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Herald-Citizen - Creative Circle Media Solutions
Sunday
Herald-Citizen
The Daily Newspaper of the Upper Cumberland
114th Year — No. 25
Weather
Today
Tonight
Cookeville, Tennessee, January 31, 2016
Pickett double murder case bound over
By tRaCeY HaCKett
HERALD-CITIZEN Staff
61º
52º
Complete forecast, Page 2
Sports
52 Pages — 7 Sections • $1.50
COOKEVILLE — “No amount of
money is worth what I’ve done.”
That’s what the Kentucky man accused
of killing a Pickett County father and son
and robbing their place of business in July
2014 reportedly told an agent from the
Tennessee Bureau of Investigation just a
day after the incident happened.
Joshua Clay Pyles, of Monticello, Ky.,
case would be bound over to the grand
jury and that Pyles will continue to be
held without bond.
That preliminary hearing was a long
time coming since Pyles waived preliminary hearings previously in both general
Joshua Clay Pyles
sessions and criminal courts.
Pyles
Accused murderer, according to TBI agent
But it was important that the case be
heard on remand by a special judge, said
is charged with two counts of first-degree And in a preliminary hearing held in defense attorney Wesley Bray, the third to
murder for the shooting deaths of Dannie Putnam County on Friday, Judge Todd
and Cody Dowdy on July 30, 2014.
Burnett of Fentress County ruled that the
See MuRdeR, Page 3
“No amount of money is worth
what I’ve done.”
CFD Retirements
Showdown
Golden Eagles host
Belmost in matchup
of top two teams in
OVC East /F1
By MeGan tRotteR
HERALD-CITIZEN Staff
burning house, and I felt the floor
under my feet get a little spongy. One
of my feet went through the floor, and
the pant leg of my protective gear
rode up, causing me to burn my leg,”
he said.
“I just knew the floor was about to
collapse into the basement, and I remember thinking ‘I’m about to die,’”
he said.
He shouted to the firefighter behind
him, “Get out of here!”
BAXTER — After the discussion at this
month’s session of the Baxter Planning Commission, the mayor has decided not to change
the current appointment of board members
after the question arose as to the appointment’s legality.
At the meeting of the Baxter Board of
Mayor and Aldermen earlier this month, one
of the aldermen announced that he had become aware that there were two members of
the Baxter Planning Commission who did
not live in Baxter. In his research, he found
that in the city’s zoning ordinance that it says
that members of the Baxter Planning Commission must be “citizens of Baxter” who are
appointed by the mayor. He raised the question on the legality of
having two people on
the board who do not
live in the city.
At this month’s meeting of the Baxter Planning Commission, Sue
Neal, one of the two
non-resident members
of the commission, addressed the board on bewilhite
half of herself and the
other
non-resident,
Sandy Birdwell.
“I personally consider it an insult,” Neal
said. “I have worked hard for a lot of years,
and when I need something or I need a
helper, I call Sandy. I’ve never had her yet to
turn me down.”
Neal explained that both she and Birdwell
own property in Baxter, pay taxes and can
vote. Birdwell’s business is in Baxter, and
Neal works in Baxter as well.
“Sandy and I happen to be people who do
not pillow our head here, but I’m here 12
hours a day, six days a week,” Neal said.
See RetiRe, Page 2
See BaxteR, Page 3
Living
Tracey Hackett | Herald-Citizen
Gallery
Walter Derryberry
talks about his
mother’s work /C1
Schools
two Cookeville Fire department lieutenants, wayne McClain and Mike Broyles, are congratulated
on their retirements. From left are CFd Captain daryl Blair, McClain, Broyles, and CPd Chief Roger
Fuqua.
CFD lieutenants look
back over 30-year careers
By tRaCeY HaCKett
HERALD-CITIZEN Staff
Snow day!
SAC program helps parents when schools are
closed for snow /B1
Index
Abby.................................C2
Business ...........................D1
Calendar...........................A6
Crossword ........................B5
Obituaries ......................A10
Jean Essex
James Ross
Harold Boatman
Corbet Hood
Hazel Carter
Robert Dixon
Deborah Napier
Jeffrey Henry
Pam Westrick
Opinion............................A4
Sudoku .............................B5
Weather ...........................A2
Baxter
mayor backs
Planning
Commission
makeup
COOKEVILLE — Watch where
you’re going and remember where
you’ve been — it’s an adage that firefighters live by each day.
But at the end of a long and successful career, it’s only natural to focus
more on remembering.
That’s something Lts. Mike Broyles
and Wayne McClain have been doing
a lot of lately, as they each retire from
a nearly 30-year career with the
Cookeville Fire Department.
“This is the best thing I’ve ever done
in my life. It feels awesome at the end
of the day to know you’ve helped
someone and maybe even saved
someone’s life,” Broyles said.
And that someone’s life you save
might even be one of your coworkers,
McClain adds.
“We literally depend on each other
for our lives,” he said.
McClain remembers a time when a
coworker likely saved his life.
“I was pulling a hoseline through a
Jeep crew a ‘godsend’ during recent snow storm
By LauRa MiLitana
HERALD-CITIZEN Staff
COOKEVILLE — It’s a new group with
only a few members, but the members of the
Jeeps and Wrenches Rescue and Recovery
group became a valuable resource during the
snow storm on Jan. 22.
This is especially true for personnel at
Cookeville Regional Medical Center and the
timing was just perfect for Corey LeCompte,
CRMC respiratory therapist, to be off when
that storm hit.
“Thursday was my last day off for a while,”
he recalled. “So before I left, I put my contact
info on the board and told my supervisor that
if anyone needed a ride to or from work when
this storm hits, I would be available to help.”
The East Tennessee group was established in
October after seeing how helpful members
were in Nashville during the February 2015
ice storm. The “wrenches” part of the name
came from an event where fellow Jeep enthusiasts helped each other out with modifications on other Jeeps. Some could not afford
the cost of the upgrades and the labor to install
so everyone pitched in to help each other out.
“That’s the whole idea of the group — to pay
it forward,” LeCompte said. “We don’t accept
money or donations.”
There were six vehicles and six guys doing
the work while LeCompte’s wife and ICU
PRN, Dana Kilgore-LeCompte, did the dispatching.
“I lost count of how many people we
helped,” she said.
The first person LeCompte helped early Friday as the storm was hitting was a fellow respiratory therapist in Cumberland Cove.
“The roads were terrible up there,” he said.
“But she had to get to work. So I got her to the
hospital and then met with other group memSee Snow, Page 2
Laura Militana | Herald-Citizen
Pam tisher, CRMC nursing supervisor, left, stands with Corey
Lepcompte and Karen Gann, coordinators of the local Jeeps and
wrenches Rescue and Recovery group.
A-2 — HERALD-CITIZEN, Cookeville, Tenn. — www.herald-citizen.com — Sunday, January 31, 2016
LOCAL
READER
SERVICES
RETIRE: Two
firefighters end
30-year careers
Contact us:
Address:
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Cookeville, Tenn.
From Page A1
Mailing Address:
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Cookeville TN 38502
Ty Kernea | Herald-Citizen
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Preparing for this year’s Cupid’s Chase are, in front, from left, Seth King, Community
Options Business Advisory Council (COBAC) member; Jeanette Preece, executive director; Amanda Franklin, program manager; and Charles West, COBAC member. In
back: Jennifer Bartlett, COBAC member; Martha Howard, COBAC member; Rita Caldwell, administrative assistant; Bill Gibson, COBAC member; Donna Brown, staffing coordinator; and Denice Poston, COBAC member.
Spread
the
love
with
Cupid’s
Chase
By MEGAN TROTTER
HERALD-CITIZEN Staff
COOKEVILLE — Members
of the community will get the
chance to show some love —
just before Valentine’s Day —
to people with disabilities by
participating in the Cupid’s
Chase 5k put on by Community
Options.
This year’s event is set for Saturday, Feb. 13, at 10 a.m. beginning at Tennessee Tech’s Tucker
Stadium. Registration begins at
8 a.m.
“Community Options provides
supported living, day services
and employment support for the
individuals in our agency,”
Jeanette Preece, Community
Options associate executive director, said. However, our dedication and commitment goes
beyond those ‘job duties.’
“We believe in what we are
doing and we think of our individuals as family members, not
just work. We want them to
have the best life possible and
that means more than just making sure they are healthy and
safe. It means that we want
them to be happy in their life
and that’s what all our staff
strive to accomplish on a day to
Ty Kernea | Herald-Citizen, file
Runners at last year’s Cupid’s Chase take off from the
starting line at Tennessee Tech.
day basis.”
The price for runners who
sign up for Cupid’s Chase 5k
before Feb. 12 is $30, and after
that, the price goes up to $40.
Proceeds benefit Community
Options, which provides housing, support, services and advocacy to help empower people
with
disabilities.
The
Cookeville branch was established in 2004 and currently
provides residential services
for 18 individuals, as well as
community-based day programs for them.
Last year, Cupid’s Chase
brought in nearly $4,500 for the
program.
“Community Options takes
the funds raised by the Cupid’s
Chase 5K race to purchase
needed items such as medication, therapy equipment, home
modifications, furniture and appliances,” Preece said. “We are
most proud of being able to
take all of the individuals on
outings such as to the General
Jackson, Dixie Stampede and
other activities. These type of
activities are very special. We
spend quality time with each
other and we make memories
for the individuals and staff.”
To register for this year’s race,
v
i
s
i
t
http://tinyurl.com/gko4wwl.
Those who want to help out,
but are not too keen about running a 5k can also donate at the
website.
For more information about
the event, call 931-372-0955.
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Call 931-526-9715.
Herald-Citizen
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ISSN 8750-5541
The Herald-Citizen is published daily except Saturdays,
New Year’s Day, Independence
Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving
Day and Christmas Day by
Cookeville Newspapers, Inc.,
at 1300 Neal St., P.O. Box
2729, Cookeville, TN 38502.
Periodicals postage paid at
Cookeville TN. POSTMASTER: send address changes to
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The Herald-Citizen is a member of the Tennessee Press
Association and the Associated Press. The Associated
Press is entitled exclusively to
use for publication news
printed in the Herald-Citizen.
SNOW: Jeep group
provides service to hospital
From Page A1
bers in the parking lot to see if
anyone else needed any help.”
Pam Tisher, CRMC nursing supervisor, is one of those who received the assistance of
LeCompte and crew.
“Because of this group, we
were able to maintain operations
in a safe and effective manner,”
Tisher said. “Many of our nurses
and support staff commute to
Cookeville from areas outside
the immediate community,
which makes it problematic during severe weather events like
the one we recently experienced.
We at CRMC are very appreciative of the Jeeps and Wrenches
Rescue and Recovery for their
unwavering support of the hospital and community.”
LeCompte and Karen Gann,
fellow coordinator, recalled just
how grateful everyone was for
their service.
“The furthest I went was
Lafayette,” Gann said, while
LeCompte went east, almost to
Oak Ridge, to help a home
health caregiver.
“We don’t take money, but we
do accept sweet treats,” Gann
said with a laugh, recalling how
a home health caregiver’s client
gave her homemade cookies as
thank you for delivering her
caregiver.
“In this area, we really could
use this type of service with the
type of terrain we have,” Kilgore-LeCompte said. “And it’s
also fun getting out in the snow
with a Jeep.”
This is a volunteer service only
to be used in emergency situations where services are needed
for transportation when 4-wheel
drive vehicles are required for
travel in inclement weather conditions.
“We don’t do grocery runs,”
LeCompte said. “But some
group members did pull emergency services and semi trucks
out of ditches.
“If what we do saves one person’s life, it’s worth it.”
Anyone can be a member and
owning a Jeep is not a requirement.
“As long as it’s a 4-wheel drive
vehicle, you’re welcome to
join,” LeCompte said.
“They really were a godsend,”
Linda Crawford, chief clinical
officer at CRMC, said. “Without
them, we would have been in a
whole new situation with regards to staffing.”
To find out more information,
search for “Jeeps and Wrenches
Rescue and Recovery of MidTN” on Facebook.
And that firefighter freed McClain’s foot from the crumbling
floor and hauled him out of the
burning house.
“When we got out of that house,
I thought, ‘He just saved my
life,’” McClain said.
While bonding among coworkers is typical, such experiences
commonly shared by firefighters
make their professional bonds especially strong.
“Firefighting isn’t just a profession, it’s also a brotherhood —
and these guys are among the
best. I’m proud to call them my
brothers,” Capt. Daryl Blair said
of Broyles and McClain.
Chief Roger Fuqua agreed.
“They’re absolutely first rate,” he
said.
Both Capt. Blair and Chief
Fuqua said the absence of the
lieutenants following their retirement will be felt throughout the
fire department.
But what exactly makes people
like Broyles, McClain and many
others in the brotherhood of firefighters run into situations that
most people run from?
Early fascination
For Broyles, he said his fascination with fire fighting began at an
early age, as a child growing up
in Sparta.
“My family lived near the
Sparta Fire Department, and
when I was a kid, I would watch
the fire engines as they left to go
on calls. I was fascinated by
them, and I remember thinking
what a neat job that would be to
have someday,” he said.
His career began in Sparta, but
after only a few years, he landed
a job with the Cookeville Fire
Department, where he remained
for the rest of his career.
“And I got to do what I grew up
wanting to do,” he said.
Harrowing situations
It hasn’t always been easy. In
fact, like McClain and many
other firefighters, Broyles can recall being in numerous dangerous
situations.
One in particular stands out in
his memory.
“The call was to a restaurant on
Highway 111, and when we
pulled up, we could see some
slight smoke coming from the
building. It wasn’t heavy, but it
was enough that we knew there
was something in there,” he said.
Ultimately, after Broyles and
other firefighters went into the
building, its metal floor — along
with all the tables, chairs and
other pieces of restaurant equipment that had been on it — fell in.
“The drink machines fell inches
away from us,” he said.
And all of the electrical cables
and wiring, the plastic coating of
which had melted off from the
heat of the fire, fell in a tangle
around them.
“I didn’t think we were going to
make it out of that one. We were
so tangled up in all of those wires,
we had to crawl to get out of the
building. But you learn from your
mistakes,” he said.
Constant training
In fact, firefighters are always
training.
“I think this is probably the besttrained fire department in the
state,” Broyles said.
McClain agreed, saying he always appreciated the opportunity
to mentor new firefighters.
“There are numerous training
topics, but especially for driver
engineers, learning to drive the
truck defensively is an important
early lesson,” he said.
“A fire truck weighs 10 times
more than a car, and while we
may need to get to the scene fast,
that doesn’t need to come at a
danger to others,” McClain said,
pointing out that a lack of caution
in that regard can easily create another critical incident for a department already trying to
respond to an initial call for service.
“We may respond to only one
actual structure fire in a month,
but we have to be ready for that
call when it comes,” Broyles said.
Trial by fire, literally
McClain had been a police officer for a short time before transferring to the fire department, and
he was told at the time he started
that the department averaged
about one structure fire per
month.
Little did he know he was about
to have a literal trial by fire into
his chosen profession.
“We were called out to two different fires on my first day! And
there were four fires in my first
three shifts,” he recalls.
In 1987, the Cookeville Fire Department averaged a total of about
200 calls per year. In 2015, Chief
Fuqua said, it averaged about
2,600 calls, many of which now
include medical response and extrication — responsibilities the
fire department didn’t have 30
years ago.
Now, medical responses make
up approximately 51 percent of
the fire department’s calls for
service.
Protective gear
The responsibility of being a
firefighter isn’t the only thing
that’s heavy.
The protective gear and oxygen
tanks each firefighter wears
weigh between 60 and 70 pounds
— and it begins to feel heavier
and heavier as the years pass, McClain said.
Broyles added that many people
also have a misconception that
their protective suits are fireproof.
“They’re not fireproof. In fact,
they only hold up for about 20
seconds in direct flame. That’s
not very long, but it could mean
the difference between life and
death,” he said.
Daily life
But between the periods of excitement, when the crew is called
out on a service call of some sort,
life for firefighters can fall into a
sort of familial routine.
“We spend a third of our lives
with each other, so we’re more
like family than coworkers,”
Broyles said.
And a third of their lives is true.
Each crew of approximately 18
firefighters works a 24-hour shift
and then gets two days off, while
a second- and then third-shift
crew takes up the rotation.
When Broyles and McClain
started their jobs nearly 30 years
ago, the crews were even more
tight-knit.
“There were only first and second shifts, so we worked 24 hours
and had 24 hours off,” Broyles
explained.
Disrupted reminiscing
The reminiscing was disrupted
by a call for service that sent the
crew into overdrive.
The bays opened and the trucks
pulled out with sirens screaming
as the firefighters made their way
to the scene of the call.
And Broyles and McClain remained behind, watching them
go.
Did that call for service make
the retirees still want to jump
onto those trucks?
One nodded yes as the other
shook his head no.
Both, however, agreed on two
things: the Cookeville Fire Department and city of Cookeville
itself have both been good to
them over the years, providing
much more than just a livelihood.
And neither of them are ready
just quite yet to settle for an armchair retirement.
Weather
Mike DeLapp
Editor & Publisher
Buddy Pearson
Managing Editor
Today
Partly sunny, with a
high near 61. South
southwest wind 10 to
15 mph, with gusts as high as
25 mph.
Roger Wells
Advertising Director
Tonight
Keith McCormick
Circulation Manager
Showers likely.
Cloudy, with a low
around 52. Chance of precipitation is 60%.
Monday
A 50-percent chance
of showers. Mostly
cloudy, with a high
near 58.
Monday Night
A 20-percent chance
of showers. Mostly
cloudy, with a low
around 47.
Tuesday
A 30-percent chance
of showers and thunderstorms. Mostly
cloudy, with a high near 66.
South wind 5 to 15 mph, with
gusts as high as 20 mph.
Tuesday Night
Showers and thunderstorms. Low around
45. South wind 10 to
15 mph, with gusts as high as
20 mph. Chance of precipitation is 90%.
Almanac:
Sunday is the
31st day of the
year with 335 remaining. The sun
sets at 5:07 p.m.
and will rise at
6:43 a.m. on
Monday.
The moon is a
last quarter
moon.
HERALD-CITIZEN, Cookeville, Tenn. — www.herald-citizen.com — Sunday, January 31, 2016 — A3
LOCAL
Since 1926
931-526-2163
MURDER: Accused man
denied bond; case bound over
From Page A1
provide counsel to Pyles since his
arrest in connection with the
murders.
“This type of high-profile case
is highly technical and requires
proper attention and consideration,” he told the Herald-Citizen.
“This type of case requires
proper respect to the judicial
process and judicial system be
observed and followed.”
TBI Special Agent Billy Miller
provided testimony at Friday’s
hearing, and much of that testimony involved a statement Pyles
reportedly made to Agent Miller
on the day following the deaths
of the Dowdys.
In that statement, Pyles reportedly told the agent he had been
having a period of financial difficulty, and when his son became
ill, he began considering robbery.
“What if I just robbed a place to
get some money?” Pyles reportedly told the agent he had been
thinking prior to the incident.
In that statement, the defendant
allegedly admitted to having
bought a handgun from someone
who had removed the serial number from the weapon — but he
said he hadn’t originally intended
to use it for such a purpose.
According to Agent Miller’s
testimony, the statement provided by Pyles describes the defendant as “driving around
looking for a place to rob,” and
he “wound up at the Sugar
Shack” (the Dowdys’ business).
He waited until the other patrons left the drinking establishment, went out to his truck and
changed shirts reportedly because he was aware of surveillance cameras, then returned
inside to commit the robbery, according to the statement he provided to the TBI.
But inside, Pyles alleges in that
statement that he panicked and
shot Dannie Dowdy, then in further panic, turned the gun on
Dowdy’s son, Cody, who was
also there.
After he shot the younger man,
Pyles reportedly “shot him again
so he wouldn’t suffer,” and also
shot the older man a second time.
With the father and son lying
dead or dying, Pyles grabbed
some money out of the cash
drawer of the establishment’s
register and fled, the defendant
reportedly admits in the statement.
He had $400, and Pyles allegedly “threw it in the lake”
upon realizing “this is not worth
what I have done,” according to
Agent Miller’s testimony regarding the statement.
Pyles reportedly further expressed remorse in that statement, supposedly telling the
agent that “being put to death
would be the only way to make
amends” for what he had done
and apologizing to his family for
the pain and embarrassment his
actions caused them.
Members of the defendant’s
family were present in the courtroom on Friday, as well as numerous family and friends of the
victims, several of whom suppressed sobs as testimony was
presented.
A motion for the possibility of
setting a bond was considered,
and Bray cited numerous reasons
for the court to rule in favor of
setting a bond for Pyles, including no prior criminal history, voluntary
cooperation
with
authorities and significant proof
of remorse.
District Attorney General
Bryant Dunaway and Assistant
District Attorney General Owen
Burnett, however, argued that remorse is by state law not a valid
factor and asked that bond, if any,
not be less than $2 million.
“The state doesn’t care if the defendant has shown remorse. The
state wishes the defendant had
been more remorseful before the
event ever happened,” Dunaway
told the court.
The prosecution instead offered
several other factors that should
be considered.
For instance, they pointed out
that Pyles is not a resident of Tennessee and has virtually no family ties to the state, that he can
show no proof of gainful employment and that he has a high
likelihood of being convicted of
the crimes for which he is accused.
“The nature of this offense is
absolutely egregious,” Dunaway
said, pointing out that Pyles is
charged with shooting “two innocent victims, not once but twice.”
The district attorney said he believed that physical evidence
would corroborate the testimony
presented at the preliminary hearing.
Judge Burnett ultimately ruled
in favor of the prosecution, denying bond for Pyles.
“There are a few instances in
which it is appropriate to hold a
defendant without bond, and
under the circumstances of this
case, I believe this is appropriate,” he said.
The ruling was met by sounds
of defeat from friends and family
of Pyles who were present, while
friends and family of the Dowdys
seemed to heave a collective
sigh.
Following the hearing, Bray
told the Herald-Citizen, “At the
end of the day, my job to my
client is to make the prosecution
prove its case with sound arguments, real evidence and reliable
testimony. We asked the court to
set a bond, as Mr. Pyles has been
held without bond since July 31,
2014. The state asked for a $2
million bond at the hearing today.
That’s the first time that any sort
of bond offer has been mentioned. The judge decided, by the
applicable law and the proof that
he heard today, that the defendant
should continue to be held without a bond.”
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Neal told the Baxter Planning
Commission that she was actually the founding member of the
commission, and cited her work
that played a large part in getting
the Baxter Depot/Welcome Center in Baxter, as well as the teeball field.
She also said that it was her understanding that the issue first
came up because another alderman had been interested on
being on the commission but had
been declined because there
were already too many members.
“I want to tell you, you all have
the authority, you can do what
you want to, but the intention for
this board was not to duplicate
the (board of the) mayor and all
the aldermen,” Neal said. “That
wasn’t the purpose. If it was, you
wouldn’t need a second board.
You would just let them take
care of it. This was to bring in
people who had a desire and a
pride in Baxter and wanted to
improve it and plan the way we
did our future events.”
Commission member Cris
Austin expressed his concern
about what this might mean for
the future of the commission.
“So we can have somebody on
this board who lives in California making decisions for us if
they have property here?” he
asked.
“I’m not going to appoint
someone who lives in California,” Mayor Jeff Whilhite said.
“I did talk to Henry Fincher (city
attorney). He hasn’t studied it
and given me an opinion about it
yet, but his initial opinion was
that if they enjoy the same political rights that anybody else
does, that they’re a citizen. Of
course they vote — if you own
property, you can vote.”
“I’ve been on this board with
you for a long time,” Alderman
Harmon Garris told Neal. “I remember we tried to make people
come and get on the board and
nobody wanted to come on the
board. I tried to get off of it one
time, but I had to come right
back on because nobody wanted
to come on. I think you’ve done
fine; Sandy’s done fine. I think
we’re fine the way we are. ... I’d
like to see the board stay the way
it is. We’ve done a lot of good
things. ... The people who are on
it, as long as they want to be on
it, I don’t see any problem with
it.”
After listening to the discussions, Wilhite determined that he
would leave Neal and Birdwell
on the commission.
“My appointments have been
challenged, and they’ve been
challenged because of the word
‘citizen,’” he said.
“So far, that’s not enough for
me to change my mind on the
appointments that I’ve made. If
somebody wants to legally challenge that, then that’s fine. We’ll
discuss that at a later date.”
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Sunday, January 31, 2016
OPINION
4
Herald-Citizen
The Daily Newspaper of the Upper Cumberland
Established 1903
Mike DeLapp, Editor and Publisher
Buddy Pearson, Managing Editor
The chionophobia
is rising
N
ow that you’ve clawed your
way out of last week’s
snowstorm, gotten your car
out of that ditch and your eyes have
lost a little of that shiny, crazed look,
you’ll be glad to know it’s only 50
more days until spring.
True, March is usually when we
get really clobbered. We
could see
enough fresh
snow to bury
Derryberry
Hall, all the
way to the
eagle’s beak.
But on the up
side, we’ve
been bloodied.
Bob
We’re braced.
McMillan
Nobody I
know is still
saying wistfully, “Gee, I wish we’d
get just one good snow this winter.”
It’s clear now that there is no “good”
snow. Snow is evil. Snow is the
White Death.
But how much do we actually
know about snow? Other than the
fact that it’s out to get you. To better
know the enemy, here are a few entirely random facts about snow.
The average snowflake is made up
of 200 ice crystals. So, snow is nature’s way of making ice fly. Two
hundred ice crystals would just drop
and scatter like salt. But a snowflake
can wing its way into hard-to-get
places. Snow is nature’s way of
making the very most of your winter
misery.
Every winter, an average of one
septillion (that’s 1 followed by 24
zeros) flakes fall across the planet.
Snowflakes are not loners. They
hunt in packs. The average flake
travels at 3 mph, unless it’s racing
you to that hill up ahead. Then it and
all its fluffy buddies can go 100
mph. You can run, but you just can’t
get traction.
A snowflake, on the average,
weighs 0.02 grams. If it snows 10
inches deep and you clear a sidewalk that’s five feet wide and 50
feet long, you’ll be lifting as much
as 1,300 pounds of snow. Or would
have if you hadn’t slipped, fallen
face-first in the stuff and the road
grader hadn’t tossed two tons of
frozen sludge on top of your whimpering, frozen form. There is no
mercy in a snowstorm. Surprisingly
little levity, either.
The biggest flake ever recorded
fell on Jan. 28, 1887 on Ft. Keogh.
Montana. It measured 15 inches in
diameter. Likely, it had friends.
Which explains why you’ve never
heard of Ft. Keogh, Montana. It’s
now Mount Keogh. The most snow
recorded in a 24-hour period fell in
1913 on Georgetown, Colo., 63
inches. By then, the Ft. Keogh survivors had resettled to Georgetown
because they’d heard winters were
nice there. Snow, it’s just gonna
getcha.
Eighty percent of the earth’s fresh
water is frozen in the form of snow
and ice. It covers 12% of the earth’s
surface. Unless you’re at work when
a heavy snow suddenly cuts loose
and you notice how little tread your
tires actually have. Then snow and
ice cover all the earth’s surface as
far as you can tell.
Although we saw precious few
Friday morning a week ago until it
was much, much too late, the first
snow plow was patented in America
in the 1840s. There have been more
than 100 patents issued since then
for snow removal devices. This
doesn’t include the flamethrowers
that many here are now attempting
to lash to their cars so they’ll never
need to wait on the plow again.
Odds are, there’ll also be a lot fewer
people poking along at 2 mph next
time the white stuff falls. Necessity
is the mother of invention. Snow is
the mother of heads up, I’m coming
through!
Early snowplows were actually
frowned on in the 1800s in the Midwest and New England where snow
covers roads for extended periods.
Many towns hired people called
snow wardens to make sure snow
on roads was thick and flattened.
Drivers put runners on their horse
carriages and wagons in winter.
They didn’t want their snow
plowed. Snow wardens used horsedrawn rollers to pack down the
snow. Today, motorists have replaced snow wardens. Because, no
matter how fast you get out once
snow starts falling, some guy in a
monster truck will have beat you to
the street, mashing flakes and slush
into a deadly glaze.
Snow accentuates driving habits.
Notably, all the bad ones. People
who cut out in front of you will keep
doing so even though they see you
skidding at them out of all control.
Slow drivers will come to a complete stop, usually at the bottom of a
hill. Sideways. And maniacs will
keep gunning their motors, skidding
and yelling “YeeeeeHAW” until all
the ditches are full. Then the snow
haze settles and all the four-wheelers come out, crisscrossing roads
and yards like deranged bees, many
of them piloted by people too young
to have drivers licenses.
Which is okay. By then, there’s no
driving going on. Just the grinding
of teeth, slow motion collisions and
the whistling of the wind over
snow-softened lumps. In the muffled silence, from inside the lumps,
you can hear, “No, really, I drive
good in snow!”
It’s the season of chionophobia,
which is Greek for “fear of snow.”
Or, in the common tongue, “Die,
winter, die.”
Bob McMillan is a columnist,
section editor and lead paginator for the Herald-Citizen.
Our Legislators
Sen. Bob Corker (R-TN) Dirksen Senate Office Building, SD-425
Washington, D.C. 20510; (Phone) 202-224-3344; (Website)
http://corker.senate.gov/public
Sen. Lamar Alexander (R-TN) 455 Dirksen Senate Office Building, Washington, D.C. 20510; (Phone) 202-224-4944 (Fax) 202-2283398 ; (Website) http://alexander.senate.gov/public
Congressman Diane Black (R-TN) 1131 Longworth HOB Washington, D.C. 20515; (Phone) 202-225-4231, (Fax) 202-225-6887;
(Website) http://black.house.gov
State Sen. Paul Bailey (R-Sparta) District 15 (Cumberland, Jackson, Overton, Bledsoe, Putnam and White counties) 301 6th Ave.
North, suite 304 War Memorial Building, Nashville, TN 37243;
(Phone) 615-741-3978; (Email) [email protected]; (Website) http://www.capitol.tn.gov/senate/members/s15.html
State Rep. Ryan Williams (R-Cookeville) District 42 (Part of Putnam County) 301 6th Ave. North, suite 109, War Memorial Building,
Nashville, TN 37243; (Phone) 615-741-1875; (Email)
[email protected]; (Website)
http://www.capitol.tn.gov/house/members/h42.html
State Rep. Cameron Sexton (R-Crossville) District 25 (Cumberland, Van Buren and part of Putnam counties) 301 6th Ave. North,
suite 20, Legislative Plaza, Nashville, 37243; (Phone) 615-741-2343;
(Email) [email protected]; (Website)
http://www.capitol.tn.gov/house/members/h25.html
State Rep. John Mark Windle (D-Livingston) District 41, (Morgan, Jackson, Overton and part of Fentress counties); 301 6th Ave.
