Pricing - Southwinds

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Pricing - Southwinds
SOUTHWINDS
News & Views for Southern Sailors
Wharram Rendezvous
Kirie Elite 37 Review
Race to Mexico
July 2010
For Sailors — Free…It’s Priceless
Exceptionally crafted in
Marion, South Carolina, USA
Beneteau 31 Keel / Centerboard Option — Less than 3’ draft
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EASTERN YACHTS
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TURNER MARINE YACHT SALES
Mobile, AL 251-476-1444
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DUNBAR SALES
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MASSEY YACHT SALES
Stuart, FL- 772-204-0660
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MASSEY YACHT SALES
Palmetto, FL 941-723-1610
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MASSEY YACHT SALES
St Petersburg, FL • 727-824-7262
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GREAT HURRICANE HOLE
Call 727-821-6347 to arrange a personal tour
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Bring in this ad for New Member Discounts plus an additional $150.00 in Gift Certificates Next to Dali Museum just
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SOUTHWINDS
NEWS & VIEWS
FOR
SOUTHERN SAILORS
6
Editorial: Sailing Mistakes and Oil Spills
By Steve Morrell
8
Letters You Wouldn’t Believe
14
Bubba Figures Out How to Plug Oil Leak
By Morgan Stinemetz
16
Southern Regional Monthly Weather and Water Temperatures
17
Short Tacks: Sailing News and Events Around the South
30
Our Waterways: Northern Gulf Oil Spill Report.
32
Spring Wharram Rendezvous
By Scott Williams
36
Kirie Elite 37 Boat Review
By Dick Dixon
40
Cooking Onboard: Caribbean Chinese Chicken Wings
By Robbie Johnson
42
Small Boat Review: The Moth
By Dave Ellis
44
Carolina Sailing: A Benign British Invasion
By Dan Dickison
46
Boatwork: Replacing Those Crazed Windows
By Tom Kennedy
48
Southern Racing:
News, Upcoming Races, Race Reports, Regional Race Calendars
70
A Sailor Meets His Limitations
By Jack Mooney
23
41
25
56
61
68
69
Marinas Page
Southern Sailing Schools Section
Marine Marketplace
Boat Brokerage Section
Classifieds
Alphabetical Index of Advertisers
Advertisers’ List by Category
COVER:
Tekaroa, a well-traveled example of James Wharram’s classic
Narai Mark IV 41-foot catamaran, at anchor off Islamorada at the
spring Wharram Rendezvous. The boat was built 30 yrs ago in
Millbrook, England. The owner, Gil Grove, purchased the boat
10 years ago in St. Marten from the second owner who sailed it
from England. Photo by Scott Williams.
4
July 2010
SOUTHWINDS
Sandy, a Wharram Tiki 21. Spring Wharram
Rendezvous. Page 32. Photo by Scott Williams.
Kirie Elite 37 boat review. Page 36.
Photo by Diane Schwab.
Each issue of SOUTHWINDS (and back
issues since 5/03) is available online at
www.southwindsmagazine.com
www.southwindsmagazine.com
News & Views for Southern Sailors
SOUTHWINDS July 2010
5
FROM THE HELM
What do the Oil Spill and Sailing
Mistakes Have in Common?
In this issue, on page 70, we have an article by Jack Mooney
about one night of sailing when all sorts of events came
together at once to create a very challenging sail. But what
does Jack’s experience have in common with the Gulf oil spill?
While reading Jack’s story, I thought of all my sailing
mistakes—all of which I survived without disaster. I have
been downright lucky, but every time I’ve gone sailing, I
knew that everything on my boat wasn’t perfect. If it was, I
would never have left the dock. But a few times, I pushed my
luck a little more than I should have. I have many times heard
others’ disaster stories, learning from them all. One was
about a boater who said he rarely sailed at night and didn’t
need running lights. He had no motor and his lights ran on a
battery, which had died. One day, events delayed him from
returning before dark, and he sailed for several hours without
lights, cautiously. A powerboat approached him at high
speed and obviously couldn’t see him. The powerboat almost
hit him, turning at the last minute, its wake rocking his boat.
Shook up, he immediately called a towboat for assistance.
After hearing this story—keeping my own guilt a
secret—I shortly thereafter checked my running lights,
which I had not used in months. I found one that was not
working and fixed it immediately, vowing to never let
myself get in that situation.
And what does this have to do with the oil spill? BP was
STEVE MORRELL,
EDITOR
known to be one of the most environmentally-friendly oil
companies out there. And yes, they have a bad safety record,
but we only know about their safety record because it is now
widely known. But I have many times read about other oil
companies’ accidents. They don’t all have great safety records.
I am willing to bet that, after this recent spill, all the other
oil companies drilling in the Gulf immediately reviewed their
wells to see where they cut corners. I spent many years in the
construction industry. Cutting corners is common practice.
Engineers hate it, because they were trained to think scientifically. (If you ever knew any engineers, they all have this in
common.) But they aren’t in charge. Their bosses are—and
their bosses make judgments based on the engineers’ advice
versus what they think is acceptable and cost-effective. And
the oil companies take more risks the farther out they are.
And drilling deep out in the Gulf, a mile underwater, is a long
ways from home—and an inspector’s eye.
Is BP to blame for this spill? Yes, but I really believe that a
whole bunch of bad practices and bad decisions all came
together at one time and resulted in disaster—and all the other
oil companies are counting their blessings right now that it
didn’t happen to them—and that they still have a chance to
prevent their own disaster. And if we don’t make it costly and
difficult for them to have one, there will be another.
How’s that saying go? “Success comes from good judgment. Good judgment comes from experience. Experience
comes from bad judgment.”
Let’s make sure the oil companies—and not just BP—
learn from this. And let’s hope the rest of us do, too.
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6
July 2010
SOUTHWINDS
www.southwindsmagazine.com
SOUTHWINDS
News & Views For Southern Sailors
SOUTHWINDS Media, Inc.
P.O. Box 1175, Holmes Beach, Florida 34218-1175
(941) 795-8704 (877) 372-7245 (941) 866-7597 Fax
www.southwindsmagazine.com
e-mail: [email protected]
Volume 18
Number 7
July 2010
Copyright 2010, Southwinds Media, Inc.
Founded in 1993
Steve Morrell
Doran Cushing, Publisher 11/1993-6/2002
Publisher/Editor
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Yacht Sales
Please view our Web site for
additional listings.
2003 42’ Valiant CE . . . . . . .$285,000
1998 Beneteau 411 . . . . . . . .$150,000
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2004 38’ Catalina 387 . . . . .$172,500
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1981 36’ Islander Freeport . . .$52,000
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Dozens of fresh water
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Contributing Writers
Letters from our readers
Julie B. Connerley
Dan Dickison
Dick Dixon
Dave Ellis
Robbie Johnson
Kim Kaminski
Tom Kennedy
Roy Laughlin
Jack Mooney
Beth Pennington
Antolin Rivera
Hone Scunook
Morgan Stinemetz Scott Williams
Brian Weeks
Contributing Photographers/Art
Rebecca Burg (& Artwork)
Dick DixonDave Ellis
Exercise Transglobe
Roy Laughlin
Diane Schwab
Scunook Photography
Julie B. Connerley
Bob Fleege
Robbie Johnson
Jack Mooney
Sean Trewes
Dan Dickison
Jim Frijouf
Tom Kennedy
Scott Schamay
Scott Williams
EDITORIAL CONTRIBUTIONS: ARTICLES & PHOTOGRAPHY:
SOUTHWINDS encourages readers, writers, photographers, cartoonists, jokers, magicians, philosophers and whoever else is out there, including sailors,
to send in their material. Just make it about the water world and generally
about sailing and about sailing in the South, the Bahamas or the Caribbean,
or general sailing interest, or sailboats, or sailing.
SOUTHWINDS welcomes contributions in writing and photography, stories about sailing, racing, cruising, maintenance and other technical articles
and other sailing-related topics. Please submit all articles electronically by email (mailed-in discs also accepted), and with photographs, if possible. We
also accept photographs alone, for cover shots, racing, cruising and just
funny entertaining shots. Take or scan them at high resolution, or mail to us
to scan. Call with questions.
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SOUTHWINDS July 2010
7
LETTERS
“Freedom of the press is limited to those who own one.”
A.J. Liebling
In its continuing endeavor to share its press, SOUTHWINDS
invites readers to write in with experiences & opinions.
E-mail your letters to [email protected]
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Go to www.southwindsmagazine.com and click on
“Letters to the Editor”
at the top of the page for our policy.
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SOUTHWINDS
Many of our letters refer to past articles in
SOUTHWINDS. All issues of the magazine since May
2003 are available for reading on the Internet. Go to
Back Issues at www.southwindsmagazine.com.
ST 4000 AUTOPILOT NO LONGER SERVICEABLE
I thought I would relate my experience on a service issue
with Raymarine that your readers might be interested in. I
sent in a 4000+ autopilot control head for repair. The Web
site says that a flat rate repair is available for $200. A few
weeks later, the tech sent me an e-mail that says that the unit
can no longer be serviced. The only option was to replace
the unit with the newer module and control head for $750.
Needless to say, I was a bit shocked. I called to verify this,
and it was true.
So, a heads-up to all you 4000 autopilot users (and
maybe others). Just because it says on the Web site that you
can get service doesn’t mean that you can. Hopefully they
will update the site, and offer a more reasonable upgrade
path in the future.
Jeff
Jeff,
Thanks for letting us know. By the way, I once found Raymarine
radar parts I needed on eBay that were real cheap. A lot of people
have different parts break down in their units and sell off their
units in pieces on eBay. Mine came from someone who had a damaged one and I got the part I needed. I found a local service company that installed it for me. Plus—some service companies have
old units they save for parts.
Editor
MIAMI BEACH WELCOMES BOATERS—
WHO ACT RESPONSIBLY
The Miami Beach Marine Patrol is no longer enforcing this
city’s nasty old ordinance that limited anchoring in local
waters to seven days. This policy change, of course, is due
to the recent changes in Florida law covering anchoring.
Sailors may anchor wherever they want for as long they
wish provided that they do not anchor in ways that would
interfere with marine traffic. All that is very good news for
cruising sailors.
However, as a resident of Miami Beach, a former chairman of the Miami Beach Marine Authority and as a cruising
sailor, I urge cruisers coming to Miami Beach to obey the
rules of common marine decency: (1) Do not pollute local
waters by secretly pumping your head over the side; find
and use a nearby pump-out station. (2) Do not anchor too
near residential buildings on the shore. Residents somewww.southwindsmagazine.com
28th Annual Event
times feel that their privacy is being infringed on. A good
rule of thumb, say, is keep off at least 200 feet. (3) Shift your
anchorage regularly, say, every four days. You would be surprised at the number of complaints I have heard about boats
that are “in my backyard for the season.” (4) Never
approach a waterfront residence in your dinghy after dark.
It may eventuate in needless calls to the police by people
who fear theft of their outboard motors or burglary of their
homes. (5) When you take your trash ashore, place it securely in a City of Miami Beach garbage container. (6) Do not
play loud music. Amplified sound can easily carry two
miles! If your music is plainly audible at 100 feet, it is too
loud. The city of Miami Beach has noise laws, and they are
actually enforced by the Police and Code Compliance
departments. (7) If you come ashore at Monument Island to
have an alcohol-fueled party with amplified music, do not
be surprised when you are arrested by the police for both
illegal consumption of alcohol and making excessive noise.
The city is cracking down, and visiting sailors should know
that. (8) If you use any public park, e.g., Monument Island,
put your trash in containers provided for that purpose. Read
signs carefully and clear the park before the closing hours.
Persons hanging out in Miami Beach public parks after the
closing hour will be prosecuted. (9) If you bring your dog
ashore, it must always be on a leash, and you must clean up
after it, so bring along those sandwich bags. (10) If there is
an emergency and you will have to leave your anchored
boat for several days or longer, be sure to contact the Miami
Beach Marine Patrol. Finally, (11) The city has no Coast
Guard-approved anchorage area. Hence, you must use your
anchor light after dusk.
Miami Beach welcomes responsible visitors including
those who come by yacht. The city has great places to eat,
excellent medical facilities, libraries, supermarkets, laundries, hardware stores, marine supply stores, pharmacies
and banks. The public transportation system is very good.
And, our marine police patrol has a new director, Sgt.
George, who is very professional, user-friendly, and can
advise visiting sailors about satisfying their cruising needs.
The telephone number for the Miami Beach Marine
Patrol is (305) 673-7959.
Morris Sunshine, Ph.D.
Miami Beach
Morris,
I am glad to hear that Miami Beach is no longer enforcing a law
that is probably illegal, anyway. And thanks for a great list of
advice to all boaters. It’s better that boaters act responsibly instead
of having to follow all sorts of new rules that are needed when people can’t control their behavior responsibly. We all know that
boaters, especially cruisers, love the lifestyle and cruising in large
part because they love the freedom that comes with it. I believe freedom is based on “self control—no more and no less.” Next, we’ll
work on the non-boaters and see if they can do the same on land.
And for those who can’t find a pump-out that’s easily accessible: Use Wag Bags, which we sell at SOUTHWINDS. You can
put your human waste in the bags and legally dump them in any
trash can. Everyone thinks pump-outs are everywhere and easy to
find—everyone except those who need one, that is. They are real
easy to find if you are riding around in a small powerboat that goes
See LETTERS continued on page 10
News & Views for Southern Sailors
Bradenton Yacht Club
2010 Fall Kickoff Regatta
Three-Race Regatta
September 24-26, 2010
Spinnaker - Non-Spinnaker
Multihull - True Cruising
Racer/Cruiser
One-Design (on separate course)
Four or more boats will make a class
This is the Premier Kickoff Event
for 2010 - 2011
Boat of the Year Award
Free Dockage Available
Friday, Saturday, & Sunday
Entry Fee Includes :
2 T-Shirts • Cap • Captain’s Dinner • Drink Tickets
Party with Live Music Saturday Night
Continental Breakfast Sat. & Sun.
Register Online @
www. Bradenton-yacht-club.org
Or call (941) 981-3891
Dock Reservations : (941) 722-5936, ext. 212
or Dockmaster Cell: (941) 374-2310
SOUTHWINDS July 2010
9
LETTERS
fast and draws very little water. Of course, few small powerboats
need pump-outs. It’s a different story for a slow- moving auxiliary
sailboat with a deeper draft.
Editor
LOBSTER TRAPS IN THE KEYS
Just talked with some good friends who spent the winter in
the Keys. One of the navigational hazards that your readers
rarely ever talk about are the growing number of styrofoam
floats attached to lobster traps. I don’t know who is responsible for policing the channels and keeping them free of
these obstructions, but whoever it is they are doing a lousy
job. In fact, from the way things look, I don’t believe anyone
is making an attempt to keep these floats out of the channels. I have snagged them on at least four different occasions, even under sail, with my propeller locked in
place. My friends snagged not one, but two of these floats in
their propeller. As a result they had to purchase a new transmission for a cost of $1400, and install it, which was a major
headache. Is the FWC responsible for policing our channels?
If so they are being negligent. The waters in and around the
Keys have become a minefield of sorts.
Harold DeBenedetti
Miami, FL
Harry,
I am not sure who is responsible for keeping the channels clear of
traps. I know we can’t have just anyone doing it, as these traps
belong to their owners and are their livelihood. I do know that during storms, these traps can move around quite a bit. Hurricanes
can not only destroy them but move them quite a ways. Northers,
during the winter months, can move them around quite a bit, too.
I am not sure we can ever hope to keep the channels totally clear
all the time. I know trap owners intentionally try to keep them out
of channels.
The best thing boaters can do on their on is be vigilant in
keeping an eye out for them. As much as these traps move, that is
the best all boaters can do. But just being aware that channels are
not free of traps is the first step.
Perhaps a reader knows who is responsible for keeping the
channels clear.
Editor
BOATERS SKIPPING VENICE VISIT
May Issue, “Docking Incident in Venice Raises Question”
At least once a year we cruise the west coast of Florida on
our sailboat. We always enjoy stopping at the Higel Park
dock so we can shop and dine in Venice. The walk into the
city is very enjoyable. The free dock also lets us enjoy Venice
without hurting our cruising budget. We can even walk to
church from the dock. Imagine our dismay this year when
we find that overnight stays are no longer permitted.
There are no alternatives for anchoring. Venice has
talked for years about moorings, but there seems to be no
progress. The city council suggests Roberts Bay for anchoring. Cruising sailboats require more than a four-foot depth
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SOUTHWINDS
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to anchor as do many larger powerboats. Roberts Bays is not
useable for anchoring.
Even if there were moorings or a spot for anchoring,
there still needs to be a dinghy dock so we can go ashore.
There is none. This lack of dock space, anchoring area, and
dinghy dock will cause us to skip Venice on future travels,
as we did this year on our return.
Higel Park dock will hold five boats. That is a potential
for 1,825 visiting boats each year. If each boat only spent $10
for a large ice cream in Venice, that would amount to
$18,250 annually. We typically leave more than that in the
church collection (the $10). But, since it seems our modest
tourist dollars are not appreciated in Venice, we will take
our trade elsewhere.
Regretfully,
Gerald Haller
Punta Gorda, FL
Gerald,
That is unfortunate for many of the local businesses, although
business is not the ultimate and only reason for allowing and
inviting boaters to visit areas, although to some, that is the only
good reason.
I don’t think it’s a coincidence that the dock was shut down
shortly after the incident we printed information about in the May
issue. I think the police were involved with this decision to shut it
down, although they were obviously lacking in sound judgment
about the referred-to incident—as evidenced by the police chief’s
own report. I haven’t heard of too many other problems at the
dock, but I do know that a general police attitude is to make their
job easier by just not allowing people to do things where it is not
clear-cut how to handle situations. And when it comes to sailboats, the police don’t know enough about them to judge easily. I
am still hoping we can get the marine police everywhere to gain
some knowledge of sailboats.
We’ll see.
Editor
DID THE HAYNIES SPOIL IT FOR EVERYONE ELSE?
May Issue, “Docking Incident in Venice Raises Question”
In that my wife and I, both in our 70s, cruise our 20-yearold, 8-ton sailboat with a 27-horse engine up and down the
east coast six months a year, we read the article on the
Venice docking incident in “Our Waterways” in the May
issue with interest. We frequently have had to maneuver in
20-knot winds, gusting to 45. Now, we fully believe that the
Haynies are not liars, but a wise man once told us that
“when listening to a truthful person, pay attention to what
they do not say as much as what they do.” We will overlook
the detail that Mr. Haynie claimed the conversation with
Officer Phillips took place about 22 hours after they arrived
(“the following day at noon”), and that the official report
seems to indicate the encounter took place a day later,
(“Officer Phillips did have contact with the female associatSee LETTERS continued on page 12
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LETTERS
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July 2010
SOUTHWINDS
ed with the boat on 1/24/10”). Maybe they are both correct.
Did the Haynies stay two nights before the city questioned
them? The initial e-mail from Mr. Haynie does mention that
they were aware of the 18-hour stay policy prior to arrival,
but makes no mention that they, being experienced sailors,
knew what the weather would be like after they arrived. Or
did they leave Anna Maria Island without checking the
weather forecast?
He also makes no mention of any attempt to contact the
authorities the day of arrival to try to work out an extended
stay agreement. They say they were the only boat remaining
at the dock (implying that others were there but felt safe
enough to leave?). They also do not mention any trauma
moving the 100 yards to the free slip at the yacht club. Nor
did they describe the need to recruit a crew on board or on
the docks to avoid damaging their boat moving in the supposedly unsafe conditions. In his second e-mail, Mr.
Haynie clearly identifies that a primary consideration was
dock fees. We understand, as we are also retired, on a fixed
income and have no desire to depend on handouts for our
food. We do not, however, try to twist public policy to get a
freebie, and actually prefer to anchor out rather than pound
a dock in rough conditions. He did go to great length to
identify his wife’s extensive cruising experience but did not
mention that, if they are anything like every other experienced cruiser we have met, they have at least two substantial anchors ready at the bow, and know how to use them to
minimize swinging and avoid dragging. He also does not
mention where he was all the time his wife was dealing
with Officer Phillips (hiding out down below, or frantically
putting out more fenders to keep the boat from pounding
on the dock, or whatever?).
Sure, the folks at Naples might have attempted to “prevent” them from leaving safe harbor, but moving a little
more than 100 yards to the anchorage or moving to a marina does not, to me, constitute leaving safe harbor. Officer
Phillips probably saw the other boats move out, observed
the size of the available anchors, and noted that the apparent skipper was not involving himself in the discussion.
Most cities are sensitive to the situation of being seen as
unfairly competing with the tax-paying marinas by offering free docking, and their employees act accordingly. Our
bottom-line conclusion from what was not reported by the
Haynies is that they were just the last of a long line of selfish boaters trying to abuse the hospitality of the people of
Venice. Accordingly, they can justly conclude that they
have spoiled it for everyone else and have no one to blame
but themselves.
Scott Mackenzie
Washington, NC
Scott,
It appears that you have joined many others in making assumptions and passing judgment without all the facts. You have pointed out a discrepancy in the dates, and rightly so, but that is no reason to make assumptions that are pure guesswork on your part.
For you to assume that Officer Phillips “probably saw the other
boats move out, observed the size of the available anchors, and
noted that the apparent skipper was not involving himself in the
discussion”—is really quite unfair. You don’t even know how
often they pass by these docks. That is a big leap to assume an offiwww.southwindsmagazine.com
In celebration of the City of New Bern’s 300th Anniversary,
the Neuse Yacht Racing Association presents
the return of North Carolina’s most successful regatta
cer saw other boats leave and even saw their anchors. Where did
you get that? And nowhere did Haynie identify himself nor his
wife as the skipper of the boat. To write that perhaps he was “hiding out on his boat” or “frantically” hanging fenders is another
presumptuous statement of judgment.
It also appears that no one—neither the police chief or you—
seems to mention the sailboat that had to be towed because it was
dragging in the nearby anchorage, making your comment about
controlling a boat swinging at anchor another irrelevant assumption. I don’t have room to mention your other assumptions.
I tried to point out that the police chief showed her ignorance
of sailboats in her writings. Speaking of discrepancies: Did anyone notice that the police chief stated that the winds were not 45
mph, even though the Haynies only said it was “gusts” to 45?
I see people who will side with the police no matter what,
hanging the accused without all the facts. Yes, I give the Haynies
the benefit of the doubt, but is that not the law of the land?
Whatever happened to “innocent till proven guilty”? That was
written in reference to the accused, not the police.
I believe the police hung themselves by their own words indicating their ignorance of sailboats in their report. One reason I
give the Haynies the benefit of the doubt is I remember when I was
younger and taking flying lessons. I learned that “gethomeitis” is
one of the main causes of accidents. But it doesn’t just apply to
going home. It applies to taking off. Pilots fly somewhere, see the
weather turn and try to get back anyway. Shouldn’t we all be
encouraging that in boating? Give boaters the benefit of the doubt,
and if they are erring on the side of safety, let them? Boaters, like
police, can’t be expected to act perfectly every time. If you think
that, then we have to start looking at you.
Where do all the real problems come from with boaters? The
statistics are overwhelming: They come from powerboaters
drinking and/or speeding and acting reckless, or from boaters
with little boating knowledge getting into trouble. How many
real problems come from sailboats? It is the non-cautious ones to
watch out for.
I remember when a police officer accused a boater of taking
free water at a dock in Palm Beach County (“Letters” Dec. 2009).
The amount of water was about 16.9 cents’ worth if he was taking
100 gallons (which he wasn’t—it was less than half, meaning less
than 8 cents). Where is our sense of proportion and reality? Of
things that make a real difference?
As for free dockage: How about if we eliminate all free parking of cars in our cities? Is that not unfair to those private parking lots? Why do we have any free parking in any city? Are you
only acting responsibly if, in fairness to those private parking lots,
you pay and park your car in a lot and not in a free parking space?
And when you anchor out for free, isn’t that unfair to those marinas where you pay? And read the article in the June issue on free
dockage for some more light on the subject.
Editor
The 26th
Regatta
Labor Day Weekend, 2010
NEW BERN, NORTH CAROLINA
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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR:
[email protected]
News & Views for Southern Sailors
SOUTHWINDS
July 2010
13
Bubba Figures Out How to Plug Oil Leak
T
he general conversational thrust at The
Blue Moon Bar is, as a rule, eclectic and
diverse. Bruno Velvetier, ASID,
likes to talk about colors and fabrics
and how the fabrics feel. Tripwire,
the Vietnam vet, doesn’t talk much
about anything, but when he does
utter a phrase, it is generally terse.
He listens very carefully, though.
When Doobie shouted, “Come
in!” to a tourist in Bermuda
shorts and knee-length black
socks—a person who was obviously very lost—Tripwire shouted,
“Incoming!” and hid under the pool table again.
Shorty, who has a problem with stuttering, doesn’t talk
much at all. But when he does, it can go on for a long time.
Doobie, the bartenderette, a woman given to wearing
tight leather pants that stretch across her perfectly formed
buttocks like a sailor’s dream, doesn’t talk much either.
When she does, however, she tends to say things in pithy
ways that usually leave the object of her riposte struck
dumb for several moments. Doobie’s utterances are the
verbal equivalent of a Taser dart. They won’t kill you, but
you might wish they had.
Bubba Whartz, the live-aboard, live-alone sailor and
skipper of the ferro-cement sloop Right Guard, has an opinion about most things. That is not to say that Capt. Whartz,
who is given to wearing a red baseball cap with a Peterbilt
emblem on it and chewing Red Man tobacco, is wellinformed about many things. He simply has a great many
opinions, most of which he is not shy about sharing.
That dynamic was much in evidence when I stopped
by The Blue Moon Bar not long ago to get out of the
Sarasota, Florida, heat and to rehydrate myself after a sweaty
time in my car the day the
air-conditioning ceased to
function.
“I’ll have the coldest
beer you have, Doobie,” I
said as I came through the
front door in a blaze of light
and heat. As Doobie started
toward the beer cooler, all the guys
sitting at the bar leaned forward just a bit
to watch her move in that swinging gait she
exhibited with such precision. It was as smooth
as a Rolex.
“Me, too, Doobie,” Bubba Whartz said. I knew what
that meant. One for the price of two.
Bubba and I had settled down to a swallow or two of
that liquid gold that goes down so well on a hot day when
the always-on TV at The Blue Moon Bar showed a picture
of one of those nameless talking heads that reads the news.
He or she was talking about the BP oil spill in the Gulf of
Mexico. Whatever it was, the news was not good, I recall.
Brown stuff was oozing ashore polluting things, staining
things, hurting wildlife, killing marine life. Sitting in The
Blue Moon Bar I felt this deflating air of futility, where life
had gotten so complicated that it seemed to have spun out
of control. BP couldn’t stop it. Our government was powerless to stop it. I guess I said as much out loud.
Bubba Whartz heard me. “Hell, I can stop it in about
two hours,” Bubba announced.
Bruno Velvetier didn’t hear him; he was sitting too far
away, playing with a paper umbrella in his drink. Tripwire
was in the gent’s room, so he missed it. Shorty had been try-
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July 2010
SOUTHWINDS
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By Morgan Stinemetz
ing to get another beer ordered from Doobie
for three minutes straight and he was stuck
on just the first syllable of the first word in
the first sentence. Doobie was waiting.
“You can do what?” I asked Bubba.
“I can stop that oil leak in two
hours, maybe less,” Bubba said.
“You can?”
“Sure,” Bubba responded. “I
have the professional knowledge. I am to marine plumbing
what Red Adair was to oil well
fires.”
