cbchs 2015 - Central Bayside Community Health Services

Comments

Transcription

cbchs 2015 - Central Bayside Community Health Services
201 5 -16
ANNUAL
REPORT
Central Bayside
Communit y Health
Ser vices
It has be en
another ver y
goo d year for
CBCHS and
our client s .
ANNUAL REP O RT
CBCHS
2015-2016
ANNUAL
REPORT
T his rep or t
document s Central
Bayside Communit y
Health Ser vices
Ltd ’s (CBCHS)
per formance
over the 2015–16
financial year.
The report comprises three main sections:
ONE
The Annual Report - providing a general
overview of CBCHS services and operations
04
FA S T FAC T S A B O U T CB CH S
07
A B O U T CB CH S , V I S I O N , M I S S I O N A N D
VA LU E S
08
O U R S E RV I CE S
10
CH A IRPE RSO N A N D CEO RE P O RT
12
B OA RD O F D IREC TO RS
13
M A N AG EM E N T E XECU T I V E COM M I T T E E
14
O RG A N I S AT I O N A L S U PP O RT A N D
D E V E LO PM E N T
CO RP O R AT E S E RV I CE S
16
FIN A N CE
IN FO R M AT I O N T ECH N O LO GY
17
CLIN I C A L G OV E RN A N CE
Q UA LI T Y A N D ACCRE D I TAT I O N
TWO
The annual audited financial statements
- detailing our financial performance for
2015-16 and our financial position at 30
June 2016
18
THREE
The Quality of Care Report - explaining the
innovative programs and services, as well as
our quality and safety processes.
LO C AT I O N S A N D CO N TAC T D E TA IL S
Opposite page:
Central Bayside Adult Community Options staff
Shofura Taqiyyani and Helen Keighley
D O N AT I O N S
M EM B E RS H IP
20
21
FIN A N CI A L S TAT EM E N T S
4
FA S T FAC T S ABO U T CBCHS
CBCHS ’s main catchment area is
the Cit y of Kingston.
OU R
COMMUNITY
The City of Kingston is about 20 km
south of Melbourne's Central Business
District.
The City of Kingston has a rich Aboriginal
history: the land north of Mordialloc
creek was occupied by the YalukitWillam clan of the Bunurong tribe.
The City of Kingston’s population is
about 150,000.
Each part of Kingston has its unique local
character and 13 kms of it is foreshore.
Over 26,000 residents are aged 60 plus,
significantly more than the Melbourne
average.
The City of Kingston is a culturally and
linguistically diverse local government
area, with residents from over 150
countries of origin, speaking 120
languages.
Newer suburbs within our catchment
area, such as Aspendale Gardens and
Chelsea Heights, have high proportions
of young families with pre-school
children.
OUR
STAFF
250
We employ 250 staff:
Full time 55
Part time 155
Casual 40
5
O UR
VOLUNTEERS
Adult Community Options
27
Auxiliary
8
Board
9
Community Visitors Scheme
97
Planned Activity Groups
31
Primary Health
13
TOTAL
CLIENTS SUBURB
185
185
O UR
CLIENTS
CLIENTS SUBURB
WHAT ' S
THEIR
AG E ?
WHERE
D O THE Y
LIVE ?
SUBURB
Parkdale Incl.
local suburbs
Bonbeach
Mentone
Cheltenham
Other
Carrum
Dingley Village
Clarinda
Keysborough
Highett
Beaumaris
CLIENTS AGE
%
AG E G RO U P
%
21.4%
0-9 yrs
10-19 yrs
20-29 yrs
30-39 yrs
40-49 yrs
50-59 yrs
60-69 yrs
70-79 yrs
80-89 yrs
90-99 yrs
26.3%
9.9%
3.6%
4.9%
7.0%
7.7%
12.2%
15.4%
11.1%
1.9%
CLIENTS AGE
18.3%
11.9%
10.9%
14.8%
6.0%
5.5%
5.3%
2.1%
2.0%
1.7%
6
N i c h o l e Fr y a n d L e a n n e B a k e r, A C O
Clients
7
VISION
S TATEMENT
Quality. Community. Wellbeing.
MISSION
S TATEMENT
Our Mission is to enhance the health and wellbeing
of individuals through innovative, responsive services
delivered in partnership with our community.
OUR
CBCHS is a not-forprofit organisation
funde d to provide
a broad range of
health, disabilit y and
communit y ser vices
to those people who
live, work or at tend
school within the
local communit y.
VALUES
Respect: for each individual, families and for the
diverse cultures within our community.
Empowerment: as a cornerstone of how we work.
We acknowledge the potential of each person and
promote client participation and contribution.
Collaboration: with each other and with members
of the community and colleagues from other
organisations. We recognise that together we can
achieve better outcomes.
Quality: in all aspects of our work. Our practice is
evidence based and we continually strive to achieve
excellence in all of our programs and services.
Transparency: in how we operate, particularly in how
we make decisions and communicate.
8
CBCHS S ERV ICE S
O UR
SERVICES
INTEGRATED HEALTH AT CBCHS
COMMUNITY VISITORS SCHEME
CBCHS provides integrated and
coordinated care based on client-centred
principles for people with complex and
chronic conditions. This service is offered
in an integrated team environment or by
clinician interventions based on client
need and capacity to self-manage.
A service that matches isolated Aged Care
Facility residents with a regular volunteer
visitor.
COUNSELLING
Day services for adults with an intellectual
disability.
This team provides a range of generalist
counselling as well as specialist
counselling for people with addiction
issues. These services are provided
individually, in group settings and, in
some cases, in the home.
CENTRAL INTAKE
DIETETICS SERVICE
This team provides service information
and advice and can make appointments
for services offered at CBCHS. The team
can also provide information about other
service providers.
This service provides nutrition education
and support for people to manage their
weight or various chronic conditions.
The Dietitians are also involved in
Health Promotion activities within the
community, in particular, in kindergartens,
schools and a variety of other community
groups.
ADULT COMMUNITY OPTIONS
CHILD DEVELOPMENT SERVICE
This service specialises in speech
pathology, physiotherapy, occupational
therapy and counselling for children and
their families. These services are offered
in individual and group settings.
COMMUNICATION SERVICE
This service provides a community
development role, working with local
services to enable them to work more
effectively in supporting people with
complex communication needs. The
service also offers limited individual client
work.
COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT
This service works with diverse and
indigenous communities. Its focus is to
identify and address the health issues
of concern to these communities and
provide opportunities for better access to
local health and welfare agencies.
GAMBLERS HELP
CBCHS, in partnership with Bentleigh
Bayside Community Health, provides
services to individuals, couples and
significant others affected by gambling
through its specialist program.
HEALTH PROMOTION
Health Promotion strategies aim to
enhance the health of our community. In
partnership with the community, CBCHS
aims to address those issues that impact
on health.
OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY
This service provides advice on aids and
equipment to assist people to maintain
their independence and safety at home.
The service also provides advice on home
modifications, as well as scooter and
wheelchair assessments.
CBCHS S ERV ICE S
ORAL HEALTH SERVICE
PAEDIATRICS
This service provides a broad range of
high quality dental treatments for children
and adults.
The Paediatricians provide medical
treatment to children and young people.
PHYSIOTHERAPY
The service provides individual physical
therapy for all ages, as well as a range of
physical group activities.
The Endocrinologist's role is to assist
individuals in restoring normal hormonal
balance, with a specialist focus on
diabetes and osteoporosis.
PODIATRY
GERIATRICIAN
This service provides individual clinical
support to clients regarding foot care.
Geriatrics focuses on the health care of
older people. It aims to promote health by
preventing and treating diseases in older
adults.
PLANNED ACTIVITY GROUPS
This program provides day activities for
the aged and younger people with a
disability, as well as providing respite for
carers.
TELELINK
The Telelink® program is for people who
are socially or geographically isolated.
The program allows for people with
similar social or cultural interests to come
together by using a group telephone link
up which supports up to ten people at the
one time.
MEDICAL SERVICES
GENERAL PRACTICE
The GP clinic is a medical bulk billing
service.
WOMEN’S HEALTH
This service specialises in preventative
health screening, including pap smears,
whilst also offering advice about sexual
and reproductive health issues including
contraception, pregnancy testing and
counselling and screening for sexually
transmitted infections.
ENDOCRINOLOGIST
NURSING
COMMUNITY HEALTH NURSING
This service provides health promotion,
education, illness prevention and
advocacy. Additionally, the Community
Health Nurse provides nursing,
health assessment, care planning and
coordination of care management in
conjunction with other care providers to
improve or maintain the health of clients
and their carers.
DIABETES EDUCATION
Diabetes Educators assist people with, or
at risk of developing diabetes. Diabetes
Educators combine clinical care with
providing diabetes-specific information
and knowledge, self-management,
education and support.
9
10
CHAIRPERSON & CEO REP O RT
The Chairperson, Board Directors and
the Chief Executive Officer have pleasure
in presenting the Annual Report on the
activities of CBCHS during the 2015/2016
f i n a n c i a l y e a r.
DURING THE LAST 12 MONTHS WE HAVE:
•
expanded our services by employing
a Geriatrician (Dr Michael Forbes), an
Endocrinologist (Dr Santhi Chalasani) and
a Physiotherapist (Elizabeth Watterson)
whose skills include running Pilates classes.
•
A $500,000 operating surplus which
provided for significant necessary asset
replacement, building maintenance and
upgrades to our ICT capabilities, systems
and equipment.
•
increased the number of patients treated
by our bulk billing GP Clinic at Parkdale by
2.4% to 5,292.
•
•
increased the client visits to our Dental
Clinic by 11% to 17,742.
•
provided dental services to 686 children
using Commonwealth funding.
•
exceeded our target for Community Health
by 5%.
•
exceeded our target for Planned Activity
Groups by 23%. We also continued to run
Turkish, Chinese, Italian and Cook Islander
groups.
worked closely with other organisations
in our catchment including South Eastern
Melbourne Primary Health Network,
Kingston City Council, Monash Health,
Alfred Health, Royal District Nursing Service,
Bentleigh Bayside Community Health,
Inner South Community Health, Bayside
City Council, Mind Australia, TaskForce,
Windana, Southern Melbourne PCP, the
Commonwealth Department of Health and
the State Department of Health and Human
Services.
•
provided practical skills’ development
programs for our clients with disabilities via
Café Escape which offers delicious food
and beverages for our staff, clients, carers,
visitors and the general public.
•
significantly improved facilities for our
clients at various sites. Works included
renovations to our Edithvale site, including
a new kitchen, new flooring at 31 Venice
St, Mentone, and a new Autoclave for our
Dental Service.
•
exceeded
our
target
for
the
Commonwealth-funded Respite for Carers
Program by 7%. These groups include a
café group, walking groups and an iPad
education group.
