Students charge officials with

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Students charge officials with
New University
December 6, 1977/Vol. 10/No. 20
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, IRVINE
Students charge officials with neglect
Police cite victims' lack of cooperation
by Mark Hazelgrove
Chancellor Dan Aldrich and
Irvine city police have denied
chargesmade byan AScouncilmember ofneglect in the case of
three Chicanostudents who were
assaulted last October.
"I was concerned about the
matter since thebeginning," said
Aldrich. "Idiscussedthe alleged
lack of responsiveness with
William Woollett, the Irvine
city manager.I
am satisfied that
the Irvine police are doing all
they can and Iam periodically
informed as to what they are
doing."
Councilperson Dave Wheeler
"
said earlier in the week, The
community has taken no action police department is doing
and they've had sufficient time everything it can. "Police bulfor a response" to resolutions letins were sent to south Orange
recently adoptedby AS.
County, Los Angeles and San
The resolutions, initiated by Diego counties."
Wheeler and Aaron Donerson, McNeely said not enough dewere presented"to give stimulus tails wereavailable towarrant a
to a police department whom IDepartment of Motor Vehicles
don'tfeel is actingas expediently (DMV) information request.
as possible," according to "The victims couldn't determine if the (getaway) truck was
Wheeler.
Wheeler expressed hope that a Ford Courier, a Chevy Luv,
the resolutions would entice or a Toyota," said McNeely.
Aldrich to favorably intervene He also suggested the victims
andinfluence city officials. One had not been cooperative.
of the resolutions offered a "The victims have beenreluc$1000 reward for information tant to talk to us," McNeely
leading to the arrest and con- said. "We've set up appointviction of the suspects.
ments forthem toseeus.Twice,
Police Investigator Dennis without even cancelling, they
McNeely explained that the didn't show. We had to track
them down."
Wheeler,however, believedthe
police department could have
accomplished more.
"The police have good deseasily run checks without getting the licensenumber through
the DMV and get a manageable
number of cars answering the
description."
get a manageable number of
cars answering the description."
Allthat would remain,he added, would be to match the
CouncilpersonDave Wheeler claimsIrvine police
characteristics of the registered STABBINGdoing
not
all they can in the UCI Chicano stabbing
owners tothoseof the "rascist" are
investigation.
photoby Mitch Evans
attackers.
Economics dept. expands
UCI administrators unveileda major expansion
of the economics department in the School of
Social Sciences last Thursday.
Over a period of three to four years, officials
IN THE DARK--UCI police Sgt. Russ Duncan claims only two said, nine new economics professors will be
cases ofassualton womenhavebeen reportedin the last twoyears, added to the current four member faculty to
making it difficult to convince the administration of the need for enable social sciences to establish a focus on
photo by HowardDeCruyenaere public economics.
more funds.
"This speciality is new to the University of
California system and unusual as a major academic unit in the United States, but recognizes
what is perhaps the most important economic
phenomenon of this century, the enormous growth
of the public sector," Social Sciences Dean
Christian Werner said.
by Gretchen Van Deusen
"There'sbeen an explosion of interest ineconUCIparking lots are extemely underpatrolled after dark, according omics," said Dr. Sheen T. Kassouf, who will
to police department officials.
chair the new program.
"Only two officers are on duty at night," saidUCI police officer
major expansionof social sciences was
BillMiller. "Often only oneis onduty andheis responsible for the Thelast
1970,
when the Social Ecology department
in
entire campus security."
established,
according toKassouf.
was
Miller added, "There isa problem. We need more officers on the
program
new
will work at the graduate level
The
problems
dark,
force. But until we have evidence of
after
Aldrich
and will stress analysis of the impact of government
won't give us more money or more officers."
Although there have been no reported assaults against men or
women inthe parking lots this year," Sergeant Duncan said, "Iam
sure there have been assaults against women that justhaven'tbeen
reported to us."
Only two cases ofassault against women have been reported at
UCI inthe past two vears. According to Duncan,this evidence of
good crime prevention makes it impossible to receive additional
funding for increased protection.
But Karen Bjorneby, co-director of the UCI Women's Center,
stressed, "We can't just wait for some violence to occur before we
get more protection. That is a fatalistic attitude."
"There mayonly be a 2%crime rateagainst women,but ifyouare
in that 2%, then it is so awful that there might as well be a 100%
crime rate."
The UCI police does provide an escort service for females after
UCI night patrol
called inefficient
dark if the female requests assistance from a building to her car.
However, the woman must be alone since the officers believe two
women are capable ofprotecting themselves againstanyassailants.
Ifthere are other things which the officer must attend to, the escort
service will take a very low priority. Theofficer may never make it
to the girl who needs assistance.
Duncan stressed that the escort service is "not a taxi service.
We're not going to haul people from one place to another."
Currently, 31% of all reported crimes occur in the parking lots,
according to Officer Miller. Buthe added, "There are definitely
more crimes which are not reported."
IT'S GOTLEGS- Noonein thisSanta Ana
garage knew how this machine grew legs or
on the economy,includingregulatory practice as
well as public services and taxes.
"For a department to become a center of
research in this area." Werner said, "it has to
feature creative conceptualization and serious
study, in depth, of governmental behavior. This
implies the assembly of a set of economists who
share a perspective on what is important, a
diversity of technical skills and an openness to
new ideas and approaches. The contributions of
sucha group will be much greater thanthe sum of
the contributions eachcould makein a traditional
department."
Dr. Julius Margolis,professor of economics, is
heading a search committee for recruitment of
new faculty.
In citing the rationale for expanding the economics program, William Parker, assistant vice
chancellor for plans and programs, said that
economics needs the most assistance of any
department in the School of Social Sciences.
"Social Sciences' most glaring deficiency was a
lack of an agressive and adequately sizedeconomics department," Parker said.
where the other halfof this man's body went
to.
Photo by Mttch Evan«
2 Opinion/Editorial
December 6, 1977 New University
City lobby
needs ASpush
A UCI student lobby annex directors' proposal to establish a
municipal lobby in Irvine is a good avenue to initiate interaction
between students and the city. Unless the directors make some
definite plans to gather student participation, however,the idea will
remain just an idea.
So far. Annex Directors Nick Roman and Dan McCarthy have
kept the burden of creating a municipal lobby on their own
shoulders Both directors claim they'd like to see more students at
Irvine city council meetings, but they have done nothing to
publicize the meetings or to encourage student input into them.
participation and support that
One obvious channel to student
is
the
AS
council. The student lobby
seems to have been ignored
hand
in
to promote student inwork
hand
AS
directors and
should
lobby should be a
municipal
community.
The
volvement in the
and the city
Mayor
Bill
Vardoulis
city
Irvine
primary concern.
in
participation
councilmembershave expressed interest in student
city activities.
But the student lobby, with AS, has to to make the first move.
UC Student Regent
must act for students
Every UC student lost the chance to receive a $5 1reduction in
registration fees nextyear because of amisconception onthe partof
the student regent.
UC Davis law student Michael Salerno, the only student with
full voting priveleges on the UC Board of Regents, abstained from
votingat lastmonth's regentsmeeting when the issuecame uptocut
the $5 1 from students' fees. The vote deadlocked at 6-6, and the
motion was defeated.
By not breaking the tie, Salerno failed in his primary duty as
student regent to represent students.
Salerno reasoned thatifhe voted it would havebeen a conflict of
interest since he would personally benefit from a fee reduction.
Salerno also seems to feel that he wouldbe a hypocrite for voting
on this issue in light of the fact he has criticized the regents for
voting on matters which would favorably help their businesses.
Butthe other regents are notsupposed to represent specialinterests
when they vote on University matters.
The student regent, though, is representing a special interest:
students. If Salerno does not represent student interests in the
regents, then it is pointless to have a student regent.
With the way things stand now, UC President David Saxon has
promised to get the feesreduced at anothermeeting.Ultimately the
state must agree to grant $6.7 million dollars to the University's
Educational Opportunity Program. Officials have said that they
are optimistic for a fee reduction in the near future.
By that time the student regentmust be willingtovote for students
—
.
New University
EDITOR
Jim Parker
MANAGING EDITOR
Richard Clucas
NEWS EDITORS
Beth Blenz
Alan Schoff
ASST. NEWS EDITOR
Rhonda Brown
FINE ARTS EDITOR
Steve Manseau
AD MANAGER
John Lamb
ASST. AD MANAGER
Chris Gunther
BUSINESS MANAGER
Barbara Dittrick
ASSJ BUS|NESS
MANAGER
Judy Brady
FEATURES EDITOR
ADVERTISING
Jeff Ettinger
SALESPERSONS
SPORTS EDITOR
Frank Caterinicchio
Steve Wolfe
PHOTO EDITOR
Mitch Evans
CIRCULATION
ASST. PHOTO EDITORS
MANAGERS
Arye Gross
Howard DeCruyenaere
George Johnson
Tim Kingston
PROOFREADERS
Joseph Church
Alan Nitikman
PRODUCTION
Ellen Pisarski Mary Beth Hughes
Laurie Dibble
Wendy Neal
Rhonda Brown
Del Leu
CgjJg^"
jeSr
Poa|e
Unsigned editorials represent a majority opinion of the
New University editorial board. Signed articles and artwork are the opinions ofthe individual writers and are not
necessarily those of the New University, ASUCI or the
University of California.
The editors reserve the right to use their discretion in
publishing letters and they may be editedfor libel or for
spaceconsiderations. All letters must besigned;allmaterial
submitted becomes the property ofthe New University.
