2015 CAPER Executive Summary and Financial

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2015 CAPER Executive Summary and Financial
2015
Consolidated Annual Performance & Evaluation
Report (CAPER)
City of Galveston
CDBG & HOME Programs
Executive Summary
The City of Galveston 2015 Program Year covers the period of June 1, 2015 through May 31, 2016. The
2015 Program Year is the third reporting year of the 2013 5-year Consolidated Plan.
Resources Made Available to Further the Objectives of the Consolidated Plan
The following resources were made available to further the City of Galveston's housing, housing related
and non-housing community development objectives of the Consolidated Plan:
2015 Community Development Block Grant
$
1,163,000.00
2014 HOME Investment Partnerships Program
223,373.00
CDBG Program Income (Est. $40,000)
87,862.12
HOME Program Income (Est. $15,000)
41,841.54
The City expended $1,749,360.76 in CDBG funds for community development and housing activities
during the 2015 program year. In 2015, HOME activities expended $474,814.72 for the purpose of
providing safe, decent affordable housing. The 2015 CDBG Program Income (PI) estimate was $40,000.
The City received $87,862.12 in CDBG PI during 2015; $10,760.00 in Revolving Loan Fund and
$77,102.12 in General PI. CDBG PI actually received was not within the City’s 25% rule for substantial
amendments of the estimated $40,000 in PI. The City’s estimated 2015 HOME PI was $15,000 and the
actual receipts were $41,841.54. The receipted HOME PI was not within the 25% rule of the estimated
HOME PI. The City provided notice to the public in coordination with its Citizen Comment Period on the
2015 CAPER of the deviation of more than 25% from the projected CDBG and HOME PI receipts on
August 10, 2016.
City of Galveston
2015 CAPER Executive Summary
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2015 Housing & Community Development Objectives
The following were identified as the 2015 Housing & Community Development Objectives, of which all
were identified as high priorities in the 2013 5-Year Consolidated Plan:
1. To provide and expand the supply of safe, decent, and affordable housing through the rehabilitation
of existing residential property and the development of new residential property for low-moderate
income persons;
2. To provide and expand homeownership opportunities for low-moderate income homebuyers;
3. To reduce the number of housing units containing lead based paint and other lead hazards;
4. To identify and eliminate barriers to affordable housing and impediments to fair housing;
5. Provide code enforcement and neighborhood revitalization activities to diminish blight, unsafe
buildings and lots, and general neighborhood decay in low-moderate income areas;
6. Provide infrastructure enhancement to support neighborhood revitalization and new residential
development in low-moderate income areas;
7. Promote the health and well-being of city residents through the provision of public and supportive
services;
8. To facilitate neighborhood, comprehensive, and individual project management, planning, and
capacity building activities for low/moderate income areas;
9. Provide economic development opportunities for low-moderate income and for their employers;
and
10. Assist in the coordination of resources in the community through expansion/enhancement of the
homeless Continuum of Care Program.
The 2015 projects made significant progress toward meeting the goals and objectives as established in
the 2015 Action Plan. The accomplishments are reported in the following sections. The grant-funded
activities administered by the Grants and Housing Department met all program requirements and
generally provided a positive impact to the low-moderate income neighborhoods and residents. The City
distributed the funds in a timely manner and the projects were substantially on schedule to meet their
objectives.
The following programs were funded from the 2015 CDBG & HOME Programs:
Project
Public Service Activity
Parks & Recreation Dept.
Children & Youth Program
2015 Community Development Block Grant
Description
Provide staffing and supplies/equipment to implement educational &
recreational summer and after-school supervised activities at Menard
& Wright Cuney Parks and Recreation Centers for 1,000 primarily LMI
children and youth ages 5-18
Public Facility & Improvement Activity
Provide 52 blocks of sidewalk installation improvements and ADA
ramps in the street right-of-ways used for pedestrian passageways in
Public Works Dept.
the LMI area of Ave. L-43rd to 53rd St., Ave. M-29th to 43rd St., and
Sidewalk Installation
Ave. O-25th to 53rd St. to assist in safe pedestrian walkways
City of Galveston
2015 CAPER Executive Summary
$
$
Allocation
145,950
145,950
$
580,120
$
580,120
2
Code Enforcement Activities
Compliance Division Code
Compliance Officers
Compliance Division
Demolition & Lot
Clearance/Boardup
Provide 4 compliance officers to work in LMI areas to conduct 9,000
property inspections to enforce local codes and follow-up notification
and 3,500 reinspections for non-compliant properties
Provide contracted demolition of 3 dilapidated/unsafe structures and
lot clearance/boardup on 95 properties that are nuisance and safety
issues in LMI neighborhoods and areas
Planning & Program Administration Activity
CDBG Program
Provide management of the CDBG and HOME Programs to ensure
Administration
compliance with all regulatory requirements
CDBG TOTAL ALLOCATION
CDBG Program Income
(Estimated)
Project
Provide 2013 Consolidated Plan CDBG Eligible Projects with PI
received primarily from housing rehabilitation loan payments and
payoffs and lot clearance, boardup, and demolition lien payoffs
2015 HOME Investment Partnerships Program
Description
Affordable Housing Activities
Community Housing
Provide a housing development activity to acquire property and
Development Org. (CHDO)
rehabilitate or construct affordable housing to be sold or rented to a
Affordable Housing
LMI household through a CHDO RFP process; Mandatory 15% SetProgram
aside Requirement
Grants & Housing Dept.
Homebuyer Assist.
Provide downpayment and closing cost assistance to 12 LMI
Program
households with first-time homeownership
HOME Program Administration Activity
HOME Program
Provide management of the HOME Program to ensure compliance
Administration
with all regulatory requirements
HOME TOTAL ALLOCATION
HOME Program Income
(Estimated)
Provide 2013 Consolidated Plan HOME Eligible Projects with PI
received primarily from housing rehabilitation loan payments
TOTAL CONSOLIDATED PROGRAMS
$
204,330
$
175,140
$
29,190
$
232,600
$
232,600
$
1,163,000
$
40,000
$
Allocation
201,036
$
51,036
$
150,000
$
22,337
$
22,337
$
223,373
$
15,000
$
1,386,373
Project Service Areas
The focus of the activities contained in the City of Galveston’s 2015 Action Plan was on a citywide basis
in the low-moderate income areas. The Public Services under the CDBG funds have been allocated on a
Citywide basis as a direct benefit activity. Code Enforcement activities will be located in the
LMI Neighborhoods. The Public Facility and Improvements under the CDBG funds have been allocated
to a specific LMI area. All of the HOME funds are dedicated to Citywide projects.
City of Galveston
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The City of Galveston has a low-moderate income percentage of 55.96%. The population of
the Island is 49,238 people with a racial/ethnic composition of: White 23,235 or 47.19%;
Hispanic 14,516 or 29.48%; Black 9,060 or 18.4%; and Other 2,427 or 4.93%. (HUD CPD
Maps Information – 2007-11 ACS).
The Citywide low-moderate income neighborhoods are primarily located in the area of 1st Street to 61st
Street (on the East and West) from Harborside, Avenue C, and Avenue E (on the North) to Seawall and
Avenue S (on the South). Other low-moderate income areas outside of this core city area will also be
considered for assistance. The low-moderate income areas are mostly located in Census Tracts: 7240,
7241, 7243, 7244, 7246, 7247, 7248, 7249, 7250, 7251, 7252, 7253, 7254, 7256, 7258 and 7259. These
areas are also the primary locations for the minority concentrations of the City's population. The total
population of this area is 36,643 with a LMI percentage of 62.54%.
The following comprise the primary LMI neighborhoods in the core city area. This area has a population
of 27,638 with a LMI percentage of 62.32% located in CT’s 7240, 7243, 7244, 7246, 7247, 7248, 7249,
7250, 7251, 7252, 7253, and 7254, and a minority concentration of 62.48% (2007-11 ACS).
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Old Central/Carver Park Neighborhood - The physical boundaries are 26th Street to 33rd Street
from Mechanic to Avenue M, 33rd Street to 41st Street from Church to Avenue M, 41st Street to
45th Street from Postoffice to Avenue M, 45th Street to 53rd Street from Postoffice to Avenue L,
and 53rd Street to 54th Street from Postoffice to Broadway. Old Central/Carver Park
Neighborhood is primarily located in census tracts CT7240 BG1; CT1246 BG1, 2, and 3; CT7247
BG1; CT7251 BG1; and CT7252 BG1.
San Jacinto Neighborhood - The physical boundaries are 6th Street to 23rd Street from
Broadway to Seawall Blvd. San Jacinto Neighborhood is primarily located in census tract CT7244
BG1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6.
Kempner Park Neighborhood - The physical boundaries are 23rd Street to 26th Street from
Broadway to Seawall, 26th Street to 30th Street from Avenue M to Seawall, and 30th to 35th
Streets from Avenue M to Avenue S. Kempner Park Neighborhood is primarily located in census
tracts CT7247 BG2 and 3; CT7248 BG1, 2, and 3; and CT7249 BG1 and 2.
