The Boyce - Community College of Allegheny County

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The Boyce - Community College of Allegheny County
The Boyce
Community College of Allegheny County/Boyce Campus
Monroeville, PA
Collegian
Vol. 47 Issue1
Boyce student honored this summer
for exceptional act of compassion
PITTSBURGH—Community College of
Allegheny County Boyce Campus student
Shelley Spaw has been honored with an
Allegheny County Emergency Medical
Services Council EMS Champion Award
for services performed during her field experience with the Canonsburg Ambulance
Service.
Spaw was presented with the award at
the council’s 37th Annual Meeting held
June 12 at the Pittsburgh Athletic Association in Oakland.
Currently in her second year of CCAC’s
Paramedic program, Spaw was working
a training shift with the service when she
and her supervisor, Paramedic Crew Chief
Steven Carson, responded to a vehicular
accident.
While tending to the medical needs
of the two women as the police and tow
truck arrived, Spaw and Carson learned the
women had been traveling from West Virginia when their GPS had taken them off
the interstate and they had become lost.
The women had been trying to get to
Mercy Hospital in Pittsburgh as the husband of one of the women had been transported to Mercy in order to undergo open
heart surgery.
Spaw told the women that she would
drive them to the hospital in her personal
vehicle.
She and Carson took the women and
their belongings back to the station where
Spaw then used her vehicle to transport the
Boyce Campus
Student
Government
will be conducting
Voter Registration
on
National Voter
Registration Day,
Sept. 23 in our
front hallway
from
9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
and
4 p.m. to 7 p.m.
PHOTO COURTESY OF neil jones
Shelley Spaw (center) accepts her EMS Champion Award from (l) CCAC Paramedic Program Associate Professor Neil Jones,and (r) Boyce Campus Dean of
Academic Affairs Richard (Rick) Allison.
women to the hospital.
When Crew Chief Carson had initially
offered to take the women when his shift
was over within the hour, Spaw had responded that these women needed to get
to the hospital quickly and that if she were
in a similar situation, she “would want
someone to do the same thing for me.”
A resident of Washington, Pa., Spaw
Boyce family
mourns loss
of Sam Price
B
Wednesday, SEPTEMBER 17, 2014
oyce
Campus
and the
Boyce
Collegian
lost a valued friend
and colleague this
summer.
Samuel G. Price,
68 of Greensburg
passed away, Sunday, August 24,
2014, in Forbes Regional Hospital.
Sam was the selfappointed
Jimmy
Olsen of Boyce
Sam and his wife,
campus, not only
Valerie Cosco.
taking photos for every administrator on campus, but also snapping photos for
the Boyce Collegian.
As an audio visual aide on campus, faculty relied on Sam
to deliver equipment, help with all technology and provide
aid of all types. He might have been Superman's pal, but he
himself often saved the day or night for faculty.
He was born September 24, 1945, in Pittsburgh and was
the son of the late Jack and Bernice (Koch) Price.
Sam worked for 32 years at LTV Steel and for the last 15
years has been employed at the Community College of Allegheny County as an audio visual aide.
Surviving are his loving wife, Valerie J. Cosco, two sisters, Carol Quel of Monroeville and Sue Maley of Butler and
a brother, Jack Price of Florida, along with numerous nieces
and nephews.
intends to graduate in May 2015 with an
Associate of Science degree before transferring to the University of Pittsburgh to
pursue a bachelor’s degree in Emergency
Medicine.
In addition to her academic pursuits,
Spaw is a member of Mt. Olive Baptist
Church in Canonsburg, Pa., where she also
serves as a missionary.
Wednesday, September 17, 2014
Perspectives
Carnegie International – An Affair to Remember
Page 2 The Boyce
Collegian
In This Issue
Sammi Allegro
Kevin Anderson
Dwight Boddorf
Dave DeVenzio
Susan Gall
Kathy Gilbert
Liz Hand
Elizabeth Healy
Melissa Hrico
Joanne Jeffcoat
Elizabeth Johnston
Frank Kaufman
Linda Neubauer
Pamela Nichols
Renee Shissler
Editorial/
Production
Coordinator
Peggy K. Roche
The Boyce Collegian is
the official newspaper
of the Boyce Campus
of the Community
College of Allegheny
County. Opinions
expressed in this
newspaper do not
necssarily reflect those
of the faculty or the
administration of
Boyce Campus.
Contact Information
CCAC/ Boyce
Campus
595 Beatty Road
Monroeville, PA
15146
724.325.6730
E-mail:
[email protected]
Letters Policy
Readers are encouraged to
submit letters to the editor
by print or e-mail.
ALL letters must include
the author’s name and
telephone number for
verification. No letters
will be printed without
the author’s name. The
Collegian reserves the right
to edit such material. A
drop box is located outside
The Collegian Office,
Room N-570.
Advertisng Policy
The Collegian reserves
the right to reject
advertising which it
considers objectionable
and inappropriate
for a college student
newapaper.
Advertisements that
discriminate by race,
creed, color, handicap,
age or sex will not be
accepted.
Wednesday, September 17, 2014
Skip Big Box Grocery Stores —Buy from Local Stands
Photos and story
by Liz Hand
I
Photo and Story
by Liz Hand
COLLEGIAN STAFF
P
COLLEGIAN STAFF
D
o you have an idea of
what an average 20
year-old looks like?
Perhaps your parents
are over 40 years of age, but some
of their friends look younger,
some look older.
Pronounced differences accelerate as we age. Someone at
age 70 may look just 60 yearsold, another 70 year-old may look
more like an 80 year-old.
The above paragraph describes
a person’s senescence. When I
Google this word, this is the first
thing to appear:
senescence
1.the condition or process
of deterioration with age.
Even though my relatives have
all lived into their 70s and 80s ,
some of them had serious medical issues.
As a young college student
studying the science of dietetics I grappled with this question
regarding aging: “How much depends upon heredity versus the
choices we make?”
Sure, it is easier to take time
to exercise as a single person, before we take on many additional
responsibilities.
We may be active in sports
or just trying to figure out what
sports we like to do when we are
growing up.
Dietary choices can influence
our health as well as other habits,
including drinking alcohol and
smoking.
This article will give you an
option to find out what you will
look like as you age. This has to
do with facial recognition technology. Google “Age My Face”
to learn what you might look like
in the future.
You might think that this topic
would make for a good Sci-Fi
movie, but law enforcement, social media and the government is
using it currently.
Different industries including
health and insurance industries
are now looking into it.
According to my source article, “Jay Olshansky with the
University of Illinois in Chicago
started a project to help refine
saucer-looking white squash
called “Patty Pan.” It has scalloped edges like a flower and is
good sautéed, fried or baked.
I met Betty Blank over 10
years ago while driving on a back
road. Since I love to cook with
fresh vegetables I was drawn to
her porch food stand. This is
where I bought my very first Patty Pan squash. I love to support
the entrepreneur spirit.
How clever to make money
right on your own porch. She has
lived near the Hempfield Park for
many years and was raised in an
agricultural family surrounding.
In other words, she knows about
farming.
Betty does not drive, is a widow and cares for a sick family
member. I admire her and see
the need to buy vegetables that
I want, while helping her to support herself.
