a decade of working to make indian country whole

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a decade of working to make indian country whole
A DECADE OF WORKING TO MAKE INDIAN COUNTRY WHOLE
ILTF M IS S ION
“Land within the original boundaries
of every reservation and other areas of high significance
where tribes retain aboriginal interest
are in Indian ownership and management.”
Photo credit: Jill Piper
LETTER FROM THE PRESIDENT AND BOARD CHAIR
In 2002, Indian Land Tenure Foundation (ILTF) was established by a concerned group of Indian landowners, tribal representatives, and land professionals
who had witnessed or experienced firsthand the profound challenges and injustices Indian people were facing in respect to the ownership and management of
reservation lands. They recognized that the issues related to Indian land tenure—fractionated land title, checkerboarding, severe probate backlogs, lack of tribal
control over land data, continued land loss, and many other issues—were only getting worse and needed to be addressed to ensure economic growth and
self-determination for Indian communities and to help Indian people maintain spiritual and cultural ties to their land. With financial support from the Northwest
Area Foundation, that group developed a long-term vision and plan of action that became the Indian Land Tenure Foundation.
Over the past 10 years, ILTF has invested nearly $20 million in 140 grants and programs that address Indian land tenure issues through education, cultural
awareness, economic opportunity and legal reform. We have worked with 190 Indian nations and Alaska Native villages and have provided educational
materials, technical assistance or direct service to more than 50,000 Indian landowners across Indian Country. ILTF’s K-12 curriculum “Lessons of Our Land” has
been implemented in over 100 tribal and public schools in five states. In partnership with our affiliate lender, Indian Land Capital Company, ILTF has
assisted in the recovery of over 30,000 acres of tribal land. We have been truly honored to work with so many dedicated individuals and, despite our ambitious
long-term goals, we are proud of what we have been able to accomplish together in such a short time. Some of our activities and partners are highlighted in the
pages that follow.
As we look forward to the next 10 years, we see both challenges and opportunities on the horizon. In recent years, a number of legislative acts and court rulings
have had a dramatic impact on federal Indian land policy. The 2004 American Indian Probate Reform Act (AIPRA) established a uniform federal probate
code that automatically applies to all Indian probates of trust land in the U.S. unless there is a tribal probate code or a valid will in place. And the 2009 Supreme
Court ruling in Carcieri v. Salazar now limits the authority of the secretary of the interior to take lands into trust under the Indian Reorganization Act. More
encouragingly, in 2010, two class action lawsuits brought against the federal government—on behalf of Indian farmers and ranchers in Keepseagle v. Vilsack and on
behalf of Indian landowners in Cobell v. Salazar—were settled in favor of the plaintiffs. In addition, the $3.4 billion Cobell Settlement allocates $1.9 billion for the
purpose of trust land consolidation—the first time a sum this substantial has been dedicated to re-establishing the tribal land estate.
With the help of our supporters, community partners and tribal leaders, we are hopeful that together we can overcome these challenges and ensure that the
opportunities are realized to the benefit of all Indian people and their communities.
John E. Sirois, Board Chair
Cris Stainbrook, President
TWO
GRANTS AND PROGRAMS: 2002 - 2012
EX PENDITURES SINCE INCE PTION
Fundraising
$2,216,712
In the past 10 years, Indian Land Tenure Foundation has invested
Admin/Mgmnt
12%
nearly $20 million in 140 innovative projects and programs that address
Fundraising
9%
land tenure issues in four primary strategic areas: Education,
16%
Cultural Awareness, Economic Opportunity and Legal Reform.
Program
$19,781,060
75%
Program
22%
Services
28%
Contracts
Grants
Admin/Mgmnt
$4,196,204
Programmatic Loans
13%
*Through December 31, 2011
E DUCATION
Educate every Indian landowner about Indian land management, ownership and transference issues so that
knowledge becomes power when decisions about land assets are made.
BRINGING THE MESSAGE TO INDIAN COUNTRY
Education is truly the key to lasting, positive change for Indian land tenure. To that end, ILTF has focused much its energy and resources on public education
and programs, including publications such as the Message Runner, workshops and training opportunities for Indian landowners and an interdisciplinary K-12
curriculum, “Lessons of Our Land,” which has been implemented in over 100 public and tribal schools in five states.
EMPOWERING INDIAN COMMUNITIES
The Pine Ridge Reservation in southwestern South Dakota lost over one-third of its land base as a result of the 1887 Allotment Act, when Indian ownership on
the reservation went from 2.7 million acres to 1.7 million acres of land. Ownership of the remaining land is now highly “fractionated” (meaning there are multiple
owners—in some cases hundreds or thousands of owners in single parcels of land), making it almost impossible for landowners to use the land in a beneficial way
that returns full value to the owners.
From 2007 to 2012, ILTF awarded several small grants to Village Earth, a nonprofit focused on sustainable community development, to address the problem
of fractionation on Pine Ridge through the development of educational materials, including a land planning map book and an online mapping tool, and
community-based outreach. The project seeks to build the capacity of traditional Lakota tiospayes (family groups) to recover, restore and manage their traditional
land base. Working with Village Earth, many Pine Ridge tribal members have volunteered to participate in the effort by sharing information with their local communities.
“I wanted to try to provide some kind of answer for these people … so that these oyate [people] can survive, so that they can understand that they
are an important part of their own tiospaye [family group].”
Calvin White Butterfly, Community Volunteer
THREE
“For young people in my community, I want them to know about those stories, so when
they go and stand there, they know about their relatives, that this is how they used
this place, and this is what they did here, that they could imagine ... what it was like for
their relatives a long time ago.”