Letters to the editor
Blade has
relevance
Dear Editor,
The recent article by one Jim
Parker is a reflection of the indifference and ignorance inherent
onthe UCIcampus. Mr.Parker
has set himself up as judge and
jury, and passed judgement on
the relevancy of the Blade. As a
black student at Irvine Iwas
glad to see the advent of the
Bladebec&useit was relevant to
the needs of minorities. Mr.
Parker seems to think that it is
no longer relevant because of
the fact that the Blade has not
met specific requirements in its
contract. His biggest complaint
is that there will be monetary
waste if there is continuedfunding of the Blade. I
wish to point
out that since AS fundsfinance
the Blade, the minority students
collectively pay for it out of
their reg. fees.Mr.Parker could
only understand the importance
of the Blade only if he could
place himselfina minority position but thisis quite impossible
since it is obvious he is not
aware of the position he now
occupies. Furthermore, Mr.
Parker fails miserably as judge
and jury since he only sees the
superficial impairments of the
Blade, and not the problems
thatunderlie itscontinued existence on this campus.
Antoine Hayes
AS 'pawns
"
A simple fact seems to have
been overlooked by the AS
council,possiblybeingmuscled
out of their conscienceness by
the emotionally supercharged
rhetoric of the particular pressure group involved: The attacks did not take place on the
UCIcampus. Thefact that they
didn't shouldend directASUCI
involvement in the matter.
Otherwise AS council will be
obliged to begin posting rewards anytime acrime against a
UCI student takes place anywhere.
It is observed by this closet
racist that more Chicanos are
assaulted and killed by other
Chicanos inEast Los Angeles
than there are Chicanos attending UCI. I
think the only thing
third world people have to fear
in a low crime area like Irvine,is
fearitself.Irrationaldogmatism
and screaming paranoia will
only cause friction where it
previously didn't exist.
On the other hand, the AS
government,which has allowed
itself to be manipulated by a
small group of students to support an irrelevent,personalized
issue, has something to fear;
Those of us who are tired of
having our funds squandered, of
having guilt assumed for something weare not guilty of, andof
a totallack of insight into what
the MAJORITY of UCI students are concerned about. I
believe that if the newly elected
AS council people don't change
what has already taken place
the entire AS government will
have,come Spring elections,an
awakened giant to fear; Its first
words,"Throw the pawns outof
the office!"
Dear Editor,
The passage of the resolution
providing a $1000 reward foconclusive information abut thd
Barry Feldman
"racist" attacks on three ChiSocial Ecology
cano students is a perfect
example of a small group of
loud students manipulating the
meek pawn of an AS government we have here at UCI.
Dear Editor,
The violent attacks upon Iwould like to point out a few
Messrs. Cruz, Lopez, and flaws in the recenteditorial conNunez are deplorable as are cerning Carter's recentdecision
Reactor flaws
violent attacks upon anyone.
However ASUCI would soon
go bankrupt ifitposted areward
everytime a UCI student is assaulted. Unless they distinguished between the type of
student that rated a reward; Say
black over white; short haired
over long; 3.7 achiever over 2.0
struggler; one withloud friends
over one with rational friends.
to veto funds for the breeder
reactor.Contrary to popular be-
timated to cost $700 million,is
now estimated to cost $2.8 billion (a 400% increase) and it
hasn't even beenbuilt yet; who
knows what its final costs will
be (and you thought nuclear
energy was cheap.).
Alsocontrarytopopularbelief
is the wishful notion that the
breeder will make America energy independent.In theory, the
breeder is supposed to double
its input of fuel in the form of
plutonium, in 2-3 years— this is
how the breeder would make
more fuel than it consumes.
However, the French experimental breeder proved that the
doubling time is not 2-3 years,
butrather on the order of 10-15
years. And when the French
built their first commercial
breeder, the doubling time increased to 60 years, an awful
long time to wait for fuel to
power just one more reactor.
Finally, time itself works against thebreeder.Let's assume
that construction of the Clinch
River breeder could be started
right now— in ten years, or by
1987, it would finally be completed. Then give them three
years to play around with it to
show that itworks. So in 1990,
the first commercial breeder is
put under construction(at acost
of probably around $5 billion)
and is not completed until the
year 2000 (this is, of course,
assuming very optimistic conditions which have not pervaded
the nuclear industry since the
early 1960's). So after investments on the order of, say, $8
billion, we finally get one, yes,
only one, breeder reactor which,
after 60 years (the year 2060)
finally produces enough fuel to
run another breeder. This is
the answer to the energy crisis?
Thisis about asmuch an answer
to the energy crisis as alcoholis
ananswer to curing a hangover.
Thank god Carter had the guts
toveto this 2.8billion dollarpile
of boondoggle technology; now
all that he needs todo is cut the
rest of the funding that is presently being wasted on nuclear
energy and spend it on sources
of energy that will make America, and for that matter the
world, energy independent:
namely solar, wind, ethanol,
methane byconversion, geothermal,garbage,tidalandeven
lief, the breeder's weakest point
is,of course, economic. The illfated Fermi reactor (America's
first experimental breeder) was
originally estimated to cost $40
minion but ended up costing
$120 million-just a small 300% good wastes.
increase. The Clinch River
Breeder reactor, originally es-
Sincerely,
Daryl Roberts
New University
News 3
December 6, 1977
Lobby seeks involvement
by Beth Blenz
UCIStudent Lobby annexdirectors are currently
working to "get the snowball rolling" in Irvine
community involvement.
Co-director Nick Roman said he'd like to end
Irvine City councilmembers' poor opinion of
UCI students.
"I'dlike to see a group of students get together
to form a municipal lobby-an official arm representing UCI," he said. "Right now, councilmembers have the attitude that students don't
care aboutthe city. Actually, alotofthecouncil's
decisions affect students."
Dan McCarthy, the other lobby corrector,
saidhe andRoman are starting a campaign toget
student involvement in city decisions.
"We're campaigning to get students to register
to vote, and possibly to support a studentcandidate for city Council in the next elections. We
also have to get more students at these meetings
to see what's happening."
"But we'vegot problems gettingpeople involved.
UCI's like an island; just the structure of the
campus makes it separated from the community.
Irvine seems like it's way out there somewhere."
"The more representation we get, the more
exciting things we'll get back," McCarthy added.
McCarthy said the main problem students and
City Council could work on was the lack of lowcost housing inIrvine. Roman agreedand added
that issues like recreationfacilities andbike lanes
would also interest and affect students.
"Ithink the idea ofhaving a student candidateis
a great idea," Roman said. "8,000 students
would be behind him or her. But we have to be
careful we don't get some dork in there who's
goingto use the position asa mouthpiece to quack
off. That would only confirm the City's idea that
students are jerks who don't care."
Roman said he thought about running in the
March city elections,but said "forget it"onehour GOOD IDEA- Nick Roman, Student Lobby annex director
later. "I couldn't take going to all the meetings thinks the plan to create a municipal lobby is a good idea, and
where they'd debate for two hours over putting hopes to gain student support.
photo by Mitch Evans
street lights in Baloney Rock."
News Notes
NORTHWEST MOUNTAINEERING
Northwest Outward i oundis now enrolling studentsin 21day winter mountaineering courses which will be held from
January through mid-April in the Wallowa Mountains of
northeastern Oregon andthe NorthCascades of Washington
andCanada. Thecourses provide instruction incross country
skiing, winter camping and winter peak climbing skills.
Participants do not need special equipment or previous
experience in outdoor activities. The school supplies all
equipment, food and instruction.
1
S'
will be open daily from noon to 5
pm.For farther informationcall the
Art Gallery at 833-6610.
/
CONCERTS
The UniversityConcertChoir and
Orchestra, including UCIChamber
Singers,CollegiumMusicum, Madrigal Singers and Women's Choir,
willbe performingBach's "Magnificat" and other seasonalmusic on
Dec. 9 and 10, in the Fine Arts
Village Concert Hall, at 8 pm,
General Admissionis $2 with students at $1 Tickets areavailableat
theFine ArtsBox Office. For further
informationcall 833-6617.
.
TheBeethovenSonata Cycle (Part
II) will be performed by cellist
Geoffrey Rutkowski and pianist
Wendell Nelson,professors of music, UCSanta Barbara,onTuesday,
Students who have taken Biblio
Strategy, or Humanities 75, can
plan,developandsuccessfully carry
out an effective search strategy for"
researchmaterialsin thelibrariesc
UCI and other academic institutions.The 2 -unit course is taught by
librarians, and is especially useful
for students in any discipline who
have assigned papers for other
classes. To find out more about
Biblio Strategy, lookupHumanities
75 in the Class Schedule, theUCI
General Catalog, talk to your
Counselor or ask a librarian.
This year, the Trapper's are providing a collection point, for the
students and faculty of UCI, in
obtaining donations for Operation
Santa Claus.These donationsshould
be new.They are for foster children
between the ages of infant and 17.
Please bring your donations of
clothing, toys, and other gifts to the
Antrap betweenthe hours of 9 am
and4 pmbefore Dec.9. If there are
any questions about pickup, please
contact Ernie Ransom at 833-6325
or JeffCarterat 645-5531 and8336325. Thanks for helping us help
those who will better enjoy the
holiday season with your HELP.
Dec. 6 at 8 pm.The concert willbe
held in the Fine Arts Village
Theatre. Tickets are $4 for general
admission, $2 forUCIstudentsand
$3 for other students and UCI faculty andstaff. Tickets are available
at ASUCIBox Office.For Further
The Veterans Office is happy to
information call 833-6378. Spon- announce a Vet-Split job opening
soredby theCommittee for Arts.
available now.The title is Veterans
Outreach Coordinator; the pay is
$3.37/hr. with 20 hrs/wk arranged.
