Next meeting saturday sep 19 10:00 am Crowley field

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Next meeting saturday sep 19 10:00 am Crowley field
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EDITOR: JIM “SKI” BRONOWSKI
E-MAIL: [email protected]
`
www.riversidercclub.org
september 2015
AMA STATEMENT ON CALIFORNIA
GOVERNOR VETO OF SB142
MUNCIE, Ind. – Dave Mathewson, executive director of the
Academy of Model Aeronautics (AMA), today released the following
statement on California Governor Brown’s veto of SB 142,
legislation that, although unintended, would have had a detrimental
impact on the aeromodeling community:
“We are thrilled with Governor Brown’s veto of SB 142. Although
unintentional, this legislation would have had significant consequences
for model aviation enthusiasts. We want to thank the nearly 3,000
AMA members in California who wrote to the Governor and urged
him to veto the legislation. There’s no doubt Governor Brown made
the right call on this one – legislators need to take a closer look at how
to ensure privacy and protect the hobbyist community before passing a
new law.
“AMA strongly supports protecting individual privacy and prosecuting
careless and reckless behavior. But it’s also important for legislators to
acknowledge, as Governor Brown has by vetoing SB 142, that placing
further restrictions on the hobbyist community, which has been flying
safely for 80 years, is not the way to prevent violations of privacy or
instances of irresponsible flying in the future.
“Since 1936, AMA and its members have been committed to safe and
responsible flying. That’s why all AMA members already follow a
strict privacy policy that prohibits model aircraft from aerial
surveillance and capturing images where there is a reasonable
expectation of privacy. We look forward to working with Governor
Brown and California legislators to find a path forward on privacy
issues.” AMA previously expressed its concerns to Senator Jackson,
sponsor of SB 142, on August 18.
RRCC CLUB OFFICERS
President: Jeff Szueber
(951) 489-8700
Vice-President: Jon DeFries
(951) 795-2787
2nd Vice-President: Bob Baker
(951) 566-7479
Secretary: Rob Evans
[email protected]
Treasurer: Larry Roberts
(951) 926-8567
[email protected]
Newsletter Editor: Jim Bronowski
(951) 780-0761
Safety Officer: Charles Lewis Jr.
(760) 500-5850
Field Director: Dale Yaney
(951) 927-1134
Webmaster: Oscar Weingart
(951) 684-8712
[email protected]
Next meeting
saturday
sep 19
10:00 a.m.
Crowley
field
Minutes of the August 2015 Meeting
Call to Order:
President Jeff Szueber called the regular monthly meeting of the Riverside Radio Control Club to order at 10:08
AM on August 15th, 2015 at Crowley Field.
Minutes of the previous meeting:
 There was no meeting in July and therefore no minutes.
Old Business:

Larry Roberts will be putting in the posts for the “No Trespassing” signs. Larry is looking into
obtaining two "NO TRESPASSING" signs with approval of the land owner.

He will also be painting the entire shelter and repair the roof once the cooler weather arrives.
The runway will also be sealed again around the November time frame.
New business:



Drones are still a major topic in the news. Jim Bronowski spoke of the California drone
legislation. It mentions that a senate act that has been proposed that would enforce trespassing
laws on drones. In some cases they may deem the incident a felony. Jim said the AMA is
encouraging members to write their representatives in Sacramento and the governor about
putting our recreational flying in jeopardy. It could put a crimp in our modeling operations.
UCSD would like to fly at our field from time to time and do testing the same as the UCR
students. The field they fly at is about 100 miles from their campus. The membership
approved this on a case-by-case basis as long as they request a date and time in advance so it
can be approved by the Executive Board.
A representative from the UCR UAV team attended the meeting to request our assistance again
this year and answer questions. The members present agreed to accommodate the team's
request where we can be of assistance.
Program and Show and Tell:

Jim Bronowski found a new source for some of his hobby items. He’s gone to hardware
stores in the area with no luck in finding a metric drill set. Specifically he needed a 12MM
drill for reaming out props for large electric motors. He found a metric drill set online at
Amazon.com, at a fair price, and is quite satisfied with it. He also bought a scalpel with
#11 blades, which he uses for cutting monocote and other such items. The last thing he
bought were disposable laboratory pipettes for applying CA. Lots and lots of available
tools.
Raffle:
Omnibus Quad Drone, 12 Volt Starter Battery, 3 LiPo Batteries, Thin and Thick CA Glue, One CA
Kicker Spray Bottle.
Meeting Adjourned at 11:02 AM by Jeff Szueber
Minutes submitted by: Robert Evans
Oscar's
Le'Observations
by Oscar Weingart
We intended to run some more
photos in this issue of Prop Talk
from my trip with my son, Dan
Weingart, to France and the
Paris Air Show, so I hope that
Ski had room for them. I forgot to
mention before that the most
popular exhibit at the Paris Air
Show was the Parrot "Bebop
Dancing Drones" show. (See
https://www.youtube.com/watch
?v=o93XRTZQd5Y) Outstanding!
We went RV camping at
the Bernardo Shores RV Park in
Imperial Beach for the month of
August. Sadly, it was our last
chance to enjoy this beautiful
adult park, as it will be torn down
in October to make way for
condominiums. I guess that all
that wonderfully located land, on
Route 75 at the extreme
southern tip of San Diego Bay,
at the start of the Silver Strand
and only eight miles from
Coronado, is just too valuable
for its current use. We would
always enjoy camping there on
the Fourth of July, when, looking
North, we could watch a half
dozen
different
fireworks
displays
at
the
various
communities lining the shores of
the bay.
Since we were in the
area, we decided to visit the
Torrey Pines Glider Port,
which is on the Pacific
Ocean just North of La Jolla,
and adjacent to the UC San
Diego Campus. This unique
facility, operated by the
State of California and the
cities of San Diego and
Torrey Pines, is a slope
soaring site for hang gliders,
para-gliders,
full
scale
gliders and RC gliders. The
Torrey Pines Gulls club
(TPG) helps to administer
the RC glider part of the
glider port, where mancarrying and RC gliders
share the same airspace.
(See http://www.flytorrey.com/).
The Gliderport was founded in
1930! Charles Lindbergh flew a
glider to a new distance record
there.
I had flown at Torrey
Pines before, many years ago.
To show just how long ago, the
glider I flew was a Graupner
Cirrus! While pulling the Cirrus
out of a loop, I heard a loud
crack, and the wings suddenly
folded upward at about a 70
degree dihedral angle! “I’m
heading down to the water”, I
thought. But the wings stayed on
and the two-channel Cirrus
continued to fly! I was able to
safely land the Cirrus, to find
that the metal socket tube in the
molded plastic fuselage, which
accepts the heavy steel wing
anchor plug-in rods, had broken
in the center where these rods
meet within the tube. I
subsequently
repaired
the
damage by inserting a new tube,
which was reinforced by a larger
diameter, snug fit, outer tube.
Inspired by the beauty of
the site, I decide to bring my
ROCHobby V-Tail glider, the
only suitable plane I had flying,
down from Riverside, and I
applied to TPG for permission to
fly as a guest. With the help of
Dan Cummins and Ray Pili of
TPG, and grandson Jacob
Martin, I went through the
complex
registration
and
certification procedures, and
qualified as an intermediate
flyer. Ray walked me through the
rules and liability forms and the
video-recorded statement and
witnessed
my
qualification/orientation
flight.
Jacob, who lives in nearby
Scripps Ranch, figured out how
to get a computer-printed
verification of membership from
AMA, needed because I forgot
to bring my AMA membership
card.
With the stiff wind
blowing at an ideal 90 degrees
to the shore, there was plenty of
lift, and the airspace was quite
crowded with full scale and
model gliders. But the rigid rules
paid off, with safe flying and no
near-misses. The V-tail had its
folding prop tied down by rubber
bands to assure that no electric
power could be used. That’s
right, the site rules allow no
powered flight of any kind, even