“You said, ‘was,’ Bubba,” I
noted.
“Yeah, Red Adair died in 2004.”
“How can you stop a monstrous oil leak in two hours?”
I asked.
“I have the experience and the equipment,” said Bubba.
“How did you come about getting such specialized
knowledge?”
“Well, as you know,” Bubba began, “I have had Right
Guard for a number of years now. I have had to charter the
boat out from time to time to make ends meet, and a number of years back I got hooked up with a bunch of Junior
League clubs here on the west coast of Florida. Various
Junior League clubs from Naples to Clearwater would charter the boat. They paid extra so that there would be no cockroaches. And there never were.
“But, you know, those ladies never knew the first thing
about marine plumbing. If they had to use the head, they
invariably plugged it up tight. It got so that I always carried
an emergency bucket on board during the Junior League
cruises, because those women always caused the head to
malfunction. It never failed. Every single time, the head
stopped working. Well, of course, after the cruise was over
and I said goodnight to all those nice but helpless women, I
then had to go and disassemble the marine head on Right
Guard and clean out whatever it was those Junior League
women had tried to flush down the head. And you know
what? I saved every bit of it. It’s in a
storage facility.”
“How much did you save?” I
asked Bubba.
“About four hundred pounds
worth,” he said.
“What was it?”
“I can’t remember it all, but time
after time it succeeded, without
fail, to plug up the head,”
Bubba explained. “Off the top
of my head, I would guess, there
were about 50 tampons, 25 sanitary
napkins, a set of car keys, several beer
cans, cocktail napkins by the hundreds, 15 or
20 hair curlers, six children’s diapers, twenty Kleenex
boxes, several lipstick tubes, some things that women apply
pancake makeup with, eye liner brushes by the dozens, one
tennis bracelet with genuine zirconium, a fake Rolex watch,
some linen handkerchiefs, one Hermes scarf, about 17
champagne corks and one pair of crotch-less panties.”
“Man, that’s a lot of stuff,” I exclaimed.
“Junior Leaguers can gum up the works of any device
made by man without half trying,” Bubba affirmed.
“And you think that this stuff you have in storage will
stop the oil leak?”
“There’s no doubt about it. I can fix that thing using just
the stuff I have acquired from Right Guard’s marine head
from Junior League charters in two hours, three hours
tops,” Bubba said. ‘Those items will jam up anything.”
“What would you want for this in terms of compensation?”
“Well, Red Adair got about $100,000 an hour when he
was working. I’d do the job for free on one condition.”
“What is that, Bubba?” I responded.
He whispered his response in my ear, so no one else
heard it but me. However, that leads me to just one question. Do you think that calling the body of water that the oil
is now polluting the Gulf of Whartz would be too steep a
price to pay?
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SOUTHWINDS
July 2010
15
Southeastern U.S. Air & Water Temperatures
and Gulf Stream Currents – July
Weather Web Sites:
Carolinas & Georgia
www.ndbc.noaa.gov/Maps/Southeast.shtml
Florida East Coast
www.ndbc.noaa.gov/Maps/Florida.shtml
Florida West Coast & Keys
http://comps.marine.usf.edu
Northern Gulf Coast
www.csc.noaa.gov/coos/
WIND ROSES: Each wind rose shows the strength and direction of the prevailing winds in the area and month. These
have been recorded over a long period of time. In general,
the lengths of the arrows indicate how often the winds came
from that direction. The longer the arrow, the more often the
winds came from that direction. When the arrow is too long
to be printed in a practical manner, a number is indicated.
The number in the center of the circle shows the percentage
of the time that the winds were calm. The lengths of the
arrows plus the calms number in the center add up to 100
percent. The number of feathers on the arrow indicates the
strength of the wind on the Beaufort scale (one feather is
Force 1, etc.). Wind Roses are taken from Pilot Charts.
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16
July 2010
SOUTHWINDS
… A PASSION FOR SAILING
SINCE 1998
www.southwindsmagazine.com
EVENTS & NEWS
OF INTEREST TO
SOUTHERN SAILORS
To have your news or event in this section, contact [email protected]
Send us information by the 5th of the month preceding publication. Contact us if later.
Changes in Events Listed on SOUTHWINDS Web site
Go to www.southwindsmagazine.com for changes and notices on upcoming events. Contact us to post event changes.
EDUCATIONAL/TRAINING
RACING EVENTS
For racing schedules, news and events
see the racing section.
UPCOMING SOUTHERN EVENTS
Go to the SOUTHWINDS Web site for our list of youth sailing programs in the southern coastal states, www.southwindsmagazine.com. The list was printed in the April 2006
issue.
Florida Boating Safety Courses Required in
Florida and Other Southern States
Effective Jan. 1, 2010, anyone in Florida born after Jan.
1, 1988, must take a boating safety course in order to operate a boat of 10 hp or more. Other states have age requirements for boaters operating motorized craft. Some states
require boaters to have boater safety education if they were
born after a certain date, meaning boaters of all ages will
eventually be required to have taken a course. To learn
GULF OIL SPILL
BoatUS Establishes Web Site for Oil Spill with
Recommendations to Protect Your Boat
BoatUS has established a Web site to help boaters during
the oil spill at www.boatus.com/oilspill.
Suggestions from the site for protecting your boat:
• If your marina or boat club puts oil containment
booms in place, do not attempt to cross the booms
with your boat. This will only spread the oil and damage the booms or possibly your vessel’s running gear.
• If there is oil in your marina, refrain from running
engines or other devices that have seawater intakes
such as air conditioners or refrigerators. To be safe,
keep seacocks closed.
• Hauling out your boat will prevent damage, but as of
press time it was not clear if these costs will be reimbursed by British Petroleum (BP).
• If the spill is sighted coming toward your marina or
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already there, call the BP Community Information
Hotline at (866) 448-5816 to make a report.
• If your boat comes in contact with the oil, call your
insurance company to file a claim. BoatUS insureds
should call (800) 937-1937.
Florida Keys Posts Oil Spill Section on its Web Site
The Florida Keys and Key West Tourism Council has
added a component to its Web site, www.flakeys.com/oilspill, to provide travelers up-to-date information regarding the TransOcean/BP oil spill in the
northern Gulf of Mexico.
The site features official National Oceanic and
Atmospheric Administration oil slick trajectory maps as
well as questions and answers regarding the oil leaks and
their proximity to the Florida Keys. The 72-hour forecast
maps are updated on a daily basis to plot and project
approximate positions of the oil slick.
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SOUTHWINDS
July 2010
17
Prospective US SAILING Level 1
Small Boat Instructor Course, Venice, FL, August
US SAILING may hold a Level 1 (small boat) instructor
course at the Venice Yacht Club on Aug. 13-16 if enough
candidates commit to it. Capt. Jabbo Gordon, US SAILING
certified instructor and instructor trainer, would teach the
40-hour course.
Candidates must be at least 16 years of age, an adult
member of US SAILING and possess a NASBLA approved
safe-boating certificate. They also need CPR and First Aid
certification, but that requirement can be completed after
Articles Wanted About Southern Yacht Clubs,
Sailing Associations and Youth Sailing Groups
SOUTHWINDS magazine is looking for articles on individual yacht clubs, sailing associations and youth sailing
groups throughout the Southern states (NC, SC, GA, FL,
AL, MS, LA, TX (east Texas). Articles wanted are about a
club’s history, facilities, major events and general information about the club. The clubs and associations must
be well established and have been around for at least five
years. Contact [email protected] magazine.com for
information about article length, photo requirements
and other questions.
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18
July 2010
SOUTHWINDS
Clearwater Coast Guard Auxiliary (Flotilla 111) Public Boating Programs, July and August.
For more information on upcoming education
programs or to request a free vessel safety
check, call (727) 469-8895 or visit
www.a0701101.uscgaux. info. Click on Public
Education Programs. America’s Boating Course and
other courses regularly posted on the Web site. About
Boating Safely: July 17-18. Sailing Skills and Seamanship
(6 lessons): August 9, 10, 12, 16, 17, 19
Electrical Certification Course, Dare County, NC, July 13-16
College of the Albemarle, Manteo, NC. American Boat and
Yacht Council. www.abycinc.org. (410) 990-4460
Onboard Weather Forecasting,
St. Petersburg Sail and Power Squadron, Aug. 18
This seminar explains how just using your own senses can
help you determine the conditions you will encounter. A
forecast is important. It tells what weather systems are
headed your way, but does not tell you exactly where and
when the conditions will change. Add your own observations and you have an extra edge. The seminar explains
weather system terms, how to understand clouds and their
changes, and using changing wind direction, temperature
and pressure to hone in on emerging weather fronts. The
seminar comes with a Captain’s Quick Guide to keep on
your boat. Wednesday, August 18, 7-9 pm. St. Petersburg
Sailing Center, 250 2nd Ave SE, Demens Landing, St.
Petersburg. Instruction free, materials $20 per family.
Maximum of 20 students. Pre-registration required/ Go to
www.boating-stpete.org, or call (727) 525-0968.
Sailing Classes, Melbourne, FL, March — July
Melbourne Yacht Club 2010 Sailing Program. Youth weekend classes during the summer. For schedule and location
go to www.melbourneyachtclub.com, click on Regattas
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FIS
about the laws in each state, go to www.aboutboatingsafely.com.
The course name “About Boating Safely,” begun by
the Coast Guard Auxiliary, satisfies the education
requirement in all the southern states and also gives
boaters of all ages a solid grounding (no pun
intended) in boating safety. Other organizations
offer other courses which will satisfy the Florida
requirements.
About Boating Safely (ABS) covers subjects
including boat-handling, weather, charts, navigation rules, trailering, federal regulations, personal
watercraft, hypothermia and more. Many insurance companies also give discounts for having taken the
boater safety education course.
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and Racing, and then “Learning to Sail” on the
lower left index. Or e-mail [email protected]
Marine Flare Deployment and Fire
Extinguishing, Coast Guard,
Tierra Verde, July 10
The United States Coast Guard along with
Tierra Verde Fire District will be having a
FLARE IT UP & PUT IT OUT event on
Saturday July 10 at the Tampa Bay Watch at 3000
Pinellas Bayway, Tierra Verde, FL 33715, 9 a.m. to 1
p.m. This is a free event. Participants will receive instructions on deploying a marine flare and practice extinguishing a fire with a fire extinguisher. For more information and
to register, go to www.tieraverdefire.com.
SOUTHWINDS PressGang Crew Web Site
Up and Running Again
PressGang, the crew and boat search Web site that
SOUTHWINDS had running previously on our Web site
is again active and up-to-date. See details on page 58 or
go to www.southwindsmagazine.com/pressgang. Web
site, www.southwindsmagazine.com and then “Sailor’s
Resources.”
Coast Guard Auxiliary Safe Boating Courses 2010,
Jacksonville, FL
Safe Boating Saturdays. 7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Cost is $25
including materials. Captains Club, 13363 Beach
Blvd., Jacksonville. Meets Florida legal requirements
for boater education. Most insurance companies
offer discounts to program graduates. Mike
Christnacht. (904) 502-9154. Generally held once
monthly on Saturdays: June 5, Sept. 25, Oct. 16,
Nov. 13. Go to www.uscgajaxbeach.com for the
schedule and to register.
Ongoing – Boating Skills and Seamanship Programs.
St. Petersburg, FL
Tuesday nights, U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary. Satisfies the
Florida boater safety education requirements. Eleven lessons, every Tuesday. Boating Skills and Seamanship
Programs, 7:30-9:30 p.m., 1300 Beach Dr. SE, St. Petersburg.
Lessons include which boat for you, equipment, trailering,
lines and knots, boat handling, signs, weather, rules, introduction to navigation, inland boating and radio. (727) 8233753. Don’t wait until next summer to have your children
qualify for a state of Florida boater safety ID, possibly lower
your boater’s insurance premium or just hone your safe
boating skills.
www.bwss.com
20
July 2010
SOUTHWINDS
www.southwindsmagazine.com
North Carolina Maritime Museum,
Beaufort, NC
Ongoing adults sailing programs. Family Sailing.
2-6 people; 2-6 hours. Traditional skiffs or
30-foot keelboat. $50-$240.
www.ncmm-friends.org,
[email protected], (252) 728-7317.
Reservations/information:
call The Friends’ office
(252) 728-1638
Ruskin, FL, Coast Guard
Auxiliary Flotilla 75 Offers Home
Study Safe Boating Course
The Ruskin flotilla each month offers a Boating Safety
course in Ruskin, but has found that many boaters do not
have the time to attend the courses, so they are now also
offering a home study course at $30. Additional family
members will be charged $10 each for testing and certificates. Tests will be held bimonthly. Entry into the course
will also allow participants to attend the classes. To apply,
call (813) 677-2354.
News & Views for Southern Sailors
OTHER EVENTS
2010 Atlantic Hurricane Season
Begins, June 1-November 30
Visit the SOUTHWINDS hurricane pages at
www.southwindsmagazine.com for articles and
links to weather Web sites, hurricane plans, tips on
preparing your boat and more.
20th Annual Seven Seas Cruising
Association Downeast Gam,
Islesboro, Maine, Aug. 7
The 20th annual SSCA Downeast Gam will be held on
Saturday, Aug. 7, at Dick and Kathy de Grasse’s cottage in
Islesboro, Maine. There will be a dinghy raft-up around
5 p.m. Friday, Aug. 6, in Broad Cove. There is no admission
charge. The lunch Saturday is a potluck. Ice, grill, tables,
name tags and such will be provided. Commemorative
SSCA Maine Gam T-shirts will be sold. Diesel, gas and
fresh water are available nearby. Bring books to swap and
SOUTHWINDS
July 2010
21
stuff to sell or give away. Gilkey Harbor and Broad
Cove are all-weather harbors on the east side of
Islesboro Island with plenty of room, good
holding and very few lobster pot buoys to
get tangled up in.
Seven Seas Cruising Association
members, Ocean Cruising Club members and non-members are invited.
Plan to spend a few days. If all goes
according to plan, VHF Channel 68 will
be monitored by the De Grasses a few days before the
gam. Dick and Kathy de Grasse s/y Endeavour, 508 Ferry
Rd. Islesboro, ME 04848. (207) 734-6948, (781) 635-5439
(cell), [email protected]
NEWS AND BUSINESS BRIEFS
Florida Passes Law Limiting Sales
and Use Tax on Boats
Those sailors considering purchasing a boat over $300,000
in Florida will save some money on the sales and use tax.
Florida passed a law in May that limits the tax at $18,000.
Purpose of the law was to give buyers an incentive to purchase boats in Florida instead of in other states and nearby
countries where it would be cheaper to purchase the boats
because of lower taxes. The law goes into effect on July 1.
Florida Allows Non-Resident
Boaters to Stay up to 180 Days
Last month in SOUTHWINDS, we printed an article about
states that are limiting the amount of time boaters can stay
in a state before owners are charged sales and use tax. We
LED LIGHTS
Drop in replacements for Beneteau, Catalina &
Hunter ceiling, reading and navigation lights
Full product information at
www.cruisingsolutions.com
COST EFFECTIVE
EQUIPMENT FOR
LIFE UNDER SAIL
did not mention Florida, which has gone against
the trend other states have followed. Last
July, we reported that Florida Gov.
Charlie Crist signed a law in May 2009
allowing non-residents who purchase a
boat in Florida, or bring a boat into
Florida for repair or alteration, to remain in
the state 180 days before becoming liable for
the sales and use tax. Beforehand, the tax
applied after 90 days.
Online E-Book for Taking Photos
on the Water
Jim Austin, who has had several covers in SOUTHWINDS
magazine, recently launched an online e-book with advice
and tips on taking photos of all kinds while on the water.
Topics include taking photos of the following: portraits
onboard, boat photos, whales, dolphins, birds on passage,
bugs on deck, sunsets, sunrises, water colors, cruising cuisine, fish caught, candid shots, cruise ships, tenders and
weather shots. The e-book, named Pixels on Passage, has
photos throughout of all the subjects, along with the tips on
photography. The book can be used for taking shots with
any camera.
The price of the 32-page color PDF is $5 and can be
downloaded online. Jim also has online photo classes available on the Web site. http://jimagesdigital.weebly.com.
Fishermen’s Village Yacht Basin in
Punta Gorda, FL, Loans Free Life
Jackets to Kids
Fishermen’s Village Yacht Basin, located in upper Charlotte
Harbor, Punta Gorda, is helping kids keep safe while on the
water by participating in the BoatU.S. Foundation Life
Jacket Loaner Program for Kids. The program, made possible by the BoatU.S. Foundation for Boating Safety and Clean
Water, allows boaters to borrow a child’s life jacket for the
day or weekend, at no charge.
If a boating family discovers they don’t have enough
properly-fitting children’s life jackets on board, they can
visit Fishermen’s Village Yacht Basin and sign out infant,
child, or youth jackets. When finished boating, they can
Review Your Boat
SOUTHWINDS is looking for boaters to review their own
boat. We found readers like to read reviews by boat owners. If you like to write, we want your review. It can be
long or short (the boat, that is), a racer, a cruiser, new or
old, on a trailer or in the water. Photos essential. If it’s a
liveaboard, tell us how that works out. Or—is it fast?
Have you made changes? What changes would you like?
Contact [email protected] for more
specifics and specifications on photos needed. Articles
must be sent by e-mail or on disc. We pay for the reviews.
800-460-7456
22
July 2010
SOUTHWINDS
www.southwindsmagazine.com
SOUTHERN MARINAS
= BOATU.S. COOPERATING MARINAS
DISCOUNTS AVAILABLE to BoatU.S. Members 800-295-2628
ADVERTISE HERE
2 inch color ads starting at
$50.00/month
(12-month rate)
[email protected]
southwindsmagazine.com
(941) 870-3422
Edenton
North Carolina
The Finest Marina in the Carolinas
Ocean Isle Beach
Georgia
On the ICW at MM 335.5,
just north of the
South Carolina line
HARBORAGE MARINA
Florida
Pasadena
FULL SERVICE
TRANSIENTS WELCOME
910-579-6440
www.oceanislemarina.com
Monthly/Daily Rentals • Well-Protected Basin
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OCEAN ISLE BEACH, NC
South
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St. Petersburg
Palmetto
ST. PETERSBURG, FL
• Floating Docks
• Pool, restaurant
• Close to downtown
• Catamarans
• Transient to Annual
Slips starting at $178.20/mo. (30')
(727) 821-6347
(727) 893-1071
www.ci.gulfport.fl.us
www.HarborageMarina.com
SEE OUR AD ON PAGE 37
LE!
AB
AVAIL
PASADENA
Southern tip of Pinellas
MARINA
County on ICW 38
SLIPS
LIVEABOARDS WELCOME
• 125 Wet Slips
• Parking Next to Slips
• Electric
• Free WiFi
• Large Pool
• Pump Out
• Laundry
• Free Ice
• Full Size Dock Box & Water
727-343-4500
www.pasadenamarina.com
News & Views for Southern Sailors
SEE OUR AD INSIDE BACK COVER
REGATTA POINTE MARINA
On the Manatee River in Palmetto, FL
• Catering to liveaboards
• Transients welcome
• Pool and Spa
• Two Restaurants
• Minutes to deep water
• Workout Facility
– and all amenities
Slips starting at $199/mo
www.RegattaPointeMarina.com
941-729-6021
ADVERTISE HERE
2 inch color ads starting at
$50.00/month
(12-month rate)
[email protected]
southwindsmagazine.com
(941) 870-3422
SOUTHWINDS
July 2010
23
return the jackets. People can stop by the yacht basin by
car or boat between 7:00 a.m.-5:30 p.m. any day of the
week. Call Fishermen’s Village at (941) 575-3000 for
more information.
Yachting Vacations Named
to Represent Jeanneau and
Fountaine Pajot Yachts in
Southwest Florida —
Offering Free ASA Training
with Purchase
Yachting Vacations, in cooperation with Florida Yacht
Group, Florida’s largest new sailboat dealer, is now representing Jeanneau and Fountaine Pajot for the southwest
region of Florida.
Yachting Vacations will help candidate owners choose
the yacht that is best suited for their needs and will guide
them through the buying and financing process as well as
assist them with the selection of equipment needed.
Candidate buyers can also choose the option of putting their
yacht in the charter fleet of Yachting Vacations and thus help
defray many of the costs of ownership. Charter ownership
can be fiscally very attractive to many people. Yachting
INNOVATIVE
MARINE SERVICES
COMPLETE YACHT RIGGING SERVICES
• Hassle free experience
• We bring the rigging shop
to you
• Shrouds, halyards,
lifelines, winches —
sales and service.
• Furling Systems —
All makes and models
sold and serviced
• Electronics installed
and electrical work
(ABYC certified)
…and much more
30+ YEARS EXPERIENCE
REFERENCES
ALL WORK GUARANTEED
Ted Weyhrauch
BRADENTON
(941) 708-0700
[email protected]
www.innovativemarineservices.com
Charlotte Harbor to Tarpon Springs
24
July 2010
SOUTHWINDS
Vacations can provide buyers with projected cash flow
figures and details of the charter program.
Buyers with little or no sailing experience will also
receive, as part of the purchase price, the full training
program of the American Sailing Association.
Through its ASA-accredited sailing school, the
Gulfcoast Sailing and Cruising School at Yachting
Vacations will train new owners, on their boat in
the following ASA courses: Basic Keelboating to
Advanced Coastal Navigation, Coastal Cruising
and Catamaran.
For further information and pricing, contact Capt. Jean “John” De Keyser at [email protected], or call (941) 637-6634.
U.S. Sailboat Brokerage Market:
Mid-Size Boats Selling in April
From Sail America
Sail America has teamed up with YachtWorld.com to provide a
report of sailboat brokerage sales. Each month Sail America will
distribute a report of the previous month’s activity and annual
trends. www.sailamerica.com.
In April, the U.S. brokerage sailboat market once again
made gains against the same month a year earlier. Sales
reported by yacht brokerage members of YachtWorld.com
showed an increase in unit sales from 425 boats in April
2009 to 547 boats in April 2010. The latter nearly equals the
best sales month in 2009, the normal seasonal high point of
June (550 boats). Collective valuation of all sales increased
as well, year over year, growing 34 percent from $27-million
to $37-million.
The best-selling size of sailboats comparing April ‘09
and April ‘10 were those in the 26- to 35-foot category, up 24
percent with 282 boats sold, and the 36- to 45-foot category,
up 57 percent with 187 boats sold.
Boat valuation in those size ranges has increased even
more. In the 36- to 45-foot size, total sales are up 72 percent,
from $11-million to $19-million. In the 26- to 35-foot category, the gain was 47 percent, from roughly $8-million to $12million.
Year to date, the 36- to 45-foot size has had the greatest percentage increase, with 630 boats sold, a gain of 36
percent.
One surprise in April is that sales of boats over 45 feet
slowed down to a pace almost a third less than in 2009, and
volume was down from $8-million to $5-million. Year to
date, sales have increased among boats this size from 92
boats in ‘09 to 118 in ‘10. Valuations are also higher, up from
$230-million to $31-million. Whether this is a one-month
anomaly for this small segment of the sailboat market or it’s
a new trend, we’ll have to wait to see.
As indicated in March’s report, brokerage sailboat sales
volume has so far been consistently above 2009 levels and
not far behind 2008, which began to cool off in the summer.
If brokers can sell 600-plus boats during the summer, they’ll
be at 2008 levels, although still well below 2007, when 700
to 800 boats were sold during each summer month.
— John Burnham, editorial director, YachtWorld.com
www.southwindsmagazine.com
To Advertise, call 941-795-8704 or email [email protected]
BOATS
BOAT SERVICES
PIER 17 MARINE
Absolute
SERVING BOATERS SINCE 1963
4619 Roosevelt Blvd., Jacksonville
(US-17 at Ortega River)
Canoes &
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904-387-4669
BOAT INSURANCE
Small Boat
INSURANCE
PAUL H. PHANEUF
FLORIDA AGENT
— Low cost plans for —
· Up to 30 years old OK
· Sail or Power up to 26 ft OK
· Racing or Trailer OK
· Dade & Broward OK!
For quote, call
1-800-743-2565 ext. 222, M-F, or go to
WWW.FIRSTPATRIOTINC.COM
BOAT LETTERING
WWW.BOATNAMES.NET
AQUA GRAPHICS 800-205-6652
1’’ ADS Start
at $132/6 months
For Information CONTACT:
[email protected]
News & Views for Southern Sailors
Bob Seay’s
TANK CLEANING
“your fuel tank specialist”
Mobile Marine Fuel & Tank
Cleaning Service
Water
Ethanol
Separation
Algae
Leaks
Sludge
Fuel Disposal
Varnish
If you have experienced:
• Frequent changing of fuel filters
• A loss of power/acceleration
• Exhaust smoke
• Costly downtime/repairs
We offer the following:
Don’t let bad fuel shut you down.
Our custom built system cleans your
fuel and your tank, gas or diesel.
Daytona Beach, FL
386-868-5907
• Six point fuel analysis/testing
• Removal of contaminates
• Fuel transfers
• Fuel spill clean-ups
• Bilge pump outs
www.marinefuelcleaning.com
www.AbsoluteTankCleaning.com
(866) 258-4060 / (727) 688-3804
MARINE AC
TAMPA BAY AREA:
NORTH TO HUDSON
SOUTH TO PUNTA GORDA
NEW INSTALLATIONS
SERVICE & REPAIR
Licensed & Insured
Scuba Clean Yacht Service
• Underwater Services • Canvas Shop
• Sail Cleaning & Repair • Detailing
Serving Pinellas, Hillsborough, Sarasota,
Pasco & Manatee counties.
(727) 327-2628
Dealer for Cruisair & Marine Air
813-731-1390
Capt. Ron's Marine Repair
10% OFF WITH THIS AD
ELLIE’S SAILING SHOP
Clearwater
–
Lifelines, rigging, hardware, repairs
Serving small boat sailors Since 1958
Sunfish Boats & Parts (727) 442-3281
INNOVATIVE
MARINE SERVICES
2009 Wins
Corsair National
1st F28 - Bad Boys
2nd F28 - Evolution
Cortez Cup
1st Multi Hull F28 - Evolution
1st Over All F28 - Evolution
SYC Invitational
1st Mono Hull - Forever Young
1st Multi Hull - Evolution
Naples Commodores Cup
1st Melges 24 USA515
sponsored by Longboat Key Moorings
957 N. Lime Ave.
941-951-0189
Sarasota, FL
[email protected]
Professional installation of your electronics,
NMEA & Raymarine certified.
Electrical upgrades & installation, chargers,
inverters, batteries & much more. ABYC certified.
941-708-0700
www.innovativemarineservices.com
or e-mail [email protected]
See our ad in rigging services as well
Charlotte Harbor to Tarpon Springs
3’’ ADS Start at
$57/Month
SOUTHWINDS
July 2010
25
To Advertise, call 941-795-8704 or email [email protected]
BOATING WEB SITE
CATAMARAN BOATYARD
GEAR & EQUIPMENT
Come to the
Boat Show that
never ends…
28' 4" wide 88-ton MarineTravelift &
125-Ton American Crane for Wider Boats
Do it yourself - or we can including spray paint
BEST RATES
BOATYARDS
www.boatsandtires.com
305-852-2025
KEY LARGO, FL
BOAT STORAGE
BOOKS
COVERED OR UNCOVERED
Charlotte Harbor, FL
SSB RADIO
Do-It-Yourself & Full-Service Boatyard
RV’s & Autos Welcome
Freshwater slips available
Capt. Marti’s
Books
ALL AMERICAN
COVERED BOAT STORAGE
941-697-9900
www.aaboatstorage.com
Order: 800-444-2581
Order Online (and more info) at:
www.idiyachts.com
727-532-9988
invites you to our new web site
www.yachtclubshipstore.com
10% off first order through web site
CAPTAIN SERVICE
CAPT. RICK MEYER (727) 424-8966
US Sailing & Powerboat Instructor
Instruction • Deliveries • Your Boat or Mine
Licensed • www.captainrickmeyer.com
www.hollandmarineboatyard.com
Classified Ads in Southwinds
$50 for a 3-month ad with photo
$25 or text ad only.