MEETINGS
Basic
duties would include comGroup
of the munitycollege
The Orange Country
visitationsandmainSierra Club will hold its monthly taining effective follow-up procedures
meeting at SaddlebackHigh School
for contact made during visitations.
inSanta Ana locatedat Flowerand For further information contact
Segerstrom on Tuesday,Dec. 13 at Nancy
McGill at the Vet's Office,
7:30 pm in the school forum. John trailer, 807-808
or call 833-6477.
Tangney of the Orange Country
will
show
Conseration Committee
LECTURES
the film "Age ofAlaska" and discuss new proposedparks in Alaska.
The meeting is open to the public.
TedHoward,a consumeradvocate
andcoauthor of"Who Should Play
Hev all you bird lovers, mud God," a new book on recombinant
clompes, and marsh friends, the DNA technolgoy, willbe on camFriends ofthe Marsh willbe having pusDec.6 tospeak on hisnew book.
a meetingTuesday,Dec. 6 at 7 pm. The event is sponsored by ASUCI
It will be held in S.S.I. 230, above and will be held inCrawford Hall.
the new bookstore. We willbedis- Admission is $2 for students and
cussing the new projects ready and $3.50 for general. For further
waiting for our help. We will keep informationcall ASUCI, 833-5547.
the meeting as short as possible so "
"Is Somebody PlayingGod?" will
please try to attend.Ifyouhave any
questions, please contact Karin be the topic of a paneldiscussion to
Hansen, 673-1876.
be held Wednesday, Dec. 7 in the
FineArts Village Theater. Members of the panelinclude Assemblyman Dennis Mangers, Dr. David
MISCELLANEOUS
Kingsbury,UCIassociateprofessor
The UCISchool of Fine Arts will of medical microbiology; and Dr.
be sponsoring an exchange art ex- David Tiemeir,UCI assistant prohibition between USC and Clare- fessor of biochemistry. General
mont Graduate School, Tuesday- admission is $2 and UCI students
Saturday, Dec. 6-13, in the Fine are $ 1 For further information, call
Arts Village Gallery. The exhibition ASUCI, 833-5547.
.
Students to protest violence
A "Rally against Violence"
will be held today in Gateway
Plaza beginning at 12 noon. The
rally, sponsored by Concerned
Students against Violence, will
feature music, speakers, theater,
and an open microphone for
questions and comments.
The catalyst for this rally was
the beating of three Chicano
students from UCI in anIrvine
liquor-deli store and the still
unsolved murder and beating of
two UCI students in Costa
Mesa nearly a year and a half
ago.
Juan Nunez, Ron Cruz, and
Ernesto Lopez will presenttheir
account of theincident in which
they were beatenby three white
youngmenonOctober 28. This
will open the program and from
their story will come speeches
about violence in our society
and in the world, its implications
for allpeople,and what students,
faculty and staff at UCI can do
to counteract this pervasive
threat to people.
The planning committee has
received consents from Professors Stanley Aronowitz and
John Gerassi in Comparative
Cultre to speak. The students
are negotiating withother members of the faculty and staff to
have them speak to different
aspects of the issue.
A mime theater group from
Fullerton will present their in-
terpretation of violence and its
effects. A group ofUCI students
will provide some music, including original compositions
by one of the 'udents.
The open mike illallow participantsin the rtuxy to ask questions,make comments, and take
a more active part in what the
Concerned Students hope will
be aneducational andcommunity
building experience leading to
concreteactionboth at UCIand
in the surrounding area.
The New U needs...
When the Winter quarter duldrums set in after
Christmas, come experience the excitement of
modern journalism... and learn about it too.
Unc?cll mill lvJt£d
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4
December 6. 1977 New University
COMING DECEMBER 23RD
UA TWIN B THEATRE-CERRITOS
CINEDOME 21 THEATRE
UA THEATRE-COSTA MESA
UA TWIN B THEATRE-WESTMINSTER
CHECK NEWSPAPERS FOR ADDITIONAL THEATRES AND SHOW TIMES
Rutkowski Nelson duo
returns to UCI tonight
Cello sonatas of Beethoven willbe presentedby the cello-pianio
duo of Geoffery Rutkowski and WendellNelson tonight at 8 p.m.
in the Fine Arts Village Theatre.
Rutkowski and Nelson, both professors of music at UC Santa
Barbara, appeared on campus earlier this fall under the sponsorship
of the UCI Committee for Arts.
Performing together for the last six years, Rutkowski andNelson
have presented concerts throughout Europe and the Orient. Their
most recent tour took them to France where they were invited by
the U.S. Embassy in Paris to perform in conjunction with the
French organization France-Etats-Unis.
Rutkowski, who studied under Pablo Casals, has performed
frequently as a soloist with chamber ensembles. Hehas appeared
with the Orchestra Philharmonique deNice under thedirection of
Pierre Montpellier andhehas given guestmaster classes incello at
USC's School of Music.
Nelson, chairmanofUC SantaBarbara's Department of Music,
is well known for his performances as a duo pianist with his wife
Marjorie. They have been featured soloists with various orchestras
and have toured widely in the Western United States and Europe.
Nelson is the author of the book, The Concerto.
Tickets for the concert are $2 for UCI students, $3 for other
students, UCI faculty and staff, and $4 for general admission.
They are available at the ASUCI TicketOffice or the Committee
for Arts office.
Stage band debuts;
University chorus
set for Dec. 9
UCISTAGE BAND
TheUCI Stage Band will debut Thursday,December 8 at 8:00
p.m. inthe Fine Arts Village Theatre at UC Irvine. Admission is
free.
The newly formed jazz ensemble of nineteen UCI students is
directed by Jack McCullough, Assistant Director of Teacher
Education at UC Irvine. The Band will perform a repertoire of
symphonic jazz, including the works of Duke Ellington, Stan
Kenton, Count Basie, and other jazz notables.
In addition to the instrumental pieces,the program will highlight
"Sin»nR and Swinging." Show tunes willbe sungbyCathy Holt, a
former UCI student, and dance improvisation ina salute to Duke
Ellington willl be performed by students Ronda Shelkey and
Valerie Jelonek.
UNIVERSITY CHORUS
The University Concert Choirs,under the new directionof Joseph
Huszti, will perform the Bach Magnificat and Festive Seasonal
Music, Friday and Saturday, December 9, 10. Performances are
scheduled for 8:00p.m. intheFine ArtsConcert Hall atUCIrvine.
Admission is $2 general, $1 for students.
TheBachMagnificat willbe performedby the University Concert
Choir and Orchestra, conducted by Joseph Huszti. Theremainder
of the program, which highlights seasonal music, willbeperformed
by the Chamber Singers, Collegium Musicum, Madrigal Singers,
and Women's Choir, under the direction of MargaretMurata and
Fredrick Stoufer, faculty members inmusic at UCI.
Joseph Huszti comes to UCI from Boston University where he
headedthe choral activities inthe SchoolofFine Arts,anddirected
Tanglewood's Young Vocalists Program from 1972-77. During
his years as director of choral and voice programs at the
University of Delaware, the Concert Choir toured Europe, and
won awards at the music festivals in Holland and Wales.
SINGALONG- An openreadingofHandel's Messiah is
planned for December 6 at 7:30 p.m. in the UCIConcert
Hall. UCI students, faculty and staff are invited to join
along witha fullorchestra, soloists and guest conductors in
singing the work. Participants are asked to try to bring
their own copies of the music.
RETURN ENGAGEMENT- GeoffiuyRutkowski
andWendallNelson will return to the Fine Arts
Village Theatre at 8 p.m. tonight to perform
Beethoven in a Committee for Arts concert.
Random note/by Marty Trujillo
Amnesia
"And through the spaces of the dark
Midnight shakes the memory
"
As a madman shakes a dead geranium.
-T.S. Eliot
There are fine, fine memories to be had about
Rolling Stonemagazine.Excerpts from Scaduto's
biography'; Ralph Gleason's wonderful "Perspectives" column; Ben Fong-Torres' always
insightful reporting; Hunter Thompson (without
end, amen!); Ralph Meadman s wild and wacky
illustrations;Stephen Holden's moving and sensitive reviews; John Mendelsohn's incoherent
ramblings that always seemed to make sense no
matter how drunk we were; Annie Leibovitz'
photography; interviews with everyone from
Norman Mailer to Glenn Gould to Maurice
Sendak to Oriana Fallaci to Daniel Ellsberg; the
exquisite Jonathon Cott (whose writings have
meant
to me than any other columnist, ever,
— but more
God bless you anyway, Joan Didion).
Ah, the dead geraniums I
am shaking here.
I
remember going to record stores every weekend
years ago with my good friend Steve Manseau
and rummaging through new releases, old releases,
used releases, releases that should never have
been released, our sojounsalways ended with the
famous question "New Rolling Stone in yet?"
This was before everyone had decided Rolling
Stone was cuddling the illegitimate baby of
Peoplemagazine and before anyone had suspected
thatone day Rolling Stone would be kneadingthe
dough of status quo. This was when each new
Rotting Stone offered its genuine thrills, when
eachnew issue offered somethingthat wehad not
known before.
One will never forget, for instance, the feeling
experienced uponreading JoeEszterhas' "Charlie
Simpson's Apocalypse," Hunter Thompson's
"Fear and Loathing" dispatches, Tom Wolfe's
"Funky Chic," Stephen Holden's reviews of
changed).
picked up a copy of Rolling Stone's Tenth
I
Anniversary special edition last week, however,
say that it's wonderful, and touching,
and may I
and exciting, and nostalgic. In short, it is everything thatitused to betwice amonth. And I
readit
cover-to-cover, andI
loved it, and I
remembered
the feeling I
had years ago walking out ofPlatterpus Records and practically screaming, "Look,
Steve, a Norman Mailer interview...and a Jon
Cott piece about Dustin Hoffman!" I
realized
missed it,how much I
missed
again how much I
Ralph Gleason (rest in peace), how much I
missed those great reviews.
