TYPOGRAFISCHE ABTEILUNG Sharing the Wealth

Comments

Transcription

TYPOGRAFISCHE ABTEILUNG Sharing the Wealth
TYPOGRAFISCHE
ABTEILUNG
Sharing the Wealth of
Contemporary Africana
Interview with New York based design
manager and founder of Another Africa
web magazine Missla Libsekal.
From Adornate series, KLV
in collaboration with Another Africa
Typography + Language
+ Writing Systems
= Afrikan Alphabets
Introduction to Afrikan Alphabets—The
Story of Writing in Africa, a review of
African writings systems completed
with an interview with its author, Harare
based graphic and type designer Saki
Mafundikwa, also founder of Zimbabwe
Institute of Vigital Arts—ZIVA.
By Ima-Abasi Okon
IDPURE ISSUE 31
Sharing the Wealth of
Contemporary Africana
Interview with Missla Libsekal
Missla Libsekal is a design
manager and founder of Web
magazine Another Africa that
was established in 2010. It
began in Africa: the idea was
born when Missla visited the
“art-deco city” of Asmara.
The web site, initiated as
Missla personal blog, turned quickly into a magazine
with many contributors. Is
Another Africa focusing enough on african
vernacular forms of art? Missla says:
“Enough—not sure if there is a measure.
But if that measure was my vision and passion for this field, then the answer is that
we’ve only begun to scratch the surface.”
↑ Photography Florent Meng
66
Images from Another Africa →
Courtesy Missla Libsekal
Cameron Platter
The Battle of Rorkes Drift at Club
Dirty Den (About 2009)
WAR IS OVER! If you want it
By Yoko Ono and John Lennon, 1969
Amharic and Tigrinya versions by
Another Africa and PMKFA
Typography by PMKFA, Michael Thorsby
Unknown Union
Men’s fashion boutique in Cape Town
• T-Bone Hair Cut, Mphakane, Limpopo
Artwork by Chas
• Steve Hair Salon, Dzanani, Limpopo
Artist unknown
• King Tiger’s Hair Clinique, Dzanani,
Limpopo. Artwork by Ram
Simon Weller from South African
Township Barbershops & Salons
Mamadou Cissé, Untitled, 2006
Courtesy Galerie Bernard Jordan
Paris/Zürich, © Mamadou Cissé
Dillon Marsh, The view from a window
in the abandoned diamond mining town
of Kolmanskop, Namibia, 2011
Stephen Burks, Man Made
Prototypes & Material Compositions
(Pile Up) Including Basket Lamps and
Basket Low Tables, 2010
Photography Daniel Håkansson
Edward Denison, Guang Yu Ren, Naigzy
Gebremedhin, Asmara Africa’s Secret
Modernist City, Published by Merrell
Publishers Limited 2003
IDPURE ISSUE 31
Sharing the Wealth of Contemporary Africana
You seem to have had varied
activities, centered around
design, open to very different
fields. What exactly are they?
Missla Libsekal: Business management
is the base, and the field of my formal
education. I was introduced to design
whilst living in Tokyo and had the opportunity to manage projects in interior architecture, ephemeral installations and
events, product and furniture design,
graphic, package design to digital communication projects and re-branding
campaigns. So a pretty wide gamut.
1.
At the beginning of your
career, did you have a specialty,
a field of choice?
ML : Funnily enough, my path was originally pretty far from design. I was on the
track to become a commercial pilot when
I decided to switch gears to focus on
management. That said I was always curious about the arts, culture and design.
So marrying my business training with
the world of visual communication felt
pretty natural. I first fell in love with interior architecture, by experiencing tactile,
environmental design that read so intuitively—and there were so many playful and poetic examples in Tokyo and
throughout Japan.
2.
3.
1. Marie-Hélène de Taillac, Over The Rainbow, 2007
Ephemeral shop in shop designed by Tom Dixon
for The Stage at Isetan Department Flagship Store,
Shinjuku, Tokyo. Photography Kozo Takayama
2. Mood Swings Apartment Store, Moscow women’s
flagship boutique. Creative direction by item idem.
Architecture by Boys Don’t Cry. Photography
courtesy of Mood Swings.
3. MARIE CLAIRE 2, Tokyo Tour Avec Chiaki Kuriyama
A guide of Tokyo recommendations by starlet,
Chiaki Kuriyama. Photography Michel Figuet;
Production: Missla Libsekal; Texts: Martin Webb
68
I could read about your work
“juxtaposing traditional West
African masquerading with
contemporary fashion, art and
nature” in collaboration
with UK based milliner, Keiron
Levine. What are some of
your achievements outside of
Another Africa?
ML : On the formal design spectrum a
few highlights include working in Tokyo
with Tom Dixon for a shop-in-shop project for French jewellery brand MarieHélène De Taillac,1 and with artist Item
Idem who art directed an interior fashion
boutique in Moscow,2 other standout projects include running a 3 day retail trend
and marketing tour with superfuture
for 20 CEOs from the top department
store groups around the world. I might
have gotten my taste for editorial though
when I produced a special 8 page feature on Tokyo featuring the Kill Bill actress Chiaki Kuriyama for Paris-based
publication, Marie Claire 2.3
Projects that have been extensions of
Another Africa but beyond the editorial page. A workshop for young leaders
on media and the power of perception
at London’s Southbank center during
Africa Utopia, collaborating with Japanese
architect and artist Megumi Matsubara
to make a guest lecture in Japanese
on modernist architecture in Asmara,
Eritrea, a sound art piece by Finnish
composer Ilpo Jauhiainen and NigerianAmerican artist Odili Donald Odita in tandem with an interview are some wonderful milestones, but truthfully told I find
the whole project so inspiring that it is
hard to really pick.
Can you think of other projects
made by other designers
that were built with a similar
approach in the field of
graphic design?
ML : A project made by designer Garth
Walker comes to mind, though his “collaborators” so to speak did not intentionally know that their work would become
the basis for the lettering and signage
for South Africa’s Constitutional Court
building. In its former incarnation, the
site had apparently housed several
prisons during Apartheid. The etchings
and graffiti markings made by political
prisoners, and the builders’ markings,
became the basis for his new typeface.
There seemed to be some kind of poetry, even if the shadows of injustice and
suffering were somehow embedded.
He described it as being letters from
both captors and captives. The new
building’s signage reads constitutional
court in South Africa’s official eleven
languages using the colors of the postApartheid era South African flag. It is a
visual marker that resonates the past
and simultaneously the present.