Lasker Park/Bayou Shore Neighborhood - The physical boundaries are 35th Street to 45th Street
from Avenue M to Avenue S, 45th Street to 53rd Street from Avenue L to Avenue S, and 53rd
Street to 61st Street from Broadway to Avenue S and Stewart Road. Lasker Park/Bayou Shore
Neighborhood is primarily located in census tracts CT1250 BG1 and 2; CT7251 BG2 and 3;
CT7252 BG2 and 3; CT7253 BG1, 2, and 3; CT7254 BG1, 2, 3, 4, and 5; and CT7258 BG3.
East End Neighborhood - The physical boundaries are 6th Street to 19th Street from Harborside
to Broadway. East End Neighborhood is primarily located in census tract CT7243 BG1, 2, 3, 4, 5,
and 6.
There is 1 targeted LMI area for the Sidewalk Project as follows:

The project is sited on Ave. L-43rd to 53rd, Ave. M-29th to 43rd, and Ave. O-25th to 53rd and
located in CT’s 7247, 7248, 7249, 7251, 7252, 7253, and 7254. This area has a population of
14,593 with a LMI percentage of 60.79% and a Minority percentage of 66.55%.
City of Galveston
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The following project was conducted in facilities located in LMI neighborhoods and open on a Citywide
basis for direct services to principally low-moderate income residents:
 City Parks & Recreation Department – Youth Recreation Program
o Wright Cuney Park & recreation center, 41st St. & Ave. H (Ball)
o Menard Park & recreation center, 27th St. & Seawall
o Based on the CPD Mapping 2007-2011 Census ACS, the following minority concentrations
comprise the service areas of this project:
 Wright Cuney Park – Area is 69.23% minority population
 Menard Park – Area is 59.19% minority population
The following projects were conducted on a Citywide basis for direct services to low-moderate income
households:
 City Grants & Housing Department – Housing Rehabilitation Program
 City Grants & Housing Department – Homebuyer Assistance Program
 CHDO – Affordable Housing Project (housing unit will be sold to a low-moderate income
homebuyer)
 Minority information is collected with the applicant eligibility process
The following projects were conducted within the Citywide low-moderate income areas:
 City Planning & Community Development Department – Code Enforcement Compliance Officers
 City Planning & Community Development Department – Demolition/Lot Clearance
 City Public Works Department – Sidewalk Installation Project
o Based on the CPD Mapping 2007-2011 Census ACS, the area is 61.11% minority population
The following table identifies the LMI Census Tracts and the Minority Concentrations:
City of Galveston
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Maps
Maps of Projects and LMI Neighborhoods/Areas with Census Tracts, LMI by Percentages Concentration,
and Race/Ethnicity Concentration follows.
2015 Project Map with LMI Census Tracts and LMI Neighborhoods
City of Galveston
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LMI Below 30% Concentration
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LMI 30-50% Concentration
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LMI 50-80% Concentration
City of Galveston
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Race-Ethnicity White Alone Concentration Map
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Race-Ethnicity Black Alone Concentration Map
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Race-Ethnicity Hispanic Concentration Map
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Financial Impact of the CDBG and HOME Program
The following contracts were awarded in the 2015 grant year.
Total CDBG & HOME Contracts
Total Amount of Contracts
Total M/WBE Contracts
Total Section 3 Contracts
56
$1,051,320.07
28/$370,508.74
18/$505,105.00
Through the CDBG and HOME Programs, the public service, public facility and improvements, code
enforcement and program administration activities provided funds for 49 staff members. There were 10
Section 3 employees hired through these activities. The race/ethnicity of the employees was Asian-1,
Black-24, Hispanic-9, and White-15.
During the 2015 Program Year, a total of $1,749,360.76 in CDBG funding was expended to address the
City of Galveston’s goals and objectives in meeting the CDBG Program primary purpose of providing
decent housing and suitable living environment and expanding economic opportunities. There was a
total of $474,814.72 in HOME funds utilized to accomplish the City’s goals and objectives and meet the
primary purpose of the HOME Program of expanding the supply of decent, safe, sanitary affordable
housing for very low-income persons.
2015 Program Year Project Accomplishments
The following accomplishments reflect the impact of programs to the community from the 2015 CDBG
and HOME Program.
Housing Programs
The effects of Hurricane Ike in 2008 on the housing units of the Island were still being assisted under the
CDBG-Disaster Recovery Housing Program. Many citizens were without insurance and others received
inadequate assistance to make the repairs to their housing. With the majority of the substandard
housing also being damaged by the storm, citizens were counting on the disaster housing program for
their assistance. From the start of the Disaster Program and through the 2015 grant year, the Disaster
Housing Program has rehabilitated or reconstructed a total of approximately 1,300 units under Phase 1
and 2. Many of the residents applied to the City’s program for assistance due to the length of time it
took for assistance from the Disaster Program or their inability to qualify for Disaster assistance. The
City’s Housing Rehabilitation Program has developed a list of prospective applicants from the
homeowner contacts that it works through as funding for housing rehabilitation becomes available.
The following priorities and specific objectives were addressed during the 2015 Program Year. The City
has identified that the housing priorities and objectives will primarily focus on assistance for owneroccupied and homeownership projects in an effort to assist in the increase of homeownership. The ACS
2010-2014 Census reflects the owner-occupied housing unit rate as 45.1%. This is far below the US rate
of 64.4% and the Texas rate of 62.7%.
Housing High Priority - To provide and expand the supply of safe, decent and affordable housing through
the rehabilitation of existing residential property and the construction of new residential properties
City of Galveston
2015 CAPER Executive Summary
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o
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The City allocated $51,036 in HOME CHDO set-aside funds and will collaborate with a certified CHDO
to acquire and rehabilitate a housing unit for low-moderate income person/s to purchase.
Accomplishment: The City developed a Request for Proposal for a CHDO Affordable Housing
Program for the 2015 HOME CHDO set-aside. The RFP was issued and responses will be due in the
next reporting period. The City continued a CHDO project for prior multi-year funding of
$467,667.35 funds to the Houston Area Community Development Corp. (HAUCDC) to implement the
City’s CHDO affordable housing project. HAUCDC will purchase up to 5 properties, rehabilitate to
code, and resell properties to eligible LMI households. HAUCDC expended $217,021.27 this period
to complete the purchase of 3 properties and completed the rehab on 1 property; these are singlefamily units with 2 - 2 bdrm./1 bath and 1 - 3 bdrm./2 bath properties. In prior year, the CHDO
conducted outreach community meetings and solicited homebuyer applicants to purchase
properties. The HAUCDC CHDO balance is $250,646.08 to expend next period. The City CHDO
balance for 2015 and prior year is $60,024.61.
The City Grants & Housing Department Housing Rehabilitation Project Administration will provide
management and oversight and project delivery costs for the housing rehabilitation and affordable
housing programs and other housing related issues including projects funded through the CDBG
Program, Revolving Loan Fund, HOME Program, and HOME Program Income to ensure regulatory
compliance and building standards. The CDBG Program Income release of funds provided $140,000
for the Housing Rehabilitation Project Delivery and Management.
Housing High Priority - To provide and expand homeownership opportunities for low- and moderateincome homebuyers
 The City Homeownership Assistance Program (HAP) with $150,000 HOME funds offers
downpayment and closing cost assistance to eligible low-moderate income homeowners. It is
anticipated that the HAP will provide assistance to 12 low-moderate income families or individuals.
o Accomplishment: During the program year, the City Grants and Housing Department provided
$9,958.39 in HOME funding assistance to 1 low-moderate income household in the purchase of their
first home. The 1 first-time homebuyer was White with LMI percentage of 60%-80%. There were 8
homebuyer applicants that were approved as income eligible during the program year. The HAP has
a balance of $158,024.78 (with prior year funds) to be expended in the next reporting period.
Housing High Priority - To reduce the number of housing units containing lead based paint and other
lead hazards
 The City of Galveston will enforce its Lead-Based Paint Ordinance. The ordinance is designed to
reduce the hazards of Lead-Based Paint exposure through proper interim controls, abatement and
removal techniques. The City will continue to increase public awareness of Lead-Based Paint hazards
through its housing rehabilitation and environmental development programs. The City will enforce
LBP hazards on each rehabilitation project that it undertakes and performs visual inspections for LBP
and requires stabilization of any deteriorated paint prior to providing homebuyer assistance.
o Accomplishment: The City takes all necessary actions to reduce lead-based paint hazards in housing
units receiving federal assistance. The housing rehabilitation program completed 1 project this
period, 2 projects were under construction, and 5 projects were in work-write-up development. The
homebuyer assistance program provided 1 homebuyer with assistance.
Housing High Priority - To identify and eliminate barriers to affordable housing and impediments to fair
housing
City of Galveston
2015 CAPER Executive Summary
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The City will continue to review policies to ensure that no new ordinances are passed that will
negatively impact affordable or fair housing or that changes in the economy and development
practices do not render existing policies as adversely affecting fair and affordable housing choice.