But I
remained excited for only a moment. I
knew that nextissue Rolling Stone would return
to Gumbyland with its articles about The Sex
Pistols and all the phoney-baloney socialites who
grace its pages each issue. But I'm grateful to
Rolling Stone for what it once was, and for the
ideas it put into the head of a young man in
Westminster, and I
don't feel slighted because of
the direction the magazine has taken.
Memory can sometimes be akin to an exposed
nerve in one's tooth. One's tongue explores the
cavity with much enthusiasm—hoping to find
something, anything! more than a seemingly bottomless pit, where contact with any part of it
produces a sharp, stinging pain. So enough remembering. Say your thanks and apologize for
not being more enthusiastic about the magazine
now. There will be other geraniums to shake.
But still the pain persists.
*
"* "
Four recently released albums deserve mention
now, this being the season of good cheer and all
that jazz.
Of the four, two contain newly-recorded material,
while others are documentaries to the continued
extraordinary careers of Neil Young, David
Crosby, and Graham Nash. We'll visit with
"Latefor the Sky" and"St.Dominic'sPreview," C,S,N&Y in a moment, first,let me mention two
John Cott'sreview of "Blood on the Tracks" (or memorable releases by Steve Goodman and
any ofthe incredible articles he'sproducedthrough David Bromberg.
the years), JohnLennon and Jerry Garcia inter- Steve Goodman is the man responsible for
views,andcountless other articles,eachof which writing the finest train song ever written ("City of
seemed inspired of madness...and to someone New Orleans"), one of the most touching love
growing up in Westminster, California, a little songs ("Would You Like to Learn to Dance?"),
shot of madness every other week was indeed a a superb song about alienation ("Banana Resoberingcommodity.
publics"), and one of the truly hilarious tunes
It's gone now, of course. We've suspected that ever conceived ("You Never Call Me By My
Name"). He is also one of the happiest men one
for years.
Rolling Stonehas seenits artistic heyday andit could everhope to meet, and his live performances
will continue to thrive and make money (which, are famous for the excitment Goodmanis able to
we suspect, is what Citizen Wenner wanted convey. Unfortunately, Goodman is not always
throughout Rolling Stone's ten year life). But it's able to capture the essence of that excitement on
records.
gone, and it will never be the same.
Hisnew release, Say ItIn Private,however,is a
It left me behind.
It continued to change, to become more pop marked departure from Goodman's past recorded
(such plasticity can truly be adverse), to put failures. Say It In Private, simply, is a gorgeous
personalities upon it cover, and its comments album, showcasingeverything thatis good about
about rock and the rock culture continued to Goodman: his charm, his musical abilities, his
become less andless credible, culminating in the wit, and his intelligence. The finest songs on the
disastrous Tenth Anniversary Television Special. album concern the passing of" institutions
So now it has become Life magazine, a pastiche "Daley's Gone," "The Twentieth Century is
of everything that will help sell it, and I
no longer Almost Over," and "My Old Man." "Daley's
look forward to it twice amonth (ofcourse,I
don't Gone" speaks of the loss residents of the Windy
go to record stores every week,either, and that,ICity feel-for better and for worse— now that
suspect, says a good deal about how I've
[con't on pg. 8]
6 Arts
December 6, 1977 New University
ceived a great deal of FM airplay,continues Townshend'spreoccupation with sexual whimsy.
("Squeeze Box," "Pictures of
Lily.") All-in-all it'sgood to see
Pete Townshend musically,
lyrically, and literally smiling
by Brendon Couglin
Rough Mix
Ronnie Lane/
Pete Townshend
again.
A friend of mine and Iwere
talking the other day about the
nature ot music reviews. After
several minutes of increasingly
heated discussion, she told me
thatrecordreviews are merely a
matter of the reviewer saying
either "Buy It" or "Don't Buy
It." She went on toclaim that all
the rest of a review is actually
just a forum where the author
tries to impress his readers,satisfy his own ego, and attempts
to come to terms with any personality conflicts that may be
troubling him.
Ronnie Lane's contribution to
Rough Mix has been largely
ignoredby many simply because
they view Rough Mix basically
as a Townshend solo venture.
That Lane's presence on the
record should be regarded as
secondary if regarded at all is
entirely, unfair. Lane wrote or
co-wrote five of the cuts on the
album. Much like Townshend,
he has been experiencingsome
pretty frustrating failures of late.
His recent attempt to join with
other original Small Faces in a
reunionLP fell through when he
and Steve Marriott had an
argument.
Hey, I
wonder if that's true.
Don't be fooled by appearances. Rough Mix is not, as
publicity photos, advertisments
and promotional literature might
lead one to believe, an easygoing collaboration between two
friends. What is actually happening here is a meeting of a
pair of severely mixed up guys
looking for a place to bury the
spectres which have been
haunting them for too long so
they can start moving forward
again.
Townshend Lane LP:
diamond in the rough
PeteTownshendhas longbeen
the most openly introspective
figure inrock music.His onstage
fury and his offstage self, no.
doubt came to meana great deal
to his peers who often found
themselves facing the same situation."If Ilook like a good
guitarplayer, it'sbecause that's
my whole thing: to looklike I'm
playing guitar. But I'm really
not"Unlike others whosemusic
reeked of self-pity.however,
Townshend's introspection surfacedin the form of rock 'n'roll
anger.
But the Who's last album,
Who By Numbers, caught
Townshend in the deepest hole
he'd ever dug for himself. Just
about every track contained
signs of cynicism, disillusionment, and despair. To a large
extent Townshend's bitterness
was totally justifiable: imagine
the coldnessofhis realizingthat
the entire rock press was just
waiting forhim to slip-up sothat
they could write cute and witty
articles on how the guitarist
hadn't died before he got too
old. But realizing inferior product only served to further depress Townshend. Problems
within the Who and large-scale abit more ambiguous. Musically
predictions of the band'sbreak- it features, if one can trust
up didn't help either.
liner notes, gulps from a Bijou
drain andoffersPetethe chance
Rough Mix appears to have to experiment with musical
been the answer for the ailing techniques whichmight not work
Townshend. Although traces of for the Who.
bitterness do surface in Pete's
compositions, they are treated All the Townshend songs on the
in such a way so that they are albumare very good. "Street In
amusing instead of unsettling. TheCity"portrays himarefleclife, while
"Misunderstood" is the most tive observer of city
r
obviously self-satirizing Towns- "Keep Me Tuming' and"Heart
hend songin the set InitTowns- To Hang On To" reveal his
hend is '^n ordinary star" who need for shelter. "My Baby
wishes his actionsandaims were Gives It Away," which has re-
by Susan Rochelson
Carpenters
Passage
A&M
SP-4703
Mention the "Carpenters"and the responses you
varied.
THE
CARPENTERS:
of time
Thehard rock fans turn down their noses and thump away.The
Lawrence Welk crowdand pre-teensnodinappreciation. Some
admit they liked them once when they were really big. Professional music critics' reactions range from pitying laughter to
reserved exaltation. How can one brother and sister team
provoke such disparity?
When the Carpenters began performing in 1969 the critics
despised them. Yet the record-buying public threw them high
intothe upper reaches of success. Thegroup began topaper their
walls with goldrecords. They won three Grammys in the space
of two years.
Lately, however,the sandshave shifted, andthe new patternis
almost the exact opposite of the way it was in the beginning.
Whereonce the public adored them, now manypeople consider
their music old hat. The critics, on the other hand, are coming
around to seriously examine their music. There are still those
who insist,as Robert Hilburn did commenting on their Greek
Theater performance, that heir music contains "A lack of
challenge,lack ofdiscovery and surprise," buthe thengoes onto
say how much he likes their golden oldies number. Chuck
Thegze admits they have a "lasting creative force."
Nowhere is that force more evident thanintheir newest album,
Passage.Only three of the songs are inthe same love-songvein
as"We've Only Just Begun,"which was the first ina long line of
predictableformula hits.On this album,"TwoSides" isthe best
representative of the genre. Karenmoves leisurely through the
poetics of the lyrics and comes to rest on lazy snippets of
melody. "All You Get From Love Is A Love Song" was
releasedas a single anddid moderately well.Ithadasmuch right
to succeed as something like "Close ToYou," with perhapsjust
a little less earnestness than used to be in all their hits.
"IJust Fall InLove Again" is a sheer celebration of Karen's
amberalto voice. All the warmth and joy is there for long-time
fans to revel in.
Weathering
the
passage
get are
Yet the manner in which Lane
handles his disappointment with
life is curiously different from
Townshend's. His tunes, especially the brilliantly gentle
"Annie,"have an innocent,lazy
quality to them which makes it
difficult to take them ton
seriously. Part of this effect is
due to Lane's fantastic vocal
work.
Thealbumcloses witha lovely
version of country singer Don
Williams' "Till The Rivers All
Run Dry." After taking the listener through some extremely
well-crafted but stillrather selfanalytical music, Pete Townshend and Ronnie Lane have
found theperfect song withwhich
to express their new-foundfaith
in the future.
"I know sometimes you may
wonder/From little things Isay
and do/But there's no need for
youto wonder/IfI
need you/Cuz
I'll need you."
Buy it.