North, suite 24, Legislative Plaza, Nashville, TN 37243; (Phone) 615741-1260; (Email) [email protected]; (Website)
http://capitol.tn.gov/house/members/h41.html
Politicians’ candid thoughts on Black History Month
A
fter four decades, Black History
Month remains controversial.
What is your position? Should the celebration remain unchanged? Should the
commemoration of African-American
milestones be spread throughout the year?
Or should a color-blind, seamlessly integrated timeline of the accomplishments of
all races and cultures be America’s goal?
I took it upon myself to ask a collection
of presidential candidates, government
spokespersons and media pundits for
their gut instincts on Black History
Month. Any connection you draw between these unguarded, off-the-cuff comments and specific individuals are entirely
up to you.
One speaker confided, “I see America as
a land of equal opportunity, where if your
father and your brother got to live in a
white house — or casa blanca — with a
rose garden, you have an equal opportunity to do so as well.”
Another political mover and shaker proclaimed, “Gone are the days when blacks
were regarded as less than human. Oh,
hey, could you JUMP THROUGH
THESE HOOPS for me before registering to vote?”
One official shared, “It’s a national disgrace that blacks had to sweat in the hot
sun picking cotton. According to the U.S.
Constitution, ethanol production would
have been a much better choice.”
Bold assertions were common. (“I’m
Danny
Tyree
sure if I had been
president in the
1860s, I would
have done exactly
what Abraham Lincoln did — except
without the whole
‘boots on the
ground’ thing. And
beards and
stovepipe hats? Can
you PAY a focus
group enough to
like presidents with
beards with
stovepipe hats?”)
One interviewee opined, “Booker T.
Washington. W.E.B. Du Bois. The
Tuskegee Airmen. Today’s AfricanAmericans stand on the shoulders of giants. Speaking of that, I wish you’d stoop
a little. I can’t see my reflection in the
mirror.”
Comments included, “And I truly believe that steel-driving man John Henry
would have laid down his hammer and
died much more peacefully if someone
had slipped him some medicinal marijuana — and the knowledge that his opponent the steam-powered hammer
would eventually be denied its supply of
coal.”
One leader agreed, “I don’t know where
America would be today without the contributions of black citizens. Um, I’m not
even sure where America is today WITH
the contributions of black citizens. Geography is not my strong suit. I just know I
can see Beijing from my front porch. You
bet’cha.”
I couldn’t resist recording the observation, “I don’t really know what to say
about this ‘Roots’ remake on TV. I know
that I’ve done an exhaustive search of
‘TV Guide’ and not a single writer would
ever come out and say definitively that
this Kunta Kinte guy was not Canadian.”
Posterity needs to know, “Of course,
with a concealed carry permit, Rosa Parks
could have had the whole &^%$# bus.
I’m just saying.”
A progressive respondent argued, “I
know they called the Sidney Poitier character MISTER Tibbs, but I think he
should have been allowed to use the girls’
shower if that was how he rolled.”
Celebrate black history, even if hidden
agendas do tend to creep into politicians’
praises. “I have no doubt that, if he was
alive today, Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr.
would declare, ‘I have been to the mountaintop — I had to climb there to escape
the rising ocean levels predicted by
heretofore wildly inaccurate computer
models. Any day now, the polar bears will
be floating into the Promised Land. Any
day now...”
Danny welcomes email responses
at [email protected] and visits
to his Facebook fan page “Tyree’s
Tyrades.”
Letters to the Editor
Above and beyond
There are many people, thank goodness,
who do selfless things for others and for
their communities. We need to recognize
them, for what they do, because they embody what good folks we all need to be.
My wife and I have just witnessed “giving” that goes way beyond…
Linda Westin has been president of the
local “Friends of Cookeville/Putnam
County Animals” group since she and
several others formed it over 10 years ago.
This group is mostly responsible for the
building of the new animal shelter and for
saving the lives of countless number of
animals during the time they took up their
cause. She has dedicated her life, with her
husband, Eric’s support, to fundraise,
work with city management, market their
mission, and spend countless hours at the
shelter to set up the structure of recruiting
and training volunteers. Every year, the
“Animal” group’s main fundraiser, “The
Fur Ball” is held at the Leslie Towne Centre, with proceeds for the Shelter. It took
place this Saturday night, Jan. 30.
On the preceeding Tuesday night, Jan,
26, the Westins home burned to the
ground. They lost their two dogs and their
cat, that they loved so much.
What is remarkable, since, is that in the
four days since this tragedy, Linda’s concentration and efforts, again with Eric’s
help and support, has been all on preparation for the “Fur Ball.” She put any personal grieving and need to work on a new
house, on “hold” until the “Fur Ball” is
over and a success again.
We don’t know how you ever thank one,
like this, enough. They, despite losing
everything in their house, want nothing
for themselves from anyone.
We, however, are donating to the animal
shelter in memory of their pets, Scooter,
Smushpants, and Lacy, whose barking
Tuesday night, may have saved Eric’s life,
by alerting him to the fire. If anyone feels
as we do, any contribution to the shelter,
is the best recognition of the sacrifices the
Westins have made.
Ryan and Marlene Jorstad
Baxter
Thank you
My husband drives a big truck for Cumberland Container. He broke down on I-
40 West at the 357 on Monday morning.
It was about 11 degrees. He had no heat
and was cold.
A state trooper stopped and checked on
him and left. He came back in about 30
minutes and let Bruce sit in his car till the
mechanic got there. He brought him some
coffee to warm him up.
I want to say thank you so very much to
Sgt. Eric McCormick. He was a true
blessing.
There are still very special people in this
world and he is one of those people.
Thank you again, Sgt. Eric McCormick.
Debra Bowman
Hanging Limb, Tenn.
Let’s get praying
President, Congress, House of Representatives, senators, governors, everyone,
please bring us together as the nation we
once were. As a family brings us together.
(2 Chronicles 7:13) Pray believing everything starts with prayer.
If Cookevillians will just start praying for
Cookeville, then we can pray for the rest
of Tennessee. Then for other states. Let’s
get started, Cookeville. Look at the one
person who wanted to take “One nation
under God” out of the pledge of allegiance. All the trouble she caused. That
was just one person.
Imagine what could happen if all of
Cookeville prayed. Unity, that’s what we
need. There is strength in numbers. I want
to thank the many men and women who
fought and died for the freedom we have.
That is freedom for EVERYONE, even
the ones who believed God isn’t of any
importance. “Our society has strived to
avoid any possibility of offending anyone,
except GOD” - Billy Graham.
I didn’t write this to offend anyone. I just
want the freedom that these men and
women fought and died for. Freedom of
religion (seems like every religion but
Christianity has the right to practice what
they believe). Freedom to pray no matter
where we are; school, restaurants, out on
the street, anywhere. I want the freedom
that was ours for 200 years. I am going to
start praying for Cookeville. How many
are going to join me? Let’s pray brothers
and sisters, let’s pray.
Samantha Roberts
Cookeville
Facing changes
Looking out of my window recently, snow
was everywhere and it was beautiful!
Thanks go out to those who shared their pictures of their neighborhoods.
The thoughts of the cold began to melt as
soon as those pictures appeared. Outside my
windows, were some of the most beautiful
icicles I have ever seen, glistening in the sun.
A friend just sent me an email regaling the
problems involved in growing old. I deleted
it. Yes, at my age I am learning a lot about
that phenomenon, but I prefer to focus on
our ability to see what is new — and growing.
There are cycles in life. We do not need to
remain stagnant, by refusing to observe
what still is. We can ignore what had been
by taking hold of what can be, merely by
changing our focus.
I have been working on my biography and
my life began to take on a new focus when
I realized how blessed I was to have been
raised by my grandparents on a farm, away
from the turmoil of big city life and in those
days, the reminder that our nation was suffering through a depression. I joined the air
force expecting to attend a trade school. Instead, I was sent overseas to Japan, and
learned to deal with people who had just lost
a war, to say nothing about their young men
who died in that war. I stayed there until the
Korean started and came home to realize
my family and friends hardly knew we were
at war.
I began to realize I was different than those
I knew, only because we had not shared the
same experiences. It took me years to realize, I was no longer that timid young farm
boy who left the others behind. It took me
years to realize we had very little in common so, I began to gather new friends, new
acquaintances and I became a different person.
My DNA had not changed, but just about
everything else did. I like this new persona,
probably because I have been a sort of a
wanderer, enjoying new experiences, developing new friends and all the while, reflecting on my past.
Life is good as long as we can look forward to the future, based on the experiences
that brought us this point, and become like
the new growth that is everywhere around
us.
Sherwood MacRae
Cookeville
HERALD-CITIZEN, Cookeville, Tenn. — www.herald-citizen.com — Sunday, January 31, 2016 — A5
LOCAL/STATE
Man involved in deadly
Livingston crash dies
By AMY DAVIS
HERALD-CITIZEN Staff
TBI
Authorities are warning the public that pills like these, which look like Percocet, but are
fentanyl, are 50 times more powerful than heroin and can be deadly.
TBI, PCSD seize clandestine
drugs, warn public of dangers
COOKEVILLE — An ongoing, joint investigation by the
Tennessee Bureau of Investigation and the Putnam County
Sheriff’s Department has resulted in a significant seizure of
counterfeit pills that pose a potentially deadly risk to users.
While executing a search warrant at a home on Massa Road
Friday, authorities discovered
approximately 300 pills stamped
with markings characteristic of
Percocet. However, laboratory
analysis performed by TBI
forensic scientists today determined the pills instead contained
fentanyl, a pain killer 50 times
more potent than heroin that can
be deadly in high doses.
“Previously, the General Assembly recognized the dangers
surrounding heroin in Tennessee
and enhanched the penalties for
those dealing the drug,” said
TBI Director Mark Gwyn.
“With fentanyl being more potent, more dangerous and potentially more deadly than heroin, it
may be in the best interest for
the state for lawmakers to consider a similar increase in penalties to further send a message to
drug dealers, while protecting
the citizens of Tennessee.”
During the execution of the
search warrant this morning, authorities also seized approximately a half a pound of
marijuana, 100 pills of Dilaudid,
and a large amount of cash.
“I am proud of the efforts of
our Narcotics Unit and the high
level of cooperation displayed
with our law enforcement partners,” said Putnam County
Sheriff Eddie Farris. “This investigation demonstrates the
dangers present in our community as it relates to drugs. Our
citizens can be assured that as
long as I am Sheriff we will
continue to be relentless in our
pursuit of anyone using or selling narcotics in Putnam County.
In 2014, in anticipation of a
proliferation of fentanyl in Tennessee, Gwyn proposed the
agency launch a program to protect agents and forensic scientists who may come into contact
with the drug with auto-injectors containing Naloxone,
which can potentially save an
individual from a fentanyl overdose.
Consumers should only use
prescription medications obtained through a licensed pharmacy and avoid purchasing
prescription medications online
or through illicit channels.
150,000 Tennesseans could lose food stamps April 1
By TRAVIS LOLLER
Associated Press
NASHVILLE (AP) — An estimated 150,000 Tennesseans could
lose food stamp benefits on April
1 if they don’t meet work requirements that were waived for several years because of the Great
Recession.
Tennessee Department of
Human Services spokeswoman
Stephanie Jarnagin said the
agency began sending out notices
earlier this winter to people who
could lose benefits from the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance
Program, as the federal program
WCTE to
air State of
the State
Monday
PUTNAM COUNTY — Governor Bill Haslam’s State of the
State address will air on WCTE
Upper Cumberland PBS Monday, Feb. 1, at 6 p.m.
On Jan. 21, Governor Haslam
announced his legislative agenda
for the 2016 session, continuing
his focus on education, public
safety, and efficient and effective
state government. Major focuses
will include the Drive to 55 initiative and the Focus On College
and
University
Success
(FOCUS) act to increase postsecondary student success, the
Public Safety Act of 2016, the
Fetal Remains Act, and the Efficiency in Handgun Permitting
Act.
Coverage of the Governor’s address to the state legislature will
begin at 6 p.m. on Feb. 1. WCTE
is found on Charter cable channel
8 and DISH and DirecTV channel 22.
is officially known.
The program requires able-bodied adults ages 18 through 49 who
have no children or other dependents at home to work, volunteer or
attend education or job-training
courses at least 80 hours a month.
If they don’t, their benefits are cut
off after three months.
The work requirement was
waived during the recession but
the waiver ended in at least 21
states, including Tennessee, on
Jan. 1. That triggered the threemonth limit for recipients to comply with work requirements. If
they don’t, they lose their food
stamps on April 1.
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Terry Work, the founder of Helping Hands of Hickman County,
said she wasn’t aware of the
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LIVINGSTON — A third person involved in what had been
deemed “a terrible tragedy” in
Livingston has died.
Johnny Halfacre, 66, of Livingston, a former city alderman
for 20 years, died Wednesday at
Upper Cumberland Hospice and
Palliative Care in Cookeville.
He had been the driver of a
pickup truck that struck the rear
of a city garbage truck on Nov.
10 — an accident that claimed
the lives of two sanitation workers.
Those who knew Halfacre
speculated that a medical emergency might have caused him to
lose control of his vehicle. He
had been airlifted to Vanderbilt
University Medical Center due
to his injuries, and, according to
his son, Chris Halfacre, was still
experiencing
complications
from the accident as well as a
long battle with cancer.
“He never did really recover
from it, but I’m sure it was a little bit of both,” his son said.
“Most of the time he was in the
hospital, but we tried to keep
him at home as long as we
could.”
Authorities and citizens alike
called November’s accident “a
terrible
tragedy.”
Johnny
Massingille, 51, of Allons and
Anthony Toney, 22, of Livingston had been emptying
garbage cans behind the sanitation truck when the wreck happened on East Main Street near
Livingston’s Save-a-Lot.
Halfacre’s family said “Johnny
simply loved life.”
In addition to serving as a city
alderman from 1986 to 2006, he
had been a Livingston Municipal Airport committee chairman
and owned and operated Livingston Handle Company. He
was a deacon at Livingston
Church of Christ and loved riding his Harley Davidson motorcycle, playing golf, making
music, flying airplanes, hunting
and karate.
“First, let me say that Johnny
was a very close friend to my
family and me,” Livingston
Mayor Curtis Hayes said. “I believe it would be fair to say my
father–in-law and Johnny were
like brothers.
“I had the pleasure to serve on
the city council with Johnny for
six years, and it was clear that he
had a special place in his heart
for the Livingston Airport. He
secured over $5 million in state
and federal funds to ensure that
Livingston had an airport to be
proud of.”
The Livingston City Council
even named the airport’s 10 new
state-of-the-art T-hangers the
“Johnny Halfacre T-Hangers.”
“Johnny was a pillar in the
community and will be deeply
missed,” Hayes said.
Halfacre’s funeral was Saturday.
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A6 — HERALD-CITIZEN, Cookeville, Tenn. — www.herald-citizen.com — Sunday, January 31, 2016
NATION
Hope for answers as release of Amtrak crash evidence nears
By MICHAEL R. SISAK
Associated Press
PHILADELPHIA (AP) — Eight
months after a deadly Amtrak derailment, federal investigators are poised to
release evidence and reports that could
help clear up the mystery of why the
train streaked into a sharp curve at double the speed limit.
The release, expected Monday, will be
the first major development in the inves-
tigation since a preliminary report a few
weeks after the May 12 crash in which
the National Transportation Safety
Board pinpointed excessive speed as a
key factor. A final report isn’t expected
for months.
The train was accelerating out of an 80
mph speed zone when it should have
been slowing to 50 mph for the coming
curve, investigators said. It reached 106
mph just before the engineer activated
emergency brakes.
David Hernandez, who lives near the
tracks, said the crashing train sounded
like shopping carts smashing together.
“They go so fast up there,” Hernandez
said.
But why, with more than 300 northbound Amtrak trains safely navigating
the curve every week and scores more
from Philadelphia’s commuter rail, did
Train 188 speed to a derailment that left
eight dead and more than 200 injured?
In the absence of an official conclu-
sion, several theories have emerged.
Early in the investigation, the NTSB
focused on whether the train had been
hit with a rock or other projectile minutes before the crash. The left-side of the
locomotive’s windshield had a grapefruit-sized fracture.
The operator of a commuter train running along the same tracks reported
being hit and passengers on another Amtrak train said something struck their
train.
“The only person that really knows for
sure is the guy who was sitting in the cab
of that locomotive,” said David B.
Clarke, a railroad expert at the University of Tennessee.
Even that may not be the case: A few
days after the crash, the 32-year-old
Bostian told the NTSB he did not recall
anything after ringing the train’s bell as
he passed through the North Philadelphia station about three miles before the
curve.
Community Calendar
The Community Calendar is
a daily list of announcements
of one-time events hosted by
nonprofit groups. To include
your information, call 5269715 and ask for the newsroom
secretary, fax 526-1209 or
email [email protected]
Be sure to include your name
and number as well as a time,
date and location of the event.
Feb. 1
BOOK CLUB: Stacie Netherton, director of Putnam County
Library, will speak about forming a book club at 12:15 p.m. at
the Cookeville Senior Center.
Feb. 2
AMERICAN LEGION: The
Livingston American Legion and
Auxiliary will meet on Tuesday
at 121 S. Church St. in Livingston. The Auxiliary meets at
5 p.m., and the Legion meets at
6 p.m.
FARMERS: The Cookeville
Future Farmers of America
(FFA) alumni will hold a meeting at 5:30 p.m. in the Ag Shop
(Room 105) at Cookeville High
School. All former Cookeville
FFA members, community supporters and former and current
parents of Cookeville FFA members are invited to attend.
Feb. 5 & 6
BOOK SALE: Twice Told
Tales, a used bookstore located
at the Putnam County Library,
will be open on Saturday from
10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Also open on
Friday, Feb. 5, from 4-6 p.m. for
members of the Putnam County
Library Friends only. Memberships are available at the door.
Hardcover books for $2 and pa-
perback books for 50 cents.
Feb. 6
COFFEE/VET: Coffee with a
vet is hosted by Livingston’s
American Legion Post 4 and
Auxiliary and VFW Post 5062.
Held on the first Saturday of
each month from 8-11 a.m. at
the VFW Post building in Livingston. We are inviting the public and those who have served or
who are currently serving in our
armed forces to come and have
coffee, conversation and enjoy
the comradeship.
BOOK SALE: Friends of
Monterey Branch Library will
have their monthly book sale
from 10 a.m.-1 p.m., at the Monterey Library. Hard cover books
are $1, paperback books are 50
cents. Used book donations accepted during normal library
hours.
BENEFIT: A benefit for Bruce
Jones (for the purchase of a
prosthetic leg) will be held at 2
p.m. at Gearheads Bar in
Cookeville.
All-you-can-eat
chili and hot dogs with fixin’s
for $5 per person. For more
info., call Dale Dyer a 2394375.
Feb. 8
ROSE
SOCIETY:
The
Cookeville Rose Society will
hold their first meeting of the
new year at 7 p.m. at Johnson’s
Nursery. Special speaker. The
public is invited.
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HERALD-CITIZEN, Cookeville, Tenn. — www.herald-citizen.com — Sunday, January 31, 2016 — A7
NATION
Cash flow could
be issue for 4
GOP contenders
By JULIE BYKOWICZ
Associated Press
WASHINGTON (AP) —
Money may be growing tight for
four Republican presidential
hopefuls clustered under Donald
Trump and Ted Cruz — just
when they’re about to need it the
most.
Financial reports coming out
Sunday will show who began the
year with enough cash to put
their long-range campaign plans
into motion. For Chris Christie,
Jeb Bush and John Kasich, the
aim is a strong showing in New
Hampshire on Feb. 9 that powerboosts them deep into primary
season. Marco Rubio’s imperative is to do well enough in the
first four states to vote that he can
make a sustained climb in the
weeks that follow.
That sort of long slog would be
costly because it involves travel
around the two dozen states that
hold contests on or before March
15. And some of those states, including Virginia, Florida and
Ohio, have expensive advertising
markets.
“If you’re going to proceed
after New Hampshire, you’re absolutely going to need considerable funds,” said Fred Malek,
who has helped four decades of
Republican presidential candidates raise money. “The pace of
the primaries builds up rapidly.
It’s far better to already have the
cash on hand rather than have to
ramp up.”
The financial health of the campaigns of Christie, Kasich, Bush
and Rubio is critically important
because they’re competing not
only with each other, but with
Trump, a billionaire who has
vowed to spend whatever it takes
to win, and Cruz, who began the
year with $19 million in the bank
— an amount that probably exceeds most of his rivals. The
foursome is considered to be
competing for mainstream Republicans in a campaign that has
seen Trump and Cruz most effectively tap populist anger and disdain for the establishment.
In addition to the candidates,
the outside political groups
known as super PACs helping
them must turn in progress reports on their fundraising and
spending Sunday.
Stanley Hubbard, a billionaire
Minnesota broadcast executive,
said he’s poised to write a large
check to a super PAC backing
any one of his preferred candidates, Rubio, Christie and Bush,
among others.
“If we get someone who really
has a chance of doing something,
I’m ready,” he said. “Someone
just needs to rise to the top.”
Asked if he is confident anyone
will have enough money to compete with Trump or Cruz, he said:
“No, I do not feel confident. But
I’m hopeful.”
There are signs that Rubio, a
Florida senator, could be facing a
cash crisis.
After his campaign began leasing corporate jets and hiring
dozens of additional employees
at the end of the year, it recently
downsized its advertising plans
in Iowa, New Hampshire and
South Carolina, according to advertising tracker Kantar Media’s
CMAG. His campaign said it
would air a 30-minute Rubio
town hall over the weekend on
several Iowa TV stations. Federal
broadcast filings show that sets
him back at least $12,000.
On Friday, Rubio acknowledged the obvious, telling reporters he’s not going to be the
candidate with the most campaign cash. He also said he believes his campaign has spent
money wisely, building up
staffing slowly and trimming the
ad buy to save money.
For Bush, the budget crunch arrived in October, when a
fundraising shortfall — combined with the realization that the
primary could last well into 2016
— prompted him to narrow what
had been a large national campaign to focus squarely on New
Hampshire.
“It’s super hard to raise money,”
said Anthony Scaramucci, a New
York-based top fundraiser for
Bush. “We’ve knuckled down to
the new reality.” But he said the
Bush finance team is working furiously and “generating cash
every day for the campaign.”
Judging by their ad buys,
Christie and Kasich haven’t been
reaping much contributor cash,
either.
Even as they barnstorm New
Hampshire, they’ve each spent
only about $500,000 on commercials there, CMAG shows. That’s
less than retired neurosurgeon
Ben Carson, who has paid little
mind to New Hampshire.
Christie campaign strategist
Mike DuHaime said he expects
“a new influx” of cash if Christie
performs well in New Hampshire
and at least some of his competitors drop out.
But under several scenarios, all
four candidates could think
they’ve done well enough to continue on.
Come Sunday, fundraising reports answer the question which
of the four is best financially prepared to do so.
As of Sept. 30, the last time the
campaigns had to report, Christie
had collected $4.2 million for the
year, Kasich $4.4 million, Rubio
$15.5 million and Bush $24.8
million.
Previous filings also hinted at a
fundraising challenge facing
them: They’re struggling to connect with low-dollar donors who
can give again and again, replenishing campaign treasuries if the
candidates survive deep into the
primaries.
NOTICE
March 1, 2016 Early Voting and Absentee Voting
PERSONAL APPEARANCE: FEBRUARY 10, 2016 - FEBRUARY 23, 2016
EARLY VOTING LOCATION:
PUTNAM COUNTY ELECTION COMMISSION OFFICE
705 COUNTY SERVICES DR.
COOKEVILLE, TN 38501
Phone: 526-2566
OFFICE HOURS FOR EARLY VOTING
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday: 8:00 am to 5:00 pm
Thursday: 8:00 am to 7:00 pm
Saturday: 9:00 am to 1:00 pm
D
I
o
t
Pho
d
e
r
i
u
Re q
Pursuant to TCA 2-2-115(b)(7), any voter who has registered to vote by mail and has never voted must
vote in person at the first election after registration. The voter must show sufficient identification when
appearing at the polls or Election Commission office. (This does not include those in the military or those
who have provided the election office with a doctor’s statement, documenting permanent disability.)
ABSENTEE VOTING BY MAIL
(TCA 2-6-201)
YOU MAY VOTE ABSENTEE BY MAIL IF ONE OF THE FOLLOWING REASONS APPLIES:
1. PERSONS OUTSIDE OF COUNTY. The voter will be outside the county in which they are registered during the Early
Voting period and on Election Day for any reason, other than imprisonment;
2. STUDENTS AND SPOUSES OUTSIDE OF COUNTY. The voter is a full-time student, or spouse of such student, in
an accredited post-secondary institution of learning in this state, which is outside the county in which they are registered
to vote;
3. (A) PERMANENT ABSENTEE VOTING REGISTER. Any person who is, because of sickness, hospitalization or
physical disability unable to appear at either the commission office or at the person’s polling place for the purpose of
voting. To be eligible for placement on the register, a voter shall file a statement by the person’s licensed physician
with the Election Commission, stating that the patient is medically unable to appear at the polling place to vote or go to
the Election Commission office to early vote. The voter shall file the physician’s statement and the application not less
than seven days before the election. (Physician statements are available at the Election Commission office and on our
website.)
(B) RESIDENTS OF CERTAIN INSTITUTIONS. An individual who is a full-time resident of any licensed nursing
home, home for the aged or similar licensed institution providing relatively permanent domiciliary care, other than a
penal institution, outside the voter’s county of residence, the procedure for voting shall substantially follow the
provisions established in subdivision (3)(A) for voters on the permanent absentee voting register, or the voter may vote
under the procedures established in subdivision (1) for voters outside of the county;
4. JURORS. An individual is unable to appear during the Early Voting period or at the polling place on Election Day
because they are serving as a juror for a federal or state court;
5. PERSONS OVER 60. PERSONS HOSPITALIZED, ILL OR DISABLED.
(A) A person 60 years of age or older when the person requests to vote absentee;
(B) The person is a disabled voter as defined in TCA 2-3-109, and the voter’s polling place is inaccessible;
(C) The person is hospitalized, ill or physically disabled, and because of such condition, the person is unable to
appear at the person’s polling place on Election Day; or
(D) The person is a caretaker of a hospitalized, ill or disabled person;
6. CANDIDATES FOR OFFICE. The voter is a candidate for office in the election in which they wish to vote;
7. ELECTION OFFICIALS-ELECTION COMMISSION MEMBERS OR EMPLOYEES. If the person is an election
official, or member or employee of the Election Commission on Election Day;
8. OBSERVANCE OF A RELIGIOUS HOLIDAY. If the voter is unable to appear during the Early Voting period or at
the polling place on Election Day because of observance of a religious holiday; or
9. PERSONS POSSESSING A VALID COMMERCIAL DRIVER LICENSE or TRANSPORTATION WORKER
IDENTIFICATION CREDENTIAL (TWIC). A voter who possesses a valid commercial driver license (or is the spouse
of a CDL holder) or who has a TWIC and who certifies that the voter:
(A) Will be working outside of the county or state where the voter is registered during the Early Voting period and
on Election Day during all the hours the polls are open; and
(B) Has no specific out-of-county or out-of-state location to which mail may be sent or received during such time;
May complete an application to vote absentee by mail at the voter’s county Election Commission office or
complete an absentee by-mail application pursuant to TCA 2-6-202(a)(3); provided, that if applicable, such voter
satisfies the requirements of TCA 2-2-115(b)(7). In order for the absentee application to be processed, the voter
must provide the commercial driver license number on the voter’s current commercial driver license and provide a
current residential address and any mailing address to which the ballot shall be mailed.
PROCEDURES FOR VOTING BY MAIL - TCA 2-6-202:
If you meet one of the above conditions and wish to vote by mail, you must request a ballot in writing over your
signature. The request can be made as much as 90 days in advance of an election and not later than 7 days prior to an election, the
earlier, the better. The request can be mailed to the election office.
Requests for absentee ballots must be in writing and signed by the voter. The LAST day for the Election Commission to
receive a REQUEST to vote by mail is Tuesday, February 23, 2016. The LAST day for the Election Commission to receive the
ballot in the mail is March 1, 2016 (Election Day.)
THE REQUEST FOR VOTING BY MAIL CAN SERVE AS THE APPLICATION FOR BALLOT IF IT CONTAINS THE
FOLLOWING INFORMATION:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
The voter’s name;
The voter’s address in Putnam County;
The voter’s social security number;
The address to mail the ballot;
The election in which the voter wishes to vote (including a party preference if the election is a primary); and
The reason the voter is requesting to vote by mail;
The request MUST BE SIGNED BY THE VOTER. (If the voter cannot sign their name, please call our office for
assistance.)
If the request does not contain all of the information listed above, the Election Commission shall send the voter an application for
absentee ballot in order to obtain the needed information.
EMERGENCY ABSENTEE VOTING. These deadlines for absentee voting may be extended for a hospitalized voter within
Putnam County; because of the death of a relative of the voter or if the voter receives a subpoena or service of process requiring
the voter’s presence of Election Day. Please call the office for further information.
MAILING ADDRESS: 705 County Services Drive, Cookeville, TN 38501
OFFICE PHONE NUMBER: 526-2566
ATTENTION VOTERS
Please be prepared to show a Valid Photo ID when you go to vote. Please bring your voting card. If you registered by
mail, please bring a form of ID with your current address on it. If your Photo ID has your current address, it will be sufficient. If
it has an old address, you will need something else (like a utility bill) with your name and current address. A valid Photo ID will
be asked of you when you go to the Election Commission office to vote, as required by state law (TCA 2-7-112). That includes a
federal or Tennessee state issued Photo ID. College student IDs and out of state driver licenses are not acceptable.
ATTENTION CANDIDATES
Display of campaign posters, signs or other campaign materials, distribution of campaign materials and solicitation of
votes is strictly prohibited within 100 feet of any polling place. The Election Commission office is the only polling place during
Early Voting. TCA 2-7-111
PUTNAM COUNTY ELECTION COMMISSION
Phil Adams, Chairman
Terry Herrin, Member
Linda Daniel, Secretary
Jean Cody, Member
Perry Bartlett, Member
Debbie Steidl, AOE
A8 — HERALD-CITIZEN, Cookeville, Tenn. — www.herald-citizen.com — Sunday, January 31, 2016
NATION
Remaining escaped inmates arrested in San Francisco
By GILLIAN FLACCUS
Associated Press
SANTA ANA, Calif. (AP) — Two inmates who remained at large after breaking out of a California jail more than a
week ago have been arrested, Orange
County sheriff’s officials said Saturday.