Typeface: Garth Walker; Signage: Eshen & Reid
Constitutional Court, Johannesburg
Photography Garth Walker
IDPURE ISSUE 31
Sharing the Wealth of Contemporary Africana
1. Why international magazines
specialized in architecture and
design do not talk about Asmara,
and more broadly of artistic
activity in Africa ?[...] It has a lot
to do with who has been doing
the talking, who owns the ink, the
printing presses, the television
networks and radio waves. We could
ask ourselves, do those channels
and mediums articulate with
complexity. In my case, [...] I began
looking for these stories which I
unequivocally understood existed.
2. One of the intentions of Another
Africa, is to give a platform and
voice for those in these contexts of
crisis to speak on their own
$account. I think that this where
the perspective lies, in the multiplicity of voices.
3. I would say that the act of
creation operates like a cultural
reservoir. We see ourselves,
our histories and developments
and can be inspired by this knowledge regardless of its incarnation: whether it be in a vernacular
state or a formalized language.
Do you think that Another
Africa is focusing enough on
vernacular forms of art?
ML : Enough—not sure if there is a measure. But if that measure was my vision
and passion for this field, then the answer is that we’ve only begun to scratch
the surface.
In a previous interview, you
were talking about Asmara and
your crush on the city.
What are the reasons?
ML : In two words Frank Lloyd Wright and
the Guggenheim in New York. His work
introduced me to modernist architecture
which I have been quite fascinated and
moved by, and when I first saw the Fiat
Tagliero building in Asmara, it leapt out
at me that these buildings where speaking from within a similar visual language.
It was unexpected, I was both fascinated and perturbed by this reaction.
In the same interview, you
asked an important question:
“why international magazines
specialized in architecture
and design do not talk about
Asmara, and more broadly
of artistic activity in Africa?”
Did you find a response to this?
ML : It’s not a simple answer… it has a
lot to do with who has been doing the
talking, who owns the ink, the printing
presses, the television networks and
radio waves. We could ask ourselves,
do those channels and mediums articulate with complexity. In my case, I
stopped asking the question, waiting
for someone else to fill in the gaps of
my knowledge and began looking for
these stories which I unequivocally understood existed.1 After all, the first one
was staring at me straight in the face
with more than 700 modernist buildings
standing tall. It is one of the only cities in
the world, with such a heritage. Another
Africa was born through that realization.
The media’s choice is to focus
solely on the crises in Africa,
goes along with the criticism
that was made to you, which
is “how dare speak of art and
design in the context of
70
TYPOGRAFISCHE ABTEILUNG
countries in crisis.” What is
your response to this issue?
ML : I am not really sure what happened
along the way for us to begin believing
that beauty is a luxury, the natural world,
fauna, plants for example are the exact
antithesis of this. The Nigerian author
Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie said it succinctly, when she stated that “The single
story creates stereotypes, and the problem with stereotypes is not that they are
untrue, but that they are incomplete.
They make one story become the only
story.” One of the intentions of Another
Africa, is to give a platform and voice
for those in these contexts of crisis to
speak on their own account. I think that
this where perspective lies, in the multiplicity of voices.2
According to you, is the
practice of art and design is
a factor of development
and progress in a country?
ML : I would say that the act of creation
operates like a cultural reservoir. We see
ourselves, our histories and developments
and can be inspired by this knowledge
regardless of its incarnation: whether it
be in a vernacular state or a formalized
language.3 A beautiful example of this
comes across in Ron Eglash’s research
on fractals found throughout the continent. He gives one example of how hair
braiding techniques typically have this
sophisticated visual architecture, quite
like that which can be found in nature.
But to give a practical example, one of
the graphic designers that we featured
early on, was recently approached by a
New York based advertising agency to
create illustrations for a new architectural project in his locality.
The choice of some photographs
suggests an ideological
motivation, which decrypts it
through a kind of a “manifesto”
(anotherafrica.tumblr.com).
What can you say about it?
ML : There is a subtle power afforded
through contrast, and in particular visual
contrast gained by placing images side
by side. Call it a paradigm shift. This attitude is another Africa, not static and
rigid but layered. There is an intention
to spark curiosity, by hinting to the complexity. It lies available for any and all
that are curious, like an open invitation
for a new kind of engagement.1 The opportunity is placed in the hands of the
viewer to decode and decipher each
topic with “open eyes” because the field
of view is in fact wide open.
You have writers from different
African countries. Most seem
based in Europe and the United
States. Is it your intention
to have a vision of Africa from
outside of Africa?
Do you work with a network of
local contacts in Africa?
ML : The project has been growing rather organically, the availability of internet
connectivity plays a big factor as we are a
digital based platform. I have been lucky
enough though to say that the contributors are like minded individuals, which
is in fact the essential criteria rather
than location.2 Do we hope to have at
least 54 contributors for each African
nation, absolutely.
From your point of view, who
and where are your audience ?
ML : Once again logistics and infrastructure plays a big part in this. Our
main audiences are located in North
American and Europe, but South Africa
consistently ranks in the top ten which
is great.
About the partnership with
the Guardian African Network :
How did you contact the
Guardian and for what kind
of collaboration?
ML : Last autumn (October 2012) The
Guardian launched a section on their
web site, the African Network, which is
essentially a collaboration between them
and other sites writing about and from
Africa—a virtual hub of opinion leaders
and thought generators. We were invited
to join in the goal to widening perspectives and sharing audiences.
How do you imagine the future
of Another Africa? What
are your expectations for the
project in terms of content,
form…?
ML : That it will become a virtual library,
a reservoir for knowledge, thought, expression. It will retain the past and help
inspire and write the future.3 In terms of
future incarnations, it is my intention to
develop several aspects: printed matter
such as topical books, a special edition
printed magazine version of Another
Africa, as well as developing exhibitions
and hopefully and educative component
in collaboration with arts and culture institutions on the continent.
Traduction
ENTRETIEN AVEC MISSLA LIBSEKAL
Vous semblez avoir des activités
très variées, centrées autour du
design et ouvertes à des domaines
très différents. Quelles sont-elles
exactement?
La gestion d’entreprise est la base et
le domaine que j’ai étudié au cours
de ma formation universitaire. J’ai
découvert le design lorsque j’habitais à Tokyo. J’ai eu l’opportunité de
gérer divers projets dans différents
domaines: architecture intérieure,
installations et manifestations éphémères, création de produits et de mobilier, graphisme, conception d’emballage, projets de communication
numérique et campagnes de changement de marque. Une gamme de
projets assez large.