[email protected]
26
July 2010
SOUTHWINDS
BOAT DELIVERIES . . . . Power/Sail
Bill Robinson – USCG Licensed Captain
ABYC Certified Marine Electrician
305-393-9411, Key West
Sailboat Rigger
[email protected]
Designed to make ordering
QUICK - EASY - COST EFFECTIVE
Burgees - Insignia - Flags - Apparel - Inflatables
1’’ ADS Start
at $132/6 months
Subscribe to SOUTHWINDS:
[email protected]
www.southwindsmagazine.com
To Advertise, call 941-795-8704 or email [email protected]
www.mastheadsailinggear.com
LAUNDRY DAY BLUES?
WONDER WASH
Non-electric
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speed cleaning
Portable & compact
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SPIN DRYER
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110V plug, no installation
Gentle on clothes
Portable & compact
$134.95
No more heavy loads to
the laundromat & loss of
money into the machines
Wash & dry quickly &
easily aboard!
We also carry Wind Generators, Leds, Solar
727-943-0424
www.svhotwire.com
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• Etc…
NATURE’S HEAD, INC.
251.295.3043
WWW.NATURESHEAD.NET
PIER 17 MARINE
SERVING BOATERS SINCE 1963
4619 Roosevelt Blvd., Jacksonville
(US-17 at Ortega River)
COMPREHENSIVE HARDWARE INVENTORY
3’’ ADS Start at
$57/Month
News & Views for Southern Sailors
ROPES - ANCHORS - PAINTS & VARNISH
YACHT FURNISHINGS - CHARTS
LIGHTING - FENDERS & CUSHIONS
WEATHER GEAR - BOAT SHOES - APPAREL
SAFETY EQUIPMENT - TROLLING MOTORS
... and just about everything else!
www.pier17jaxfl.com
SOUTHWINDS
904-387-4669
July 2010
27
To Advertise, call 941-795-8704 or email [email protected]
SA I L O R S !
PUT YOUR WATER
PROBLEMS TO REST…
RIGGING
SMALL AD, SMALL PRICES
Standing and running rigging, life
lines, winches, furlers, line and all
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solving is one of our specialties.
OUR 25TH YEAR IN BUSINESS.
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& SLEEP ON IT
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www.waterbornllc.com
Prop Glop™
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www.riggingonly.com
[email protected]
508-992-0434
SAILING SCHOOLS
SEE OUR
Southern Sailing Schools Page
INFLATABLE BOATS
ON PAGE 21
INFLATABLE BOAT
REPAIRS
SAILS/CANVAS
See Scuba Clean in BOAT SERVICES
www.moby-cool.com™
Repairs of All Makes & Models
Authorized: Zodiac, Avon, Achilles,
Walker Bay Sales & Service
Phone: 407.435.9733
FAIR WINDS BOAT REPAIRS
ADVANCED SAILS
(727) 896-7245
Prop Glop™ Propeller Antifouling
134 Riberia St. #7, St. Augustine, FL 32084
Applied Underwater
Barnacles hate it.
Boaters love it.
Purchase Online
(904) 669-6045
[email protected]
www.fairwindsboatrepairs.com
Quality Cruising Sails & Service
Closest Sailmaker to St. Petersburg Marinas
Keith Donaldson . . . . . . . . (727) 896-7245
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PUBLISHING
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SUBMIT ONLINE
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28
July 2010
SOUTHWINDS
CASH FOR YOUR SURPLUS SAILS
• Huge Inventory of Used Sails
• Top Quality Custom-Made New Sails
• Hardware, Canvas, Repairs, Alterations
• Roller Furling Systems, Line
ALL AT DISCOUNT PRICES
Buy the Sail, not the label!
1-800-WIND-800
Local (941) 957-0999
1818 Mango Ave., Sarasota, FL 34234
FOR OUR UP-TO-DATE INVENTORY DATABASE VISIT:
www.atlanticsailtraders.com
SERVING SAILORS WORLDWIDE SINCE 1985
www.southwindsmagazine.com
To Advertise, call 941-795-8704 or email [email protected]
WWW.BACONSAILS.COM
7800 Used Sails Online Now
Free New Sail Quoter Online
— ONLINE SHIPS STORE —
New & Used Hardware
Call to order by 2pm - same day shipping
BACON SAILS &
MARINE SUPPLIES
SAIL REPAIR
410-263-4880
Fort Myers/Southwest Florida
50 Years Brokering Sails & Hardware
• Sail Inspection & cleaning
• UV Suncover replacement
• Repairs & restitching
• Reef added
• Reshapes and Recuts
• Reasonable Rates
• Pick up and Delivery
• Or bring sail to us
Serving Fort Myers area
and Southwest Florida
Excellent Customer Service
Kurt Martin
239-691-4769
PALMETTO • BRADENTON
Masts •Booms • Deck Hardware
Rigging •Canvas & More
WHEELS CUSTOM LEATHERED
SUNRISE SAILS, PLUS
941-721-4471
www.sunrisesailsplus.com
[email protected]
MARINE CANVAS
727-804-6173
Dodgers, Biminis, Cushions, etc.
Stainless & Aluminim Frames
Mig & Tig Welding
On Salt Creek just south of dowtown
Don... St. Petersburg
3’’ ADS Start at
$57/Month
News & Views for Southern Sailors
You’ll see the quality
You’ll feel the performance
But most of all,
you’ll appreciate the price
Phone 1-800-611-3823
E-mail: [email protected]
Fax 813-200-1385
www.nationalsail.com
New and Used in Stock
Complete Yacht Outfitting Service
Order on the Internet
New Sails •Sail Repair •Cleaning
Sailing doesn’t have to be expensive
NEW & USED SAILS
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7060 15th St. E. #12 • Sarasota, FL 34243
Phone: 941-758-2822• Fax: 941-758-2979
1-800-507-0119 • www.porpoisesailing.com
Sail Service & Repair
www.sailrepairfortmyers.com
All You Need
to Sail!
957 N. Lime Ave., Sarasota, FL
941-951-0189
[email protected]
Cruising & Race Sails
Sail Repairs
Fiberglass Repairs
Fair Hulls, Keels, Rudders
Rigging, Splicing Swaging
Tacktick Electronics
420, V15, Sunfish &
Laser Parts
We Serve Your Sailing Needs
SOUTHWINDS
July 2010
29
OUR WATERWAYS
BP Oil Spill Affects Boating Activities
Along Northern Gulf Coast
By Julie Connerley
T
he April 20 Deepwater Horizon oil disaster marked the
beginning of the worst oil-related catastrophe our nation
has witnessed.
The blast killed 11 employees. The total loss of wildlife,
wildlife habitat, ecosystems, livelihoods, family units, and
even culture, will not be known for years—even as oil continues to pour into the Gulf of Mexico from a blown-out
undersea well.
On April 29, oil reached Louisiana’s coast. By June 4,
headlines announced tar balls had reached the “world’s
whitest sand” of Pensacola Beach. The weeks leading up to
the inevitable were filled with cancellations of beach hotel
bookings and a slowdown in pre-summer business.
John R. Ehrenreich has owned Bonifay Watersports
since 1975. The family-oriented business includes Jet Ski
rentals, parasail flights, a mini-golf course and go-cart track.
It is situated on the Intracoastal side of Pensacola Beach
(Santa Rosa Island) known as the Sound.
“By this time of year,” said Ehrenreich, “I should be
NO MORE HOLDING TANKS
No More Smell • No More Dumping • No More Pumpouts
INSTEAD
USE
WAG BAGS
Use it… Zip it… Toss it!
Place the Wag Bag in your toilet (see photo), use it 2-3 times.
The “Pooh Powder” in the Wag Bag solidifies the waste.
Stick it in the disposal bag (shown here on top of the toilet seat),
zip it shut, store it, then take it to the trash —
you can legally dump this in a city trash can or city dump
(it will break down in several months).
NOW SOLD THROUGH SOUTHWINDS MAGAZINE
— PRICE REDUCED —
$4 for one, 10 for $30
Plus shipping/Sales tax applies in Florida
Read the articles about Wag Bags on our Web site at
www.southwindmagazine.com/wagbags.php
To order, call
(941) 795-8704 or e-mail
[email protected]
Credit Cards Accepted
30
July 2010
SOUTHWINDS
swapping out some of the Jet Skis for newer models. Business
is slower than normal. It is a beautiful June day, the water
temperature is 80 degrees, but few people are renting. It
almost looks like the beginning of the winter season!”
And he wasn’t alone. Sailboat rentals and charter boat
captains have seen their businesses sink since the disaster also.
Bluewater charter boats, like the Miss Marisa, a 46-foot
sport fishing boat, owned by Capt. Mike Newell, 63, were
effectively “out of business” as soon as federal waters were
closed by the oil situation.
“My charters fish blue marlin 30 to 100 miles out,”
Newell began. “That’s federal waters.“ I lost 70 percent of my
bookings in May, and all in June. I filed a claim with BP. Then
they opened up a Vessel of Opportunity program, but it
seemed like all the jobs went to folks who already had jobs—
not the out-of-work charter boat captains.
“Then BP got more organized and now I have a 60-day
contract for my boat and my two hands to take environmental folks out to gather water samples. I think the Gulf is
ruined for the remainder of my lifetime. Money isn’t the
issue anymore; we’ve lost our livelihoods.”
Fishing tournaments have been “caught” by the oil spill
as well. The June 5-6 Queen of Kings Women’s King
Mackerel Tournament was cancelled (and optimistically
reset for September 17-18). The Outcast Family Fishing
Rodeo, originally planned for June 11 was also canceled.
Long-time favorite, the Bud Light King Mackerel
Tournament, planned for June 26, was nixed, but its sister
event, the Shallow Water Slam, is still expected to proceed
as of press time.
For sailors all along the Gulf Coast, the oil spill timing
could not have been worse.
The offshore Gulfport to Pensacola race, sponsored by
the Southern Yacht Club since 1949, was set for June 11.
Commodore J. Dwight LeBlanc, III, made the announcement June 9, “…with deep regret and disappointment after
reviewing the forecasts and projections of surface oil as well
as notices from the U.S. Coast Guard and other regulatory
authorities.” Only 13 yachts had confirmed plans to participate, and possible closure of entrances to marinas in the
Pensacola Bay area by the U.S. Coast Guard also contributed to LeBlanc’s decision.
Pensacola Yacht Club is hosting this year’s Gulf
Yachting Association’s Challenge Cup June 18-20. As of
press time, PYC was still forging ahead with plans for a
successful GYA inter-club regatta.
Pensacola Bay yacht clubs have 23 more regattas after
the Challenge Cup this year—some women only, others
national championships.
Sailors, recreational and commercial anglers, tourists,
and residents alike will be watching BP closely as the company continues to deal with the aftermath. We can only
www.southwindsmagazine.com
Beach clean-up crews in the Pensacola area in early June.
Photo by Julie Connerley.
hope that we are not dealt another bad hand as we cautiously monitor the skies and seas during hurricane season.
Sewage Spills Spoil West Florida Waters
In May, a Charlotte County utilities sewage line broke and
spilled more than 10,000 gallons of raw sewage in a waterway. The contaminated water made its way down to
Charlotte Harbor and Port Charlotte Beach Park. The
county health department put out a precautionary advisory for high levels of bacteria and advised swimmers that
the park could be dangerous to swimmers, possibly causing rashes, diarrhea, nausea and vomiting. If contaminated water is ingested or it enters through an open cut or
sore, disease or infection may result. The advisory against
swimming was lifted one week after the spill, as the
sewage was dispersed into Charlotte Harbor and carried
into the Gulf by tides.
On May 29, a broken wastewater pipe in downtown
Sarasota caused between 10,000 to 20,000 gallons of raw
News & Views for Southern Sailors
sewage to spill into Sarasota Bay. The city put out a health
advisory prohibiting swimming near the Marina Jack’s boat
basin. Forty-eight hours after the spill, the advisory was lifted.
In February, 10,000 gallons of raw sewage was spilled
into the waters on the south side of the Palma Sola
Causeway, just east of the ICW near Anna Maria Island in
south Tampa Bay. Swimming was prohibited in the bay
until testing proved the waters safe.
The Florida Department of Environmental Protection
requires all spills of 1000 gallons or more to be immediately
reported to a 24-hour hotline known as the State Warning
Point. The department states that it receives—at the
Warning Point—on average, two notifications a day, and
that two-thirds of all spills are less than 10,000 gallons. That
means that one third, or approximately 240 spills happen
each year that are over 10,000 gallons. Not all spills reach
waters, whether freshwater or saltwater.
For more information on Florida spills, go to
www.dep.state.fl.us/water/wastewater/wce/spills.htm.
SOUTHWINDS
July 2010
31
Abaco, a Tiki 30 painted with red Awlgrip and fitted with top-notch hardware and modern synthetic rigging, was built by professional
builder David Halladay of Boatsmith, Inc. David is the only builder in the U.S. authorized by designer James Wharram to build his designs.
Spring Wharram Rendezvous
Islamorada, Florida Keys, May 15-16
By Scott Williams
Cover: Tekaroa, a well-traveled example of James Wharram’s classic Narai Mark IV 41-foot catamaran, at anchor off Islamorada at the
Spring Wharram Rendezous.
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32
July 2010
SOUTHWINDS
T
he third annual Spring Wharram Rendezvous was
held at the anchorage off the Lorelei Restaurant in
Islamorada the weekend of May 15-16. A better place
to have such a gathering of James Wharram’s ocean-going
plywood catamaran designs could hardly be imagined.
Warm clear water, a gently sloping shore where shallow
draft cruising cats can nose up to the beach to load and
unload passengers, and coconut palms, reggae music and
good food and drink all combined to create an illusion of the
South Seas dream that inspires folks to build these boats in
their backyards and garages. Like many of the attendees
who are obsessed to varying degrees by these lashedtogether Polynesian-inspired “double canoes,” I drove nearly a thousand miles to be there for the three-day event. My
own Tiki 26 is still in construction at my home in
Mississippi, so I couldn’t sail down, but many owners either
sailed or trailered their Wharram cats from ports around
Florida and from as far away as North Carolina.
Wharram catamaran owners have been having these
get-togethers for decades in Europe where the British
designer’s work has been popular since the 1960s. In the
United States, there are probably more examples of these
home-built catamarans in Florida than any other state, and
for good reason, considering how much excellent shoal
water cruising is available on both sides of the peninsula
and in the Keys. One of the best-known Wharram enthusiasts in the state is Gene Perry, who at age 85 is still sailing
Inseparable, the Tiki 26 he built after acquiring the incomplete hulls some 12 years ago. Before that, he sailed a Tiki 21,
one of James Wharram’s most popular designs. Perry was
among the first builders of the Tiki 21, having ordered the
plans back in 1982 after reading an article in Cruising World
about the design, which won the magazine’s award for the
www.southwindsmagazine.com
Gene Perry’s Tiki 26, Inseparable, right, and Greg Russell’s Pahi 31 Surfrider, left. Inseparable, was built by Gene Perry, 83, after acquiring the incomplete hulls some 12 years ago. Before that, Perry built a Tiki 21 and was one of the first builders of the Tiki 21, having
ordered the plans back in 1982 after reading an article in Cruising World about the design, which won the magazine’s award for the
most innovative trailerable sailboat that year.
most innovative trailerable sailboat that year. Perry has been
well-known in Florida’s Wharram community ever since
and has been a resource of knowledge and experience with
these designs to many new builders and owners. In 2005,
along with Ann and Neville Clement, who live aboard and
sail the Tiki 46, Peace IV, Perry began organizing the first
annual Winter Wharram Rendezvous near his home in
Hobe Sound. When this event caught on and inspired the
Spring Rendezvous in Islamorada, Perry began making the
News & Views for Southern Sailors
trip to the Keys for that one as well. This year, he sailed
Inseparable down from Hobe Sound with the help of a friend.
He has cruised South Florida extensively on both his Tiki 26
and the Tiki 21 that he started out with, and has no plans to
stop sailing anytime soon.
The Tiki 21 is still a popular design for the same reasons
it won that Cruising World contest back in 1982. This year a
big hit at the rendezvous was Sandy, a fine example of a Tiki
21 built by Rick Hueschen of North Carolina. Rick, along
with his wife and daughter made the trip down with Sandy
loaded on a custom slide-out trailer he also designed and
built, allowing for easy self-launching at a boat ramp. Rick
and his family were certainly using the boat the way the
designer intended, camping aboard in the anchorage under
a custom deck tent, and planning to head down to Key West
after the rendezvous to sail out to the coral reefs for some
snorkeling. Rick took all of us who were interested out for
day sails on the boat, and spending time on it sure made me
miss my own Tiki 21, which I sold a few years ago to fund
the building of my Tiki 26.
While Rick and his family traveled the longest highway
distance with a Wharram cat in tow to attend the rendezvous, the sailor who traveled the farthest by sea was
Greg Russell, who with the help of his friends Paul and Matt
Garcia, sailed his Pahi 31, Surfrider, down from Panama City,
taking the offshore route much of the way. They had a great
trip down and were looking forward to the return passage
the following Monday. Greg said he acquired the neglected
vessel in Miami for very little cash, then invested his time
and labor into bringing it back to a seaworthy, cruise-ready
condition. Surfrider stood out in the anchorage as the only
Pahi design represented—easily distinguished by its symmetrical, upswept bows and sterns that truly bring to mind
the phrase, “double canoe.”
Two of the biggest catamarans in attendance were also
anchored out off the Lorelei for the duration of the rendezvous. Both were examples of James Wharram’s early
“classic” line of catamarans, built in a more traditional plywood-on-all frame construction without as much reliance
on epoxy as the Tiki range. One was Skip Lichty’s 34-foot
Tangaroa Mark IV, Tucanu, and the other was Gil Grove’s 41foot Narai Mark IV, Tekaroa. Gil purchased Tekaroa in St.
Martin and sailed her home to Florida. The boat was built in
England and sailed across the Atlantic by a previous
SOUTHWINDS
July 2010
33
owner. Gil has cruised her in the
Bahamas and has plans for more
extensive cruising in the future.
Another prominent Wharram
promoter who is always in attendance at the Spring Rendezvous
in Islamorada is David Halladay,
the proprietor of Boatsmith, Inc.,
in Jupiter, FL. Boatsmith is James
Wharram’s only licensed professional builder here in the United
States, and the company is working hard to show that these simple
but seaworthy designs have a lot Greg Russell’s Pahi 31, Surfrider, which he sailed down from Panama City. Russell acquired the
to offer serious cruisers, especially neglected vessel in Miami for very little cash, then invested his time and labor into bringing it back
those interested in shallow draft, to a seaworthy, cruise-ready condition.
multihull stability and fun.
Halladay realized that not everyone has the time or the space to
commit to a big catamaran-building project; hence his company’s
slogan: “We Build Your Dreams.”
He has proven his ability to deliver on this promise with two of the
first foam-cored fiberglass Tiki 8meter cats built in the United
States, now working as day charter boats for a Marco Island resort.
His outstanding demo boat,
Abaco, a Tiki 30 painted with red
Awlgrip and fitted with top-notch
hardware and modern synthetic Rick Hueschen’s Tiki 21, Sandy. Rick, along with his wife and daughter, trailered the boat from
rigging, was, of course, in atten- North Carolina loaded on a custom slide-out trailer he also designed and built, allowing for easy
dance at the Spring Rendezvous. self-launching at a boat ramp.
Halladay and his associate, David
can be located in the United States and many beyond, and
Crawford, spent most of Saturday and Sunday taking
his efforts have been rewarded each year with a good
guests for rides on the Tiki 30, flying the cruising spinnaker
turnout and wide cross-section of the designs from
as much as possible. Along with Halladay and Crawford, I
Wharram’s 17-foot daysailers to long-term cruisers like the
bunked for the weekend aboard Abaco while in Islamorada,
Tiki 46 and larger classics.
enjoying a couple of nights on the hook in my first time
Saturday, May 15th, the main day of the rendezvous
aboard since I crewed on her with Crawford on a delivery to
when a special dinner was served for those in attendance
Nassau last summer.
by the staff of the Lorelei, also happened to be the 82nd
Dan Kunz, a resident of Islamorada, who keeps his
birthday of the designer, James Wharram, who currently
Tangaroa Mark IV Plus, Forever Young, docked at the marina
resides with his co-designers in England. Wharram has a
next to the Lorelei, is the organizer who has been responsilot to be proud of in his years as a catamaran pioneer,
ble for putting the Spring Rendezvous together in each of
bringing his dream to thousands in all parts of the world.
the three years it has been held there. Dan begins with an eDespite design and material evolution since he made the
mail campaign to all the Wharram builders and owners that
first catamaran crossing of the Atlantic in 1955, his designs
are still being built and enjoyed by those who can appreciate what they have to offer. Those who are attracted to
them usually find they have a lot in common that leads
them to build and sail boats that go against the grain of the
mainstream yachting community. These common traits are
evident in gatherings such as the Spring Rendezvous, and
driving back on the long road to Mississippi, I was reminded of why I wanted to build a Tiki 26 in the first place, and
inspired to get back to my shop with renewed enthusiasm
to get the job done. Maybe next year or the year after, I’ll
sail down to Islamorada on my own hulls.
Scott B. Williams is a sailor, boatbuilder and sea kayaker based in
Mississippi and is the author of five books. He can be reached
through His web site at www.scottbwilliams.com.
34
July 2010
SOUTHWINDS
www.southwindsmagazine.com
BOAT OWNER’S REVIEW
Kirie Elite 37
A European Touch
By Dick Dixon
LOA:
LWL:
Keel:
Draft:
Beam:
Displacement:
Engine: Yanmar
Fuel:
Water:
Max speed:
Homeport:
PHRF:
36 July 2010
37 feet
31’-7”
Shoal draft centerboard
4’ to 6’ 11”
12’ 2”
12,787 lbs.
30 HP
20 gallons
90 gal. (+ 6-gal. hot water tank)
7.8 knots
Pascagoula, MS
135
SOUTHWINDS
F
or nearly five years I have owned a Kirie Elite 37, a
French-built racer/cruiser that most sailors probably
aren’t familiar with—given the popularity of other
brands. When I first considered making an offer on the sailboat in 2004, it wasn’t a design that immediately caught my
attention. I was more interested in a traditional design, such
as the Sparkman & Stevens’ Tartan 37 made popular in the
late ’70s and ’80s. But I found the Kirie interesting and
“doable” given the sellers’ urgency to rid their retirement
budget of an unused second boat that was draining their
checking account of dock fees and insurance.
From the drawing board of famed yacht designer Ron
Holland, this Elite 37 was manufactured in 1985 by Kirie
Feeling in France, shipped to the United States and sold to a
customer in the Miami, FL, area. For the next several years,
Man on the Run participated in South Florida sailboat races,
including the1987 Columbus Day Regatta during which the
Elite lost its mast.
Ultimately, the boat made its way to south Alabama
where the new owners changed the name to MA HAU. With
Pirate’s Cove in Josephine, AL, as their homeport, the owners sailed the Elite 37 in the northern Gulf coast for more
than 10 years, finally moving aboard a trawler at retirement.
Although the design from the sheer to the keel was very
appealing, at first I didn’t particularly like the deck profile.
The long, fixed port lights and the rounded cockpit coaming
seemed too European for a guy who favors a more traditional look. But after sailing the boat and realizing the functionality of the design, I began to appreciate Holland’s
expertise. My concern for the deck profile faded into appreciation as I sailed the Elite, renamed CD Express, and realized its performance capabilities and comfort.
The layout of the cockpit, with matching self-tailing,
two-speed jib sheet winches strategically mounted in proximity to the foot blocks and corresponding adjustable jib
sheet blocks, allows easy crew accessibility especially during the heat of battle. Positioned on the bridge deck between
the cockpit and companionway is the adjustable traveler on
which 6:1 mainsheet blocks and tweak adjustment are
mounted. Aft of this area is wheel steering with fixed
guardrail—all positioned to provide adequate space for the
helmsman. Attached to the guardrail are a teak
drink/binocular holder and a matching folding table, easily
deployable for meals and cockpit gatherings. Engine,
autopilot, VHF and AM/FM radio controls are all within
easy reach of the helmsman. Wind, depth and speed instruments are conveniently mounted in a fiberglass structure
www.southwindsmagazine.com
To port of the companionway
and across from the navigation
area is the “T” shaped galley
with twin sinks and countertop
area.
The large navigation station.
built into the companionway sliding hatch-housing on the
cabin top. Mounted behind the helmsman is access to an
emergency tiller and a ratchet-driven backstay adjuster at
the rear of the cockpit. Mahogany slates measuring 2 inches
wide by .750 of an inch thick cover the cockpit seating, providing non-skid and rapid water draining functionality.
Realizing the importance of adequate cockpit storage,
the Elite 37 has a pocket on each side near the jib sheet
winches where various small items may be stored. Aft are
two large storage lockers, one to port and another on the starboard side. Inside the port locker is a self-contained propane
locker with external ventilation as well as shelf storage and
electronic and mechanical mechanisms for the hydraulic
steering system. The much larger starboard locker also provides shelf storage and ample room for the holding tank,
spare anchor, and other equipment. Located between these
two lockers amidships is another smaller locker where fend-
ers and assorted lines are
stored. There is also access
under a removable shelf to
the steering quadrant.
Moving forward, there
are four two-speed winches
and corresponding rope
clutches mounted on the cabin top within easy reach of the
cockpit. In addition to supporting the mainsail, jib and spinnaker halyards, these winches also provide handling for the
spinnaker pole hoist, boom-topping lift, boom vang and jib
roller-furling lines. With the exception of the roller-furling
line, all other lines lead aft from the mast base through the
clutches as described herein. Forward of the mast is a baby
stay with an adjustment mechanism ready for action. On the
bow is a well-proportioned anchor storage locker just forward and inside a pair of heavy-duty cleats on each side. At
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SOUTHWINDS July 2010
37
BOAT OWNER’S REVIEW
Instead of teak or another traditional marine wood down below,
the lighter-colored elm provides a brighter atmosphere while
remaining true to a nautical appeal.
the business end of the bow is a roller base that supports the
anchor in the deployment position. My anchor of preference
is a 33-pound Bruce with 5/16” chain and 5/8” nylon rode
ready for deployment.
Complementing the stern pulpits is a bow pulpit connected with double lifelines running fore and aft through
multiple stanchions. Forward running lights are mounted
on the bow pulpit while the aft light is affixed to a stern pulpit. A combination steaming/deck light fixture is attached
REVIEW YOUR BOAT
SOUTHWINDS is looking for sailors who like to write
to review their sailboat — whether it is new or old,
large or small. It can include the following:
Year, model, make, designer, boat name
Specifications: LOA, LWL, beam, draft, sail plan
(square footage), displacement
Sailing performance
Comfort above and below deck
Cruiser and/or Racer
Is it a good liveaboard?
Modifications you have made or would like
General boat impression
Quality of construction
Photos Essential (contact us for photo specs)
We have found that our readers love reviews by those
who own the boats — comments are more personal and real
All articles must be sent via email or on disc
For more information and if interested,
contact [email protected] or call (941) 795-8704
(If you hate your boat, we aren’t interested — you must at least like it)
38
July 2010
SOUTHWINDS
midway up the mast, while an anchor light sits at the top.