The City will continue to educate the consumers on the fair housing law and avenues for filing
complaints. The City will receive fair housing complaints and forward them to the Houston HUD
office. The City of Galveston periodically publishes the HUD Fair Housing toll-free hotline number
and public service announcements in the general-circulation newspaper. The Grants & Housing
Department also posts Fair Housing and contact information on its City webpage.
o Accomplishment: The City is following its AI and Fair Housing Plan as submitted to HUD.
- Actions taken to remove or ameliorate the negative effects of public policies that serve as
barriers to affordable housing such as land use controls, tax policies affecting land, zoning
ordinances, building codes fees and charges, growth limitations, and policies affecting the
return on residential investment.

Action: The City of Galveston is required to meet floodplain mitigation through elevation.
The majority of the island is in a FEMA 100-Year Flood Plain. The City allocates CDBG and
HOME funds to housing rehabilitation programs and first-time homebuyer programs to help
alleviate the housing difficulties encountered by low- to moderate-income residents. These
funds are available to provide homeowners with assistance in repairs or rebuilding their
homes. All properties must meet Local and International Residential Building Codes for one
and two family dwellings.
Community Housing Development Organizations (CHDOs) access HOME and other funds for
housing rehabilitation and new affordable housing construction.
The Galveston Central Appraisal District and Tax Assessor/Collector provides tax relief in the
form of installment payments and split payments to property owners. Homeowners 65
years of age or older can “defer” or postpone paying any property taxes on their homes for
as long as they own and live in the unit. Property owners can also apply for exemption
categories that will reduce the amount of property taxes due on their properties such as:
residential homestead exemption, over 65 exemption, disability exemption, disabled
veteran exemption, surviving spouse of disabled veteran or armed services member killed in
action and over 65 exemption, and donated residence for disable veteran exemption.
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Actions taken to address obstacles to meeting underserved needs:
Action: The City of Galveston administers a First Time Homebuyer’s Program (HAP) which
provides first time homebuyers with up to $14,500 in Home Investment Partnership
Program funds for downpayment and closing costs to purchase a home. The Grants and
Housing Department has assisted a total of 1 LMI family with downpayment and closing cost
during this reporting period.
The City of Galveston works with local Community Housing Development Organizations
(CHDO) for the provision of first-time homebuyer’s assistance and the development or
renovation/sale of affordable housing. The Galveston Historical Foundation CHDO currently
has 3 single-family properties that were offered for sale to LMI households and was
converted to rental due to failure to sell; the 3 properties are currently under lease this
reporting period to LMI households. The City also continues to lease 2 single-family housing
City of Galveston
2015 CAPER Executive Summary
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units to LMI families under the rental program. The Houston Area Urban Community
Development Corp. CHDO will purchase up to 5 properties, rehabilitate to code, and resell
properties to eligible LMI households. This period the CHDO completed the purchase of 3
single-family properties and completed the rehab on 1 property. The CHDO has also
conducted outreach community meetings and solicited LMI homebuyer applicants to
purchase the properties.
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Actions taken to reduce the number of poverty-level families:
Actions: The City of Galveston gives preference to construction contractors who are Section
3-qualified or hire low-income laborers. One (1) Section 3 construction contract was
awarded under the CDBG Program for $496,415.00. Our City Departments hire Section 3
residents/businesses whenever feasible. During this program year Code Enforcement
awarded 17 Section 3 contracts totaling $8,690.00 and the Parks and Recreation
Department hired 10 Section 3 residents.
Galveston College Universal Access Scholarships are provided to ensure that every eligible
high school graduate, or equivalent, who resides in the Galveston College taxing district, has
the opportunity to attend college, receive an associate’s degree, or acquire technical
training through a workforce development program and obtain a certificate. The College
offers workforce education, continuing education programs, and developmental programs
to assist in specific careers and vocations and skills training to assist residents with meeting
the needs of the local job market.
-
Actions taken to develop institutional structure:
Actions: The City of Galveston coordinates and administers its housing and community
development efforts through the Grants and Housing Department. The Department
functions as a liaison with other City departments, community groups, non-profit service
providers, other governmental entities, and public and private organizations to share
information, identify resources and coordinate community development activities, when
possible.
The City of Galveston works with City departments to provide infrastructure support, code
enforcement, after school programs and activities for the youth as well as summer program
and activities for the youth.
The Housing Rehabilitation Program provides home improvements assistance to low to
moderate income residents which includes minimum, moderate or substantial rehabilitation
to the housing units. This program allows low to moderate income residents to maintain a
housing unit that is affordable and code compliant.
-
Actions taken to enhance coordination between public and private housing and social
service agencies:
Actions: Through Fair Housing education and outreach activities during the 2015 year, the
City provided Fair Housing Information to three (3) social service agencies that worked with
“at risk” populations. The City of Galveston and Galveston Housing Authority sponsored a
City of Galveston
2015 CAPER Executive Summary
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Landlord Reception on April 20, 2016. Ada Raglin Thomas, Equal Opportunity Specialist with
HUD’s office of Fair Housing and Equal Opportunity Office (Houston) gave an overview of
Fair Housing requirements for landlords and property managers. The reception was well
attended with over 30 interested residents and landlords.
The City of Galveston attends meetings on a regular basis to foster a communication
network to remain informed regarding local programs; these meeting include NAACP, FHAST
(Fair Housing) quarterly roundtable meetings and Homeless Continuum of Care. The City
provides support as appropriate and practical.
The City also solicits public comment on CDBG & HOME Programs, including the availability
of housing for low-income persons and Fair Housing.
-
Identify Actions taken to overcome the effects of any impediment identified in the
jurisdictions analysis of impediments to fair housing choice:
Actions: City staff regularly attends Fair Housing Training sponsored by HUD. The City
promotes Fair Housing through the distribution of education materials and posting posters
in City offices and public buildings. The City has translators available to assist limited English
Proficient homeowners.
The City allocates CDBG and HOME funds to housing rehabilitation programs and nonprofit
housing agencies to help alleviate the housing difficulties encountered by low- to moderateincome residents. Community Housing Development Organizations (CHDOs) access HOME
and other funds for housing rehabilitation and new affordable housing construction.
On August 14, 2015, City staff participated in a Back to School Fair hosted by the Galveston
Independent School District. A total of 50 residents visited the City’s booth and received
information on the City’s housing rehabilitation and reconstruction programs, as well as
information on first-time homebuyer assistance. City staff also distributed 80 Fair Housing
informational booklets.
As part of the City’s annual Fair Housing Celebration, on April 15, 2016, City staff and
Galveston Housing Authority read “When Chocolate Milk Moved In” to four (4) kindergarten
classes at Coastal Village Elementary. City staff also used puppets to illustrate the book.
This book taught the kids the importance of love and diversity in the community and how to
welcome newcomers to the neighborhood.
On April 20, 2016, City staff co-hosted a Landlord Reception with Galveston Housing
Authority at the Island Convention Center. This event was geared toward our current and
potential landlords. Ada Thomas from HUD FHEO gave an overview of the Fair Housing
requirements for landlords. Over 30 residents and landlords were in attendance.
On April 27, 2016, staff attended a Fair Housing Conference at Gulf Coast Community
Services Association. This conference focused on housing discrimination based on disability,
specifically, the impact of housing discrimination on individuals with an invisible illness or
mental disability.
City of Galveston
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On April 28, 2016, staff attended an Affirmatively Furthering Fair Housing (AFFH)
Educational Seminar at United Way Community Resource Center. This seminar focused on
the new rules under AFFH, what program participants are required to do to meet their AFFH
duties and to make informed policy decisions.
On May 11, 2016, staff facilitated an informational presentation for the City employees in
the Sanitation Department to advise them of the City’s Housing Assistance Program and the
benefits of homeownership. The Sanitation employees are generally some of the lowest
paid employees of the City. Our presentation focused on how the City’s program could help
them purchase their first home and how a home is an asset that generates equity and
potential wealth and that can be passed down through generations of family members.
Outcome Measure – the Housing projects will provide the following performance measure:
 Affordability for the purpose of providing decent affordable housing by assisting 1 acquisition and
rehabilitation of a housing unit to be sold to a low-moderate income homebuyer and 12 LMI firsttime homebuyers with home purchases
o Actual: This year’s accomplishments provided for the affordability for the purpose of providing
decent affordable housing by assisting CHDO affordable housing project began implementation and
purchased and completed 1 housing unit to be sold to a LMI household and purchased 2 units to be
rehabilitated and sold to LMI households next reporting period. Homebuyer assistance was provided
to 1 LMI household.
Community Development Programs
The City of Galveston implemented the following activities with its 2015 Program Year funding to meet
the non-housing community development needs eligible for assistance by CDBG eligibility category. All
of the activities implemented in 2015 were listed as HIGH priorities in the 2013 5-year Consolidated
Plan.
