American Symbols - Lerner Publishing Group

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American Symbols - Lerner Publishing Group
TEACHING
GUIDE
TEACHING
American
Symbols
2nd Grade Reading Level
ISBN 978-0-8225-1822-8
TEACHING
2
AMERICAN
SYMBOLS
Standards
History
• Knows the history of American symbols.
• Knows why important buildings, statues, and monuments are associated with state
and national history.
Language Arts— • Demonstrates competence in the stylistic and rhetorical aspects of writing.
Writing
• Uses grammatical and mechanical conventions in written compositions.
• Gathers and uses information for research purposes.
Language Arts— • Demonstrates competence in the general skills and strategies of the reading process.
Reading
• Demonstrates competence in the general skills and strategies for reading a variety of
informational texts.
Visual Arts
• Understands the characteristics and merits of one’s own artwork and the artwork of
others.
Life Skills
• Displays effective interpersonal communication skills.
• Contributes to the overall effort of a group.
Multiple Intelligences Utilized
• Spatial, linguistic, logical-mathematical, interpersonal, and intrapersonal
Copyright © 2004 by Lerner Publishing Group, Inc.
All rights reserved. International copyright secured. Student pages may be
reproduced by the classroom teacher for classroom use only, not for commercial
resale. No other part of this teaching guide may be reproduced, stored in a
retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means—electronic,
mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise—without the prior written
permission of Lerner Publishing Group, Inc., except for the inclusion of brief
quotations in an acknowledged review.
LernerClassroom
A division of Lerner Publishing Group, Inc.
241 First Avenue North
Minneapolis, MN 55401 U.S.A.
800-328-4929
Website address: www.lernerclassroom.com
Manufactured in the United States of America
4 5 6 7 8 9 — IG — 14 13 12 11 10 09
Books in the American Symbols
series include:
The Alamo
The American Flag
The Bald Eagle
The Liberty Bell
The Lincoln Memorial
Mount Rushmore
The Statue of Liberty
The Washington Monument
The White House
TEACHING
Lesson 1
What Is A Symbol?
Purpose: Students will understand what a symbol is
and will find symbols in their school and
neighborhood.
Materials:
• American Symbols
books
• pencils
• My Symbol
Notebook pp. 9–10
• clipboards (optional)
Objectives
• Define the word symbol.
• Describe a symbol in one’s own words.
• Collect examples of symbols.
• Illustrate common symbols.
• Organize symbols into common categories.
• Compare and contrast symbols in different categories.
AMERICAN
SYMBOLS
Model
(teacher)
• Write the definition for the word symbol on the
board.
• Brainstorm some examples of symbols (such as school
mascots, store and restaurant logos, etc.).
Practice
(class, students)
• Fold My Symbol Notebook pp. 9–10 to make a
book.
• Write a definition for the word symbol in My Symbol
Notebook pp. 9–10.
• Draw pictures of the symbols you see in your
classroom and community in the boxes on My
Symbol Notebook pp. 9–10. Next to each symbol,
write what the symbol is (a flag, for example) and
what the symbol stands for.
• As a class, look around the classroom, school, or
school grounds for more symbols.
• Add any other symbols you find.
Prepare
(teacher)
• Copy My Symbol Notebook pp. 9–10 for each
student. (Two-sided copying works best.)
Discuss
(teacher, class)
• Share the symbols you found and noted in My
Symbol Notebook pp. 9–10.
• Divide the symbols into categories, defining the
things they represent (e.g. traffic signs).
• Which category had the most symbols? Which
category had the fewest symbols? Why do you think
some categories have more symbols than others?
Pretest
(teacher, class)
• Write the word symbol on the board.
• Ask students to define the word.
Evaluate
(teacher)
• Check each student’s My Symbol Notebook
pp. 9–10 for completion and accuracy.
Activity Procedures
Read
(student, class)
• Read one or more American Symbols books.
3
4
TEACHING
AMERICAN
Lesson 2
American Symbol
Words
Purpose: Students will preview American Symbols
books while learning pertinent vocabulary.