If you like fresh vegetables
or are driving near Greensburg
en route to somewhere nearby,
please check out her stand, she
also sells books and other miscellaneous items.
From Route 22 you can take
old Route 66 South. Or if you are
coming from the back road like I
do, I just drive through Trafford
and Level Green on Route 130
and take Route 993 near Bushy
Run, right to old route 66.
When you pass the new Route
66 toll route, go .5 miles and take
a left past some trailers at the
sign that has Hempfield Park on
it, drive .2 miles and the porch is
on the left.
The house number is 265 and is
clearly seen on the white column.
Free Store in Braddock Represents Community
Photos and Story
by Liz Hand
I
art form, which was partially
open in the front. To me this was
the social hub of the Carnegie International.
There was something fabulous
brewing inside; one small round
table and five chairs.
There was the fragrant aroma of
freshly brewed tea with beautiful
teapots and cups. This was so appreciated on this cold day.
Here we were strangers shar-
ing a beverage and friends when
we parted. Our new friends were
from New York, Washington
D.C, even Italy.
The hostess was very pleasant
and she served mint tea, as well
as a sweet black tea with an almond flavor to it.
The tea was from Teavana. It
was a most pleasant ending to our
trip. Discounted tickets are available through CCAC.
Can New Software Really Predict How We Age?
By Liz Hand
COLLEGIAN STAFF
erhaps like me, your
family grows a few
herbs and vegetables.
Take advantage of the
many fresh local vegetables at
Schramm’s Farm in Export, Pa.
or stop along the way at roadside
stands.
While growing up, one of my
favorite reasons for traveling to
the vicinity of Seven Springs,
near Champion, Pa., was to see
the many little food road side
attractions. They are unlike the
cookie cutter grocery stores that
we shop in.
This year I grew tomatoes,
zucchini and yellow squash and
saved the seeds from an unusual
(Top) A tea party at the museum offers a chance to sample
exotic teas and make new
friends.
(Right) Bob Hand meets a
Raptor in the Dinosaur exhibit.
Victorian models, especially all
of the details of a dining room or
sitting area.
There is another room I recently
discovered on the second floor
called “Gallery One” which holds
beautiful big glass windows.
How fitting that they display
colored glass there. The room is,
in my opinion, a mix of folk art
which includes a collection of
antique chairs, other furniture,
pictures, Tiffany glass, and European as well as Early American
art and china.
There is something so fragrant
about the scent of old wood. It
takes you back to another time,
perhaps the home your grandparents lived in or a family tour
through a historical home.
So, once again I perused my favorite spots. Maybe next time I
will even try the third floor.
By this time, I called my husband to join me for a special exhibit of canvas. It was a tent-like
Page 3
Take Advantage of This Harvest Season
Take in Special Events or Visit Dinosaurs
t amazes me that no matter how many trips we take
to the Carnegie Museum in
Oakland, we can never take
in all the exhibits in one day.
I am always drawn to the second floor starting with the permanent art collection and the evolving collections of borrowed art as
my first stop.
But, this time accompanied by
my husband I decided to change
it up, and we visited the beautiful
minerals and gems.
It was enhanced by the addition
of a temporary showing of gems
and jewelry with the Carnegie International event.
That was great as not only did
we appreciate the beautiful displays, but I got a chance to point
out my favorite gems to my husband, should he ever feel compelled to bestow upon me a gift of
precious gems in the future.
Moving on to the Dinosaur exhibit, I must say I miss the original entrance without the walled
space.
There weren’t any fancy wall
murals or reconstructed green
spaces when I was kid that I can
recall, but the sense of immediately being taken by the humongous prehistoric bones.
Of course, I was a lot shorter
then. But, what is still impressive
to me is that these are “actively
posed original fossil specimens.”
By this time we split up and
I visited the Hall of Architecture
and the Hall of Sculpture.
These are both very impressive
rooms, but the one I always like
to see is the tiny space, a cozy
corridor that houses miniature
displays.
Since I love antiques it was
so much fun to view these little
Perspectives
facial recognition technology in
a way that it could predict a person’s lifespan.”
He wrote that the children of
people who senesce more slowly tend to live longer than other
people. Could facial recognition
technology be implemented in the
future by insurance agencies setting premiums?
It will be interesting to see if
they will be allowed to do that.
How did this come about, you
might ask? It actually came about
one evening while Olshansky was
having dinner with an insurance
agent.
The agent was complaining
about the process of evaluating
a person’s survival prospects.
Some companies may require
blood and urine samples, while
others rely more on questions.
My husband and I had an agent
come to sell us term life insurance
and besides some questions about
our health, he had to trust that we
were telling the truth about how
healthy we currently were, as
you cannot always tell a person’s
health by his or her appearance.
How many times have we heard
stories of seemingly healthy athletes who have suddenly died?
Olshansky is interested in
biological aging, as I have been
with my interest in nutrition and
dietetics, and he said it could also
“benefit people by convincing
them to make healthy lifestyle
changes while they still can.”
I really liked what he had to
say at the end of the article, “In
order to increase your chances of
living a healthy and longer life,
you need to avoid smoking, eat
less and exercise more,” the website stated.
“Science may soon develop
therapies that will help you age
slower, but until then, diet and
exercise are the only equivalent
of a fountain of youth that exists
today.”
We don’t know how accurate
this technology is. Also, with
technology’s benefits, there are
also downsides. Could employers use this technology to predict
our life span and not hire us in the
first place? Could we be charged
more for buying insurance?
COLLEGIAN STAFF
t seems
that there
is more
for free
in Braddock,
Pa. than the
Library.
My friend,
a Braddock
resident, recently told me
about a store
in Braddock
where everything is free.
That
hardly seems
possible. While I am an advocate
of bartering, I have never heard of
a store where you can walk in and
take things home for free.
So, as curiosity kills a cat, I
had to learn more. My travels
have recently taken me through
Braddock towards the Waterfront
shopping district, but I could never find the store.
Every time I drove through
Braddock I looked for the free
store with no avail.
Since the hours are limited, I
began to Google to find out more.
I found a link to the store at www.
freestore15014.ORG.
Giselle Fetterman started the
non-profit, she is the mayor's
wife.
While most of us know about
the demise of Braddock due to the
steel mill closures
and massive layoffs of the 1980s,
Braddock now
stands poised for
revitalization.
There is more
than a spark of life
in this town. It is
a town that cares
about community.
The Carnegie
Free Library in
Braddock is bringing the music hall
back to life, the employment center freely helps job seekers to better themselves, the urban gardens
are adding a feast for the eyes,
and soon a restaurant by Chef
Kevin Sousa will open in the early part of 2015.
All of this is all breathing little
pockets of revitalization into the
community.
When I arrived at the Free
Store I was transported to another
day and time.
This was a pocket of community in an otherwise deserted town.
It was a place where people
came together and lingered on the
College Nondiscrimination Policy
The Community College of Allegheny County (CCAC) and
its Board of Trustees are committed to the principle of equal
opportunity in education and employment for all. CCAC does
not discriminate based upon race, color, religion, national origin, ancestry or place of birth, sex, gender identity or expression, sexual orientation, disability, use of a guide or support
animal due to disability, marital status,familial status, genetic
information, veteran status or age. Creating, supporting and
sustaining a diverse community prepares our students to be
effective in the world outside of CCAC.