Jonathan Tieu, 20, and Hossein Nayeri,
37, were in the custody of the San Francisco Police Department, the Orange
County sheriff’s department said on its
Twitter feed. A news conference was
scheduled for noon.
Texas attorney
general
looking for
way to fund
defense
By PAUL J. WEBER
Authorities had been hunting for Tieu,
Nayeri and a third inmate, 43-year-old
Bac Duong, in Southern California since
they pulled off a brazen jail escape on
Jan. 22.
On Friday, Duong walked into an auto
repair shop and said he wanted to surrender. He told investigators he had last
seen the other two inmates Thursday afternoon in San Jose, shifting the manhunt 400 miles to the north.
The three men had all been jailed and
awaiting trial on charges in separate violent crimes. They were held in a dor-
mitory with about 65 other men in the
jail about 30 miles southeast of Los Angeles.
The men escaped in the early morning
hours after cutting a hole in a metal grate
then crawling through plumbing tunnels
and onto the roof of a four-story jail
building.
They pushed aside barbed wire and
rappelled down using a rope made of
bed linen.
It took jail staff 16 hours to realize the
three men were missing.
On Thursday, authorities arrested a
woman who taught English inside the
jail. Nooshafarin Ravaghi, 44, gave
Nayeri a paper copy of a Google Earth
map that showed an aerial view of the
entire jail compound, Hallock said.
She was booked on suspicion of being
an accessory to a felony and was being
held pending a court appearance set for
Monday.
It wasn’t clear if she had a lawyer.
Ravaghi and Nayeri also exchanged
“personal and close” handwritten letters,
but sheriff’s spokesman Lt. Jeff Hallock
could not say if the two were romanti-
cally involved.
Duong, a native of Vietnam, has been
held since last month on charges of attempted murder and assault with a
deadly weapon.
It was the first escape in nearly three
decades from the Central Men’s Jail,
built in 1968, that holds 900 men.
Tieu is charged with murder and attempted murder in a 2011 gang shooting. Nayeri had been held without bond
since September 2014 on charges of kidnapping, torture, aggravated mayhem
and burglary.
OFFICIAL SAMPLE BALLOT:
REPUBLICAN AND DEMOCRATIC
PRIMARY ELECTION
Associated Press
AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — Texas
Attorney General Ken Paxton,
who says he won’t resign despite
criminal charges of defrauding investors and a separate investigation into a profitable land deal,
may soon be allowed to let supporters pay his costly legal bills.
A state ethics board is expected
to decide Monday if the Republican can lean on donors to cover
what will likely be a lengthy and
expensive courtroom battle. Financial gifts to politicians are
generally prohibited but the board
is considering letting Paxton only
accept money from out-of-state
sources, who are less likely to
have cases or business with the
Texas attorney general.
But even under those restrictions, the idea is still unpalatable
to critics: the state’s top prosecutor taking outside dollars for the
high-stakes purpose of avoiding
possible prison time.
“No one is outside his jurisdiction. Christ, we just sued Volkswagen in Germany,” said Craig
McDonald, director of the leftleaning watchdog group Texans
for Public Justice, referring to the
state’s lawsuit against the automaker over an emissions scandal. “The arm of the attorney
general is very long.”
If the Texas Ethics Commission
rules the other way — and bars
Paxton from letting donors pick
up the check for his defense —
that could force him to find another means of financing a
lengthy legal battle while simultaneously running one of the nation’s most high-profile attorney
general offices. In March, Paxton
will go before the U.S. Supreme
Court to defend abortion restrictions in a case that is likely to reverberate nationally.
If the risk of Paxton being distracted or the appearance of
undue influence bothers Republican leaders, they’re not saying
publicly.
Gov. Greg Abbott and Lt. Gov.
Dan Patrick declined to comment
over whether they would be OK
with Paxton tapping donors to
pay for his high-powered defense
team. Neither has publically pressured Paxton since he was indicted in July, but they also
haven’t enthusiastically come to
his defense.
The proposal before the Texas
Ethics Commission would only
allow out-of-state donors to help
Paxton, but opponents say that
wouldn’t safeguard possible conflicts with his job.
Paxton attorney Bill Mateja,
who is handling the criminal case,
said he was not involved in the
ethics matter, and the attorney
general’s office did not return
messages seeking comment.
Paxton was indicted six months
after taking office last year and
has pleaded not guilty. He is accused of deceiving wealthy investors in 2011, when he was still
a state legislator, by encouraging
them to put money into a hightech startup called Servergy Inc.
without disclosing that the company was paying him for such referrals. He is charged with two
felony counts of securities fraud.
If convicted, Paxton could get a
lengthy prison term.
The governor cannot remove an
elected official from office. Abbott, who was attorney general
for 11 years before he was elected
governor, has tried making tighter
ethics rules a centerpiece of his
early administration.
These are the sample ballots for the Putnam County Republican and Democratic
primaries. You must choose either the Republican or Democratic ballot if you wish to
vote in the primaries. Early voting begins February 10, 2016 and ends February 23, 2016.
Election Day is March 1, 2016. Please have your voter registration card and a valid Photo
ID with you when you go to vote.
Polls will be open on Election Day from 9 am to 7 pm.
Putnam County Election Commission
Phil Adams, chair Jean Cody, member
Terry Herrin, member Linda Daniels, secretary
Perry Bartlett, member Debbie Steidl, AOE
Page: 3
Page: 4
Page: 7
Page: 8
HERALD-CITIZEN, Cookeville, Tenn. — www.herald-citizen.com — Sunday, January 31, 2016 — A9
NATION
Remaining occupiers of wildlife refuge remain watchful
By NICHOLAS K. GERANIOS and aircraft, and Fry gets jumpy when he beMARTHA BELLISLE
lieves he hears gunshots near the enAssociated Press
trance.
“False alarm,” he then said after realBURNS, Ore. (AP) — Four people oc- izing the noise came from a generator or
cupying an Oregon wildlife refuge con- some other type of equipment.
tinued to hold their position Saturday “We’re not dead yet,” he said, repeatand posted live videos that reveal their ing a theme that he and others have exhyper-vigilance against federal officials pressed through the weeks of the
who may try to move them out, while 11 occupation. They’ve said they will only
others who were arrested this week re- leave if given immunity from prosecumained in custody.
tion and are ready to die defending their
During one early morning video posted position.
by a man identified as David Fry, the oc- Ammon Bundy, the principal leader of
cupiers express concerns about nearby the group that seized the Malheur Na-
tional Wildlife Refuge nearly a month
ago, and others used the platforms to
summon recruits to join their takeover.
Court documents against the 11 occupiers under arrest show FBI agents have
scrutinized social media postings, interviews and online talk shows that have
been during the standoff that began Jan.
2
Bundy and several other jailed leaders
appeared Friday in federal court in Portland, where a judge denied their release.
U.S. Magistrate Judge Stacie Beckerman said Bundy, his brother Ryan
Bundy and Ryan Payne pose a danger to
the community, and she is concerned
they would not follow orders to return to
Oregon for criminal proceedings.
The only woman arrested so far in the
standoff, Shawna Cox, will be allowed
to go home while her case makes its way
through the court system. But Beckerman said that won’t happen until after
the armed occupation ends.
Ammon Bundy’s lawyer, Lissa Casey,
said her client is not aligned with those
remaining at the refuge near Burns and
wants to go back to his family in Idaho.
“He is done in Harney County; his
message has been sent,” she said.
Bundy and his followers took over the
refuge to demand that the federal government turn public lands over to local
control. They have complained about
what they say are onerous federal rules
governing grazing and mining rights
across the West.
Court documents detail some of the evidence against the occupiers, including
a memorandum filed by prosecutors Friday arguing against releasing defendants
before trial. The charges against the defendants say the refuge’s 16 employees
have been prevented from reporting to
work because of threats of violence.
Civil rights
leader,
politician
Georgia Davis
Powers dies
Page: 1
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LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) —
Georgia Davis Powers, a giant in
the fight for civil rights in Kentucky and the first woman and
African-American elected to the
state Senate, has died. She was
92.
She died around 3:40 a.m. Saturday at her brother’s home in
Louisville, said Louisville’s
NAACP President Raoul Cunningham, a friend for five
decades.
“When you think of civil rights
in Kentucky, you have to start
with Georgia Davis Powers,”
said Kentucky State Sen. Gerald
Neal, a longtime friend and colleague who says Powers inspired
him into public service.
She fought for fair housing and
employment rights, became a
close confidant of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., and served 21
years in the state Senate. She was
soft-spoken, gracious, quick with
a joke, Neal said. But in her battle for civil rights, she did not
blink.
“She walked into the Legislature, a man’s world, a white
man’s world, and she did not
waver,” Neal said. “She asked no
quarter and gave no quarter.”
Powers was born in 1923 in
Washington County, Kentucky,
the only girl among her parent’s
nine children. The family moved
to Louisville when she was a
young child. As a teenager, Powers quit a job at a five-and-dime
store rather than tell black customers they weren’t allowed to
eat their food at the counter.
“I didn’t like it. I knew it was
going on and I always wondered
what could be done about it,”
Powers said in an interview.
“And in my young mind I couldn’t think of anything to do about
it.”
That didn’t last for long.
During Kentucky’s civil rights
movement, Powers was a
founder of the Allied Organizations for Civil Rights. She also
helped organize a 1964 march in
Frankfort — an event that attracted King, baseball legend
Jackie Robinson and folk singers
Peter, Paul and Mary — to push
for an end to racial segregation in
public accommodations. Two
years later in 1966, the General
Assembly passed a civil rights
law, making Kentucky the first
southern state to do so.
“She was a fighter, and she
knew how to fight,” said Cunningham. “She was a champion
of equal rights for women, for
lesbians and gays, for the economically deprived. Her voice
will be missed.”
By 1967, Powers became the
first woman and the first AfricanAmerican ever elected to the
Kentucky Senate. She took office
in 1968, and for next 21 years
fought for African-Americans,
women, the poor, the disabled,
the disenfranchised.
Democratic leaders across the
state mourned her passing Saturday.
“She was a powerful voice for
those she served; she was a
leader who never stopped rallying others to join her in making
Kentucky a better place; and she
proved to be an enduring inspiration for others called to public
service,” Kentucky House
Speaker Greg Stumbo wrote.
“Those of us lucky enough to
know her will never forget her
smile, her wit and the fire she had
that warmed us all.”
Secretary of State Alison Lundergan Grimes described her as a
brave champion for civil rights.
A10 — HERALD-CITIZEN, Cookeville, Tenn. — www.herald-citizen.com — Sunday, January 31, 2016
LOCAL/NATION
Obituaries
Harold Henry
Boatman
COOKEVILLE — Funeral
services for Harold Henry Boatman, 87, of Algood, will be held
at 2 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 31, from
the chapel of Whitson Funeral
Home. Burial will follow in
Paran Cemetery in Overton
County.
Visitation will be held from
noon until time
of services Sunday at the funeral
home.
Mr. Boatman
passed
away
Wednesday, Jan.
27, 2016, in SigMr.
nature HealthBoatman care in Algood.
Harold Henry
Boatman was born on Nov. 25,
1928, in Putnam County to the
late Talmadge Henry and Winnie
Alice (Wilmoth) Boatman.
Harold worked for McCord’s and
attended Washington Avenue
Baptist Church.
He also served in the Marines.
His survivors include his son
and daughter-in-law, Ricky
(Diane) Boatman of Algood; a
daughter and son-in-law, Patty
(Ron) Reel of Murfreesboro; a
grandchild, Jessica Boatman; and
great-grandchild, Patrick Boatman.
In addition to his parents, Mr.
Boatman is preceded in death by
his first wife, Anna V. Barnes
Boatman; second wife, Winnie
Flatt Boatman; and one sister,
Geneva Alene Mainord.
Whitson Funeral Home is in
charge of the arrangements.
Corbet “Corky” Hood
COOKEVILLE — Funeral
services for Corbet “Corky”
Hood, 52, of Cookeville will be
held Tuesday, Feb. 2, at 1 p.m. at
the chapel of Goff Funeral Home
with burial at Taylor Place Cemetery in Jamestown.
The family will receive friends
from 11 a.m. until the time of the
services at the funeral home.
Mr. Hood died Wednesday, Jan.
27, 2016, at his home.
Goff Funeral Home in Monterey, 839-2311, is in charge of
the arrangements.
Deborah Lynn Napier
COOKEVILLE — Funeral
services for Deborah Lynn
Napier, 57, of Cookeville will be
held Monday, Feb. 1, at 2 p.m. at
Presley Funeral Home.
The family will receive friends
from noon until the time of the
services at the funeral home.
Burial will take place at a later
date at Brown’s Mill Cemetery.
Deborah Napier died Thursday,
Jan. 28, 2016, at St. Thomas
Rutherford Hospital in Murfreesboro.
Presley Funeral Home, 931528-1044, is in charge of the
arrangements.
Hazel Irene Carter
ALLONS — Funeral services
for Hazel Irene Carter, 84, of Allons will be held today, Sunday,
Jan. 31, at 2 p.m. from the chapel
of Livingston Funeral Home with
burial at Richardson Cemetery in
Monroe.
The family will receive friends
from 11 a.m. until the time of the
services.
Miss Carter died Jan. 28, 2016,
at Overton County Care and
Rehab Center.
Livingston Funeral Home, 931823-1272, is in charge of the
arrangements.
Jeffrey Lynn Henry
OHIO — Funeral services for
Jeffrey Lynn Henry, 58, of New
Lebanon, Ohio, will be held
Tuesday, Feb. 2, at noon at
George C. Martin Funeral Home,
Northridge Chapel, at 5040 Frederick Pike, Needmore Road, in
Dayton, Ohio. Burial will be at
Dayton Memorial Park Cemetery.
The family will receive friends
from 11 a.m. until the time of the
services at the funeral home.
Mr. Henry died Wednesday,
Jan. 27, 2016, at Genesis New
Lebanon Nursing Facility in New
Lebanon, Ohio.
George C. Martin Funeral
Home, 937-277-9290, is in
charge of the arrangements.
plants, animals, and people.
Pam loved more than anything
to be happy and to increase the
amount of happiness in the lives
of her friends and the world. She
succeeded in this extraordinarily
well.
She is survived by an Uncle
Bob Geise in Northumberland,
Pennsylvania, and five cousins.
Pam had numerous godchilden
who loved her dearly, and to
whom she was a loving motherfigure.
A Celebration of Life ceremony
will be held in the future. Family
and friends will be notified.
Hooper, Huddleston and Horner
Funeral Home, 931-526-6111, is
in charge of the arrangements.
played a horn in the marching
band in college, sang in choirs,
and enjoyed dancing to Big
Band music.
In May 2014, Jim and Elinor
moved to Westminster Suncoast,
a retirement community in St.
Petersburg, Fla. The family is
grateful for the excellent care
and compassion Jim received
from the Health Center staff and
Suncoast Hospice Coral Team at
the dementia unit there.
A celebration of Jim’s life will
be held on March 20 at Westminster Suncoast at 2 p.m.
Memorial contributions may be
made in Jim’s name to the Backsliders Class, c/o First United
Methodist Church, 165 E. Broad
Street, Cookeville, TN 38501, or
to a charity of your choice.
Robert (Bob) Dixon
Jean Essex
COOKEVILLE — Robert
(Bob) Dixon, 74, of Cookeville
died Wednesday, Jan. 27, 2016,
at his residence.
No funeral services are planned.
Hooper, Huddleston and Horner
Funeral Home, 931-526-6111, is
in charge of the arrangements.
COOKEVILLE — Funeral
services for Roena “Jean” Essex,
84, of Cookeville will be held at
2 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 31, at
Cookeville Freewill Baptist
Church. Burial will follow in the
Essex
Family
Cemetery.
The family will
receive friends
from 1 p.m. until
the time of the
services Sunday
at the church.
Mrs. Essex Mrs.
Essex
passed
away
Thursday morning, Jan. 28,
2016, at her home surrounded by
her three children.
Jean was born Oct. 19, 1931, in
DeKalb County to the late John
Cantrell Spears and Lena Mae
Lafever Spears. She was a loving
wife, mother and grandmother,
and her children praised her for
her Godly spirit.
She taught her primary Sunday
school class at Cookeville
Freewill Baptist Church for 33
years. She was very creative, enjoyed writing poetry and songs
and wrote each of her grandchildren a poem for their birthday
every year.
She worked at Acme Boot
Company and was a homemaker.
Jean is survived by her three
children, Carol Randolph, Cecil
(wife Rhonda) Essex of
Cookeville, and Cindy (husband
Dale) Walker of Sparta; four
grandchildren, William Logan
Randolph, Parker Essex Randolph, Lauren Alyssa (husband
Mark) Apple and Andrew Keith
Essex;
two
sisters-in-law,
Theresa Spears and Ina Essex;
and a host of nieces, nephews,
family and friends.
In addition to her parents, she
was preceded in death by her
husband of 55 years, Gilbert
Keith Essex; a granddaughter,
Amy Michelle Essex; and seven
brothers and sisters, Sam Spears,
James Spears, Albert Spears,
Betty Ann Lafever, Audrey Goff,
Lena Spears and Rita Dyer.
Pallbearers will be Mark Apple,
Kevin Spears, Andrew Essex,
Parker Randolph, Chris Clinton
and Dale Walker.
Bros. Charles Cook and Mark
Apple will be officiating the
services.
In lieu of flowers, donations
may be made to Samaritan Inn,
PO Box 982, Sparta, TN 38583,
for the support of orphans in
India.
Dyer Funeral Home in
Cookeville is in charge of
arrangements.
Pamela Carol Westrick
CELINA — Pamela Carol
Westrick passed from this life on
Jan. 22, 2016. She was born in
Raleigh, N.C., on June 16, 1953,
to Dr. Charles and Mollie
Westrick, who both preceded her
in death, along with her sister,
Debra Westrick.
Pam graduated in 1971 from
Mount Tabor High School in
Winston-Salem, N.C. She received her B.A. degree in theater
from the University of North
Carolina at Charlotte.
While studying there, she was
mentored by prominent author
and actor Spalding Gray and remained friends with him until his
passing. During those years she
spent two summers traveling
around Europe, immersing herself into local life wherever she
was at the time. Upon returning,
she attended Peabody College at
Vanderbilt University. Pam went
on to receive her master’s degree
in special education and an Ed.S.
from Tennessee Technological
University.
Pam taught special education
for almost 20 years, first at Fox
Elementary in Gainesboro and
then later retiring from Maple
Grove School in Clay County,
the last one-room schoolhouse in
Tennessee. She was very esteemed in her field and was
beloved by both her fellow teachers and her students. She made
many contributions in education
and ultimately received a Teacher
of the Year award while in the
Clay County School System.
Pam was known as a tremendously generous person, willing
to share with so many. She had
many wonderful friends from all
walks of life. Spending time with
her friends, listening to music,
and dancing brought her great
joy. She loved to garden, take
long walks with her dogs and her
friends, and spend countless
hours on her houseboat on Dale
Hollow Lake celebrating just
about any occasion.
Pam quite fondly remembered
her mother taking her to Greensboro, N.C., to civil rights sit-ins
and marches, and she was active
in political, environmental, and
women’s issues her whole life.
Pam’s friends remember her
great love of nature and gardening. She transformed her homestead into a lovely sanctuary for
Wills, Living Trusts
& Estate Planning
James R. Ross
COOKEVILLE — James R.
Ross, 86, a resident of
Cookeville for 45 years, passed
away on Jan. 27, 2016. Born in
Murrysville, Pa., Jim is survived
by his wife of 61 years, Elinor;
his daughter and son-in-law,
Cheryl and John Hodges of St.
Petersburg, Fla.; his son and
daughter-in-law,
David and Stacy
Ross; two grandchildren, Veronica and Clay
Ross
of
Kingston, Tenn.;
a brother and sisMr. Ross
t e r- i n - l a w,
Charles and Alice Ross of Butler,
Pa., and a brother-in-law and sister-in-law, Brenton and Lois
Groves, of Melbourne, Australia.
Jim graduated from Geneva
College with a B.A. in industrial
engineering and from Tennessee
Technological University with a
Master of Business Administration degree. He was later president of the MBA Alumni
Association and a member of the
College of Business Foundation. He was a Fellow and Life
Member of the Institute of Industrial Engineers and served as
chapter president, division director, adjunct instructor, and guest
lecturer in industrial engineering. He was a registered professional engineer in Tennessee. He
was dedicated to lifelong learning and the development of new
knowledge, which he shared at
industrial engineering conferences.
Following a two-year stint in
the Army, Jim began his career
with DuPont in Wilmington,
Del. He spent a year as a management consultant in Sweden
and eventually moved to
Cookeville, where he was chief
engineer for OXCO Brush Company. After OXCO closed, he
spent the next 28 years as a consultant with the University of
Tennessee Center for Industrial
Services. In this position he traveled across the state helping
small businesses. He had a remarkable memory for the names
and occupations of the colleagues and friends he met over
the years.
In Cookeville, Jim was active
in the Red Cross Blood Program,
Rotary Club, Symphony Board,
and United Way Board. At First
United Methodist Church, he
was president of the Backsliders
Sunday School class, chair
of Missions, a trustee, and a
member of the Staff Parish Committee. Jim loved music and
➟
115 South Dixie Ave., Cookeville, TN
526-7868
By AMY DAVIS
HERALD-CITIZEN Staff
PUTNAM COUNTY — Discarded ashes from a woodstove
are believed to be the cause of a
fire that destroyed a home on
Newt Road Friday night.
“It was a total loss,” Putnam
County Fire Department Assistant Chief Tom Brown said of
the single-wide trailer located
near the White County line. “It
appeared that the fire started
outside around the deck.”
Brown said the fire began
shortly after 7 p.m. By the time
firefighters arrived on the scene,
the home was already consumed.
“The structural stability was
such that when we got there we
couldn’t get inside so we had to
fight it from outside,” he said.
The couple who lived there
had reportedly awoken when
they smelled the smoke. No injuries were reported.
Mutual aid from Northend
Fire Department in White
County responded with a tanker
and two firefighters, joining the
Putnam County Fire Department’s 10 firefighters to extinguish the flames.
Brown estimated the loss at
$50,000. He said discarded
ashes from a woodstove most
likely caused the fire, but he is
still investigating the incident.
As for the proper way to dispose of ashes, he said, “They really need to be discarded where
they can’t ignite anything, or in
a metal can, until they’re cooled
off.”
Obama to meet with Muslims
on first visit to U.S. mosque
WASHINGTON (AP) — In a
public show of support, President Barack Obama will meet
with Muslim community members Wednesday in Baltimore
on his first presidential visit to
an American mosque.
Obama plans to hold talks
with Muslim leaders at the Islamic Society of Baltimore, the
White House announced Saturday. The visit will amount to a
public embrace of Muslims by
Obama at a time when public
sentiment against them seems
to be growing, largely fueled by
fears of terrorist acts carried out
by extremist groups.
Obama has largely put distance between himself and U.S.
Muslims, opting against fueling
the rampant theories that he is a
closet Muslim who was born
in Kenya, the country of his
late father’s birth. Obama is
American by virtue of his
birth in Hawaii and has released his birth certificate as
proof. He also is Christian.
But segments of the U.S. pop-
ulation still believe neither to be
true.
As such, the visit will come
during the final year of
Obama’s two terms in office.
The White House said he will
go to the Baltimore mosque to
“celebrate the contributions
Muslim Americans make to our
nation and reaffirm the importance of religious freedom to
our way of life.”
In remarks to be delivered at
the mosque, Obama “will reiterate the importance of staying
true to our core values: welcoming our fellow Americans,
speaking out against bigotry, rejecting indifference and protecting our nation’s tradition of
religious freedom,” the White
House said.
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HERALD-CITIZEN, Cookeville, Tenn. — www.herald-citizen.com — Sunday, January 31, 2016 — A11
NATION
A look at federal cases on handling classified information
By ERIC TUCKER
Associated Press
WASHINGTON (AP) — News that
Hillary Clinton’s home email server
contained top-secret messages brings renewed attention to the security of her
mail system and to the laws and regulations that control classified information.
The new disclosure, and the question
of whether it exposes her to more serious legal problems, was certain to escalate political heat on the Democratic
presidential candidate ahead of Monday’s Iowa caucuses, the first contest on
the 2016 nominating calendar.
FBI Director James Comey, whose
agency is looking into the setup of the
server, has said only that the investigation is being conducted without regard
for politics. Officials have given no public hint as to when or how the probe will
be finished.
Stephen Vladeck, an American University law professor and national security
law expert, said it would be a stretch,
based on what’s now known, to think
Clinton could be charged under any existing statute for her behavior.
“This is an area where the government
tends not to test the margins too often,”
Vladeck said.
It’s not uncommon for workers with
access to classified material to mishandle it, and by far the bulk of those cases
don’t attract the attention of federal
prosecutors.
But when the Justice Department does
pursue a case, it often relies on a statute
that bars the unlawful removal and retention of classified documents. That
low-level charge, meant for cases in
which defendants improperly hold onto
information that they know to be classi-
AP File
Then-Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton checks her Blackberry
from a desk inside a C-17 military plane upon her departure from
Malta, in the Mediterranean Sea, bound for Tripoli, Libya.
fied, carries a fine and maximum yearlong prison sentence and is reserved for
people who have “really, really screwed
up,” Vladeck said.
Much more serious is another statute
that makes it illegal to knowingly disclose classified information to someone
who’s not authorized to receive it.
Each case that’s resulted in prosecution
has unique facts, making comparisons
difficult. Investigators invariably take
into account questions of knowledge,
damage to national security, who sent,
State Dept. declares 22
Clinton emails ‘top secret’
By BRADLEY KLAPPER
Associated Press
WASHINGTON (AP) — The
Obama administration has confirmed for the first time that
Hillary Clinton’s home server
contained closely guarded government secrets, censoring 22
emails that contained material requiring one of the highest levels
of classification. The revelation
came three days before the former secretary of state and current
Democratic presidential candidate competes in the Iowa caucuses.
State Department officials also
said the agency’s Diplomatic Security and Intelligence and Research bureaus are investigating
if any of the information was
classified at the time of transmission, going to the heart of Clinton’s defense of her email
practices.
The department on Friday
evening published its latest batch
of emails from her time as America’s top diplomat.
But The Associated Press
learned ahead of the release that
seven email chains would be
withheld in full for containing
“top secret” information. The 37
pages include messages a key intelligence official recently said
concerned “special access programs” —highly restricted, classified material that could point to
confidential sources or clandestine programs like drone strikes.
“The documents are being upgraded at the request of the intel-
ligence community because they
contain a category of top secret
information,” State Department
spokesman John Kirby told the
AP, calling the withholding of
documents in full “not unusual.”
That means they won’t be published online with others being
released, even with blacked-out
boxes.
Department officials wouldn’t
describe the substance of the
emails, or say if Clinton sent any
herself.
Clinton insists she never sent or
received information on her personal email account that was
classified at the time. No emails
released so far were marked classified, but reviewers previously
designated more than 1,000 messages at lower classification levels. Friday’s will be the first at
top secret level.
Even if Clinton didn’t write or
forward the messages, she still
would have been required to report any classification slippages
she recognized in emails she received.
But without classification markings, that may have been difficult, especially if the information
was publicly available.
“We firmly oppose the complete blocking of the release of
these emails,” Clinton campaign
spokesman Brain Fallon said.
“Since first providing her emails
to the State Department more
than one year ago, Hillary Clinton has urged that they be made
available to the public. We feel
no differently today.”
received or stored the information, and
whether the material was classified at
the time of transmission.
Some examples of past cases concerning classified information:
David Petraeus
The best-known recent prosecution involves the former CIA director who
pleaded guilty last year to a misdemeanor count of unlawful removal and
retention of classified materials. He was
spared prison as part of his plea and was
given two years’ probation by a judge
who faulted him for a “serious lapse in
judgment.”
The retired four-star Army general admitted that he loaned his biographer,
Paula Broadwell, with whom he was
having an affair, eight binders containing highly classified information regarding war strategy, intelligence capabilities
and identities of covert officers. Petraeus
kept the binders in an unlocked desk
drawer at his home, instead of a secure
facility that’s required for handling classified material.
There’s a critical distinction.
While Clinton has repeatedly said she
didn’t send or receive anything that was
classified at the time — something the
State Department now says it’s investigating — the Petraeus plea deal makes
clear that he knew the information he
provided was classified. He told Broadwell in a recording revealed by prosecutors that the binders had “code-word
stuff in there.”
When initially questioned by the FBI,
he denied having given Broadwell classified information, but in his plea deal
he avoided being charged with making
a false statement.
John Deutch
Deutch was CIA director from May
1995 until December 1996. He came
under Justice Department investigation
after his resignation when classified material was found on his home computer
in Maryland.
An internal CIA investigation found
that he stored and processed hundreds of
files of highly classified material on unprotected home computers that he and
family members also used to connect to
the Internet, making the information potentially vulnerable to hackers.
A report by the Defense Department in-
spector general found that Deutch had
failed to follow “the most basic security
precautions” and faulted him for rejecting Pentagon requests that security systems be installed on his home
computers.
Deutch apologized for his actions and
was pardoned by President Bill Clinton
before the Justice Department could file
a misdemeanor plea deal for mishandling government secrets.
Sandy Berger
Berger was the national security adviser during Bill Clinton’s second term.
After leaving office, he found himself
in trouble for destroying classified documents.
Berger, who died in December at age
70, pleaded guilty in 2005 to illegally
sneaking classified documents from the
National Archives by stuffing papers in
his suit. He later destroyed some of
them in his office and lied about it. The
materials related to terror threats in the
United States during the 2000 millennium celebration.
He pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor
count of unauthorized removal and retention of classified material, and
though he avoided prison time, he lost
access to classified material for three
years.
A judge fined him $50,000, higher
than the amount recommended by prosecutors.
He called his actions a lapse in judgment that came as he was preparing to
testify before the Sept. 11 commission
that examined the events leading up to
the 2001 attacks.
“I let considerations of personal convenience override clear rules of handling classified materials,” Berger said
at the time.