•
achieved our target
Community Care.
•
supported 150 adults with disabilities in our
Adult Community Options day service.
•
supported lonely people in Aged Care
Facilities through our Community Visitors
Scheme.
•
continued our responsible
management as evidenced by:
•
A working capital ratio of 1.99, i.e. current
assets exceeded our current liabilities by 99%.
for
Home
and
financial
STRATEGIC OBJECTIVES
Looking to the future, our strategic objectives
are:
1. To prepare CBCHS, our clients and
their carers for the National Disability
Insurance Scheme. CBCHS intends to
offer more choices for its current clients
11
On Friday 21 August 2015, State Health Minister, Jill Hennessy and Member for
Mordialloc, Tim Richardson, visited our Parkdale site to announce $280,000 of new
dental equipment for our dental clinic!
and is considering providing residential
accommodation for people with disabilities.
•
Board Directors, Peter Spyker AM, Bill Nixon
OAM, John Tetteroo, Peter Lay, Jacqui
Clancy, Janice Munt, Fiona McAlinden,
Rachel Vogelsang and Neal Ng. Bill Nixon,
John Tetteroo, Jacqui Clancy and Fiona
McAlinden must retire as Board Directors
at the 2016 Annual General Meeting but are
eligible for re-election.
•
Valma Johns, Jan Innes, Kay Hiddlestone
and Pat O’Sullivan, who organise our
Auxiliary which sells hand-made garments,
books and toys at our Parkdale site.
•
Deirdre Martinz’s Community Visitors who
provide friendship and companionship to
residents of Aged Care Facilities, who are
socially isolated.
•
Lynne Worcester’s volunteers who support
frail, elderly people in our Planned Activity
Groups.
•
Julie Torcasio’s volunteers who provide
support for adults with disabilities in our day
programs.
•
Brett Kinross’ volunteers who assist with
strength training classes and hydrotherapy
classes.
2. To assist our clients and the community
generally to understand and navigate the
Commonwealth Government’s new ‘My
Aged Care’ services.
3. To
continue to implement a selfmanagement model of care for people with
chronic conditions, working in partnership
with Kingston City Council’s homecare staff, the Department of Health and
Human Services and the Commonwealth
Department of Health.
4. To further expand the medical services we
provide.
5. To increase the allied health services we
provide by using Commonwealth funding.
6. To provide a free dental check-up and care
to the value of $1,000 for children aged 2
to 17.
7. To continue to provide leadership in health
promotion and prevention strategies.
8. To be part of the national initiative to have
a personally-controlled, electronic health
record for every Australian.
QUALITY & CLINICAL GOVERNANCE
On behalf of the Board, we would like to thank
all of our volunteers and staff who contribute so
much to the quality of life of our clients.
CBCHS is fully accredited by the Australian
Quality Improvement Council.
We have produced a Quality of Care Report,
which is part of this Annual Report.
Volunteers provide invaluable service to CBCHS,
its clients and staff. They are as follows:
Peter Spyker AM
Chairperson
Chris Fox Chief
Executive Officer
12
BOARD O F DIREC TO RS
Janice Munt
Bill Nixon OAM
VICE CHAIRPERSON
Peter Lay
Fiona McAlinden
Peter Spyker AM
CHAIRPERSON
Jacqui Clancy
Neal Ng
John Tetteroo
TREASURER
Rachael Vogelsang
M ANAG EMENT E XECU TIV E COMMIT TEE
CHRIS FOX
DANIELA PHELAN
PETER SPYKER
Chief Executive Officer
General Manager
Corporate Services
General Manager
Aged & Disability Services
SAM PORTELLI
GEORGE ROBINSON
PAUL BUNN
Chief Information Officer
General Manager
Primary & Oral Health
Chief Financial Officer
13
ORGANISATIONAL SUPPORT
AND DEVELOPMENT
CORP OR ATE S ERVICE S
Working Together to Maximise Impact
CBCHS requires safe and effective working
relationships across all levels and programs
within our service. Ensuring that our staff are
safe in their workplace is a key role of Corporate
Services. Our Values define what is important
to CBCHS, and these values are reflected in
position descriptions, policies, procedures,
guidelines and orientation information, along
with tangible ways to demonstrate and model
appropriate standards and behaviour.
In 2015, Corporate Services delivered a range
of services to the organisation to contribute
to the realisation of our strategic objectives
and priorities. Also in 2015, we contributed
and delivered positive business partnering
outcomes across each of our portfolios of
management, as follows:
Promoting Organisational Values
• Developed a simpler Performance
Appraisal System which promotes the
evaluation of performance against our
organisational values.
HUMAN RESOURCES
•
Undertook a comprehensive review of
our volunteer policies, procedures and
systems to ensure consistency with other
employment systems and placed all
relevant documentation on our intranet
site.
•
Achieved statutory compliance with
Workplace Gender Equity requirements.
•
Continued to utilitise online learning as
a cost-effective means to provide high
quality training that meets compliance
obligations.
Maintaining Conditions of Employment
• Successfully negotiated the agreement
with our dentists to maintain parity
with Public Sector conditions (Victorian
Community Health Sector [General
Dentists] CBCHS Enterprise Agreement
2014-2017).
•
Throughout 2015-16 CBCHS maintained
a strong presence in sector-wide
Agreement negotiations to ensure
CBCHS requirements were considered
in the five Agreements that were under
negotiation.
•
Commenced workforce planning for the
introduction of the National Disability
Insurance Scheme (NDIS) with the primary
objective to examine employment terms
and conditions to ensure these match the
services under the NDIS.
•
Implemented a two-day mediation and
conflict resolution training program for
17 Managers and Team Leaders.
•
Created an internal newsletter, ‘The
Bigger Picture’, to create a focus on our
people, projects and strategic objectives
via another medium.
Achieved strong compliance outcomes
• Introduced compliance workshops
delivered by legal advisors to ensure
CBCHS managers can understand and
implement obligations effectively.
ORG ANIS ATIONAL SU PP O RT
AND D E V ELOPMENT
FACILITIES AND PROPERTY
MANAGEMENT
Transformed spaces for Staff and Clients
• Undertook projects to help deliver
improvements to medical and dental
reception areas and improved the staff
room with the purchase of new furniture.
•
With funding assistance from the CBCHS
Auxiliary, created a new garden space for
the enjoyment of staff and clients.
Delivered capital improvements with
minimal or no disruption to client services
• Such projects included installation of
walkways and exit points in ceiling spaces.
•
Continued to upgrade and deploy new air
conditioning units.
Ensured environmental load was minimised
• Corporate Services oversaw the removal
of 30 cubic metres of waste. This was
done in an environmentally responsible
way.
SAFETY & RISK
Proactive management of work
environment and WorkCover claims
• Developed an enhanced quarterly CBCHS
Safety Report.
•
Continued the focus on workplace
ergonomics and the health and wellbeing
of employees, with standing workstations
implemented across the organisation,
including the boardroom for minute
takers.
•
Development, review and education of
relevant policies and procedures (e.g.
road rage, storage and use of chemicals,
working after hours, extreme weather)
in accordance with Australian standards,
compliance codes and regulations.
•
Nil WorkCover claims and a further
reduction to WorkCover Premiums over
the last 12 months.
Daniela Phelan
General Manager
Corporate Services
Contributed to good governance
• Review of the risk assessment process to
improve efficiency of the risk system with
strong adherence to review of treatment
plans and communications with the
Management Executive Committee and
Board of Directors.
•
Annual Conflict of Interest process for
Board of Directors and audit of Board of
Directors' information.
Undertook safety checks
• Environmental site reviews carried out
twice yearly to identify hazards and risks
to employees, clients and the public.
•
Scheduled audits of medical equipment,
duress alarms, fire systems and first aid
qualifications completed.
ACO client David Gorin, working with Al from
Corporate Services.
15
ORG ANIS ATIO NAL SU PP O RT
AND D E V ELOPMENT
16
FINAN CE S ERVICE S
INFO RM ATIO N TECHN O LO GY
Our hard working Finance team provides
finance, payroll, accounts payable and
accounts receivable services across the
organisation. Our team of two full-time and
three part-time staff are primarily responsible
for the systems and processes that facilitate
all financial transactions. Through receipting
and banking, paying suppliers, invoicing
some service users, paying our staff, and the
comprehensive recording and reporting to
internal and external stakeholders, we ensure
strong and efficient financial management of
all grant funding and other income received.
In addition, we are responsible for properties
and lease management, the motor vehicle
fleet and all organisational insurances.
The IT department at CBCHS provides desktop
support services to all CBCHS staff, as well as
carrying out projects to improve and expand
on existing infrastructure and services. It has
been another great year with many positive
outcomes.
Following the implementation of the
MicrOpay Meridian payroll system in October
2014, in February this year we implemented
and have progressively rolled out ConnX, our
new HR Information System and Employee
Services Portal. ConnX has been very well
received throughout the organisation and
has brought significant enhanced processing
efficiencies by integrating web-based access
for all employees as well as more detailed,
instant data access and reporting for HR and
management.
Going forward, Finance is working closely
with our service programs and other support
teams, to affect the transition toward the new
government reforms, especially My Aged
Care and NDIS. The new world of consumer
directed care, and new and different funding
agreements, will require considerable change
in our billing and collection, costing, and
financial reporting processes.
Paul Bunn
Chief Financial Officer
A major accomplishment during this year was
the change of our email system from being
locally hosted to Cloud hosted on Microsoft’s
Office 365 service. Over the coming months
we will work towards further migration of
services to the Microsoft Cloud by transferring
our locally hosted SharePoint intranet. The
main driver behind these changes is to provide
a high level of disaster recovery to the business,
in addition to other benefits.
Our Intranet’s content (i.e. SharePoint) has
been further expanded to provide a staff
directory which has had a positive impact on
communication within the organisation. We
have added more team sites - assisting team
collaboration and changing the way teams
are working together. We have implemented
a rotating news banner on the front page,
which is used to promote internal staff news.
We will continue to develop and improve our
SharePoint Intranet in response to business
needs over the next 12 months.
We have supported business units in
their IT requirements by assisting in the
implementation of the new ConnX timesheet
program and maintenance software program.
Other initiatives undertaken during the year
include:
•
•
•
•
•
Introduction of 10 x IT training laptops for
staff training and presentations.
Planning and testing of a new version of
the TrakCare system (our CMS application).
Implementing a new high-capacity of
data storage unit (NAS).
Implementation of a new VMWare server
environment, increasing the performance
and capacity for the future.
Supporting the rollout of the My Aged
Care system and assisting the business in
their reporting requirements.