Julie Cajune, Salish Educator and Curriculum Specialist
SPEAKING TO OUR YOUTH, OUR FUTURE
In 2008, ILTF funded the adaptation of its K-12curriculum,
“Lessons of Our Land,” to reflect Montana tribal histories and cultures
and to implement the curriculum in classrooms state-wide.
Montana public schools educate nearly 150,000 students each year,
with Indian students making up 12 percent of the student population.
Montana has been on the front line of an emerging trend in state
legislatures’ and education departments’ mandatory inclusion of Indian
nation histories and cultural components into classroom materials.
In 1999, the Montana Legislature passed the Indian Education for All
Act, requiring all public schools throughout the state to include coursework in the history and culture of Indian tribes in the state.
The Montana-based curriculum was developed by Salish educator and
Montana native Julie Cajune (pictured left). Cajune conducted extensive
research and interviews with tribal elders and historians from Montana’s
12 tribes who reside on seven reservations throughout the state. The
resulting product is a rich and varied source of lesson plans and materials,
including photographs, slideshows, maps and a Montana tribal lands
Jeopardy-like game. All of the lessons align with Montana’s state-wide
content standards.
Photo credit: Jake Wallis
GRANTS AND PROGRAMS: 2002 - 2012
CULTURAL AWARENES S
Use Indian land to help Indian people discover and maintain their culture.
RESTORING CULTURAL TIES TO THE LAND
Land is a critical base for spiritual practices, beliefs and worship. Land can be a keeper
of memories, a portal to the spirit world or a place to go for guidance and strength. In
addition, the land supports traditional cultural practices such as hunting, fishing, farming
and harvesting wild foods. Maintaining strong ties to the land is necessary for preserving
religious beliefs and cultural traditions for future generations. ILTF is committed to
helping Indian nations document and protect their cultural and sacred sites and promoting
American Indian cultural awareness among tribal members and the general public.
ELDERS SHARE THEIR STORIES
The Snoqualmie Indian Tribe is one of the many Indian nations who make up the larger
group of Coast Salish peoples. Since time immemorial, the Snoqualmie have hunted deer,
elk and other game, fished for salmon, and gathered berries and wild plants for food
and medicinal purpose in the Puget Sound region. Snoqualmie Falls has always been at
the center of the Tribe’s spiritual traditions and is regarded by the Tribe as its birthplace.
In 2008, ILTF provided a grant to the Snoqualmie Indian Tribe for the Sacred Lands Project
to produce an educational video of recorded interviews with tribal elders recounting
the history, culture and spiritual beliefs of the Snoqualmie. The video is used by the Tribe
to educate tribal members about the places sacred to the Tribe and their historical and
cultural importance.
“The falls, it’s a spiritual place. It’s a beginning. We used to go to the waters and pray
under Indian ways and bless our children, our elders, people who needed healing. We
did that. Now you use baptism and other different words and we still do that, we still
go there in our troubled times for our guidance and help.”
Elsie Erickson, from the Sacred Lands Project
FIVE
GRANTS AND PROGRAMS: 2002 - 2012
ECONOM IC OPPORT UNITY
Increase economic assets of Indian landowners by gaining control of Indian lands and creating financial models
that convert land into leverage for Indian landowners.
REALIZING THE ECONOMIC POWER OF OUR LAND
Indian Country has seen funding sources come and go with largely unsuccessful efforts to reduce poverty and create sustainable economic development on Indian
lands. Contrary to popular belief, only a small percentage of Indian nations and tribal members have benefitted substantially from casino revenues. By supporting
land acquisition through our affiliate lender, Indian Land Capital Company, and by promoting sustainable economic development through projects such as National
Indian Carbon Coalition and through partnerships with other Native organizations and Indian nations, ILTF will decrease the economic imbalance plaguing Indian
communities while restoring Indian use and control of Indian land.
RETURNING BUFFALO TO THE GREAT PLAINS
“ The importance of buffalo to the Lakota way of life can’t be
Before buffalo were nearly driven from the Great Plains forever, the Lakota relied on this
underestimated. It sustained our people and many other tribes
sacred animal—Tatanka—to meet their basic needs for food, shelter, clothing and
for thousands of years. We want to help return health to the
ceremony. In this way, the buffalo sustained American Indian people for thousands of
diets, economies and ecosystems of Indian communities by
bringing buffalo back.”
Karlene Hunter, CEO, Native American Natural Foods
years. Through establishment of the Tanka Fund, we are helping the buffalo to return to
its rightful place.
The Tanka Fund was founded by Native American Natural Foods (NANF), makers of the
Tanka Bar, in partnership with ILTF in 2011. The Tanka Bar and other Tanka products are
made from Indian-raised buffalo meat, cranberries and other natural ingredients and
are based on traditional wasna recipes.
Karlene Hunter, NANF CEO, and company president Mark Tilsen, wanted to do more to
help Indian producers who were interested in entering buffalo production but did not
have the capital to get started. So they approached ILTF with the idea to create the Tanka
Fund as a way to bridge this gap by making dedicated resources available to support new
Indian producers and to generate awareness about the benefits of restoring buffalo to
Indian communities.
SIX
“The whole legal framework about Indian land and Indian tribes in the United States is very, very
flawed. You wouldn’t like it and you wouldn’t believe it if I told you the law provides that the federal
government can absolutely take Indian land at will without paying any compensation, without due
process of law, for any reason whatsoever. . . . The federal government can’t do that to anyone else
in the United States—only an Indian tribe.”