But with "Sweet Sweet Smile" she begins to delve intonewer
territory. There isa snappy, campy, slightly country flavor that
first showeditselfin snatches onthelast album.Thestyle fitsher
like the galss slipper fit Cinderella. 'B'wanna She No Home"
goes even farther and touches uponseductivejazz.The song was
recorded almost totally live with just a few overdubbings.
"Man Smart Woman Smarter" is a successful mishmash of
elements completely unexpected for the Carpenters. Harry
Belafonte did the song as a calypso, but it is here transformed
intoa roaringtwenties tease with chirping birds,conga, andsteel
drums. Halfway through, the vocals gave way to freewheeling
instrumentals.
The concludingsongs on each side are 7 minute masterpieces
of originality. On side 1, there is "Don't Cry For Me,
Argentina' from the opera Evita.The opera tellsthelife story of
Maria Eva duarte Peron, the second wife of the Argentine
dictator Juan Peron. Over 150 people were involved in the
recording of the song for this album, including the L.A.
Philharmonic orchestra. Narrative operatice voices introduce
Karen's part which she sings with full-bodied,innocent clarity.
On first hearingit all put together, one does not know what ot
make ofit. The effect is layered. Each time throughbrings out
new lavers.and voufind yourself reassured to know that there is
an order there. The humorous elements form one layer, the
historical another, classical influences yet another, and on
and on.
Side 2 ends with the bestsongin the album:"Calling Occupants
of Interplanetary Craft," the anthem of World Contact Day.
We first hear someone twirling aradio dial,and thenaconfused
disc jockey tries to take a song request from some mushmouthed aliens. Harmonious instrumentals swell up into
beautiful melodies out of which emerges Karen's crystal voice.
Violins mingle with a marching band. The mood is totally
removed from that Klaatu created with this song a while ago.
Passage is a triumph for the Carpenters. But perhaps it has
come too late to reach the generalpublic who by now are tuned
into newer groups.
The Carpenters seem to be oblivious to the tugs on their
popularity. The advertisements for their television special
promised, "A unique departure for the Carpenters,you'll have
to see it to believe it,"proving thatno matter what you think the
Carpenters are, no one else agrees with you.
Arts 7
New University December 6, 1977
'Close Encounters*: Speilberg s cinematic event
by George Parise
Close Encounters of the
Third Kind
directed by
Steven Speilberg
a Columbia Pictures release
by derelects, druggies and other
such undesirables. These militaryminds are close to any input
outside the parametes of their
limited world view.
Nearey, however, can not ignore the visionthat plagues his
psyche. Rationale to the contrary,he trusts hisintuition and
follows the impulse to seek answers to his many questions.
His visceral reactions leadhim
to the same place the military
reaches through rational thought.
But both the rational military
and intuitive Neary require the
If there is one event in the
history of the human race that
would equal or surpass the
magnitude of the coming of a
Christ, it is contact and communication with intelligent, alien life. Steven Speilberg's
Qose Encounters of the Third assitance of Claude Lacombe,
Kind captures the religious ex- the one character who inteperience that such a meeting grates both traits into his personality.
would engender.
Special effects wizard,Doug- Lacombe's rationale is not
las Trumbull has repeated his closed to the input of gut
mammoth effort in 2001 and feelings. He allows himself the
created some alienvehicles that freedom to believe. Lacombe is
are beyond the realm of normal the one who realizesthat music,
conception. His unique visuali- not mathematics, is the lanzations along with those of an guage through which commuarmy of photographers (Vilmos nication will take place. He emZsigmond, William A. Fraker, bodies the new renaissance by
Douglas Slocome, John Alon- assimilating the rationality of
zo, and Laszlo Kovacs) create the west with the spirituality of
images thatstir the imagination the east, modern technology
and probe the psyche.
with an older faith in religious
By now, it is common know- beliefs.
ledge that QoseEncounters of
the Third Kind is about the
earth's first contact with alien
life.Inpast sciencefictionfilms,
discoveryand contact hascome
through the exercise of clear
and concise rational thought.
There hasbeenno place forthe
visceral.It ishere that Spielberg
makes a serious departure from
the norm.
He envisions a new reality
ushered in by this encounter.
Through these events, mankind
regains a belief in spirituality.
Humanity istreetoaccept those
occurances that fall beyond the
purview oflogic. Rationalthough,
to the exclusion of intuition,is
not solely responsible for the
discovery of and ultimate contact with extraterrestial life.
Events unfold through a series
of rational deductions,intuitive
feelings, and uncanny luck.
Once it has become clear to
the U.S. Air Force that something is broadcasting from space
aparty ofscientificmindsbrood
over the six numbers being
transmitted at regular intervals.
Theparticipants at this gathering of the minds include a
former geographer who tranlates for the French, Claude
Lacombe. The geographer,
who is present in a secondary
capacity, realizes the significance of the numbers, and his
revelation starts the machinery
for the initial contact.
Claude Lacombe (Francois
Truffaut) and RoyNeary (Richard Dreyfuss) are the central
characters in this human en-
in. The film creates for us the tion.Itis reverent without being a revelation,but we needed the
feelings that are wracking the sanctimonious, wonderous but perceptionand expressive skills
brains of the characters. Whe- not unimaginable, and joyous of one man to call it to our
ther through fear oftheunknown yet not euphoric.
attention. Qose Encounters of
that apparently threatens an un- Qose Encounters of the Third the Third Kind stimulates the
enlighted Jillian or the wonder- Kindis an important film. The psyche and challenges the inmen, almost religious zeal, of theme, once articulated,is hardly tellect. It is a cinematic event.
the encounter, the film is experienced by the viewers.
As was amply demonstratedin
Jaws, Spielberg knows how to
manipulate an audience. In
Qose Encounters ofthe Third
Kind, Spielberg handles the
tension with such skill that it
wouldmake Alfrded Hitchcock
proud. Spielberg establishes a
mystery in the opening scene.
Vintage World War II planes
are "discovered" in a Mexican
desert, allinexcellent condition
ready to go. Enter Claude La- CHRISTMAS SPECIAL
combe whose presence radiates
self-confidence. Lacombeknows
that this whole matter is all
<
about even if we don't. Enter
To studentsoff of fair trade retail
Roy Neary. What then unfolds
on
is expert cutting between the
man with the questions andthe
man who knows the answers.
Over 100 styles
Spielberg juxtaposes the obscessive search of Neary with
For detailed catalogue
the meticulous progress of LaCall 645-7269 or write
combe. They are clearly on a 2077 Charle St. Costa Mesa
collision course headed for the
AS Council Meeting
Tuesday 5 PM
Administration 1 07
25 /o Discount*
Seiko Watches
CloseEcnountersoftheThird
Kind begins and ends with
feelings. Electricity goes haywire. All power items: appliances, lights, toys goberserk. A
home is reduced to mayhem
that recalls TheExorcist. Only
the delightedresponse of a child
tells us the bizarre events are
notdemonic. Barry,his mother,
and Neary are united by the
sighting and the vision it implants in their subconscience
Both adults arebothered by the
vision and struggle to incorporate it into their logic. The
child, by contrast, simply accepts it and responds, which
foreshadows the later action of
Roy and Barry's mother, Jillian
(Melinda Dillion).
But Idwell too much on the
intellect. Speilberg's writing
and directing are so controlled
that we are emotionally drawn
climax.
Lacombe's confidence parallels Neary'sunshakablebelief in
his experience. It gives credence
Neary's "irrational" faith.
Lacombe knows what Neary
can only feel. Through this use
of montage, Spielberg reinforces Neary's spiritualism and
to
vindication.
Spielberg has carefully pre-
pared for us a climax thatis not
to be believed. The anticipation
that he has created combined
with the visual marvel that
Trumbull manifests leaves you
awe-struck. John William's
I
1001 Dove St., Suite 160,
Newport Beach
our hope for his success and
j^.gQgg
IJoan Cook,
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score, which has repeatedly
foreshadowed and punctuated
scenes throughout the film,
againrises to thetaskinthefinal
moments when all the elements
of filmmaking blend to perfec
BRITTANIA
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counter with non-human intel-
ligence. Lacombe, the unofficial
project leader, travels around
the world putting together the
clues left by the aliens. Roy
Neary,on theother hand,is Mr.
Everyman 1977, an employee
of a Indiana electric company.
Neary's boss sends him out to
correct a blackout that has
darkened half the state. While
bumbling through the countryside, Neary sites a UFO which
implants a vision into his subconscious. Neither he nor the
others who have had a similiar
experience know the significance
of the apparition,but something
drives them to seek it out.
The Air Force, in all its calculating,military efficiency,dismisses the numerous UFO
sightings with the usual condescendingattitudes.In a scene
that lampoons military thinking, the Air Force covers up
many sightings withintimations
of crackpot fantasies imagined
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8 Arts
December 6, 1977 New University
Random notes...
[con't from pg. 5]
I
Richard Daley has died. The
songboasts an irresistible "Daley's gone/One more round/
Dalev's eone" chorus. An excellent
song. "My Old
Man" touchingly laments
the love the song's narrator
could never find for his father
while his father was alive. "The
Twentieth Century is Almost
Over" (cowritten by anther
Chicagoan, John Prine) is a
wittv euloEV to the 1900's, with
the century noting the passing
of such technological advancements as recording sessions,petroleum jelly, linoleum floors,
and burglar alarms. And
Goodman was even able to
coax Pete Seeger intojoining in
on banjo and background vocals. Whew!
Like Goodman, David Bromberg is a performer whose
charm is intimate, and whose
talents must be expereinced
live. Bromberg, though, is also
capable of producing magical
recordings, as he proved with
Midnight on the Water. Bromberg's skill on guitar is unmatched in contemporary
music. Bromberg is adept on
any ofa number of instruments,
ranging from the mandolin to
the penny whistle to the dobro.