Questions may be addressed to [email protected]
Notifications of nondiscrimination and contact information
can be found at www.ccac.edu, search keywords “notifications
of nondiscrimination.”
Individuals with disabilities who are requesting accommodations should contact the Supportive Services for Students with
Disabilities Office at 412-469-6215.
(Top left) Giselle Fetterman,
wife of Braddock's mayor,
started the non-profit.
(Top right) Displays at the Free
Shop offer clothing.
(Bottom right) Children wait
for Moms to finish shopping.
New Braddock housing is rising in the background.
porch, in a rocking chair or where
children could enjoy the green
space and babies could crawl on
their hands and knees.
What I saw too was cooperation
and respect. There was no pushing or shoving for the free items.
Three people could enter the
store three at a time, and when
they left, three more were invited.
The selection was mostly of
clothing and toys, but there were
a few books too.
If you have any clothes, toys,
or small items or bicycles that
you would like to donate, please
Phone: 201.532.1722 or email:
[email protected]
Boyce Dean's List
Page 4 The Dean’s List, which recognizes academic achievement, is announced at the end of each semester.
As a full-time student, you make the Dean’s List if you have accumulated 12 credits with a cumulative GPA of 3.50 or higher and
received no “F” grades and not more than one “W” grade during the
semester.
Courses below 100 are not included in calculations of the Dean’s
List GPA. If you are a part-time student, you will be on the Dean’s List
each time you have accumulated 12 credits with a cumulate GPA of
3.50 or higher and have received no “F” grades.
Calculating Grade Point Average
To calculate a student’s grade point average (GPA), CCAC assigns
grade points to each of a student’s letter grades (“A”=4, “B”=3, “C”=2,
“D”=1, “F”=0), and these are then multiplied by the credits assigned
to the class.
Grade points are then added up for all classes completed in a term
and divided by the total term credit hours completed.
This result is the term GPA. Students can calculate their cumulative GPA by adding up the grade points for all the courses attended
and dividing this number by the sum of credit hours completed. These
calculations are available on CCAC Central e-Services.
Spring 2014
AbbiatiSamantha
AckleyAmber
AdamsMiriam
AhmedHashim
AllisonBrittany
AlworthLindsey
AmbsSusan
Amoroso Jiane
AmosJared
Andrews Joseph
AndringDanielle
Antonenko Maryna
ArroyoApril
BacDaniel
BaldwinChoonghwa
BanksZachary
BarrettKathleen
BartoJacqueline
BartosBrian
BennettRoland
BenyoAlexander
BenyoStephen
BiggsOlivia
BillantiAngela
BirxMatthew
BitonDina
Blacksmith Paula
BlakerChristina
BobnarCameron
BolgertKateri
Bordonaro Felicia
BourgartJoseph
BradleyChristylee
BrinkerBenjamin
Broadrick Richard
BrownMichael
BrownTinamarie
BryantShantell
BucarHeather
BurdaCharles
BurksEmily
ButlerJenna
BuzzaCarrie
ByersMichelle
ByrnesLauren
Calamosca Micah
Campbell Danielle
CantinEmily
Capozzoli Ryan
CarrChristina
CarsonAlicia
CarusoKayla
CatulloJennifer
Cavanaugh Karyn
ChontasNicholas
Chowdhry Sana
Christian Michael
CoffenTravis
Concepcion-Rivera Yolianette
Constable-BrownAmanda
ContiRonald
CookMatthew
CordovaShaina
CousarJulie
CoxHaley
CoxJohn
CraigJacob
DailyNathan
DakanHeather
DaleyNicolas
Damianos Dara
DanielLori
DannyCharlotte
DarrEric
Daugherty Timothy
DavisChaz
Decarolis Shea
DeibertMichael
DelenneCheryl
DevorDaniel
Dicriscio Adam
Donoughe Daniel
DoranVictoria
DornBrandon
DorseyPatricia
Douglass Baily
DrexlerDerek
Druschel Amanda
DryerDaniel
DurickSherry
Dwumfour Doreen
EbaughChase
Edmundson Jessica
EdwardsCourtney
EicherSamantha
ElyardDavid
EspositoMichael
EvansHeather
Fabyanic Elizabeth
FairDavid
FetterJason
Fiorentini Amy
Firesmith Kodiak
FischettiKelly
FisherCarol
FisherVanessa
FiumaraAbigail
FleckKelli
FloridaJohn
FrazierZachary
FullerSamantha
FultzJordan
Funderburk Christina
FusiaAndrew
Gallagher Nicole
GaribayPatrick
Gasiorowski Lynn
GavlikJaimie
GeibelKrystal
GentileNicholas
Gesselman James
Gildersleeve Molly
GinderJacy
GlathAmy
Gorman-Perez Amanda
GrancheKristin
GreenDavid
GrobEmily
GromleyLinda
HaddenJeremy
HankoElise
HarmonKaelin
Harriel-Allen Kimberly
HarrisKathryn
HartzellApril
HawkenKristen
HaynesAirika
HelmsSarah
HenryYolanda
HensleyFelicia
HeplerAlyssa
HernJeannette
HittJesse
Hoagland Carol
Holmquist Stephanie
HomzaRebecca
HopsonCynthia
Howland Benjamin
HughesChad
HulingsMichele
HumesBenjamin
HustonAndrea
Iadicicco Jill
Inselmini Trisha
IonadiRegina
Jackson Gentry Celeste
JacksonLeal
JaysonMatthew
JenkinsAmber
JohnsHeather
JohnsonDayna
JohnsonLaurel
JohnsonLori
JohnsonMegan
Johnstone Terry
JonesCatherine
JonesKevin
Kamalasanan Seenumole
Kappeler Lindsay
KelseyVicki
KenstJulie
KidaneMichael
KileyKevin
KingElizabeth
KircherDavid
KleinMichael
KohlerJessica
Kohlman Kalynn
KohutPeter
KoloskiKatherine
KostyukYana
Kovalcik Ethan
Krchnavy Sarah
KuhnTyler
KupiecRebecca
KuzmenBrian
LangeJohn
LashnukSara
LauverVictoria
LavrincTyler
LaytonJacob
LebeAmanda
LecnarChristopher
LecuyerAndrew
LeggeKimberly
LenhartKaitlyn
LennexBeth
Lewandroski Megan
LiffSanford
Lightfoot Jonathan
LilacAlycia
LiShuo
LongJonathan
Lorberbaum Mollie
LuchkiwNicole
LyonsEthan
MadisonNira
MagillJames
MaierMelissa
MajirosMarissa
Malarkey Andrew
MasseyRobert
Mathews Sarah
Matthews Joshua
MayuricAshlee
MazurNichole
MazzaJaclyn
Mc CoyMarcy
McAuliffe Jeremiah
McBrideMcKenzie
McCannMarilyn
McCormick Bryan
McDonough John
McGuire Esther
McKeague Mary
McShane Abigail
MeadeBryan
MeadeKatelyn
MedinaAshley
Meliksetian Eileen
Wednesday, September 17, 2014
