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$2.00 DESIGNATED AREAS HIGHER
© 2016 WSCE
latimes.com
WEDNESDAY, JULY 20, 2016
California
Obamacare
rates to jump
Premiums are set to go
up an average of 13.2%
next year. Rising
medical costs are one
reason, officials say.
By Melody Petersen
and Noam N. Levey
Photographs by
Brian van der Brug Los Angeles Times
BELMONT HIGH School Principal Kristen McGregor greets student Gaspar Marcos after school. The
orphan is among those at the school who made their way to the U.S. from Central America without parents.
L.A. school is a haven
for teens after long treks
Nearly 1 in 4 at Belmont High are from Central America
By Cindy Carcamo
Gaspar Marcos stepped
off the 720 bus into earlymorning darkness in MacArthur Park after the end of
an eight-hour shift of scrubbing dishes in a Westwood
restaurant.
He walked toward his
apartment, past laundromats fortified with iron bars
and scrawled with graffiti,
closed stores that sold
knockoffs and a cook
staffing a taco cart in eerie
desolation. Around 3 a.m.,
he collapsed into a twin bed
in a room he rents from a
family.
Five hours later, he slid
into his desk at Belmont
High School, just before the
bell rang. The 18-year-old
A TIRED Marcos wipes an eye in history class. He
and several others at the school work full shifts at
night, then get little sleep before going to classes.
Studios applaud
new crop of fan
films — to a point
By Josh Rottenberg
In early April, two longtime friends, Jeffrey Henderson and Nick Finch, went
out to the sand dunes of
Glamis, Calif. — a barren
landscape
that,
three
decades ago, stood in for the
desert planet Tatooine in
“Return of the Jedi” — to
shoot a “Star Wars” fan film
called “The Sable Corsair.”
With a crowd-funded
budget of less than $10,000
for the short film — about a
group of smugglers who
crash-land on a desert planet while on the run from the
Empire — creature comforts
for the cast and crew of
roughly 60 people were few.
A day and a half out of the
three-day shoot were lost to
transportation snafus and a
sandstorm.
But, as in every good
“Star Wars” story, the heroes
persevered. Finch and Henderson entered “The Sable
sophomore rubbed his eyes
and fixed his gaze on an algebra equation.
Minutes ticked by, and
others straggled into the
class, nine in all. Like Marcos, most had worked a full
shift the night before —
sewing clothes, cooking
in restaurants, painting
homes.
Most were immigrants
from Central America, part
of several waves of more
than 100,000 who arrived as
children in the U.S. in the
past five years without parents, often after perilous
journeys.
Many ended up in classrooms throughout the country. In Los Angeles’ Belmont
High, nearly 1 in 4 of the
school’s estimated 1,000 stu[See Belmont, A9]
Premiums for Californians’ Obamacare health coverage will rise an average of
13.2% next year — more than
three times the increase of
the last two years and a jump
that is bound to stir debate
in an election year.
The big increases come
after two years in which California officials had boasted
that the program helped insure hundreds of thousands
people in the state while
keeping costs moderately in
check.
Premiums in the insurance program called Covered California rose just 4%
in 2016 after rising 4.2% in
2015 — the first year that exchange officials negotiated
with insurers. The program
insures 1.4 million Californians.
On Tuesday, officials
blamed next year’s premium
hikes in the program on rising costs of medical care, including expensive specialty
drugs and the end of a mechanism that held down rates
for the first three years of
Obamacare.
Two of the state’s biggest
insurers — Blue Shield of
California and Anthem Inc.
— asked for the biggest
hikes. Blue Shield’s premiums will jump an average of
more than 19%, according to
officials, and Anthem’s rates
will rise more than 16%.
For consumers, the effect
will depend on whether they
get
taxpayer-supported
subsidies for their premiums and whether they are
willing to switch to less-ex-
REPUBLICAN NATIONAL CONVENTION
Comic-Con gets
into launch mode
The annual pop culture
event is all set to make a
splash in San Diego with
film premieres and much
more. CALENDAR, E1
Brian van der Brug Los Angeles Times
Corsair” into Lucasfilm’s official Star Wars fan film contest, and on Sunday they
were awarded the Audience
Choice prize at the Star
Wars Celebration convention in London.
For years, studios have
generally tolerated and even
encouraged short fan films
like “The Sable Corsair” as
long as they don’t attempt to
capitalize financially on
copyrighted material.
Recently, however, with
the advent of crowd funding
and the spread of inexpensive tools to create digital effects, fan films have grown in
[See Fan films, A8]
Kirk McKoy Los Angeles Times
JEFFREY HENDERSON , left, and Nick Finch ful-
fill a childhood fantasy as co-directors of “The Sable
Corsair,” an award-winning “Star Wars” fan film.
A SIDE-BY-SIDE COMPARISON left little doubt that one passage of Melania
Trump’s speech had been largely copied from one Michelle Obama gave in 2008.
How one speech ate up
a whole day for Trump
By David Lauter
CLEVELAND — The allegation that a chunk of
Melania Trump’s Republican convention speech had
been lifted from Michelle
Obama — a charge that
overshadowed much of Day
2 of the GOP event here — almost certainly won’t change
anyone’s vote.
That doesn’t mean it
won’t affect the Trump campaign.
The problem for Donald
Trump and his allies is lost
opportunity. The whole purpose of a modern political
convention is to serve as a
96-hour-long advertisement
for the nominee and party.
The aim is to spend every
minute of those hours
pounding home a few basic
messages.
Even in the best of times,
Trump has little patience
LATIMES.COM
CONVENTION
COVERAGE
8 Go inside (and outside)
the GOP convention with
Times journalists for live
coverage and analysis at
latimes.com/trailguide
8Watch the GOP convention gavel-to-gavel at
latimes.com/conventions
with that sort of discipline.
To be sure, his seemingly
freewheeling,
unconstrained style forms a big
part of Trump’s appeal to his
core constituency. But even
Trump’s allies agree that his
most faithful supporters,
who have proved willing to
stick with him through any
controversy,
are
not
numerous enough to win the
general election.
At the convention, “he
has to convince some of the
doubters” that he “can deliver”
on
his
promises,
Kellyanne Conway, a senior
advisor to the campaign,
told reporters Tuesday.
That effort to reach out to
the uncommitted is where
the apparent plagiarism
interferes. The issue is not
that voters necessarily care
about whether Melania
Trump, or more likely someone working for her, lifted
[See Speech, A5]
pensive plans that may
come with higher co-pays
and deductibles. Changing
plans could also mean a new
network
of
physicians,
which could be disruptive to
care for those with chronic
conditions.
The rates vary significantly by region and insurer.
Los Angeles and the rest of
southwest Los Angeles
County will see an average
increase of almost 14%.
Blue Shield’s preferred
provider organization rate
in Los Angeles, chosen by
21% of those using the exchange, is increasing by an
average of 19.5%. For a 40year-old single person making $17,820 to $23,760, choosing a silver level plan, the
monthly rate currently is
[See Obamacare, A12]
AILES
APPEARS
CLOSE TO
LEAVING
FOX NEWS
By Stephen Battaglio
NEW YORK — While the
stars of Fox News Channel
were covering the Republican National Convention in
Cleveland, their pugnacious
leader Roger Ailes was discussing his departure in
what would be a shocking
exit following recent allegations of sexual harassment
by a former anchor.
Ailes, 76, who turned Fox
into the most influential
force in the news media over
the last two decades, has
been uncomfortably thrust
into the spotlight since former anchor Gretchen Carlson alleged that her contract
was not renewed after she
spurned sexual advances by
Ailes.
Ailes has denied the Carlson allegations, which Fox is
investigating. But one person close to Fox News said
it’s a matter of time before
Ailes leaves.
His attorney, Susan Estrich, and a spokesperson
for 21st Century Fox said
Ailes was still a Fox News
employee as of late Tuesday.
“We don’t have a deal,”
Estrich said. “The review is
ongoing. There have been no
decisions reached and no
deal. I don’t know what the
internal review has turned
up.”
Since the allegations by
Carlson became public, reports have emerged of sev[See Ailes, A7]
Nancy R. Schiff Getty Images
‘Happy Days’
creator dies
Garry Marshall, 81,
was a prolific writer,
producer, director and
actor whose career
included iconic 1970s
TV sitcoms and hit
movies. OBITUARY, B3
Weather
Mostly sunny, warm.
L.A. Basin: 89/65. B8
A2
W E D N ES DAY, J U LY 2 0 , 2 016
L AT I ME S . CO M
BACK STORY
UNCONVENTIONAL
COVERAGE
OVERAGE
Crumbling beneath our feet
Why it’s time to invest in infrastructure, and why we probably won’t
By Don Lee
Live from
the 2016
Republican
Convention
Each day of the convention, our
team brings you gavel-to-gavel
coverage inside and outside of the
arena, including live video and
expert analysis at latimes.com/
TrailGuide.
And join Los Angeles Times
journalists at a free watch party
July 21 in downtown L.A. RSVP
at latimes.com/ConventionParty.
WASHINGTON — Broken water mains, creaking
subway systems, tens of
thousands of rickety bridges
and countless miles of
shoddy,
traffic-clogged
roads.
America’s infrastructure
is crumbling. Never has
there been a better time to
bolster public investments
and shore up one of the nation’s biggest competitive
weaknesses, say many advocates for stepped-up spending. Yet the golden opportunity may soon pass. Here’s
why:
What’s so great about the
timing right now?
You can’t borrow money
for much cheaper. Longterm interest rates remain
near record lows; yields on
10-year Treasury bonds,
which dipped further after
Britain’s vote to leave the
European Union, hover
around 1.5%. With inflation
running just a tad below,
that means it’s almost like
free money for Uncle Sam.
Construction materials
also are near cyclical lows,
thanks to the bottom falling
out of the commodities
market. But such favorable
conditions for ramping up
projects won’t last forever.
Construction labor is already getting harder to find.
Industry unemployment is
down to 4.6%, from nearly
10% just three years ago.
Before it’s too late, “we
should be creating the infrastructure bank and moving
aggressively to fund it,” says
Rep. John Garamendi (DWalnut Grove), a member of
the House Transportation
and Infrastructure Committee.
How bad is the infrastructure problem?
Globally, America
ranked 11th this year in
infrastructure quality, below most of its peer group of
major developed nations,
according to the World
Economic Forum.
But here’s a more sobering statistic: Across the
nation, a whopping 142,915
bridges — or about 1 in every
4 — were classified “deficient” in 2015 by the Department of Transportation.
One of them was the halfcentury-old Tex Wash
Bridge on I-10 in Southern
California’s desert. It crumpled last summer after
heavy rains, costing millions
in repairs and closing a
main artery from California
to Arizona for five days.
It wasn’t always so bad.
In the mid-1960s, federal,
state and local government
spending for structures,
including roads and bridges,
represented more than 4.5%
of the nation’s gross
domestic product, or total
economic output. That’s
latimes.com/politics
Don Bartletti Los Angeles Times
ACROSS the nation, a whopping 142,915 bridges were classified “deficient” in 2015.
One was the Tex Wash Bridge on I-10, which crumpled in flooding last summer.
since declined to a meager
1.5% in recent years.
Why did federal infrastructure spending slow down so
much?
The main problem is that
federal funding for transportation has come from a
fuel tax of 18.4 cents per
gallon. That hasn’t changed
since 1993, meaning it hasn’t
kept up with inflation, the
increasing population and
amount of infrastructure, or
the rising costs to maintain
the roads, airports, rail,
airports and the like.
What’s more, as autos
have become more fuelefficient, spending for gas
simply hasn’t grown in
proportion to the miles
driven by motorists. That
means more use — or damage to roads — but not more
money to maintain or upgrade them.
So how much money are we
talking about to catch up?
By Moody’s Analytics’
estimates, all levels of government would need to
spend an extra $865 billion
total over 10 years for infrastructure to bring investments back to historical
averages, at least as far as
spending per GDP.
But because of years of
lagging investments, much
more than that would be
needed annually to catch
up. The Federal Highway
Administration figures it
would take $124 billion to
$146 billion a year in capital
investments in roads to see
“noticeably improving
roadway conditions and
performance.”
What would be the impact
to the economy?
If spending returned to
historical norms, it would
add as much as $1.5 trillion
to GDP over 10 years, says
Moody’s, which based its
projections on a multiplier
of 1.78. And that would support as many as 12 million
additional jobs.
Douglas Holtz-Eakin,
president of the right-leaning American Action Forum, thinks that’s way too
high; the right multiplier
might be half that, or even
less depending on the
broader economic conditions. He’s also skeptical
that public infrastructure
spending will generate as
much productivity gains as
economists have projected.
Fixing potholes may get you
to the office quicker, he says,
but that doesn’t mean you’ll
be any more productive at
work.
If the timing is right and it
would help the economy,
why doesn’t the government act?
In two words: tea party.
It’s no secret that this wing
of congressional Republicans has had an outsized
influence on the GOP leadership, with its mantra of
reducing government
spending and lowering
taxes.
But neither did the
Obama administration
really “put the muscle”
behind its budget request
for more infrastructure
spending, said Garamendi.
The White House last year
proposed spending $485
billion for highways, bridges
and rail over five years, but
ended up getting only $305
billion.
Even though Republican
presidential nominee Donald Trump and his presumed opponent, Hillary
Clinton, have spoken of the
need to address failing
infrastructure, political
deadlock and disagreement
over where to get the money
is likely to block progress for
the foreseeable future.
Sooner or later, though,
most everyone agrees that
Congress will have to come
up with a new funding
source to replace the existing gas tax, especially in an
ever more fuel-efficient and
less carbon-dependent
economy.
Can’t states and cities pick
up the slack?
To some degree, they
already have. A growing
number of states have
raised fuel taxes of their own
to support infrastructure
projects. Counties like Los
Angeles have boosted sales
taxes, and municipalities
including Chicago have
raised infrastructure bond
issues.
But after the Great
Recession, state and local
governments remain cautious about debt financing.
One drawback of raising
sales taxes to fund infrastructure is that such taxes
are inherently unpredictable as a revenue
source, because they
fluctuate with the vicissitudes of the economy, says
Asha Agrawal, a transportation economics expert
at San Jose State University.
Smaller rural areas have
little capacity to raise
enough money, she says.
The upshot is that all these
still would not be enough to
make up for the shortfall in
federal spending.
Could private-public partnerships be the solution?
Private investors, including foreign firms, are beginning to get into the game.
Georgia, for example, this
year signed a $679-million
deal to redevelop a major
highway interchange in
metro Atlanta with the
Spanish multinational firm
Ferrovial Agroman.
Ferrovial is fronting the
investment money for Georgia and will build the interchange in exchange for
guaranteed payments over
a long period of time, says
Wassim Selman, infrastructure president of the North
American operations of
Dutch-based Arcadis, a
consultant on the project.
Still, the private-sector
involvement in U.S. infrastructure remains tiny and
isn’t likely to grow big any
time soon. A big factor is
that government agencies
remain circumspect about
letting private firms manage
or operate public roads and
structures, says Selman.
Unlike in Europe, there’s
not much trust between
government and the private
sector in the U.S., he says.
“Culturally, we’re not there
yet.”
[email protected]
16COM015
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L AT I ME S . CO M
W E D NE S DAY, J U LY 2 0 , 2 016
A3
THE WORLD
Train assailant vowed revenge
Knife-and-ax attack in
Germany by Afghan
refugee adds to debate
over risks posed by
influx of migrants.
By Laura King
and Nabih Bulos
A teenage Afghan refugee
who terrorized passengers
aboard a suburban commuter train in a knife-and-ax
rampage left behind a note
vowing revenge against “infidels,” German investigators
said Tuesday after the latest
attack on European soil
claimed by Islamic State.
The assault, carried out
by a 17-year-old baker’s apprentice who had arrived in
Germany little more than a
year ago, came amid growing debate over the security
repercussions of an unprecedented influx of migrants
and refugees, many from
war-ravaged Syria.
Even as civil libertarians
and rights activists cautioned against unfairly tarring those fleeing war and
persecution in their homelands, right-wing politicians
across the continent have
seized on such attacks as
proof that it is impossible to
safely assimilate so many
newcomers.
A video disseminated by
the Islamic State-affiliated
Amaq News Agency pur-
Karl-Josef Hildenbrand European Pressphoto Agency
Amaq News Agency
GERMAN police stand guard after an attack on a train near Wuerzburg. Islamic
OFFICIALS referred to the slain attacker as “R.A.,”
ported to show the young assailant before the attack
Monday night aboard a regional train outside the normally placid Bavarian city of
Wuerzburg. In it, he boasted
that he was a “soldier of the
caliphate.”
German officials were
working
to
determine
whether the youth with pimples and a scraggly beard in
the video was in fact the attacker, who apparently concealed his weapons in a bag
before bursting from a restroom on the train and hack-
that attack, and French officials said even in the absence of any direct link to the
group, signs pointed to a
swift radicalization on the
part of the assailant, Mohamed Lahouaiej Bouhlel.
He was described by neighbors as a drinker and womanizer who had not followed
the harsh religious tenets espoused by Islamic State.
The attack in Nice, which
spurred intense criticism of
French President Francois
Hollande and the French security establishment, also
State claimed responsibility; the assailant said he was a “soldier of the caliphate.”
ing away at those around
him.
Police shot him dead
when he confronted them as
he tried to flee the scene after the train came to an
emergency halt.
Citing privacy issues,
German authorities did not
identify the five wounded by
name, but officials in Hong
Kong said that they included four members of the
same family, and that two
were in grave condition.
Authorities did not identify the assailant by his full
name because he was a minor, instead referring to him
using only the initials “R.A.,”
but the video introduced
him as Muhammad Riyad.
The attack rattled nerves
across Europe, coming only
four days after a Tunisianborn deliveryman barreled a
19-ton truck through crowds
celebrating Bastille Day in
the French Riviera resort
city of Nice, killing at least 84
people and injuring more
than 200 others.
Islamic
State
also
claimed responsibility for
but a video introduced him as Muhammad Riyad.
Strains on an uneasy alliance
U.S. assures Turkey of
support for its elected
government and
decries reports of
backing for uprising.
By Roy Gutman
and Tracy Wilkinson
ISTANBUL, Turkey —
With tensions on the boil
over Turkey’s demand for
the handover of a Muslim
cleric it blames for last weekend’s attempted military
coup, President Obama
telephoned the Turkish
president Tuesday and assured him the U.S. does not
support terrorists but will
follow a lawful process before considering extradition.
Obama’s phone call to
Turkish
leader
Recep
Tayyip Erdogan was the first
since the failed coup Friday
by elements of the Turkish
military, and his forceful
words appeared to be a direct response to Erdogan’s
demand Monday that “the
United States has to extradite” his political nemesis
and onetime ally, Fethullah
Gulen.
The two leaders spoke after the Turkish government
announced a vast expansion
of its purge, which grew to
50,000 military, police, teachers and civil servants — a
fast-moving process that
drew an implicit rebuke from
Obama.
“It’s in times like this that
it’s particularly important
for the Turkish government
and the Turkish people to
adhere to the principles of
democracy they have been
fighting for and that they’re
justifiably proud of,” White
House Press Secretary Josh
Earnest said, referring to
Obama’s words.
Turkish officials said Erdogan replied that Turks,
who turned out by the thousands to block the coup plot,
had shown “great support
for democracy.” He added
that proceedings against
those responsible will be in
line with justice and the rule
of law — something few in
the country expect under
Turkey’s politicized system
of justice.
Turning to the extradition demand, Obama made
some other things clear,
Earnest said.
“The first is that the
United States doesn’t support terrorists, the United
States doesn’t support
individuals who conspired
to overthrow democratically
elected governments. The
United States follows the
Aris Messinis AFP/Getty Images
SUPPORTERS of Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan rally in Istanbul. The government says thousands
of people have been suspended from their jobs, including 15,200 employees of the Education Ministry.
‘Such speculation
is harmful to the
decades-long
friendship
between two
great nations.’
— U.S. Ambassador
John Bass,
on reports that U.S. supported
coup attempt in Turkey
rule of law,” he said. The U.S.
will follow the extradition
process agreed to by treaty
that would also provide due
process for Gulen, Earnest
said.
Obama spoke one day after Erdogan called Gulen a
terrorist and a criminal and
questioned how the U.S.
could keep him in the face of
an urgent demand from its
NATO ally.
Erdogan’s spokesman,
Ibrahim Kalin, told reporters Monday that the paperwork for an extradition request was being prepared.
Mevlut Cavusoglu, the
Turkish foreign minister,
had announced he was
traveling to Washington on
Tuesday but canceled his
plans on short notice to at-
tend a meeting of the Turkish National Security Council on Wednesday.
Obama’s call came two
days after Russian President Vladimir Putin contacted Erdogan, a delay that
bore testimony to the
strained relationship. It
seems unlikely to settle the
dispute, which has taken on
a far more bitter tone in the
days since the Turkish military put down the revolt Saturday.
Warning signs that it
could turn into a full-blown
rift appeared in the pro-government media Monday in
the form of accusations that
the U.S. played a passive
role, even as the rebels were
shutting down airports,
bridges and government offices in Ankara and Istanbul
and attempting to seize top
government officials.
Sabah, a leading pro-government daily, claimed in an
editorial that Secretary of
State John F. Kerry had
failed in the middle of the
coup to say the U.S. stood in
solidarity with Turkey and
urge the military to return to
the barracks.
But the White House and
Kerry both issued strong
statements during the uprising supporting Turkey’s
elected government.
Voicing the “gravest con-
cern” about the events unfolding in Turkey, Kerry said
he had emphasized over the
phone to Cavusoglu “the
United States’ absolute support for Turkey’s democratically elected civilian
government and democratic
institutions.”
Media accusations continued Tuesday when Yeni
Safak, a pro-government
daily, claimed Kerry had extended support to the junta
by saying he hoped “there
will be stability and peace
within Turkey.” Columnist
Ibrahim Karagul said that
the U.S. government had
used Gulen’s organization in
an attempt to trigger a civil
war in Turkey. The pro-government tabloid Gunes also
said that Western countries
were silent while the rebellion was underway.
Taking note of the accusatory tone, U.S. Ambassador John Bass decried
speculation in news reports
and by some public figures
that the U.S. in some way
supported the coup attempt. “That is categorically
untrue,” he said, “and such
speculation is harmful to the
decades-long friendship between two great nations.”
The Pentagon said Defense Secretary Ash Carter
telephoned Turkish Defense
Minister Fikri Isik on Tues-
day and among the issues
discussed was Incirlik Air
Base, a principal launch
point for air attacks against
Islamic State, but which has
had limited operations since
the failed coup.
The Turkish government
cut power to the base as well
as all access after it learned
that aerial tankers from the
base had been used for airto-air refueling for the rebel
air force Friday and Saturday. There was no indication when the base would return to full operations.
Although Turks of every
political persuasion have
voiced relief at the outcome
of the weekend struggle,
there were growing misgivings over the government’s
mass purges in the days that
followed.
On Tuesday the government announced that the
thousands of people it was
suspending included 15,200
employees of the Education
Ministry and that it had demanded the resignations of
1,577 deans of state and private universities.
tracy.wilkinson
@latimes.com
Special correspondent
Gutman reported from
Istanbul and Times staff
writer Wilkinson from
Washington.
prompted hand-wringing
over the difficulty of staving
off assaults by lone attackers
who might have been inspired by radical ideology,
even if not trained or directed by a particular group.
Recent surveys have
documented rising fears in
Europe over immigration
and security. “The refugee
crisis and the threat of terrorism are very much related to one another in the
minds of many Europeans,”
the Pew Research Center
wrote in a report released
this month.
In eight of the 10 European nations surveyed, half or
more respondents believed
incoming refugees increased
the likelihood of terrorism,
according to the Pew report.
It notes, however, that anxiety tended to be the highest
in countries that had taken
in relatively few newcomers,
such as Hungary.
Germany absorbed more
than 1 million arrivals last
year, with the influx largely
driven by Syria’s bloody,
multi-sided conflict, but the
newcomers also included
about 150,000 Afghans.
Public sentiment in Germany initially backed Chancellor Angela Merkel in welcoming them, but support
has waned considerably, especially after a wave of New
Year’s Eve sexual assaults
against women in the city of
Cologne and other locales.
By some accounts, the
train attacker had appeared
to be settling into a new life.
After requesting asylum, he
received a temporary residence permit this year, German media reported, and
was placed in a foster home
just weeks ago, after spending his initial months in a
group residence for unaccompanied minors.
Having secured an apprenticeship in a bakery, he
was seeking a spot in a jobtraining program, the German news agency DPA reported. That hopeful-seeming trajectory was a sharp
contrast to the furious diatribe in the video that Islamic State distributed, which
appeared to have been selfrecorded by smartphone.
“I will fight you so long as
I have a vein that beats, and I
will slaughter you with this
knife, and I will cut your
necks with axes, God permitting,” says the youth in
the video, speaking in
Pashto, one of Afghanistan’s
two main languages.
Specific clues as to the
motive were slow to emerge.
German
news
reports
quoted a state prosecutor,
Erik
Ohlenschlager,
as
telling reporters that the
suspect had learned over the
weekend of a friend’s death
in his homeland.
A spokesman for Bavaria’s criminal investigations
bureau, Lothar Koehler, said
a note found in the attacker’s room read: “Pray for me
that I will attain revenge on
these infidels.”
Witnesses told police
that after someone pulled
the emergency cord, the assailant jumped off the train,
attacking and seriously injuring a female pedestrian
he encountered before police spotted him.
DPA cited a witness as
saying that the train’s interior resembled a slaughterhouse after the attack.
[email protected]
Times staff writer King
reported from Washington
and special correspondent
Bulos from Amman, Jordan.
A4
W E D N E S DAY, J U LY 20 , 2 016
L AT I ME S . CO M
Feeling vulnerable in France
The country had
already stepped up
security. After the
latest terrorist attack,
frustration rises.
By Erik Kirschbaum
and Sarah Harvey
NICE, France — Terrorism in France has shifted
from bloodbaths at a newspaper office and a concert
hall in Paris to a summer
tourist hot spot on the Mediterranean.
The killers have included
trained attackers with automatic rifles and bombs and a
man driving a tractor-trailer
into an unsuspecting crowd
of revelers.
As France struggles to
come up with an antidote to
the terrorist attacks that
have killed scores of people
in the last 18 months — including 84 in Nice last week
— its increasingly unpopular
government has warned the
public that the country is at
war. Officials have advised
that there will probably be
more terrorist attacks like
Thursday’s low-tech atrocity with a truck.
“The reality is that
France is at the epicenter of
the current global terror
threat,” said Raffaello Pantucci, a counter-terrorism
expert and associate fellow
at the International Center
for the Study of Radicalization in London.
Security experts say
there are several reasons
France is likely to remain
vulnerable.
Among those: France is a
major combatant in the
U.S.-led coalition fighting Islamic State extremists, with
its air force bombing targets
in Iraq and Syria, and
France has a large number of
poorly assimilated Muslim
immigrants from its former
colonies in North Africa —
Algeria, Tunisia and Morocco. With high youth un-
Olivier Anrigo European Pressphoto Agency
FRENCH SOLDIERS patrol the Promenade des Anglais in Nice, where a terrorist attack killed 84 people last
week. Security experts say some kinds of terrorism are virtually impossible to prevent.
employment, some are susceptible to recruitment by
the militant group Islamic
State.
Also, France has stirred
anger in the Arab world because its government has
been
accused
of
discrimination against Muslims for laws banning head
scarves in public schools
and outlawing full-face veils
in public.
Nice has traditionally
been a gateway into France
from North Africa. A report
by the International Center
for Counter-Terrorism in
April found that more than
900 French citizens have
journeyed to Syria and Iraq
to join forces with the extremists and at least 250
have returned. About 11,000
French citizens are on the
center’s terrorism watch
lists, including 2,000 with
suspected direct links to Is-
FOR THE RECORD
Jennie Abrahamson: In the
July 19 Calendar section, a
review of Peter Gabriel and
Sting’s concert at the Hollywood Bowl misspelled backing vocalist Jennie Abrahamson’s first name as
Jenny.
Kit Harington: In the July 15
Calendar section, a photo
caption with an article
about the Emmy nominations misspelled the last
name of “Game of Thrones”
actor Kit Harington as Harrington.
Angry TV characters: In the
July 17 Calendar section, a
chart that showed angry
characters and performers
in television history said
that
David
Letterman
hosted “Late Show with
David Letterman” from 1982
to 2015. He hosted “Late
Night with David Letterman” from 1982 to 1993, then
started “Late Show” later in
1993.
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lamic State.
“All of France is under
threat from Islamist terrorism,” French President
Francois Hollande said after
the Bastille Day attack by a
Tunisian immigrant who,
according to prosecutors,
had
recently
become
radicalized. Islamic State
later claimed indirect responsibility for the attack.
France has been under a
heightened state of alert for
months, and heavy security
was in place across the country for the monthlong European soccer championships
that had finished without
any incidents of note four
days before the July14 attack
in Nice.
Under a state of emergency, authorities have the
power to place those suspected of terrorist activity
under house arrest without
evidence
and
without
charge, or search homes
without warrants.
Since 2015, 10,000 soldiers
have been deployed to sensitive sites. Hollande’s recruitment drive seeks to boost
the gendarme reserve to
40,000 from 28,000 by 2018.
Speaking in Lisbon on
Tuesday at the start of a tour
aimed at reviving European
Union partnerships after
Britain’s vote last month to
leave the 28-nation bloc,
Hollande said the “first priority” of Europe is “security
and defense.”
Nevertheless,
several
people in Nice said they remained baffled that security
services weren’t able to stop
one man in a truck from
killing so many people.
Valerie Collignon, a 38year-old worker in a nail salon, said she did not think
France was prepared for the
war against terrorism.
“We can’t protect ourselves from every madman,
but we’ve got to try harder,”
Collignon said. “I want to see
more police patrols and
more security at big public
events.”
Philippe Castelli, an 18year-old student in Nice,
said a lot of people are angry,
as evidenced by Prime Minister Manuel Valls being
booed and jeered at a memorial ceremony Monday.
“What kind of future do
we have if these terror attacks keep happening? The
president is weak, the prime
minister is even worse,”
Castelli said. “We need a
great leader to move us forward. We’re angry and frustrated and it seems there aren’t any good options.”
Several security experts
said that they understood
the frustration, but that
some kinds of terrorism are
virtually impossible to prevent.
Kirschbaum and Harvey are
special correspondents.
Palestinian prisoners
father test-tube babies
Fertility clinics help
their wives conceive
using sperm smuggled
out of Israel.
By Joshua Mitnick
NABLUS, West Bank —
Fathiya Safadi was married
less than three weeks when
her husband, Ashraf, a
wanted Palestinian militant,
was arrested, jailed and sentenced to 21 years behind
bars in Israel.
Her friends suggested a
divorce so she could start
over and have a family. Instead, Safadi resigned herself to life without a husband
at her side and childless: “I
thought, this is my fate. This
is my life.”
But her life changed a
decade later when, during a
prison visit, Safadi’s husband slipped her a candy
wrapper and told her to take
it straight to a fertility clinic
in the West Bank town of
Nablus. The wrapper contained his semen and — with
the aid of clinic doctors —
she became pregnant and
gave birth to the couple’s
first child, Amir.
The Safadis are among
dozens of Palestinian couples who have defied jail
terms and conservative social norms to become parents by undergoing in-vitro
fertilization
treatments
with semen smuggled out of
Israeli prisons.
Although IVF is rare in
the traditionalist society of
the Palestinian territories,
some have started to embrace the procedure as a way
to support the cause of thousands of Palestinians in
Israeli jails, many of whom
are considered prisoners of
war. For Fathiya Safadi, it is
far more personal.
“Even though people feel
that having a baby from a
prisoner is a patriotic act, I
disagree. I consider Amir
coming into my life as having
saved me from a personal
crisis,” she said.
In June, she was back at
the Razan fertility clinic in
Nablus with 2-year-old Amir
climbing on the waitingroom chairs as she nervously
awaited another procedure
in the hope of expanding her
family.
“My life had no meaning
before Amir,” she said. “It
was difficult.
“Nothing was beautiful in
my eyes. I was insecure.”
In the nearly four years
since the first IVF birth to a
prisoner’s wife, about 50 Palestinian children have been
born using the treatment,
Joshua Mitnick For The Times
FATHIYA SAFADI waits with son Amir, 2, in a clinic in Nablus, West Bank. He
was conceived using seminal fluid smuggled out from prison in a candy wrapper.
said
Dr.
Salem
Abu
Khaizaran, director of the
Razan Medical Center,
which pioneered treatments
in the West Bank.
Abu Khaizaran said that
wives of prisoners began inquiring about the fertility
treatments as far back as
2003, but that he was initially
skeptical that it would gain
traction in Palestinian society.
“We were reluctant to do
it because we were worried
that the community will not
accept such treatment,” he
said. “We are a small society,
and if people suddenly saw a
woman pregnant whose
husband is in jail, they might
start accusing her of cheating.”
To offset social backlash,
the Razan center instructed
treatment candidates to
bring two representatives
from each side of the family
to vouch for the woman. The
prisoners’ wives won religious support for the procedure from a fatwa issued
by the Palestinian Authority’s religious council, which
deemed the treatment acceptable if it was for a husband and wife.
Though IVF treatments
— which cost about $3,000 —
are not covered by the Palestinian public medical
plans, unlike in Israel, the
Razan center offers such
procedures free of charge for
the wives of prisoners.
About 6,000 Palestinians
are in Israeli jails, many of
them sentenced for involvement in violence against Israelis that includes stone
throwing and bus bombings.
Family members said
Ashraf Safadi was wanted by
Israeli forces for involvement in a Palestinian uprising against Israel, and in
2004 he was sentenced to 21
years in jail for shooting at
Israelis. Among Palestinians, inmates like him are
considered a cause celebre.
“It’s considered a national mission and a national achievement,” said
Zaid Nasser, a doctor at the
clinic. “This is helping the
prisoners.
“They get hope from the
fact that they’ll have a family
waiting for them” when they
get out of jail, he said.
Though Israeli prisoners
are allowed conjugal visits —
most notably for Yigal Amir,
who assassinated Israeli
Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin in 1995 — they are not
permitted for Palestinians
from the West Bank or Gaza
Strip.
So Palestinian prisoners
have become creative.
Holding up a plastic pen
and a pitted date, Nasser
demonstrated some of the
improvised containers used
to smuggle seminal fluid out
of prisons. The sperm can
survive for up to 48 hours before it needs to be frozen,
said Nasser, whose clinic
now is treating about five
women pregnant with the
children of prisoners.
The Israel Prison Service
did not respond to a request
for comment.
As
Safadi
caressed
Amir’s tiny knuckles with
her thumb in the waiting
room, she recalled feeling a
moment of “liberation” for
her husband when she found
out she was pregnant. But
she also described a sort of
personal liberation. Having
a child suddenly conferred
on her social status: She
moved from her family’s
home to an apartment set
up by her in-laws.
“My in-laws were extremely happy with Amir.
Before I had no place in their
family. I didn’t feel like I fit
in,” she said. “Socially I
changed,
personally
I
changed, and people started
looking at me differently.”
The fertility center provides the IVF treatments for
free as a “humanitarian” gesture to the wives of prisoners
who might miss the opportunity to get pregnant before
their husbands are released
from
jail,
said
Abu
Khaizaran. The center does
not receive any subsidies
from the Palestinian government or from political
groups, he said.
Although the wife of a
prisoner serving a life sentence would be eligible for
pro bono treatments, a
woman in her mid-20s whose
husband is scheduled for release in 10 years would not be
eligible. Safadi, who will be
in her mid-40s when her husband is released, qualified.
“The reproductive life of
a woman is short,” Abu
Khaizaran said. “If they are
too old, the husband will
marry another woman just
to have a child.”
Back in the waiting room,
it was the turn of Safadi’s
brother-in-law, Ali Safadi, to
watch Amir after she was
called to begin the procedure.
The brother-in-law boasted that it was he who
convinced his reluctant
brother to try the procedure
to preserve the couple’s marriage.
“The personal part of this
is that there is part of my
brother with us. My brother
is home with us,” he said. “I
hope more will come, so
when Ashraf gets out there
will be three or four children.”
Mitnick is a special
correspondent.
L AT I ME S . CO M
W E D N E S DAY, J U LY 20 , 2 016
A5
Speech is
the perfect
fuel for a
media fire
[Speech, from A1]
parts of her speech, but that
the controversy got in the
way of the message Donald
Trump wanted — and
needed — to convey.
For a brief moment,
Melania Trump’s speech
seemed like a clear fit with
the convention’s message —
a simple, human rebuttal of
the image Democrats have
tried to foster of her husband as an unsteady,
bigoted and dangerous man.
But within minutes of her
conclusion, whatever benefit the campaign had
reaped began to curdle.
The agent of the undoing
was a recently laid-off television reporter, Jarrett Hill,
who had watched the speech
at a Starbucks in Culver City
and had been struck by a
phrase that reminded him of
Obama’s 2008 speech.
Eight years ago, he had
thought the speech was
“really beautifully written,”
he recalled in an interview
Tuesday.
“I believe I even wrote it
down or typed it,” he said,
“obviously having no idea
that eight years later I’d hear
them again from a woman
who wanted to be first lady
speaking at a convention in
front of 40 million people.”
Hill’s tweets Monday
night reporting what he had
discovered spread at Internet speed through the cavernous media filing center
here.
The side-by-side comparison left little doubt that
one passage of Trump’s
speech — ironically a section
dealing with honor and in-
‘If there was a
mistake ... we’re
better served ... to
just admit it and
move on. It’s a
shame this is now
the story.’
— Sen. Shelley
Moore Capito
(R-W.Va.)
tegrity — had been largely
copied from Obama’s.
In both speeches, for example, the section began
with the speaker saying that
her parents had impressed
on her certain “values: that
you work hard for what you
want in life; that your word is
your bond and you do what
you say.” Both went on to
talk about the need to pass
those values to the next generation and teach young
people that “the only limit”
to achieving their “dreams”
is their “willingness to work
for them.”
Similar plagiarism controversies in recent years
have seriously damaged careers, both in politics and academia. In 1988, for example,
then-Sen. Joe Biden was
among
the
leading
contenders for the Democratic presidential nomination until aides to Massachusetts Gov. Michael Dukakis noticed that he had
lifted part of a speech from
British Labor Party leader
Neil Kinnock.
When
the
Dukakis
operatives tipped off a reporter to the story, the resulting controversy forced
Biden to drop out of the race.
Nothing so dramatic is in
the offing this time, but the
evidence of copying undermined one of Donald
Trump’s strengths — that
he is the candidate of
authenticity.
The controversy also
overturned one of Trump’s
great advantages in his campaign to date — his ability to
use his celebrity and mastery of social media and the
cable television news cycle to
shape his message without
having to worry much about
being filtered by the media.
At a convention, the media coverage of a campaign
is at a peak, with thousands
of reporters eager to find any
bit of news that breaks from
the campaign’s prepared
script.
The plagiarism charges
— easy to understand and
Laid-off reporter
breaks the news
He apparently was the
first to publicly note that
speech repeated words of
Michelle Obama. B9
quickly illustrated by sideby-side video — were perfect
fuel for a media fire, and the
Trump campaign’s shifting
explanations served only to
fan it hotter.
At first, before the speech
was delivered, Melania
Trump had said in an interview with NBC News that
she had written the speech
personally, with “little help.”
That was implausible
from the start — writing a
speech to deliver in a huge,
noisy convention center before a television audience of
tens of millions is a specialized skill that campaigns
don’t typically entrust to
candidates or their families.
By the morning after the
speech, Trump campaign
aides had largely abandoned
that claim, although they
would not say who had written the speech.
Instead, various factions
close to Trump pointed fingers at one another — reprising the staff intrigue that
had threatened to debilitate
Trump’s campaign earlier in
the season.
On CNN, where he now
works as a commentator,
Corey
Lewandowski,
Trump’s campaign manager
until his ouster last month,
suggested that his rival,
campaign chairman Paul
Manafort, should “do the
right thing and resign” if he
had signed off on the speech
text.
Donald Trump Jr. defended Manafort in an interview later in the day with
CBS, saying that “you have
to work with speechwriters.
Those are the people that
did this, not Paul.”
Manafort, speaking to
reporters at the campaign’s
daily briefing, tried to dismiss questions about the
speech.
He
blamed
Democrat Hillary Clinton
and the media for bringing
attention to “50 words, and
that includes and’s and the’s
and things like that.”
“There’s a political tint to
this whole issue, and certainly we’ve noted that the
Clinton camp was the first to
get it out there and tried to
say that there was something untoward about the
speech,” he added.
Clinton’s
communications director, Jennifer
Palmieri, shot back on Twitter: “Nice try, not true.”
“Blaming Hillary Clinton
is not the answer for every
Trump campaign problem,”
she wrote.
There was no evidence
that the Clinton campaign
had been involved in the initial spreading of the story, although it certainly joined in
the Democratic glee once it
became widely publicized.
Even as Manafort tried to
minimize the problem, fellow Republicans urged the
campaign to stop digging in.
Republican
National
Committee
Chairman
Reince Priebus called it a potential firing offense for
someone on staff.
“If there was a mistake
there ... we’re better served,
and Donald Trump’s better
served, to just admit it and
move on,” Sen. Shelley
Moore Capito (R-W.Va.) told
CNN.
“It’s a shame this is now
the story,” said Capito.
By then, of the convention’s 96 hours, more than 18
had vanished into the maw
of Melania Trump’s speech.
That’s time Trump will
never get back.
Carolyn Cole Los Angeles Times
BOTH MELANIA TRUMP and Michelle Obama said their parents had impressed on them certain “values:
that you work hard for what you want in life; that your word is your bond and you do what you say.”
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L AT I ME S . CO M
THE NATION
A wife’s final ‘good morning’
A daily wake-up text
was the last message
from a Baton Rouge
officer slain while
trying to save another.
By Nigel Duara
BATON ROUGE, La. —
Every morning that her husband sat behind the wheel of
his police cruiser, Tonja
Garafola began her day by
tapping her phone to life and
smiling at the text message
waiting for her.
It usually arrived around
7:45, and this last Sunday
morning was no different.
“Good morning, my love,” it
said.
An hour later, just as his
overnight shift was winding
down, 45-year-old Brad
Garafola was shot dead.
The East Baton Rouge
Parish sheriff ’s deputy was
one of three officers killed by
a 29-year-old black separatist less than a mile from police headquarters in this
southern Louisiana college
town.
On
Monday,
Tonja
Garafola learned about her
husband’s final minutes as
he faced the killer, Gavin Eugene Long.
Armed with an IWI Tavor
SAR 5.56-millimeter rifle,
Mark Boster Los Angeles Times
A MEMORIAL for Montrell Jackson, Matthew Gerald and Brad Garafola, from left, the officers slain in
Baton Rouge by a black separatist. “He wasn’t thinking of himself,” Tonja Garafola said of her late husband.
Long was taking his time.
He was after cops, not
civilians.
One officer, wounded, fell
to the ground and crawled,
according to authorities’ recounting of a surveillance
video.
Long closed in on him.
“Brad knew right then he
could have waited for
backup — he could have
thought of just his family, of
us,” Tonja Garafola said.
“But that’s not what he did.”
“He could have stayed
down, but he was never going to do that,” she said.
Instead, her husband
moved to intervene, al-
though it’s unclear how close
he was to the wounded officer. Even after he was hit,
Garafola returned fire as
Long continued to shoot at
them.
Garafola “went down
fighting,” said Sheriff Sid J.
Gautreaux III.
Authorities believe Long,
of Kansas City, Mo., was in
Baton Rouge for days before
the attack, which they described as militaristic in its
precision. The superintendent of the Louisiana State
Police called the officer
killings “assassinations.”
Dechia Badeaux Gerald,
the wife of another slain offi-
cer, took to Facebook after
midnight Tuesday to thank
well-wishers and write a
message to her husband,
Matthew Gerald.
“No worries babe, [the
Baton Rouge Police Department], our community,
family, friends, thin blue line
family and military family
has our 6,” she wrote, using
the military lingo for watching a person’s back. “I’m
forever grateful and will
never forget. I’m drawing my
strength from all the love
surrounding me from all directions.”
Garafola was a 24-year
veteran of the Sheriff ’s Office.
“Of course, of course, of
course I want him back,” his
wife said. “But I know that
when he went to [help] that
other officer, he wasn’t
thinking of himself. He was
thinking of the officer’s
family.”
Garafola had four children, the eldest a 21-year-old
son and the youngest a 7year-old daughter.
“He’ll never get to walk
his daughters down the
aisle,” Tonja said. “That’s
what I think about. Everything he’s going to miss.
Everything he won’t be there
for, because he was taken
from us.”
[email protected]
Twitter: @nigelduara
Trump has ‘nothing to offer,’
Clinton tells labor groups
By Chris Megerian
Hillary Clinton steered
clear of the plagiarism controversy enveloping Donald
Trump’s campaign Tuesday, instead heaping scorn
on the Republican presidential candidate’s business record and the first day
of his party’s convention.
“Last night in Cleveland
was surreal,” she told union
members in a speech in Las
Vegas, comparing Trump’s
dramatic entrance — silhouetted by bright lights as rock
music blared — to “The Wizard of Oz.”
“Lots of sound and fury,”
Clinton said. “But when you
pulled back the curtain,
there was just Donald
Trump, with nothing to offer
the American people.”
When Trump says he’ll
help workers and get tough
on Wall Street, Clinton said,
“don’t buy it.”
“Donald Trump’s business model is basically fraud
and abuse,” she said.
She rattled off a list of
Trump products that are
produced outside the country, despite the candidate’s
pledges to bring manufacturing jobs back to the
United. States.
Clinton also talked about
the recent killings of police
officers in Baton Rogue, La.,
and Dallas, an issue that has
inflamed an already raw national debate over policing
and race relations.
“If you take aim at police
officers, you take aim at all
of us,” she said in an address
at a union conference.
“There can be no justification for killing a police officer. None — none at all.”
At the same time, Clinton
said police need training in
the “proper use of force” and
“how to build trust with the
NEUROPATHY
CLINIC
communities they serve.”
Amid
her
blistering
criticisms of Trump, Clinton
made no mention of the
most talked-about story
from the first day of the Republican convention — allegations that the speech delivered by Trump’s wife
Monday night included lines
lifted from a Michelle
Obama speech in 2008.
Trump’s campaign chairman, Paul Manafort, has defended Melania Trump and
accused Clinton’s operation
of stoking the controversy.
Clinton has been working
to rally union support for her
candidacy, and spoke to two
organizations in Las Vegas
on Tuesday.
Her first speech was at a
conference hosted by the
American Federation of
State, County and Municipal Employees, where she
pledged to defend workers’
collective bargaining rights.
“Supporting and respecting public employees
means supporting and respecting police officers and
firefighters, all the men and
women who put their lives
on the line to keep us safe,”
she told the union members.
Clinton later spoke to
Unite Here, another labor
group that includes the Culinary Union, a political powerhouse in Las Vegas. The
union, which declined to
back a candidate during
Nevada’s caucuses in February, endorsed her Tuesday.
“We will deliver Nevada
for Hillary Clinton,” said
Geoconda Arguello-Kline,
secretary-treasurer of the
Culinary Union.
Clinton is scheduled to
campaign in Orlando and
Tampa on Friday, and a
campaign official suggested
she may announce her vice
presidential pick in Florida.
The on-the-record hint,
Andrew Harnik Associated Press
HILLARY CLINTON uses a fitting phone to take a
selfie with a backer after speaking in Las Vegas.
which came after days of
backstage rumors, was
dropped when CNN’s Wolf
Blitzer interviewed Karen
Finney, a spokeswoman for
the Clinton campaign.
Blitzer asked whether
the announcement could
come on Friday.
“I expect that’s about
right,” Finney said.
Finney later downplayed
her answer. “To be clear,
there is no announcement
set yet,” she said on Twitter.
Clinton has been widely
Frank Gehry
reported to be seriously
considering several candidates, including Sen. Tim
Kaine of Virginia and at least
two members of President
Obama’s Cabinet: Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack
and Labor Secretary Tom
Perez.
chris.megerian
@latimes.com
Twitter: @chrismegerian
Times staff writer Michael
A. Memoli in Washington
contributed to this report.
Mon., August 1
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L AT I ME S . CO M
W E D N E SDAY , J U LY 2 0 , 2 016
A7
Ailes appears close
to departing Fox News
[Ailes, from A1]
eral other women who have
worked with Ailes in the past
also saying that he sought
sexual favors in return for
employment. Ailes has denied those incidents as well.
But the reports have probably hurt the executive’s
standing.
If Ailes, as appears likely,
does depart under a cloud, it
would be a sudden fall from
grace by a powerful media
figure who also wielded considerable political clout.
Ailes helped launch Fox
News in 1996 and positioned
it as being a “fair and balanced” network — many
would say with a staunchly
conservative viewpoint —
that would be an alternative
for viewers who believed
there was a liberal bias in the
established media outlets,
including CNN, which had
the cable news market all to
itself. The approach appealed to conservatives.
“We’re not programming
to conservatives,” Ailes said
in a 2003 interview. “We’re
just not eliminating their
point of view.”
A political force, Ailes
toiled in Republican politics
as a media advisor for Richard Nixon’s 1968 presidential
campaign — helping engineer the greatest political
comeback of its time. He
also played a major role in
the presidential election of
George H.W. Bush in 1988.
Ailes’ ability to transform
personalities worked on Fox
News as well. He oversaw Bill
O’Reilly, who had trouble fitting into the broadcast network news culture, into one
of the most influential commentators on TV. He helped
conservative radio commentator Sean Hannity make
the transition to television.
Megyn Kelly was a corporate
litigator before she came to
Fox News and became one of
its biggest prime-time stars.
By early 2003, Fox News
Channel had passed CNN as
the most-watched cable
news network, a crown it has
held ever since. It also became highly profitable, and
Ailes was richly rewarded by
becoming one of the highestpaid
television
news
executives.
That combination of political clout and financial
success made Ailes a favorite of News Corp. founder
Rupert Murdoch. However,
Ailes is viewed less favorably
by Murdoch’s sons, James
and Lachlan, who now have
leadership roles at 21st Century Fox. They have avoided
making any changes at Fox
News because it has been
such a reliable profit center
— generating more than $1
billion in profit annually.
But the sexual harassment charges appear to have
led to a reexamination of
Ailes’ role.
Carlson’s complaint, filed
in Superior Court in New
Jersey this month, said
Ailes, chairman and chief
executive of Fox News,
“sabotaged” the anchor’s career at the cable channel because she complained about
a hostile working environment when she was a co-host
of “Fox & Friends.” The suit
also alleges that Ailes made
sexual advances that were
rebuffed by Carlson and that
he directed innuendo-filled
comments toward her.
Ailes said the allegations
were untrue and defamatory.
Estrich, his attorney, said
the news of Ailes’ possible
departure has upset some of
the Fox News talent who
called to offer support.
“I’ve heard Roger say, ‘I
want you to tell everybody to
be professional about this,’ ”
Estrich said. “Put this aside
and be professional.”
The reaction is a testament to how Ailes’ personality is the force that has
built Fox News into the
most-watched cable news
network and helped shape
the public’s tendency to have
their news delivered with a
healthy side order of opinion
and commentary.
Ailes’ departure could
lead to uncertainty at Fox
News Channel because of
the loyalty of many anchors.
Some anchors are believed
to have clauses in their contracts that could allow them
to leave if Ailes doesn't remain in power. But Ailes’
imperial managing style has
left Fox without any clear
successor.
One possible replacement is Bill Shine, a senior
executive vice president for
Fox News who has also been
with the organization since
its launch.
Drew Angerer Getty Images
stephen.battaglio
@latimes.com
ROGER AILES, the only leader Fox News has had, commands loyalty among
many of its anchors. Above, Ailes with his wife, Elizabeth Tilson, this month.
THE BIG HOME SALE
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Richard Drew AP
VETERAN Fox anchor
Gretchen Carlson filed
suit against her former
boss, Roger Ailes.
ONE BONUS PER CUSTOMER, PER OFFER, WHILE SUPPLIES LAST.
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A7B
A8
W E D NE S DAY, J U LY 2 0 , 2 016
WSCE
L AT I ME S . CO M
Kelton Jones
AMERICA YOUNG , above, gets a touch-up from makeup artist Julie Marquez on
the set of “The Sable Corsair.” The fan film was shot on the sand dunes of Glamis,
Calif., below, the same location that was featured in 1983’s “Return of the Jedi.”
Drafthouse Films
CHRIS STROMPOLOS , clockwise from top, Eric Zala and Jayson Lamb are
shown in the 1980s on the set of their “Raiders of the Lost Ark” remake. Their
seven-year labor of love is examined in a new documentary, “Raiders!,” below.
Kelton Jones
Drafthouse Films
When does a fan film cross line?
[Fan films, from A1]
sophistication — to the extent that the very definition
of what a fan film is has
started to blur.
To try to halt the arms
race among some larger fanmade productions, studios
now find themselves in the
rather awkward position of
deploying lawyers to protect
their most valuable intellectual property from its
most hardcore fans.
Late last year, CBS and
Paramount Pictures filed a
copyright infringement lawsuit against the makers of a
fan film called “Star Trek:
Axanar,” who had raised
more than $1.2 million
through a crowd-funding
campaign for what they
billed as “the first fully professional, independent ‘Star
Trek’ film.”
Today’s pop culture
acolytes have more ways
than ever to express their
fandom, as evidenced by
the throngs who will once
again make the pilgrimage
this week to the ComicCon International fan expo
in San Diego. But for many
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the Rings,” comic book
movies or slasher flicks,
nothing gets closer to the
source than the act of making a fan film.
“In some small way, I’ve
become part of this thing
that was so defining, that I
love so much,” Henderson,
the 46-year-old storyboard
artist and voice-over actor
behind “The Sable Corsair,”
said on a recent afternoon at
his apartment in the San
Fernando Valley. “It was like
Adolescent Wish Fulfillment
101. I mean, we had 14 dudes
show up dressed as Stormtroopers!”
Since the modern fan film
movement kicked off with
the 1997 short “TROOPS,” a
parody of TV’s “COPS” with
Stormtroopers, fan films
have largely been modest,
homemade affairs shared
among fellow obsessives well
below the mainstream radar.
“The studios put up with
this because they don’t want
to alienate the fan base,”
said Christine Cuddy, a partner at the entertainment
law firm Kleinberg Lange
Cuddy & Carlo. “These fans
can be very active on the Internet.”
Boundary-pushing fan
films like “Star Trek: Axanar,” however, have changed
the equation.
“There’s a lot of talk online about: ‘What is a fan
film?’ ” said Robert Meyer
Burnett, who is set to direct
“Axanar” if it ever gets made.
“A lot of people are saying,
‘Well, a fan film needs to be
made in your parents’ basement by a bunch of friends.’ I
don’t know where that notion even comes from. As
technology has gotten exponentially better, if you’re
clever and you employ real
production methodologies,
you can make something to
rival what you see in television and the movies. But the
difference will always be that
what fan filmmakers are doing is given away for free.”
Although some see “Axanar” as a David-and-Goliath
battle for a form of creative
expression that should be
protected under fair use,
others regard it as a legally
questionable overreach that
threatens the entire world of
fan films.
“If you make a fan film
that’s $1 million, by definition it’s not a fan film,” Henderson said flatly. “OK, five
or 10 grand — that’s fine. But
once you start stepping on
the toes of stuff that they
spend hundreds of millions
of dollars to make, no reasonable person could think
they’re not going to shut you
down.”
The fact is, no matter how
much your fan film costs, the
holder of the copyright can
take you to court at any time
if they feel you’ve stepped
over the line.
“If you’re saying it’s fair
use, you have to comply with
the fair use rules, and it’s always gray,” Cuddy said.
“There’s no black line. People always want to know,
‘Can I do this?’ And you go,
‘Well, there’s a risk.’ ”
Even so, J.J. Abrams, who
directed “Star Wars: The
Force Awakens” and appeared in a video announcing this year’s “Star Wars”
Fan Film Awards, has expressed support for fanmade projects. At a promotional fan event in May for
“Star Trek Beyond,” which
Abrams produced, he argued that litigation “was not
an appropriate way to deal
with the fans.” A few weeks
later, CBS and Paramount
issued new guidelines directed at those looking to
create their own “Star
Trek”-inspired works. For
now, though, the “Axanar”
lawsuit remains unresolved.
In a statement accompanying their new “Star Trek”
guidelines, CBS and Paramount said that they want
to “encourage celebrations
of this beloved cultural phenomenon.”
Some fan filmmakers argue that rules such as these
inevitably stifle creativity.
But Finch, who co-directed
“The Sable Corsair” with
Henderson, thinks Lucas-
Honor a loved one and
share remembrances.
placeanad.latimes.com/Obituaries
film is wise to encourage fan
filmmakers to play around in
the “Star Wars” sandbox —
within limits and on their
terms. (According to the official rules of the Star Wars
fan film contest, entries
couldn’t be longer than five
minutes, could use only Lucasfilm-supplied sound effects and music cues and
had to “avoid bad language,
rude gestures and other inappropriate stuff.”)
“It’s great in my opinion
that the ‘Star Wars’ family is
embracing these fan films,”
said Finch, a 33-year-old actor. “You’re never going to be
able to put a gag in the
mouths of the fans. So you
might as well embrace it and
give people the tools to
showcase your brand. You
never know — you could
have someone who does one
of these fan films that blows
people away go on to direct
the next ‘Star Trek’ or ‘Star
Wars’ movie.”
Indeed, a well-made fan
film can become an attention-grabbing calling card.
“TROOPS” writer-director
Kevin Rubio has parlayed
the success of that short into
a career writing and directing for TV. Creature designer
and filmmaker Sandy Collora made a mash-up of
“Dark Knight,” “Alien” and
“Predator” into a fan film
called “Batman: Dead End.”
The film debuted at ComicCon in 2003 and became a viral hit; he is now developing
an independent sci-fi/horror
feature, for which he has
raised nearly $100,000 on
Kickstarter.
For both fans and studios
alike, things were much simpler back in 1982, when a pair
of 12-year-old kids in Mississippi named Chris Strompolos and Eric Zala set out to
make a shot-for-shot re-creation of their favorite movie,
“Raiders of the Lost Ark.”
Their seven-year DIY odyssey has since passed into
fan film legend and is
chronicled in the new documentary “Raiders!”
“Our primary intention
was just to have fun and role
play,” said Strompolos. “It
wasn’t to make money or sell
it or do anything with it. We
were just doing it for ourselves in a vacuum without
any sort of guidance,
teaching ourselves from an
organic place. There was a
purity to it that people really
gravitate toward.”
Though he wouldn’t
mind seeing the recognition
for “The Sable Corsair” open
up a few doors in his career,
Henderson says the film ultimately came out of a
similar place of love.
“No matter what happens from this point forward, I got to make a ‘Star
Wars’ movie with my best
friends, with real Stormtroopers and Boba Fett,
where they made ‘Return of
the Jedi,’ ” he said. “I win.”
josh.rottenberg
@latimes.com
L AT I ME S . CO M
W E D N E SDAY , J U LY 2 0 , 2 016
A9
A haven for migrant students
[Belmont, from A1]
dents came from Central
America — many of them as
unaccompanied minors.
They crossed the border
to reunite with mothers and
fathers or to find refuge from
unprecedented gang violence at home. Some dare to
dream they will find success
in America, not just the
means to survive.
Belmont Principal Kristen McGregor said it has
forced the school to reimagine its role in its students’ lives.
“Our students, a lot of
them have to work. A lot of
them have to send money
home or pay for rent,” she
said. “This is going to take a
rethinking of education in
general. Sure, they get into
school, but what’s next?
How do we support them?”
She first noticed a surge
of students from Central
America in the spring of 2013.
Some of the Guatemalan
students spoke only indigenous languages, such as
Quiche and Mam. She
bought a Quiche dictionary.
For the hungriest, McGregor turned a bookcase into a
food pantry stuffed with
canned peas, Sloppy Joe
sauce and dried fruit.
When some students
ended up homeless, she
found places for them to
stay.
“They come here to have
a better life, but that’s not always the case,” McGregor
said.
Photographs by
::
Marcos grew up in an indigenous village called Huehuetenango, a poor community where most residents
speak Chuj. When he was 5,
his mother and father fell ill.
There was no doctor in town,
and they died.
Orphaned, Marcos was
taken in by a neighbor. She
kicked him out when he was
12.
“You’re a man now,” she
said. “You have to find your
own way.”
Marcos shined shoes to
scrape together a living. He
earned enough money to put
himself through the better
private school in his village,
where he learned to read and
write in Spanish. A year later, work dried up, and the
teenager set his gaze north.
He called up a half-brother
who lived in L.A.
Marcos had never even
been to Guatemala City. He
wore a T-shirt and pants for
the long trip. He forgot to
take a backpack.
Like most children who
make the journey to the U.S.
without a parent or guardian, a smuggler — often referred to as a coyote — is
paid to guide them along the
trip.
Marcos spent three days
lost and without water in the
Sonoran Desert. He didn’t
eat for a week. At one point,
he fainted. The smuggler
abandoned him after he fell
behind.
He made it to Falfurrias,
Texas, where Marcos said he
was kidnapped by two men
who wanted him to pay
$3,000 to let him go.
They spoke only English,
and Marcos spoke some
Spanish. They used a
translation app on a cellphone, he said. Marcos said
he was able to negotiate the
price down to $1,000. His
relative wired the money
and bought him a bus ticket
to Los Angeles. But immi-
Brian van der Brug Los Angeles Times
BELMONT HIGH student Gaspar Marcos runs down the stairs of the Westlake apartment he lives in to catch a bus to work.
AFTER arriving home from school, Marcos , 18, has
little time to get ready for his job as a dishwasher.
Marcos made the journey to the U.S. when he was 13.
gration officials caught him
in Arizona.
He was 13 at the time, so
they gave him a notice to appear in immigration court
before releasing him to a
half-brother he’d never met.
A few months later, the halfbrothers had a falling out
and Marcos struck out on
his own.
He got a job that paid
about $5 an hour to sew
clothes in a factory in downtown L.A.
Later, he’d land a job at a
restaurant making $10.50 an
hour and he’d pay $600 a
month in rent as well as a few
hundred dollars for groceries. Every month, he peeled
off $300 to pay off the $10,000
smuggling
debt
that
brought him to the U.S.
“What can I do?” he said
in Spanish. “It’s just the life I
was given to lead.”
::
His formal learning cut
short in Guatemala, Marcos
knew that education was
“the most important thing.”
“If you don’t have education, nobody will respect
you,” he said. “If you don’t
educate yourself, you don’t
have employment. I want to
be a good person and have
an education … have a good,
stable job. I want to have a
home, the sort of home I
never had.”
McGregor said some of
the immigrant children who
came to L.A. showed up at
Belmont in the Westlake
neighborhood almost immediately. Others enrolled a
few years later, having first
gone to work.
Because of this, many
students, like Marcos, are
older than other students at
their grade level.
“They start here in the
ninth grade, regardless of
how old they are,” McGregor
said. “Some finish at 19 or 20
years old.”
Many of these children
have ended up at Belmont
High because it had a reputation for welcoming them.
At Belmont, teachers
contend with the trauma
many of these children suffered in their countries of origin or along the treacherous
journey north. Some of the
students struggle against resentment and abandonment issues while getting to
know a mother, father or
family member who left
them behind. Some run
away.
Some of algebra teacher
Marvin Centeno’s students
studied until only the third
or fourth grade in their
home country.
At the same time they are
trying to learn and work,
many of the students also
have to navigate a complex
immigration system that
will decide whether they get
to stay in the U.S., said Fede-
LegaL Notice
If you purchased title insurance from one of 25 title agencies after
June 12, 2006, a proposed class action settlement may
affect your rights. You could get a payment.
A class action settlement has been proposed in Edwards v. The First American Corporation, et al., Case No. 07-03796
SJO (FFMx) (C.D. Cal.). The proposed settlement resolves claims about whether The First American Corporation
and First American Title Insurance Company (collectively “First American”) unlawfully paid referral fees for title
insurance underwriting business in the form of payment for acquiring ownership interests in any one of 25 title
insurance agencies (the “Implicated Title Insurance Agents”). First American denies all claims of wrongdoing and
has agreed to a proposed settlement in order to avoid incurring further expenses and burdens relating to this lawsuit.
If you purchased title insurance from one of the Implicated Title Insurance Agents during the relevant time period,
and otherwise meet the qualifications to be a Settlement Class Member, the proposed settlement, if approved, will
pay you $75.00. To get complete information regarding this settlement and your rights under it, call 1-844-778-5951
or visit www.RESPAClassActionSettlement.com.
Who’s Included? You are a Settlement Class Member if you: (1)(a) paid for; (b) a First American title insurance
policy; (c) issued by an Implicated Title Insurance Agent; (d) after June 12, 2006 and before May 11, 2016; (e)
that insured a residential property; and (2) were not the seller of the property insured. A list of the Implicated Title
Insurance Agents can be found at www.RESPAClassActionSettlement.com.
What Does the Settlement Provide? Among other things, First American has agreed to pay Settlement Class
Members who submit a valid claim form the sum of $75.00.
How can I get a Payment? To be eligible for payment, Settlement Class Members must send in a claim form,
which is available at www.RESPAClassActionSettlement.com. You may also submit a claim form online through
the website, with requested documents. If you think you have a valid claim, read the claim form instructions
carefully, fill it out, sign it, and mail it, together with all requested documents, postmarked no later than
November 18, 2016. A settlement administrator will review the information you provide and determine if you
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Your Other Options. If you do not want to be legally bound by the proposed settlement, you must exclude yourself
by August 19, 2016. If you do not exclude yourself, you will release any claims you may have against First
American, as more fully described in the Settlement Agreement, available at the settlement website. If you are a
Settlement Class Member and do not exclude yourself, you may object to the terms of the proposed settlement by
August 19, 2016. For more information about excluding yourself from, or objecting to, the proposed settlement,
please visit www.RESPAClassActionSettlement.com. The timeliness of requests for exclusion and objections will
be conclusively determined by the post-mark date or other like proof of the date of mailing or for the delivery.
The Court will hold a Hearing on September 19, 2016 to consider whether to approve the proposed settlement
and a request for attorneys’ fees and expenses of up to $5,750,000 and a service award of $10,000 to the Class
Representative. You may appear at the hearing, either yourself or through an attorney hired by you, but you don’t
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www.RESPAClassActionSettlement.com • 1-844-778-5951
rico Bustamante, who manages a transitional shelter
for unaccompanied migrant
children called Casa Libre.
Bustamante helped Marcos retain a pro-bono attorney through Kids in Need of
Defense, an advocacy organization that works to find
representation for these
children in immigration
court.
Marcos was allowed to
stay at Casa Libre until he
turned 18. A condition of
staying there was attending
Belmont High, something
Marcos thought he couldn’t
do because he wasn’t in the
country legally. At school, he
declined to take food from
the makeshift pantry, believing other students needed it
more. But he devours any
advice
from
McGregor
about improving his English.
Marcos has at least one
advantage over some immigrant students: He was able
to receive a special immigrant juvenile visa, usually
given to children who were
found to have been abused,
neglected or abandoned by
one or both parents. That
makes him eligible for legal
residency, for which he’s in
the process of applying.
But he still struggles with
balancing school and work.
Many of the immigrant students attend school every
day, McGregor said. But for
some, work and other complications become an obstacle to education.
Worried about earning
enough money, Marcos
rarely turns down extra
work shifts. Sometimes he
oversleeps
and
misses
morning classes. Other
days, he doesn’t show up at
all. A’s and B’s started sinking into C’s. McGregor often
turns to pleading with students like him to show up.
“If you have to pay off a
coyote who brought you up
here, at what point does
school play a role?” she said.
During his second-period
biology
class,
Marcos
thumbed through two textbooks — one in English, one
in Spanish — with a laptop
within reach.
“What are some of the
plants that live in this biome?” he read out loud to
himself, pulling on the top of
his hair as he searched for
the answer.
When a student sitting
next to him asked Marcos a
question in Chuj, he answered in Spanish, thinking
it disrespectful to leave
other classmates out of the
conversation.
The last week of school,
Marcos was in and out. McGregor pulled him aside and
again urged him to come to
school. On the very last day,
his desk sat empty during
first-period algebra, and
then again during his biology class.
When third-period history started, he slid into his
desk.
cindy.carcamo
@latimes.com
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A10
W E D NE S DAY, J U LY 2 0 , 2 016
L AT I M E S. C O M /O P I N I O N
OPINION
EDITORIALS
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
LETTERS
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Herbalife’s empty promises
O
ne of the basic tenets of consumer goods is that companies
live or die based on the demand
for their products. But some
companies have charted a path
to prosperity by selling something else: the
lure of riches hidden in their products’ sales
chain.