Au début de votre carrière, aviezvous une spécialité, un domaine
de prédilection?
C’est assez amusant mais mon parcours était à l’origine assez éloigné
du design. J’étais partie pour devenir
pilote professionnel quand j’ai décidé de changer et de me consacrer
à la gestion. Cela dit, je me suis toujours intéressée à l’art, à la culture
et au design. Il m’a donc semblé assez naturel d’associer ma formation
commerciale à l’univers de la communication visuelle. J’ai d’abord été
conquise par l’architecture intérieure
en découvrant le design environnemental et tactile qui est si intuitif. Il y
avait tant d’exemples poétiques et ludiques dans Tokyo et au Japon.
1. There is a subtle power afforded
through contrast, and in particular visual contrast gained
by placing images side by side.
Call it a paradigm shift. This
attitude is Another Africa, not
static and rigid but layered.
There is an intention to spark
curiosity, by hinting to the
complexity. It lies available for
any and all that are curious,
like an open invitation for a new
kind of engagement.
2. The project has been growing
rather organically, the availability
of internet connectivity plays
a big factor as we are a digital
based platform. I have been
lucky enough though to say that
the contributors are like
minded individuals, which is in
fact the essential criteria rather
than location.
3. The future of Another Africa:
That it will become a virtual
library, a reservoir for knowledge,
thought, expression. It will
retain the past and help inspire
and write the future.
J’ai lu au sujet de votre travail «juxtaposant le déguisement traditionnel
d’Afrique de l’Ouest et la mode
contemporaine, l’art et la nature» en
collaboration avec Keiron Levine,
IDPURE ISSUE 31
Sharing the Wealth of Contemporary Africana
Traduction
un modiste installé au Royaume-Uni.
Pouvez-vous nous parler de certaines
de vos réalisations en dehors
d’Another Africa?
Dans le domaine de la création purement formelle, voici quelques temps
forts: mon travail à Tokyo avec Tom
Dixon dans le cadre d’un projet de
stand pour la marque française de
bijouterie Marie-Hélène de Taillac,
et avec l’artiste Item Idem, alors directeur artistique d’une boutique de
mode intérieure à Moscou. D’autres
projets remarquables comprennent:
une visite marketing et sur les tendances de la vente au détail de trois
jours avec Superfuture pour 20 PDG
des plus importants groupes de
grands magasins du monde entier.
J’ai peut-être pris goût au rédactionnel lorsque j’ai réalisé un reportage
spécial de huit pages consacré à
Tokyo avec l’actrice de Kill Bill, Chiaki
Kuriyama pour une publication parisienne, Marie Claire 2.
Ces projets étaient des prolongements d’Another Africa mais au-delà
de la page éditoriale. Un atelier pour
de jeunes dirigeants sur les médias
et la force de la perception dans
le centre de Southbank à Londres
pendant Africa Utopia, la collaboration avec un architecte japonais
et l’artiste Megumi Matsubara pour
une conférence d’honneur en japonais sur l’architecture moderniste
à Asmara. En Érythrée, une œuvre
d’art sonore par le compositeur finnois Ilpo Jauhiainen et l’artiste nigérian-américain Odili Donald Odita
en tandem avec un entretien. Voilà
quelques événements marquants extraordinaires. Mais honnêtement, j’ai
trouvé que le projet dans son ensemble était une telle source d’inspiration que c’est vraiment difficile de
choisir.
plantes, par exemple en sont la parfaite antithèse. L’auteure nigériane,
Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, l’a dit
succinctement quand elle a déclaré
que «l’histoire crée des stéréotypes
et le problème des stéréotypes n’est
pas qu’ils sont faux mais qu’ils sont
incomplets. Ils font qu’une histoire
devient la seule histoire». L’une des
objectifs d’Another Africa est d’offrir
une tribune et une voix pour que les
personnes dans ces contextes de
crise puissent donner leur propre explication. Je pense que c’est là où se
trouve le point de vue, dans la multiplicité des voix.
Pouvez-vous nous indiquer d’autres
projets réalisés par d’autres
designers et créés avec une démarche
similaire dans le domaine de la
création graphique?
Un projet mené par le designer Garth
Walker me vient à l’esprit, bien que
ses «collaborateurs» pour ainsi dire
ignoraient, intentionnellement, que
leur travail servirait de base aux inscriptions et à la signalisation du bâtiment de la Cour constitutionnelle
d’Afrique du Sud. Dans une «vie»
antérieure, le site avait apparemment
abrité plusieurs prisons pendant
l’apartheid. Les gravures et les graffitis faits par les prisonniers politiques
et les marques des constructeurs ont
servi de base à ce nouveau caractère. Il semblait y avoir une certaine
forme de poésie même si l’ombre de
l’injustice et de la souffrance était en
quelque sorte incrustée. Garth Walker décrivait son caractère comme
des lettres provenant à la fois des
gardes et des captifs. Sur la signalisation du nouveau bâtiment, «Cour
constitutionnelle» est inscrit dans
les onze langues officielles d’Afrique
du Sud avec les couleurs du drapeau
du pays de l’époque qui a suivi l’apartheid. C’est un marqueur visuel qui
fait résonner simultanément le passé
et le présent.
Pensez-vous qu’Another Africa
se concentre suffisamment sur les
formes locales d’art?
Suffisamment, mais je ne suis pas
certaine que cela soit mesuré. Mais
si cette mesure devait être ma vision de ce domaine et la passion que
j’éprouve pour lui, alors la réponse est
que nous n’avons que commencé à
effleurer le sujet.
Au cours d’un entretien précédent,
vous avez évoqué Asmara et
l’amour que vous portez à cette ville.
Quelles en sont les raisons?
En deux mots, Frank Lloyd Write et
le Guggenheim à New York. Grâce à
son travail, j’ai découvert l’architecture moderniste qui me fascine et
me touche énormément. Quand j’ai
vu pour la première fois le bâtiment
Fiat Tagliero à Asmara, il m’est apparu comme une évidence que ces
bâtiments parlaient un langage visuel
similaire. C’était inattendu. J’étais à
la fois fascinée et troublée par cette
réaction.
Dans le même entretien, vous avez
posé une question importante:
«Pourquoi les magazines internationaux spécialisés en architecture et
en design ne parlent-ils pas d’Asmara
et plus généralement de l’activité
artistique en Afrique?» Avez-vous
trouvé une réponse à cette question?
La réponse n’est pas simple… Tout
cela est très lié à la personne qui
parle, à la personne qui possède
l’encre, les presses d’impression, les
réseaux de télévision et les ondes
radio. Nous pouvons nous demander: est-ce que ces réseaux et ces
médias s’articulent avec complexité?
