameplay. The
battlefield is generally considered open ground
anywhere that there is no terrain piece.
Difficult terrain: A model is slowed to half speed
in difficult terrain, spending double the movement
for any distance moved.
Some terrain pieces can also provide light cover or
hard cover (see Missile Attacks) or can block LOS.
Water: Shallow water is difficult terrain. Deep
water is impassable terrain. A toxic pool is difficult,
dangerous terrain.
Forest: A sparse forest is difficult terrain that
provides light cover. A dense forest is difficult
terrain that blocks LOS and provides hard cover.
A thorn bush is difficult, dangerous terrain that
provides light cover.
Stone: Large boulders or tall rock walls are
impassable terrain that block LOS and provide
hard cover. A short rock wall provides hard cover
and is not impassable, but a model cannot end its
movement or be placed on it.
PLAYING THE GAME
BUILDING A CHANT DECK
Before the game, each player will need to build
a deck of chant cards. The deck must contain at
least 21 cards. Chant creations and constructions,
such as Rakhera and Marks of Ether, count
toward that minimum of 21 cards in your deck.
Your chant deck can include no more than three
copies of any card and only one copy of any
unique card.
If your dragon’s alliance has a chant affinity, you
must include at least five cards of that element in
your deck, plus one card for each dragon of that
alliance in your force beyond the first.
You do not have to reveal the contents of your
deck to your opponent before the game.
Once each player has chosen their deck and their
force, the game can begin!
6
Alliance
Chant affinity
Builders
Earth
Great Mystics
Spirit
Lords of the Mountain
Life
Shi Nation
Sun
SETUP
Battlefield setup: Players should discuss the terrain
they are using and agree on what each piece does.
Then players each roll a D10 and take turns placing
terrain pieces, starting with the winner. Alternately,
players can place terrain however they wish,
provided all players agree to the placement.
Deployment: Players each roll a D10 again. The
winner chooses which corner or side to deploy on.
In a dragon vs. dragon game, players deploy their
dragons completely within a 5” radius of opposite
corners of the battlefield. In larger games, players
deploy completely within 10” of opposite edges of
the battlefield and take turns deploying one unit at
a time, starting with the winner of the roll.
Drawing a starting hand: Each player can take
any cards from their deck with a point cost (such
as chant creations or constructions) and put them
into their starting hand. Each player then shuffles
the rest of their chant deck and draws chant cards
until they have seven cards in their hand.
Determining first player: Players each roll a D10
again. The winner will take the first turn.
TURN STRUCTURE
Each player’s turn consists of three phases: a
beginning phase, operation phase, and end phase.
BEGINNING PHASE
Effects that trigger at the beginning of the turn resolve.
Any player can then use snaps.
OPERATION PHASE
The player must operate each of their units on the
battlefield in whatever order they choose. A unit’s
operation consists of the following steps.
Selection Step
The player selects a unit, which then generates its
AP and CP. When a player selects a dragon, that
player draws a chant card.
Any player can then use snaps.
Movement Step
The unit must choose one of the following
movement options. Some movement options have
an AP cost. When moving, unless the movement
option specifies that the model must move in a
straight line, the model can change facing and
direction an unlimited number of times during its
movement.
Hold: The model cannot move, not even to change
facing.
Advance: The model can move up to its MV in
inches.
Run (1 AP): The model can move up to 2× its MV.
The model then skips its action step, unless it is a
dragon. A dragon takes an action step but can only
make a heroic chant this operation.
Fly (2 AP): Only available to flying models. The
model first must make a takeoff move of half
its MV in a straight line in any direction. If the
model successfully makes the takeoff move without
contacting any other models or impassable terrain,
it then makes a glide move of up to 2× its MV. The
glide move does not have to be in a straight line. A
gliding model ignores free strikes and can move
over all terrain and other models. If the model was
slowed by difficult terrain during its takeoff move,
subtract the distance travelled through difficult
terrain from the model’s MV before doubling it to
calculate its glide distance.
A model that flies or makes an unsuccessful takeoff
skips its action step, unless it is a dragon. A dragon
takes an action step but can only make a heroic
chant this operation.
Charge (1 AP): The model must choose a model
in LOS and then move up to 1.5× its MV in a
straight line in a direction that would bring it in
base contact with its target, stopping at any point
once the target is in melee range. The model cannot
make missile attacks this operation and must make
at least one melee attack against its target. If the
model moved at least 2”, it gets +1 to melee damage
rolls against its target this operation.
If the model contacts impassable terrain or another
model, the charge fails, but the model still takes
its action step. If the model runs out of movement,
the charge fails and the model skips its action step,
unless it is a dragon. A dragon takes an action step
but can only make a heroic chant this operation.