That’s been one of the keys to success for
Los Angeles-based Herbalife, which sells nutrition and personal care products through a
global network of ordinary people who act as
distributors. But like many other companies
of its ilk, Herbalife has been dogged by
accusations that its distributors are actually
victims of a scam designed to enrich the
company and a few people at the top of the
distribution chain.
Last week, the Federal Trade Commission announced a settlement with Herbalife
that will change the company’s practices for
the better, in addition to extracting $200 million in compensation for money-losing distributors. More important, though, the settlement will make it easier in the future to
distinguish legitimate approaches to this
business model from scams.
Known as multi-level marketing companies, firms like Herbalife typically produce
household goods, cosmetics and health- and
wellness-related products. But rather than
wholesaling to established retailers, they
recruit individuals to act as distributors by
promising them a cut of the proceeds. For
those people, profits lie not in selling small
quantities to many customers, but in persuading friends and acquaintances to buy
large supplies that they, in turn, distribute
within their social circles.
And therein lies the problem, because the
same approach is the hallmark of a pyramid
scheme — a scam that doesn’t produce
wealth, but simply transfers money from new
recruits to those who signed up before them.
At some point the supply of new recruits
dries up and the scheme collapses.
Herbalife admits no wrongdoing, and in
fact characterizes the settlement as validation of its business model. But the FTC’s
complaint pulls together statistics from
Herbalife’s own financial reports and statements to paint a damning picture of the company’s operations.
According to the complaint, the “overwhelming majority” of distributors who try
to sell Herbalife products to actual consumers make little or no money doing so. And
those who try to profit off the rewards the
company offers for signing up new distributors largely fail to do so as well; more than
half of Herbalife’s elite distributors in 2014 received an average reward payment of less
than $300 for the year, according to the FTC.
(Herbalife says the agency’s figures are inaccurate.) That helps explain why nearly half of
Herbalife’s U.S. distributors quit each year,
and why more than half of the distributors
“stop ordering Herbalife products within
their first year,” the complaint says.
The settlement with the FTC sets at least
two key standards for Herbalife, and by extension every other multi-level marketing
company that wants to avoid a lawsuit by the
feds. The first is that the incentives offered to
distributors have to be tied to sales of the
product to bona fide consumers. In other
words, distributors can’t be rewarded for
funneling products onto other middlemen;
companies must have a stake in the success
of their products at the retail level.
The second is that the materials
Herbalife uses to attract distributors can’t
promise a better life than the company can
actually deliver. The FTC’s complaint cites
promotional videos by Herbalife that show
“images of expensive houses, luxury automobiles and exotic vacations,” while offering
testimonials from distributors who claimed
to be making six- and seven-figure incomes.
A pyramid scheme may be so desperate to
recruit new participants that it has to grossly
inflate its returns, but a legitimate business
should be able to entice people with its actual
results.
Sadly, the FTC’s investigation into
Herbalife apparently was triggered by a complaint from a hedge fund manager, Bill Ackman, who bet more than $1 billion on Herbalife’s stock tanking. Although Ackman has
said he was trying to stop a predatory company with “phantom, or fictitious, customers,” he stood to gain heavily if the FTC had
sought to shut down the company. The end
result leaves Herbalife in business, which
won’t help Ackman, but with new strictures
that will protect those who might be tempted
to sign on as distributors — and, with the
right amount of diligence by the FTC, anyone
else trying to discern a real business opportunity from a pyramid scheme.
Ban the Russians from Rio
T
he use of performance-enhancing drugs at the top levels of
sports is a persistent and intractable problem. But the Russians have raised the sordid practice to an art form, according to an independent report released Monday.
Commissioned by the World Anti-Doping
Agency, the report confirms the core
accusations of Grigory Rodchenkov, the former head of Russia’s laboratory responsible
for certifying that athletes have not used
banned substances. It says that instead of
ferreting out cheaters, Rodchenkov was
personally involved in a scheme that reached
to the top levels of the Russian sports ministry to cover up the use of banned substances by dozens of athletes who competed in
the 2014 Sochi Olympics and the 2012 London
Olympics, as well as the 2013 World Championships in Athletics in Moscow and the
2015 World Championships of swimming in
Kazan, Russia.
How did they cover up the cheating? In
part, by making false assertions that athletes’ tests were clean, according to Monday’s
report. When a sample tested positive for
banned substances, the deputy minister of
sport would determine whether to protect or
report the cheating athlete. In what sounds
like an episode from the old “Mission: Impossible” television show, the Russians also
turned to an agent of the Federal Security
Service (a successor to the infamous KGB)
to spirit dirty urine samples out of a secured
testing room at the Sochi Olympics, circumvent the supposedly tamper-proof container
seals and replace the tainted samples with
frozen-and-thawed urine collected before the
athletes began doping up.
The investigation by Canadian law professor Richard McLaren was conducted over
57 days — an insufficient amount of time, he
said, to identify individual athletes who benefited from the cheating. The anti-doping
agency has commissioned McLaren to keep
digging and file as complete a report as possible. That’s a welcome step.
Yet the scope of the cheating already revealed means that the International Olympic
Committee has a decision to make. With the
Summer Olympics set to begin in Rio de Janeiro next month, anti-doping groups are
urging a blanket ban on participation by
Russian athletes.
The International Assn, of Athletics
Federations, which oversees world track and
field athletics, already has barred the Russian team from international competitions —
including the Olympics — because of a related doping scandal. (Russia has appealed
the ban.)
The IOC’s executive committee said
Tuesday that it is seeking advice on its legal
options, including banning all Russian athletes from the Rio Games, and that it is urging the international sports community to
not schedule any events in Russia. The committee also announced it will not issue credentials for the Rio Games to members of
the Russian Ministry of Sport, has created a
disciplinary commission to review the 2014
Sochi doping tests and will not plan or support any competitions in Russia.
Banning the entire Russian delegation
from the Summer Games raises an interesting question about individual versus
group punishment, and whether athletes
who have not been found to have been doping should suffer for the dirty dealings of others. Collective guilt treads on dangerous
ground, and risks denying due process. But
as the World Anti-Doping Agency noted, the
details in the McLaren report, along with allegations by Rodchenkov and others, make it
clear that cheating is so rampant within the
Russian athletic system — 580 positive tests
covered up across 30 different sports — that
a presumption of innocence may be misplaced.
The IOC should, if its bylaws allow, ban
the entire Russian team from Rio.
Why did the Russians cheat at such an
epic scale? Apparently, a misplaced sense of
national pride. After what McLaren described as a “very abysmal medal count” at
the 2010 Vancouver Olympics, the Russians
decided to cheat to avoid a similar embarrassment at the 2014 Winter Games it hosted
on its own territory in Sochi. Russia, unsurprisingly, denies that it has engaged in systematic cheating and has attacked Rodchenkov’s credibility. Yet it also suspended at
least four high-level sports ministry officials.
It would be naive to think doping is
limited to Russia. Just look at the parade of
suspensions among professional American
athletes caught using banned substances,
not to mention the fall of cycling legend
Lance Armstrong. It would be naive, too, to
think that banning Russia from the Games
will end the problem. But it would send the
necessary message that cheating is unacceptable, even if it is just for the sake of sport.
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MANAGING EDITORS
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DEPUTY MANAGING EDITORS
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Mark Boster Los Angeles Times
ALTON STERLING is memorialized outside the
store in Baton Rouge, La., where he was killed.
A real conversation
Re “The racial divide in Baton Rouge,” July 19
Every media outlet, every law enforcement agency,
every publicized comment from a citizen, every
politician’s news release agrees how outrageously wrong
are the latest killings of police officers in Baton Rouge,
La. I can do no less than concur.
However, someone needs to say — as I do now — that
until law enforcement agencies across the country
mention not only the names of the too many officers
killed, but also the names of civilians recently killed by
police that are excused as being “within department
policy,” and until many officials cease their oblique blame
of President Obama for these problems, then we are not
actually having a national conversation about these
issues. We are simply accepting the conditions of the
police state we live in.
How brave we are.
Bob Loza
Burbank
“Certainly,” Ernest
Hemingway once observed, “there is no hunting like the hunting of man,
and those who have hunted
armed men long enough
and liked it, never really
care for anything else
thereafter.” Hemingway
was talking about war and
the battlefield.
The shooters in both
Dallas and Baton Rouge
were products of expert
military training and the
hunting of armed men in
U.S. war zones overseas.
As Martin Luther King
Jr. said of a different war in
an equally terrible period
of American history, “The
bombs in Vietnam explode
at home.” Could the same
be true of the bombs in
Syria, Iraq and Afghanistan?
Leigh Clark
Granada Hills
::
Guns don’t kill people.
People with guns kill people, and we can’t ban people.
Patricia Freter
Yucca Valley
::
Re “The thinning blue
line,” editorial, July 19
In regard to the
strained relationship between police and the black
community, The Times
asks, “So what to do about
it?”
For starters, how about
doing what officers ask you
to do?
Your editorial calls the
recent shootings of police
officers “reprehensible”
and “indefensible,” and
then the rest of the piece
places the blame for these
disasters squarely on law
enforcement policies. As
for your call for better
accountability, the recent
acquittals of the Baltimore
officers prove that charging them in the first place
with crimes related to the
the death of Freddie Gray
was a supreme example of
over-reaction on the part of
the state’s attorney for the
city.
One thing is very clear
now: If there’s ever a time
to support your local police, this is it.
Charles Reilly
Manhattan Beach
ago become ridiculous. It
began about the time that
he was awarded the Nobel
Peace Prize because, just a
few months into his first
term, he had not yet used
thermonuclear weapons.
I look forward with
great anticipation to see all
the honors that will arrive
at the White House in the
next few months to adulate
this president for things he
has done, things he might
have done, things he didn’t
do and things he shouldn’t
have done.
Ermanno Signorelli
Mar Vista Crest
::
At first blush I agreed
with Alex Berezow and
Tom Hartsfield that
President Obama should
not have had a paper published in a scholarly journal. But upon examination
I found the authors of this
piece not as objective as I
first thought.
Berezow is with the
American Council on
Science and Research. Its
backers have included the
Koch brothers, tobacco
companies, Big Pharma,
Monsanto Co. and ExxonMobil Corp. The group,
which has a decidedly
conservative bias, has
claimed that there’s no
scientific consensus on
global warming, no evidence that secondhand
smoke can lead to heart
problems, and that fracking doesn’t pollute water or
air.
Hartsfield writes for
RealClearScience, which
has a similar point of view.
Watching, reading and
listening to media nowadays obviously requires
greater skepticism than
ever.
Hal Rothberg
Calabasas
::
The president is not a
scientist, and I can’t imagine that the readership of
JAMA believe that he is.
The editors of the journal
felt Obama’s paper was
important enough to publish.
I can’t imagine that any
reader would put this in
the category of “the discovery of DNA or black holes.”
Patrick A. Mauer, MD
Pasadena
Barack Obama,
doctor in chief?
Donald Trump’s
insecurity and us
Re “The president is not a
scientist,” Opinion, July 18
Re “Mixed signals and
missed chances,” news
analysis, July 19
With the publication of
an opinion piece by Barack
Obama in the Journal of
the American Medical
Assn., a new title has been
bestowed on the president:
physician in chief. Where
will it end?
There are so many
organizations and institutions that are eager to
bestow titles and awards
on this president while he
is in office that it has long
I can’t help but be
struck by the irony in presumptive Republican
presidential nominee
Donald Trump’s messages
that he is “tough” and that
he will “make America safe
again.”
Trump’s knee-jerk
reactions to any perceived
slight speak to a level of
insecurity unmatched in
any presidential candidate
in U.S. history. Yet he
would have us believe this
behavior betrays a “toughness” that will make
America safe. I would
argue the opposite.
More disturbingly,
Trump’s reactions are so
predictable that foreign
powers will have no problem manipulating him.
Several months ago, Russian President Vladimir
Putin publicly praised
Trump; as expected,
Trump swooned at the
compliment. Now Putin
understands how false
praise (or insults) can be
employed against Trump
to manipulate him.
Far from making America safe, Trump’s fragile ego
will have the direct effect of
making the world far more
dangerous.
Matthew Singerman
Newbury Park
::
I heard excerpts from
Melania Trump’s speech at
the Republican National
Convention Monday night
and Michelle Obama’s
speech at the Democrats’
convention in 2008. While it
is likely true that each of
them were taught to work
hard, keep their word and
respect others, those are
all the usual core values
taught by parents to children.
Given that Melania
Trump probably did not
write her own speech, it
was her speechwriter’s
parents who apparently
missed, “Thou shalt not
steal.”
Michele Hart-Rico
Los Angeles
Taxpayer funding
for antibiotics
Re “Deadly medical
disaster slowly unfolds,”
July 12
Can the government
encourage the development of new
antibiotics? Not only can
the government do so; it
must.
As an infectious diseases physician, I see too
many patients dying from
infections caused by antibiotic-resistant bacteria. A
purely market-based approach can no longer deliver the goods, as
pharmaceutical companies develop more profitable drugs instead of
antibiotics. If the government fails to offer appropriate incentives, the new
antibiotics our patients
need will not be brought to
market.
Tax credits targeted to
antibiotics that would
address unmet medical
needs — such as those
proposed in the Reinvigorating Antibiotic and Diagnostic Innovation Act by
Reps. Charles Boustany
(R-La.) and Mike Thompson (D-St. Helena) —
would have a critical impact.
Antibiotic-resistant
infections cost our health
care system more than $20
billion annually; this is
money that could be saved
if we had new, safe and
effective antibiotics. Inaction is not an option.
Henry Chambers, MD
San Francisco
Why print the
villain’s photos?
Re “Caught in a ‘net of
shame,” July 19
An obviously beautiful
young woman (a Playboy
model) invades another
person’s privacy by taking
a photo of her showering at
a gym and posts it with her
ugly comments.
The beast shows itself,
but The Times reports on
the disgusting act while
publishing not one, but two
publicity photos of the
young woman. What does
this say about The Times’
values?
I for one am appalled at
both the young woman’s
actions and The Times’
handling of the story.
Chris Keller
West Covina
HOW TO WRITE TO US
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A big reveal
on political
‘dark money’
REPUBLICAN NATIONAL CONVENTION
Must the
show go on?
By Ann M. Ravel
D
Los Angeles Times Opinion has asked
columnist Doyle McManus and other
political observers to send their thoughts
on the Republican convention in
Cleveland as it unfolds.
A failure so far
By Doyle McManus
A
modern political convention, now that it’s no
longer about choosing a
nominee, is supposed to be a
well-crafted infomercial — a
four-day miniseries that energizes party loyalists and attracts undecided voters into
their camp. By that measure,
Donald Trump’s shambolic
gathering is failing.
It isn’t unifying the Republican Party. It isn’t making Trump
more appealing to skeptics. It
hasn’t offered much solace to
audiences who feel demeaned by
some of Trump’s language:
women, African Americans,
Latinos.
Trump’s campaign manager,
Paul Manafort, has said his goal
this week is to “expand” voters’
view of Trump and win some
converts, just as Ronald
Reagan did in 1980. And yet
he started off the festivities
by denouncing Ohio Gov.
John Kasich — who is not
attending the convention
— as “dumb, dumb,
dumb.” “When is John
Kasich going to grow
up?” he asked.
Then the Trump majority refused to give minority
#NeverTrump delegates a roll call
vote on rules changes, even though they
were almost certain to lose. “He’s shown us
that we’re not wanted,” said Kendal Unruh,
a Ted Cruz delegate.
Meanwhile, the convention speakers
have focused more on the depredations of
Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton than on
the hitherto undetected virtues of the man
the GOP nominated Tuesday.
A parade of politicians and minor celebrities accused Obama of ignoring terrorism (not really true) and presiding over
higher crime rates (definitely not true).
One, soap opera actor Antonio Sabato Jr.,
said after his speech that he is “absolutely”
sure Obama is a Muslim (also not true).
Slamming the other party is a compulsory exercise at a political convention, of
course. And loathing Clinton may be the
glue that holds the GOP together. But
many of the speakers nearly forgot to talk
up the man they want to be president.
“One remarkable thing about this campaign is that you have a large number of
undecided voters, mostly because they
don’t like either candidate,” GOP pollster
David Winston told me.
“Those voters don’t know how to choose
between them. They need a framework for
making a decision. And the convention can
help provide that.” But, he added, “It can’t
just be about why the other side is wrong.
The candidates … have to define their
visions of a future for the country.”
That’s a good description of what’s been
missing from Trump’s campaign, and an
explanation for why he’s lagging behind
Clinton in all but a few polls.
Manafort says Trump needs a “bounce”
from the GOP convention to open a path to
victory in November. The way his week has
gone so far, he’s not going to get one.
[email protected]
Melania’s plagiarism
By David Litt
I
n the words of Melania Trump, “It is
amazing what you can accomplish if you
do not care who gets the credit.”
This is something I thought about often
four years ago, when I was part of the
speechwriting team at the Democratic
National Convention. There were about a
dozen of us responsible for the remarks of
just about anyone without an “OTUS” in
their job title.
Every speech was subject to thorough
quality control. First, strict time limits were
imposed — if a speech was long, even by a
single word, it would be sent back for revisions. Next, drafts were edited by Jeff Nussbaum and Ken Baer, two veteran writers.
After that, speeches were fact-checked by
the research department to make sure they
were accurate. The message was clear: It’s
important to get even the little things right.
As Melania Trump once said, “God is in the
details.”
Apparently, her husband never got the
message. On Monday, we saw what happens when a political team leaves quality
entirely to chance. Trump counterprogrammed his own convention with
interviews on the Golf Channel and Fox
News. A 45-minute opus from retired Lt.
Gen. Michael Flynn pushed Sen. Joni Ernst
out of prime-time. And Melania Trump
Angel Boligan Cagle Cartoons
delivered remarks that were plagiarized
from Michelle Obama’s, eight years before.
On a campaign, disorder leads to minor
embarrassments. But in theory, the next
stop for the Trump Train is the White
House, a place where even tiny mistakes
have enormous consequences. Imagine
Melania’s speechwriting team responding
to a mass shooting. Imagine this lack of
competence — and even more, this lack of
interest in competence — transplanted
from a greenroom to the situation room. A
spouse’s plagiarized speech doesn’t tell us
much about a candidate. But the missteps
that lead to plagiarism speak volumes.
David Litt wrote speeches for President
Obama from 2011-2016, and is currently the
head writer/producer for Funny or Die D.C.
The coming coup
By James Kirchick
A
mericans viewing the recent failed
coup attempt in Turkey as some
exotic foreign news story — the
latest, violent yet hardly unusual political
development to occur in a region constantly beset by turmoil — should pause to
consider that the prospect of similar instability would not be unfathomable in this
country if Trump were to win the
presidency.
Trump is the most brazenly authoritarian figure to secure the nomination of a
major American political party. He openly
expresses his support for all manner of
strongmen and his campaign manager,
Manafort, has actually worked for one:
former Ukrainian President Viktor
Yanukovich. At the convention on Monday,
Manafort put some of the tricks he learned
overseas as a dictator-whisperer to good
use, employing underhanded tactics to
avoid a roll call vote on the convention’s
rules package and removing language from
the party platform expressing support for
Ukraine’s democratic aspirations.
Throughout the campaign, Trump has
bragged about ordering soldiers to commit
war crimes, and has dismissed the possibility that he would face resistance. “They
won’t refuse,” he told Fox News’ Bret Baier
earlier this year. “If I say do it, they’re going
to do it.”
Oh really? Blimpish swagger might fly
within the patriarchal confines of a family
business, a criminal operation (the distinction is sometimes blurred) or a dictatorship. It does not, however, work in a liberal
democracy.
Try to imagine, then, a situation in
which Trump commanded our military to
do something stupid or illegal. Something
so dangerous that it put the lives of
Americans and the security of the country
at risk. (Trump’s former rival for the Republican presidential nomination, Marco
Rubio, said the U.S. could not trust “the
nuclear codes” to an “erratic individual.”)
Faced with opposition from his military
brass, Trump would perhaps reconsider
and back down. But what if he didn’t?
In that case, our military men and
women, who swear to uphold both the
Constitution and a civilian chain of command, would be forced to choose between
obeying the law and serving the wishes of
someone who has explicitly expressed his
utter lack of respect for it.
They might well choose the former.
“I would be incredibly concerned if a
President Trump governed in a way that
was consistent with the language that
candidate Trump expressed during the
campaign,” Gen. Michael Hayden, who
served as head of the CIA and NSA under
President George W. Bush, said in response
to Trump’s autocratic ruminations. Asked
by Bill Maher what would happen if Trump
told soldiers to kill the families of terrorists,
as he has promised to do, Hayden replied,
“If he were to order that once in government, the American armed forces would
refuse to act.”
Such a scenario is unimaginable under a
President Hillary Clinton, who, whatever
her faults, would never contemplate ordering a bombing run or a nuclear strike on a
country just because its leader slighted her
small hands at a summit. Trump is not only
patently unfit to be president, but a danger
to America and the world. Voters must stop
him before the military does.
James Kirchick is a fellow with the
Foreign Policy Initiative. His forthcoming
book is “The End of Europe.”
Who’s not
at the convention
By Mickey Edwards
T
here are no Ronald Reagans in
Cleveland this week, no Jack Kemps.
There are few neo-cons, eager to
promote the spread of democracy, and even
fewer serious players in the Republican
foreign policy establishment. Nor, most
surprising, are there many members of the
#NeverTrump movement, those Republicans, like Kasich and Jeb Bush, who are not
only appalled by Trump’s ignorance and
bigotry but willing to oppose him because
of it. Instead the convention has become a
battle between two more narrowly defined
elements: on the one hand, the coalition of
actual Trump supporters and their enablers at the Republican National Committee, and on the other hand, Cruz
supporters trying less to block Trump than
to reconfigure the nomination process to
secure the brass ring for Cruz four years
from now.
This is why people like Bob Dole have
given their support to Trump: He may be
awful, scary, stupid, but at least he’s not
Cruz. Or, for others, Trump is incompetent
and unhinged but at least he’s not Hillary
Clinton. This is not 1964 or 1976, where the
Republican conventions provided a framework for ideological confrontation — what
does our party stand for; what policies
make most sense for America? The convention unfolding in the Quicken Loans Arena
is at least in part about who is least loathsome. Do we despise Trump more than we
despise Cruz? Do we hate Trump more
than we hate Hillary? Do we hate hate more
than we hate Democrats?
Mickey Edwards is a former member of
the House Republican leadership.
ark money — campaign spending from undisclosed sources —
is seeping into the 2016 election
at a rate unmatched in U.S. history. Sham nonprofit organizations and limited liability companies put
blinders on voters. And as I’ve seen firsthand during my three years on the Federal
Election Commission, misguided court decisions plus my pwm agency’s dysfunction
have completely hampered the ability to ensure accountability in election spending on
a nationwide level.
Voters have a right to know who is paying
for a political campaign before they go to the
polls. Given how easily dark money is shuttled around the country, a national solution
would be best. But until that happens,
states and cities can take steps to improve
transparency in campaign spending.
In California, where I used to chair the
state’s Fair Political Practices Commission,
strong state campaign finance laws and a
commitment to enforcement exposed who
was spending millions on campaigns. As a
result, dark money in California has been
kept to a minimum.
A notable example came in 2012, when
the FPPC investigated the largest anonymous donation in the history of California
politics. Ultimately we uncovered a web of
secretive nonprofits stretching from Virginia to Iowa to Arizona that colluded to funnel
$15 million into ads about two state ballot
measures. California’s robust disclosure
laws led to a record $1-million fine against
two of those donor groups — and would
have permitted the state to collect an additional $15 million from the political action
committee that spent the donations.
At the time, however, California’s laws
did not require disclosure of the individual
donors hiding behind the nonprofits. The
state Legislature passed measures in 2014 to
remedy that. So this November, when
Californians vote on whether to renew
Proposition 30 — the tax that was one of the
ballot measures targeted by dark money in
2012 — they stand a much better chance of
learning who is supporting or opposing it.
A new report on a study by the Brennan
Center for Justice at New York University
School of Law quantified what a difference
strong transparency laws have made in California. The study analyzed outside spending in six states — Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Maine and Massachusetts
— between 2006 and 2014. California saw by
far the greatest total amount of outside
spending, which includes all election spending that is not coordinated with a candidate:
a minimum of $75 million in a cycle. Still, no
more than $2 million of it was dark money.
California, as a result of its 2014 reforms, was
the only state to see dark money actually
drop between 2010 and 2014.
By contrast, in the five other states with
weaker transparency requirements, average dark money expenditures shot up
nearly threefold between 2010 and 2014. Arizona was particularly egregious; dark money there skyrocketed from about $600,000 in
2010 to more than $10 million in 2014. Unfortunately, Arizona doesn’t recognize how
this is undermining its elections. In March
the Arizona Legislature actually voted to
significantly weaken its state oversight of
anonymous campaign spending.
I’ve advocated repeatedly that the federal government could learn from California. But given the gridlock in Washington, some cities and states — Connecticut,
Montana, New York City and Austin, Texas
— have seized the lead.
Among
their
reforms:
requiring
nonprofits that buy political ads to disclose
their relevant donors, and for those donors
to disclose their donors. Some also require
that top donors’ names appear on any advertisement. Some governments require
each politically active group to name the individual who controls its election activity,
which provides a starting point for uncovering the networks behind meaningless nonprofit names such as “Americans for Apple
Pie.”
Even California could make its laws
stronger. For example, it could enshrine the
public’s right to transparency in all campaign spending in the state’s Constitution
as a way to advance democratic self-government and protect the integrity of the electoral process. It also could make it much
easier for voters to access information
about the true sources of campaign money.
At the national level, we are a long way
from compelling transparency in political
spending from outside groups. Already, $37
million of dark money has been spent this
election cycle — three times the amount
spent at this point in 2012. Meanwhile, three
of my fellow FEC commissioners who are
ideologically opposed to campaign finance
regulation have blocked the agency from
updating its disclosure rules to bring this
spending into the light.
Ideally, curbing dark money will someday get a national solution. In the meantime, local and state measures to increase
transparency can have an effect, and California’s efforts serve as a model for the rest
of the country.
Ann M. Ravel has served on the Federal
Election Commission since 2013 and
chaired the commission in 2015.
latimes.com
/opinion
Patt Morrison Asks
Ursula K. Le Guin
As Comic-Con begins, an acclaimed pioneer of imaginative fiction explains how
she helped change the genre. Listen to the
podcast or read the transcript.
A12
W E D N E S DAY , J U LY 2 0 , 2 016
WSCE
L AT I ME S . CO M
State’s Obamacare rates rising
Monthly rates by income level
Here’s what a 40-year-old single person might pay in
southwest Los Angeles County for a silver, or mid-level,
plan next year.
Annual income
Federal assistance *
Anthem EPO
Anthem HMO
Blue Shield HMO
Blue Shield PPO
Health Net HMO
Kaiser Permanente HMO
L.A. Care HMO
Molina Healthcare
HMO (Coinsurance)
Oscar EPO
Rich Pedroncelli Associated Press
“CALIFORNIA has a very competitive marketplace,” said Peter Lee, executive
director of Covered California. Above, Lee discusses the program last year.
Tuesday, saying that the
competition among insurers
offering coverage on the exchange was working to keep
rates lower than they otherwise would be.
“California has a very
competitive marketplace,”
said Peter Lee, executive director of Covered California.
Obamacare has significantly reduced the number
of uninsured Californians.
Since the state’s health insurance exchange began offering coverage in 2014, the
share of Californians without health insurance has
fallen from 17% at the end of
2013 to 8.1% at the end of last
year, according to officials.
Rates are expected to
jump in other states too, although complete details
won’t be available until later
this year.
An analysis of 14 metro
areas that have already announced their 2017 premiums found an average jump
of 11%. The changes ranged
from a decrease of 14% in
Providence, R.I., to an increase of 26% in Portland,
Ore., according to the analysis by the nonpartisan Kaiser Family Foundation.
The federal healthcare.gov exchange provides in-
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The gospel on celebrity and pop culture
August 23, Santa Monica
Ministry of Gossip
August 17, Pasadena
L# 19101168
$17,820 $23,760 $29,700
$ 211
210
91
147
170
78
124
59
45
$ 146
275
156
212
235
143
190
125
110
121
187
Source: Covered California
latimes.com/MinistryofGossip
[Obamacare, from A1]
$122, while the government
pays Blue Shield $196. Next
year that same person would
pay $170, while the government would chip in $211 a
month.
“We’re paying more for
less,” said Jamie Court,
president of Consumer
Watchdog in Santa Monica.
“Insurers are limiting access
to doctors and hospitals
while also demanding a
higher price.”
Horacio Chavez, 34, of
Boyle Heights said he made
less than $25,000 last year as
an education coordinator at
a youth center. He currently
pays a $100 premium for a
Covered California plan that
he uses for an annual
checkup and a safety net in
case of emergencies.
“I do want healthcare — I
want the peace of mind that
if anything happens to me
that there’s some kind of
coverage,” Chavez said. But
“a 13% hike ... that’s going to
affect people.”
He said he’s already
barely making ends meet
trying to pay his rent, student loans from the University of Chicago, car payments and his health insurance premium.
“I’m already living check
to check,” Chavez said.
Covered California officials defended the system
surance under the Affordable Care Act in 38 states.
California and a few other
states operate their own exchanges.
Around the country, several insurers, including giant UnitedHealth, have
stopped selling health plans
on the exchanges, and a
number of new nonprofit
health insurance co-ops
have gone out of business.
Those decisions have fueled charges from the law’s
critics that Obamacare isn’t
working.
Former Secretary of
State Hillary Clinton, the
presumptive
Democratic
presidential nominee, is
pushing a number of specific
steps to ease price pressure
on consumers, including allowing Americans ages 55 to
64 to buy into Medicare.
Republican presidential
nominee Donald Trump has
argued the health law
should be repealed.
The health law’s next
enrollment period begins a
week before election day.
The state and federal
health insurance exchanges
provide coverage to about 12
million people nationally,
representing just a fraction
of the nation’s total insurance market. The vast majority of Americans — more
than 250 million people —
are in health plans purchased through an employer
or provided by a government
plan such as Medicare or
Medicaid.
But the exchanges are a
pillar of the Affordable Care
Act’s program for guaranteeing Americans’ insurance
coverage. And monthly premiums have become a
closely watched barometer
of how the law is performing.
Covered California’s Lee
told the House Ways and
Means Committee on July 12
that 2017 would be “a transitional year” for Obamacare,
with rates seeing “significant adjustments” across
the nation.
He said one reason for
the increase was the end of a
program designed to keep
rates down during the insurance exchange’s first three
years. The program had assessed a fee on all health insurers and then redistributed those funds among
carriers whose members
had the highest medical expenses, Lee said.
Lee added that some insurers had also not charged
enough in the first two years
because they didn’t have full
data on the medical costs or
health status of those signing up. Now they’re adjusting to account for those
higher costs.
$47,520
$ 71
349
231
287
310
218
264
199
185
$0
421
302
358
381
289
335
270
256
261
332
* Applies to all plans
Mia Campitelli, a Blue
Shield spokeswoman, said
Tuesday that the insurer’s
average 19.9% premium increase was “driven by our
members
using
more
healthcare services than we
expected,” as well as the
phaseout of the federal
mechanism that had kept
rates down in the law’s early
years.
Anthem spokesman Darrel Ng said: “Factors such as
increased use of medical
services and added costs of
drugs and medical therapies
put upward pressure on
rates and underscore the additional work that needs to
be done to moderate the
growth in healthcare costs.”
The financial pain for
most Californians getting insurance through the exchange will be muted because 90% get taxpayer assistance to cover the premiums.
Americans making less
than four times the federal
poverty level — about
$47,000 for a single adult or
$97,000 for a family of four —
qualify for the assistance.
Nonetheless, Americans
who make too much to qualify for subsidies are likely to
feel the brunt of the higher
premiums. That will probably increase pressure on
the new president —
Democrat or Republican —
to review the exchanges in
2017 for ways to make health
plans more affordable.
A year ago, Lee wrote an
op-ed in The Times saying
that Covered California’s
power in negotiating with insurers was allowing Obamacare to work in the
state.
“We now have the full picture in California, where
we are proving that health
insurance exchanges can
keep prices in check,” he
wrote.
Though the Affordable
Care Act has improved care
for millions of Americans —
for example, insurance companies can no longer set lifetime limits on care or exclude anyone because of a
preexisting condition — the
6-year-old law contains few
controls on overall costs.
Spending on the country’s medical system averages more than $10,000 for
every American, according
to statistics released by the
Obama administration this
month, far higher than any
other nation.
melody.petersen
@latimes.com
[email protected]
Times staff writer Soumya
Karlamangla contributed to
this report.
PHOTO: LA Times
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W ED NE SDAY , JULY 20, 2016
L AT I ME S. C O M/ TR AI L GU ID E
ELECTION 2016
REPUBLICAN NATIONAL CONVENTION
Brian van der Brug Los Angeles Times
FOUR OF Donald Trump’s children — Donald Jr., center left, Ivanka, Eric and Tiffany — take part in the roll call of states to nominate the billionaire candidate.
Trump claims nomination
A night of praise
and ambivalence
ANALYSIS
Anger, optimism
vie for dominance
By Cathleen Decker
CLEVELAND — Donald
Trump won the Republican
nomination by harnessing
the dour mood of GOP
voters put off by the nation’s
political class. Now, as he
turns to the general election,
he faces the challenge of incorporating something he
has mostly omitted to this
point — an overarching, positive vision for the country.
His best opportunity to
date will come during his
Thursday night convention
address. Hillary Clinton will
have the same opportunity
— and the same demand —
one week later.
For Trump and his fellow
Republicans, crafting an appealing argument requires a
How he scooped
everyone
A laid-off TV reporter
in a Culver City Starbucks first uncovered
borrowed passages in
Melania Trump’s
speech. B9
Marginalized
no more
Once insulted by fellow
Republicans, Harmeet
Dhillon is now a rising
GOP star. B2
On the stump,
not the floor
Republicans facing
tough reelection races
keep their distance
from Cleveland and
the nominee. B2
$2.00 DESIGNATED AREAS HIGHER
7
85944 00200
5
deft touch. They must convince even parts of the country that have benefited
under President Obama
that what they say would be
his third term — under Clinton — would be untenable.
That requires a heavy dose
of negativity.
But history suggests that
shifting gears toward an upbeat message is also a necessity.
“What voters want is a
message of optimism — an
upbeat, positive message
that tells them, to use the
words of a past candidate:
Americans, better days are
ahead,” said G. Terry
Madonna, a veteran pollster
in Pennsylvania, a state targeted by Trump this fall but
reliably Democratic for two
[See Analysis, B10]
By Noah Bierman
and Mark Z. Barabak
Brian van der Brug Los Angeles Times
“WHEN IT’S about ideas, the advantage goes to us,”
Speaker Paul D. Ryan assured the often angry crowd.
CLEVELAND — Setting
aside another day of self-inflicted turmoil, Donald
Trump celebrated his formal ascension Tuesday to
the Republican presidential
nomination — an achievement once seen as highly improbable and not fully assured until the roll call was
completed on the second
night of the GOP convention.
Republicans hoped the
moment would help them
correct course after a muddled first day on which the
dominant images were a
failed revolt by resistant
delegates and a plagiarism
controversy
involving
Trump’s wife, Melania.
Unlike Monday night,
when amateur speakers
dominated the prime-time
convention schedule, Tuesday’s headliners were some
of the party’s heavyweights,
including House Speaker
Paul D. Ryan, the 2012
vice presidential candidate
viewed by many as the
GOP’s intellectual leader.
But once more, a distinct
ambivalence about the party’s newly minted standardbearer was evident. Ryan
and others offered only passing praise for Trump, whose
main virtue, many suggested, was simply the fact
that he was not Hillary Clinton. The mere mention of her
name automatically drew
angry roars from the delegates on the convention hall
floor.
“Not since Baghdad Bob
has there been a public fig[See Day Two, B9]
OUTSIDE THE HALL
Protesters are rocking and rolling, peacefully
By Matt Pearce
reporting from cleveland
Tales from the streets outside the GOP convention,
where thousands are holding their own debate over
America’s future.
Day 2, 10:25 a.m.
I’ve never been around so
many police in my life.
In downtown Cleveland,
there are thousands of
them, roving in specially
sworn patrols on seemingly
every block. They might be
from California, Texas or
Georgia, and the units all
have different uniforms —
black, blue, tan. It’s got a
quasi-multicultural flair,
kind of like a gathering of
Olympic delegations where
the pole vaulters from
Ukraine have guns and the
power to arrest you.
Which is what makes
Tuesday morning’s first
protest so interesting.
Despite the city’s enormous police and surveillance presence, about 7:15
a.m., two women began
shimmying up the two flagpoles outside the Rock and
Roll Hall of Fame, which has
been hosting Republican
National Convention
guests. The two had managed to unhook and slip
past the least rock ’n’ thing
imaginable: metal barricades around the hall,
draped with signs that say,
“MUSIC DEFIES
BARRIERS.”
“Slightly ironic in its own
right,” said activist Collin
Rees, who was assisting
with the protest from the
ground, and whose favorite
group is the Temptations.
It was immigration and
anti-fracking activists who
were defying the barriers
this time. As police arrived
about 15 minutes later and
helplessly barked for the
two women to stop what
they were doing, according
to Rees, the activists hung a
25-by-25-foot banner that
said, “DON’T TRUMP OUR
COMMUNITIES: Ban
fracking, tear down the wall,
stop climate injustice.”
The flag hung slightly
above the American, Ohio
and Cleveland flags, which
had been lowered to halfstaff for the recent killings of
police officers in Dallas and
Baton Rouge, La.
The two women, Jacqui
Zepeda of Los Angeles and
[See Outside, B10]
Marcus Yam Los Angeles Times
TREVOR LEIS of the West Ohio Minutemen militia
stands guard outside the convention arena.
B2
W E D N E S DAY, J U LY 20 , 2 016
L AT I ME S . CO M
R E P U B L I C A N NAT I O NA L C O N V E N T I O N
‘Democracy is a series of choices.... Have we had our arguments this year?
Sure we have. And you know what I call those? Signs of life.’
— Paul Ryan,
Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives
Will
unity
betray
Ryan’s
ideals?
House speaker’s bid
to hold party together
could come at the
expense of GOP’s
conservative policies.
By Lisa Mascaro
Brian van der Brug Los Angeles Times
CALIFORNIAN Harmeet Dhillon opened the second night of the convention by singing the invocation in Punjabi and then translating it.
Devout and determined
Once insulted by
fellow Republicans,
Harmeet Dhillon is
now a rising star.
By Seema Mehta
When Harmeet Dhillon
first ran for vice chairwoman
of the California GOP, rivals
whispered that the Indianborn Sikh would slaughter a
goat at the lectern.
On
Tuesday
night,
Dhillon opened the second
night of the Republican
National Convention by
singing the invocation in
Punjabi and then translating it into English.
It’s a first for the RNC.
But it’s not the first time the
47-year-old San Francisco
lawyer has upended expectations.
Born in Chandigarh, India, she emigrated with her
parents to England and then
to the Bronx, N.Y. Her father,
an orthopedic surgeon, soon
moved the family to rural
Smithfield in central North
Carolina.
Dhillon says she was an
awkward, chubby child who
didn’t fit in at school.
“I had two long braids
and a funny name and my
mother didn’t dress me in
fashionable clothes. I was
not popular at all,” said
Dhillon.
Now thin with long hair,
she wore an Escada jacket
and draped a silk navy-andgold scarf over her long hair
when she delivered the
prayer Tuesday.
“Please give us the
courage to make the right
choices, to make common
cause with those with whom
we disagree, for the greater
good of our nation,” she told
the delegates.
She was raised as a devout Sikh. “I had a very religious upbringing at home.
That was very central to my
life from day one,” she recalled.
Her parents supported
Republicans after they became naturalized U.S. citizens. Their politics were
driven in part by her father’s
contempt for trial lawyers
because of medical malpractice lawsuits.
But they also were
formed by turmoil in India in
the 1970s, when an insurgency in Punjab led to temple raids and attacks on
some Sikhs.
Dhillon’s parents hosted
fundraisers for Sen. Jesse
Helms (R-N.C.), a conservative with strong views on foreign policy. He, in turn,
spoke out against persecution of Sikhs.
Dhillon attended Dartmouth College, where she
wrote for the college’s conservative paper, the Dartmouth Review, and ultimately was named editor.
In October 1988, the
weekly made headlines
when it published a satirical
column likening the college
president to Adolf Hitler,
and the effects of his campus
policies to the Holocaust.
A drawing on the next issue’s cover depicted the college president, who was Jewish, as Hitler.
As condemnation poured
in, Dhillon, then editor in
chief, denied in an interview
with the New York Times
that the column was antiSemitic, saying critics were
“trying to twist the issue to
their own ends.”
She said the column
sought to compare “liberal
fascism” with other forms of
fascism and was not meant
to show “callous disregard”
for the Holocaust.
“I’m
very
disturbed
about the response to it,”
she said. “I’m very surprised,
very, very surprised.”
Dhillon went to law
school at the University of
Virginia and worked in New
York City and London before
she settled in San Francisco.
She grew active in Bay
Area politics after hosting
debate watch parties for
President George W. Bush’s
reelection campaign in 2004.
After becoming county
party chair, she ran unsuccessfully for the state Assembly in 2008. She met her
future husband, Sarv, during that campaign.
In 2013, Dhillon ran for
vice chairwoman of the state
GOP. Some Republicans
castigated her for serving on
the board of the American
Civil Liberties Union’s Bay
Area chapter.
She says she got involved
in the ACLU after some
Sikhs were abused in the
aftermath of the Sept. 11 attacks.
But some of her opposition at the state GOP was
blatantly racist.
Fliers at the convention
called her a “Taj Mahal princess.” The goat slaughter rumors spread. The leader of a
county GOP women’s group
posted on Facebook that
Dhillon was a Muslim who
would defend beheadings.
(The woman was rep-
rimanded by the party and
no longer holds the post.)
Party leaders came to
Dhillon’s defense and she
won the election.
Since then, she has become the public face of the
state GOP while the chairman, Jim Brulte, worked to
rebuild its war chest.
“As she’s proven, she’s a
rising star in the party and
she’s also a sharp cookie and
highly able,” said Charles
Munger Jr., a major GOP
donor.
“One has to distinguish,
she was elected on her
merits,” he added. “She got
there in spite of being a
woman, in spite of being
Sikh. She’s the first woman
vice chair in party history.
There was no royal road
paved for her.”
Dhillon also has an acerbic wit. Brulte recalled a 2013
fundraiser where he saw a
thin man receive an award
for walking precincts.
“I said to the people at
the table, ‘You see, when you
walk precincts you lose
weight,’ ” said Brulte, who is
not svelte. Dhillon “spun
around, looked at me and
said, ‘You should walk a
few.’ ”
[email protected]
On stump, far from Cleveland
Republicans facing
tough reelection races
keep their distance
from the nominee.
By Lisa Mascaro
CLEVELAND — Republican Sen. Rob Portman of
Ohio spent this week building houses with Habitat
for Humanity, motivating
young campaign volunteers
and kayaking with wounded
veterans on the Cuyahoga
River.
Sen. Marco Rubio was
home in Florida, stumping
for votes before investigating mold contamination in a
federal courthouse in Pensacola.
And Sen. Kelly Ayotte
was busy in New Hampshire
fighting the scourge of opiate addiction crushing the
state.
As the Republican Party
gathers in Cleveland to
nominate Donald Trump as
their candidate for president, some key lawmakers
are steering clear of the GOP
convention.
Usually, elected officials
would be climbing over one
another for the chance to deliver a prime-time speech on
the convention stage or
share the limelight with
their party. They can hobnob with donors at swanky
parties.
Instead, House
and
Senate Republicans are set-
ting aside the possible gains
that come with attending a
convention and charting
their own route to reelection
as they try to retain their
majorities in Congress.
“I’m supporting Donald
Trump,” said Portman, a
first-term senator meeting
with campaign volunteers
less than a mile from the
convention site, as he wages
a tough fight for reelection
against Democratic former
Gov. Ted Strickland.
“He could be helpful because he’s bringing more
people into the party,” Portman said of Trump, saying
he would make his way to the
convention hall at Quicken
Loans Arena this week. “But
we’ll see.”
The story among House
Republicans was similar, as
many decided to stay away
from Cleveland rather than
hitch their reelection prospects to Trump.
Campaign officials said it
makes sense for lawmakers
to concentrate on their
constituents at home rather
than pass the week at
parties and political events
in Cleveland.
Republican leaders remained confident they will
hold the majority in both the
House and Senate with
Trump as the nominee.
“Our members are doing
what they need to do,” said
Rep. Greg Walden (R-Ore.),
the chairman of the National
Republican Congressional
Committee.
Even though it doesn’t always get as much attention
Brian van der Brug Los Angeles Times
NEW YORK delegate Wendy Long attends the GOP
convention, unlike some down-ballot Republicans.
as this year’s unusual presidential contest, the downballot battle for control of
Congress has become fierce,
with both parties sensing an
advantage because Trump
and Democrat Hillary Clinton are so unpopular among
voters.
The House and Senate
battles have also attracted
big-money
Republican
donors, including the influential Koch brothers and
their political network, who
would rather invest in Congress than Trump.
Republicans are likely to
easily hold the majority in
the House, where they have
a comfortable margin and
few seats at risk. Democrats
would need to pull off a landslide to flip nearly 30 seats to
retake the chamber.
In the Senate, though,
the majority may be in
jeopardy, with Republicans
defending 24 seats, including some in the key swing
states of Ohio, Pennsylvania, Nevada, New Hampshire and Florida that could
be tough to hold with Trump
on the ballot.
“The
word
‘volatile’
doesn’t begin to describe the
fight for a Senate majority
this year,” wrote veteran political analyst Charlie Cook
of the Cook Political Report
this month.
Democrats have been
taking overt pleasure in
linking virtually every single
House and Senate Republican up for reelection to
Trump’s bombastic pronouncements and policies
that break from GOP orthodoxy as Republicans convene in Ohio.
“They’re celebrating the
most hateful, dangerous
presidential nominee in a
generation,” Sen. Charles E.
Schumer of New York, who is
in line to become the majority leader if Democrats retake the Senate, wrote in an
email to donors Tuesday.
A few rank-and-file Republicans running for reelection did decide to make the
trek to Cleveland.
Sen. Ron Johnson of Wisconsin, who faces a tough reelection against Democratic
former Sen. Russ Feingold,
was expected to attend, and
another lawmaker from the
Badger State, Rep. Sean P.
Duffy, had a prime-time
speaking role Monday with
his wife.
But Sen. John McCain,
the GOP’s 2008 nominee,
was home campaigning in
Arizona, as was Sen. Mark
Steven Kirk, perhaps the
most endangered senator
facing
reelection,
in
Democrat-heavy Illinois.
“We’re
running
for
Senate. We’re not running
for president,” said Ward
Baker, executive director of
the National Republican
Senatorial Committee working to keep the Senate GOP
majority.
“I’ve always counseled
people to stay in their
states,” he said at a briefing
Tuesday in Cleveland. “I
gave that advice in ’12, I did it
in ‘16, and I’d do it again in
’20.”
[email protected]
Twitter: @LisaMascaro
CLEVELAND — House
Speaker Paul D. Ryan spent
a career honing an image as
one of Washington’s most serious, likable and wonkish
Republicans.
At a recent fundraising
dinner, he dazzled finance
industry leaders by sparring
for more than an hour over
the intricacies of monetary
policy.
He used his leadership
position this year to turn the
House into an incubator for
GOP policies on poverty and
taxes.
During the mudslinging
Republican primary, he implored presidential candidates to “raise our gaze.”
Yet on Tuesday night,
Ryan found himself presiding over a presidential convention that nominated a
Republican nominee who
could not be more different
in style and substance from
the 46-year-old Wisconsin
congressman.
As Ryan conceded just
days ago, Donald Trump is
“not my kind of conservative.” He previously called
Trump’s attack on an
American-born judge of
Mexican descent the “textbook definition of racism.”
And only after a very public hand-wringing did the
2012
vice
presidential
nominee reluctantly agree to
endorse Trump with a logic
that only a debate champ
might appreciate: He called
it a “binary choice” of either
supporting Trump despite
misgivings,
or
helping
Democrat Hillary Clinton.
In a convention speech
Tuesday night, Ryan tried
again to bring his party together, focusing largely on
the risk of electing Clinton
rather than the promise of
Trump, whom he scarcely
mentioned.
“Democracy is a series of
choices,” he said. “We Republicans have made ours.
Have we had our arguments
this year? Sure we have.”
But he characterized the
internal disputes as a
promising “sign of life” and
energy inside the party and
said the time had come to
unify.
“This year of surprises
and dramatic turns can end
in the finest possible way —
when America elects a conservative governing majority,” he told delegates. “So
what do you that say we
unite this party, at this crucial moment when unity is
everything?”
Ryan still faces an uphill
battle for the rest of the
week: Can he unify a fractured Republican convention boycotted by most of
the party’s biggest names
and inject some of his own
traditional GOP policy prescriptions into an inexperienced, unpredictable
and often hostile presidential campaign whose
positions sometimes contradict long-standing Republican ideology?
The task is a risky one for
Ryan.
While he may succeed in
holding the party together,
helping to elevate Trump’s
White House bid, it could
come at the expense of the
core GOP principles that
have been Ryan’s life’s work.
At stake is not only
Ryan’s brand as the keeper
of conservative ideology of
Washington, but also the future of the Republican Party.
lisa.mascaro
@latimes.com
Twitter:
@Lisa Mascaro
CALIFORNIA
B3
W E D N E S D A Y , J U L Y 2 0 , 2 0 1 6 :: L A T I M E S . C O M / C A L I F O R N I A
Wage
dispute
stalls
housing
plan
A COAS TA L QU E ST
Governor and unions
are at an impasse over
pay demand as part of
a push to build more
low-income units.
By Liam Dillon
Photographs by Allen J. Schaben Los Angeles Times
A SURFER catches a wave in Crescent City, Calif. Times columnist Steve Lopez has embarked on a summer-long trip along the
length of the state to study coastal preservation. Along the way, he’ll be reviewing past victories and disappointments.
Our shoreline savior
Coastal Act’s 40th anniversary is a good time to see its effects
STEVE LOPEZ
Editor’s note: On
Monday, Steve
Lopez left Oregon
headed for the
Mexican border, on
a summer-long
trip to understand
the forces that
helped save and
still threaten California’s 1,100 miles of beaches,
wetlands, wave-pounded coves
and rocky cliffs.
Once upon a time, the California coast was up for grabs.
Really up for grabs.
Industry took what it could,
erecting mills, oil refineries and
power plants. Mega-hotels squatted on beaches. Subdivisions
sprouted by the dozens. People of
means built homes with backyard
oceans, blocking public access and
views.
And then, in the 1960s, something extraordinary happened.
People began demanding a halt to
unregulated development, and
began fighting to save what was
left.
On Monday morning, I stood
with one foot in Oregon and one in
California.
Then I began the first leg of my
1,100-mile trek to the Mexican
border, a summer trip along the
A BIRD in Lake Earl Wildlife Area near Crescent City. The
Coastal Act resulted from activism of the 1960s and early ’70s.
length of the state to study coastal
preservation. Along the way I’ll be
reviewing past victories and disappointments with an eye toward
understanding what Californians
might do to make sure your greatgrandchildren can still enjoy this
glorious landscape.
The timing is right for two
reasons.
First, this is the 40th anniversary of the California Coastal Act
that resulted from all the activism
of the 1960s and early ’70s.
Second, developers are warm-
ing up bulldozers along several
stretches of the coast at a moment
when the state Coastal Commission has stirred up a troubling
little political drama.
Commissioners fired Executive
Director Charles Lester in February for reasons that don’t add up.
Some have challenged the science
of experts as if they’re carrying
water for developers. And Gov.
Jerry Brown has been invisible,
leaving reasonable people to assume he likes the way business at
one of the nation’s most powerful
regulatory agencies is being conducted.
But two ethics investigations
are underway involving campaign
donations from an executive with
the most powerful coastal lobbying firm, and two legislative reform
efforts are in play, one of which
would put an end to private confabs between commissioners and
those who want to build something on the coast.
When my plane landed in
Arcata, my first visit was with
former California Coastal Commission Chief Counsel Ralph
Faust, who reminded me of the
words of former agency Executive
Director Peter Douglas:
“The coast is never saved. It’s
always being saved.”
Douglas was right. It’s a constant battle to save the coast, not
just from big industrial projects,
but from hundreds of little ones
where someone wants to build or
expand a house that could impinge on the public’s right to access or views.
But like I said, the victories are
many, and they offer lessons and
inspiration going forward.
An hour after talking to Faust, I
hiked the Ma-le’l Dunes on Humboldt Bay with Jen Kalt of Humboldt Baykeeper. This 160-acre
treasure has been called one of the
most pristine dune systems on the
[See Lopez, B6]
LATIMES.COM/lopez-road-trip >>> Follow along as Steve Lopez documents his exploration of California’s coastline.
GAR RY M ARSH ALL , 1934 -2 016
Brought comic touch to TV, film
From Associated Press
W
riter-director Garry
Marshall,
whose deft
touch with
comedy and romance led to
a string of TV hits that included “Happy Days” and
“Laverne & Shirley” and the
box-office successes “Pretty
Woman” and “Runaway
Bride,” has died. He was 81.
Marshall died Tuesday at
a hospital in Burbank of
complications from pneumonia after having a stroke,
his publicist Michelle Bega
said in a statement.
The director also had an
on-screen presence, using
his New York accent and
gruff delivery in colorful supporting roles that included a
practical-minded
casino
boss unswayed by Albert
Brooks’ disastrous luck in
“Lost in America” and a
crass network executive in
“Soapdish.”
“A great, great guy and
the best casino boss in the
history of film,” actor-filmmaker Brooks posted on
Twitter.
Henry Winkler, who
starred as Fonzie on “Happy
Days,” saluted Marshall in a
tweet as “larger than life,
funnier than most, wise and
the definition of friend.”
Richard
Gere,
who
starred opposite Julia Roberts in “Pretty Woman,” said
in a statement that “everyone loved Garry. He was a
mentor and a cheerleader
and one of the funniest men
who ever lived. He had a
heart of the purest gold and
a soul full of mischief. He was
[See Marshall, B7]
Gary Friedman Los Angeles Times
‘A SOUL FULL OF MISCHIEF’
Garry Marshall enjoyed a long string of sitcom successes including “Laverne &
Shirley” and “The Odd Couple.” Among his film hits was “Pretty Woman.”
SACRAMENTO — A
fight over construction
worker pay has left Gov.
Jerry Brown and a powerful
labor group at a stalemate
over the governor’s plan to
speed up housing development for low-income
Californians, leaving uncertainty over whether a final
deal can be reached before
the end of the legislative session in August.
Brown has proposed legislation to streamline approval for housing with units
for low-income residents.
The State Building and Construction Trades Council,
which represents ironworkers, roofers, electrical workers and other construction
unions, wants Brown to
force home builders to pay
construction workers at
rates often equivalent to
union wages to qualify under
the plan, something the governor is resisting.
Without the higher pay
rules, known as prevailing
wages, Brown’s plan would
push construction workers
into needing low-income
housing themselves, said
Robbie Hunter, the head of
the State Building and Construction Trades Council.
“It’s bad for the state of
California. It’s bad for residents,” Hunter said. “The
developers are just going to
pad their profits.”
[See Housing, B8]
Cal State
funding
woes
linger
By Rosanna Xia
State budget cuts have
left California State University with about 19% less in
funding to spend per student compared with pre-recession years — compromising efforts to fully address
student needs, university officials said.
The state spends about
$7,858 per full-time student,
compared with $9,686 in
2007-08, adjusted for inflation, Assistant Vice Chancellor Ryan Storm told the
board of trustees at a meeting Tuesday in Long Beach.
The state’s final budget
agreement for fiscal year
2016-17 gave Cal State about
60% of the additional funding that administrators
wanted, which forced some
priorities, such as student
enrollment, to be downsized.
Cal State received an additional $154 million from
the state general fund —
raising total state support
for the university system to
$3.2 billion — plus one-time
funding increases for maintenance needs and student
success initiatives.
Trustees had requested
an additional $110 million
from
the
state
for
enrollment
growth
—
enough to fund roughly
12,600 additional students.
The final state budget plan
allocated an additional $57.4
million, which will allow the
[See Cal State, B6]
B4
W E D N E SDAY , J U LY 20 , 2 016
L AT I ME S . CO M
CA L I F O R N I A
BRIEFING
ROCKLIN
Boy arrested
in slaying
of girl, 13
A teenage boy has been
arrested in the killing of a girl
whose body was found in her
bedroom in Northern California.
The 13-year-old girl was
found dead Tuesday by her
mother in their Rocklin
home, where the suspect
also lives.
Rocklin Police Department spokesman Lon Milka
said the girl appeared to
have died from blunt force
trauma.
Milka said both the boy
and girl lived in the home
but police had not determined their relationship.
—Associated Press
SAN FRANCISCO
Man held after
alleged threat
Irfan Khan Los Angeles Times
SASHA ALI sits outside Yucca-Argyle Apartments in Hollywood. The tenants association supports the L.A. Tenants Union, which is
fighting against a November affordable housing ballot measure, saying it would create more luxury housing at the expense of renters.
CITY HALL WATCH
Housing plan faces new foes
Tenants groups join
fight against ballot
measure, reject its
vow to aid renters.
EMILY ALPERT REYES
When labor unions and
community groups teamed
up to back a November
affordable-housing ballot
measure, their plans drew a
predictable set of opponents.
The ballot measure,
called Build Better L.A.,
would impose new requirements for affordable housing on real estate developers
who seek to build projects
bigger than city rules ordinarily
allow.
Business
groups such as the Los Angeles Area Chamber of Commerce said the proposal
would end up making it
harder and costlier to build
needed housing, pointing to
labor requirements they
said would favor unions.
Now the Build Better L.A.
initiative has a new and unexpected foe: tenant activists. At a Tuesday news
conference, the L.A. Tenants
Union railed against the ballot proposal, arguing that it
would fuel luxury housing
rather than truly affordable
apartments. Renters hoisted signs that read “Affordable for Who?” outside a Hol-
lywood apartment building
that is targeted for demolition to make way for a bigger
project that would include
restaurants, shops and hundreds of housing units. Activists said more renters
would face displacement if
the new measure is passed,
despite promises to protect
affordable housing.
“Build Better L.A. is expediting displacement in
our communities, and we
need to protect the tenants
who are going to be affected,” said tenant union
member Elizabeth Blaney.
The
proposed
rules
would require some developments that seek zoning
changes or amendments to
the city general plan to either provide affordable
housing or pay additional
fees, according to an analysis by City Atty. Mike Feuer.
Building projects funded by
the city’s Affordable Housing Trust Fund would also
have to follow new hiring and
wage requirements.
Feuer also noted that the
proposal would limit L.A.’s
ability to restrict amendments to the general plan —
a city document that guides
development — for real estate developments that
meet affordable housing,
transit and labor requirements.
The L.A. Tenants Union
argued that wording would
make it easier and faster to
build new, more expensive
developments without providing enough housing for
the poor and displaced. Tenants ejected to make way for
such developments would
not have a guaranteed right
to return, the group said.
“We don’t want to accept
breadcrumbs that are being
thrown at us,” Blaney said.
Backers of Build Better
L.A. say the concerns are unfounded. Laura Raymond,
campaign director for the
Alliance for Community
Transit-Los Angeles, argued that Build Better L.A.
would not take away any city
discretion over big projects.
She said the wording that
had worried the tenant activists was meant to address
any future limits on general
plan amendments, not alter
the existing process.
The proposed measure
has had firm support from
several other groups that
represent renters, including
Strategic Actions for a Just
Economy and the Coalition
for Economic Survival.
Larry Gross, executive
director of the coalition, said
that tenants don’t have a
guaranteed right to return
except in specific circumstances — something that
the measure would not
change — and that the new
requirements would help
protect affordable housing.
Big developments can be
built either way, Gross said.
The ballot
measure ‘is
expediting
displacement in
our communities,
and we need to
protect the
tenants who are
going to be
affected.’
— Elizabeth Blaney,
L.A. Tenants Union member
Without the housing and labor requirements imposed
by Build Better L.A.,
“they’re doing it anyway —
and we’re not getting these
things.”
Tuesday’s event was held
jointly with the Yucca-Argyle Tenants Assn., whose
members raised concerns
about how displaced tenants would fare if their Hollywood building is torn down.
Sejal Patel, who has lived in
the building for five years,
said she earned too much to
qualify for affordable housing but couldn’t afford the
planned new units either.
Bob Champion, whose
company is developing the
new project, said Tuesday
that the firm plans to re-
place all of the affordable
units that exist in the building and offer them to the current tenants.
Like the tenants, he opposes Build Better L.A. —
but said his worry was that it
would destroy jobs for building companies that aren’t
unionized.
The L.A. Tenants Union
was formed last year as
renters reeled from evictions
and displacement. Its concerns about luxury development echo similar arguments raised by backers
of the Neighborhood Integrity Initiative, another upcoming ballot measure that
targets bigger developments. That measure would
restrict “mega developments” and curb the ability
of city lawmakers to alter
planning rules for individual
projects.
Members of the L.A. Tenants Union said it has not yet
taken a position on the
Neighborhood Integrity Initiative, which backers now
aim to put on the ballot in
March. Sasha Ali, a tenant at
the Argyle Avenue building,
has spoken publicly at a
Neighborhood Integrity Initiative event but said she
and the Argyle tenant group
had not endorsed it either.
[email protected]
Times staff writer David
Zahniser contributed to this
report.
SURROUNDINGS
‘Pokemon Go’ raises agencies’ ire
Some players of the
game upset officials by
seeking access to fire
stations and a jail.
VERONICA ROCHA
“Pokemon Go” players
will go anywhere to catch a
virtual fictional character,
even if it’s a trip to jail.
The augmented reality
game is the latest craze
sweeping the nation, but
not everybody is happy
about it.
Using GPS mapping on
smartphones, the app allows “Go” players to hunt for
the characters while out and
about in their neighborhoods. Stops and landmarks
have
been
established
throughout the game, allowing players to collect loot
and battle others.
But that aspect of the
game is part of the problem,
officials said, and it’s causing
headaches for public safety
agencies in Los Angeles
County.
In just the last two days,
fire dispatchers received
about 100 calls from app
users saying they couldn’t
get into certain fire stations
because they were closed
when firefighters were responding to calls, said fire
Inspector Richard Licon.
“They couldn’t get in and
called 911, asking if they
Karl Mondon TNS
USING GPS MAPPING on smartphones, “Pokemon Go” enables players to hunt
for virtual fictional characters while out and about in their neighborhoods.
could gain access,” he said.
At the request of fire dispatchers, the Fire Department released a tweet asking “Pokemon” users not to
call 911 for gaming questions.
Soon thereafter, the calls
stopped, Licon said.
Licon’s message to “Go”
gamers: “Although it’s not
your emergency, it’s someone else’s emergency you are
slowing down,” he said.
Even more mind-boggling is that some players are
trying to get into jail.
The Covina Police Department on Thursday re-
ceived two calls from “Pokemon Go” players asking if
they could visit the jail because it was a “target-rich
environment,” Sgt. Trevor
Gaumer said.
And to one request,
Gaumer responded: “Absolutely not.”
The two calls were
enough to prompt Lt. Tim
Doonan to put out a tweet
advising “Go” players they
could not access the jail.
In a post-9/11 environment, Gaumer said police
departments and fire stations are not accessible to
the public because of increased security measures.
“It just can’t happen,” he
said. “It’s a little naive to
think you can have access to
a government building in
this day and age.”
Across
police
headquarters, Gaumer said
he sees up to 40 players daily
glued to their smartphones
searching for characters at a
small concrete park. The
players are usually in their
teens to early 20s.
On Friday about 4:15
a.m., there were a handful of
“Go” players already at the
park fixated on the game, he
said.
While some law enforcement agencies have complained about the game’s
unintended consequences,
other departments have
taken the concept and run
with it. They see the game as
an opportunity to connect
with their community.
Coronado officials placed
an electronic traffic sign
near the San Diego-Coronado Bridge with the message: “No Pokemon and
driving.” In Fairfield, the Police Department hosted a
“Pokemon Go” hunt Friday
morning and invited players
to help them “catch them
all.”
Officer Kathryn McCormick told players she picked
up the game three days ago
and is still learning. But she
noted she has taken some
funny photographs showing
the fictional characters.
McCormick used the opportunity to advise players
about the risks that come
with playing “Pokemon.”
“This kind of gives us a
chance to come and hang
out and have fun and hopefully to get to know some of
you guys and you guys get to
know us,” she said. “Realize
we are people just like you.
We are not scary. You can
come up and talk to us anytime you want to.”
veronica.rocha
@latimes.com
A man who allegedly
tweeted a threat against San
Francisco’s acting police
chief is in police custody, an
official said.
Officer Carlos Manfredi
said 60-year-old Donald
Hoganson was taken into
custody Tuesday.
Manfredi said police began investigating after a
tweet posted Saturday
called for beheading Chief
Toney Chaplin, who is black,
and included a photo of the
chief beside a guillotine.
He said Hoganson was
taken into custody after a
judge approved a warrant to
search the man’s San Francisco home.
Hoganson’s Twitter account is filled with photographs of swastikas and
messages about white supremacy.
—Associated Press
LOS ANGELES
Actor accused of
domestic abuse
Actor Tom Sizemore,
known for his roles in the
films “Saving Private Ryan”
and “Black Hawk Down,”
was arrested Tuesday in
downtown Los Angeles on
suspicion of domestic violence.
Police received a report
of cohabitant abuse about
8:15 a.m. in the 400 block of
South Main Street, said Officer Jane Kim, spokeswoman
for the Los Angeles Police
Department. Officers took
Sizemore into custody, and
he was being held in lieu of
$50,000 bail.
Sizemore, 54, has a history of run-ins with the law.
In 2006, he pleaded no contest to using methamphetamine outside a Bakersfield
motel and was sentenced to
36 months’ probation.
Los Angeles police arrested him twice in 2009:
once on suspicion of battery
on a former spouse and the
other time on suspicion of
transporting or selling a
controlled substance, according to arrest records.
In 2011, he was arrested on
charges of battery on a former spouse.
Most recently, Sizemore
was reported to be driving a
vehicle that ran over a stuntman on the set of the new TV
show “Shooter.” Sizemore
reportedly didn’t see the
stuntman while filming at
Agua Dulce Airpark.
The stuntman suffered
major injuries, Los Angeles
County fire officials said.
— Veronica Rocha
Lottery results
Tonight’s SuperLotto Plus
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Tonight’s Powerball Jackpot:
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Sales close at 7 p.m.
For Tuesday, July 19, 2016
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Mega number is bold
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Jackpot: $25 million
Fantasy Five: 3-15-17-20-24
Daily Four: 4-3-9-0
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Daily Three (evening): 4-1-5
Daily Derby:
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Race time: 1:46.25
Results on the Internet:
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General information:
(800) 568-8379
(Results not available at this number)
L AT I ME S . CO M
W E D NE S DAY, J U LY 2 0 , 2 016
B5
CITY & STATE
Obama and Biden endorse Harris
Support strengthens
her U.S. Senate race
and adds new hurdle
for rival Sanchez.
By Phil Willon
SACRAMENTO — President Obama and Vice
President Joe Biden on
Tuesday announced that
they are backing state Atty.
Gen. Kamala Harris, a longtime political ally of the
president, in California’s
historic Democrat-on-Democrat U.S. Senate race.
The president praised
Harris as a “lifelong courtroom
prosecutor”
who
fought international gangs,
oil companies and the big
banks responsible for the
mortgage crisis.
“Kamala Harris fights for
us. That’s why I’m so proud
to endorse her for United
States senator,” the president said in a statement released by the Harris campaign and Democratic National Committee. “And if
you send her to the Senate,
she’ll be a fearless fighter for
the people of California — all
the people of California —
every single day.”
For Harris’ rival, Orange
County Rep. Loretta Sanchez, the endorsements add
another political obstacle to
the many she must overcome by the November election.
Sanchez, who has served
in Congress for two decades,
said in a statement released
by her campaign Tuesday
evening that she was “disappointed” that Obama picked
sides in a race between two
Democrats. Instead, she
said, he should be focused on
defeating Republican presidential nominee Donald
Trump.
“I believe that California
voters are deeply concerned
about the entrenched political establishment which has
failed to work for them. Yet,
it has been clear for some
time that the same political
establishment would rather
have a coronation instead of
an election for California’s
next U.S. Senator,” Sanchez
said.