Sam Portelli
Chief Information Officer
ORG ANIS ATIONAL SU PP O RT
AND D E V ELOPMENT
CLINIC AL G OVERNAN CE
Q UALIT Y AND ACCREDITATIO N
The Clinical Governance Committee works
to ensure clinicians and clinical teams deliver
high quality and safe clinical treatments. The
role of the committee is to:
In the past 12 months CBCHS has continued to
pursue Quality Improvements across all areas
of our service. A new Quality Improvement
template based on the ‘Plan, Do, Study,
Act’ cycle was implemented and staff were
encouraged to document the development,
implementation and evaluation of Quality
Improvement initiatives using the template.
•
Oversee the quality of clinical services
delivered by Primary Health, Oral Health,
medical practices, Planned Activity
Groups and Adult Community Options.
•
Improve the overall clinical risk
management system within these
programs.
•
Develop a framework to support clinicians
to deliver safe, high quality care based on
current evidence-based guidelines and
best practice models of care.
•
Monitor implementation of quality and
safety policies and procedures.
•
Contribute to the monitoring and
reporting of clinical risk issues throughout
the organisation.
In the past 12 months the committee has
reviewed and updated clinical supervision
policy and procedures, finalised all policy
and procedures relating to infection control
and established audits to evaluate new
procedures.
Work has commenced on
reviewing evidenced-based best practice for
clinical services.
The committee also oversees the Dental
Safety and Quality Report and the clinical
Incident Report.
The Quality Committee has continued to
work through the Quality Work Plan with a
large volume of work now completed.
A cultural audit was undertaken with
the assistance of the Aboriginal Health
Coordinator, Urban South Koolin Balit
Project. Participating in the audit assisted
CBCHS to identify areas of improvement
to ensure our organisation is culturally
responsive to the needs of Aboriginal people
in our community. Over the past 12 months
we have implemented a number of actions
in response to the audit, including the
development of The Aboriginal and Torres
Strait Islanders Access Policy and providing
our workforce with specific training.
O U R ACCREDITATIO N S TAT US
In 2015 our General Practice received
accreditation with the Australian General
Practice Accreditation Limited (AGPAL).
Our Planned Activity Group service underwent
a quality review in March 2016. The Quality
Review team reviewed the service against
each of the expected outcomes of the Home
Care Standards. The final report indicated
the Planned Activity Group had ‘met’ all areas
of the Home Care Standards.
In 2017, our Primary Health Services, Dental
Service and Adult Community Options
program will undergo Accreditation.
Sue Moulton, Quality Coordinator
Dianne Willmott, Senior Lead Nurse,
Oral Health Dental Clinic
IT TE A M
17
AUXILIARY L AD IE S
18
DONATIONS
OUR CBCHS AUXILIARY R AIS ED
A RECORD -BRE AKIN G TOTAL O F
$1 1 , 186 . 20!
Anonymous – donation of $300 to OT
Mobility Aids and Equipment to benefit our
OT clients.
Carers Victoria - donation of $483 to Adult
Community Options.
Ms Margaret Anger – donations totalling
$221 which will assist CBCHS in providing
some of the many items needed to continue
to provide our clients with the highest quality
care.
Anonymous - has generously donated and
had installed at the Edithvale site a spring
form trampoline at the cost of $1200.
St Augustine’s Southern Opportunity Shop –
donation of $1,425 which will assist CBCHS
in providing some of the many items needed
to continue to provide our clients with the
highest quality care.
Jacquie Cowan and family - donation of $20
to Adult Community Options.
Anonymous - donation of $6 which will assist
CBCHS in providing some of the many items
needed to continue to provide our clients
with the highest quality care.
Anonymous - donation of $58.85 which will
assist CBCHS in providing some of the many
items needed to continue to provide our
clients with the highest quality care.
Mr Peter Fassoulis – donation of $50 which
will assist CBCHS in providing some of the
many items needed to continue to provide
our clients with the highest quality care.
Officeworks Highett – donation of art
supplies which will help to support CBCHS
and the Auxiliary with its Adult Community
Options Art Project.
Jean Garrow - donation of $40 which will
assist CBCHS in providing some of the many
items needed to continue to provide our
clients with the highest quality care.
All Souls’ Opportunity Shop – donation
of $1,200 which will be used for Telelink
Services.
TOTAL
$5,003.85
19
MEMBERSHIP
You can become involved with CBCHS by becoming a
member - it is free! Any member of the community is
eligible for membership of CBCHS if they are over the
age of 18 and live, work or are enrolled as a student at
an educational institution in the City of Kingston, or if
they are a client, carer or volunteer of CBCHS.
Being a member provides opportunities to see
and hear about what we do, through invitation to
community consultation forums and the Annual
General Meeting. You will also receive a copy of our
Quarterly Newsletter! Members are eligible to apply
and vote for candidates for the Board of Directors at
the time of election.
If you would like to become a member, please call
8587 0200.
Quarterly Newsletter
Members
and Volunteers
Issue #3 Winter 2016
CEO Message
It is an exceptionally busy time at
CBCHS, as we prepare for the rollout
of two major government initiatives,
they are:
• The National Disability Insurance
Scheme, CBCHS will be in the
rollout commencing 1 April 2018.
As well as continuing our group
day programs for people with
disabilities, we are going to offer
one on one support to clients so
the clients can do whatever activity
they want. We are also examining
the possibilit y of providing
accommodation for people with
a disability.
• M y A g e d C a re, C B C H S i s
currently operating within an early
implementation region. My Aged
Care is the newly established
main entry point to the aged care
system in Australia. Many of our
eligible elderly clients have found
the new on-line My Aged Care
system confusing and difficult to
access services through. If you
or your parents are experiencing
difficulties with My Aged Care, talk
to our Intake staff and/or clinical
staff, who will be able to help you
navigate the My Aged Care system.
NVW CBCHS Morning Tea -11 May
During National Volunteer Week CBCHS held a morning tea on 11
May to thank our volunteers for their dedication and commitment
to our service. A record number of volunteers attended and were
thanked by Peter Spyker AM, Chairperson, Chris Fox, CEO, Peter
Spyker, General Manager Aged and Disability Services and Petrina
Schoorman, Psychologist.
Further information about both these
initiatives will be available in future
newsletters.
Wishing you the best of health. I
encourage you to contact our Central
Intake team if you need access to
our services or are experiencing
difficulties with “My Aged Care”.
Chris Fox
CEO
Quality. Community. Wellbeing
CBCHS Quarterly Winter 2016.indd 1
14/06/2016 2:43 pm
20
LO C ATIONS & CO NTAC T D E TAIL S
Road
Road
Clayton
Keys Road
Argus
Rd
Sundowner
Avenue
Kingston
Karen St
Bourke
7
Oakes
Avenue
Westall
Warrigal
Chesterville
Wickham Road
Highett Road HIGHETT
Abbott St
Sandringham
Bay Road
Road
3
d
Road
Road
a
Ro
an
pe
Ne
Bluff
Road
South
MOORABBIN
Da
nd
g
on
en
South Road
Road
Ol
d
Bunney Road
Viney Street
PATTERSON
Road
Main Road
Centre
Road
Road
Clarinda
Centre
Heatherton
Road
Road
Street
SANDRINGHAM
Ce
nt
re
Road
Da
nd
e
CHELTENHAM
Dandenong
Roa
d
Road
MENTONE
1
Carrier Ave
8
PARKDALE
Road
4
Venice St
Lower
no
ng
White
Street
Springvale
Road
Charman Road
y
wa
Southern Rd
gh
Balcombe
5
Road
Cheltenham Road
Dandenong
Boundary
Tulip Street
Centre
Park Road
Hi
Bluff
Road
Royal Ave
MORDIALLOC
Groverno
r
M o r dial l o c C reek
Road
n
io
at
St
Wells
Road
7
CLAYTON SOUTH
ADULT COMMUNITY OPTIONS
6-8 Edithvale Road Edithvale 3196
ADULT COMMUNITY OPTIONS
45 Oakes Avenue Clayton South 3169
CAFE ESCAPE
2 Carrier Avenue Parkdale 3195
Phone: 9782 7400 Fax: 9782 7410
Phone: 9562 3019 Fax: 9562 3019
Phone: 9588 2463 Fax: 9588 2457
www.cbchs.org.au
CARRUM
r
ve
Ri
BONBEACH
Phone: 9581 8500 Fax: 9581 8510
Pa
t ter
son
d
R
od
Le
Mc
Freeway
EDITHVALE
CHELSEA
2
a
sul
nin
ad
Pe
Ro
Phone: 9552 0833 Fax: 9552 0834
ADULT COMMUNITY OPTIONS
299 Centre Dandenong Rd Cheltenham 3192 Phone: 9581 1150 Fax: 9581 1155
6
8
Phone: 9782 7633 Fax: 9782 7600
et
Groups also operate at sites 3 and 6
CHELTENHAM
se
Fra
Stre
5
PLANNED ACTIVITY GROUPS
31 Venice Street Mentone 3194
6
lls
We
4
MENTONE
58 Viney Street Clarinda 3169
le
va
ith
Ed
ton
3
CLARINDA
3/1 The Strand Chelsea 3196
EDITHVALE
ion
CHELSEA
Phone: 8587 0200 Fax: 8587 0210
Phone: 8587 0350
Phone: 8587 0250 Fax: 8587 0293
Stat
2
e
Av
es
dg
Bri
e
nu
ve
rA
t
335-337 Nepean Highway Parkdale 3195
Dental Clinic
Adult Community Options Main Office
ree
PARKDALE
ng
rni
St
1
1
Ro
ad
Mo
ASPENDALE
21
2015-2016
FINANCIAL
STATEMENTS
Central Bayside
Communit y Health
Ser vices
ABN 50 362 120 798
FINAN CIAL S TATEMENT S
22
,
DIREC TORS REPORT
Your Directors present this report on Central Bayside
Community Health Services Limited for the financial
year ended 30 June 2016.
• Build capacity and capability of our people,
systems and facilities to meet the changing
service needs and delivery modes.
• Maintain strong financial and infrastructure
DIRECTORS
The names of each person who has been a Director
during the year and to the date of this report are:
Peter Spyker AM
William Nixon OAM
Peter Lay
capacity
to
objectives.
enable
our
plans
and
The company's long-term objectives are:
• To enhance the health and wellbeing of
individuals through innovative, responsive
services delivered in partnership with the
community.
Jacqui Clancy
• To develop and deliver integrated and holistic
John Tetteroo
health services in response to the needs of the
communities we serve.
Janice Munt
Fiona McAlinden
Rachel Vogelsang
To achieve these objectives the company adopted
the following strategies:
Neal Ng
• Monitor the NDIS implementation and position
Appointed 29/10/2015
Directors have been in office since the start of
the financial year to the date of this report unless
otherwise stated.
CBCHS for opportunities for new and expanded
disability services.
• Design and implement Medical Benefits Scheme
funded GP and allied health services.
PRINCIPAL ACTIVITIES
The principal activity of the company during the
financial year was to provide primary health and
welfare services in the community with particular
attention to the socially and economically
disadvantaged.