En ce qui me concerne, j’ai arrêté
de poser la question. J’attends que
quelqu’un comble les lacunes de
mes connaissances et je me suis
mise à chercher ces histoires qui, je
le sais catégoriquement, existent.
Après tout, la première me regardait fixement en face avec plus de
700 immenses bâtiments modernistes. C’est l’une des seules villes au
monde à posséder un tel patrimoine.
Another Africa était né à travers cette
réalisation.
Les médias choisissent de se
concentrer uniquement sur les crises
en Afrique et acceptent la critique
qui vous a été faite qui est «Comment
oser parler d’art et de design dans
le contexte de pays en crise?» Quelle
est votre réponse à cette question?
Je ne sais pas vraiment ce qui s’est
passé au fil du temps pour que nous
en venions à croire que la beauté
est un luxe. La nature, la faune, les
Selon vous, est-ce que la pratique
de l’art et du design est un facteur
de développement et de progrès dans
un pays?
Je dirais que l’acte de création agit
comme un réservoir culturel. Nous
nous voyons, nous voyons nos histoires et nos développements et
nous pouvons être inspirés par ces
connaissances quelle que soit la
manière dont elles sont incarnées:
qu’elles prennent une forme locale
ou un langage formalisé. Un bel
exemple de cela apparaît dans les
recherches de Ron Eglash sur les
fractales que l’on retrouve dans tout
le continent. Ron Eglash donne en
exemple l’architecture visuelle généralement sophistiquée des techniques de tressage de cheveux, une
architecture assez proche de ce que
l’on trouve dans la nature. Mais pour
donner un exemple concret, l’un
des designers graphiques que nous
avons présentés il y a quelque temps
a été récemment approché par une
agence de publicité new-yorkaise
pour créer des illustrations pour un
nouveau projet architectural dans
son quartier.
Le choix de certaines photographies
suggère une motivation idéologique
qui la décrypte à travers une sorte
de «manifeste» (voir anotherafrica.
tumblr.com). Que pouvez-vous nous
dire à ce sujet?
Le contraste confère une subtile
force, notamment le contraste visuel
obtenu par des images placées côte
à côte. Parlons de changement de
paradigme. Cet état d’esprit est une
autre Afrique, ni statique ni rigide
mais superposée. Il y a une volonté
de susciter la curiosité en laissant
poindre la complexité. Elle est à la
disposition de tous qui sont curieux,
comme une invitation ouverte à une
nouvelle forme d’engagement. Le
spectateur a entre ses mains l’opportunité de décoder et de déchiffrer
chaque thème qui «ouvre les yeux»
car le champ de vision est en fait
grand ouvert.
Des écrivains sont originaires de
différents pays africains. La plupart
d’enter eux semblent être installés
en Europe et aux États-Unis. Est-ce
que votre objectif est d’avoir une
vision de l’Afrique en dehors de
l’Afrique? Est-ce que vous travaillez
avec un réseau de contacts locaux
en Afrique?
Le projet se développe de façon plutôt organique. La disponibilité d’une
connexion Internet est un facteur
important car nous sommes une
plate-forme numérique. J’ai cependant la chance de pouvoir dire que
les contributeurs sont des personnes
avec le même état d’esprit, ce qui est
en fait le critère primordial, plus que
la localisation. Est-ce que nous espérons avoir au moins 54 contributeurs
pour chaque nation africaine? Oui,
absolument.
D’après vous, quel est votre public et
où est-il situé?
Là encore, la logistique et l’infrastructure jouent un rôle important. Notre
public est principalement situé en
Amérique du Nord et en Europe, mais
l’Afrique du Sud figure régulièrement
parmi les 10 premiers et c’est une
très bonne chose.
À propos du partenariat avec le
Guardian African Network: Comment
avez-vous contacté The Guardian
et pour quel genre de collaboration?
L’automne dernier (octobre 2012),
The Guardian a lancé un espace sur
son site Web, African Network. Il s’agit
principalement d’une collaboration
entre The Guardian et d’autres sites
qui écrivent sur l’Afrique et d’Afrique.
C’est une plate-forme virtuelle de
leaders et de générateurs d’opinion.
Nous avons été invités à y participer
dans le but d’élargir les points de vue
et de partager les publics.
Comment imaginez-vous l’avenir
d’Another Africa? Quelles
sont vos attentes pour le projet en
termes de contenu, de format, etc.?
J’espère qu’Another Africa deviendra
une bibliothèque virtuelle, un réservoir pour les connaissances,
les idées et l’expression. J’espère
qu’Another Africa conservera le passé, qu’il contribuera à être une source
d’inspiration pour l’avenir et à écrire
ce dernier. J’ai l’intention de développer plusieurs aspects dans le cadre
de mes futurs projets: des ouvrages
imprimés comme des livres thématiques, une version magazine imprimé en édition spéciale d’Another
Africa, ainsi que la création d’exposition et, avec un peu de chance, un volet éducatif en collaboration avec des
institutions artistiques et culturelles
du continent.
�����
s�is�t�pefa�es
�ILL �OON
RELEASE
Euclid from
Ultr�light ↠ �old
I�LUDING
��en�ype
�eatures: ��ica�eLigat�es
& Alternate�
Euclid from Ultralight to Bold
Euclid Regular
Euclid Light Italic
Euclid Medium
Euclid Bold Italic
Euclid Light
Euclid Ultralight
Euclid BP Bold
Euclid Bold
Euclid Bold
Euclid Bold
Euclid Ultralight Italic
Euclid Ultralight Italic
Euclid Medium
72
Euclid Medium Italic
Euclid Light
swiss typefaces
schweizer schriften
caractères suisses
caratteri svizzeri
www.swisstypefaces.com
IDPURE ISSUE 31
Typography
+
Language
+
Writing Systems
=
Afrikan Alphabets
TYPOGRAFISCHE ABTEILUNG
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
Interview with Saki Mafundikwa by Ima-Abasi Okon
I am an easy sell-out to a top piece of print.
At times this has been thwarted by the occasional stench emitted when graphic design
becomes “Graphic Design:” a constructed
notion. Nevertheless, terms and definitions
are important, as they can establish parameters of intelligibility by liberating relationships. Where the relationship between
the discipline of graphic design and Africa
appears to have little or no public harvest,
evidence such as the work of celebrated,
Durban based designer Garth Walker has
done well to dispel this. Yet being a faint
sound I quietly went looking for a perfect
level of pandemonium.