He is also an enthusiast for
traditional American and Irish
music, andhe performs ragsand
jigs as well as anyone,save The
Chieftans.
Bromberg's Reckless Aban- "Campaigner" ("EvenRichard
don is a diversified and sat- Nixon has got soul"). The
isfying collection,paarticularly three-record-set contains most
when gauged against last year's of Young's hits, and includes
disappointing How Late il You some album cuts that demonPlay To.Brombergperforms an strate to thenovitiate whatNeil
incredible array of songs, in- Young admirers have thought
cluding a soulful "Stealin'," a for years: that Younghas sometouching "Baby Breeze," a thing important to say,and that
traditional medley of "Battle of he says it with skill and good
Bull Run," "Paddy on the humor. Also included in the
Turnpike," and "Rover's Fancy." package are some priceless anHis recording of Rick Danko's notations written by young
"What's a Town" is a delight- himself. The perfect Christmas
Ringo Starr had better get his
hands on this one...and soon! As is the Crosby-Nash Live
Jim Price's production is out- album. Recorded, presumbly,
standing,and, as always,'Brom- during their summer tour of
berg has assembledsome of the 1976, Live contains some exmost talented session men a- quisite recordings of Crosbyround. Also,the album cover by Nashclassics like "IUsed to-be
the dementedMr.Klibanmerits a King." "Simple Man," "Dean unqualified 100 points.
ja-Vu," "The Lee Shore" (the
Whichbrings us to atrio of old finest recording I
have heardof
pros.
that masterful Crosby song),
I've already said too much and "Page 43." The albumalso
aboutNeil Younginthesepages contains biting renditions of
(is that possible?), but would "Fieldworker" and "Foolish
like to add that Ibelieve his Man," with distinguishedbacknewly-released Decade to be a ing oneverysongby thesession
near-perfect greatest hits pack- men goodenough to playbehind
age, and certainly the finest God: Russel Kunkel, Tim
"Best of..." collection since Drummond, Craig Doerge,
The Kink Kronikles. Here, for Danny Korchmar, and (bow at
the first time on anyNeil Young his feet) David Lindley. This
album,"Sugar Mountain"makes album beats Four Way Street,
its appearance, as do six other hands down. Bravo.
previously-unreleased tunes, Merry Christmas and holiincluding an exquisite "Love is days, lads, and may you not be
A GOODMAN IS HARD TO FIND- Steve Goodman has a
a Rose," a touching "Sol- caught with an empty bottle. I winner
withhis latest LP, Say ItIn PrivatefinElectra/Asylum
dier," and an hilarious know Iwon't
records.
RECOMBIANT DNA
CLONES
TEST TUBE BABIES
Has Genetic Engineering
Gone Too Far?
WHO SHOULD PLAY GOD?
TONIGHT
(Tuesday Dec. 6)
A lecture presentation on DNA
and Genetic Research
With
TED HOWARD
Author of the bestselling book Students $2.
Faculty Staff $3.
"Who Should Play God?"
General $3.50
Crawford Hall 8 p.m.
IS ANYONE PLAYING GOD?
A panel discussion probing the regulations and
PLAYING LATE AGAIN- David Bromberg's Trujillo Christmas Stocking recommendation
new LP, Reckless Abandon,is thelatest Marty
COMING FRIDAY!!!!!!!
The New University's
Literary Supplement
To be inserted in the December
9th edition of the New University
benefits of Genetic Research with
Dr. David T. Kingsbury
Dr. David C. Tiemeier
Assemblyman Dennis Mangers
Students-FacultyTomorrow
Staff $1
Wednesday Dec. 7
Fine Arts village Theatre 8 p.m. General $2.
Sponsoredby the ASUCI SPEAKERS BUREAU
/SOCIAL ECOLOGY
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, IRVINE
COMMITTEE FOR ARTS PRESENTS
Tuesday. December 6
8:00 p.m.
Concert Hall
RUTKOWSKI AND NELSON: Piano and Cello
Concert The program includes the
Beethoven Sonata Cycle and selection's
from Mozart's "The Magic Flute."
- -
-
Tickets. General Admission $4, Faculty, Staff and other students
$3 and UCI Students $2 Available at the
ASUCI Box Office from
9:30 am to4 pm. and at theboxoffice onthenight of the
performance
For further information Call Committee for Arts at 833-6378.
New University
December 6, 1977
Automobiles
FORSALE '74 ToyotaLandCruiser
4x4,excellentcondition,
646-5358.
'69 MGC-GT 6
4
many extras
Tony,
cylinder; speed
w/overdrive;new paint; chrome wires;
rebuilt engine. Must see and drive to
appreciate. $2600. 752-2003; ask for
FOR SALE '63 Ford
Kick.
van, 200 cu ft,
30 mpg highway/20 city; carpet, bed
storage, space,paneling, whip antenna,
mags, new seats; excellent transportation, $600; 119 Sapphire, Balboa
-
Island.
"77 MGB CONVERTIBLE low
mileage, excl. cond., extras.714-752-
0610.
'69 KARMANN GHIA- Lo mi., runs
well, auto stk., FM stereo, needs some
body work. $1,000. Cail 963-9168.
FOR SALE-'-'74 Honda Civic, 4 spd.,
hatchback,FM/8-track stereo, 34 mpg!
Excellentcondition.$2395. 893-4326.
"II,Mach I, 45K
FORD 74- Mustang
miles, W.L. new tires, exc.cond.. stick.
air.cond.,AM/FM stereo,magwheels,
new battery, $2500. Call 559-7080.
Malibu,
FOR SALE-1966 Chevelle,$600
or
white; almost new paint job.
best offer. Call and leave messasge,
752-0442.
Employment
VACATIONJOB- Lookingfor respon-
sible Christian girl to do babysitting
duringthe vacation.Agood way toearn
money.Fulltime for tendays.For room
and board or cash. Call 955-2157.
WANTED Girltohelp w/treeservice.
Must be coordinated, strong andhavea
sense ofbalance. Work outside. Hours
flexible. Apply in person in front of
library Friday, 11 to 1, or call Art at
-
WANTED Work Study students
675-7085.
toFill
research positions at outpatient alcoholism treatment programs. Exper-
ience desirable.Contactthe work study
office at 833-6881.
FAST FOOD Carl's Jr.; counter
personnel,cooks, and waitresses;male
andfemale; parttime/fulltime,days and
nights; 18 or over for closing; apply in
person, 2-5 p.m., Tues. - Sat., 2092
SoutheastBristol St., SantaAna Heights.
-
STUDENTS- Earn while
you learn.
Part time contact work affords extra
income. For appointment, call Mr.
Jamieson. 898-3758.
EARN MONEY during vacation.
Babysitting morning
and/or evenings.
December 22 -Jan. 1 Live-in optional.
Hours flexible for holidays. Must love
children. Call 955-2419.
HELPWANTED Goinghome to L.A.
for holidays? Make $50-$ 100 selling
picture film at parade. Tournament of
Roses Film Sales.Inc. (213) 242-1992
or 242-1915.
HELP WANTED Part-time accounting
clerk, filing, typing, 15-20 hours/week,
hours flexible,$3.00/hour.CallDebbie
@
-
.
-
546-8801.
LOCAL BUSINESS needs energetic
college
students, part time.No experienceneeded. 552-5736.
BABYSITTER WANTED- 3 yr. old
boy, weeknights, 7-9, $2.5O/hr, weekends if possible. 752-0865.
RESTAURANT PIZZA-Full andpart
time openings for general restaurant
work near OC airport. Must be 18 or
over. Apply in person. Set Pepperoni
Pizza Store, 2300 S.E. Bristol, Santa
Ana Heights, 549-8674 (nextto MacDon
-
aid's) Equal Opportunity Employer.
FOR SALE? Then why not run a
classifiedin theNew University? Afraid
noone will readthe classifiedand buy
whatever youhave to sell? You'rereading this andso do8,000 other students,
faculty,and staff. Call us at 833-5546.
HELP WANTED- We have jobs available; clerical and industrial; skilled &
non-skilled.Must have home phone &
transportation. Call now. 731-5731.
Never a fee at TEMPO temporary
services.
For Sale
FOR SALE- 1976 Kawasaki KZ 400
street bike, excellentcondition, asking
$600. Phone 955-3066, and ask for
Keith or leave message.
SKIIS '77 Rossignol
"Calypso," 180
cm, Geze "Jet'r bindings; excellent
intermediate or bump skiis; selling out
of financial necessity,or Iwould keep
them. Call Dave, 675-1695 eves.
RECORDS/LP's-Selling out my collection of records: Eagles, ELO, and
more, many more. Over 400 albums,
someneverplayed.Will sell cheap.25«
to $2.50 Steve 551-5733. eves.
-
-
MOPED FOR SALE- Jawa in good
SKI CABIN, MAMMOTH Walk to 7
& 8, clean, sleeps 8, $60/weeknights,
$80/weekend nights. (213) 597-9900,
(714)642-8594.
condition, 650 miles, red. Best offer.
Call 752-0865.
MARANTZ- Model3200 pre-ampand
Model140 power amp. 75 RMS/channel, .1% distortion.Excellentcondition!
List price-$600; asking price-$35O.I
needXmas money! CallRon fordetails
(714) 675-9125, eves.
Housing
TWOSENIOR WOMEN seek roommate for 3 bdnnapt.in NewportBeach
(35thSt.). Rentis SI 17/mo, inc. washer
and drier. We are art and Spanish
majors. Prefer junior or senior female,
non-smoker. Available after Xmas.
675-9687.