Public Services
Community Development High Priority - Promote the health and well-being of city residents through the
provision of public and supportive services
 The City with CDBG funding of $149,950 will provide program staffing and supplies/equipment to
implement youth recreational and educational activities through the Parks & Recreation Dept.
summer and after-school programs. Project will benefit 1000 children and youth primarily of lowmoderate income families to meet the objective for new services for LMI persons. Programs are
located in low-moderate income neighborhoods and available to young people on a citywide basis.
This is a short term 1-yr. objective.
o Accomplishment: The Parks & Recreation Dept. expended $132,020.17 and provided 36 staff
members for implementation of summer and after-school programs in low-moderate income areas
to 1,273 primarily LMI (90.5%) young people ages 5-18. The programs were conducted at the
Menard Park Recreation Center and Wright Cuney Recreation Center; both located in LMI areas and
with programs offered on a Citywide basis, the City is 55.96% LMI. There were 52,376 continuing
daily units of service to the young people throughout the year; 26,591 at Wright Cuney and 25,785
at Menard. The race/ethnicity was 430 White, 726 Black, 21 Asian, 5 Am. Indian/Alaskan Native, 4
Am. Indian/Alaskan Native and White, 2 Asian and White, 44 Black and White, 3 Am. Indian/Alaskan
Native and Black, 38 Multi-Racial with 302 Hispanic; there were 43 disabled children/youth served.
Programs included supervised educational/recreational activities such as tennis, karate, weights,
City of Galveston
2015 CAPER Executive Summary
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open gym, arts & crafts, computer labs, homework labs, and sports. This project is complete;
balance of $23,024.39 will be used to assist project in next period.
Outcome Measure – the Public Services will provide the following performance measures:
 Availability/Accessibility for the purpose of creating a more suitable living environment by providing
services to the youth education/recreation assistance 1,000 people of which an estimated 90% will
be low-moderate income
o Actual: The youth education/recreation activities assisted in the availability/accessibility to public
services to 1,273 primarily LMI (90.5%) residents by creating a more suitable living environment.
Public Facilities & Improvements
Community Development High Priority - Provide infrastructure enhancement to support neighborhood
revitalization and new residential development
 The City Public Works Dept. with CDBG funding of $580,120 will provide 52 block area of at least 4'
W sidewalks and ADA handicap ramps installation improvements in LMI areas of Ave. L-43rd to 53rd,
Ave. M-29th to 43rd, and Ave. O-25th to 53rd to enhance pedestrian safety for approximately
14,593 population with 60.79% LMI. Install sidewalks in LMI area to meet the objective to improve
the quality and increase the quantity of public improvements for lower income persons. This is a
short term 1-yr. objective.
o Accomplishment: The Public Works Dept. expended $1,071.70 and contracted an engineering firm
to complete the engineering for the project to develop the design and specifications to bid the
sidewalk construction; engineering will be completed next period. The project completions were
over-estimated in the original design; the project will complete 22 block area of 6,109 linear ft. of
sidewalks and 24 ramps in the area of Ave. L-43rd to 53rd Sts. and Ave. M-29th to 30th Sts. for
approximately 5,982 population with 63.55% LMI. This project will be bid and completed in the next
reporting period expending the balance of $579,048.30.
Outcome Measure – The Public Facility & Improvements will provide the following performance
measure:
 Sustainability of a more suitable living environment by providing public facilities and infrastructure
improvements to a City low-moderate income area as a direct benefit with an indirect benefit for
the entire population of 14,593 with 60.79% LMI.
o Actual: The sidewalk installation improvements projects will be completed next period for
approximately 5,982 population with 63.55% LMI.
Code Enforcement
Community Development High Priority - Provide code enforcement and neighborhood revitalization
activities to diminish blight, unsafe buildings and lots, and general neighborhood decay
 The City Compliance Division with CDBG funding of $175,140 will provide Code Enforcement
through 4 Code Compliance Officers to perform inspections and reinspections and enforce housing,
zoning, and environmental codes in low-moderate income neighborhoods. Approximately 9,000
property inspections will be conducted with 3,500 reinspections. Meet the objective to improve the
services in LMI areas for approximately 27,638 population with 62.32% LMI. This is a short-term 1year objective.
o Accomplishment: The City Compliance Division expended $169,647.69 and provided 4 compliance
officers working in the LMI neighborhoods. The officers provided housing, zoning, and
environmental code inspections on 10,386 properties resulting in 3,762 code violations issued.
City of Galveston
2015 CAPER Executive Summary
19

o
There were 6,624 properties re-inspected to ensure violations were abated. The Project is complete
and final draw of $5,492.31 will be completed in the next period.
The City Compliance Division with CDBG fundings of $29,190 will provide through contracted
services on nuisance and substandard properties 3 demolitions of dilapidated unsafe structures and
95 lot clearances and boardups of properties that are unsafe or overgrown and strewn with debris
that could lead to the investation of vermin and adverse environmental conditions. Meet the
objective to improve the services in LMI areas for approximately 27,638 population with 62.32%
LMI. This is a short-term 1-year objective.
Accomplishment: The Compliance Division expended $11,110.00 and provided 116 lot clearances of
nuisance properties and 4 boardups of unsafe units through 25 contracts with 15 Section 3 contracts
and 19 M/WBE contracts. Balance of $18,080 will be expended in next period.
Outcome Measure – the Code Enforcement activity will provide the following performance measure:
 Sustainability of a more suitable living environment by providing compliance officers in the City’s
LMI neighborhoods for 9,000 property inspections and demolition/lot clearance and boardup for 98
properties to 27,638 population with 62.32% LMI
o Actual: Sustainability for the purpose of creating a more suitable living environment through the
provision of code enforcement for 10,386 property inspections identifying 3,762 code violations and
116 lot clearances and 4 boardups to an area of 27,638 population with 62.32%.
Economic Development
Community Development High Priority - Provide economic development opportunities for the lowmoderate income and for their employers
 The City will seek to utilize Section 3 residents/businesses and M/WBE contractors to participate in
housing rehabilitation, public facility and improvements construction, demolition of dilapidated
structures, clearance of overgrown lots and other contracting opportunities.
o Accomplishment: Through the Housing Rehabilitation Program and Other Projects, the City awarded
56 Total Contracts for $1,051,320.07 with Total M/WBE Contracts of 28 at $370,508.74 and Total
Section 3 Contracts of 18 at $505,105.00. Through the CDBG and HOME Programs, the public
service, public facility and improvements, code enforcement and program administration activities
provided funds toward 49 staff members. The race/ethnicity of the employees was Asian-1, Black24, Hispanic-9, and White-15. There were 10 Section 3 employees hired through these activities.
Program Administration
Community Development High Priority - To facilitate neighborhood, comprehensive, and individual
project management, planning, and capacity building activities for low/moderate income areas
 The City Grants & Housing Department will provide management and oversight for the CDBG and
HOME Programs to ensure compliance with all regulatory requirements. The CDBG Program funded
$232,600 and HOME Program funded $22,337 for administration of the City’s projects.
Prior Program Year Project Accomplishments
Through continuing efforts with prior years’ CDBG and HOME funds, the City provided the following
activities.
City of Galveston
2015 CAPER Executive Summary
20
Housing Program
Housing High Priority - To provide and expand the supply of safe, decent and affordable housing through
the development of new residential property
 The City will collaborate with certified CHDO’s to acquire and rehabilitate housing units for lowmoderate income person/s to purchase.
o Accomplishment: The City continued working with CHDO activities from past years. Through a
previous year RFQ, the City contracted with Houston Area Community Development Corp.
(HAUCDC) to implement the City’s CHDO affordable housing project utilizing multi-year funding of
$467,667.35. HAUCDC will purchase up to 5 properties, rehabilitate to code, and resell properties to
eligible LMI households. HAUCDC expended $217,021.27 this period to complete the purchase of 3
properties and completed the rehab on 1 property; these are single-family units with 2 - 2 bdrm./1
bath and 1 - 3 bdrm./2 bath properties. In prior year, the CHDO conducted outreach community
meetings and solicited homebuyer applicants to purchase properties. The HAUCDC CHDO balance is
$250,646.08 to expend next period. The Galveston Historical Foundation (GHF) 3 CHDO properties
previously completed that did not sell and were converted to rental units for LMI households
continued to provide rental units leased to eligible LMI tenants.
Housing High Priority - To provide and expand homeownership opportunities for low- and moderateincome homebuyers
 The City Homeownership Assistance Program (HAP) with $17,983.17 prior year HOME funds offers
downpayment and closing cost assistance to eligible low-moderate income homeowners. It is
anticipated that the HAP will provide assistance to 2 low-moderate income families or individuals.
o Accomplishment: During the program year, the City Grants and Housing Department provided
$9,958.39 in HOME funding assistance to 1 low-moderate income household in the purchase of their
first home. The 1 first-time homebuyer was White with LMI percentage of 60%-80%. There were 8
homebuyer applicants that were approved as income eligible during the program year. The HAP has
a balance of $8,024.78 to be expended in the next reporting period.