No significant changes in the nature of the
company's activity occurred during the financial
year.
SHORT-TERM AND LONG-TERM
OBJECTIVES
The company's short-term objectives are to:
• Develop and expand our disability services in
line with Commonwealth Government's NDIS
Program as it is implemented.
• Expand our Commonwealth funded GP, Medical
Specialist and Allied Health Care services.
• Seek opportunities to grow and maintain a
positive and productive workplace.
• Set and manage operational and capital
budgets as guided by our Strategic Financial
Parameters.
PERFORMANCE MEASURES
The performance measures of the company are
related to meeting funded program objectives as
contracted in service agreements with funding
providers (State, Federal and Local Governments,
and non-government organisations). The
performance measures relate to hours of service,
number of clients serviced, number of courses of
care, as well as service quality and responsiveness
standards.
FINAN CIAL S TATEMENT S
23
,
DIREC TORS REPORT
INFORMATION ON DIRECTORS
Peter Spyker AM
Qualifications & Experience
Special Responsibilities
William (Bill) Nixon OAM
Qualifications & Experience
Special Responsibilities
Chairperson
Former Member of Parliament (State) Heatherton Electorate 1979-1985
and Mentone Electorate 1988-1992
President/Chairperson since 2003, Member of Executive Committee &
Finance Committee
Deputy Chairperson
Former Mayor City of Kingston / Mordialloc, Former CBCHS President/
Chairperson, Past Member City of Kingston Audit Committee
Member of Executive Committee, Member of Finance Committee,
Member of Security & Maintenance Committee
Peter Lay
Qualifications & Experience
Special Responsibilities
Director
Lawyer
Chairperson of Audit & Risk Committee, Member of Finance Committee
Jacqui Clancy
Qualifications & Experience
Special Responsibilities
Director
Registered Tax Agent
Member of Finance Committee, Member of Audit & Risk Committee
John Tetteroo
Qualifications & Experience
Director
Retired Accountant/Finance Manager - State Public Service, Team
Leader - Matt‘s Place
Member of Executive Committee, Chairperson of Finance Committee,
Member of Audit & Risk Committee
Special Responsibilities
Janice Munt
Qualifications & Experience
Director
Former Member of Parliament (State) Mordialloc Electorate 2002-2010,
Parliamentary Secretary 2009-2010
Fiona McAlinden
Qualifications & Experience
Director
Director Allied Health, Master of Business Management (MBM),
Bachelor of Social Administration (Hons), Certificate in Social Work (CQSW)
Member of Strategic Planning Committee
Special Responsibilities
Rachel Vogelsang
Qualifications & Experience
Special Responsibilities
Neal Ng
Qualifications & Experience
Special Responsibilities
Director
Quality & Risk Manager, RTW Coordinator, Degree in Applied Science,
Diploma in Management, Certificate IV in Workplace
Training & Assessment
Member of Audit & Risk Committee
Director
Director of Concept Builders Pty Ltd, Bachelor of Construction Economics
(RMIT), Associate of Australian Institute of Quantity Surveyors (AAIQS)
Chairperson of Security & Maintenance Committee
FINAN CIAL S TATEMENT S
24
,
DIREC TORS REPORT
MEETINGS OF DIRECTORS
During the financial year 11 meetings of Directors were held. Attendances by each Director were as follows:
Peter Spyker
William Nixon
Peter Lay
Jacqui Clancy
John Tetteroo
Janice Munt
Fiona McAlinden
Rachel Vogelsang
Neal Ng
11
10
10
7
9
7
7
9
6
(Number eligible 7) MEMBERS' GUARANTEE
The company is incorporated under the Corporations Act 2001 and is a company limited by guarantee. If
the company is wound up, the constitution states that each member is required to contribute a maximum of
$1 each towards meeting any outstanding obligations of the entity. At 30 June 2016, the total amount that
members of the company are liable to contribute if the company is wound up is $112 (2015: $113).
AUDITOR'S INDEPENDENCE DECLARATION
The lead auditor’s independence declaration for the year ended 30 June 2016 has been received and can be
found at the end of the financial report.
This Directors’ report is signed in accordance with a resolution of the Board of Directors.
Peter Spyker
Chairperson
Dated this 29th day of September 2016
John Tetteroo
Treasurer
FINAN CIAL S TATEMENT S
25
S TATEMENT OF PROFIT OR LOSS AND OTHER COMPREHENS IV E IN COME
FO R THE YE AR END ED 30 J U NE 2016
Note
Revenue from operating activities
Other Revenue
Other Income
2
2
2
2016
$
2015
$
15,751,277
15,439,292
176,566
68,467
185,023
(17,617)
15,996,310
15,606,698
(10,269,281)
(959,037)
(159,714)
(10,367)
(15,000)
(564,504)
(66,574)
(123,645)
(467,718)
(241,752)
(287,885)
(1,657,296)
(152,787)
(510,025)
(10,110,409)
(912,351)
(167,867)
(14,356)
(16,200)
(565,879)
(75,286)
(109,075)
(367,028)
(268,510)
(242,390)
(1,685,279)
(274,535)
(502,740)
(15,485,585)
(15,311,905)
510,725
294,793
212,500
-
723,225
294,793
-
-
723,225
294,793
-
-
723,225
294,793
Expenses from ordinary activities
Employee salaries & oncosts
Superannuation
Other employees expenses
Accounting & legal expenses
Audit expenses
Office expenses
Occupancy expenses
Utility expenses
Cleaning & maintenance expenses
Motor vehicle costs
Medical & paramedical supplies
Program & client expenses
Other expenses
Depreciation & amortisation
Capital contribution - Dental program equipment
Surplus from ordinary activities
Income Tax Expense
Surplus attributable to members
Other Comprehensive Income
Total Comprehensive Income
The accompanying notes form part of this financial report.
2
FINAN CIAL S TATEMENT S
26
S TATEMENT OF FINAN CIAL P OS ITIO N
A S AT 30 J UNE 2016
Note
CURRENT ASSETS
Cash and cash equivalents
Trade and other receivables
Inventories
Financial Assets
Other Assets
3
4
5
6
7
TOTAL CURRENT ASSETS
NON-CURRENT ASSETS
Property, plant and equipment
8
TOTAL NON-CURRENT ASSETS
TOTAL ASSETS
CURRENT LIABILITIES
Trade and other payables
Provisions
9
10
TOTAL CURRENT LIABILITIES
NON-CURRENT LIABILITIES
Provisions
10
TOTAL NON-CURRENT LIABILITIES
TOTAL LIABILITIES
NET ASSETS
EQUITY
Retained surplus
Reserves
TOTAL EQUITY
The accompanying notes form part of this financial report.
11
11
2016
$
2015
$
3,321,409
74,520
3,796
3,392,655
320,467
2,583,920
117,004
3,796
3,071,242
510,283
7,112,847
6,286,245
9,088,721
9,056,728
9,088,721
9,056,728
16,201,568
15,342,973
1,467,882
2,196,063
1,292,521
2,170,783
3,663,945
3,463,304
457,609
522,880
457,609
522,880
4,121,554
3,986,184
12,080,014
11,356,789
10,228,233
1,851,781
9,505,008
1,851,781
12,080,014
11,356,789
FINAN CIAL S TATEMENT S
27
S TATEMENT OF CHAN G E S IN EQ U IT Y FO R THE YE AR END ED 30 J U NE 2016
Note
Retained
Surplus
$
Asset
Revaluation
Reserve
$
Total
$
11
9,210,215
294,793
-
1,118,144
733,637
10,328,359
294,793
733,637
Balance at 30 June 2015
Net Surplus for year
Transfer from Reserves
11
9,505,008
723,225
-
1,851,781
-
11,356,789
723,225
-
Balance at 30 June 2016
11
10,228,233
1,851,781
12,080,014
Balance at 1 July 2014
Net Surplus for year
Transfer to Reserves
The accompanying notes form part of this financial report.
S TATEMENT OF C A S H FLOWS FOR THE YE AR END ED 30 J U NE 2016
2016
$
INFLOWS /
(OUTFLOWS)
2015
$
INFLOWS /
(OUTFLOWS)
15,340,700
3,804
2,359,881
(16,344,694)
172,762
14,752,631
1,985
2,173,520
(16,221,104)
183,038
1,532,453
890,070
CASH FLOW FROM INVESTING ACTIVITIES
Fixed asset purchases
Proceeds on sale of fixed assets
(604,915)
131,364
(536,437)
58,810
Net cash provided by (used in) investing activities
(473,551)
(477,627)
CASH FLOW FROM FINANCING ACTIVITIES
Net cash used in financing activities
(321,413)
-
Net increase in cash held
1,058,902
412,443
Cash at the beginning of the financial year
2,583,920
2,171,477
3,321,409
2,583,920
Note
CASH FLOW FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES
Operating grant receipts
Donations received
Receipts from clients & programs
Payments to suppliers and employees
Interest received
Net cash provided by (used in) operating activities
Cash at the end of the financial year
The accompanying notes form part of this financial report.
17b
17a
28
N OTE S TO THE FINAN CIAL S TATEMENT S
FO R THE YE AR END ED 30 J U NE 2016
Note 1 :
Summary of Significant Accounting Policies
Basis of Preparation
These general purpose financial statements have
been prepared in accordance with Australian
Accounting Standards - Reduced Disclosure
Requirements and Interpretations issued by the
Australian Accounting Standards Board ('AASB')
and the Australian Charities and Not-for-profits
Commission Act 2012, as appropriate for not-forprofit oriented entities.
Australian Accounting Standards set out accounting
policies that the AASB has concluded would result
in financial statements containing relevant and
reliable information about transactions, events and
conditions. Material accounting policies adopted
in the preparation of these financial statements are
presented below and have been consistently applied
unless stated otherwise.
The financial statements, except for the cash flow
information, have been prepared on an accruals
basis and are based on historical costs, modified,
where applicable, by the measurement at fair value
of selected non-current assets, financial assets
and financial liabilities. The amounts presented in
the financial statements have been rounded to the
nearest dollar.
The financial statements were authorised for issue
on 29 September 2016 by the directors of the
company.
Accounting Policies
a Revenue
Non-reciprocal grant revenue is recognised in profit
or loss when the entity obtains control of the grant
and it is probable that the economic benefits gained
from the grant will flow to the entity and the amount
of the grant can be measured reliably.
If conditions are attached to the grant which
must be satisfied before it is eligible to receive the
contribution, the recognition of the grant as revenue
will be deferred until those conditions are satisfied.
When grant revenue is received whereby the entity
incurs an obligation to deliver economic value
directly back to the contributor, this is considered
a reciprocal transaction and the grant revenue is
recognised in the statement of financial position as
a liability until the service has been delivered to the
contributor, otherwise the grant is recognised as
income on receipt.