SKI CABIN, MAMMOTH Walk to7
& 8, clean, sleeps 8, $60/week nights,
$80/weekend nights. (213)597-9900,
(714)642-8594.
Classifieds 9
GUITAR LESSONS- begin., intermed.,
advanced; weeknights;private or group
lessons. 752-0865, ask for Janet.
DRIVING- to Berkeleyor Stockton in a
van, pick-up or truck? Ineed a ride for
mv desk. 833-7275 or 645-2357.
WOMEN- Volunteers needed for engineering structural analysis of strapless
evening gown. Dataarray tobe compiled
from all available pectoral sizes and
contours. To schedule appointment, call
642-8625.
ALL OUR YESTERDAYS-looking
for an unusual Xmasgift?Howaboutan
out of printbookon their favorite subject
or a lvoely antiquarian volume? A first
edition always increases in value. Ph.
APARTMENTS, HOUSES FROM 640-2491.
$125. We have hundreds of rentals in ATTENTIONFRISBEE experts!
Here's
OrangeCounty. Smallerunits for living your chance todemonstrate your Frisbee
alone,and largerunits perfect for sharing. skills while traveling the country. Need
Some furnished,
some with all utilities responsible people for demopromotion
paid! Fee - 100% REFUNDABLE - during March thru July '78. Salary &
Call: Western Pacific, 962-9365.
Per Diem. Send resume to CPI 3006
SKI MAMMOTH tri-levelcondo next Enterprise, Costa Mesa, Ca. 92626.
$70Tellus why you shouldbe a memberof
to 7 and 8, sleeps 10, Jacuzzi.
the Coppertone-Frisbee Team!
80/night. 531-9848.
Lost & Found
LOST-Pairof Rx-mirroredsunglasses,
somewhere on campus; in black case;
important tome...Rewardoffered.They
have been missing three weeks. Call
640-2491. 24 hr. messages.
LOST A '77 high school ring lost in
the engineeringbuilding.It has a gold
frame and a crystal stone. Initials on
ring are WHM. Ifyou found it will you
please return. REWARD! Call 7525429.
-
-
-
Personal
HAPPY BIRTHDAY Maria!!! K.
NATE Quit messing
- around with the
reds and oranges. Go for the gusto!!
Don't settle for lessthan thebest. The
White T.
COMPUTE-A-DATE- Scientifically
matchedintroductions for singles. Men.
reasonable; ladies 18-30 FREE Trial
membership. FREE counseling to all
members, by a social scientist. For
efficiency with a personal touch call
Ellieat544-0185or973-1606ext.109
ALPHA CHI OMEGA would like to
announce the engagement of two of our
actives. Sue Moldarelli and her man,
Geoff Noonan, will be wed in Sept.
'78, and Helen Pela and her fiance
Richard Phillips to be wed Aug. '78.
Best wishes to themboth!
MELISSA HACK- Your love Ilack...
My life is not complete...Should you
give in, I'd live again...Ma belle, ma
belleamie. BSSS.
ATTN: ANNE R.-Have a great Christmas and an even better New Years.
P.S.-good luck on your finals. From
vour S. Santv.
JIM CLADEK-- WHERE ARE YOU?
Your old roomie Mark needs to find
vou. Call me at 646-6725.
-
1
HAIR LIU
-
$8.50
MEN'S HAIRCUT
-
tgfe .
-
Miscellaneous
CLASSICAL PIANO LESSONS all
levels and beginners; instruction with
children, adults;
theory, UCI students,
close location UCI campus; 979-
*°
PRECISION CUTTING
A n"intmont
Mn A
PP° ntment
PRESCRIPTION PERMING Necessary
NUCLEIC COLORING
211 Wilson (At Fairview) Costa Mesa
7579.
ATTENTION radio amateurs! The
UCI Ham Radio Club is having an
importantmeeting onWed., Dec. 7that
4:80 to discuss upcoming activities.
Thrills,chillsand spills await you at the
ham trailer; BE THERE...P.S. bring
dues!
548-1344
We're allthebank
a student needs.
If you're looking for the bank that can do the most for you, chances
are you'll be looking into Bank of America.
We offer a complete range of basic student banking services:
College Plan* Checking, Personal Choice Savings Plans, and if you
qualify, Student BankAmericard* Visaf overdraft protection,
and more.
Including Consumer Information Reports to provide you with
the kind of straight-to-the-point facts you need to know about
banking, establishing credit, financing an education,and many
Othe Ub eC S
Our eports cover a range of topics. And you can pick up your
copies free at any one of our branches. Without obligation.
k
You see, quite frankly, we want to be your bank. But we know
it's not what we want that matters. What matters is what you want.
And that's why we're hoping we can help you learn more
about banking.
We figure the more you know about it, the more you're going
to want to bank with the bank that can do you the most good, both
in school and after.
Quite a few Californians think that's us. If you look into it
thoroughly enough, we think you'll agree.
D«P« nd
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~
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BANKof AMERICA Oi
BANK OF AMERICA NT&SA. MEMBERFDIC
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10 Features
December 6, 1977 New University
Food stamps, thepoor and the Biltmore
by Marsha Noreen Honda
It was a gloomy overcast
morning but the air was warm
and muggy. On the southside of
Grand Avenue,Pershing Square
was already filled with old men
playing cards and feeding the
pigeons. Winos were drinking
from bottles wrapped in brown
paperbags, andgroups of young
men were lying in the grass
talking idly.
But directly across the street,
a top-hatted doorman in a gray
uniform was directing valet
parking while bellboys wearing
white gloves were busy piling
suitcases ontolarge metal carts.
Inside the Biltmore hotel, a sign
in the lobby listed the various
meetings and conferences. The
public hearing on the new food
stamp program was being held
in the Music Room. It would
have been more appropriate in
Pershing Square.
Several weeks ago, a welfare
rights worker had called me aboutthe hearing. She saidit was
part of a nationwide program
designed to get recommendations that will guide the drafting
of regulations governing thenew
food stamp program. I
hadnever
attended a public hearing before, at the Real World.
She seemed slightly embarrasand the idea that thegovernment "This is the public hearing on sed for me, "...the public is, of
asked the course, welcome too youknow,"
was willing to listen to people food stamps, isn't it"I
appealed to me. As a college woman at the reception desk. she said, smiling.
student on food stamps, I
was When she assured me it was, I Isigned the register quickly
bothinterested andcurious, soIexplained that I
didn'trepresent and found a seat in the half
was justa emptyroom.
decided to cut my Tuesday any organization butI
morningclasses andhave alook member of the public.
The hearinghad alreadybegun.
WAITING FOR GODOT- Assistant PhotoEditor Howard DeCruyenaerecaptured this scene
down the street from the Biltmore Hotel in downtown Los Angeles.
Restaurant/Bar/Pro Shop
Teen Amusement Center
/^~~~^^\
AA \
/
I
Open Bowling Six
Nights a Week
i\
\^LJ/
I
COUPLES NIGHT
Saturday Night from 6 p.m. til Midnight
for
X0
with this ad
you
your
and
date receive
*
*
a Hamburger
I. i
\
*
* a Small coke
* Rental of Shoes
* and 3 GAMES OF BOWLING
Neighborhood Action Program
hadnot toldherabout the hearing
and provided her with trans-
*$$t*^'&
1 ■
.'
<
*
Forest Lanes
■
Lake Forest Drive in El Toro
770-0055
An elderly woman was at the
microphone speaking. Icould
barely see her head above the
small podium at the end of a
long table at the front of the
room. She had short,curly white
hair andtiny glassesperched on
the tip of her nose. Her hands
kept bumping into the microphone as she nervously turned
over the paper she was reading.
Icould not understandwhat she
was saying because she was
stuttering and rambling. Finally,
she looked up from her paper
and asked why the hearing was
beingheld at theBiltmore Hotel.
At the other end of the table
were three name cards. One
identified a short-haired manin
a gray suit as Ed Speshock,
Acting Chief of Programming.
With his elbows propped up on
the table and his chin cupped in
his hands, he stared blankly at
the audience. Another man in a
suit and tie was sitting with his
hands folded neatly in front of
him. His name card indicated
that he was Neil Freeman,
Regional Director of the Western Region.
With her head turned toward
the speaker's podium, Chris
Van Lenten, Special Assistant
to the Administrator, pickedup
the challenge, telling her microphone thatthe U.S. Department
of Agriculture had carefully
considered the location of the
hearing.
'Idon't think we have to hold
public hearings in a shabby
place,do we?" she said, smiling
and shrugging her shoulders.
She asked the elderly woman
to submit a written copy of her
testimony.
Before the next speaker could
get to the podium, a Chicana
woman walked up the aisle and
said that she had just "raised
hell at the front receptiondesk"
and that she had something to
say to the panel. She pointed to
Ms. Van Lenten and angrily
stated that she still wanted to
know why the Biltmore Hotel
waschosen as the location for a
public hearing on food stamps.
She said she was insulted by
Ms. Van Lenten's previous remark.
"Don't tell us about 'shabby
places.' We live there!" she
shouted, as she walkedback to
her seat. The audience began
clapping.
A youngblack woman, wearing
jeans and a tee-shirt, stood up
and identified herself as a food
stamp recipient.
'Why didn't you tell us people?
How are we supposed to know
about this hearing? Igot no
notification in the mail with my
food coupons," she said, explaining that if a member of the
1
portation, she would not have
been able to attend. She apologized for her casual appearance,
But I
ain't got nothingnicer."
Aman's voice from the back of
the room asked why the hearing
could not be held at Los Angeles City College or at a local
high school. He said that the
Biltmore Hotel was not only
inaccessible but intimidating as
well. Although the room was
still half empty, it turned noisy
as peopL began clapping and
talking among themselves.