Materials:
• American Symbols
books
• Reading Skills
Checklist p. 11
• pencils
• American Symbols
Word Cards
pp. 12–13
• scissors
Objectives
• Recall information from a text.
• Restate facts.
• Apply prior knowledge while reading.
• Practice using a glossary.
• Identify boldfaced words in a text.
• Explain the meaning of a word.
SYMBOLS
Model
(teacher, class)
• Students should turn to page 31 in their American
Symbols books. Explain that this is the glossary. Tell
students that the glossary has a list of important words
from the book and that it explains what each word
means.
• Look through the American Symbols books for words
in boldfaced print. Explain that you know these are
important words because they are thicker and darker
than the other words on the page. Tell students that
the boldfaced words are the words that will be found
in the glossary.
• Demonstrate how to find words in the glossary:
• While reading the text, stop at a boldfaced word.
• Ask the class what they think the word means.
• Look at the first letter of the boldfaced word.
• Turn to the glossary on page 31.
• In the glossary, find a boldfaced word that
begins with the same letter as the boldfaced
word from the text. Then look for the word
from the text.
• Read the definition to the class and discuss it.
Read
(small groups)
• Read one book from the American Symbols series.
Activity Procedures
Prepare
(teacher)
• Copy Reading Skills Checklist p. 11 for each student.
(Some skills are provided on the reproducible. You
may fill in the blank spaces with additional reading
skills. Use the checklist throughout the unit.)
• Copy two sets of American Symbols Word Cards
pp. 12–13 for each small group.
• Divide students into small groups.
Pretest
(small group)
• Choose one American Symbols book to read.
• Preview the text.
• What would you like to learn from this book?
Practice
(small groups)
• Write each glossary word on two of the American
Symbols Word Cards pp. 12–13. Cut out the cards.
• Shuffle the cards and lay them face down on a flat
surface. One student will turn over a card. If that
student can provide a reasonable definition of the
word, he or she can try to find the match to the card by
turning over another card. If the student cannot
provide a definition, his or her turn ends. Continue
taking turns until all cards are matched or time runs out.
Discuss
(teacher, class)
• What new vocabulary words did you learn?
Evaluate
(teacher)
• Use Reading Skills Checklist p. 11 to evaluate each
student’s reading proficiency.
TEACHING
Lesson 3
Introduce an
American Symbol
Purpose: Students will be introduced to and
understand the significance of American symbols.
Materials:
• American Symbols
books
• News Flash! p. 14
• pencils
• markers or crayons
• lined paper
Objectives
• Recall information about American symbols.
• Restate facts.
• Apply prior knowledge while reading.
• Differentiate between trivial knowledge and
important facts.
• Communicate ideas from a book using one’s own
words.
• Compare and contrast different symbols and their
importance to America.
Activity Procedures
Prepare
(teacher)
• Divide students into small groups.
• Copy News Flash! p. 14 for each small group.
Pretest
(teacher, class, small group)
• Review the definition of a symbol.
• Each group should select an American Symbols book
to read.
AMERICAN
SYMBOLS
Model
(teacher)
• List the titles of the American Symbols books on the
board.
• Briefly discuss why these are symbols of the United
States. Tell students that they will learn more about
each symbol when they read the American
Symbols books.
Read
(small groups)
• Read one American Symbols book.
Practice
(small group)
• As a group, write down important facts about your
chosen American symbol on lined paper. These are
facts that you want to share with the class.
• Use your group’s notes to write a news report about
your symbol. Write your final draft on News Flash!
p. 14.
• Draw a picture of your American symbol on News
Flash! p. 14.
Discuss
(teacher, class)
• Each group will share what they learned about their
American symbol by reading their News Flash! p. 14
to the class.
• Discuss how each symbol is important to America in
its own unique way.
Evaluate
(teacher)
• Check each group’s News Flash! p. 14 for completion
and understanding.