Including the companionway, there are six openings for
ventilating the interior. The forward hatch, the larger of the
deck-mounted openings, is ideal for passing sails or allowing ventilation into the boat. Just aft and to port is a smaller
opening hatch, which complements the larger forward one.
In the main cabin and just aft of the mast is a relatively large
opening hatch that provides ventilation to the main cabin.
There is a single opening port light in the head and an identical one in the port aft cabin. Both these port lights face aft.
The head and the aft cabin each have hull mounted nonopening port lights. Instead of Kirie’s standard two-piece
Lexan® companionway drop boards, I chose to build and
install teak saloon style doors.
Despite my original discontent with the European style
deck, all was forgotten when I stepped below and saw the
cabin for the first time. Immediately catching my attention
was the use of elm wood on bulkheads and cabinets throughout the entire cabin. Instead of teak or another traditional
marine wood, the lighter-colored elm provides a brighter
atmosphere while remaining true to a nautical appeal.
To starboard is the navigation area complete with 12volt and 110-volt panels, VHF and SSB radios, GPS (another
is at the helm), chart plotter, radar, fuel gauge, and other
equipment necessary for vessel operation. Complementing
the area is ample storage under the chart table and in the
cabinet containing the GPS and chart plotter. There is also a
drawer discreetly located under the radar screen where
smaller items may be stored. Nicely hidden but easily accessible is the 20-gallon stainless steel diesel fuel tank located
between the seat and hull.
Aft of the navigation area is the head, which contains a
nice sink and mirror cabinet combination. Aft of the toilet is
a double-door, cedar-lined cabinet containing ample storage for towels, toiletries and bed linen. Complementing an
easily accessible wraparound curtain stored behind the
door, the shower is conveniently ready for use.
To port of the companionway and across from the navigation area is the “T” shaped galley with twin sinks and
countertop area. To port of this is the built-in top loading
icebox with refrigeration. Aft is the two-burner propane
stove/oven, bordered by a narrow storage area just forward
of the bulkhead. Complementing upper galley storage is an
excellent area for glasses and cups, easily accessible through
clear sliding panels. Below the sinks is a large cabinet containing shelf storage and accessibility to the freshwater and
sump pumps. To the left are four drawers used for silverware and galley utensils. Under the stove is a smaller area
excellent for pots and pans storage.
Through the doorway aft of the galley is a nicely proportioned berth with a cabinet mounted on the hull and
another covering the engine. Along with two drawers there
is ample storage under the berth including room for the
refrigeration unit. The cabinet covering the engine provides
quick access for maintenance and inspection.
Forward of the galley is a U-shaped settee with storage
similar to that on the starboard side. A nicely proportioned
folding elm table—complete with internal wine storage and
cheese-cutting board—divides the main cabin. Under the
port aft athwartship settee is the hydraulic pump for the keel
and the six-gallon water heater. Under the port side fore-andwww.southwindsmagazine.com
aft settee is a 45-gallon stainless steel freshwater tank, also
complemented by a similar tank under the starboard settee.
The forward athwartship settee has large storage areas easily
accessible by removing the seat cushion and boards.
Passing through the arched doorway forward is a small
bench seat to starboard and a cedar-lined hanging locker
above. Directly across to port is a two-door base vanity containing a sink and mirror. Above is another cedar-lined single door cabinet. Forward of this area is a large v-berth with
deep shelving on each side. Underneath the V-berth is a
16,000-BTU, reverse-cycle Cruisair, which easily provides
air-conditioning throughout the boat.
Located throughout the boat are 13 12-volt ceilingmounted dome lights, each strategically placed to provide
maximum light. A single 12-volt spotlight mounted on the
forward bulkhead in the main cabin provides perfect lighting to the framed photo of CD Express. A small adjustable
light at the navigation station provides specific chart and
document reading capabilities. Included in the dome light
above the navigation station is a red light option for those
dark nights when CD Express is underway. Additionally,
there are two gimbaled oil lamps and four 12-volt fans
strategically positioned around the interior.
Powering the 12-volt needs of the vessel when away
from shore-based 110-volt power are four 6-volt house batteries. A single 12-volt battery is dedicated for engine starting.
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News & Views for Southern Sailors
The long, fixed port lights and the rounded cockpit coaming
seemed too European for a guy who favors a more traditional look.
But after sailing the boat and realizing the functionality of the
design, I began to appreciate designer Holland’s expertise.
20+ charger or the Balmor 100 amp alternator affixed to the 30
horsepower three-cylinder Yanmar diesel engine located
under the companionway stairs. The diesel turns a one-inch
stainless steel shaft, which has a Mar Tech feathering propeller attached. Without question, the Mar Tech feathering
propeller is a tremendous asset to the boat’s performance,
both under power (forward and reverse) and sail.
Perhaps the most commonsense piece of mechanical
equipment onboard CD Express is the three-way water
pumping system mounted below the sinks in the galley.
Depending on which valve is selected, a single self-priming
Shurflo pump will discharge water from the icebox, bilge or
bathroom sump. Because the bilge option utilizes a six-foot
hose, it can be used to conveniently pump water from nearby ice chests or bilge water trapped in various hull cavities.
Capitalizing on a two-spreader masthead design, CD
Express’ 53-foot mast height provides excellent performance
in multiple wind conditions. In addition to the mainsail,
there is a 135 and 155 percent headsail choice for the skipper, including either a radial or asymmetrical spinnaker.
Unlike most sailboats manufactured today, my 1985
Kirie Elite 37 has a shoal draft keel with centerboard. With
the board up, the boat draws four feet; when lowered the
draft is six feet, eleven inches. Utilizing a hydraulic ram and
manual pump, the centerboard, made of one-half-inch steel,
provides the boat with exceptional windward performance
while allowing flexibility for all other points of sail. Because
centerboards allow forgiveness in areas where shallow
water is the norm, I’m somewhat dismayed as to why
today’s designers shy away from the shoal draft centerboard design.
Without question my Kirie Elite’s sailing performance,
quality construction, comfort and utilization of space makes
me glad I purchased the boat. Although the boat has a narrow slot when sailing to windward, it points well and quickly responds to the slightest turn of the helm. Off the wind,
the Elite 37 performs like a sleigh, accelerating quickly in the
puffs to reach hull speed with the right breeze. With nearly
eight thousand miles under the keel during my ownership,
this Kirie Elite has repeatedly proven its worth during
numerous races and cruising vacations since February 2004.
Although I still enjoy the lines of a more traditional design,
the Kirie Elite 37 ranks as one of my favorite choices.
SOUTHWINDS July 2010
39
COOKING ONBOARD
Caribbean
Chinese
Chicken
Wings
(Prepared in a Pressure Cooker)
S
ailing time is party time! Every anchorage, every marina, every haul-out offers an opportunity to meet fellow
sailors and compare notes on what a great choice of
lifestyle we’ve made. Invariably, beer and rum, or maybe a
fruity tropical sangria are broken out, and then stomachs
begin to grumble. This is where sailing chefs need a quick,
inexpensive and delicious appetizer to hold the party
together.
These Chinese chicken wings take only 25 minutes of
cooking with a pressure cooker. So, that takes care of the
quick. Chicken is the cheaper meat of the Caribbean, and I
can tell you these wings are heavenly delicious! I came upon
this rather unusual approach to preparing chicken wings
By Robbie Johnson
during a stopover on the western
end of Puerto Rico, in a gorgeous
anchorage off the little town of
Boqueron. Seasoned Caribbean
sailors soon discover that every single island of the Caribbean has a
small population of Chinese, and
they usually farm fresh vegetables
for the local market, or have a grocery store, or operate a restaurant.
There was a feria, a sort of county fair,
going on in Boqueron at the time of my visit, and these wings
were being sold in a booth by two young, Spanish-speaking
Chinese girls. They were so delicious, I asked for the recipe
and was directed to the family’s restaurant. A couple of days
later, I visited the restaurant and was surprised to learn that
the chicken wings were not prepared in some ancient oriental fashion, but a modern pressure cooker! The Chinese proprietor explained that instead of two hours of baking, the
pressure cooker did the job in 25 minutes and saved a great
deal of propane fuel. I also noticed that he cut off the wing
tips, and he explained with a broad smile that these were
saved for later to make broth for wonton soup.
The pressure cooker is the perfect utensil for anyone who
is intimidated by cooking. It’s usually just a case of dumping
the ingredients into the cooker, firing up the heat, and coming back less than a half-hour later to release the pressure and
begin eating. The meals seem to always come out just right.
As you can see in the recipe below, the chicken wings and
ingredients are simply placed in the pressure cooker, heat
applied, and the rest is downwind from there! Give this
recipe a try if you’re in a hurry to prepare an appetizer for a
crowd of hungry sailors, and want to be sure of success.
INGREDIENTS
2 doz. chicken wings, rinsed
1 tablespoon Chinese rice wine (or sake, or a dry white wine)
1/4 cup hot-and-sweet mustard (sometimes I mix Coleman’s
Dry Mustard with a bit of water and a tablespoon or so
of a bottled fruit jelly like Smucker’s Apricot Marmalade)
1/4 cup soy sauce or ponzu sauce (ponzu is soy sauce
with citrus added)
1/4 teaspoon red pepper flakes
PREPARATION
1. Pat dry the wings after a thorough rinse.
2. Combine the rice wine, the mustard, soy sauce and pepper
flakes in a large bowl. Add the wings and toss to coat, then allow
to marinate at least half a day, or overnight, in an ice chest or
refrigerator.
3. When ready to cook, place the wings and the marinating sauce
in the pressure cooker. Lock on the lid and over 3-5 minutes of
high heat, bring the cooker to pressure. Next, reduce the heat to
medium-high to keep the cooker at pressure, and cook for 15
minutes. Then, turn off the heat and allow cooker to sit for 5
more minutes of cooking. Finish by slowly releasing the steam in
the cooker and removing the lid. Remove wings and arrange on
a serving platter, then pour the sauce over them. NOTE: If you
want to get fancy, you can sprinkle sesame seeds over all and top
with a few sprigs of cilantro.
Bienvenidos a Puerto Rico!
Robbie Johnson lives aboard a steel Tahiti Ketch and is the author
of Gourmet Underway – A Sailor’s Cookbook. Order his book
at www.gourmetunderway.com.
40
July 2010
SOUTHWINDS
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News & Views for Southern Sailors
SOUTHWINDS July 2010
41
SMALL BOAT REVIEW
Moths sailing in Tampa Bay in
1939. Photo courtesy Dave Ellis.
A hydrofoil Moth at the 2009 International Moth Worlds. Photo by Sean Trewes.
The Moth
By Dave Ellis
N
o sailing craft has gone through as much change over
its existence as the Moth. Started in the United States
in 1929, the original Moth was always home-built.
Since it was only 11 feet long and no more than five feet
wide, it was easy to build by the average sailor. There was
no set design for the hull. If a sailor thought of an innovative idea for a hull shape, in a few days the boat could be
launched and sailed in a fleet among others’ bright ideas.
The Moth shows up in many old newspaper clippings
from the late 1930s through the ‘40s around the Tampa Bay,
Florida, area. Most were ‘V’ bottomed with a rounded bow
area. Former St. Petersburg Yacht Club sailing master, Del
Jordan, built a few Moths using sheet metal. They say that
there were numerous street signs missing in the area at the
time. The boats were lightweight but noisy, and they leaked.
But they went really fast while they lasted.
Many old-timers sailed the Moth. My mother sailed
hers in races on Big Bayou, St. Pete, in the 1930s, beating the
boys in light air. Past St. Petersburg Yacht Club commodore
Don Krippendorf raced Moths, one of which hung for years
at the former Marina Point Ships Store at the St. Pete
Municipal Marina. Page Obenshain, who owns the store,
says Don took it back and plans to get it sailing again.
By the mid to late 1950s plywood took the place of strip
planking. Doug Halsey of St. Petersburg’s Big Bayou was a
prolific builder of Moths. His thin aircraft ply boats ranged
from scow types with flat bottoms and blunt bows to
extreme ‘V’ shapes, narrow at the waterline with the top42 July 2010
SOUTHWINDS
sides extending far out to maximum beam at the deck. I
owned two of these boats in the 1970s, and they both sailed
very well indeed.
The Miami Yacht Club had several Moths in the ’50s
and ’60s. An icon of the class was Lew Twitchell. He was
known to be still building his Moth while sailing out to the
starting line. Then he would proceed to win. About the only
time he lost was when Ed Sherman from St. Pete showed up
with a Moth using a trapeze hiking aid. That, along with
extendable hiking boards, was banned thereafter.
Times change and by the early 1970s fewer people were
interested in building their own boat. It was about that time
that the Laser, the antitheses of the anything-goes hull of the
Moth, was introduced. Most sailors went with the simplicity and off-the-shelf option of the Laser, and the Moth soon
died off as a viable class.
Meanwhile, in Australia—and later in Europe and the
UK—a very similar boat was being sailed. It too was 11-feet
long but had a more modern, bigger sail plan. When the
United States adopted a sort of unified rule with the other
fleets of the world for the Moth, development accelerated.
The boats were certainly faster, but were so narrow and with
such wide wings that only a few athletic sailors could manage to get around a racecourse.
With an anything-goes philosophy, within the 11-foot
length and set sail-area bounds, it was inevitable that flying
the hull above the water with hydrofoils was developed. As
early as the late 1970s there were Moths that had some sucwww.southwindsmagazine.com
The inside of
Energizer with
shrouds that can be
loosened to allow
the mast to rake
forward on a run, a
positive rotating
arm for the mast
and a JC strap
bungee to hold the
boom out on a run.
Every Classic Moth
is rigged in accord
with its owner’s
fancy. Photo by
Dave Ellis.
cess with flying the hull. But in the mid-1990s, with the
development of foils that could be manipulated automatically by a wand off the bow and manually at the stern by a
tiller rotating arrangement, foiling became a true success.
In anything over about eight knots of breeze, a foiling
Moth will go faster than conventional Moths, and in over 15
knots of breeze, faster than just about any other sailing craft
on the water. Top speeds currently are over 28 knots.
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News & Views for Southern Sailors
In 1989, some of This photo shows how very small the Moth is
the old Moth stal- for an adult sailor, the adult here being Dave
warts in this coun- Ellis, the author. Photo courtesy Dave Ellis.
try got tired of the
sameness of their Sunfish and Laser sailing and longed for
the fun of the original Moth. George Albaugh and Walt
Collins started talking up the idea of renewing the old class.
Charleston’s Greg Allen set up a Web site for “Classic
Moths” and there was found to be significant interest. The
rules for the Moth as they stood in 1965—with some tweaks
to allow for modern materials and methods—have served
them well. Some older Moths were dragged out of sheds
and garages and refurbished. Several Europe Dinghies, the
one-time Olympic women’s singlehanded boat, were fitted
with the classic Moth rig. After all, it had originally been a
Moth, before modification for the Olympics. One Moth was
even fashioned from the first 11 feet of an old Flying
Dutchman hull.
For the past several years the Midwinter championship of the Classic Moth has been in the St. Petersburg,
Florida, area. Divided into the really old designs and more
modern shapes for trophies, good competition is still
enjoyed. The fastest shape now is the light plywood sharp
bow, twisted ply ‘V’, maximum beam at the deck, with nice
curved decks inside. Masts are often carbon, leftover or
broken Finn or Europe Dinghy masts or beefed up windsurfer spars. The sails must still be the old low-aspect
design, but with modern sailmaking skill they sure look
better than in the old days.
So, inevitably, the Moth of today has a split personality.
The International Moth is the darling of the media, flitting
around on top of the water. The US SAILING Rolex Sailor of
the Year, Bora Gulari, won the honor largely by winning the
Moth Worlds. The classic Moth continues as a builder and
innovator’s choice, with good competition among diverse
hull shapes.
Have an idea for a hull shape? Build a Moth in the
garage in short order. Want to go faster than ever? Foiling
Moths are ready for you to take that sailing challenge.
International Moth Web site: www.moth-sailing.org. Moth
Web site: www.mothboat.com/CMBA/index.htm.
SOUTHWINDS July 2010
43
CAROLINA SAILING
A Benign
British Invasion
By Dan Dickison
Adventure, sailing near Antigua, the stopover before
the boats came to Charleston. Photo courtesy of
Exercise Transglobe. www.exercisetransglobe.com
I
t was midweek in late May that three brightly adorned,
67-foot, cutter-rigged vessels made their way into
Charleston Harbor, arriving after a 1,540-mile passage from
Antigua in the Caribbean. That’s nothing special this time of
year. Sailboats of all descriptions make port in Charleston
throughout the spring season as they migrate north to ports
with cooler climes. Though they’d depart in a few days for
Boston, this trio was definitely different. Each vessel represented a branch of the British military (Royal Air Force, Navy,
and Army), and on board were 42 individuals—airmen,
sailors and soldiers—among them 12 crew who had lost
limbs, the majority of those injuries sustained during service
in Iraq or Afghanistan. Their arrival in Charleston was the
culmination of the 11th leg in a 13-stage, ‘round-the-globe
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SOUTHWINDS
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adventure dubbed Exercise Transglobe, a major expedition
open only to members of the British armed forces.
According to the organizers, Exercise Transglobe was
created to test the physical and mental stamina of these servicemen and women while building confidence in themselves and their fellow crew. “We take the service personnel
out of their comfort zone for team-building,” explained Ian
Kane, skipper of the Royal Navy crew on the leg to
Charleston. Talking to a crowd gathered at the Charleston
Yacht Club to celebrate these sailors, he continued: “They
ultimately find reliance on one another, and they end up
better able to address some of the situations that they will
find themselves in while serving.”
This unique team-building circumnavigation began in
July 2009 in Gosport, England, and the small fleet has since
sailed port to port around the globe, accommodating more
than 540 men and women in the process. At each port of
call, new crewmembers are flown in to take over, and those
who’ve just completed a passage fly home. In addition, the
crews are as representative as possible of each branch of the
armed forces, including varying ranks, ages, genders, areas
of specialty and sailing experience. And, there were also a
few Ghurka soldiers (from Nepal) on board as well.
One of the more experienced sailors among them was
Wayne Harrod, a color sergeant in the Royal Army from
Wilkshire, who had served as watch leader on board the
Royal Air Force boat. H, as he prefers to be called, is a jovial
guy and career military man, but that profession hasn’t kept
him from amassing an impressive sailing resume that
includes the ARC (Atlantic Rally for Cruisers), the Fastnet
Race and the Caribbean RORC. And, he’s done all of that
with one artificial leg.
“I really enjoyed it,” said H, smiling broadly to explain
that only on this portion of the circumnavigation did the
organizers include limbless crew. “It was actually the first time
in a long time that I’ve sailed with able-bodied crew on board.
Usually I participate in events that are part of BLESMA
(British Limbless Ex-Servicemen Association). But what we
learned from the skippers is huge. This passage was a good
mental and emotional challenge for everyone.” H said that
was especially the case for those crew with injuries. “You’ve
been through hospital, you’re finished with rehab and now
it’s down to you. What are you going to do to carry on? And
the way I see it, it’s not what you can’t do, it’s what you can do.”
H’s outlook was certainly admirable. And his enthusiasm was contagious; more contagious than he knew. One of
the hosts of that gathering was Ron Acierno, a Charlestonwww.southwindsmagazine.com
The Royal crew in front of the Charleston Yacht Club.
The guy in the light blue polo is Wayne Harrod, known as “H.”
Photo by Dan Dickison.
based psychologist and sailing enthusiast. Acierno, who
owns a Cabo Rico 38, directs the post-traumatic stress disorder clinic at Charleston’s Veterans Administration
Medical Center. Along with several friends and colleagues,
he had recently founded Veterans On Deck, a sailing nonprofit that he hopes can accomplish some of the same goals
as Exercise Transglobe.
According to Acierno, Veterans On Deck (VOD) will
teach team-building and sail training as an important part of
therapy, doing it on a long-term basis—essentially over a
course of months. The objective, he says, is to offer programs
that aren’t solely therapeutic, but that also address the vocational and social “recalibration” needs of returning military.
“Despite the fact that our clinic has won national accolades and the guys are experiencing fewer psychological
symptoms,” explained Acierno, “I don’t think the majority
of veterans we work with are where they should or could be
both socially and vocationally. We’re very good at reducing
overt anxiety and depression symptoms, but it seems that a
lot of our veterans are socially withdrawn, and they particularly avoid social interactions where stress is involved.”
In Acierno’s view, what happens on board a sailboat
offers the perfect setting for effective therapy. “Sailing is a
microcosm in which we can create some controllable social
stress while also giving advice and direction, with the end
result being – hopefully – a successful social interaction. If
you are working together, the boat goes. The better you
work together as a crew, the better it goes. If you don’t work
together, it doesn’t go. That concrete manifestation of success is appealing to me, and it’s very easy to use with veterans as a demonstration of productive teamwork.
“Most of the guys we will work with will never have
been on a sailboat,” he adds. “The noise, the unfamiliarity,
the interaction with other people, all of this is stressful. We
then guide them through it, combining their own personal
resources and ability to work outside their comfort zone
with our professional counseling skills to reach a point of
therapeutic value and success.”
As of early June, VOD had secured the use of two larger, privately owned sailboats as well as fee-free dockage
from two local marinas for staging its outings. Acierno
explained that he had also established a partnership with
the U.K. and Charleston-based firm Ondeck Sailing, a forprofit firm that offers sail training, crewed and bareboat
charters, as well as a variety of sailing experiences at different venues in Europe, the Caribbean, and now recently,
Charleston.
“We want our servicemen to bounce back from medical
and psychological injuries,” explained Acierno, “and we want
them to have real, marketable skills in order to earn beyond
the minimum wage.” To accomplish the latter, Acierno has
allied his organization with Charleston’s City Marina and
Boatyard and the A&B Boat Yard, both of which he says are
standing by as internship sites for VOD, having provided
such internships for the well-known Landing School.”
Acierno is convinced that this is the first non-profit venture ever to combine psychotherapy, vocational training,
News & Views for Southern Sailors
and social problem-solving into an integrated whole. But
he’s most enthused that VOD will take advantage of
Charleston’s maritime resources to address the social, vocational and mental health needs of veterans. If his instincts
are correct, what Exercise Transglobe has done for so many
servicemen and women in the U.K. (and Nepal), VOD could
do for veterans in the United States. And if that does happen, you can expect a form of VOD to take root in your
home waters some time soon as well.
For information regarding Exercise Transglobe, go to www.excercisetransglobe.com. For more about Veterans On Deck, go to www.veteransondeck.org, or contact Ron Acierno at [email protected]
SOUTHWINDS July 2010
45
BOATWORK
Replacing Those
Crazed Windows
A
s sailboatmakers compete to grab the attention of
potential customers, they have really started to
change some of the traditional aspects in the later
model boats that are being produced today. One of those
aspects is the shift from traditional glass and aluminumframed windows to plastic-framed windows, and finally, to
using solid Plexiglas windows that are glued to the boat
much like a windshield on a car. This article will discuss the
steps to replace the newer style Plexiglas windows.
Anyone who has owned a boat with the glass and aluminum-framed ports can tell you about the leaks that develop over time. While the design was very strong, the weak
points were the seals. The proper repair to reseal one of
these windows was to completely remove the window and
trim for the boat. Once out and disassembled, the U-shaped
seal that went around the rim of the glass window was
replaced and the entire window was then reassembled and
then installed into its proper location. Often during
reassembly, the seal would get pinched or a gap develop
inside the frame that would necessitate starting the whole
process over again. Additionally, the light aluminum frame
would easily bend out of shape creating a whole new challenge in the installation. Such was the angst of many a sailboat owner that all too often I would see another method to
stop those leaks in a move of desperation. That method was
a cry for help and involved putting as much silicone as possible around the outer and inner edge of the window frame.
Depending on how good the person was at caulking largely decided how good or bad the repair looked, and ultimately the problem was just covered up and not remedied.
So folks either lived with the leaks—and ensuing mildew
and damage to woodwork and fabrics—or undertook a desperate act of caulking or they themselves—or a contractor—
removed the windows and installed fresh seals.
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July 2010
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SOUTHWINDS
Some designers started to get away from the large cabin
windows and started to install numerous 12-inch port lights
instead. Adequate lighting became an issue and eventually,
hatches started to show up in the salon and galley overhead.
This new development greatly improved the open-air circulation throughout the vessel, and the component design
made changing out glass, screens and seals very simple,
and, more important, did not require removal of the frame.
About 10 years ago, a huge sailboat manufacturer got
the notion that all those small windows didn’t really look
sleek and sexy and came up with the idea of going back to
large windows in the salon. With the incorporation of
marine air-conditioning systems, ventilation was no longer
an issue. Function took a backseat behind form, and before
you knew it, new boats were now sporting frameless, tinted
Plexiglas windows that looked like something from a concept
car magazine. Gone were the wide and deep companionways
and overhead hatches, and in were accent stripes and these
new windows for a sleek, fast boat look. While these newstyle windows are both loved and hated by the community,
they are relatively maintenance-free. Made from durable and
strong materials and bedded into a channel surrounding the
opening, these windows are extremely watertight and not
prone to leaks. While able to withstand some formidable
wave action over the gunnels, they are in no way the choice
for bluewater vessels, and, since most of the sailing fleet is
classified as inshore/coastal, cruising/recreational, these
windows are becoming quite popular.
One of the issues I am starting to see with these windows is their propensity to start to get crazing and become
brittle over time. The tinting does help protect the window
from the harmful effects of UV rays, but eventually they will
fail. Fortunately, replacement of these windows is relatively
simple and can be done by most do-it-yourself sailors over
a weekend using common tools. A razor knife, putty knife,
caulk gun, tape and some cleaning solvent are all you need
to accomplish this repair. Once you have obtained a replacement window from your boat manufacturer and bought
some marine grade adhesive caulk, you are ready to start.
Your first step is to score the edge of the window
through the existing caulk with the razor knife. Remove as
much of the exposed bead of caulk and then under behind
the window. Have a helper push on the window from inside
the cabin while you work the putty knife behind the window and through the mating surface. If you have successfully broken the bond between the window and the existing
sealant, the window will easily push out from inside.
Once removed, take the razor and putty knife and
remove the existing sealant from the recessed channel that
held the window. There will be a lot of sealant there as it
serves as the bed and seal by which the window was
www.southwindsmagazine.com
BY TOM KENNEDY
secured. Clean the area thoroughly
with a solvent like MEK or acetone,
making sure no remaining sealant is
left behind, and allow the area to dry.
Take some masking tape and surround
the inner and outer edge of the
recessed channel. This will help keep
the caulk from getting onto nonintended surfaces.
I find it easier to squeeze out an
ample amount of sealant onto a putty
board or a plastic plate and then take
up sealant with a putty knife and apply
an even coat of sealant onto the entire
mating surface on the recessed channel. It is important to apply a good 3-4
mm thickness of sealant in order to
achieve a good bed and enough material to ensure proper and uniform
adhesion. You should let the sealant
firm up a bit per the application
instructions before installing the window. The warmer it is outside, the
faster it will start to skin over.
Installing the window will take two
people, and if you have some suction
cup handles, they will allow you to
control the window much easier. Set
the bottom edge of the window into
the recessed channel, and, starting in
the middle, press the window both
sideways and upward until the entire
window is mounted inside the channel. Don’t push in too hard or you will
run the risk of squeezing out the
sealant. All you want is a uniform seal
with the window and the mating surface. If some excess sealant comes out
the edge, just wipe it off with solvent.