Central Bayside Community Health Services Limited
receives non-reciprocal contributions of assets
from the government and other parties for zero or
a nominal value. These assets are recognised at fair
value on the date of acquisition in the statement of
financial position, with a corresponding amount of
income recognised in profit or loss.
Donations and bequests are recognised as revenue
when received.
Interest revenue is recognised using the effective
interest method, which for floating rate financial
assets is the rate inherent in the instrument.
Revenue from the rendering of a service is
recognised upon the delivery of the service to the
customers.
All revenue is stated net of the amount of goods and
services tax.
b Inventories
Inventories consist of food stocks at Café Escape
and are carried at the lower of cost allocated and net
realisable value.
c Property, Plant and Equipment
Each class of property, plant and equipment is
carried at cost or fair value less, where applicable,
any accumulated depreciation and any impairment
value.
Property, plant and equipment are measured on the
cost basis.
Impairment
The carrying values of property, plant and
equipment are reviewed for impairment when
events or changes in circumstances indicate the
carrying value may not be recoverable. If such an
indication exists and where the carrying values
exceed the recoverable amount, the asset is written
down to the recoverable amount.
Depreciation
The depreciable amount of all fixed assets are
depreciated as detailed below over the useful lives
of the assets to the Company commencing from
the time the asset is held ready for use. Leasehold
improvements are depreciated over the shorter
of either the unexpired period of the lease or the
estimated useful lives of the improvements.
The policy of Central Bayside Community Health
Services Ltd is to only capitalise items that cost in
excess of $2,000.
N OTE S TO THE FINAN CIAL S TATEMENT S
FO R THE YE AR END ED 30 J U NE 2016
The depreciation rates used for each class of
depreciable asset are :
e Superannuation
Superannuation contributions for the reporting
period are detailed in the Statement of Profit or Loss
and Other Comprehensive Income.
Class of Fixed
Asset
Depreciation
Rate
Depreciation
Method
Buildings
2%
Straight Line
Leasehold
improvements
5%
Straight Line
Furniture &
Equipment
10 - 20%
Straight Line
Motor Vehicles
15%
Straight Line
Computers
20%
Straight Line
Emergency
Services Super
The name and details of the employee
superannuation and contributions made by the
Company are as follows :
2016
$
2015
$
First State Super
696,229
715,094
HESTA
238,148
204,343
11,160
14,804
1,441
304
946,978
934,545
BT Super
d Employee Benefits
Short-term employee benefits
Provision is made for the Company's liability for
employee benefits arising from services rendered
by employees to the end of the reporting period.
Employee benefits that are expected to be settled
within one year are recognised in current liabilities
and have been measured at the amounts expected
to be paid when the liability is settled.
Other long-term employee benefits
Employee benefits payable later than one year are
recognised as non-current liabilities and have been
measured at the present value of the estimated
future cash outflows to be made for those benefits.
In determining the liability, consideration is given to
employee wage increases and the probability that
the employees may not satisfy vesting requirements.
Those cash outflows are discounted using market
yields on national government bonds with terms
to maturity that match the expected timing of cash
flows attributable to employee benefits.
Sick leave
Sick Leave is generally managed by the Company in
its normal course of operations and by it's current
funding arrangements. The policy in relation to
employee sick leave is to recognise employee sick
leave as an expense in the financial year in which the
entitlements are used by and/or paid to employees.
Sick Leave is only payable while the employees
are employed by the Company. If an employee
terminates employment there is no requirement to
pay outstanding sick leave entitlements. This policy
recognises the non-vesting nature of the Sick Leave
entitlements.
The bases for contributions are determined by the
various schemes.
The unfunded superannuation liability in respect
to the members of Health Super, HESTA &
Emergency Services Super is not recognised in
the Balance Sheet. The Company's total unfunded
superannuation liability in relation to these Funds
has been assumed by and is reflected in the financial
statements of the Victorian Department of Treasury
and Finance
All employees of the Company are entitled to
benefits on retirement, disability or death from the
respective Fund. The defined benefit fund provides
defined lump sum benefits based on years of service
and annual average salary.
The Company has no other legal obligation to
provide benefits to employees on retirement.
f
Cash
For the purposes of the Cash Flow Statement, cash
and cash equivalents include cash on hand, deposits
held at call with banks, other short term highly liquid
investments with original maturities of three months
or less.
g Goods and Services Tax (GST)
Revenues, expenses and assets are recognised net
of the amount of GST, except where the amount
of GST incurred is not recoverable from the
Australian Tax Office. In these circumstances the
GST is recognised as part of the cost of acquisition
of the asset or as part of an item of the expense.
Receivables and payables in the Balance Sheet are
shown inclusive of GST.
29
30
N OTE S TO THE FINAN CIAL S TATEMENT S
FO R THE YE AR END ED 30 J U NE 2016
h
Financial Instruments
Initial recognition and measurement
Financial assets and financial liabilities are
recognised when the entity becomes a party to
the contractual provisions to the instrument. For
financial assets, this is equivalent to the date that the
company commits itself to either purchase or sell
the asset (ie trade date accounting is adopted).
Classification and subsequent measurement
Financial instruments are subsequently measured at
amortised cost using the effective interest method,
or cost.
Amortised cost is calculated as the amount at which
the financial asset or financial liability is measured
at initial recognition less principal repayments and
any reduction for impairment, and adjusted for any
cumulative amortisation of the difference between
that initial amount and the maturity amount
calculated using the effective interest method.
The effective interest method is used to allocate
interest income or interest expense over the
relevant period and is equivalent to the rate that
exactly discounts estimated future cash payments
or receipts (including fees, transaction costs and
other premiums or discounts) through the expected
life (or when this cannot be reliably predicted, the
contractual term) of the financial instrument to
the net carrying amount of the financial asset or
financial liability. Revisions to expected future net
cash flows will necessitate an adjustment to the
carrying amount with a consequential recognition of
an income or expense item in profit or loss.
(i) Loans and receivables
Loans and receivables are non-derivative financial
assets with fixed or determinable payments
that are not quoted in an active market and are
subsequently measured at amortised cost. Gains or
losses are recognised in profit or loss through the
amortisation process and when the financial asset is
derecognised.
(ii) Financial liabilities
Non-derivative financial liabilities other than financial
guarantees are subsequently measured at amortised
cost. Gains or losses are recognised in profit or loss
through the amortisation process and when the
financial liability is derecognised.
Impairment
At the end of each reporting period, the company
assesses whether there is objective evidence that a
financial asset has been impaired. A financial asset
(or a group of financial assets) is deemed to be
impaired if, and only if, there is objective evidence of
impairment as a result of one or more events (a “loss
event”) having occurred, which has an impact on the
estimated future cash flows of the financial asset(s).
In the case of financial assets carried at amortised
cost, loss events may include: indications that the
debtors or a group of debtors are experiencing
significant financial difficulty, default or delinquency
in interest or principal payments; indications
that they will enter bankruptcy or other financial
reorganisation; and changes in arrears or economic
conditions that correlate with defaults.
For financial assets carried at amortised cost
(including loans and receivables), a separate
allowance account is used to reduce the carrying
amount of financial assets impaired by credit losses.
After having taken all possible measures of recovery,
if management establishes that the carrying amount
cannot be recovered by any means, at that point the
written-off amounts are charged to the allowance
account or the carrying amount of impaired
financial assets is reduced directly if no impairment
amount was previously recognised in the allowance
accounts.
When the terms of financial assets that would
otherwise have been past due or impaired have
been renegotiated, the company recognises the
impairment for such financial assets by taking into
account the original terms as if the terms have not
been renegotiated so that the loss events that have
occurred are duly considered.
Derecognition
Financial assets are derecognised when the
contractual rights to receipt of cash flows expire or
the asset is transferred to another party whereby
the entity no longer has any significant continuing
involvement in the risks and benefits associated
with the asset. Financial liabilities are derecognised
when the related obligations are discharged or
cancelled, or have expired. The difference between
the carrying amount of the financial liability, which
is extinguished or transferred to another party, and
the fair value of consideration paid, including the
transfer of non-cash assets or liabilities assumed, is
recognised in profit or loss.
i
Economic Dependence
Central Bayside Community Health Services Limited
is dependent on the Department of Health & Human
Services for the majority of its revenue used to
operate the business. At the date of this report, the
Board of Directors has no reason to believe the
Department will not continue it's support.
N OTE S TO THE FINAN CIAL S TATEMENT S
FO R THE YE AR END ED 30 J U NE 2016
Note 2 : Revenue & Other Income
Revenue from operating activities
Operating grants
Client fees & program income
Recoveries & rebates
Other revenue from operating activities
Other Revenue
Donations
Interest received
Other Income
Profit on disposal of plant and equipment
Capital contribution - Dental program equipment
Total Revenue & Other Income
Note 3 : Cash and Cash Equivalents
Note
Cash on hand
Cash at bank
Cash on deposit
16 & 17
2016
$
2015
$
13,842,637
1,455,002
120,289
333,349
15,751,277
13,399,263
1,539,826
152,350
347,853
15,439,292
3,804
172,762
176,566
1,985
183,038
185,023
68,467
212,500
16,208,810
(17,617)
15,606,698
2016
$
12,811
844,243
2,464,355
3,321,409
2015
$
13,769
441,475
2,128,676
2,583,920
The cash balance at 30 June 2016 includes $286,983 (2015 $325,312) committed to the Southern
Melbourne Primary Care Partnership Alliance.
The Cash at bank interest rate is 1.05%. The Cash on deposit interest rate is 2.95%.
Note 4 : Trade and Other Receivables
Note
2016
$
2015
$
16
61,353
13,167
74,520
104,116
12,888
117,004
2016
$
2015
$
3,796
3,796
Note
2016
$
2015
$
16
3,392,655
3,071,242
CURRENT
Trade Debtors
Sundry Debtors
Note 5 : Trade and Other Receivables
CURRENT
Stock on hand (Café Escape)
Note 6 : Financial Assets
CURRENT
Term Deposits
31
32
N OTE S TO THE FINAN CIAL S TATEMENT S
FO R THE YE AR END ED 30 J U NE 2016
Note 7 : Trade and Other Receivables
2016
$
2015
$
129,227
191,240
320,467
365,857
144,426
510,283
2016
$
2015
$
2,225,000
2,225,000
2,129,540
(165,934)
3,997,007
(1,246,650)
6,938,963
2,062,043
(40,366)
3,997,007
(1,244,450)
6,999,234
Furniture & Equipment - at cost
Less accumulated depreciation
1,603,922
(675,340)
928,582
1,173,185
(514,570)
658,615
Motor Vehicles - at cost
Less accumulated depreciation
1,496,807
(808,899)
687,908
1,726,220
(853,974)
872,246
Leasehold Improvements - at cost
Less accumulated depreciation
917,366
(384,098)
533,268
9,088,721
882,723
(356,090)
526,633
9,056,728
CURRENT
Accrued Grants
Prepayments and Accruals
Note 8 : Property, Plant and Equipment
Land & Buildings - at valuation
Land
At Independent Valuation
Buildings
At Independent Valuation 2 June 2015
Less accumulated depreciation
At Directors Valuation 30 June 2012
Less accumulated depreciation
Total Property, Plant and Equipment
The entity's valuations of land and buildings at Chelsea and Edithvale were adopted on 2 June 2015.