“California’s Senate seat
does not belong to the political establishment — it belongs to the People of California, and I believe California voters will make their
own independent choice for
U.S. Senate in November,”
she said.
The president’s nod caps
a string of major endorsements for Harris, the candidate of choice among the
Democratic Party’s power
barons and some of the left’s
most influential interest
groups. It also sends a clear
signal to Democratic donors, many of whom have
stayed on the sidelines this
election.
Harris already has won
the support of Gov. Jerry
Brown and the California
Democratic Party, along
with Sen. Elizabeth Warren
(D-Mass.), a favorite of the
left.
Sanchez supporters expressed dismay that the administration would attempt
to tip the scales in this intraparty contest.
“In this historic Democrat versus Democrat race,
we have two strong, qualified women of color and it is
unfortunate that instead of
letting the voters decide, the
Democratic party along
with President Obama are
picking sides,” said Martín
Diego Garcia, director of the
Campaign for Latino Victory Fund, a political action
committee that supports
Latino candidates.
Lori Cox Han, a political
science professor at Chapman University in Orange,
said the endorsements by
Obama and Biden solidified
the message that Harris was
the Democratic Party’s chosen one.
“It just kind of says that
it’s really not going to be that
competitive going forward,”
she said.
If Sanchez had the ability
to mount a serious challenge, that would have become apparent in the June
primary, Cox Han said.
Sanchez finished a distant
second with 19% of the vote,
compared with the 40%
nabbed by Harris.
Sanchez supporter John
Harris, the Republican owner of Harris Farms in Coal-
inga, said he still thinks the
congresswoman
has
a
chance if she can stitch together
support
among
enough Southern California
Democrats, Latinos, moderates and Republicans.
“Loretta Sanchez has a
path to victory, if she can get
there,” said Harris, whose
farm was home to the 2014
Kentucky Derby and Preakness Stakes winner, California Chrome.
The impact of Obama’s
endorsement will be “neutral” in the Central Valley, he
said. Harris is largely perceived as part of the “elite
San Francisco establishment,” and along with the
president has been unsympathetic to the water issues
faced by California’s farmers
and ranchers, he said.
Harris has more than a
3-to-1 edge over Sanchez
in fundraising and easily
topped a crowded field of
Senate candidates in the
June primary. The attorney
general also held a 15-percentage-point lead over
Sanchez in the latest Field
Poll.
The two Democrats will
face off in the November
election, setting the stage for
the highest-profile contest
between two members of the
same party since California
adopted a top-two primary
election system.
Harris’ ties to Obama
and his administration
stretch back more than a
decade, even before he burst
onto the national political
scene. While she was still the
San Francisco district attorney, Harris supported and
raised money for Obama
when he ran for the U.S.
Senate in Illinois. She later
served as the California cochair of his upstart 2008
presidential campaign.
Obama reciprocated by
helping to launch Harris into
the national spotlight when
Genaro Molina Los Angeles Times
AS SENATOR , Kamala Harris would be a “fearless
fighter” for California, President Obama wrote.
he gave her a speaking role
at the 2012 Democratic National Convention in North
Carolina.
The next year, the president landed in hot water
when he called Harris the
“best-looking attorney general” in the country during a
Democratic fundraiser in
the Bay Area.
The president called
Harris the next day to apologize for the remark and the
distraction it caused.
Because of that political
allegiance, it would have
been more surprising if
Obama hadn’t endorsed
Harris, said John Hanna of
Southwest Regional Council
of Carpenters, which supports Sanchez.
The Orange County congresswoman backed Hillary
Clinton in her 2008 campaign against Obama for the
Democratic
presidential
nomination, so that also
could be a factor, Hanna
said.
“The president and vice
president are stand-up
guys,” Hanna said. “They reward loyalty.”
Hanna said he was
thankful that the endorsement was announced this
week, predicting that it
would get lost in the blizzard
of news coverage of Trump
and the Republican National Convention in Cleveland.
philip.willon
@latimes.com
Twitter: @philwillon
Gary Coronado Los Angeles Times
A SEWAGE SPILL in Boyle Heights flowed into the Los Angeles River, prompting beach closures in Long Beach, above, and Seal Beach.
Sewer line splits; spill worsens
Ruptured pipe breaks
again as workers try to
fix it. Beaches remain
closed to swimmers.
By Veronica Rocha,
Alexia Fernandez
and Matt Hamilton
A damaged sewage line
spilled a total of about 2.4
million gallons of untreated
waste into the Los Angeles
River and has forced the closure of all beaches in Long
Beach and Seal Beach, officials said Tuesday.
The sewage line began
leaking Monday about 2 p.m.
and was stopped late that
night, but the cracked pipe
split again Tuesday as repairs were underway, said
Tonya Durrell, a spokeswoman for the City of Los
Angeles Department of Public Works.
The overflow, which occurred near 6th Street and
Mission Road in Boyle
Heights, was fully stopped
Tuesday afternoon, Durrell
said.
Officials said the top of a
5-foot sewer pipe collapsed,
sending debris into the pipe.
The clog then caused the
sewage to overflow.
The spill sent millions of
gallons of waste into the
river, a 51-mile waterway
that snakes through Los Angeles County, ending in Long
Beach. Using pumps, workers were able to capture
about 750,000 gallons of
sewage before it reached the
river, Durrell said.
Officials don’t know what
caused the break, but the
large sewer line was built in
1929, said Adel Hagekhalil,
assistant director of Los Angeles Sanitation.
“This happening is just a
part of the maintenance system,”
Hagekhalil
said.
“Something grows old, you
have to repair it or replace
it.”
Sanitation workers on
Tuesday installed a permanent bypass system to divert
the flow of waste around the
old pipe. Crews were working to mend the damaged
pipe and expected to complete repairs by late Thursday, Durrell said.
In addition to the foul
stench, the deluge of waste
posed health risks.
The untreated sewage
could lead to eye, ear and
throat infections, health officials said.
Dr. Mauro Torno, the acting health officer for Long
Beach, decided to shut down
swimming along the coast
until tests show the water is
safe. Officials asked the public to avoid puddles of water
near the spill.
Long Beach officials
planned to regularly test
samples of ocean water for
the rest of the week, said Nelson Kerr, manager of the
city’s Bureau of Environmental Health.
Depending on the quality
of the samples, the beaches
could reopen as early as
Thursday.
“It’s a lot of sewage to
consider,” he said. “This is a
fairly large spill.”
The Orange County
Health Care Agency also
closed Seal Beach’s shore
from the mouth of the San
Gabriel River to Anaheim
Bay. Swimming, surfing and
diving were prohibited.
veronica.rocha
@latimes.com
alexia.fernandez
@latimes.com
matt.hamilton
@latimes.com
Homeless protester spared from probation
Court commissioner
refuses to punish man
who blocked truck in
Venice cleanup.
By Gale Holland
Calling Venice homeless
cleanups “troubling,” a Los
Angeles court commissioner
has turned down the city attorney’s request to punish a
homeless man for protesting
by lying in the path of a sanitation truck.
“People are not disposable property,” Commissioner Alan I. Rubin said
Monday during a sentencing
hearing at the Airport
Courthouse for homeless
activist David Busch. “You
just can’t sweep people up.”
Busch, who had long accused the city of illegally
seizing
and
destroying
homeless people’s belongings, was arrested during a
March 2015 cleanup on the
Venice boardwalk, and later
pleaded guilty to disturbing
the peace.
Prosecutor Claudia Martin had asked Rubin to sentence Busch to a year’s probation and order him to stay
off the boardwalk on cleanup days. Rubin suggested
the city overstepped its
bounds by destroying homeless people’s property during the weekly sweeps and
rejected any further sanctions for the activist.
“It seems to me a lot of
personal property is being
thrown away that should not
be thrown away,” Rubin
said. “It’s not for the Bureau
of Sanitation to decide what
clothing is valuable to people.”
The city has long been
embroiled in controversy
and litigation over the
sweeps, which were dramatically
increased
as
homeless
encampments
spread throughout the city
last year. Officials say their
policies balance homeless
people’s property rights
against the need to maintain
public safety and health in
the streets.
In Venice, the sweeps
take place every Friday on
the boardwalk, where teams
of police and sanitation
workers power-wash the
concrete as well as the
grassy and sandy areas
where homeless people congregate. In addition, the
workers search and discard
contaminated belongings
left unattended while their
owners line up for food, collect cans for recycling or seek
a bathroom.
The city also confiscates
oversized possessions and
impounds them in storage
on skid row, 18 miles from
Venice Beach.
Busch’s attorney, Venicebased John Raphling, argued that Busch was exercising his 1st Amendment
rights to protest what he
sees as unjust city politics.
“This is a very important
case,” Raphling said. “It’s a
test of our moral values and
how we as a society choose to
deal with the problems of
poverty and homelessness.”
Raphling showed photographs to the court of city
workers taking neatly bundled clothing, bedrolls and
pill bottles and throwing
them in a dumpster, and tagging and confiscating bicycles. Raphling also presented a city report indicating that of the ton of belongings discarded the day of
Busch’s arrest, only 50
pounds were contaminated
with feces, needles and other
hazardous residue.
Rubin appeared particularly concerned that the city
stored items, including bicycles, so far away from homeless Venice residents.
“You take away their
means of transportation,
their bicycle, and then tell
them to go downtown,” the
commissioner said. “There’s
a certain irony there, don’t
you think? How are they
supposed to get downtown?
Hitchhike? Walk?“
Martin argued that the
court appeared to be taking
Raphling’s “interpretation”
as fact, and said she could
present counter-testimony
that the items destroyed
were contaminated. She declined Rubin’s offer to delay
sentencing so she could
bring in city officials to take
the witness stand.
“Sometimes in a free society, the peace needs to be
disturbed,” said Rubin, who
invoked Martin Luther King
Jr. and his own history of
protest of the Vietnam War
during the hearing. “I have
to think there is some sort of
justification for their protest.”
“How many judges have
to say these things to the city
before the city stops wasting
judges’ time?” Busch said after the decision. Martin declined to comment.
gholland
@latimes.com
Twitter: @geholland
B6
W E D NE S DAY, J U LY 2 0 , 2 016
L AT I ME S . CO M
Wrongly jailed man gets $10 million
Former gang member
spent 20 years behind
bars before his case
was overturned.
By Abby Sewell
Los Angeles County supervisors voted Tuesday to
pay $10.1 million to a man
who spent 20 years behind
bars before having his murder conviction overturned in
2011.
Francisco Carrillo Jr. was
convicted and sentenced to
life in prison in 1992 in the fatal drive-by shooting of Donald Sarpy in Lynwood. Carrillo, who was 16 at the time
of the 1991 shooting, maintained
his
innocence
through two trials and in
prison.
In 2011, a judge overturned his conviction after
witnesses who had identified Carrillo as the shooter
recanted and a reenactment
of the shooting convinced
the court that the witnesses
could not have seen the
shooter well enough to accurately identify him.
After his release from
prison, Carrillo sued the
county, former Sheriff ’s
Deputy Craig Ditsch and
other unnamed deputies, alleging that his civil rights
had been violated.
He argued that deputies
had improperly influenced
the witnesses to pick his picture out of a photo lineup
and that deputies involved
in the case were part of the
Lynwood Vikings, a white
supremacist gang within the
Sheriff ’s Department.
Ron Kaye, the attorney
who represented Carrillo in
the suit, said that the case
“epitomizes the corrupt
practices of the L.A. Sheriff ’s
Department in 1991” and
that the deputy “stole my
client’s youth by coercing a
15-year-old witness to pick
Franky out of a lineup, even
though [the witness] admitted he could never identify
the shooter of the drive-by
on the night of the crime.”
“Franky Carrillo will
never regain those years of
his life — the birthdays, the
Michael Robinson Chavez Los Angeles Times
AFTER HIS 2011 release, Francisco Carrillo Jr. sued
L.A. County, alleging that sheriff’s deputies improperly influenced witnesses and violated his civil rights.
weddings, the graduations
and the funerals of loved
ones that he missed, things
we all take for granted — but
at least this settlement
holds those responsible accountable,” he said.
Since his release, Carrillo
has gone back to school and
obtained a bachelor’s degree
from Loyola Marymount
University, Kaye said.
On the night Sarpy was
killed, he had walked out of
his home to talk to a group of
teenagers, including his son,
when someone leaned out of
a passing car and opened
fire.
The victim was not gang
affiliated, but investigators
believed
the
shooting
stemmed from a rivalry between a primarily African
American gang, the Neighborhood Crips, and the
Young Crowd, a predominantly Latino gang. The
teenagers who witnessed
the shooting were initially
only able to describe the
shooter as a “Hispanic
male.”
Of the six teenagers who
witnessed the shooting, five
were not shown photos of
potential suspects until six
months after the shooting.
The other witness, Scott
Turner, was shown the photos immediately after the
shooting, but later said the
deputy had steered him into
picking Carrillo as the suspect.
Carrillo acknowledged in
his suit that he had considered himself a member of the
Young Crowd because he
grew up in the gang’s territory, but said that by the
time of the shooting, he had
moved away from Lynwood
and was not associating
with the gang.
A corrective action plan
submitted by the Sheriff ’s
Department to the county
Board of Supervisors said
the department had put in
place new policies governing
procedures for identifying
suspects and the use of
Recession’s toll
felt at Cal State
[Cal State, from B3]
system to accept about 6,100
new students.
This issue will continue
to be a sticking point. Although enrollment has increased by about 20,000
since 2008, officials have not
been able to make room for
everyone who wants to attend one of Cal State’s 23
campuses.
Cal State is the largest
university system in the nation and last fall had to turn
away about 30,000 applicants who fulfilled all the
admissions requirements,
Chancellor
Timothy
P.
White said.
The system, which serves
about 460,000 students, is
dependent on state general
funds to cover about half its
operating costs. The rest is
covered by fees and tuition,
which has been frozen for
five years.
“That is the nexus of our
dilemma,” White told the
trustees. “In the absence of
resources, and you look at
the difficult decisions we
had to make to live within
our means again this year,
you see that we end up disinvesting in those support
services that enable the very
students that we ourselves
are under the gun to get
their degrees sooner rather
than later.”
Cal State has also had to
compromise on addressing a
backlog of buildings that are
in need of repair or replacement — maintenance work
totaling about $2.6 billion
and growing by $150 million
each year, officials said.
Trustees requested an
additional $25 million each
year in the state budget but
instead received a one-time
boost of $35 million earmarked for this year’s most
urgent infrastructure needs.
Cal State had also sought
an additional $50 million to
improve graduation rates,
such as hiring more tenuretrack faculty and providing
more hands-on academic
advisors.
In its final budget plan,
the state allocated $10.2 million as well as a one-time appropriation of roughly $15
million toward improving
degree completion.
An additional one-time
boost of $35 million is expected in the fall once university officials have updated goals and plans to improve graduation rates.
Gov. Jerry Brown has
been sharply critical of Cal
State’s performance: Across
the country, the average
four-year graduation rate
for public universities is
about 34%. For the Cal State
system, the average is about
17%.
White wants to raise that
rate to 24% by 2025. Trustees
are expecting a report in
September on how the university plans to reach that
goal.
After the budget discussion Tuesday, the board
unanimously agreed to
grant White, six vice chancellors and 18 campus
presidents a 2% increase in
compensation.
The 2% raise will cost the
system a total of $160,185,
White said. Five new
presidents, whose salaries
were set when they took office July 1, were not included
in this increase.
Executive compensation
has been a thorny issue in
the past: The system took
heat in 2011 when trustees
approved a $100,000 increase
in compensation for the incoming San Diego State
president as it also increased annual student tuition by 12%. The next year,
Cal State adopted a policy
that froze compensation
paid with state funds while
allowing a 10% increase paid
with private donations. In
November 2015, in a move to
quell criticism and controversy, the trustees voted to
eliminate the use of private
funds to supplement salaries.
From 2010 to 2014,
executives received no salary raises, officials said. In the
2014-15 budget year, a 3% increase was approved, followed by a 2% increase in
2015-16.
Officials had long argued
that restricting compensation puts the system at a disadvantage when trying to attract the most qualified candidates.
“Recruiting and retaining high-quality leadership,
faculty and staff for the CSU
is important for the shortand long-term health of our
enterprise,” White told the
board, “and it is critical
to the overall success of
our students and our system.”
White’s salary, after the
2% increase, will total
$439,361. Campus president
salaries now range from
$267,903 at the Maritime
Academy to $428,645 at San
Diego State.
rosanna.xia
@latimes.com
Twitter: @RosannaXia
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photo lineups.
The settlement, which
the supervisors approved
unanimously and without
discussion, will be one of the
largest the county has paid
out in a case involving the
Sheriff ’s Department.
Payouts
in
lawsuits
against the Sheriff ’s Department have driven litigation
costs higher in Los Angeles
County in recent years.
An analysis of county legal costs released this year
showed that litigation costs
had risen from $95.6 million
in the 2014 fiscal year to $118.9
million last year. Cases
against the Sheriff ’s Department accounted for $40.7
million of the total cost in
2014 and rose to $61 million in
2015.
Kaye said the settlement,
which amounts to more than
$500,000 for each year Carrillo spent behind bars, is
also the largest claim ever
paid in a wrongful imprisonment case in California on a per-year basis.
[email protected]
Twitter: @sewella
MWD
finalizes
purchase
of islands
By Matt Hamilton
Photographs by Allen J. Schaben Los Angeles Times
STEVE LOPEZ follows Jen Kalt of Humboldt Baykeeper on a hike through the
Ma-le’l Dunes, called one of the most pristine dune systems on the West Coast.
Coastal preservation’s
victories and letdowns
[Lopez, from B3]
West Coast, a place where
forest meets sea and both
the landscape and
vegetation are unlike anything I’ve seen. The dunes
go on forever, then rise up
and over a berm to miles of
crashing waves.
And yet it was in danger
of being destroyed.
“You’d be walking in the
dunes and see a motorcycle
track,” Kalt said.
The land was privately
owned by a dune buggy club
with big plans to transform
a gift from Mother Nature
into an off-road vehicle
playground — at least until
conservationists and local
officials began a battle to
turn the environmentally
sensitive habitat over to the
Humboldt Bay National
Wildlife Refuge.
In the early 1990s, the
California Coastal Commission approved an amendment to the area’s local
plan, banning off-road
vehicles.
“Those are shore pine,
this is Sitka spruce, these
are bearberries, and that’s
reindeer lichen,” Kalt, a
botanist, said as we walked
past marshland, through
forest, on our way to the
lunar landscape of the
dunes.
We passed signs saying
motorized vehicles are
prohibited.
In places the California
coast is cold and gray and
wet, and the sea-misted red
hues on beach-strewn driftwood are brilliant.
At the Oregon border, I
saw no swimmers, no
surfers, no flip-flops.
The coast is different
here, much wilder than the
Southern California shore,
and if you haven’t seen it,
you should, if only for the
rocky crests and curtain of
giant redwoods that rise in
full majesty from the edge of
the continent.
One early stop, just
north of Crescent City, was
the scene of another Coastal
Commission victory.
Pacific Shores was sold
THE COAST in Northern California is different,
much wilder than the Southern California shore.
in the 1960s as a dream
community in the making.
For as little as $1,800, a halfacre parcel could be had,
and with it, the possibility of
one day building an affordable vacation getaway or
retirement home.
More than 1,500 dreamers were easily hooked,
many of them sending
checks from Southern California and even Hawaii. It all
sounded too good to be true.
And it was.
Streets were paved and
remain to this day in the
ghostly seaside expanse,
but when it came time to
build sewer systems and
other utilities, the Coastal
Act was firmly in place and
it forbade this very type of
development.
The Coastal Commission’s Douglas, traveling
north with zoologist Bill
Kier, the state Senate’s
natural resources guru,
identified Pacific Shores
and surrounding privately
owned land as coastal habitats crucial to bird and
marine life. To them, these
were treasures, not commodities, and the public
had a duty to reclaim and
refurbish them for current
and future generations.
“The Coastal Act gave us
a long time to work on it, “
said Patty McCleary of the
nonprofit Smith River
Alliance, which facilitated
the state’s purchase of many
of those parcels.
Today more than half the
land is in public hands, and
McCleary, along with husband and business partner
Grant Werschkull, hopes to
one day purchase the remaining parcels.
On a tour of the surrounding land, I saw what
might have been lost if Pacific Shores had been built.
A wildlife paradise flourishes between mountains
and sea. Werschkull spotted
and identified dozens of
birds as they chirped a
symphony with the whisper
of waves in the distance.
“I don’t think you can
appreciate the Coastal Act
until you go to other states,
where the beaches are private,” McCleary said. “It’s
different here, where we
have this California experiment.”
My next stops are Shelter Cove, Sea Ranch and
Bodega Bay, where I will
meet with some of the
pioneers who gathered
signatures in 1972 for
Proposition 20, which
changed everything.
Four years after that, the
Coastal Act became law.
Forty years later, the
coast is still being saved.
[email protected]
Southern
California’s
powerful water supplier has
completed the $175-million
purchase of five islands in
the heart of the Sacramento-San Joaquin River
Delta, the ecologically sensitive region that’s a key
source of water for the
Southland.
The top attorney for the
Metropolitan Water District
said in a memo Monday that
the agency had finalized the
purchase of the islands from
Delta Wetlands Properties.
The purchase comes less
than a week after the state
Supreme Court lifted an order that had barred the water agency from buying the
islands. The order was imposed after San Joaquin
County, other local governments and environmental
groups sued to block the sale
of the islands.
Metropolitan is a wholesaler that uses water from
Northern California as well
as the Colorado River to
supply more than two dozen
cities and water agencies, including Los Angeles.
The water district has
said the land may be used
during the construction of
the proposed delta tunnel
system, a controversial $15billion project that would divert Sacramento River water through tunnels directly
to pumping plants in the
southern delta. Two of the
islands are in the path of the
tunnels; the MWD’s ownership would end the need for
eminent domain battles.
An MWD spokeswoman
told The Times last week
that the agency has yet to
put forth a project for the
land.
The acquisition of the
land from Delta Wetlands
Properties, a subsidiary of
the Swiss insurance company Zurich Insurance
Group, has generated division since it was proposed in
2015. The MWD board approved the deal in March on
a 54% to 41% vote, with “no”
votes from representatives
of Los Angeles, Santa Monica and the San Diego County
Water Authority.
Opponents of the sale
filed suits claiming breach of
contract or arguing that the
water agency should have
filed an environmental impact report. Attorneys for
San Joaquin County and the
environmental group Food
and Water Watch blasted the
water agency for sidestepping the California Environmental Quality Act, according to court papers.
The Supreme Court order from last week did not
dismiss any litigation but
cleared the way for the MWD
to buy the islands while
fighting the legal challenges.
The litigation against the
MWD is expected to continue for months or years.
matt.hamilton
@latimes.com
Twitter: @MattHjourno
Times staff writers Bettina
Boxall and Matt Stevens
contributed to this report.
L AT I ME S . CO M
W E D N E SDAY , J U LY 20 , 2 016
obituarY
notices
OBITUARIES
DAVID HOROWIT Z, 1929 - 2016
Place a paid Notice: latimes.com/placeobituary
Search obituary notice archives: legacy.com/obituaries/latimes
Refooah, amanollah M.D.
Publicist for Oscar films
By Jill Leovy
D
avid H. Horowitz, a longtime
Oscar publicist
who helped broker public appearances for Bill Clinton,
died Sunday at his home in
Los Angeles, said friend and
colleague Carl Samrock. He
was 86.
Horowitz was a publicist
for various Hollywood celebrities, but was known
particularly for his Academy
Awards campaigns.
He worked on behalf of
such winning films as
“Dances With Wolves,” “The
Silence of the Lambs” and
“The Lord of the Rings: The
Return of the King,” which
not only swept the awards
but broke new ground as a
fantasy epic best-picture
winner in 2004.
Horowitz broke similar
conventions with “The Fugitive,” an Oscar outlier that
did not win but succeeded in
getting a surprise nomination.
Called
one
of
the
publicity industry’s top veterans by the Los Angeles
Times in 2003, Horowitz excelled
at
low-key,
naturalistic campaigns, said
A TOP PUBLICITY VETERAN
David Horowitz excelled at low-key campaigns,
spreading interest in films through chatter.
Samrock.
He spread interest in
films through chatter and
word-of-mouth. He would
toss a casual mention into
conversations. His pitches
were as simple as “ ‘I’ve seen
this movie. It’s great,’ ” Samrock recalled.
Horowitz had a longstanding interest in leftleaning politics, and occasionally combined his political
and
professional
interests. One such occasion
was when he helped arrange
for his longtime client Barbra Streisand to perform at
the Hollywood Bowl in 1968
to benefit the Southern
Christian Leadership Con-
ference after Martin Luther
King Jr.’s assassination.
Horowitz also did work
on
behalf
of Native American causes
and was active with Peace
Now, a group seeking a politically negotiated twostate solution to the IsraeliPalestinian conflict.
When the Clinton presidential campaign needed to
repair the candidate’s image
after a long-winded appearance in 1988, they
turned to Horowitz to float
the idea to late-night host
Johnny Carson.
Clinton’s subsequent appearance on Carson’s show
playing the saxophone was
“a good night” for the candidate, producer and Clinton
backer Harry Thomason later told PBS. Horowitz also
reminisced about Clinton’s
subsequent saxophone performance on “The Arsenio
Hall Show” four years later,
in which the publicist said he
played a similar role, Samrock said.
Horowitz’s career included stints with Rogers &
Cowan, Kirk Douglas’ Bryna
Productions, and as vice
president of publicity at TriStar Pictures. During the
1970s, he was head of
publicity for the film division
at Warner Bros. and later a
television vice president
there.
Horowitz was born July
21, 1929, in New York City. He
came to Los Angeles as a
child and graduated from
University High School. He
went to UCLA as a premed
student, but his interests
shifted after a summer job
with an advertising agency.
He started his show business career as a cameraman
for KERO-TV in Bakersfield.
He is survived by his wife,
Lynn, whom he married in
1959.
[email protected]
G AR RY MARSH ALL , 1934 -2 016
Director reached for the masses
[Marshall, from B3]
Garry.”
Marshall, brother of actress-director Penny Marshall, earned a degree in
journalism from Northwestern University and worked
at the New York Daily News.
But he found he was better
at writing punchlines.
“In the neighborhood
where we grew up, in the
Bronx, you only had a few
choices,” Marshall said in a
1980s interview. “You were either an athlete or a gangster,
or you were funny.”
He began his entertainment career in the 1960s selling jokes to comedians, then
moved to writing sketches
for “The Tonight Show” with
Jack Paar in New York. He
caught the eye of comic Joey
Bishop, who brought him to
Los Angeles to write for “The
Joey Bishop Show.”
Sitcoms quickly proved
to be Marshall’s forte. He
and then-writing partner
Jerry Belson turned out
scripts for the most popular
comedies of the ’60s, including “The Lucy Show,” “The
Danny Thomas Show” and
“The Dick Van Dyke Show.”
Marshall and Belson detoured into screenwriting in
1967 with “How Sweet It Is,”
starring Debbie Reynolds,
and followed it up with “The
Grasshoppers” (1970) with
Jacqueline Bisset. But the
two kept their hand in TV.
In 1970, they turned Neil
Simon’s Broadway hit “The
Odd Couple” into a sitcom
starring Jack Klugman and
Tony Randall and produced
by Marshall. It ran for five
seasons and proved the beginning of a TV sitcom empire.
In January 1979, Marshall
had three of the top five com-
Neighbors say that Marvin and Mae Acosta moved
into their tidy, new Eastvale
home in Riverside County
late last year.
Then, about a week ago,
moving vans appeared out
front. On Friday, the couple
walked into the California
Lottery’s office in Van Nuys
with a Powerball ticket for
the record Jan. 12 jackpot
worth $1.6 billion. Their
share of the pot before taxes
was estimated at $528.8 million. The Acostas, who purchased the ticket at a 7-Eleven in Chino Hills, opted for
the lump sum payment of
$327.8 million before federal
taxes.
Lottery officials said that
by law, the lucky couple
would have to be publicly
Satin, alex Paul
Glass, seamon
September 26, 1925 - July 12, 2016
Seamon Glass, beloved husband to
Yan Zhang for 23 years, passed away
peacefully on Tuesday, July 12, 2016
in his Los Angeles home surrounded by
family and friends. He was 90.
A long-time resident of Santa
Monica, California, Seamon was born
in New York City on September 26,
1925. Two years after losing his father,
at the age of 13, he moved to California
with his mother. At the age of 17, he
convinced his mother to let him serve
in the U.S. Marine Corps. He returned
to California following his honorable
discharge in 1945.
Seamon lead a full and adventurous
life. He found and married the love
of his life while teaching English in
China. He was an actor, writer, teacher,
guidance counselor, professional
heavyweight boxer, merchant seaman,
harbor patrol officer in Santa Monica,
world traveler, and a veteran of World
War II.
As an actor, Seamon was best known
for his work on the films, Deliverance,
Slither, Damnation Alley, The Rose and
This Is Not a Test, and the television
shows Star Trek, Perry Mason, and
Vegas. He was a natural teacher, a
great story-teller and reciter of poetry,
a friend to many, and a well-loved
guidance counselor for many years
at Fairfax High School in Los Angeles,
California.
Seamon is survived by his wife,
Yan Zhang, his son, David Glass, his
granddaughter, Chelsea Glass, his cat,
Ghengis, and his giant unnamed blood
parrot cichlid fish.
A memorial service will be held at
9 AM on Sunday, July 31, 2016 at the
Public Viewing Deck located on the
west end of the Santa Monica Pier
next to the Harbor Patrol station and
Marisol’s restaurant in Santa Monica,
California 90401. Please RSVP to
[email protected] by July 27,
2016 if you wish to attend.
Harrison, aaron
Matthew
September 9, 1975 - July 17, 2016
Alex Satin was born June 13th,
1924 in Chicago, Illinois. He was a
corporal in the US Army during WW2
and was honored with the Silver Star
for gallantry in action. An Optometrist
turned automobile dealership owner,
Alex loved to golf, jog, bike ride, and
travel. More than anything he loved
his wife of 67 years, Shirley Satin.
He is survived by his wife, his three
children; David (Gail), Diane and
Michael; and four grandchildren, Josh
(Allyson), Danny (Emily), Jaclyn and
Dylan, as well as many loved ones and
friends. He will be deeply missed and
remembered forever. Services will be
held on Thursday, July 21, 2016, at
12:30pm, Mount Sinai Memorial Parks
and Mortuaries~ Hollywood Hills.
Mount Sinai Memorial Parks
and Mortuaries 800-600-0076
www.mountsinaiparks.org
Segall, Dena F.
December 6, 1927 - July 14, 2016
Dena F. Segall passed away at the
age of 88 with her family at her side.
Dee leaves behind a heartbroken
family including four children: Jeff and
Laura Segall, Bruce and Sandy (Segall)
Hilton; seven grandchildren; and a
great grandson. Her husband, Leonard
Norman Segall, passed away in 2004.
A Celebration of Life is planned at The
Castaway in Burbank on Saturday, July
23 at 1:30 p.m.
Sneh, Dina
Mount Sinai Memorial Parks
and Mortuaries 800-600-0076
www.mountsinaiparks.org
In Memoriam
Michael Sobhani Weigand
March 3, 1979 - July 20, 2015
Buckley School 1996/UC Santa
Cruz 2001 genius, musician, artist,
writer, love you forever, brother Kevin
Shahraum Weigand
Joseph J. Ybarra
September 29, 1930 - July 20, 1998
Its been 18 years.
Remembering you today as always.
With love and sadness.
Your wife Gloria and family.
Cemetery Lots/Crypts
Beautiful Inglewood Park Cemetery
plot 105D available in the highly
desirable Cherry Blossom area.
List price $12,190 asking $9,000
OBO. Call 805-478-7061 or email
[email protected]
To place an obituary ad
please go online to:
latimes.com/placeobituary
or call
1-800-234-4444
ABC Photo Archives ABC via Getty Images
THE ‘HAPPY DAYS’ GANG
Henry Winkler, left, Garry Marshall, Jim Knaub and Ron Howard in 1979.
Winkler saluted Marshall in a tweet as “larger than life, funnier than most.”
New York Times in 2001 that
her brother “has a life. He’s
not into the show business
glitterati. If he has a hot
movie, that’s great. But if he
has something that doesn’t
do great, he’s not around
those people who won’t
speak to you.”
After cranking out what
he once estimated to be 1,000
sitcom episodes, Marshall
switched his focus to the big
screen with 1984’s “The Flamingo Kid,” starring Matt
Dillon, which Marshall wrote
and directed.
He concentrated on directing with his later films,
including “Nothing in Common” (1986), with Tom
Hanks and Jackie Gleason;
“Overboard” (1987), starring
Goldie Hawn and Kurt Russell; “Beaches” (1988), with
Bette Midler and Barbara
Hershey; “Pretty Woman”
(1990) and “Dear God”
(1996), with John Denver
and George Burns.
The Gere-Roberts pairing that helped make “Pretty
Woman” a smash hit did the
same for “Runaway Bride” in
1999. “The Princess Diaries”
in 2001 was another winner,
although Marshall suffered
a flop with “Georgia Rule”
(2007), starring Jane Fonda
and Lindsay Lohan.
Marshall is survived by
his wife, Barbara, and the
couple’s three children, Lori,
Kathleen and Scott.
Funeral services will be
private but a memorial is
planned for his birthday on
Nov. 13, his publicist said.
[email protected]
Powerball winners claim prize
By Joseph Serna
and Paloma Esquivel
Mount Sinai Memorial Parks
and Mortuaries 800-600-0076
www.mountsinaiparks.org
Aaron Matthew Harrison passed
away on Sunday, July 17, 2016 in the
county of San Diego, California.
He was the son of the late David Jay
Harrison. He is survived by his mother,
Elaine Pansky Harrison, brother Jamie
Harrison, sister-in-law Laura Harrison,
nieces and nephew, Kayla, David, and
Taegan Harrison, and grandmother
Jane Link.
A celebration of Aaron’s life is to
follow at a later date. Donations may
be made to the Foundation for Fighting
Blindness in Aaron’s memory.
edies on the air with “Happy
Days,” which ran from 197484; “Laverne & Shirley”
(1976-83), which starred
Penny Marshall and Cindy
Williams; and “Mork and
Mindy” (1978-82) with newcomer Robin Williams.
“Critics have knocked me
for targeting society’s lowest
common denominator,” he
said in his 1995 autobiography, “Wake Me When It’s
Funny,” written with his
daughter Lori Marshall.
“I believe that television
was, and still is, the only medium that can truly reach society’s lowest common denominator and entertain
those people who maybe
can’t afford a movie or a play.
So why not reach them and
do it well?” he said.
Penny Marshall told the
identified after coming forward. The Acostas had the
weekend to brace for the onslaught of attention.
On Tuesday, the blinds
on the home on Glover Court
were closed and no one appeared to be inside the residence. Maria Franco, who
lives across the road, said
she was happy to hear about
the family’s win, though she
didn’t know them very well.
Like others in the neighborhood, she bought her own
Powerball tickets when the
jackpot soared in January
and had wondered whether
the winners would ever come
forward.
The Acostas requested
privacy, lottery officials said.
In lieu of interviews, they released a statement:
“We are thankful and
blessed for the rare gift that
has been placed in our care.
We have engaged a team of
B7
advisors to educate and
guide us through this process so that we can be good
stewards of these new resources. While many decisions are still to be made, we
have committed nearly all of
this new resource to a Trust
and to charities that are important to us. While we are
very grateful for the wonderful wishes and encouragement we’ve received, it is not
our intention to become
public figures, and we ask for
and appreciate privacy going forward. Thank you.”
Speculation surrounded
the identity of the Chino
Hills ticket owner for
months. The January jackpot was the biggest in U.S.
lottery history, and the two
other winners, from Tennessee and Florida, came forward within days of the
drawing.
A
Pomona
nurse
mistakenly believed she
owned the winning ticket after her son pulled a prank on
her.
But the Acostas opted to
stay silent until their affairs
were in order, said lottery
spokesman Alex Traverso.
“They did all the stuff we
hoped they would … they got
a lawyer, made a plan, got
everything squared away so
they could get their claim
and sort of disappear,” he
said. “They’re going to fall off
the grid. That’s going to be
an interesting challenge.”
The 7-Eleven that sold
the winning ticket received
the maximum award of
$1 million.
joseph.serna
@latimes.com
Twitter: @JosephSerna
paloma.esquivel
@latimes.com
Twitter: @palomaesquivel
John O’Donnell
October 20, 1932 - July 18, 2016
John David O’Donnell was born in Lorain, Ohio.
When he was 12 his mother sold everything they
had and bought a 10 year old Cadillac to drive to
California. If they were going to be poor at least
they were going to be warm.
After failing out of San Fernando High he enrolled
in the Air Force to get some discipline. He served
in Korea for four years which included his getting a
High School diploma.
John enrolled at LA Valley Junior College all the
while selling for Sears Roebuck, selling Jewel Tea
door to door, and selling anything else one might
purchase in order to fine tune his salesmanship
skills and put a dollar in his pocket. After two
years he entered USC to be introduced to his yet
to be discovered social skills, get his degree in
Telecommunication, join Beta Theta Pi and meet
his wife to be, Trish Dwyer. He graduated in 1959.
They married July 2, 1960.
Upon graduation, John joined Coldwell Banker
with the help of his fraternity ties. They had never
seen the likes of him. Six years later he was their
top salesman. By 1969 he was ready for a new
challenge and accepted management of Rancho
California now called Temecula. The area was
massive and too much for John and Coldwell
Banker. It was time to move on to becoming
a developer. He began his new challenge in
Southern California where he developed empty
warehouses. Not wanting to compete with himself,
he continued to build northward. Ending up in
Alaska, he developed in Anchorage just before the
pipeline was signed. Voila and the rest is history.
John was a giant among giants. He cherished
his faith, his family and his friends above all else.
We all will forever treasure the good times we
shared and the large imprint he left with each of
us. He was incredibly generous to anyone in need.
His faith, his moral code, the love he had for life
and his wonderful personality will remind everyone
what is truly right in this world. God blessed him in
so many ways for which he was eternally grateful.
Trish and John were married 56 years. He
desperately loved his wife Trish, three wonderful
children, Leslie, David and Douglas, two daughtersin-law Dana Jenkins O’Donnell and Angela
Tesselaar O’Donnell, four grandsons, Oliver, Peter,
JD and Christian, his sister, Helen Gerth and an
amazing number of friends who have supported
them through their lifetime. Thanks to all the
medical staff at Hoag Hospital and at Eisenhower
for their loving care but most especially to Dr. John
Storch and Dr. Joel Hirschberg for whom we will be
eternally grateful.
A funeral Mass will be offered at Our Lady Queen
of Angels Church in Newport Beach this Saturday,
July 23rd at 12:00 with reception to follow at The
Pacific Club.
In lieu of flowers, John would prefer that
donations be sent to his favorite charities: Hoag
Hospital Foundation, Our Lady Queen of Angels
Catholic Church or The Vintage Club Employee
Scholarship Fund.
To place an obituary ad please go online to:
latimes.com/placeobituary
B8
W E D N E S DAY, J U LY 20 , 2 016
L AT I ME S . CO M
Today in Southern California
Today in North America
5-day forecasts
Pressure:
High/low temperatures are average forecasts for entire zone.
Today
Thursday
Friday
Saturday
Sunday
L.A. Basin
89/65
Valleys
94/68
Mostly sunny, warm
Mostly sunny 90/66
Sunny, warm 92/67
Partly cloudy 95/67
Mostly sunny 90/63
Los Angeles Basin: Patchy
morning low clouds or fog
at the beaches, then mostly
sunny and warm.
Valleys/canyons: Sunny
with a hot afternoon. Clear
and warm tonight. Mostly
sunny and hot Thursday.
Orange County: Patchy
morning low clouds or fog
Air quality
Beaches
82/64
Mostly sunny, warm
Mostly sunny 95/70
Sunny, hot
99/71
Sunny, hot 100/67
Mostly sunny 94/64
Mostly sunny
Mostly sunny
Mostly sunny
Partly cloudy
Clearing
at the coast, then mostly
sunny and warm. Mostly
clear tonight.
Ventura/Santa Barbara:
Mostly sunny and warmer.
Mostly clear tonight with
patchy fog late at the coast.
San Diego County: Patchy
morning low clouds or fog
at the coast, then mostly
Good
Moderate
Mountains
83/54
83/65
88/65
89/66
84/63
Mostly sunny
Mostly sunny
Sunny
Partly sunny
Partly sunny
sunny and warm.
Local mountains: Mostly
sunny and warm today and
Thursday. Mostly clear
tonight.
High desert: Sunny and hot
with a breezy afternoon.
Mostly clear tonight. Mostly
sunny and hot Thursday.
Low desert: Mostly sunny
Unhealthful for:
Sensitive people
Heat wave: Temperatures will climb into the upper 90s to lower 100s
Thursday across the Plains and the Southeast. Afternoon
thunderstorms are forecast for the Rockies and the Southeast,
while the Mid-Atlantic region has a few strong thunderstorms.
Temps
Deserts
113/84
–0
Low
H
High
Cold Front
0s 10s 20s 30s 40s 50s 60s 70s 80s 90s 100+
and hot. Clear and warm
tonight.
San Francisco Bay Area:
Low clouds across most of
the area during the
morning, then mostly sunny
and breezy this afternoon.
Seattle
78/58
Los Angeles
89/65
All
▲
Warm Front
Jet Stream
Rain T-storm Snow Ice
New York
83/68
Chicago
88/74
Las Vegas
108/84
Denver
92/65
Houston
98/79
Not Available
Miami
89/79
South Coast Air Quality Management District forecasts air quality
SANTA
BARBARA CO.
Santa Clarita
Hesperia
97/62
Santa Paula
LOS ANGELES CO.
100/66
93/63
Santa
Simi Valley
Barbara
Chatsworth
SAN BERNARDINO CO.
Burbank Monrovia
92/64
77/58
93/67
Camarillo
Ventura
96/68
94/68
82/61
79/62
Yucca Valley
Pomona/
UCLA
102/73
Fairplex
Oxnard
San Bernardino
Westlake
86/65 LA Downtown 100/65 Ontario
76/62
Woodland
103/68
89/65
Village
103/68
Hills
Whittier
Santa Barbara Co.
91/62
Chino
96/64
Height
Period
Direction
Santa Monica Hills
Riverside
104/63
RIVERSIDE CO.
Fullerton
94/67
1-3’
13 sec S
82/64
101/64
94/67
Torrance
Santa Ana
Ventura Co.
83/67
ORANGE CO.
Palm
Hemet
Long
Height
Period
Direction
85/67
Springs
100/65
Irvine
Beach Newport
2-4’
13 sec S
87/65
113/84
89/66 Beach
Mission Viejo
Los Angeles Co.
82/68
Temecula
Height
Period
Direction
90/65
Laguna
96/62
2-4’
15 sec SSW
Beach
San
83/66
Clemente
Orange Co.
Surf and sea
85/65
SAN DIEGO CO.
Height
Period
Direction
POINT CONCEPTION TO MEXICO
Oceanside
3-5’
12 sec S
Inner waters: Wind becoming west
85/59
10-15 knots. Wind waves 1-5 feet; mixed
San
Diego
Co.
west and south swells 2-4 feet.
Ramona
Escondido
Height
Period
Direction
98/59
90/61
Surf zone: The potential for strong rip
2-4’
15 sec SSW
currents is high today at beaches in
Poway
L.A., Ventura and Orange counties;
83/65
moderate in San Diego County and low
Tides
UV index
in southern Santa Barbara County.
L.A. Outer Harbor, in feet.
Minutes to burn for
San Diego
Today 11:00a 4.2 Hi 4:36a -0.7 Lo sensitive people
Station
Time Wind
Waves Temp
79/68
Las Vegas, 25
Morro Bay
Santa Barbara
Ventura
Zuma Beach
Marina del Rey
Hermosa Beach
Cabrillo Beach
Hunt’n. Beach
Newport Beach
Dana Point
San Clemente
Oceanside
Solana Beach
Mission Beach
Avalon
4p
4p
4p
4p
4p
4p
4p
4p
4p
4p
4p
4p
4p
4p
4p
VENTURA CO.
Ojai
93/63
WNW7
WSW8
WSW10
WSW8
SW12
WSW8
WSW8
WSW10
WSW8
W8
W8
W8
W8
WNW8
W8
3/14
2/13
4/13
4/15
4/15
4/15
4/15
4/12
4/12
3/12
4/15
3/15
3/15
3/15
3/15
58/70
67/75
68/77
70/75
71/78
70/78
68/79
68/81
69/80
71/81
73/83
74/76
74/77
73/74
70/82
Wind speed in knots; wave heights in feet/intervals in seconds;
temperatures for sea/air
10:07p 6.2 Hi
Thu. 11:36a 4.4 Hi
10:46p 6.0 Hi
Tuesday
Today Thursday
Hi Lo Prcp. Hi Lo Hi Lo
Anaheim
93
Avalon/Catalina
79
Bakersfield
95
Barstow
107
Beaumont
97
Big Bear Lake
79
Bishop
100
Burbank
94
Camarillo
80
Chatsworth
98
Chino
100
Dana Point
75
Death Valley
117
Del Mar
72
Escondido
91
Eureka
66
Fallbrook
90
Fillmore
94
Fresno
95
Fullerton
93
Hemet
100
Hesperia
98
Huntington Beach 77
Idyllwild
87
Irvine
84
L.A. D’ntown/USC 82
L.A. Int’l. Airport 76
65
57
66
73
65
53
47
64
58
63
62
65
94
68
65
55
63
54
63
66
66
65
63
56
67
64
65
----------------------------
94
82
98
108
98
83
100
96
82
93
104
82
116
72
90
62
90
93
97
94
100
100
81
89
87
89
80
65
68
69
78
67
54
59
68
61
67
63
67
90
67
61
52
62
62
67
67
65
66
68
66
65
65
66
94
84
99
110
99
84
101
98
83
99
105
82
117
78
91
62
90
94
99
95
102
101
81
91
87
90
81
66
66
68
78
67
52
59
70
64
70
65
67
94
67
61
51
64
64
68
68
66
66
68
67
65
66
67
3:57p 1.9 Lo
5:10a -0.7 Lo
4:40p 1.9 Lo
Almanac
Los Angeles, 25
Phoenix, 25
San Francisco, 25
Tuesday Downtown readings
Temperature
Los Angeles Fullerton
Ventura
High/low
82/64
93/66
74/61
High/low a year ago
92/72
91/72
87/71
Normal high/low for date 84/64
84/65
74/58
Record high/date
97/1960 94/2009 82/2015
Record low/date
52/1884 63/2001 51/1966
Precipitation
24-hour total (as of 4 p.m.) 0.00
0.00
0.00
Season total (since Oct. 1)
6.88
5.26
8.43
Last season (Oct. 1 to date) 8.85
6.83
8.24
Season norm (Oct. 1 to date) 14.77
13.69
16.41
Humidity (high/low)
86/46
84/21
86/61
California cities
City
Trough
Anchorage
72/61
Mostly sunny, warm
Sunny
115/86
Sunny
115/85
Some sun
116/84
Some sun
114/85
84/52
85/53
86/55
84/55
L
◗
Gradual warming: Strong upper-level high pressure centered in the Plains will expand westward
through the weekend. This will promote a warming trend with above-normal warmth and minimal
coastal clouds each morning. By Friday, daytime highs inland from the coast will range from 95 to 105,
and overnight low temperatures will be above normal.
City
Tuesday
Today Thursday
Hi Lo Prcp. Hi Lo Hi Lo
Laguna Beach
80 66 -- 83 66 82 66
Lancaster
99 63 -- 102 69 104 71
Long Beach
86 66 -- 89 66 89 68
Mammoth Lakes
82 37 -- 85 46 85 44
Mission Viejo
93 63 -- 90 65 91 66
Monrovia
95 63 -- 94 68 95 69
Monterey
66 54 -- 66 53 65 52
Mt. Wilson
86 64 -- 88 63 89 65
Needles
113 89 -- 114 90 116 90
Newport Beach
75 66 -- 82 68 82 68
Northridge
97 62 -- 97 67 97 70
Oakland
70 57 -- 69 56 70 55
Oceanside
80 63 -- 85 59 86 63
Ojai
97 51 -- 93 63 93 63
Ontario
99 65 -- 103 68 103 70
Oxnard
75 59 -- 76 62 77 62
Palm Springs
108 80 -- 113 84 115 86
Pasadena
94 64 -- 94 66 94 67
Paso Robles
95 51 -- 97 54 100 54
Pomona/Fairplex 97 62 -- 100 65 100 66
Poway
91 61 -- 83 65 87 64
Redding
89 63 -- 93 62 92 61
Rialto
101 62 -- 102 67 104 68
Riverside
99 66 -- 101 64 102 65
Forecasts provided by
AccuWeather, Inc. ©2016
City
Sun and moon
Today’s rise/set
Los Angeles County
Sun 5:56a/8:02p
Moon 8:37p/6:43a
Orange County
Sun 5:55a/8:01p
Moon 8:36p/6:42a
Last Quarter
July 26
New Moon
August 2
First Quarter
August 10
Ventura County
Sun 6:00a/8:07p
Moon 8:42p/6:47a
Full Moon
August 18
Tuesday
Today Thursday
Hi Lo Prcp. Hi Lo Hi Lo
Sacramento
86
San Bernardino
99
San Clemente Pier 83
San Diego
78
San Francisco
69
San Gabriel
xx
San Jose
75
San Luis Obispo
79
Santa Ana
83
Santa Barbara
76
Santa Clarita
92
Santa Monica Pier 76
Santa Paula
92
Santa Rosa
82
Simi Valley
88
Tahoe Valley
76
Temecula
97
Thousand Oaks
82
Torrance
79
UCLA
78
Van Nuys
98
Ventura
74
Whittier Hills
89
Woodland Hills
100
Wrightwood
83
Yorba Linda
95
Yosemite Valley
91
56
66
56
66
55
xx
57
52
66
54
76
63
53
50
57
40
61
58
68
62
64
61
63
59
62
62
50
-- 89 56 88 55
-- 103 68 104 68
-- 85 65 85 64
-- 79 68 80 68
-- 68 55 69 54
xx 97 67 99 68
-- 76 56 77 55
-- 81 54 82 55
-- 85 67 86 68
-- 77 58 77 60
-- 97 62 98 67
-- 82 64 83 65
-- 93 63 94 63
-- 81 50 81 48
-- 92 64 93 66
-- 79 43 80 39
-- 96 62 96 63
-- 88 62 88 64
-- 83 67 84 69
-- 86 65 87 66
-- 101 68 102 70
-- 79 62 79 63
-- 94 67 94 68
-- 96 64 97 67
-- 91 65 93 64
-- 96 65 97 66
-- 91 56 91 57
U.S. cities
High 117 in Death Valley, Calif.
Low 21 at Bodie State Park, Calif.
City
Tuesday
Hi Lo Prcp.
Albuquerque
95 70 .04
Amarillo
94 67 -Anchorage
74 63 -Atlanta
98 76 .34
Atlantic City
84 74 -Austin
98 73 -Baltimore
90 70 -Billings
99 63 .10
Birmingham
93 75 .12
Boise
93 57 -Boston
84 75 -Brownsville
95 77 .03
Buffalo
78 62 -Burlington, Vt.
75 63 .05
Casper
95 70 Tr
Charleston, S.C.
95 76 .38
Charleston, W.Va. 88 72 -Charlotte
95 70 -Chicago
91 68 -Cincinnati
90 68 -Cleveland
85 68 -Colo. Springs
96 64 .06
Columbia, S.C.
97 74 .01
Columbus
89 69 -Concord, N.H.
79 63 -Dallas/Ft.Worth
97 80 -Denver
95 64 .06
Des Moines
77 72 3.53
Detroit
88 62 -Duluth
80 56 -El Paso
99 74 .08
Eugene
77 59 -Fairbanks
64 54 .18
Fargo
88 66 Tr
Flagstaff
76 51 .28
Grand Junction
84 67 .04
Grand Rapids
87 62 -Green Bay
84 58 -Hartford
84 69 -Helena
95 58 -Honolulu
87 75 .08
Houston
93 77 .23
Indianapolis
89 71 -Jacksonville, Fla. 94 73 -Kansas City
92 74 -Las Vegas
108 85 -Little Rock
98 80 .04
Louisville
94 74 -Medford
84 56 -Memphis
96 79 .06
Miami
92 82 .07
Milwaukee
82 67 -Minneapolis
87 68 -Nashville
95 76 Tr
New Orleans
95 80 .05
New York
83 74 -Oklahoma City
95 72 -Omaha
85 75 .31
Orlando
92 77 .10
Philadelphia
89 73 -Phoenix
107 84 .67
Pittsburgh
87 67 -Portland, Maine
79 65 -Portland, Ore.
77 63 -Providence
85 73 .02
Pueblo
103 69 -Raleigh
93 75 -Rapid City
99 63 Tr
Reno
89 52 -Richmond
89 70 1.80
St. Louis
95 78 .01
Salt Lake City
99 77 Tr
San Antonio
96 77 .01
San Juan, P.R.
90 79 .20
Santa Fe
92 62 .01
Seattle
77 60 --
Today
Hi Lo Sky
93
98
72
95
82
98
85
94
96
91
81
94
81
80
98
91
87
94
88
90
85
89
96
88
82
98
92
94
87
85
98
84
62
96
77
88
90
85
84
90
89
98
86
92
94
108
96
91
91
98
89
85
94
97
94
83
95
96
94
86
108
85
81
82
82
99
89
102
92
86
94
100
97
88
90
78
70
71
61
75
69
72
66
63
75
63
66
78
63
60
56
74
61
69
74
69
65
63
73
68
53
80
65
78
69
73
75
54
52
74
52
67
71
72
58
57
77
79
72
72
77
84
77
74
60
79
79
72
79
73
80
68
73
79
76
69
90
61
59
61
63
67
69
67
59
66
79
74
77
77
60
58
Pc
Pc
Pc
Pc
Su
Pc
Su
Pc
Pc
Su
Su
Ts
Su
Su
Pc
Ts
Pc
Pc
Ts
Pc
Su
Ts
Ts
Pc
Su
Su
Ts
Pc
Su
Ts
Pc
Pc
Cy
Pc
Ts
Ts
Pc
Ts
Su
Pc
Pc
Ts
Pc
Ts
Pc
Su
Pc
Pc
Su
Pc
Pc
Ts
Ts
Pc
Ts
Su
Su
Pc
Ts
Su
Pc
Su
Su
Pc
Su
Pc
Pc
Pc
Su
Su
Ts
Pc
Pc
Pc
Pc
Pc
Taken at 3 p.m. Tuesday
Spokane
77 55
Springfield, Mo.
93 74
Tallahassee
98 75
Tampa
93 77
Tucson
102 78
Tulsa
96 76
Washington, D.C. 92 73
Wichita
97 74
Yuma
108 83
World
Acapulco
Amsterdam
Athens
Baghdad
Bangkok
Barbados
Beijing
Berlin
Buenos Aires
Cabo San Lucas
Cairo
Calgary
Cancun
Copenhagen
Dublin
Edinburgh
Frankfurt
Geneva
Havana
Ho Chi Minh City
Hong Kong
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kabul
Kingston
London
Madrid
Manila
Mecca
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Mumbai
New Delhi
Oslo
Paris
Rio de Janeiro
Rome
Seoul
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei
Tehran
Tokyo
Toronto
Vancouver
Vienna
Winnipeg
Zurich
93
84
86
119
95
87
80
75
52
97
91
79
88
68
77
76
90
90
88
93
90
82
86
63
98
90
90
102
90
109
73
73
79
83
97
73
95
72
86
90
73
77
92
106
88
77
73
82
84
86
79
55
77
85
79
79
73
57
41
78
72
55
73
59
54
54
59
59
73
75
81
73
65
39
62
81
63
68
82
86
55
59
66
77
81
46
68
61
61
68
46
58
79
82
78
57
63
61
63
59
--.20
.04
.02
-----
82
91
95
93
101
97
88
99
110
57
74
75
77
80
78
72
77
86
Pc
Pc
Ts
Ts
Ts
Su
Su
Su
Su
.10
---.10
.05
.70
----Tr
.89
-.02
----.25
.33
----.04
----.10
.04
.02
.97
-.05
-----.78
.05
-.16
-.20
-.10
--
88
91
87
123
92
88
76
80
52
96
94
74
89
72
69
70
94
93
87
91
91
82
85
67
96
90
85
98
94
108
72
80
75
84
99
76
87
72
87
88
75
66
95
106
84
82
73
80
90
92
78
63
73
90
76
80
74
60
36
78
78
50
74
60
55
52
68
66
74
74
84
70
68
40
60
78
62
67
79
81
52
60
62
77
84
60
64
66
65
73
51
60
78
77
74
62
56
60
69
64
Ts
Pc
Su
Su
Ts
Sh
R
Pc
Su
Su
Su
Sh
Pc
Pc
Cy
R
Su
Su
Ts
Ts
Pc
Pc
Su
Su
Su
Pc
Ts
Ts
Pc
Su
Ts
Su
R
R
Pc
Pc
Ts
R
Su
Cy
Pc
R
Ts
Su
Ts
Su
Pc
Pc
Ts
Su
Key: Su sunny; Pc partly cloudy; Cy cloudy; Fg
foggy; Prcp precipitation; Dr drizzle; Hz;hazy
Sh showers; Ts thunderstorms; R rain; Sn snow;
Sf snow flurries; I ice; Rs rain/snow; W windy;
Tr trace. Notes: National extremes are for NWS
stations; excludes Alaska and Hawaii.
Missing data indicated by “xx”.
Wage impasse puts housing plan at risk
[Housing, from B3]
But Ben Metcalf, the governor’s director of Housing
and Community Development, said the labor group’s
proposal is a deal-breaker
because it would raise costs
for developers, making them
less likely to build new
homes.
“The cost-benefit analysis is such that few developers could actually afford to do that,” Metcalf
said.
The prevailing wage impasse reflects deep disagreement between the governor’s office and labor over
the housing plan, and could
threaten its approval in the
Legislature.
Hunter said Brown’s proposal was the most important bill his organization has
dealt with in the last three
decades. He compared the
loosening of housing rules
offered by Brown to those
that preceded the state’s energy crisis in the early 2000s
and the nation’s financial
crisis shortly thereafter.
“We have found the history of mass deregulation in
America doesn’t work well
for working people,” Hunter
said.
But the changes offered
by Brown apply only in a
limited set of circumstances:
low-income housing projects that match a local government’s zoning rules.
Brown’s plan is an effort
to chip away at local restrictions that make it difficult to
build housing, something
many academics and researchers blame as a primary driver of California’s
soaring housing costs.
Under the proposal, developers would be allowed to
bypass some of those restrictions if they set aside
between 5% and 20% of their
projects for low-income residents depending on how
close the project is to transit.
To qualify, the projects
would already have to comply with a city’s underlying
zoning. For example, a developer couldn’t receive
expedited approval to build
300 condominiums on land
approved for only 100 units.
By itself, the plan would
result only in a modest increase in new development
— by one estimate, fewer
than 2,400 new units would
be constructed in San Francisco — but it would make
dramatic changes in the
housing approval process in
that city, Los Angeles and
others that now require
often lengthy reviews for
nearly all developments.
The strongest supporters of Brown’s plan are home
builders and businesses —
especially in the Bay Area,
where a tech-fueled job
boom has spurred demand
for housing. Jeremy Stoppelman, CEO of user-review
website Yelp, said the state’s
high housing costs have
made it difficult for his company and others to attract
and retain employees.
“The governor’s simple
solution will increase the
state’s supply of housing,
making it more affordable
for all Californians, including those most in need of
help,” Stoppelman said.
Brown’s effort, however,
Eric Risberg Associated Press
GOV. JERRY BROWN’S plan has not been warmly received in the Legislature.
No lawmaker has emerged as a full-throated backer of the proposal.
has not been warmly received in the Legislature. No
lawmaker has emerged as a
full-throated backer of the
proposal, even after the
governor agreed to spend
$400 million on low-income
housing subsidies if the Legislature passes a version of
his plan.
Instead, the proposal has
continued to face intense opposition, chiefly from labor
and environmental groups
upset that the plan would
limit reviews for projects
under the state’s main environmental law that guides
development. Brown and
others have criticized labor
groups for threatening litigation under that law to leverage union-friendly hiring
rules.
Lawmakers are feeling
the heat, said Metcalf, the
Housing and Community
Development director.
“They are getting a lot of
political pressure from significant constituencies that
don’t want this to happen,”
he said.
In contrast to labor’s request for prevailing wages,
Metcalf said the governor
was open to some of the
changes proposed by environmental groups, such as
strictly limiting the program
to urban areas.
Since 2001, the majority
of California’s low-income
housing projects that include taxpayer subsidies
have required builders to
pay prevailing wages, and
there’s little consensus on
what effect the requirement
has had on home building.
In 2005, researchers at
UC Berkeley found that paying prevailing wages increased costs by as much as
37%, concluding that the requirement effectively subsidizes construction workers
at the expense of low-income
housing consumers. Other
economists have argued
that the Berkeley study
significantly overestimated
the effects of labor on construction costs and failed to
consider benefits of a betterpaid workforce.
The Brown administration is trying to drum up
support for the plan this
month through a series of
events with housing advocates and other backers
across the state, starting
Wednesday in San Francisco with Mayor Ed Lee.
Negotiations are expected to heat up once the
Legislature returns from
its summer recess in
August. Despite the strong
opposition from powerful
groups, Assemblyman Richard Bloom (D-Santa Monica), who is part of the discussions, said he was hopeful a
deal could get done.
“I support a responsible
compromise,” said Bloom,
who has authored narrower
legislation than Brown’s. “It
looks somewhat different
than what’s on the table.”
Prior to the $400 million
in subsidies as part of this
package, Brown had been
reluctant to spend more
state money on low-income
housing during his current
tenure as governor. If nothing gets done this legislative
session, Metcalf said, it’s unlikely Brown would offer a
similar deal to lawmakers.
“I would worry a lot if I
were them that if they pull
the rug out from under this,
there is not going to be an
interest to do this again,”
Metcalf said.
[email protected]
L AT I ME S . CO M
W E D N E SDAY , J U LY 20 , 2 016
B9
R E P U B L I C A N NAT I O NA L C O N V E N T I O N
‘So we must ask this question: Hillary Clinton is ... a failed strategist who has
allowed Russia back into the Middle East. Is Hillary guilty or not guilty?’
— New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie,
as the crowd chanted, “Guilty! Guilty!” and “Lock her up!”
GOP tries to put chaos behind it
[Day Two, from B1]
ure with such a tortured relationship with the truth,”
Senate Majority Leader
Mitch McConnell of Kentucky said, referring to Iraq’s
famously prevaricating former information minister.
“There is a clear choice before us. And it is not Hillary.”
The arm’s-length embrace suggested a party still
struggling to unify after a
bitterly contested primary
season that delivered the
most unorthodox nominee
either party has nominated
in generations.
Fittingly, one of the most
forceful testimonials came
from one of the most unlikely
of speakers, Dana White, the
president of the Ultimate
Fighting
Championship,
who recalled Trump supporting his mixed martial
arts competition in 2001
when others rejected it as a
“blood sport.”
“Sometimes he’ll call just
to say, ‘Hey, Dana, I’ll be
watching the fights this
weekend,’ ” White said,
vouching for the business tycoon’s regular-guy credentials.
The most stinging case
against Clinton came from
New Jersey Gov. Chris
Christie, a former federal
prosecutor who delivered
what he called an “indictment” of her. He led the
crowd in a call and response,
reciting “charges” based on
her foreign policy record and
various scandals, asking after each count whether she
is “guilty or not guilty.”
“Guilty!”
the
crowd
chanted repeatedly, crossing their arms as if cuffing
the former secretary of
State, and frequently interrupting Christie’s speech
to yell “Lock her up!” in
unison.
It was perhaps the
week’s most visceral demonstration of the anti-Clinton hatred that seethes from
the party’s core activists.
Pro-Trump
delegates
seemed eager to put Monday’s chaos behind them as
his name was put up for
nomination and the stateby-state tally began, erupting into chants of “Trump,
Trump”
as
speakers
promised he would build a
wall on the Southwest border and construct a new political movement too.
Trump’s home state, led
by his son Donald Trump Jr.,
ceremonially awarded him
the last of the 1,237 delegates
needed to clinch the nomination, and the band struck
Brian van der Brug Los Angeles Times
THE CALIFORNIA delegation celebrates Trump’s nomination. Earlier, many booed when Colorado awarded 31 delegates to Ted Cruz.
up “New York, New York”
while delegates danced.
The stage lighted up in
gold, with stars bursting,
amid a sign declaring
Trump “Over the top.”
“Congratulations, Dad.
We love you!” Donald Trump
Jr. shouted.
Amid the hail of Clintonbashing, the most intimate
and heartfelt testimonials
came from Trump’s children. Tiffany Trump spoke
of the loving notes her father
— “a natural-born encourager ” — wrote on her report
cards, starting in kindergarten.
His namesake, Donald
Jr., gave a stirring speech
that sparked immediate
speculation about his own
political future; it was a far
more detailed and traditional policy address than
his father usually delivers.
The younger Trump
spoke of “my father, my mentor, my best friend, Donald
Trump” as a businessman
who “hung out with guys on
the construction sites, pouring concrete and hanging
sheetrock.”
“For my father, impossible is just the starting
point,” Trump Jr. said.
The movement to dislodge the nominee, which
was largely crushed in a procedural move Monday, was
left gasping during Tuesday’s pomp. Many in the
crowd booed when Colorado
— ground zero for the effort
to thwart Trump — announced
that
it
had
awarded 31of its 37 delegates
to Texas Sen. Ted Cruz.
Portions of the downtown sports arena sat
empty; typically delegates
clamor to be in the hall to
witness history firsthand.
Some did little to hide their
disappointment.
“We’re trying to get behind Trump,” said Chris
Herrod, a mortgage officer
from Provo, Utah. “We obviously don’t want Hillary. But
it’s a lot harder when there’s
a spear at our back.”
Before Trump could
claim the nomination, he
had to contend with plagiarism allegations against his
wife that festered throughout Tuesday as the campaign, in characteristic fashion, refused to back down or
confess error.
In her speech Monday,
Melania Trump repeated
verbatim portions of the
speech that future First
Lady Michelle Obama delivered at the 2008 Democratic convention.
Normally, these choreographed party pageants
give candidates an opportunity to reintroduce themselves to a vast audience, answer questions about perceived weaknesses, demonstrate party enthusiasm after a grueling series of primaries, or attempt all three.
Trump’s unscripted style
and bare-bones campaign
operation — touted as a
virtue during the primary —
have made it more difficult
for him to achieve those
goals.
Speeches from would-be
first ladies in particular provide a personal accounting
that often transcends typical political criticism, so the
perceived failing put more
pressure on Trump to deliver a flawless second night of
the convention.
For all the statements
Tuesday professing party
unity, it was clear many of
the wounds from the bitter
primary season had yet to
fully heal.
Ryan and McConnell
have repeatedly criticized
Trump’s policy positions,
many out of step with those
of his party, and his rhetoric,
which has forced them to answer allegations of racism
and nativism.
Ryan, who took the ceremonial role of chairing the
evening’s events, did not
speak to Trump’s policy
goals. Rather, he cast the
choice facing voters in November as one between a forward-looking Republican vision — including his own
proposals to alleviate poverty, overhaul the tax code and
repeal Obamacare — and a
stagnant status quo. “Here
we are at a time when men
and women in both parties
so clearly, so undeniably
want a big change in direction for America.... What
does the Democratic Party
establishment offer? They
are offering a third Obama
term,” Ryan said to a cascade of boos. “Brought to
you by another Clinton.”
Trump’s campaign chairman, Paul Manafort, said
earlier that the convention
was off to a great start and
that Trump’s nomination
would mark a seminal moment. As usual with the
campaign, the joy of that
moment was inflected with a
grievance aimed at the media.
“All of you who doubted
that he could be the nominee
will no longer be able to
say, ‘Yes, but maybe it won’t
happen,’ ” Manafort told
Laid-off reporter breaks the news
Watching the GOP
convention, he heard
a familiar phrase. His
tweet made headlines.
By Brittny Mejia
Since he lost his TV reporting job last year, Jarrett
Hill has been looking for his
next opportunity. It presented itself in an unexpected way.
Hill was sitting at a corner table Monday night in a
Culver City Starbucks,
drinking a venti iced coffee
and watching the Republican National Convention on
an MSNBC live stream. As
Melania Trump spoke, she
uttered a phrase that the 31year-old California native
had heard once before —
from soon-to-be First Lady
Michelle Obama.
“The only limit to your
achievements
is
the
strength of your dreams … ,”
Melania Trump said during
her address to the convention in Cleveland.