Housing High Priority - To provide and expand the supply of safe, decent and affordable housing through
the rehabilitation of existing residential property and the construction of new residential properties
 The HOME Housing Rehabilitation Program had a balance of $651,986.92 multi-year funds to
provide minimum, moderate, substantial and emergency rehabilitation to approximately 4 LMI
single-family housing units to prioritize owner-occupied housing.
o Accomplishment: The Grants & Housing Dept. Housing Rehabilitation Program expended
$200,614.58 and completed 1 owner-occupied unit and had 4 housing rehabilitation/reconstruction
projects underway during the 2015 program year. The completed homeowner unit race was White
at 30%-50% LMI; this was a handicap accessible project. The homeowner units in progress are 2
White, 1 Black, and 1 Hispanic race/ethnicity with 1 at 0%-30%, 1 at 30%-50%, 1 at 50%-60%, and 1
at 60%-80% LMI; there is 1 handicap accessible unit and 2 senior citizen projects.

The following CDBG Housing Rehabilitation Programs have projects in progress that were not
completed this reporting period; there are 3 CDBG funded projects underway that will be completed
and the funds expended next reporting period. The CDBG Revolving Loan Fund had a balance of
$223,364.20 during the reporting period; $16,246.09 was used for the Housing Rehabilitation
Program as reported in the following activities. There is a balance of $207,118.11 to be utilized in
the next period.
City of Galveston
2015 CAPER Executive Summary
21
Grant
Year/
IDIS #
2011/
#1334
Activity/
Allocation
Description/ Objective
Total
Accomplishments
2015 PY Comments
Housing
Rehabilitation
Program/
$329,627
2012/
#1378
Housing
Rehabilitation
Program/
$71,010.11 & RLF
$495.00
Minimum, moderate,
substantial rehab for
LMI single-family
household/ Proposed
4 units
Assisting with 3 units in progress with
accomplishments to be reported at
#1415 and #1378; expended $40,193.33;
balance of $85,774.31 to be completed
next period
2013/
#1415
Housing
Rehabilitation
Program/
$182,635 & RLF
$15,751.09
Assisting with 3 units
and Completed 4
single-family owner
occupied units
expending
$243,852.69
1 unit in progress
and assisted with 1
HOME unit
w/accomp. reported
at #1422 expending
$14,641.64
2 units in progress
expending
$86,465.50
Minimum, moderate,
substantial rehab for
LMI single-family
household/ Proposed
1 unit
Minimum, moderate,
substantial rehab for
LMI single-family
household/ Proposed
2 units
1 unit in progress expending $1,815.00;
balance of $56,863.47 to be completed
next period
2 units in progress expending
$81,790.60; Balance of $111,920.59 will
be completed next period
In the 2015 program year, the CDBG and HOME funded Housing Program completed accomplishments
providing the total Outcome Measure of affordability for the purpose of providing decent affordable
housing as per the following:
Activity
Housing Rehabilitation-Homeowner
Homebuyer Assistance
Total Accomplishments
Accomplishment
1
1
2
Activity
Housing Rehabilitation-Homeowner
Homebuyer Assistance
CHDO Acquisition/Rehabilitation
Total Projects In Progress
In Progress
7
8
3
18
During the 2015 program year, the CDBG and HOME funded Housing Program had the following projects
in progress:
There are 5 total rental properties under the HOME Program affordable housing projects from previous
years in the City’s housing inventory. 2 of the projects are being maintained by the City and 3 are under
the Galveston Historical Foundation (GHF) CHDO supervision. During the 2015 reporting period, 4 of the
properties provided affordable housing to LMI renters as follows: 1 White, 1 Black, 1 Am. Indian/Alaska
Native and White, and 1 Hispanic with 1 at 30%-50% LMI, 2 at 50%-60% and 1 at 60%-80% LMI. One
property became vacant during the reporting period and required repairs.
Community Development Program
Public Services
Community Development High Priority - Promote the health and well-being of city residents through the
provision of public and supportive services
City of Galveston
2015 CAPER Executive Summary
22
Grant Year/
IDIS #
2014/ #1431
Activity/ Allocation
Children & Youth
Program/
$150,000.00
Description/
Objective
Provide staffing
for supervised
recreational and
education
opportunities to
1000 primarily
LMI children &
youth ages 5-18
Total Accomp.
Provided services to
1,455 (91.6% LMI)
children and youth at
the City’s recreation
centers located in LMI
areas of the City;
expended $150,000
2015 PY Comments
Assisted with 2015 # 1451
children and youth program
with accomplishments reported
there; expended balance of
$5,776.69; activity completed
Public Facilities & Improvements
High Priority - Promote viable neighborhoods through the installation and improvements of parks and
public facilities.
Grant Year/
IDIS #
2013/ #1416
Activity/ Allocation
Wright Cuney/
McGuire Dent Park
Renovation/
Reallocation
$185,813.74
Description/
Objective
Replacement of
the AC’s at Wright
Cuney and
McGuire Dent
Recreation
Centers
Total Accomp.
Completed installation
of the HVAC at McGuire
Dent, scoped Wright
Cuney AC project and
City’s AC contractor
installed 2 units;
expended $185,813.74;
2015 PY Comments
No accompl., project set to
complete this period
Infrastructure Improvements
High Priority – Provide infrastructure improvements to support neighborhood revitalization and new
residential development.
Grant Year/
IDIS #
2010/ #1427
2012/ #1369
2013/ #1417
Activity/ Allocation
Sanitary Sewer
Improvements/
$123,024.91
Alley Paving/
$133,786.00
Sidewalk Installation/
$159,558.60 and
Reallocation
$113,349.35
City of Galveston
Description/
Objective
Replacement,
slip-lining or
pipe-bursting
with no capacity
increase to 4
blks. of main
sewer lines
Pave 20 alleys in
LMI areas
Install 15,000 ln.
ft. of sidewalks in
area of Aves. K-L
from 25th to 57th
Sts.
Total Accomp.
2015 PY Comments
Completed 1,150 (4 blks)
of slipline in main sewers
29th & Sealy to Ball and
29th to Winnie 59
Church; expended
$118,810
No accompl., balance of
$4,214.91 was released this
period and activity set to
complete
Paved 25 alleys;
expended $120,275.19
No accompl., balance of
$13,510.81 released and activity
set to complete
Completed final draw
$229,963.73 this period and set
activity to complete
Completed engineering
and bid, installed 23 blks
of sidewalk in area of
Aves. K-L from 25th to
29th; total expenditures
$272,907.95
2015 CAPER Executive Summary
23
2013/ #1418
Sidewalk Installation/
$163,172.40
2014/ #1428
Sidewalk Installation/
$596,257.00 & PI
$48,729.64 &
Redirected balances
#1369 $752.40 &
#1418 $6,345.73
Install 8 blks. of
sidewalks in LMI
area of
Hollywood
Hgts./Parker
School
Install 24 blk.
area of sidewalks
in LMI area of
Hollywood
Hgts./Parker
School
Completed engineering
design and bid project,
installed 8 blks of
sidewalks; total
expenditures
$156,826.67
Completed engineering
and installed approx. 28
blk. area with 7,061
linear ft. of sidewalks
and 29 ADA ramps;
expended $646,084.77
No accompl., draw of $176.09
for prior period expenses,
balance of $6,345.73 redirected
to #1428 Hollywood Hgts. Phase
2 sidewalk project; activity set
to complete
This period project bid out;
completed installation of
approx.. 28 blk. area with 7,061
linear ft. of sidewalks and 29
ADA ramps; expended
$645,484.36; balance of $6,000
used for staff adj. next period
Code Enforcement
High Priority – Provide code enforcement and neighborhood revitalization activities to diminish blight,
unsafe buildings and lots, and general neighborhood decay.
Grant Year/
IDIS #
2014/ #1430
2014/ #1429
Activity/ Allocation
Code Compliance
Officers/
$180,000.00 & PI
$8,710.33
Lot Clearance &
Demolition/
$30,000.00 & PI
$644.16
Description/
Objective
Provide 4
compliance
officers to
conduct 6,000
property
inspections and
3,000
reinspections in
LMI areas to
enforce codes
and ordinances
Provide 3 demos,
95 lot clearances
and boardups in
LMI areas/
Proposed 98
units
Accomplishments
2015 PY Comments
Completed 3 demos and
154 lot clearances; Total
expenditures $30,644.16
Completed 1 demo and 24 lot
clearances this period; awarded
5 contracts with 2 Section 3
contracts and 3 M/WBE
contracts; $375 used with #1445
and accomp. reported there;
expended $2,980 this period;
activity completed this period
Conducted 10,993
inspections and 6,614
reinspections finding
4,356 violations; Total
expenditures
$188,710.33
Completed final draw of
$8,609.69 for 2014 PY; activity
set to complete this period
CDBG Reallocations
The City did not complete any reallocation of activity unused balances this period. There were 2
projects, as follows, where funds were redirected to another activity for the same objective and benefit
area as the original project. This allowed for the effective use of the balance of funds from prior year
projects.