Robert T. (Tim) Coulter, Executive Director, Indian Law Resource Center
Photo credit: Jill Piper
GRANTS AND PROGRAMS: 2002 - 2012
LE GAL RE FORM
Reform the legal mechanisms related to recapturing physical,
cultural and economic assets for Indian people and strengthening sovereignty of Indian land.
REFORMING THE SYSTEM THAT CHALLENGES IT ALL
Today, approximately 56 million acres of reservation land are owned by Indian nations and people and held in trust by the federal government. Because of this trust
status, approval by the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) is required for nearly all land use decisions, such as selling, leasing, farming, building a home or starting a
business. This adds multiple layers of red tape that can severely hinder land use and management. In addition, the federal government has not always fulfilled its
obligations as trustee. In fact, its gross mishandling of the trust system has led to the loss of billions of dollars of income, mostly from improperly managed agricultural,
forestry and mineral leases on these lands and the resulting proceeds.
Also troubling is the fact that the lawmakers who devised the allotment of Indian land in the late 1800s did not account for how these lands would be transferred
to subsequent generations. As a result, when an allottee died, ownership was divided amongst all of the living heirs, but the land itself was not physically divided.
After more than a century of ownership interests being transferred in this way, the title to much Indian land is now severely “fractionated,” meaning there can
be hundreds or sometimes thousands of owners of one single parcel of land. Because the BIA holds these lands in trust, and gaining consent from co-owners to do
anything with the land is nearly impossible, Indian land often ends up unused or by default is leased to non-Indian farmers and ranchers by the BIA.
PLANNING FOR THE FUTURE
ILTF has long recognized that writing a will is one of the most effective ways for a landowner to consolidate trust ownership interests and prevent the further
fractionation of Indian land title. In 2003, ILTF funded four estate planning projects covering a broad geography. The success of these projects led ILTF to create
and staff the Institute for Indian Estate Planning and Probate. The Institute, now supported by Seattle University School of Law, continues to provide outreach,
education and will writing services for Indian nations throughout the Pacific Northwest and has been involved in the writing of more than 2,000 wills. In late 2011,
ILTF launched a three-year will writing initiative to provide free community education and estate planning services for four Minnesota Indian nations: Bois Forte
Band of Chippewa, Fond du Lac Band of Lake Superior Chippewa, Leech Lake Band of Ojibwe and Mille Lacs Band of Ojibwe.
“Words cannot describe how thankful I am for the completion of my will. I have procrastinated for many years to accomplish this task.”
Avis C. Poupart, Leech Lake Band of Ojibwe
NATIVE LAND LAW
The issues surrounding Indian land tenure are deeply complex and long-term solutions will require legislative and/or legal reform at the federal, state, local and
tribal level. One of ILTF’s most ambitious projects to date has been to partner with the Indian Law Resource Center to develop a new legal framework for laws
related to Native lands and natural resources that accurately reflects what the law is and proposes reforms that clarify what the law should be. Titled Native Land
Law: General Principles of Law Relating to Native Lands and Natural Resources, the treatise has been published by Thomson Reuters and serves as a resource for
practicing lawyers, judges, academics, Indian nations and all people who have an interest in reforming U.S. law to create fairness for Indian nations.
EIGHT
GRANTS AND PROGRAMS: 2002 - 2012
S PECIAL INITIATIVES
While ILTF primarily funds projects that address our established strategies, sometimes we support other unique
and innovative ideas that may not fit neatly into this framework but still fulfill our mission. Some of these projects
have included land recovery efforts, advocacy, events and public education projects.
CHANGING PUBLIC PERCEPTIONS THROUGH MEDIA
In 2005, ILTF produced a full-length documentary, American Indian Homelands: Matters of Truth, Honor
and Dignity—Immemorial. Narrated by Sam Donaldson and winner of a 2006 Telly Award, the film documents
the devastating effects of federal law and policy on Indian land ownership. It includes interviews with
many of the people trying to reform the oppressive legal and administrative systems that prevent Indian people
from controlling their own lands. One of those people is the late Elouise Cobell, lead plaintiff of Cobell v.
Salazar, who sued the U.S. Department of the Interior on behalf of 500,000 Indian landowners and won.
“The United States government has breached the trust responsibility and the individual
Indian beneficiaries for so long that they think it’s normal . . . the fraud and corruption that has
been allowed to happen has got to stop.”
Elouise Cobell, Blackfeet Nation
NATIVE WOMEN AND YOUTH IN AGRICULTURE
From 2005 through 2008, ILTF provided support to Native Women and Youth in Agriculture to support an
annual student essay contest and banquet held during the Intertribal Agriculture Council annual conference.
Youth from across Indian Country were invited to submit essays on a series of topics that addressed the
importance of land in American Indian food systems and culture. Essay winners won several prizes, including
scholarship funds, and read their essays to a crowd of approximately 700 banquet attendees.
“The land and people are sacred to each other and we treat the earth with respect. In return the land gives us food, water,
clothes and shelter to survive. Then we give the land blessing and prayers for providing us with many things.”