Instinctively, Hill finished the phrase aloud to his
laptop screen: “… and your
willingness to work for
them.”
He recalled the words
from Michelle Obama’s
speech because, he said, he
had thought to himself at
the time that it was “really
beautifully written.”
“I believe I even wrote it
down or typed it,” Hill said.
“Obviously having no idea
that eight years later I’d hear
them again from a woman
who wanted to be first lady
speaking at a convention in
front of 40 million people.”
When
Hill
googled
Michelle Obama and parts
of her memorable turn of
phrase, her 2008 convention
speech popped up. An hour
later, after he had watched
Melania Trump’s full speech
again, he realized more than
just a few words had been
borrowed.
Hill went on Twitter to
share his discovery. He apparently was the first person
to publicly note the similarities between the speeches.
The discovery prompted
headlines across media
outlets and flooded Hill with
interview requests worldwide.
One of Hill’s tweets, highlighting text from Obama’s
speech and sharing a link to
a video of Trump’s speech,
states:
“CORRECTION:
Melania stole a whole graph
from Michelle’s speech.”
It had been retweeted
more than 20,000 times
Tuesday.
The
controversy
prompted Paul Manafort,
Donald Trump’s campaign
chief, to blame Hillary Clinton and the media for bringing attention to “50 words,
and that includes and’s and
the’s and things like that”
that were similar to Michelle
Obama’s speech.
“These are themes that
are personal to her, but
they’re personal to a lot of
people depending on the
Al Seib Los Angeles Times
JARRETT HILL reported findings about Melania
Trump’s speech from a Culver City Starbucks.
stories of their lives,” he said,
pointing out Trump’s focus
on her own story and what
he referred to as “family
values.”
“Obviously,
Michelle
Obama feels very much
similar sentiments towards
her family,” he said.
Although
Manafort
blamed those who work for
the Democrats’ likely pres-
idential nominee, stating
they were the “first to get it
out there,” Hill said he has
no connection with Clinton’s
team, though he is a registered Democrat.
Hill, who is from Fairfield,
Calif., moved to Los Angeles
in 2011 to work in television.
In 2014, he was hired by ABC
Action News WFTS in
Florida to work as a pro-
ducer and a digital on-camera reporter.
He lost his job in April
2015, eight months after he
started. “It was a gutwrenching loss, for sure,” he
said.
Since then, Hill has
worked with his agent to
look for his next full-time job
and has freelanced for
places including Huffington
Post and Independent Television News in Britain. He
also runs an interior design
business on the side.
Now, things are looking
up for Hill, who did
interviews with the BBC,
New York Times and
MSNBC, among others.
“I would love to get a
great job from this, doing
something that I love,” he
said, “but I don’t think I’ve
even processed all of what’s
happening.”
Hill also received tweets
and texts from former colleagues at WFTS, requesting an interview.
He hasn’t spoken to them
yet, but said he planned to.
“I loved a lot of people I
worked with there, but I’m a
little salty,” Hill said. “I was
really upset to have been laid
off the way that I was.
“My gut told me I’d come
back to that station on a national story someday. No
idea it would be like this.”
brittny.mejia
@latimes.com
Twitter: @brittny_mejia
Times staff writer Noah
Bierman contributed to this
report.
reporters.
But Manafort’s effort at a
victory lap lasted only about
a minute before reporters
began peppering him with
questions about Melania
Trump’s speech.
Although there was
much finger-pointing, the
campaign has not said who
wrote the speech or whether
anyone would face discipline. Nor would it concede
plagiarism.
Manafort tried to dismiss
questions about it, blaming
Clinton and the media for
bringing attention to “50
words, and that includes
and’s and the’s and things
like that.”
In fact, the similarities
were first reported on Twitter by someone with no evident ties to the Clinton campaign.
Even events beyond the
campaign’s control cast a
pall over the day’s proceedings. At least a dozen California GOP staff members
were quarantined in their
hotel rooms after becoming
ill with what appears to be a
highly contagious norovirus,
also known as the cruiseship virus, according to officials from the California
party and local health agencies.
noah.bierman
@latimes.com
mark.barabak
@latimes.com
Times staff writers Michael
Finnegan, Lisa Mascaro,
Melanie Mason and Seema
Mehta in Cleveland and
Javier Panzar in Los
Angeles contributed to this
report.
Christopher Serra
Convention
coverage online
Go inside (and outside)
the Republican
convention with Times
journalists for live
coverage and analysis.
latimes.com
/trailguide
Watch a gavel-to-gavel
live stream of the
Republican convention.
latimes.com
/conventions
Join Times journalists
on July 21 and July 28 in
downtown L.A. at free
convention watch
parties. RSVP at:
latimes.com
/conventionparty
B10
W E D N E S DAY, J U LY 2 0 , 2 016
L AT I ME S . CO M
R E P U B L I C A N NAT I O NA L C O N V E N T I O N
‘My father is good with advice.... If you do what you love ... never let fear of
failure get in the way, then you’ve pretty much figured out the Trump formula.’
— Tiffany Trump
Negativity isn’t enough to win
[Analysis, from B1]
decades.
“A sense of optimism,
ebullience, that says, ‘Yes,
things are tough but we can
solve them,’ ” Madonna said.
Other
Republicans,
particularly those running
in Senate and House races,
have been anxious to distance themselves from
Trump’s mien and emphasize their own, different
viewpoint.
On Tuesday night, House
Speaker Paul D. Ryan of
Wisconsin, who only belatedly endorsed Trump and
has upbraided him more
than once for damaging remarks, tried to inject a sense
of optimism into the convention. Ryan has sought to
make clear that members of
Congress have different priorities than their nominee.
He continued that effort
Tuesday night, offering a bit
of self-deprecation about
how “things didn’t work out
quite according to plan” after the last time he was onstage as the 2012 vice presidential nominee.
“But, hey, I’m a positive
guy,” he said. He offered a
lengthy critique of Democrats but followed it with an
equally lengthy list of Republican desires that he cast
in uplifting terms.
“By the true measure
we are all neighbors and
countrymen, called — each
one of us — to know what is
right and kind and just, and
to go and do likewise,” he
said. “Everyone is equal, everyone has a place, no one is
written off, because there is
worth and goodness in every
life.”
Ryan also offered what
could be read as a warning to
Trump.
“We know better than
most — we know better than
to think that Republicans
can win only on the failures
of Democrats,” he said. “It
still comes down to the
contest of ideas. Which is
really good news, ladies and
gentlemen, because when
it’s about ideas, the advantage goes to us.”
Senate Majority Leader
Mitch McConnell of Kentucky, who is trying to prevent Trump-related losses
of seats in Congress’ upper
house, added a less lyrical,
but still specific, list of Republican policy goals. Alabama Sen. Jeff Sessions
joined the effort, describing
Trump in his remarks as a
man who “is positive by nature.”
But over the convention’s
first two days, many of the
attendees and speakers
have hewed to pessimism —
often with an apocalyptic
tone.
Carolyn Cole Los Angeles Times
DONALD TRUMP addresses delegates by satellite on the second night of the convention. His fans are recep-
tive to his bleak assessment of the country’s state, but he may need a more positive message to reach others.
Speakers on Monday and
Tuesday condemned the
state of the country — and
Obama and Clinton in particular — in harshly negative
terms.
On both days, Republicans spent hours talking
about Clinton’s role in the
2012 attack on the U.S. mission in Benghazi, Libya, and
Clinton’s uses of a private
email system. Both are issues of high importance to
conservatives and Republican regulars, but have pre-
sumably already exacted
whatever political punishment they possess on Clinton.
The first night of the convention was supposed to
highlight how to “Make
America Safe Again,” and
Tuesday’s theme was to be
“Make
America
Work
Again.” In reality, the two
nights were indistinguishable as speakers delivered
blistered accusations and
repeated grievances against
Democrats.
Sharon Day, co-chairwoman of the Republican
National Committee, said
Clinton had “viciously attacked the character of
women who were victims of
sexual abuse at the hands of
her husband,” referring to
unproven claims against Bill
Clinton.
Chris Cox, executive
director of the National
Rifle Assn.’s lobbying arm,
warned the delegates that
“we live in dangerous times,”
casting access to guns as
the solution.
Former candidate Ben
Carson suggested that Clinton was influenced by a follower of Lucifer.
The epitome came when
New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie offered a fierce — and in
some cases inaccurate —
condemnation of Clinton’s
actions as secretary of State.
He cast the crowd as her
jury, asking delegates over
and over for a verdict.
“Guilty!” they yelled, adding chants of “Lock her up!”
while they held their wrists
together to mimic handcuffs.
Placating Republicans
energized by that display, as
well as other voters seeking a
broader understanding of
what Trump would bring to
the White House, is a challenge for the nominee.
Throughout his campaign, Trump has been
caustic and bleak in his assessments of the country,
castigating his opponents,
existing officeholders and
negotiators as “stupid.” As
the nation reeled in recent
weeks over shootings of
Americans by police, and
later the multiple shootings
of police, Trump asserted
that the world was spinning
apart and that nearly a dozen cities were on the verge of
exploding.
Trump’s fans are receptive to those arguments, as
his nomination shows. A
recent Suffolk University
poll of likely voters asked
whether in the last five to 10
years respondents felt more
safe or less. Overall, 54% said
less safe. But among Republicans, 76% said they felt less
safe. Among other voters
Trump will need to win the
presidency, fewer than half
took that view.
That suggests Trump’s
problem: He has to maintain
his often bleak rhetoric to
engage and motivate his
core voters while somehow
also attracting others.
“It’s really unfortunate
that this is such a negative
campaign,” said Republican
pollster Kristen Soltis Anderson.
She said Trump has a
negative message “that’s tailor-made for places where
opportunity has left,” such
as the Rust Belt. But, she
said, the message isn’t
enough in the Sun Belt,
where the economy has improved — and where many
important electoral states
lie.
The first two days of the
convention have failed to focus on those voters, pollster
Madonna said.
“There’s nothing wrong
with him talking about the
problems, but he has to have
a path to solve them,” he
said. “Saying ‘Crooked Hillary’ does not provide voters
with a solution.”
On the highest-profile
stage he will occupy until
fall’s presidential debates,
Donald Trump now has two
days left to offer that solution.
cathleen.decker
@latimes.com
Times staff writer David
Lauter contributed to this
report.
Fist bump between
protester, officer
[Outside, from B1]
Sharon Spencer of Akron,
Ohio, were arrested as soon
as they climbed down, Rees
said. A third activist helping
from the ground, Liz Butler
of Mount Rainier, Md., was
also arrested, he said.
“They were doing their
job; we were doing our job,”
Rees said of the officers,
adding that the activists
were not part of a formal
group. “We were sending out
the message we set out to
send.”
By the time I got to the
Hall of Fame, the protest
had ended, the women were
arrested, the banner was
already gone — gone, like
dust in the wind. Because all
we are is dust in the wind.
2:29 p.m.
“They’re both carrying
AR-15s,” the police scanner
barked.
I was sitting in the shade
at Public Square when I
heard the descriptions of
two armed men come over
an officer’s radio — not with
any seeming urgency. There
have been other armed men,
2nd Amendment advocates,
wandering around with
their weapons outside the
Republican National Convention, which is their right
in Ohio. Up to now, they
haven’t caused any trouble.
Still, I hopped up to see
whether I could find these
two who had caught the
police’s attention, to see
what it looks like when you
bring weapons to what feels
like one of the most heavily
guarded places on Earth.
It’s probably a sign of
how well things are going in
Cleveland that I couldn’t
find anybody with AR-15s, or
even any other sign of trouble.
Downtown’s Public
Square has become a pulsing jugular of the republic,
where pro- and anti-Trump
demonstrators mill about
with signs and score TV
interviews. It’s peaceful.
There are no brawls between sides. Protester riots
have not materialized. Guns
haven’t been fired. When I
wandered past, I saw two
groups of performance
artists dancing in a grassy
lawn, moving in slow motion, figures from a hallucination, as if this weird little
world outside the RNC had
started falling asleep.
“I see people with water
guns,” one of my photographer co-workers, Marcus
Yam, texted me.
AR-15s are legal in the
protest zone, but water
guns are not. They were
temporarily banned by the
City Council as a security
measure. I decided to check
it out.
Marcus Yam Los Angeles Times
POLICE PUSH back protesters and photographers during a confrontation in Cleveland. Despite this inci-
dent, the scene has been mostly peaceful — no riots and no brawls between protesters and counter-protesters.
I found Stevedore Crawford Jr., 53, of Delaware,
Ohio, standing in a white
T-shirt that said “TAMIR
RICE ONLY,” with what
looked to be three technically prohibited lime-green
squirt guns on the sidewalk.
(Actually, I couldn’t tell
whether they were squirt
guns or regular toy guns.)
Rice was the 12-year-old
shot and killed by police
while playing with a toy gun
in a Cleveland park in 2014.
The officer who shot him
was not charged.
Crawford was there with
a woman and two very
young girls who appeared to
be his daughters. “I find it
hard to live my life ... knowing Tamir Rice was shot
down where she will be
playing,” Crawford, who is
black, shouted to anyone
who would listen, patting
one of the girls on the head.
“They murdered Tamir Rice
in this city!”
A group of police officers
walked past, and a white
officer hailed Crawford:
“Hey, boss.” They bumped
fists as cameramen circled
— one of those made-formedia moments when a
black American and a white
cop come together for something — a visual metaphor
for the idea that we can
bridge our differences, even
though the reality tends to
be much, much harder.
The fist bump was a little
awkward. Crawford began
crying and bent over after
the officers passed, overcome by emotion.
The officers left the play
guns alone. After Crawford
collected himself, he wandered down the street in the
other direction.
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Health
insurer
deals
are in
danger
Regulators will sue to
block Anthem-Cigna
and Aetna-Humana
mergers, reports say.
By Jim Puzzanghera
Amel Emric Associated Press
A SIGN near the Bosnian town of Brcko warns of a minefield as a man plays “Pokemon Go” on his smartphone. Products that
blend the real world and the digital world using a technology called augmented reality are raising a host of new issues.
FOR PUBLIC SPACES,
A GAME-CHANGER
The success of ‘Pokemon Go’ — which turns random sites into virtual
arcades — raises questions about real-world friction in augmented reality
By Alex Schiffer
The magic of “Pokemon
Go” is in the way it overlays
the Pokemon world atop the
real world. Step outside and
you’ll spot cartoonish creatures to capture. Head to a
place where people congregate — say a park or a bus
stop — and you’ll battle
other players or encounter
the rarest beasts.
In the two weeks since
the app’s launch, random locations have essentially become arcades for the mobile
gaming set — attracting
crowds of phone-toting
players at all hours.
That’s a problem for UC
Irvine Medical Center, which
is the unenthusiastic host of
five Pokemon hubs —
dubbed
gyms
and
Pokestops — across its Orange campus.
“What we’re trying to do
is discourage people who
don’t have a legitimate rea-
Alexander Koerner Getty Images
IN HANOVER, GERMANY, young “Pokemon Go” players gather at
the city center and then walk around holding their smartphones.
Why is the FTC
letting Herbalife
stay in business?
MICHAEL HILTZIK
The legal
complaint
and settlement wit h
Herbalife
unveiled
Friday by the
Federal Trade
Commission
answers several questions about the Los
Angeles-based nutritional
supplement marketing
company, but leaves the
most important question
wide open.
Yes, Herbalife’s business
model is deceitful, according to the FTC’s complaint
— the company has misrepresented itself as a nutritional supplements company, when what it’s really
selling are business opportunities, at inflated
values. And yes, it’s a ripoff:
“Consumers have suffered
and will continue to suffer
substantial monetary loss
as a result of [Herbalife’s]
violations of the law,” the
FTC said.
The agency extracted a
$200-million settlement
from the company, along
with a promise to straighten
up and fly right.
“Herbalife is going to
have to start operating
legitimately,” FTC Chair
Edith Ramirez said Friday.
So here’s the unanswered question: Why is the
FTC allowing Herbalife to
remain in business?
The agency isn’t powerless to act against pyramid
schemes, which is what
Herbalife has been alleged
to be. Last August, the FTC
shut down Vemma Nutrition Co., a Phoenix multilevel marketing outfit it said
was targeting college students and recent college
graduates.
The FTC alleged that
[See Hiltzik, C4]
son to be at the hospital
[from coming] here looking
for Pokemon,” hospital
spokesman John Murray
said.
The hospital wants out of
the app — and it’s not alone.
Arlington National Cemetery outside Washington,
D.C., the National September 11 Memorial and Museum in New York City and the
Auschwitz-Birkenau State
Museum in Poland have
asked visitors to stop
playing out of respect. Funeral homes sought an exclusion from the game as the
blog Pokemon at Funerals
shared images of people
playing at services.
Such
conflicts
have
raised pressing questions
about games and other
products that blend the real
world and the digital world
using a technology called
augmented reality.
Exactly how much of reality should be augmented?
[See Pokemon, C3]
Two major health insurance deals that would reshape the industry’s landscape — Anthem Inc.’s purchase of Cigna Corp. and
Aetna Inc.’s deal to acquire
Humana Inc. — appear to be
in trouble amid concerns
they would reduce competition.
The Justice Department,
which has been reviewing
both transactions, is preparing lawsuits to block them,
Bloomberg News and the
Wall Street Journal reported
Tuesday.
A decision whether to file
the suits could come as early
as this week, and the companies could fight in court or
agree to settle, the reports
said.
A Justice Department
spokesman declined to comment.
Shares of the four companies fell 2% to 4% on Tuesday.
“We are steadfast in our
belief that this deal is good
for consumers and the
healthcare system as a
whole,” Aetna spokesman
T.J. Crawford said.
Anthem and Cigna declined to comment. Humana
did not respond to email requests for comment.
The Obama administration has been tough on
major mergers in various industries, with the Justice
Department blocking Comcast Corp.’s purchase of
Time Warner Cable Inc. and
Halliburton Co.’s acquisition of oil-services rival
Baker Hughes Inc., among
other deals.
The two health insurance
deals were announced a year
ago. If approved, they would
result in just three companies dominating the U.S.
health insurance business.
The mergers have drawn opposition from consumer advocates.
In March, Assistant Atty.
Gen. William Baer told Con[See Mergers, C4]
A search-based credit score
Baidu users’ Web history will play role under deal with ZestFinance
By James Rufus Koren
For Chinese consumers,
what you search for online
soon
could
determine
whether you’re eligible for a
loan.
Through a landmark deal
with Hollywood credit scoring firm ZestFinance, China’s leading search engine,
Baidu, soon will assign credit scores to its users based on
search, location and payment data.
A handful of Chinese
companies already judge
creditworthiness based on
the shopping and payment
histories of their customers,
but Baidu’s plan to use
search data appears to be a
first.
“Nobody’s ever been able
to turn search data into
credit data,” said Douglas
Merrill, chief executive of
ZestFinance, which also will
get an equity investment
from Baidu as part of the
deal announced late Sunday. Merrill would not dis[See ZestFinance, C4]
Michael Robinson Chávez Los Angeles Times
DOUGLAS MERRILL is CEO of Hollywood credit scoring company ZestFinance.
China’s Baidu will give credit scores based on search, location and payment data.
C2
W E D N E S DAY, J U LY 20 , 2 016
L AT I M E S. C O M / BU S I N E S S
BUSINESS BEAT
Home prices in
the Southland
keep climbing
By Andrew Khouri
Justin Sullivan Getty Images
GOOGLE CHAIRMAN Eric Schmidt, left, and U.S. Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx, right, look at a
Google self-driving car. Foxx said it’s time to move beyond existing safety rules to address the technology.
Autonomous cars will
get new U.S. guidelines
By Russ Mitchell
Companies working on
self-driving cars need to focus on safety: “We want people who start a trip to finish
it,” Transportation Secre-
MARKET ROUNDUP
Stocks
mixed;
Netflix
plunges
associated press
Stocks ended mixed
Tuesday as investors let up
on the accelerator after a
three-week rally sent indexes to all-time highs.
The Dow Jones industrial
average inched up to set another record. But the Standard & Poor's 500 index and
Nasdaq composite pulled
back.
A mixed set of corporate
earnings helped keep the
market in a tight range
through the day.
Netflix was one of the decliners to pull down the S&P
500. It dived 13.1% to $85.84
after the video-streaming
service reported adding
fewer subscribers last quarter than it expected. The
tumble continued a sharp
turnaround for Netflix,
whose stock has struggled in
recent months after more
than doubling in 2015.
Philip Morris International fell 3% to $99.89 after
the firm posted weaker
quarterly results than analysts expected. Smokers in
North Africa, Japan, Argen-
tary Anthony Foxx announced Tuesday, saying his
department will issue new
guidelines on the vehicles
this summer.
“Autonomous
doesn’t
mean perfect,” he told attendees at an industry con-
ference in San Francisco.
“We need industry to take
the safety aspects of this
very seriously.”
Foxx’s remarks come in
the wake of May’s fatal crash
involving a Tesla Model S
sedan being used in semiau-
Major stock indexes
Index
Dow industrials
Close
Daily
change
Daily %
change
YTD %
change
18,559.01
+25.96
+0.14
+6.51
S&P 500
2,163.78
-3.11
-0.14
+5.86
Nasdaq composite
5,036.37
-19.41
-0.38
+0.58
S&P 400
1,542.18
-2.89
-0.19
+10.27
Russell 2000
1,200.45
-7.45
-0.62
+5.68
EuroStoxx 50
2,851.05
-13.82
-0.48
-8.56
16,723.31
21,673.20
+225.46
-129.98
+1.37
-0.60
-12.14
-1.10
Nikkei (Japan)
Hang Seng (Hong Kong)
Source: AP
tina and elsewhere bought
fewer cigarettes, leading to a
5% drop in shipments from a
year earlier.
Better-than-expected
earnings from Johnson &
Johnson, meanwhile, helped
prop up the Dow. The
healthcare giant’s shares
rose 1.7% to $125.25 after it
raised its forecast for profit
this year.
California
companies
making big moves included
Palo Alto cloud computing
firm VMware, whose shares
jumped 9% to $68.23 after it
posted quarterly results
that beat expectations and
raised its estimates for the
year.
Super Micro Computer
plunged 27.8% to $19.02 after
the
San
Jose
server
technology firm slashed its
forecasts for the fiscal fourth
quarter.
SciClone
Pharmaceuticals dived 20.8% to
$10.50 after the Foster City
drugmaker said it is no longer in active talks with potential buyers and plans to remain independent.
“For investors, the most
important questions are:
When is the recession coming, and am I paying too
much for stocks?” said
Linda Duessel, senior equity
strategist at Federated Investors. “Everything else is
noise, and there’s so much
noise.”
Duessel does not foresee
a recession on the horizon,
and she said stock prices can
stay high because alternatives look even less attractive.
Overseas, Japan’s Nikkei
225 index jumped1.4%, France’s CAC 40 was down 0.6%,
and Germany’s DAX shed
0.8%.
The yield on the 10-year
Treasury fell to 1.55% from
1.59%. Gold rose $3 to
$1,332.30 an ounce. Silver fell
7 cents to $20.01 an ounce,
and copper rose nearly 3
cents to $2.26 a pound.
The price of U.S. crude oil
fell 59 cents to $44.65 a barrel. Brent crude slipped 30
cents to $44.66 a barrel.
Wholesale gasoline fell 1 cent
to $1.38 a gallon, heating oil
edged up less than 1 cent to
$1.38 a gallon and natural gas
rose less than 1 cent to $2.73
per 1,000 cubic feet.
The euro fell to $1.1015
from $1.1068, the British
pound fell to $1.3093 from
$1.3260 and the dollar
slipped to 106.09 yen from
106.12 yen.
tonomous “autopilot” mode.
The car crashed into a truck
that the autopilot feature
did not sense, killing the
car’s driver.
The Transportation Department has been working
with Google, BMW, General
Motors and other companies developing driverless
and partly autonomous cars
to adapt existing safety rules
to the new technologies.
But Foxx said it’s time to
move beyond existing safety
rules.
Although vague about
the guidelines, Foxx hinted
that they involve “pre-market approval steps” for autonomous car technology.
Given industry concerns
about regulation hampering
innovation, Foxx promised
that the approach would be
flexible, with a lot of input
from businesses, drivers and
technology experts.
“We need clear lines of responsibility between industry, government and consumers,” he said.
Autonomous cars have
great potential to improve
safety, he said, but clear
rules and guidelines are
needed to ensure safety and
boost would-be buyers’ confidence. He said his department also would create an
advisory committee to help
plan how to “approach autonomous vehicles and artificial intelligence more generally” and work with states
to come up with standard
approaches to regulation.
After the fatal crash in
May, Tesla Chief Executive
Elon Musk noted that owners are told that they must
remain alert and keep their
hands on the steering wheel,
even when using the autopilot feature.
Foxx, however, said it
must be assumed that some
drivers will “push the limits
of what the manufacturer intends.” Distractions “that
can be reasonably foreseen”
must be considered for
safety’s sake.
[email protected]
3 states accuse Volkswagen of fraud
associated press
New York state, Massachusetts and Maryland are
suing Volkswagen and its affiliates Audi and Porsche
over diesel emissions cheating, alleging that the German automakers defrauded
customers by selling diesel
vehicles equipped with software enabling them to cheat
emissions testing.
Prosecutors also delved
into which executives knew
about the problem and
when.
The lawsuits, announced
Tuesday, accuse company
employees of trying to cover
up the cheating by submitting false documents and de-
stroying
incriminating
paperwork.
“The allegations against
Volkswagen,
Audi
and
Porsche reveal a culture of
deeply rooted corporate arrogance, combined with a
conscious disregard for the
rule of law or the protection
of public health and the environment,” New York Atty.
Gen. Eric Schneiderman
said.
Schneiderman’s investigation found it “was clear”
that current Volkswagen
Chief Executive Matthias
Mueller knew about emissions issues in July 2006, the
attorney
general
told
reporters Tuesday.
Other top VW executives,
including former CEO Mar-
tin Winterkorn, knew about
the deception and participated in efforts to cover it
up, the New York lawsuit
said.
In a statement, Volkswagen said it already is in
talks with authorities regarding “a comprehensive
national resolution of all remaining environmental issues arising from the diesel
matter.” The firm noted that
it has agreed to buy back or
modify affected vehicles,
create a $2.7-billion environmental trust and invest $2
billion on infrastructure for
zero-emission vehicles.
“The allegations in complaints filed by certain
states today are essentially
not new, and we have been
addressing them in our discussions with U.S. federal
and state authorities,” the
company said. “It is regrettable that some states have
decided to sue for environmental claims now, notwithstanding their prior support
of this ongoing federal-state
collaborative process.”
Some 25,000 affected vehicles were sold in New York
state and 15,000 in Massachusetts, according to the
lawsuits. As of October,
about 13,000 such vehicles
were registered in Maryland,
officials said. Some 600,000
were sold nationwide.
Times staff writer Alex
Schiffer contributed to this
report.
Southern California home prices jumped in June as
prospective buyers bid higher, fighting over a meager supply of homes for sale.
The six-county region’s median price rose 5% from a
year earlier to hit $464,000 in June, data firm CoreLogic
announced Tuesday. Sales were essentially flat, reflective
of the low inventory that experts say is driving up prices.
Job growth and historically low mortgage rates are
also adding fuel to the fire, and prices have now risen for
more than four years. In some communities, prices are
now higher than during last decade’s bubble, at least before accounting for inflation.
According to CoreLogic’s calculations, the median
price in Orange County surpassed its bubble-era high of
$645,000 in May. The county’s median continued to climb
in June, reaching $657,500.
Other areas have further to go. Los Angeles County’s
median price, for example, rose 6.2% from a year earlier to
$530,000 in June. That is 3.6% below the county’s peak of
$550,000 in summer 2007. San Bernardino County is 25%
below its peak, Riverside County 23%, Ventura County
12.7% and San Diego County 4.3%.
In other housing news, the Commerce Department
said builders nationwide started construction on 4.8%
more new homes in June than in May. Economists say one
reason prices have soared in many areas of the U.S. is that
not enough homes have been built to meet demand.
Though prices in some areas are nearing, or surpassing, levels seen in last decade’s bubble, CoreLogic analyst
Andrew LePage cautioned that there are important differences this time, including tighter lending standards.
“The last cycle benefited from loose underwriting and
high-risk ‘subprime’ home loans that allowed borrowers
to stretch to their financial max, if not well beyond,” he
said. Today, after accounting for inflation, even Orange
County prices are about 10% below their 2007 peak, he
said.
[email protected]
Hyperloop One
files countersuit
By Paresh Dave
Hyperloop Technologies Inc. is seeking at least $250
million in damages from four former high-ranking
employees who the company says tried to incite rebellion
within the Los Angeles start-up.
Now referring to itself as Hyperloop One, the firm says
then-Chief Technology Officer Brogan BamBrogan and
his fellow “conspirators” knew their days at the company
“were numbered” because of poor performance or erratic
and misogynistic behavior, according to documents submitted Tuesday in Los Angeles County Superior Court.
In an attempt at taking control before being shoved
out the door, the group launched a failed coup attempt
and then tried to form a competitor, the documents say.
BamBrogan went as far as registering the Internet address hyperlooptoo.com.
Hyperloop One attorneys describe BamBrogan as being in a “Gang of Four” with William Mulholland, vice
president of finance; Knut Sauer, vice president of business development; and David Pendergast, assistant general counsel. They’re accused of breaching employment
contracts, along with their duty of loyalty to the company.
The filing counters a lawsuit the four men brought
against the company last week seeking to get their jobs
back. They say Hyperloop One pushed them out after
they complained about the firm’s top investors breaching
their fiduciary duty. They asserted that investors’ friends
and family had been overpaid for company work, including a public relations consultant whose salary was
boosted while dating Executive Chairman Shervin Pishevar.
The company says those controversial decisions were
justified. The PR firm, for one, charged the standard rate
rather than a discounted one as it took on more responsibilities and Hyperloop One got more cash.
[email protected]
IMF cuts outlook
for global growth
By Jim Puzzanghera
Britain’s vote to leave the European Union has led the
International Monetary Fund to trim its forecast for global economic growth through 2017, but so far the impact
has not been as severe as initially feared.
World economic output will increase 3.1% this year, the
same as it did in 2015, and improve to 3.4% growth next
year, the IMF said Tuesday. Those forecasts each were a
tenth of a percentage point lower than in the
organization’s April World Economic Outlook.
The U.S. economy is expected to expand 2.2% this year,
down 0.2 percentage point from the April estimate. The
2017 forecast of 2.5% growth is unchanged.
If not for the British vote, dubbed “Brexit,” the IMF
said it would have left its world forecast for this year unchanged because “better-than-expected economic
activity” in the Eurozone had offset “disappointing U.S.
first-quarter growth.”
The forecast for next year would have been increased
by a tenth of a percentage point from the April estimate.
But the result of last month’s referendum in Britain
“creates a wave of uncertainty amid already-fragile business and consumer confidence,” the IMF said.
Britain’s economy now is forecast to expand 1.7% this
year — down 0.2 percentage point from the IMF’s April estimate — and just 1.3% in 2017. The forecast for next year is
nearly one percentage point lower than the April estimate.
[email protected]
L AT I ME S . CO M / B U S IN E S S
C3
W E D N E S DAY, J U LY 2 0 , 2 016
COMPANY TOWN
GOP
CONFAB
A CABLE
NEWS HIT
By Stephen Battaglio
NEW YORK — Donald
Trump has been a ratings
draw for most of the events
related to the 2016 presidential campaign and the
first night of the Republican
National Convention was no
different.
Nielsen data showed a
significant audience lift for
cable news networks on
Monday compared with the
Aug. 28, 2012, opening night
of the last GOP convention,
which was delayed a day because of weather.
Fox News Channel, which
typically draws the largest
audience for the GOP confab, led prime-time coverage
Monday with 5.5 million
viewers from 8 to 11 p.m.
Eastern time, a gain of 7%
over 2012, when the party
faithful gathered to nominate former Massachusetts
Gov. Mitt Romney.
CNN saw a far bigger
Trump bump as its primetime audience of 3.6 million
viewers was up 200% from
2012. MSNBC was up 46% to
1.9 million viewers.
While Fox News also led
among the 25 to 54 age group
that advertisers seek for the
commercials they buy on
news programming, CNN
made significant inroads in
the category. Fox News
ranked first with 1.3 million
viewers in the demographic,
a gain of 11% over 2012. But
CNN was close behind with
1.18 million, thanks to a 220%
increase.
MSNBC scored 469,000
viewers in the 25-to-54 age
category, up 39% from 2012.
More than 22 million
viewers watched across cable and broadcast networks
during the 10 p.m. Eastern
time slot that featured an
appearance by Trump and a
speech by his wife, Melania,
which soon became engulfed in controversy as several passages appeared directly borrowed from first
lady Michelle Obama’s remarks to the Democratic
National Convention in 2008.
Fox News had 6.4 million
viewers in the hour; followed
by CNN, with 3.94 million;
NBC, 3.91 million; ABC, 3.6
million; CBS, 2.7 million; and
MSNBC, 1.99 million. NBC’s
broadcast coverage led in
the 25-to-54 demographic
with 1.6 million viewers.
stephen.battaglio
@latimes.com
Kimberley French
THE CAST of “Star Trek Beyond” includes John Cho, left, Anton Yelchin, Karl Urban, Chris Pine, Zachary Quinto and Simon Pegg.
MOVIE PROJECTOR
‘Star Trek’ likely to soar to top
The latest film in the
franchise is expected
to knock ‘Secret Life
of Pets’ from its perch.
By Ryan Faughnder
Paramount Pictures is
hoping Kirk and Spock will
help revive its sagging boxoffice fortunes.
“Star Trek Beyond,” the
third voyage on the USS Enterprise since J.J. Abrams
revived the venerable franchise in 2009, is expected to
easily replace “The Secret
Life of Pets” as the No. 1 film
this weekend. It’s on track to
gross about $60 million in
ticket sales from the U.S.
and Canada through Sunday, according to people who
have reviewed pre-release
audience surveys.
Though down about 15%
from 2013’s “Star Trek Into
Darkness,” that would be
considered a solid debut for
the big-budget picture and a
welcome success for a studio
that could use a hit after the
relative disappointments of
“Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Out of the Shadows”
and “Zoolander 2.”
Paramount is last among
the six major Hollywood studios in domestic ticket sales,
according to Box Office
Mojo.
Studio executives are
cautious, projecting an
opening weekend of $50 million to $55 million for “Star
Trek.” Nonetheless, Paramount clearly has high
hopes for the new film, for
which it recruited director
Justin Lin of the “Fast & Furious” series.
The studio on Monday
announced it had greenlighted a fourth “Star Trek,”
featuring
“Thor”
and
“Ghostbusters” star Chris
Hemsworth. The world premiere of “Beyond” takes
place Wednesday at San Diego Comic-Con, complete
with an outdoor Imax
screening and a live orchestra.
“It is a very important
film for them,” said Bruce
Nash, a box office analyst
with Nash Information
Services. “They need a film
that’s going to do pretty decent business, and clearly it
will.”
Abrams, who directed
the previous two “Star
Treks,” produced “Beyond”
with Paramount and David
Ellison’s Skydance Productions. Its estimated
production budget of $185
million is similar to “Into
Darkness,” and it will need
to do powerful business
internationally. Chinese ecommerce giant Alibaba
Group said in April it would
invest in the new “Star
Trek.”
“Star Trek” has been one
of Paramount’s most reliable franchises. The 2009 reboot posted $385 million
globally, while the follow-up
took in $467 million.
The latest space adventure was filmed largely in
Vancouver, Canada, and
Dubai, unlocking rebates
and tax benefits for the
production. That’s in contrast with the previous two
installments, which Abrams
wanted to shoot in Los Angeles.
“Star Trek Beyond” has
several factors working in its
favor, including a loyal fan
base and largely stellar early
reviews. On the other hand,
sequels have proved unpredictable at the box office this
year, with disappointments
including “Alice Through
the Looking Glass” and
“Neighbors 2.”
“Beyond” returns Chris
Pine as James T. Kirk and
Zachary Quinto as Spock,
joined by newcomers Sofia
Boutella and Idris Elba. The
cast and crew were dealt a
tragic blow last month with
the death of actor Anton
Yelchin in a freak automobile accident at his Los Angeles home.
As “Star Trek” beams scifi fans to the multiplex, 20th
Century Fox will try to draw
families with its latest computer-animated
offering,
“Ice Age: Collision Course.”
Fox and analysts are expecting a debut of $25 million
from the fifth “Ice Age” movie,
which
would
be
significantly less than the
last one, which came out in
2012. That’s not surprising,
given the dominance of “The
Secret Life of Pets” and
“Finding Dory.”
Still, “Ice Age” movies
tend to do a vast majority of
their business overseas
(more than 80% of its ticket
sales for the previous one,
“Continental Drift” were
international). Indeed, “Collision Course” has grossed
an impressive $127 million
internationally already.
The only other wide release this weekend is “Lights
Out,” a PG-13 supernatural
horror tale from Warner
Bros.’ New Line Cinema that
is expected to take in $16 million to $18 million in its debut.
ryan.faughdner
@latimes.com
Where the cameras roll
Overall shoot days were up 11% last week for TV, film and
commercial shoots in the Los Angeles area compared with the
same period last year, according to FilmL.A. Inc.
Production days for three main categories
Television
Commercials
Features
July 11-17, 2016 (438 total shoot days)
93
240
+13%
+5%
July 13-19, 2015 (395 total shoot days)
82
229
[Pokemon, from C1]
“When people are being
directed by the gameplay to
enter inappropriate or dangerous places, there are a
whole host of different questions that need to be addressed whether or not the
gameplay is to blame,” said
Darren Cahr, an intellectual
property attorney in Chicago. “No one really knows
how far people are going to
push this.”
Many in the gaming industry doubt it was the intention of Niantic Labs,
which developed the game,
to create uncomfortable
situations at memorials or
distractions for staff at hospitals.
The app usually designates geographic landmarks big and small as
Pokestops and gyms. It
knows the location of those
sites based on data from Niantic’s first augmented reality game, Ingress.
Ingress isn’t known for
causing real-world problems
or for its big audience. Analysts say the 3-year-old game
has 1 million monthly users
— a fraction of the 15 million
Pokemon has racked up in
just days.
With such a difference in
scale, there’s no way Niantic
could have seen this coming,
said Sunny Dhillon, a partner at Signia Venture Partners, a fund that invests in
games involving augmented
reality.
Cole Burston Associated Press
GAMERS use their smartphones during a release
party this week in Toronto for the “Pokemon Go” app.
“I’m willing to give the
game developer the benefit
of the doubt,” said Dhillon,
who predicts engineers will
tinker with the game to help
reduce these real-world faux
pas. “A lot of the privacy issues were unanticipated.”
Niantic launched the app
without giving locations the
ability to opt out. That
hasn’t stopped many establishments, including UC
Irvine Medical Center, from
contacting the company
asking to be left out. (UC
Irvine Medical Center says it
has not heard back from Niantic, and Niantic declined
to comment for this story).
Some
tech
experts
predict Niantic will create a
feature that allows estab-
lishments to opt out (though
that could raise its own
questions: Which requests
coming from affected establishments are valid?)
But because of the
game’s huge success, some
question whether those
changes will come soon.
Now that “Pokemon Go”
is, by some estimates, the
biggest-ever mobile game in
the U.S., the San Francisco
company has lots on its
plate. Since its launch, there
have been complaints about
bugs and faulty servers that
will probably take priority.
Then there’s building the
business side of the game
with in-app purchases and
advertising.
Julia Ask, a media ana-
lyst at Forrester Inc., says it’s
not Niantic’s place to tell
people how to behave.
She compared the situation with kids eating dinner
with their phones out. Some
parents would ask them to
put them away during the
meal; others wouldn’t care.
“It’s an old-fashioned value,” she said. “It’s more of a
point of view of how people
should experience their
space. It’s a public space,
and they can’t enforce that.”
Both Ask and Cahr said
businesses that don’t wish
to participate in the game
should put up signs asking
users not to play.
Murray, of UC Irvine
Medical Center, said the
hospital is “developing some
messages” to discourage
gamers from entering the facility. But, he said, turning
away gamers shouldn’t be
the hospital’s responsibility.
Boosters of augmented
reality predict more apps to
use the technology in the
coming years. The success of
“Pokemon Go” suggests
they’ll have a captive audience — and the potential for
real-world friction.
“Its just the beginning,”
Cahr said. “Five years from
now, 10 years from now, people are going to look back at
this as quaint and will be
amazed at far these things
have really gone.”
alex.schiffer
@latimes.com
84
Sampling of permitted shoots this week
K
14
A
LOS ANGELES COUNTY
5
Los Angeles
118
L
G
F
405
101
Questions over augmented reality
105
+25%
M
N
H
C
S
Q
10
D
J
Commercials
60
E
605
T
5
710
Television
Unincorporated Santa Susana
Mountains, Thu.-Fri.
MJZ
B Microsoft
R
B
110
10 MILES
A Toyota
O
IP
210
K NCIS
Santa Clarita, Mon.-Sat.
CBS Studios
L Who Do You Think
Westlake, Mon.
Afterall
You Are?
Chatsworth, Mon.-Sun.
Shed Media US Inc.
C Roku
Brentwood, Mon.
Iconoclastic Features
M Leno's Garage
North Hollywood, Mon.-Wed.
Mad Dog Video Inc.
D TJ Maxx
Downtown L.A., Tue.-Thu.
Identity Media Inc.
N The Way Home
Studio City, Fri.
Slauson Productions
E Buick
East Los Angeles, Mon.
Motomo Inc.
O Goliath
West Hollywood, Mon.-Sat.
Picrow Inc.
Features
P Mind of a Chef
Westwood, Tue.
Zero Point Zero Production
Inc.
F Camp Hollywood
Sun Valley, Mon.-Tue.
First Dog Corp
G Bodied
Canoga Park, Mon.
Bodied Productions Inc.
H Shine
Beverly Hills, Wed.
Protean Image Group
I Unplugged
Bel-Air, Mon.-Fri.
Blessedly Silent Films
J Female Brain
Lennox, Mon.
BBG Female Brain LP
Note: Permits are subject to
last-minute changes.
Q How to Get Away
With Murder
University Park, Mon.
ABC Studios
R Ray Donovan
Palms, Mon.
Blind Decker Productions
Inc.
S Superdope
Santa Monica, Mon.
Znak & Jones Productions
T Major Crimes
South Gate, Mon.
Warner Bros. Television
Production
Sources: FilmL.A. Inc.; cities of Beverly Hills and Santa Clarita
Thomas Suh Lauder Los Angeles Times
C4
W E D N E SDAY , J U LY 20 , 2 016
L AT I M E S. C O M /B U S I NE S S
Health
insurer
mergers
may be
blocked
[Mergers, from C1]
gress that the deals would be
scrutinized “very, very carefully” because they would be
a “game changer” for the industry.
The biggest effect would
be from the $48-billion combination of industry giants
Anthem and Cigna. The deal
would create a company
with 53 million members and
about $115 billion in annual
revenue.
The membership of the
combined company would
vault it over industry leader
UnitedHealth Group Inc.,
which has about 46 million
members. The combination
of Aetna and Humana would
be No. 3 with 33 million members.
Paul Ginsburg, a professor at USC’s Schaeffer Center for Health Policy and
Economics, said he wouldn’t
be surprised if the Justice
Department sued to block
the Anthem-Cigna deal.
“That clearly has potential to reduce competition in
the national market where
large,
self-insured
employers get coverage,” he
said.
Last month, California
Insurance Commissioner
Dave Jones urged the Justice Department to block
the deal. A state review
found that the combined
company would control
more than half the insurance market in 28 California
counties.
“When it comes to the Anthem and Cigna merger, bigger is not better for California’s consumers or the
health insurance market,”
Jones said.
Aetna’s $34-billion acquisition of Humana is less
problematic because its
main effect would be in the
market for Medicare Advantage coverage, Ginsburg
said. That market is regional, which would allow
the companies to sell assets
in places where both companies have a significant presence in order to allay antitrust concerns, he said.
“The
Aetna/Humana
merger, which is like many
other heathcare mergers, is
a local phenomenon and
there are clearly remedies”
to address antitrust problems, he said.
Last month, the California Department of Managed Health Care approved
that deal after Aetna agreed
to several conditions, including increased state
oversight of rates.
jim.puzzanghera
@latimes.com
Introducing the
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newsletter.
Celebrity home sales and
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Mark Boster Los Angeles Times
THE FTC EXTRACTED a $200-million settlement from Herbalife, along with a promise to straighten up and fly right. Founded in 1980,
Herbalife last year posted profit of $339 million on sales of $4.5 billion. Above, the lobby of Herbalife’s factory in Lake Forest in 2013.
Firm’s wealth buys influence
[Hiltzik, from C1]
Vemma’s business model
“depends upon recruiting
individuals to participate in
Vemma as Affiliates and
encouraging them to purchase Vemma products in
connection with such participation, rather than
selling products to ultimateuser consumers.”
Here’s how the FTC
described Herbalife’s model: “[Herbalife’s] compensation program incentivizes
not retail sales, but the
recruiting of additional
participants who will fuel
the enterprise by making
wholesale purchases of
product.”
Yet the FTC called
Vemma “an unlawful pyramid” and Herbalife merely
as a “multi-level marketing
company.”
The details in the FTC’s
complaint against Herbalife
are damning. It enticed
individuals to sign up as
“distributors” by suggesting
they could earn annual
income of six figures or
more and live a lifestyle of
“big houses, fancy cars,
cash, and boats” by hawking
Herbalife inventory. But as
the FTC observed, the vast
majority of Herbalife distributors don’t even make
minimum wage.
One striking difference
between Vemma and
Herbalife is size: Vemma
was collecting about $200
million a year in revenue
when the FTC went after it.
Herbalife, which was
founded in 1980, last year
reported profit of $339 million on net sales of $4.5
Irfan Khan Los Angeles Times
HERBALIFE CEO Michael O. Johnson says the
company’s business model “is sound.”
billion.
That wealth buys a lot of
influence. Enough to keep
the words “pyramid
scheme” out of a federal
regulator’s lawsuit, for
example.
Herbalife has not been
shy about putting its connections on public display.
For years it boasted of its
close connections with
UCLA Medical School,
which as we reported in 2013
it exploited to give its nutritional shakes and other
products the veneer of
scientific credibility.
The FTC’s complaint
implies that the luminaries
who have been trotted out
by Herbalife to attest to its
integrity should hang their
heads in shame. Among
them is former Secretary of
State Madeleine Albright,
LA Times
Check rates daily at http://latimes.interest.com
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12 mo
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Min
18 mo
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24 mo
CD
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36 mo
CD
Min
60 mo
CD
Min
Phone / Website
NA
NA
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NA
10,000 10,000 10,000
NA
10,000 10,000 10,000
Member FDIC, Penalty for Early W/D, APY’s accurate as of 07-20-16
909-625-7891
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310-273-2500
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50,000 50,000 50,000 50,000 50,000
In Orange County call (949) 221-8977. Member FDIC.
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NA
www.ccombank.com
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1.35
2.05
1
2,500 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 877-320-3598
www.kinecta.org
Kinecta Federal Credit Union
Federally Insured by NCUA. Membership requirements apply.
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who seems to have sold her
soul to lobby for Herbalife
internationally.
Albright touted
Herbalife in public statements as a paragon of “corporate responsibility and
community service,” and as
an “ethics-driven company.”
We asked Albright’s consult-
ing firm, Albright Stonebridge Group, for comment
but didn’t receive an answer.
The FTC is forcing the
company to restructure its
marketing pitch and its
distributor compensation.
Herbalife will have to drop
the references to lavish
wealth and the images of
opulent mansions and
personal helicopters that
lured the unwary into signing up as distributors. It will
have to connect the compensation of top-tier agents
— those tiny few who make
big money from lower-level
distributors — to retail
sales, not to potentially
bogus purchases.
Some say that forcing
Herbalife to make its money
from actually selling its
nutritional supplements to
retail buyers will be its
death knell, since a small
percentage of the product
actually goes to such customers.
It’s also possible that
Herbalife will cry all the way
to the bank. The stock market treated the $200-million
settlement as a triumph for
the company, sending its
shares up nearly 10% Friday
after the FTC settlement;
the shares also gained
about 9% in May, after the
company disclosed the
pending penalty in a quarterly report. The company
already has pointed out that
the FTC settlement applies
only to its activities in the
U.S., and those account for
only 20% of its net sales. So
it’s free to continue its old
model in the rest of the
world.
Herbalife’s chairman
and chief executive, Michael
O. Johnson, said in a release
that the FTC settlement,
along with a second deal
with the state of Illinois, “are
an acknowledgment that
our business model is
sound.”
If that’s not thumbing his
nose at government
regulators, what is it?
A version of this column can
be found online at
lat.ms/2a642p6.
michael.hiltzik
@latimes.com
China’s Baidu to break new
ground on credit scoring
[ZestFinance, from C1]
close terms of the investment.
Aaron Rieke of consulting firm Upturn, which has
tracked various alternative
credit scoring firms, said the
deal, thanks to Baidu’s size,
would mark the first time a
company has taken such a
vast amount of information
about online behavior and
used it to make credit decisions.
“They’re going to have a
lot of data,” Rieke said.
“Once you’re going to be
judged by the byproducts of
online activity, that’s a brave
new world.”
ZestFinance, founded in
2009, specializes in scoring
the creditworthiness of borrowers who have little or no
credit history.
The firm uses complex algorithms that look for correlations between creditworthiness and all kinds of nontraditional credit information.
In the U.S., it makes consumer loans under the
brand Basix, and judges customers based on a wide array of information gleaned
from data brokers and other
sources. In China, e-commerce site JD.com uses
ZestFinance’s systems to
underwrite loans to its customers based on their
browsing and transaction
history.
But the deal with Baidu
takes things a step further,
setting ZestFinance’s system loose on a huge trove of
information about what
consumers are looking for
online, where they go and
what they purchase through
merchants on Baidu’s ecommerce platform.
Though much of that information has nothing to do
with money, Merrill said behavioral data can weed out
fraud and produce solid
credit information.
“If you get enough data
about people’s behavior,
you’ll be able to extract information about ability to
repay and willingness to repay,” Merrill said.
Because of the vagaries of
ZestFinance’s
system,
which may find correlations
that are far from obvious, it’s
difficult to say precisely how
the Baidu scores will work or
what factors will lead to a
good or bad score.
For instance, in ZestFinance’s U.S. lending practice, Merrill has said that
borrowers who fill out a loan
application using proper
capitalization are more
likely to repay than those
who use all capital letters —
though Merrill also acknowledges he’s not sure why that
is.
The deal with ZestFinance comes less than a year
after Baidu and Chinese fi-
nance firm Citic Group announced plans to start a new
bank, to be called Baixin
Bank.
At the time, Baidu said in
a statement that its search
data could “help the bank
understand the individual
needs of customers.” Now,
by working with ZestFinance, it’s likely planning to
use that same data to help it
underwrite credit cards,
loans and other financial
products for hundreds of
millions of potential customers.
In a statement announcing the deal with ZestFinance, Tony Yip, Baidu’s
head of investments, said
the deal will “help transform
the financial services market in China.”
China’s consumer credit
market is growing fast,
but it’s still relatively small.
In December, Fitch Ratings
estimated about 35% of Chinese consumers had a formal credit history. By comparison, about 89% of
American adults have a
credit record, according to
the federal Consumer Financial Protection Bureau.
That gap has pushed
other Chinese firms to look
for new ways to estimate
consumers’ creditworthiness.
[email protected]
Twitter: @jrkoren
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If you were a customer of
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WEDNESDAY, JULY 20, 2016
Legal Notices
Out of State
Legal Notices
TEFRA NOTICE
NOTICE OF PUBLIC
HEARING
Notice is hereby given
that on August 3, 2016,
a public hearing as required by Section 147(f )
of the Internal Revenue
Code (the “Code”) will
be held by the California
Health Facilities Financing Authority (the “Authority”) with respect to
the proposed issuance by
the Authority of its revenue bonds in one or more
series in an amount not to
exceed $325,000,000 (the
“Bonds”). The proceeds of
the Bonds will be used by
Adventist Health System/
West (the “Borrower”)
or certain of its affiliates
to refinance the cost of
construction, expansion,
remodeling, renovation,
furnishing,
equipping
and acquisition of certain
health facilities generally
located at the addresses
in California as follows:
• Simi Valley Hospital
& Health Care Services
d/b/a Simi Valley Hospital
at 2975 North Sycamore
Drive, Simi Valley
• Feather River Hospital
at 5974 Pentz Road and
5734 Canyon View Drive,
FRH-Rural Health Care
Clinic at 5125 Skyway,
each in Paradise
• Lodi Memorial Hospital
Association, Inc. d/b/a
Lodi Memorial Hospital
at 975 South Fairmont
Avenue and 800 South
Lower Sacramento Road,
each in Lodi
• Hanford Community
Hospital d/b/a Adventist
Medical Center – Hanford,
Adventist Medical Center
– Central Valley at 1025
North Douty Street, 450
North Greenfield Avenue
and 115 Mall Drive, each
in Hanford
• Glendale Adventist Medical Center, 1509 Wilson
Terrace, Glendale
• St. Helena Hospital d/b/a
St. Helena Hospital Napa
Valley at 10 Woodland
Road, St. Helena, and 650
Sanitarium Road, Deer
Park
• St. Helena Hospital d/b/a
St. Helena Hospital Center
for Behavioral Health at
525 Oregon Street, Vallejo
• Adventist Health Clearlake Hospital, Inc. d/b/a
St. Helena Hospital Clear
Lake at 15630 18th Avenue, Highway 53 and
15250 Lakeshore Drive,
each in Clearlake and Hidden Valley Medical Clinic
at 18990 Coyote Valley
Road, Hidden Valley Lake
• San Joaquin Community
Hospital at 2615 Chester
Avenue, Bakersfield
• Sonora Community
Hospital d/b/a Sonora
Regional Medical Center
at One South Forest Road,
1000 Greenley Road, 179
South Fairview Lane, and
940 Silva Lane, each in
Sonora
• Ukiah Adventist Hospital
d/b/a Ukiah Valley Medical Center at 275 Hospital Drive and 1120 South
Dora, each in Ukiah
• White Memorial Medical
Center at 1720 East Caesar E Chavez Avenue, Los
Angeles
• Adventist Health System/West at 2100 Douglas Boulevard, Roseville
•
Adventist
Health
System/West
at
approximately 27 acres
of undeveloped land
in Roseville, California,
bounded by Eureka Road
(on the southwest side),
N. Sunrise Avenue (on the
northwest side), Stone
Point Drive (on the northeast side), and an existing
shopping center (on the
southeast side)
Proceeds of the Bonds
will also be used to pay
costs in connection with
the issuance of the Bonds.
The facilities listed above
are owned and operated
by the Borrower or one of
its affiliates, each a California nonprofit religious
corporation and an organization described in Section 501(c)(3) of the Code.
The hearing will commence at 10:00 am, or
as soon thereafter as the
matter can be heard, and
will be held in Suite 590,
915 Capitol Mall, Sacramento, CA. Interested
persons wishing to express their views on the
issuance of the Bonds or
on the nature and location of the health facilities proposed to be refinanced may attend the
public hearing in person
or by phone (888) 2403210 (participation code
955669) or TDD (916)
654-9922 or, prior to the
time of the hearing, submit written comments to
Diane Stanton, Executive
Director, California Health
Facilities Financing Authority, 915 Capitol Mall,
Suite 590, Sacramento,
CA 95814. The Authority
may limit the time available for persons attending the public hearing to
provide comments while
assuring such persons a
reasonable opportunity
to be heard.
Dated: July 20, 2016
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Time Warner Cable’s
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Investment
Opportunities
We Hoiston International
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The project has been approved by the city of San
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Legal Notices
Employment
NOTICE OF REQUEST
FOR PROPOSALS
/QUOTATIONS /
INFORMATION
Notice is hereby given that
proposals will be accepted by the
South Coast Air Quality
Management District, 21865
Copley Drive, Diamond Bar, CA
91765 for the following:
P2017-01 Disposal of Existing
Air Monitoring Platform and
Installation of Infrastructure for
Replacement Air Monitoring
Platform Mandatory Bidder's
Conference 7/23/16 Closing Date:
8/19/16 2:00 p.m. Contact: Rene
Bermudez 909-396-2269
P2017-04 Consolidation of
Mapping Functions on SCAQMD’s
Website Optional Bidder’s
Conference 7/22/16 Closing Date:
8/10/16 3:00 p.m. Contact:
Roberta Lewis 909-396-3160
Q2017-01 One Cryogen Free
Preconcentrator Used in Support
of GC-FID Analysis of Compounds
for the Federal Photochemical
Assessment Monitoring Stations
(PAMS) Program Closing Date:
8/12/16 2:00 p.m. Contact: Raul
Dominguez, Jr. Ph.D. 909-3962225
RFI2017-01
Develop,
Integrate, and Demonstrate UltraLow Emission Diesel Engines for
On-Road Heavy-Duty Vehicles
Closing Date: 9/07/16 1:00 p.m.
Contact: Richard Carlson 909-3963996
The RFP/RFQ/RFI may
be obtained through
the
Internet
at:
http://www.aqmd.gov/
grants-bids
If you have questions or would
like a copy of the RFP/RFQ/RFI
mailed to you, call the contact
person.
It is the policy of the SCAQMD to
ensure that all businesses
including
minority-owned
businesses,
women-owned
businesses, disabled veteranowned businesses and small
businesses have a fair and
equitable opportunity to compete
for and participate in AQMD
contracts.
SCAQMD Procurement
Unit
7/13, 7/20/16
To obtain the Request for
Proposal (RFP) package,
In addition, from time
please mail request to:
to time we make certain
Business
changes in the services
Armie Tolentino
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that we offer in order to
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NOTICE OF PUBLIC WORKSHOP
Money Out Of Pocket.
Proposed Amendments to RECLAIM
(CDCN)
August 11, 2016, Thursday
1:30 p.m.
SCAQMD Headquarters, Auditorium
21865 Copley Drive
Diamond Bar, CA 91765
Purpose of this Meeting
The South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) has scheduled a Public Workshop in order to
obtain additional comments, information, and suggestions from the public regarding proposed amendments
to Regulation XX - Regional Clean Air Incentives Market (RECLAIM), a market-based incentive program, and on
achieving the air quality objectives discussed below. Regulation XX is scheduled to be amended at a Public
Hearing before the SCAQMD Governing Board on October 7, 2016.
Rule Background
At the December 4, 2015 Governing Board Meeting, amendments were adopted to Regulation XX – Regional
Clean Air Incentives Market (RECLAIM) that pertained to oxides of nitrogen (NOx). However, the SCAQMD
Governing Board did not adopt amendments pertaining to facility and equipment shutdowns. Staff was
instructed by the Governing Board to return to the NOx RECLAIM Working Group for further discussion and
analysis of potential impacts on the entire NOx RECLAIM program and consideration of possible alternatives
that would allow a closer alignment of the treatment of shutdown credits in RECLAIM with the treatment of
shutdown credits in command-and-control programs short of full forfeiture. Following this process, staff was
instructed to return to the Board with either the original proposal for Rule 2002(i) or some other alternate
proposal.
Proposed Rule Amendments and Air Quality Objectives
The proposed amendments to Regulation XX would achieve a closer alignment of the treatment of shutdown
credits under RECLAIM and emission reduction credits (ERCs) under command-and-control rules. In addition,
the proposed amendments would prevent certain RTCs from facility shutdowns from entering the market and
delaying the installation of BARCT at other RECLAIM facilities. This would further ensure that the RECLAIM
program as a whole will result in equivalent or greater reductions in emissions compared to BARCT regulations.
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CEQA Guidelines §15164 (a) allows a lead agency to prepare an Addendum to a previously certified CEQA
document if some changes or additions are necessary but none of the conditions described in CEQA Guidelines
§15162 have occurred. The currently proposed amendments to Regulation XX would not be expected to trigger
any conditions identified in CEQA Guidelines §15162 because the proposed project would not:
- result in new or more severe significant effects requiring substantial revisions in the previous CEQA document
(e.g., the Final PEA);
- create new significant project-specific or cumulative impacts in any environmental topic areas; or,
- make any project-specific or cumulative impacts in any environmental areas substantially worse as a result of
implementing the proposed project.
Thus, SCAQMD will prepare an Addendum to the December 2015 Final PEA for the currently proposed project.
While an Addendum need not be circulated for public review [CEQA Guidelines §15164 (c)], the Addendum, as
well as the currently proposed amendments to Regulation XX, will be made available to the public 30 days
prior to Public Hearing to be held on October 7, 2016 (subject to change). The previously certified Final PEA,
supporting documentation, and record of approval of the December 2015 amendments to Regulation XX are
available upon request by calling the SCAQMD Public Information Center at (909) 396-2039 or by visiting
SCAQMD's website at www.aqmd.gov. The direct link to the December 2015 Final PEA can be found at
http://www.aqmd.gov/home/library/documents-support-material/lead-agency-scaqmd-projects/scaqmdprojects---year-2015.
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Too vintage
for your
taste
?
The proposed amendments would apply to facilities in RECLAIM that permanently shut down. The proposed
rule establishes the criteria for determining a facility shutdown, and the methodology to calculate the amount
of RTCs that a facility will be required to surrender to the Executive Officer. Proposed Amended Regulation XX
also includes exclusions from this provision to allow facilities under common ownership that conduct the same
function to use shutdown RTCs as well as provisions that allow for planned non-operation for up to five years
for facilities that meet specific criteria.
California Environmental Quality Act
The currently proposed amendments to Regulation XX are considered to be modifications to the previously
approved project (the December 2015 amendments to Regulation XX) and are a "project" as defined by the
California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA). For the previously approved project, the SCAQMD, as the CEQA
Lead Agency, prepared a Final Program Environmental Assessment (PEA) for Proposed Amended Regulation XX
- Regional Clean Air Incentives Market (RECLAIM) that was certified by the SCAQMD Governing Board on
December 4, 2015 (State Clearinghouse No. 2014121018 / SCAQMD No. 12052014BAR).
C5
Pass it on.
Sell your unwanted items
where they’ll be appreciated.
latimes.com/marketplace
Questions regarding the CEQA analysis and the upcoming preparation of the Addendum may be directed to:
Barbara Radlein
Planning, Rule Development and Area Sources
South Coast Air Quality Management District
21865 Copley Drive
Diamond Bar, CA 91765
Phone: (909) 396-2716
Email: [email protected]
Fax: (909) 396-3324
Available Supporting Documents
The following supporting documents will be made available on or before the public workshop:
- Proposed Amended Regulation XX
- Preliminary Draft Staff Report
To Obtain Copies of the Above Documents
Copies of the documents listed are available and may be obtained from:
Mr. Philip Crabbe III
Public Information Center
South Coast Air Quality Management District
21865 Copley Drive
Diamond Bar, CA 91765
(909) 396-2039
The documents are also available for download from the SCAQMD website at:
http://www.aqmd.gov/home/regulations/rules/proposed-rules
Submissions of Documents or Comments
The public is requested to send comments, documents or other information relevant to these proposals to:
Mr. Gary Quinn, P.E.
Planning, Rule Development and Area Sources
South Coast Air Quality Management District
21865 Copley Drive
Diamond Bar, CA 91765
Phone: (909) 396-3121
Fax: (909) 396-3324
Email: [email protected]
Written comments regarding the proposed rule amendments submitted by August 26, 2016 will be responded
to in the staff report, which is part of the information considered by the SCAQMD Governing Board.
7/20/16
09CL397
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
USAHQ
©2016 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
All Rights Reserved.
TURET
ONEHGU
GYTIZL
Answer
here:
Yesterday’s
Check out the new, free JUST JUMBLE app
SALES EVENTS
BUSINESS
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
“
”
(Answers tomorrow)
Jumbles: PICKY
KNIFE
DONKEY
OUTLET
Answer: When Steve Martin got the role of Inspector
Clouseau, he was — TICKLED PINK
C6
WEDNESDAY, JULY 20, 2016
LOS ANGELES TIMES
Para más información sobre este aviso por favor llame al número 1-866-237-1333.
Notice of General Rate Case Application filed by California American Water
for an Increase in Water Rates
Southern Division
(APPLICATION NO. A.16-07-002)
California American Water has filed a General Rate Case (GRC) application with the California
Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) to increase customers’ rates beginning January 1, 2018. This
GRC will cover the years 2018–2020.
The Application
The CPUC requires California American Water to file a GRC every three years. On July 1, 2016,
California American Water filed a GRC requesting overall revenue increases of $34,559,200 (or
16.29%) for 2018, $8,478,500 (or 3.43%) for 2019, and $7,742,600 (or 3.03%) for 2020. The
GRC includes revenue requirement information, the anticipated cost to run the water company’s
systems, new infrastructure investments, a request to increase rates to cover anticipated costs and
other requests the water company deems necessary to run its business.
Without consolidation, the proposed revenue increases in the Ventura District are shown in the
chart below by customer class.
Ventura District Proposed Revenue Increases WITHOUT Consolidation
2018
2019
Increase Over
3 Years
2020
CUSTOMER
CLASS
$ Increase
%
Increase
$ Increase
%
Increase
$ Increase
%
Increase
Residential
$1,827,933
7.9%
$615,882
2.5%
$579,034
2.3%
$3,022,849
Commercial
$569,349
7.8%
$190,173
2.4%
$178,795
2.2%
$938,317
Rate Consolidation
As part of this GRC, California American Water is proposing three major consolidations. The
consolidations will encompass several districts for rate-making and operations purposes.
The consolidation proposals should provide customer benefits by spreading costs of large
infrastructure projects over time and over a larger base of customers.
Industrial
$265,717
7.5%
$85,318
2.3%
$80,213
2.1%
$431,248
Public
Authority
$202,274
7.7%
$66,119
2.3%
$62,163
2.1%
$330,557
Southern Division
The proposed Southern Division consolidation includes the Ventura, San Diego and Los Angeles
County service districts. These systems are served primarily with water purchased from the
Metropolitan Water District and share common management and administrative support staff.
Private Fire
A. With Consolidation
California American Water’s revenue proposals for the Southern Division, WITH consolidation,
are shown by customer class in the chart below.
Construction/
Other
TOTAL
CUSTOMER
CLASS
$ Increase
2019
%
Increase
$ Increase
%
Increase
$ Increase
%
Increase
10.7%
$1,909
4.0%
$1,794
3.7%
$8,285
$15,845
5.9%
$0
0.0%
$0
0.0%
$15,845
$959,400
$ Increase
YEAR
Avg Use (CGL)1
Current Bill
2018
135.3
$103.30
2019
135.3
2020
135.3
$2.73
$116.53
2.40%
$116.53
$2.56
$119.10
2.20%
4.4%
$2,700,379
3.8%
$14,219,627
Commercial
$2,891,231
11.8%
$1,117,947
4.1%
$1,017,794
3.6%
$5,026,971
Industrial
$736,640
18.0%
$169,173
3.5%
$154,018
3.1%
$1,059,831
Public
Authority
$907,009
11.3%
$336,354
3.8%
$306,221
3.3%
$1,549,585
$904
17.0%
$456
7.4%
$415
6.2%
$1,775
$22,011
11.9%
$9,012
4.6%
$8,205
4.0%
$39,228
$100,939
95.5%
$11,692
5.7%
$10,645
4.9%
$123,276
YEAR
Avg Use (CGL)1
Current Bill
($31,298)
2018
110.2
$68.79
($31,298)
TOTAL
-4.0%
$13,180,584
$0
0.0%
$4,610,734
$0
0.0%
$4,197,677
$21,988,995
Customer Impact
If California American Water’s proposed consolidation of the Southern Division is approved, a
typical residential customer’s monthly water bills (with a 5/8-inch meter size) would resemble
those below. Amounts shown include fees, taxes and surcharges.