Enter Saki Mafundikwa.
1. Bride; 2, 3. Beautiful visitor;
4. Queen; 5, 6. Goddess of creation,
mother, source; 7, 8. Chieftainess;
9, 10. Planter, skillful person;
11, 12. Vagabond, useless person;
74
13, 14. Mariage, unity, love; 15, 16. Birth
(figurative and actual); 17. Home;
18. Fire, lust, love, passion; 19. Unity;
20. Break-up, divorce
A selection of Bantu Symbols →
IDPURE ISSUE 31
Typography + Language + Writing Systems = Afrikan Alphabets
1. His book Afrikan Alphabets: The
Story of Writing in Afrika presents
a collated introduction into the
history and development of over
twenty alphabets. Through
pictograms, mnemonic devices
and syllabaries Saki charts how
writing has and continues to evolve
across Africa.
2. Saki contends that
pictograms,
tally stick markings and scarification should all be seen as
forerunners of writing in Africa.
3. Initially created with 465
characters, the Shü-mom script went
through several iterations during
his reign. With the exception of the
printing press he invented w
( hich
was later destroyed) King Njoya left
a legacy of several manuscripts,
maps, administrative notes
and records including a calendar
that detailed the history and
culture of his people. This collection is now available to view
at the Bamum Palace Museum.
76
Born and raised in Harare, Zimbabwe,
Saki Mafundikwa completed an MFA at
Yale School of Art in 1984. He has since
gone on to found Zimbabwe Institute of
Vigital Art—ZIVA, Zimbabwe’s only school
dedicated to design and new media.
Studying design under Paul Rand, a seed
was sown to look into African writing systems. Twenty years later his book Afrikan
Alphabets: The Story of Writing in Afrika
presents a collated introduction into the
history and development of over twenty
alphabets. Through pictograms, mnemonic devices and syllabaries Saki
charts how writing has and continues to
evolve across Africa.1
Aware that some of the systems documented do not satisfy the criteria to exist
as an alphabet, he nonetheless proceeds to call them as such, apprehending them as practices of proto-writing.
Saki contends that pictograms, tally
stick markings and scarification should
all be seen as forerunners of writing in
Africa.2 Asserting the significant role
that symbols have in African culture as
documentation of oral information. Rendering void the idea that the majority of
graphic symbols are purely decorative
and instead advocates their place within agencies of communication.
The chapter on historical systems charts
the personal achievements of King Njoya
of the Bamum Kingdom, who acknowledged the need to preserve the culture
of his people during Cameroons colonization in 1896. Initially created with 465
characters, the Shü-mom script went
through several iterations during his
reign. With the exception of the printing
press he invented (which was later destroyed) King Njoya left a legacy of several manuscripts, maps, administrative
notes and records including a calendar
that detailed the history and culture of his
people. This collection is now available to
view at the Bamum Palace Museum.3
Further on the modification and continuation of some of these Afrikan alphabets in South America and the Caribbean
are mapped through Saki’s observation
of forced migration through the Atlantic
slave trade. He highlights the similarities between Nsibidi, an ancient ideographic script created by the Ejagham
people of southern Nigeria, to that of
TYPOGRAFISCHE ABTEILUNG
Anaforuana which can be found in Cuba
and Haiti. Likewise in reverse, Vah, the
writing system of the Bassa people
was restored to Liberia in the 1900s after being lost during colonization. Now
taught in schools and used in literature
it was found to be actively used among
Brazilians of Bassa origin. Enjoyably
Saki’s surveillance of these scripts reemphasises Africa’s relationship with
South America which is often blighted
by an intense absorption on the western
hemisphere.
Saki spells Africa with a “k.” A-f-r-i-k-a.
The forward by Maurice Tadadjeu expands on this. I however, inquired further, purposely provoking him. “I AM the
Afrikan here and I decide how I want to
spell my continent whether it pleases anyone or not” was the seasoned response
that I was after. Highlighting that the
sound in Africa is a “k” and not a “c” and
in Zulu, which he speaks “c” is a click
sound. Which makes perfect sense for
him and most African languages to use
a “k.” Tadadjeu points to the logic, that
non-African languages should take the
spelling of African names from African
languages. But due to limitations in number and the circulation of African writing
scripts, the power needed to influence
is extremely short.
Informal with an emphasis on the graphic form, and an acceptance that there is
room for deeper levels of enquiry including a more rigorous approach to their
epistemology, Afrikan Alphabets is a
foundation for those wanting to expand
further on the subject.
What Saki has done with this work and
continues to do with ZIVA is proof that
graphic design is a nascent process
happening all over the continent. Perhaps similar to Saki’s usage of the letter
“k” to spell Africa, we must contend that
what we may be looking for is called by
a different name —and quite possibly, in
a way that no roman character can describe. However, by presenting Afrikan
Alphabets and a commitment to ZIVA’s
objectives, Saki teaches us how to redraw this “Afrikan” creativity in a way
that remains true.
II. The first version of Shü-mom
III. Shü-mom calendar
IV. Portrait of King Ibrahim Njoya. Elements of the script
can be seen above and beneath the kings figure.
IDPURE ISSUE 31
Typography + Language + Writing Systems = Afrikan Alphabets
Interview with Saki Mafundikwa
1. There is (urgent) need on our part
(Afrikan scholars) to correct the
myths and plain lies that have been
immortalised in books the world
over about us, our contributions
and our accomplishments.
2. What do writing systems say?
They say, “Hey World, I am
here, look at me in all my Afrikan
glory and beauty. Look at my
ingenuity, my dexterity!! I am not
’“just a writing system’“” but I
am also spirit, rhythm, song, dance,
movement, I am timeless. Yet,
I am deceptively, SIMPLE.”“” They
speak of our glorious past,
a past that is under constant
attack from ““ modernity”
and misconstrued ““ civilization.””
3. I am not calling for the Roman
Alphabet to “reflect Afrikan
culture,” rather in a situation where
we have seen type design in the
age of technology being mutilated
and distorted in grotesque ways,
I see Afrikan alphabets offering a
breath of fresh air that can
rescue the Roman alphabet from
the vagaries of style and trends.
78
Ima-Abasi Okon: Collectively
what do these writing systems
present? What do they do
to the accepted narrative of
history and culture? The
obvious one being that Africa
has made no contributions
to World history or civiliZation.