5
6
TEACHING
AMERICAN
Lesson 4
Our Flag
Purpose: Students will understand how individual
flags represent groups of people.
Materials
• pictures of various
flags (country, state,
city, and organizations’
flags)
• pencils
• The American Flag
book
• Our Flag p. 15
• markers or crayons
• butcher paper or
poster board
• whiteboard or chalk
board
• dry erase marker or
chalk
Objectives
• Identify the features of a flag.
• Explain how flags represent people.
• Determine how symbols on a flag represent things or
people.
• Create symbols that represent the class.
• Design a class flag using student-created symbols.
• Interpret a flag.
Activity Procedures
Prepare
(teacher)
• Collect pictures of various flags.
• Copy Our Flag p. 15 for each student.
Pretest
(class)
• What is a flag?
• What can flags represent?
• What kinds of flags have you seen?
SYMBOLS
Model
(teacher)
• Tell students that the American flag represents a
group of people. Explain that it represents each one
of them.
• Using the American flag as an example, discuss the
different parts of the flag and what each part
represents.
Read
(teacher, class)
• Read The American Flag.
Practice
(class, student)
• As a class, brainstorm symbols that could represent
the class on a class flag. Write these on the board.
• Individually, choose 2 or 3 of the symbols that you
think represent the people in your class. Draw and
write about them on Our Flag p. 15.
Discuss
(teacher, class)
• Share the symbols you chose with the class.
• List these on the board.
• Vote on the symbols your class feels are the most
important to include on a classroom flag.
Evaluate
(class)
• Create a class flag using butcher paper or poster
board.
• Hang your flag in the classroom and use it to teach
visitors about the class.
TEACHING
Lesson 5
Personal Symbol
Purpose: Students will draw and write about animals
that they feel best represent themselves.
Materials
• The Bald Eagle book
• assorted animal
books
• Personal Symbol
p. 16
• pencils
• crayons or markers
Objectives
• Identify qualities of animals and people.
• Describe how animal traits could represent people.
• Choose an animal to symbolize one’s personal
characteristics.
• Illustrate how particular animal qualities can be used
to describe an individual.
• Create a picture of an animal.
• Compare two animals’ characteristics.
Activity Procedures
Prepare
(teacher)
• Copy Personal Symbol p. 16 for each student.
• Collect animal books for reference.
Pretest
(teacher, class)
• What qualities does a bald eagle have?
• How do these qualities represent America?
Read
(teacher, class)
• Read The Bald Eagle.
AMERICAN
SYMBOLS
Model
(teacher, students)
• Select an animal that you (the teacher) feel best
represents you.
• Share your reasons for choosing this animal.
• Have students brainstorm some animals.
• Allow students to use animal books for reference if
necessary.
Practice
(student)
• Choose an animal to use as your personal symbol.
• Draw and write about the animal you chose on
Personal Symbol p. 16. Explain why you feel that
particular animal represents you. What characteristics
do you share with that animal?
Discuss
(student, class)
• Share your Personal Symbol p. 16 with the class.
• Explain why you chose the animal you did.
Evaluate
(teacher, student)
• Check each student’s Personal Symbol p. 16 for
completion.
• Display students’ personal symbols in the classroom.
• Have students compare their symbols to those of
their classmates.
7
8
TEACHING
AMERICAN
Additional Resources
BOOKS
Curlee, Lynn. Liberty. New York: Simon & Schuster
Children’s, 2000.
This book details the planning, construction, and
symbolism of the Statue of Liberty.
DK Publishing. Washington D.C. Board Book. New
York: DK Publishing, Inc., 2004.
This book highlights the monuments and other
famous sites in Washington D.C.
Douglas, Lloyd G. The Liberty Bell. New York:
Scholastic Library Publishing, 2003.
This book introduces students to the Liberty Bell.
Gibbons, Gail. Soaring with the Wind: The Bald Eagle.
New York: William Morrow & Co., 1998.
This fascinating book describes the characteristics
and habits of the Bald Eagle. It also looks at the
traits for which the Bald Eagle came to symbolize
America.