Nehemiah Yazzie, Navajo, Student at Shiprock High School (2007)
NINE
Photo credit: Donna LaChapelle
INDIAN NATIONS ASSISTED: 2002 - 2012
Absentee Shawnee Tribe of Oklahoma * Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians * Arctic Village Aroostook Band of Micmac Indians * Bad River Band of Lake Superior Chippewa *
Beaver Village * Big Lagoon Rancheria * Big Pine Paiute Tribe of the Owens Valley * Big Sandy Rancheria Band of Western Mono Indians * Blackfeet Nation * Bois Forte Band of Chippewa
* Burns Paiute Tribe * Cahto Tribe of the Laytonville Rancheria * Campo Kumeyaay Nation * Chalkyitsik Village * Cher-Ae Heights Indian Community of Trinidad * Cherokee Nation *
Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribes of Oklahoma * Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe * Chickasaw Nation * Chippewa Cree Indians of the Rocky Boy's Reservation * Choctaw Nation of
Oklahoma * Circle Native Community * Citizen Potawatomi Nation * Coeur d'Alene Tribe * Confederated Salish & Kootenai Tribes * Confederated Tribe of the Coos, Lower Umpqua &
Siuslaw Indians * Confederated Tribes of the Chehalis Reservation * Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation * Confederated Tribes of the Grand Ronde * Confederated Tribes
of the Umatilla Indian Reservation * Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs * Coquille Indian Tribe * Council of Athabascan Tribal Governments * Coushatta Tribe of Louisiana * Crow Creek
Sioux Tribe * Crow Tribe * Delaware Nation * Duckwater Shoshone Tribe * Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians * Eastern Pequot Tribal Nation * Flandreau Santee Sioux Tribe * Fond du Lac
Band of Lake Superior Chippewa * Forest County Potawatomi * Fort Belknap Indian Community * Fort McDermitt Paiute and Shoshone Tribes * Fort McDowell Yavapai Nation * Fort
Mojave Indian Tribe * Fort Peck Assiniboine & Sioux Tribes * Grand Portage Band of Minnesota Chippewa * Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa & Chippewa Indians * Hannahville
Indian Community * Ho-Chunk Nation * Hoh Tribe * Hoopa Valley Indian Tribe * Hopi Tribe * Hopland Band of Pomo Indians * Houlton Band of Maliseet Indians * Hualapai Tribe
* Iipay Nation of Santa Ysabell * Iowa Tribe of Oklahoma * Jamestown S'Klallam Tribe * Kalispel Tribe of Indians * Karuk Tribe of California * Kenaitze Indian Tribe * Kialegee Tribal
Town * Kickapoo Tribe in Kansas * Klamath Tribes * Lac Courte Oreilles Band of Lake Superior Chippewa * Lac du Flambeau Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians * Lac Vieux Desert
Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians * Leech Lake Band of Ojibwe * Little River Band of Ottawa Indians * Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians * Lower Brule Sioux Tribe *
Lower Sioux Indian Community of Minnesota * Lummi Nation * Menominee Indian Tribe of Wisconsin * Mescalero Apache Tribe * Miami Tribe of Oklahoma * Miccosukee Tribe of Indians of
Florida * Mille Lacs Band of Ojibwe * Minnesota Chippewa Tribe * Morongo Band of Mission Indians * Muckleshoot Indian Tribe * Muscogee (Creek) Nation * Narragansett Indian Tribe *
Native Village of Kassan * Native Village of Kotzebue * Native Village of Stevens * Native Village of Venetie Tribal Government * Navajo Nation * Nez Perce Tribe * Nisqually Indian Community
* Nooksack Indian Tribe * North Fork Mono Tribe * Northern * Arapaho Tribe * Northern Cheyenne Tribe * Oglala Sioux Tribe * Oneida Indian Nation * Oneida Nation of Wisconsin *
Onondaga Indian Nation * Osage Nation * Passamaquoddy Tribe Indian Township * Passamaquoddy Tribe Pleasant Point * Pauma Band of Luiseño Mission Indians * Pechanga Band
of Luiseño Indians * Penobscot Indian Nation * Poarch Band of Creek Indians * Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians * Ponca Tribe of Oklahoma * Prairie Band of Potawatomi Nation
* Prairie Island Indian Community of Minnesota * Pueblo of Isleta * Pueblo of Jemez * Pueblo of Laguna * Pueblo of San Felipe * Pueblo of Sandia * Pueblo of Zuni * Puyallup Tribe of
Indians * Pyramid Lake Paiute Tribe * Quechan Nation * Quileute Nation * Quinault Indian Nation * Rampart Village * Red Cliff Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians * Red Lake
Nation * Rincon Band of San Luiseño Indians * Rosebud Sioux Tribe * Round Valley Indian Tribes * Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe * Salt River Pima Maricopa Indian Community * San Carlos
Apache Tribe * San Manuel Band of Mission Indians * San Pasqual Band of Diegueno Mission Indians * Santa Ynez Ban of Chumash Indians * Santee Sioux Nation * Sauk-Suiattle
Indian Tribe * Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians * Seminole Nation of Oklahoma * Seminole Tribe of Florida * Seneca-Cayuga Tribe of Oklahoma * Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux
Community * Shawnee Tribe * Shoalwater Bay Indian Tribe * Shoshone Bannock Tribes * Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate of the Lake Traverse Reservation * Snoqualmie Indian Tribe * Soboba Band