Saki Mafundikwa: To me they present a
“eureka moment,” they flip open Pandora’s box laying bare the lies, prejudice, and evil that has been visited on
a whole continent and her people. Why
is it important that there are scholars
today who have dedicated their lives
to deciphering writing systems like the
Mayan Alphabet? Or even more profoundly, why is it of any importance or
relevance to (today’s) society for the
said scholars to share their findings with
us? Why is it of any relevance that two
Yale scholars referred to as “Egyptologists” discovered a writing system in the
Egyptian desert (in 1998), that they say
is the FIRST effort at writing ever made
by humanity—correcting centuries of
the false belief that the cradle of writing
is the Mesopotamian basin. There is (urgent) need on our part (Afrikan scholars)
to correct the myths and plain lies that
have been immortalized in books the
world over about us, our contributions
and our accomplishments.2 We’ve let
the hunter tell the story for too long, it’s
time, WE the hunted tell the story from
our perspective.
IO: Individually what do they
say? Speak of, or begin to
pronounce ?
SM: They say, “Hey World, I am here,
look at me in all my Afrikan glory and
beauty. Look at my ingenuity, my dexterity! I am not ’just a writing system’ but
I am also spirit, rhythm, song, dance,
movement, I am timeless. Yet, I am deceptively, SIMPLE.” They speak of our
glorious past, a past that is under constant attack from “modernity” and misconstrued “civilization.” 3 They inspire
us to SANKOFA—return to the past, be
inspired by it to make our future GREAT.
IO: One of the things you call
for, is for African designers to
expand upon the Roman alphabet to reflect African culture.
TYPOGRAFISCHE ABTEILUNG
How would you suggest they
go about this? Looking now
at Typography and Type Design
as practices, do you not
think that this is gimmicky,
and can become a novelty?
SM: I am not calling for the Roman alphabet to “reflect Afrikan culture,” rather in a situation where we have seen
type design in the age of technology being mutilated and distorted in grotesque
ways, I see Afrikan alphabets offering a
breath of fresh air that can rescue the
Roman alphabet from the vagaries of
style and trends. As a typographer, and
more importantly as a designer, I am in
the business of the creation and peddling of “Beauty.” Aesthetic value has
gone out of typography in recent memory. Afrikan alphabets offer a more aesthetically pleasing perspective and alternative. The deconstructionists could
care less about “legibility” instead they
care more about the “expressive” nature
of typography. Afrikan alphabets straddle
those two extremes comfortably.
IO: What would be the point
of African Typefaces? Surely
a cultural slant in a font
is superfluous. Type is supposed
to be invisible when we read it.
It is supposed to make language
visible, right? I favour fonts
that are void of decorative
motifs, and that don’t parody
a period or action because it
presents the challenge to use
them to evoke meaning. The
thought of a zebraesque typeface makes me cringe, because
I imagine it to be ornamental
or illustrative in style. Surely
things like this only confirm
this hegemonic African aesthetic that the West likes to
populate. I.E it’s always safari,
kente, wax prints or tribal
masks—how do we avoid this?
Again will this establish or
reiterate?
SM: For the typography novice, Afrikan
alphabets can bring out the beauty of
type. Some of the writing systems are so
intrinsically beautiful that one cannot ignore this and so whatever work they will
produce, it will by extension contain the
same beauty. Let me point out that I am
not suggesting literal translation of the
writing systems here. Rather I am suggesting metaphorical use: where one
takes cues from a specific system but
maintaining the essence of the original
font.1 The work becomes powerful when
it’s “inspired by” rather than a simple literal translation or copy.
IO: Swiss typography is seen as
the influential powerhouse
of typography. Pure, clean and
balanced. Without using Swiss
motifs such as cows and
everything synonymous with
their culture, when you
say Swiss typography you automatically think of a sans
serif, black, heavy, considered
unobtrusive glyphs, strong
composition—an identity. What
their typography communicates is an attitude. Can you
describe an African attitude and
how this can be translated
into the design of fonts or the
use of typography.
SM: Swiss typography embodies the
coldness of the country and its people,
the Alps and the white snow, the grid as
the cornerstone of all forms of design
whether they be architectural, or graphic; less is more —the modernist canon,
(white space becomes more about the
design than the typography and the message) and an overall minimalist approach
to all forms of design.2 The people’s fascination with cleanliness and order—to
the point where it becomes anal, dead
and soulless.
Afrikan typography is the exact opposite:
warm, humane, funky, organic, free, not
constrained by the puritanical straitjacket! Good thing you know that type
can describe (or represent) an attitude.
Isn’t Afrika the home of “attitude?” Lagos
could be the city with the most “attitude!” The market women, the street vendors, the Felas of this world, Nollywood,
(hey, I should design a font and call it Nollywood!), you know how Nigerian women
kiss their teeth in a show of contempt
or exasperation! THAT’S attitude galore
that can be translated into the design of
fonts and or the use of typography! The
folks who put together the amazingly
beautiful Lagos: A City at Work—an incredibly beautiful book designed with a
Nigerian attitude (right down to the typography!) succeeded in this. Yet they did
not even overtly take their cues from
Afrikan alphabets! 3
Traduction
Typographie + Langage
+ Système d’écriture = Afrikan
Alphabets
Je suis un succès commercial d’une
importante œuvre imprimée. Parfois
déjoué par les relents ponctuels surgissant quand le design graphique
devient le «Design graphique»: une
notion structurée. Les termes et les
définitions sont néanmoins importants car ils permettent de définir des
paramètres d’intelligibilité en rendant
plus libres certaines associations. Là
où la relation entre la discipline du
design graphique et l’Afrique semble
avoir peu ou aucune audience auprès
du public, des éléments tels que le
travail de Garth Walker, un designer
reconnu de Durban, ont largement
contribué à changer cette situation.
Cependant, comme il s’agissait d’une
tendance à peine perceptible, j’ai
continué calmement à chercher le
seuil idéal d’agitation. Présentation
de Saki Mafundikwa.
Saki Mafundikwa est né et a grandi
à Harare, au Zimbabwe. Il a obtenu
un MFA (master des Beaux-arts) à
la Yale School of Art en 1984. Il a ensuite créé la Zimbabwe Institute of
Vigital Art (ZIVA), la seule école du
Zimbabwe dédiée au design et aux
nouveaux médias.
Saki a étudié le design sous la direction de Paul Rand et il était donc prêt
pour étudier les méthodes d’écriture
africaines. Vingt ans plus tard, son livre,
Afrikan Alphabets: The Story of Writing
in Afrika, présente une introduction
étayée à l’histoire et au développement de plus d’une vingtaine d’alphabets. À travers des pictogrammes, des
procédés mnémotechniques et syllabaires, Saki retrace l’évolution passée
et actuelle de l’écriture en Afrique.