Ms. van Lenten was calmly
noddingher head, "So you think
the hearingbelongs in the community..."
Havingthus officially acknowledged the complaints, she explained very slowly, mouthing
each word, that for information
on the place and time of addi
[contonpg. 11]
New University
Features 11
December 6, 1977
and the Biltmore...
[con't from pg. 10]
tional hearings,one shouldcontact the USDA Western Regional Office. She requested that
speakers from theaudience come
up to the front microphone;
otherwise the testimony would
not be recorded.
She turned and whispered
something to the Regional Administrator who had remained
silent and expressionless through
out the discussion. Then, after
glancing at her watch, she announced that they were behind
schedule and speaker's testimony would have to be limited.
Joe Sanchez, the owner of a
small grocery store in EastLos
Angeles, wasat the podium testifying. Hewas tallanddark and
spoke with a slight accent. He
suggested that recipients be allowed to use food stamps for
non-food items, such as toilet
paper,soap and sanitarynapkins.
"People really need these
items, and some recipients
don't have the money to buy
them," he said.
Noting that half the people in
the room were members of
minorities, he recommended
that the USDAincludedminority and community people on
thepanel. Finally,he concluded
his testimony by expressing
his feelings on the location of
the hearing.
"Many people in the barrios
feel uncomfortablecoming here
to the Biltmore without a tie or
nice shoes,"said Mr. Sanchez.
"I feel it was a disservice to
them to holdthe hearing here."
Ms. Van Lenten thanked Mr.
Sanchez and informed him that
Section 7 of the New Food
Stamp Act allows grocers to
provide recipients with cash
change for any amount less than
one dollar food coupon. Stores
would no longer have to print
paper tokens, and food stamp
recipients would be able to use
the cash change for non-stamp
items, if they so desired.
"Food stamp people should
not feel uncomfortable in any
place," continued Ms. Van
Lenten. "This isapublic placeeveyone should reel welcome
here."
Ms. Van Lenten appeared to
be the spokesperson for the
panel. The other two panel
members had made no comments.Mr. Speshock was looking
followed
uptowardthe ceiling.I
hisgaze andfound myselfstaring
at a crystal chandelier. Mr.
Freeman wasbusy playing with
his penciluntil the woman from
the reception desk handed him
a message on a small slip of
paper.
The next speaker was a voung
woman from the the Welfare
Mothers Organization. She
lookeddirectly at the panelwhen
she spoke. She said she was
tired of "being treated like a
criminal" and tired of the dirty
looks she continually receives
from people at the supermarket.
She recommended that the
government be less concerned
with catching welfare cheats and
more concerned with feeding
bout four years old, walked up
to the podium. He had a scared
questioning look on his face as
he approached the young woman.
She picked himup and smiledat
him and pusheda strandof hair
off of his face. She lookedback
at the panel and continued
speaking.
"I think the whole work program stinks. You expect
mothers with kids to waste time
looking for jobs that don't even
exist? Just look at the unemployment rates."
"Under the New Act, mothers
with children under twelve are
not requred to register for work."
explained Ms. Van Lenten.
"That's when my kidsneed me
most,"the young woman yelled
angrily. "In my neighborhood,
that's when they hit the streetsgo ask any juvenile hall."
Outside,the doorman was still
directing parking and the old
men were still sitting in the park,
but the sun had finally broken
through the clouds.
In a wayI
was glad Icould not
stay for the entire hearing. Testimony would contiune until 9:00
at night-and parking had already cost me four dollars. If I
could have used my food
stamps to pay for the parking, I
wouldhave stayed a little longer.
Ireally would liked to know
how long Mr. Speshock could
look at that chandelier.
RALLY AGAINST VIOLENCE
Tuesday, Dec. 6th (today)
12-1 p.m. Gateway Commons
Sponsored by: Concerned Students & the Ad-Hoc Committee
Great Christmas Gifts
SOME MORE
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3805 NEWPORT BOULEVABP
-NEWPORT BEACH-
Gift
from the
Searching for
His Master's voice
Ceramic, Glass, Pewter
$1.25 to $26.
A little brown-haired boy, a-
KUCI
-
Ashtrays, Mugs, Glasses
hungry people.
"I've got kids to take care of,
no husband to support me and
no work skills... Her voice
started tocrack and she paused
for a moment looking down at
the floor.
that perfect sound?
Try
HBGSSfl
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ijn
VWV/J/
—
whw-6 paswem goes beauTy follows
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eaup
To warch^ <^ Ii
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makeup colcx-5 are aaiw Than £^y
mJAl
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They've been ror years.'
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Irvine Campus
Bookstore
12 Sports
December 6, 1977 New University
Intramural results
IM Football Rankings:
Pro League Champs
Chug a Mug
Final CompLeauge Standings
1. Beta Theta Pi Dragons
-
2. Night Shift
3 SeamCn
4. Cumbre
I'4. Sid
Ciudad
Larry Denner def. the Crankers 15-7, 14-16, 15-12
Racquetball
TournamentWinners:
Women's Division Andora
"
0
5. Sigma Chi
6 Person Volleyball:
9. Pitts
10. Caballo
11. Puddle Jumpers
Recreation League:
l.EM Butt4
2 Over the Hill
LO
Men's
, Open Tim Gilligan
Men s Intermediate Bob
8
Trinkeller
Men'.Nowoe GregWeinberg
5 1^^^Raiders
6. Go Nads
6. Bates Masters
7/. Sicma
L.ni II
11
Sigma Chi
Coed Basketball:
Dribbling Fools def. Grunion
? Psycnoses
8. Runaway Hormones
8. Lymphnodes
58-44
Anteaters trv to do it deeper
■
by Kevin Strehlo
Why, at a campus only five
miles form the ocean, did the
physical education department
stop teaching classes in scuba
diving after the 1975-76 academic year? The answer is that
there seems to be no viable
reason.
Coach Irwin of the UCI
physical education department
did anexcellentjobteachingthe
scubaprogram for allbut that 1st
year, when additional administrative duties made it impossible for him to continue. Two
outsideinstructors were hiredto
replace him, and this additional
expense caused the scuba program to run up a $1500deficit.
Could this deficit explain why
the PE department dropped
scuba?
During the scuba program's
days under coach Irwin, three
classes of twenty students were
taught each quarter— in basic
ISNT SHE LOVELY-UCI women's rugger Chris Daily
lead the Anteaters to a 20-0 victory over The Huntington
Beach women's club Saturday. This weekendthe women's
club travels
Bakersfield for the Women's Rugby
to
Tournament.
by Greg Callle
j
J|||111Ijifft
The very best intennis
would have been generated
from the 180 scuba students,
turning that $1500deficit into a
$300 surplus.
So why wasn't the fee raised
and the class continued? Why
are the 24 complete scuba outfits owned by the University
sitting around unused,rusting in
a storageroom off the pool deck
at Crawford Hall?
The new UCI diving club has
been trying to get someone to
answer these questions, led by
Earl Gibbs, the club has been
pursuing two goals. The first is
to get the University's scuba
equipment released for club
use, so that the club's certified
divers can doit deeper without
haying to dig quite so deep into
their pocketbooks. The second
tennis pjto sfooj>
I
2728East Pacific Coast Hwy
Del Mar 92625
I1 |'
|
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714/640-4172
i
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2 blocks east of MacArthur Blvd.
OPINION
OPEN! j
Independent Programs
and Social Sciences
are Now Available in
ASUCI
1
]|
GURDJIEFFOUSPENSKY
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Now Accepting Students
NEWPORT BEACH CENTER
(714) 559-7193
i
I
I
Stocking Stuffer
$5.00 VALUE ...
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tion.
Release of the equipment has
been a problem because ofsafety regulations imposed by the
UCI diving control board, a
group which meets six times a
year and controls all aquatic
activity on or connected with
the UCI campus. The diving
board requires, among other
things, that all the regulators
belonging to the university be
inspected and upgraded every
sixmonths if they are tobeused.
Coach Irwin and Earl Gibbs
agree that about $700 would
be required to bring the mothballed equipment up to diving
board standards.
The biggest problem with reinstituting scuba instruction at
certification,
intermediate goal has been to convince the UCI is the lack of a NAUI
scuba, and open water certifi- PE department to reinstitue its (National Association of Uncation. Theclasses were always scuba classes, so that uncerti- derwater Instructors) certified
full,and hopeful students joined fied club members and other PE department staff member,
long waiting lists, despite the interested students can learn to given the department's reluc$35 per quarter fee. Now, if the dive, at reasonable cost, from a tance to hire someone from the
fee hadbeen raised to $45 (the conveniently located class outside.Perhaps thebest course
fee had previously been raised taught for university credit.
of action would be for the PE
from $25 to $35, so there was In pursuing these goals, the department to send a staff
no obstacle to block such a UCI Diving Club has set up member to a NAUI certificaraise), an additional $1800 meetings with Tim Harris (su- tion school. It shouldn't be difficult to convince a staff member totake the course— it's taught
in Hawaii,ifincentive is needed,
FOR
and that staffmember wouldbe
many frustrated divers
making
SEATS
COUNCIL
happy.
I APPLICATIONS^
i
pervisor of recreation with the
PE department) and scuba instructor Irwin. The club also
hopes to meet soon with Linda
Dempsey, the head of UCI's
department of physical educa-
The UCIScuba Diving Club
is currently circulating a petition to encourage the PE department to teachscuba again.
Their first drive is scheduled
for LagunaonNovember 19th,
but plans for Juture dives will
be discussed at their next meeting, to be held in January.
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