Now take masking tape and tape
across the window past both sides of
the mating surface approx 6-8 inches in
order to keep the window in place as
the sealant cures. Normally 24 hours is
needed for a full cure. The next day,
you can come back and with your
caulk gun, run a bead around the outer
edge of the window and smooth it
with a caulk tool. This is more for
appearance than watertight integrity
or adhesion. Carefully pull the tape
before the bead cures, and you will
have a clean line to your bead and a
factory appearance. Good luck and
have a great day on the water!
Window and old sealant removed, and new sealant applied in uniform thickness
Window installed and secured with tape over new sealant.
Caulk bead applied with masking tape on both sides of bead.
Finished job.
Got a Question or Topic You Want Covered?
Tom Kennedy owns Patriot Yacht Services in Pensacola, FL. The company specializes in paint, fiberglass / gel coat and brightwork
restorations. He has been an active sailing and boating enthusiast for over 40 years, and his repair expertise and customer satisfaction
levels have earned him a loyal client base. Questions and ideas for future articles can be sent to [email protected] Your
question may be answered in a future article. You can also go to http://www.patriotyachtservices.com for more information.
News & Views for Southern Sailors
SOUTHWINDS July 2010
47
RACING
Race to Mexico
Two well-established races to Mexico took place this spring,
both of which had the same destination; Isla Mujeres off the
coast of the Yucatan Peninsula at the southern end of the
Gulf of Mexico. The first to leave was the 42nd Regata del
Sol al Sol from St. Petersburg, which leaves each April. The
second race was the biannual 26th Regata al Sol from
Pensacola, which starts in May.
XLII Regata del Sol al Sol 2010,
St. Petersburg, FL, to Isla Mujeres,
Mexico, April 22
By Beth Pennington, chairperson
Exchange of gifts at the Casa de Las Rocas party. Admiral of Mexican
navy, mayor of Isla Mujeres, Beth Pennington, chair, Richard Doyle,
commodore, St. Petersburg Yacht Club. Courtesy photo.
Race day for the 42nd Regata del Sol al Sol began with a
parade of Boats just off The Pier with P/C Bob Johnson
announcing the vessels and the skippers as they passed by.
Due to the fact that the wind—which had been substantial
all night long—decided to die down just before the original
10 a.m. start, Principal Race Officer George Pennington
decided to put up the postponement flag and take the start
48
July 2010
SOUTHWINDS
to Pinellas Point #1. The winds increased to between 6-8
knots. The entrants had a slight beat to the first mark and
then a reach to marker SW #1. Once rounding this mark, the
wind was on the nose the whole way to Isla Mujeres, making for a porpoising, or hobbyhorse ride, on a very long port
tack for most. The skippers reported that the seas were very
choppy and square. There were no major problems. (Just a
few rigging and sail problems that were fixed rather quickly). One of the support vessels, Bodacious, had fuel and fuel
filter problems, but was able to stop every so often, clear the
filters and then keep going. This vessel was carrying over
half of the regatta trophies. The owners were John and Jo
Brinckerhoff. The trip for them took four-and-a-half days
instead of the estimated two to three.
The overall winner on corrected time was a first-time
participant in this race; American Spirit, owned and skippered by Brian Fox from the
Boca Ciega Yacht Club. He
had acquired a very experienced crew coming from several different Tampa Bay area
yacht clubs and associations.
After all the race activities
were over, the owner took
advantage of being in Central
America and sailed to
Guatemala, back to Isla
Mujeres and then home to the
States. Bodacious, as mentioned above, and Scooter,
skippered by Skip Ryan and
Mike Dawson of Davis
Nine-year old Xochitl Ixchel Island, also decided to cruise
Hernandez Lopez, who won the the coast before returning
poster contest. Her poster will be home.
used for our T-shirts and adverBecause the wind was on
tising for 2011. Courtesy photo. the nose all the way, no time
records were set or broken
this year. However, this is the first time that all but one
scheduled vessel arrived at Isla Mujeres. Twenty-six out of
27 arrived, and all were there by Tuesday, April 27.
This year, there were three very special events. At the
Casa de Las Rocas party for the skippers and navigators,
everyone was privileged to witness the burial at sea of Sr.
Jose de Jesus Lima Gutierrez, the original commodore of
the Club de Yates and the cofounder of the Regata del Sol
al Sol (the race from the sun to the sun). Sr. Lima passed
away at the age of 96 last May just after we left the island.
We are so proud that he was able to join us last year, and
have the traditional toast with the skippers and navigators. Sr. Lima had also received an award from his own
country and state recognizing all the contributions he had
made to help Mexico. His family continues the traditions
with Sr. Enrique Lima Zuno now the commodore of the
Club de Yates.
The second event was the mayor’s town hall reception,
where the participants are awarded diplomas and the race
is declared official by the mayor of Isla Mujeres. Stephanie
Curran, commissioner of Pinellas County, presented a
proclamation from St. Petersburg to Isla Mujeres. At this
same event, we presented gifts to a young girl who had won
www.southwindsmagazine.com
our poster contest. Her school and five others that participated in the contest have received donations from the participants of the regatta. She is nine years old and her name
is Xochitl Ixchel Hernandez Lopez. Her poster will be used
for our T-shirts and advertising for 2011.
The third event was the awards reception on Friday
evening, April 30. All the boats were represented at these
three events. After a delicious island buffet and entertainment, 54 trophies, both perpetual and keepers from the St.
Petersburg Yacht Club and Club de Yates, were awarded to
the skippers and crew of the winning vessels for the top
three places in each class. Bodacious was awarded the
Friendship Trophy named the License Jose de Jesus Lima
Trophy for going “above and beyond the call of duty” in the
delivery of our trophies. The grandchildren of Sr. Jose de
Jesus Lima Gutierrez, Maria del Mar Lima Fernandez, Kin
Lima Fernandez and Jose de Jesus Lima Fernandez—with
the help of George Pennington, Fred Bickley, Jopie Helsen
and a journalist from Isla Mujeres—had put together a historical CD presentation for our viewing and then the
Friendship Trophy was presented.
We again, for the 41st year, held the Regata Amigos for
which the vessels take out the children from the island. This
year, seven of the boats carried about 20-25 children per vessel. These children had to meet certain requirements this
year to be able to be one of the participants. One was that
they had to wear a flotation device per the captain of the
port for Isla Mujeres. The vessels that participated are to be
congratulated on a job well done. These were Mi Vida Loca,
Cool Change, Sweet Melissa, Mango Latitudes, Jade, Kuma, and
Second Wind.
Every year the sailing conditions are different. This is
often true even during the same race as the conditions vary
depending on where you are on the 450+ nautical-mile race.
The skippers and crews have so many sea stories to tell. It is
impossible to relate all the events that occurred on the way
to the island, on the island, and on the way back home.
Besides all the planned events, there are a variety of restaurants, water activities and explorations to enjoy.
For full results, go to www.regatadelsolalsol.org.
Results (Top three. Place, Boat Name, Owner/Skipper, Rating, Finish
Time, Elapsed Time, Corrected Time, Boat Type, Club):
Spinnaker; 1, Carinthia, Frank Kern, 43, 02: 53: 00, 63: 18: 00, 57: 55:
00, J-120, BYC, Gross Pointe MI; 2, Second Wind, Ray/MIke Sullivan, 72,
09: 22: 34, 69: 47: 34, 60: 46: 44, Dufour 44, KBYC, Key Biscayne, FL:
Non-Spinnaker; 1, Midnight Sun, Blaise Pierson, 207, 20: 04: 46, 80: 29:
46, 54: 34: 51, Hunter 37, Bradenton YC, FL; 2, XTC Tom Glew, 128, 17:
25: 15, 77: 50: 15, 61: 48: 45, Beneteau 46, St. Pete YC, FL; 3, Blue
Heron, Russell Hoadley, 152, 04: 53: 31, 89: 18: 31, 70: 16: 45, Catalina
380, CSA, New Orleans, FL: Racer/Cruiser ; 1, Spring Fever, Patrick
Roberts, 169, 05: 23: 23, 89: 48: 23, 68: 38: 55, Catalina 34, Cortez YC,
FL; 2, Cool Change, Martin Zonnenberg, 160, 15: 59: 47, 100: 24: 4, 80:
22: 55, Tartan 37, DIYC, Tampa, FL; 3, Tigi Too, Dieter Hugel, 130, 15:
26: 21, 99: 51: 21, 83: 34: 50, Newport 41-2, SYC, New Orleans, LA:
Cruising A; 1, Sweet Melissa, Christopher Cantolino, 178, 15: 44: 50, 76:
19: 50, 54: 02: 45, Hunter 49, BYC, Bradenton, FL; 2, Jade CruChu, Jopie
Helsen, 155, 14: 05: 17, 74: 40: 17, 55: 15: 59, Helsen 470, St. Pete YC,
FL; 3, Kasoumai, Henri Rochard, 187, 22: 59: 00, 83: 34: 00, 60: 09: 19,
Beneteau 423, CMCS, Ft.Myers, FL: Cruising B; 1, American Spirit, Brian
Fox, 201, 17: 51: 47, 78: 26: 47, 53: 16: 56, Beneteau 40, BCYC,
Odessa, FL; 2, Nobility, Mike Noble, 265, 03: 38: 00, 88: 13: 00, 55: 02:
25, Morgan OI 41, SPYC, Madeira Bch,FL; 3, Kuma, William Odell, 240,
19: 34: 00, 104: 09: 0, 74: 06: 12, Harden 45, Voy, Jeanneau, AK.
News & Views for Southern Sailors
Regata al Sol Sets New Record
and Many Firsts
By Julie B. Connerley
The crew of Parlay, which won the Non-Spinnaker division and
first overall in Cruising fleet. Parlay was also the first boat to finish the regatta—rare for a non-spinnaker cruising boat. Photo by
Bob Fleege.
The 26th Regata al Sol from Pensacola began May 12-13
amid sunny skies for the 18 boats competing in three divisions. By all accounts, it was a memorable race with many
“firsts.”
Stories of offshore races repeated around yacht club
bars seldom equal what really happened. Here are some of
the highlights—minus the bar gossip.
Originally, 20 boats registered. One backed out when
the BP oil incident threatened crewmembers’ properties in
New Orleans. The other was struck by lightning in Mobile
Bay days before the race was to begin. Four did not finish.
Carried Away, a Moorings 432, did make it to Mexico, but
withdrew before finishing the regatta. Three others turned
around.
Less than 24 hours after the start, one of the crewmembers aboard Ghost Riders II, a Beneteau 43, became violently
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490 South “L” Street • Pensacola FL 32501
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SOUTHWINDS July 2010
49
RACING
ill following drug interactions. Tide’n Knots, an Island Packet
44, had both mechanical and medical problems. Pipes in
both heads broke at their bases, disabling them. A
crewmember fell and broke a couple of ribs.
Aboard the Formosa 46, C’est la Vie—48 hours into the
race—the steering broke. With the autopilot on a separate
system, the crew switched over while looking for a solution
to the problem. After another hour, the autopilot also broke,
leaving skipper and co-owner Tom Sims to declare, “Mr.
Murphy, of Murphy’s Law Firm must be on board.” After
removing a lifeline and stripping it, co-owner Russ Orr
rigged it as a makeshift steering cable, and the crew headed
for Tampa/St. Pete. Since they had signed on to bring a perpetual trophy to Isla Mujeres, two crew members did fly
down. “There should be a special award for first to finish in
Tampa,” quipped Sims.
Those that did finish were not without their mechanical
problems as well. Black Swan, a C&C Landfall 43, is owner
John Werner’s first sailboat, and this was his first race. He
chose veteran racer and marine specialist Steve Teague as
skipper. An improperly installed through-hull fitting
(installed years earlier in the main bilge) caused a major
flood below decks. Next, an electrical fire shorted out all
navigational equipment and ruined three batteries. Teague
was able to save one. A handheld GPS ate batteries like
snacks, so the crew decided to keep the other handheld GPS
in reserve until they were much closer to Mexico. That
meant that Steve steered almost four days by dead reckoning. They also encountered a squall that filled the boat up
with water a second time and knocked the screwed-in
wooden slats out of the bowsprit.
“Disneyland has nothing on our ride,” exclaimed
owner Werner who says he is looking forward to the 2012
regatta.
The scratch boat in the race, Stephen Murray, Jr.’s BotinCarkeek TP52, Decision, had a battery malfunction, which left
his crew without computer navigation and wind instruments. “We had only our handheld GPS, but plenty of batteries,” Murray said, “and we had already planned our route,
just 5 to 10 miles east of the rhumb line.” Murray had set the
course record in 2002 aboard another Decision, an Andrews
70. Without computer assistance, Murray stayed the course
and set a new course record. However, since the course was
modified this year, calculations were made using the distance
of the original course and elapsed time versus this year’s
longer course. The crew’s efforts won them first in the Racing
division and three perpetual trophies.
Winning the Non-Spinnaker division and first overall
in Cruising fleet, was Parlay, a Beneteau 49 owned by Jim
and Linda Oyler. “Our strategy for this year’s race was to
select a compatible crew of seasoned off-shore sailors who
were capable helmsmen,” said Jim. “Each of us took a 45minute wheel watch, assuring a fresh set of hands on the
wheel at all times.” With continual winds at 15-25 knots and
close-reaching conditions, Parlay also won the distinction of
being the first boat to finish the regatta—rare for a non-spinnaker cruising boat! Besides class and fleet trophies, Parlay
earned three perpetual trophies.
There were many notable “firsts” for this year’s race,
beginning with the racecourse. Regatta co-chair Guy
Brierre of the Southern Yacht Club explained. “The rhumb
50
July 2010
SOUTHWINDS
line distance is 555 nautical miles,” he said. “With the BP oil
spill catastrophe, we worked closely with the U.S. Coast
Guard and altered the course by adding an offset area indicated by latitude and longitude coordinates that boats were
required to stay east of.” The offset rule added 11 miles to
the racecourse, and those who did not honor the “gate”
were penalized. Again this year, transponders were
required and www.iboattrack.com kept track of each vessel’s progress.
This was also, unfortunately, the first time race headquarters in Isla Mujeres did not have a single sideband
available to contact competitors. Lightning hit the unit
given to Sr. Enrique Lima and Club de Yates de Isla Mujeres
by Southern Yacht Club and Pensacola Yacht Club four
years ago. “We had to rely on VHF radios, which provided
spotty communications, occasional satellite phone calls
(those who had them), and much of the time we relied on
the iboattrack program,” said Regatta Co-chair and
Principal Race Officer John Matthews of PYC.
The most significant “first” was the proclamation of a
new perpetual trophy, dedicated at the Casa de las Rocas,
home of the late Sr. Jose de Jesus Lima, founder of the
Regata al Sol and father of tourism in the Yucatan Peninsula.
Co-sponsored by SYC and PYC, to honor the memory,
accomplishments, and life of Sr. Jose Lima, it is awarded to
the yacht or sailor that best exemplifies seamanship and
sportsmanship in the regatta. The inaugural winner was
Dan Valoppi, 48, delivery skipper/crewmember aboard Big
Booty, Pat Eudy’s Lutra GP42, whose homeport is
Charleston, SC. When the race committee learned Valoppi
was leaving Mexico on Tuesday, May 18, they asked if he
would mind heading due north instead, toward the last
known position of Carried Away, which the race committee
had not been able to reach by radio. He gladly volunteered,
saying, “If the situation was reversed, I would hope that
someone would search for me.” He steered his boat more
than 40 miles north before heading toward Key West.
Valoppi didn’t learn of winning the newest perpetual trophy until May 29, when he finally had Big Booty back in her
slip in South Carolina.
Finally, another “first.” This year’s NOR stated that
Regata al Sol XXVII in 2012 will require some minimum
number of crew to have completed the US SAILING-sanctioned Safety at Sea Seminar.
For complete results, go to www.pensacolayachtclub.
org, or www.southernyachtclub.org.
I UPCOMING MAJOR REGATTAS
(see each regional section for upcoming regattas
in those regions)
Regatta Time in Abaco, July 2-10
This annual regatta, one of the most famous in the Bahamas
and Florida starts with Bob Henderson’s immense
“Cheeseburger in Paradise” picnic and runs through a week
of festivities and casual racing with Bahamian boats and
cruisers from all over. For more information, go to
www.regattatimeinabaco.com.
www.southwindsmagazine.com
I SOUTHERN REGIONAL RACING
Table of Contents
Regional Racing (Race Reports, Club Racing,
Upcoming Regattas, Regional Race Calendars)
Southeast Coast (NC, SC, GA)
East Florida
Southeast Florida
Florida Keys
West Florida
Northern Gulf Coast (Florida Panhandle, AL, MS, LA, TX)
Regional Racing Calendars: Regattas and Club Racing—
Open to Everyone Wanting to Race
For the races listed here, no individual club membership is
required, although a regional PHRF rating, or membership
in US SAILING or other sailing association is often required.
To list an event, contact [email protected]
com. Send in the name of the event, date, location, contact
info, possibly a short description. Do not just send a link to
this information.
Since race schedules and venues change, contact the
sponsoring organization to confirm.
Contact information for the sailing organizations listed
here can be found at the Southern yacht club directory under
Sailor’s Resources at www.southwindsmagazine.com. The
Web site also has articles on getting into racing and racing.
Club Racing. Many clubs have regular club races year
around open to everyone and new crew is generally invited
and sought. Contact the club for dates and information.
Individual club races are not listed here. We will list your
club races if they happen on a regular schedule (eg, every
Sunday; every other Sunday, etc.). Contact editor to list your
club racing.
Carolina (Neuse Yacht Racing Association) and the Long
Bay Sailing Association in Myrtle Beach, SC. There is also
racing scattered among a few clubs along North Carolina’s
barrier islands on the Outer Banks.
The South Atlantic Yacht Racing Association is an
organization that coordinates and lists races in the entire
three-state area, including high school and collegiate racing.
Racing in the Southeast Coast is year around, but regattas are mainly in the spring and fall. Club racing is year
around, but in the summer, races are generally held in the
evening because of the heat. Winter racing continues in
places like Charleston, even in cold weather, although
“warm” days can be found even in January.
Race Reports
2010 Gulfstreamer, Daytona Beach, FL
to Charleston, SC, May 28
By Dan Dickison
Funny thing about the Gulfstream: it’s always dependable,
except when it isn’t. And that was the case this year during
the seventh edition of the Gulfstreamer, the biennial offshore dash from Daytona Beach to Charleston. Every other
year since 1998, a gaggle of sailboats from around the
Southeast make their way to the Halifax River Yacht Club in
Daytona Beach to participate in this contest, an event that
advertises itself as “too intense to hold every year.”
FIND CREW
CREW ON
A BOAT
RACING · DAYSAILING
CRUISING · PASSAGEMAKING
SOUTHWINDS’ PressGang*
crew and boat finding web site
is again up and running
There is both coastal and inland racing in North Carolina,
South Carolina and Georgia. Many inland lakes have racing,
and the most famous and largest is Lake Lanier, GA, near
Atlanta. Many clubs are based at the lake and race individually and together. There are also several small lakes in the
area, like Lake Norman in North Carolina or Lake Murray
in South Carolina.
In coastal racing, Charleston, SC, stands out with the
largest number of regattas. Racing around Charleston is run
by many yacht clubs in the area, which all coordinate their
racing through the Charleston Ocean Racing Association
(CORA). The most famous regatta in the region is
Charleston Race Week, an annual week of racing which
draws one-design and PHRF racing from all over the South,
including many one-design teams that come from other
parts of the United States and a few foreign countries. Other
major sailing areas are the Neuse River area in North
News & Views for Southern Sailors
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PressGang serves people who are seeking crew or boats
for racing, day sailing, cruising and for longer passages.
Add your boat or crew listing to be included in regional searches.
PressGang FOR PASSAGES
Searches for boats and crew making crossings and one-way voyages.
PressGang has been recently updated and will be maintained on a
regular basis to stay current with listings
www.southwindsmagazine.com/pressgang
www.southwindsmagazine.com
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PressGang is a free service of SOUTHWINDS magazine
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SOUTHWINDS July 2010
51
RACING
Illyria, in the Spinnaker class, headed out to the Gulfstream, hoping to take advantage of the northbound current, but when the
crew reached the waypoint where they’d hoped to find it, they discovered the stream wasn’t there. It worked in 2008, when they
won the race, but not this year. Photo by Scott Schamay.
The 227-mile run is actually two races in one. Prizes are
awarded for both the full distance to Charleston and for the
first 10.6 miles—a sprint from the sea buoy off the inlet up
to the Daytona Beach Pier (which has been christened the
Brian Every Memorial Sprint). After that, the competitors
turn northeast to Charleston and settle into their onboard
routines for the next 30 or so hours.
With 16 entries, the fleet this year included vessels as
small as a Hunter 28.5 and those as large as a Moorings 51.
But it was Norm Church’s crew on board his 1968-vintage
Morgan 41 Obsession that performed best and figured out
the most expedient route up the coast to grab overall honors
on corrected time as well as first in the Spinnaker fleet.
(Charlestonian Brad Law’s Gulfstar 50 Shenanigan won the
Cruising class, and Richard Klimas’ Irwin 43 Jolie Dancer
won the sprint race.)
It’s safe to say that Church’s craft isn’t the fastest boat
in the fleet with a PHRF rating of 133, but he and his crew
definitely sailed the course better than any other entrant.
And this wasn’t the first time. Church and company also
took top honors in the 2000 and 2004 editions of the race.
Perhaps the fastest boat in this race was John Keenan’s
J/120 Illyria out of Charleston (PHRF rating: 51). Illyria’s
crew—the overall victors of this race in 2008—were intent
on defending that title. “But,” explained Randy Draftz, a
52
July 2010
SOUTHWINDS
three-time race veteran who had signed on to share tactical
duties with Charleston sailmaker John Bowden, “it just wasn’t in the cards this year.
And that’s where the Gulfstream’s erratic behavior
comes in. According to Draftz, “It was a simple close reach
the whole way up the coast, and the key was not heading
out to the stream. But we were so successful in the 2008 race
by using the stream that we ignored the warnings from the
skippers’ meeting and those from Commander’s Weather as
well. They both advised us that recent northeasterly winds
had altered the stream. For whatever reason, we stuck with
our game plan and headed directly out toward the stream.
Unlike Illyria, the majority of the fleet stuck closer to
shore. Among those boats working their way steadily
along the coast in moderate, east-southeasterly winds and
a two-foot swell was Obsession. Meanwhile, Draftz and the
Illyria crew arrived at their Gulfstream waypoint about
9:00 on Friday night to discover that the stream wasn’t
there. They quickly abandoned that strategy and bore
away toward Charleston, setting their spinnaker.
“Throughout the night,” recalled Draftz, “the breeze
swung around a bit and increased in velocity, but we were
generally close-reaching, and those were the conditions all
night and all day Saturday, enabling us to average 7.5 to
8.25 knots of boatspeed.”
When Illyria finished on Saturday evening, says Draftz,
they didn’t see any other boats. “We figured that we had
covered everyone, except maybe for Obsession. It would all
depend on the conditions over the next four hours.”
With the wind backing to the east and the flood tide
starting, Obsession crossed the finish line roughly three and
a half hours later to secure the win. Draftz had ample praise
for that crew’s efforts. “That Morgan 41 is a great boat. I
sailed on one in the early ’70s, and these guys really seem to
know the way to Charleston.” After three victories in this
race, there’s no debating that. But the dependability of the
Gulfstream, well, that’s a different matter.
For additional information and full scores, go to
www.thegulfstreamer.com
Southeast Coast Upcoming Regattas
Charleston Yacht Club Open
Regatta, Charleston, SC, July 17-18
This youth regatta is one of the largest events that the
yacht club supports during the year with over 100 boats
participating. Several classes race: J/24s, SIOD, E-Scows,
Melges 24, Y-Flyers, MC Scows, Sunfish, Lasers, 420s and
Optimists. On occasion, there have been fleets of Snipes,
Holders, JY-15s and Hobies. Sailors travel from the many
locations in the Southeast, including SAYRA clubs located
in Georgia, North Carolina and South Carolina.
Registration is on Friday evening and Saturday morning.
Awards are presented after racing on Sunday. For more
information and the NOR, go to http://charlestonyachtclub.com.
www.southwindsmagazine.com
26th Michelob Ultra Regatta,
New Bern, NC, Sept. 3-5
In celebration of New Bern’s 300th Anniversary, the
Neuse Yacht Racing Association and Michelob Ultra are
bringing back this historic Labor Day regatta, which at
one time had 161 boats racing. The first race, historically
called the Oar race, from New Bern to Oriental, is on
Saturday, with after-race festivities at the Oriental Marina.
On Sunday, the Michelob Ultra Regatta will race back to
New Bern with festivities following the race in New Bern.
Classes racing are Spinnaker, Non-Spinnaker and
Cruising. Go to www.mich-nyra.org for the NOR and
details. E-mail [email protected], or call Tinka
Talbert at (252) 349-1337.
Race Calendar
JULY
South Atlantic Yacht Racing Assoc. Go to this site for a list of the
clubs in the region and their Web sites. www.sayra-sailing.com
3-4
Lake Norman Open. Lake Norman YC
9-11
Rocket Regatta. PHRF. Cape Fear YC
10-11
Firecracker Regatta. Laser, Sunfish, Opti, 420, JY15,
MC Savannah YC
17-18
Water Festival Regatta. Beaufort YC-SC
17-18
Charleston Yacht Club Regatta, Charleston YC
17-18
Windmill Championship. Lake Lanier SC
24-25
Spar Wars. Open and Junior. South Carolina YC
31
Jolly Jordan Regatta. Optimists. Carolina SC
31-Aug 1 Carolina Yacht Club Regatta, Carolina YC-SC
31-Aug 1 Diva Day Ladies Regatta, Waccamaw SC
Charleston Ocean Racing Association.
www.charlestonoceanracing.org
Winter weekend club racing - Frostbite Series.
17-18
Charleston Yacht Club Regatta
Neuse Yacht Racing Association www.nyra.org
Weekend club racing
3
ODC Croaker Fest Regatta. Sunfish & Optis
10-11 HYC Regatta. ICRC
Lake Lanier. www.saillanier.com
See web site for club race schedule
3
Firecracker Cup. Lake Lanier SC
7
AISC Summer 2 #1. Atlanta Inland SC
10 Fair Winds #3. Barefoot SC
14 AISC Summer 2 #2. Atlanta Inland SC
17 Fair Winds #4. Barefoot SC
21 AISC Summer 2 #3. Atlanta Inland SC
24 Moonlight Scramble/Firefly #2. Barefoot SC, Southern SC
28 AISC Summer 2 #4. Atlanta Inland SC
31 Evening Breeze #1. Barefoot SC
Long Bay Sailing. www.longbaysailing.com
See Web site for local club races
AUGUST
South Atlantic Yacht Racing Assoc. Go to this site for a list of the
clubs in the region and their web sites. www.sayra-sailing.com
6
SAYRA Team Racing Juniors Optis, 420 Carolina YC-NC
7-8 Rockville Regatta. Open SIYC
7-8 SAYRA Open Invitational Open Carolina YC-NC
28-29 Mt. Pleasant Youth Juniors HYC
Charleston Ocean Racing Association.
www.charlestonoceanracing.org
Summer Wed. evenings club racing. See Web site for schedule.
Neuse Yacht Racing Association www.nyra.org
Summer weekend club racing. See Web site for schedule.
News & Views for Southern Sailors
7-8
28-29
Dragons Breath - ICRC. Oriental Dinghy Club
Blackbeard Regatta (One Design). Blackbeard SC.