The valuations were performed by independent valuers, Hay Property Group. Valuations were made
on the basis of market value. The valuation resulted in a revaluation increment being recognised in the
Asset Revaluation Reserve. The property at Parkdale is managed under Committee of Management: the
Directors believe the carrying value approximates the fair value.
a Movements in carrying amounts
Movement in the carrying amounts for each class of property, plant and equipment between the
beginning and the end of the current financial year.
2016
Total
$
Furniture &
Equipment
$
658,615
Motor
Vehicles
$
872,246
Leasehold
Improvements
Balance at the beginning of year
Land &
Buildings
$
6,999,234
526,633
9,056,728
Additions
(Disposals)
Revaluation
Depreciation expense
Carrying amount at the end of year
67,497
(127,768)
6,938,963
433,541
(1,183)
69,234
(61,714)
(191,858)
687,908
34,643
(28,008)
533,268
604,915
(62,897)
(510,025)
9,088,721
(162,391)
928,582
$
N OTE S TO THE FINAN CIAL S TATEMENT S
FO R THE YE AR END ED 30 J U NE 2016
Note 9 : Trade and Other Payables
Note
CURRENT
Trade creditors and accruals
Grants in Advance
Funds in trust for Primary Care Partnerships
Funds in trust for Central Bayside Trust Fund
GST and Taxation liabilities
Financial Liabilities at amortised cost classified as Trade and Other Payables
Trade and Other Payables
Less Grants in Advance
Financial liabilities as Trade and Other Payables
16
Note 10 : Provisions
CURRENT
Provision for Annual Leave
2016
$
2015
$
809,602
94,938
286,983
90,549
185,810
1,467,882
687,962
325,312
88,004
191,243
1,292,521
1,467,882
(94,938)
1,372,944
1,292,521
2016
$
2015
$
1,292,521
816,679
839,874
1,306,906
49,102
23,376
2,196,063
1,273,854
40,808
16,247
2,170,783
NON CURRENT
Provision for Long Service Leave
457,609
522,880
Employee Number / EFT at 30 June
228/152
242 / 155
Provision for Long Service Leave
Provision for ADO's
Provision for Time in Lieu
Provision for Long Term Employee Benefits
A provision has been recognised for employee entitlements relating to long service leave. The non-current
portion for this provision includes amounts accrued for long service leave entitlements that have not yet
vested in relation to those employees who have not yet completed the required period of service.
In calculating the present value of future cash flows in respect of long service leave, the probability of long
service leave being taken is based upon historical data. The measurement and recognition criteria relating
to employee benefits have been included in Note 1(d) to these financial statements.
Note 11 : Equity
Retained Surplus
Retained surplus at the beginning of the financial year
Net surplus attributable to the Company
Retained Surplus at the end of the financial year
Asset Revaluation Reserve
Asset Revaluation Reserve at the beginning of the financial year
Revaluation of land and buildings
Asset Revaluation Reserve at the end of the financial year
2016
$
2015
$
9,505,008
9,210,215
723,225
10,228,233
294,793
9,505,008
1,851,781
1,851,781
1,118,144
733,637
1,851,781
Net revaluation of land & buildings based on Hay Property Pty Ltd's independent valuation 2 June 2015
33
34
N OTE S TO THE FINAN CIAL S TATEMENT S
FO R THE YE AR END ED 30 J U NE 2016
Note 12 : Leasing Commitments
a
2016
$
2015
$
Operating Lease Commitments
Being for rent of property
Payable :
not later than 1 year
later than 1 year but not later than 5 years
later than 5 years
36,116
40,413
125,562
130,043
65,963
65,281
227,641
235,737
The Company currently leases property from the City of Kingston and has a lease with a commercial agent
for another property, with rent payable monthly in advance.
Note 13: Contingent Liabilities
There are no known contingencies requiring disclosure in the financial statements.
Note 14: Events Subsequent to Reporting Date
No events have arisen since the end of the financial year which significantly or may significantly affect the
operations of the Company, the results of those operations, or the state of affairs of the Company in future
financial years.
Note 15: Related Parties
Details of the Directors of the Company during the financial year are set out in the Director's Report. All
Directors act in an honorary capacity. No Director received or is entitled to receive any remuneration,
benefit or compensation whether monetary or otherwise, during or since the end of the financial year
relating to the office of Director held by them. No Directors are employed by the Company or have an
interest in any contract or arrangement with the Company.
Note 16: Financial Risk Management
The company’s financial instruments consist mainly of deposits with banks, local money market
instruments, short-term investments, accounts receivable and payable, and leases.
The carrying amounts for each category of financial instruments, measured in accordance with AASB 139
as detailed in the accounting policies to these financial statements, are as follows:
Note
2016
$
2015
$
Financial assets
Cash & cash equivalents
3
3,321,409
2,583,920
Loans & receivables
Term Deposits
4
6
74,520
3,392,655
6,788,584
117,004
3,071,242
5,772,166
Financial liabilities
Financial liabilities at amortised cost:
- Trade and other payables
9
1,372,944
1,372,944
1,292,521
1,292,521
Fair Value
Carrying amount of financial assets and liabilities recorded in the financial statements represents their fair
values, as determined in accordance with the accounting policies disclosed in Note1(h) to the financial
statements
N OTE S TO THE FINAN CIAL S TATEMENT S
FO R THE YE AR END ED 30 J U NE 2016
Note 17: Cash Flow Information
2016
$
2015
$
12,811
13,769
844,243
2,464,355
3,321,409
441,475
2,128,676
2,583,920
723,225
294,793
510,025
(68,467)
502,740
17,617
42,484
189,816
175,361
(63,338)
(106,903)
83,705
25,280
(65,271)
1,532,453
164,667
(3,211)
890,070
Note
a
Reconciliation of Cash
Cash on hand
Cash at bank
Cash on deposit
3
b
Reconciliation of Net Cash provided by Operating
Activities to Result from Ordinary Activities after
Income Tax
Surplus from ordinary activities after income tax
Non-cash flows in result from ordinary activities :
Depreciation
Amortisation
Net loss/(profit) on disposal of plant and equipment
Changes in assets and liabilities :
(Increase)/decrease in receivables
(Increase)/decrease in inventories
(Increase)/decrease in other assets
Increase/(decrease) in creditors, accruals and grants
in advance
Increase/(decrease) in current provisions
Increase/(decrease) in non-current provisions
Net cash provided by operating activities
c
The Company has no credit stand-by or financing facilities in place.
d
There were no non-cash financing or investing activities during the period.
Note 18: Key Management Personnel Compensation
Any person(s) having authority and responsibility for planning, directing and controlling the activities of
the entity, directly or indirectly, including any director (whether executive or otherwise) of that entity is
considered key management personnel.
The totals of remuneration paid to key management personnel (KMP) of the company during the year are
as follows:
Key management personnel compensation
Note 19: Company Details
The registered office and principal place of business of the Company is:
Central Bayside Community Health Services Ltd
335 - 337 Nepean Highway PARKDALE VIC 3195
ABN : 50 362 120 798
ACN : 136 367 505
Telephone : (03) 8587-0200
Email [email protected]
Fax :
Website www.cbchs.org.au
(03) 8587-0210
2016
$
815,284
2015
$
745,484
35
FINAN CIAL S TATEMENT S
36
,
DIREC TORS DECL AR ATION
In accordance with a resolution of the Directors of Central Bayside Community
Health Services Limited, the Directors of the entity declare that:
1
2
The financial statements and notes are in accordance with the
Australian Charities and Not-for-profits Commission Act 2012 and :
a
comply with Australian Accounting Standards - Reduced
Disclosure Requirements; and
b
give a true and fair view of the financial position
of the company as at 30 June 2016 and of its performance
for the year ended on that date.
In the directors‘ opinion, there are reasonable grounds to believe that
the entity will be able to pay its debts as and when they become due
and payable.
Signed in accordance with a resolution of the Board of Directors
Peter Spyker
Chairperson
Dated this 29th day of September 2016
John Tetteroo
Treasurer
FINAN CIAL S TATEMENT S
37
FINAN CIAL S TATEMENT S
38
FINAN CIAL S TATEMENT S
39
40
OVERVIE W OF FU ND IN G SOU RCE S AND M A J O R E XPENS E S
RE V ENU E BY SO U RCE
State Government
13,407,955
82.7%
1,005,910
6.2%
349,104
2.2%
767,177
4.7%
678,663
4.2%
16,208,810
100.0%
Federal Government
Non-Govt Grants
Client Contributions
Business Undertakings &
Fundraising
Note: Volunteer contribution of 14,000 hours valued at $300,000
RE V ENU E BY PRO G R A M ARE A
Primary Health
6,039,277
37.3%
Aged & Disability
5,452,064
33.6%
Dental
3,338,242
20.6%
Primary Care Partnerships
651,099
4.0%
Business Undertakings &
Fundraising
728,128
4.5%
16,208,810
100.0%
12,586,627
81.3%
Program
861,905
5.6%
Vehicles
241,753
1.6%
1,163,273
7.5%
Administration
122,003
0.8%
Depreciation
510,024
3.3%
15,485,585
100%
E XPEND IT URE
Staffing
Occupancy & Office expenses
2017
2016 QUALIT Y OF
C ARE REP ORT
C ALENDAR
Each year CBCHS writes a report on the work it has undertaken to
improve the quality of the services it provides.
This is our eighth report!
WHERE D O I G E T A CO PY ?
Calendars are available in our main reception areas, including Dental,
Adult Community Options and Planned Activity Group sites, or please
call 8587 0200 and we will post out a copy to you.
An electronic copy is available from our website!
JANUARY
2017
01
SUN
NEW YEAR’S DAY
02
MO N
NEW YEAR’S DAY
(DAY IN LIEU)
03
TUES
0 4 WE D
05
CL ARINDA COMMUNIT Y
HE ALTH AND WELLB EIN G
POP UP
EVENT
THUR
0 6 FRI
07
S AT
08 SUN
0 9 MO N
CBCHS partnered with local agencies
to develop an initiative with a focus on
improving health and wellbeing across the
lifespan of people living in Clarinda.
10
TUES
11
WE D
One of the events conducted in April was a
‘Pop Up’ health event, targeting community
members outside a local supermarket. The
main objective of the event was to inform
the community about local health services,
access, and low-cost services available at
CBCHS.