From:
Grant Year/ IDIS #
2012/ #1368
2013/ #1418
City of Galveston
Activity
Sidewalk Installation
Sidewalk Installation
Description/ Objective
Install 7 sidewalks that were storm damaged in
LMI areas
Install 8 blks. of sidewalks in LMI area of
Hollywood Hgts./Parker School
2015 CAPER Executive Summary
Amount
$752.40
$6,345.73
24
To:
Grant Year/ IDIS #
2014/ #1428
Activity
Sidewalk Installation
Description/ Objective
Install 24 blk. area of sidewalks in LMI area of
Hollywood Hgts./Parker School (area received
high degree of storm damage
Amount
$7,098.13
Project Summary
All CDBG activities funded in the 2015 grant year were used to benefit one (1) of the three (3) national
objectives of the Community Development Block Grant Program. The City expended 100% of its CDBG
project funds during the program year for activities that benefited low-moderate income persons. The
CDBG program met the overall benefit certification that at least 70% of the CDBG funds were allocated
towards activities that benefit low and moderate-income people. The City also ensured that individual
activities met a national objective to provide a benefit to persons where at least 51% were of low and
moderate-income status. All of the CD projects were designed to be of benefit to the low-moderate
income population either by designation to a low-moderate income area or a direct benefit to lowmoderate income clientele. Since the City of Galveston has a low-moderate income percentage of
55.96%, CDBG funds are primarily directed to activities that provide benefits on a citywide available
basis to low-moderate income individuals. The citywide activities include housing rehabilitation activities
and youth recreational/educational activities. The identification and correction of code violations was
conducted in citywide low-moderate income neighborhoods. The public infrastructure and
improvement activities are located in low-moderate income areas as previously identified. Each of these
activities provides benefits to primarily low-moderate income persons and indirectly aids in the
prevention of slum and/or blighted areas. The direct service activities are open to residents on a
citywide basis and will provide benefits to low-moderate income persons or families as measured
through in-take documentation and determined by median family income limits provided by HUD.
The City met its CDBG timeliness ratio on April 2, 2016. The HOME deadlines were met as follows: 2011
disbursements and 2011 CHDO disbursements by the deadline of June 30, 2016. The commitments
deadline will be September 30, 2016 for 2014 HOME funds and 2014 CHDO funds. The CHDO
commitments are met and the City has projects lined up to meet the HOME funds deadline.
Leveraging Resources
The CDBG Disaster Recovery Round 1 funds of $242M for housing and non-housing projects is still
assisting in the City’s efforts in rebuilding the housing stock to over 800 households and infrastructure
that was damaged by Hurricane Ike. The Disaster Housing Program is utilizing Round 2 funding during
this reporting period to begin assisting an estimated 500 households. The non-housing disaster program
is continuing work on projects from Round 2 funding.
Due to the storm damage, FEMA projects continued to provide resources to the City in its recovery
processes.
The City utilized funding from the Federal Transportation Administration, Federal Highway
Administration, Texas Department of Transportation, Department of Justice, Dept. of Homeland
City of Galveston
2015 CAPER Executive Summary
25
Security, Texas General Land Office, and Federal Aviation Administration to meet its community needs
including Island Transit, Public Works, the City’s Scholes Airport, the Planning Dept., and the Police Dept.
As the primary assistance for the homeless services, the Continuum of Care coordinated through the
Gulf Coast Homeless Coalition for provision of homeless services under the Texas Homeless Network.
The United Way of Galveston Capital Campaign provides funding to assist many of the social service
agencies located in the City that provide public services to the low-moderate income residents.
Leverage totaling $319,000 is provided for the 2015 CDBG funded projects as follows: approximately
$229,000 from general funds in prorated salaries of managers and other staff implementing CDBG
funded City projects and $90,000 in operational costs for City facilities housing CDBG projects. The
Infrastructure Project to install sidewalk improvements will be leveraged with an ADA ramp installation
project at bus stops with some of the ramps located in the sidewalk project sites funded from a US Dept.
of Transportation FTA New Freedom Grant totaling $378,072.
The HOME Match requirement is 25% of the participating jurisdiction’s project funds drawn for
affordable housing. The City of Galveston is determined by HUD to be in fiscal distress and receives a
50% reduction of match, making its match contribution at 12.5%. The HOME match required will be
provided by the City and CHDO. The City of Galveston will satisfy the Match Requirements by using
existing match carried over from previous years, match commitments obligated by subrecipients using
HOME dollars, waived permit fees for HOME funded projects, and the City will use Rental Rehabilitation
funds in conjunction with the HOME funds to be counted toward Match. The City’s Affordable Housing
program utilizes cash contributions of non-federal funds, waived fees and charges, donated land, and
supportive services for rehabilitation projects benefiting low-moderate income persons. Subrecipients
receiving HOME funds provide matching contributions for their affordable housing projects. The
following table identifies the 2015 HOME Match.
HOME Match
1. Excess match from prior Federal fiscal year
2. Match contributed during current Federal fiscal year
3. Total match available for current Federal fiscal year (Line 1 plus Line 2)
4. Match liability for current Federal fiscal year
5. Excess match carried over to next Federal fiscal year (Line 3 minus Line 4)
182,124
5,728
187,852
54,415
133,437
Managing the Process
The City of Galveston’s Grants and Housing Department is designated as the lead agency for
coordinating and implementing the Consolidated Plan and the 1-year Action Plan.
The Grants and Housing Department supports the concept of staff development for members of its
team. Staff members are provided access to community development training programs offered by
HUD, HUD contractors, and others. The access to training and development initiatives not only keeps
staff abreast of new community development trends and reporting tools, but also the requirements of
citizen participation and consolidated planning to ensure citizens access to the program, especially lowmoderate income citizens.
City of Galveston
2015 CAPER Executive Summary
26
Prior to the start of the program activities, Grants & Housing staff facilitated Implementation Meetings
with each funded City Department. The purpose of the meetings is to ensure that the Department staff
is cognizant of the City and Federal requirements associated with the CDBG and HOME funds. The scope
of services, budgets and schedules are reviewed and discussed. The staff provides a booklet outlining
the Guidelines and Instructions to each City Department. The booklet covers all reporting (beneficiary
and financial) processes, financial recordkeeping, monitoring, and other programmatic aspects of
administering a CDBG or HOME funded activity. Any and all questions posed by the Departments are
addressed by Grants’ staff and if necessary, follow-up meetings are scheduled to assist the funded entity
prior to the implementation of the programs.
The Grants Division was responsible for administrative oversight of the CDBG Program (non-housing)
activities for compliance with HUD’s regulatory requirements including all Federal Labor Standards
provisions, EEO Compliance, citizen participation, preconstruction conferences, environmental reviews
and monitoring program activities. Staff prepared and submited numerous programmatic performance
reports to HUD, City Council and citizen groups in the areas of program management, Labor Standards
Enforcement, Contractor/Subcontractor Activity, program beneficiaries and fiscal accountability. Grants’
staff also are responsible for approving all CDBG and HOME funded expenditures.
The Housing Division was responsible for the administration of the Housing Rehabilitation Program and
the HOME Investment Partnerships Program for compliance with HUD’s regulatory requirements. Staff
coordinated all housing related programs. All housing rehabilitation projects are monitored to ensure
the work is in conformance with local, state, and federal codes and regulations. Staff also provided
housing related reports to HUD, City Council and the public.
Due to the City’s management efforts, all activities were in compliance with the program and the
comprehensive planning requirements.
Citizen Performance Report
The Public Notice for the availability of the 2015 CAPER was published on August 10, 2016 in the
Galveston Daily News. The Public Notice was posted on the City’s website on August 10, 2016 and
throughout the 15-Day Comment Period. The CAPER was made available to the public for examination
for fifteen (15) days, from Thursday, August 11, 2016 through Thursday, August 25, 2016. The
performance report available to citizens for review provided information on the major initiatives and
highlights that were proposed and executed throughout the year and included: the Federal funds made
available for furthering the objectives of the Consolidated Plan; the total amount of CDBG and HOME
funds available (including program income); the total amount of funds committed during the reporting
period; the total amount expended during the reporting period; and the geographic distribution
(including the census tracts) and location of expenditures. Maps were included to show the geographic
distribution and location of investment (including areas of minority concentration). The Grants &
Housing Dept. will conduct a Public Hearing on the 2015 CDBG and HOME Programs CAPER on
Wednesday, August 24, 2016 in the City Council Chambers, 2 nd Floor of City Hall at 823 Rosenberg,
Galveston, Texas.