A12 — HERALD-CITIZEN, Cookeville, Tenn. — www.herald-citizen.com — Sunday, January 31, 2016
NATION
America and its politics in flux as 2016 voting begins
By JULIE PACE
AP White House Correspondent
DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) — First
there was the promise of political
change in Barack Obama’s historic 2008
election. Then the pledge to upend
Washington’s ways after the 2010 tea
party wave.
But for some Americans, the change
and disruption have come too slowly, or
failed altogether. On the eve of the first
voting contest in the 2016 presidential
election, these voters are pushing for
bolder, more uncompromising action,
with an intensity that has shaken both
the Republican and Democratic establishments.
Candidates with deep ties to party leadership have been unexpectedly challenged
by
a
billionaire
businessman-turned-reality television
star, a young senator loathed by GOP
leaders, and an unabashed democratic
socialist.
“A lot of people feel like the status quo
is a machine that’s grinding them
down,” said Sen. Claire McCaskill, a
Democrat from Missouri. “They are
gravitating toward candidates that are
disruptive and promising massive
change.”
Indeed, the campaigns of Republicans
Donald Trump and Ted Cruz, as well as
Democrat Bernie Sanders, have been fueled for months by anger, frustration and
anxiety over an economic and national
security landscape that is undeniably in
flux.
Wages have barely budged and the
costs for housing, education and health
care are soaring. The country is more
racially and ethnically diverse than at
any point in its history, with census data
projecting white Americans will make
up less than half the population by midcentury. New terror threats feel both
confusing and very close to home.
Monday’s Iowa caucuses will offer the
first hard evidence of whether the out-
Jae C. Hong | AP
Republican presidential candidate Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas speaks at a campaign event at High Point Bulls
Oswald Barn in Osceola, Iowa. For some Americans, the promise of political change and disruption has
come too slowly, or failed altogether. On the eve of the first voting contest in the 2016 presidential election,
these voters are pushing for bolder, more uncompromising action, with an intensity that has shaken both
the Republican and Democratic establishment.
sider candidates can turn the energy
around their campaigns into votes.
Trump and Cruz have been battling for
supremacy in Iowa, while Sanders has
been cutting into Democratic front-runner Hillary Clinton’s lead.
Sanders, an independent who caucuses
with Democrats on Capitol Hill, has
spent years railing against the influence
of wealthy and corporate interests on
American politics. Yet even he says he’s
surprised by what’s happening.
“My gut told me that this message
would resonate with the American people but to be honest with you it has resonated stronger and faster than I thought
it would,” Sanders told The Associated
Press.
For years, surveys have shown a large
majority of Americans say the country is
headed in the wrong direction. But that
sentiment now appears to be disproportionately driven by frustration with politics and the political system.
A recent AP-GfK poll showed that
among the 74 percent of Americans with
a negative view of the country’s direction, 51 percent of Republicans and 38
percent of Democrats listed at least one
political reason for their negative outlook — far more than listed an economic
or foreign policy-related reason.
No candidate has tapped into the public’s disillusionment with politics better
than Trump, whose controversial comments about Mexicans, Muslims and
women are seen by his supporters as a
welcome change from most candidates’
careful political correctness.
“It’s harder and harder to believe in an
establishment guy who’s so polished,”
said Wayne Magoon, a 72-year-old from
Exeter, New Hampshire.
Cruz has tapped into a similar anti-establishment sentiment. Despite being in
the Senate, Cruz aligned himself with
Republicans who believe party elites
made lofty promises to win the House in
2010 and the Senate in 2014, then ignored the will of the voters who drove
those victories.
“Republicans get to Washington and
become part of Washington,” said Brendan O’Brien, 51, of Portsmouth, New
Hampshire.
It’s not just Republicans grappling with
a disillusioned electorate.
Clinton entered the Democratic race
with all of the institutional advantages.
Most Democrats who were seen as potentially tough challengers decided
against a run, including Vice President
Joe Biden.
At the heart of the fight between Clinton and Sanders is how much the government should do to ease economic
burdens for the middle class.
Sanders wants to make tuition at public
colleges and universities free. Clinton
wants to lessen the burden of the student
loan repayment system and create incentives for institutions to lower costs.
With prescription drug costs soaring,
Clinton wants to cap out-of-pocket drug
costs at $250 a month. Sanders wants to
change to a single-payer health care system that he says would lower overall
health care costs, even including the tax
hike to help pay for the program.
McCaskill says Sanders is running on
“promises that in his gut he’s got to
know can’t be kept.” The Republican establishment makes the same argument
about Trump’s proposals.
But all that matters is whether voters
believe the candidates’ plans can fly —
or whether that factors into their vote at
all.
Soon, they’ll have their say.
Now deeply Christian, Cruz’s religion once wasn’t so obvious
By WILL WEISSERT
Associated Press
AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — Ted
Cruz sometimes sounds more like
a preacher than a presidential candidate, praising the transformative love of Jesus Christ and
promising to defend religious liberty. But the Texas senator rarely
evokes the biblical tenet of
tithing, the mandate that 10 percent of possessions be donated to
God.
That’s because Cruz doesn’t
tithe. He and his wife donated
less than 1 percent of their income to charity and nothing to
churches, including to their own
in Houston, according to tax returns from 2006 to 2010, the most
recent Cruz has released.
His campaign declined requests
from The Associated Press to provide recent tax returns or otherwise demonstrate donations since
2010. Cruz has said he and his
wife were more focused on using
their seven-figure annual income
to build a financial foundation for
their family.
Being a past charitable cheapskate provides a glimpse of who
Cruz was before running for president, when he was known more
as a fierce fiscal conservative
than a devout Southern Baptist.
Cruz’s religious side similarly
didn’t dominate his 2012 run for
Senate in Texas. Cruz suggested
shortly after taking office that
politicians should “avoid ostentatiously wrapping yourself in your
faith” — advice he has ignored
amid his rise in national polls.
“It’s not like this is a new issue,
it just wasn’t front and center,”
James Bernsen, the spokesman
for Cruz’s Senate campaign, said
of religion. “Ted’s main focus
was on Obamacare, taxing and
spending, the national debt.”
On the night he won the 2012
Texas primary, Cruz reminded a
packed Houston hotel ballroom
that victory came on what would
have been the 100th birthday of
free-market champion Milton
Friedman. Only after that did he
praise God.
The following year, Cruz told
the Christian Broadcasting Network: “I think anyone in politics,
you’ve got a special obligation to
avoid being a Pharisee, to avoid
ostentatiously wrapping yourself
in your faith.”
Now seeking the White House,
Cruz has done the opposite. He is
trying to solidify support from
evangelical Republicans against
Donald Trump and religious conservatives like Rick Santorum
and Mike Huckabee, whose supporters have questioned Cruz’s
lack of tithing.
Cruz launched his presidential
bid at evangelical Liberty University and has sought support from
pastors in all 99 Iowa counties. A
super political action committee
built a website trumpeting his
faith bona fides, including a video
detailing how a then-8-year-old
Cruz “surrendered his heart to
Jesus” during summer camp at a
Christian ranch. Cruz mentioned
faith repeatedly in Thursday’s
GOP debate.
Cruz’s past charitable donations
weren’t so generous, though he
isn’t alone in withholding more
recent tax records. Trump also
hasn’t disclosed his tax returns.
Jeb Bush, Carly Fiorina, Hillary
Clinton and Bernie Sanders have
released partial returns from recent years.
Clinton reported giving away
13 percent of her family’s taxable
income in 2014, and Bush reported donating 4 percent of his
that year.
Sanders did not release the part
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of his 2014 return that shows
charitable donations, but his
campaign said he and his wife
gave away about 6 percent of
their taxable income. Fiorina reported donating what amounted
to 22 percent of her family’s taxable income in 2013.
Cruz’s Senate campaign released five years of tax returns
through 2010 showing that he
and his wife donated about
$44,500 of the more than $5 million they made over the period —
less than 1 percent of their income.
Those returns didn’t include
itemized donations, but Cruz
gave a list to the San Antonio Ex-
press-News in 2012. The newspaper reported that, while some
donations went to faith-based organizations, no money was reported to have been donated to
churches, including Houston’s
First Baptist, where the Cruzes
have worshipped since 2008.
Cruz responded that he’d
“worked and saved to build a
solid financial foundation to provide for my children.” He has
two daughters.
Recently asked about tithing by
the Christian Broadcasting Network, Cruz said “I will readily
admit that I have not been as
faithful in this aspect of my walk
as I should have been.”
HERALD-CITIZEN, Cookeville, Tenn. — www.herald-citizen.com — Sunday, January 31, 2016 — A13
WORLD
Syrian opposition delegation arrives in Geneva
By BASSEM MROUE
Associated Press
GENEVA (AP) — The main Syrian opposition delegation arrived in Switzerland Saturday night, however it remained
unclear whether the delegation would actually participate in U.N.-sponsored
peace talks aimed at ending Syria’s civil
war.
The indirect peace talks began here Friday with a meeting between the United
Nations envoy and the Syrian government delegation. The main opposition
group, the Higher Negotiations Committee or HNC, boycotted that session saying it won’t take part until a set of
preliminary demands are met: releasing
detainees, ending the bombardment of
civilians by Russian and Syrian forces,
and lifting government blockades on
rebel-held areas.
The HNC later agreed to send a delegation to meet with U.N. officials, while
still insisting it would not negotiate until
their demands are met. The HNC decision to come to Geneva gave a glimmer
of hope that peace efforts in Syria might
actually get off the ground for the first
time since two earlier rounds of negotiations collapsed in 2014.
Meanwhile officials from Syria’s
The participation of the PYD has been
a divisive issue in advance of the Geneva
talks. Turkey, which has struggled with
its own large Kurdish population, considers the PYD a terrorist organization
and the HNC claims they are too close to
the Syrian government.
Unlike other groups from outside the
HNC that were invited as advisers, the
PYD received no invitation from U.N.
Special Envoy to Syria Staffan de Mistura.
The move to exclude the PYD angered
Qadri Jamil, a former Syrian deputy
prime minister who has become a leading opposition figure but is not part of the
HNC. Jamil said the PYD’s military
wing has been the most effective force
on the ground in Syria fighting the Islamic State group.
“The PYD is a historic part of the Syrian democratic opposition and PYD
today is fighting terrorism on the ground
and it is a main force,” Jamil told a group
of journalists in Geneva on Saturday.
Jamil said they are working with the
AP
U.N. to resolve the crisis regarding the
Syrian chief negotiator and the country’s ambassador to the U.N. Bashar Ja’afari, right, attends the Syria representation of the PYD.
peace talks in Geneva, Switzerland, Friday.
Bassam Bitar of the opposition’s Movelargest Kurdish group left Geneva Satur- opposition figures said.
when it became clear he would not be in- ment for a Pluralistic Society said the
day after being excluded from the nego- Saleh Muslim, co-president of the vited to participate, according to Kurdish PYD will most likely be invited to take
tiations, a Kurdish official and Democratic Union Party, or PYD, left official Nawaf Khalil.
part in future rounds of negotiations.
Thousands march in Paris rain
to protest state of emergency
By CHRIS DEN HOND
Associated Press
PARIS (AP) — Thousands of
people marched in the Paris rain
on Saturday to denounce plans to
renew France’s state of emergency and revoke the French citizenship of dual nationals
convicted of terrorism.
Human rights groups, politicians
and unions joined the march in
the French capital, and in other
demonstrations around France.
The protests came just days before the Cabinet plans to review a
measure on Wednesday to prolong the state of emergency, first
Christophe Ena | AP
imposed after the Nov. 13 Paris
A protester holds a banner reading: “Stop state of emergency” during a protest against attacks that killed 130 people.
the state of emergency, in Paris, Saturday.
The state of emergency gives
more power to police and administrative authorities, allowing for
searches without warrants, house
arrests and other measures.
“My France of liberties, where
are you?” read one banner.
The parliament is expected to
approve the prolongation of the
exceptional measures in voting
later this month. The current state
of emergency expires Feb. 26.
Jean-Baptiste Eyrault, of the
Right to Housing movement,
said: “Democracy is moving
backwards ... at the expense of
judges and the rule of law, freedom to demonstrate and (freedom) of expression.”
Last week, a French high court
upheld the measure, saying the
danger “has not disappeared.”
At least 37 migrants drown trying to reach Greece
By SUZAN FRASER
Associated Press
ANKARA, Turkey (AP) — A boat carrying Syrians attempting the short sea journey from Turkey to Greece struck rocks
and capsized at dawn on Saturday, causing
at least 37 people to drown, among them
several babies and young children.
Images of dead children on a beach on
Saturday were another soul-searing reminder that Europe’s migrant crisis keeps
destroying lives and families by the day.
They recalled the photo of 3-year-old
Aylan Kurdi lying face down on a Turkish
beach last year. His story put an intimate
face on the Syrian refugee crisis for people
across the world, prompting many to finally grapple with the magnitude of the
suffering being inflicted by the war in
Man caught with arms entering
Disneyland hotel to face trial
PARIS (AP) — A French prosecutor says a man who tried to
enter a Disneyland Paris hotel
last week with two handguns will
face criminal charges.
Prosecutor Dominique Laurens
in Meaux, east of Paris, had already dismissed terrorism links
but said Saturday the man risks
up to five years in prison and a
fine of 75,000 euros ($82,000) if
convicted. The charges include
acquiring and transporting arms
and ammunition.
The man, who has not been
identified, was detained Thursday with a female companion
when he tried to bring the
weapons into the hotel. The
woman was cleared of complicity.
The man was expected to go before a court Monday, a statement
by the prosecutor said.
France is under a state of emergency since November Paris attacks by Islamic extremist that
killed 130 people.
Syria and the treacherous journeys many
risk in hopes of finding shelter in Europe.
By contrast, the heartbreaking images
Saturday met a muted response, perhaps a
sign that many have grown weary of the
unending reports about the suffering of migrants even though the number of people
dying at sea is rising.
“January has been the deadliest month so
far for drownings between Turkey and
Greece,” Peter Bouckaert, the emergencies
director at Human Rights Watch, told The
Associated Press in an email. “Almost
every day, more drown on this dangerous
journey.”
Saturday’s tragedy occurred when the
boat capsized as dozens of people attempted the deceptively short crossing
from the Turkish coast to the Greek island
of Lesbos barely 5 miles away.
Opponents of another plan to revoke citizenship for dual nationals convicted of terrorism claim
the move would feed racism, creating a two-tier system of citizens. Many dual nationals are
Muslims, and some feel they are
blamed for attacks by Islamist extremists.
Green party lawmaker Noel
Mamere, taking part in the march,
said the state of emergency lays
the foundations for “a society
under surveillance.”
Christiane Taubira resigned suddenly last week as France’s justice minister over her opposition
to the plan, and as it became evident her views were on a collision
course with those of President
Francois Hollande.
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Working with employees at all levels of Signature HealthCARE of Putnam County, the Eden Alternative
provided professional development training in person-directed care, an evolving process that honors the
voices and choices of elders and those working most closely with them, thus transforming the delivery of care
to the entire community.
“Culture change is the common name for a global initiative focused on transforming long-term care as we
know it,” explained Signature’ s CEO Lee Rooney, “and our entire team was eager to shift its care practices
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Throughout this comprehensive Registry process, both ancillary and clinical staff at Signature focused on core
person-directed values that included choice, dignity, respect, self-determination and purposeful living. “We
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A14 — HERALD-CITIZEN, Cookeville, Tenn. — www.herald-citizen.com — Sunday, January 31, 2016
WORLD
As peace nears, renewed push to free Colombian rebel in U.S.
By JOSHUA GOODMAN
Associated Press
BOGOTA, Colombia (AP) — As negotiations to end Colombia’s half-century conflict close in on a final deal,
attention is turning to the fate of an
aging bank manager-turned leftist rebel
who is being held at a U.S. maximum
security prison alongside notorious terrorists.
The Revolutionary Armed Forces of
Colombia consider Ricardo Palmera to
be a prisoner of war and have long insisted he be released for a peace accord
to be signed. But the administration of
U.S. President Barack Obama has long
rejected freeing Palmera, who is serving
a 60-year sentence in connection to the
FARC’s holding captive of three American defense contractors for more than
five years a decade ago.
With peace talks expected to wrap up
as early as March and President Juan
Manuel Santos heading to Washington
on Tuesday to cement U.S. support for
an accord with the FARC, there is a renewed push to win the 65-year-old’s release.
Last week, Colombian Sen. Ivan
Cepeda, a trusted conduit of both the
FARC and Santos, quietly met with
Palmera at the United States’ highest security prison to discuss how he can contribute to peace, according to officials in
Colombia and the U.S. familiar with the
meeting. Cepeda was accompanied by
Javier Galeano, File | AP
Ricardo Palmera, known as Simon Trinidad, a leader of the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, FARC, shouts out as he is escorted by
soldiers, at a military base in Bogota, Colombia.
Colombian diplomats and the conversation monitored by U.S. law enforcement, said four officials, who insisted on
not being named because they weren’t
authorized to discuss the issue publicly.
The officials wouldn’t reveal specifics
about was said in the meeting, but the
visit was unusual. Dubbed the “Alcatraz
of the Rockies,” the 400-plus inmates at
the “Supermax” penitentiary in Florence, Colorado, including Boston
Marathon bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev
and some al-Qaida operatives, are kept
in their cells as much as 23 hours a day
and are normally allowed to meet only
with their lawyers and family.
Palmera’s lawyer, Mark Burton, didn’t
reply to repeated email and phone requests seeking comment.
For FARC leaders, Palmera, better
known by his nom de guerre Simon
Trinidad, is a symbol of what they con-
sider to be heavy-handed U.S. meddling
in Colombia’s conflict. When peace
talks began in Cuba in 2012, Colombia’s
main rebel movement named him one of
its five chief negotiators, using an empty
seat and life-size cutout to draw attention to his imprisonment.
He was extradited to the U.S. in 2004
and convicted of conspiracy to kidnap
the three Americans and sentenced to the
maximum 60 years, though he beat more
serious charges of actual hostage-taking
and terrorism as well as drug-trafficking.
The Americans were rescued in 2008.
“He was convicted to teach the FARC
a lesson,” said Carlos Lozano, a Communist Party politician and past intermediary to the FARC. “If Obama really
wants to help build peace, after expending such an effort on war-making and
weapon selling, then he can facilitate an
agreement to allow this man to be at the
peace table. The moment has arrived.”
Born into a wealthy cattle-ranching
family and the son of a senator, Palmera
was an unusual recruit for the peasantbased FARC. After watching fellow leftists gunned down by right-wing militias
during a previous peace attempt in the
1980s, he left his job as a bank manager
near his home in Valledupar and fled to
a guerrilla hideout in the jungle.
His elite pedigree and familiarity with
real-world politics are valuable assets
for the FARC as it prepares to disarm
and compete at the ballot box, Lozano
said.
Although FARC negotiators insist
Palmera’s release is a priority, they have
not said flatly that they would jettison a
deal over the issue. U.S. officials, meanwhile, haven’t ruled out an early release
or transfer but insist Colombia has not
made any such request and say it’s not a
topic of negotiations.
Santos, in an interview with The Associated Press, was emphatic that he isn’t
seeking Palmera’s release, because it’s
not in his hands, but would view any
such move by the U.S. favorably.
“Of course I would like it because it
would help the process,” he said.
“It would be a tremendous gesture for
the FARC, for their dignity, as they really have made this issue an important
issue for them. And you sometimes you
have to make concessions of this sort to
make the agreements stronger,” he said.
“But again: this is something I can’t
commit myself to.”
Another Colombian official, who
spoke on condition of anonymity because of the sensitivity of the matter,
said the White House and State Department have expressed a willingness to
consider repatriating Palmera, but also
have cautioned that opinion inside the
U.S. government is divided.
Clearly, some Americans balk at any
move to free Palmera.
Sen. Marco Rubio, a Republican presidential candidate, introduced a resolution last year opposing Palmera’s
release.
Turkey warns Russia after new airspace violation
By SUZAN FRASER
Associated Press
Stoltenberg also called on Russia
“to act responsibly and to fully
respect NATO airspace” but also
urged “calm and de-escalation”
of tensions between Moscow and
Ankara.
“Russia must take all necessary
measures to ensure that such violations do not happen again,” he
said in a statement. “NATO
stands in solidarity with Turkey
and supports the territorial integrity of our ally, Turkey.”
There was no immediate comVladimir Isachenkov, File | AP
ment on the incident from
A Russian Su-24 takes off on a combat mission at Moscow.
Hemeimeem airbase in Syria.
ANKARA, Turkey (AP) —
Turkish President Recep Tayyip
Erdogan warned Moscow on Saturday that it would be forced to
“endure the consequences” if its
jets continue to violate the Turkish airspace, after Ankara reported a new border infringement
incident by a Russian plane.
NATO-member Turkey said another Russian warplane violated
its airspace on Friday despite
several warnings — two months
after Turkey’s military shot down
a Russian jet for crossing over its moned the Russian ambassador It was not clear where exactly the
territory. The past incident seri- to the ministry Friday evening to new infringement had occurred.
ously strained the previously “strongly protest” the violation. NATO Secretary General Jens
close ties between the two countries, damaging a strong economic partnership.
“We regard this infringement
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an effort by Russia to escalate the
crisis in the region,” Erdogan
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the Russian leader did not respond.
“These irresponsible steps do
not help the Russian Federation,
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In November Turkey shot down
a Russian plane which violated
its airspace near Syria, touching
off a crisis between the two countries. It was the first time in more
than half a century that a NATO
nation had shot down a Russian
plane.
Turkey brought down the Russian Su-24 bomber near the border
with Syria on Nov. 24, saying it
violated its airspace for 17 seconds despite repeated warnings.
Russia insists the plane never entered Turkish airspace. One pilot
and a Russian marine of the res-
cue party were killed in the incident.
The Russian military quickly
sent missile systems to Syria and
warned that it would fend off any
threat to its aircraft. Moscow also
punished Turkey by imposing an
array of economic sanctions.
On Saturday, Stoltenberg said
NATO had agreed in December
to increase the presence of
AWACS early warning planes
over Turkey to increase the country’s air defenses. He said the decision was taken before Friday’s
incident.
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HERALD-CITIZEN, Cookeville, Tenn. — www.herald-citizen.com — Sunday, January 31, 2016 — A15
PETS
How not to lose hope in the face of tough dog problems
That word — hope — has come up a
lot in my consultations lately. The dog
doesn’t want to get along with other
dogs. The dog has suddenly lost her
housetraining. The dog has started
guarding things he sees as valuable —
food, toys, his human. And yet, after a
session or two, there comes an email
stating — “There is hope!” Yes, but
what will it take to see this through to
success?
One of my first thoughts is absence of
instilling fear in or intimidating the dog.
At the risk of sounding like a broken
record, this is so important that I mention it first. If the dog is already reacting
from fear, making her more fearful will
not cure the problem. If you fear rats,
me chasing you with a rat is not going
to make you less fearful. In fact, you
may attack me as soon as I put that rat
down. If the problem is not fear, but the dog’s
need to maintain control over a coveted
item, teaching the dog that my approach
means it’s confrontation time is going to
backfire — big time. I can assure you
that dogs have a mouth full of steak
knives they will use if they feel they
must, if you fail to heed all the warning
signals. So by working with the dog,
making sure that she knows this will be
a win/win situation, makes it possible to
hope for cooperation in the future.
Hope becomes part of the picture when
the exercises given are doable by the
owners and any other parties involved.
Many times I feel owners are left feeling
they have no clue as to where to begin
after a session. They must have a clear
vision of the first steps to be taken and
exactly how to proceed to the next step
and also what to do if there is a failure
(and there will be a failure, trust me). For hope to exist, the trainer must be
accessible via internet and/or phone.
Clients should feel encouraged to report
in with updates on the latest attempts at
changing the behaviors. That means the
trainer has not only encouraged such
check-ins, but that the owner has faith
that s/he will not be chided for any mistakes or confusion which may take
place. One must feel comfortable that
the trainer is an ally, not an omniscient
leader who will blame the owner and/or
dog for any setbacks.
Is the exercise
broken
down
enough so that only
one small behavior
must be achieved at
a time, building toward the major
overall behavior
desired? One of the
major problems I
Jan
see with people
Casey
working with canine behavior issues is the fact that the task is not broken
down into small enough pieces. Dog reacts negatively to other dogs? Throwing
the reactive dog in with a lot of other
dogs will not assure success. What will most likely happen is either
a fight or the dog will be so flooded, he
will shut down and offer no behaviors.
Absence of behavior is not a cure! Seeing a rattler on the trail in front of you
and you failing to move does not mean
you are cured of your fear of snakes. It
just means you hope that by not moving
you will avoid provoking an attack. We
may have to start treatment by briefly
seeing a dog at a distance which does
not cause anxiety. We may move closer
by one foot at a time — or we may make
huge strides moving closer 5 feet a
time. The dog decides. But there will be
hope each time we move forward. Which brings us to timelines. Timelines are important, but it is not possible
to establish a date at which the desired
behavior will be achieved. There are no
guarantees! Needing to have your dog
“fixed” a week before company visits
with their dog sets the dog up for failure. You could have an Einstein, but
emotions and rational thought do not
work side by side. I know you are smart
(you read this column!), but you may
also have some irrational fear. Heights?
Snakes or spiders? Claustrophobia?
None of those is linked to intelligence,
but rather to emotions. I cannot just talk you out of the irrational fear and I certainly can’t set a
timeline as to when you may get over it
(if ever). You are, after all, an individual. And so it is with dogs. As smart (or
challenging) as your dog may be, how
long it takes to change the unwanted behavior will depend on the dog as well as
how dedicated and skilled you are at the
exercises which must be performed to
reach the goal. Is there hope for your dog? I am sure
there is, but it will depend on many factors as I have listed above. Be aware
there will be set backs. There will be
frustration. There will be times when
you question your abilities, the abilities
of your trainer, and quite possibly
whether you should even have a dog.
Know that no dog is perfect just as no
owner and no trainer is perfect. What
will give you hope is sticking with the
training plan and watching for the small
steps toward improvement. They will be
there, don’t overlook them, reward
them. And enjoy the journey.
Jan Casey, MS, DipCBST, is a professional dog trainer and owner of
Golden Hearts Dog Training and
Behavior located in the Tampa
Bay area of Florida. She can be
reached by emailing
How can I help my
dog get used to snow?
AP
Basset hound Sherlock gets a high-pressure blow dry from groomer Carrla Rasco Bickel
in Newburgh, Ind., in the mobile grooming salon run by Carla and her husband, Barry
Bickel. This is their sixth year in business and the couple have learned much and built a
strong clientele.
Groomer hits the
road to serve clients
GENOA, Ill. (AP) — DeKalb
County’s newest salon caters to
an unexpected clientele.
2015 Mobile Groomer of the
Year recipient Lisa Leady and
her husband, Eric Leady, were
to open a Genoa storefront Jan.
18 to compliment her on-the-go
pet grooming company, Primp
My Pooch Mobile Dog and Cat
Salon. From haircuts and shampoos to bows and holidaythemed “pawdicures,” Lisa
Leady has been making DeKalb
County’s pets look and smell
fresh for more than 20 years.
“I love working with the animals and I love being able to see
people’s faces when they come
in and they pick up their dog, or
I bring their dog back in their
house and you know that this little animal is one of the best
things in their life,” Leady said.
Primp My Pooch’s 500-squarefoot storefront at 316 W. Main
St. in Genoa will open Jan. 18
and operate Mondays through
Fridays by appointment only.
The base price for pet grooming
at the Genoa store is $55, and
includes services like baths, nail
trims, full grooming and a selection of retail items, Leady said.
Leady is a third-generation
groomer, whose mother and
grandmother introduced her to
the craft as a young girl. She has
since become a certified Master
Groomer by the National Dog
Groomers Association of America and the International Pet
Groomers Inc., as well as winning runner-up on Animal
Planet’s reality competition
show, “Groomer Has It.” She
also was named 2015 Mobile
Groomer of the Year by Cardinal Pet Care.
In 2012, she founded Lisa
Leady Products, a manufacturer
of canine ear cleaners and loops
and leads products.
“I don’t have anybody working
on anybody’s dog that trains on
the job. They must know what
they are doing,’ Leady said.
Now that Leady’s husband has
decided to return to the family’s
grooming business, the couple
can handle primping twice as
many animals than Lisa’s mobile business alone.
“We knew we wanted to stay
in our own town, which is
Genoa. When we walked into
this little salon of 500 square
feet we knew it was perfect. It’s
a darling little location,” she
said.
The Leadys will continue serving Genoa’s surrounding area,
including DeKalb, Sycamore,
Kingston, Kirkland, Hampshire
and Pingree Grove, with their
mobile business. Customers
should book their appointments
at least one week in advance.
Both groomers can see about 12
animals a day without getting
overwhelmed, and for Lisa
Leady the focus is on quality,
not quantity, she said.
“I love to see (owners’) faces
light up when their dog has a
new haircut and they’re happy
with it,” she said.
Dear Cookie,
I don’t think my dog likes
the snow. What can I do to
help her get used to it?
Regan
Well, I guess a lot depends on
your dog! Is she small and unable to see her way to her favorite bathroom spot in the
yard? You may
need to dig a
path for her. Is
she
shorthaired and getting too cold?
Get
her
a
sweater
or
coat
Cookie
and don’t forget boots to
protect her feet. Don’t just throw her out into
the snow — you get out there
with her! Make it game time
and be sure to reward well
while she is out. Is there a chance she’ll never
like it? Sure! All dogs are different. Just do what you can to
make it a great experience and
if she still hates it, get her an
indoor litterbox and enjoy the
inside cuddles.
Winter can be
a hazard to cats
and being lost forever. Please keep your cat inside.
You can devise some toys and
Dear Putter,
games which will keep him
My cat stays outside even in just as happy as he would be
the cold weather. He really outside.
likes it. Should I be concerned?
Garvey
I would be concerned. Even
though your cat seems to like
the cold, he may choose to
seek
warmth
under the hood
of a car. If the
car’s
owner
V e t Recommended
Vet
Recommended
does not bang
9
931-520-1906
3
1
-520-1906
on the hood before starting it, Your
Yo u r One-Stop
O n e - S t o p Pet
P e t Care
C a r e Center
Center
your cat could
Putter
get caught in
Call 526-9715
the belts and killed. to subscribe
He could also end up taking a
ride to another part of town
Certain Messages
Need To Be Repeated
Several Times
Man drives
1,700 miles to
retrieve his cat
NEW BERN, N.C. (AP) — A
cat named Hemi, who vanished in 2011 and reappeared
mysteriously last week, is back
with the man who had adopted
him as a kitten and drove 1,700
miles from North Dakota to retrieve his lost-and-found pet.