12
THUR
13
FRI
14
S AT
There were many activities on offer to
engage people, such as free dental and
blood pressure checks and a Tai Chi
demonstration.
People were happy to
receive free raffle tickets for prizes and
giveaways such as show bags, baseball caps,
muffins, cook books, gym passes, fruit and
bottled water. Everybody got something
and all were eager to learn something new!
CBCHS health practitioners and other
service providers talked to more than 100
people in three hours. Many people made
appointments with our services including
dental, the women’s health clinic, podiatrists,
physiotherapists and day groups for the
elderly.
The day was very successful with positive
feedback being received from community
members. Most importantly, the community
spirit was fantastic!
15
SUN
16
MO N
17
TUES
18
WE D
19
THUR
20
FRI
21
S AT
22
SUN
23
MO N
24
TUES
25
WE D
26
THUR
27
FRI
28
S AT
29
SUN
30
MO N
31
TUES
Quotes from the community on the day:
“Great Community Spirit!
Would definitely participate
a g a i n .”
“Opportunity to engage with
o t h e r s e r v i c e s .”
“Opportunity to find out
the barriers to accessing
s e r v i c e s .”
“Did not realise CBCHS
provided so many different
s e r v i c e s .”
Gulay Cevik
Community Development Co-ordinator
AUSTRALIA DAY
PUBLIC HOLIDAY
FEBRUARY
2017
01
WE D
02
THUR
03
FRI
0 4 S AT
05
SUN
0 6 MO N
07
TUES
0 8 WE D
09 THUR
CLIENT IN VO LVEMENT IN
STAFF
RECRUITMENT
10
FRI
11
S AT
12
SUN
13
MO N
14
TUES
At Planned Activity Groups (PAG) we value client
involvement in all areas of our service. One particular
area that clients are involved in is staff recruitment.
Peter McLeish is a valued member of the PAG. When we
recruit new staff, Peter is always willing to assist! Peter
has been involved in many PAG groups over his 20 years
of attending our service and so he has an excellent
understanding of what makes a good staff member and
the skills required.
Prior to the interview, the recruitment panel meet and
discuss the questions to be asked. Peter has a strong
focus on safety, especially bus safety and making sure
people who are in wheelchairs are secured correctly in
the bus.
After the interviews, Peter’s comments are very insightful
and are of great assistance when making a decision
about who should be the successful candidate. Many
people who have been interviewed have commented
on Peter’s professionalism in his interviewing role.
We are very lucky to have Peter at PAG, to assist us in
maintaining a high quality service for our clients.
Peter’s thoughts:
15
WE D
16
THUR
17
FRI
18
S AT
19
SUN
20
MO N
21
TUES
22
WE D
23
THUR
24
FRI
25
S AT
26
SUN
27
MO N
28
TUES
“ I f e e l I a m p a r t o f t h e t e a m .”
“I like helping at Central Bayside
a n d m e e t i n g n e w p e o p l e .”
Lynne Worcester
Team Leader
MARCH
2017
ACHIE VEMENT PRO G R A M
FO R E ARLY CHILD H O OD
EDUCATION
& CARE
SERVICES
The Achievement Program is a state-wide
initiative to help improve the health and
wellbeing of Victorian children so that they
can learn better. The program aims to
support early childhood services in creating
healthier environments for children, families
and staff by following a continuous cycle of
planning, action and review.
At CBCHS, the Dietetics team worked
closely with a local preschool by assisting
in the completion of the first phase of
the Achievement Program, by creating a
Health and Wellbeing Team of parents and
staff who successfully identified health
priority areas most relevant to their service.
01
WE D
02
THUR
03
FRI
0 4 S AT
05
SUN
0 6 MO N
07
TUES
0 8 WE D
09 THUR
10
FRI
11
S AT
12
SUN
13
MO N
14
TUES
L ABOUR DAY
PUBLIC HOLIDAY
These included ‘Physical Activity’ and
‘Mental Health & Wellbeing’. By forming
a partnership with CBCHS, the preschool
felt supported and empowered to promote
good health to children, parents and staff.
The preschool will receive a certificate from
the Victorian Government and badge to be
displayed outdoors to acknowledge their
health promotion achievements!
Raquel Baptista
Dietitian
15
WE D
16
THUR
17
FRI
18
S AT
19
SUN
20
MO N
21
TUES
22
WE D
23
THUR
24
FRI
25
S AT
26
SUN
27
MO N
28
TUES
29
WE D
30
THUR
31
FRI
APRIL
2017
01
S AT
02
SUN
03
MO N
04 TUES
05
WE D
06 THUR
07
NE W CENTR ALIS ED
S TERILISATION D EPARTMENT
INFECTION
CONTROL
CBCHS
is
committed
to
the
development and maintenance of
effective infection control and this
year has seen the development of a
Centralised Sterilisation Department.
The Infection Control Committee had
made this recommendation to ensure
that all services across CBCHS are held
FRI
0 8 S AT
09 SUN
10
MO N
11
TUES
12
WE D
13
THUR
14
FRI
GOOD FRIDAY
PUBLIC HOLIDAY
at the same high level of sterilisation,
thus reducing risk to both staff and
clients. The improved process allows
for all instruments to be tracked and
monitored, and reduces the risk of
spreading infection.
This improved procedure ensures
infection control practices across the
organisation are in accordance with
National Standards of Quality and
Safety Guidelines for the Prevention
and Control of infection in Healthcare.
A huge improvement for 2016!
Dianne Willmott
Senior Lead Nurse
15
S AT
16
SUN
17
MO N
18
TUES
19
WE D
20
THUR
21
FRI
22
S AT
23
SUN
24
MO N
25
TUES
26
WE D
27
THUR
28
FRI
29
S AT
30
SUN
EASTER MONDAY
PUBLIC HOLIDAY
ANZAC DAY
PUBLIC HOLIDAY
MAY
2017
01
MO N
02
TUES
03
WE D
04 THUR
05
FRI
0 6 S AT
07
SUN
0 8 MO N
VOLUNTEER WEEK 8TH - 14TH
09 TUES
10
WE D
11
THUR
12
FRI
13
S AT
14
SUN
MOTHER’S DAY
15
MO N
16
TUES
17
WE D
18
THUR
19
FRI
20
S AT
21
SUN
22
MO N
23
TUES
24
WE D
25
THUR
The glimmer of a smile, sounds of laughter and the direct eye contact made by our
clients as they interact with their wonderful four-legged friends is a joy to see!
26
FRI
Michelle Wharton
Senior Client Support Professional
27
S AT
28
SUN
29
MO N
30
TUES
31
WE D
AD U LT COMMU NIT Y
OP TIONS
DOGS
FOR LIFE
Dogs for Life is an organisation that provides assistance dogs, which are trained to
support individuals with Autism, Epilepsy, Alzheimer’s, the aged and people suffering
Post-Traumatic Stress.
Adult Community Options has been in partnership with Dogs for Life for two years.
Small group sessions, tailored to each individual, are run weekly at our Clayton
venue. Sessions focus on fine motor skills, simulating a multitude of senses, hand/eye
development, strengthening communication and reducing anxiety.
The enthusiasm and passion Yariv and Etai, from Dogs for Life, bring to our clients,
coupled with the non-judgemental temperament of the “four-legged teachers” is
priceless. Each week our staff comment on the obvious increased self-awareness,
worth, confidence and pride shown by our clients as they work alongside these
wonderful assistance dogs.
JUNE
2017
01
THUR
02
FRI
03
S AT
04 SUN
05
MO N
WORLD
ENVIRONMENT DAY
06 TUES
07
WE D
08 THUR
0 9 FRI
10
S AT
11
SUN
12
MO N
13
TUES
14
WE D
QUEEN’S BIRTHDAY
PUBLIC HOLIDAY
DENTAL
G O E S D I G ITAL
2016 has seen a major change in the Dental
Clinic with an important equipment upgrade.
We now have digital X-rays available in all
eight surgeries, which require a very low
dose of radiation, about one tenth of what
was previously required for manual X-ray
films. What a difference for our clients! The
impact on staff has been a vast improvement
to their occupational health and safety.
Staff no longer have to handle chemicals.
The environmental outcome is a great
achievement, as there is no longer any films,
lead or chemical waste and reception has
also been able to go paper free!
Dianne Willmott
Senior Lead Nurse
15
THUR
16
FRI
17
S AT
18
SUN
19
MO N
20
TUES
21
WE D
22
THUR
23
FRI
24
S AT
25
SUN
26
MO N
27
TUES
28
WE D
29
THUR
30
FRI
I was treated with
respect and courtesy
by staff?
JULY
97. 8% S TRO N G LY
AG REE
2017
I received enough
information during my
care about my condition
and treatment?
95 .6% S TRO N G LY AG REE
01
S AT
02
SUN
03
MO N
04 TUES
On arrival at this
service, was the
reception staff
friendly and helpful?
10 0% YE S
05
I found the service
easy to locate:
10 0% S TRO N G LY
AG REED
WE D
06 THUR
07
FRI
0 8 S AT
I was confident in the
ability of the staff
that attended to me?
96 . 2% S TRO N G LY AG REE
Were you/your carer
involved as much as you
wanted in the decisions
about your care?
97. 8% ALWAYS
09 SUN
10
MO N
11
TUES
12
WE D
13
THUR
14
FRI
15
S AT
16
SUN
17
MO N
18
TUES
19
WE D
Primary Health and Dental regularly collect
information from our clients on how we
are doing. Our ultimate aim is to make our
systems safer and provide our clients and
their families with a better experience. One
method initiated this year is the use of a
Patient Experience Tracker. This is a mobile
tablet device, which presents clients with five
short questions regarding their experience
of our services. Clients are asked to use the
device at the completion of their treatment
or therapy. The feedback is anonymous and
regular reports are sent to us by an external
agency.
20
THUR
21
FRI
22
S AT
23
SUN
24
MO N
25
TUES
We would like to thank all clients who have
provided feedback about our services!
26
WE D
Dianne Willmott
Senior Lead Nurse
27
THUR
Sue Moulton
Co-ordinator Health Promotion and Quality
28
FRI
29
S AT
30
SUN
31
MO N
CLIENT
It was easy to
contact us:
75% AG REED
I found the
process of
making an
appointment to
b e : 75% G O O D
FEEDBACK
AUGUST
2017
01
TUES
02
WE D
03
THUR
0 4 FRI
05
S AT
06 SUN
07
MO N
08 TUES
0 9 WE D
A B E T TER CHRO NIC D IS E A S E
M ANAG EMENT
MODEL
OF CARE
10
THUR
11
FRI
12
S AT
13
SUN
14
MO N
Effective co-ordination of primary care beyond treatment and prevention
interventions to a comprehensive chronic disease program has been a
central focus of CBCHS. One of the initiatives undertaken is our partnership
with the Primary Care Partnership and consumers which has established a
co-design process to look at current models of integrated person-centred
care and chronic disease models, systems and services.