of Luiseño Indians * Sokaogon Chippewa Community of Mole Lake Band * Southern Ute Indian Tribe * Spirit Lake Tribe * Spokane Tribe of Indians * Squaxin Island Tribe * Standing
Rock Sioux Tribe * Stockbridge Munsee Community Band of Mohican Indians * Suquamish Indian Tribe * Susanville Indian Rancheria * Swinomish Indian Tribal Community * Taos Pueblo
* Three Affiliated Tribes of Mandan, Hidatsa, Arika * Timbisha Shoshone Tribe * Tonawanda Band of Seneca Indians * Torres-Martinez Desert Cahuilla Indians * Tulalip Tribes * Tunica-Biloxi
Indian Tribe * Tuolumne Band of Me-Wuk Indians * Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians * Twenty-Nine Palms Band of Mission Indians * Upper Sioux Community of Minnesota
* Upper Skagit Indian Tribe * Ute Indian Tribe * Walker River Paiute Tribe * Wampanoag Tribe of Gay Head (Aquinnah) * Washoe Tribe of Nevada & California * White Earth Nation *
Yakama Nation * Yankton Sioux Tribe * Yavapai-Apache Nation of Camp Verde * Yavapai-Prescot Indian Tribe * Yocha Dehe Wintun Nation * Yomba Shoshone Tribe * Yurok Tribe
ELEVEN
ORGANIZATIONAL AND TRIBAL SUPPORTERS: 2002 - 2012
Aerial Data Service * AIM Interpretive Center * Ain Dah Yung Shelter * All Nations Indian Church * American Association of University Women * American Indian College Fund * American
Indian Community Development Corporation * American Indian Economic Development Fund * American Indian Policy Center * Appeal * Associated Bank * Auscon * Bad River Lodge
and Casino * Bank2 * Benson Carpet * Berthel Schutter * Best & Flanagan * Binder Heating and AC * Birchbark Books * Black Bear Crossing * Blackfeet Reservation Development Corporation
*
Blandin Foundation * Booth Publications * Bromelkamp Company * Edward and Markell C.Brooks Family Fund * Bush Foundation * Cahto Tribe of the Laytonville Rancheria * Margaret
A. Cargill Foundation * Cher-Ae Heights Indian Community of Trinidad Ranch * Cherokee Preservation Foundation * Chickasaw Nation Industries * The Circle * Community Development
Financial Institution * Complete Construction * Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation * Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation * Confederated Tribes of Warm
Springs * Conscious Change * Crowley, White & Helmer * Dan Dugan Foundation * Dan-Bar Homes * Dorsey & Whitney Foundation * Dorsey & Whitney * E Noodle Café * Educators
Financial Services * Edward Jones * Electrical Consultants * The Event Group Incorporated * Experimental College * F. R. Bigelow Foundation * Faegre Baker Daniels * Fairview Foundation
*
F. B. Heron Foundation * Fiduciary Management * Filmmakers Collaborative * First Universalist Church * Fond du Lac Band of Lake Superior Chippewa * Ford Foundation * Forest County
Potawatomi Foundation * Foundation for Community Vitality * GiveMN * Grand Portage Band of Minnesota Chippewa * Gray Plant Mooty * GSB Construction Management Services *
Heard Museum Library * Heathglenn Farm * Higher Education Consortium for Urban Affairs * Ho-Chunk Nation * Holland & Hart * Honor Our Neighbors Origins and Rights * HRK
Foundation * Idaho Legal Aid Services * Ingenus Management and Consulting * Intertribal Agriculture Council * Intertribal Software Consultants * International Rights of Way Association
*
ISHPI * Janet Hamilton Triplett Trust * Juel Fairbanks Chemical Dependency Services * Kenaitze Indian Tribe * KeyBank * John S. and James L. Knight Foundation * LaSalle Development
Group * Latino Economic Development Center * Laura Berg Consulting * Law Office of Lisa L. Atkinson * Law Office of Maureen McCormmach * Lawyers Title * Leech Lake Band of
Ojibwe
*
The Lindsay Legacy Fund
*
Little Earth of United Tribes
Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians
*
*
Lower Sioux Indian Community of Minnesota
*
Lundrigan's
*
Maka Foundation * Marcus McCoy Foundation * Marketing Incentive Resources * Marketplace Productions * Marnita's Table * Matt's Custom Stripes and Graphics * MBH Surveyors
*
Media Workshop * Menards * Mille Lacs Band of Ojibwe * The Minneapolis Foundation * Minnesota American Indian Chamber of Commerce * Minnesota Campus Compact * Minnesota
Historical Society * Mobile Giving Foundation * Morongo Band of Mission Indians * MTG Engineers * Muckleshoot Indian Tribe * Multicultural Endowment * National Congress of
American Indians * National Rural Funders Collaborative * Native American Bank * Native American Catering * Native American Community Development Corporation * Native American
Community Development Institute * Native American Rainbow Network * Native Americans in Philanthropy * Nez Perce Tribe * Nisqually Indian Community * Northland Native
American Products * Northwest Area Foundation * Oneida Indian Nation * Otto Bremer Foundation * Park Midway Bank * The Paul G. Allen Foundation * Pechanga Development
Corporation * Pepsi/NEI Bottling Company * Piper Jaffray * Poarch Band of Creek Indians * Poitra Consulting * POPP Communications * Potawatomi Business Development Corporation
*