MillerJarrod
MillerJohn
MillerMeghan
MochanMatthew
MonroeAlexa
MonroeAmy
Montgomery Samantha
MooreMark
MorganDevon
MorrisChristopher
MorrisVicci
MurphyMatthew
NeelyWebster
NejakNicholas
NemethTroy
NogalChristine
O'DellAmanda
O'Malley Karen
Obiekezie Regina
ObusekJoseph
OffeiDaniel
OropezaMark
Oshaughnessy Ronald
OvertonMorgan
Pampena Vanessa
PapulaKatie
ParrishJessica
ParrishSusan
PetroneLouis
PolacekShannon
PoulinLina
PrimusStacie
ProbolaNicholas
Pruchniewski Jennifer
PsicaKristen
PurcellKelsey
RaineyRachel
ReedKelli
ReganJames
ReisBrian
RenwickAlayna
ReynaNatasha
Riccadonna Jordan
RichterShanna
RizzoKristen
RodgersKristen
Romanelli Samantha
RosnickKyle
RossEdmund
Rowland Taylor
RubinoJoel
RubinoLara
Rutkowski Jeffrey
RybackiLauren
SalandroZachary
SalesRobin
SantavyAshley
SawhillSamantha
SchmittJoshua
SchmitzJulie
Schrecengost Jessica
ShaffoJoseph
ShurpaAla
SimmenKelsey
SimpsonChristopher
SkalkaAmber
Slonceski Brittany
SmithNicole
SmithTierra
SocciTed
SolteszAndrew
Sommers Shawna
SomNandini
SpinelliStephanie
Springette Steven
StecikSarah
SteinerBenjamin
StevickElizabeth
StewardSonya
StoneAlicia
Stratemeier Breanna
Summers Sheldon
SurianoJessica
SusallaJoseph
Sweeney Laura
SwopeRobert
TarrNicole
TaylorAlexandra
TaylorSusan
TempestDanielle
ThakkarKhyati
ThakkarManasi
ThomasNakeshia
Thompson Danielle
Thompson Dominique
Timmons Matthew
TomesRachel
TrgovicRandy
Trojanowski Abigail
TruschelDamien
TrzeciakTyler
TumultyTheodore
Ulyanyuk Svitlana
ValchoKenneth
Valentine Ruby
VelezWilliam
VergatoTiffany
VesceMaria
Viskovic Traci
WallDestiny
WatsonJennifer
WattJulie
Weismiller Stephanie
WelshZachary
WestKristin
Williams Douglas
Williams Sukari
WitterJoshuah
Yaworski Tracey
Yezovich John
ZajchTina
Zawodniak Elise
ZoraAmanda
First Summer
2014
AiuppySara
AkarAzin
AlterAmy
AngeloTimothy
BaronSarah
BergKurt
BertramCharles
BishopCollin
BolognaTraci
BrawdyLisa
BrickerLaura
BrownDesire'
BruneczJody
ChessTyler
Colalella Gabriel
CoyBarbara
DevitoElizabeth
Doemling Maria
DomkeCaressa
DurickSherry
Eisenhooth Alaina
EspositoDoreen
FazioCrista
FindlayOksana
FisherVanessa
FleckKelli
Fominyam Vivian
FondrkTori
FrankMara
GadsonDanielle
GardoneBrittany
GarveyKeith
GreenRachael
GreenWhitney
GriffinLinda
GrzybekDawn
HartJamie
HeilmanJamie
HoltSandy
Hutchison Katherine
JohnsonLaurel
KiferAshley
LacavaLisa
LakinMelissa
Laughlin Edward
LaurinaJoseph
Lewkowicz Edward
LimoneChristopher
Longobardi Brittany
MacGregor Brandon
MajirosMarissa
MangisPhilip
MarraCarmela
MarshLisa
MartinRenee
Wednesday, September 17, 2014
McWilliams Scott
Meredith Jamie
MichelsChanel
MilcicJessica
MileyDavid
Mirilovich Megan
MitschKelly
Mohrbach Amanda
MoranWilliam
MorleyAshlee
MurphyJulie
ParcoCynthia
ParkGrace
PusateriPhilip
RiskoMark
RupnikKirsti
Schillinger Heather
ScottJuanita
SiddoCandiece
SimpsonBeth
SinghalMira
Slonceski Brittany
Stalnaker Chris
StrehlGeoffrey
StummeAmanda
SullivanJustin
UngerKimberly
VehecKelly
WoodsTaylor
ZanchaHolli
Second
Summer
2014
Aronckes Megan
BarnerJustin
BrownMaggie
BullockAleta
CannonCynthia
ClearyTheresa
ColoritoRegina
Delancey Sandra
Drummond Lisa
GreenStormy
LiShuo
LoganMichael
MajetichEric
Ndipenock Agboryong
NovakBrittany
OffeiErnest
PalermoJoseph
PierreBouaze
SahaMallika
SimkoBryttanni
TepkeShawna
WalkerSean
The 2014
Pennsylvania
gubernatorial
election will
take place on
Tuesday,
Nov. 4,
2014,
to elect the
governor of
Pennsylvania.
Republican
Governor Tom
Corbett is
running against
Democratic
candidate
Tom Wolf
Boyce Dean's
List
Page 5
Student Life
Page 6 Wednesday, September 17, 2014
Intramural Champions
Fall 2014
COFFEE KLATCH
J
IMBO SERO
KOOKY SPOOKYASHLEY DECAROLIS
BASEBALL RECORDSJAKE ALLEN
COIN TOSSSTEVE BENYO
LONG DRIVE CONTEST
LUKE BURRELL
MINIATURE GOLFDAVE DEVENZIO
PINS IN THE BOTTLE
TYLER MITLO
PAPER FOOTBALLDAN FIELDS
CONNECT 4DERRICK SMITH
FRISBEE ACCURACYCODY BILLINGSLEY
photo by frank kaufman
FINANICAL AID OFFICE: We are
pleased to announce that the Community
College of Allegheny County has been approved for participation in the Ready to
Succeed Scholarship Program (RTSS).
Invitations to Phi Theta Kappa,
Academic Honor Society of
Two-year Colleges, in the mail
STUDENT LIFE: An honor society exists to recognize and encourage superior scholarship and achievement. The Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society, founded in 1918, is
the oldest and most prestigious honor society serving community colleges around the
world. Phi Theta Kappa is the largest honor society in American higher education
with more than two million members and over 1,250 chapters. The American Association of Community Colleges recognizes Phi Theta Kappa as the official academic
honor society for two-year colleges.
The Society offers its members unique benefits and opportunities, the most significant of which is $38 million in transfer scholarships to complete their baccalaureate
degrees at four-year institutions in Pennsylvania, across the nation and abroad. Additionally, there are innovative programs, services and array of membership benefits
offered by Phi Theta Kappa that are unequaled among honor societies. Membership
in Phi Theta Kappa is a lifetime membership, so access to all of these benefits will
last…forever!
Membership in Phi Theta Kappa is offered by invitation only. To be eligible, students
must have a cumulative QPA of 3.50 or higher with at least 12 CCAC credits completed, excluding developmental courses. Additionally, students must be currently
enrolled at CCAC to receive an invitation and to join the society. Typically, this
outstanding group of honor students is the top 8 percent of the CCAC student body.