Several news outlets report
that Robert Connell drove
from Bismarck to the Craven
County, North Carolina, animal shelter to pick up Hemi on
Monday.
Connell says he decided to
make the drive after a winter
storm nixed plans for a family
friend to fly Hemi to Bismarck.
Connell served as a Marine,
and he says Hemi helped him
cope with post-traumatic stress
disorder.
“Shake”
“Shake”
“Shake”
“Shake”
Instagrams of ’Dog Named Jimmy’ turned owner’s life around
LOS ANGELES (AP) —
Rafael Mantesso turned 30 in
an empty New York apartment
after divorce left every wall,
floor, closet and shelf bare.
The only things he had left
were his cellphone and a pit
bull named Jimmy Choo that
his neighbors went out of their
way to avoid.
When he turned 33 on Jan.
14, Mantesso still owned that
apartment and it’s still vacant.
But it’s for sale now. And people can’t get enough of his 6year-old bull terrier — from
the Instagram sketches-plusAP
photos of Jimmy that went
Mantesso and his dog Jimmy viral, the book “A Dog Named
Choo with thought bubble added Jimmy” and a collection of
Mantesso at his studio in Belo Jimmy-inspired bags and
Horizonte, Brazil.
purses for the high-end fashion
brand
Jimmy
Choo.
(Mantesso’s ex-wife had
named the dog for her favorite
shoes.)
There are future plans too: a
calendar, endorsements and
launching the charitable
Jimmy Foundation. Meanwhile, Mantesso is working at
an advertising agency in Sao
Paulo in his native Brazil, and
doing the occasional photo
shoot.
The first night they were
alone in the “naked” apartment
three years ago, Jimmy did a
happy dance through all the
rooms. Mantesso picked up his
phone and started shooting
photos of Jimmy’s contagious
dance of joy.
“When I sat in my empty liv-
ing room, Jimmy was happy,
running from one side to the
other side, in circles, crazy.
The apartment was a playground to him. He was loving
that empty place. That energy
was amazing. I looked at him
and said to myself, ’Oh my
God, I was thinking everything
was lost and I had the most important thing in the house —
Jimmy,’” Mantesso said in his
Portuguese accented-English.
Jimmy is a white dog but his
ginger and red ears contrasted
with the white walls, floors and
ceilings. At some point,
Mantesso picked up a piece of
white cardboard, drew a skeleton with a red heart on it, put it
in front of Jimmy and took a
photo.
“Shake”
“Good Dog”
The more often a consumer sees your
advertising message, the better your
chances are that they will remember
you when they’re ready to buy!
Call us to place your advertisement
with us today! 931-526-9715
A16 — HERALD-CITIZEN, Cookeville, Tenn. — www.herald-citizen.com — Sunday, January 31, 2016
Herald-Citizen
Sunday, January 31, 2016
SCHOOLS
Let it snow!
By AMY DAVIS
HERALD-CITIZEN Staff
S
now day! It’s what every student
longs to hear on a cold winter morning.
And — thanks to a strong winter storm
system that blew through the area last
week — that’s just what students in Putnam County got to hear before going on to
enjoy not one, but five glorious days in the
frozen white wonder that reached the double digits inch-wise in many areas.
Many students may have spent their days
away from all things school-related; others, however, went on to class as part of
the School Age Care program.
SAC, a parent-tuition funded group childcare program licensed by the Tennessee
Department of Education, continued to
serve its participating students while Putnam County schools were closed due to
the snow and ice Jan. 20-26. SAC students
from all over the county gathered at Northeast Elementary to enjoy art projects,
games and play time during what is referred to as snow day care.
“Before- and after-school care might be
what Putnam County SAC is best known
for, but snow day care seems to be what
parents are most thankful for,” SAC’s
website says. “We understand that parents
still have to work even though there might
be snow on the ground.”
When schools do close for snow, SAC
opens combined care at a designated
school.
“We provide a day full of activities for
your children so you don’t have to worry
about finding impromptu care for your
child in the event of bad weather,” the
website says. “Some of our daily activities
include the iPad lab, organized gym
games, the Wii lab, board games and the
computer lab. If it isn’t too cold outside,
we also like to take the children outside for
a few minutes to play in the snow.”
Which, of course, they were able to do this
past week.
The Putnam County Board of Education
is the governing body for SAC, authorizing the use of public school buildings for
before- and after-school childcare and fullday programs during holidays, intersession
and summer vacation.
SAC is an equal-access program for children ages 4-13 enrolled in Putnam County
schools. It includes numerous creative and
cultural activities such as crafts, sports,
games, snacks, art, music and multimedia,
as well as homework time and assistance if
needed.
For more information about registration,
visit www.putnamsac.org or call 528-1847.
SAC students move and groove to a
GoNoodle activity.
Addie Howell reads during SAC
snow care at Northeast Elementary.
Ty Kernea | Herald-Citizen
D’vera Wilken reads to students in the School Age Care program Tuesday at Northeast Elementary.
SAC, a parent-tuition funded group childcare program licensed by the Tennessee Department of Education, continued serving students while Putnam schools were closed for snow Jan. 20-26.
Annabelle
Casey, Mason
Taylor, Sawyer
Stone and Lila
Rooney, from
left, spend their
“snow day”
making a new
frozen friend as
part of the SAC
program at
Northeast
Elementary.
SAC site
director Ashlee
Vaughn helps
Cade Boswell
and Draven
Hutton with a
snow day
themed cooking
activity.
B
Student
Briefs
Area students named to
Vol State fall honor roll
GALLATIN — Four area students have been named to the fall
honor roll at Volunteer State
Community College. They are
Claudia Juetten of Cookeville,
Chelsey Stanton of Baxter, and
Jamie Phillips and Pamela Trahan, both of Monterey.
Honor roll recognition is
awarded to students who have
accumulated a minimum of 18
overall collegiate-level hours
with at least a 3.750 grade point
average during the awarding
term.
Volunteer State Community
College has more than 90 programs of study and offers twoyear degrees, certificates and
paths to university transfer. Continuing Education and Workforce
Development extends the college
mission to the entire community.
Vol State dean’s list and
honor roll announced
GALLATIN — Five Cookeville
students have been named to
both the fall dean’s list and honor
roll at Volunteer State Community College.
They include Marianne Borden,
Mayson Burgener, Chelsea Ferrell, Bryan Nash and Jared
Thomase.
In order to be awarded both the
dean’s list and honor roll recognition, students must have accumulated a minimum of 18 overall
collegiate-level hours and complete a minimum of 12 collegiate-level hours with at least a
3.750 grade point average during
the awarding term.
Vol State releases
local dean’s list
GALLATIN — Several students from Cookeville have
earned the grades needed to
make the fall dean’s list at Volunteer State Community College.
They are Bree Burchett, Lauren
Daniels, Sara Dodson, Josh Gentry, Trenton Lowe, Carrie
Thompson and Olivia Thompson.
Students are awarded dean’s list
recognition by completing a minimum of 12 semester hours of
collegiate-level coursework during the semester with a grade
point average of at least 3.750.
Baxter student
on SU dean’s list
BIRMINGHAM, Ala. — Olivia
R. Jarvis of Baxter was named to
the fall 2015 dean’s list at Samford University.
To qualify for the dean’s list, a
student must have earned a minimum 3.5 grade point average out
of a possible 4.0 while attempting at least 12 credit hours of
coursework. The dean’s list is the
highest academic recognition
given by the school at the end of
each semester.
Samford University is Alabama’s top-ranked private university and one of the nation’s
top
Christian
universities.
Founded in 1841, it is the 87tholdest institution of higher learning in the United States and
enrolls more than 5,200 students
from 46 states and 32 countries
in its 10 academic units: arts, arts
and sciences, business, divinity,
education, health professions,
law, nursing, pharmacy and public health.
Cookeville resident
on Dayton dean’s list
DAYTON, Ohio — Savannah
Keaney of Cookeville has been
named to the University of Dayton’s fall dean’s list, which honors undergraduate students
achieving a minimum 3.5 grade
point average for the semester.
The University of Dayton is a
top-tier national Catholic research institution founded in
1850 by the Society of Mary.
Furman University dean’s
list includes Cookevillian
GREENVILLE, S.C. — John
Gleason and Anne Jestus, both of
Cookeville, are on the dean’s list
at Furman University.
Furman’s dean’s list is composed of full-time undergraduate
students who earn a grade point
average of 3.4 or higher on a
four-point system.
Furman is a private undergraduate liberal arts college of 2,600
students in Greenville, S.C.
B2 — HERALD-CITIZEN, Cookeville, Tenn. — www.herald-citizen.com — Sunday, January 31, 2016
SCHOOLS
Ready to color
Monday, Feb. 1
Breakfast
Choice of one
Chicken biscuit
Apple bosco
Cereal with
vanilla Goldfish
and canned fruit
Lunch
Choice of one
Ravioli
PB&J sandwich
with string cheese
Choice of two
Seasoned green beans
Romaine salad
with dressing
Fresh veggies
and fruit
Tuesday, Feb. 2
Breakfast
Choice of one
Egg and cheese biscuit
Cinnamon Pop Tart
Cereal with Scooby Bones
and fresh fruit
Lunch
Choice of one
Taco wrap
Breaded chicken sandwich
Choice of two
Refried beans
Taco trimmings
Salsa cup
and fruit
Tennessee Tech University basketball players Aleksa Jugovic, left, and Micaiah Henry, right, and TTU First Lady Kari Oldham present coloring
books to Mitzi Hanson’s first grade class at Jere Whitson Elementary. TTU recently provided coloring books to all K-4 students in Putnam County
as part of its centennial celebration in conjunction with the 100th day of school on Jan. 15. At JWES, Oldham spoke to students about the importance of education and why it’s never too soon to start planning ahead for college. The coloring books featured vintage logos from the university
and a customizable diploma students could cut out.
Wednesday, Feb. 3
Breakfast
Choice of one
Breakfast pizza
Manager’s choice
Cereal with Bug Bites
and fresh fruit
Feb. 1-3
ADULT ED: The Adult Learning Center at 286 E. Main St. in Algood will have
free high school equivalency class orientation sessions for evening classes as follows:
• Feb. 1: CASAS test
• Feb. 2: Registration and orientation
• Feb. 3: (as assigned)
Sessions begin at 5:30 p.m.
For additional information, call 5288685. Participants are expected to attend
all sessions. The project is funded under
an agreement with the State of Tennessee
through the Department of Labor and
Workforce Development.
Feb. 2
PEP TALKS: PEP Talks, which stands
for Parents Encouraging Parents, will be
held on the following Tuesdays from
noon to 1 p.m. at the Putnam County
board of Education office:
• Feb. 2 and 9 — “Handling the Really
Hard Stuff: What to do when behavior is
unhealthy and/or harmful.” Licensed professional counselor Tabitha Schlatter will
cover concerns such as panic attacks,
self-harm, eating disorders, depression
and suicidal thoughts among youth.
Feb. 16, 23 and March 1 are reserved as
snow day make-up dates. Parents, stepparents, grandparents and guardians are
welcome. Contact Paula King at
[email protected] for more information.
Feb. 18
HRA OPEN HOUSE: Highland Rim
Academy will host a school-wide open
house Feb. 18 from 4-6:30 p.m. Open enrollment begins in late February. Call
526-4472 for more information.
Jan. 28
OPEN HOUSE: Heavenly Host
Lutheran School will have an open house
from 5-7 p.m. The school, located at 777
S. Willow Ave. in Cookeville, serves students from 6 weeks old through eighth
grade. All faiths are welcome. For more
information, call 520-3766 or visit
www.hhls.org.
4-H LIVESTOCK: Putnam County 4H will have a livestock judging meeting
from 4-5 p.m. at the 4-H office at 900 S.
Walnut Ave. for those interested in the
contest in April. Participants should
R.S.V.P. by Jan. 27.
The contest, practice dates and upcoming judging opportunities will be discussed. 4-H’ers do not need to own
livestock to judge. If Putnam County has
no school on Jan. 28, the meeting will be
Feb. 1 at 4 p.m. For more information,
call 526-4561.
Lunch
Choice of one
Meatloaf with roll
Popcorn chicken
with roll
Choice of two
Creamed potatoes
Romaine salad
with dressing
Fresh veggies
and fruit
Thursday, Feb. 4
Breakfast
Choice of one
Biscuit and country-style
or chocolate gravy
Belgian waffles
Cereal with
chocolate graham Goldfish
and canned fruit
Lunch
Choice of one
Thick crust cheese pizza
Manager’s choice entree
Choice of two
Steamed broccoli
Caesar salad
with dressing
Fresh veggies
and fruit
Friday, Feb. 5
Breakfast
Choice of one
Sausage and biscuit
Mini cinnamon bagel
Cereal with
cinnamon graham Goldfish
and fresh or canned fruit
Lunch
Choice of one
Mini corn dogs
Chicken tenders
with roll
Choice of two
Crinkle cut fries
Sandwich trimmings
Fresh veggies
and fruit
School Happenings
Prescott South Elementary chorus students, above, present “Season’s Greetings Around the World.” Below,
second graders show their holiday spirit.
Feb. 4 and 25
OPEN HOUSES: Cookeville Christian
Academy, located at 1200 Miracle Road
in Cookeville, will host open houses Feb.
4 and Feb. 25 from 4-6 p.m. Open enrollment begins Feb. 15. Call 209-7604 for
more information.
Feb. 12
POSTER CONTEST: American Legion Auxiliary Unit 46’s annual Poppy
Poster Contest is open to Putnam County
students in grades 2-12, including those
who are home schooled. The theme is the
Flanders Field Red Poppy. Posters are
due by Feb. 12 at the Putnam County
Board of Education. They must be on
11x14 poster board, and the words
“American Legion Auxiliary” and a picture of the Flanders Field Poppy must be
used in the design. For more details regarding contest rules, call 931-933-5037
or visit www.auxiliary46.org/posters.
Feb. 13
THERAPY DOGS: Students and their
families are invited to enjoy a story with
certified therapy dogs from the
Cookeville Regional Medical Center pet
therapy program at 10:30 a.m. at the Putnam County Library in Cookeville. Up
next is “Sadie” on Feb. 13 and “Hershey”
on March 12.
March 28-April 1
Spring break
April 12
KINDERGARTEN
REGISTRATION: The Putnam County School System will hold kindergarten registration
and orientation at all elementary schools
from 1-5 p.m. for children who will be 5
on or before Aug. 15. They will have an
opportunity to meet teachers and the
principal and explore the school. Parents
will leave the event with their children
enrolled and have information on school
and district policies, school transportation, before- and after-school child care,
extended school day possibilities and
school nutrition information.
April 30
MUD RUN: Highland Rim Academy is
teaming up with Putnam County YMCA
to host the third annual Kid’s Muddy
Mile, the only mud run of its kind in the
Upper Cumberland region. The one-mile
course, open to ages 5-14, will have more
than 10 obstacles, including a giant mud
pit at the end. Registration opens Feb. 1.
The cost is $15 per child until April 28 or
$20 on April 29 and 30. Registration
forms are available at the Putnam County
YMCA or Highland Rim Academy. For
more information, call the YMCA at 528-
1255 or HRA at 526-4472.
May 3
BOOK FAIR: Algood Middle School
will have family night during its book
fair from 3-7 p.m.
May 5
TRANSITION: Algood Middle
School will have fifth grade transition
night at 6 p.m.
May 20
Last day of school
Ongoing
GED: The Adult Learning Center is offering ongoing registration for high
school equivalency classes (GED). For
more information, call 931-528-8685.
Prospective students will be given the
date and time of classes depending on
when they contact the center, which is located at 286 E. Main St. in Algood.
HOMESCHOOL
HANGOUT:
Homeschool students are welcome the
second and fourth Friday of the month at
11 a.m. at the Monterey Branch Library.
Educational programs are featured on the
second Friday while movies are shown
on the fourth Friday. Call 839-2013 for
details.
Email school events to
[email protected]
State board launches social studies standards public review website
NASHVILLE — The Tennessee State Board of
Education just launched a review website —
https://apps.tn.gov/tcas — to collect public feedback on Tennessee’s grade K-12 social studies
standards.
This is the first of two public review periods for
the social studies standards.
The social studies standards set grade-specific
instructional standards that exemplify what students are expected to know and be able to do by
the end of a given grade or course. The current
social studies standards were approved in 2013
and first implemented in the 2014-15 school year.
This highly transparent and comprehensive review process is an opportunity for every Tennessean to log in online, review each specific
social studies standard by grade level, and provide comments and make suggestions for
changes.
“It is exciting that we are beginning the social
studies standards review process two years early,”
Dr. Sara Heyburn, executive director of the Tennessee State Board of Education, said.
“This robust and transparent review has proven
very successful with math and English language
arts.”
The public review website will remain active
until April 30.
Once data has been collected from the website,
it will be aggregated and given word-for-word to
expert educator advisory teams to review and revise the standards starting this summer.
The revised standards will be posted for a second public review period in the fall and winter of
this year.
Following a similar review process as the math
and English language arts standards, the revised
standards will be reviewed in the fall by a standards recommendation committee appointed by
the governor, lieutenant governor, and speaker of
the house.
In October 2014, Gov. Haslam introduced a
comparable review process online in partnership
with the state board for the state’s English language arts and math standards. This process was
codified by the General Assembly in HB 1035.
For more information, visit
http://tn.gov/sbe/topic/standards-review.
HERALD-CITIZEN, Cookeville, Tenn. — www.herald-citizen.com — Sunday, January 31, 2016 — B3
SCHOOLS
Student outdoor clubs enjoy backpacking adventure
OVERTON COUNTY — Forty students from the
Jackson County and Livingston Academy Outdoor
Clubs met at Standing Stone State Park to participate
in the first Standing Stone Backpacking Adventure on
Dec. 17
Upon arrival, students were tasked with establishing
camp and preparing for the next two days. Students
then hiked to the Tea Room where they received
classes on the skills they would need to master the
competition over the next two days.
As students emerged from their tents on a cold Friday morning, they discovered the snow flurries falling
upon the park. Students were treated to a pancake
breakfast as they prepared their packs for the day.
After a quick pack check and an endurance challenge,
the individual teams began their adventures on the
trail.
As students hiked the five-mile loop around Kelly
Lake, the first station they encountered was fly fishing. Here, teams were taught to cast a fly rod and were
judged on accuracy. The next station was fire building.
Each team had to build a fire using flint and steel and
a separate fire using only a single match.
As students continued around the trail, they were
challenged with wildlife identification, knot tying, tree
identification, shelter building, first aid and a team
building activity.
When all students had completed the hike, they returned to the campground where they prepared dinner
for their individual teams. After dinner, the students
returned to the Rec Hall where they had to prepare
team skits. Campers were treated to hot dutch oven
cobblers at the conclusion of the skits. The teams then
returned to the campground for another brisk night of
camping.
On Saturday morning, the teams reassembled at the
Rec Hall for an awards ceremony. Each team could
earn a maximum of 10 point at each station. Teams
were awarded certificates for overall top three places
as well as best performance at each challenge.
Helping to make the event possible were Standing
Stone State Park, Friends of Dale Hollow National
Fish Hatchery, Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency,
Tennessee Department of Forestry, and Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation. Also
contributing were Livingston Pizza Hut, Superior
Heating and Cooling and The Outdoor Experience.
Winners were as follows:
• First place overall — Hardcore 4, Livingston Academy: Mary Rachel Gean, Jamie Wilson, Dalton Clark,
Josh Beau and alternate Abby Sells.
• Second place overall — JC Football, Jackson
County: Orry Smallwood, Jessica Smith, Matthew
Roberts and Jesse Garrison.
• Third place overall — The Super Team, Jackson
County: Rebecca Collins, Carlie Dodson, Connor
Brown and Kaleb Johnson.
Students test their fire-building skills during the first Standing Stone Backpacking Adventure in December at Standing Stone State
Park. Below, a group shows excitement at being outdoors.
Honored
TCAT
Crossville’s
student of
year a state
regional
finalist
The Trinity Teacher of
the Month at Northeast
Elementary is resource
teacher Sandy Landry,
center. Presenting the
award are Pastor
Richard Farley of Trinity
Assembly and NES Principal Dr. Melissa Palk.
Baxter
Elementary’s
Servant of the
Month is
Ashley
Williams, a
third grade
teacher with
nine years of
teaching
experience.
Congratulating her is Pastor Richard
Farley of Trinity Assembly.
Sycamore
Elementary’s
Trinity Servant
of the Month for
December is
Martha Ramsey,
a kindergarten
teacher, who is
congratulated
by Pastor
Richard Farley
of Trinity
Assembly.
School Board Appreciation Week celebrated in state
NASHVILLE — Gov. Haslam declared Jan. 24-30 as
School Board Appreciation Week in Tennessee. This
week helped build awareness and understanding of the
vital functions locally elected boards of education play
in their community.
Public school districts from across the state joined together to celebrate School Board Appreciation Week and
honor local board members for their commitment to the
community and its children.
The key work of school boards, according to the Tennessee School Boards Association, is to raise student
achievement by the following:
• Creating a vision for what the community wants the
school district to be and for making student achievement
the top priority;
• Establishing standards for what students will be ex-
pected to learn and be able to do;
• Ensuring progress is measured to be sure the district’s
goals are achieved and students are learning at expected
levels;
• Being accountable for their decisions and actions by
continually tracking and reporting results;
• Creating a safe, orderly climate where students can
learn and teachers can teach;
• Forming partnerships with others in the community to
solve common problems; and
• Focusing attention on the need for continuous improvement by questioning, refining and revising issues
related to student achievement.
“A community’s school system is the backbone of our
community, and these men and women devote countless
hours to making sure their schools are helping every
child,” TSBA officials said.
“These committed individuals spend countless hours
studying the issues and regulations and make the tough
decisions when called upon to ensure the type of accountability people expect.”
The Tennessee School Boards Association is a state
wide, nonprofit organization of school boards throughout
Tennessee. Its mission is to assist school boards in effectively governing school districts.
Through the years, TSBA has helped school boards and
their members reach their highest potential through Association programs, meetings and services.
TSBA also provides school board members with a collective voice in matters of legislation and public education concerns. For more information about TSBA, visit
www.tsba.net.
CROSSVILLE — The Tennessee College of Applied
Technology in Crossville’s
Student of the Year, Lisa
Hartigan, is a regional finalist and will compete at the
state
competition in
April.
Hartigan is a
student
in the
hybrid
electric
vehicle
Hartigan
technology program who expects to
graduate in the spring with
three credentials: one for automotive electronics technician, automotive specialty
technician and alternative
fuel vehicle technician.
Hartigan was nominated
for the award by Stacy Johnson, HEV instructor, who
said, “Throughout her enrollment, Ms. Hartigan has
shown great initiative and
pride in her work. Her enthusiasm and excitement
about all things Hybrid Electric Vehicle is clear to anyone who meets Lisa, and her
passion is contagious.”
Nine regional winners will
compete. The judges will select one student, the State
Outstanding Student of the
Year winner, to serve as an
ambassador for technical education in Tennessee.
This student will travel
across the state speaking at
various business and industry meetings, community organizations meetings, board
meetings, and state conferences.
The chosen OSY will also
be presented a new car.
B4 — HERALD-CITIZEN, Cookeville, Tenn. — www.herald-citizen.com — Sunday, January 31, 2016
SCHOOLS
Recognized
Most studious
Baxter Elementary’s most
studious students for the
second nine weeks are, in
front, from left, Heidi
Williams, third grade, star;
Ryder Nash, first grade;
Jake Stinnett, kindergarten; Jacob Vinson, first
grade, star; and, in back,
Madox Maynard, second
grade, star; Madeline
Scripter, fourth grade, star;
Kam Bush, fourth grade;
Wesley Dunn, third grade;
and Lindsea Grissom, second grade.
Citizenship
Most improved
Baxter Elementary’s citizenship award winners are, in front, from
left, Cade Austin, kindergarten; Libby Jo Hargis, third grade; and,
in back, Roger Cannon, second grade, star; Jake McAfee, fourth
grade; Kim Gallegos, fourth grade, star; and Logan Gunnels, third
grade, star. Also recognized were Evie Burchett, first grade; Cob
McClain, second grade; and Aliya Dulworth, first grade, star.
The most improved students at Baxter Elementary School for the second nine
weeks are, in front, from left, Landon Selby, first grade, star; Taylor Hernandez,
kindergarten; Emily Kinney, first grade; Ollie Bowman, second grade; and, in
back, Kelsey Hawkins, fourth grade; Kloe Helm, second grade, star; Breiana
Flatt, third grade; Kyle Simpson, fourth grade, star; and Hailey Smith, third
grade, star.
Special visitor
Students at Baxter Elementary enjoy a visit from Ollie
the Otter in December.
From left are Tenny C. Bear,
fourth grader Hope Bain,
Mr. Cason of Lojac,
Tennessee Highway Patrol
Officer Jimmy Neal,
kindergarten student
Brooklyn Perry and Ollie
the Otter, Tennessee’s
booster seat and seat belt
safety mascot who promotes the use of booster
seats. Ollie’s program also
encourages students to
wear their seat belts and to
raise awareness about
roadway construction site
safety. Ollie’s slogan for the
students is “Under 4’9” —
it’s Booster Time!”
Cane Creek Elementary honor roll released
Fourth Grade
All A’s
Jordyn Arnold, Braxton Bennett, Macy Coomer, Trinity
Denton, Walker Durant, Levi Fike, Astin Gabriel, Katie
Green, Kylie Grider, Audrey Herald, Rylan O’Neill,
April Ponce, Ryan Quillen, Halyn Todd, Lidia Tower, Selena Tzum Sanchez.
A’s and B’s
Breanna Bryant, Lila Cade, Irene Cuevas-Rodriguez,
Danna Dorantes-Colunga, Hayden Garrett, Kirra Hancock, Kadense Henley, Cayden Mahan, Amara Marshall,
Gracie-Lynn Marshall, Brookelyn Maxwell, Andrew
Page, Nathanael Parris, Dhruv Patel, Krish Patel, Colton
Phipps, Dade Rami, Bryan Sanchez, Annaleisa Stanberry, Kiara Underwood, Taylor Whited.
Third Grade
All A’s
Alecea Anderson, Vincent Apicelli, Taylor Brindley,
Emma Conley, Kyra Crosby, Tehya Dobbs, Rhiley Holland, Caleigh Howard, Aidan Hughes, Colin Johnson,
Kayleigh Page, Aayush Patel, Madison Reich, Rylee
Todd, Bennett Williams, Riley Wilmoth, Zachary Wray,
Ella Yankee.
A’s and B’s
Bryson Alley, Arturo Arellano Sanchez, Serenity
Askew, William Davis, Kel’C Fowler, Cassidy Gibson,
Robert Griffin, Colter Hagan, Jude Haney, Avery Hickman, Zachary Isabell, Ava Latta, Aden Ledbetter,
Mikayla Martin, Dafne Martinez-Cortes, Charles Moore
II, Brienna Owens, Bryce Pippin, Francisco PonceRoman, Macie Potter, Evan Randolph, Jessie SanchezRodriguez, Ethan Sheagren, Alexander Thompson,
Makayla VanMeter, Lucero Vazquez-Figueroa, Colt
Williams, Aidan Wray.
Second Grade
All E’s
Audrey Cathey, Mylie Coomer, Avery Hagan, Maggie
Parris, Emma Poston, Colton Thompson, Emily Thweatt,
Liam Waller, Alison York.
E’s and G’s
Alexa Ankrom, Dakota Arnold, Carmen Barrett, Caitlyn
Clark, Koleton Coffee, Emma Collins, Connor Cowan,
Zander Gonzalez, Ansley Herald, Benjamin Hernandez
Villegas, Destiny Jaynes, Ty Kirby, Ethan Lockhart,
William Mason, Hayden Maurer, Lillian Montgomery,
Jace Moore, Zimmy Moore, Colin O’Neill, Kaitlyn Pass,
Elena Penn, Gavin Sells, Gabby Thrasher, Clayton
Vaughn, Juliana Wallace, Alayna Webb, Taylor White,
Alyssa Willette.
First Grade
All E’s
Brookelynn Berry, Rylan Case, Kallee Chambers, Benjamin Clark, Greta Durant, Jonathan Fletcher, Tristen
Gateley, Trinity Harley McCoy, Ella Harris, Jude Hite,
Kami Hughes, Christian McClellan, Jaquetta Moore,
Aiden Pippin, Ronan Rami, Scott Saunders, Eli Stout,
Colin Wilmoth, Brianna Wilson, Nathan Woerdeman.
E’s and G’s
Elaina Capps, Tashariannah Carson, Aiden Carver, Emy
Coker, Teighan Edmondson, William Harris, Dominic
Hill, Hannah Johnson, Colin Leckenby, Isabella Martino,
Suzanna Mooneyham, Amber Theis, Parker Wilson,
Carly Yankee, Addison Young.
Van Buren
Head Start
hosts
National
School
Choice Week
assembly
SPENCER — The Upper
Cumberland Human Resource Agency Van Buren
Head Start hosted a school
assembly to commemorate
National School Choice
Week, the nation’s largestever celebration of opportunity in education.
The assembly, which was
open to students, teachers,
parents, prospective families, and community members, featured a scarf
ceremony, pictures, displays
and an open house on Jan.
25.
During the week, Tennessee had 246 events to
raise awareness about to
raise awareness about K-12
school choice, and 16,140
events were planned nationwide.
The events in Tennessee,
which were independently
planned and funded, included everything from information sessions and open
houses at schools to rallies,
policy discussions, and
movie screenings organized
by community groups.
Gov. Bill Haslam, the mayors of Chattanooga, Memphis and Nashville, and
county leaders from Sumner
County issued official
proclamations recognizing
Jan. 24-30 as “School
Choice Week.”
“Tennessee families enjoy
more K-12 education
choices for their children
than they have in the past,”
said Andrew R. Campanella,
president of National School
Choice Week. “National
School Choice Week shines
a positive spotlight on these
options so that more parents
can learn about the opportunities available for their
kids.”
With a goal of raising public awareness of effective
education options for children, National School
Choice Week was planned to
be the largest celebration of
education options in US history.