PSOMAS * Pyramid Lake Paiute Tribe * The Rapids Foundation * Razoo Foundation * Red Lake Gaming Enterprises * Red Lake Nation * Red Plains Surveying Company * Russell Surveying *
S and K Technologies * S and T Office Products * Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe * The Saint Paul Foundation * Salt River Pima Maricopa Indian Community * San Manuel Band of Mission
Indians * San Pasqual Band of Diegueno Mission Indians * Seattle University * Seneca Allegany Casino and Hotel * Seven Clans Casino Thief River Falls * Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux
Community * Shoshone Bannock Tribes * Silver Fox * SOVRAN * St. John the Evangelist Episcopal Church * Summit Engineering Corporation * Sushi Tango * Swinomish Indian Tribal
Community * Thalden Boyd Emery Architects * Thomas and Lassiter Family Fund * TICOM * The Tom Glynn Company * Topographic Land Surveyors * Travelers Foundation * Treasure
Island Resort and Casino * Tuolumne Band of Me-Wuk Indians * Twenty-Nine Palms Band of Mission Indians * Two Feathers Endowment * Ulland Investment Advisors * Ulteig * United
South and Eastern Tribes
*
Upper Sioux Community of Minnesota
*
US Department of Health and Human Services, Administration of Native Americans
*
USDA Office of Tribal
Relations * USDA Risk Management Agency * Valley Venture Group * Vassallo Fabrication/Installation * VIP Hair Designs * Wallinga Design * Wells Fargo Home Mortgage * White Earth
Nation * Wilson and Company * Wind River Alliance * Woodland Indian Crafts * Words on Fire Communications * WHPacific * Yavapai-Apache Nation of Camp Verde * ZeVan Corporation
THIRTEEN
INDIVIDUAL SUPPORTERS: 2002 - 2012
Anonymous * Ruth Agar * Kimberly Andrade * Lee Antell * John and Nina Archabal * Jocelyn Archer * Andrew Arsham * Dana Austin * Sara Axtell * Stacey Ayers * David Baker * Aaron
Barr * George Barr * Nichole Barr * Victor Barr * Yvonne Barrett * Dawn Battiste * Josh Beal * Fred Bigjim * John Bobolink * Catherine Bohrer * Jason Booth * D'Arcy Bordeaux *
J. Tonny Bowman * Kenneth Bowman * Barry Boyer * Wilson Bradshaw * Christine Bremer * Denise Breton * James and Cindy Bronczyk * Ellis Bullock * Asu Burik * Cecelia Burke
*
Julie Cajune * Gail Campbell * Theresa Carmody * Cari Carpenter * Patricia Chase * Gabrielle Clark * Garfield Clark * John L. Cleveland * Brian Collins * Carolie Collins * Michèle
Corsange * Art Coulson * Robert ''Tim'' Coulter * David Cournoyer * Freyda Craw * Josee Cung * Maya Daurio * Jill Davis * Michael Davis * Sharon Day * Kathy Denman-Wilke
*
Erin Dennis * S. Dennis * Shane Dennis * Amy Denouden * Nicholas Dethier * Macy Dick * Shelley M. Dickison * Marisa DiDiano * Jackie Dionne * Humphrey and Elisabeth Doermann
*
John Dossett * Diane Dovenberg Lewis * Loretta Draths * Kelly Drummer Perkins * Virgil Dupuis * Deborah Edwards-Anderson * Staci Emm * Sam English * Larry Erickson
*
Jonathan Ewing * Kristina Fielding * Christian Finch * Dorothy Firecloud * Cornelia Flora * Jan Flora * Jamie Ford * Jon and Carolyn Ford * Sharon Franklet * Sharon Franquemont
*
David Freeman * Luz Frias * Albert and Judith Gage * Richard Garland * Tony Genia * Paulette Gibson * David Glass * Catherine Glover * Vonda Gluck * Jose Gonzalez * Norman
Good * Sheila Gothmann * Roxanne Gould * Sherry Gray * LM Garcia Greigo * Michelle Grosz * Eileen Grundstrom * Rudy Guglielmo * Kent Gustafson * Daniel Hack * Arvel Hale *
Katherine Hanson * Paulita Harness * Jean and B.C. Hart * Graham Hartley * Mary Heer-Forsberg * Marlene Helgemo Whiterabbit * Desiree Heller * Alan D. Henaman * Sarah Hernandez
*
Jettie Ann Hill * Joseph Hiller * Charles Hilliard * Arthur Himmelman * Jennifer Leimaile Ho * Shirley Hokanson * Carol Holmes * Karin Holser * John Hunter * Margie Hutchinson *
Terry Janis * Eric Jeanotte * Ralph Jersild * Carol Johnson * Fred Johnson * Michael Johnson * Scott Johnson * Ted Jojola * Birch and Shirley Jones * Sharon Kavanaugh * Rollin and
Twila Kekahbah * Donovan T. Kelly * Velma and Kent Kimsal * Harvey Klevar * Lou Anne Kling * Bruce Knutson * Todd Knutson * Suzanne Carol Koepplinger * Theodora Kramer *
Jane Kretzmann * Donna LaChapelle * Richard LaFortune * Arthur Gary Lamppa * Priscilla Laskey * Kuhn Lee * Lavon Lee * Adele Lennig * Georgia Lickness * Mary Liebman * Rose
Locatelli * Bill Lorentz * Renee Louis * David and Roxanne Lucchesi * Jim Lutz * Richard Lyman * Kaya MacMillen * Terry Maltarich * Francisca Manriquez * Michael Marolt * Audrey
Martinez * Cecilia Martinez * Susan Maxwell * Denise Mayotte * Toby McAdams * Gloria McCarty * Anise McDowell * Ronald McKinley * Jodi Melamed * Tina Mercurio * Rose Merriam
*
Kim Meyer * Yusef Mgeni * Sue Miller * Paul Mohrbacher * James Morrison * Mary Jo Mullan * Nora Murphy * David and Karen Nasby * Douglas Nash * Phyllis Nash * Stacy Nation-
Knapper * Rick and Rosie Novitsky * Amelia Ortega * Brenda Owen-Milano * Clarine Packineau * Louise Pardee * Anton Patrick * Patricia Paul * Al Paulson * Chuck Peterson * W'Kawin
PethaKwanink * Candida Petite * Alexandra ''Sandi'' Pierce * Marie Podratz * Chad Poitra * Andrew Pooler * John Poupart * Patricia Prescott * JoAnn Puckett * Phebe Quattrucci *