A flying model can make a flying charge, where
it divides its charge into a takeoff move of half
its MV and then a glide move of up to 1.5× its
MV, both parts of the movement in a straight line
toward its charge target, following the charge rules
for direction and stopping point, but otherwise like
a normal takeoff and glide.
After movement, any player can use snaps.
7
Action Step
Models make attacks and perform other actions
during their action step. The player chooses the
order in which all attacks or other actions happen.
A model can perform any of its actions before, in
between, or after its attacks.
R5 An active model must choose to make either
melee or missile attacks and can make one
attack with each of its attacks of the chosen
type. It can also make as many extra attacks
as are allowed for each attack – listed as (×0),
(×1), and so on – at a cost of 1 AP each.
R5 Once per operation, an active model can
spend 1 AP to get a cover marker (see
Missile Attacks). The cover marker is
removed the next time the model moves,
unless it only changes its facing.
R5 An active model can pay the cost to use its
abilities.
R5 An active dragon can cast chant cards.
R5 Damage roll: If the attack hits, roll a
number of D10s equal to the attack strength
(ATTS) of the attack. For each die that is
equal to or greater than the target’s AR, the
target suffers 1 damage.
Players can choose to roll multiple hit rolls and
damage rolls simultaneously if they know they
won’t make actions or trigger any effects between
attacks. Different colours of dice can be used to
differentiate different attacks.
MISSILE ATTACKS
A model cannot make missile attacks if it is engaged.
Breath weapons are a special type of missile
attack that can be used while engaged.
Missile attacks receive the following modifiers.
Deadeye
+1 to hit
The attacker chose hold as a
movement option.
Ambush
strike
+1 to hit and
+1 to damage
End of Operation Step
The attacker is completely
within the target’s rear arc
and has spent its entire
operation out of the target’s
LOS. (Also applies to melee
attacks.)
Long range
−1 to hit
The target is within the
attack’s long range but not its
short range.
All models on the battlefield lose all AP.
Obscured
−1 to hit
There is no point on the
front arc of the attacker’s
base from which it has LOS
to the target’s whole base.
Light cover
or
Hard cover
−1 to hit
or
−1 to hit and
−1 to damage
The target has a cover marker
and is within 1” of terrain
that is at least half the target’s
height, provides cover, and is
obscuring the target from the
attacker.
During the action step of an operation, snaps
can only be used by the active unit or by any
player in response to a chant order begun by the
active unit.
Effects that trigger at the end of the operation
resolve.
Any player can then use snaps.
END PHASE
Effects that trigger at the end of the turn resolve.
If a player has more than eight chant cards in their
hand in their end phase, they must discard down
to eight cards.
Any player can then use snaps.
Cover is cumulative with
being obscured, but light
and hard cover are not
cumulative.
COMBAT
MAKING ATTACKS
An attack consists of the following steps. Once
an attack is made, it must resolve completely,
including the hit roll, damage roll, and any other
effects, before cards or abilities can be used.
R5 Choose a target within range and LOS.
R5 Hit roll: Roll a D10. If the result is equal to or
greater than the target’s DEX, the attack hits.
8
In melee
−1 to hit
The target is in melee. If
the attack against the target
misses, randomly select
another model in melee
with the target and make
an attack against it, with all
relevant modifiers, including
this one.
Some missile attacks have an area of effect (AE)
represented by a circular template of 3”, 4”, or 5”
diameter or by a small or large teardrop-shaped
breath template.
When making an attack with a circular template,
the player marks a point on the battlefield within
the attack’s range, then rolls a to-hit directional
die (THD), attempting to land the die near that
point. Subtract the attack’s accuracy (ACR) from
the number on the die.
R5 If the result is zero or less, the template is
centred on the chosen point.
R5 If the result is greater than zero, the template
drifts that many inches in the direction the
THD’s top face is pointing.
TAKING DAMAGE AND SURVIVAL CHECKS
When a model is reduced to zero HP or less, it is
destroyed immediately after the attack or effect
resolves if it has suffered more damage than its
base HP in a single unit’s operation.
Otherwise, when a model is reduced to zero HP
or less, it makes a survival check at the end of the
operation. A survival check is made by rolling a
D10. The model passes if the roll is equal to or
less than its constitution (CON). It makes the
check at −1 CON for each HP below zero.
R5 If failed, the model is destroyed.
R5 If passed, the model gets a wounded marker
and is restored to 1 HP. A model can only
ever have one wounded marker.
A wounded model
R5 gets −1 to every stat but HP and CP,
R5 only generates half its normal CP, and
R5 must make a survival check at the end of
each of its operations.