According to National
School Choice Week’s organizers, families in Tennessee could use the week to
look for K-12 schools for the
2016-2017 school year. Parents in the Volunteer State
can choose from the following education options for
their children: traditional
public schools, public charter schools, magnet schools,
online academies, private
schools, and homeschooling.
In some parts of the state,
open enrollment policies
allow parents to select the
best traditional public
school, regardless of where
the school is located. The
state also has a program allowing qualifying children,
in some cases, to receive
scholarships to attend private schools.
National School Choice
Week is an independent public awareness effort spotlighting effective education
options for children, including traditional public
schools, public charter
schools, magnet schools, private schools, online learning, and homeschooling.
For more information about
School Choice Week, visit
the website at www.schoolchoiceweek.com.
Opportunity Scholarships Bill clears last major hurdle before House vote
NASHVILLE — On the heels of the
recent successful vote in the House Finance Subcommittee, the Tennessee
Choice and Opportunity Scholarship Act
secured passage in yet another key
House committee. The groundbreaking school choice legislation, which would empower thousands of Tennessee families zoned to
underperforming schools with the ability
to access high-performing private school
options for their children, advanced
through the full House Finance Committee by a steady 11-10 vote. The committee vote was widely considered to be the last major legislative
hurdle on the bill’s path to a full vote on
the House floor. In addition to receiving
overwhelming approval on the Senate
floor last year, the vote represents the
sixth legislative committee to advance
the bill thus far in the 109th General Assembly.
“Today’s affirmative vote marks yet
another important milestone in the ongoing effort to ensure that every family
can access a quality education for their
children, no matter where they live,”
StudentsFirst Tennessee Spokesman Ted
Boyatt, praising the committee’s action,
said.
“Thanks to the thousands of parents,
students, faith leaders and advocates
who have publicly spoken out in support
of this measure, our state is one step
closer to building a bridge that will bring
our most educationally at-risk students
to the doorstep of a great school with a
proven track record of academic success. “While the fight to empower parents
with more high-quality educational options for their children is far from over,
we remain committed to ensuring that
legislation so crucial to Tennessee’s continued academic progress finds its way
to Gov. Haslam’s desk.”
The bill now advances to the House
Calendar and Rules Committee to be
scheduled for a floor vote.
HERALD-CITIZEN, Cookeville, Tenn. — www.herald-citizen.com — Sunday, January 31, 2016 — B5
ENTERTAINMENT
Monday, February 1
7 p.m. — “Live Green Tennessee”
Ride the Future Tour; Random Acts of Flowers;
Poke Sallet Festival.
7:30 p.m. — “Bluegrass Underground”
Chatham County Line’s insightful songs are powerful and contemporary, yet rich with Southern heritage.
8 p.m. — “Antiques Roadshow”
Discoveries in Little Rock, Arkansas include a
1983 Truman Capote “Playboy” manuscript.
9 p.m. — “Antiques Roadshow”
El Paso, Texas items include a 1775 Revolutionary War canteen and an 1834 will of Alamo fighter
Ben Milam.
10 p.m. — “Iowa Caucuses, A PBS NewsHour
Special Report”
Live coverage as the caucus votes are tallied, with
reports from correspondents in Iowa.
10:30 p.m. — “Independent Lens: No Mas Bebes
(No More Babies)”
The story of Mexican-American women who
were sterilized at Los Angeles County-USC Medical Center.
11:30 p.m. — “Charlie Rose”
Tuesday, February 2
7 p.m. — “Finding Your Roots”
Business mogul Richard Branson and architects
Maya Lin and Frank Gehry learn about their ancestors.
8 p.m. — “American Experience: Murder of a
President”
James Garfield’s unprecedented rise to power, his
shooting and its tragic aftermath are explored.
10 p.m. — “Mercy Street, Part 3”
Dr. Foster operates on his brother. Alice Green realizes the depth of Tom Fairfax’s battle trauma.
11 p.m. — “Charlie Rose”
Wednesday, February 3
7 p.m. — “Nature: Mystery Monkeys of ShangriLa”
A family of Yunnan snub-nosed monkeys living
in the highest forests in the world is examined.
8 p.m. — “NOVA: Creatures of Light”
Explore how and why so many of the ocean’s
creatures light up in their hidden undersea world.
9 p.m. — “Rise of the Black Pharaohs”
Archeologists discover indisputable evidence of
an advanced African society in the heart of Sudan.
This Week on WCTE
James Gill
Discover the story of Vel Phillips — the nation’s first African American woman elected
to executive office in state government — and one of the pioneers of the civil rights
era. “Vel Phillips: Dream Big Dreams” airs Sunday, Feb. 7, at 5 p.m. on WCTE.
8:30 p.m. — “One on One with Becky Magura”
10 p.m. — “A Craftsman’s Legacy”
Master shoemakers Jesse Moore and Marika Ver- Julius Johnson, Tennessee’s 36th Commissioner
of Agriculture.
ploegh Chasse discuss shoemaking.
9 p.m. — “Jammin at Hippie Jack’s”
10:30 p.m. — “America from the Ground Up”
Explore the towns, forts and settlements along the Chuck Johnson weaves songs out of the tales of
border between Colonial America and New France. small southern towns and the roads he has traveled.
9:30 p.m. — “Bluegrass Underground”
11 p.m. — “Charlie Rose”
10 p.m. — “Tennessee’s Wild Side”
Thursday, February 4
10:30 p.m. — “Southern Accents”
7 p.m. — “Discover the Upper Cumberland”
Franklin Fixtures, the BSO Derryberry concerto Gatlinburg, Tennessee.
winner, and Cookeville’s museums in Putnam Co.; 11 p.m. — “Charlie Rose”
Friday, February 5
the Barefoot Farmer in Macon Co.; going (back) to
7 p.m. — “Washington Week with Gwen Ifill”
college with Tennessee Reconnect.
7:30 p.m. — “Charlie Rose: The Week”
7:30 p.m. — “Tennessee Crossroads”
8 p.m. — “Live from Lincoln Center: Richard
8 p.m. — “Live Green Tennessee”
Tucker Opera Gala”
Andrea Bocelli joins Renee Fleming, Jamie Barton and a formidable array of opera superstars.
10 p.m. — “Front and Center”
Ronnie Dunn, half of the legendary duo Brooks
& Dunn, performs some of his best-loved hits.
11 p.m. — “Charlie Rose”
Saturday, February 6
7 p.m. — “Classic Gospel”
The Best of the Booth Brothers.
8 p.m. — “Antiques Roadshow”
9 p.m. — “Jammin at Hippie Jack’s”
9:30 p.m. — “Sun Studio Sessions”
Otis Gibbs.
10 p.m. — “Austin City Limits”
Leon Bridges; Nathaniel Rateliff & The Night
Sweats.
11 p.m. — “Music City Roots: Live from the Factory”
Lindsay Lou and the Flatbellies; Jonell Mosser;
Jamey Johnson.
Sunday, February 7
3 p.m. — “Ghosts of Amistad: In the Footsteps of
the Rebels”
Academics and historians aim to recover the lost
history of the Amistad insurrection in 1839.
4 p.m. — “Bridging the Divide: Tom Bradley and
the Politics of Race”
Tom Bradley’s 1973 election as the first African
American mayor of Los Angeles is examined.
5 p.m. — “Vel Phillips: Dream Big Dreams”
Discover the story of Wisconsin’s first AfricanAmerican woman elected secretary of state.
6 p.m. — “Discover the Upper Cumberland”
6:30 p.m. — “One on One with Becky Magura”
7 p.m. — “Downton Abbey, Season 6, Part 5”
Thomas makes Andy a generous offer. Spratt rescues Denker. A powerful politician comes to dinner.
8 p.m. — “Downton Abbey, Season 6, Part 6”
The hospital war reaches a climax, Violet goes on
the warpath and Daisy tries to foil a romance.
9 p.m. — “Mercy Street, Part 4”
Dr. Foster guides Samuel Diggs through a delicate
operation to save Aurelia Johnson’s life.
10 p.m. — “Mr. Selfridge, Season 3, Part 3”
Surprising accomplices turn up in the search for
Kitty’s assailants. Agnes and Henri call it quits.
11 p.m. — “Globe Trekker: Myanmar”
Horoscope
SUNDAY, JAN. 31, 2016
Stick to your game plan this
year and don’t let the things you
cannot control dictate your actions. Your success will depend
on your focus and desire. Anger
is the enemy, and peace your salvation. Offer positive thoughts
and deflect negative influences.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19)
— Above all else, you must keep
the peace. Trouble is brewing,
and if you aren’t willing to compromise, you will get more than
you bargained for. Minor accidents and mishaps are likely, so
be careful.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) —
If you push for what you want,
you will come out a victor. A passionate can-do attitude will separate you from the crowd and
bring you the recognition you desire. Romance is encouraged.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) —
Reflect on your experience to
make sure you don’t make the
same mistake twice. Offer love
and compassion in order to get
the same in return. Positive
change can be accomplished.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20)
— There will be plenty to do that
excites you, but before you indulge in something, you should
make sure your motives are honorable. Kindness and generosity
will bring the best results.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) —
Dealing with authority figures or
institutions will result in difficulties. Don’t push your luck or take
on something you know you
shouldn’t do. Honor your reputation.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) —
You can accomplish so much if
you get off the couch and start
doing things that will make a difference to your surroundings and
important relationships.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) —
Problems will develop if you are
argumentative or fall short of
your expectations. Try to find the
best solution, instead of thinking
about where to put the blame.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) —
Take a short trip or spend time
with someone who makes you
happy. Activities that allow you
to test your strength or intelligence will boost your confidence
and promote friendships.
Sudoku
MONDAY, FEB. 1,
LIBRA (Sept. 232016
Oct. 23) — A opportuBe more thoughtful
nity to pick up extra
this year and concenwork you can do from
trate on building a
home will help you
strong base and stable
make positive changes
future. Accept the
by giving you needed
changes that come
extra income.
your way in order to
SCORPIO (Oct. 24put a positive spin on
Nov. 22) — You’ll be
whatever situation you
on top of your game
face. How you handle
and ready for a chal- Eugenia
discord will make a
lenge. Initiate change Last
difference. Make love,
and let someone you
not war.
love know how you
feel. Progressive action will AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19)
— Don’t let your emotions take
bring positive results.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. charge or anger lead to a regret21) — Don’t reveal personal in- table mistake. Get your facts
formation or be enticed by a bad straight before you confront
influence. Unrealistic expecta- someone. Work on self-improvetions and unfounded assumptions ment, not trying to change others.
will be your downfall. Take time PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) —
to gather accurate facts and fig- Your generosity will result in unexpected benefits and rewards.
ures before you make a move.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. Your skills will be recognized,
19) — The help you offer others and a proposal will help you use
will bring high returns. Someone your attributes diversely. Love is
who shares your integrity and in the stars.
tenacious attitude will propose a ARIES (March 21-April 19) —
partnership. Celebrate your good Gather information and hone
fortune with someone you love. your skills to suit the current job
World Almanac Databank
SATURDAY, JAN. 30, 2016
TODAY’S HISTORY: In
1649, England’s King Charles I
was executed for treason. In
1835, a gunman attempted to
shoot President Andrew Jackson
near the U.S. Capitol and was
subdued by a crowd, marking the
first presidential assassination attempt. In 1933, Adolf Hitler was
sworn in as chancellor of Germany. In 1948, Indian leader Mahatma Gandhi was assassinated
by a Hindu extremist. In 2005,
Iraq held its first free elections in
a half-century.
TODAY’S
BIRTHDAYS:
Franklin D. Roosevelt (18821945), 32nd U.S. president; Barbara Tuchman (1912-1989),
historian; Dick Martin (19222008), actor/comedian; Gene
Hackman (1930- ), actor;
Vanessa Redgrave (1937- ), actress; Dick Cheney (1941- ), U.S.
vice president; Phil Collins
(1951- ), singer; Charles Dutton
(1951- ), actor; Christian Bale
(1974- ), actor; Wilmer Valderrama (1980- ), actor.
TODAY’S FACT: Charles I
was the first king of England to
be tried for crimes against his
kingdom. He refused to enter a
plea, insisting that the court had
no authority over a monarch.
TODAY’S QUOTE: “Human
kindness has never weakened the
stamina or softened the fiber of a
free people. A nation does not
have to be cruel to be tough.”
— Franklin D. Roosevelt
SUNDAY, JAN. 31, 2016
TODAY’S HISTORY: In
1606, Guy Fawkes was executed
for his role in the Gunpowder
Plot in Britain. In 1958, Explorer
1 was launched, marking the first
successful launch of an American
satellite into orbit. In 1968, the
North Vietnamese Tet Offensive
began in South Vietnam. In 2010,
James Cameron’s “Avatar” became the first film to reach a
worldwide gross of $2 billion.
TODAY’S
BIRTHDAYS:
Franz Schubert (1797-1828),
composer; John O’Hara (19051970), author; Jackie Robinson
(1919-1972), baseball player;
Carol Channing (1921- ), actress;
Norman Mailer (1923-2007), author/journalist; Ernie Banks
(1931-2015), baseball player;
Jonathan Banks (1947- ), actor;
Nolan Ryan (1947- ), baseball
player; Justin Timberlake (1981), singer-songwriter.
TODAY’S FACT: The first Social Security check, issued on
this day in 1940, was for $22.54
and went to Ida May Fuller, who
lived on a Vermont farm. Having
worked less than three years
under Social Security, she paid
only $24.75 into the system, but
she had collected $22,888.92 by
the time of her death in 1975.
TODAY’S QUOTE: “There
was that law of life so cruel and
so just which demanded that one
must grow or else pay more for
remaining the same.” — Norman
Mailer, “The Deer Park”
market. Avoid a run-in with
someone you love. Stay focused
on advancing your career.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20)
— Execute your plans systematically in order to fire up interest
in what you want to do next. Celebrate your success. Romance
will enhance your life.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) —
Don’t look back or give in to
someone trying to take advantage
of your abilities. Temptation or
unrealistic offers will lead to regret and setbacks.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) —
You can reach your goal and improve your life if you are willing
to do things a little differently.
Learn from those with more experience or a different perspective.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) — Take
responsibility and do what has to
be done before someone complains. Avoid an argument in
order to bypass an emotional and
financial loss. Keep the peace.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) —
You’ll attract interest and favors
from people you have worked
with in the past. Enjoy your suc-
cess with someone who has supported you from the beginning. A
reunion will boost your spirits.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) —
Keep a low profile until you
know exactly how you want to
handle an emotional situation.
Acting in haste will jeopardize
your position, reputation and
popularity.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22)
— Share your creative ideas with
an intriguing someone who has
something to contribute. Consider a partnership and make a
proposal that offers incentives
that will ensure your success. Romance is highlighted.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec.
21) — Keep your secrets to yourself. Someone trying to take advantage of your skills will put
you in a compromising position.
Stick close to home and protect
your assets.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19) — Express your thoughts and
make a point to do something
nice for the people you love.
Sharing your plans as well as
your success with loved ones will
bring you closer together.
Crossword
B6 — HERALD-CITIZEN, Cookeville, Tenn. — www.herald-citizen.com — Sunday, January 31, 2016
SCHOOLS
Shutterbugs
4-H’ers: Capture those snow day photos
By JIMMY CHAMBERS
Putnam County 4-H Agent
PUTNAM COUNTY — Our surroundings are full of interesting and
unusual things that many miss in this
hectic life. The 4-H photography project gives youth the opportunity to become more aware of the unique world
around us.
This year, the Putnam County 4-H
program is offering a Snow Day
Photo Contest every day the Putnam
County School System is dismissed
due to weather. This contest is open to
any youth in grades 4-12.
All photos or questions about the
contest should be emailed to
[email protected] Photos will be
posted on the Putnam County 4H Facebook page.
Rules are as follows:
1. One photograph per person, and the
photo must be taken by the entrant.
2. Any type of camera is acceptable
as long as the photo can be emailed to
[email protected]
3. The photo must be taken on the day
of the contest.
4. Three divisions:
a) Junior (grades 4-5)
b) Junior high (grades 6-8)
c) Senior high (grades 9-12)
5. The deadline to submit photos is
6:30 p.m. on the day of the contest.
Late entries will not be accepted
6. Color and black and white photos
are acceptable.
7. Be creative and have fun.
Photographs will be professionally
judged and a winner announced the
following day at noon.
Winners from the first photo contest
were Hannah Bernhardt, a freshman
homeschool student; Blake Shepherd,
an eighth grader at Avery Trace Middle
School; and Jared Shepherd, a fourth
grader at Northeast Elementary.
Youth gain many benefits in the exciting 4-H photography project. They
can record information for other 4-H
projects and maintain visual records of
their family and friends and important
events in their lives. Their photography
experiences could lay the foundation
for a good start in a professional career.
The photography project is a self-exploration endeavor because youth
take the initiative to plan, carry out
and evaluate the learning process.
Members develop basic skills in a
logical sequence. Topics include the
elements of photography, parts and
operation of a camera, types of cameras and film, and planning, composing and taking various types of
photographs. Participants experiment
with composition, lighting, distance
and movement among other photography theories.
These hands-on camera experiences
give youth many opportunities to explore and discover. The active approach to learning introduces, teaches
and reinforces photography skills.
Youth also develop and master many
life skills including acquiring, analyzing and using information, solving
problems, making decisions, managing resources, communicating with
and relating to others, and working
with groups. Members also develop
artistic expression and learn to recognize and accept differences. Equally
important, 4-H’ers develop self-esJared Shepherd, a fourth grader at Northeast Elementary, photographed his dog enjoying the snow.
teem through pride in their photographic accomplishments.
Collectively, all these skills enable
4-H members to develop workforce
preparation expertise that is a lifetime
benefit. 4-H members are encouraged
to take the initiative to share these
new skills and knowledge with other
youth and adults.
Members can also exhibit their photography each year at the Putnam
County Fair in the open youth section.
For more information on the photography project and other educational
opportunities available through the
local 4-H youth development program — including agriculture and
natural resources, 4-H youth development, family and consumer sciences,
and resource development — contact
the UT-Putnam County Extension Of- Avery Trace Middle School eighth grader Blake Shep- Freshman homeschool student Hannah Bernhardt
fice at 526-4561.
herd captured this photo of icicles.
took a photo of this snowy scene.
Honor roll students released
at Northeast Elementary
First Grade
All E’s
Richlynne Bennett, Madison
Corley, Harrison Cox, Kaylee
Dement, Ana Francisco Francisco, Amelia Franklin, Jaxon
Grijalva,
Bryce
Herren,
Annabelle Maddle, Chase Monroe, Racquel Montero, Berkley
Norrod, Yoel Reyes, Lilyanne
Ribardi, Jacob Rivers, Adrianne
Roberts, Jackson Stinnett, Abigail Stone.
E’s and G’s
Jeremiah Castaneda, Everett
Jude Clark-Heinrich, Nevaeh
Craighead, Zachary deClaire,
Kierstyn Ealey, Gabriella Farley,
Dalton Flowers, Trevor Huddleston, Autumn Johnson, Aiden
Jones, Hevon Kockx, Jullian
Marti, Ethan McElroy, Zachary
Quarles, Stella Richardson, Ben
Short, John Fynlan Sissom,
Nikolas Smith, Jaylee Swallows,
Kevin Tollison, Betty Wills, Zayden Wyatt.
Kylie Norvell, Shaydan O’Neal,
Silas Pirkle, Sophya Roman.
E’s and G’s
Emma Baird, Serenity Barclay,
Jane Crockett, Kaitlyn Flatt, Destiny Goodman, Jackson Jolley,
Alwin Martinez Remigio, Chad
Maxwell, Gregory Poligkeit,
Brayden Price, Jordann Robertson, Arianna Sliger, Kobe Tolliver,
Carley
VanKooten,
Caidence York.
Third Grade
All A’s
Sarah Coonce, Gavin Eicholtz,
Canaan Gibson, Kalina Goodman, Madeline Jolley, Grace
Krug, Thaddeus Lewis, Abigail
Murdock, Camryn Murdock,
Peyton Murdock, Maliyah Reels,
Katherine Smith, William Western, Madison Whittaker.
A’s and B’s
LeeAnna Bennett, Cydney Brazle, Taylan Dam, Ava Dughi,
Alexander Gaitan, Angelo Joseph
Hardin, Haven Kockx, William
Second Grade
Mateo Ignacio, Kendyll McAll E’s
Jade Hargis, Jenna Hopson, Cloud, Kyah McCrary, Lily
Montgomery, Cameron Mullenax, Ethan Richey, Gabriella
Romero, Sidney Shaffer, Jade
Simpkins, Abby Simpson,
Katherine Simpson, Arlette
Toala-Hidalgo,
Kaydence
Williams, Olivia Williams.
Fourth Grade
All A’s
Macie Crist, Baylee Curlin,
Emerson Delk, Grant Dunaway,
Sarah Jessica Giezentanner, Abigail Russell, Kendall Smith, Hassaanah
Williams,
Emmett
Wilson.
A’s and B’s
Serenity Austin, Hannah Boles,
Jackson Brannon, Lauren Burton, Alenia Chaffin, Donovan
Coffman, Matthew Cook, Casey
Goldsby, Charles Herren, Anastasia Hruska, Mia Huddleston,
Brant Kardatzke, Halo Kockx,
Autumn Loy, Matthew Masters,
Mahler McAlpin, Jason Newberry, Edwin Remigio-Salas,
Jared Shepherd, Kendra Tippens,
Abbigail Walker, Calista Williford.
New interactive map provides
legislators with school information
TENNESSEE — The Comptroller’s Offices of
Research and Education Accountability have created two new interactive maps featuring a wide
range of education data at the school and school
district levels.
The maps illustrate the House of Representatives
and Senate legislative districts overlaid with school
district and school level information. The legislative profile maps are both clickable and searchable.
A user can search by legislator, school district, and
school name.
The maps include demographic information, accountability and performance, and financial data.
Some specific data points include the number and
type of schools (e.g., traditional, charter, etc.),
school designation, average ACT score, per-pupil
expenditure by average daily membership, and average classroom teacher salary.
“These maps offer a simple and unique way for
General Assembly members to learn more about
the schools in their districts,” Comptroller Justin P.
Wilson said. “This interactive map is also useful to
any Tennessean who wishes to learn more about
public education achievement and spending in our
state.”
The new interactive maps can be found at
http://comptroller.tn.gov/OREA/MappingTN. To
learn more, call 615-741-2775.
In addition to the release of the legislative profiles
maps, OREA has updated its Higher Education Attainment map, and Mapping Tennessee Education
page.
Things we want you to know: Shared Connect Plan and Customer Service Agreement with a 2-yr. initial term (subject to a pro-rated $150 Early Termination Fee for basic phones,
modems and hotspot devices and a $350 Early Termination Fee for Smartphones and Tablets) or Retail Installment Contract for installment pricing required. Credit approval also required.
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conditions and coverage areas apply and may vary by plan, service and phone. $300 Switcher Incentive: Requires port-in, purchase of a new Smartphone with Retail Installment
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pursuant to a license from Visa U.S.A. Inc. Valid only for purchases at U.S. Cellular® stores and uscellular.com. For online and telesales transactions, see uscellular.com for redemption
details. Device Protection+: Enrollment in Device Protection+ required. The monthly charge for Device Protection+ is $8.99 for Smartphones. A deductible per approved claim applies.
You may cancel Device Protection+ anytime. Federal Warranty Service Corporation is the Provider of the Device Protection+ ESC benefits, except in CA and OK. Limitations and exclusions
apply. For complete details, see an associate for a Device Protection+ brochure. Kansas Customers: In areas in which U.S. Cellular receives support from the Federal Universal Service
Fund, all reasonable requests for service must be met. Unresolved questions concerning services availability can be directed to the Kansas Corporation Commission Office of Public Affairs
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Herald-Citizen
LIVING
Sunday, January 31, 2016
Clearing
the
calendar
Passion
For Art
B
y the time you read this
column, the knee-deep
snow that blanketed middle
Tennessee last weekend will almost certainly be gone. But as I
settle down to write in front of the
big windows in my living room,
the white stuff is coming down at
a rate we haven’t seen here in a
long, long time.
Today’s calendar has been wiped
clean, which will almost certainly
hold true for the next several days.
Folks from colder climes will
probably never understand Southerners’ inability to cope with winter, but it’s a fact that we have
neither the experience nor
Just
the equipment
Jennie
to deal with
roads covered
in snow and
ice. And the
truth is, we really don’t
want to. Better
to make a lastminute run to
the store for
milk and
bread and toiJennie
let paper and
Ivey
then take a big
eraser to our
schedule. School? Cancelled.
Church? Cancelled. Meetings and
appointments? Cancelled. Social
outings? Cancelled.
Being something of a Type-A
personality, my first inclination as
the snow starts falling in earnest is
to start on some at-home projects.
Clean out a closet. Straighten a
drawer. Balance the checkbook.
Catch up on the ironing. Re-organize the file cabinet.
As my head begins to reel with
this not-so-fun to-do list, I pull
myself up short. I’ve been handed
a wonderful gift: a string of empty
days with nowhere I have to go
and nothing I have to do. Realizing I need a solid downtime plan, I
quickly formulate one. Here it is.
• Fill the birdfeeders to the brim
• Take the dogs for an off-leash
romp in the snowy woods
• Build a snowman
• Watch whatever I want on TV
for as long as I want
• Read one of the big thick books
I’ve set aside for when I finally
have time
• Call and chat with an out-oftown friend I haven’t seen for ages
Now, four days later with the
thaw upon us and a column deadline staring me in the face, it’s
time to assess how things went.
My report? During the snow days,
I didn’t mess with closets or drawers or the ironing board or checkbook. But I did spend a lot of time
watching birds, which are still
swarming my feeders even though
temperatures have climbed above
freezing. My once-adorable snowman, whose face my dogs chewed
off because I used Hershey’s
kisses for eyes (I didn’t have any
chunks of coal), is melting faster
than the Wicked Witch of the
West.
On the Friday the snow arrived, I
lounged in my pajamas with gas
logs blazing and watched four
episodes of HGTV’s “Fixer
Upper.” Five SEC basketball
games on Saturday. Both NFL
play-off games on Sunday. All
without guilt. And I’m almost 200
pages into the 791-page thriller
“Natchez Burning,” by Greg Iles.
Riveting.
I enjoyed unhurried phone visits
with not one but three out-of-town
friends.
Best of all, I allowed myself time
to sit and do nothing but gaze at
the winter wonderland. To contemplate the year just passed, with
its unspeakable disappointments
and innumerable joys, and to anticipate the year ahead. To affirm
that there’s nothing much lovelier
in this world than a red cardinal
perched on a snow-covered branch
of a dogwood tree, unless it’s an
enormous full moon rising over
the ghost-white Tennessee mountains.
And to be grateful for the all-toorare gift of a calendar wiped clean.
Jennie Ivey is a Cookeville
writer. Visit her website at
jennieivey.com.
C
Sarah Cook enjoys creating works of art from engagement portraits.
Steven and Sarah Cook
Cookeville couple has passion for art
By MeGaN TrOTTer
HERALD-CITIZEN Staff
COOKEVILLE — For Sarah and
Stephen Cook, the love of color, of
light and of dark, of capturing life on
paper or the computer screen — it’s a
passion they both share.
This husband and wife have a heart
for art and love showing it in their
own, unique ways. For both of them,
the passion started when they were
just children.
“After I was baptized something
clicked and I believe God helped me
take my art to the next level,” Sarah
said. “I then joined the Cumberland
Art Society when I was around age 12
and I was blessed to have many mentors who helped me and parents who
encouraged me. I had one instructor
who introduced me to pastels and I
began to draw pastel portraits.”
Now, Sarah spends her free time
painting portraits, as well as animals,
landscapes and still life. She also enjoys graphic design and creating
things like logos, business cards and
ads.
She uses mainly acrylics now, after
finding out she is allergic to pastel
dust. Stephen uses pastels and oils, as
well as computer art on Photoshop.
“I’m a big fan of astronomy so I
Stephen Cook creates images of astronomical events.
love to create things from outer space
that you don’t usually see, such as
galaxies, stars, and comets,” Stephen
said. “I also like to do landscapes.”
Both Sarah and Stephen are enthusiastic about having a spouse who
shares their artistic passion. They
never have to go far to get an opinion
or a critique on a piece of work.
“The only drawback is that sometimes we have to share art supplies!”
Sarah said.
Sarah, who graduated from MTSU
in graphic arts, recently quit her full
time job to pursue her passion in art
and to take care of their children. She
now does freelance work in portraits,
illustrations and graphic design.
“(Stephen’s) art is more of a hobby,
but he is going to TTU for a marketing degree and I know his artistic talent will be useful in that field,” Sarah
said.
Both Sarah and Stephen were the
Sarah Cook captures the youthful joy of a child.
artists of the month for January at
Putnam First Mercantile Bank in
Cookeville. Currently, more of their
work can be seen online at www.destined-x.org and www.sarahsentscook.com.
“Our dream is to one day get an RV
and drive around the U.S. painting
landscapes together,” Sarah said.
Derryberry work displayed in her gallery
By PaIGe STaNaGe
Special to the HERALD-CITIZEN
TTU — For Joan Derryberry, the use
of bright and vivid colors to create
beautiful landscape paintings was all in
a day’s work. Currently, about 20 of her
paintings hang above spotlights at the
gallery room in the Roaden University
Center on Tennessee Tech’s campus.
During the gallery talk this past
Thursday, Centennial Coordinator
Laura Clemons stated that this art
gallery is part of Tech’s Centennial
Celebration, along with other art galleries displaying the works of Tech’s
alumni.
“I think a lot of people don’t know
how much of an impact she had here on
campus and in the community,” says
Clemons.
According to Tech’s website, Derryberry had a large role as one of the
founders of the Tennessee Art Commission, and was the founder of the
Town and Gown organization in
Cookeville. She also had an influence
on Tech’s music and art programs,
specifically the Tech Chorale.
Math professor Brian O’Connor
stated at the gallery talk that when Joan
Derryberry passed away, he was in a
Tech Chorale rehearsal. He said to the
Chorale members at that time, “You
may not have known much about her
(Derryberry), but I feel fairly confident
that if it wasn’t for her, probably about
one-third of you wouldn’t be in this
Ty Kernea | Herald-Citizen
Dr. Walter Derryberry speaks about his late mother, Joan Derryberry, at the reception to celebrate her
paintings at TTU.
room right now.”
Coordinator of the Derryberry gallery
Kimberly Winkle says that Derryberry’s paintings are impressionistic,
and vary in mood and tone. The paint-
ings also vary in colors and brush but she was good with capturing a figstrokes. Some of the pieces include ure and an attitude,” says Walter Derscenes of middle Tennessee, and mem- ryberry, Joan Derryberry’s son, in
ories of Devonshire, England.