Ross Racine * Reid Raymond * John Red Horse * James Rickert * Gregory Ritter * Phillip Romine * Lee Roper-Batker * Randy Ross * Randi Roth * Kevin Royce * Jessica Ryan * Enrique
Salazar
*
Elaine Salinas
*
Marnita Schroedl
*
Eric Schultz
*
Paul and Mary Jo Schupmann
*
Diana Schutter
*
Frank and Kathy Schweigert
*
Robert and Karen Shaler
*
Gerald
Sherman * Rowzat Shipchandler * Carrie Jo Short * Judith Siegle * John Sirois * Christine Sleeter * Alicia Smith * Laura Smith * Thomas Smith * Neely Snyder * Martin Soulier * Dawnena
Squirrel- Mackey
*
Cooper Stainbrook
*
Cris Stainbrook
*
Tesla Stainbrook
*
John Stanfield
*
Karen Starr
*
Jo-Anne Stately
*
Frederick Street
*
Imre Sutton
*
Louise Taylor
*
Mala Thao * Rae Thiede * William Tovey * Howard Valandra * Marisol Valerio * Kimberly and Jan Vanderwall * Long Vang * Edward 'Eddie' Villaume * Mary Voight * Lisa Vuong-Deo-Campo
*
Adam Wachter
*
Wendy Wehr
*
Catherine Whipple
*
Emily White Hat
*
Elladean Wikstrom
*
Paul Williams
*
Diane Wilson
*
Marlys Wisch
*
Sheldon Wolfchild
*
Patricia
Wolfgram * K. Wolslegel * Lynn Yamanaka * William Yang * Linda Yardley * Diana Yellowhammer * Matthew and Nicole Youngvorst * Pamela Zeller * Barry ZeVan * Clare Zupetz
FOURTEEN
“Networking makes me feel better. I always thought we were in the dark ages
but we’re actually doing a pretty good job.”
Sheri Miner, Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe
2011 GRANTS AND CONTRACTS
ED UCAT ION
E CONOMIC D E VE LOPM ENT
Adam Beach Endowment for Native Arts Scholarships
•••
$8,900
Native American Community Development Corporation
$43,076
to support scholarships for First Nations People of Canada and American
Browning, Montana
Indian students who attend accredited colleges and universities within
to conclude the Northern Plains Economic Sovereignty Project on the
the United States of America and who major in performing arts programs.
Fort Peck and Fort Belknap reservations.
Ball State University - Muncie, Indiana
•••
$1,500
L E GAL REFORM
to support development of the ILTF curriculum at the college level at
Swanson, Drobnick & Tousey P.C.
Ball State University with commitment to on-going implementation of
Woodbury, Minnesota
the course as part of the Native American Indian Studies program.
Nichlas D. Emmons - Muncie, Indiana
•••
•••
•••
$39,170
to support contract services for the Minnesota Indian Estate Planning
$1,698
Project, a three-year project to provide free community education
to provide consulting services relating to completion of research that
and estate planning services for tribal members of four Minnesota Indian
will use interviews to better understand and identify factors that
nations: Bois Forte Band of Chippewa; Fond du Lac Band of Lake
promote involvement with traditional Potawatomi customs, tribal life
Superior Chippewa; Leech Lake Band of Ojibwe; and Mille Lacs Band
and engagement with the land.
of Ojibwe.
Prescott College, Inc. - Prescott, Arizona
•••
$135,000
to support adaptation, implementation and marketing of the California
“Lessons of Our Land” curriculum.
2011 SPECIAL EVENTS
TRIBAL LAND STAFF NATIONAL CONFERENCE
In April 2011, ILTF hosted the first ever Tribal Land Staff National Conference in Las Vegas, Nevada. More than
100 participants from across Indian Country attended the three-day conference which offered workshops,
training and networking opportunities for tribal land professionals. A second conference was held in 2012 which
had twice the attendance, and plans are already underway for 2013. One outcome of the conference has been
the formation of a new group, the National Tribal Land Association (NTLA), which has taken a leadership role in
planning the annual conference. Currently a volunteer-based organization, NTLA has created a board of directors
and several committees toward the long-term goal of creating a national membership association to meet the
needs of tribal land professionals.
SIXTEEN
2011 CONTRIBUTIONS
DONORS OF $1,000 OR MORE
DONORS OF $100 - $499
DONORS OF UNDER $100
David Baker
Ruth Agar
John Hunter
Kimberly Andrade
Lou Anne Kling
Dawn Battiste
John and Nina Archabal
Kenaitze Indian Tribe
Dana Austin
Renee Louis
Berthel Schutter
Andrew Arsham
Laura Berg Consulting
Barry Boyer
Native American
Shane Dennis
D’Arcy Bordeaux
Susan Maxwell
Bromelkamp Company
Ho-Chunk Nation
Patricia Chase
Brenda Owen-Milano
Cari Carpenter
Anton Patrick
Karin Holser
Erin Dennis
Marie Podratz
Edward Jones
Reid Raymond
Mary Jo Mullan
Diane Dovenberg-Lewis
Diana Schutter
Kristina Fielding
Judith Siegle
Cris Stainbrook
Virgil Dupuis
Jo-Anne Stately
Fond du Lac Band
Laura Smith
Louise Taylor
Staci Emm
Wallinga Design
of Lake Superior Chippewa
Paulita Harness
Jonathan Ewing
Rainbow Network
John Stanfield
Upper Sioux Community
of Minnesota
DONORS OF $500 - $999
Jan Flora
Shirley Hokanson
David Freeman
Jamie Ford
Ralph Jersild
White Earth Nation
Arvel Hale
Joseph Hiller
Scott Johnson
Diana Yellowhammer
Ted Jojola
National Congress of American Indians
Thank you to everyone who contributed in 2011. We appreciate your support!