1. Some of the writing systems are
so intrinsically beautiful [...] so
whatever work they will produce,
it will by extension contain the
same beauty. I am not suggesting
literal translation of the
writing systems here. Rather I am
suggesting metaphorical use:
where one takes cues from a
specific system but maintaining
the essence of the original font.
2. Swiss typography embodies the
coldness [...] the grid as the
cornerstone of all forms of design
whether they be architectural, or
graphic; [...] w
( hite space becomes
more about the design than
the typography and the message)
and an overall minimalist
approach to all forms of design.
3. Afrikan typography is the exact
opposite: warm, humane, funky,
organic, free [...] Good thing
you know that type can describe
(or represent) an attitude. Isn’’t
Afrika the home of ““attitude?”?”
[...] That can be translated into
the design of fonts and or the use
of typography!
IDPURE ISSUE 31
80
Ima-Abasi Okon: Collectivement, que
représentent ces procédés d’écriture?
Qu’apportent-ils au récit admis
de l’histoire et de la culture? Le plus
évident est que l’Afrique n’a apporté
aucune contribution à l’histoire ou à la
civilisation mondiale.
Saki Mafundikwa: Pour moi, ils représentent un déclic. Ils ouvrent la
boîte de Pandore mettant en évidence les mensonges, le préjudice
et le mal présents sur un continent
et son peuple. Pourquoi est-il important qu’aujourd’hui des chercheurs
consacrent leur vie à déchiffrer des
procédés d’écriture tels que l’alphabet maya? Ou pour aller plus loin,
pourquoi est-il important ou utile
pour la société (actuelle) que lesdits
chercheurs partagent leurs découvertes avec nous? Pourquoi est-il
utile que deux chercheurs de Yale
connus comme étant des «égyptologues» aient découvert un procédé
d’écriture dans le désert égyptien
(en 1998), procédé dont ils ont dit que
c’était le PREMIER travail d’écriture
jamais effectué par l’humanité. Ils ont
ainsi rectifié des siècles de croyance
qui ont amené à croire à tort que le
berceau de l’écriture était le bassin
mésopotamien. Nous (les chercheurs
africains) devons (urgemment) corriger les mythes et les mensonges
purs et simples qui sont immortalisés dans des livres dans le monde
entier nous concernant, concernant
nos contributions et nos réalisations.
Depuis trop longtemps, nous avons
laissé au chasseur le soin de raconter l’histoire. Il est temps que NOUS,
les chassés, racontions l’histoire de
notre point de vue.
IO: À quoi serviraient des caractères
africains? Un élément culturel
dans un caractère est certainement
superflu. Un caractère est censé
être invisible quand vous le lisez. Il
est supposé rendre le langage visible,
n’est-ce pas? Je privilégie les
caractères sans motif décoratif et qui
ne parodient pas une période ou
une action car elle présente la difficulté
de l’utiliser pour évoquer un sens.
L’idée d’un caractère en forme de
zèbre m’irrite car je l’imagine comme
étant ornemental ou d’un style
illustratif. De telles choses ne font que
confirmer l’hégémonie esthétique
africaine que l’Occident aime coloniser.
C’EST-À-DIRE qu’il s’agit invariablement des safaris, des kentés,
des imprimés à la cire ou des masques
tribaux—Comment pouvons-nous
éviter cela? À nouveau, est-ce que
cela s’établira ou se répétera?
SM: Pour le novice en typographie,
les alphabets africains peuvent faire
ressortir la beauté du caractère.
Certains des procédés d’écriture
sont d’une telle beauté intrinsèque
qu’il est impossible de l’ignorer. Quel
que soit le travail qu’ils produiront,
ce travail contiendra par conséquent
la même beauté. Permettez-moi de
souligner que je ne suggère pas ici
une traduction littérale des procédés
d’écriture. Je suggère plutôt une utilisation métaphorique, pour laquelle
l’on s’inspire d’un procédé spécifique
tout en préservant l’essence du caractère original. Le travail devient
puissant quand il est «inspiré par» au
lieu de n’être qu’une simple traduction ou copie littérale.
IO: La typographie suisse est
considérée comme étant la dynamique
influente de la typographie. Pure,
épurée et équilibrée. Sans utiliser des
motifs suisses comme les vaches
et tout ce qui est synonyme de la
culture suisse, quand vous dites typographie suisse, vous pensez automatiquement à des glyphes
considérées comme discrètes, sans
empattement, noires, grasses,
une composition forte: une identité.
Ce que la typographie suisse
communique est un état d’esprit.
Pouvez-vous décrire un état d’esprit
africain et la manière dont il peut
être traduit dans la création de caractère ou l’utilisation de la typographie?
SM: La typographie suisse incarne la
froideur du pays et de son peuple,
les Alpes et la neige blanche, le tracé
comme étant la clé de voûte de
toutes les formes de design qu’elles
soient architecturales ou graphiques.
Moins on en fait, mieux c’est. Le canon moderniste (les espaces blancs
traduisent davantage le design que
la typographie et le message) et une
démarche minimaliste globale de
toutes les formes de design. La fascination du peuple vis-à-vis de la propreté et de l’ordre, au point d’en devenir
maniaque, vide ou sans âme.
La typographie africaine est l’opposé
exact: chaleureuse, humaine, stylée,
organique, libre, non contrainte par
le carcan puritain! C’est une bonne
chose que vous sachiez qu’un caractère peut décrire (ou représenter) un
état d’esprit. L’Afrique n’est-elle pas
la source d’un «état d’esprit»? Lagos pourrait être la ville qui a le plus
d’«état d’esprit». Les femmes sur le
marché, les vendeurs de rue, les Felas de ce monde, Nollywood (hé, je
devrais créer un caractère et l’appeler Nollywood!), vous savez cette manière qu’ont les femmes nigérianes
d’embrasser leurs dents pour exprimer leur mépris ou leur exaspération.
C’EST une profusion d’états d’esprit
qui peut se traduire dans la création
de caractères et / ou l’utilisation de
la typographie. Les gens qui ont élaboré le magnifique LAGOS: a city at
work, un livre d’une beauté incroyable
conçue avec une état d’esprit nigérian (sans parler de la typographie!)
y sont parfaitement arrivés. Ils ne se
sont même pas ouvertement inspirés
des alphabets africains!
www.cig-chaumont.com
ENTRETIEN AVEC SAKI
MAFUNDIKWA
IO: Individuellement que disent-ils?