At CCAC, there are four Phi Theta Kappa chapters, one at each of the four main
campuses. Each chapter will automatically mail invitations to students eligible to join
their chapter from their “home campus;” however, students may choose to join their
preferred campus chapter. Invitations are sent via U.S. Mail usually in September and
February. Invitations from the Sigma Omicron Chapter at Boyce Campus will arrive
in mailboxes by Sept. 30, 2014. If you do not receive an invitation but believe that
you are eligible for membership, please inquire by sending your name and Student ID
number by email to Linda Neubauer, Sigma Omicron Chapter Advisor at [email protected]
ccac.edu.
Please note that BOYCE CAMPUS MEMBERSHIP INVITATIONS EXPIRE
PROMPTLY AT MIDNIGHT DEC. 1, 2014, as membership is based on a student’s
current academic standing. The Sigma Omicron Chapter offers potential new members a convenient and user-friendly online application process that is available 24
hours a day, as well as the option to accept membership by a traditional method. Instructions are included in the invitation mailing.
Phi Theta Kappa Orientation for potential new members of the Boyce Campus Sigma Omicron Chapter is scheduled Friday evening, Oct. 24, 2014, from 7 -8:30
p.m. in the Student Union. Please attend the Orientation session or learn more about
Phi Theta Kappa at www.ptk.org.
Ready
to
Succeed
Scholarship
available to
second year
students
Still Time to Apply
for Spring or
Summer Terms
17 clubs and organizations participated in this fall's Activities Fair
which was held in the front hallway Sept. 4, 2014. New and returning
students had the opportunity to learn about dozens of clubs and
organizations open to them and to meet fellow students and club
advisors.
The Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society is made up of diverse individuals who share a
common commitment to learning and a proven record of academic success. Membership in this prestigious organization is a special honor as it permanently recognizes
a student’s hard work and academic excellence among their peers. Among the Society’s distinguished alumni are the late Jeane Kirkpatrick, United States Ambassador
to the United Nations; Fred Haise, Astronaut; Dr. Sylvia Earle, Oceanographer/Researcher; Michael Weiss, Three-time US National Ice Skating Champion; and Trisha
Yearwood, Grammy Award-winning Country Western musician.
Wednesday, September 17, 2014
PHOTO BY FRANK KAUFMAN
Boyce's golf team (l-r) Roger Pogoda, CJ Smith, Mark Kiesel, Brian
Reis, and Shane Larkin have already begun to compete.
Intramural Activities
Fall 2014
ACTIVITY
ENTRY DEADLINE
ACTIVITY BEGINS
WEIRD KNOWLEDGE
SEP 17
SEP 16
BOCCESEP 16 SEP 16 CARDS IN HAT
SEP 18
SEP 17
BATTLESHIPSEP 24SEP 24
TOURNEY DAY/SKEE BALL
SEP 25 SEP 26
MLB BASEBALL PREDICTIONSSEP 30
SEP 30
JENGAOCT 1OCT 1
PENGUIN PREDICTIONS
OCT 8
OCT 8
WIFFLE BALL HITTING
OCT 8
OCT 8
OREO STACKING
OCT 9
OCT 9
ROCK*PAPER*SCISSORS
OCT 15
OCT 15
TABLE TENNISTOURNEY
OCT 10
OCT 15
ROPE JUMPINGOCT 20OCT 20
SMART QUIZOCT 23OCT 22
WPIAL FOOTBALL PICKS
OCT 30
OCT 31
WARNOV 4NOV 4
TIDDLYWINKSNOV 6NOV 5
PICK THE NUMBER
NOV 11
NOV 11
BALLOON FLYING
NOV 13 NOV 12
5000 DICE
NOV 17 NOV 17
WHAT’S THE ANSWERNOV 20NOV 19
FREE THROW SHOOTING DEC 3
DEC 3
DEFYING GRAVITY
DEC 8 DEC 8
THE INTRAMURAL OFFICE RESERVES THE RIGHT TO ALTER THE SCHEDULE IN ORDER TO BETTER SERVE THE
NEEDS OF THE BOYCE STUDENT BODY. ALL STUDENTS,
STAFF, ALUMNI, AND FACULTY ARE ELIGIBLE TO PARTICIPATE. ALL EVENTS ARE FREE. WINNER OF EACH EVENT RECEIVES CHAMPION T-SHIRT. FOR MORE INFORMATION, VISIT
THE ACTIVITIES OFFICE ACROSS FROM THE BOOKSTORE.
The Ready To Succeed Scholarship Program was initiated by Governor Corbett
and is being administered by PHEAA in
close cooperation with the Pennsylvania
Department of Education.
The program, which is funded by the
Pennsylvania General Assembly, provides
awards to high achieving students whose
annual family income does not exceed
$110,000.
RTSS provides scholarships to high academic achievers that, in combination with
the Pennsylvania State Grant Program, offer a total award up to $2,000 for full-time
and $1,000 for part-time students.
The minimum award is $500. Awards
can be used to cover tuition, books, fees,
supplies, and living expenses.
Students must be nominated by their
postsecondary institution for participation in the program. Funding is limited for
the program and awards will be made on
a first-come, first-served basis. Student
awards will be announced in mid-fall.
Student Eligibility:
With the exception of financial need,
the student must meet all other Pennsylvania State Grant eligibility requirements to
qualify for RTSS. This includes the submission of a FAFSA (Free Application for
Federal Student Aid) and a Pennsylvania
State Grant Form (SGF). The student must
also:
1. Have completed at least one academic year—defined as having earned
at least 24 semester credits or the
equivalent by the time that the student's school checks academic progress for the Pennsylvania State Grant
program. This may be the spring or
summer term of 2014 for the 2014-15
academic year.
2. Demonstrate outstanding academic
achievement by attaining a minimum
cumulative Grade Point Average
(GPA) of 3.25 at the time that the student's school checks academic progress for the Pennsylvania State Grant
Program. This may be the spring or
summer term of 2014 for the 2014-15
academic year.
3. Have a family income equal to or less
than $110,000.
Questions:
Contact your campus Financial Aid Office
for more information or visit https://www.
pheaa.org/funding-opportunities/rtss/index.shtml.
Life
Student
Page 7
Journeys at Home and Abroad
By Kathy Gilbert
Art Department
Boyce Art Gallery presents the art of Professor Gerry
Dinnen and his 2Design Class from to October 9th
T
he tall glass display cases contain masterful pottery created by Professor Dinnen during his
sabbatical year and studies in Europe.
He spent three weeks in Rome and 10 days in London. His colorful patterned tile-like paintings are displayed in the glass wall case.
These works were inspired by carefully examining intricate designs in European floors
and walls. They are not copies of others' work but are his own artistic response to what he saw and
studied. Materials used to create these were gouache, which is an opaque watercolor paint and gessoed
masonite panels. He also crafted the custommade black frames.
Professor Dinnen instructed his 2D class to also create colored patterns from their observations of everyday patterns they could find in this area. The students were guided to
pay attention to their environments and search out patterns in daily life. On the long wall you will see
the students' large, colorful patterned work created with oil pastel on paper.