Ventura District Average Residential Bill WITH Consolidation
YEAR
Avg Use (CGL)1
Current Bill
$ Increase
Proposed Bill
% Increase
2018
135.3
$103.30
$23.45
$126.74
22.70%
2019
135.3
$126.74
$5.29
$132.04
4.17%
2020
135.3
$132.04
$4.82
$136.85
3.65%
San Diego District Average Residential Bill WITH Consolidation
YEAR
Avg Use (CGL)1
Current Bill
$ Increase
Proposed Bill
% Increase
2018
71.6
$63.33
($1.46)
$61.88
-2.30%
2019
71.6
$61.88
$2.58
$64.46
4.17%
2020
71.6
$64.46
$2.35
$66.81
3.65%
Los Angeles District - Baldwin Hills Average Residential Bill WITH Consolidation
YEAR
Avg Use (CGL)1
Current Bill
$ Increase
Proposed Bill
% Increase
2018
110.2
$68.79
($3.28)
$65.51
-4.77%
2019
110.2
$65.51
$2.73
$68.24
4.17%
2020
110.2
$68.24
$2.49
$70.73
3.65%
Los Angeles District - Duarte Average Residential Bill WITH Consolidation
YEAR
Avg Use (CGL)1
Current Bill
$ Increase
Proposed Bill
% Increase
2018
130.0
$65.76
$12.72
$78.48
19.34%
2019
130.0
$78.48
$3.27
$81.75
4.17%
2020
130.0
$81.75
$2.98
$84.73
3.65%
Los Angeles District - San Marino Average Residential Bill WITH Consolidation
YEAR
Avg Use (CGL)1
Current Bill
$ Increase
Proposed Bill
% Increase
2018
157.8
$68.73
$18.02
$86.75
26.21%
2019
157.8
$86.75
$3.62
$90.37
4.17%
2020
157.8
$90.37
$3.29
$93.66
3.65%
1: CGL= 100 gallons
B. Without Consolidation
California American Water’s proposed revenue increases, WITHOUT consolidation, for each
Southern District are shown below.
San Diego District Proposed Revenue Increases WITHOUT Consolidation
2018
2019
Increase
Over 3 Years
2020
CUSTOMER
CLASS
$ Increase
%
Increase
Residential
$1,135,790
8.1%
$665,909
4.4%
$587,375
3.7%
$2,389,075
Commercial
$777,063
7.2%
$453,343
3.9%
$399,878
3.3%
$1,630,285
Industrial
$276,479
7.1%
$161,496
3.9%
$142,450
3.3%
$580,424
Public
Authority
$10,091
8.4%
$5,551
4.6%
$4,897
3.9%
$20,539
($57,124)
-25.4%
$0
0.0%
$0
0.0%
($57,124)
Private Fire
TOTAL
REVENUE
$2,142,300
$ Increase
%
Increase
$1,286,300
$ Increase
%
Increase
$1,134,600
$ Increase
$4,563,200
Without consolidation, the proposed revenue increases in the Los Angeles District are shown in
the chart below by customer class.
Los Angeles District Proposed Revenue Increases WITHOUT Consolidation
2018
CUSTOMER
CLASS
$ Increase
Residential
Commercial
2019
%
Increase
$ Increase
$5,978,030
27.2%
$1,621,111
25.0%
Industrial
$126,605
Public
Authority
Increase
Over 3 Years
2020
%
Increase
$
Increase
$1,643,208
5.9%
$1,562,310
5.3%
$9,183,548
$479,950
6.0%
$456,321
5.3%
$2,557,381
22.7%
$34,561
5.1%
$32,860
4.6%
$194,026
$374,508
24.7%
$104,009
5.5%
$98,888
4.9%
$577,405
Sale for Resale
$1,589
29.9%
$472
6.8%
$449
6.1%
$2,509
Construction/
Other
$6,124
27.8%
$1,633
6.4%
$1,553
5.7%
$9,310
$120,764
114.3%
$13,167
5.8%
$12,519
5.2%
$146,450
$0
0.0%
$0
0.0%
$3,969
Irrigation
Private Fire
TOTAL
$3,969
$8,232,700
1.4%
$2,277,000
$2,164,900
%
Increase
$ Increase
$12,674,600
% Increase
$113.81
$2,966,100
Private Fire
Proposed Bill
$113.81
14.4%
Irrigation
$ Increase
$10.51
$8,553,147
Construction/
Other
$4,747,100
Customer Impact
If California American Water’s proposed consolidation of the Southern Division is not approved,
a typical residential customer’s monthly water bills (with a 5/8-inch meter size) would resemble
those below. Amounts shown include fees, taxes and surcharges.
Residential
Sale for
Resale
$902,000
Ventura District Average Residential Bill WITHOUT Consolidation
Increase
Over
3 Years
2020
$4,582
$2,885,700
Southern Division - Proposed Revenue Increase WITH Consolidation
2018
$ Increase
10.17%
San Diego District Average Residential Bill WITHOUT Consolidation
YEAR
Avg Use (CGL)1
Current Bill
$ Increase
Proposed Bill
% Increase
2018
71.6
$63.33
$4.49
$67.83
7.10%
2019
71.6
$67.83
$2.79
$70.62
4.12%
2020
71.6
$70.62
$2.46
$73.09
3.49%
Los Angeles District - Baldwin Hills Average Residential Bill WITHOUT Consolidation
$ Increase
$16.08
Proposed Bill
% Increase
$84.87
23.37%
2019
110.2
$84.87
$4.92
$89.79
5.80%
2020
110.2
$89.79
$4.68
$94.47
5.21%
YEAR
Avg Use (CGL)1
Current Bill
$ Increase
Proposed Bill
% Increase
2018
130.0
$65.76
$18.59
$84.34
28.26%
2019
130.0
$84.34
$4.89
$89.23
5.80%
2020
130.0
$89.23
$4.65
$93.88
5.21%
Los Angeles District - Duarte Average Residential Bill WITHOUT Consolidation
Los Angeles District - San Marino Average Residential Bill WITHOUT Consolidation
YEAR
Avg Use (CGL)1
Current Bill
$ Increase
Proposed Bill
% Increase
2018
157.8
$68.73
$17.64
$86.37
25.67%
2019
157.8
$86.37
$5.01
$91.38
5.80%
2020
157.8
$91.38
$4.76
$96.14
5.21%
1: CGL= 100 gallons
Primary Drivers of Rate Increase
California American Water has made efforts to keep expenses low. However, there continues to
be an ongoing need to invest in the infrastructure for each district. This application will also cover
proposals to make investments to improve water quality and comply with new water treatment
regulations. Additionally, California American Water is requesting approval for investments in
automated meter reading. This will give customers more accessibility to data about how and when
they use water, and how that impacts their bill.
Customer conservation and the drought have led to reduced sales revenue for California American
Water. Due to this reduction and projected declining sales, California American Water is requesting
an increase to the price per unit of water. The proposed rate increases will also allow California
American Water to sustain new infrastructure investments, higher depreciation, higher costs for
purchased water, higher operating and maintenance costs, information technology and laboratory
costs, as well as higher taxes.
Obtaining a Copy of the Application
A copy of California American Water’s proposed GRC application and related exhibits may be
reviewed at California American Water’s offices at the locations below:
•
Los Angeles County - 8657 Grand Avenue, Rosemead, CA 91770
•
San Diego County - 1025 Palm Avenue, Imperial Beach, CA 91932
•
Ventura County - 2439 W. Hillcrest Drive, Newbury Park, CA 91320
Copies of the proposed application are also available to review at the CPUC’s Central Files
Office in San Francisco by appointment. For more information, please contact them at
[email protected] or (415) 703-2045.
The CPUC’s Process
This application will be assigned to an Administrative Law Judge (Judge) who will determine how to
receive evidence and other related documents necessary for the CPUC to establish a record upon
which to base its decision. Evidentiary hearings may be held where utilities, consumer advocacy
groups, and other entities which have been given official status as “parties” will present their
testimony and may be subject to cross-examination by other parties. These evidentiary hearings
are open to the public, but only those who are parties may participate. The hearings and documents
submitted in the proceeding become part of the formal record that the Judge relies upon when
writing a proposed decision to present to the Commissioners for their consideration.
After considering all proposals and all evidence presented during the formal hearing process, the
Judge will issue a proposed decision determining whether to adopt California American Water’s
request, modify it, or deny it. Any of the CPUC’s Commissioners may sponsor an alternate
decision. The proposed decision and any alternate decisions will be discussed and voted upon at a
scheduled Commission Voting Meeting.
The Office of Ratepayer Advocates (ORA) may review this application. ORA is the independent
consumer advocate within the CPUC with a legislative mandate to represent investor-owned utility
customers to obtain the lowest possible rate for service consistent with reliable and safe service
levels. ORA has a multi-disciplinary staff with expertise in economics, finance, accounting, and
engineering. For more information about ORA, please call (415) 703-1584, e-mail [email protected],
or visit ORA’s website at www.ora.ca.gov.
Stay Informed
If you would like to follow this proceeding, or any other issue before the CPUC, you may use the
CPUC’s free subscription service. Sign up at http://subscribecpuc.cpuc.ca.gov.
If you would like to learn how you can participate in the proceeding, have informal comments, or
have questions about the CPUC’s processes, you may access the CPUC’s Public Advisor’s webpage
at http://consumers.cpuc.ca.gov/pao/. You may also contact the Public Advisor as follows:
Email: [email protected]
Write: Public Advisor’s Office, 505 Van Ness Avenue, San Francisco, CA 94102
Call: Toll free 1-866-849-8390; TTY toll free 1-866-836-7825
Please reference California American Water’s GRC Application No. 16-07-002 in any
communications you have with the CPUC regarding this matter. All public comments will become
part of the public correspondence file for this proceeding and be made available for review for the
assigned Judge, the Commissioners, and appropriate CPUC staff.
D
SPORTS
W E D N E S D A Y , J U L Y 2 0 , 2 0 1 6 :: L A T I M E S . C O M / S P O R T S
Angels
lose
another
pitcher
Tropeano has a torn
elbow ligament and
will be sidelined for
rest of the season.
ANGELS 8, TEXAS 6
By Mike DiGiovanna
The Angels on Tuesday
lost their third starting
pitcher to a major elbow injury in 31⁄2 months when
Nick Tropeano was diagnosed with a medium- to
high-grade tear in his ulnar
collateral ligament, an injury that will sideline the
promising young righthander for the rest of this
season and, most likely, all of
2017.
Tropeano joined lefthander Andrew Heaney,
who underwent elbow ligament-replacement surgery
July 1, and ace Garrett
Richards, who tore his UCL
in May and could need
surgery, on the disabled list
and sent the Angels searching for clues as to why they
have suffered so many UCL
tears this season.
Since Mike Scioscia took
over as manager in 2000, only
three Angels pitchers have
had ligament-replacement
surgery while with the club
[See Angels, D5]
Mitchell Layton Getty Images
CHASE UTLEY IS GREETED by Howie Kendrick after getting the Dodgers off to a fast start with a leadoff home run against
Washington’s Reynaldo Lopez, who was making his major league debut. Utley had three hits and three RBIs in the 8-4 victory. D5
BACK OFF
Kershaw still has soreness and his return to the Dodgers is ‘uncertain,’
according to Roberts. Ryu also has a flare-up and goes on disabled list.
DODGERS 8
WASHINGTON 4
By Andy McCullough
Sean M. Haffey Getty Images
NICK TROPEANO
might be headed for elbow surgery.
Not again
Three Angels pitchers
might have elbow ligament-replacment surgery
this season, matching the
team’s total for the previous 16 years:.
Pitcher
Andrew Heaney
Garrett Richards
Nick Tropeano*
Tyler Skaggs
Michael Kohn
Matt Wise
Year
2016
2016
2016
2014
2012
2003
* Suffered a medium- to
high-grade UCL tear in right
elbow. Ligament-replacement
surgery is one option, but
Tropeano has not determined a
course of treatment.
WASHINGTON — On Sunday
in Los Angeles, a day after he completed a simulated game that
looked like his final tuneup before
rejoining the Dodgers, Clayton
Kershaw met with team doctor
Robert Watkins.
It was Watkins who initially prescribed an epidural for Kershaw’s
herniated disk last month. And it
was Watkins who listened to Kershaw relay a recurrence of soreness
in his lower back and advised him
to rest until the discomfort subsided.
The setback pulls the rug out
beneath a franchise awaiting the
return of its left-handed anchor.
On Tuesday, before the Dodgers
defeated the Washington Nationals, 8-4, Manager Dave Roberts referred to a return date for Kershaw
as “uncertain.”
“When you’re dealing with the
back, there’s always some concern,
certainly,” Roberts said. “But
you’re just hoping in the coming
2016 OLYMPICS
Elsa Garrison Getty Images
CLAYTON KERSHAW , who hasn’t pitched since June 26, was
expected to return to the Dodgers’ rotation this week.
days there is some improvement.”
Roberts revealed a series of injury issues before the game. The
team scratched Hyun-Jin Ryu
from a scheduled start Wednesday
because of elbow tendinitis, placing him on the 15-day disabled list
along with reliever Casey Fien, who
is also suffering from elbow tendinitis. The Dodgers activated outfielder Joc Pederson, who has recovered from a sprained AC joint,
and recalled reliever Luis Avilan.
Scrambling to align a rotation,
the team will start Bud Norris on
Wednesday and 19-year-old rookie
Julio Urias on Thursday. The
Dodgers had sent Urias to triple-A
Oklahoma City to preserve innings
as a reliever. He has pitched one inning since July 4.
Heading into the weekend, the
Dodgers hoped Kershaw (11-2 with
a 1.79 earned-run average) could
start either Thursday in Washington or Friday in St. Louis. He completed four simulated innings Saturday at Dodger Stadium and revealed no physical issues during
the outing, which led Roberts to remark that, barring any setbacks,
all that remained for Kershaw was
[See Dodgers, D5]
ROAD TO RIO
16 DAYS TO SUMMER GAMES
Purity, shmurity:
All bets are on
IOC moves with
care over Russia
Another vestige of Olympic ideal fades
away with Vegas books taking wagers
on Games for the first time since 2000.
Executive board, pondering whether to
ban nation from Games amid doping
allegations, will explore legal options.
By Lance Pugmire
By David Wharton
LAS VEGAS — The long, slow erosion of the
Olympics’ claim to sporting purity has reached a
new landmark.
The Summer Games in Rio de Janeiro will be
gambled on inside Nevada sports books.
The Nevada Gaming Control Board, acting on
the interests of race and sports book directors in
the state, agreed last year to allow bettors to wager on Olympic events for the first time since the
practice was forbidden in 2001.
Asked if the world should pause to mourn the
lost innocence once associated with the Games,
the head of Las Vegas’ powerful Westgate Superbook saw no reason to shed a tear.
“ ‘Used to be’ is exactly right, because almost
everyone in the Olympics is getting paid now,” Jay
Kornegay said. “I don’t
[See Gambling, D3]
Sixteen days before the opening ceremony for
the 2016 Summer Games, Olympic leaders still
aren’t sure what to do with the Russians.
Anti-doping authorities want the International Olympic Committee to consider banning
the entire national contingent over allegations of
systemic cheating among athletes, coaches and
officials.
It would set a bold precedent — no country has
ever been excluded from the Games for doping —
but the IOC’s executive board sounded a more
cautious note Tuesday, saying it would spend the
next few days exploring “the legal options.”
“We have to do this the right way or it will be an
even bigger mess than it already is,” said Anita DeFrantz, an IOC member from Los Angeles.
The board has asked
[See IOC, D3]
Francine Orr Los Angeles Times
“WE’RE DOING as much as we can as fast
as we can,” says International Olympic
Committee member Anita DeFrantz.
Gordon
Earnhardt
Racing team’s
backup plan
Jeff Gordon, who’s
retired, is ready to
pinch-drive for
NASCAR’s Dale
Earnhardt Jr., who
has health issue. D3
Make sure
of eligibility
As a new high school
sports season nears,
Eric Sondheimer
says player transfers
need to be properly
cleared. D2
Woods will
miss PGA
The golfer, rehabbing
after back surgeries,
will pass up that
major and the rest of
the tour season. D6
D2
W E D NE S DAY, J U LY 2 0 , 2 016
L AT I M ES . C O M / SP O RTS
PRO CALENDAR
WED.
20
DODGERS
ANGELS
at Wash.
4
SNLA
THU.
21
FRI.
22
SAT.
23
SUN.
24
at Wash. at St. Louis at St. Louis at St. Louis
9 a.m.
5:15
4:15
5
SNLA
SNLA
SNLA
ESPN
TEXAS
7
FSW
at Houston at Houston at Houston
5
4
11 a.m.
FSW
FSW
FSW
SEATTLE
7:30*
at Portland
12:30
ESPN
GALAXY
Shade denotes home game. *-U.S. Open Cup
SPARKS: Friday, at Washington, 4 p.m. PDT, TWC, Dep.
TODAY ON THE AIR
TIME
EVENT
AUTO RACING
2 p.m.
NASCAR, Camping World Truck Series, Eldora,
qualifying
6 p.m.
NASCAR, Camping World Truck Series, Eldora
BASEBALL
9:30 a.m. Atlanta at Cincinnati
11:15 a.m. New York Mets at Chicago
4 p.m.
San Francisco at Boston
4 p.m.
Dodgers at Washington
7 p.m.
Texas at Angels
7 p.m.
San Diego at St. Louis (in progress)
CYCLING
5 a.m.
Tour de France, Stage 17
5 a.m.
Tour de France, Stage 18
(Thurs.)
GOLF
4 a.m.
Senior British Open
(Thurs.)
HORSE RACING
1 p.m.
Racing Coast to Coast
2 p.m.
Trackside Live, Del Mar
PRO BASKETBALL, WNBA
9:30 a.m. Connecticut at Dallas
Noon
San Antonio at Seattle
SOCCER
11:30 a.m. Exhibition, Munich vs. Manchester City
4:45 p.m. Copa MX, Queretaro vs. Puebla
5:30 p.m. Copa Libertadores, Independiente del Valle vs.
Nacional
6:15 p.m. Copa MX, Venados vs. America
TENNIS
11 a.m.
ATP, Citi Open, early round
ON THE AIR
TV: FS1
TV: FS1
TV: MLB
TV: ESPN
TV: ESPN
TV: SNLA R: 570,
1020, 1540
TV: FS West
R: 830, 1330
TV: MLB
Robert Gauthier Los Angeles Times
TV: NBCSN
TV: NBCSN
LONG BEACH POLY quarterback Nolan McDonald tries to escape a tackle by Narbonne last fall. Poly had to
forfeit three Moore League games last season because of an ineligible player and missed the playoffs.
TV: Golf
TV: Prime
TV: Prime
TV: NBA
TV: NBA
TV: FOXD
TV: ESPND
TV: FS2, FOXD
TV: UDN
TV: Tennis
TV programming subject to blackout. For TV channel questions and availability please
contact your cable or satellite provider; Note: Times may be different for satellite TV users;
consult your guide.
GALAXY TONIGHT
U .S. OPEN CUP
VS. SEATTLE SOUNDERS
When: 7:30.
Where: StubHub Center track stadium.
On the air: Streaming on lagalaxy.com.
Record vs. Seattle: 1-0 (in MLS play).
Update: The Galaxy have reached the quarterfinals of the
U.S. Open Cup four times in the last seven years, but the
team hasn’t gone further since 2006 when it reached the
final. The Sounders, on the other hand, have been the tournament’s dominant team, reaching the final five times since
2009 and winning the title four times. The teams come into
this game heading in opposite directions. The Sounders
have won just three of their last 11 games against MLS competition, and the Galaxy have lost one of their last eight. The
Galaxy are unbeaten at home this season, although
Wednesday’s game will be played in the StubHub Center’s
track stadium since the main field is playing host to the
CrossFit Games.
— Kevin Baxter
Check out transfers now,
or risk paying price later
player. Los Angeles
Hawkins was banned from
last season’s City Section
playoffs because of ineligible players in 2014.
The vast majority of
problems involve transfer
students. Yes, it’s fun to get
excited when someone new
shows up and looks talented. But it’s the responsibility of each school to know
the rules, fill out the paperwork and confirm eligibility.
If that means going to a
student’s house in a surprise
visit, or double checking
transcripts, so be it. Asking
for advice or help from CIF
officials is way better than
having to break the news of
forfeits to a team.
Seemingly every year,
right around playoff time,
ineligible players are revealed. That’s because
people sometimes wait to
inform schools about where
players are really living until
after they see how the team
or player has performed. It’s
not ethical or classy to wait
so long to blow the whistle
on a violation, but it’s the
way it often happens, so
ERIC SONDHEIMER
ON HIGH SCHOOLS
Consider this a public
service announcement
before the new high school
sports season begins: Parents, coaches and athletic
directors, you need to prevent the embarrassment,
ridicule and chaos that
happen when an ineligible
player is discovered during a
season.
There were more than
6,000 transfers in the CIF
Southern Section alone last
school year, so the potential
for mistakes, oversights and
even cheating is pretty high
— especially if the people in
charge don’t fulfill their
responsibilities.
Last football season,
Long Beach Poly had to
forfeit three Moore League
games because of an ineligible player, leaving the
Jackrabbits out of the playoffs. Simi Valley Grace
Brethren, on the eve of
playing for a championship,
was removed from the playoffs because of an ineligible
administrators had better
do their job thoroughly.
Southern Section Commissioner Rob Wigod, a
former athletic director,
said he used a simple approach at the start of each
school year to determine
eligibility.
First, he introduced
himself to each varsity team
on the first day of practice.
“Then I asked all of the
players who played the
sport at our school last
season to gather in a spot,”
he said in an email. “Next,
anyone who attended our
school last year but did not
play that sport, go join
them. Finally, whoever is
left, after practice is over,
come to the main office and
we can make sure that we
have your eligibility situation taken care of, paperwork, etc.
“In that way, we identified the students who we
needed to make sure were
eligible. There were still two
to three weeks before the
first game, which was plenty
of time to get things done,
before they actually started
playing in games. It may
seem like a simple thing, but
it really helped.”
Wigod stressed that
“eligibility is an administrative task, not a coach’s
task.” But coaches need to
be proactive, and if they
have any suspicions about a
player’s eligibility they need
to intervene and make sure
questions and concerns are
answered.
Wigod recommends
athletic directors bounce
questions off other ADs and
“never hesitate to call or
email our office any time
with questions.”
Athletic directors probably deserve a big raise,
because so much is riding
on their competence and
integrity. It’s a tough
assignment, but the
process works if the person
has the freedom and support to do the right thing
and demand rules be followed and ask the appropriate questions when a transfer shows up.
[email protected]
Twitter: @latsondheimer
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L AT I ME S . CO M / S P O RT S
W E D NE S DAY, J U LY 2 0 , 2 016
D3
Action on Games
is likely to be light
Butch Dill Associated Press
JEFF GORDON might come out of retirement to drive in the Brickyard 400 at Indianapolis this
weekend in place of Dale Earnhardt Jr., who still is experiencing concussion-like symptoms.
Gordon is prepared to
step in for Earnhardt
GEORGE DIAZ
ON MOTOR RACING
Rick Hendrick made the
suggestion in casual conversation
with Jeff Gordon. Call it a desperation pass.
“What are you doing next
week?” he said, trying to find a
fallback plan in case Dale Earnhardt Jr. was unable to drive for a
second consecutive week because
of continued concussion-like
symptoms.
“He said he’d be in Indy for one
of the appearances he has to
make,” Hendrick said. “I said,
‘Well, bring your driver’s uniform
just in case.’ He said, ‘Are you
kidding?’ And I said, ‘No, I’m
serious.’ So if Dale can’t go then
Jeff is ready to step in.”
And so there you go. The perfect storm of good and bad for the
Hendrick Motorsports team.
The good: Gordon, a four-time
Cup season champion who retired
at the end of the 2015 season, is
ready to step in should Earnhardt
be unavailable Sunday for the
400-mile race at Indianapolis
Motor Speedway.
The bad: Earnhardt is still
hung up physically, not only
putting his chances of qualifying
for the Chase in peril but also
raising questions about his longterm future.
Things are understandably a
bit fuzzy. Earnhardt did not race
last weekend at New Hampshire
after suffering balance issues and
nausea. Presumably, he is still
feeling the sting of crashes in
Michigan and Daytona.
But there’s also concern that
this is becoming a recurring issue
because Earnhardt did not drive
in two races in 2012 because of
concussion-related symptoms as
well. The encouraging news is that
a test that measures cognitive
function showed optimistic results, but the game plan is still
TBA for Earnhardt and Hendrick
Motorsports.
“I take my health and quality of
life as a top priority. ... I am going
to take this slow and strictly take
the advice of my doctors,” Earnhardt said during his weekly race
recap podcast, “The Dale Jr.
Download.”
It was be the epitome of mixed
emotions for Gordon to get back in
a Hendrick car. That was Gordon’s
only team in his NASCAR Cup
career that spanned 23 full-time
seasons. And he still has a business stake in the Hendrick team.
It would be an easy fit, under
the most difficult conditions.
“I think Jeff will do well,” said
team owner Hendrick. “He’s won
that race a lot of times. I expect if
he gets in the car, he might be a
little bit rusty. But we’ve got a lot of
practice time and I don’t think it’ll
take Gordon long to get back in
the groove.”
Gordon will have a few days to
get over some jet lag if indeed he
does drive in Indy. He was
traveling back from Europe on
Tuesday.
But that’s not the pressing
physical concern at Hendrick
Motorsports these days.
“He wants to race for a long
time, so we are going to let the
doctors make those decisions,”
Hendrick said of Earnhardt. “It’s
really hard at first and then the
[Gambling, from D1]
think there’s anything wrong with
it. The Kenyans in the marathon,
the Russians — they get paid. Our
athletes get endorsements. There
are very few amateurs left.”
Experts speculate Nevada
books will accept around $20 million to $30 million in betting tickets
on Olympic events, a small fraction
compared to the sports that gamblers bet most frequently on the
big boards along the Strip.
Jay Rood, director of the MGM
Resorts’ race and sports book, said
he expects 70% of Olympic bets to
be on men’s basketball games.
“And I think the average draw
[betting amount on a specific
game] will be like a low-tier college
game, like Santa Barbara playing
Long Beach,” Kornegay said.
“The gold-medal game, even if it
becomes this super showdown of
the U.S. against a team who’s beating everyone by 50 will be 10%, maybe less, of the average game in the
Cleveland-Golden State NBA Finals.”
Nevada’s Gaming Control
Board re-instituted Olympic gambling after a campaign by Sen.
John McCain (R-Ariz.) sought to
stop betting on college sports.
McCain’s argument was that
point-shaving concerns were real,
because Nevada previously didn’t
set lines on University of Nevada
Las Vegas basketball games. The
sports books ultimately retained
college sports gambling, adding
UNLV and Nevada games, but
made a concession in 2001 to stop
setting lines on the Olympics.
In 2012, however, the Summer
Games in London were bet upon by
books in England, catching the Nevada sports book directors’ attention and prompting them to push
their state to overturn the ban.
“We stated the position that
we’re at a bit of a disadvantage in
Nevada by not being able to offer
odds on some of the more mainstream events,” Rood said.
“Everybody agreed that we
don’t think the state of Nevada is
interested in booking 12-year-old
gymnasts or ice skaters, but we do
want to book the basketball, the
hockey, some of the track and field
— things that are appealing . . . the
volleyball, the swimming.”
Stephen Mosher, a sports ethics and character development
professor at Ithaca College in New
York, said it is “not surprising to
hear that Vegas is taking bets on
Olympics.
“The purity of the Olympic
movement was lost years ago when
the International Olympic Committee removed any distinction between amateurism and professionalism. Only in the U.S. does a portion of the population actually believe in what even the IOC calls this
‘magic dust.’ ”
Regulations allow Nevada to
set odds on all Olympic events, but
Rood said he and most of his peers
will limit setting odds to popular
competitions that are “scored or
timed, not voted upon by judges,
with the exception of boxing, because that is the accepted form of
scoring.”
It’s good business, the Nevada
bookmakers say, to offer action on
events visitors want to gamble on.
With limits not expected to exceed
$2,000 on each bet, in most cases,
the potential for fixing Olympic
events is minimized, as well.
“We’ll appease those who want
it now, but it’s really not going to
move the needle at all for us,”
Kornegay said.
Kornegay likes having odds
posted on a lot of events, but admitted he can’t be overzealous
when it comes to the Olympics.
“It’s a lot of work,” he said.
Establishing odds and lines
“has to be 100% accurate,” Kornegay said. “There’s unusual names,
countries and rules — in some
cases, we don’t even know the
rules. So it’s going to be a very selective menu at most books —
basketball, soccer, golf. You’re not
going to see rowing, kayaking, fencing, handball.”
The bookmakers will strive to
have odds set on the handful of
other events that draw media attention and national interest. In
some cases, the Nevada books will
consider European and offshore
book odds in setting lines for
events considered third- and
fourth-tier American sports.
“I know basketball, soccer, golf,”
Kornegay said. “As far as swimming, fencing, absolutely not. . . .”
While most betting on the
Games will be done by casual gamblers, Kornegay is aware that major gamblers — known as sharps —
will pounce if he has a bad number.
“Sharps don’t care if the athlete
or team is American, Romanian or
Brazilian,” he said. “They just look
at the odds and if there’s an overlay,
I guarantee you they’ll take it.”
[email protected]
Twitter: @latimespugmire
Current turmoil might
ultimately prove useful
Wilfredo Lee Associated Press
DALE EARNHARDT JR. is suffering balance issues and nau-
sea after crashes in NASCAR races at Michigan and Daytona.
more you think about it it’s the
right thing to do for him and it’s
the right thing to do for the team
and everyone else. He wants to get
back and we want him back. We
will just take it day by day.”
Mixed viewing numbers
Facts don’t lie, so the saying
goes, but the numbers game involving NASCAR racing and fan
engagement can be viewed
through optimistic and pessimistic prisms.
“Debbie Downer” says that
ratings are down for most races,
including last weekend’s race at
New Hampshire that included a
13% dip from last year (2.3 rating)
and down 23% from 2014 on TNT
(2.6).
“Oliver Optimistic” says not so
fast. Through the Kentucky race
the previous weekend, TV ratings
are up double digits in major markets, including New York, Los
Angeles, Chicago, Baltimore and
West Palm Beach, Fla.
And more to the point of engaging fans on different platforms,
NASCAR rolled some impressive
bumps in terms of interaction.
Engagement with content on
the NASCAR social platforms is
up 83% year over year, with more
than 114 million total engagements.
The NASCAR Facebook and
Twitter accounts have generated
more than 2.3 billion impressions
to date this year.
There have been more than 76
million video views on the
NASCAR Facebook and Twitter
accounts, more than five times as
many as last year.
Kenseth gets popped
A car failing post-race inspec-
tion is kind of a little dirty asterisk
next to a driver, but nothing noteworthy. Winner Matt Kenseth’s
Toyota failed the postrace technical-measurements inspection at
New Hampshire. Penalties have
yet to be announced, but don’t
expect any news that will rock the
NASCAR Nation.
Perhaps it should be, said NBC
Sports analyst and former Cup
champion Dale Jarrett.
“This is the third time this
[infraction] has been found this
year,” Jarrett said. “Kyle Larson
and Kasey Kahne have already
been through this. Maybe this is
the time to up the penalty a little
bit to get people’s attention. If this
is something race teams are doing
to make their cars better, than
they are getting a slight advantage.”
This was the first time a race
winner has been cited for a postrace infraction since 2013.
Townley is out
John Wes Townley will not be
able to compete in the Camping
World Truck Series race Wednesday at Eldora Speedway because
he remains under treatment for a
possible concussion. ARCA competitor Brady Boswell will step in
and take Townley’s ride in the No.
05 Zaxby’s/Jive Communications
Chevrolet. On Friday night,
veteran driver and NASCAR on
NBC analyst Parker Kligerman
will sub for Townley in the ARCA
Sioux Chief PowerPEX 200.
Townley is scheduled to be
reevaluated by his physician Monday and will need clearance before
returning to competition.
[email protected]
[IOC, from D1]
for help from an array of international federations that govern the
various sports in the Summer
Olympics. To further complicate
matters, Russia’s track and field
team, which has been banned from
competition since late last year, is
pursuing an appeal in court.
A comprehensive resolution
seems unlikely in the next few weeks.
“There’s no good outcome at this
point,” said Roger Pielke Jr. of the
Sports Governance Center at the
University of Colorado. “Decisions
will be made and people will be unhappy.”
But the turmoil engulfing the
Olympic movement on the eve of the
Rio de Janeiro Games, while unpleasant, might ultimately prove
useful.
The trouble began last fall with a
World Anti-Doping Agency report
that alleged widespread doping
within Russia’s track and field program. The international track federation subsequently suspended
that team.
Two later reports — one of which
was released this week — implicated
other sports, alleging that Russian
officials and government agencies
conspired to conceal hundreds of
positive tests from their athletes
over the last five years.
The IOC executive board held an
emergency teleconference Tuesday
to discuss the matter and settled on a
multi-pronged approach.
As has often been the case, the
board laid much of the problem at
the feet of the international federations, asking them to investigate and
“take the appropriate measures.”
The Russian track ban notwithstanding, anti-doping enforcement
has traditionally focused on individual athletes. The Assn. of Summer
Olympic International Federations
appears to be leaning in that direction, preferring case-by-case sanctions over a blanket ban.
“It is important to focus on the
need for individual justice in all these
cases,” the association stated.
Any penalties handed down
could be subject to appeal. It remains unclear if there is time for
mass adjudication before the Games
begin Aug. 5.
“We’re talking about hundreds of
athletes who would need to have
their cases evaluated,” Pielke said.
Meanwhile, IOC leaders will consider other options. Their decision
will probably hinge upon the Russian
track athletes’ appeal.
The Court of Arbitration for
‘There’s no good
outcome at this point.
Decisions will be
made and people will
be unhappy.’
— Roger Pielke Jr.,
of the Sports Governance Center
at the University of Colorado
Sport, expected to rule later this
week, could side with the track federation, establishing a precedent for
team-wide bans. Or, it could go the
opposite direction.
“As soon as we get more information, we’ll reconvene,” DeFrantz said
of the IOC’s executive board, adding:
“We’re doing as much as we can as
fast as we can.”
At the very least, Olympic leaders
will pursue disciplinary proceedings
against Russian Sports Ministry officials mentioned in WADA’s McLaren Report earlier this week.
They will also begin retesting
samples from all Russian athletes
who competed at the 2014 Winter
Olympics in Sochi, where workers at
a drug-testing lab allegedly swapped
dirty samples for clean ones.
And WADA still has a role to play
in all this.
In the McLaren Report, investigators said there was much more evidence to be scrutinized. The IOC has
asked them to proceed as quickly as
possible, and to provide names of alleged dopers.
No athletes have been identified
by the McLaren team so far.
Though the ongoing controversy
might cast a shadow over the Rio
Games, all the attention being paid
to doping could help in the long run.
It could fuel a growing effort to
centralize the anti-doping effort. At
present, each nation is responsible
for testing its own athletes; critics
would like to see WADA given global
authority over enforcement.
Pielke believes that policies need
to be modernized to account for corrupt organizations and governments, not just corrupt athletes. He
remains hopeful.
“When the Games end, the sports
world still has a lot of problems to
deal with,” the professor said. “The
worst-case scenario would be that
everyone forgets.”
[email protected]
Twitter: @LATimesWharton
D4
W E D N E S DAY, J U LY 2 0 , 2 016
S
L AT I M ES . C O M / SP O RTS
BASEBALL
DODGERS
NATIONALS
GB
L10
—
5-5
53 42 .558
41⁄2
5-5
43 50 .462
131⁄2
5-5
San Diego
41 52 .441
151⁄2
5-5
Arizona
40 54 .426
17
3-7
GB
L10
West
L
W
Pct.
San Francisco
57 37 .606
DODGERS
Colorado
Central
W
L
Pct.
Chicago
56 37 .602
—
4-6
St. Louis
48 44 .522
71⁄2
5-5
Pittsburgh
48 45 .516
8
6-4
Milwaukee
39 52 .429
16
4-6
Cincinnati
35 59 .372
211⁄2
5-5
GB
L10
East
W
L
Pct.
Washington
56 38 .596
—
6-4
Miami
51 42 .548
41⁄2
8-2
New York
50 43 .538
51⁄2
5-5
Philadelphia
43 52 .453
131⁄2
4-6
Atlanta
33 61 .351
23
5-5
Tuesday’s results
DODGERS 8, at Washington 4
Miami 2, at Philadelphia 1, 10 innings
New York 2, at Chicago 1
at Pittsburgh 3, Milwaukee 2
Atlanta 5, at Cincinnati 4, 11 innings
at Boston 4, San Francisco 0
Tampa Bay 10, at Colorado 1
Toronto 5, at Arizona 1
San Diego at St. Louis, ppd., rain
AL STANDINGS
West
W
L
Pct.
GB
ANGELS
RANGERS
8
6
Streak
Won 1 This month
9-5
Home
30-18 Road
23-24
Division
23-18 Interleague
5-7
Next: Tonight at Washington, 4 PDT
TV/Radio: SportsNet LA/570, 1020, 1540
Streak
Won 5 This month
Home
21-26 Road
Division
17-20 Interleague
Next: Tonight vs. Texas, Angel Stadium, 7
TV/Radio: FS West/830, 1330
10-5
21-26
6-9
55 40 .579
—
2-8
Houston
50 44 .532
41⁄2
5-5
Seattle
47 47 .500
71⁄2
4-6
ANGELS
42 52 .447
12 ⁄2
8-2
Oakland
42 52 .447
12 ⁄2
6-4
GB
L10
Central
W
L
Pct.
1
1
Cleveland
55 38 .591
—
4-6
Detroit
49 45 .521
61⁄2
5-5
Kansas City
47 46 .505
8
4-6
3-7
Chicago
46 47 .495
9
Minnesota
34 59 .366
21
6-4
GB
L10
East
W
L
Pct.
Dodgers
Utley 2b
Kendrick lf
J.Turner 3b
Gnzlz 1b
Grandal c
Pederson cf
Puig rf
C.Taylor ss
Kazmir p
a-Toles
Totals
Dodgers
Washington
AB
5
4
5
5
5
5
5
3
2
0
39
R
1
2
2
0
1
0
0
2
0
0
8
H
3
2
3
1
1
1
1
1
0
0
13
BI
3
0
0
1
1
2
1
0
0
0
8
Avg.
.266
.274
.266
.285
.208
.235
.256
.321
.097
.286
Washington
T.Turner 2b
Revere cf
c-M.Taylor cf
Murphy 3b
Harper rf
Werth lf
Robinson 1b
Espinosa ss
Lobaton c
Lopez p
Belisle p
b-Heisey lf
Totals
AB
4
3
1
4
4
4
3
4
3
1
1
2
34
R
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
2
0
0
1
4
H
1
0
0
2
0
1
1
0
1
0
0
1
7
310 020 011 —8
000 010 030 —4
BI
2
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
4
Avg.
.318
.219
.226
.352
.248
.244
.216
.233
.194
.000
.000
.228
13
7
0
2
a-walked for Kazmir in the 8th. b-singled for Treinen in the 8th.
c-struck out for Revere in the 8th.
Walks—Dodgers 3: Kendrick 1, C.Taylor 1, Toles 1. Washington 1:
Lobaton 1. Strikeouts—Dodgers 11: Utley 1, J.Turner 1, Grandal 3,
Pederson 3, Puig 1, Kazmir 2. Washington 9: T.Turner 1, M.Taylor 1,
Werth 2, Robinson 1, Espinosa 2, Lopez 1, Belisle 1. E—Murphy (7),
Harper (2). LOB—Dodgers 8, Washington 5. 2B—J.Turner (17),
C.Taylor (2), Murphy 2 (27), Werth (18). 3B—T.Turner (1). HR—Utley
(6), off Lopez; Grandal (13), off Kelley; Lobaton (3), off Kazmir.
RBIs—Utley 3 (30), Gonzalez (45), Grandal (38), Pederson 2 (35),
Puig (32), T.Turner 2 (2), Murphy (68), Lobaton (6). SB—Puig (5).
S—Kazmir. DP—Washington 1 (Espinosa, Harper).
Dodgers
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Kazmir W, 8-3 ..............7 4 1 1 0 8
88 4.30
Hatcher .......................0 2 3 3 1 0
15 5.53
Liberatore ....................1 1 0 0 0 1
10 0.57
Jansen ........................1 0 0 0 0 0
15 1.33
Washington
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Lopez L, 0-1 ..............42⁄3 10 6 6 1 9
105 11.57
Belisle ......................11⁄3 1 0 0 1 1
19 2.02
Perez ..........................1 0 0 0 0 0
9 4.72
Treinen ........................1 1 1 0 1 0
20 2.10
Kelley .........................1 1 1 1 0 1
11 2.78
Hatcher pitched to 3 batters in the 8th.
IBB—by Belisle (C.Taylor). HBP—Jansen (Robinson).
WP—Hatcher. PB—Lobaton (5).
T—3:14. Tickets sold—38,747 (41,418).
L10
Texas
RAYS
ROCKIES
R
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
H
2
0
0
0
2
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
4
BI
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
Avg.
.307
.327
.286
.338
.269
.232
.277
.243
.232
.188
.000
.204
13
4
1
0
6-4
1
⁄2
8-2
Toronto
53 42 .558
11⁄2
7-3
New York
47 46 .505
61⁄2
6-4
Tampa Bay
Colorado
Tampa Bay
36 57 .387
17 ⁄2
2-8
a-flied out for Arcia in the 8th. b-grounded out for McGee in the
8th. c-grounded out for Germen in the 9th.
Walks—Tampa Bay 4: Miller 1, Kiermaier 1, Arcia 1, Snell 1.
Colorado 3: LeMahieu 1, Story 2. Strikeouts—Tampa Bay 3:
Longoria 1, Maile 1, Snell 1. Colorado 12: Blackmon 2, LeMahieu 1,
Arenado 2, Raburn 2, Reynolds 1, Hundley 2, Barnes 2. E—Maile (1).
LOB—Tampa Bay 5, Colorado 5. 2B—Forsythe 2 (18), Miller (15),
Dickerson (15), Kiermaier (10), Blackmon (17). HR—Longoria (22),
off Chatwood; Pearce (10), off Germen; Story (23), off Andriese.
RBIs—Forsythe (23), Miller 2 (35), Longoria 3 (53), Dickerson (36),
Pearce 2 (27), Kiermaier (17), Story (60). CS—Story (4).
DP—Colorado 2 (Reynolds, Story), (Story, LeMahieu, Reynolds).
Tampa Bay
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Snell W, 2-4.................6 1 0 0 3 9
96 3.11
Andriese S, 1-1 ............3 3 1 1 0 3
48 2.78
Colorado
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Chatwood L, 8-6...........3 8 7 7 2 1
64 3.83
Lyles...........................4 3 0 0 1 2
47 6.15
McGee ........................1 0 0 0 0 0
8 5.81
Germen.......................1 2 3 3 1 0
24 5.94
Chatwood pitched to 2 batters in the 4th.
Inherited runners-scored—Lyles 2-1. WP—Snell.
U— Clint Fagan, Paul Emmel, Bob Davidson, Dan Iassogna.
T—2:54. Tickets sold—33,061 (50,398).
W-L
5-7
5-8
1-1
4-0
8-4
8-6
5-3
8-6
4-7
6-6
4-10
8-5
5-3
6-7
ERA
TIME
4.17
4 p.m
4.70
SNLA
3.63 9:30 a.m.
2.55
MLB
3.11 11:15 a.m.
2.41
ESPN
4.95 11:15 a.m.
2.85
5.05 5:15 p.m.
4.11
MLB*
5.44
4 p.m.
5.26
4.90
4 p.m.
4.03
AMERICAN LEAGUE >>>
MATCHUP
TEX/Perez (L)
Angels/Santiago (L)
MIN/Santana (R)
DET/Verlander (R)
CLE/Carrasco (R)
KC/Kennedy (R)
HOU/Fister (R)
OAK/Mengden (R)
CHI/Gonzalez (R)
SEA/Hernandez (R)
BAL/Gallardo (R)
NY/Pineda (R)
W-L
7-6
7-4
3-8
9-6
6-3
6-7
9-6
1-4
2-5
4-4
3-1
3-9
ERA
TIME
4.05
7 p.m.
4.27
FS West
4.12
10 a.m.
3.91
2.49 11:15 a.m.
3.86
3.64 12:30 p.m.
5.54
4.40 12:30 p.m.
2.86
5.77
4 p.m.
5.56
W-L
4-13
6-6
7-4
4-8
1-5
8-7
ERA
TIME
4.68
Noon
5.50
5.15 12:30 p.m.
5.25
5.34
4 p.m.
2.47
ESPN
INTERLEAGUE >>>
MATCHUP
TB/Archer (R)
COL/De la Rosa (L)
TOR/Stroman (R)
ARI/Corbin (L)
SF/Cain (R)
BOS/Pomeranz (L)
*-joined in progress
AROUND THE MAJORS
Peralta returns
to disabled list
St. Louis Cardinals third baseman Jhonny Peralta is going back
on the 15-day disabled list because
of a strained ligament in his surgically repaired left thumb.
The 34-year-old Peralta (.221,
five homers, 13 runs batted in)
missed the first 57 games of the
season before returning June 7.
The three-time All-Star underwent surgery in March for an injury
in a different spot on the thumb.
The team is hopeful Peralta will resume baseball activities in 10 days.
Etc.
Toronto slugger Jose Bautista
(turf toe) is expected to begin a rehab assignment Wednesday and
could rejoin the Blue Jays on Monday. ... Pittsburgh pitcher Jameson
Taillon was struck in the head by a
105-mph line drive by Milwaukee’s
Hernan Perez but remained in the
game Tuesday. ... Cincinnati starter Jon Moscot had surgery to repair a torn ligament in his right elbow.... Outfielder Michael Conforto rejoined the New York Mets
after a demotion to the minors.
— associated press
0
1
Josh Harrison tripled in the ninth and
scored when the throw from the outfield skipped past Milwaukee’s Hernan Perez. Third baseman Perez had
hit a tying single in the top of the ninth.
Miami
AB R H BI Avg.
Realmuto c 4 0 2 0 .316
Prado 3b
4 0 0 0 .316
Yelich lf
5 1 2 2 .318
Stanton rf
5 0 0 0 .235
Ozuna cf
3 0 1 0 .304
Dietrich 2b
4 0 0 0 .285
Rojas 2b
0 0 0 0 .259
Johnson 1b 3 0 1 0 .236
Hchvrria ss
3 1 1 0 .244
Urena p
1 0 0 0 .000
b-Suzuki
1 0 0 0 .343
Kelly 1b
1 0 0 0 .053
Totals
34 2 7 2
Milwaukee AB R H BI Avg. Pittsburgh AB R H BI Avg.
Villar ss
4 0 0 0 .299 Jaso 1b
4 0 0 0 .267
Gennett 2b 4 0 0 0 .263 Rdrigz 1b
0 0 0 0 .254
Braun lf
3 1 1 0 .313 Polanco rf
3 1 0 0 .284
Lucroy c
4 0 2 0 .305 McCthn cf
3 1 1 0 .245
Carter 1b
4 1 1 0 .224 Marte lf
3 0 0 0 .312
Nuwnhuis cf 4 0 0 0 .197 Freese 3b
4 0 1 1 .286
Perez 3b
4 0 2 2 .267 Cervelli c
2 0 0 1 .254
Flores rf
4 0 0 0 .218 Harrison 2b 4 1 1 0 .270
Guerra p
2 0 1 0 .240 Mercer ss
3 0 2 0 .278
Knebel p
0 0 0 0 --- Taillon p
2 0 0 0 .000
b-Elmore
0 0 0 0 .100 Feliz p
0 0 0 0 --Jeffress p
0 0 0 0 --- a-Joyce
1 0 0 0 .275
Thornbrg p
0 0 0 0 --- Watson p
0 0 0 0 --Totals
33 2 7 2
Totals
29 3 5 2
Miami
Philadelphia
Philadelphia
Herrera cf
Bourjos rf
Franco 3b
Rupp c
Joseph 1b
Asche lf
Galvis ss
C.Herndz 2b
Velasqz p
a-Howard
c-Blanco
Totals
AB
4
5
5
4
3
3
4
3
2
1
1
35
R
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
000 100 000 1 —2
000 100 000 0 —1
H
1
1
0
0
2
0
1
0
0
0
0
5
BI
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
Avg.
.285
.264
.255
.278
.264
.244
.228
.277
.222
.158
.259
7
5
1
0
a-lined out for Velasquez in the 7th. b-grounded out for Phelps in
the 8th. c-popped out for Gomez in the 9th.
Walks—Miami 5: Realmuto 1, Prado 1, Ozuna 1, Johnson 1,
Hechavarria 1. Philadelphia 4: Herrera 1, Joseph 1, Asche 1,
C.Hernandez 1. Strikeouts—Miami 8: Realmuto 2, Yelich 1, Stanton
2, Ozuna 1, Dietrich 1, Urena 1. Philadelphia 11: Herrera 1, Bourjos 1,
Franco 3, Rupp 2, Joseph 1, Galvis 2, Velasquez 1. E—Realmuto (8).
LOB—Miami 8, Philadelphia 8. 2B—Hechavarria (12). HR—Yelich
(8), off Velasquez; Joseph (13), off Urena. RBIs—Yelich 2 (51),
Joseph (23). SB—Realmuto (10), Bourjos (5). S—Urena.
DP—Philadelphia 2 (Galvis, C.Hernandez, Joseph), (Galvis, Joseph).
Miami
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Urena .......................52⁄3 4 1 1 1 5
94 6.23
Phelps ......................11⁄3 0 0 0 3 3
37 2.76
Wittgren ......................1 1 0 0 0 0
18 2.46
Dunn W, 2-1 ................1 0 0 0 0 1
8 3.45
Ramos S, 31-32...........1 0 0 0 0 2
14 2.02
Philadelphia
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Velasquez ....................7 3 1 1 4 5
105 3.15
Neris ..........................1 1 0 0 0 1
19 2.70
Gomez ........................1 1 0 0 0 1
16 2.82
D.Hernandez L, 1-3.......2⁄3 1 1 1 1 1
16 4.43
Stumpf ....................... 1⁄3 1 0 0 0 0
8 9.00
Inherited runners-scored—Phelps 1-0, Stumpf 2-1. IBB—by
Phelps (Herrera).
U—Tom Hallion, Laz Diaz, Adam Hamari, Dan Bellino. T—3:26.
Tickets sold—18,347 (43,651).
Milwaukee
Pittsburgh
000 100 001 —2
200 000 001 —3
7
5
3
1
No outs when winning run scored. a-grounded out for Feliz in the
7th. b-walked for Knebel in the 8th.
Walks—Milwaukee 2: Braun 1, Elmore 1. Pittsburgh 4: Polanco 1,
McCutchen 1, Marte 1, Cervelli 1. Strikeouts—Milwaukee 8: Villar 1,
Gennett 1, Lucroy 1, Carter 2, Nieuwenhuis 2, Perez 1. Pittsburgh 9:
Jaso 2, Polanco 1, McCutchen 2, Cervelli 1, Harrison 1, Taillon 2.
E—Villar 2 (14), Gennett (6), Mercer (5). LOB—Milwaukee 6,
Pittsburgh 7. 2B—Carter (18). 3B—Harrison (5), Mercer (2).
RBIs—Perez 2 (24), Freese (39), Cervelli (22). SB—Cervelli (4).
SF—Cervelli. Runners left in scoring position—Milwaukee 4 (Villar,
Carter, Flores 2); Pittsburgh 4 (Jaso, Polanco, Cervelli, Harrison).
RISP—Milwaukee 1 for 8; Pittsburgh 2 for 10. Runners moved
up—Nieuwenhuis, Perez, Freese. GIDP—Villar, Lucroy, Freese.
DP—Milwaukee 1 (Gennett, Villar, Carter); Pittsburgh 2 (Mercer,
Harrison, Jaso), (Mercer, Harrison, Rodriguez).
Milwaukee
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Guerra ........................6 3 2 2 3 6
106 3.06
Knebel ........................1 1 0 0 0 2
23 5.68
Jeffress .......................1 0 0 0 1 1
15 2.29
Thornburg L, 3-4...........0 1 1 0 0 0
2 2.46
Pittsburgh
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Taillon .........................6 5 1 1 0 3
65 3.44
Feliz H, 20...................1 0 0 0 0 2
17 3.19
Watson H, 20...............1 0 0 0 1 1
12 2.85
Melancon W, 1-1 ..........1 2 1 1 1 2
25 1.63
T—2:49. Tickets sold—27,106 (38,362).
METS
CUBS
2
1
New York
AB R H BI Avg. Chicago
AB R H BI Avg.
Reyes 3b
4 1 1 0 .227 La Stella 3b 3 0 2 0 .276
Grndrsn cf
3 0 0 1 .238 d-Szczur
1 0 0 0 .291
Cespedes lf 4 0 1 0 .295 Bryant rf
5 0 2 0 .284
Loney 1b
4 0 1 0 .283 Rizzo 1b
4 0 0 0 .290
Walker 2b
4 1 1 0 .246 Zobrist 2b
4 0 0 0 .274
Cabrera ss
4 0 1 0 .266 Contreras lf 3 1 1 0 .290
Conforto rf
3 0 0 0 .223 Heyward cf
4 0 1 0 .236
Lagares cf
0 0 0 0 .262 Russell ss
3 0 1 0 .239
Rivera c
4 0 3 1 .217 Montero c
3 0 0 0 .194
Syndrgrd p
2 0 0 0 .139 1-Almora
0 0 0 0 .256
a-De Aza
1 0 0 0 .179 Arrieta p
2 0 1 0 .293
Robles p
0 0 0 0 .000 b-Baez 3b
2 0 1 0 .283
c-Johnson
1 0 0 0 .291 Totals
34 1 9 0
Totals
34 2 8 2
AB
4
3
3
1
2
4
4
3
3
1
1
1
30
—
MATCHUP
Dodgers/Norris (R)
WAS/Gonzalez (L)
ATL/Harrell (R)
CIN/DeSclafani (R)
NY/Colon (R)
CHI/Hendricks (R)
SD/Rea (R)
STL/Martinez (R)
SD/Cashner (R)
STL/Garcia (L)
MIL/Anderson (R)
PIT/Locke (L)
MIA/Chen (L)
PHI/Hellickson (R)
13
10
Christian Yelich’s 10th-inning single
scored Adeiny Hechavarria, who’d
doubled, with the winning run. Yelich
also homered for Miami, which leads
the race for the NL’s second wild card.
T. Bay
AB R H BI Avg. Colorado
Frsth 2b 5 2 2 1 .276 Blackmon cf
Miller ss 4 2 2 2 .245 LeMahieu 2b
Lngria 3b 5 1 2 3 .290 Arenado 3b
Dkrsn lf
5 2 3 1 .230 c-Descalso
Prce 1b
5 1 2 2 .324 Story ss
Krmar cf 4 0 1 1 .226 Raburn lf
Maile c
4 0 0 0 .308 Reynolds 1b
Arcia rf
2 2 1 0 .244 Hundley c
a-Gyr rf
1 0 0 0 .246 Barnes rf
Snell p
2 0 0 0 .000 Chatwood p
Adrse p
1 0 0 0 .000 Lyles p
Totals
38 10 13 10
bAdms 3b
Totals
52 39 .571
NATIONAL LEAGUE >>>
010 221 000 —6
000 431 00x —8
a-grounded out for Rua in the 9th. 1-ran for Nava in the 7th.
Walks—Texas 2: Desmond 1, Beltre 1. Angels 3: Calhoun 1, Trout
1, Simmons 1. Strikeouts—Texas 9: Choo 2, Odor 1, Beltre 1,
Moreland 2, Rua 2, Chirinos 1. Angels 2: Calhoun 1, Simmons 1.
E—Escobar (14). LOB—Texas 9, Angels 4. 2B—Andrus (17), Trout
(23). 3B—Calhoun (4). HR—Chirinos (7), off Lincecum; Chirinos (8),
off Lincecum; Desmond (17), off Guerra; Pujols (18), off Lohse;
Pujols (19), off Lohse; Bandy (3), off Tolleson. RBIs—Desmond (57),
Mazara (37), Andrus (45), Chirinos 3 (17), Pujols 6 (71), Bandy 2
(14). SB—Desmond (16), Odor (8), Trout (16). SF—Bandy.
Runners left in scoring position—Texas 5 (Odor, Rua 4); Angels 1
(Calhoun). RISP—Texas 1 for 7; Angels 2 for 4.
Runners moved up—Escobar. GIDP—Simmons, Petit.
DP—Texas 2 (Andrus, Odor, Moreland), (Beltre, Odor, Moreland);
Angels 1 (Simmons, Choi).
Texas
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Lohse L, 0-2 ..............41⁄3 6 7 7 3 0
79 12.54
Tolleson ....................12⁄3 2 1 1 0 2
24 7.20
Barnette......................1 1 0 0 0 0
16 2.25
Bush...........................1 1 0 0 0 0
7 2.30
Angels
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Lincecum W, 2-3...........5 9 5 3 2 7
91 6.59
Guerra H, 1..................1 1 1 1 0 0
19 2.86
Smith H, 5...................1 1 0 0 0 0
12 4.50
Bedrosian H, 5 .............1 1 0 0 0 2
15 1.03
Street S, 8-10 ..............1 1 0 0 0 0
11 4.82
IBB—by Lohse (Trout). HBP—Barnette (Pujols).
U—Mark Wegner, Mike Muchlinski, Mike Winters, Marty Foster.
T—3:01. Tickets sold—36,368 (43,250).
3
2
Jeurys Familia got Kris Bryant to hit
into a game-ending double play, and
Rene Rivera singled to drive in the
tiebreaking run with two outs in the top
of the ninth, lifting New York.
53 39 .576
TODAY’S GAMES
Texas
Angels
PIRATES
BREWERS
Blake Snell (2-4) allowed one hit and
struck out nine over six strong innings,
Evan Longoria homered and drove in
three runs, and Tampa Bay ended an
11-game road losing streak.
Boston
Tuesday’s results
at ANGELS 8, Texas 6
at New York 7, Baltimore 1
at Boston 4, San Francisco 0
Minnesota 6, at Detroit 2
Cleveland 7, at Kansas City 3
Tampa Bay 10, at Colorado 1
Toronto 5, at Arizona 1
at Oakland 4, Houston 3, 10 innings
Chicago 6, at Seattle 1
Texas
AB R H BI Avg. Angels
AB R H BI Avg.
Choo dh
5 0 0 0 .260 Escobar 3b 4 0 0 0 .314
Dsmnd cf
4 1 3 1 .315 Calhoun rf 3 2 1 0 .284
Odor 2b
5 0 3 0 .276 Trout cf
3 2 1 0 .320
Beltre 3b
4 0 0 0 .271 Pujols dh
3 2 3 6 .252
Mrelnd 1b 5 0 0 0 .231 Nava lf
4 0 1 0 .240
Rua lf
4 1 1 0 .263 1-Cnghm lf 0 0 0 0 .105
a-Profar
1 0 0 0 .316 Smns ss
3 1 0 0 .267
Mazara rf
4 1 1 1 .277 Choi 1b
4 0 1 0 .175
Andrus ss
4 1 3 1 .296 Bandy c
3 1 2 2 .282
Chirinos c
4 2 2 3 .217 Petit 2b
4 0 1 0 .281
Totals
40 6 13 6
Totals
31 8 10 8
2
1
10
1
Baltimore
1
MARLINS
PHILLIES
8
4
NL STANDINGS
105 100 003 —10
000 000 001 — 1
New York
Chicago
Charles Rex Arbogast Associated Press
E S CA P E A RT I S T RY
Mets closer Jeurys Familia celebrates after wriggling out of a
bases-loaded, no-out situation in the ninth to preserve a 2-1
win over the Cubs and earn his 33rd save.
BLUE JAYS
5
DIAMONDBACKS 1
YANKEES
ORIOLES
7
1
TWINS
TIGERS
000 001 001 —2
001 000 000 —1
8
9
1
0
a-struck out for Blevins in the 7th. b-grounded out for Arrieta in
the 7th. c-grounded out for Robles in the 9th. d-out on fielder’s
choice for Rondon in the 9th. 1-ran for Montero in the 9th.
Walks—New York 1: Conforto 1. Chicago 4: La Stella 1, Contreras
1, Russell 1, Montero 1. Strikeouts—New York 10: Reyes 2, Cespedes
1, Cabrera 2, Conforto 2, Syndergaard 2, De Aza 1. Chicago 9: Rizzo
4, Zobrist 1, Heyward 1, Russell 1, Montero 1, Arrieta 1. E—Rivera (1).
LOB—New York 7, Chicago 10. 2B—Contreras (6), Russell (13),
Arrieta (2). 3B—Reyes (1). RBIs—Granderson (29), Rivera (14).
SB—Contreras (1). SF—Granderson. Runners left in scoring
position—New York 3 (Syndergaard, De Aza, Johnson); Chicago 5
(Bryant 2, Contreras 2, Montero). DP—New York 1 (Reyes, Walker,
Loney); Chicago 1 (Rizzo, Russell).
New York
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Syndergaard ..............52⁄3 7 1 0 2 8
105 2.42
Blevins .......................1⁄3 0 0 0 0 0
6 2.05
Robles W, 4-3 ..............2 1 0 0 0 1
19 2.76
Familia S, 33-33...........1 1 0 0 2 0
22 2.44
Chicago
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Arrieta.........................7 5 1 1 1 8
85 2.60
Strop ..........................1 0 0 0 0 1
9 3.03
Rondon L, 1-2..............1 3 1 1 0 1
21 1.85
WP—Syndergaard 2.
U—Eric Cooper, Jim Wolf, Gabe Morales, Gary Cederstrom.
T—3:04. Tickets sold—41,456 (41,072).
6
2
RED SOX
GIANTS
4
0
Edwin Encarnacion hit a three-run
home run in the third inning and Aaron
Sanchez (10-1) gave up six hits in
seven innings to improve to 9-0 in his
last 15 starts.
Starlin Castro hit a two-run home run
against Vance Worley (2-1) in the
second inning and drove in four runs,
and Nathan Eovaldi (8-6) won for the
first time since May.
Tommy Milone (3-2) held Detroit scoreless until the ninth inning, and Minnesota broke through with five runs in the
seventh inning, three against Anibal
Sanchez (5-11).
David Ortiz hit a three-run home run
against Jake Peavy (5-8) and Rick
Porcello (12-2) improved to 9-0 at
Fenway Park this season. San Francisco is 0-4 since the All-Star break.
Toronto
AB R H BI Avg. Arizona
AB R H BI Avg.
Travis 2b
5 2 2 1 .267 Segura 2b
4 1 2 0 .306
Dnldsn 3b
5 1 3 1 .306 Bourn cf
3 0 0 0 .266
Ecrncn 1b
4 1 1 3 .266 Gldsmdt 1b 4 0 0 1 .294
Saunders lf 3 0 0 0 .286 Lamb 3b
4 0 0 0 .298
Martin c
4 0 1 0 .232 Castillo c
3 0 0 0 .261
Tulowitzki ss 4 0 1 0 .240 Drury lf
4 0 1 0 .267
Pillar cf
4 0 0 0 .262 Tomas rf
4 0 2 0 .253
Lake rf
4 0 0 0 .222 Ahmed ss
3 0 0 0 .219
c-Smoak
0 0 0 0 .239 Godley p
1 0 1 0 .167
1-Burns
0 1 0 0 .000 a-Freeman
1 0 0 0 .000
Totals
35 5 8 5
b-Weeks
0 0 0 0 .239
Totals
31 1 6 1
Baltimore
Jones cf
Rickard lf
Machado 3b
Trumbo rf
Schoop 2b
Alvarez dh
Hardy ss
Joseph c
Flaherty 1b
Totals
Minnesota AB R H BI Avg. Detroit
AB R H BI Avg.
Nunez ss
4 1 2 3 .312 Kinsler 2b
4 0 0 0 .290
Grssmn lf
5 0 1 0 .282 Maybin cf
4 1 1 0 .337
Mauer 1b
4 1 2 1 .268 Cabrera 1b 4 1 1 0 .287
Dozier 2b
4 1 1 2 .247 Martinez dh 3 0 1 1 .295
Sano 3b
4 0 1 0 .243 Cstllns 3b
3 0 0 1 .299
Kepler rf
3 0 0 0 .227 Upton lf
3 0 1 0 .237
Vargas dh
3 1 0 0 .344 Aviles rf
3 0 1 0 .208
Suzuki c
4 2 2 0 .289 McCann c
4 0 1 0 .200
Buxton cf
3 0 1 0 .202 Iglesias ss
4 0 0 0 .255
Totals
34 6 10 6
Totals
32 2 6 2
San Fran.
Span cf
Pagan lf
Belt 1b
Posey c
Crawford ss
Parker dh
Gillaspie 3b
Green 2b
Williamson rf
Blanco rf
Pena 2b-3b
Totals
Toronto
Arizona
Baltimore
New York
003 010 001 —5
100 000 000 —1
8
6
0
2
a-flied out for Godley in the 5th. b-hit by pitch for Burgos in the
7th. c-walked for Grilli in the 9th. 1-ran for Smoak in the 9th.
Walks—Toronto 3: Saunders 1, Sanchez 1, Smoak 1. Arizona 1:
Bourn 1. Strikeouts—Toronto 9: Travis 2, Encarnacion 1, Saunders 1,
Martin 1, Tulowitzki 1, Lake 2, Sanchez 1. Arizona 5: Lamb 1, Castillo
1, Drury 2, Ahmed 1. E—Godley (1), Leone (1). LOB—Toronto 6,
Arizona 6. 2B—Drury (17), Tomas (16). HR—Encarnacion (25), off
Godley. RBIs—Travis (23), Donaldson (67), Encarnacion 3 (84),
Goldschmidt (62). SB—Segura (16). Runners left in scoring
position—Toronto 1 (Saunders); Arizona 4 (Segura, Lamb 2,
Ahmed). RISP—Toronto 2 for 5; Arizona 0 for 10. Runners moved
up—Travis, Bourn 2, Goldschmidt. GIDP—Goldschmidt, Ahmed.
DP—Toronto 2 (Sanchez, Tulowitzki, Encarnacion), (Travis, Tulowitzki,
Encarnacion).
Toronto
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Sanchez W, 10-1 ..........7 6 1 1 0 5
98 2.87
Grilli H, 7.....................1 0 0 0 1 0
17 2.30
Osuna.........................1 0 0 0 0 0
7 2.11
Arizona
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Godley L, 2-1 ...............5 6 4 3 1 7
91 5.31
Bracho........................1 1 0 0 0 0
16 7.24
Burgos ........................1 1 0 0 1 2
29 4.30
Delgado ......................1 0 0 0 0 0
8 4.15
Leone .........................1 0 1 0 1 0
18 6.43
HBP—Sanchez 2 (Castillo,Weeks). WP—Leone.
T—2:58. Tickets sold—26,626 (48,633).
ATHLETICS
ASTROS
Houston AB R H BI Avg. Oakland AB R H BI Avg.
Springer rf 5 1 1 1 .255 Crisp cf
4 0 2 1 .240
Gnzlz 1b
5 0 1 0 .255 Lowrie 2b
5 0 1 0 .280
Altuve 2b
5 2 4 0 .354 Valncia 1b 5 0 1 0 .298
Correa ss
3 0 1 1 .265 Davis lf
5 0 0 0 .252
Valbna 3b 4 0 1 1 .262 Semien ss 4 1 1 0 .241
Gomez dh 5 0 0 0 .208 Butler dh
2 1 1 0 .253
Rasmus lf
4 0 0 0 .236 b-Alnso dh 0 0 0 0 .259
Gattis c
4 0 2 0 .220 Smlnski rf
2 1 1 0 .301
Mrsnck cf
4 0 0 0 .194 c-Rddick rf 2 0 1 1 .298
Totals
39 3 10 3
Healy 3b
4 0 2 2 .316
MBride c
2 0 0 0 .182
a-Vogt c
2 1 1 0 .289
Totals
37 4 11 4
001 020 000 0 —3
000 000 201 1 —4
R
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
H
1
2
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
4
BI
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
Avg.
.262
.269
.308
.284
.298
.250
.259
.160
.233
10
11
1
1
Two outs when winning run scored. a-lined out for McBride in the 7th.
b-pinch hit for Butler in the 8th. c-flied out for Smolinski in the 8th.
Walks—Houston 2: Correa 1, Valbuena 1. Oakland 6: Crisp 1, Semien 1,
Butler 1, Alonso 2, Smolinski 1. Strikeouts—Houston 8: Springer 2, Gonzalez
1, Altuve 1, Gomez 2, Marisnick 2. Oakland 10: Lowrie 1, Valencia 3, Davis 2,
Butler 1, Healy 2, McBride 1. E—Gonzalez (5), Semien (12). LOB—Houston 9,
Oakland 10. 2B—Altuve (26), Gattis (11), Crisp (20), Lowrie (11), Smolinski (2),
Healy (2), Vogt (20). 3B—Altuve (3). HR—Springer (21), off Overton.
RBIs—Springer (53), Correa (59), Valbuena (38), Crisp (38), Healy 2 (6),
Reddick (23). SB—Correa (9), Semien 2 (9). CS—Gattis (1), Smolinski (1).
SF—Correa. DP—Houston 2 (Altuve, Correa, Gonzalez), (Gattis, Altuve).