Gilmore, Frederic. Washington Monument: A Tribute to
a Man, a Monument for a Nation. Chanhassen,
MN: The Child’s World, Inc., 2000.
This book details the history, creation, and
significance of the Washington Monument.
Herman, John. Red, White, and Blue: The Story of the
American Flag. New York: Putnam Publishing
Group, 1998.
This illustrated book details the history of the
American flag and the changes it has undergone.
Johnson, Linda Carlson. Our National Symbols.
Brookfield, CT: Millbrook Press, 1994.
This book tells the stories behind various
American symbols.
Owens, Tomas S. Mount Rushmore. New York: Rosen
Publishing Group, Inc., 2001.
This books details the conception and creation
of the carvings at Mount Rushmore.
Quiri, Patricia Ryon. The American Flag. New York:
Scholastic Library Publishing, 1998.
This book describes the history and symbolism of
the American flag.
SYMBOLS
Thomson, Sarah L. Stars and Stripes: The Story of the
American Flag. New York: HarperCollins
Publishers, 2003.
This book discusses the symbolism of the
American flag, changes the flag has undergone,
and American history during the flag’s creation
and development.
Waters, Kate. The Story of the White House. New York:
Scholastic, Inc., 1992.
This simple text explores the history of the White
House, its layout and rooms, and some of the
people who have lived and worked there.
WEBSITES
A to Z Kids Stuff Symbols of the USA
http://atozkidsstuff.com/symbols.html
Kids can learn more about famous American
Symbols, make a 3-D American flag, and link to
other American Symbols sites.
The Bald Eagle: An American Emblem
http://www.baldeagleinfo.com/eagle/eagle9
.html
This site explains the qualities of the Bald Eagle
and how these qualities (strength, longevity, and
majestic looks) engender the United States. It
discusses how and when the Bald Eagle became
the official symbol of the United States.
Symbols of U.S. Government
http://bensguide.gpo.gov/k-2/symbols/index
.html
This site contains information about American
symbols and links to other American symbols
sites.
National Historical American Flags
http://www.law.ou.edu/hist/flags/fedflag.shtml
This site shows the American flag through its
evolution, from Betsy Ross’s original flag to the
current 50-star flag. It also features Confederate
flags. Links to state flag pages and more.
The White House
http://www/whitehouse.gov/history/whtour/
Kids can take a virtual tour of the White House
as well as read interesting White House trivia.
9
_____________ is a
symbol. It stands
for _____________
_________________________________
_________________________________
_____________ is a
symbol. It stands
for _____________
_________________________________
_________________________________
My
Symbol
Notebook
Name
Date
___________________________________
___________________________________
___________________________________
___________________________________
___________________________________
___________________________________
___________________________________
___________________________________
___________________________________
___________________________________
___________________________________
___________________________________
___________________________________
___________________________________
A symbol is _______________________
_________________________________
_________________________________
for _____________
symbol. It stands
_____________ is a
_________________________________
_________________________________
for _____________
symbol. It stands
_____________ is a
10
Skill ➤
➤
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11
Reading Skills Checklist
Mastered
A
Developing
B
Teaching American Symbols
C
Needs Improvement
D
F
12
American Symbols Word Cards
Teaching American Symbols
13
American Symbols Word Cards
Teaching American Symbols
14
NEWS FLASH!
Group Members
Introducing the
(symbol)
Teaching American Symbols
15
Our Flag
Name
Date
Directions: What are some symbols that might represent your class? Draw them on the flag
below. Use the lines beneath the flag to describe each symbol and why it represents your class.
Symbol 1:
Symbol 2:
Symbol 3:
Teaching American Symbols
16
Personal Symbol
Name
Date
Directions:
Write your answers to the questions below.
write
What animal did you choose to represent you?
Why did you choose this animal?
List the qualities this animal has that you think you have.
Directions:
Draw a picture of your animal symbol in the box.
Teaching American Symbols