City of Galveston
2015 CAPER Executive Summary
27
Office of Community Planning and Development
DATE:
07-21-16
Integrated Disbursement and Information System
PAGE:
1
U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development
PR26 - CDBG Financial Summary Report
TIME:
11:35
Program Year 2015
Metrics
GALVESTON , TX
Grantee
Program Year
PART I: SUMMARY OF CDBG RESOURCES
01 UNEXPENDED CDBG FUNDS AT END OF PREVIOUS PROGRAM YEAR
02 ENTITLEMENT GRANT
03 SURPLUS URBAN RENEWAL
04 SECTION 108 GUARANTEED LOAN FUNDS
05 CURRENT YEAR PROGRAM INCOME
05a CURRENT YEAR SECTION 108 PROGRAM INCOME (FOR SI TYPE)
06 FUNDS RETURNED TO THE LINE-OF-CREDIT
06a FUNDS RETURNED TO THE LOCAL CDBG ACCOUNT
07 ADJUSTMENT TO COMPUTE TOTAL AVAILABLE
GALVESTON , TX
2,015.00
1,744,920.93
1,163,000.00
0.00
0.00
87,862.12
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
08 TOTAL AVAILABLE (SUM, LINES 01-07)
2,995,783.05
09 DISBURSEMENTS OTHER THAN SECTION 108 REPAYMENTS AND PLANNING/ADMINISTRATION
1,441,407.53
11 AMOUNT SUBJECT TO LOW/MOD BENEFIT (LINE 09 + LINE 10)
1,441,407.53
PART II: SUMMARY OF CDBG EXPENDITURES
10 ADJUSTMENT TO COMPUTE TOTAL AMOUNT SUBJECT TO LOW/MOD BENEFIT
12 DISBURSED IN IDIS FOR PLANNING/ADMINISTRATION
13 DISBURSED IN IDIS FOR SECTION 108 REPAYMENTS
14 ADJUSTMENT TO COMPUTE TOTAL EXPENDITURES
15 TOTAL EXPENDITURES (SUM, LINES 11-14)
16 UNEXPENDED BALANCE (LINE 08 - LINE 15)
PART III: LOWMOD BENEFIT THIS REPORTING PERIOD
17 EXPENDED FOR LOW/MOD HOUSING IN SPECIAL AREAS
18 EXPENDED FOR LOW/MOD MULTI-UNIT HOUSING
0.00
307,953.23
0.00
0.00
1,749,360.76
1,246,422.29
0.00
0.00
19 DISBURSED FOR OTHER LOW/MOD ACTIVITIES
1,441,407.53
21 TOTAL LOW/MOD CREDIT (SUM, LINES 17-20)
1,441,407.53
20 ADJUSTMENT TO COMPUTE TOTAL LOW/MOD CREDIT
22 PERCENT LOW/MOD CREDIT (LINE 21/LINE 11)
LOW/MOD BENEFIT FOR MULTI-YEAR CERTIFICATIONS
23 PROGRAM YEARS(PY) COVERED IN CERTIFICATION
24 CUMULATIVE NET EXPENDITURES SUBJECT TO LOW/MOD BENEFIT CALCULATION
25 CUMULATIVE EXPENDITURES BENEFITING LOW/MOD PERSONS
26 PERCENT BENEFIT TO LOW/MOD PERSONS (LINE 25/LINE 24)
PART IV: PUBLIC SERVICE (PS) CAP CALCULATIONS
27 DISBURSED IN IDIS FOR PUBLIC SERVICES
28 PS UNLIQUIDATED OBLIGATIONS AT END OF CURRENT PROGRAM YEAR
29 PS UNLIQUIDATED OBLIGATIONS AT END OF PREVIOUS PROGRAM YEAR
30 ADJUSTMENT TO COMPUTE TOTAL PS OBLIGATIONS
31 TOTAL PS OBLIGATIONS (LINE 27 + LINE 28 - LINE 29 + LINE 30)
32 ENTITLEMENT GRANT
33 PRIOR YEAR PROGRAM INCOME
34 ADJUSTMENT TO COMPUTE TOTAL SUBJECT TO PS CAP
35 TOTAL SUBJECT TO PS CAP (SUM, LINES 32-34)
36 PERCENT FUNDS OBLIGATED FOR PS ACTIVITIES (LINE 31/LINE 35)
PART V: PLANNING AND ADMINISTRATION (PA) CAP
0.00
100.00%
PY: PY: PY:
0.00
0.00
0.00%
132,020.17
23,024.39
9,094.56
0.00
145,950.00
1,163,000.00
131,478.27
0.00
1,294,478.27
11.27%
37 DISBURSED IN IDIS FOR PLANNING/ADMINISTRATION
307,953.23
39 PA UNLIQUIDATED OBLIGATIONS AT END OF PREVIOUS PROGRAM YEAR
116,515.97
41 TOTAL PA OBLIGATIONS (LINE 37 + LINE 38 - LINE 39 +LINE 40)
232,600.00
38 PA UNLIQUIDATED OBLIGATIONS AT END OF CURRENT PROGRAM YEAR
40 ADJUSTMENT TO COMPUTE TOTAL PA OBLIGATIONS
42 ENTITLEMENT GRANT
43 CURRENT YEAR PROGRAM INCOME
44 ADJUSTMENT TO COMPUTE TOTAL SUBJECT TO PA CAP
45 TOTAL SUBJECT TO PA CAP (SUM, LINES 42-44)
46 PERCENT FUNDS OBLIGATED FOR PA ACTIVITIES (LINE 41/LINE 45)
41,162.74
0.00
1,163,000.00
87,862.12
0.00
1,250,862.12
18.60%
LINE 17 DETAIL: ACTIVITIES TO CONSIDER IN DETERMINING THE AMOUNT TO ENTER ON LINE 17
Report returned no data.
LINE 18 DETAIL: ACTIVITIES TO CONSIDER IN DETERMINING THE AMOUNT TO ENTER ON LINE 18
Report returned no data.
LINE 19 DETAIL: ACTIVITIES INCLUDED IN THE COMPUTATION OF LINE 19
2013
2
1417
Voucher
Number
5843112
2013
2
1418
5878575
Plan Year
2013
2014
2014
2014
2014
2014
2014
2015
2015
IDIS Project
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
IDIS Activity
1418
1428
1428
1428
1428
1428
1428
1452
1452
5843112
5849987
5878575
5904638
5907410
5910609
5929872
5887675
5898606
2014
3
1429
5843112
2014
3
1429
5859644
2014
2014
2014
2015
2015
2015
2015
2015
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
1429
1429
1429
1445
1445
1445
1445
1445
5849987
5870428
5907410
5872332
5904638
5907410
5929872
5944829
Matrix
Code
Public Works Ave L-K from 25th to 57th Streets Infrastructure 03L
Improveemnts
Public
Works Hollywood-Heights/Parker School Area Sidewalk 03L
Activity Name
Installation
Public
Works Hollywood-Heights/Parker School Area Sidewalk
Installation
Public
Works Hollywood-Heights/Parker School Area Sidewalk
Installation
Public
Works Hollywood-Heights/Parker School Area Sidewalk
Installation
Public
Works Hollywood-Heights/Parker School Area Sidewalk
Installation
Public
Works Hollywood-Heights/Parker School Area Sidewalk
Installation
Public
Works Hollywood-Heights/Parker School Area Sidewalk
Installation
Public
Works Hollywood-Heights/Parker School Area Sidewalk
Installation
Sidewalk
and ADA Handicap Ramps Installation Ave L, M and
O
Sidewalk
and ADA Handicap Ramps Installation Ave L, M and
O
03L
03L
03L
03L
03L
03L
03L
03L
03L
03L
National
Objective
LMA
LMA
LMA
$111,993.14
LMA
$332,323.39
LMA
$401.35
LMA
LMA
LMA
Matrix Code 03L
Demolition & Lot Clearance/Boardup
04
LMA
Demolition & Lot Clearance/Boardup
Demolition & Lot Clearance/Boardup
Demolition & Lot Clearance/Boardup
Demolition & Lot Clearance/Boardup
Demolition & Lot Clearance/Boardup
Demolition & Lot Clearance/Boardup
04
04
04
04
04
04
04
04
$32.15
LMA
LMA
LMA
Demolition & Lot Clearance/Boardup
$143.94
$68,260.00
04
04
$229,963.73
LMA
Demolition & Lot Clearance/Boardup
Demolition & Lot Clearance/Boardup
Drawn Amount
LMA
LMA
LMA
$4,140.00
$97,073.61
$31,694.22
$670.35
$876,695.88
$500.00
$425.00
$1,455.00
$225.00
$375.00
LMA
$8,835.00
LMA
$1,200.00
LMA
LMA
LMA
Matrix Code 04
$325.00
$400.00
$350.00
$14,090.00
2014
1
1431
5843112
Children & Youth Educational/Recreational Program
05
LMC
2015
1
1451
5872332
Children & Youth Educational/Recreational Program
05
LMC
$77,624.52
Children & Youth Educational/Recreational Program
05
LMC
$9,989.73
2014
2015
2015
2015
2015
2015
2015
2015
2015
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1431
1451
1451
1451
1451
1451
1451
1451
1451
5853060
5878575
5887675
5898606
5904638
5907410
5910609
5929872
5944829
Children & Youth Educational/Recreational Program
Children & Youth Educational/Recreational Program
Children & Youth Educational/Recreational Program
Children & Youth Educational/Recreational Program
Children & Youth Educational/Recreational Program
Children & Youth Educational/Recreational Program
Children & Youth Educational/Recreational Program
Children & Youth Educational/Recreational Program
05
05
05
05
05
05
05
05
05
LMC
LMC
LMC
LMC
LMC
LMC
LMC
LMC
Matrix Code 05
2011
11
1334
5859644