The next time a wounded model would heal 1 HP
or more, the first HP that would be healed instead
removes the wounded marker, and further HP is
healed normally.
When making an attack with a breath template,
place the template with the narrow end touching
any point of the attacker’s base, pointed directly away
from the attacker, so that a line drawn through the
centre of the template would cross the centre point
of the attacker’s base.
WINNING THE GAME
Once an AE template is placed, attacks are made
against all models within the AE. For models
completely within the AE, hit rolls are doubled, and
cover and obscured modifiers are ignored.
The game is a draw if both dragons are destroyed
at the end of any turn.
In a dragon vs. dragon game, a player wins if they
have the only dragon left in play at the end of
any turn.
9
ADVANCED GAME CONCEPTS
FREE STRIKES
A model can make a free strike against an enemy
model that leaves its melee range when that
enemy model ends its movement. The model can
make an attack using any of its melee weapons at
+1 to hit and +1 to damage. A model reduced to
zero HP or less from a free strike in its movement
step skips its action step and makes a survival
check at the end of the operation as normal.
If an effect causes a model to make a free strike
during its own operation, the free strike is
resolved immediately and does not count toward
the normal attacks the model would make in its
action step.
AMBUSH STRIKES
A model gets +1 to hit and +1 to damage a target
with all attacks if it is completely within the
target’s rear arc and has spent its entire operation
out of the target’s LOS.
COMPOSURE CHECKS
A composure check is made by rolling a D10.
The unit passes if the roll is equal to or less
than its courage (CR). In some cases, passing a
composure check on a natural 1 will yield a bonus
beyond just passing the check.
Dragons never make composure checks.
Engagement composure checks are made when
a unit charges another unit and at least one model
in either unit has a larger base than any model
in the other unit. The unit with the smaller base
size makes a composure check.
If failed,
R5 a unit being charged gets −1 DEX until the
end of the operation; or
R5 each model in a charging unit loses 1 AP.
If passed on a natural 1,
R5 a unit being charged gets +1 DEX until the
end of the operation; or
R5 each model in a charging unit gets +1 to hit
until the end of the operation.
Retreat composure checks are made at the end
of any single operation, beginning phase, or end
phase in which a unit loses half or more of the
models it started the game with or, in the case
of units of a single model, half or more of its
maximum HP. If failed, the unit is fleeing and
immediately makes a flee move (see below). A
fleeing unit gets −2 DEX and cannot operate
until it passes a rally composure check.
Rally composure checks are made at the
beginning of a player’s turn for every fleeing unit.
R5 If failed, the unit is still fleeing and
immediately makes a flee move.
R5 If passed, the unit is no longer fleeing, and
its models can immediately change facing. It
still cannot operate this turn.
R5 If passed on a natural 1, the unit can operate
this turn and gets +1 MV.
Flee Move
Roll a D10 and divide by 2. Each fleeing model
in a unit moves its MV plus that amount directly
away from the closest enemy model or directly
toward the closest point on the edge of the
battlefield, whichever is closer. If a model reaches
the edge of the battlefield, it is removed from
the game.
10
GLOSSARY
active: May refer to a player currently taking their
turn or a model or unit currently operating.
base contact: A model is in base contact with
something if any part of its base is touching it.
caster: Your caster is the model you identify as
casting a chant card when you play it from your
hand.
coherency: In a unit of multiple models, when
more than half of the models are all within 3” of
another model of that group, those models are
in coherency. Units of multiple models must be
deployed in coherency. A model out of coherency
gets −1 ACT, −1 CR, and −1 DEX, and it must
make a CR check in its selection step. If failed,
it runs toward the models in its unit that are in
coherency.
controller, owner: The owner of a model, unit, or
card is the one who had it as part of their force or
deck at the start of the game. The controller is the
one who currently can operate or play it. Certain
effects allow a player to take control of something
from the other player.
destroyed: When a model is destroyed, remove it
from the battlefield.
directly toward/away: To make a move directly
toward or away from a model, the model must
travel along a line extending from the centre of
its base to the centre of the other model’s base.
engaged, in melee: A model is engaged if it is
within the melee range of an enemy model. A
model is in melee if it is either engaged or
engaging an enemy model.
place: If a model is to be placed in a location, it is
removed from the battlefield and placed directly
in that location. Placing is not considered moving
and therefore ignores intervening terrain and free
strikes.
round: A round lasts from the start of the first
player’s turn to the end of the last player’s turn.
within, completely within: A model is within a
given distance or area if any part of its base is
within that distance or area, even up to the full
exact distance or just touching the outside of an
area. To be completely within, a model’s entire
base must be within the distance or area. A unit
containing multiple models is considered within a
distance if any of its models is within that distance.
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