De quoi parlent-ils, ou que
commencent-ils à déclarer?
SM: Ils disent: «Ohé, le Monde, je suis
ici, regarde-moi dans toute ma gloire
et ma beauté africaines. Regarde mon
ingénuité, ma dextérité! Je ne suis pas
seulement un procédé d’écriture mais
je suis également un esprit, un rythme,
une chanson, une danse, un mouvement. Je suis intemporel. Je suis néanmoins d’une simplicité trompeuse».
Ils évoquent notre passé glorieux, un
passé qui est perpétuellement attaqué par la «modernité» et une «civilisation» méconnue. Il nous inspire
SANKOFA : le retour dans le passé, le
fait qu’il nous inspire pour que notre
avenir soit GRAND.
IO: Vous demandez, entre autres, que
les créateurs africains développent
l’alphabet romain pour refléter
la culture africaine. De quelle manière
suggéreriez-vous qu’ils le fassent?
Considérons maintenant la typographie et la création de caractères
comme des pratiques. Ne pensezvous pas que cela soit une mode et que
cela puisse devenir une fantaisie?
SM: Je ne demande pas que l’alphabet romain «reflète les cultures
africaines». Dans un contexte où
nous assistons, à l’ère de la technologie, à la mutilation et à la déformation grotesques de la création de
caractères, je considère plutôt que
les alphabets africains offrent une
bouffée d’air frais susceptible de
sauver l’alphabet romain des aléas
de style et de tendance. En ma qualité de typographe et, surtout en
celle de créateur, je travaille à créer
et à colporter la «Beauté». Depuis
quelque temps, la valeur esthétique
n’est plus une valeur de la typographie. Les alphabets africains offrent
une perspective et une alternative
plus agréables du point de vue esthétique. Les déconstructionnistes
pourraient moins s’intéresser à la «lisibilité». Ils s’intéressent plus à la nature «expressive» de la typographie.
Les alphabets africains enjambent
ces deux extrêmes avec une grande
facilité.
Exhibitions, workshops, competitions and lectures:
Metahaven, Dexter Sinister and a few others will be there.
Saki est conscient que certains des
systèmes documentés ne répondent
pas aux critères qui leur permettent
d’exister en tant qu’alphabet. Il continue cependant de les appeler ainsi
et les appréhende comme des pratiques de proto-écriture. Saki prétend
que les pictogrammes, les marques
d’encoches et les scarifications doivent être considérées comme étant
des précurseurs de l’écriture en
Afrique. Il affirme que les symboles
jouent un rôle important dans la
culture africaine en tant que documentation des informations orales. Il
rend caduque l’idée selon laquelle la
majorité des symboles graphiques
sont purement décoratifs et défend
leur place dans les agences de communication.
Le chapitre consacré aux procédés historiques retrace les réalisations personnelles du roi Njoya du
royaume Bamum. Ce roi a reconnu
la nécessité de préserver la culture
de son peuple pendant la colonisation du Cameroun en 1896. Créée
initialement avec 465 caractères,
l’écriture Shü-mom a connu plusieurs
itérations au cours de son règne.
Hormis la presse d’imprimerie qu’il
a inventée (qui a été détruite par la
suite), le roi Njoya a laissé en héritage
plusieurs manuscrits, cartes, notes
administratives et dossiers dont un
calendrier détaillant l’histoire et la
culture de son peuple. Cette collection est désormais exposée au musée
Bamum Palace.
La modification et la continuation de
certains des alphabets africains en
Amérique du Sud et aux Caraïbes
sont ensuite cartographiées par les
observations de Saki sur la migration
forcée à travers la traite transatlantique des esclaves. Il souligne les
similarités entre le Nsibidi, une ancienne écriture idéographique créée
par le peuple Ejagham dans le sud du
Nigeria, et l’Anaforuana que l’on retrouve à Cuba et à Haïti. À l’inverse, le
Vah, le procédé d’écriture du peuple
Bassa a été rétabli au Libéria dans les
années 1900 après avoir été perdu
pendant la colonisation. Désormais
enseigné dans les écoles et utilisé en
littérature, les chercheurs ont découvert que les Brésiliens d’origine bassa
l’utilisaient activement. L’observation
que fait Saki de ces écritures remet
avec bonheur l’accent sur la relation
liant l’Afrique et l’Amérique du Sud,
une relation qui est souvent ternie par
une concentration intense sur l’hémisphère occidental.
Saki écrit «Africa» avec un «k».
A-f-r-i-k-a. La préface de Maurice
Tadadjeu aborde ce point. J’ai néanmoins voulu en savoir plus, cherchant
sciemment à le provoquer. «Ici, c’est
MOI l’Africain et je décide comment
je veux épeler mon continent que
cela plaise aux autres ou non» est
la réponse pimentée que je recherchais. Il souligne que le son dans
Afrique est un «k» et non un «c» et
en zoulou, langue qu’il parle, «c» est
un son «clic». Ce qui justifie parfaitement pour lui et pour la majorité
des langues africaines d’utiliser un
«k». Maurice Tadadjeu souligne la logique selon laquelle les langues non
africaines devraient adopter l’orthographe des noms africains provenant
des langues africaines. Mais en raison de la limitation en nombre et de
la circulation des caractères d’écriture africains, le pouvoir d’influence
nécessaire est extrêmement faible.
Afrikan Alphabets est un livre informel qui met l’accent sur la forme
graphique et qui admet que des enquêtes plus poussées soient possibles, notamment une démarche
plus rigoureuse sur leur épistémologie. Ce livre est une base pour les
personnes désireuses d’approfondir
le sujet.
Avec son ouvrage, Saki a prouvé, et
il continue de le prouver avec ZIVA,
que le design graphique est un nouveau processus sur tout le continent.
Peut-être comme l’usage que fait
Saki de la lettre «k» pour écrire «Africa», nous devons affirmer que ce que
nous cherchons peut-être est appelé
différemment. Et très probablement,
d’une façon qu’aucun caractère romain ne peut décrire. Néanmoins, en
présentant Afrikan Alphabets et un
engagement aux objectifs de ZIVA,
Saki nous apprend comment redéfinir cette créativité «Afrikan» d’une
façon qui reste authentique.
24th International Poster
and Graphic Design Festival of Chaumont
25th of May — 9 th of June 2013
Traduction
Jean-François Lyotard, Postmodern Fables, translated from French by Georges Van den Abbeele, University of Minnesota Press, 1997

Similar documents