Houston
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Keuchel ....................61⁄3 5 2 2 3 6
116 4.70
Giles H, 16..................2⁄3 2 0 0 0 0
10 4.19
Gregerson H, 6 .............1 0 0 0 2 1
22 3.27
Harris BS, 1-10 ............1 2 1 1 0 2
31 1.80
Neshek L, 2-2..............2⁄3 1 1 1 0 1
12 2.73
Sipp ...........................0 1 0 0 1 0
9 4.91
Oakland
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Overton.....................61⁄3 9 3 3 0 6
107 8.40
Coulombe .................11⁄3 0 0 0 1 2
19 4.19
Hendriks......................2 1 0 0 0 0
28 5.06
Rzepczynski W, 1-0 .......1⁄3 0 0 0 1 0
5 3.30
WP—Gregerson. PB—Gattis (1).
T—3:41. Tickets sold—15,143 (37,090).
New York
Gardner lf
Ellsbury cf
Beltran rf
1-Hicks rf
McCann c
Rodriguez dh
2-Trryes dh
Grgrius ss
Castro 2b
Headley 3b
Rfsnydr 1b
Totals
AB
4
2
2
0
3
3
0
3
4
3
3
27
R
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
2
2
1
1
7
H
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
2
2
1
0
7
000 001 000 —1
020 012 02x —7
BI
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
4
2
0
7
Avg.
.259
.272
.301
.197
.239
.213
.219
.299
.261
.252
.260
4
7
1
0
1-ran for Beltran in the 7th. 2-ran for Rodriguez in the 8th.
Walks—Baltimore 2: Machado 1, Flaherty 1. New York 7: Beltran
2, McCann 1, Rodriguez 1, Gregorius 1, Headley 1, Refsnyder 1.
Strikeouts—Baltimore 6: Rickard 1, Machado 1, Trumbo 1, Schoop 1,
Alvarez 1, Hardy 1. New York 5: Gardner 2, Beltran 1, Rodriguez 1,
Headley 1. E—Joseph (2). LOB—Baltimore 4, New York 5.
2B—Rickard (13), Castro (17). HR—Castro (11), off Worley; Headley
(9), off Givens. RBIs—Rickard (19), Ellsbury (31), Castro 4 (36),
Headley 2 (30). SB—Ellsbury (17), Refsnyder (2). S—Ellsbury.
Runners left in scoring position—Baltimore 2 (Schoop 2); New York
1 (Refsnyder).GIDP—Hardy, Beltran, McCann. DP—Baltimore 2
(Schoop, Hardy, Flaherty), (Flaherty, Hardy, Hart); New York 1
(Gregorius, Refsnyder).
Baltimore
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Worley L, 2-1 .............41⁄3 3 3 3 4 3
88 3.16
Despaigne.................12⁄3 2 2 2 1 2
36 3.64
Hart............................1 1 0 0 1 0
14 0.00
Givens ........................1 1 2 2 1 0
22 3.61
New York
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Eovaldi W, 8-6............51⁄3 4 1 1 2 1
82 4.93
Swarzak H, 1 .............22⁄3 0 0 0 0 2
27 4.00
Goody.........................1 0 0 0 0 3
13 4.50
Inherited runners-scored—Despaigne 1-0, Swarzak 3-0.
IBB—by Hart (Beltran). WP—Despaigne.
U—Todd Tichenor, Brian Knight, Mark Carlson, Tony Randazzo.
T—2:51. Tickets sold—31,192 (49,642).
4
3
Coco Crisp hit a run-scoring double to
tie the score in the ninth inning and
pinch-hitter Josh Reddick hit a walk-off
single against Tony Sipp in the 10th
inning.
Houston
Oakland
AB
4
4
3
4
4
3
3
3
2
30
INDIANS
ROYALS
Cleveland
Kansas City
AB
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
3
1
36
R
0
1
3
2
0
0
0
0
1
0
7
H
1
2
2
1
1
1
1
2
1
0
12
BI
0
0
2
2
2
0
1
0
0
0
7
Avg.
.260
.283
.303
.249
.254
.294
.214
.202
.250
.301
Kansas City
Escobar ss
Cuthbert 3b
Hosmer 1b
Morales dh
Perez c
Gordon lf
Orlando rf
Merrifield 2b
Dyson cf
Totals
AB
4
3
4
4
4
4
4
3
4
34
R
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
1
0
3
201 030 001 —7
000 002 100 —3
H
0
2
1
1
1
0
2
0
1
8
BI
0
1
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
2
Avg.
.258
.293
.301
.256
.278
.200
.317
.276
.259
12
8
0
0
a-popped out for Gonzalez in the 8th.
Walks—Cleveland 2: Davis 1, Napoli 1. Kansas City 1: Merrifield 1.
Strikeouts—Cleveland 6: Davis 1, Napoli 1, Uribe 2, Gimenez 1,
Gonzalez 1. Kansas City 11: Escobar 1, Hosmer 2, Morales 2, Perez 2,
Gordon 2, Dyson 2. LOB—Cleveland 6, Kansas City 6. 2B—Kipnis
(19). HR—Napoli (21), off Flynn; Lindor (12), off Wang. RBIs—Lindor
2 (49), Napoli 2 (65), Santana 2 (53), Uribe (25), Cuthbert (31),
Perez (43). SB—Kipnis (7). SF—Lindor, Cuthbert. S—Kipnis.
Runners left in scoring position—Cleveland 3 (Santana 2,
Gimenez); Kansas City 2 (Hosmer, Orlando). RISP—Cleveland 3 for
7; Kansas City 1 for 5. DP—Kansas City 2 (Escobar, Merrifield,
Hosmer), (Escobar, Hosmer, Merrifield).
Cleveland
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Salazar W, 11-3 .........62⁄3 8 3 2 1 7
104 2.75
Crockett H, 2 ...............1⁄3 0 0 0 0 1
5 13.50
Shaw H, 16 .................1 0 0 0 0 2
8 4.46
Allen...........................1 0 0 0 0 1
12 2.59
Kansas City
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Flynn L, 1-1 ...............21⁄3 4 3 3 1 1
43 3.14
Gee..........................51⁄3 6 3 3 1 5
82 4.19
Wang........................11⁄3 2 1 1 0 0
13 3.79
Inherited runners-scored—Crockett 1-0, Gee 2-0, Wang 1-0.
WP—Salazar. PB—Gimenez (4).
U—Doug Eddings, Ryan Blakney, Cory Blaser, Jeff Nelson.
T—2:46. Tickets sold—31,144 (37,903).
001 000 500 —6
000 000 002 —2
10
6
1
0
Walks—Minnesota 2: Kepler 1, Vargas 1. Detroit 2: Martinez 1,
Upton 1.
Strikeouts—Minnesota 13: Nunez 2, Grossman 4, Dozier 2, Sano
2, Kepler 1, Vargas 1, Buxton 1. Detroit 6: Kinsler 1, Castellanos 1,
Aviles 1, McCann 2, Iglesias 1.
E—Kepler (3). LOB—Minnesota 5, Detroit 7. 2B—Sano (10).
HR—Dozier (16), off Rondon. RBIs—Nunez 3 (43), Mauer (29),
Dozier 2 (49), Martinez (55), Castellanos (52). SB—Nunez (23),
Mauer (2). CS—Nunez (6). SF—Nunez, Castellanos. S—Buxton,
Aviles.
Runners left in scoring position—Minnesota 4 (Mauer, Kepler,
Suzuki 2); Detroit 4 (Martinez, Iglesias 3). RISP_Minnesota 2 for 8;
Detroit 2 for 8.
Runners moved up—Vargas, Cabrera.
Minnesota
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Milone W, 3-2 ............81⁄3 4 2 2 2 4
109 4.71
Kintzler .......................2⁄3 2 0 0 0 2
16 2.28
Detroit
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Sanchez L, 5-11 ...........6 7 3 3 2 10
100 6.60
Rondon.......................2⁄3 3 3 3 0 1
24 5.56
Wilson ........................1⁄3 0 0 0 0 0
3 3.49
Ryan...........................1 0 0 0 0 0
14 3.54
Lowe...........................1 0 0 0 0 2
12 9.39
Sanchez pitched to 2 batters in the 7th.
Inherited runners-scored—Kintzler 1-0, Rondon 2-2.
U—Jerry Layne, Scott Barry, Tripp Gibson, Hunter Wendelstedt.
T—2:55. Tickets sold—32,030 (41,681).
7
3
Danny Salazar (11-3) handled Kansas
City for the third time this season,
Mike Napoli hit a two-run home run and
Cleveland ended a skid at Kauffman
Stadium at five games.
Cleveland
Davis cf
Kipnis 2b
Lindor ss
Napoli 1b
Santana dh
Ramirez lf
Uribe 3b
Gimenez c
Gonzalez rf
a-Chsnhll rf
Totals
Minnesota
Detroit
WHITE SOX
MARINERS
6
1
Melky Cabrera hit a tiebreaking home
run leading off the top of the seventh
inning, Todd Frazier hit a two-run shot
in the ninth and Chicago ended a
losing streak at five games.
Chicago
AB R H BI Avg.
Eaton rf
4 0 0 0 .273
Andrsn ss
5 0 2 0 .283
Abreu 1b
3 0 0 0 .269
Cabrera lf
3 2 1 1 .298
Frazier 3b
4 2 2 2 .215
Lawrie 2b
4 1 1 1 .252
Garcia dh
1 0 0 0 .234
a-Mrnu dh 1 0 0 0 .100
Shuck cf
4 1 3 1 .260
Navarro c
4 0 1 1 .208
Totals
33 6 10 6
Seattle
AB R H BI Avg.
O’Malley ss 3 0 0 0 .226
Gutierrez rf
4 0 0 0 .244
Cano 2b
4 1 1 1 .305
Cruz dh
4 0 3 0 .284
Lee 1b
3 0 0 0 .275
Seager 3b
4 0 0 0 .283
Iannetta c
2 0 0 0 .211
b-Smith
1 0 0 0 .273
Martin cf
3 0 0 0 .242
Robertson lf 3 0 2 0 .263
c-Lind
1 0 0 0 .230
Totals
32 1 6 1
Chicago
Seattle
010 000 203 —6
000 100 000 —1
10
6
1
0
a-struck out for Garcia in the 9th. b-struck out for Iannetta in the
9th. c-grounded out for Robertson in the 9th.
Walks—Chicago 5: Eaton 1, Abreu 1, Cabrera 1, Garcia 2. Seattle
3: O’Malley 1, Lee 1, Iannetta 1. Strikeouts—Chicago 10: Eaton 2,
Anderson 2, Abreu 1, Cabrera 1, Lawrie 2, Morneau 1, Navarro 1.
Seattle 11: Gutierrez 2, Cano 2, Lee 2, Seager 2, Iannetta 1, Smith 1,
Martin 1. E—Shuck (1). LOB—Chicago 5, Seattle 8. 2B—Navarro
(10). HR—Lawrie (12), off Miley; Cabrera (9), off Miley; Frazier (27),
off Benoit; Cano (22), off Quintana. RBIs—Cabrera (42), Frazier 2
(61), Lawrie (36), Shuck (13), Navarro (24), Cano (60).
DP—Chicago 1 (Lawrie, Abreu); Seattle 3 (Lee, O’Malley), (O’Malley,
Cano, Lee), (Seager, Cano, Lee).
Chicago
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Quintana W, 8-8 ...........6 6 1 1 3 7
109 3.13
Duke H, 17..................1 0 0 0 0 1
10 2.78
Jones H, 19 ...............11⁄3 0 0 0 0 2
23 2.38
Fulmer........................2⁄3 0 0 0 0 1
8 0.00
Seattle
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Miley L, 6-7 ...............61⁄3 6 3 3 3 4
98 5.36
Wilhelmsen .................2⁄3 1 0 0 0 0
8 1.50
Diaz............................1 0 0 0 0 3
15 2.29
Benoit ........................2⁄3 2 3 3 1 2
24 5.40
Rollins ........................1⁄3 1 0 0 1 1
15 4.05
HBP—Quintana (Martin).
T—3:00. Tickets sold—24,851 (47,476).
AB
4
4
4
3
4
2
2
1
1
1
3
29
R
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
H
2
2
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
5
BI
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Avg.
.251
.289
.287
.287
.274
.255
.255
.265
.222
.247
.344
San Francisco
Boston
Boston
Betts rf
Pedroia 2b
Bogaerts ss
Ortiz dh
Ramirez 1b
Bradley Jr. cf
Shaw 3b
Leon c
Holt lf
Totals
AB
4
3
4
3
3
3
3
3
3
29
R
0
1
1
1
0
0
0
0
1
4
000 000 000 —0
001 300 00x —4
H
0
0
1
1
1
0
0
0
1
4
BI
0
0
0
3
0
0
0
0
1
4
Avg.
.299
.298
.318
.327
.280
.293
.265
.431
.264
5
4
1
0
Walks—San Francisco 2: Posey 1, Williamson 1. Boston 1: Pedroia
1.Strikeouts—San Francisco 5: Belt 2, Posey 1, Crawford 2. Boston
6: Bogaerts 2, Bradley Jr. 1, Shaw 2, Leon 1.E—Green (2). LOB—San
Francisco 5, Boston 2. HR—Holt (5), off Peavy; Ortiz (23), off Peavy.
RBIs—Ortiz 3 (75), Holt (23). FIDP—Gillaspie. GIDP—Crawford,
Green.
DP—Boston 3 (Ramirez, Bradley Jr.), (Pedroia, Bogaerts,
Ramirez), (Shaw, Pedroia, Ramirez).
San Francisco
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Peavy L, 5-8.................6 3 4 4 1 6
96 5.15
Lopez..........................1 1 0 0 0 0
17 4.60
Kontos ........................1 0 0 0 0 0
9 2.86
Boston
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Porcello W, 12-2.........61⁄3 4 0 0 2 3
108 3.47
Ross Jr........................2⁄3 0 0 0 0 0
2 4.31
Ziegler.........................1 1 0 0 0 0
17 0.00
Uehara .......................1⁄3 0 0 0 0 1
7 4.50
Layne .........................2⁄3 0 0 0 0 1
11 3.42
Lopez pitched to 1 batter in the 8th.
Inherited runners-scored—Kontos 1-0, Ross Jr. 1-0.
HBP—Porcello (Parker).
U— Tim Timmons, Stu Scheurwater, Mike Everitt, Jordan Baker.
T—2:42. Tickets sold—38,082 (37,499).
BRAVES
REDS
5
4
Atlanta’s bullpen blew a two-run lead in
the ninth, but Ender Inciarte rescued
the Braves with a sacrifice fly in the
11th that scored Nick Markakis, who
had singled to start a rally.
Atlanta
Bckhm 2b
Garcia 3b
Fremn 1b
Markkis rf
Francoeur lf
Inciarte cf
Recker c
Aybar ss
Jenkins p
Peterson
Pierzynski
Totals
Atlanta
Cincinnati
AB
5
5
5
5
5
3
4
3
2
1
1
39
R
1
0
0
2
0
1
0
1
0
0
0
5
H
2
1
0
3
1
1
0
2
0
0
0
10
BI
2
0
0
0
0
1
0
1
0
0
0
4
Avg.
.262
.257
.274
.260
.255
.236
.222
.212
.000
.274
.215
Cincinnati AB R H BI Avg.
Cozart ss
6 0 1 1 .261
Hmiltn cf
5 0 1 0 .244
Votto 1b
2 1 2 0 .270
Bruce rf
5 1 1 2 .263
Duvall lf
3 0 1 0 .245
Phillps 2b 5 0 1 0 .260
Suarez 3b 5 1 3 0 .230
R.Cabra c
4 0 1 0 .266
Peraza
0 1 0 0 .237
DJsus 2b
1 0 1 0 .241
Reed p
2 0 0 0 .000
Holt
1 0 0 0 .223
Brnhart c
2 0 0 1 .266
Totals
41 4 12 4
020 000 200 01 —5
200 000 002 00 —4
10
12
1
2
Walks—Atlanta 3: Inciarte 1, Recker 1, Aybar 1. Cincinnati 4: Votto
3, Duvall 1. Strikeouts—Atlanta 8: Freeman 2, Francoeur 3, Recker
1, Jenkins 1, Peterson 1. Cincinnati 6: Cozart 1, Hamilton 1, Bruce 1,
Duvall 1, Reed 1, Holt 1. E—Aybar (11), Bruce (5), Suarez (16).
LOB—Atlanta 5, Cincinnati 9. 2B—Phillips (17), Suarez (6),
R.Cabrera (6). HR—Beckham (4), off Lorenzen; Bruce (19), off
Jenkins. RBIs—Beckham 2 (19), Inciarte (12), Aybar (15), Cozart
(40), Bruce 2 (66), Barnhart (22). SB—Inciarte (10). CS—Hamilton
(5). SF—Inciarte. DP—Atlanta 2 (Freeman, Aybar), (Freeman,
Aybar); Cincinnati 3 (Votto), (Phillips, Cozart, Votto), (Hamilton, De
Jesus).
Atlanta
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Jenkins........................6 4 2 2 4 2
107 4.05
Alvarez H, 1 ...............12⁄3 1 0 0 0 2
27 2.08
Withrow H, 7................1⁄3 1 0 0 0 0
4 3.33
Johnson BS, 3-5...........2⁄3 4 2 2 0 0
12 4.59
Cervenka ....................2⁄3 1 0 0 0 0
5 2.93
M.Cabrera W, 1-0 .......12⁄3 1 0 0 0 2
25 1.80
Cincinnati
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Reed ..........................6 5 2 0 2 5
94 6.75
Lorenzen .....................1 1 2 2 1 1
17 4.26
Diaz............................2 1 0 0 0 1
18 4.24
Cingrani L, 2-3 .............1 2 1 1 0 1
15 3.43
Wood..........................1 1 0 0 0 0
10 2.98
Cingrani pitched to 1 batter in the 11th.
HBP—Jenkins (Duvall).
T—3:38. Tickets sold—23,080 (42,319).
L AT I ME S . CO M / S P O RT S
S
W E D N E S DAY, J U LY 20 , 2 016
D5
DODGERS REPORT
Kazmir gets out of a pickle and wins
By Andy McCullough
WASHINGTON — Because these are the 2016
Dodgers, a team beset by injuries at every turn, an 8-4
victory over the Washington
Nationals on Tuesday would
not be complete without a
scare. Which is why Scott
Kazmir retired to the clubhouse after the fifth inning
to gulp down pickle juice,
swallow a nutrition bar and
squirt a bottle of spicy mustard into his mouth.
All to combat a case of
cramping in both his calf
muscles.
Kazmir diced up the Nationals across seven innings
of one-run baseball. He was
less precise with the mustard. When he returned to
the dugout, Justin Turner
spotted a splotch on his
cheek.
“What is on your face?”
Turner asked.
“I don’t know,” Kazmir
said. “It’s probably mud or
something.”
“It’s yellow,” Turner informed his teammate.
Either way, Kazmir recovered from his midgame
swoon to log his longest outing since May 14. He struck
out eight Nationals as his
teammates battered Reynaldo Lopez, a 22-year-old
making his big league debut,
for six runs. Chris Hatcher
coughed up three runs in the
eighth, but the Dodgers
hung on for the victory.
The team declined to
pout after learning about
the setback with Clayton
Kershaw’s back and the tendinitis in Hyun-Jin Ryu’s elbow. Kazmir performed like
the pitcher the Dodgers
hoped they acquired when
he signed a three-year, $48million contract last winter.
“Kaz has a lot of fight in
him,” Manager Dave Roberts said. “With what we’re
going through, guys have to
step up.”
The lineup also did its
part. Chase Utley drove in
three runs on three separate
hits, including a leadoff solo
shot in the first inning. Joc
Pederson victimized Lopez
for a crucial, two-out, tworun single in the first. Turner
recorded three hits and
scored
twice.
Howie
Kendrick reached base
three times and scored
twice.
The victory continued an
odd trend. The team is now
12-6 since Kershaw last
pitched.
“We realized that we’ve
got to pick it up a little bit,”
Utley said. “It’s tough losing
the best pitcher in baseball.”
Yet the night still involved worry. In the fifth inning, Kazmir hopped to snag
a grounder. When he landed
on the lip of the mound, his
right leg buckled, caused by
cramping. On his next pitch,
he felt his left calf cramp. He
soon gave up a solo homer to
catcher Jose Lobaton on an
87-mph fastball.
After that inning, the
training staff tended to
Kazmir’s dehydration, administering the odd mixture
of ingredients. The remedy
stuck. He passed an early
test in the sixth, when he had
to spring to first base on a
groundout.
“It felt like I was walking
on eggshells,” Kazmir said.
“I was a little cautious.”
Kazmir’s fastball velocity
returned to 93 mph, and he
retired six of the last seven
batters he faced. It was only
the second time in 19 starts
this season that he finished
the seventh inning.
“To be able to get deep in
the game, and pick those
guys up?” Kazmir said.
“That was huge.”
Mitchell Layton Getty Images
[email protected]
Twitter: @McCulloughTimes
CATCHER YASMANI GRANDAL hits a home run, his 13th, in the ninth inning
in the Dodgers’ 8-4 victory over the Washington Nationals.
Kershaw not
expected to
need surgery
ANGELS REPORT
Pujols
powers
fifth in
a row
By Mike DiGiovanna
The batting average, onbase and slugging percentages are nowhere near what
he posted during his 11-year
career in St. Louis, but Albert Pujols left no doubt
Tuesday night that he is still
capable of driving the ball
out of the park.
Pujols crushed a pair of
three-run home runs in an
8-6 victory over the Texas
Rangers in Angel Stadium,
giving the 36-year-old slugger two multi-homer games
in three days and 54 in his career.
Pujols’ 18th and 19th
homers of the season gave
him 579 homers in his career,
four shy of Mark McGwire
for 10th place on baseball’s
all-time list, and pushed the
Angels to their fifth straight
win and ninth win in 11
games.
The Angels, 191⁄2 games
behind Texas at the beginning of July, now trail by 121⁄2.
Pujols and the Angels got
a scare in the seventh when a
92-mph
fastball
from
Rangers reliever Tony Barnette hit both the brim of Pujols’ helmet and his face. Pujols went down to one knee
while Barnette rushed to
check on him. Pujols got up,
and took first base, where he
smiled as he was checked by
a trainer.
“I’m good,” Pujols said
afterward. “Any time you get
hit in the head it’s a little
scary, but it’s part of the
game. I’m lucky. It could
have been worse.”
There were no hard feel-
Sean M. Haffey Getty Images
ALBERT PUJOLS , who had hit two three-run homers, reacts after having his
helmet knocked off by a pitch from Texas’ Tony Barnette in the seventh inning.
ings between Pujols and
Barnette, who met after the
game.
“He apologized three
times, actually,” Pujols said
of Barnette. “I’m pretty sure
that’s the last thing he wants
to do on a 1-2 count. I told
him it’s baseball, it happens,
just thank God I was OK.”
The
Pujols
homers,
which both came with Kole
Calhoun and Mike Trout
aboard, erased deficits in
the fourth and fifth innings
and gave him 71 runs batted
in on the season, putting him
on a pace for 122.
“He’s quietly having another incredible season,”
Manager Mike Scioscia said.
“You look at the production
numbers, it’s what you’d expect. And more importantly,
he’s getting Mike pitches to
hit.”
Trout got Pujols a pitch
to hit in the fifth inning
Tuesday night. After Calhoun hit a one-out triple, the
Rangers walked Trout intentionally to face Pujols,
who belted a three-run homer to left-center off starter
Kyle Lohse for a 7-5 lead.
“I don’t think it’s disrespect,” Pujols said. “If I was
the manager, I’d have done
the same thing. Trout is one
of the best players in the
game. In that situation,
they’re looking for a doubleplay grounder.”
Pujols followed a Calhoun walk and Trout double
with a three-run homer to
left in the fourth that tied it
at 3-3. Andrelton Simmons
walked, took third on Ji-Man
Choi’s single and scored on
Jett Bandy’s sacrifice fly to
center for a 4-3 lead.
Angels
starter
Tim
Lincecum was roughed up
for five runs — three earned
— and nine hits in five innings but escaped a basesloaded, one-out jam in the
first and a first-and-third,
no-out jam in the third. He
gave up a solo homer to Robinson Chirinos in the second
and a two-run shot to Chirinos in the fourth.
Joe
Smith,
Cam
Bedrosian and Huston
Street pitched scoreless relief innings, Street ending
the team’s 28-game streak
without a save dating to
June 14. It was the secondlongest stretch without a
save in club history. The Angels went 48 games without a
save in 1972.
[email protected]
Twitter: @MikeDiGiovanna
Angels lose Tropeano for rest of year
[Angels, from D1]
— Matt Wise in 2003, Michael
Kohn in 2012 and Tyler
Skaggs in 2014.
“With so many back to
back, we’re looking in the
mirror,” Scioscia said before
Tuesday night’s 8-6 victory
over the Texas Rangers.
“You definitely look internally. You analyze everything from the throwing program to how you monitor
guys. We’ve been very healthy over the course of our
time here.
“This might be a fluke
thing, but naturally, you
have to look from within to
make sure that the process
is correct. We’ve always been
confident with it, but when
you have injuries like this,
naturally, you look to see if
there’s any cause.”
Tropeano, who was 3-2
with a 3.56 earned-run average in 13 starts, was pulled
from Monday night’s game
after giving up four runs and
three hits — home runs to
Rougned Odor, Adrian Bel-
tre and Mitch Moreland — in
two innings.
Tropeano, 25, described
his initial discomfort as
“day-two soreness after a
start … it wasn’t anything
that was alarming to me.”
The results of Tuesday’s
MRI test were jarring.
“It’s upsetting; it’s a
tough blow to me,” Tropeano said. “Obviously, I
want to be out there. I want
to pitch. I want to help this
team win, and it sucks. It’s a
part of the game nowadays, I
guess. It’s one of those
things where you’ve got to
stay positive until you get
that diagnosis.”
Tropeano plans to consult another doctor or two
before deciding on a course
of action. He will consider
stem-cell therapy, which
Heaney and Richards had,
and platelet-rich plasma injections but knows that
surgery, which requires a 12to 18-month recovery, is a
distinct possibility.
“As of now, we’re going to
keep all options open,” Tropeano said. “Usually when
you see [UCL] damage,
Tommy John surgery is the
course of action. Right now,
we’re just defining the severity of the tear and seeing
what action I can take.”
Scioscia
said
either
Skaggs, who is nearing the
end of a long rehabilitation
from elbow surgery and a
shoulder injury, or Jhoulys
Chacin, who threw four
scoreless innings in relief of
Tropeano on Monday night,
would replace Tropeano in
the rotation.
Skaggs,
who
hasn’t
pitched in the big leagues in
nearly two years, was
scheduled to start for
triple-A Salt Lake on Tuesday, but the game against
Iowa was rained out.
The game will be made up
as part of a doubleheader
Wednesday, with Skaggs
scheduled to start the first
game. Since the Angels are
off Thursday and won’t need
a fifth starter until next
Tuesday in Kansas City,
Skaggs could pitch at triple
A and still have five days of
rest before starting for the
Angels.
Skaggs gave up one hit,
struck out 14 batters and did
not walk any in seven scoreless innings of his last triple
A start in Omaha on Thursday night.
Tropeano’s injury will
likely scuttle any plans the
Angels had of trading Hector Santiago or Matt Shoemaker before the Aug. 1 nonwaiver trade deadline.
With
Richards,
28,
Heaney, 25, and Tropeano
likely out for 2017, and the
contracts of Jered Weaver
and the injured C.J. Wilson
expiring, Santiago, Shoemaker and Skaggs will be
needed to form the bulk of
the rotation next season.
“All we’re thinking about
right now,” Scioscia said, “is
2016.”
[email protected]
Twitter: @MikeDiGiovanna
[Dodgers from D1]
“figuring out what day we’d
put him into our rotation.”
His optimism was misguided. The symptoms Kershaw felt Sunday were
similar to how he felt before
the epidural, Roberts said.
Kershaw has not picked up a
baseball since Saturday, but
team officials do not expect
him to completely restart his
throwing program in order
to build up arm strength.
Neither do the Dodgers
believe Kershaw will require
another pain-killing injection. One team official described the prospect of
surgery as “very unlikely.”
The team planned to monitor Kershaw on a daily basis
and see how he recovers.
“I don’t know if it’s a step
back,” Roberts said. “But
we’re going to let the back
pain subside and see where
we go.”
The club must take a
similar approach with Ryu.
He missed the entire 2015
season because of a torn
labrum. He slogged through
a lengthy rehab assignment,
one interrupted by a bout
with shoulder soreness, to
return to the mound July 7.
In a discouraging outing
during which his fastball velocity faded, Ryu gave up six
runs and could not finish the
fifth inning against San Diego.
His arm failed to respond
to the strain. The Dodgers
placed him in the fifth spot
in the rotation coming out of
the break, which gave Ryu 12
days off between starts. The
delay was not enough. Ryu
felt inflammation “flare up”
after a bullpen session Sunday, Roberts said. There was
no timetable for a resumption of his throwing.
An MRI exam revealed
no “notable changes” in his
elbow
from
previous
examinations, said Andrew
Friedman, president of
baseball operations. Ryu
has pitched through issues
Jae C. Hong Associated Press
HYUN-JIN RYU made
one start for Dodgers in
his return from injury.
with his elbow after more
than 1,600 innings split between the majors and his
seven-year career in Korea.
“We’re disappointed for
him, and the time that he’s
put into coming back, and
for us,” Roberts said. “It’s
something that’s not a new
injury, in the sense that
there’s been something before in the elbow. It’s disappointing, but we’ll see where
we go from there.”
The continued absence
of Kershaw stings for a club
so reliant upon him during
the first half of the season.
Though the team has not
foundered since he went on
the disabled list, team officials understand how vital
his presence is for the
Dodgers’ championship aspirations.
“Clayton is going to do
everything he can to get
back,” Roberts said. “But,
yeah, we’re better when he’s
active, obviously. It’s something we’ve got to deal with.
We’ve got to continue to try
to win baseball games.”
[email protected]
Twitter: @McCulloughTimes
Fever hand Sparks second
straight loss after 20-1 start
INDIANA 92
SPARKS 82
associated press
INDIANAPOLIS
—
Tamika Catchings had 23
points and four steals Tuesday night to help the Indiana
Fever hand the Sparks their
first two-game losing streak
of the season in a 92-82 victory.
Catchings made steals on
consecutive
possessions,
leading to Erica Wheeler's
give-and-go
layup
and
Lynetta Kizer's baseline
jumper for an 86-70 lead.
Kristi Toliver hit her fourth
three-pointer of the fourth
quarter to pull the Sparks to
within 90-82 with 56.2 seconds left, but Catchings
made two free throws to seal
it for Indiana.
After starting the season
with 20 wins in their first 21
games, the WNBA-leading
Sparks have lost two in a
row. Despite their 20-3
record, they are only one
game ahead of Minnesota in
the Western Conference.
Toliver finished with 18
points for the Sparks. Nneka
Ogwumike had16 points and
14 rebounds, her 12th double-double, and Candace
Parker scored 15 points.
Kizer and Wheeler each
scored 14 points for Indiana
(11-12)
D6
W E D N E S DAY, J U LY 2 0 , 2 016
L AT I M ES . C O M / SP O RTS
THE DAY IN SPORTS
Woods out
of PGA and
for season
staff and wire reports
Tiger Woods pulled out of the PGA Championship, marking the first time in his career that he
will miss all four majors in a year. The PGA Championship is next week at Baltusrol in New Jersey.
The decision, while not a surprise, also means he
will go an entire PGA Tour season without playing.
His agent, Mark Steinberg of Excel Sports Management, said in a text to the Associated Press on
Tuesday that Woods will not play the remainder of
the tour season as he continues to rehab following
back surgeries. That would have amounted to only
three more tournaments before the start of the FedEx Cup playoffs.
Steinberg said Woods will continue to work hard
and assess when he can play the following season,
which starts in October.
Woods now has gone eight full years since winning his 14th major championship at the 2008 U.S.
Open at Torrey Pines.
Nice perk for NCAA’s top seed
The NCAA says the top overall seed in the men’s
basketball tournament will be able to pick its locaAdam Nurkiewicz Getty Images for IAAF
tion to play for the first and second round and regional sites.
B EL LY U P T O T H E B A R
The Division I Men’s Basketball Committee decided the geographic preferences would be made by
Alessandro Van De Sande of Belgium competes in the high jump portion of the decathlon during the World U20
teams in contention for the overall No. 1 seed far in
advance of Selection Sunday. There is no indication Track and Field Championships at Bydgoszcz, Poland. Van De Sande was in 14th place after five events.
whether the preferences will be guaranteed.
Teams will be able to choose from eight assigned
PRO
TENNIS
TRANSACTIONS
cities for the first and second round. The eight cities GOLF
SINGLES (first round)—Gerald Melzer, Austria, BASKETBALL
$1.85-MILLION CITI OPEN
BASEBALL
hosting the first- and second-round games in 2017 PGA TOUR STATISTICS
Through July 17
d. Albert Montanes, Spain, 5-7, 7-5, 6-4; JanAt Washington
WNBA
Angels—Claimed infielder Sean Coyle off
are Buffalo, Milwaukee, Orlando, Salt Lake City, FedExCup Season Points
Western Conference
Lennard Struff (8), Germany, d. Akira Snatillan,
Surface: Hard-Outdoor
waivers from Boston and optioned him to ArkanW
L Pct.
G B sas (TL); designated pitcher A.J. Achter for as1. Dustin Johnson, 2,493.066. 2. Jason Day,
MEN’S SINGLES (first round)—Yoshihito Nish- Japan, 6-2, 6-2; Adam Pavlasek, Czech Repub- Team
Greensboro, Indianapolis, Tulsa and Sacramento.
Japan’s Risa Ozaki upset second-seeded Sloane
Stephens in straight sets on the women’s side, and
eighth-seeded Sam Querrey advanced on the men’s
side at the Citi Open in Washington.
Stephens, the defending champion, lost 6-2, 6-1to
Ozaki in her opening match. Querrey, coming off a
trip to the Wimbledon quarterfinals that featured a
victory against world No. 1 Novak Djokovic, beat fellow American Bjorn Fratangelo, 6-7 (5), 6-4, 6-4, on
center court. Earlier in the day, fifth-seeded Eugenie
Bouchard of Canada was upset by Italy’s Camila
Giorgi, 7-5, 6-4.
Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal pulled out of
the Rogers Cup, leaving the Toronto tournament
next week without three of the world’s top four men’s
players. Tennis Canada announced the withdrawals
a day after Wimbledon champion and world No. 2
Andy Murray said he would not defend his Rogers
Cup title this year.
British cyclist Mark Cavendish has withdrawn
from the Tour de France in a bid to improve his medal chances at next month’s Olympics.
Team Dimension Data made the announcement
Tuesday on the race’s second and final rest day, with
five stages remaining.
Cavendish, a sprinter, has won four stages on this
year’s Tour and is preparing to race on the track at
the Olympics, where he will be competing in the omnium event.
Brock Lesnar has been informed his UFC 200
fight-night sample has the same banned performance-enhancing substance that he tested positive
for on June 28, UFC announced.
An official with knowledge of Lesnar’s samples
identified the banned substance as the fertility drug
clomiphene, one of the two banned substances
found in a June sample taken from former UFC lightheavyweight champion Jon Jones.
Lesnar, 39, defeated No. 8-ranked heavyweight
Mark Hunt by unanimous decision in the co-main
event of UFC 200 on July 9, a celebratory return from
a five-year absence by the former heavyweight
champion.
— Lance Pugmire
2,352.250. 3. Adam Scott, 2,010.700. 4. Jordan Spieth, 1,903.567. 5. Phil Mickelson,
1,497.983. 6. Russell Knox, 1,456.750. 7.
Brandt Snedeker, 1,444.850. 8. Kevin Chappell,
1,421.500. 9. Patrick Reed, 1,408.500. 10.
Justin Thomas, 1,345.543.
Scoring Average
1. Dustin Johnson, 69.101. 2. Phil Mickelson,
69.218. 3. Jason Day, 69.457. 4. Jordan Spieth,
69.501. 5. Adam Scott, 69.611. 6. Sergio Garcia, 69.656. 7. Rory McIlroy, 69.667. 8. Matt
Kuchar, 69.679. 9. Charl Schwartzel, 69.775.
10. Brooks Koepka, 69.872.
Driving Distance
1. J.B. Holmes, 312.7. 2. Dustin Johnson,
312.3. 3. Tony Finau, 310.7. 4. Bubba Watson,
308.6. 5. Andrew Loupe, 307.2. 6. Jason
Kokrak, 306.7. 7. Gary Woodland, 306.5. 8.
Hudson Swafford, 306.3. 9. Luke List, 305.6.
10. Jamie Lovemark, 304.7.
Driving Accuracy Percentage
1. Colt Knost, 73.96%. 2. Thomas Aiken,
73.50%. 3. Jerry Kelly, 71.50%. 4. Darron Stiles,
70.97%. 5. Justin Hicks, 70.50%. 6. Zac Blair,
69.81%. 7. Henrik Stenson, 69.65%. 8. Graeme
McDowell, 69.58%. 9. Brian Stuard, 69.41%.10.
Roberto Castro, 69.32%.
Greens in Regulation Percentage
1. Lucas Glover, 71.72%. 2. Henrik Stenson,
71.62%. 3. Thomas Aiken, 70.58%. 4. Sergio
Garcia, 70.46%. 5. Jhonattan Vegas, 70.05%. 6.
Patrick Rodgers, 69.90%. 7. Stewart Cink,
69.83%. 8. Greg Owen, 69.80%. 9. Russell
Knox, 69.57%. 10. Graham DeLaet, 69.54%.
Total Driving
1. Henrik Stenson, 74. 2. Emiliano Grillo, 76.
3. Hudson Swafford, 77. 4. Keegan Bradley, 81.
5. Lucas Glover, 86. 6. Russell Henley, 87. 7.
Rory McIlroy, 90. 8. Jim Herman, 100. 9. Thomas
Aiken, 104. 10. Boo Weekley, 106.
Strokes Gained-Putting
1. Jason Day, 1.106. 2. Steve Stricker, .930. 3.
Jamie Donaldson, .887. 4. Phil Mickelson, .821.
5. Jordan Spieth, .785. 6. Harris English, .688.
7. Aaron Baddeley, .677. 8. Brian Harman, .652.
9. Adam Hadwin, .650. 10. Andrew Landry, .644.
Birdie Average
1. Rory McIlroy, 4.52. 2. Dustin Johnson and
Jordan Spieth, 4.45. 4. Henrik Stenson, 4.32. 5.
Hideki Matsuyama, 4.25. 6. Jason Day, 4.18. 7.
J.B. Holmes, 4.17. 8. Phil Mickelson, 4.15. 9.
Sergio Garcia, 4.10. 10. 3 tied with 4.00.
Eagles (Holes per)
1. Kevin Chappell, 93.9. 2. Ben Martin, 94.2.
3. Morgan Hoffmann, 102.6. 4. Jhonattan Vegas,
103.5. 5. Bubba Watson, 105.8. 6. Dustin Johnson, 108.0. 7. Patrick Rodgers, 109.6. 8. Jason
Day, 110.3. 9. Adam Scott, 112.0. 10. Chez
Reavie, 114.5.
Sand Save Percentage
1. Jason Day, 63.75%. 2. Sean O'Hair,
63.72%. 3. Jonas Blixt, 62.90%. 4. K.J. Choi,
62.16%. 5. Bryce Molder, 61.47%. 6. Phil Mickelson and Brendon Todd, 61.32%. 8. Robert Allenby, 61.02%. 9. Jon Curran, 60.53%. 10. David
Toms, 60.00%.
All-Around Ranking
1. Henrik Stenson, 218. 2. Rory McIlroy, 277.
3. Jason Day, 302. 4. Sergio Garcia, 339. 5.
Dustin Johnson, 343. 6. Brooks Koepka, 355. 7.
Phil Mickelson, 360. 8. Kyle Reifers, 388. 9.
Rickie Fowler, 396. 10. Ryan Palmer, 399.
More than 50 former professional wrestlers sued BOXING
FIGHT SCHEDULE
World Wrestling Entertainment Inc., saying the Today
At Osaka, Japan, Shingo Wake vs. Jonathan
WWE is responsible for repeated head trauma in- Guzman,
12, for the vacant IBF junior-featherweight
title; Kazuto Ioka vs. Kyvin Lara, 12, for
cluding concussions they suffered in the ring that
Ioka's WBA World flyweight title.
led to long-term neurological damage.
Thursday
Jimmy “Superfly” Snuka, Joseph “Road WarAt Mashantucket, Conn. (ESPN), Sergiy
vs. Sam Soliman, 12,
rior Animal” Laurinaitis and Paul “Mr. Wonder- Derevyanchenko
middleweights; Ievgen Khytrov vs. Paul Mendez,
ful” Orndorff are among the plaintiffs who filed the 10, middleweights.
Friday
lawsuit Monday in federal court in Connecticut.
USC cornerback is
suspended for opener
By Zach Helfand
USC cornerback Isaiah Langley has been suspended for the Trojans’ season-opening game
against Alabama, Coach Clay Helton confirmed
Monday, after Langley was arrested on suspicion of
three misdemeanor offenses in May.
Langley was arrested on May 6 on UCLA’s campus on suspicion of trespassing, intoxication and resisting arrest, according to UCLA police spokeswoman Nancy Greenstein. Helton said Langley was
disciplined by USC in May for violating team rules.
Langley was a backup cornerback as a freshman
in 2015. He appeared in 11 games.
Langley was attending a fraternity party at
UCLA when he was arrested, according to Greenstein. She said Langley gave responding officers the
wrong age and resisted arrest.
“When he was asked to leave, he refused,” Greenstein said. “Police were called and he was arrested
for misdemeanor trespassing.”
Langley does not currently face charges, according to Frank Mateljan, a spokesman for the Los Angeles city attorney's office. Mateljan said the city attorney’s office is in the process of placing Langley in
the Neighborhood Justice Program, a diversion program for first-time, nonviolent offenders to avoid
criminal records.
[email protected]
Twitter: @zhelfand
Times staff writer Richard Winton contributed to
this report.
ioka, Japan, d. Ivan Dodig, Croatia, 6-2, 4-2, retired; Donald Young d. Ernesto Escobedo, 6-4,
3-6, 6-3; Ryan Harrison d. Stephane Robert,
France, 7-6 (1), 6-3; Brian Baker d. Sam Groth,
Australia, 7-6 (3), 7-6 (5); Yen-hsun Lu, Taiwan,
d. Austin Krajicek, 6-1, 7-6 (3); Lukas Lacko, Slovakia, d. Denis Shapovalov, Canada, 7-6 (3),
4-6, 6-4; Malek Jaziri, Tunisia, d. Reilly Opelka,
6-7 (4), 7-6 (4), 7-6 (3).
(Second round)—Daniel Evans, Britain, d.
Grigor Dimitrov (12), Bulgaria, 6-4, 6-4; Alexandr
Dolgopolov (11), Ukraine, d. Jordan Thompson,
Australia, 6-4, 1-6, 7-6 (4); Benoit Paire (4),
France, d. Jared Donaldson, 6-0, 7-5; Sam Querrey (8), d. Bjorn Fratangelo, 6-7 (5), 6-4, 6-4.
WOMEN’S SINGLES (first round)—Camila
Giorgi, Italy, d. Eugenie Bouchard (5), Canada,
7-5, 6-4; Christina McHale d. Monica Niculescu
(8), Romania, 6-3, 6-4; Sabine Lisicki, Germany,
d. Kristina Kucova, Slovakia, 6-3, 7-5; Tamira
Paszek, Austria, d. Lauren Albanese, 6-3, 6-4;
Naomi Broady, Britain, d. Irina Falconi, 6-3, 6-4;
Risa Ozaki, Japan, d. Sloane Stephens (2), 6-2,
6-1; Monica Puig (3), Puerto Rico, d. Oceane
Dodin, France, 6-2, 4-6, 6-3.
$710,000 BANK OF THE WEST CLASSIC
At Stanford
Surface: Hard-Outdoor
SINGLES (first round)—Julia Boserup d. Naomi Osaka, Japan, 2-6, 6-4, 6-4; Urszula Radwanska, Poland, d. Kateryna Bondarenko, Ukraine,
6-4, 7-5; Magda Linette, Poland, d. Kristyna
Pliskova, Czech Republic, 2-6, 6-2, 7-5; Alison
Riske, d. Varvara Lepchenko (8), 2-6, 6-3, 7-6
(4); CiCi Bellis d. Jelena Ostapenko (6), Latvia,
6-4, 6-4; Sachia Vickery d. Elitsa Kostova, Bulgaria, 6-1, 6-2.
$511,275 GSTAAD OPEN
At Gstaad, Switzerland
Surface: Clay-Outdoor
SINGLES (first round)—Robin Haase, Netherlands, d. Thiemo de Bakker, Netherlands, 6-7
(4), 6-3, 6-1; Tristan Lamasine, France, d. Radu
Albot, Moldova, 6-4, 6-2; Konstantin Kravchuk,
Russia, d. Guido Pella (5), Argentina, 6-7 (5),
7-6 (4), 7-6 (7); Horacio Zeballos, Argentina, d.
Fernando Verdasco (6), Spain, 6-4, 6-2; Henri
Laaksonen, Switzerland, d. Jozef Kovalik, Slovakia, 3-6, 6-1, 7-6 (5); Paul-Henri Mathieu (8),
France, d. Marco Chiudinelli, Switzerland, 7-5,
6-1; Dustin Brown, Germany, d. Juan Monaco,
Argentina, 6-2, 7-5.
$511,000 CROATIA OPEN
At Umag, Croatia
Surface: Clay-Outdoor
SINGLES (first round)—Teymuraz Gabashvili,
Russia, d. Nino Serdarusic, Croatia, 6-4, 6-2;
Andrej Martin, Slovakia, d. Sergiy Stakhovsky,
Ukraine, 7-6 (6), 6-4; Gastao Elias, Portugal, d.
Guillermo Garcia-Lopez, Spain, 6-1, 6-2; Damir
Dzumhur, Bosnia-Herzegovina, d. Nicolas Almagro (5), Spain, 6-2, 5-7, 7-5; Jiri Vesely (8),
Czech Republic, d. Michael Linzer, Austria, 6-3,
6-1; Thomas Fabbiano, Italy, d. Franko Skugor,
Croatia, 6-0, 4-1, retired; Carlos Berlocq, Argentina, d. Filip Krajinovic, Serbia, 6-3, 6-1; Pablo
Carreno Busta (6), Spain, d. Andreas Seppi, Italy, 6-4, 6-4; Martin Klizan, Slovakia, d. Enrique
Lopez-Perez, Spain, 6-2, 7-5; Renzo Olivo, Argentina, d. Andre Ghem, Brazil, 3-6, 7-6 (4), 7-6
(5).
$511,000 GENERALI OPEN
At Kitzbuehel, Austria
Surface: Clay-Outdoor
lic, d. Maximo Gonzalez, Argentina, 6-3, 6-4;
Roberto Carballes Baena, Spain, d. Dennis Novak, Austria, 6-0, 6-2; Nikoloz Basilashvili, Georgia, d. Lukas Rosol (5), Czech Republic, 6-4, 7-6
(4); Dusan Lajovic (6), Serbia, d. Rogerio Dutra
Silva, Spain, 7-6 (7), 6-1; Jurgen Melzer, Austria,
d. Taro Daniel, Japan, 6-4, 7-6 (4).
$226,750 ERICSSON OPEN
At Bastad, Sweden
Surface: Clay-Outdoor
SINGLES (first round)—Sara Errani (2), Italy,
d. Cagla Buyukakcay, Turkey, 6-2, 6-3; Laura
Siegemund (6), Germany, d. Kateryna Kozlova,
Ukraine, 6-1, 6-2; Lucie Hradecka, Czech Republic, d. Teliana Pereira, Brazil, 6-2, 6-2; Sara Sorribes Tormo, Spain, d. Aleksandra Krunic, Serbia,
6-2, 3-6, 6-2; Annika Beck (4), Germany, d. Sorana Cirstea, Romania, 7-5, 7-5; Mona Barthel,
Germany, d. Yaroslava Shvedova (7), Kazakhstan, 4-6, 6-3, 3-0, retired; Lara Arruabarrena, Spain, d. Aliaksandra Sasnovich, Belarus,
6-2, 4-6, 6-1; Katarina Siniakova, Czech Republic, d. Jana Cepelova, Slovakia, 6-2, 6-2; Johanna Larsson (8), Sweden, d. Rebecca
Peterson, Sweden, 7-6 (3), 6-2; Julia Goerges,
Germany, d. Polona Hercog, Slovenia, 6-7 (7),
6-3, 6-4; Bethanie Mattek-Sands, d. Kiki
Bertens (3), Netherlands, 7-5, 6-2; Anastasija
Sevastova, Latvia, d. Anett Kontaveit, Estonia,
6-2, 6-4; Viktorija Golubic, Switzerland, d. Elizaveta Kulichkova, Russia, 7-6 (5), 6-1.
THE ODDS
Baseball
National League
Favorite
Underdog
at Washington OFF DODGERS
OFF
at Cincinnati -180 Atlanta
+165
at Chicago
-170 New York
+158
at Pittsburgh -157 Milwaukee
+147
Miami
-125 at Philadelphia +115
at St. Louis
-185 San Diego
+170
American League
Favorite
Underdog
at ANGELS
-140 Texas
+130
at Detroit
-170 Minnesota
+158
Cleveland
-135 at Kansas City +125
Houston
-133 at Oakland
+123
at Seattle
-175 Chicago
+163
at New York -133 Baltimore
-123
Interleague
Favorite
Underdog
at Colorado -120 Tampa Bay
+110
Toronto
-160 at Arizona
+150
at Boston
-185 San Francisco +170
Updates at Pregame.com
—Associated Press
PRO FOOTBALL
ARENA LEAGUE
Saturday’s Schedule
KISS at Jacksonville, 4 p.m.
Portland at Tampa Bay, 2 p.m.
CANADIAN LEAGUE
Thursday’s Schedule
Calgary at Winnipeg, 8:30 p.m.
In the Bleachers by Steve Moore
At Mashantucket, Conn. (SHO), Adam Lopez
vs. Roman Ruben Reynoso, 10, bantamweights.
Saturday
At Las Vegas (PPV), Terence Crawford vs. Viktor Postol, 12, for the WBC-WBO World juniorwelterweight title unification; Gilberto Ramirez
vs. Dominik Britsch, 12, for Ramirez's WBO super- middleweight title; Oscar Valdez vs. Matias
Adrian Rueda, 12, featherweights; Jose Benavidez vs. Francisco Santana, 10,
welterweights; Lenny Zappavigna vs. IK Yang, 10,
junior-welterweights; Ryota Murata vs. George
Tahdooahnippah, 10, middleweights.
SPARKS ..............20
3 .870
—
Minnesota ...........19
4 .826
1
Phoenix...............10
14 .417
101⁄2
Dallas ..................9
14 .391
11
Seattle .................8
14 .364
111⁄2
San Antonio ..........5
17 .227
141⁄2
Eastern Conference
Team
W
L Pct.
GB
New York.............17
7 .708
—
Atlanta ...............12
11 .522
41⁄2
Indiana ...............11
12 .478
51⁄2
Chicago ..............11
12 .478
51⁄2
Washington ...........9
13 .409
7
Connecticut ...........6
16 .273
10
Tuesday’s Results
Indiana 92, SPARKS 82
Chicago 79, Phoenix 77
Today’s Schedule
New York at Washington
Connecticut at Dallas
Atlanta at Minnesota
BOX SCORE
Fever 92, Sparks 82
SPARKS—Beard 3-9 0-0 7, Carson 3-9 2-2 8,
Ogwumike 6-11 3-4 16, Parker 5-13 2-2 15, Toliver 6-9 2-2 18, Belyakova 2-3 0-0 4, Gray 1-2
0-0 2, Lavender 6-8 0-0 12. Totals 32-64 9-10
82.
INDIANA—Catchings 8-13 4-4 23, January
4-5 2-2 12, Kizer 6-9 2-2 14, Larkins 2-7 0-0 4,
Wheeler 6-10 2-2 14, Coleman 1-4 2-3 5, Johnson 3-5 5-5 12, Mitchell 2-5 2-2 6, Pohlen 1-1
0-0 2. Totals 33-59 19-20 92.
Sparks ......................19 21 20 22—82
Indiana .....................22 27 18 25—92
Three-point goals—Sparks 9-15 (Toliver 4-6,
Parker 3-5, Ogwumike 1-1, Beard 1-1, Carson
0-2), Indiana 7-15 (Catchings 3-4, January 2-3,
Johnson 1-2, Coleman 1-2, Mitchell 0-2, Wheeler
0-2). Fouled out—None. Rebounds—Sparks 34
(Ogwumike 14), Indiana 26 (Kizer, Coleman 5).
Assists—Sparks 22 (Ogwumike 7), Indiana 22
(January 9). Total Fouls—Sparks 20, Indiana 16.
Technicals—Sparks defensive three second.
A—7,269 (18,165).
PRO SOCCER
MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCER
WEST
W L T
Pts GF GA
FC Dallas......12 6 4
40 34 30
Colorado.......10 2 7
37 22 13
GALAXY ..........8 3 8
32 32 18
Real Salt Lake .8 6 6
30 29 30
Vancouver .......8 8 5
29 33 35
Portland .........7 6 8
29 32 31
Sporting K.C....8 10 4
28 24 25
San Jose ........6 6 7
25 21 22
Seattle ...........6 11 2
20 20 24
Houston .........4 9 6
18 23 26
EAST
W L T
Pts GF GA
N.Y.City FC ......9 6 6
33 34 35
Philadelphia....8 6 6
30 34 28
New York ........8 9 4
28 32 27
Montreal.........6 5 8
26 30 29
Toronto FC ......6 7 6
24 21 22
New England ...5 7 8
23 26 33
D.C. United .....5 7 7
22 18 21
Orlando City ....4 5 10
22 30 33
Columbus .......3 7 9
18 24 30
Chicago..........4
Three points for a win, one for a tie.
Friday’s Schedule
San Jose at Real Salt Lake, 8 p.m.
Saturday’s Schedule
GALAXY at Portland, 12:30 p.m.
Chicago at New England, 4:30 p.m.
D.C. United at Toronto FC, 4:30 p.m.
Orlando City at Columbus, 4:30 p.m.
Philadelphia at Montreal, 4:30 p.m.
FC Dallas at Colorado, 6 p.m.
Vancouver at Houston, 6:30 p.m.
NATIONAL WOMEN’S LEAGUE
Saturday’s Schedule
FC Kansas City at Western New York, 4 p.m.
Washington at Shy Blue FC, 4 p.m.
Houston at Chicago, 5 p.m.
Seattle at Portland, 7:30 p.m.
MINOR LEAGUE
BASEBALL
PACIFIC COAST LEAGUE
Tuesday’s Results
Omaha 13, Las Vegas 6
Sacramento 1, New Orleans 0, first game
New Orleans 3, Sacramento 0, second game
Albuquerque 7, Nashville 5, first game
Albuquerque 5, Nashville 3, second game
Fresno 1, Round Rock 0
El Paso 9, Memphis 2
Reno 9, Colorado Springs 6
Tacoma 5, Oklahoma City 4
Salt Lake at Iowa, rain
CALIFORNIA LEAGUE
Tuesday’s results
San Jose 4, High Desert 3
Inland Empire 12, Lake Elsinore 5
Lancaster 5, Rancho Cucamonga 4
Stockton 4, Modesto 2
Visalia at Bakersfield, late
AUTO RACING
INDYCAR LEADERS
Through July 17
1. Simon Pagenaud, 432 points. 2. Will
Power, 384. 3. Helio Castroneves, 358. 4. Scott
Dixon, 349. 5. Josef Newgarden, 344. 6. Tony
Kanaan, 339. 7. Alexander Rossi, 300. 8. James
Hinchcliffe, 299. 9. Charlie Kimball, 294. 10.
Carlos Munoz, 293. 11. Graham Rahal, 292. 12.
Ryan Hunter-Reay, 282. 13. Juan Pablo Montoya,
279. 14. Sebastien Bourdais, 273. 15. Takuma
Sato, 235. 16. Mikhail Aleshin, 227. 17. Marco
Andretti, 220. 18. Conor Daly, 211. 19. Max
Chilton, 173. 20. Jack Hawksworth, 153. 21.
Spencer Pigot, 108. 22. Gabby Chaves, 105. 23.
JR Hildebrand, 84. 24. Oriol Servia, 72.
signment.
Dodgers—Put pitchers Casey Fien and HyunJin Ryu on the 15-day disabled list, Fien retroactive to July 17 and Ryu to July 9; activated outfielder Joc Pederson from the 15-day disabled
list; called up pitcher Luis Avilan from Oklahoma
City (PCL); sent pitcher Yimi Garcia to Rancho
Cucamonga (Cal) for a rehab assignment.
Baltimore—Purchased the contract of
outfielder Julio Borbon from Bowie (EL); put outfielder Hyun Soo Kim on the 15-day disabled list,
retroactive to July 11; designated outfielder
Henry Urrutia for assignment.
Chicago Cubs—Sent pitcher Trevor Cahill to
Iowa (PCL) for a rehab assignment.
Cleveland—Sent pitcher Zach McAllister to
Columbus (IL) for a rehab assignment.
Detroit—Sent pitcher Daniel Norris to Toledo
(IL) for a rehab assignment.
Miami—Optioned outfielder Yefri Perez to
Jacksonville (SL); called up pitcher Jose Urena
from New Orleans (PCL).
N.Y. Yankees—Agreed to terms with
outfielders Blake Rutherford, Joe Burton and Ben
Ruta, first basemen Dalton Blaser and Tim
Lynch, pitchers Trevor Lane, Connor Jones, Tony
Hernandez, Phillip Diehl, Tyler Honahan, Brooks
Kriske, Nolan Martinez, Greg Weissert, Nick Nelson, Taylor Widener, Brian Trieglaff, Miles Chambers, Braden Bristo, William Jones and Brian Keller, center fielders Dom Thompson-Williams, Jordan Scott, Evan Alexander, Timmy Robinson and
Edel Luaces, third baseman Mandy Alvarez, second baseman Nick Solak and catcher Keith Skinner on minor league contracts.
Oakland—Put pitcher Andrew Triggs on the
15-day disabled list, retroactive to July 18; optioned infielder Tyler Ladendorf to Nashville
(PCL); called up pitchers Daniel Coulombe and
Dillon Overton from Nashville.
Philadelphia—Sent outfielder Aaron Altherr
to Clearwater (FSL) for a rehab assignment.
Pittsburgh—Designated catcher Erik Kratz for
assignment; optioned pitcher Chad Kuhl to Indianapolis (IL); activated catcher Francisco
Cervelli and pitcher Jameson Taillon from the 15day disabled list.
St. Louis—Put infielder Jhonny Peralta on the
15-day disabled list, retroactive to July 18; designated catcher Michael McKenry for assignment;
called up outfielder Jeremy Hazelbaker and
pitcher Miguel Socolovich from Memphis (PCL).
Tampa Bay—Optioned infielder Nick Franklin
to Durham (IL); activated first baseman Steve
Pearce from the 15-day disabled list; sent pitchers Brad Boxberger and Chase Whitley to Charlotte (FSL) for rehab assignments.
Texas—Sent catcher Bryan Holaday to Round
Rock (PCL) for a rehab assignment.
Washington—Put pitcher Sammy Solis on the
15-day disabled list, retroactive to July 8;
claimed pitcher Abel de Los Santos off waivers
from Cincinnati; purchased the contract of
pitcher Reynaldo Lopez from Syracuse (IL).
BASKETBALL
Detroit—Signed forward Henry Ellenson to a
multiyear contract.
Phoenix—Signed guard Leandro Barbosa.
FOOTBALL
Arizona—Released cornerback Carrington
Byndom; signed cornerback Mike Jenkins.
Oakland—Signed cornerback David Amerson
to a four-year extension.
SOCCER
Major League Soccer— Fined D.C. United mifielder Lloyd Sam an undisclosed amount for violating the policy regarding hands to the face,
head or neck of an opponent, and Philadelphia
defender Fabinho an undisclosed amount for
simulation.
CYCLING
TOUR DE FRANCE
Rest Day
At Bern, Switzerland
STANDINGS: (after 16 stages)—1. Chris
Froome, Britain, Sky, 72 hours, 40 minutes, 38
seconds. 2. Bauke Mollema, Netherlands, TrekSegafredo, 1 minute, 47 seconds behind. 3. Adam Yates, Britain, Orica-BikeExchange, 2:45. 4.
Nairo Quintana, Colombia, Movistar, 2:59. 5.
Alejandro Valverde, Spain, Movistar, 3:17. 6. Romain Bardet, France, AG2R La Mondiale, 4:04.
7. Richie Porte, Australia, BMC Racing, 4:27. 8.
Tejay Van Garderen, U.S., BMC Racing, 4:47. 9.
Daniel Martin, Ireland, Etixx-QuickStep, 5:03.10.
Fabio Aru, Italy, Astana, 5:16.
11. Roman Kreuziger, Czech Republic, Tinkoff,
5:24. 12. Louis Meintjes, South Africa, LampreMerida, 5:48. 13. Joaquim Rodriguez, Spain, Katusha, 5:54. 14. Sebastien Reichenbach, Switzerland, FDJ, 8:40. 15. Sergio Henao, Colombia,
Sky, 12:24. 16. Geraint Thomas, Britain, Team
Sky, 12:47. 17. Pierre Rolland, France, Cannondale, 13:03. 18. Warren Barguil, France, GiantAlpecin, 19:15. 19. Mikel Nieve, Spain, Sky,
27:00. 20. Alexis Vuillermoz, France, AG2R La
Mondiale, 28:23.
Others included: 49. Peter Stetina, U.S., TrekSegafredo, 1:20:34. 109. Lawson Craddock,
U.S., Cannondale, 2:22:16. 135. Alex Howes,
U.S., Cannondale, 2:39:31. 149. Brent Bookwalter, U.S., BMC Racing, 2:47:09.
Today’s Schedule, Stage 17
A 114.6-mile ride with a Category 1 climb to
the Col de la Forclaz followed by an Hors categorie finish at Finhaut.
DEL MAR ENTRIES
Fourth day of a 39-day thoroughbred meet.
Odds
5-2
3-1
4-1
5-1
5-1
8-1
12-1
7033 THIRD RACE. 7 furlongs. Maiden claiming. Fillies
and mares. 3-year-olds and up. Claiming price $20,000.
Purse $21,000.
PR
Horse (PP)
Jockey,Wt
Odds
6192 Stylistic,5
S Elliott,125
2-1
6301 Marriedtoaminister,6 F Prat,121
5-2
6192 Journeytothestars,8 S Gonzalez,121
3-1
6200 Hilda,2
I Puglisi,121
6-1
2062 Tanager,4
M Pedroza,121
8-1
6039 Big Alice,1
C Lindsay,XX118
12-1
6298 One Afleet Star,98 T Pereira,121
20-1
....
Smarty’s Choice,7 C Salcedo,XX118
20-1
6298 Maria Faustina,3
B Boulanger,121
30-1
7035 FIFTH RACE. 5 furlongs turf. Allowance optional
claiming. 3-year-olds and up. Claiming price $62,500.
Purse $68,000.
PR
Horse (PP)
Jockey,Wt
Odds
7024 Kentuckian,5
F Prat,120
2-1
6176 Act,3
G Stevens,120
5-2
4533 Chips All In,6
B Blanc,122
3-1
....
Bottle Rocket,4
S Elliott,120
8-1
6295 Pay The Fine,1
M Gutierrez,120
8-1
5047 Fueled By Bourbon,2 T Baze,120
12-1
6326 Why Two,8
K Desormeaux,120 12-1
6151 Horse Laugh,7
G Ercegovic,120
20-1
7032 SECOND RACE. 6 furlongs. Claiming. Fillies and
mares. 3-year-olds and up. Claiming prices
$8,000-$7,000. Purse $18,000.
PR
Horse (PP)
Jockey,Wt
Odds
(6317) Sweet Profit,1
R Bejarano,122
5-2
....
Allthatnmore,4
B Blanc,120
3-1
6124 Senza Fina,7
F Perez,120
7-2
4386 Warren’s Cracker,3 T Baze,120
4-1
6160 Smooth Talker,6
D Van Dyke,120
8-1
6317 Papaslilprincess,8 G Ercegovic,120
10-1
9060 Jackie K,5
E Maldonado,120
12-1
6203 Smil’n From Above,2 C Lindsay,XX111
20-1
7034 FOURTH RACE. 51⁄2 furlongs. Claiming. Fillies.
3-year-olds. Claiming prices $12,500-$10,500. Purse
$23,000.
PR
Horse (PP)
Jockey,Wt
Odds
(6269) Spicy Blonde,2
F Perez,124
5-2
....
You Sleep On That,5 J Talamo,120
3-1
6269 Wife Approved,7
T Baze,122
4-1
6272 Golden Bayers,8
K Desormeaux,120
6-1
2011 Sharp Holiday,9
J Theriot,120
8-1
6159 Sooner Time,4
C Lindsay,XX113
10-1
6159 Dancing Sunset,6 S Elliott,120
12-1
2006 Khalaya,3
A Cedillo,122
12-1
4070 Seaside Fantasy,1 B Pena,120
20-1
7036 SIXTH RACE. 6 furlongs. Maiden special weight.
Fillies and mares. 3-year-olds and up. State bred. Purse
$63,000.
PR
Horse (PP)
Jockey,Wt
Odds
6268 Chao Chom,6
T Pereira,121
5-2
6271 Christy Jackson,7
K Desormeaux,121
7-2
6245 Rebarules Again,4 R Bejarano,121
4-1
6268 Tinian,2
E Maldonado,121
4-1
....
Princess Tiznow,8
J Talamo,121
5-1
....
Southern Drawl,1
F Prat,121
6-1
9014 Curlina Curlina,5
S Gonzalez,121
20-1
6147 Swiss Breeze,3
I Puglisi,121
20-1
7031 FIRST RACE (2 p.m.). 61⁄2 furlongs. Maiden
claiming. 3-year-olds and up. Claiming prices
$40,000-$35,000. Purse $28,000.
PR
Horse (PP)
Jockey,Wt
6194 Agronomy,7
S Gonzalez,121
6320 Zealous Tale,5
J Talamo,125
6237 Dreamy Martini,4
V Espinoza,121
6181 Guapo Diablo,3
R Bejarano,121
8345 Marvelous Max,6
F Prat,125
4352 Elegant Street,1
N Arroyo, Jr.,125
....
Shell Beach,2
T Baze,121
7037 SEVENTH RACE. 6 furlongs. C.E.R.F. Stakes. Fillies
and mares. 3-year-olds and up. Purse $75,000.
PR
(6284)
(4238)
4046
6080
6072
6072
Horse (PP)
Shh She’s Ours,6
Enchanting Lady,1
Pretty N Cool,2
Dr. Fager’s Gal,4
Everqueen,3
Lucky Folie,5
Jockey,Wt
V Espinoza,123
R Bejarano,119
M Smith,118
Mn Garcia,119
M Gutierrez,116
F Prat,118
Odds
8-5
5-2
3-1
5-1
10-1
10-1
7038 EIGHTH RACE. 11⁄8 mile turf. Claiming. 3-year-olds
and up. Claiming prices $32,000-$28,000. Purse
$36,000.
PR
6084
4430
6184
6224
6208
6191
6217
6348
6239
Horse (PP)
Trifecta,3
Buymeabond,5
Infinite Magic,9
Terrys Tom Cat,2
Horizontalyspeakin,6
Prime Issue,4
Sky Preacher,8
Madikwe,7
Bird E House,1
Jockey,Wt
J Talamo,125
B Blanc,125
K Desormeaux,125
M Gutierrez,125
C Lindsay,XX116
G Ercegovic,125
T Baze,125
S Gonzalez,123
A Lezcano,123
Odds
5-2
7-2
4-1
5-1
8-1
8-1
12-1
15-1
20-1
CALENDAR
E
W E D N E S D A Y , J U L Y 2 0 , 2 0 1 6 :: L A T I M E S . C O M / C A L E N D A R
C O M I C- C O N I N T E RNAT I ONA L
THEATER REVIEW
Salve
for a
world
gone
mad
Musical ‘Sense and
Sensibility’ provides
happy endings just
when they’re needed.
CHARLES McNULTY
THEATER CRITIC
Wally Skalij Los Angeles Times
JEFFREY WALKER is largely credited with bringing the comic book, sci-fi and movie worlds together in the Comic-Con of today.
The tent-widener
This guy helped connect the fan fest to Hollywood. Ka-pow!
was not alone, but Walker’s
understanding of genre, marketing, music and film brought the
movie business — and the likes of
Arnold
Schwarzenegger
and
Christian Bale — to the loyal and
lucrative fantasy domains of nerds,
geeks and all those who costume
out as droids, Stormtroopers,
aliens, hobbits, Jokers, Supergirls,
Captain Americas and steampunks.