electric! What surprised me was
that here I was, flying in a wind
that would have grounded me
and most others at our RRCC
field. The V-tail flew just fine,
exhibiting its usual refusal to
come down, thus floating to a
rather long landing. It probably
could have used more flap
travel. With no electric motor
drain, the receiver batteries last
forever. Ray estimated his use at
250 MAH per hour of slopesoaring flight. So my 1300 MAH
battery in the V-tail could last
about 5 hours!
We had to return to
Riverside over the weekend for
some social commitments and I
was inspired by my success with
the V-tail glider, so I took a dusty vintage glider down from the rafters of my garage workshop.
This two-channel, 100 inch wingspan glider is more than 40 years old. I bought it at the Brockton Arcade
Hobby Shop, where it was for sale on consignment. It came with a brand new Kraft Sport 5-channel
yellow box radio and a total of 4 servos.
The wings and tail were built-up balsa/Monokote and it had a fiberglass fuselage. I had flown it by
winch launch, Hi-start, Aero-tow (by a Senior Telemaster), slope soaring, and with an .049 power pod. I
had somehow damaged it back then, accidentally knocking off the tail feathers, and it had nestled up in
the rafters, collecting dust, since then. I glued the tail feathers back on with 30 minute epoxy and
installed a 2.4 GHz radio. A new 2200 MAH NiMH receiver pack replaced the old 500 MAH pack of the
same square dimensions and weight. We then took it back down to Imperial Beach and I flew it at Torrey
Pines. Ray Pili helped me dial it in, and it flew beautifully, slow and graceful in a light wind that would not
support the V-Tail. Who needs ailerons?
A great feature at Torrey Pines is Rich Parry's on-line, real-time weather reporting station, giving
past 4 hour and current wind speed and direction, as well as 5 and 15 minute averages, along with a
rating of how good conditions are for glider flying. (See http://w9if.net/cgi-bin/torreywx/wx.pl)
While down there so far south, I checked out the Chula Vista Club's flying field, near the I-5
freeway just north of the Mexican border, with high-tension electric lines at each end of the paved
runway. I was graciously invited to fly there, as long as a club member was present.
Oscar
Shelby ready to pounce as Oscar Holds the old Vintage
lightweight Glider – 100 inch wingspan – at Torrey Pines. It
flew like a bird. Photo by Ray Pili of the Torrey Pines Gulls.
A mini-warplane that reminds one of the Bede BD-5 of
yesteryear. It is a Forward Air Control aircraft that is much
smaller than the one your editor flew in Viet Nam.
Fw-190 “BUTCHER BIRD” AT LE BOURGETAIR FIELD MUSEE D’AIR.
It's hard to belive over 20,000 of these aircraft were built
during WW II.
It does't get any better than this! Oscar and son, Dan
Weingart, pose with famous Chartres Cathedral in the
background on their trip to the Paris Air Show.
Prop Talk
Field tests the Turnigy Thrust
Measuring stand
By Jim Bronowski
Now that so many of us have moved over to electric power, there are several new devices designed to help us with
this different mode of power for our models. By far the most handy is the Turnigy Thrust Measuring Stand
distributed by HobbyKing. For less than 50 bucks this little beauty will measure the motor thrust for any outrunner
motor/propeller size combination. That is for motor diameters less than 56 mm and thrust less than 5000grams
(177 ounces). Now when you add a watt meter and RPM indicator into the setup you get all the information you
need to properly match the prop and motor. All in all, this is a great investment that will save a great deal of time
and allows you to select the optimum power performance for your model.
Thrust Measuring Stand
HP 2012/09
APC 9X4.5 E
Reciever
3S 2200MHA 30C
10.8 Volts
Battery
Watt Meter
1
171 Watts
15.5 Amps
117 mAH
30.55 oz
ESC
9200 RPM
Readings below are at half throttle with motor pictured above
HP 2012/09
Thrust in ounces
APC 8X6 E
3S 2200MHA 30C
10.9 Volts
2
170 Watts
15.2 Amps
138 mAH
39.00 oz
9400 RPM
Wattmeter readings
HP 2012/09
APC 9X6 E
3S 2200MHA 30C
10.9 Volts
205 Watts
18.5 Amps
91 mAH
41.00 oz
8400 RPM
3
RIVERSIDE RADIO
CONTROL CLUB
P.O. Box 295
Homeland, CA 92548

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