15
TUES
16
WE D
17
THUR
Through a series of workshops, clinicians, managers and Primary Care
Partnership representatives worked together with consumers to further
build and develop our chronic disease model of care.
18
FRI
19
S AT
20
SUN
Key features:
• Better assistance for clients and carers to navigate the health system.
21
MO N
• Full comprehensive assessment on entering the service to determine
22
TUES
23
WE D
24
THUR
25
FRI
26
S AT
27
SUN
28
MO N
29
TUES
30
WE D
31
THUR
The valuable input of consumers has ensured we have further developed
our model to meet the needs of our community and deliver an integrated,
client and carer-focused whole person approach.
health needs that link clients into the right types of care.
• For clients needing a higher level of care, a designated clinician will
provide ongoing support, ensuring continuity of care.
• Care plans that document client goals.
• Timely access to a range of services at the same appointment which will
improve coordination of care and be more convenient for consumers.
Designated time for clinicians to develop integrated client case planning,
monitoring and review.
The model will be presented at the upcoming Australian Disease
Management Association Conference so that others can learn from our
experience.
Rosemary McGrann
Service Support Co-ordinator
SEPTEMBER
2017
01
FRI
02
S AT
03
SUN
0 4 MO N
05
TUES
0 6 WE D
07
THUR
0 8 FRI
0 9 S AT
10
SUN
11
MO N
12
TUES
13
WE D
14
THUR
FATHER’S DAY
S ELF-M ANAG EMENT AND
RECOV ERY TR AININ G
SMART
SMART Recovery is a free group program
assisting people with problematic behaviours,
including addiction to drugs, alcohol,
cigarettes, gambling, food, shopping, the
Internet and others.
Currently, SMART
Recovery runs from the CBCHS Parkdale site
every Wednesday and slowly but surely the
group foundation is forming. The two trained
facilitators have been pleased to assist group
members to help themselves and help each
other using a variety of cognitive behaviour
therapies (CBT) and motivational tools and
techniques. No referral is required. The
group is open to adults with substance use
issues of any kind.
For more information, call us on 8587 0200
or go to the following website:
www.smartrecoveryaustralia.com.au
Jane Fisicaro
Psychologist
15
FRI
16
S AT
17
SUN
18
MO N
19
TUES
20
WE D
21
THUR
22
FRI
23
S AT
24
SUN
25
MO N
26
TUES
27
WE D
28
THUR
29
FRI
30
S AT
WORLD
ALZHEIMER’S DAY
GRAND FINAL
PUBLIC HOLIDAY
OCTOBER
2017
THE CHILD D E VELOPMENT
S ERVICE (CDS)
FAMILY PLAY
& SCREENING
SESSIONS
Children and their families are seen within
the CDS, which is an interdisciplinary team.
The team consists of Speech Pathologists,
Occupational Therapists, Physiotherapists,
Psychologists, an Allied Health Assistant and
consulting Paediatricians and Dieticians.
Being an interdisciplinary team for a number
of years, the CDS had a number of team
processes already in place that were working
well. For example, joint assessments and
therapy groups, case discussion and regular
meetings.
We researched current best practice
guidelines in child development, evaluated
our service as it stood and identified
elements for improvement.
01
SUN
02
MO N
03
TUES
0 4 WE D
05
THUR
0 6 FRI
07
S AT
08 SUN
0 9 MO N
10
TUES
11
WE D
12
THUR
13
FRI
14
S AT
INTERNATIONAL DAY
OF OLDER PERSONS
Analysis of this information indicated we
could strengthen the team-based approach
at the initial contact with families around
assessment, intervention planning and
implementation.
15
SUN
16
MO N
17
TUES
18
WE D
19
THUR
20
FRI
21
S AT
22
SUN
23
MO N
24
TUES
25
WE D
We have completed five screening sessions
to date. Client feedback has been positive!
26
THUR
Marie-Clare Dunlop
Speech Pathologist
27
FRI
28
S AT
29
SUN
30
MO N
31
TUES
We wanted to achieve:
• Timely service delivery, a streamlined
service, increased information sharing
and collaboration between CDS team
members
• A greater understanding of shared
assessment and care planning
• Family-centred practice – to reduce
stress on families, and provide
information and services in a flexible way
• Quality evidence-based service.
So we introduced the Family Play and
Screening Session, which involved:
• A multi-disciplinary team approach for
children with known complexities
• Children and their families undergoing
a screening and care planning process
based on family-centred practice, using
a strengths-based approach
• Case discussion and care planning as
part of the team approach.
NOVEMBER
2017
01
WE D
02
THUR
03
FRI
0 4 S AT
05
SUN
0 6 MO N
07
TUES
MELBOURNE
CUP DAY
0 8 WE D
09 THUR
10
FRI
11
S AT
12
SUN
13
MO N
14
TUES
LIVIN G WITH
DIABETES
D E SMOND: D IAB E TE S ED U C ATIO N
AND S ELF-M ANAG EMENT FOR
O N G O IN G AND NE WLY D IAG N OS ED
WORLD DIABETES DAY
A new award-winning Diabetes ‘DESMOND’ group
program has been launched this year at CBCHS
for people with Type 2 Diabetes.
The program puts our clients in the driver’s seat!
The program is designed to motivate and support
people living with Type 2 Diabetes. As well as
getting up-to-date information, people learn
practical skills for managing diabetes. Our clients
discuss and learn about food choices, physical
activity and medication interactions.
The program is built around group activities, but
there are opportunities for individuals with the
need, to speak to a Diabetes Educator on their
own.
One of our Diabetes Educators described the new
DESMOND program as a “light bulb” moment,
when she realised that by changing from
traditional education sessions to the DESMOND
program, clients get to work together and teach
each other about their challenges with diabetes
and share how they overcame them. Participants
described how powerful it was learning from one
another and are going to keep in touch by joining
an exercise group at CBCHS.
Debra Starr
Integrated Services & Planning Manager
15
WE D
16
THUR
17
FRI
18
S AT
19
SUN
20
MO N
21
TUES
22
WE D
23
THUR
24
FRI
25
S AT
26
SUN
27
MO N
28
TUES
29
WE D
30
THUR
DECEMBER
2017
01
FRI
02
S AT
03
SUN
0 4 MO N
05
TUES
0 6 WE D
YOGA
FO R PEO PLE WITH A
DISABILIT Y
07
THUR
0 8 FRI
0 9 S AT
With an attitude of fun, trust and patience,
our Adult Community Options’ clients
embark on weekly Yoga classes, run by Katie
Fox.
10
SUN
11
MO N
Katie commences each session by inviting
clients to participate as she plays calm,
relaxing music. With her reassuring voice,
she encourages each person to find a safe,
quiet space on a floor mat or chair, wherever
they feel comfortable. As each session
begins a silence and calmness overcomes
12
TUES
13
WE D
14
THUR
WORLD AIDS DAY
INTERNATIONAL DAY OF
PERSONS WITH A DISABILIT Y
the group as the soft music filters into the
air. Katie reassures each client, to help focus
on breathing and meditation.
15
FRI
16
S AT
17
SUN
18
MO N
19
TUES
20
WE D
21
THUR
22
FRI
23
S AT
“Thank you. I appreciate it
so…relaxing!” Pauline
24
SUN
“I did it!” Olga
(when tr ying a new move)
25
MO N
CHRISTMAS DAY
PUBLIC HOLIDAY
26
TUES
BOXING DAY
PUBLIC HOLIDAY
27
WE D
28
THUR
29
FRI
30
S AT
31
SUN
With a range of individual needs, staff
support clients to participate at a level they
feel most comfortable. Some clients find it
initially confronting to lay on the floor, but as
their confidence grows they are more able
and relaxed to try new positions.
The Yoga classes help to increase flexibility,
muscle tone and strength, improve posture,
breathing and general fitness. It is lovely
to see a boost in body awareness and
confidence, trusting that their bodies can do
more than they ever thought and emptying
their minds from ever-present thoughts.
It’s wonderful to see clients and staff unite in a
calm and gentle activity where all are equally
respected and valued in an atmosphere of
trust and serenity.
Julie Dunn
Team Leader
Julie Torcasio
Program Manager
NEW YEAR’S EVE
Success rate of
Adult Fillings
91.5%
Denture
success rate
9 7. 8 %
Success rate of
Fillings in children
96.5%
DENTAL
JANUARY
Number of
Patients
seen in
2015-2016
7, 5 5 4
2018
01
MO N
02
TUES
03
WE D
04 THUR
Success rate of
Extractions with
no complications
98%
05
FRI
0 6 S AT
07
SUN
0 8 MO N
CLINIC AL IND IC ATORS
09 TUES
Dental Health Services Victoria audits
clinical outcomes for all Community
Dental Clinics across Victoria. Quality
Clinical Indicators are widely used in
the health sector as an evidence-based
method of measuring dental outcomes
compared to the region and State
average. The indicators are also useful
for quality improvement. The Australian
Council on Healthcare Standards (ACHS)
regularly reviews the indicators in oral
health so that they accurately represent
the current health care environment.
Emergency
Patients
offered care
within 24 hr
96.7%
10
WE D
11
THUR
12
FRI
13
S AT
14
SUN
NEW YEAR’S DAY
PUBLIC HOLIDAY
The small percentage of failures is often
due the patient’s own personal or medical
condition, not clinician treatment.
•
Time Out Procedure
•
Treatment details Recorded
The data below shows CBCHS’s dental
recordkeeping compared to the region
and State average for 2015. The following
areas were rated greater than 90% and
achieved results higher than the region
and State averages:
•
Drugs administered – name,
concentration dose, anatomical site
•
Legible, accurate and concise
documentation (including
corrections)
•
Patient Charter & Privacy of Health
Information Brochure Provided
•
Date and legible clinician’s name and
signature
•
Patient Identification Confirmed
•
Standard abbreviations
•
Signed and Updated Medical History
•
Chronological order
•
Drug Allergies Recorded
•
Objective comments
•
Presenting Complaint
•
Referral documentation
•
Complete Charting
•
Instrument Tracking
•
Diagnostic Tests & Investigations
•
Clinician working within defined
scope of clinical practice
•
Diagnosis & Treatment Planning
•
Informed consent
•
Clinician following best practice
clinical guidelines
Dr. Priya Gopalakrishnan
Clinical Coordinator
15
MO N
16
TUES
17
WE D
18
THUR
19
FRI
20
S AT
21
SUN
22
MO N
23
TUES
24
WE D
25
THUR
26
FRI
27
S AT
28
SUN
29
MO N
30
TUES
31
WE D
AUSTRALIA DAY
PUBLIC HOLIDAY