New Bern
Lake Lanier. www.saillanier.com
See Web site for local club races
Long Bay Sailing. www.longbaysailing.com
See Web site for local club races
Racing
The northeast and east central Florida areas offer a more
varied sailboat racing experience than any other in Florida.
Buoy racing, distance racing and, increasingly, match racing
are all formats for races held in this region.
Active yacht clubs and sailing associations occur about
every 20 miles along the coastal region. Regattas are held
year round, from ocean-going yachts to dinghies and catamarans. The peak of the regatta season is the spring while
mid to late summer is the “low season“ because of afternoon lightning storms and hurricane season.
In northeast Florida, around Jacksonville, several
notable ocean regattas occur each year. The focus in that
area for small boat regattas is the St. Johns River and some
of the larger lakes. The lower St. Johns has an active regatta
schedule, too. From Daytona Beach south, both the Atlantic
and the Indian River Lagoon offer rich regatta venues.
Inland lake sailing is also popular in this region, the
most notable being on Lake Eustis.
From January through May, in this part of Florida, it is
impossible to be more than 30 miles from a sailing event
during any seven-day interval. For the rest of the year, the
time interval is about two weeks, and the generalization
holds true. Racing in this area can be as casual as a hobby, or
as serious as a lifestyle.
Race Calendar
Club Racing
Rudder Club of Jacksonville, Indian River YC, Melbourne YC, East
Coast SA, Halifax River YC, Halifax SA (Sunfish racing), Lake
Monroe SA, Lake Eustis SC
JULY
4
Big Boys’ Race. Halifax Sailing Association
3-4 Fire Cracker Regatta. Port Canaveral Yacht Club
23 Howl At The Moon. Halifax Sailing Association
24 Moonlight Regatta. Rudder Club of Jacksonville
AUGUST
1
River Challenge. East Coast Sailing Association
7
Gilligan’s Run (distance Cat Race). Fleet 80
13-15
Lady Helmsman Race. Halifax River Yacht Club
27
Howl at the Moon. Halifax Sailing Association
Sept. 4-5 Mayport – Fernandina – Mayport Race. North Florida
Cruising Club
4-6
Labor Day Regatta. Rudder Club
4-5
Lobster Regatta. Port Canaveral Yacht Club
SOUTHWINDS
July 2010
53
RACING
Racing in southeast Florida—from Miami to Stuart—is year
around, but slows down considerably during the hot summer months, when many clubs switch to evening racing.
Clubs race regularly all along this coastal area, but the greatest concentration of regattas is in the greater Miami area, in
Biscayne Bay, during Florida’s Southern “tourist” season.
Major regattas, including Olympic trials and many onedesign regattas, are held in the Miami area during the winter season. The Biscayne Bay Yacht Racing Association coordinates many of these events. Every March, Premiere
Racing runs the Miami Grand Prix, a one-week regatta
attended by world racing teams and boats.
The Shake-a-Leg organization, one of the world’s most
well-known and successful disabled sailing/racing groups
has its home in Miami.
Farther north up the coast is Fort Lauderdale, the West
Palm Beach area, Stuart and points in between, where many
clubs hold regattas and club racing year around. Fort
Lauderdale hosts a feeder race each January to Key West for
boats racing in Key West Race Week.
Race Calendar
Biscayne Bay Yacht Racing Association. www.bbyra.net
Go to the Web site for local club races
BBYC
Biscayne Bay YC
BBYRA Biscayne Bay Yacht Racing Association. www.bbyra.net
CGSC
Coconut Grove SC. www.cgsc.org
CRYC
Coral Reef YC. www.coralreefyachtclub.org.
KBYC
Key Biscayne YC. www.kbyc.org.
LYC
Lauderdale YC. www.lyc.org.
MYC
Miami YC. www.miamiyachtclub.net.
PBSC
Palm Beach SC. www.pbsail.org
SCF
Sailfish Club of Florida. www.sailfishclub.com
JULY
17 J/24 Florida DISTRICT 10 Championships. Flat Earth Racing
18 US Junior Women’s Singlehanded Championship. US
Sailing/CRYC
AUGUST
14 Single Handed Race. CGSC
15 Double Handed Race. CGSC
major catamaran regattas are also held in the Upper Keys.
These are mainly hosted by Rick White of Catamaran Sailor
magazine, which is based in the Upper Keys, and are in the
winter-season months.
Key West is host to the Western Hemisphere’s biggest
regatta, Key West Race Week, each January, run by Premiere
Racing. Boats and racing teams from all over the United
States and Europe race in this event, which also brings a
week of partying to the island. Both one-design and PHRF
boats compete.
Almost all other racing in the Key West area is done
through the Key West Sailing Club, which holds weekly
club races open to all. The only exception is the Schooner
Wharf Wrecker’s Race, which is a series of four races with
boats of any size racing. First boat out and back wins, with
no handicaps. The series runs every few weeks, starting in
January during Key West Race Week. All sizes of boats race,
from small day sailors to 80-foot schooners .
Marathon has limited racing with the sailboats from the
Boot Key Harbor mooring field holding an annual regatta.
Race Calendar
Key West Sailing Club. Every Saturday – Open House at
the Key West Sailing Club. 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. (305) 2925993. www.keywestsailingclub.org. Sailboat Lane off Palm
Avenue in Key West. Come by the club to sail. Non-members
and members welcome. Wednesday night racing has begun
for the summer season. Skippers meet at the clubhouse by
5:00 p.m. and boats start racing at 6:00 p.m. in the seaplane
basin near the mooring field. Dinner and drinks afterward.
Upper Keys Sailing Club (UKSC). www.upperkeyssailingclub.com.
Go to the Web site for regular club racing open to all.
JULY
3
Firecracker Regatta. Portsmouth.
4
Firecracker Regatta. PHRF
AUGUST
7
Dog Days. Portsmouth
8
Dog Days. PHRF
Racing
Racing
Racing in the Keys is basically in three locales: Upper Keys;
some racing in the Marathon area; and Key West where
most of the racing takes place.
The Upper Keys Sailing Club has regular racing year
around, slowing down in the hot summer months. They
host a few regattas and have regular club racing. Several
54
July 2010
SOUTHWINDS
West Florida—the region from Naples to Cedar Key—is one
of the most active racing venues in the Southeast. More sailboats are concentrated in this region than any other in the
South, although it does cover a large area. And Tampa Bay
is the largest concentration of sailboats—and racing—in this
area, although racing is very active south of here. Racing is
year around, but like the rest of Florida, it is concentrated
from fall through spring—during the “tourist” season—and
many club races move to evening venues during the hot
summer months.
Besides club racing, many major national one-design
and PHRF regattas are held in the Tampa Bay area each
www.southwindsmagazine.com
year. The St. Petersburg Sailing Center is also home to some
notable disabled racing/sailing groups. The area is also
home to the decades-old annual Regata del Sol al Sol race
from St. Petersburg to Mexico.
Almost all racing is handled through the West Florida
PHRF organization (see below). The main regional racing
areas are the Fort Myers-Naples area, Charlotte Harbor,
Sarasota-Bradenton and greater Tampa Bay, although racing
is organized through the many clubs in between these points.
Southwinds Annual Online West Florida
Race Calendar Posted Sept. 1
Southwinds magazine posts the annual race schedule/calendar (9/1— 8/31) on its Web site racing pages (www.southwindsmagazine.com) for all racing in this region. The calendar includes all scheduled races of the West Florida PHRF
(WFPHRF) organization (www.westfloridaphrf.org), plus
club races in the area and any others that sailors in the area
would like to post. The WFPHRF Boat of the Year races are
also listed.
Contact [email protected] to list your
race, or changes.
Upcoming Regattas
28th Bradenton Yacht Club Fall
Kickoff Regatta, Bradenton, FL,
Sept. 24-26
This regatta, held at the Bradenton Yacht Club, is the
“kickoff” event for the Tampa Bay/Sarasota Bay area
winter racing season. It is two days of racing in Tampa
Bay. Six classes, spinnaker, non-spinnaker, true cruising,
racer cruiser, multihull and one-design, will make up
the three-race regatta. Free dockage at the yacht club.
Upwards of 70 boats have raced in the past, most of
which raft up at the yacht club. Partying for the event
begins on Friday night as boats gather at the club, continuing Saturday afternoon after racing. Register at
www.bradenton-yacht-club.org, or call (941) 981-3891.
For dock reservations, call (941) 722-5936, ext. 212, or the
dockmaster cell at (941) 374-2310.
Race Reports
SunCoast-DIYC Laser Fleet’s
Inaugural Regatta, Davis Island
Yacht Club, Tampa Bay, FL, June 5
By Antolin Rivera, fleet captain and regatta chairman
Based out of the Davis Island Yacht Club, the newest
SunCoast-DIYC Laser fleet held their first even on Saturday,
June 5. Twelve sailors from the Tampa Bay area, including
some who travelled from Lake Eustis, Sarasota and
Orlando, enjoyed a fantastic set of seven races. Conditions
News & Views for Southern Sailors
The 12 sailors (minus one who had to leave early) who competed
in the SunCoast-DIYC Laser fleet’s inaugural regatta. The author
is in the middle with the yellow hat. The sailor who had nothing
but bullets, finishing in first place, is Buzzy Heausler, fourth from
the left. Photo by Jim Frijouf.
varied from a light-air start to a slow-building wind, which
topped 15 knots for the last few races.
The race committee performed an outstanding job reconfiguring the starting line to adjust for the afternoon sea breeze.
Buzzy Heausler posted nothing but bullets across seven
races. In a class where you are considered a Master at 35
years old, it takes a lot of stamina and will to go around the
course in such a tippy, high-performance boat. There were
nine standard rigs and three radial rigs.
After racing was the trophy ceremony. The goodies
included US SAILING decals and bumper stickers as well as
Laser class decals and bumper stickers, which included
handing out the much-celebrated “Laser Master’s” bumper
stickers. One reads, “Laser Master – cheat the nursing home
– die on your Laser.”
Results (place, name, total points, club):
1, Buzzy Heausler, 7, Davis Island YC; 2, Jeff Olson, 16, Sarasota Sailing
Squadron; 3, Eric Robbins, 27, Davis Island YC; 4, Dave Hillmyer,
33,Sarasota Sailing Squadron; 5, David Olson, 39, Sarasota Sailing
Squadron; 6, John Poulson, 44,Davis Island YC; 7, Kevin Ratigan,
54,Sarasota Sailing Squadron/Orlando; 8, Anthony Scott, 53, Sarasota
Youth Sailing Program; 9, Alejandro Illera, 62, Lake Eustis Sailing Club;
10, Antolin Rivera, 64, Davis Island YC; 11, Donna Steele, 70, Sarasota
Sailing Squadron; 12, Carrie Greene, 78, Davis Island YC.
Race Calendar
Club Racing
Boca Ciega YC. Gulfport. Every Sunday following the third Friday
of each month. Skipper’s meeting at 10 a.m., PHRF racing, spin and
non-spin. (727) 423-6002. One-design, dinghy racing every Tuesday
at 5:30 p.m. March through October. Jim Masson at (727) 776-8833.
Guests welcome for all races. www.sailbcyc.org.
Bradenton YC. Races November thru March. Sunday races at 1:30
p.m. PHRF racing on Manatee River. For info, call Gerry Baily at
(941) 981-3891.
Clearwater Community Sailing Center. The center holds regular
weekend club races. For dates and more information, go to
www.clearwatercommunitysailing.org.
Dunedin Boat Club. Monthly club racing. For more information,
contact [email protected]
Edison Sailing Center, Fort Myers. Sunfish and dinghy racing
once a month, year-round [email protected]
Port Charlotte. Third Saturday of month, year-round. [email protected]
SOUTHWINDS
July 2010
55
Old Towne
Yacht Sales
SELECT POWER & SAIL BROKERAGE
Dealer for Sabre Yachts Southeast U.S.
FEATURED LISTINGS
RACING
Punta Gorda Sailing Club. Charlotte Harbor. Weekly racing.
www.pgscweb.com.
Sarasota Sailing Squadron. Friday evening races start in April.
www.sarasotasailingsquad.com.
St. Pete Yacht Club. Friday evenings (except April 3) through Aug.
28. 1630 starts off The Pier. www.spyc.org.
Venice Sailing Squadron. Saturdays. First Saturday of each
month, PHRF racing. Start at mouth of Venice Inlet. www.venicesailing-squadron.org
JULY
4
Tampa Bay Catamaran Sailors. Race for Liberty,
Dunedin Causeway
10 Caloosahatchee Marching & Chowder Society.
Firecracker Night Race
TBA Cortez YC. Commodores Cup Series PHRF.
AUGUST
21 Caloosahatchee Marching & Chowder Society. Ladies Day Race.
Tradewinds 35
Stunning 35’ Tradewinds offshore sailboat built in England and designed
by John Rock. NEW hull and deck Awlgrip w/nonskid. Call for details.
Cabo Rico 45
1995 Cabo Rico Cutter coming onto the market very soon.
She is a custom 45' proven, offshore, very well-equipped beauty.
Own a boat that you can be PROUD of!
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35 years experience in the boating industry
16 years in yacht brokerage
Old Towne Yachts will only take a handful of power and sail
listings at a time. We are a small experienced company that
takes pride in handling QUALITY listings for our clients
so we will know your boat inside and out.
Racing
This region—the Florida Panhandle, Alabama, Mississippi,
Louisiana and Texas—has a very active and serious racing
schedule, being host to many local, as well as national,
regattas. The five-state area is geographically linked and the
Gulf Yachting Association is the controlling authority.
This area races year around, but winter slows down
considerably because of the cold. It is notably, though, the
most active summer racing region in the South, with major
regattas being held all summer, besides active spring and
fall schedules. (The summer schedule has been drastically
interrupted by the Gulf oil spill.)
The area has a racing history going back many years,
with the Southern Yacht Club in New Orleans being the second oldest club in the U.S, although New Orleans in general has been making a difficult revival from the effects of
Hurricane Katrina.
Many national one-design sailing classes have been
holding their nationals in the area for decades, including
major multihull classes. Busy racing venues go from
Pensacola west all along the coastal area.
For northern Gulf coast race calendars and more information, go to the Gulf Yachting Association Web site, at
www.gya.org.
Race Reports
(941) 957-8627
[email protected]
47th Navy Cup, Pensacola, FL,
May 22-23
By Kim Kaminski
415 N. Briggs Ave. Ste 526
Sarasota, FL 34237
56
July 2010
SOUTHWINDS
In one of the closest races in the history of the prestigious
Navy Cup, which pits yacht club against yacht club, the
teams from the Pensacola Yacht Club won by two points
See RACING CALENDAR continued on page 67
www.southwindsmagazine.com
Your Authorized Dealer for
SELECTED LISTINGS
Gulfstar 50 1979 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$95,000 (N)
Phinn 50 Custom Schooner ’89 . . . . . . . .$75,000 (P)
Tayana 48 CC 1995 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$315,000 (S)
Wellcraft 4600 MY 1995 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$159,000 (P)
Hardin 45 1981 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$125,000 (N)
Gulfstar 44 MS 1974 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$39,500 (N)
Beneteau 43 2008 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$242,000 (S)
Beneteau M432 1988 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$67,900 (S)
Hatteras 43 DC 1977 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$121,000 (S)
Pilgrim 43 PLAY 1992 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$220,000 (N)
Slocum 43 1989 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$125,000 (N)
Beneteau 423 2007 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$220,000 (S)
J/Boats J 42 2004 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$314,000 (N)
Swift Trawler 42 2008 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$335,000 (S)
Tayana 42 VAC 1983 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$115,000 (N)
Hunter 41 AC 2005 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$185,000 (N)
Hunter 41 DS 2007 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$199,000 (N)
Morgan Classic 41 1987 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$75,000 (N)
Block Island 40s ‘58 & ‘65 starting at . .$39,900 (N)
Beneteau O393 2003 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$144,500 (P)
Island Pilot 395 2006 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$254,000 (S)
Hunter 375 1994 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$69,000 (S)
B&H Sydney 36 1998 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$89,000 (P)
Catalina 36 1992 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$65,000 (N)
Lien Hwa 36 1983 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$59,900 (S)
Pearson 36s ‘80 & ‘82
starting at . .$39,500 (N)
Hunter 355 1993 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$58,000 (P)
Catalina 34 1990 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$44,500 (S)
Mainship Pilot 34 2001 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$79,900 (S)
Beneteau O331 2001 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$75,000 (N)
Hunter 33s ‘93 & ‘05
starting at . .$48,900 (N)
Beneteau Antares 980 32 2004 . . . . . . . . .$159,000 (N)
Beneteau O321s ‘99 & 00 starting at . .$67,900 (N)
Beneteau 311s ‘00 & ‘03
starting at . .$59,000 (P)
Nonsuch 30 Ultra 1989 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$69,000 (P)
Alerion AE 28s ’96, ’98 & ’04 starting at . .$49,900 (N)
Hunter 28s ‘90 & ‘98
starting at . .$21,000 (N)
Knight Bros Custom 28 2003 . . . . . . . . . .$79,000 (S)
Island Packet 27 1988 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$42,000 (P)
J Boats J/80 2002 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$39,900 (N)
Beneteau FC 75 ’06 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$39,900 (N)
Details & Pictures - Go to www.MurrayYachtSales.com
Complete Gulf Coast Coverage
New Orleans (N)
504-210-3668
[email protected]
Pensacola (P)
850-261-4129
[email protected]
St. Petersburg (S)
727-214-1590
[email protected]
Beneteau (31’ to 58’)
J/Boats (22’ to 43’)
Swift Trawler (34’ to 52’)
Eagle Pilothouse (40’ to 53’)
We have IN & OUT of the Water Slips AVAILABLE for our Listings!
www.MurrayYachtSales.com
News & Views for Southern Sailors
SOUTHWINDS
July 2010 57
New Yacht Dealers for
Great American Sailboats
Built in Florida
Yacht Model Centers
Regatta Pointe Marina-Palmetto
Bradenton/Sarasota/Charlotte Harbor
941-723-1610
Scott Pursell, CPYB, 941-757-1250
Brad Crabtree, CPYB, 941-757-1251
Joe Zammataro, CPYB, 727-527-2800
Frank Hamilton, CPYB, 941-757-1253
The Harborage Marina-St. Pete
Tampa/St. Pete/Clearwater
727-824-7262
Bill Wiard, 727-492-7044
Al Pollak, 727-492-7340
Kelly Bickford, CPYB, 727-599-1718
Sunset Bay Marina-Stuart
Stuart/Miami/Florida Keys
772-204-0660
Rusty Hightower, 941-730-7207
John Barr, 772-985-0523
John McNally, 561-262-3672
Mobile Broker Centers
North Florida
Jacksonville/St. Augustine/Georgia
904-759-2413 Linda Reynolds
South Florida
Miami/Ft. Lauderdale/Florida Keys
305-332-3428 Bob & Susan Everhard
Southwest Florida
Marco Island /Naples
65
58
50
49
49
49
46
46
46
46
46
46
46
45
45
45
44
44
Steel Schooner 1987 . . . . . . . .Al
Kasten Steel Schooner 2005 .Brad
Beneteau 1997 . . . . . . . .John M.
Hunter # 166 2008 Warranty .Massey
Hunter #153 2008 Warranty .Massey
Hunter 2008 Loaded . . . . . . .Joe
Island Packet 2009 Warranty .Massey
Hunter 466 2004 (2) . . . . . .Brad
Hunter 2003 . . . . . . . . . . . . .Joe
Hunter 460 2000 . . . . . . .Scott P
Hunter 460 2000 . . . . . . . . . . .Al
Custom Baraka Sloop 1993 .Linda
Durbeck 1973 . . . . . . . . . . . .Joe
Hunter Deck Salon 2008 . . . . .Bill
Hunter 450 1997 . . . . . . . .Doug
Morgan Nelson/Marek 1983 .Kelly
Catalina/Morgan 440 2007 . . .Bill
Hunter AC 2006 . . . . . . . . . . .Al
. .$224,900
. .$425,000
. .$219,900
. .$399,900
. .$349,900
. .$389,000
. .Clearance
. .$229,000
. .$224,900
. .$219,000
. .$179,000
. .$349,900
. .$119,000
. .$285,000
. . .$90,000
. .$115,000
. .$295,000
. .$229,900
Catalina, Hunter & Island Packet new
boat Clearance – Buy Now,
Sail Now, Save Forever – Call Today
44 Hunter 2004 . . . . . . . . . . . .Brad
44 Beneteau 1996 . . . . . . . .John B.
44 Alden 1983 . . . . . . . . . . .Scott P.
43 Jeanneau 43DS 2002 . . . .Scott P.
43 Hans Christian 1989 . . . .Scott H.
43 Endeavour 1980 . . . . . . . . .Linda
42 Hunter 426DS 2003 . . . . . .Linda
42 Hunter Passage 2001 . . . . . .Brad
42 Hunter Passage 1996 . . . .John M.
42 Catalina 42 MKII 2001 . . .Scott P.
42 Catalina 1997 . . . . . . . . . . .Brad
42 Catalina 1992 . . . . . . . . . . .Brad
41DS Hunter 2008 Warranty .Massey
41 Hunter 410 1998 . . . . . . . .Linda
41 Morgan Classic 1988 . . . .Scott P.
41 Sigma Shoal Draft 1986 . . . . . .Al
41 Defever Trawler 1983 . . . .Scott P.
41 Cheoy Lee Yawl 1965 . . . . . .Brad
40 Island Packet 1995 . . . . . . . .Joe
41 Kings Legend 1981 . . . . .Scott H.
40 Catalina 400 2006 . . . . . . . . . .Al
40 Island Packet 1998 . . . . . . .Brad
40 Dean Catamaran 1994 . . . .Susan
40 Hunter 1989 . . . . . . . . . . . .Brad
40 Gulfstar Center Cockpit 1982 Scott P.
. .$192,500
. .$139,000
. .$159,000
. .$169,000
. .$199,000
. .$127,500
. .$194,900
. .$159,000
. .$119,000
. .$175,000
. .$139,500
. . .$99,500
. .$249,900
. .$124,900
. . .$99,900
. . .$79,900
. .$138,000
. .$195,000
. .$224,900
. . .$79,000
. .$224,000
. .$229,000
. .$165,000
. . .$74,500
. . .$89,000
40
39
38
38
38
38
38
38
38
38
38
37
37
37
36
36
36
36
36
36
36
36
35
35
35
35
35
35
35
35
34
34
33
33
33
33
32
31
31
31
28
28
Hood Gulfstar 1976 . . . . . . .Kelly
Corbin Cutter 1979 . . . . . . .Kelly
Hunter 2009 Warranty . . .Massey
Hunter 2001 . . . . . . . . . . .Linda
Island Packet 380 2003 . . . . .Bill
Island Packet 1986 . . . . . . . .Joe
Catalina 387 2005 . . . . . . . . .Bill
Jeanneau 1987 . . . . . . . . . . . .Al
Irwin CC 1987 . . . . . . . . . . . . .Al
Waquiez 1985 . . . . . . . . .John B.
Kady Krogen 1982 . . . . . .John B.
Island Packet 2007 . . . . . . . . .Al
Island Packet 2005 . . . . . . . .Joe
Hunter 376 1997 . . . . . . . .Kelly
Hunter 2005 . . . . . . . . . .Scott P.
Catalina MKII 2003 . . . . . . . . .Al
Catalina MKII 2001 . . . . . . .Brad
Catalina MKII 2000 . . . . . . .Brad
Catalina 1997 . . . . . . . . .John M.
Catalina 1994 . . . . . . . . . . .Brad
Catalina 1992 . . . . . . . . .Scott P
Union Cutter 1983 . . . . .John M.
Catalina 350 w/Gen 2004 . .Linda
Catalina 350 2003 . . . . . . . . .Bill
Shannon Shoalsailer 2006 . . . . .Al
Hunter 356 2004 . . . . . . .Scott P.
Hunter 356 2003 . . . . . . .Scott P.
Beneteau 351 1995 . . . . .John M.
Niagara 1987 . . . . . . . . . . .Rusty
Pearson 365 Ketch 1977 - Repowered .Doug
Hunter 2001 REDUCED . . .Scott P.
Pacific Seacraft Crealock 1990 . . .Al
Hunter 2008 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Al
Hunter 2006 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Al
Hunter 2005 . . . . . . . . . . . . .Bill
Wauquiez 1984 . . . . . . . .John B.
Catalina 320 1994 . . . . . . .Linda
Catalina 310 2004 . . . . . .Scott P.
Island Packet 1986 . . . . .John M.
Beneteau First 31 1993 . . . .Linda
Catalina 28 MKII 2006 . . .John M.
Catalina MKII 2006 . . . . . . . . .Al
. . .$99,000
. . .$82,500
. .$224,900
. .$129,900
. .$226,000
. .$114,000
. .$163,700
. . .$49,900
. . .$89,900
. .$119,900
. . .$79,900
. .$328,000
. .$289,900
. . .$93,000
. .$127,900
. .$129,000
. .$124,500
. .$107,500
. . .$95,000
. . .$67,500
. . .$69,900
. . .$75,000
. .$134,900
. .$135,000
. .$299,000
. .$115,900
. .$114,999
. . .$69,000
. . .$79,000
. . .$46,000
. . .$77,000
. . .$99,000
. .$123,000
. . .$99,900
. . .$85,000
. . .$70,000
. . .$54,900
. . .$82,000
. . .$58,000
. . .$49,900
. . .$79,000
. . .$79,000
Call Grant Smalling at
Lending Associates for the
best rate in yacht financing
and Free Pre-Purchase Loan
Qualification 866-723-3991
www.MasseyYacht.com • [email protected]
239-465-6480 Doug Howard
Mobile Broker Center
North Florida
904-759-2413
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Florida Panhandle
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772-204-0660
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Kelly will come to your home, office or boat - evenings included!
Massey Yacht Sales sells more brokerage sailboats than any
firm in the Southeast U.S.
Call Kelly!
We are proud to be a dealer for Valiant Yachts
Annapolis MD, Sailing Capital of the World!
Kate and Bernie specialize in only high quality, blue water
sailing vessels! Let us help you find your dream boat, anywhere!
List your Blue Water Cruising Boat with us!
We are your choice for buying or selling a blue water boat!
Kelly Bickford, CPYB
Massey Yacht Sales & Service
TAMPA BAY AREA
Call Kate & Bernie
[email protected]
www.RogueWaveYachtSales.com
Cell: 727-599-1718 Toll Free: 877-552-0525
410-571-2955
YACHT BROKERS
Advertise in the SOUTHWINDS
Brokerage Section at special rates:
$110 QUARTER PAGE
Catalina Yachts
Com-Pac Yachts
RS Sailboats
Quarter Page (includes 1 free classified ad/photo)
$200 HALF PAGE
Half Page (includes 2 free classified ads/photos)
$325 FULL PAGE
Full Page (includes 4 free classified ads/photos)
(12-month rates, black and white ads – add 20% for color)
Broker classified ads w/photos: $15-$20/month
Update Your Ads Monthly
The most cost effective way to reach southern boaters
New RS Tera 9’5”
$2895
New RS Q’Ba 11’5”
$3895
New RS Feva 12’
$5495
New RS Vision 15’
$9495
2006 Catalina Expo 14.2 $4,978
2010 Compac Legacy 16 $11,500
2010 Catalina 16.5
$7019
2010 Compac Picnic Cat $10,995
New Compac Suncat-trl
$19,878
2010 Compac SundayCat $17,245
2004 Compac Horizon Cat $25,995
2010 Compac Eclipse
$24,582
1997 Catalina Capri 22fin $9,695
2005 Catalina 22 Sport/trl $12,700
New Catalina 22 MKII
$ tba
2001 Catalina 250 WB/trl $19,995
2010 Catalina 250 WK
$30,022
1983 S-2 7.9 GrandSlam SOLD
**Brand New RS Sailboats
CONTACT
[email protected]
or call (941) 795-8704
News & Views for Southern Sailors
SOUTHWINDS
July 2010 59
Largest Selection of Sailboats &Trawlers in Florida
www.SailboatsInFlorida.com
IHULL
MULT
51' Beneteau Idylle, 1987, 3 staterooms, Loaded
with gear, cruise ready, $120,250, Jane @ 813917-0911
45' Hunter 456 Center Cockpit, 2004, Great
Electronics, A/C, Genset, Loaded! $215,000,
Wendy @ 941-916-0660
44' Rosborough Schooner, 1972, A classic!