“Comic-Con was the perfect
convention to grow like it did,” said
Walker, a publicist and media consultant who lives and works in a
rambling house and office in Laurel Canyon. “It had location. It had
pros in the business fans wanted to
meet. … It was the biggest tent in
[See Walker, E7]
By Jeffrey Fleishman
In a galaxy known as New York,
in a drab age before Trekkies and
light sabers, there lived a curious
boy who liked comic books, time
travel and Elvis. He read Isaac Asimov and tuned in to John Zacherle,
this Phantom of the Opera-type
guy with scraggly hair and a creepy
laugh who introduced horror
movies on Channel 9, which, if you
were a kid at the time, was something close to splendid.
This boy — let’s call him Jeffrey
Walker — who, incidentally would
later watch “2001: A Space
Odyssey” 29 times, tended toward
the imaginative. His mother was a
beauty queen, his father a clothier.
Walker grew up to be many things,
including an actor who played
poker with Jesus Christ, shot a
nude scene with Al Pacino and was
hugged by Natalie Wood. This is
not that Walker story.
This tale is about the man who
helped transform Comic-Con into
the pop-culture bazaar it is today
by bridging the gap between Hollywood and the world of science fiction and comic book fandom. He
Those fancy fan films
Movie studios are applauding
the new crop of sophisticated
fan films, but only to a point. A1
Kim Gottlieb-Walker
IN 1982 , Walker, right, and Batman co-creator Bob Kane look
through slides for a presentation at the comics convention.
Disabled
actors
left out
The few roles for
them are filled mostly
by the able-bodied,
study has found.
‘Star Trek’s’ big score
By Tre’vell Anderson
“Star Trek Beyond’s” ComicCon premiere will feature a
live orchestra performance. E4
When Hollywood discusses diversity, one community is often left out of the
conversation: people with
disabilities. Even in the discussion’s most recent iterations, prompted by #OscarsSoWhite,
differently
abled people in the industry
seem unable to find a seat at
the table.
A recent study by the Ruderman Family Foundation
found that, despite those
with disabilities representing nearly 20% of the country’s population, about 95%
of characters with disabilities on television are played
by able-bodied actors.
“The protest and ensuing
media frenzy ignited by the
‘Oscars So White’ campaign
has shaped an ideology
[See Disabled, E9]
It’s a fan’s fantasy come to life
San Diego is about to be
the center of the universe
for aficionados of sci-fi and
sword ’n’ sorcery fare.
By Josh Rottenberg
As Donald Trump whips up Republicans to a fever pitch in Cleveland, and the Democrats tee up for
their rejoinder next week in Philadelphia, a very different, though no
less impassioned, kind of convention is set to kick off in San Diego.
Starting Wednesday, about
130,000 people of all ages will gather
at the San Diego Convention Center in the annual pop-culture pilgrimage that is Comic-Con International. Some will be clad in
superhero tights, some will wear
Stormtrooper costumes, and
some, riding the latest craze, will
undoubtedly be decked out as
Pokémon characters. But whatever their particular flavor of fandom,
Hollywood will be there to greet
them with open arms.
The convention offers attendees the chance to be the first on
their block to catch glimpses of
some of the most hotly anticipated
upcoming superhero, sci-fi and
fantasy films, including possible
[See Comic-Con, E6]
SAN DIEGO — Feeling
overwhelmed by this summer of tumult, when the
news seems to go only from
bad to worse? I have just the
remedy: an English novelist
who wrote delectable comedies of manners that haven’t
gone out of style despite being more than 200 years old.
Yes, Jane Austen is the
writer to soothe our jangled
nervous systems. Her books,
operating on the principle
that the more delayed the
romantic gratification the
more delicious it will be,
comfort their readers with
the assurance that good oldfashioned English morals
will prevail even as good oldfashioned English mores are
satirized with a gently unrelenting hand.
A musical version by Paul
Gordon of Austen’s early
novel “Sense and Sensibility” is having its West Coast
premiere at the Old Globe.
Having seen Gordon’s “Jane
Austen’s Emma — A Musical
Romantic Comedy” at the
Old Globe in 2011, I wasn’t expecting more from his
“Sense and Sensibility” than
[See ‘Sensibility,’ E8]
Setting the
stage in L.A.
Latino Theater
Company’s recent
grant showcases the
group’s mark on the
local theater scene. E3
A new season
of inspiration
The Mark Taper
Forum’s 2017-18
season will feature
world premieres and a
homegrown classic. E3
Brian van der Brug Los Angeles Times
CHRISTOPHER CISNEROS , left, and brother Zachary visit Comic-Con 2015 as video-game char-
acters. San Diego expects about 130,000 fans at this year’s fantastical event, starting Wednesday.
Comics ............... E12-13
TV grid ..................... E11
WEDNESDAY, JULY 20, 2016
LOS ANGELES TIMES
TUES - FRI AT 8 • SAT AT 2 & 8 • SUN AT 1 & 6:30
BROADWAY’S DEFINITIVE
TONY -WINNING MASTERPIECE
®
“DIVINELY, DANGEROUSLY
DECADENT.”
BEN BRANTLEY
Andrea Goss and the 2016 national touring cast of Roundabout Theatre Company’s CABARET. Photo by Joan Marcus
E2
N OW THRU AUGUS T 7 ONLY!
HOLLYWOODPANTAGES.COM/800-982-2787
16/17
Single Tickets Now on Sale!
DANCE
SEP 23-25 /
Diavolo
WORLD
MAR 18 /
Béla Fleck &
Abigail Washburn
FEB 16–18 /
Les 7 Doigts de la Main
Cuisine & Confessions
THEATER
BROADWAY
JAZZ
JAN 14 /
Matthew
Morrison
OCT 15 /
Joey Alexander
FAMILY
APR 22–23 /
Dr. Seuss’ The Cat in the Hat
310.434.3200
thebroadstage.com
Follow us @TheBroadStage
SANTA MONICA COLLEGE PERFORMING ARTS CENTER
L AT I M E S. C O M / CA L E N DA R
W E D N E S DAY, J U LY 20 , 2 016
E3
CULTURE MONSTER
latimes.com/culturemonster
5 DAYS
OUT
Highlights of the week
ahead in arts, music and
performance
ART
STAGE
MUSIC
MUSIC
OPERA
“Conversations: Todd Gray
& Hamza Walker”
Hammer Museum
Westwood
7:30 p.m. Wednesday
Free
“New Original Works
Festival 2016”
REDCAT, L.A.
Opens 8:30 p.m. Thursday
Ends Aug. 6
$14-$20
“Beethoven’s Ninth”
Pacific Symphony
Irvine Meadows
Amphitheatre
8 p.m. Saturday
$12-$108
“Tosca”
Los Angeles Philharmonic
Hollywood Bowl
7:30 p.m. Sunday
$14-$125
Vittorio Grigòlo
Broad Stage
Santa Monica
7:30 p.m. Tuesday
$80-$180
THEATER
Jay Thompson
EDWARD JAMES OLMOS starred in the 1978
“Zoot Suit.” Center Theatre Group plans a revival.
Bringing back
‘Zoot Suit’
By Matt Cooper
To mark its 50th season
at the Mark Taper Forum,
Center Theatre Group and
its artistic director Michael
Ritchie announced on Tuesday a 2017-18 season that includes one Pulitzer-winning
drama, two world premieres
by noted playwrights and
the timely revival of one
homegrown, groundbreaking theatrical event.
That revival would be
“Zoot Suit,” writer-director
Luis Valdez’s song-filled exploration of the lives of Mexican Americans in 1940s Los
Angeles — the sometimes
fragile bonds of family and
friendship, the injustices
and indignities that come
with racism and the attempt
to assimilate yet retain a
sense of ethnic identity, all
while being marginalized as
a stranger in a not-strange
land.
Inspired by the infamous
Sleepy Lagoon murder trial
and the so-called Zoot Suit
riots, Valdez’s show was first
mounted at the Taper in
1978. “Zoot Suit” was a hit,
running for nearly a year. It’s
often credited as later becoming the first show to represent Chicano culture on
Broadway.
It will return in a
production
once
again
helmed by Valdez and copresented by Center Theatre Group and Valdez’s acclaimed El Teatro Campesino. It is scheduled to run
Feb. 12-March 12, 2017.
Also in the Taper’s 2017-18
season:
“Remote L.A.” (March 14April 2, 2017): The international theater collective
Rimini Protokoll will put au-
Joseph Moran
QUIARA Alegria Hudes’
“Water” won a Pulitzer.
Gregory Costanzo
“SOFT POWER” is new
by David Henry Hwang.
dience members through
their paces as the group
sends them off the beaten
path in this immersive,
multiple-site,
audio-enhanced guided tour of Los
Angeles.
“Archduke” (April 30-May
28, 2017): Three young Serbian men in 1914 Belgrade find
they have roles to play in
events that will ultimately
set World War I in motion.
The darkly comic fable is a
world premiere commissioned by CTG from
“Guards at the Taj” and
“Bengal Tiger at the Baghdad Zoo” playwright Rajiv
Joseph.
“Head of Passes” (Sept. 24Oct. 22, 2017): Tony winner
Phylicia Rashad (“A Raisin
in the Sun”) will take the Taper stage in a new Southernset, biblically informed drama about family and faith
from MacArthur fellowship
recipient Tarell Alvin McCraney (“The Brothers
Size,” “In the Red and
Brown Water”).
“Water by the Spoonful”
(Feb. 11-March 11, 2018): Four
recovering addicts connect
in an online chat room while
a troubled Iraq war veteran
tries to readjust to civilian
life in Quiara Alegria Hudes’
Pulitzer Prize-winning drama.
“Soft Power” (April 15-May
13, 2018): Tony winner David
Henry Hwang (“M. Butterfly”) riffs on a possible shift
in relations between a rising
China and the rest of the
world in the decades to come
in this world-premiere musical fable.
[email protected]
Jean-Marc Giboux
TARELL ALVIN Mc-
Craney addresses faith.
Rohit Chandra
RAJIV JOSEPH visits
WWI in “Archduke.”
Jay L. Clendenin Los Angeles Times
JOSÉ LUIS VALENZUELA says a $500,000 grant will help Latino Theater Company extend its reach.
The next stage
BY GARY GOLDSTEIN >>> Independent theater companies may come and go, but L.A.’s
Latino Theater Company has stayed alive since its founding in 1985 by artistic director
José Luis Valenzuela. ¶ The company, dedicated to the advancement of Latino theater in
the United States as well as to the creative employment of all people of color, has mounted
productions such as the award-winning Mexican trilogy “Faith,” “Hope” and “Charity” by
Evelina Fernández, “Calligraphy” (coproduced with Playwrights’ Arena) by Velina Hasu
Houston and the experimental, Iraq war-themed “Melancholia,” which was collectively
written as a company project. ¶ In 2006, following a long and contentious competition
with a downtown developer, the Latino Theater Company was awarded a 20-year lease —
along with a $4-million state grant — to operate the city-owned Los Angeles Theatre Center, a historic five-theater facility on Spring Street. Problems erupted in 2012 when the
City Council voted to terminate the theater company’s lease along with that of its leasing
partner, the Latino Museum of History, Art and Culture, because of “failed expectations.”
But the museum ultimately vacated the premises, and the Latino Theater Company
worked with the city to update the lease. ¶ Now, the Latino Theater Company has received a $500,000 grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. Valenzuela spoke recently about the company for this conversation (edited for length).
How did the Mellon Foundation
grant come about?
The foundation first gave us a
grant in 2014 for $89,000 to support
the artistic director fellowship we
were awarding as part of our Encuentro (Encounter) festival [which assembled 150 artists from theater
companies nationwide to perform 17
plays in a month]. It was a very successful program, so the foundation
was excited to support the organization again.
The theater said the grant money
would be used to “expand and professionalize” your staff?
We will now be able to add a marketing director and a development
director as well as hire a new managing director.
The marketing director will help
with institutional marketing and a
strategic marketing plan for the next
five years. The new general manager
will work in partnership with our
board and the artistic director to
ensure the future of the center within
a new global culture and environment.
What’s your feeling about the state
of L.A. theater these days?
I don’t think theater in Los Angeles gets respected. I think there are a
lot of very talented, very committed
theater people here. It’s astounding
why we can’t compete with a lot of
other theater people in the rest of the
country.
L.A., specifically, does not have a
lot of funding sources for theater,
especially for the midsize houses.
Versus New York or Chicago?
Of course. Very different than New
York. Very different from Chicago.
Chicago is fairly well-funded for the
midsize theater. Chicago is also very
proud of their theater community
and very united about what theater
means for that city.
Still, I feel like there are a lot of
people interested in Los Angeles
theater that really want to promote
the understanding that it’s important to the city.
How do you see your company’s
place within the Los Angeles theater
world?
Most important is that we are an
independent company and that
we’ve been able to survive for the last
30 years. It’s extra important since
our mission is to give opportunities
not only to Latinos but to other communities of color as well as to smaller
theater companies that need
production support and exposure.
Let’s talk about the Los Angeles
Theatre Center. How are its performance spaces [three midsize
auditoriums and a smaller black box
theater and “creative space”] used?
The Latino Theater Company
usually does four to five plays per
season, one season in the spring and
one in the fall. Each season, two of the
plays are Equity productions and two
are produced in the small house.
And the rest of the time? Outside
rentals?
Yes. These rentals usually come to
the small theater. The bigger theater
rentals are usually only for a weekend
[for one-off presentations].
So then much of the time the theater
is not operating at capacity?
That’s right.
As manager of the LATC, is it your
responsibility to keep all of the
houses rented?
Yes, it is. The theaters are sometimes used for dance productions,
panels and youth festivals. We try to
find things that are compatible to our
audience or compatible with what we
think our future should be.
Has the downtown resurgence these
past years helped?
This is something that we’re
always talking about. It’s helped a lot.
People were fearful to come to this
part of town for many, many years.
But now, not as much.
At the same time, the populations
that live [downtown] or are moving in
are getting acclimated to what the
cultural life is going to be for them. We
have great cafes and great restaurants and great bars, but I think they
are still tentative about theater as
part of their cultural life.
Are you saying you need to get the
millennials on board?
Exactly. It’s not in their DNA yet.
What else is in the works for the
Latino Theater Company?
So much. We are creating a new
relationship with seven Los Angeles
playwrights that’s called the Temblors Initiative. We’re producing their
plays in Equity houses, one to two
[world premiere] plays a year over
four years.
This fall, we will be presenting “A
Mexican Trilogy” in its entirety for
the first time. And next fall, we’ll be
returning to our Encuentro program
with Encuentro de Las Americas
(Encounter of the Americas), which
is going to include Canada, the
United States, and South and Central America.
[email protected]
E4
W E D N E SDAY , J U LY 20 , 2 016
L AT I M E S. C O M /CA L E N DA R
C O MI C -C O N I N T E R NAT I ONA L
QUICK TAKES
More ‘Murderer’ shows
The saga of Steven Avery will continue at Netflix.
The streaming network announced Tuesday that it had
ordered an unspecified number of additional episodes of
“Making a Murderer.” The documentary series chronicles
the strange case of Avery, a Wisconsin man who was
exonerated in 2003 after spending 18 years in prison for rape,
only to be convicted of a murder that some believe he did
not commit and that helped fuel a cultural obsession with
true-crime tales.
Directors and creators Laura Ricciardi and Moira
Demos have started production on the additional episodes,
which will follow Avery, his co-defendant Brendan Dassey
and their respective lawyers as they fight to overturn the
convictions.
A project 10 years in the making, “Making a Murderer”
was released in December. Like the HBO series “The Jinx”
and the podcast “Serial,” the documentary generated
tremendous public interest and widespread, if not
unanimous, critical acclaim. Last week, it was nominated
for six Emmy Awards, including documentary or nonfiction
series.
Netflix has yet to announce a premiere date for the
episodes.
— Meredith Blake
Katie Falkenberg Los Angeles Times
Gyllenhaal on
Broadway again
Jake Gyllenhaal, who
made his Broadway debut
last year, will be returning to
star in Lanford Wilson’s acclaimed play “Burn This.”
The Academy Award
nominee from “Brokeback
Mountain” and “Nightcrawler” will also help mark a
milestone of sorts — it will be
the first play at the reopened Hudson Theatre in
almost 50 years.
In “Burn This,” grief over
the accidental drowning of a
brilliant
young
dancer
unites what would seem to
be, at first glance, two entirely opposite people.
Performances will begin
in February.
Gyllenhaal’s costar has
yet to be announced. The
play has been tackled by
Elisabeth Shue and Peter
Sarsgaard, Edward Norton
and Catherine Keener, and
John Malkovich and Joan
Allen. Gyllenhaal made his
Broadway debut last year in
“Constellations.”
— associated Press
New ‘Thrones’
season delayed
As “Game of Thrones”
fans know, building and/or
reclaiming an empire takes
time. And, in a departure, it
will take a bit longer than
usual for HBO’s blockbuster
series to return.
HBO revealed this week
that the show would deviate
from its usual spring return
date and, instead, would begin production on a seventh
season later this summer to
meet a planned air date of
summer 2017.
Filming for the seven-episode season will be based in
Northern Ireland, with
Spain and Iceland also
among the locations, the
last of which will presumably
provide plenty of that wintry
Westeros look.
— Chris Barton
“NO SAFETY NET,” Michael Giacchino says in describing the live performance. “You just gotta go for it.”
Rare treat at the ‘Star
Trek Beyond’ premiere
Fox
MARC ANTHONY is
Latin Recording Academy Person of the Year.
Marc Anthony
to receive honor
Salsa star Marc Anthony
has been named 2016 Latin
Recording Academy Person
of the Year.
The academy will honor
the five-time Latin Grammy
and two-time Grammy winner Nov. 16 at the MGM
Grand Garden Arena in Las
Vegas, on the eve of the Latin
Grammys.
“I was ecstatic when I received the news,” Anthony
said in a press release. “It is
an honor, and I am humbled
to be selected as the Person
of Year recipient for my contributions as a music ambassador and my humanitarian efforts.”
Anthony has sold more
than 12 million albums
worldwide. His hits include
not only salsa songs in Spanish such as “Valió la Pena”
and “Vivir Mi Vida” but also
pop hits in English such as “I
Need to Know” and “You
Sang to Me.”
As a humanitarian, Anthony is cofounder and vice
chairman of the Maestro
Cares Foundation, which
helps rescue and provide
critical resources to impoverished children in Latin
America. Since its creation
in 2012, the foundation has
opened orphanages in the
Dominican Republic, Colombia and Mexico.
— associated press
things going off the rails.
“The truth is, all of this is on
the shoulders of the conductor. We have an amazing
team, but that is the only guy
holding the ball. So he’s the
one who’s probably stressing.”
The “Beyond” premiere
arrives at an exceptionally
busy time for Giacchino.
He’s in the middle of writing
his score for the upcoming Marvel film “Doctor
Strange,” which he’ll record
in London next month, and
he just flew from two
performances of the 2009
“Star Trek” at the Hollywood Bowl with the L.A.
Philharmonic to a concert
screening of “Ratatouille” in
San Francisco. In September, he’ll conduct a showcase
of his music from the ABC
series “Lost” at the John Anson Ford Theatre.
What keeps him fueled,
ultimately, is his nerdy passion for it all. Giacchino has
become the musical voice of
several revived pop culture
products of yore (“Star
Trek,” “Planet of the Apes”),
and Comic-Con seemed the
ideal place for him to attempt this previously unattempted feat.
“You’re sort of preaching
to the choir there,” he says.
“What better place to have
this premiere than with the
fans who are coming to celebrate it there anyway? We
only get to do what we do because of our fan base. For
me, it’s like a gift to them — a
‘thank you, guys, for supporting what we do and for
loving these things as much
as we do.’ ”
Composer Michael
Giacchino’s score will
be played live at the
film’s debut — a first
since the silent era.
By Tim Grieving
Michael Giacchino was
boldly going where few composers had gone before at
the dawn of the recent explosion of film screenings with
live score accompaniment.
Since 2012, his scores for
“Star Trek,” “Star Trek Into
Darkness” and “Ratatouille”
have been performed live-topicture around the world.
“When you have the
players playing right in front
of you, and you’re looking up
at the screen, then down at
the orchestra — it’s a whole
different experience for people,” he says. “It’s a lot of
fun.”
It was only a matter of
time before the 48-year-old
composer, who won an Oscar for 2010’s “Up,” would go a
step further and accompany
a film’s premiere this way —
and only fitting that it be the
next chapter in the rebooted
“Star Trek” series. “Star
Trek Beyond” will kick off
Comic-Con with its world
premiere at the Embarcadero Marina Park in San Diego
on Wednesday night, and
the San Diego Symphony
will be performing its score
hot off the press.
This will be the first time
since the silent film era that
a major motion picture has
premiered with a live orchestra performing its score.
Kimberley French Paramount Pictures
ANTON YELCHIN, left, Chris Pine and John Cho in
a scene from the upcoming “Star Trek Beyond.”
“It was just one of those
things we’ve been wanting to
do on every film that I’ve
been working on,” says Giacchino. “And for some reason, [Paramount] said yes
this time.”
This is the composer’s
first journey into the final
frontier without J.J. Abrams
in the captain’s chair
(though Abrams did serve
as a producer). Justin Lin of
the “Fast & Furious” franchise took the crew out this
time for a different kind of
adventure.
“Now that the characters
are well established, as far as
in our new universe, it was an
opportunity for someone to
take that and go into a different direction,” explains Giacchino. “This film, of all the
films, feels the most like an
old episode of the show —
but if they had $150 million to
make that episode.”
These live concerts always involve a hefty amount
of preparation, between
making sure all parts match
what’s heard in the film and
the conductor remaining
squarely in sync with the picture while wielding an enormous collective of human
beings.
“No safety net,” says Giacchino. “You just gotta go
for it.”
Accompanying a brandnew film, though, compounds the difficulty. The
picture wasn’t locked until
last week, and the orchestra
— which received the score
Monday — has (at most)
only three rehearsals. Fortunately, conductor Richard
Kaufman is a veteran of
these events, having given
the same treatment to films
ranging from “Psycho” to
“Raiders of the Lost Ark”
with the Pacific Symphony
and various other orchestras.
“It’s so important to have
a conductor that is in tune
with the orchestra and also
loves movies as much as we
do,” says Giacchino, adding
that he never stresses about
[email protected]
NOW PLAYING
WESTWOOD
ORANGE COUNTY
DIRECTOR’S CUT CINEMA
EAST LOS ANGELES
NORWALK 8
13917 Pioneer Blvd.
Rancho Niguel Road
961 Broxton Avenue
310-208-5576
MIKE AND DAVE NEED WEDDING DATES E
(1:15), 4:15, 7:30, 10:00
948 Broxton Avenue
310-208-5576
THE SECRET LIFE OF PETS 3D B 4:30, 9:50
THE SECRET LIFE OF PETS B (1:30), 7:15
949-831-0446
THE INFILTRATOR E (11:10, 2:00, 4:50), 7:40, 10:30
HUNT FOR THE WILDERPEOPLE C (12:00, 2:30,
5:00), 7:30, 10:00
THE SECRET LIFE OF PETS B (11:30, 2:00, 4:30),
7:00, 9:30
THE INNOCENTS C (11:00, 1:30, 4:10), 6:50, 9:20
OUR KIND OF TRAITOR E (11:45, 2:10, 4:45), 7:15, 9:45
SWISS ARMY MAN E 9:00 PM
FREE STATE OF JONES E (12:30, 3:30), 6:45, 9:50
LOVE & FRIENDSHIP B (2:15), 6:40
THE MEDDLER C (11:35, 4:25)
CHARTER CENTRE 5
ORANGE COUNTY
7822 Warner Ave. at Beach 714-596-3456
WESTMINSTER 10
TEENAGE MUTANT NINJA TURTLES: OUT OF
THE SHADOWS C 11:55, 2:30, 5:00, 7:30, 10:00
ALICE THROUGH THE LOOKING GLASS B
12:45, 3:45, 6:30, 9:10
X-MEN: APOCALYPSE C 9:00 PM
THE ANGRY BIRDS MOVIE B 11:40, 2:00, 4:20, 6:40
THE NICE GUYS E 12:00, 2:45, 5:30, 8:15
THE JUNGLE BOOK IN DISNEY DIGITAL 3D B
2:20, 4:50, 7:20, 9:50
THE JUNGLE BOOK B 11:50 AM
6721 Westminster Ave.
714-893-4222
$5.50 All Day Sunday (Not Applicable in 3D)
GHOSTBUSTERS C 11:35, 12:30, 1:30, 4:25, 6:20,
7:20, 9:15, 10:15
GHOSTBUSTERS IN 3D C 3:25 PM
THE INFILTRATOR E 12:45, 3:45, 6:45, 9:50
MIKE AND DAVE NEED WEDDING DATES E
12:20, 2:50, 5:15, 7:40, 10:20
THE SECRET LIFE OF PETS B 11:30, 1:00, 2:00,
3:30, 4:30, 5:30, 6:00, 7:00, 8:30, 9:30
THE LEGEND OF TARZAN C 1:40, 4:35, 7:15, 10:00
THE PURGE: ELECTION YEAR E 12:00, 2:40, 5:20,
7:50, 10:20
INDEPENDENCE DAY: RESURGENCE C 2:20, 8:00
FINDING DORY B 11:40, 2:10, 4:40, 7:10, 9:40
SAN JUAN CAPISTRANO
26762 Verdugo Street
949-661-3456
ENJOY BEER & WINE IN ALL AUDITORIUMS
$6.00 All Day Tuesday (Not Applicable in 3D & VIP)
GHOSTBUSTERS C 9:15 PM
GHOSTBUSTERS - VIP SEATING C 1:00, 4:00,
7:00, 9:45
THE SECRET LIFE OF PETS B 11:30, 1:00, 2:00,
3:30, 4:30, 6:00, 7:00, 8:15
THE LEGEND OF TARZAN C 1:30, 4:15, 6:45, 9:30
HISTORIC LIDO THEATER
3459 Via Lido at Newport Blvd.
949-673-8350
THE SECRET LIFE OF PETS B (2:00, 4:30), 7:00
SOUTH COAST VILLAGE 3
At South Coast Plaza/Sunflower & Plaza Dr. 714-557-5701
HUNT FOR THE WILDERPEOPLE C (11:45, 2:30,
5:00), 7:30, 9:55
OUR LITTLE SISTER B (12:00, 3:15), 6:30, 9:15
ZERO DAYS C (2:00 PM)
OUR KIND OF TRAITOR E (11:30, 4:45), 9:55
INVASION OF THE BODY SNATCHERS (1956) B 7:30 PM
Bargain Showtimes in ( )
EAST LOS ANGELES
COMMERCE 14
Goodrich & Whittier
323-726-8022
$5.50 All Day Tuesday (Not Applicable in 3D)
GHOSTBUSTERS C (11:10, 2:00, 4:50), 7:40, 10:30
GHOSTBUSTERS (SPANISH SUBTITLES) C
(12:10, 3:00, 5:50), 8:40
LUCHA MEXICO (DUBBED IN SPANISH) I (2:10), 7:20
LUCHA MEXICO (ENGLISH SUBTITLES) I (11:35,
4:45), 10:00
THE INFILTRATOR E (12:55, 3:55), 6:55, 9:50
MIKE AND DAVE NEED WEDDING DATES E
(11:50, 2:25, 5:00), 7:35, 10:10
THE SECRET LIFE OF PETS B (10:30, 11:30, 1:05,
3:30, 4:30), 6:00, 8:30, 9:30
THE SECRET LIFE OF PETS
(DUBBED IN SPANISH) B (11:00, 1:30, 2:05, 4:00),
6:30, 7:00, 9:00
THE BFG B (3:55), 9:40
THE BFG (SPANISH SUBTITLES) B (1:00), 6:45
THE LEGEND OF TARZAN C (12:15, 3:00, 5:40), 8:25
THE LEGEND OF TARZAN
(SPANISH SUBTITLES) C (11:30, 2:00, 4:40), 7:25, 10:10
THE PURGE: ELECTION YEAR E (11:40, 5:00), 10:20
THE PURGE: ELECTION YEAR
(SPANISH SUBTITLES) E (2:20), 7:40
INDEPENDENCE DAY: RESURGENCE C (1:10), 7:05
INDEPENDENCE DAY: RESURGENCE
(SPANISH SUBTITLES) C (4:10), 10:05
FINDING DORY B (1:10), 6:30
FINDING DORY (SPANISH SUBTITLES) B (10:35,
3:50), 9:10
562-804-5615
FREE STATE OF JONES E (12:40, 4:00), 7:10
WARCRAFT C (12:10, 3:30), 6:40, 9:40
ALICE THROUGH THE LOOKING GLASS B
(11:50, 2:30, 5:10), 7:40, 10:10
THE ANGRY BIRDS MOVIE 3D B (11:40, 2:20,
4:40), 7:20, 10:00
THE ANGRY BIRDS MOVIE B (3:40 PM)
NEIGHBORS 2: SORORITY RISING E (12:20, 2:50),
8:00, 10:15
BARBERSHOP: THE NEXT CUT C (12:00, 5:00), 10:30
THE JUNGLE BOOK B (11:30, 2:10, 4:50), 7:30, 10:20
BATMAN V SUPERMAN: DAWN OF
JUSTICE C 6:45, 10:05
ZOOTOPIA B (11:20, 1:50, 4:30), 7:00, 9:50
SAN FERNANDO VALLEY
GRANADA HILLS 9
16830 Devonshire Street
818-363-3679
GHOSTBUSTERS C (10:50, 1:40), 4:30, 6:00, 7:20,
9:00, 10:10
THE INFILTRATOR E (12:50, 3:50), 7:10, 10:00
MIKE AND DAVE NEED WEDDING DATES E
(11:40, 2:20), 5:00, 7:40, 10:20
THE SECRET LIFE OF PETS B (11:20, 12:10, 1:00,
1:50, 2:40, 3:30), 4:20, 5:20, 7:00, 8:00, 9:30, 10:30
THE LEGEND OF TARZAN C (11:10, 2:10), 4:50,
7:30, 10:15
THE PURGE: ELECTION YEAR E (11:50, 2:30), 5:10,
7:50, 10:40
FINDING DORY B (11:00, 1:30), 4:10, 6:50, 9:40
PLANT 16
7876 Van Nuys Blvd.
818-779-0323
GHOSTBUSTERS C (12:00, 1:40, 2:40, 3:25), 5:25,
6:05, 7:05, 8:05, 10:45
GHOSTBUSTERS - DBOX SEATING C (1:40), 7:05
GHOSTBUSTERS IN 3D C (11:00), 4:25, 9:45
GHOSTBUSTERS IN 3D - DBOX SEATING C
(11:00), 4:25, 9:45
LUCHA MEXICO I (11:35, 2:05), 4:35, 7:15, 9:50
THE INFILTRATOR E (10:55, 1:50), 4:40, 7:35, 10:30
MIKE AND DAVE NEED WEDDING DATES E
(11:45, 2:25), 5:10, 7:40, 10:15
THE SECRET LIFE OF PETS 3D B (10:30), 6:00
THE SECRET LIFE OF PETS B (11:30, 1:00, 2:00,
3:30), 4:30, 6:55, 8:25, 9:30
THE BFG B (10:45, 1:30), 4:20, 7:20, 10:10
THE LEGEND OF TARZAN C (11:40, 12:40, 2:15,
3:15), 4:55, 5:55, 7:30, 8:30, 10:05
THE PURGE: ELECTION YEAR E (12:05, 1:35, 2:35),
5:15, 7:50, 9:35, 10:20
INDEPENDENCE DAY: RESURGENCE C (12:35), 9:10
THE SHALLOWS C (12:45, 2:55), 5:05, 7:25, 9:40
CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE C (11:50, 2:30), 5:20,
8:00, 10:40
FINDING DORY B (10:35, 11:05, 1:05, 3:35), 4:15, 6:10,
7:00, 8:40
“Locally Owned, Proudly Operated”
SAN FERNANDO VALLEY
VALLEY PLAZA 6
6355 Bellingham Ave.
818-760-8400
$1.75 Sun. & Tue! (All 2D Movies, All Day!)
WARCRAFT C 5:00, 7:45, 10:30
ALICE THROUGH THE LOOKING GLASS B
12:30, 3:30, 7:10, 9:50
THE ANGRY BIRDS MOVIE 3D B 11:50, 2:20, 4:40,
7:00, 9:20
VENTURA COUNTY
BUENAVENTURA 6
1440 Eastman Ave. at Telephone Rd. 805-658-6544
All Seats $3.50 • $1.50 Surcharge for 3D Movies
$1.00 All Day Tuesday - 3D Surcharge Applies
WARCRAFT C 7:00 PM
ME BEFORE YOU C 11:20, 2:10, 4:50, 7:40, 10:15
TEENAGE MUTANT NINJA TURTLES: OUT OF
THE SHADOWS C 11:10, 1:50, 4:20, 7:20, 9:50
NEIGHBORS 2: SORORITY RISING E 12:10, 2:30, 9:30
ALICE THROUGH THE LOOKING GLASS B
THE NICE GUYS E 1:00, 4:00, 7:20, 10:00
11:40, 2:20, 5:00, 7:30, 10:05
THE JUNGLE BOOK B 11:30, 2:10, 4:50, 7:30, 10:10
X-MEN: APOCALYPSE C 12:30, 4:00, 10:00
ZOOTOPIA B 11:20, 1:50, 4:20, 6:50
THE ANGRY BIRDS MOVIE B 11:30, 2:00, 4:40, 7:10
CONEJO VALLEY
NEIGHBORS 2: SORORITY RISING E 9:40 PM
THE JUNGLE BOOK B 11:00, 1:40, 4:10, 6:50, 9:30
AGOURA HILLS STADIUM 8
29045 Agoura Road
SAN GABRIEL VALLEY
818-707-9966
$6 Wednesday all day for all 2D films
(upcharge for DBOX & 3D)
Now Offering Reserved Seating
GHOSTBUSTERS - DOLBY ATMOS C (11:20,
2:10, 4:50), 7:30, 10:15
ACADEMY CINEMAS 6
1003 E. Colorado Blvd
626-229-9400
All Seats $2.00 before 6pm • $1.00 All Beef Hot Dogs
FREE STATE OF JONES E (12:40, 4:00), 7:10, 10:15
GHOSTBUSTERS - DBOX SEATING DOLBY ATMOS C (11:20, 2:10, 4:50), 7:30, 10:15
WARCRAFT C 7:00, 9:50
GHOSTBUSTERS C 8:30 PM
THE SHADOWS C (11:20, 2:00, 4:40), 7:20, 10:00
TEENAGE MUTANT NINJA TURTLES: OUT OF
THE INFILTRATOR E (11:00, 1:50, 4:45), 7:40, 10:30
ALICE THROUGH THE LOOKING GLASS B
MIKE AND DAVE NEED WEDDING DATES E
(12:00, 2:30), 5:10, 7:50, 10:20
(11:30, 2:15, 4:50), 7:40, 10:20
THE SECRET LIFE OF PETS B (11:45, 1:10, 2:20,
3:30, 4:40), 6:15, 7:15, 9:40
THE NICE GUYS E (11:40, 2:20, 5:10), 7:50, 10:30
THE LEGEND OF TARZAN C (11:10, 1:40, 4:10),
7:20, 9:50
OUR KIND OF TRAITOR E (11:15, 1:45, 4:30), 7:10
THE ANGRY BIRDS MOVIE B (11:50, 2:10, 4:30)
THE JUNGLE BOOK B (12:00, 2:30, 5:00), 7:30, 10:10
FOOTHILL CINEMA 10
854 E. Alosta Ave. at Citrus
FINDING DORY B (11:05, 1:30, 4:00), 6:30, 9:00
WESTLAKE VILLAGE TWIN
4711 Lakeview Canyon at Agoura Rd. 818-889-8061
HUNT FOR THE WILDERPEOPLE C (11:45, 2:15,
4:40), 7:30
THE INNOCENTS C (12:30, 3:45), 7:15
VENTURA COUNTY
PASEO CAMARILLO 3
390 N. Lantana at Daily
805-383-2267
626-334-6007
All Seats $6.50 before 5pm
CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE C 10:10 PM
GHOSTBUSTERS C (10:55, 1:40, 4:20), 7:15, 10:00
THE INFILTRATOR E (11:00, 1:50, 4:50), 7:40, 10:30
MIKE AND DAVE NEED WEDDING DATES E
(11:50, 2:20), 5:15, 7:45, 10:40
THE SECRET LIFE OF PETS B (10:50, 12:15, 1:10,
2:30, 3:30, 4:45), 5:45, 7:00, 8:00, 9:15, 10:15
THE BFG B (1:15, 4:15), 7:10, 10:05
THE LEGEND OF TARZAN C (11:10, 1:45, 4:30),
7:20, 9:55
THE PURGE: ELECTION YEAR E (12:30, 3:00), 5:30,
HUNT FOR THE WILDERPEOPLE C (11:15, 1:55, 4:35)
8:05, 10:35
THE INNOCENTS C (11:00, 1:40, 4:20), 7:00
INDEPENDENCE DAY: RESURGENCE C (1:55), 7:30
TICKLED E (11:30, 2:10, 4:50), 7:30
CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE C (11:15, 4:40), 10:25
LOL COMEDY NIGHT I 7:30 PM
FINDING DORY B (12:00, 2:40), 5:10, 7:50, 10:20
Showtimes for July 20
LOS ANGELES TIMES
CALENDAR
WEDNESDAY, JULY 20, 2016
VITTORIO
GRIGÒLO
TUE / JUL 26 / 7:30 PM
Alberto Meoli Conductor
WITH ORCHESTRA
GET YOUR
TICKETS TODAY!
310.434.3200
thebroadstage.com
Superstar tenor Vittorio Grigòlo returns to
The Broad Stage in a summer concert featuring
Italian and French arias with orchestra conducted
by Alberto Meoli. Experience Vittorio’s “worldclass voice and star power” (Los Angeles Times) and
“relentless energy” (The New York Times) that have
critics raving across the globe.
Celebrity Opera
Series at The Broad
Stage supported by
a generous gift from
Lloyd E. Rigler –
Lawrence E. Deutsch
Foundation
Photograph by Alessandro Dobici
TICKETS: $180/$150/$80
Follow us @TheBroadStage
SANTA MONICA COLLEGE PERFORMING ARTS CENTER
BOOK BY
MUSIC BY
LYRICS BY
DOUG WRIGHT SCOTT FRANKEL MICHAEL KORIE
BASED ON THE FILM GREY GARDENS
by DAVID MAYSLES, ALBERT MAYSLES, ELLEN HOVDE, MUFFIE MAYER AND SUSAN FROEMKE
DIRECTED BY
MICHAEL WILSON
“Astounding performances.”
– don grigware, broadway world
“Heart-wrenching performance
with enduring emotional resonance…
an outstanding showcase for Rachel York
backed by the legendary Betty Buckley.”
“This is a revival that
no musical lover will
want to miss!
–jordan riefe, the hollywood reporter
York and Buckley are divine.”
– charles mcnulty, los angeles times
Rachel York and Betty Buckley. Photo by Craig Schwartz.
Limite
ed Engagement! Thru Aug 14 ONLY
AHMANSON THEATRE | DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES
CenterrTheatreGroup.org | 213.972.4400 |
E5
E6
W E D N E S DAY, J U LY 20 , 2 016
L AT I ME S . CO M / CA L EN DA R
C O M IC - C ON I N TE R NAT I O NA L
Fans of the fantastic flock to San Diego
[Comic-Con, from E1]
glimpses
of
“Justice
League,” “Doctor Strange”
and “Fantastic Beasts and
Where to Find Them.” For
the studios and TV networks, it’s an opportunity to
stoke enthusiasm for their
upcoming wares among a
diehard crowd of true believers and potential influencers.
As with last year, a few big
players will be missing in action: 20th Century Fox —
which brought 6,000-odd
fans in the convention’s fabled Hall H to their feet last
year with its early look at
“Deadpool” — is sitting this
year out, reportedly over
concerns about piracy. Ditto
Universal Pictures.
Paramount and Sony
won’t be putting on major
panels either, though the
former will be hosting the
premiere of its new film
“Star Trek Beyond” and the
latter will offer a screening of
its R-rated animated comedy “Sausage Party.” And,
barring any surprises, Lucasfilm — the 800-pound gorilla at last year’s convention
— will keep its “Star Wars”
franchise powder dry this
year following last week’s
Star Wars Celebration convention in London.
That will leave the two behemoths of the comic-book
world, DC and Marvel, to
slug it out in the battle for
buzz while also providing a
chance for films that may
otherwise have become lost
in the shuffle — like Luc Besson’s sci-fi epic “Valerian
and the City of a Thousand
Planets” and Oliver Stone’s
“Snowden” — to grab a piece
of the spotlight.
In its two-hour panel Saturday morning, Warner
Bros. will try to move past
the disappointment of this
spring’s critically bashed
“Batman
v
Superman:
Dawn of Justice” and stir up
excitement for its future
slate of DC superhero films,
including “Suicide Squad”
and possibly debut footage
Photographs by
Kirk McKoy Los Angeles Times
2015 COMIC-CON fans included, clockwise top left, Garrett Cipperly as Thor, Isabel Armas and Mason Coyle
as Deadpool, Jennifer Adams as Harley Quinn with baby Anna as the Joker, and Jesse Horton as Ultron.
from “Wonder Woman” and
“Justice League.”
“Suicide Squad” director
David Ayers, who earned a
raucous reception at last
year’s convention when he
unveiled an early look from
the edgy supervillain teamup film, is well aware that the
expectations have been
raised for the movie, which
opens Aug. 5.
“The film was sort of the
redheaded stepchild of the
DC universe — it was always
supposed to be like the
cooler little brother to your
Batmans and your other
shows,” said Ayer, who will
be on hand with the film’s
stars, including Will Smith,
Jared Leto and Margot Robbie. “Suddenly it became a
lot more prominent than I
think any of us expected initially.”
Warner Bros. will also offer sneak peeks at noncomic-book fare, including
“King Arthur: Legend of the
Sword” and “Fantastic
Beasts and Where to Find
Them,” a spinoff from the
Harry Potter franchise set to
hit theaters in December.
For “Fantastic Beasts”
director David Yates, who
helmed the last four Potter
films, Comic-Con will offer
the chance to pull the curtain back more on the new
J.K. Rowling-scripted film,
about which little has yet
been revealed beyond a
teaser trailer.
“This is a very different
part of the Potter universe —
it’s new characters and
brand-new stories,” Yates
said. “It’s like going to a
restaurant that you absolutely love, but it’s a different
meal.”
On Saturday afternoon,
Marvel Studios — which
skipped Comic-Con last
year in favor of Disney’s D23
convention in Anaheim —
will pull out its own big guns
in Hall H. While there has
been no official word about
what will be showcased or
who the panel’s “special
guests” may be, Marvel Studios President Kevin Feige is
expected to show off “Doctor
Strange” starring Benedict
Cumberbatch, while director James Gunn has teased
that he may unveil an early
look at “Guardians of the
Galaxy 2.”
Pacific Symphony’s
SUMMER FESTIVAL 2016
Though big-screen tentpole fare hogs much of the
spotlight, Comic-Con is
about more than comicbook movies and sci-fi epics.
TV has a push into the convention in recent years, and
2016 will be no exception. Fan
favorites like “The Walking
Dead,” “Supergirl” and
“Game of Thrones” will be
on hand, as will newer smallscreen fare like “Marvel’s
Luke Cage,” which hits Netflix in September.
Writer and producer Bryan Fuller, who has a new
“Star Trek” series in the
works, will join “Trek” veterans like William Shatner,
Scott Bakula and Michael
Dorn in a panel celebrating
the 50th anniversary of the
space-adventure franchise.
Fuller will also be unveiling
the Starz fantasy drama series “American Gods,” which
he co-created and which is
based on a bestselling novel
by fan favorite Neil Gaiman,
who will also be on hand.
“I’m excited to be in a
room full of Neil Gaiman
fans,” Fuller said. “It’s always fascinating because
Comic-Con is just like being
shot out of a cannon. You
don’t quite know when your
feet are touching the
ground.”
And for those who can’t
make it to San Diego this
year, the official convention
streaming service, ComicCon HQ, launches this year
with a new video initiative.
Classic Comic-Con experiences such as the Eisner
Awards (hosted by John
Barrowman), the Masquerade and the Her Universe
fashion show will all be livestreamed from Comic-Con
HQ.
And a select number of
panels, such as “Game of
Thrones” and “Silicon Valley,” will be available for
streaming at some point after they wrap up.
Still, for longtime ComicCon veterans like actor
Bruce Campbell, who will be
touting the upcoming second season of his Starz comedy-horror series, “Ash vs
Evil Dead,” there is nothing
quite like being there.
“Ten or 15 years ago, nobody cared about these conventions — they were for actors who weren’t working
anymore,” Campbell said.
“Finally, the studios realized
the depth of the fandom
that’s out there, the intensity that it is. I laugh at all the
big actors who come to
Comic-Con now. Now, you’ll
get Harrison Ford. I go,
‘Where were you 10 years
ago?’ ”
[email protected]
latimes.com
Times staff writer Meredith
Woerner contributed to this
report.
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ART
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Sat. July 23 • 8 p.m. • Irvine Meadows Amphitheatre
Gates open at 6 p.m. for picnicking
Carl St.Clair, conductor
Pacific Chorale — John Alexander, artistic director
COPLAND: Fanfare for the Common Man
BARBER: Adagio for Strings
WILLIAMS: Liberty Fanfare; Hymn to the Fallen
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Discussion / Book Signing
Wednesday, July 27th, 7PM
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The comedian and former MTV VJ reflects
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Event is $75 and includes admission to the Festival of Arts
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L AT I ME S . CO M / CA L EN DA R
W E D N E SDAY , J U LY 20 , 2 016
E7
COMI C-CO N I N T E RNAT I ONA L
He helped comics fest
turn a page and expand
[Walker, from E1]
terms of fandom.”
Some believe, though,
that the mating of these two
worlds has created a beast
much too beholden to the
Hollywood bottom line.
“Jeff brought movies to
Comic-Con to fit comic book
tastes,” said Len Wein, a
comic book writer and editor
known for creating Marvel’s
Wolverine and DC Comics’
Swamp Thing and editing
DC’s seminal series “Watchmen.” “But now [the convention is] this science-fiction
fantasy show that acknowledges comic books. That’s
because of Hollywood studio
money and power. I think
there’s friction here and
there between the studios
and the cons.” He added, “I
call Comic-Con the Bataan
death march with Wookiees.”
More than 130,000 fans
are expected to attend this
week’s convention, a universe vastly different than it
was in 1970 when Shel Dorf,
Ken Krueger, Richard Alf
and others gathered in a hotel basement for what was
called San Diego’s Golden
State Comic-Con.
Since showing “Star
Wars” slides on a wall,
Comic-Con has welcomed
Tim Burton’s “Batman”; the
growth of the Internet; the
“Twilight” franchise, which
brought more women into
Comic-Con; global fervor for
the video game industry; a
television renaissance that
delivered “The Walking
Dead” and “Game of
Thrones”; the rise of virtual
reality; and a new wave of independent horror and sci-fi
films such as Shane Carruth’s “Pri-mer.” As ComicCon goes, so goes entertainment.
Not always. When Walker
moved to Los Angeles in 1968
to be an actor, the founding
of Comic-Con, which opens
Wednesday at the San Diego
Convention Center, was still
two years away. He landed
bit parts in “Panic in Needle
Park” and “Bob & Carol &
Ted & Alice.” A man who
loved Edgar Allan Poe as
much as reggae, Walker
started writing music reviews for $35 a pop at
publications like Phonograph Record Magazine and
Cashbox. He was editor of
Music World, where he met
rising talents like Cameron
Crowe, who wrote for him
before moving on to Rolling
Stone.
The game changes
By the early 1970s, young
filmmakers such as Steven
Spielberg and George Lucas
— who were shaped in an era
of cheesy ray-gun space
movies, threats of the atomic annihilation, the Beatles,
Rod Serling and Ray Bradbury — were trying to make
sense of a world shaken by
the Vietnam War and civil
rights movements.
Walker kept up his music
reviews and later went to
work for record labels, including handling national
publicity for Island Records,
where he learned the intricacies of different fan communities, which would lead to
his marketing ventures in
commingling science fiction,
comics and movies.
He traveled to conventions across the country and
met Charles Lippincott, a
publicist for Alfred Hitchcock who worked for Lucas
in 1976. “He was my mentor,”
Walker said of Lippincott.
“He was the first person to
show ‘Star Wars’ slides at
conventions. That was the
beginning.”
Walker, who would later
market films for Warner
Bros. and Spielberg’s Amblin Entertainment, including “Gremlins” and “Back to
the Future II,” advanced
Lippincott’s strategy by
bringing to conventions
movie trailers and 16-millimeter featurettes to give
fans
behind-the-scenes
glimpses of films such as
“Outland” and “Blade Runner.”
The conventions in those
days were populated by gaggles of mostly white guys
holding boxes of comic
books and speaking in nerd
while pondering light-years
and the predilections of
monsters and robots.
“Jeff is the guy who really
put it together by knowing
the needs of the magazines
and knowing the conventions,” said David McDonnell, editor of the now-defunct science fiction magazine Starlog, founded in 1976
to capitalize on the flowering
“Star Trek” fandom. “He
was well connected in the
movie industry. He brought
Tom Cruise to the Denver
science fiction convention to
promote ‘Interview With a
Vampire.’ He brought Francis Ford Coppola to a convention for ‘Bram Stoker’s
Dracula.’ This electrified audiences.”
Walker also cofounded
Thinking Cap Co., which
had licensing rights to
create replicas of caps and
insignias for “Alien,” “The
Empire Strikes Back” and
many other movies.
“Comic-Con embraced it
all,” he said. “You could see
the growth of geek culture. It
was obvious.” He added that
today’s science fiction and
comic book fans have a respect for “the fathers of the
genre that you don’t see in
other areas except rock ’n’
roll. These are the groups
that imagine things and
make them real.”
His hair gray and his
manner soft, Walker, who
once introduced science fiction writer Philip K. Dick to
“Blade Runner” director
Ridley Scott, ambled into his
office the other day. It was a
small, messy kingdom, like a
library out of “The League of
Extraordinary Gentlemen.”
Filled with statues, buttons,
photographs, the room
spoke to more than half a
century’s pop culture fantasies, stretching from Betty
Page to three-headed dragons to Supergirl to an original 2002 movie poster — later reedited — that showed
the World Trade Center towers gleaming in SpiderMan’s eyes.
But like all good makebelieve settings there was a
flash of incongruity, a huge,
gold-framed pre-Raphaelite-style pastoral painting
that hung square center
over it all. Walker smiled as if
to suggest that a man, even a
sci-fi geek, contains untold
dimensions. He turned to
another wall. “This is one of
my favorites,” he said, pointing past a picture of Serling
to an old newspaper ad that
read: “Civilization Inventory
Clearance. Everything Must
Go.”
Persistence of ideas
Which brings us back, not
so incongruously, to that
galaxy in New York in that
shudder-to-think-about-it
time before special effects.
Walker’s father, who had
flown bombing missions
over Nazi Germany, and his
mother, who was Miss Illinois in 1946, heard that psychologists and the government believed comic books
were bad for a child’s mind.
His mother trashed his collection. But he still had TV
and old films like “Abbott
and Costello Meet Frankenstein.”
“That movie,” he said,
“was an early meta-merging
of genres.”
jeffrey.fleishman
@latimes.com
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Photographs by
A most charming ‘Sense’
[‘Sensibility,’ from E1]
a series of singing postcards
of Devonshire and London.
But Gordon’s latest crack at
musicalizing Austen captivated me with its modest
charm and wit.
Austen’s fictional worlds
have proved remarkably
malleable, lending themselves to a wide range of
dramatic treatments, from
fizzy rom-coms (“Clueless,”
“Bridget Jones’s Diary”) to
pop
cultural
infusions
(“Pride and Prejudice and
Zombies”) to the more traditional BBC fare.
But the author’s episodic
storytelling is better suited
to film and television than
the stage. Too often in the
theater, Austen seems miniaturized and commodified
— “Pride and Prejudice”
converted into the theatrical
equivalent of a tourist shop
tea cozy.
This
production
of
“Sense and Sensibility,” directed by Barbara Gaines,
succeeds within a narrow
compass. More of a chamber
piece than a Broadway-scale
offering, the musical is impressive less as an independent work of musical theater
than as an artfully efficient
and occasionally highly
clever adaptation.
The show, which had its
world premiere last year at
Chicago Shakespeare Theater, economizes Austen’s
plot with a frugality that
might seem unnecessarily
severe. But the aggressive
pruning keeps the work theatrically lithe and buoyant.
The story moves at a
pleasant clip on a set by Kevin Depinet that makes use of
only minimal furnishings
and scenery. Unlike the 1995
Ang Lee film version that
starred Emma Thompson,
who won an Oscar for her
screenplay, this production
doesn’t dazzle us with Eng-
‘Sense and
Sensibility’
Where: Old Globe Theatre,
1363 Old Globe Way,
Balboa Park, San Diego
When: 7 p.m. TuesdaysWednesdays, 8 p.m.
Thursdays-Fridays, 2 and 8
p.m. Saturdays, 2 and 7
p.m. Sundays. Ends Aug.
14.
Tickets: Start at $39
Info: (619) 234-5623,
www.theoldglobe.org
Running time: 2 hours, 30
minutes
WAYNE WILCOX as Edward Ferrars woos Sharon
Rietkerk as Elinor Dashwood in Jane Austen’s play.
lish countryside.
The action appears to
take place indoors, in that
magical circle of theatrical
storytelling, even when set
on a rainy knoll. The focus is
entirely on the talkative
characters, who are lustrously enveloped by Donald
Holder’s lighting design,
which creates stunning effects against a darkened
backdrop.
The tale of Elinor and
Marianne Dashwood, two affectionate sisters of opposing temperaments who
must learn to incorporate
personality aspects of the
other to realize their dreams
of love, is hard to resist even
if a touch schematic in
places.
Sharon Rietkerk plays
Elinor, the eldest and most
sensible sister, who keeps
the family’s financial and
emotional budgets in check.
Megan McGinnis portrays
Marianne, the far more romantic middle child who
values nothing so much as a
passionate sensibility. (The
sisters’ mother and youngest sibling have been jettisoned here to concentrate
our attention on the main
love plots.)
Romantic obstacles involving disparities of wealth
and previous attachments
create havoc for these marriageable young women,
whose lives have taken a difficult turn after the death of
their father.
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641-B Camino De Los Mares
949-661-SHOW (7469)
* GHOSTBUSTERS C (10:50, 1:40, 4:30), 7:20, 10:10
* GHOSTBUSTERS C F (3:45), 9:00
16DM2032
Liz Lauren Chicago Shakespeare Theater
MEGAN McGINNIS , left, and Sharon Rietkerk in a scene from “Sense and Sensibility” at the Old Globe.
REDLANDS
redlandS cineMa 14
340 N. Eureka St.
909-793-6393
* GHOSTBUSTERS C (10:30, 11:00, 1:15, 1:50,
4:00), 6:45, 7:20, 9:35
* GHOSTBUSTERS C F (11:30, 2:20, 5:10), 8:00
* GHOSTBUSTERS IN 3D C (4:35), 10:05
THE INFILTRATOR E (10:35, 1:30, 4:25), 7:20, 10:20
MIKE AND DAVE NEED WEDDING DATES E
(11:40, 2:25, 5:15), 7:50, 10:30
* THE SECRET LIFE OF PETS B (10:30, 11:20,
12:30, 1:00, 2:00, 3:00, 3:30, 4:30, 5:30), 6:30, 7:10,
7:55, 9:15, 9:55, 10:30
THE LEGEND OF TARZAN C (10:45, 1:40,
4:25), 7:05, 9:45
THE LEGEND OF TARZAN C F (11:35, 2:15,
5:05), 7:45, 10:30
THE PURGE: ELECTION YEAR E (11:25, 2:10,
4:50), 7:40, 10:20
INDEPENDENCE DAY: RESURGENCE C (1:45), 7:30
THE SHALLOWS C (10:50, 4:40), 10:25
CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE C (10:55, 1:35, 4:20),
7:35, 10:15
FINDING DORY B (10:40, 1:25, 4:05), 7:25, 9:55
MONROVIA
Monrovia cineMa 12 &
lfx
410 S. Myrtle Avenue
626-305-SHOW (7469)
LFX LARGE FORMAT EXPERIENCE
* GHOSTBUSTERS C DOLBY ATMOS
(10:25, 1:15, 4:05), 7:00, 9:45
* GHOSTBUSTERS C (10:55, 1:45, 4:50), 7:30,
9:00, 10:15
THE INFILTRATOR E (10:45, 1:35, 4:40), 7:35, 10:25
MIKE AND DAVE NEED WEDDING DATES E
(12:15, 2:45, 5:30), 8:00, 10:30
* THE SECRET LIFE OF PETS B (10:15, 11:30,
12:30, 1:55, 2:55, 4:20, 5:20), 6:45, 7:45, 10:10
* THE SECRET LIFE OF PETS B F (12:00, 2:25,
4:50), 7:15, 9:40
THE BFG B (10:20, 1:10, 4:00), 7:00, 9:50
THE LEGEND OF TARZAN C (10:50, 1:25,
4:10), 7:40, 10:15
THE PURGE: ELECTION YEAR E (11:50, 2:25,
5:00), 7:50, 10:30
INDEPENDENCE DAY: RESURGENCE C (1:30), 7:30
CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE C (11:00, 4:30), 10:10
FINDING DORY B (11:15, 2:00, 4:45), 7:10, 9:35
DOWNEY
doWney cineMa 10
8200 3rd St., Corner of 3rd St. and New Ave.
562-622-3999
* GHOSTBUSTERS C (11:00, 11:40, 1:50, 2:30,
4:40), 7:30, 8:05, 10:15
* GHOSTBUSTERS C F (10:05, 12:55, 3:45),
6:35, 9:25
* GHOSTBUSTERS IN 3D C (5:15), 10:45
MIKE AND DAVE NEED WEDDING DATES E F
(12:05, 2:35, 4:55), 7:45, 10:15
MIKE AND DAVE NEED WEDDING DATES E
(12:20, 2:50, 5:20), 7:50, 10:20
* THE SECRET LIFE OF PETS B (10:10, 10:50,
11:30, 12:30, 1:15, 1:55, 3:00, 3:40, 4:20, 5:25), 6:05,
7:00, 7:40, 8:30, 9:25, 10:05, 10:45
* THE SECRET LIFE OF PETS B F (11:00,
12:00, 1:20, 2:30, 5:00), 6:30, 7:30, 10:00
THE LEGEND OF TARZAN C (11:35, 2:10,
4:45), 7:25, 10:10
THE LEGEND OF TARZAN C (11:20, 2:10,
4:50), 7:40, 10:20
THE PURGE: ELECTION YEAR E (10:00, 12:20,
2:55, 5:20), 7:55, 10:35
FINDING DORY B (11:10, 1:50, 4:20), 7:00, 9:30
FINDING DORY B (11:20, 1:55, 4:25), 7:05, 9:35
*SPecial enGaGeMenT/no PaSSeS
TiMeS for WedneSday, July 20, 2016
Elinor’s relationship with
Edward Ferrars (Wayne
Alan Wilcox), the charmingly diffident brother of
Elinor’s snooty sister-in-law,
who has taken over the
family estate that the Dashwood girls’ half brother has
inherited, suffers a long and
anxiety-inducing interruption. This allows time for
Marianne’s entanglement
with the ardent if irresponsible Mr. Willoughby (Peter
Saide) as the wealthy, dour
and unimpeachably good
Col. Brandon (Sean Allan
Krill) longingly looks on.
No matter the adaptation, I always seem to favor
Elinor over Marianne, and
that is the case here. Rietkerk’s dignified reserve
makes a more lasting impression than McGinnis’
runaway ebullience, but that
is perhaps what Austen intended. Both actresses convey, in song as well as speech,
the distinctive qualities of
their agreeable characters.
If Wilcox’s Edward and
Krill’s Col. Brandon come off
better than Saide’s Willoughby, it needs to be said
that we aren’t meant to hold
Marianne’s libertine beau
permanently in our affections. Brian Ray Norris as
Lord Middleton, the sisters’
generous uncle who leases
the cottage on his estate to
them, and Paula Scrofano as
his gossipy mother-in-law,
Mrs. Jennings, provide delightful comic relief.
Gordon’s songs are never
narratively idle. They advance the plot even when introducing a character or
dwelling on a theme. Some
of the numbers can seem
dutifully expositional, but
there’s less musical hackwork in “Sense and Sensibility” than there was in his
“Emma.”
Col. Brandon’s “Wrong
Side of Five and Thirty” is especially winning, humorously playing up the problem Marianne has with this
in every way superior gentleman — his relatively advanced age. Also fine are Edward’s “Elinor” and Col.
Brandon’s “Lydia,” love ballads that linger in the memory longer than any of the
lilting tunes sung by the
sisters.
This may seem odd, but
these numbers assure us of
the capacity of these male
characters to love, thereby
strengthening the hope of a
happy ending for Elinor and
Marianne.
With so much discord
and chaos in the world today, it’s a relief to return to
Austen’s more orderly universe, where matters of personal happiness — all that
make life truly worth living
— are treated with the importance of grave national
affairs.
charles.mcnulty
@latimes.com
L AT I M E S. C OM / CA L EN DA R
W E D N E S DAY, J U LY 20 , 2 016
E9
Carin Baer USA
DANNY WOODBURN, right, in a scene from television’s “Monk” in 2007. With Traylor Howard as Natalie
and Tony Shalhoub as Monk. A study finds that disabled actors often have a difficult time landing roles.
Few roles for disabled actors
[Disabled, from E1]
around diversity in entertainment,” actor Danny
Woodburn, a coauthor of the
report, said in a statement.
“This off-balanced idea of diversity has led to policy and
even proposed legislation
that has excluded people
with disabilities. The Ruderman White Paper on Employment of Actors With
Disabilities in Television is
our attempt to bring perspective to inclusion, to reinforce access and an understanding of authenticity as
an expression of what true
diversity means and to finally let the least represented group in this medium
be heard.”
Woodburn (“Jingle All
the Way,” “Seinfeld” and
“Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles”), who as a little person
counts himself as a person
with a disability, co-wrote
the report with Kristina
Kopic, a specialist with the
Ruderman Foundation, an
internationally recognized
organization that advocates
for the inclusion of people
with disabilities.
Surveying hundreds of
actors with visible and nonvisible disabilities, they
found that a plurality of actors with disabilities worked
less than once a year and
were repeatedly subjected to
negative stigma and preconceived biases by casting
agents and producers. The
report also examined how
often actors with disabilities
appeared on the top 10 television shows of the 2015-16
season. The study looked at
31 shows, including streaming platforms, and found
that only four actors with
disabilities were cast, or less
than 2% of all actors on
screen.
Additionally, the study
cites GLAAD’s “Where Are
We on TV” report that noted
that characters with disabilities on broadcast programming dropped from 1.4% in
2014-15 to 0.9% the following
season. When taking into account that 95% of these few
roles are filled by ablebodied actors, the true extent of the misrepresenta-
tion is evident, the report
stated.
“Because of the widespread stigma in Hollywood
against hiring actors with
disabilities, we very rarely
see people with real disabilities on screen,” said Jay Ruderman, president of the
Ruderman Family Foundation. “This blatant discrimination against people
with disabilities not only is
fundamentally unfair ... it
also reinforces stigmas
against people with disabilities. By systematically casting able-bodied actors portraying characters with disabilities, Hollywood is hurting the inclusion of people
with disabilities in our country.”
Ruderman and Woodburn co-wrote a July 11 op-ed
for The Times titled “Why
Are We OK With Disability
Drag in Hollywood?,” in
which they outlined how the
industry could rectify this
situation.
“We don’t believe that every single character with a
disability needs to be played
by an actor with a disability,”
they wrote. “But if we’re going to employ Computer
Graphics and makeup to
create the illusion of disability, then we should also be
willing to do the reverse.”
They added: “Inequality
of self-representation matters on a real, human level.
We are not talking about
some obscure pursuit; we’re
talking about America’s No.
1 leisure activity. Studies
and polls have shown repeatedly that positive exposure to gay TV characters
sways audiences toward
greater acceptance and even
toward greater support for
same-sex marriage. Exposure to people with disabilities would have an equally
beneficial effect.”
The Ruderman Foundation intends to bring the major studio heads together
this fall in Los Angeles to discuss the report’s findings
and possible corrective measures.
trevell.anderson
@latimes.com
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INDEPENDENCE DAY: RESURGENCE (PG-13) Digital
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PRIME-TIME TELEVISION RATINGS
‘Talent’ wins out
over All-Star Game
City News Service
Viewership for Major
League Baseball’s All-Star
Game sank to a prime-time
record low opposite NBC’s
“America’s Got Talent,”
which was last week’s second-most watched primetime program.
Fox’s coverage of the
American League’s 4-2 victory over the National
League July 12 averaged
8.71 million viewers, finishing
third among prime-time
programs airing between
July 11 and Sunday, according to live-plus-same-day
figures released by Nielsen
on Tuesday.
The previous low was
10.9 million viewers for the
2012 game. The 2015 game
had drawn the secondsmallest viewership, 10.91
million viewers.
The All-Star Game had
set record lows in 10 of the 18
years from1995 through 2012.
Fox has carried the game
each year since 2001.
“America’s Got Talent,”
which ran opposite the first
one hour and 46 minutes of
the All-Star Game in most of
the nation, averaged 11.54
million viewers, second for
the week.
The two-hour Wednesday edition of “America’s
Got Talent” finished first for
the week, averaging11.85 million viewers.
An “America’s Got Talent” episode has been the
most-watched prime-time
program for four consecutive weeks and the mostwatched entertainment program all seven weeks that it
has aired this summer.
The
All-Star
Game
helped Fox to its mostwatched week since April 410, when its programming included the final episode of
“American Idol.”
However, its 3.31 million
average was not enough to
end what is now a 14-week
streak of fourth-place finishes among the major
broadcast networks.
14MEM358
Frank Gehry
Trae Patterson Associated Press
SOFIE DOSSI performs on the talent competition
“America’s Got Talent,” a popular show this summer.
Here are the combined rankings for national prime-time
network and cable television last week (July 11-17), as compiled by Nielsen. They are based on the average number of
people who watched a program from start to finish during
its scheduled telecast or on a playback device the same day.
Nielsen estimates there are 289 million potential viewers in
the U.S. ages 2 and older. Viewership is listed in millions.
Program
1 America’s Got
Talent (Wed.)
2 America’s Got
Talent (Tue.)
3 MLB All-Star
Game: American
League vs.
National League
4 60 Minutes
5 Celebrity Family
Feud (Sun. 8
p.m.)
Net- Viewwork
ers
NBC 11.85
NBC
11.54
FOX
8.71
CBS
ABC
8.17
7.77
--------------------------------------6 The Big Bang
Theory
7 $100,000
Pyramid (Sun.)
8 The Bachelorette
9 American Ninja
Warrior (Mon.)
10 The Night Shift
CBS
7.22
ABC
7.16
ABC
NBC
6.87
6.34
NBC
6.28
CBS
CBS
6.18
6.05
CBS
CBS
ABC
5.91
5.85
5.66
--------------------------------------11 Big Brother (Thu.)
12 Big Brother
(Wed.)
13 NCIS
14 Big Brother (Sun.)
15 Match Game
(Sun.)
--------------------------------------16 ESPY Awards
2016
17 Home Run Derby
18 Blue Bloods
19 NCIS: New
Orleans
20 To Tell the Truth
4.55
CBS
CBS
ABC
4.46
4.46
4.44
ABC
ABC
4.42
4.41
FOX
CBS
TNT
CBS
ABC
4.35
4.35
4.14
4.05
4.02
Dateline Classic
Scorpion
Maya & Marty
Major Crimes
The Kelly File
(Thu.)
NBC
CBS
NBC
TNT
Fox News
4.02
3.94
3.93
3.92
3.88
NBC
3.85
FOX
3.65
NBC
3.51
ABC
NBC
3.44
3.43
Fox News
3.42
CBS
CBS
3.39
3.31
USA
USA
3.24
3.23
Fox News
3.23
Fox News
3.22
Fox News
3.21
Fox News
NBC
3.16
3.14
---------------------------------------
53
54
55
56 Braindead
CBS
57 Match Game
ABC
(Thu.)
58 On the Record
Fox News
(Thu.)
59 Madam Secretary
CBS
60 WWE (8 p.m.)
USA
3.13
3.11
3.07
3.05
3.04
--------------------------------------61 Mistresses
ABC
62 Spartan: Ultimate
NBC
Team Challenge
(Thu. 8 p.m.)