Stop a moment and check out the gallery located next to the cafeteria. There are four shows a semester,
so come back often to see new art.
CCAC News
Page 8 Wednesday, September 17, 2014
Two new book clubs form at Boyce, Braddock Hills CCAC selected to
receive
national
diversity award
Photo and story by Melissa Hrico
English instructor
This semester
two new books
clubs will be
available to students, faculty
and employees
at the Boyce
Campus
and
Braddock Hills
Center.
The book
clubs will meet
every
other
week to informally discuss,
debate, question and explore two novels
this fall.
To kick things off, the book clubs are
participating in the National Endowment
of the Arts “Big Read” project.
We will begin by reading Ray Bradbury’s Fahrenheit 451. Community College of Allegheny County will be joining
colleges across the country in reading and
discussing this exciting novel.
In his story, Bradbury portrays a dystopic future version of America where books,
learning, knowledge and intellectualism
are illegal and taboo.
Reflecting Nazi policies during World
War II, the officials in Bradbury’s society
burn all books. Bradbury’s predictions
about modern technology bear uncanny
similarities to the contemporary world.
Our first meetings had a great turnout,
but we are still open to new members.
During our first meeting, we worked on
planning the club for the semester.
We also watched a video interview
with Ray Bradbury that is on the Big Read
website. We briefly discussed the book,
the author and the post-War War II historical context in which Bradbury wrote his
cautionary tale.
When we meet next, we will be discussing Part 1 of “Fahrenheit 451”—“The
Hearth and the Salamander.” We will
hold the final discussion of the novel during the last two weeks of October.
Boyce Campus students: Barbara Coy, Kerry Smith, Danielle Thompson, and Cassie
Doege meet to plan future meeting dates and discussion topics for the new book clubs.
In October, members of the club will
decide which book we will read during the
second half of the fall semester.
The Braddock Hills Book Club met for
the first time Thursday, Sept. 11. The
meeting was held at the Braddock Hills
Center in Room 107. We will meet again
Thursday, Sept. 25 at 5 p.m. to discuss the
first third of the novel.
The Boyce Book Club met for the first
time Monday, Sept. 15. This meeting
was held in the Reading and Writing Lab
(N306). The Boyce Book Club will meet
again Monday, Sept. 29 at 1p.m. to discuss
the first third of the novel.
Anyone who is interested in joining
the book club can email Melissa Hrico at
[email protected] for more information.
There are still a limited number of novels
available for students. In addition, some
instructors will be offering their students
extra-credit for participating in the book
club.
The book club will meet bi-monthly to
informally discuss two novels this semester. All who are interested are welcome
to attend one of our meetings on the 25th
or the 29th of September when we will
be discussing Part 1, “The Hearth and the
Salamander.”
Career Week
Monday, October 6 –
Friday, October 10
PITTSBURGH—The Community College
of Allegheny County has been selected to
receive the 2014 INSIGHT Into Diversity
Higher Education Excellence in Diversity
(HEED) Award for its continued commitment to expand and promote diversity and
inclusion initiatives at the college and in
the community.
The HEED Award is the only national
recognition given to colleges, universities
and school systems that exhibit outstanding efforts and success in the area of diversity and inclusion.
This is the second year in a row that
CCAC has received this prestigious award.
“It is an honor for CCAC to once again
be recognized for our efforts to promote
diversity and inclusion at the college and
in the greater community,” says Special
Assistant to the President for Diversity &
Inclusion Clyde W. Pickett.
“At CCAC, we continually strive to foster a culture that not only supports diversity, but encourages it as an institutional
priority through the college’s Transformative Inclusion initiative.
"In an ever-expanding global society,
it is imperative for college communities to
promote cross-cultural understanding and
support for a more invested climate of equity.”
For more information on CCAC’s Office
of Institutional Diversity & Inclusion as
well as the college’s diversity initiatives,
log onto ccac.edu, search keywords “diversity & inclusion.”
Veterans
Representatives
Serve All Campuses
By Dwight Boddorf
DIRECTOR OF VETERANS
SERVICES
I am pleased to announce that we now
have a new team of fully trained Veterans
Representatives, with one serving each
campus and a center at Allegheny Campus
staffed with a Director and Senior Clerk.
CCAC’s Veterans Services Department
was created to assist student veterans in
their transition between military and civilian life.
CCAC developed the Veterans Services
Department because it recognizes the barriers veterans face when transitioning to civilian life, in addition to the challenges of
obtaining their first post-secondary degree.
Veterans Services provides comprehensive and coordinated services to address
the academic, financial, physical and social needs of veterans.
Additionally, CCAC has recognized that
our veteran staff and faculty often face
unique challenges and barriers while working, taking care of loved ones, their own
health, and dealing with VA Benefits.
Therefore, Veterans Services has expanded its services within the last two
years to provide support for faculty and
staff as well.
We take pride in providing our veteran
family here at CCAC, both staff and students with the best service possible.
Please take a moment to familiarize yourself with the Veterans Services Staff Members on each campus and make sure to stop
in, say hello, and make them feel welcome
to the CCAC Family.
Hours of Operation: Boyce S555- 724325-6617, North, South: 9:30 a.m. – 2:30
p.m. - Monday – Friday .
CCAC News
Massage therapy program moves to Boyce
Wednesday, September 17, 2014
Public demand
sparks interest
in massage
therapy careers
MASSAGE THERAPY PROGRAM:
Stress.
We all have it. And with the start of
a new semester here at CCAC, what you
may not have been aware of, amidst your
daily hustle and bustle, is that the former
Allegheny Massage Therapy degree and
certificate programs have moved to Boyce
campus!
That’s right, our very own student specialists are preparing now to go out and
battle the number one cause of disease—
stress.
Public awareness and demand for massage therapy has dramatically increased.
According to the U.S. Department of Labor in 2010, employment for massage
therapists is expected to increase 19 percent from 2008 to 2018, faster than average for all occupations.
The Community College of Allegheny
County Boyce campus helps to create a solution to this demand by offering both Associate Degree and Certificate options for
students during the day or evening.
Our curriculum includes everything students need to make a competitive entry into
the job market including anatomy & physiology, business strategies, professional
ethics, theory and technique of Swedish
and Chair massage, adjunct therapies for
spa settings including Aromatherapy and
Hot Stone Massage, as well as clinical assessment, Deep Tissue, and various corrective techniques to manage pain.
Our newly created Massage Therapy lab
Page 9
Career
Week
opens
October 6
Monday, Oct. 6, 2014
PHOTO BY KEVIN ANDERSON
The new Boyce Campus Massage Therapy lab – N-208 - stands ready for students and their "victims."
has all the latest equipment students need
to be successful including a hydraulic
table, hydrocollator, Hot Stone warmers,
paraffin bath, and more!
The massage therapy employers of Pittsburgh need licensed, qualified therapists!
Both the Associate Degree and Certificate
programs do just that—prepare students to
sit for a state licensing exam.
In addition, the hands-on lab coursework and clinical practice provides valuable real-world experience that helps students learn to effectively and safely deal
with clients with specific conditions.