Perfect for charter or cruising. Many upgrades.
$269,000, Butch @ 850-624-8893
43' Voyage 430 Catamaran 1998, Rare owners
version, Watermaker, Solar panels, Just back from
cruising, $279,000, Tom @ 904-377-9446.
42' Westsail Ketch, 1975, No exterior teak,
Inside is gorgeous! Very special must see cruising
boat. $98,500, Harry @ 941-400-7942
41' Hans Christian 41T, 1986, New teak decks,
recent survey, upgraded cruising gear,
$179,000, Tom @ 904-377-9446
41' Morgan Out Island, 1976, Custom interior,
New genset, Watermaker, A/C. Nicest on the
market, $82,900 Butch @ 850-624-8893
39' Beneteau Oceanis, 1990, New Yanmar, A/C,
Super clean! Great Shine! $84,900, Roy S @
305-775-8907
IHULL
MULT
37' Gulfstar, 1979, Well maintained, Autopilot,
Radar, Recent survey, $52,000, Jane @
813-917-0911
60’ CUSTOM CATAMARAN
51’JEANTOT/PRIVILEDGE CAT
50’ VOYAGE MAYOTTE
48’ NAUTITECH CATAMARAN
44’ LAGOON CATAMARAN
44’ VOYAGE CATAMARAN
43’ VOYAGE CATAMARAN
43’ LAGOON POWER CAT
42’ MANTA CATAMARAN
42’ CROWTHER TRIMARAN
40’ KELSAIL CATAMARAN
40’ NORSEMAN CATAMARAN
38’ FOUNTAINE PAJOT
36’ G-CAT POWER CAT
36’ FOUNTAIN PAJOT
35’ CHARTER CAT. WILDCAT
35’ CHARTER CAT. WILDCAT
35’ CHARTER CAT. WILDCAT
34’ GEMINI CATAMARAN
34’ GEMINI CATAMARAN
30’ MAINE CATAMARAN
30’ MC 30 CATAMARAN
1999
1994
1997
1998
2007
2002
1998
2005
2004
1987
1995
1994
1996
2008
2007
2001
1999
2000
2002
1996
1999
2003
74’
65’
53’
51’
51’
50’
49’
47’
47’
47’
47’
46’
46’
46’
46’
45’
45’
45’
45’
44’
1939
1994
2000
1976
1987
1976
1972
2005
2004
1979
1979
2000
1978
1998
1974
1983
2004
1987
2000
1993
ORTHOLAN MOTORSAILOR
MACGREGOR
BRUCE ROBERTS CUSTOM
MORGAN OUT ISLAND
BENETEAU
GULFSTAR
HINCKLEY KETCH
GARCIA PASSOA
BENETEAU
GULFSTAR SAILMASTER
GULFSTAR SAILMASTER
HUNTER
HERITAGE
BENETEAU OCEANIS 461
DURBECK KETCH
MORGAN 454
HUNTER 456
HUNTER LEGEND
HUNTER 450
BENETEAU 445
37' Tartan, 1987 Sheel keel, New canvas, One of
the nicest Tarans on the market, $75,000, [email protected]
941-224-9661
MULTI-HULLS
$577,900
$530,000
$479,000
$369,000
$570,000
$315,000
$279,000
$395,000
$369,000
$ 75,000
$189,000
$175,000
$135,900
$249,900
$269,000
$150,000
$119,000
$139,000
$119,900
$ 69,900
$103,000
$ 99,000
SAILBOATS
$375,000
$220,000
$169,500
$134,900
$122,500
$ 74,999
$189,000
$495,000
$295,000
$139,000
$154,900
$138,900
$100,000
$169,000
$110,000
$107,500
$215,000
$ 88,900
$229,500
$122,500
TARPON SPRINGS
FLORIDA
VIRGIN ISLANDS
PUNTA GORDA
COLUMBIA
TORTOLA
ST. AUGUSTINE
GEORGETOWN, MD
NORTH CAROLINA
SARASOTA
ST. AUGUSTINE
BELIZE
BRADENTON
DADE CITY
RUSKIN
MELBOURNE
VENEZUELA
COLUMBIA
LARGO
PALMETTO
FT. MYERS
FT. MYERS
BILL
TOM
BOB
RICK
BOB
TOM
TOM
RICK
HARRY
HARRY
TOM
BOB
HARRY
RICK
ROY S
KEVIN
RICK
RICK
HARRY
ROY S
RICK
BOB
ARGENTINA
FT. LAUDERDALE
NEW HAMPSHIRE
TREASURE ISLAND
DAYTONA BEACH
BRADENTON
ST. AUGUSTINE
PANAMA
BAHAMAS
WEST PALM BEACH
MADEIRA BEACH
ST. PETERSBURG
FLORIDA
BRADENTON
PANAMA CITY
PANAMA CITY
PALMETTO
CRYSTAL RIVER
FLORIDA
NAPLES
KIRK
BOB
BOB
HARRY
JANE
TJ
TOM
BOB
BOB
TJ
ROY S.
JOE
ROY S.
HARRY
BUTCH
BUTCH
WENDY
RICK
HARRY
HARRY
34' Gemini MC105, 2002, Custom bow sprit
w/schreecher, Very clean and well maintained.
$119,000, Harry @ 941-400-7942
44’
44’
44’
42’
42’
42’
42’
42’
42’
41’
41’
41’
39’
38’
38’
38’
37’
37’
37’
37’
37’
37’
36’
36’
36’
36’
36’
35’
35’
35’
34’
34’
34’
34’
33’
32’
31’
31’
31’
31’
30’
30’
29’
28’
28’
ROSBOROUGH SCHOONER
ISLAND PACKET
FREEDOM
HUNTER PASSAGE
CATALINA
WESTSAIL KETCH
WESTSAIL
TAYANA
CHEOY LEE CLIPPER
MORGAN OUT ISLAND
MORGAN OUT ISLAND
HANS CHRISTIAN
BENETEAU OCEANIS
IRWIN MK II
CATALINA 380
PACIFIC SEA CRAFT
GULFSTAR
ENDEAVOUR
TAYANA CUTTER
O’DAY
TARTAN
TARTAN
CATALINA
VANCOUVER
PEARSON 365 KETCH
PEARSON
MARINER
MORGAN
MORGAN
FREEDOM
CAL MKIII
CATALINA
PACIFIC SEACRAFT
TARTAN
MORGAN OI
PEARSON 323
BENETEAU
HUNTER
ISLAND PACKET
SOUTHERN CROSS
NONSUCH ULTRA
BRISTOL
WATKINS
CATALINA MKII
SHANNON
1972
1992
1982
1991
1990
1975
1975
1988
1970
1976
1982
1986
1990
1989
1997
1998
1979
1980
1984
1979
1987
1976
1983
1986
1977
1975
1978
1970
1971
1994
1976
1992
1988
1985
1977
1980
2000
1985
1984
1985
1989
1978
1987
2002
1978
31' Beneteau 311, 2000, Lift keel brings draft to
2'7", double rudders, lift kept, nice boat!
$69,500, [email protected] 941-741-5875
$269,000
$249,000
$ 88,900
$115,000
$119,000
$ 79,500
$ 98,500
$189,900
$ 74,000
$ 82,500
$ 75,000
$179,000
$ 79,900
$ 69,900
$124,900
$167,900
$ 52,500
$ 39,900
$ 94,000
$ 29,900
$ 75,000
$ 55,000
$ 39,900
$ 94,900
$ 45,000
$ 29,000
$ 82,000
$ 31,900
$ 26,900
$ 79,000
$ 14,900
$ 59,900
$ 74,900
$ 49,900
$ 27,900
$ 19,900
$ 69,500
$ 16,900
$ 59,900
$ 35,900
$ 63,900
$ 17,900
$ 20,500
$ 52,000
$ 47,000
Edwards
Yacht
Sales
Quality Listings, Professional Brokers
PANAMA CITY
BRADENTON
FT. LAUDERDALE
BRADENTON
FERNANDINA BEACH
CAPE CORAL
CAPE CORAL
BRADENTON
BOKEELIA
ORANGE BEACH, AL
PALM COAST
ST. AUGUSTINE
ST. PETERSBURG
NEW PORT RICHEY
PUNT GORDA
TIERRA VERDE
HUDSON
PALMETTO
CHARLESTON, SC
MIAMI
PUNTA GORDA
MELBOURNE
PANAMA CITY
FT. LAUDERDALE
PUNTA GORDA
MELBORUNE
PORT CHARLOTTE
TREASURE ISLAND
PANAMA CITY
GOODLAND
PANAMA CITY
PANAMA CITY
PUNTA GORDA
FT. MYERS
PUNTA GORDA
PANAMA CITY
CAPE CORAL
PANAMA CITY
PANAMA CITY
MADEIRA BEACH
PUNTA GORDA
PANAMA CITY
PANAMA CITY
SARASOTA
ST. AUGUSTINE
BOAT
FROM
BUTCH
HARRY
KIRK
HARRY
TOM
HARRY
HARRY
ROY S.
JOE
BUTCH
TOM
TOM
ROY S.
TJ
LEO
ROY S
JANE
TJ
HARRY
KIRK
JOE
KEVIN
BUTCH
KIRK
JOE
KEVIN
JOE
JOE
BUTCH
CALVIN
BUTCH
BUTCH
CALVIN
JOE
CALVIN
BUTCH
TJ
BUTCH
BUTCH
ROY S.
CALVIN
BUTCH
BUTCH
WENDY
TOM
LOANS
4.9%
Roy Edwards • Clearwater • 727-507-8222
Bob Cook • Naples • 239-877-4094
Tom Morton • St. Augustine • 904-377-9446
Rick Hoving • St. Petersburg • 727-422-8229
Bill Mellon • St. Petersburg • 727-421-4848
Leo Thibault • Punta Gorda • 941-504-6754
Roy Stringfellow • Tierra Verde • 305-775-8907
Joe Weber • Bradenton • 941-224-9661
TJ Johnson • Palmetto • 941-741-5875
Harry Schell • Sarasota • 941-400-7942
Brian Beckham • North Carolina • 252-305-4967
Butch Farless • Panama City • 850-624-8893
Wendy Young • Punta Gorda • 941-916-0660
Calvin Cornish • Punta Gorda • 941-830-1047
Kevin Welsh • Melbourne • 321-693-1642
Jane Burnett • New Port Richey • 813-917-0911
Bill Alvarez • Punta Gorda • 941-204-9788
Mark Newton • Tampa • 813-523-1717
Kirk Muter • Ft. Lauderdale • 818-371-6499
www.EdwardsYachtSales.com • 727-507-8222 •
60
July 2010
SOUTHWINDS
FAX 727-531-9379 •
[email protected]
www.southwindsmagazine.com
CLASSIFIED ADS
Ads Starting at 3 Months for $25.
FREE ADS — All privately owned gear for sale up to $200 per item
ADVERTISE YOUR BOAT WITH A 1/4 PAGE AD FOR $99/mo (privately owned boats)
For questions, contact [email protected] or (941) 795-8704
PRICES:
• These prices apply to boats, real estate, gear,
dockage. All others, see Business Ads.
• Text up to 30 words with horizontal photo: $50
for 3 months; 40 words @ $60; 50 words @ $65;
60 [email protected] $70.
• Text only ads up to 30 words: $25 for 3 months;
40 words at $35; 50 words at $40; 60 words at
$45. Contact us for more words.
• Add $15 to above prices for vertical photo.
• All ads go on our Web site classifieds page on the
first of the month of publication at no additional
cost. Add $10 to place the ad early on the Web site.
• The last month your ad will run will be at the
end of the ad: (5/10) means July 2010.
• Add $5 typing charge if ads mailed in or dictated over the phone.
• Add $5 to scan a mailed-in photo.
DEADLINES:
5th of the month preceding publication. IF LATER:
Contact [email protected], or
(941) 795-8704.
AD RENEWAL: 5th of the month preceding pub-
lication, possibly later (contact us). Take $5 off
prices to renew your ad for another 3 months.
SAVE MORE ON RENEWALS: Ask us about automatic renewal (credit card required) to take $10
off above prices on text only ads and $15 for ads
with photos. Ads renewed twice for 3-month period unless you cancel.
BUSINESS ADS:
Except for real estate and dockage, prices above
do not include business services or business
products for sale. Business ads are $20/month up
to 30 words. $35/month for 30-word ad with
photo/graphic. Display ads start at $38/month for
a 2-inch ad in black and white with a 12-month
agreement. Add 20% for color. Contact [email protected]
southwindsmagazine.com, or (941) 795-8704.
BOAT BROKERAGE ADS:
• For ad with horizontal photo: $20/month for new
ad, $15/month to pick up existing ad. No charge
for changes in price, phone number or mistakes.
• All ads go on our Web site classifieds page on the
first of the month of publication at no additional
cost. Add $10 to place the ad early on the Web
site. Unless you are a regular monthly advertiser,
credit card must be on file.
TO PLACE AND PAY FOR AN AD:
1. Internet through PayPal at www.southwindsmagazine.com. Applies only to $25 and $50 ads.
(All others contact the editor) Put your ad text in
the subject line at the end when you process the
Paypal payment, or email it to: [email protected] E-mail ALL photos as separate jpeg attachments to editor.
2. E-mail, phone, credit card or check. E-mail
text, and how you intend to pay for the ad to [email protected] E-mail photo as a
jpeg attachment. Call with credit card number
(941) 795-8704, or mail a check (below).
3. Mail your ad in. Southwinds, PO Box 1175,
Holmes Beach, FL 34218, with check or credit
card number (with name, expiration, address).
Enclose a SASE if photo wanted back.
4. We will pick up your ad. Send airline ticket,
paid hotel reservations and car rental/taxi (or pick
us up at the airport) and we will come pick up
your ad. Call for more info.
We advise you to list the boat type first followed by the length. For example:
Catalina 30. Your boat is more likely to be found by Internet search engines in this format.
Boats Wanted
Boats & Dinghies
Boat Gear & Supplies
TOO LATE TO CLASSIFY
_________________________________________
Donate Your Boat
Help Wanted
Lodging for Sailors
Real Estate for Sale or Rent
Sails & Canvas
Too Late to Classify
BOATS & DINGHIES
_________________________________________
See this section at the end of classifieds
for ads that came in too late to place in
their appropriate section. Contact us if
you have a last-minute ad to place—we
still might have time in this section.
BOATS WANTED
_________________________________________
Sunfish and Sunfish Rigs Wanted. TSS Youth
Sailing, Inc., Tampa Youth Sailing, an organization to which donations are tax deductible, is in
great need of sailing rigs for Sunfish sailboats. If
you have a Sunfish rig (mast, sail and spars.)
which you are not using, please consider a gift
to us. Go to www.tssyouthsailing.org and click
on
Contact Us.
_________________________________________
SEA SCOUTS of St. Pete need donated
Sunfish and a 26- to 27-ft sailboat to hold
youth sailing classes on Boca Ciega Bay in
Tampa Bay area. All donations are fully taxdeductible. See our Web site www.seascoutstpete.org, or call (727) 345-9837.
$25 – 3 mo.
Ad & Photo
941-795-8704
News & Views for Southern Sailors
Flying Scot. Built 2002, #5455. Excellent, racing package, two sets of sails (one used three
times). White hull, blue waterline. Aluminum
trailer, cover, fast boat. Everything you need
to win. $9,500. Located Palmetto, FL. (941)
729-8228. (8/10)
18’ Florida Bay Wooden Sharpie. Just
restored. 2 sets of sails. Custom aluminum
trailer. 3hp Outboard. Ready for the water.
$3800. North Florida. Will deliver. (305) 9237384. (9/10)
Subscribe to SOUTHWINDS:
[email protected]
1979 Pacific Seacraft Flicka 20 on aluminum
trailer with brakes. New 1 GM Yanmar diesel,
new Mack headsail roller furler. All lines lead
aft. $25,000. Can deliver. (828) 226-6123.
(8/10)
Catalina Capri 25. Popular racer outfitted for
competition. Responsive tender helm, fun to
sail. North main, 155 & spinnaker. Draws 5.5,
roomy cockpit 9-foot beam, 5-horse Johnson
runs great. Jacksonville (414) 510-9338. [email protected] (8/10)
26X Macgregor 2000. Ready to sail or trailer
away. Trailer included. 50 hp Honda fresh from
annual service. $15,500. Terms considered 1/3
down.
Glenn at (251) 209-6177. (8/10)
_________________________________________
SOUTHWINDS
July 2010 61
CLASSIFIED ADS
Telstar 26 trimaran. New standing rigging,
new roller furling. 25hp OB 4-stroke, electric
start. Tilting mast to get under bridges. Good
condition. New Upholstery, radio, Porta-potti,
etc. $21,000. (305) 893-6061. (9/10)
1982 John Marples 30’ trimaran. $25,000.
Professionally built. Kick-up rudder, draft less
than 30”. Fun and fast. Boomless main, 150%
genoa plus lots more. http://home.rr.com/
johnandpeggy. Apollo Beach, FL. (239) 2921234. (8/10)
1983 Allmand 31 Sloop for sale. $28,500. 44’
mast, 4 foot draft. Bristol condition, loaded and
ready to go cruising! Call Capt. Marti (305)
731-7315. For specs [email protected]
(8/10)
Catalina 27 with 2008, 8 hp Yamaha with
electric start. 23 hours d/s/w inst. tiller auto
pilot. All you need to sail away. $9995. Terms
considered 1/3 down. Glenn at (251) 2096177.
(8/10)
_________________________________________
Sailboat J27, 1985, hull # 111, good condition & sail inventory. New rigging '08. New
bottom Nov 2009, $ 12,500. Will deliver from
US Virgin Islands. Jerry: (340) 690-3459 or
[email protected] (7/10)
30’ Hunter Cherubini 1982 with Yanmar
diesel, Bimini, dodger, Harken roller furling,
new Genoa, Autohelm 3000 autopilot,
marine air conditioning, hot and cold pressure water, bow sprit w/anchor roller, Imron
green top sides, very well maintained. Asking
$15,900. Cortez Yacht Sales. (941) 792-9100.
C&C 32, 1981, centerboard 4' 5" to 7' 5".
Good sails, good ground tackle, hard dinghy,
Yanmar diesel, Bimini, dodger, spinnaker gear,
two-burner propane stove. $20,000 or best
offer. Apollo Beach, (813) 634-4596. (8/10)
1996-2004 Alerion Express 28. FOUR to
choose from, $49,900 to $83,000. New
Orleans, LA. 727-214-1590. Full specs at
www.MurrayYachtSales.com.
1978 Ericson 30, Good condition. Repowered in 2004 with Kubota diesel, runs great.
Roller furler, anchor windlass, 4ft draft.
Located Tampa, FL. Asking $16,500 or best
offer. Contact Scott (813) 340-9599. (9/10a)
1977 Cheoy Lee Offshore 33 Ketch with
Perkins 4-108. Loaded with new upgraded
equipment. Only 3' 8" draft. Recent Awl-Grip,
Wind Gen, Solar, Windlass, Refrig, Propane,
GPS, H&C Pressure water, Head with Shower
and more. A classic beauty asking $29,900.
www.CortezYachts.com or (941) 792-9100.
30’ Maine Cat Catamaran, 1999, Two New
Honda 9.9 HP Outboard Engines Great performance on all points of sail, all weather
cockpit,
accommodations
for
five+.
$103,000, Rick @ 727-422-8229, Edwards
Yacht Sales, www.CatamaransinFlorida.com
2009 Eastern 31 Coastal Explorer-Reduced
to $274,950. This is a loaded boat with many
factory and dealer options. Ruggedly built
and sea kindly. Factory warranty and dealer
support. Must see to appreciate. Low interest
financing available. $274,950 Contact Ed
Massey at (941) 725-2350
1987 CATALINA 30. This shoal-draft standard
rig model has Quantum sails, propane
stove/oven, Universal diesel, inflatable dinghy
and is ready for cruising. $26,900 Sarasota, Fl.
Contact [email protected] (7/10)
62
July 2010
SOUTHWINDS
Subscribe to SOUTHWINDS:
[email protected]
www.southwindsmagazine.com
CLASSIFIED ADS
Big Price Reduction! 33’ Columbia Caribbean 1965, 3.5’ draft w/swing keel up, everything updated recently. 100 hours on the
rebuild, new rigging, canvas enclosure, all
new electrical and plumbing, new solar panels, new cabin sole, new ground tackle, new
cold plate, good sails, lots of spares! Ready to
cruise. Reduced from $24,500 to $16,500.
Located in St. Pete. (239) 298-1696.
1980 Morgan Out Island 33 Pilot House
motor sailor. A unique opportunity for one of
these outstanding boats. 50 hp Perkins dieselrecent top end overhaul. Full keel/4’ draft.
Salon wheelhouse with 360 view. Marine Air,
generator, GPS, radar, VHF, depth, new furniture and upholstery, full galley, enclosed head
w/shower, V-berth, Bimini, davits, roller furling jib and main. More room than you can
imagine. Sail or motor full time in air-conditioned comfort. $34,900. Offered by Cortez
Yacht Sales at Major Carter’s Landing. (941)
792-9100.
Hans Christian 33T, 1982. 30hp Yanmar
diesel. Cutter-rigged. Roller furling main,
headsail and staysail. Solar panel, propane,
refrig, Garmin 182C Chartplotter/GPS. SSB
Icom. Hard Dodger. True Bluewater cruiser.
New electric windlass. RIB dinghy with 15hp
OB. Lots of Gear/spares. No teak decks. No
blisters. Cortez Yachts Sales, Cortez, FL.
Asking $74,900, (941) 792-9100.
Popular 2001 Sabre 34 FB Sedan located in
Punta Gorda. Twin Cummins 220 HP diesel
engines, NEW Awlgrip in 2009, varnished
cherry interior, generator, autopilot and in
very nice condition. Old Towne Yacht Sales.
SE U.S. Sabre dealer. [email protected]
(941) 957-8627.
34’ Tartan 1985, Westerbeke diesel, Very
clean and well maintained, Awlgrip Blue hull,
$39,950, Joe @ 941-224-9661 Edwards Yacht
Sales, www.SailboatsinFlorida.com
Hans Christian 33T- Bluewater cruiser 1981.
Updated w/50hp Yanmar diesel (new 17hrs),
New Electronics: Raymarine S1 autopilot,
Garmin 4208 radar/GPS/map plotter. Air
Marine wind generator, Harken roller furlers,
Genoa and Jib sails. Classic teak interior,
queen-sized bed Captain’s berth, A/C, heater;
stand-up shower, marble sink. Galley complete with new refrigeration system, alcohol
stove/oven. Docked Fairhope, Alabama.
Accepting offers. Inquiries contact (228) 3320554, [email protected] (8/10a)
BROKERS:
Advertise Your Boats for Sale.
Text & Photo Ads:
$50 for 3-months.
Text only ads: $25 for 3 months
News & Views for Southern Sailors
35’ Morgan Centerboard, 1971, Yanmar
diesel, Very clean, well maintained, Ready to
cruise @ only $26,900, Butch @ 850-6248893, Edwards Yacht Sales,
www.SailboatsinFlorida.com
For Information CONTACT:
[email protected]
Stunning 35’ Tradewinds offshore sailboat
built in England and designed by John Rock.
NEW hull and deck Awlgrip w/nonskid. Call to
get details. [email protected] (941) 9578627.
Victory 35 1995 cruising catamaran, 35x16,
Roomy, Comfortable, 10 ports, 6 hatches,
easy to sail. 38hp diesel, well equipped, fresh
upgrades. Asking 130K. Tampa Bay. Details at
www.sailboatlistings.com. (813) 431-8268.
(8/10)
2002 Catalina 36 MK II. Original owners! Flexo-Fold prop, 2 Mermaid A/C, dripless stuffing
box, Ultraleather, Raymarine gauges, Garmin
chartplotter, windlass, Quantum 155% jib,
Stereo/ CD, TV/ DVD. Draws 4'5" LIKE NEW!
$114,500. Diane (239) 850-4935. Cape Coral.
(9/10)
37’ Tayana Cutter, 1984, Fiberglass decks,
Awlgriped hull, Numerous upgrades,
Windgenerator, New sails in ’05, New Yanmar
’05, $94,000, Harry @ 941-400-7942
Edwards Yacht Sales, www.Sailboatsin
Florida.com
$50 – 3 mo.
Ad & Photo
941-795-8704
SOUTHWINDS
July 2010 63
CLASSIFIED ADS
KROGEN 38 Centerboard Cutter 1983.
Excellent condition, located Pensacola.
Extensively equipped for cruising, Aires,
Ampair, Profurl, Harken, Sailing Dinghy. SSB,
Refrigeration, Radar etc. $119,500 call John
Gear, Krogen Yachts, (772) 286-0171. (8/10)
39’ CORBIN PILOT HOUSE 1981, 64 hp
Pathfinder diesel 200 hrs, Blue Water Cruiser,
Gen Set, All Roller Furling, Solar, Wind Gen,
Radar, Auto Pilot, GPS, Electric Windlass, Full
Galley + more. $98,000. Cortez Yacht Sales
(941) 792-9100
39’ Corbin Cutter 1979. Don’t let this veteran circumnavigator’s age discourage you.
Completed 1984 by a professional cabinetmaker. Call Kelly Bickford CPYB at (727) 5991718 for HD photos.
CORTEZ YACHT SALES
39’ Gulfstar Sailmaster, 1982. The first deck
salon layout with large windows for wrap
around visibility. Main, 120% jib, 150%, spinnaker. Air conditioning, refrigerator, propane
stove. Shows well. $69,500. Stewart Marine
Corp, Miami, since 1972. (305) 815-2607.
www.marinesource.com
41’ Morgan Out Island, 1976, Ford 50 HP,
Custom main saloon and galley arrangement,
New genset, watermaker, $82,900, Butch @
850-624-8893, Edwards Yacht Sales,
www.SailboatsinFlorida.com
2008 Hunter 41DS #399 – Reduced to
$249,900. This is a new in-stock boat loaded
with factory options, including AC, gen and
a full suite of Raymarine electronics. Was
$284,188, now $249,900. Great financing
available, Contact Ed Massey at (941) 7252350.