“She wasn’t great at capturing a face,
See Gallery, Page C3
C2 — HERALD-CITIZEN, Cookeville, Tenn. — www.herald-citizen.com — Sunday, January 31, 2016
LIVING
Marriage Licenses
Note: Listed below are the
marriage licenses issued in Putnam County on the dates indicated. This information was
obtained from open, public
records in the office of the
County Clerk, located at 121 S.
Dixie Ave. In order to be fair to
everyone, all marriage licenses
will be published — we cannot
make exceptions.
Melissa Kay Hernandez King,
both of Cookeville;
Joshua Brian Hensley to Trudy
Elaine Miller, both of Baxter.
Monday, Jan. 25
Luke Jordan Prince to Agnese
Balcere, both of Cookeville;
James Howard Difalco of
Cookeville to Candi Lynn Stover
Allred of Livingston;
Thomas Francis Pisut to Lavere
Thursday, Jan. 21
Marie Pisut Suresch, both of
Omar Ahmed Alzahrani to Cookeville.
Sierra Club hosts
Sparta chamber
president Monday
COOKEVILLE — The Sierra
Club will host Marvin Bullock,
president of the Sparta Chamber
of Commerce, at their meeting
from 5:30-7 p.m. Monday, Feb.
1.
A meet-and-greet will be held at
5:30 p.m. at the Get Fresh! Cafe,
at 37 N. Cedar Ave., in
Cookeville. The program will
begin at 6 p.m. at the UUCC
meeting room, directly across 1st
Street.
While teaching Information
Systems classes at Vanderbilt
University and MET 545 at State
Tech, Bullock was a member of
the Friends of Scott’s Gulf, a
group that was instrumental in
obtaining The Bridgestone Centennial Wilderness Area (BCWA)
two decades ago.
Later, Bullock founded what
grew to become one of the largest
real estate firms on the North
Carolina coast.
Four years ago, he returned
home to his farm in Sparta,
where he now serves as president
of the Chamber
of Commerce.
The
BCWA
contains some of
the most bio-diverse hardwoods
left on the planet
including
the
Bullock
head-waters of
the Caney Fork River. The Sierra
Club also played a key role in
convincing the state to obtain this
land.
Other properties have been
added to the Bridgestone area in
the ensuing years and now it is
possible to walk from Lost Creek
or Virgin Falls to Fall Creek Falls
while staying on state land. There
is an opportunity to build a trail
over 60 miles long. There will be
more caves, waterfalls and scenic
overlooks per mile of trail than
probably anywhere else in the
United States.
Come to learn about existing
trails, how they tie-in to the future Mid-Cumberland Trail, and
how the Sierra Club can help.
Title announced for Nike
founder Phil Knight’s memoir
NEW YORK (AP) — Nike cofounder Phil Knight’s memoir
will be called “Shoe Dog” and is
coming out in April.
Scribner announced the title
Thursday for Knight’s book and
set an April 26 release.
The memoir, first announced
last year, will cover the early
years of Nike, when Knight in
1964 started what became the
iconic company through a handshake deal with his track coach at
the University of Oregon, Bill
Bowerman.
The publisher is billing
Knight’s book as “candid, humble, gutsy, and wry.”
Thank a legislator for supporting the library
T
ennessee Library Legislative Day is
Wednesday, Feb. 3. This is a time
when librarians, trustees, and library
lovers will gather in Nashville to visit local
legislators to thank them for their support
and defend the vital role of libraries. We
encourage you to do the same!
You don’t have to visit Nashville to have
your voice heard. Simply contact your
local and state legislators this week to express your support and tell your library
story. For additional ideas on how to advocate for your library visit ilovelibraries.org
or geekthelibrary.org.
New books
Select new adult fiction at the Library include “The Art of War” by Stephen Coonts,
“Brotherhood in Death” by J.D. Robb,
“Blackjack” by Robert B. Parker, “Loving
Eleanor” by Susan Wittig Albert, and
“Breakdown” by Jonathan Kellerman.
Story Time
Have you had enough of winter? Will he
or won’t he? See his shadow that is! This
week for Story Time, Mrs. Donovan presents stories about groundhogs. Stories include Garden for a Groundhog by Lorna
Balian, Will Spring Be Early? Will Spring
be late? by Crockett Johnson, First Comes
Spring by Anne Rockwell, and the Cherokee tale Groundhog Dance from Myths of
the Cherokees.
Twice Told Tales
Book Sale
Twice Told Tales
Book Store, the PCL
Friends’ monthly book
sale, will be on Friday,
Feb. 5, and Saturday,
Feb. 6. The Friday sale
will run from 4-6 p.m.
and be open to members of the Friends
group only.
Memberships may be
purchased at the door.
Stacie
The Saturday sale will
Netherton
run from 10 a.m.–1
p.m. and is open to the
public. A portion of the proceeds from the
sale will go toward the purchase of new
books and other materials.
PCL events
The Page Turners Book Club will meet
Monday at 5:30 p.m. to discuss Things Not
Seen by Andrew Clements. This book club
is open to new members and appropriate
for ages 10-12.
The Teen Gaming Club meets this Tuesday from 3:30-5:30 p.m. This program is
appropriate for ages 12-17.
The Volunteer Income Tax Assistance
At the
Library
(VITA) Program will be open this Wednesday from 1-4 p.m. Appointments are first
come, first served.
The V.I.P. Program will meet this Thursday at 10 a.m. in the upstairs meeting room
for arts and crafts. This program is held
each Thursday and offers art, games,
movies, and yoga for all adult patrons and
provides accommodations for those adults
with special needs.
An Introduction to Computers class will
be held in the downstairs meeting room
this Thursday at 10 a.m.
The First Friday Book Club will meet Friday at 3 p.m. to discuss The Shack by
William Paul Young. New members are
welcome!
Join us for a family movie night this Friday at 5 p.m. We will show Minions (PG,
2015) on the big screen in the upstairs
meeting room.
VITA at the Monterey
Branch Library
The Volunteer Income Tax Assistance
program will be open from 10 a.m.-4 p.m.
on Monday, from 10 a.m.-5 p.m on Tuesday, from noon-5 p.m. on Wednesday, from
1-5 p.m. on Thursday, and from 10 a.m.-4
p.m. on Friday.
Check on events at pclibrary.org for the
full schedule of events!
Dad’s ragged appearance may follow him to the grave
D
EAR ABBY: My father is 80. In
his prime he was a businessman
with lots of contacts. Most of his
friends and siblings are gone now. He
doesn’t take good care of himself. His
hair is unkempt, he goes weeks without
shaving, his pants sag, and worst of all,
his fingernails are full of dirt. He doesn’t
get out much, so I’m not sure it’s important to him.
My main concern is how to handle this
with the funeral home when he dies. Is
this something they would clean? I can’t
imagine putting anyone through that. It
would also not reflect who he really is.
I have never been comfortable confronting Dad about his appearance as he is
sure to have his feelings hurt. I would appreciate your thoughts on this. — CAN’T
CONFRONT DAD IN INDIANA
DEAR CAN’T CONFRONT: Is your
father in good physical health? If he is,
could he be depressed or becoming demented? Those could be reasons why he
has let his appearance go. From your description, your dad appears to have become very isolated.
Perhaps if you encouraged him to join a
senior group, he’d be more inclined to fix
himself up and visit a barber. But I digress.
If your sole concern is how your father
will look in his casket, your concerns will
be alleviated when you talk about it with
the director of the
funeral home you
plan to use. Making
sure a body is clean
and presentable is
standard procedure.
DEAR ABBY: In
recent years, when I
befriend women, we
start off having
things in common
(husband, children).
Then these women
lose all other interests and talk about
Abigail
nothing else. I have
Van Buren
a wide range of interests (sports,
travel, work, church — you name it), and
I’m willing to listen and learn.
Abby, I have never met these women’s
families and I am so tired of hearing their
children’s names that I’m starting to distance myself. I have dedicated most of my
life to my husband and raising my children. I do not want to spend the rest of it
talking about them. How do I handle these
ladies? — STARVED FOR STIMULATING CONVERSATION
DEAR STARVED: Birds of a feather
flock together. If you want stimulating
conversation, you will have to find another flock to fly around with. Sign up for
classes at a local college, join a political
Dear
Abby
campaign, volunteer at a hospital, join a
group that helps the less fortunate, go to a
museum. Do this and I assure you, you
WILL meet others whose interests more
closely match yours.
DEAR ABBY: I’ve met a man with
whom I get along well. He is a physical
therapist. We talk and joke during my
therapy sessions. He makes them seem
more like fun than work.
I think we could be friends if given the
chance. When I have finished my therapy
at the practice, would it be OK to ask if
we could keep in touch? If so, how does
one approach this? He’s married, but I’m
not looking for a romantic relationship. I
would just enjoy being able to talk with
him occasionally. — ON THE MEND IN
GEORGIA
DEAR ON THE MEND: When your
therapy is completed, tell him you enjoyed the sessions and how enjoyable
conversing with him was. Then ask if you
can talk occasionally because he has
many of the qualities you would like in a
friend. You have nothing to lose by asking.
Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van
Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips,
and was founded by her mother,
Pauline Phillips. Contact Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box
69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.
All ears: Debut novel comes out first in audio edition
By HILLEL ITALIE
AP National Writer
NEW YORK (AP) — Before book
buyers get to read Julia Claiborne Johnson’s debut novel, “Be Frank With Me,”
they’ll have a chance to hear it.
On Friday, the audio edition of Johnson’s comic saga of a famous writer’s 9year-old son became available through
the audio seller and producer Audible
Inc. four days before the hardcover and
e-books go on sale. The early release,
read by the popular audio narrator Tavia
Gilbert, was a joint project of the Amazon.com-owned Audible and HarperCollins Publishers.
“Sometimes you don’t know how well
an audiobook is going to turn out until
you listen to the final version,” says
Sean McManus, associate publisher of
HarperAudio. “When we heard Tavia’s
performance, we knew we had a great
audiobook on our hands and an opportunity to do something different with a
debut author.”
Audio book revenues have been growing by double-digits over the past few
years, with reasons cited including digital downloads that allow you to hear a
book on your phone and the appeal of
“Serial” and other podcasts that feed an
appreciation for the spoken word.
Anthony Goff, Hachette Book Group’s
audio publisher, said that a decade ago
audiobooks often came out after the
print edition. Now, simultaneous re-
leases are the standard and advance releases for audio a growing possibility.
Last summer, Stephen King’s short story
“Drunken Fireworks” came out months
before it appeared in print in the collection “The Bazaar of Bad Dreams.” Jack
Campbell’s fantasy series “The Pillars of
Reality” was first released in audio late
in 2014, and in paper last May.
“Publishers pick their spots, and an
early e-book release can be an effective
thing to do,” said Chris Lynch, president
and publisher of Simon & Schuster
Audio, which released King’s audiobook.
“Doing it with a first-time author is an
interesting experiment, because any time
we’ve tried anything like that there’s
been a well-known author involved.”
Audio sales don’t yet approach those
for paper or even for e-books, which
comprise around 25 percent of the overall market, but for some releases they
have become substantial. In a blog post
from last summer, children’s author
John Scalzi noted that some 40,000
copies of his novel “Lock In” had sold
in audio, just under the combined numbers for the hardcover and e-book.
Scalzi added that audio’s growth was
even affecting his writing style.
“Audio has its own audience, with its
own sets of desires and expectations,
and that’s something you’ll want to factor in as you create your work,” Scalzi
wrote.
“At this point, I absolutely give consideration to how my work sounds as well
as reads. I’m starting to use substantially
fewer dialogue tags (‘he said,’ ‘she
said’), as an example.”
In a recent email interview, Johnson
said she knew people who found it easier to listen a story than read it. They
would ask her, sheepishly, about an
audio edition for her novel as “if they
were second-class citizens.”
“When I heard the audio version was
coming out before the hardcover I
thought, ‘Nice. All you listeners, please
step to the front of the line,’” she told
The Associated Press.
“Look, I prefer reading my books; but
I grew up in the South where there’s a
real oral tradition, so I’m a big fan of listening. At family reunions — I go to one
in Tennessee that’s been going on for
around 175 years now — people sit
around telling stories late into the night.”
Johnson said she had imagined her
book being read out loud, just not by her.
She noted a passage in “Be Frank With
Me” in which the title character is asked
if he’s been talking to his missing
mother and he answers, “Outside my
head? No.”
“That’s how it was for me when my
novel was still just ideas bouncing
around inside my skull,” Johnson wrote
in her email. “It was being read out loud,
but just to me and nobody else. When
my publishers asked if I wanted to read
the audio book edition, I said no before
they could finish the sentence.”
“Tavia Gilbert nailed it,” Johnson
added. “I may crib from her delivery
when I have to read my book aloud myself.”
Submission Information
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good in the paper. When submitting photos via e-mail, please
send unadjusted images attached as .jpg files. You may
bring printed copies by the office.
events that occur in Putnam
County and the surrounding
Upper Cumberland Region. The
Regular Meetings calendar includes events of public interest
that are held regularly by nonprofit groups like civic clubs and
the many medical support
groups that meet in the area.
The Arts Calendar includes Putnam County events in the arts
community. The Recreation Calendar
includes
recreation
events from Putnam County. To
submit an event for inclusion in
any of these calendars, e-mail
[email protected]
Calendars
Weddings, Engagements
The Herald-Citizen welcomes
submissions regarding community events, club news, engagements,
weddings,
births,
birthdays, anniversaries, the arts
and entertainment. Here is information on how to submit items
for the Living section.
Photos
The Living section maintains
four calendars to keep the community informed about the many
All wedding and engagement
announcements will run in two
columns. If you wish to include
a photo, there is a $30 charge
for a one-column photo and a
$50 charge for a two-column
photo. Submissions with no
photos run free of charge. Payment is expected to be made at
the time of submission.
Wedding and engagement
announcements will be published in Sunday editions. We do
our best to honor date of publication requests, but due to
space limitations and publication deadlines, the sooner you
submit your announcement, the
better chance we have of publishing it on the requested date.
We can’t guarantee that we will
publish on the requested date.
Engagement announcements
are limited to 300 words. We are
not able to publish wedding an-
nouncements more than six
months old.
Anniversaries
Those celebrating wedding
anniversaries are welcome to
submit up to two photos for
publication, free of charge.
Those two photos are usually of
the couple early in the marriage
and a current photo of them.
Anniversaries will be published
in Sunday editions. Again, we
do our best to honor date of
publication requests, but we
can’t guarantee dates of publication.
Births and Birthdays
We publish birthdays and
birth announcements in Births
and Birthdays. Please see
below for information about obtaining or submitting forms. Due
to space limitations, note that
only immediate family will be included in the article and only the
person celebrating the birthday
will be shown in the photograph.
Forms
Forms for wedding, engagement, anniversary or Births and
Birthdays announcements are
available in the newsroom or by
e-mail
([email protected]). Completed forms
may be submitted to the same
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address below. Please make
sure to include a contact name
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are questions.
Suggestions Welcome
Suggestions for feature stories are welcome. You may email
your suggestions to
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speak to someone in the newsroom.
Contact Info
E-mail Addresses:
[email protected]
[email protected]
Mailing Address:
P.O. Box 2729
Cookeville, TN 38502
Physical Address:
1300 Neal St.
Cookeville, TN 38501
HERALD-CITIZEN, Cookeville, Tenn. — www.herald-citizen.com — Sunday, January 31, 2016 — C3
LIVING
Inquiry finds concert
ticket sales a ‘fixed game’
By MICHAEL VIRTANEN
Associated Press
Robert James-Collier as Thomas Barrow, Michael Fox as Andy Parker, and Kevin Doyle
as Joseph Molesley in “Downton Abbey.”
WCTE annual event celebrates
‘Downton Abbey’ and PBS producer
COOKEVILLE — The community is invited to the WCTE
Upper Cumberland PBS Annual
Dinner on March 10, celebrating
Masterpiece programming on
PBS. The event will take place at
Cookeville’s Leslie Town Centre.
The reception/cocktail hour will
open at 5 p.m., followed by dinner from 6-8:30 p.m.
Attendees can expect an
evening of food, fun, and refinement, as well as a special view
into the world of renowned PBS
programming.
“This year’s WCTE Annual
Dinner celebrates ‘Downton
Abbey’ and other national programming that makes viewers return again and again to public
television,” Jodi Pitts, WCTE
special events coordinator, said.
“We encourage attendees to join
us in wearing your best ‘Downton Abbey’-inspired attire for this
occasion!”
WCTE is excited to announce
this year’s keynote speaker: John
Bredar, vice-president of National Programming at WGBH
Boston. Bredar oversees highly
acclaimed prime-time series produced in Boston and seen nationally on PBS, including American
Experience, Nova, Frontline,
Masterpiece, and Antiques Roadshow. He also supervises Studio
Six, WGBH’s in-house production studio. Before working for
PBS, Bredar was senior executive producer for the National
Geographic Specials and produced more than 150 National
Geographic programs.
Rihanna releases album,
‘ANTI,’ for free for 1 day
NEW YORK (AP) — Rihanna
has released her much anticipated new album, “ANTI,” for
free for 24 hours on her website.
A limited number of “ANTI”
downloads were available for
free on the pop star’s website
Thursday. The album was also
available on the Tidal streaming
service, which Rihanna co-owns
with Jay Z and other musicians.
“ANTI” will be available for
purchase digitally on Friday. It is
been streamed exclusively on
Tidal for a week.
The album was teased Wednesday with the single “Work,” featuring Drake. The standard
version of her eighth album includes 13 tracks.
Rihanna co-wrote the majority
of the songs, while The Weeknd
has a writing credit on the track
“Woo.”
Rihanna
“ANTI” doesn’t include the singles Rihanna released last year,
including “Bitch Better Have My
Money,” “American Oxygen”
and “FourFiveSeconds,” with
Kanye West and Paul McCartney.
Tidal, which has struggled to
match its competitors, is also
owned by Madonna, Beyonce,
Usher and other acts.
GALLERY:
Derryberry art on
display until Feb. 25
From Page C1
memory of his mother’s work.
Winkle continued the talk by
thanking Derryberry for lending
most of the paintings at the
gallery. Derryberry later said that
he was happy to lend them out,
and to speak at the gallery that
evening.
Derryberry talked about his
mother’s education in the arts,
stating that while she was 15, she
played the piano and began to de-
velop her skills in painting. He
continued by saying she focused
on music while she was younger,
but began to really focus on
painting as she grew older.
“She could easily remember a
scene and paint it, just by the
memory,” says Walter Derryberry. He continued to say that by
the end of her lifetime, she created 1,500 paintings.
The exhibition is free to the
public and will be available until
Feb. 25.
Tickets are $50 in advance and
will be $60 at the door. Table
reservations are also available.
To purchase tickets online, visit
wcte.org/AnnualDinner.
For
more information, contact Jodi
Pitts at 931-528-2222 ext. 236 or
[email protected] ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) — Had a
hard time getting a ticket to a
concert or sporting event? New
York's attorney general says
that's probably because more
than half of tickets to many
events are held for industry insiders or otherwise unavailable
to the general public.
Attorney General Eric Schneiderman said in a report released
Thursday that his investigation
of the industry was prompted by
consumer complaints, which his
office receives regularly.
“Ticketing, to put it bluntly, is
a fixed game,” the report said.
Investigators found abuses and
practices that prevent consumers
from buying tickets at affordable
prices or sometimes even getting
them at all.
Investigators found that thirdparty brokers resell tickets on
sites like StubHub and TicketsNow at average margins of 49
percent above face-value and
sometimes more than 10 times
the price. Some brokers use illegal specialty software, called
“ticket bots,” to quickly pur-
chase as many desirable tickets
as possible for resale at significant markups, they said.
The report cited a single broker
buying 1,012 tickets within one
minute to a U2 concert at Madison Square Garden when they
went on sale on Dec. 8, 2014,
despite the vendor's claim of a
four-ticket limit. By day's end,
that broker and one other had
15,000 tickets to U2's North
American shows.
Madison Square Garden is
“well aware of the issue of tickets getting into the hands of brokers” and has been working to
address it, spokeswoman Kimberly Kerns said. “While there
are no obvious solutions, we
continually look for ways to
avoid selling tickets to brokers,”
she said.
Venues and sellers like Ticketmaster regularly tacked on fees
that added more than 21 percent
to the face value, investigators
said. They found that on average, 16 percent of tickets are reserved for various industry
insiders like the venue employees, artists and promoters, while
38 percent are reserved for presales to certain groups like hold-
ers of a particular credit card.
Ticketmaster did not immediately reply to a request for comment.
The report also criticized
“price floors,” particularly by
sports leagues and teams including the NFL and New York Yankees, which are rules meant to
prevent tickets from being sold
below their face value and that
deprive the public of possibly
cheaper tickets. Many NFL
teams encourage or even require
ticket holders to use Ticketmaster's NFL Ticket Exchange platform, where the seller is
prohibited from cutting the
price.
“The more aggressively sports
leagues and individual teams
push ticket buyers and sellers to
use their 'official' secondary
markets, the more serious this
problem becomes,” the report
said.
“This investigation is just the
beginning of our efforts to create
a level playing field in the ticket
industry,” Schneiderman said.
An NFL spokesman said the
NFL Ticket Exchange is just one
of many options for ticket holders to buy or sell tickets.
C4 — HERALD-CITIZEN, Cookeville, Tenn. — www.herald-citizen.com — Sunday, January 31, 2016
LIVING
Writers’ Corner
How to be a legend in your own time
By WAYNE HOGAN
crisp indigo blue, and that here and
there big fat puffs of while cumulus
clouds go floating by.
What leaf-fringed legend
Let’s say, too, that even though you’d
haunts about thy shape?
set the alarm clock to ring unusually
— John Keats early, your wife had gone straight to
the kitchen to cook you a really big
Let’s say you’re driving west down
breakfast — homemade biscuits (she’d
the Interstate headed for, oh, Nashville, prepared the dough the night before),
let’s say. Let’s say you’re driving along sausage links, red-eye gravy, scramwell within the allowed speed limit,
bled eggs, and steaming-hot freshlistening to a taped recording of Eubrewed decaf coffee. That the two of
dora Welty reading her very wry little
you, let’s say, sat at the kitchen table
story, “Why I Live At the P.O.,” just
leisurely eating and discussing your regenerally enjoying the bounteously
spective experiences of the previous
beautiful Upper Cumberland terrain.
day, shared your hopes for the current
And let’s say it’s an extra-nice early
one, and just generally enjoyed another
Spring day, that the mid-morning’s sun bounteously beautiful Tennessee day.
hangs there at about a 45-degree angle That, when finished with breakfast, she
off the hilly horizon, that the fog that
washed and you dried the dishes before
had been pea-soup thick just an hour
kissing goodbye, that you then backed
earlier has almost lifted, though there’s out of the driveway and turned your
still a patch or two hovering at the low- 1980 two-tone gray Chevy station
est levels, that the whole sky’s full of
wagon slowly onto the narrow country
Special to the HERALD-CITIZEN
road leading to the Interstate.
You’ve just passed “Buffalo Bill’s”
seemingly still-under-construction
cross between a git-it-’n’-go market
and serious eyesore, have slowed down
to about 25 miles-per-hour as requested
by the CONSTRUCTION — LEFT
LANE CLOSED sign you’ve just
passed when out of the corner of your
left eye you see the blurred shape of a
woman (“Hmmm, not bad” you say to
yourself) falling through the air at a
fairly fast clip toward a spot in the field
across the Interstate to your left. You
immediately pull off the road onto the
shoulder, stop your 1980 two-tone gray
Chevy station wagon, get out (being
careful to look both ways for oncoming
traffic), run across the Interstate’s four
lanes, jump the three-strand barbedwire fence that surrounds the field, and
catch the lady in your opened arms just
before she’d’ve otherwise hit the
ground with a resounding thud.
On the highway again after cradling
the young woman (she’s introduced
herself, saying her name was Margo) in
your arms and carrying her back to
“Buffalo Bills,” where, with proper instruction all around, you left her with
Bill promising to call a cab to take her
wherever she wanted to go, let’s say by
now the Eudora Welty tape has concluded, having repeated the name
Stella Rondo at least a thousand times
it seemed, and that you’re back to driving normally down the road, still about
65 or so miles from Nashville, listening, now, to Sam Westerson’s taped
reading of Arthur Millers “The Misfits” (you can see Clark Gable clear as
day, let’s say, and let’s say, can smell
Marilyn’s Roseland coming more’n a
mile away, let’s say.)
Let’s also say that by now you’re on
your way back from Nashville and
you’re noticing how lush gree the grass
is in the meridian and out in the fields
on both sides of the Interstate (the Winter season tha’d just ended had been
unusually mild, and Spring had come
early this year), that you’re noticing
how nicely blossomed the satin-white
dogwoods and purplish redbuds are all
along the way, how they and assorted
wildflowers add their ever-so-painterly
touches to the now-impressionist, nowexpressionist countryside, when out of
the corner of your eye, let’s say, you’re
noticing the blurred shape of a woman
(“Hmm, she looks familiar,” you say to
yourself) falling through the air at a
fairly fast clip toward a spot off to your
right in the field next to the Interstate.
You stop, set your handbrake (set the
shift-lever on “park” for added safety)
then race into the field and catch the
woman just before she’d’ve otherwise
hit the ground with a resounding thud.
“Hello, again,” she says.
“Hi, Margo,” you reply. “May I call
you a cab.”
A better angel? Jane Lynch wings
in for her funny new sitcom
By FRAZIER MOORE
AP Television Writer
AP
Linen items lie neatly folded in a drawer. Marie Kondo, the author of the international
best-seller, “The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up,” became famous for advising readers to transform their lives by sifting through all their belongings, one by one, embracing
those that “spark joy” and bidding a fond but hasty farewell to the rest.
Kondo is back with more
tidying advice in ‘Spark Joy’
By KATHERINE ROTH
Associated Press
NEW YORK (AP) — Marie
Kondo is back.
Author of the international
best-seller “The Life-Changing
Magic of Tidying Up” (Ten
Speed Press, 2014), Kondo became famous for advising readers how to transform their lives
by sifting through their belongings one by one, embracing
those that “spark joy” and bidding a fond but hasty farewell to
the rest.
Her new book, “Spark Joy: an
Illustrated Master Class on the
Art of Organizing and Tidying
Up” (Ten Speed), provides illustrations and more detail.
“After I published my first
book, a lot of readers came with
a lot of questions,” the petite,
soft-spoken Kondo told The Associated Press, in Japanese, after
a presentation to a packed auditorium at the Japan Society in
New York.
Kondo is still communing lovingly with socks and blouses,
folding clothes like origami and
bowing in gratitude to her home.
She also has a fresh perspective
as a new mother.
“My daughter is only 6 months
old, so my method hasn’t
changed ... She cannot make a
mess yet. What has surprised me
most is the amount of stuff a
baby needs,” Kondo said, sitting
primly at the edge of her seat in
an impeccable white top over a
pale blue print dress.
“Once she gets older, I’m sure
there will be a little bit of adjustment.”
With an understated sense of
humor, she notes in her new
book that one of the people with
whom she has had to share her
storage methods is her new husband, himself so minimalist that
he moved in with only four cardboard boxes of belongings.
“I am learning that unspoken
family rules differ from one
household to another, and that
storage methods I had assumed
were obvious need to be properly shared and explained,” she
writes.
NEW YORK (AP) — “A nice
match,” says Jane Lynch, referring to herself and her new sitcom role. “Made in heaven, if
you will.”
Heaven, indeed.
On CBS’ “Angel From Hell”
(Thursdays at 9:30 p.m. EST),
Lynch plays Amy, a spirited but
scatterbrained oddball who barrels into the life of Allison, a
sweet but neurotic young doctor
played by Maggie Lawson, insinuating herself as a self-styled
“guardian angel.” (“Angel From
Hell” also stars Kevin Pollak
and Kyle Bornheimer as Allison’s father and brother.)
Is Amy really on a job from
God? Or is she a boozy, jobless
nutcase from the streets?
“At one point I do something
great for Allison and she says,
‘Are you really an angel, or are
you just crazy?’ And I just say,
‘Does it matter?’”
In the process, Lynch stands
tall (all imposing 6 feet) keeping
Allison bemused as to just who
Amy is.
Lynch admits to being a bit bemused, too.
At a recent interview in New
York, Lynch reports that once
her series took flight, “with
every new script I read, I said,
‘This is TOO crazy!’” Like
when Amy stops on a street corner to consult with a traffic light,
which she recognizes as a fel-
AP
Jane Lynch
low angel in traffic-light disguise.
“This show is not going to be
the sweet Roma (‘Touched by
an Angel’) Downey story,”
Lynch says with a laugh. “And
I’m not Michael (‘Highway to
Heaven’) Landon. I’m kind of
coarse, I come from a very
strange, psychotic place. But to
Amy, it’s all perfectly natural.
“The most important thing for
me in playing her: stay in the
heart. Amy’s mission is to really
love somebody, and let her
KNOW she’s loved. No matter
how weirdly Amy behaves,
she’s SO committed to this
woman Allison!”
Idyllic Youth
“I grew up in a Southside suburb of Chicago,” says Lynch,
55. “It was idyllic. But I was
plunked into a family that was
not artistic, and didn’t know
how to deal with my emotions.
I could be pretty volatile, especially when I didn’t feel understood, which was 99 percent of
the time. I do think that, as a
young person, I suffered over
that. But as I look back, it doesn’t even feel like part of me —
except when I act, and need
those emotions. Then I can
dredge it up.”
Breaking Out
“When you get out of school,
you just go where the wind
blows: Here’s an audition,
there’s an audition. And before
you know it, you’re where
you’re supposed to be. And that
was Second City,” where Lynch
was hired for the touring company.
After that, she scored lots of
work onstage and in TV and
films, though nothing launched
her as a star. “There was a part
of me that said, ‘Ohhh, when’s
the ship gonna come in for me?’
But then I would think, ‘Why
SHOULD I get a ship?’ And
once you get over that, in comes
your ship!”
Her “ship” was a commercial
for Kellogg’s Frosted Flakes
that was directed by Christopher
Guest, who then remembered
her when casting his 2000 dogshow mockumentary, “Best in
Show.”
Another high-profile job: joining Steve Carell in the 2005
comedy hit “The 40-Year-Old
Virgin.”