The Kelly File
Fox News
(Wed.)
64 The Kelly File
Fox News
(Fri.)
65 So You Think Can
FOX
Dance
tour of Grand Avenue architectural landmarks led
by Hawthorne.
2.97
2.94
2.94
2.90
2.88
--------------------------------------66 Premios Juventud
UNI
2016
67 The Kelly File
Fox News
(Tue.)
68 American Gothic
CBS
69 Alaskan Bush
Discover
People
70 Love & Hip Hop:
VH1
Atlanta
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latimes.com/IdeasExchange
The O’Reilly
Factor (Wed.)
The O’Reilly
Factor (Fri.)
The O’Reilly
Factor (Mon.)
Hannity (Thu.)
Spartan: Ultimate
Team Challenge
(Thu. 9 p.m.)
---------------------------------------
options include a pre-event reception and a walking
#IdeasExchange
2.81
2.78
2.77
2.73
2.71
---------------------------------------
Presented in association with
2.63
CBS
FOX
2.50
2.37
--------------------------------------81 Por Siempre Joan
Sebastian (Mon.)
82 Por Siempre Joan
Sebastian (Wed.)
Por Siempre Joan
Sebastian (Tue.)
84 Home Free
85 Noche de
Estrellas
UNI
2.22
UNI
2.17
UNI
2.17
FOX
UNI
2.07
2.05
--------------------------------------86 Un Camino Cacia
el Destino (Wed.)
87 Tres Veces Ana
(Mon.)
People’s List
89 Un Camino Cacia
el Destino (Mon.)
Hollywood Game
Night
UNI
2.01
UNI
1.92
ABC
UNI
1.92
1.91
NBC
1.91
---------------------------------------
52
Christopher Hawthorne about the future of L.A. Ticket
Fox News
4.60
46 The O’Reilly
Factor (Tue.)
47 Criminal Minds
48 48 Hours (10
p.m.)
49 WWE (9 p.m.)
50 WWE (10 p.m.)
conversation with Los Angeles Times architecture critic
2.63
5.07
4.63
4.60
---------------------------------------
of his most acclaimed projects for a fascinating
Fox News
21 Life in Pieces
CBS
22 Mom
CBS
23 Celebrity Family
ABC
Feud (Tue.)
The O’Reilly
Fox News
Factor (Thu.)
25 NCIS: Los
CBS
Angeles
---------------------------------------
41 America’s Got
Talent (Fri.)
42 MasterChef
(Wed.)
43 Spartan: Ultimate
Team Challenge
(Mon.)
44 20/20 (Sat.)
45 Dateline
Join a master of contemporary architecture in one
2.64
5.15
---------------------------------------
111 S. Grand Ave., L.A.
NBC
ABC
37
38
39
40
The Music Center’s Walt Disney Concert Hall
American Ninja
Warrior (Sun.)
77 The Kelly File
(Mon.)
On the Record
(Fri.)
79 Elementary
80 Wayward Pines
---------------------------------------
91 Por Siempre Joan
Sebastian (Fri.)
92 Tres Veces Ana
(Wed.)
93 Aquarius
94 Un Camino Cacia
el Destino (Fri.)
95 Un Camino Cacia
el Destino (Tue.)
---------------------------------------
Mon., August 1
2.64
5.52
5.39
5.26
31 Bones
Code Black
33 Rizzoli & Isles
34 2 Broke Girls
35 $100,000
Pyramid (Tue.)
PHOTO / Los Angeles Times, Kirk McKoy, 7/27/2014
OWN
ESPN
CBS
CBS
---------------------------------------
The Music Center
75 The Haves and
the Have Nots
5.60
26 Hawaii Five-0
Zoo
28 Celebrity Family
Feud (Sun. 7
p.m.)
29 Greatest Hits
30 20/20 (Fri.)
presented in association with
Net- Viewwork
ers
ABC
---------------------------------------
in conversation with
Christopher Hawthorne
Program
The Making of
ABC
Star Wars: the
Force Awakens
72 What Would You
ABC
Do?
73 48 Hours (9 p.m.)
CBS
74 Hannity (Fri.)
Fox News
2.71
---------------------------------------
97
98
99
100
2.67
2.65
1.88
UNI
1.80
NBC
1.79
1.78
UNI
1.76
FOX
1.76
UNI
CBS
1.74
1.71
UNI
1.70
CBS
1.65
---------------------------------------
101 Family Guy
102 The Simpsons (8
p.m.)
Sal y Pimienta
104 Tres Veces Ana
(Fri.)
105 Aqui y Ahora
FOX
FOX
1.56
1.53
UNI
UNI
1.53
1.51
UNI
1.47
106 Penn & Teller:
Fool Us (Wed.)
107 Rosewood
108 Sueño de Amor
(Wed.)
109 2016 Nitro World
Games
110 MasterChef (Fri.)
CW
1.46
FOX
UNI
1.39
1.37
NBC
1.34
FOX
1.23
UNI
1.23
CW
1.23
---------------------------------------
---------------------------------------
Sueño de Amor
(Fri.)
Whose Line Is It
Anyway? (Wed. 9
p.m.)
113 The Simpsons (7
p.m.)
114 Bob’s Burgers
Sueño de Amor
(Mon.)
FOX
1.22
FOX
UNI
1.20
1.20
---------------------------------------
116 Crónicas de
Sábado
117 Brooklyn
Nine-Nine
(Encore)
118 Just For Laughs
119 Penn & Teller:
Fool Us (Fri.)
120 Sueño de Amor
(Tue.)
UNI
1.17
FOX
1.16
CW
CW
1.12
1.09
UNI
1.08
---------------------------------------
121 Whose Line Is It
Anyway? (Wed.
9:30 p.m.)
122 Masters of Illusion
(8 p.m.)
123 The Last Man on
Earth
124 Soccer: Club
America vs.
Jaguares de
Chiapas
125 Masters of Illusion
(8:30 p.m.)
CW
1.07
CW
1.05
FOX
1.00
UNI
0.97
CW
0.91
---------------------------------------
126 Whose Line Is It
Anyway? (Mon.)
127 The Flash
128 Containment
129 Beauty and the
Beast
Soccer: CF
Monterrey vs.
Puebla FC
CW
0.88
CW
CW
CW
0.78
0.78
0.71
UNI
0.71
--------------------------------------131 DC’s Legends of
Tomorrow
CW
0.68
Network averages
Here is the number of viewers (in millions) that
each network averaged per hour of prime time,
for last week and for the season.
Network
NBC
Last
week
4.88
Season
to date
7.71
-------------------------------------4.69
6.77
-------------------------------------CBS
4.44
9.91
-------------------------------------Fox
3.31
5.29
-------------------------------------UNI
1.82
2.08
--------------------------------------
ABC
2.69
Premier Boxing
Champions
Va Por Tí
Angel From Hell
(8 p.m.)
Tres Veces Ana
(Tue.)
Angel From Hell
(8:30 p.m.)
UNI
L AT I ME S . CO M / CA L EN DA R
W E D N E S DAY, J U LY 20 , 2 016
T V HIGH LI GHTS
Wednesday Prime-Time TV
SERIES
Penn & Teller: Fool Us Jesse
Eisenberg
performed
magic as his character in
the “Now You See Me”
movies, but how will he
fare in staging illusions
before the masters?8 p.m.
KTLA
Young & Hungry Gabi (Emily Osment) is thrilled, at
first, when Sofia (Aimee
Carrero) gets a chance to
write for a media entrepreneur (Ashley Tisdale,
reprising her recurring
guest role). 8 p.m.
Freeform
Baby Daddy Ben’s (JeanLuc Bilodeau) first date
with a new flame doesn’t
go well, so Riley and
Danny (Chelsea Kane,
Derek Theler) decide to
get involved and help resolve the couple’s obstacles. 8:30 p.m. Freeform
Wayward Pines An error
made by Jason (Tom
Stevens) could spell the
end of the human race. To
stop that, Theo and Xander (Jason Patric, Josh
Helman) try to overcome
differences and work together. 9 p.m. Fox
Suits Louis, Jessica and
Harvey (Rick Hoffman,
Gina Torres, Gabriel
Macht) fend off a class action lawsuit. Meanwhile,
still in prison, Mike (Patrick J. Adams) has no
choice but to run afoul of a
fellow prisoner. 9 p.m.
USA
Another Period As a very
nasty contagious disease
spreads at the Bellacourt
Mansion, Lillian (Natasha
Leggero) — not one to
mingle with the staff — is
horrified to end up
quarantined with the sick
servants. 10 p.m. Comedy
Central
Greenleaf Mac (Gregory
Alan Williams) wants
family members to help
Jacob (Lamman Rucker)
with his pitch to the
Bishop (Keith David) and
to prepare for an IRS audit. Merle Dandridge also
stars. 10 p.m. OWN
The A Word Following Joe’s
(Max
Vento)
autism
diagnosis, Paul, Alison
and Rebecca (Lee Ingleby,
Morven Christie, Molly
Wright) clash over how best to deal with his first
weeks at school. 10 p.m.
Sundance
V
Rory Mulvey Sundance
MAX VENTO stars as
Joe in the drama “The A
Word” on Sundance.
SPECIALS
Republican National Convention C-SPAN begins
its third day of coverage
with
a
preview
of
scheduled events, programs and speeches (8
a.m.), followed by live coverage (4 p.m.). Cable news
channels,
including
CNBC; CNN; Fox Business;
Fox
News;
Bloomberg and MSNBC,
will incorporate coverage
into their regular programming
and
as
breaking news. Special
programming will air on
PBS (5 p.m.), CBS, NBC
and ABC (7 p.m.).
The Bravos Andy Cohen
hosts this awards show
celebrating pop culture.
Erika Jayne performs;
Mariah Carey is honored.
10 p.m. Bravo
MOVIES
Hercules (1997) 8 a.m. Disney
One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest (1975) 8:40 a.m.
Cinemax
Guardians of the Galaxy
(2014) 3:05 p.m. Starz
TALK SHOWS
CBS This Morning Eric and
Donald Trump Jr., sons of
Donald Trump, (N) 7 a.m.
KCBS
Today Mila Kunis; countdown to Rio de Janeiro;
Dierks Bentley and Elle
King; NeedtoBreathe performs; rapper Jermaine
Dupri. (N) 7 a.m. KNBC
Good Morning America
Julianne Moore; Joanna
Lumley; Tracy Anderson.
(N) 7 a.m. KABC
Good Day L.A. Ashley Tisdale and Aimee Carrero;
Tom Stevens (“Wayward
Pines”). (N) 7 a.m. KTTV
GHOSTBUSTERS (PG-13) RESERVE XD 10, 4, 7
GHOSTBUSTERS (PG-13) RESERVE XD 1, 10
FINDING DORY (PG) RESERVE 10:45, 1:15, 3:45, 5:10, 9:50
FINDING DORY 3D (PG) RESERVE 9:40, 12:10, 2:40
CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE (PG-13) RESERVE 11:10, 1:55, 4:30, 7:05, 9:40
INDEPENDENCE DAY: RESURGENCE (PG-13) RESERVE 8, 10:45
THE SHALLOWS (PG-13) RESERVE 12:30, 5:50, 10:45
THE LEGEND OF TARZAN (PG-13) RESERVE 11:15, 1:55, 4:35, 7:15, 9:55
THE LEGEND OF TARZAN 3D (PG-13) RESERVE 9:50, 3:10, 8:10
THE BFG (PG) RESERVE 11, 1:50, 5, 7:50
THE PURGE: ELECTION YEAR (R) RESERVE 11:20, 2:10, 4:50, 7:30, 10:10, 10:40
THE SECRET LIFE OF PETS (PG) RESERVE 9:40, 10:15, 12:05, 2:30, 3:05, 4:55,
7:20, 7:55, 9:45, 10:20
THE SECRET LIFE OF PETS 3D (PG) RESERVE 11:20, 12:40, 1:40, 4, 5:30, 6:20,
8:40
V
The View Author Julianne
Moore. (N) 10 a.m. KABC
Wendy Williams Leslie
Jones (“Ghostbusters”);
chef Akhi (“Electric”). (N)
11 a.m. KTTV
The Talk Teresa Palmer;
Dave Coulier. (N) 1 p.m.
KCBS
Rachael Ray First Lady
Michelle Obama; Ayesha
Curry; chef Anne Burrell.
(N) 1 p.m. KABC
Steve Harvey Gun violence
in Chicago. (N) 2 p.m.
KNBC
The Dr. Oz Show Unsanitary restaurant conditions; freaky food facts.
(N) 2 p.m. KTTV
Real Time With Bill Maher
The Republican National
Convention:
Michael
Moore; Joy Reid; Dan Savage. (N) 8 and 11 p.m. HBO
Tavis Smiley Ralph Nader.
(N) 11 p.m. KOCE
Charlie Rose (N) 11 p.m.
KVCR; 11:30 p.m. KOCE
The Daily Show (N) 11 p.m.
Comedy Central
Conan Thomas Middleditch, Kumail Nanjiani and
Zach Woods. (N) 11 p.m.
TBS
The Nightly Show With
Larry Wilmore DeRay
Mckesson. (N) 11:30 p.m.
Comedy Central
The Tonight Show: Jimmy
Fallon Mila Kunis; Mike
Birbiglia; ASAP Mob performs. (N) 11:34 p.m.
KNBC
The Late Show With
Stephen Colbert The Republican National Convention. Tony Goldwyn;
Mark Cuban; Lewis Black;
Cory Kahaney; Wyclef
Jean. (N) 11:35 p.m. KCBS
Jimmy Kimmel Live Cara
Delevingne; Jeff Ross;
Culture Club performs.
(N) 11:35 p.m. KABC
The Late Late Show With
James Corden Aaron
Sorkin; Cheryl Hines;
Scott Speedman; Carpool
Karaoke with First Lady
Michelle Obama. (N) 12:37
a.m. KCBS
Late Night Taylor Schilling;
Dominic Cooper; Royal
Headache performs; Atom Willard performs. (N)
12:37 a.m. KNBC
Nightline (N) 12:37 a.m.
KABC
8 pm
CBS
FOX
KOCE
KDOC
KLCS
A&E
AMC
ANP
BBC
BET
Bravo
CNN
Com
Disc
Disn
E!
ESPN
Food
FNC
Free
FX
Hall
HGTV
Hist
IFC
Life
MSN
MTV
NGC
Nick
Ova
OWN
Spike
Sund
Syfy
TBS
TCM
TLC
TNT
Toon
Travel
Tru
TV L
USA
VH1
WGN
Cine
Encr
EPIX
HBO
For today’s sports on TV, see
the Sports section.
TMC
11:10
THE SECRET LIFE OF PETS (PG) RESERVE 9:30, 10:10, 12, 12:40, 2:30, 3:10, 5,
5:40, 7:30, 8:10, 10, 10:40
THE SECRET LIFE OF PETS 3D (PG) RESERVE REALD 3D 11, 1:30, 4, 6:30, 9
MIKE AND DAVE NEED WEDDING DATES (R) RESERVE 10:30, 1:10, 4:30,
7:10, 9:40
GHOSTBUSTERS (PG-13) RESERVE 10, 1, 7
GHOSTBUSTERS 3D (PG-13) RESERVE REALD 3D 4:10, 10:10
THE ACHY BREAKY HEARTS (NR) RESERVE 10:20, 1:20, 4:20, 7:20, 10:20
MIKE AND DAVE NEED WEDDING DATES (R) RESERVE 9:45, 12:15, 2:45,
guests vie for the power of
veto. (N) Å
MasterChef (TV14) Four
dishes purchased for $20 or
less. (N) Å
MyNt TMZ Live (TVPG) (N) Å
KVCR Vera (TVPG) Å
KCET Death in Paradise (TVG) Å
UNI
Un camino hacia el destino (N)
Show
FINDING DORY (PG) RESERVE 9:40, 12:10, 2:40, 5:10, 7:40, 10:30
CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE (PG-13) RESERVE 9:20, 12:20, 3:20, 6:20, 9:20
INDEPENDENCE DAY: RESURGENCE (PG-13) RESERVE 7:50, 10:50
THE LEGEND OF TARZAN (PG-13) RESERVE 10:50, 1:50, 4:50, 8, 11
THE LEGEND OF TARZAN 3D (PG-13) RESERVE REALD 3D 9:50, 12:50, 3:50
THE BFG (PG) RESERVE 10:40, 1:40, 5
THE PURGE: ELECTION YEAR (R) RESERVE 11:10, 2:10, 5:30, 6:50, 8:30, 9:50,
Big Brother (TVPG) House
9 pm
American Gothic (TV14)
5:15, 7:45, 10:15
V
W
V
GHOSTBUSTERS (PG-13) RESERVE
D-BOX 10:10, 1:05, 3:50, 6:35, 9:20
GHOSTBUSTERS 3D (PG-13) RESERVE
D-BOX REALD 3D 12:10, 2:55, 5:40, 8:25
FIGHT CLUB (R) 2, 7
FINDING DORY (PG) 11:20, 2, 4:40, 7:20, 10
THE CONJURING 2 (R) 12:45, 7:20
NOW YOU SEE ME 2 (PG-13) 4, 10:40
CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE (PG-13) 11:35, 2:20, 5, 7:40, 10:20
INDEPENDENCE DAY: RESURGENCE (PG-13) 4:15, 7:15
INDEPENDENCE DAY: RESURGENCE 3D (PG-13) REALD 3D 1:15, 10:15
FREE STATE OF JONES (R) 12:40, 7:25
THE SHALLOWS (PG-13) 12:10, 2:35, 5:05, 7:25, 10
COSÌ FAN TUTTE MET SUMMER ENCORE (NR) 7 P.M.
THE LEGEND OF TARZAN (PG-13) 11:25, 2:15, 3:35, 5, 7:45, 10:25
THE LEGEND OF TARZAN 3D (PG-13) REALD 3D 12:50 P.M.
THE BFG (PG) 11, 1:55, 4:45, 7:45, 10:35
THE PURGE: ELECTION YEAR (R) 11:45, 2:30, 5:15, 8, 10:45
THE SECRET LIFE OF PETS (PG) 11:30, 11:50, 12:10, 12:30, 1:50, 2:10, 2:30, 2:50,
4:15, 4:50, 5:10, 6:35, 6:50, 7:10, 7:30, 8:55, 9:30, 9:50
FIGHT CLUB (R) 2, 7
FINDING DORY (PG) 10, 11:20, 12:40, 3:20, 4:40, 7:20, 9:25
THE CONJURING 2 (R) 10:05 P.M.
CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE (PG-13) 10:30, 1:15, 4
INDEPENDENCE DAY: RESURGENCE (PG-13) 10:05, 1, 3:55, 6:55, 9:45
THE SHALLOWS (PG-13) 10:50, 1:50, 4:30, 7:10, 10
COSÌ FAN TUTTE MET SUMMER ENCORE (NR) 7 P.M.
THE LEGEND OF TARZAN (PG-13) 11:45, 2:25, 5:05, 7:45, 10:25
THE LEGEND OF TARZAN 3D (PG-13) REALD 3D 9:55 P.M.
THE BFG (PG) 10:40, 1:30, 4:15, 7:15
THE PURGE: ELECTION YEAR (R) 10:15, 1:20, 4:50, 7:50, 10:30
THE SECRET LIFE OF PETS (PG) 10:20, 11, 12:20, 1, 1:40, 3, 4:20, 5:45, 6:20, 7, 8:15,
9:40, 10:10, 10:35
THE SECRET LIFE OF PETS 3D (PG) REALD 3D 11:40, 2:20, 3:40, 5, 7:40, 9
MIKE AND DAVE NEED WEDDING DATES (R) 10:55, 1:35, 4:35, 7:35, 10:20
GHOSTBUSTERS (PG-13) 10:10, 1:05, 3:50, 6:35, 9:20
GHOSTBUSTERS 3D (PG-13) REALD 3D 12:10, 2:55, 5:40, 8:25
Starz
Life on the Reef (TVPG) Å
Law & Order: CI (TV14) Å
Masterpiece
Composers
Duck Dynasty Duck Dynasty
(TVPG) Å
(TVPG) Å
9:10, 10:30
7:40, 9, 10:25
GHOSTBUSTERS (PG-13) 11, 12:20, 3:05, 4:25, 5:50, 7:10, 8:35
GHOSTBUSTERS 3D (PG-13) REALD 3D 1:05, 1:40, 3:50, 6:35, 9:20, 9:55
THE INFILTRATOR (R) 1:20, 4:25, 7:25, 10:25
SWISS ARMY MAN (R) 4, 10:30
THE ACHY BREAKY HEARTS (NR) 11:05, 2, 4:55, 7:50, 10:40
GODHI BANNA SADHARANA MYKATTU (NR) 12, 3:15, 6:30, 9:45
V
GHOSTBUSTERS (PG-13) RESERVE XD 10, 1, 7
GHOSTBUSTERS (PG-13) RESERVE XD 4, 10
FINDING DORY (PG) RESERVE 10:40, 1:20, 4:10, 6:50, 9:30
THE CONJURING 2 (R) RESERVE 10:15 P.M.
CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE (PG-13) RESERVE 11:15, 2, 4:50, 8:10, 11:05
INDEPENDENCE DAY: RESURGENCE (PG-13) RESERVE 10:25, 1:25, 4:25,
7:20, 10:25
THE SHALLOWS (PG-13) RESERVE 10:10, 12:35, 3, 5:25, 7:50
THE LEGEND OF TARZAN (PG-13) RESERVE 10:50, 4:30, 9:55
THE LEGEND OF TARZAN 3D (PG-13) RESERVE 1:40, 7:10
THE PURGE: ELECTION YEAR (R) RESERVE 11:35, 2:20, 5:15, 8, 11:10
THE SECRET LIFE OF PETS (PG) RESERVE 10:15, 11, 12:45, 1:30, 3:15, 4:15,
5:45, 6:45, 8:15, 9:15, 10:45
THE SECRET LIFE OF PETS 3D (PG) RESERVE 11:45, 2:15, 5, 7:30, 10:10
MIKE AND DAVE NEED WEDDING DATES (R) RESERVE 10:05, 12:40, 3:10,
5:50, 8:20, 11
GHOSTBUSTERS (PG-13) RESERVE 11:30, 2:30, 5:30, 8:30, 11:25
GHOSTBUSTERS 3D (PG-13) RESERVE 10:45, 1:45, 4:45, 7:45, 10:45
THE INFILTRATOR (R) RESERVE 10:30, 1:35, 4:35, 7:40, 10:40
ShowtimeS Valid 07/20/16 ONLY
V
GHOSTBUSTERS (PG-13) RESERVE XD 4, 10
GHOSTBUSTERS 3D (PG-13) RESERVE XD 10, 1, 7
FIGHT CLUB (R) 2, 7
FINDING DORY (PG) 10:30, 1:15, 4, 6:45, 9:30
CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE (PG-13) 2, 4:50, 7:40, 10:30
INDEPENDENCE DAY: RESURGENCE (PG-13) 10:10, 10:25
THE SHALLOWS (PG-13) 10:15, 12:45, 3:15, 5:45, 8:15, 10:50
THE SANDLOT (PG) 10 A.M.
COSÌ FAN TUTTE MET SUMMER ENCORE (NR) 7 P.M.
THE LEGEND OF TARZAN (PG-13) 10:45, 1:35, 4:25, 7:25, 10:15
THE BFG (PG) 10:20, 1:25, 4:15
THE PURGE: ELECTION YEAR (R) 11:20, 2:10, 5, 7:50, 10:45
THE SECRET LIFE OF PETS (PG) 11, 11:55, 1:45, 2:40, 4:30, 5:25, 7:15, 8:10, 10,
10:55
THE SECRET LIFE OF PETS 3D (PG) REALD 3D 10:05, 12:50, 3:35, 6:20, 9:05
MIKE AND DAVE NEED WEDDING DATES (R) 11:45, 2:25, 5:05, 7:45, 10:25
GHOSTBUSTERS (PG-13) 11, 2, 5, 8, 11
GHOSTBUSTERS 3D (PG-13) REALD 3D 12, 3, 6, 9
THE INFILTRATOR (R) 10, 1:10, 4:20, 7:30, 10:40
News (N) Å
Mike & Molly
TMZ (TVPG)
Å
(TVPG) (N) Å (TVPG) (N) Å (TVPG) (N) Å (TVPG) (N) Å (TVPG) (N) Å
op oppose each other. Å
vice backfires. Å
tasks for the family. (N) Å
(TV14) Å
X2: X-Men United ››› (2003) Patrick Stewart, Hugh Jackman. (PG-13)
X-Men Origins
The Curious Case of Benjamin Button ››› (2008) (6:30) Å The A Word (TV14) (N) Å
2012 (2009) (5:30) (PG-13) Deep Impact ›› (1998) Robert Duvall, Tea Leoni. (PG-13) Å
Big Bang Å
Big Bang Å
Big Bang Å
Big Bang Å
Big Bang Å
Full Frontal (N) Conan (N) Å
Rio Bravo ››› (1959) John Wayne, Dean Martin. (7:30) Å Rio Lobo ›› (1970) John Wayne. (G) Å
My Big Fat Fabulous Life (N) Å My Big Fat Fabulous Life (N) Å I Am Jazz (TVPG) (N) Å
Fat Fabulous
Castle (TVPG) Å
Castle (TVPG) Å
Major Crimes (TVPG) Å
Major Crimes
King of the Hill Bob’s Burgers Bob’s Burgers Cleveland Show American Dad American Dad Family Guy Å
Expedition Unknown (TVPG) Expedition Unknown (N)
Expedition Unknown (TVPG) Expedition Å
Knockout
Knockout
Jokers (TV14) Jokers (TV14) Jokers (TV14) Jokers (TV14) Knockout
George Lopez George Lopez Raymond Å
Raymond Å
Raymond Å
Raymond Å
King of Queens
Law & Order: SVU (TV14)
Suits (TV14) A class action Mr. Robot (TV14) Elliot is determined to beat
Spousal Privilege. Å
lawsuit. (N) Å
Mr. Robot, but that proves difficult. (N) Å
Dating Naked (TV14)
Dating Naked (TV14) (N)
Dating Naked (TV14)
Barely Famous
How I Met Å How I Met Å How I Met Å How I Met Å How I Met Å How I Met Å Engagement Å
The Number 23 › (2007) Jim Carrey. (8:20) (R) Å
Outcast (TVMA) Å
Crimson Peak
Philadelphia ››› (1993) Tom Hanks. (7:50) (PG-13) Å
Survivor’s
Survivor’s
Ghost
Heist (2015) Jeffrey Dean Morgan. (R) Å
Serena (TV14) (9:45) Å
Bill Maher (N) Unfriended ›› (2014) (8:35) (R) Å
Wednesday
Ballers Å
Bill Maher Å
Zodiac ››› (2007) Jake Gyllenhaal. (7:15) (R) Å
Southpaw ›› (2015) Jake Gyllenhaal. (R) Å
22 Jump Street (7:05) (R) Å Power (TVMA) Å
The Night Before ›› (2015) (R) Å
Begin Again (2013) Keira Knightley, Mark Ruffalo. (R) Å
Happy Endings ›› (2005) Tom Arnold. (R)
V
GHOSTBUSTERS (PG-13) RESERVE XD 10, 4, 10
GHOSTBUSTERS (PG-13) RESERVE XD 1, 7
FIGHT CLUB (R) RESERVE 2, 7
FINDING DORY (PG) RESERVE 10:40, 1:25, 4:15, 7:10, 9:55
CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE (PG-13) RESERVE 10:55, 4:45, 10:20
INDEPENDENCE DAY: RESURGENCE (PG-13) RESERVE 10:55 P.M.
THE SHALLOWS (PG-13) RESERVE 1:50, 7:30
THE LEGEND OF TARZAN (PG-13) RESERVE 1:40, 4:25, 7:15
THE LEGEND OF TARZAN 3D (PG-13) RESERVE 10:45, 10:10
THE BFG (PG) RESERVE 10:30 A.M.
THE PURGE: ELECTION YEAR (R) RESERVE 11:15, 2:05, 4:55, 7:40, 10:40
THE SECRET LIFE OF PETS (PG) RESERVE 10:05, 10:50, 12:40, 1:35, 3:25, 4:20,
6:10, 7:05, 9, 10:05, 11:30
THE SECRET LIFE OF PETS 3D (PG) RESERVE 9:30, 12, 2:35, 5:10, 8, 10:45
MIKE AND DAVE NEED WEDDING DATES (R) RESERVE 9:35, 12:05, 2:40,
5:15, 7:50, 10:35
V
THE SECRET LIFE OF PETS (PG) RESERVE XD 9:30, 12,
2:30, 7:30
THE SECRET LIFE OF PETS 3D (PG) RESERVE XD 5, 10
FINDING DORY (PG) RESERVE 9:40, 7, 9:40
FINDING DORY (PG) RESERVE 9:40, 11, 1:35, 4:25, 7, 9:40
FINDING DORY 3D (PG) RESERVE 12:30, 3:20
FINDING DORY 3D (PG) RESERVE REALD 3D 12:30, 3:20
INDEPENDENCE DAY: RESURGENCE (PG-13) RESERVE 10:30, 1:25, 4:30,
7:20, 10:15
INDEPENDENCE DAY: RESURGENCE (PG-13) RESERVE 10:30, 1:25, 4:30,
7:20, 10:15
COSÌ FAN TUTTE MET SUMMER ENCORE (NR) RESERVE 7 P.M.
THE LEGEND OF TARZAN (PG-13) RESERVE 11:10, 2, 4:40, 7:50, 10:40
THE PURGE: ELECTION YEAR (R) RESERVE 11:20, 2:10, 4:50, 7:40, 10:30
THE PURGE: ELECTION YEAR (R) RESERVE 11:20, 2:10, 4:50, 7:40, 10:30
THE SECRET LIFE OF PETS (PG) RESERVE 1:45, 6:45
THE SECRET LIFE OF PETS (PG) RESERVE 1:45, 6:45
THE SECRET LIFE OF PETS 3D (PG) RESERVE 11:15, 4:15, 9:15
THE SECRET LIFE OF PETS 3D (PG) RESERVE REALD 3D 11:15, 4:15, 9:15
MIKE AND DAVE NEED WEDDING DATES (R) RESERVE 12:15, 2:50, 5:25,
8, 10:45
FINDING DORY (PG) 10:50, 1:35, 4:10, 6:50
THE LEGEND OF TARZAN (PG-13) 1:50, 7:25
THE LEGEND OF TARZAN 3D (PG-13) REALD 3D 11:05, 4:35
THE BFG (PG) 10:30, 1:25, 4:20, 7:15
THE SECRET LIFE OF PETS (PG) 11:10, 12:15, 2:40, 5:15, 7:45
THE SECRET LIFE OF PETS 3D (PG) REALD 3D 1:40, 4:10, 6:45
MIKE AND DAVE NEED WEDDING DATES (R) 11:45, 2:15, 4:50, 7:25
GHOSTBUSTERS (PG-13) 11:30, 2:20, 5:10, 7:10, 8
GHOSTBUSTERS 3D (PG-13) REALD 3D 10:40, 1:30, 4:20
THE INFILTRATOR (R) 10:20, 1:20, 4:30, 7:30
HUNT FOR THE WILDERPEOPLE (PG-13) 11:30, 2, 4:30, 7:20
News (N)
News (N)
News (N)
Ghostbusters ››› (1984) Bill Murray, Dan Aykroyd. (PG) Å
Ghostbusters II ›› (1989)
Dr. Jeff: Rocky Mountain Vet Å Dr. Jeff: Rocky Mountain Vet Å Dr. Jeff: Rocky Mountain Vet Å Dr. Jeff Å
The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy ›› (2005) Martin Freeman. (PG) Å
Robin Hood: Men in Tights Å
Music Moguls (TV14)
F In Fabulous Martin (9:35) Martin (TVPG) (10:15) Å
Martin (10:54)
Housewives: NYC (TV14) Å
Housewives: NYC (TV14) (N) The Bravos Awards show. (N) Housewives
America’s Choice 2016 (N)
America’s Choice 2016 (N)
CNN Tonight: Don Lemon
CNN Tonight
South Park Å South Park Å South Park Å South Park Å Another… (N) South Park Å Daily Show (N)
Dual Survival: Untamed (TV14) Dual Survival (TVPG) (N) Å American Tarzan (N)
Dual Survival
Stuck in Middle Bizaardvark
Girl Meets
KC Undercover Walk the Prank Best Friends
KC Undercover
The Kardashians (TV14) Å
EJ NYC (TV14) (N) Å
The Kardashians (TV14) Å
E! News (N)
SportsCenter (N) Å
SportsCenter (N) Å
SportsCenter (N) Å
SportsCenter
Chopped (TVG)
Cutthroat Kitchen (TVG) (N) Diner, Drive-In Diner, Drive-In Diner, Drive-In
Hannity (N)
America’s Election HQ (N)
Young & Hun- Baby Daddy
Bedtime Stories ›› (2008) Adam Sandler, Keri Russell.
The 700 Club
gry (N) Å
(TV14) (N) Å Strange tales come true. (PG)
(TVG) Å
Star Trek Into Darkness ››› (2013) Chris Pine. (7) (PG-13) Tyrant (TVMA) (N)
Tyrant (11:12)
Last Man Å
Last Man Å
The Middle Å The Middle Å The Middle Å The Middle Å Golden Girls Å
House Hunters Hunters Int.
Property Bros.
Desperate (N) Desperate (N) Property Brothers (N) Å
Pawn Stars
American Pickers (TVPG) Å American Pickers (TVPG) Å Pawn Stars (N) Pawn Stars
Batman Begins ››› (2005) Christian Bale, Michael Caine. (PG-13)
Batman Begins
Little Women: LA (TV14) (N) Little Women: LA (TV14) (N) Little Women: Atlanta (N) Å Little Women
Republican Convention (N)
Republican
Republican Convention (N)
Republican Convention (N)
The Challenge: Rivals III (TV14) The Challenge
Friday After Next › (2002) Ice Cube, Mike Epps. (R)
Surviving Alcatraz (TVPG)
Life and Death Row (TV14) (N) Life and Death Row (TV14)
Death Row
Nicky, Ricky Å Dudas Å
Full House Å Full House Å Full House Å Full House Å Friends (TV14)
Wyatt Earp ›› (1994) Kevin Costner. Portrait traces him from boy to lawman. (7) (PG-13) Ian Fleming
Greenleaf Grace and the Bish- Greenleaf (TV14) Kevin’s ad- Greenleaf (TV14) Mac juggles Greenleaf
MIKE AND DAVE NEED WEDDING DATES (R) RESERVE 12:15, 2:50, 5:25,
MIKE AND DAVE NEED WEDDING DATES (R) 11:45, 1:05, 2:20, 3:40, 4:55, 6:20,
11 pm
Seinfeld (TVG) Seinfeld Å
The Closer
The Great Polar Bear Feast (N) Greener World Charlie Rose Å
Link Voices Å
Sound Tracker (10:33) Å
Tres Veces Ana (TV14) (N)
Por Siempre Joan Sebastian
Noticias (N)
Life on the Reef (TVPG) Å
Life on the Reef (TVPG) Å
Tavis (N) Å
Raymond Å
Raymond Å
Family Guy Å Family Guy Å Seinfeld (TVG)
Between Lines Science
L.A. County Board of Supervisors Meeting
Duck Dynasty Duck Dynasty Wahlburgers
Wahlburgers
Duck Dynasty
8, 10:45
THE SECRET LIFE OF PETS 3D (PG) REALD 3D 1:10, 3:30, 4:30, 5:50, 8:10,
10:30
Entertainment News (N)
Matt Damon. Tonight Rob-
and Xander must put aside
their differences. (N) Å
Hollywood Today Live (TVPG)
GHOSTBUSTERS (PG-13) RESERVE XD 4:45, 10:15
GHOSTBUSTERS 3D (PG-13) RESERVE XD 11:15, 2, 7:30
GHOSTBUSTERS (PG-13) RESERVE XD 5:10, 10:45
GHOSTBUSTERS 3D (PG-13) RESERVE XD 11:40, 2:25, 7:55
Movies
Sports
News (N) New Å Closed Captioning
The Insider
Wayward Pines (TV14) Theo
GHOSTBUSTERS (PG-13) RESERVE 11:30, 5:30, 11:20
GHOSTBUSTERS 3D (PG-13) RESERVE 2:30, 8:30
THE INFILTRATOR (R) RESERVE 10:20, 1:30, 4:40, 7:45, 11
GHOSTBUSTERS (PG-13) RESERVE 11, 2, 5, 7:50, 10:50
GHOSTBUSTERS 3D (PG-13) RESERVE 9:30, 12:15, 3, 6:10, 9
10 pm
9:30
Hallucinations make Cam
ert Redford.
question his inolvement in a (N) Å
(N) Å
gruesome crime. (N) Å
NBC America’s Got Talent (TV14) Louis Tomlinson. (N) Å
Dateline NBC (TVPG) Å
KTLA Penn & Teller: Fool Us (TVPG) Whose Line Is Whose Line Is News (N)
Jesse Eisenberg. (N)
It Anyway? (N) It Anyway? Å
ABC The Goldbergs The Goldbergs Modern Family Blackish
News (N) Å
(TVPG) Å
(TVPG) Å
(TVPG) Å
(TVPG) Å
KCAL News (N)
News (N)
News (N)
Sports Central
SPORTS
GHOSTBUSTERS (PG-13) RESERVE XD 11:20, 11:20
GHOSTBUSTERS 3D (PG-13) RESERVE XD 2:20, 5:20, 8:20
8:30
E11
SWISS ARMY MAN (R) RESERVE 12:45, 3:30, 6:15, 9
SWISS ARMY MAN (R) RESERVE 12:45, 3:30, 6:15, 9
FINDING DORY (PG) 11:10, 1:50, 4:40, 7:20, 10
THE SANDLOT (PG) 10 A.M.
THE LEGEND OF TARZAN (PG-13) 11:15, 2:10, 4:50, 7:30, 10:10
THE PURGE: ELECTION YEAR (R) 2:15, 5, 7:50, 10:30
THE SECRET LIFE OF PETS (PG) 10:20, 12:45, 2, 4:30, 5:35, 7:10, 8:10, 10:35
THE SECRET LIFE OF PETS 3D (PG) REALD 3D 11:30, 3:10, 9:40
MIKE AND DAVE NEED WEDDING DATES (R) 11:55, 2:30, 5:05, 7:40, 10:20
GHOSTBUSTERS (PG-13) 10:30, 1:20, 4:10, 7, 9:50
GHOSTBUSTERS 3D (PG-13) REALD 3D 11:20, 2:20, 5:10, 8, 10:45
V
W
GHOSTBUSTERS (PG-13) RESERVE XD 10:45, 4:35
GHOSTBUSTERS 3D (PG-13) RESERVE XD 1:40 P.M.
GHOSTBUSTERS (PG-13) RESERVE
D-BOX 2:35, 5:30, 8:20, 11:10
GHOSTBUSTERS 3D (PG-13) RESERVE
D-BOX REALD 3D 12:40, 3:35, 6:30, 9:20
FIGHT CLUB (R) 2, 7
FINDING DORY (PG) 11:05, 1:45, 4:25, 7:05, 10:10
THE CONJURING 2 (R) 10:20 A.M.
CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE (PG-13) 11:20, 2:10, 5, 7:45, 10:30
INDEPENDENCE DAY: RESURGENCE 3D (PG-13) REALD 3D 1:30 P.M.
THE SHALLOWS (PG-13) 10:35, 12:55, 3:20, 5:45, 8:10, 10:35
THE SANDLOT (PG) 11:10 P.M.
COSÌ FAN TUTTE MET SUMMER ENCORE (NR) 7 P.M.
THE LEGEND OF TARZAN (PG-13) 11:45, 2:30, 5:15, 8, 10:45
THE BFG (PG) 10:25, 1:15, 4:15, 7:10, 10
THE PURGE: ELECTION YEAR (R) 10:30, 5:10, 7:55, 9:40, 10:40
THE PURGE: ELECTION YEAR (R) RESERVE 11:35, 2:25
THE SECRET LIFE OF PETS (PG) 10:20, 12:40, 2:30, 3:10, 5:40, 7:40, 8:05, 10:35
THE SECRET LIFE OF PETS (PG) RESERVE 11:30, 2, 4:30, 7, 9:30
THE SECRET LIFE OF PETS 3D (PG) REALD 3D 10:50, 12, 1:20, 3:50, 5, 6:20,
8:50, 10:05
MIKE AND DAVE NEED WEDDING DATES (R) 11:55, 2:25, 5:05, 7:40, 10:15
GHOSTBUSTERS (PG-13) 11:40, 2:35, 5:30, 8:20, 11:10
GHOSTBUSTERS 3D (PG-13) REALD 3D 12:40, 3:35, 6:30, 9:20
THE INFILTRATOR (R) 10:40, 1:40, 4:40, 7:40, 10:50
SULTAN (NR) 10:30, 2:15, 6, 9:55
V
THE SECRET LIFE OF PETS (PG) XD 9:30, 12, 2:40, 8, 10:50
THE SECRET LIFE OF PETS 3D (PG) RESERVE XD 5:30 P.M.
GHOSTBUSTERS (PG-13) RESERVE XD 10:30, 10:30
GHOSTBUSTERS 3D (PG-13) RESERVE XD 1:30, 4:30, 7:30
W
GHOSTBUSTERS (PG-13) RESERVE
D-BOX 9:40, 12:40, 3:40, 6:40, 9:40
GHOSTBUSTERS 3D (PG-13) RESERVE
D-BOX REALD 3D 11:20, 2:20, 5:20, 8:15, 11
V
FIGHT CLUB (R) 2, 7
EIGHT BELOW (PG) 1:15 P.M.
IRON WILL (PG) 10:30 A.M.
DISNEY'S A CHRISTMAS CAROL (PG) 7 P.M.
COOL RUNNINGS (PG) 4 P.M.
FINDING DORY (PG) 10, 12:30, 1:35, 3, 4:10, 5:30, 8, 10:30
CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE (PG-13) 10:50, 1:45, 4:35, 7:35, 10:15
INDEPENDENCE DAY: RESURGENCE (PG-13) 10:35, 10:05
THE SHALLOWS (PG-13) 12:30, 3:15, 5:50, 8:25, 10:45
THE SANDLOT (PG) 10 A.M.
COSÌ FAN TUTTE MET SUMMER ENCORE (NR) 7 P.M.
THE LEGEND OF TARZAN (PG-13) 11:50, 2:30, 5:10, 7:50, 10:30, 10:55
THE BFG (PG) 10:30, 1:20, 4:20, 7:10, 10
THE PURGE: ELECTION YEAR (R) 11:30, 2:25, 5:05, 8, 10:40
THE SECRET LIFE OF PETS (PG) 10, 11:10, 12, 12:45, 1:30, 2:20, 3:05, 3:50, 4:40,
5:25, 6:10, 7, 7:45, 8:30, 9:25, 10:05, 10:55
THE SECRET LIFE OF PETS 3D (PG) REALD 3D 10:45, 1:05, 3:25, 5:45, 8:05,
10:25
MIKE AND DAVE NEED WEDDING DATES (R) 11:45, 1, 2:15, 3:30, 4:50, 6, 7:20,
8:35, 9:50, 11
GHOSTBUSTERS (PG-13) 10, 12, 2:45, 5:30, 6:45, 8:15, 9:30, 11
GHOSTBUSTERS 3D (PG-13) REALD 3D 10:20, 11:15, 1:15, 2, 4, 4:45, 7:30, 10:15
THE INFILTRATOR (R) 11:05, 2:05, 5, 7:55, 10:50
SWISS ARMY MAN (R) 9:35 P.M.
FINDING DORY (PG) 10:20, 1:20, 4:20, 7:10, 9:50
CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE (PG-13) 10:35, 1:40, 4:45, 7:45, 10:35
INDEPENDENCE DAY: RESURGENCE (PG-13) 1, 6:50
THE LEGEND OF TARZAN (PG-13) 4, 10:10
THE LEGEND OF TARZAN 3D (PG-13) REALD 3D 11, 1:45, 4:50, 7:50, 10:40
THE BFG (PG) 10:45, 1:50, 5:10, 8:10
THE PURGE: ELECTION YEAR (R) 10:50, 1:25, 4:10, 7, 9:55, 11
THE SECRET LIFE OF PETS (PG) 9:45, 10:40, 11:30, 1:10, 2, 3, 3:50, 4:40, 6:30, 7:20,
8:30, 9:20, 10
THE SECRET LIFE OF PETS 3D (PG) REALD 3D 10, 10, 12:20, 12:30, 3:20, 5:50,
6:20, 9
MIKE AND DAVE NEED WEDDING DATES (R) 11:40, 2:10, 5, 7:40, 10:20
GHOSTBUSTERS (PG-13) RESERVE 9:40, 12:40, 3:40, 6:40, 9:40
GHOSTBUSTERS 3D (PG-13) RESERVE REALD 3D 11:20, 2:20, 5:20, 8:15, 11
FINDING DORY (PG) RESERVE 11:40, 2:10, 4:40, 7:20, 10
THE LEGEND OF TARZAN (PG-13) RESERVE 11, 4:30, 10:10
THE LEGEND OF TARZAN 3D (PG-13) RESERVE 1:40, 7:30
THE PURGE: ELECTION YEAR (R) RESERVE 11:10, 2, 4:50, 7:40, 10:30
THE SECRET LIFE OF PETS (PG) RESERVE 11:20, 1:50, 4:20, 6:50, 9:20
THE SECRET LIFE OF PETS 3D (PG) RESERVE 9:50, 12:20, 2:50, 5:20, 7:50,
10:20
MIKE AND DAVE NEED WEDDING DATES (R) RESERVE 10, 12:30, 3, 5:30,
8:10, 10:40
GHOSTBUSTERS (PG-13) RESERVE 10:30, 1:20, 5:10, 8, 9:50
GHOSTBUSTERS 3D (PG-13) RESERVE 11:50, 2:30, 4:10, 7, 10:45
E12
W E D N E S DAY, J U LY 2 0 , 2 016
L AT I M E S. C O M /CA L E N DA R
COMICS
BRIDGE
SUDOKU
By Frank Stewart
Unlucky Louie didn’t
show up for his penny game.
When he finally entered the
club — two hours late — he
said he’d been doing odd
jobs around the house.
“Your wife’s ‘honey-do’
list must be long,” I said.
“Her ‘honey-don’t’ list is
longer,” Louie sighed.
When Louie was declarer
at five diamonds, he took the
ace of clubs and hopefully
cashed the A-K of trumps.
East discarded. Louie next
took his top spades, pitching
a club from dummy; West refused to ruff. Louie then
ruffed his last spade in
dummy but was stuck there.
When he led the ace and a
low heart, West won and
cashed his high trump, and
Louie had a club loser.
KENKEN
Every box will contain a number; numbers depend on the size of the grid. For a 6x6
puzzle, use Nos. 1-6. Do not repeat a number in any row or column. The numbers in each
heavily outlined set of squares must combine to produce the target number found in the
top left corner of the cage using the mathematical operation indicated. A number can be
repeated within a cage as long as it is not in the same row or column.
7/20/16
HOROSCOPE
By Holiday Mathis
Aries (March 21-April 19):
Business guru Raymond
Aaron said, “If you don’t
have an assistant, you are
one.” You’ll certainly feel like
an assistant today.
Taurus (April 20-May
20): You needn’t worry about
what you’re going to
contribute to others that will
mean something. It will all
happen in the moment.
Gemini (May 21-June 21):
Maybe you made adjustments because you had to,
not because you wanted to.
Ultimately you’ll be glad you
were strong enough to bend.
Cancer (June 22-July 22):
That person asking you annoying questions is just trying to get to know you. It’s
flattering that someone
wants to be closer to you.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22):
You can easily sense social
tension, and when you do,
your immediate response is
to smooth things over with a
joke or diversion.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22):
You may be putting your all
into a project, and yet the desired result still eludes you.
If this makes you frustrated,
all the better.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23):
You’re spiritually generous,
and this is why you can be as
enthusiastic about the successes of others as you would
be if the win were your own.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 21):
The astral influences may
have you feeling edgy.
Among the many ways to
work off this stress, the
easiest way is to exercise.
Sagittarius (Nov. 22Dec. 21): Everything that’s
happened, good and bad,
has made you who you are
today. You’ll profit from one
of your mistakes.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan.
19): Your experiences will
mimic the scenes in your
mind, so taking charge of
your imagination is a powerful way to bring about the
changes you desire.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb.
18): You’ve a strong will, big
goals and the freedom to
pursue them. The circumstances are more precious
and rare than you think.
Pisces (Feb. 19-March
20): You’re used to leading in
a certain arena, but were you
to back off and let another
person help, your schedule
would open up and you
would be quite impressed by
what happens next.
Today’s birthday (July
20): Your talent for rapport
and knack for warming people up to you will help you
reach a significant goal in
August. You’ll be paid well
for this, but more importantly, you’ll make a difference. Your lucky numbers
are: 4, 10, 3, 33 and 12.
Holiday Mathis writes her
column for Creators
Syndicate Inc. The
horoscope should be read
for entertainment. Previous
forecasts are at
latimes.com/horoscope.
Louie could add an item
to his “honey-don’t” list:
Don’t draw trumps too soon.
He can cash one high trump,
then take his spade winners
for a club discard. West can’t
gain by ruffing the third high
spade in front of dummy.
Louie then ruffs a club,
comes to a high trump and
leads his last spade. He loses
one trump and one heart.
Question: You hold: ♠ A
Q 8 5 ♥ 7 6 ♦ A K 9 6 4 ♣ A 6.
Your partner opens one
heart. The next player
passes. What do you say?
Answer: Slam is possible,
but you must not jump-shift,
crowding your auction,
when you need space to find
a trump suit. Bid two diamonds. If partner rebids two
hearts, as he often will, continue with a space-saving
bid of two spades. Since you
have enough ammunition
for several bids, you need not
show your four-card major
first.
South dealer
N-S vulnerable
NORTH
♠K4
♥A9843
♦J752
♣94
WEST
EAST
♠96
♠ J 10 7 3 2
♥ K 10 5
♥QJ2
♦ Q 10 8
♦3
♣ K J 10 5 2
♣Q873
SOUTH
♠AQ85
♥76
♦AK964
♣A6
SOUTH WEST
NORTH EAST
1♦
Pass
1♥
Pass
1♠
Pass
3♦
Pass
5♦
All Pass
Opening lead — ♣ J
2016, Tribune Media
Services
ASK AMY
Daughter hurt by gossip
Dear Amy: Recently, my
mother and I found out that
my father is having an affair
with a woman not much older than myself (I am 21).
My mother has two older
daughters, my half-sisters
from a previous marriage,
who, putting it nicely, have a
tendency to gossip without
thinking about the feelings
of others.
Knowing this, I asked my
mother to keep our family
situation to herself while we
process and decide our next
steps. She agreed. However,
she ended up telling one
sister, who then told the
other, who then told my entire extended family.
I now receive calls from
aunts and uncles, cousins I
barely talk to, and family
friends expressing their condolences and subtly prying
for more information.
I am shocked and hurt
and don’t know who to be
most angry with: my mother
or my sisters for betraying
my confidence. On the other
hand, I feel as if I don’t have
the right to be angry as the
primary victim is my
mother, but I do also feel
cheated by my father’s affair.
Devastated
Dear
Devastated:
Of
course you have the right to
be angry. Validating your
own feelings about this be-
trayal will help you to cope
with those feelings.
You might be feeling
somewhat torn because the
person your sisters are gossiping about is your father
(not theirs). I could imagine
that you are even wrestling
with a defensive impulse, as
these other women perhaps
gang up on him, gossip
about him and call him out.
You can certainly ask
family members to keep
something a secret or to be
discreet, but your mother
and sisters are a part of this
story, and they have the
right to discuss it.
When you hear from farflung
family
members,
thank them for their concern, offer up no details and
refer them to your mother if
they want to talk further
about it.
Dear Amy: My husband
and I have recently decided
we want to move to his
hometown, near his family.
My mom is incredibly upset
with me over it. The thing is,
I haven’t lived near my
mother since I left for college
and have lived almost halfway across the country from
my mom and other family for
almost a decade. She obviously thinks I’m choosing his
family over my own, even
though I don’t see it that way
at all.
We have many good reasons to move. Our friends
have moved away, and we
want to be near family now
that we have a child. I just
don’t feel connected to my
hometown. I never planned
to live there as an adult.
I love my mom and family
and we will see each other
just as often, but she’s making what should be an exciting and somewhat difficult
decision a miserable one,
and I feel horrible enough
about it to possibly not make
the move.
Terrible Daughter
Dear
Daughter:
You
blame your mother for creating an untrue narrative
and then feed it.
It is your right and responsibility to live wherever
you want to live. But you are
deliberately moving your
mother’s grandchild to be
closer to your husband’s
family. You can expect your
mother to be sad about this
— and she is.
Reassure her. Say, “Mom,
I know this is hard on you,
but everything’s going to be
OK.” Plan trips home with
your child. Invite her out to
stay with you.
Send questions to Amy
Dickinson by email to
[email protected]
FAMILY CIRCUS By Bil Keane
DENNIS THE MENACE By Hank Ketcham
ARGYLE SWEATER By Scott Hilburn
MARMADUKE By Brad & Paul Anderson
BLISS By Harry Bliss
BALLARD STREET By Jerry Van Amerongen
CROSSWORD
Edited By Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
By Janice Luttrell
ACROSS
1 Dropped the ball
6 Pantry pest
9 Puts in a cooler
14 Successor of
Pope John X
15 Like many indie films
17 “You Be __”: 1986 RunD.M.C. hit
18 Dr. Brown’s classic
drink
19 Pasadena institute
21 Mysterious power
22 Slush Puppie maker
23 Little snicker
25 Cries out for calamine
30 Three times, in an Rx
31 Notes after do
32 Prefix for “time”
33 __-wop music
35 Starting device: Abbr.
37 Belgian banknotes
38 Speedmaster
watchmaker
40 __ Na Na
41 Gypsum painting
surface
42 Whittled
43 President pro __
44 Salt Lake City
collegian
45 Remains in the fire?
47 Wolfgang’s veto
49 Baseball uniform part
52 Doesn’t go for
the green, in golf
53 U.K. military award
54 Buckwheat noodle
55 Earn after taxes
57 “I Know Why the
Caged Bird Sings”
autobiographer Maya
59 Writer of medical
thrillers
64 Book with interstates
65 Like California, to a
Hawaiian
66 Gape
67 One in a cast
68 WKRP’s Nessman
69 Pasture groups
DOWN
1 Draw out
2 Tighten, as sneakers
3 Contact skating sport
4 Party-planning site
5 Use the good china,
say
6 Lead-into-gold
practitioner
7
8
9
10
Negative connector
Overly cute, to a Brit
Act too quickly
Source of much
website revenue
11 “Need __ on?”
12 Had no one to catch
13 BART stop, e.g.
16 Rudimentary
20 Revolutionary Guevara
24 Top-of-the-line, and
what each of the four
longest puzzle answers
begins with?
26 Dressing holder
27 Kind of tackle made
illegal in the NFL in
2005
28 Hall of Famer Slaughter
29 Only fair
31 Cartoon bird that first
appeared in “Fast and
Furry-ous”
34 Fancy moldings
36 Some first-born
children
38 Volkswagen rival
39 Doll’s cry
46 Short job details?
48 Electrified particle
© 2016 Tribune Content Agency
50 On the train
51 Stops to think, say
54 Luigi’s lucky number?
56 Work very hard
58 Deep cut
59 Zimbabwe neighbor:
Abbr.
60 Non-Rx
61 Night flier
62 Olympics skater
Midori
63 Neruda wrote one to
salt
ANSWER TO
PREVIOUS PUZZLE
7/20/16
L AT I ME S . CO M / CA L EN DA R
W E D N E S DAY, J U LY 20 , 2 016
COMICS
DOONESBURY By Garry Trudeau
Doonesbury is on vacation. This is a reprint.
DILBERT By Scott Adams
LA CUCARACHA By Lalo Alcaraz
BABY BLUES By Jerry Scott & Rick Kirkman
CANDORVILLE By Darrin Bell
CRANKSHAFT By Tom Batiuk & Chuck Ayers
HALF FULL By Maria Scrivan
PEARLS BEFORE SWINE By Stephan Pastis
NON SEQUITUR By Wiley
LIO By Mark Tatulli
JUMP START By Robb Armstrong
9 CHICKWEED LANE By Brooke McEldowney
BLONDIE By Dean Young & John Marshall
GET FUZZY By Darby Conley
ZITS By Jerry Scott & Jim Borgman
BIZARRO By Dan Piraro
TUNDRA By Chad Carpenter
DRABBLE By Kevin Fagan
PRICKLY CITY By Scott Stantis
MUTTS By Patrick McDonnell
FRAZZ By Jef Mallett
PEANUTS By Charles M. Schulz
E13
congrats
E14
WEDNESDAY, JULY 20, 2016
5
LOS ANGELES TIMES
4
E
M
M
Y
®
N O M I N A T I O N S
OUTSTANDING DRAMA SERIES
OUTSTANDING LEAD ACTOR IN A DRAMA SERIES
KEVIN SPACEY
OUTSTANDING COMEDY SERIES
OUTSTANDING LEAD ACTOR
IN A COMEDY SERIES
OUTSTANDING LEAD ACTRESS IN A DRAMA SERIES
AZIZ ANSARI
OUTSTANDING SUPPORTING ACTOR IN A DRAMA SERIES
OUTSTANDING DIRECTING FOR
A COMEDY SERIES
ROBIN WRIGHT
MICHAEL KELLY
AZIZ ANSARI, DIRECTED BY
OUTSTANDING GUEST ACTOR IN A DRAMA SERIES
OUTSTANDING WRITING FOR
A COMEDY SERIES
REG E. CATHEY
OUTSTANDING GUEST ACTOR IN A DRAMA SERIES
MAHERSHALA ALI
OUTSTANDING S
OUTSTANDING
SOUND
OUND EDITING FOR A SERIES
LAUREN STEPHENS, SUPERVISING SOUND EDITOR
JORDAN WILBY, SOUND DESIGNER
JONATHAN GOLODNER, SOUND FX EDITOR
CHRISTIAN BUENAVENTURA, DIALOGUE EDITOR
GREG VINES, MUSIC EDITOR
ZANE BRUCE, FOLEY ARTIST
LINDSAY PEPPER, FOLEY ARTIST
AZIZ ANSARI, WRITTEN BY
ALAN YANG, WRITTEN BY
OUTSTANDING STUNT COORDINATION FOR
A DRAMA SERIES, LIMITED SERIES OR MOVIE
OUTSTANDING COMEDY SERIES
LILY TOMLIN
OUTSTANDING LEAD ACTRESS
IN A COMEDY SERIES
OUTSTANDING COSTUMES FOR A CONTEMPORARY
SERIES, LIMITED SERIES OR MOVIE
PHILIP J. SILVERA, STUNT COORDINATOR
OUTSTANDING GUEST ACTOR IN A DRAMA SERIES
PAUL SPARKS
OUTSTANDING GUEST ACTRESS IN A DRAMA SERIES
ELLEN BURSTYN
OUTSTANDING GUEST ACTRESS IN A DRAMA SERIES
MOLLY PARKER
OUTSTANDING CASTING FOR A DRAMA SERIES
LARAY MAYFIELD, CSA, CASTING DIRECTOR
JULIE SCHUBERT, CSA, CASTING DIRECTOR
OUTSTANDING PRODUCTION DESIGN FOR A NARRATIVE
CONTEMPORARYOR FANTASY PROGRAM
ELLIE KEMPER
OUTSTANDING SUPPORTING ACTOR
IN A COMEDY SERIES
STEVE ARNOLD, PRODUCTION DESIGNER
HALINA GEBAROWICZ, ART DIRECTOR
TIFFANY ZAPPULLA, SET DECORATOR
TITUSS BURGESS
OUTSTANDING CINEMATOGRAPHY FOR A SINGLE
CAMERA SERIES
CINDY TOLAN, CSA, CASTING DIRECTOR
DAVID M. DUNLAP, DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY
OUTSTANDING MAIN TITLE DESIGN
OUTSTANDING DOCUMENTARY
OR NONFICTION SERIES
DAVID GELB, EXECUTIVE PRODUCER
ANDREW FRIED, EXECUTIVE PRODUCER
BRIAN McGINN, EXECUTIVE PRODUCER
MATTHEW WEAVER, EXECUTIVE PRODUCER
DANE LILLEGARD, CO-EXECUTIVE PRODUCER
OUTSTANDING DOCUMENTARY OR NONFICTION SERIES
OUTSTANDING DIRECTING FOR
A NONFICTION PROGRAM
OUTSTANDING DIRECTING FOR A NONFICTION PROGRAM
OUTSTANDING MUSIC COMPOSITION
FOR A SERIES
LAURA RICCIARDI, EXECUTIVE PRODUCER
MOIRA DEMOS, EXECUTIVE PRODUCER
LAURA RICCIARDI, DIRECTED BY
MOIRA DEMOS, DIRECTED BY
ALLYSON B. FANGER, COSTUME DESIGNER
LORI D E LAPP, COSTUME SUPERVISOR
OUTSTANDING CASTING FOR
A COMEDY SERIES
OUTSTANDING SOUND MIXING FOR A COMEDY
OR DRAMA SERIES
SCOTT R. LEWIS, RE-RECORDING MIXER
NATHAN NANCE, RE-RECORDING MIXER
LORENZO MILLAN, PRODUCTION MIXER
OUTSTANDING LEAD ACTRESS IN A COMEDY SERIES
MICHELLE DOUGHERTY, CREATIVE DIRECTOR
ARISU KASHIWAGI, LEAD DESIGNER
ROD BASHAM, FLAME ARTIST
DAVID MACK, ILLUSTRATOR
ERIC DEMEUSY, ANIMATOR
THOMAS McMAHAN, ANIMATOR
OUTSTANDING ORIGINAL MAIN TITLE THEME MUSIC
SEAN P. CALLERY, THEME BY
DAVID GELB, DIRECTED BY
DUNCAN THUM, MUSIC BY
OUTSTANDING WRITING FOR A VARIETY SPECIAL
JOHN MULANEY, WRITTEN BY
OUTSTANDINGPICTURE EDITING FORANONFICTION PROGRAM
MOIRA DEMOS, EDITOR
OUTSTANDING SOUND EDITING FOR A NONFICTION PROGRAM
DANIEL WARD, SOUND EDITOR
LESLIE BLOOME, FOLEY ARTIST
OUTSTANDING SOUND MIXING FOR A NONFICTION PROGRAM
LESLIE SHATZ, RE-RECORDING MIXER
OUTSTANDING WRITING FOR A NONFICTION PROGRAM
LAURA RICCIARDI, WRITTEN BY
MOIRA DEMOS, WRITTEN BY
OUTSTANDING SINGLE CAMERA PICTURE
EDITING FOR A DRAMA SERIES
LEO TROMBETTA, ACE, EDITOR
OUTSTANDING MAIN TITLE DESIGN
TOM O’NEILL, CREATIVE DIRECTOR
NIK KLEVEROV, EDITOR
DAVID BADOUNTS, LEAD ANIMATOR/
COMPOSITOR
JOSH SMITH, CG/DESIGN LEAD
OUTSTANDING CASTING FOR A DRAMA SERIES
JENNIFER EUSTON, CSA, CASTING DIRECTOR
OUTSTANDING ORIGINAL MAIN TITLE
THEME MUSIC
RODRIGO AMARANTE, THEME BY
OUTSTANDING DOCUMENTARY OR NONFICTION SPECIAL
SIDNEY BEAUMONT, EXECUTIVE PRODUCER
AMY HOBBY, PRODUCER
LIZ GARBUS, PRODUCER
JUSTIN WILKES, PRODUCER
JAYSON JACKSON, PRODUCER
OUTS
OUTSTANDING
STA
AND
DING
G WRITING FOR A VARIETY SPECIAL
PATTON OSWALT, WRITTEN BY
OUTSTANDING CINEMATOGRAPHY FOR
A NONFICTION PROGRAM
IGOR MARTINOVIC, CINEMATOGRAPHY BY
RACHEL MORRISON, CINEMATOGRAPHY BY
OUTSTANDING DIRECTING FOR
A NONFICTION PROGRAM
LIZ GARBUS, DIRECTED BY
OUTSTANDING TELEVISION MOVIE
OUTSTANDING MUSIC DIRECTION
PAUL SHAFFER, MUSIC DIRECTION BY
OUTSTANDING ORIGINAL MAIN TITLE THEME MUSIC
JOHNNY KLIMEK, THEME BY
TOM TYKWER, THEME BY
OUTSTANDING PICTURE EDITING FOR
A NONFICTION PROGRAM
JOSHUA L. PEARSON, EDITOR
OUTSTANDING SOUND EDITING FOR
A NONFICTION PROGRAM
JOSHUA L. PEARSON, SOUND EDITOR
DAN TIMMONS, SOUND DESIGNER
OUTSTANDING SOUND MIXING FOR
A NONFICTION PROGRAM
TONY VOLANTE, RE-RECORDING MIXER
TAMMY DOUGLAS, PRODUCTION MIXER
OUTSTANDING LEAD ACTOR IN A DRAMA SERIES
KYLE CHANDLER
OUTSTANDING SUPPORTING ACTOR
IN A DRAMA SERIES
BEN MENDELSOHN
EXCEPTIONAL MERIT IN DOCUMENTARY FILMMAKING
EVGENY AFINEEVSKY, PRODUCED BY
DEN TOLMOR, PRODUCED BY
LATI GROBMAN, EXECUTIVE PRODUCER
DAVID DINERSTEIN, EXECUTIVE PRODUCER
LOS ANGELES TIMES
WEDNESDAY, JULY 20, 2016
PS1
*
+CRV
V
Our most popular sale
is good for you and good
for your wallet.
Save on more than 8,000
top quality vitamin and
body care items.
*Limited to stock on hand. Not to be combined
with other promotional discounts in effect.
7861
PS2
WEDNESDAY, JULY 20, 2016
LOS ANGELES TIMES
LOS ANGELES TIMES
WEDNESDAY, JULY 20, 2016
California Red or Green
Seedless Grapes
98
Organic
Bunched Broccoli
Mini Seedless Watermelons
98
98
¢
lb.
On-the-Vine
Cluster Tomatoes
Tender Asparagus
98
¢
ea.
¢lb..
1
¢
$ 98
lb.
Xingtea or Icelandic Water
Organic Valley Brown Eggs
R.W. Knudsen Just Juice
Select varieties,
23.5 oz. or 1.5 ltr.
Large or Extra Large, grade A, doz.
Select varieties, 32 oz.
lb.
Stella Artois or
Blue Moon Beer
Select varieties, 12 pk., 11.2 oz.
or 12 pk., 12 oz.
88
3
¢
+CRV
Raw Almonds
4
4
$ 99
ea.
Turkish Apricots
$ 99
3
$ 99
lb.
Grass-Fed Lamb Shoulder Chops
or Farm-Fresh Pork Tenderloin
All-natural.
5
$ 99
lb.
Country Style Pork Ribs or
Boneless Skinless Chicken Thighs
2
lb.
1
12
99
+CRV
Mild Cheddar Cheese
Salted or unsalted
Fresh, all-natural.
Chicken thighs sold in value pa
ack.
$ 99
+CRV
Roasted Cashew Pieces
$ 99
$
2
$ 99
lb.
lb.
Large Peeled & Deveined
Shrimp
31/40 ct. Raw. Farm-raised, previously frozen.
$ 49
lb.
SALE PRICES VALID JULY 20-27, 2016 IN ALL LOS ANGELES AREA LOCATIONS.
6
$ 99
lb.
7961
PS3
PS4
WEDNESDAY, JULY 20, 2016
LOS ANGELES TIMES
Chobani Greek Yogurt
thinkThin
Protein Bars
Select varieties, 5.3 oz.
Bragg
Select varieties, 2.1 oz.
All Items
88
55
for
ea.
Sprouts Frozen Fruit
Select varieties, 12 oz.
35
$
¢
Kerrygold
Pure Irish Butter
%
off
regular retail
Essence Alkaline Water
1 gal.
Select varieties, 8 oz.
25
$
for
Sprouts
Extra Virgin Olive Oil
26
$
25
$
for
for
Stacy’s Pita Chips
Select varieties, 7.33 oz.
+CRV
Alexia Frozen Potatoes
Select varieties, 20 oz.
1 ltr.
6
24
26
$
$ 99
ea.
$
for
35
%
for
off
regular retail
Select brands,
varieties and sizes
JULY 20-27
+CRV
Save on these and many
other great brands...
SALE PRICES VALID JULY 20-27, 2016 IN ALL LOS ANGELES AREA LOCATIONS.
For store hours or to find a location near you, visit sprouts.com
7861