SAIL
45' Jeanneau 1996 . . . . . . . . . . .$134,900
42' Vagabond 1980 - Project . . . .$39,500
40' Bayfield 1984 . . . . . . . . . . . .$109,500
39' Corbin PH 1984 . . . . . . . . . . .$98,000
33' Morgan Pilothouse 1980 . . . .$34,900
33' Hans Christian 1982 . . . . . . . .$74,900
33' Cheoy Lee 1977 . . . . . . . . . . .$29,900
30' Hunter 1982 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$15,900
30' Catalina 1987 . . . . . . . . . . . . .$20,500
POWER
34' Silverton 1986 . . . . . . . . . . . .$49,000
34' Sea Ray 1983 Twin Diesels . .$49,000
28' Sheffield Diesel/Charter Biz . .$Offers
26' Pacemaker 1978 . . . . . . . . . . . .$5,900
20' Shamrock 1989 . . . . . . . . . . . .$11,900
42’ VAGABOND KETCH 1980, Center
Cockpit, aft cabin walk thru with 3 Cabins,
2 Heads, propane stove, h&c water, refrig,
microwave, bbq, gps, radar, vhf, ssb, speed
& depth, auto pilot, solar panel, inverter/charger, dodger, Bimini, 5 sails, electric
windlass, 4 anchors, Perkins Diesel ready to
be installed. Interior suffered some water
damage. $39,500. www.CortezYachts.com.
(941) 792-9100. (5/10)
42’ Hunter Passage 420, 1991, This boat was
so popular that it was in production for 15
years. This great cruising boat is one of the
best of its kind on the market. Well outfitted,
lovingly cared for. Onan 8 kw generator,
Bottom paint - NEW 4/10! $114,900, Harry @
941-400-7942, Edwards Yacht Sales,
www.SailboatsinFlorida.com
1977 CT 41 Pilothouse. New interior paint,
varnish ceilings, cushions. Teak decks
removed except in cockpit, new life lines and
standing rigging. Great offshore boat. (772)
463-7031. Leave message. (8/10)
WE HAVE BUYERS — LISTINGS WANTED
(941) 792-9100
visit www.cortezyachts.com
42 Irwin Ketch, 1977. Roller main, ‘99,
60hp. Westerbeke, air conditioning, generator, 4‘6” board up. Stout 29,000-pound cruiser. All new opening ports. $49,500. Stewart
Marine, Miami, since 1972. (305) 815-2607,
[email protected] www.marine
source.com. (7/10)
Subscribe to SOUTHWINDS:
[email protected]
2004 J Boat J/42. Shoal Draft 5’3, Air
Conditioning, GPS, TV, Seafrost Refrig, Blue
Awlgrip hull $314,000. New Orleans, LA.
727-214-1590. Full specs at
www.MurrayYachtSales.com.
CORTEZ YACHT SALES
64
July 2010
SOUTHWINDS
www.southwindsmagazine.com
CLASSIFIED ADS
FREE ADS
Free ads in boat gear for all gear under
$200 per item. Privately owned items
only. [email protected]
(941-795-8704)
2008 Beneteau 43. Air Conditioning,
Generator, Radar, GPS, Autopilot, In Mast
Furling $242,000. St. Petersburg, FL. 727214-1590. Full specs at
www.MurrayYachtSales.com.
2006 Hunter 466 - Asking $179,000. One of
Hunter’s most popular cruising yachts.
Loaded, three staterooms and never chartered. Includes dinghy and OB. Must see!
Contact Al Pollak at (727) 492-7340.
43’ Voyage Catamaran, 1998, Rare owners
version, Just back from Cruising and loaded
with gear! $279,000, Tom @ 904-377-9446,
Edwards Yacht Sales,
www.CatamaransinFlorida.com
1995 Tayana 48 Center Cockpit. Air
Conditioning, Generator, Autopilot, Electric
Winch, Navy Hull, $315,000. St. Petersburg,
FL. 727-214-1590. Full specs at
www.MurrayYachtSales.com.
1983 Nelson/Marek Morgan 45 - $115,000.
Big, fast, beautiful and strong. Everything critical to the operation of this vessel has been
replaced in the last 5 years. Must be seen!
Contact Kelly Bickford at (727) 599-1718
Valiant 50, 2002. Exquisite, fresh water,
lightly used, Valiant 50. In-boom furling, bow
thruster, AC/Heat. $519K. RogueWave Yacht
Sales —“Your Choice for Blue Water Boats.”
www.roguewaveyachtsales.com. Kate/Bernie.
(410) 571-2955.
4 hp YAMAHA. 2-cycle, short-shaft outboard,
mid 90s. Excellent condition. Complete service.
$450.(941) 792-9100
_________________________________________
Canadian CQR Anchor. Kingston K-27 NEW.
27lb. Galvanized. Lifetime guarantee $80.
Stuart,
FL. (772) 285-4858. (9/10)
_________________________________________
Sailboat Wheel: 42-inch Edson 6-spoke
destroyer wheel, stainless steel, 1-inch bore.
Like new. $199. E-mail [email protected] comcast.net, or call Russell at 239-471-2757.
(8/10)
BOAT GEAR & SUPPLIES
_________________________________________
45’ JEANNEAU 45.1 Sun Odyssey 1996,
Volvo Diesel, Twin Steering, 4 separate cabins,
two heads w/shower, roller furling main, electric windlass, auto-pilot, Tri-Data, full galley,
Rib w/ OB. Excellent performance. $134,900
Cortez Yacht Sales (941) 792-9100.
$50 – 3 MO. AD & PHOTO
941-795-8704
News & Views for Southern Sailors
SEE CLASSIFIED
INFORMATION ON PAGE 61
SOUTHWINDS
July 2010 65
CLASSIFIED ADS
CREW WANTED
_________________________________________
Lady Shipmate Wanted. This sailboat skipper
is looking for a lady shipmate. She must be fit
and trim and enjoy sailboats. Good looking
could be important. Fred at (727) 787-9231.
(7/10)
LODGING FOR SAILORS
_________________________________________
SAILS & CANVAS
_________________________________________
Ponce de Leon Hotel
Historic downtown
hotel at the bay, across
from St. Petersburg
YC. 95 Central Ave.,
St. Petersburg, FL
33701
(727) 550-9300
www.poncedeleon
hotel.com
R
EAL ESTATE FOR SALE OR RENT
_________________________________________
DONATE YOUR BOAT
_________________________________________
SLIPS FOR RENT/SALE
_________________________________________
Donate your boat to the Safe Harbor Boys
Home, Jacksonville, Fl. Setting young lives on a
true path. Please consider donating your working vessel. http://boyshome.com/ or call (904)
757-7918, e-mail [email protected]
HELP WANTED
_________________________________________
Marine Technician Wanted. Annapolis, MD.
We are a growing rigging and marine services
company in need of a highly experienced
installation and service technician. We offer
competitive wages and benefits (vacation,
health, dental, 401K). This individual must
have in depth knowledge of marine electrical
and mechanical systems. Carpentry and other
skills are a plus. Must have a clean driving
record. Please e-mail your resume to
[email protected] (7/10)
_________________________________________
Sponsor Wanted. Business to sponsor our
Crew Web pages online and get an ad in the
magazine and on our Web site in return for regular monthly payment to us to keep the Crew
Web pages going and regularly updated. Could
be ideal for a racing-related company. editor
@southwindsmagazine.com. (941) 795-8704
_________________________________________
Massey Yacht Sales Mobile Broker Do you
prefer to sell yachts from your home office? If
you do and are a proven, successful yacht sales
professional, we have positions open for Florida
west and east coast. Take advantage of the
Massey sales and marketing support, sales management and administration while working
from home selling brokerage sail and powerboats. Call Frank Hamilton (941) 723-1610 for
interview appointment and position details.
Classified info — page 61
66
July 2010
SOUTHWINDS
CALLING ALL SERIOUS BOATERS!!! Waterfront 2/2 condo in gated community with
46’ x 14’ deeded boat slip. On protected
water - no bridges to Gulf of Mexico.
$282,000. St Petersburg, Florida. (727) 2044405. (9/10)
BAHAMAS: LONG ISLAND: One-bedroom,
one bath, fully furnished beachfront cottage
on secluded Atlantic Beach-protected cove.
Fireplace, screen porch, vehicle. Turn key.
$750,000 USD. Fact sheet, photos, inventory:
[email protected] (8/10)
Multihull slip for lease or purchase. Broad
Creek, NC, just off ICW near Oriental. 30 feet
wide by 40-plus feet long. Previously home to
Windswept (Voyage 440). (978) 697-6281.
[email protected] (9/10)
DOCK SPACE off SARASOTA BAY!! Slips
start at $117 a Month on 6-Month Lease.
Sheltered Marina accommodates up to 28’
sail or power boats. Boat ramp. Utilities
included. Call Office: (941) 755-1912. (7/10)
TO LATE TO CLASSIFY
_________________________________________
Sailor’s Paradise “Old Florida“ Lakefront
mobile home cottage with dock on 20K acre
Lake Crescent in Crescent City. Small, quiet,
adult park with reasonable lot rent. $7500
(386) 698-3648 or
www.LakeCrescentFlorida.com. (8/10)
ADVERTISE YOUR BOAT
$25 for up to
30 words for 3 months
$25,000 - 30’ custom built, aft cabin, cutter rigged ketch. The hull & Volvo engine &
transmission were completely re-conditioned
in 2007. Hand laid up fiberglass hull. Built in
Sweden in 1980. Main cabin has 6-foot settee/berths each side and a semi-enclosed forward V-berth. Boat lies in Cortez, FL. Contact
Tom O’Brien (941) 518-0613. [email protected] (9/10)
www.southwindsmagazine.com
RACING continued from page 56
over the Pensacola Beach Yacht Club (defending champion)
and the Navy Yacht Club of Pensacola, which were both tied
for second place. Trophies were given to first, second and
third in all classes except in the Flying Scot division. PYC also
received the first-place trophy in the Flying Scot class. This
two-day competition was reduced to a one-day event due to
the Regata al Sol race from Pensacola to Isla Mujeres, Mexico,
which took a number of boats out of the country. Still, 24
boats managed to compete in the event, with winds that were
blowing out of the south most of the day at 10 knots.
Upcoming Regattas
Many races have been canceled because of the oil spill. Check with organizers.
Women’s Trilogy Races, July & August
By Kim Kaminski
The Women’s Trilogy Series is held every July and August.
The first race, the Fast Women Regatta, is at the Point Yacht
Club in Josephine, AL, and will be held on July 17 on Perdido
Bay. In this race, a female sailor must be at the helm and 50
percent of the crew must be female. www.pointyachtclub.org.
The second race, the Bikini Regatta, is held at the Navy
Yacht Club in Pensacola. It will he held July 24 on Pensacola
Bay. In this regatta, a female sailor must be at the helm and
50 percent of the crew must be female. www.navypnsyc.org.
The third race, the Race for the Roses, will be held on
August 14 at the Pensacola Beach Yacht Club and only
female crew are allowed to race. www.pensacolabeachyc.org. www.gya.org.
Awards will be at each regatta. At the last regatta, there
will be a special Trilogy Trophy for the contestant who
enters all three races and earns the most combined points.
2010 USODA Gulf Coast
Championship, Pensacola, FL,
July 2-4
By Kim Kaminski
This regatta is presented by Subway in conjunction with the
U.S. Optimist Dinghy Association. Red, White and Blue fleets
will be competing with the assignments based on the competitor’s age on the first day of the regatta. On Friday, July 2,
is registration with later registration Saturday morning.
Racing will be Saturday and Sunday. The awards ceremony
will be held following Sunday’s races. For more information,
go to www.pensacolayachtclub.org, or www.usoda.org.
Texas Race Week 2008,
Galveston, TX, July 23-24
Texas Race Week is the premier offshore yacht-racing event
held by the Galveston Bay Cruising Association (GBCA). The
regatta encompasses three days of offshore sailboat racing on
a variety of courses, beginning on Thursday with a 15- to 30mile offshore route that lasts for five hours. Courses on
Friday and Saturday run along the beach so onshore spectators can view the racing. The Galveston Yacht Club will be
headquarters for the regatta. The 40 to 50 yachts expected to
News & Views for Southern Sailors
compete will race PHRF. One-design and level fleets will race
as well. For more information, the NOR and to register
online, go to www.gbca.org.
Inaugural Children’s Cup Regatta,
Mobile Bay, Aug. 21
Fairhope Yacht Club will host the inaugural Children’s Cup
Regatta, benefitting Children’s Hospital of Alabama, on
Saturday, Aug. 21. A full day of racing and entertainment is
scheduled. For regatta registration and a full list of activities
planned, visit www.fairhopeyachtclub.com. For additional
information, contact FYC Vice Commodore Cathy
Cromartie at [email protected], or Kerrie Benson
of Children’s Hospital at (251) 610-4969.
Race Calendar
LEGEND
BSC
Birmingham SC, Birmingham, AL
BWYC Bay Waveland YC, Bay St. Louis, MS
CSA
Corinthian SA, New Orleans, LA
FWYC Fort Walton YC, Fort Walton Beach, FL
GYA
Gulf Yachting Association
GYC
Gulfport YC, Gulfport, MS
LBYC
Long Beach YC, Long Beach, MS
MYC
Mobile YC, Mobile, AL
NOYC New Orleans YC, New Orleans, LA
NYCP Navy YC of Pensacola, Pensacola, FL
OSYC
Ocean Springs YC, Ocean Springs, MS
PYC
Pensacola YC, Pensacola, FL
PBYC
Pensacola Beach YC, Pensacola Beach, FL
PCYC
Pass Christian YC, Pass Christian, MS
PontYC Pontchartrain YC, New Orleans, LA
PtYC
Point YC. Josephine, AL
SRYC
Singing River YC, Pascagoula, MS
JULY
1-2
Flying Scot NA Championship. BWYC
3
Patriot’s Day Race. PBYC
3-4
Horn Island Hop. OSYC
3-4
Olympic Festival. PYC
3-4
USODA Gulf Coast Championship. PYC
9-11
Area D Chubb Championships, FSA youth regatta. Pont YC
10-11
Meigs Regatta. FWYC
10-11
Horn Island Hop. OSYC
10-11
Sears. Bemis& Smythe Semi-Finals. PontYC
15-16
Memorial Hospital Jr. Regatta. GYC
17
Fast Women Regatta. PtYC
17-18
Summer Regatta. MYC
17-18
Birthday Regatta. PCYC
17-18
Bastille Day. NOYC
24
Bikini Regatta. NYCP
24-25
Weatherly Regatta. GYC
24-25
GYA J22. PCYC
24-25
Summer in the Pass-Finn. PCYC
29-1
USSA Single Handed Champ. FSA youth regatta. PYC
31
Good Restaurant Race. LBYC
31-1
Junior Lipton Regatta. GYC
AUGUST
1
USSA Single Handed Championship. PYC
1
Junior Lipton Regatta. GYC
7-8
Knost Regatta. PCYC
14
Race for the Roses. PBYC
14
Round the Rig. MYC
14-15
Charles R. Galloway. GYA Sunfish/Laser/Opti. GYC
21
Round the Lake. CSA
28
Big Mouth Regatta. PBYC
28
Pam Sintes. NOYC
28
Rock, Paper, Scissors. BSC
28-29
Race Week. SRYC
SOUTHWINDS
July 2010 67
ALPHABETICAL INDEX
OF
ADVERTISERS
Absolute Tank Cleaning..........................25
Advanced Sails .......................................28
All American Boat Storage......................26
Allstate Insurance ...................................43
AlpenGlow .............................................14
Aqua Graphics .......................................25
Atlantic Sail Traders ................................28
Aurinco Solar .........................................26
Bacon Sails .............................................29
Banner Bay Marine.................................26
Beaver Flags ...........................................26
Beneteau Sailboats.................................BC
Beta Marine ...........................................17
Bluewater Insurance .................................8
Bluewater Sailing School ........................20
Boaters’ Exchange..................................11
BoatNames.net ......................................25
Boatsmith ...............................................6
BoatUS ...................................................31
Boca Ciega YC sailing class.....................15
Borel ......................................................27
Bo’sun Supplies ......................................34
Bradenton YC Regatta ..............................9
Capt. Bill Robinson.................................26
Capt. Marti Brown .................................26
Capt. Rick Meyer....................................26
Capt. Ron’s Marine Repair......................25
Catalina Yachts.................................IFC,11
Catamaran Boatyard ..............................26
Cedar Mills Yacht Sales.............................7
Clearwater Municipal Marina .................23
CopperCoat ...........................................14
Cortez Yacht Brokerage ..........................64
CPT Autopilot.........................................65
Cruising Solutions ..................................22
Defender Industries ................................33
Doctor LED .......................................21,27
Doyle/Ploch Sails....................................29
Dunbar Sales.........................................IFC
Dwyer mast............................................65
Eastern Yachts/Beneteau ........................BC
TELL THEM YOU SAW IT IN SOUTHWINDS! SOUTHWINDS provides these lists as a
courtesy and asks our readers to support our advertisers. The lists includes all display advertising.
Eau Gallie Boatworks ..............................17
Edenton Harbor Marina..........................23
Edwards Yacht Sales ...............................36
Ellies Sailing Shop ..................................25
E-Marine ................................................27
Fairwinds Boat Repairs ...........................28
First Patriot Insurance.............................25
Fishermen’s Headquarters ......................42
Flagship Sailing ......................................39
Flying Scot Sailboats ..............................62
Garhauer Hardware................................19
Gourmet Underway Cookbook...............32
Gulfport City Marina .........................23,37
Harborage Marina............................IBC,23
Harbourgate Marina...............................23
Hobie Cats/Tackle Shack ........................10
Holland Boatyard ...................................26
Hotwire/Fans & other products .............27
Innovative Marine Services ................24,25
International Sailing School....................41
Island Packet .........................................IFC
J/Boats - Murray Yacht Sales ...................33
Kelly Bickford,Yacht Broker .....................35
Leather Wheel ........................................27
Mack Sails ..............................................45
Marine AC..............................................25
Marine Canvas .......................................29
Marine Fuel Cleaning .............................25
Marshall Catboats ..................................12
Massey Yacht Sales ..........................IFC,34
Masthead Enterprises ..............11,27,29,35
Mastmate ..............................................27
Murray Yacht Sales/Beneteau............33,BC
National Sail Supply ...............................29
Nature’s Head ...................................27,37
Neuse Yacht Racing Assoc. .....................13
North Sails ............................................35
North Sails Direct ...................................31
North Sails Outlet ..................................66
Ocean Isles Marina.................................23
Old Towne Yacht Sales ...........................32
Pasadena Marina.................................8,23
Patriot Yacht Services .............................18
Pelican’s Perch Marina............................46
Pier 17 ..............................................25,27
Porpoise Used Sails.................................29
Prop Glop ..............................................28
Puerto Isla Mujeres.................................12
Quantum Sails........................................29
Regatta Pointe Marina.........................5,23
Rigging Only..........................................28
Rogue Wave Yachts Sales .......................35
RS Sailboats............................................16
Sail Repair ..............................................29
Sailing Florida Charters ..........................41
Sailing Florida Sailing School..................41
Sailrite....................................................40
Schurr Sails ............................................49
Scuba Clean ...........................................25
Sea School .............................................15
Sea Tech ................................................65
Sea Worthy Goods ............................28,36
Shadetree...............................................44
Snug Harbor Boats & Co........................11
Spotless Stainless....................................28
SSB Radio Books.....................................26
St. Augustine Sailing Enterprises.............41
St. Barts/Beneteau .................................BC
Strategic Publishing ...............................28
Sunrise Sails,Plus ....................................29
Tackle Shack...........................................10
Tow BoatUS ...........................................31
Turner Marine Yacht Sales .....................IFC
Ullman sails .......................................25,29
Valiant Yachts ...........................................7
Wag Bags ...............................................30
Waterborn..............................................28
West Marine.............................................3
Wharram Catamarans ..............................6
Yacht Authority .................................13,26
Yachting Vacations .................................41
LIMITATIONS continued from page 70
the number of great friendships that we
develop. After Guy and Nancy left to
head south, Sandy and I showered and
went to lunch. At that point I became
more exhausted than I ever remember.
I was literally shaking as I dragged
myself into the V-berth to sleep for
about 14 hours. Somehow, Sandy was
able to do a pretty good job of cleaning
the boat before she too collapsed.
On Thursday morning we finished
cleaning the boat, washed some clothes
that were soaked with salt water, and
refilled our fuel. We talked about
returning home, but with a new day we
decided not to accept defeat. So we
motored on to Cape Haze just north of
Charlotte Harbor to anchor for the
night. On Friday we motored across the
Boca Grande entrance with a 15-knot
wind against a flood tide, another nasty
ride. Still, we arrived at Ft. Myers
Beach mooring field in time to join the
68
July 2010
SOUTHWINDS
other club members for dinner and an
evening at Bonita Bill’s. We made the
sand sculpture event the next day,
returning home several days later after
enjoying the sights.
What should I have done differently? I certainly should have checked the
weather, and secured the jib properly.
But after I made those mistakes and was
in trouble, I could have handled the
problems better. When the halyard came
loose and the jib came down part way, I
could have gone forward to pull the jib
down and secure it on the deck rather
than try to furl it with the halyard loose.
At least that would have protected the
rig and saved the sail from damage due
to the flogging. When I needed to add
fuel, we could have stopped the boat
and let it “lie a-hull” while I stowed the
tiller, giving me room to lift and stow
the floor boards and then carefully pour
the fuel. Most of all, I should have taken
the inside route. This old sailor has plenty of hindsight.
Where do we stand now? After we
got over the talk about selling Utopia
Too, we decided that instead we would
be careful in our cruising. My mistakes
were the cause of our troubles, but there
are still limitations. At 83, I have to
admit that I no longer have the strength
to solve many problems encountered at
sea. Although the 26-foot boat is safe, it
is not very comfortable in even moderate seas. So we will continue cruising,
but aware of our limitations.
As sailing writer Randy Deering
quotes Robin Knox-Johnson: “Prevention, as in other aspects of seamanship
(and in life), is better than the cure.”
In June, Utopia Too’s engine suffered a
fatal breakdown, and Jack and Sandy decided to end their cruising days and donated
the boat to a good cause. - editor
www.southwindsmagazine.com
ADVERTISERS INDEX
BY
CATEGORY
SAILBOATS – NEW AND BROKERAGE
Beneteau .....................................................BC
Boaters Exchanges/Catalina ........................11
Boatsmith ......................................................6
Catalina Yachts ......................................IFC,11
Cedar Mills Yacht Sales .................................7
Cortez Yacht Brokerage ...............................64
Dunbar Sales ..............................................IFC
Edwards Yacht Sales....................................36
Flying Scot Sailboats....................................62
Hobie Cats/Tackle Shack .............................10
Island Packet ................................................34
Kelly Bickford Yacht Broker ..........................35
Marshall Catboats ........................................12
Massey Yacht Sales/Catalina/Hunter/Island
Packet/Eastern/Mariner....................IFC,34
Masthead Yacht Sales/Catalina ......1,27,29,35
Murray Yacht Sales/Beneteau ................33,BC
Old Towne Yacht Sales ................................32
Pier 17 .....................................................25,27
Rogue Wave Yachts Sales ...........................35
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CPT Autopilot................................................65
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Defender Industries ......................................33
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SOUTHWINDS
July 2010 69
A Sailor Meets His Limitations
By Jack Mooney
needed to add fuel
As Clint Eastwood’s
from the jerry cans
Dirty Harry said, “A
we carry on deck. I
man has got to know
was able to get one
his limitations.” On
can in, lift the floor
Nov. 3, 2009, I cerboards and open the
tainly learned mine.
tank. This was diffiSandy and I
cult as I had to work
planned to join a
under the tiller while
cruise to Ft. Myers
Sandy steered. When
with five other boats
I started to pour the
from the Hudson
fuel, the spout came
Beach Yacht Club.
loose and a lot of fuel
We usually do the
was lost. It was not
150-mile trip in four
fun cleaning up that
leisurely days as
Sandy and Jack Mooney, on the left, with friends at the sand sculpture event,
their final destination in Fort Myers.
mess. I had the same
there are many good
problem with the
anchorages along the
go outside in the Gulf. It looked like
second jerry can and lost more fuel. At
ICW that help make it a pleasant
conditions were mild enough that we
this point, we did not think we had
cruise. The plan was to meet for dinner
could safely take the outside route.
enough fuel to make Boca Grande, so
in Ft. Myers Beach on Friday and
We were off Clearwater at sunset,
we set a course for the Venice entrance.
attend the sand sculpture event on the
and the wind was picking up. The
At dawn, we talked it over and decidbeach the next day. Most of the cruiscourse was dead downwind, which
ed to head for Sarasota’s New Pass
ers left on Sunday or Monday. Our
was difficult with the confused seas
instead. We knew that the pass had
departure was delayed until Tuesday,
building to four feet. Utopia Too is
been dredged recently, and we did not
Nov. 3. But that was okay, because we
tiller-steered and difficult to handle in
have the current charts. We were also
could make up the time by an
a following sea. Consequently we
concerned about the engine failing in
overnight passage to the Boca Grande
traded the helm frequently, getting litthe
entrance,
so
we
called
entrance to Charlotte Harbor. This is a
tle off-watch rest. About midnight, we
TowBoatU.S. We were 16 miles out at
distance of about 120 nautical miles.
were off Tampa Bay, and things were
the time. That may seem far out for
We had done this passage on two
getting increasingly uncomfortable.
coastal cruisers, but Gulf coast water is
other occasions in Utopia Too, our
We decided to drop the main to avoid
shallow, and at night we want to be in
Westerly Centaur 26.
the possibility of a jibe. Then if we
water deep enough to avoid crab trap
But I made two mistakes. Sandy
rolled the jib half way, the drive would
buoys that can foul the prop.
and I have cruised some 30,000 miles
be as far forward as possible, and the
The towboat operator said he
in the past 16 years, and I have always
boat would settle down. When the jib
would be held up for an hour so we
been careful with weather planning.
sheet was released to furl the sail, the
should motor as well as we could until
Also, I have always seen to it that my
halyard came free and the sail
he arrived. On arrival, he was convessel was in sound condition.
dropped part way down the track. We
cerned that the flapping sail would
First, I accepted the NOAA precould only furl the sail a couple of
take down the rig, and asked me to try
diction of 10 to 15 knots without takrotations before the errant halyard
to control it. I went forward again, but
ing a proper look at the weather sites I
wrapped around the head of the furler,
even in daylight I could not get it
usually check before a passage.
jamming it. The flogging sail was
under control. When he had us into
Second, I did not check the security of
unmanageable. I carefully crawled forcalmer water he towed us in circles to
my headsail. We had a problem with
ward and tried to control the sail. I
wrap the sail. He certainly was accomthe furler, and after fixing it, I secured
could not handle it. I crawled back to
modating.
the halyard and tack of the jib with a
the cockpit in defeat to continue
Guy Colson, the cruise director of
nylon cord instead of the usual shackmotoring with a madly flogging jib.
the HBYC, overheard the call for a tow
le and turnbuckle. I should have
About two o’clock we had been
so he and Nancy delayed leaving
changed the hookup before leaving
motoring for over 12 hours, and the 11Marina Jack’s in Sarasota to catch our
the dock. These mistakes contributed
gallon tank was less than half full.
lines when we arrived. We were so
to my limitations.
Apparently, the fuel sloshed enough
exhausted that if he hadn’t helped me
The tide was enough for us to
for the pickup tube to grab air, and the
pull down the shredded sail and fold it,
leave Hudson at noon on Tuesday,
engine died. It started easily, but we
then secure and cover the main, I don’t
which gave us sufficient time to make
were concerned. Although the rapid
think it would have gotten done. One
the passage to the anchorage before
shut-down and instant restart didn’t
of the cruising sailor’s best rewards is
dark on Wednesday. We had two
indicate clogged filters, I was worried
options to make the trip: Head south
about that possibility. In any case, I
See LIMITATIONS continued on page 68
six miles and take the ICW south, or
70 July 2010
SOUTHWINDS
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