CDBG Housing Rehabilitation Program
14A
LMH
2012
6
1378
5859644
Housing Rehab Program-Redirected Funds
14A
LMH
Housing Rehabilitation Program/Affordable Housing Program
14A
Housing Rehabilitation Program/Affordable Housing Program
14A
2011
2012
2013
2013
2013
2013
11
6
4
4
4
4
1334
1378
1415
1415
1415
1415
5944829
5907411
5849987
5907410
5944829
5944830
CDBG Housing Rehabilitation Program
Housing Rehab Program-Redirected Funds
Housing Rehabilitation Program/Affordable Housing Program
Housing Rehabilitation Program/Affordable Housing Program
14A
14A
14A
14A
14A
LMH
LMH
LMH
Matrix Code 14A
Housing Rehab Delivery & Mgmt (Admin)
14H
LMH
2014
4
1437
5859644
Housing Rehab Delivery & Mgmt (Admin)
14H
LMH
2014
2014
2014
2014
2014
2014
2014
2015
2015
2015
2015
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
8
8
8
8
1437
1437
1437
1437
1437
1437
1437
1455
1455
1455
1455
5870428
5878575
5887675
5898606
5907410
5929872
5944829
5887675
5898606
5904638
5907410
Housing Rehab Delivery & Mgmt (Admin)
Housing Rehab Delivery & Mgmt (Admin)
Housing Rehab Delivery & Mgmt (Admin)
Housing Rehab Delivery & Mgmt (Admin)
Housing Rehab Delivery & Mgmt (Admin)
Housing Rehab Delivery & Mgmt (Admin)
Housing Rehab Delivery & Mgmt (Admin)
Housing Rehab Delivery & Mgmt (Admin)
Housing Rehab Delivery & Mgmt (Admin)
Housing Rehab Delivery & Mgmt (Admin)
Housing Rehab Delivery & Mgmt (Admin)
Housing Rehab Delivery & Mgmt (Admin)
14H
14H
14H
14H
14H
14H
14H
14H
14H
14H
14H
14H
$9,637.44
$3,253.57
$4,523.35
$4,346.09
$6,569.15
$132,020.17
$2,150.00
$38,043.33
$1,320.00
$495.00
$62,484.82
5843112
5849987
$3,821.38
LMH
LMH
1437
1437
$3,160.38
$1,354.69
4
4
$5,776.69
LMH
2014
2014
$3,317.87
LMH
LMH
LMH
LMH
$2,200.00
$15,751.09
$123,798.93
$1,320.05
$2,578.92
$933.26
$972.74
$730.40
$70.34
LMH
$267.05
LMH
$165.24
LMH
$18,369.63
LMH
$24,376.02
LMH
LMH
LMH
LMH
$35.64
$165.24
$31,278.95
$6,061.33
2015
8
1455
5910609
Housing Rehab Delivery & Mgmt (Admin)
14H
LMH
2015
8
1455
5944829
Housing Rehab Delivery & Mgmt (Admin)
14H
LMH
2015
8
1455
5929872
Housing Rehab Delivery & Mgmt (Admin)
14H
14H
LMH
Matrix Code 14H
2014
3
1430
5843112
Code Compliance Officers
15
LMA
2015
3
1444
5878575
Code Compliance Officers
15
LMA
2015
2015
2015
2015
2015
2015
2015
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
1444
5872332
1444
5898606
1444
5904638
1444
5907410
1444
5910609
1444
5929872
1444
5944829
Code Compliance Officers
Code Compliance Officers
Code Compliance Officers
Code Compliance Officers
Code Compliance Officers
Code Compliance Officers
Code Compliance Officers
Total
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
$6,258.17
$13,193.10
$9,769.09
$116,545.17
$8,609.69
LMA
$76,521.42
LMA
$19,249.71
LMA
LMA
LMA
LMA
LMA
Matrix Code 15
$13,483.03
$22,284.00
$6,772.55
$6,722.76
$11,267.87
$13,346.35
$178,257.38
$1,441,407.53
LINE 27 DETAIL: ACTIVITIES INCLUDED IN THE COMPUTATION OF LINE 27
2014
1
1431
Voucher
Number
5843112
2015
1
1451
5872332
Plan Year
2014
2015
2015
2015
2015
2015
2015
2015
2015
IDIS Project
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
IDIS Activity
1431
5853060
1451
5878575
1451
5887675
1451
5898606
1451
5904638
1451
5907410
1451
5910609
1451
5929872
1451
5944829
Children & Youth Educational/Recreational Program
Matrix
Code
05
National
Objective
LMC
Children & Youth Educational/Recreational Program
05
LMC
$77,624.52
Children & Youth Educational/Recreational Program
05
LMC
$9,989.73
Activity Name
Children & Youth Educational/Recreational Program
Children & Youth Educational/Recreational Program
Children & Youth Educational/Recreational Program
Children & Youth Educational/Recreational Program
Children & Youth Educational/Recreational Program
Children & Youth Educational/Recreational Program
Children & Youth Educational/Recreational Program
Children & Youth Educational/Recreational Program
Total
05
05
05
05
05
05
05
05
05
LMC
LMC
LMC
LMC
LMC
LMC
LMC
LMC
Matrix Code 05
Drawn Amount
$3,317.87
$5,776.69
$3,160.38
$3,821.38
$9,637.44
$3,253.57
$4,523.35
$4,346.09
$6,569.15
$132,020.17
$132,020.17
LINE 37 DETAIL: ACTIVITIES INCLUDED IN THE COMPUTATION OF LINE 37
2013
6
1413
Voucher
Number
5843112
2014
6
1432
5843112
Plan Year
2013
2014
2014
2015
2015
2015
2015
2015
2015
2015
2015
Total
IDIS Project
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
IDIS Activity
1413
1432
1432
1453
1453
1453
1453
1453
1453
1453
1453
5904638
5849987
5859644
5872332
5878575
5898606
5904638
5907410
5910609
5929872
5944829
CDBG Program Administration
Matrix
Code
21A
CDBG Program Administration
21A
Activity Name
CDBG Program Administration
CDBG Program Administration
CDBG Program Administration
CDBG Program Administration
CDBG Program Administration
CDBG Program Administration
CDBG Program Administration
CDBG Program Administration
CDBG Program Administration
CDBG Program Administration
CDBG Program Administration
National
Objective
Drawn Amount
$4,961.82
21A
$10,180.32
21A
$53,245.63
$26,546.71
21A
$21,581.49
21A
$50,296.22
21A
$4,092.03
21A
$11,329.13
21A
$58,016.55
21A
$8,846.47
21A
$17,502.82
21A
21A
21A
$21,601.49
Matrix Code 21A
$19,752.55
$307,953.23
$307,953.23
Financial Summary Attachment
A. Program Income Received
1. Revolving Fund
3. Demolition/Clearance
6. RLF Interest
10,760.00
77,102.12
19.93
B. Prior Period Adjustments
C. Loans and Other Receivables
Economic Development RLF
Direct Homeownership (5-year deffered, forgivable)
Housing Rehabilitation (5-year deffered,forgivable)
D. LOCCS Reconciliation
Unexpended Balance of CDBG funds
LOC Balance
Cash on Hand:
Grantee Program Account
Subrecipients Program Accounts
Revolving Fund Cash Balances
Section 108 Cash Balances
Grantee CDBG Program Liabilities (include
any reimbursmts. due from program funds)
Subrecipient CDBG Program Liabilities (include
any reimbursements due from program funds)
$
$
1,246,422.29
1,039,304.18
$
207,118.11
Cash on Hand Total
$
$
207,118.11
Liabilities Total
$
$
-
$
Balance (provide an explanation if an unreconciled difference exists)
(0.00)
Explanation (if applicable):
E. Unprogrammed Funds Calculation
Amount of funds available during the
reporting period
Income expected but not yet realized**
Subtotal
Less total budgeted amount
Unprogrammed Balance
$
$
$
$
$
2,995,783.05
2,995,783.05
2,712,012.41
283,770.64
** This amount should reflect any income considered as a resource in the action plan (and any amendments) for the period covered by this report,
as well as that identified in prior action plans/final statements (including any amendments), that was expected to be received by the end of
the reporting period but had not yet been received; e.g., program income or Section 108 proceeds not yet received from an approved 108 loan.
8/10/2016
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