COMBINED FEDERAL CAMPAIGN
$4,515.25 was donated to ILTF through the 2011 Combined Federal Campaign, the annual workplace fundraising drive conducted by federal employees and military personnel.
FUNDERS
Blandin Foundation
$5,000 for 2011 summer internships; $500 for the distribution of
“Cutting through the Red Tape.”
Ho-Chunk Nation
$1,000 for a meeting to discuss a tribally-based strategy for implementing the Cobell Land
Consolidation Program.
Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for
Children and Families, Administration for Native Americans (ANA)
$120,560 for the Minnesota Indian Estate Planning Project
(first year of a three-year $402,560 grant).
Margaret A. Cargill Foundation
$48,361 for general operating support
($10,000 of which represents the third year of a five-year $50,000 grant).
Forest County Potawatomi Foundation
$10,000 for 2011 student internships.
Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community
$250,000 recoverable grant for support to Native American Natural Foods.
Travelers Foundation
$10,000 for development of new online platform for ILTF’s K-12 curriculum, “Lessons of Our Land.”
SEVENTEEN
2011 FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
ASSETS
REVENUES AND EXPENDITURES
Cash and Cash Equivalents
Investments
729,494
Revenues
11,758,771
Accounts Receivable
Fundraising Income
12,093
25,895
Grants and Awards
820,133
Grants Receivable
255,954
Interest and Investment Income
(284,464)
Funds Held for Others
250,000
Other Income
348,139
Interest Receivable
145,632
Total Revenue
909,703
Prepaid Expenses and Other Assets
1,505
Expenditures
Notes Receivable, net of allowance for
uncollectible notes of $334,744 and 231,169
4,931,944
Property and Equipment, net
Total Assets
Salaries/Taxes/Benefits
770,327
Advertising
18,855,720
Depreciation
LIABILITIES AND NET ASSETS AND MINORITY INTEREST
852,244
2,051
57,763
Insurance
6,561
Dues and Subscriptions
6,753
Accounts Payable
45,405
Postage
26,547
Grants Payable
80,364
Office Expenses
58,508
Professional Fees
37,147
Recoverable Grants
Accrued Payroll Expenses
Accrued Interest
Deferred Revenue
250,000
Contracted Services
42,302
Rental
5,000
Repairs and Maintenance
125,000
329,021
70
6,743
Notes Payable
3,500,000
Grants
10,400
Total Liabilities
4,048,071
Travel Expenses
85,650
Utilities
NET ASSETS
Unrestricted
Temporarily Restricted
Minority Interest
1,492,170
13,315,479
---
Board Expenses
41,287
Communications
61,286
Interest
37,525
Other Expenses
152,970
Indian Land Capital Company
348,831
Total Net Assets and Minority Interest
14,807,649
Total Expenditures
Total Liabilities and Net Assets
18,855,720
Revenue over Expenditures
EIGHTEEN
5,567
2,126,924
(1,217,221)
OUR PEOPLE
“Land is the most important resource for tribes and tribal members. Ownership of workable tracts of land
provides financial resources, a place of being and cultural history.”
William Tovey, ILTF Board Member
BOARD MEMBERS SINCE INCEPTION
PRE S E NT
David Baker
Clara Niiska
+
STAFF
+ D’Arcy Bordeaux
PAST
+
John E. Sirois, Chair
+
Ben Black Bear (2001-2008)
+
Staci Emm, Vice Chair
+
Theresa Carmody (2001-2007)
+
William Tovey, Secretary/Treasurer
+
Brian Collins (2001-2008)
+
David Baker
+
Virgil Dupuis (2001-2012)
+
Dawn Battiste
+
Jeremiah Farrow (2002-2004)
+
Joseph Brewer II
+
Erick Giles (2006-2011)
Accountant/Human Resources Director
+ Pat Chase
Office Manager/Grants Manager
+ Erin Dennis
Communications Director
+ Jamie Ford
Development Officer
+ Erick Giles
+
Reginald DeFoe
+
Arvel Hale (2001-2008)
+
Laura Harjo
+
Michael Kotutwa Johnson (2007-2011)
+
Joseph G. Hiller
+
Douglas Nash (2001-2005)
+
Margie Hutchinson
+
Janet Nicholson (2001-2002)
+
Bryan Maracle
+
Ross Racine (2001-2011)
+
David Tovey (2001-2008)
+
Emily White Hat (2005-2007)
+ Mark Jacobson
Development Director
+ Terry Janis
Program Officer
+ Cris Stainbrook
President
+ Diana Yellowhammer
INVESTMENT COMMITTEE
+
W.E. “Bye” Barsness
+
Thomas Hotovec
Program Director,
National Indian Carbon Coalition
Administrative Assistant
+
John R. Schweers
For the past 10 years, Indian Land Tenure Foundation (ILTF) has been assisting Indian nations and individual Indian people in
the return of their rightful homelands. Since inception in 2002, ILTF has worked with 190 Indian nations and Alaska Native villages
and provided nearly $20 million in grants and programs to support Indian land recovery and management efforts.
You can help us to continue this important work by making a direct contribution to ILTF at:
www.iltf.org/get-involved
Cover photo: Michael Kotutwa Johnson
151 East County Road B2
•
Little Canada, MN 55117
•
P) 651-766 - 8999
•
www.iltf.org