It won’t be long until the new Boyce
campus student Massage Therapy clinic
will be looking to help relieve some of
your stress!
Until then, if you’re interested in learning more about CCAC’s Massage Therapy
program options, or want to bring some
peace to your frenzied daily life, stop by
new state-of-the-art Massage Therapy Lab
room N208 in the Northwest Wing.
Or better yet, reach out to the new Massage Therapy Program Coordinator, Kevin
Anderson at 724-325-6815.
A graduate of the Pennsylvania School
of Muscle Therapy in King of Prussia, PA,
Associate Professor Anderson earned his
Bachelor of Science in Kinesiology from
Penn State as well as his Master’s degree
in Exercise Science.
The new Program Coordinator brings a
wealth of practical and teaching experience to the CCAC Massage program.
Good luck with your semester, and remember DON’T STRESS! Instead, take
out time for your most important asset—
YOU
Presentation: Leadership
Development Institute,
PHEAA & The Road
Map Committee
Financial Literacy and
Responsibility/ Student
Loan Debt/ Career
Choice/ Road Map
Boyce Campus Auditorium
10 AM – Noon
This workshop is open to CCAC
students only; all majors are welcome.
Braddock Hills students: Sign up with
Barbara Poppa, Secretary Braddock
Hills Center by 3 PM Friday, Oct. 3 for
transportation to and from Boyce Campus
Presenters: Jamie HightowerPoindexter, Juel Smith & Natasha
Walton: Leadership Development
Institute Participants
Kimberly McCurdy - Higher Education
Access Partner - Allegheny County
PHEAA - Pennsylvania School Services
Job Fair Wednesday,
October 8
CCAC Veterans Services
admissions and financial aid
www.oafa.pitt.edu
Boyce Campus:
S555
724-325-6617
Pricilla Robertson,
Veteran Success Coach
PITT
TRANSFER
Allegheny Campus:
Jones Hall Room 212
Phone: 412-237-6503
Dwight Boddorf,
Director of Veterans Services
Daphne Rees,
Veteran Success Coach
Kim Fairley,
Senior Clerk for Veterans ServicesN
COME VISIT
PICTURE YOURSELF AT PITT:
OCTOBER 4, 2014
OCTOBER 18, 2014
NOVEMBER 8, 2014
NOVEMBER 15, 2014
INFORMATION SESSIONS:
AVAILABLE WEEKDAYS AND
SELECT SATURDAYS
North Campus:
Admissions Suite
Phone: 412-369-4191
Sharmyn Straughters,
Veteran Success Coach
South Campus:
A 305
Phone: 412-469-6310
James O’Connor,
Veteran Success Coach
Hours of Operation:
Allegheny: 8 a.m. – 4 p.m.
Monday – Friday
Boyce, North, South: 9:30 a.m. – 2:30 p.m.
As always, if a campus representative is not available please direct students to Allegheny Campus, where
all VA paperwork is centralized and processed.
SCHEDULE A VISIT:
WWW.OAFA.PITT.EDU/VISIT
pittadmissions
today
find us at instagram.com/pittadmissions
and twitter.com/pittadmissions
visit us this fall!
APPLY FOR ADMISSION:
WWW.OAFA.PITT.EDU/TRANSFER
REQUEST MORE INFORMATION:
WWW.OAFA.PITT.EDU/VIP
CCAC News
Page 10 Wednesday, September 17, 2014
Honors Program students awarded Leadership in Honors Scholarship
Four CCAC women
in Honors Program
earn full-tuition
scholarships
for academic,
leadership
excellence
If you'd like to write
for the Boyce Collegian,
it's easy to submit. Just
e-mail Peggy Roche at
[email protected]
This newspaper is the
first place students,
faculty and staff can turn
to voice opinions about
community college life
or the world at large.
By Renee Shissler
• Voice your opinion to
a larger audience.
• We can all share
in the myriad
experiences
community college
students bring to the
entire community.
• Tell your story to a
larger audience.
• I'll copyedit for
you, so don't worry
about too many
rules - express
yourself first. I'll
fix the grammar if
you want me to.
Honors Program Secretary
The CCAC Honors Program is pleased
to announce the winners of four full-tuition
Leadership in Honors Scholarships for the
2014-2015 academic year. The winners
are Emily Burks, Alyssa Carlson, Rachael
Schneider, and Alexis Schnepp.
Emily Burks attends Boyce Campus and
will graduate from CCAC in May 2015
with an associate’s degree in General Studies.
She plans to transfer to either the University of Pittsburgh or University of Kentucky. Her career goals are to work for the
Peace Corps, teaching math with the hope
of someday working at the United Nations
as a statistician.
Alyssa Carlson attends Allegheny Campus and will graduate with an associate’s
degree in early childhood development in
May 2015. She plans to transfer to Carlow
University to earn a bachelor's degree and
teacher certification. Alyssa would like to
be an elementary school teacher.
Rachael Schneider attends South Cam-
U
N
I
V
E
R
PHOTO COURTESY OF RENEE SHISSLER
The honors students : (l-r) Rachael Schneider, Alyssa Carlson, Alexis Schnepp,
and Emily Burks line up following an honors rock climbing outing.
pus where she is a General Studies major
working toward entry in the nursing program. Upon graduation from the nursing
program, she plans to work as work as a
nurse at a local hospital.
Alexis Schnepp attends North Campus as
a nursing major. Upon graduation in May
2016, she plans to transfer to the University
of Pittsburgh to earn a doctorate in nurse
anesthesia.
Her career goal is to be a nurse anesthetist
at the Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh.
Leadership in Honors Scholarships are
competitive full-tuition scholarships awarded to returning CCAC Honors students who
S
I
T
Y
O
have been actively engaged in the CCAC
Honors Program.
The Leadership Scholars will assume
leadership roles on their campuses and participate in the Honors Leadership course,
which helps to develop the students’ leadership and interpersonal skills through the
study of leadership theory, literature and
historical documents and film as a means
of analyzing leadership principles in action.
If you would like more information about
Honors at CCAC or the Leadership in
Honors scholarship, please call (412) 4694303 or e-mail [email protected]
F
P
I
T
T
• Our next
deadline
is Monday,
Oct. 20.
S
B
U
R
G
H
YOU STARTED SMART.
FINISH STRONG.
Transfer the credits from your associate’s degree and get the bachelor’s
you need in today’s competitive job market from a world-class university.
Wednesday, September 17, 2014
“You
Gotta Be”
A Nurse
Boyce News
Page 11
Boyce hosts
traditional nurse
pinning ceremony
By Elizabeth Healy
Professor of Nursing
CCAC Boyce graduating nursing students held a traditional nurse pinning ceremony at the Boyce Campus May 9.
Proud families and friends filled the Performance Hall as these candidates received
their pin and recited the customary Florence Nightingale Pledge.
The ceremony included a slideshow prepared by student, Caitlyn Lazzaro.
Keynote faculty speaker for the ceremony was Dr Rebecca Shaheen. Marcella
Gruchalak, student speaker, praised her
classmates on helping in each other’s success.
Like the childhood game, Chutes and
Ladders, they aided each other by helping
those who were down and making sure that
everyone was on the ladder of achieve-
PHOTO COURTESY OF Caitlyn Lazzaro
Lauryn Johnson (center) sings "You Gotta Be" at Boyce's annual nurse-pinning ceremony held each May for graduating
nurses.
ment.
The ceremony concluded with remarks
by Dana Cecere, the Student Nurse Association President, who held Lauryn Johnson
to her first semester promise of singing at
the pinning ceremony.
Lauryn Johnson rendition's of “You Gotta Be” was a testimony to the hard work,
perseverance and dedication of this year’s
candidates.
Pinning candidates included Steve
Beckett, Janelle Billy, Dana Cecere, Ashley Cherico, Michelle Cousar, Kelly Dooley, Rashko Dorosiev, Alexis Forbes, Deidra Gaertner, Randy Geiselhart, Marcella
Gruchalak, Amber Hanus, Elyse Harkema,
Lauryn Johnson, Caitlyn Lazzaro, Kara
Marshall, Erica Miller, Haitien Phung,
Martha Rey, Tracey Stelf, Jean Stone, and
Jessica Thomas.
These students successfully completed
the two year program which allows the
graduate to submit an application to the
State Board of Nursing for the Registered Nurse State Licensure Examination
(NCLEX).
Upon passing the NCLEX exam, graduates receive the distinction of being a Registered Nurse (RN).
Following the ceremony, everyone enjoyed a reception with light refreshments
sponsored by the Student Nurse Association.
Join us for an Open House!
Wednesday, October 15
4-7 p.m.
First Floor, Wesley W. Posvar Hall
230 South Bouquet Street • Pittsburgh, PA 15260
MOST POPULAR MAJORS:
• ADMINISTRATION OF JUSTICE (BA)
• HEALTH SERVICES (BA and BS)
• MEDIA AND PROFESSIONAL COMMUNICATIONS (BA)
• NATURAL SCIENCES (BS) Includes premed
Learn more at cgs.pitt.edu/OpenHouse/cc
Kristine Trotta, CGS student,
natural sciences major
Fall
Break
Monday,
Oct. 13
Tuesday,
Oct. 14
The Boyce Collegian
Page 12 Free Concerts at
Boyce Campus
Wednesday, September 17, 2014
History Center Pours It On
With New Heinz Exhibition
PITTSBURGH, Sept. 5, 2014 – The Senator John Heinz History Center launched its
newest long-term exhibition Saturday, Sept. 6 showcasing the local origins and international reach of one of the world’s most beloved food brands.
The new Heinz exhibition highlights the 145-year history of the company, including its
evolution from a small food purveyor into one of the most recognizable international
brands.
Throughout the exhibit, History Center visitors will discover how the Heinz family business that began with eight-year old Henry John Heinz selling produce from his mother’s
garden in Sharpsburg grew to a worldwide company with more than 5,700 products in
200 countries around the globe.
“Few food companies have had a more lasting impact on American eating and buying
habits than Pittsburgh’s own H.J. Heinz Company,” said Andy Masich, president and
CEO of the History Center.
“For more than 20 years, the History Center has been home to the world’s largest collection of artifacts and archival materials related to this iconic Pittsburgh company. The
new Heinz exhibit showcases the rich history, commitment to quality, and innovative
spirit of the company that still abides by H.J.’s famous motto, ‘To do a common thing
uncommonly well brings success.’”
Photo and Story by Liz Hand
COLLEGIAN STAFF
The River City Brass Quintet played on August 8, 2014, at our Boyce
Campus Auditorium.
It was a successful completion of the 31st Summer Concert Series
sponsored by UPMC. The five brass band players proved to be a real
crowd pleaser.
I appreciate the fact that the concert was held in our clean, air-conditioned auditorium since it was such a hot, sticky day. Instead of attending
one of the many outdoor concerts in the area, a good crowd was present
to listen to cool jazz. And the price was right--free!
Although I am not an expert in instruments, I believe there were two
playing trumpets, two playing the trombone on either side of the French
horn player.
They played a delightful mix of classical, gospel and jazz, tunes. They
also played Broadway music including the prelude to “West Side Story,”
“Maria” and “I Feel Pretty.”
To hear a sample just view them on the Boyce Campus CCAC Facebook posted under August 9, 2014.
“Heinz is proud to partner with the History Center to bring this exhibition to life,” said
Bernardo Hees, CEO of Heinz. “The ideals and values held by H.J. Heinz still inspire the
Company today, with our unwavering focus on quality and innovation. Heinz remains
committed to its Pittsburgh roots and we are thrilled about this gift to the city, a story that
the History Center will share with hundreds of thousands of residents and visitors to the
region.”
Highlights of the new Heinz exhibit include:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
A larger-than-life, 11-foot ketchup bottle comprised of more than 400 individual
bottles alongside a display of more than 100 historic bottles that shows the evolution
of Heinz products and packaging;
Innovative displays on the history of Heinz, including videos chronicling the genealogy of the family and an interactive table focusing on Heinz’s international popularity;
A life-like figure of 10-year-old H.J. Heinz;
Video loops of vintage Heinz TV ads from around the world;
A display of iconic Heinz pickle pins, including the first pin from the 1893 World’s
Fair in Chicago;
Items from former Heinz brand advertising campaigns, such as a 9Lives director’s
chair used by Morris the Cat and a life-size costume of StarKist’s Charlie the Tuna;
and
Never before seen artifacts from the History Center’s collection, the largest of its
kind in the world, including H.J. Heinz’s desk set and H.J.’s hand-written ledger,
recipe book from 1869, rare memorabilia, and hundreds of Heinz bottles.
In addition to the exhibit, a variety of Heinz products are available in the History Center’s
museum shop and e-store, including ketchup t-shirts, holiday ornaments, cookbooks and
more.
Volunteer for CCAC's
Bridge to College, Career
Pathways Program
By SUSAN GALL
Director, Special Projects
Office of the President
CAMPUS NEWS: If you are enrolled in
one of CCAC's four year degree transfer programs and can find find to or three
hours a week to help an adult student to
develop math, science and language arts
skills, then CCAC's Bridge to College and
Career Pathways Program asks you to considering serving as a volunteer tutor.
CCAC students with strong math, language arts, social studies and science skills
are needed to serve as volunteer tutors for
students in CCAC's Bridge to College and
Career Pathways Program.
The grant-funded provides adult students who did not complete high school
with the chance to prepare academically to
take the high school equivalency examination and attain a Commonwealth Secondary School Diploma.
Over the past year, the Bridge to College
and Career Pathways Program provided
educational assistance to more than onehundred and fifty students.
The core academics of this adult education program include mathematics, science, social studies and language arts.
Students attend classes on Allegheny
Campus three days a week and focus on
strengthening their skills in four academic areas and developing their computer
literacy.
The role of the volunteer turor is to
provide students with one-on-one assistance to supplement and enhance their
classroom learning experience. Training
is provided for all volunteer tutors.
Volunteer tutoring is an excellent opportunity to work with others while developing valuable professional experience for your resume.
If you'd like to learn more about becoming a Volunteer Tutor, visit the college
website at Bridge to College and Career
Pathways Volunteer Tutoring Program or
contact Francis (Fran) Albright, Volunteer Tutor Coordinator at 412-237-4578.

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