‘Justified’ star Timothy
Olyphant returns to the stage
By MARK KENNEDY
AP
Marie Kondo
Kondo’s earlier book had no illustrations; “Spark Joy” is full of
her charming, child-like drawings of everything from organized kitchen cupboards, to
folding techniques for clothes
ranging from underwear to frilly
blouses to hoodies.
“It is very important that you
know how to fold clothes in the
correct way,” she informed the
crowd at the Japan Society, before daintily approaching a
demonstration table where a
small pile of unfolded clothing
awaited. For one thing, “make
sure you put a lot of love through
your palms,” she said.
The audience — die-hard fans
and those new to her KonMari
Method — applauded as Kondo
quickly folded one item after another into a tiny cube, balanced
each on edge to show how
tightly wound it was, then tucked
them neatly into what resembled
a lidless shoe box.
“Wow, that’s so cool. How did
she do that?” a man in the second
row whispered to his neighbor.
Kondo suggests setting the
boxes of origami-esque parcels
in drawers so that each is a joy-
provoking bento of delights.
What about those pesky possessions that fail to spark joy yet are
undeniably useful? Well, functionality can be beautiful too.
“After discarding a hammer because the handle was worn out, I
used my frying pan to pound in
any nails,” Kondo writes. But
after she threw out a screwdriver,
“I tried using a ruler to tighten a
loose screw, but it snapped down
the middle. This almost reduced
me to tears as it was one I really
liked.”
“All these incidents stemmed
from youthful inexperience and
thoughtlessness,” she continues.
Things that make life simpler,
“the recognition that a possession is useful in our lives —
these, too, indicate joy.”
“Spark Joy” includes advice on
moving, packing and decorating
with tiny, cheerful knickknacks
(this is smile-inducing minimalism).
She even gives a nod to those
who don’t thrill to tidying up.
Kondo admitted to her New York
audience that she regrets some of
her earlier zeal in discarding her
family’s belongings.
AP Drama Writer
NEW YORK (AP) — Timothy
Olyphant had gotten only a few
pages into Kenneth Lonergan’s
new play when he told his wife,
“I’m going to want to do this.”
His wife’s response? “Finish
the play.”
But Olyphant, best known for
six seasons of the FX series
“Justified” as Deputy U.S. Marshal Raylan Givens, was
hooked: “I’m telling you right
now, I’m going to want to do
this.”
True to his word, Olyphant
will be starring in “Hold on to
Me Darling,” a comedy making
its world premiere this spring at
the off-Broadway Atlantic Theater Company.
It will mark Olyphant’s return
to an off-Broadway stage for the
first time in 20 years following
roles in “The Santaland Diaries”
in 1996 and “The Monogamist”
in 1995.
“I personally came back to the
theater for the obvious reason
— the money,” joked Olyphant.
“I think everyone can understand that. Everyone knows I’ve
got to make a living.”
The play is about Strings McCrane, a film star and countrywestern singer who goes
AP File
Actor Timothy Olyphant attends the screening for the
television series finale of FX’s “Justified.”
through a personal crisis after Hogan, Jenn Lyon, Keith
the death of his mother and Nobbs, and C.J. Wilson. Permoves back to his hometown in formances begin Feb. 24 under
the direction of Neil Pepe, the
Tennessee.
Olyphant will play McCrane Atlantic’s artistic director.
and will be taking some guitar Lonergan has written several
classes to sound authentic on- other plays, most notably “This
stage. The humor will come nat- is Our Youth,” ‘’Lobby Hero”
urally. “Whenever I try to do and “The Waverly Gallery.” He
something musical, it’s more or made his film debut with “You
less funny,” he said, laughing. Can Count On Me” and had a
“I’m just going to assume the follow-up with “Margaret.” He
also contributed to the screenaudience is forgiving.”
The rest of the cast will feature plays of “Gangs of New York”
Adelaide Clemens, Jonathan and “Analyze That.”
HERALD-CITIZEN, Cookeville, Tenn. — www.herald-citizen.com — Sunday, January 31, 2016 — C5
LIVING
Largest shipment of fur out: 1935
By BOB MCMILLAN
HERALD-CITIZEN Staff
Looking back in history, here
were some of the happenings in
the Cookeville area for the week
of Jan. 30-Feb. 4, as recorded in
the pages of the Herald-Citizen
1935
City Commissioner H.S. Hargis, in charge of Cookeville’s
public utilities, says the city is
cracking down on customers
who don’t pay their electric bills.
The city has just signed a
“standby” agreement with the
Tennessee Electric Power Company to provide electricity here
when the demand exceeds the
city’s ability to generate it.
Not long ago, flooding knocked
out the city’s power plant at
Burgess Falls, and interruptions
are still not infrequent.
“This assurance of continuous
electrical service is enjoyed by
few if any of the smaller towns
in Tennessee,” said Hargis.
But it’s costly, he said. So the
city is taking a more aggressive
stance towards bill collection.
No payment, no power, said Hargis.
Herman Mott of Mott’s Produce on the Square said this
week he’s sent out his largest
shipment ever of furs from the
region — 3,000 hides.
They were mostly grey fox, but
there were also skunks, albino
racoons, mink and white weasel
skins brought in by trappers in
the region.
Come by his storage house on
the Square if you’re interested in
buying or selling furs, he said.
(Jan. 31, 1935)
1941
Cookeville’s 200 Tennessee National Guardsmen and their 12
officers will become federal
troops on Feb. 24. It’s part of the
mobilization of 624 Tennessee
Guardsmen.
With war breaking out in Europe, the U.S. is beefing up its
active military forces. The
Cookeville men will train here
for a week or so and then ship out
to Camp Forrest in Tullahoma.
The Upper Cumberland Chamber of Commerce went to Washington this week to talk to
government officials about hydroelectric dams planned for the
area.
They’re going to get details on
when the dams at Center Hill and
Dale Hollow will be built.
They’re also looking into the
chances of getting government
defense plants in the area.
In a page one picture this week,
Haile Selassie, emperor-in-exile
of Ethiopia, is seen with British
officers training Abyssinian
troops. They’re getting ready to
fight the Italians, who recently
overran Selassie’s home country.
(Jan. 30, 1941)
1946
The American Legion is
strongly encouraging Congress
to pass a large-scale package of
legislation that would aid veterans, especially those disabled in
the world war that just ended.
The legislation would create aid
and pensions for vets, guarantee
them the right to reclaim their
former jobs, give them Social Security credit for money earned in
the military, and restrict immigration to keep aliens from competing with them for jobs in the
U.S.
In veteran’s news:
— William O’Neal, now serving in Manila, has been promoted
to the rank of first lieutenant.
He’s been in the service since
1941. His wife and daughter live
on Freeze Street here.
— Billy Stanton, in the army
since 1941, has been honorably
discharged. He saw several major
engagements in the Pacific.
— Ken Bailey has also been
discharged honorably after three
years in the military. In the drive
across Europe he saw action in
France, Belgium, Luxembourg
and Germany, including the recent Battle of the Rhine.
The country’s oldest justice of
the peace is dead. W.M. Watson,
a member of the Putnam County
Court for the past several years,
died this week at his home in
Monterey. He had also been a
city judge and a tax collector on
the mountain. (Jan. 31, 1946)
1954
It was a week of highs and lows
for the Dry Valley Community.
They’ve been active there recently, turning part of the Dry
Valley School, the heart of the
community’s social life, into a
community center and the people
went en masse to see the school’s
boys and girls basketball teams
play Bangham at the Algood
school this week.
It was the first teams the school
has fielded in some time and for
the girls, it was their first time to
play on a hardwood court. The
boys won 37-20. The girls lost
33-12.
The community gathered again
24 hours after the game to discuss what to do about their
school. It burned during the
night.
It not only destroyed the school,
but the community center the
people had prepared inside. They
lost an electric stove, a freezer, a
piano and other furnishings.
The fire is believed to have
originated in an old stove in the
recreation area. The community
had begun digging space under
the school to install a new furnace in the spring.
The school’s 72 students will be
sent to Cookeville City School
until other arrangements can be
made. (Feb. 4, 1954)
1964
In the latest go-around between
the county court and the school
board over the new high school,
a special meeting has been called
by the court to decide whether to
seek a court order to halt work
on the school.
Several commissioners are
charging that a contract the
board issued for the project is illegal.
Meanwhile, County Judge
Jimmy Mosier is arguing that
building a more “orthodox”
school rather than the one
planned by the board — one
with cluster classrooms —
would be $200,000 cheaper to
build and would cost the county
$15,000 less to operate each
year.
An historic house at White
Plains, east of Cookeville, has
just been renovated by its owners, Mr. and Mrs. Howard
Draper.
It’s the site of a home built by
Revolutionary War veteran
William Quarles, who was
headed west to claim land when
his wagon broke down here. It
snowed, delaying him further.
He liked the area and decided to
build here, transferring his land
grant to what would become Putnam County.
He started a prosperous plantation and built a two-story log
home. He was killed four years
later in a dispute. His daughter’s
husband, Steve Burton, bought
the farm. (Former Putnam Sheriff Alec Burton is a descendant.)
When the log home burned in
1825, Burton replaced it with a
fine two-story frame house. The
plantation continued to grow and
served as a post office for Putnam, Overton, Clay and parts of
White County.
He raised race horses too. Andrew Jackson, a lover of fine
horse flesh, was a frequent buyer
here. It was Jackson who encouraged Burton to run for Congress
to unseat a political enemy of the
president. Burton beat the opponent, David Crockett. Crockett
subsequently went to Texas
where he died at the Alamo.
The Drapers bought the house
seven years ago and the renovations have put electrical heat and
better plumbing in the structure,
which is now bricked-in. (Jan.
30, 1964)
1974
The nation’s independent truckers are on strike and they’ve set
up a check point in Cookeville
just off I-40 to encourage other
truckers to stop their rigs or head
home in support of the strike.
No violence has been reported
here, but across the state, windshields have been shot out of 15
trucks, including ones in
Nashville and Manchester.
The truckers are striking in
protest of high fuel prices and a
recent reduction of speed limits
on the nation’s highways by
President Richard Nixon. They
can’t legally go above 55 mph
now. (Jan. 30, 1974)
1984
Coyotes in Putnam County?
Yes, says State Rep. Jerry Jared,
who’s pictured this week on
page one with one he shot in
Buffalo Valley
Wildlife experts say the wily
predators have been creeping
eastward in recent years and are
now across the Tennessee River
in West Tennessee.
Buffalo Valley farmers say coyotes have been here for at least
three years. That’s how long
they’ve been losing calves and
goats to them, they say.
The highly-intelligent creatures
have no natural enemies this far
east. None except man. (Jan. 30,
1984)
Jefferson Airplane co-founder Paul Kantner dies at age 74
BY HILLEL ITALIE
AP National Writer
NEW YORK (AP) — Paul Kantner, a
founding member of the Jefferson Airplane who stayed with the seminal San
Francisco band through its transformation from 1960s hippies to 1970s hit
makers as the eventual leader of successor group Jefferson Starship, has died at
age 74.
Kantner, who drew upon his passion
for politics and science fiction to help
write such rock classics as “Wooden
Ships” and “Volunteers,” died on Thursday of organ failure and septic shock. He
had been admitted to a San Francisco
hospital after falling ill earlier in the
week, his former girlfriend and publicist
Cynthia Bowman, the mother of one of
his three children, told The Associated
Press.
The guitarist and songwriter had survived close brushes with death as a
younger man, including a motorcycle
accident during the early 1960s and a
1980 cerebral hemorrhage, and he recovered from a heart attack last year.
Few bands were so identified with San
Francisco or so well-embodied the ide-
Shawn Baldwin, File | AP
Jefferson Starships’ Paul Kantner
alism and hedonism of the late ‘60s as
Jefferson Airplane, its message boldly
stated on buttons and bumper stickers
that read “THE JEFFERSON AIRPLANE LOVES YOU.”
The Airplane advocated sex, psychedelic drugs, rebellion and a communal
lifestyle, operating out of an eccentric,
Colonial Revival house near HaightAshbury. Its members supported various
political and social causes, tossed out
LSD at concerts and played at both the
Monterey and Woodstock festivals.
Formed by veterans of the folk circuit
in the mid-’60s, the Airplane combined
folk, rock, blues and jazz and was the
first group from a Bay Area scene that
also featured Janis Joplin and the Grateful Dead to achieve mainstream success,
thanks to the classics “Somebody to
Love” and “White Rabbit.”
Besides Kantner, who played rhythm
guitar and added backing vocals, the
Airplane’s best-known lineup included
singers Grace Slick and Marty Balin;
lead guitarist Jorma Kaukonen; bassist
Jack Casady; and drummer Spencer
Dryden, who died in 2005. Jefferson
Airplane, named in part after blues artist
Blind Lemon Jefferson, was inducted
into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in
1996 and is scheduled to receive the
Recording Academy’s lifetime achievement award this year.
“He was the first guy I picked for the
Publishers Weekly Best Sellers
Week ending 1/24/2016
HARDCOVER FICTION
1. “Blue” by Danielle Steel
(Delacorte)
2. “My Name is Lucy Barton”
by Elizabeth Strout (Random
House)
3. “The Girl on the Train” by
Paula Hawkins (Riverhead)
4. “Rogue Lawyer” by John Grisham (Doubleday)
5. “Feverborn” by Karen Marie
Moning (Delacorte)
6. “Scandalous Behavior” by
Stuart Woods (Putnam)
7. “The Nightingale” by Kristin
Hannah (St. Martin’s Press)
8. “Warriors of the Storm” by
Bernard Cornwell (Harper)
9. “The Force Awakens: Star
Wars” by Alan Dean Foster (Del
Rey/Lucas Books)
10. “See Me” by Nicholas
Sparks (Grand Central Publishing)
HARDCOVER NONFICTION
1. “When Breath Becomes Air”
by Paul Kalanithi (Random
House)
2. “Spark Joy” by Marie Kondo
(Ten Speed)
3. “The Name of God Is Mercy”
by Pope Francis (Random
House)
4. “The Power of Broke” by
Daymond John (Crown Business)
5. “Always Hungry?” by David
Ludwig (Grand Central Life &
Style)
6. “Between the World and Me”
by
Ta-Nehisi
Coates
(Random/Spiegel & Grau)
7. “Presence” by Amy Cuddy
(Little, Brown)
8. “The Road to Little Dribbling” by Bill Bryson (Doubleday)
9. “The Negative Calorie Diet”
by Rocco DiSpirito (Harper
Wave)
10. “Dark Money” by Jane
Mayer (Doubleday)
MASS MARKET
PAPERBACKS
1. “Prodigal Son” by Danielle
Steel (Dell)
2. “The Choice”(movie tie-in)
by Nicholas Sparks (Grand Central Publishing)
3. “Last One Home” by Debbie
Macomber (Ballantine)
4. “New Leaf” by Catherine
Anderson (Signet)
5. “Death Wears a Beauty Mask
and Other Stories” by Mary Higgins Clark (S&S/Pocket)
6. “Burn” by James Patterson
(Hachette/Vision)
7. “Point Blank” by Fern
Michaels (Kensington/Zebra)
8. “Motive” by Jonathan Kellerman (Ballantine)
9. “Mr. Mercedes” by Stephen
King (S&S/Pocket)
10. “Invisible” by James Patter-
son (Hachette/Vision)
11. “The Patriot Threat” by
Steve Berry (Minotaur)
12. “The Manning Brides” by
Debbie Macomber (Mira)
13. “Trust No One” by Jayne
Ann Krentz (Jove)
14. “Gray Mountain” by John
Grisham (Dell)
15. “A Husband for Mari” by
Emma Miller (Harlequin/Love
Inspired)
TRADE PAPERBACKS
1. “Lost Ocean” by Johanna
Basford (Penguin)
2. “The Choice”(movie tie-in)
by Nicholas Sparks (Grand Central Publishing)
3. “Fervent” by Priscilla Shirer
(B&H)
4. “The Revenant(movie tie-in)
by Michael Punke (Picador)
5. “13 Hours” (movie tie-in) by
Mitchell
Zuckoff
(Hachette/Twelve)
6. “Truth or Die” by Patterson/Roughan (Grand Central
Publishing)
7. “The 5 Love Languages” by
Gary Chapman (Moody/Northfield)
8. “Creative Cats Coloring
Book” by Marjorie Sarnat
(Dover)
9. “The Official SAT Study
Guide 2016” (College Board)
10. “Adult Coloring Books”
(Zing)
band and he was the first guy who taught
me how to roll a joint,” Balin wrote of
Kantner on his Facebook page. “And although I know he liked to play the
devil’s advocate, I am sure he has earned
his wings now”
Kantner, who looked as much like a
college student as a rock star with his
glasses and shaggy blonde hair, did not
have the vocal or stage presence of Balin
and Slick, or the instrumental power of
Kaukonen or Casady. But he became the
conscience of the band and by the end of
the ‘60s was shaping its increasingly
radical direction, whether co-writing the
militant “Volunteers” with Balin or inserting a profane taunt into his own incendiary “We Can Be Together,” leading
to an extended fight with their record
company, RCA.
Meanwhile, Kantner and Slick reigned
as one of rock’s most prominent couples. Rolling Stone would note their
contrasting styles, labeling Slick “the
Acid Queen of outrageousness” and
Kantner her “calm, dry, sardonic flip
side.”
apocalypse fantasy “Wooden Ships,”
which Jefferson Airplane and Crosby,
Stills and Nash each recorded and performed at Woodstock.
With perfect timing for a ‘60s band, the
Airplane began splitting apart at the end
of decade. Kaukonen and Casady
founded the blues group Hot Tuna, and
Balin, the band’s estranged original
leader, also left. In 1974, Kantner and
Slick brought in new musicians and renamed the group Jefferson Starship.
Their sound softened and, with Balin
back, they had hit singles with “Miracles” and “Count On Me” among others
and a No. 1 album, “Red Octopus.”
But by the mid-1980s, when Slick and
Mickey Thomas were lead vocalists,
Kantner thought the music so “mundane” that he left the Jefferson Starship
and successfully forced the remaining
members not to use the name “Jefferson.” (His former bandmates called
themselves “Starship” and had three No.
1 songs, including “Sara” and “We Built
This City”).
Over the past 30 years, Kantner, Balin
and Casady occasionally performed as
Kantner, Crosby and Stephen Stills the KBC Band and a reunited Airplane
would collaborate on the escapist, post- briefly toured and recorded.
Its Almost Time for the
The annual Home & Garden Show is coming March
4-6th at the Hyder-Burks Pavilion in Cookeville!
If your business is participating be sure to contact
one of our advertising representatives at the
Herald-Citizen. We’ll be producing a special pull
out section that will be published Sunday, February
28th in the Herald-Citizen and Wednesday, March
2nd in the Regional Buyers Guide. Promote what
your business will have at the show and get the
word out to over 35,000 readers in the
Upper Cumberland. Reserve your space
by calling (931) 526-9715. The deadline
is Thursday, February 18th.
C6 — HERALD-CITIZEN, Cookeville, Tenn. — www.herald-citizen.com — Sunday, January 31, 2016
LIVING
Cookeville Camera Club opens Intro to Photography class
Q
: The Cookeville Camera Club
has been offering introductory
photo courses every winter for
a number of years. What are your
plans for this year?
A: The key word is “winter.” In some
respects that is the perfect time to be
inside to take a class, but a lot of photography is difficult to learn indoors.
Besides, it’s a lot more fun to be outside in nicer weather.
As you remember, last year was a
weather disaster for many, but it was at
least a big inconvenience for the
classes. It was difficult to get outside
and take pictures, and many class sessions had to be re-scheduled.
This year, we are moving the intro
class to March/April in an attempt to
avoid the worst weather. We will see.
Q: Any changes in store this year?
A: Always! A newly revised course,
Getting Started in Photography, will be
a seven-session class offered on Saturdays at the Putnam County Library in
Cookeville for up to sixteen participants. It will begin on March 5.
In addition, we are moving to be more
inclusive in terms of the type of camera
a participant may use. In the past, each
camera was required to be a dSLR, but
this session will be open to people with
any camera that has manual settings, in
addition to automatic modes. Camera
technology is continuing to progress
with new models that are smaller,
lighter, and possibly less expensive
than the traditional dSLR.
Q: What about camera phones?
A: Camera phones are amazing in
terms of the quality they can provide.
This summer, we plan to offer a new,
shorter course dedicated to phone cameras and other so-called basic “point
and shoot” cameras. The intent of the
summer course is to expose participants to the art of photography that is
possible with iPhones and Android
phones. The cameras in smart phones
are so much more capable than just
taking “selfies”.
However, for the March/April course,
phone cameras do not meet the requirement.
Q: I assume you do not consider
Bill Miller
The Camera Club can help photographers learn to take photos in both
color and black and white.
“selfie” pictures as art?
A: Well . . . We are trying to appeal to
people who want to move beyond taking snapshots. Creating a photograph
involves two main skills: technical
mastery of the camera, and “seeing”
the world differently. The second part
is about recognizing the potential of a
scene, and using a camera to make a
photograph that has emotional impact.
The impact could be laughter, joy, happiness, anger, or just plain “Wow!” . . .
any emotion, really. Impact could also
be the result of seeing an interesting
story that a photograph will tell. After
recognizing the potential, the photographer will make conscious decisions to
present the resulting image in the most
creative, unique, and highly interesting
way possible.
The good news is any camera can be
used to create a photograph with impact. On the other hand, making photographs with impact requires lots and
Bill Miller
Caney Fork River, taken by a Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX5 camera.
lots of practice — just like learning
any new skill.
Q: Where do you get more information?
A: Go to www.cookevillecameraclub.com and look for the “Getting
Started in Photography” link on the left
side of the home page. The link will
show much more information about the
course including specific dates and
times. You will also be able to register
and pay online.
Class participants are also encouraged
to attend our meetings.
Club members have a wide variety of
experience in many types of photography, and they are eager to help people
who are beginning to learn how to use
their cameras.
Register soon — there are only 16
spots.
Bill Miller is a past president of the
Cookeville Camera Club.
Long-lived asparagus plants can last decades
By DEAN FOSDICK
Associated Press
Asparagus is a delicious and resilient
perennial that can be grown anywhere
from kitchen gardens to roadside
ditches and flowery meadows. In raised
beds, too.
But be careful when scouting locations. Once established, this hardy plant
will produce for 20 years or more.
Asparagus is considered something of
a gourmet vegetable but it isn’t a crop
for impatient gardeners, says Brenna
Aegerter, a University of California
farm adviser based in San Joaquin
County.
“To be on the safe side, you don’t want
to over-harvest, so it’s good to wait at
least two years after planting,” Aegerter
said. “You don’t want to take them too
early. You want those underground
crowns (year-old root systems) to build
up a carbohydrate reserve.”
Asparagus should be planted in sunny,
well-drained sites in spring, using uniformly sized crowns set 18 inches apart
and in rows some 5 feet apart. Wait until
the threat of frost has passed.
Place crowns in the furrows and fill
with about 2 inches of soil. Gradually
boost the rows with soil as the plants
continue their growth, or until the
crowns are about 6 inches below the
surface.
AP
Asparagus grows in a deep container in a yard in Langley, Wash. Asparagus is a surprisingly large fernlike plant that can grow to heights of five feet or more.
Each crown can produce about a halfpound of edible spears per year when
fully established.
“Asparagus is very drought-tolerant
and can usually grow without supplemental watering because it seeks moisture deep in the soil,” according to an
Ohio State University fact sheet.
The optimal pH for asparagus is 6.5 to
7.5. Weed growing beds thoroughly, and
fertilize with a 10-20-10 formulation
before planting.
“You can’t completely neglect it but
asparagus isn’t a high-maintenance
plant,” Aegerter said. “It is susceptible
to a few serious diseases, but for the
Sandy Duncan, an ex-Peter Pan,
to join Pan show on Broadway
By MARK KENNEDY
AP Drama Writer
NEW YORK (AP) — One of
the best Peter Pans ever is returning home to Broadway —
and to a musical about Peter
Pan.
Sandy Duncan, who played
the boy who won’t grow up on
Broadway from 1979-81, will
soon replace Carolee Carmello
in “Finding Neverland,” easily
the most inspired piece of recasting in recent history.
Making the move even more
special is the fact that Duncan
will be returning to the LuntFontanne Theatre, where she
played Peter in the first Broadway revival, earning her one of
her three Tony Award nominations.
The “Finding Neverland” musical is adapted from the 2004
Duncan
whimsical film of the same
name about a widow whose
four young sons inspired play-
wright J.M. Barrie to write the
children’s classic.
Starting Feb. 9, Duncan will
play the widow’s mother, joining Tony Yazbeck as Barrie
and Kelsey Grammer as both
the American theatrical producer Charles Frohman and a
fearsome Captain Hook.
Duncan, known for her TV
turn in “The Hogan Family,”
previous was on Broadway in
“Chicago,” ‘’Canterbury
Tales” and “The Boyfriend.”
She will turn 70 on Feb. 20.
“Finding Neverland” is directed by Diane Paulus and has
a book by British playwright
James Graham, whose “This
House” premiered at the National Theatre in 2012. Music
and lyrics are by Gary Barlow
of the pop band Take That, and
songwriter and producer Eliot
Kennedy.
most part doesn’t have high fertilizer
needs. Its roots go deep so it also
doesn’t need the kind of watering that
something like tomatoes would need.”
Asparagus is a surprisingly large fernlike plant that can grow to heights approaching 5 feet in dedicated sites.
“Asparagus produces over a two- or
three-month period and needs a large
garden to produce a family harvest,”
Aegerter said. “It would be much more
popular if it didn’t take up so much
space.”
Weed control is the most challenging
part of growing asparagus, said David
Trinklein, an associate professor of
plant sciences at the University of Missouri.
“Asparagus is a poor competitor with
weeds,” Trinklein said. “On small plantings, very light cultivation with a hoe
may be used to remove weeds, but
avoid using power rotary tillers or any
other tillage implements that can damage the crown, reduce yields and promote diseases.”
Use organic mulches liberally to suppress weeds, he said.
Asparagus spears or shoots begin
emerging from the ground in early
spring when the soil warms to about 50
degrees.
“When spears are 7 to 9 inches tall and
still have tight tips, they are ideal for
harvest,” Trinklein said. “When the
leaves of the spears start to unfurl or
’fern out,’ the spear is past its prime for
eating.”
Asparagus tastes best if eaten immediately after harvest. It will tolerate refrigeration for several weeks, but at the
expense of some sweetness, crispness
and flavor.
Herald-Citizen
BUSINESS
Sunday, January 31, 2016
Region
seeing
existing
home sales
increase
D
Gift of hearing
T
he national forecast
is predicting solid
job gains and eased
credit restrictions could
help offset out tight available inventory. National
predictions for 2016 are a
2.7 percent growth with
median sold price increasing. All of
these
factors
are
what
we are
experiencing
currently
here in
our
Pam
Upper
Looper
Cumberland area.
We are seeing job growth
in our area and the statistics are already trending
with tight available inventory and an increase in median price for sold single
family residences.
The year-end review statistics from the Upper
Cumberland Association
of Realtors (UCAR) reveals the real estate market
has seen a total rise of 164
single family units sold for
2015. For the year 2015,
there were 1,904 single
family units sold as compared to this same statistic
at year end of 2014 of
1,740 single family units
sold.
The total days on the
market that a single family
unit has decreased from
160 from to 151 which is
trending in the right direction in the marketplace for
sellers. We have seen a decrease in the units listed on
the market in 2014 year
end there were 1,195 single family units on the
market with only 1,134
single family units available at year end of 2015. We currently have more
sales pending at the end of
2015 with a total of 249
than year-end of 2014 a
total of 219, showing an
increase of 30 single family units than this same
time period last year. The
average single family residence sale price is also up
from an average of
$135,826 in 2014 to and
average of $140,673 at
year end of 2015. This
combination of factors allows for the perfect timing
to market single family
residences in our area.
Pam Looper is the
president of the Upper
Cumberland Association of Realtors (UCAR).
Ty Kernea | Herald-Citizen
Walter Stasiuk, owner of Tennessee Hearing Instrument Specialists, shows off one of the hearing aid devices in
his office. The board behind him shows how many hearing aids the Starkey Hearing foundation, which he is a
volunteer with, has supplied across the globe.
Stasiuk volunteers time and efforts
By LAURA MILITANA
HERALD-CITIZEN Staff
A
nyone who visits Tennessee
Hearing Instrument Specialists
can see the impact made throughout the world just by looking at the photos that line the lobby wall.
Ask Walter Stasiuk, owner of Tennessee
Hearing Instrument Specialists, about the
trips and he’ll tell you how it all began.
“It really began when I donated a kidney
to my daughter, which was in 2000,” he
said. “Then, I opened my own practice a
few weeks later and became affiliated with
Audibel electronics and saw what Bill
Austin, the founder of Starkey Hearing
Foundation, was doing with charitable
work. I saw a lot of opportunities with
that.”
Stasiuk, a Philadelphia native, has been
in the hearing aid field for 27 years. He
met his wife in Georgia and worked with
Beltone in Atlanta before settling in Tennessee.
He bought the Nashville Beltone franchise in 1990 and a little more than 10
years later, donated a kidney to his daughter. The rest is history, with him opening
Tennessee Hearing Instrument Specialists
a few weeks later.
“Becoming affiliated with Audibel gave
me opportunities to go on trips and help
people,” he said. “I’ve been as close as
east Tennessee, helping people in Appalachia, then I’ve gone as far as to the
Ukraine and Mexico.”
The trip to the Ukraine was the most
memorable for him, as that is where his
family is from.
The Starkey Hearing Foundation focuses
on developing strong partnerships, training and empowering local teams to help
the more than 360 million people worldwide, including 32 million children, who
struggle with disabling hearing loss, reach
Walter Stasiuk works with another volunteer fitting a hearing aid in Mexico
during a 2007 trip.
their full potential with the gift of hearing.
There are three phases of communitybased hearing healthcare.
The first is identifying and training local
programs teams comprised of partners,
clinicians and community-based hearing
healthcare coordinators and conduct community outreach to raise awareness of
hearing loss, educate communities on
hearing loss prevention and to identify potential hearing aid candidates. This phase
also deals with collecting important hearing healthcare information, provide primary ear care services and complete
hearing screenings for potential hearing
aid candidates and take ear impressions
and create custom earmolds for qualified
hearing aid candidates.
The second phase is going to the area in
need and fitting hearing aids and custom
earmolds on qualified hearing aid candi-
dates, counsel and train hearing aid recipients, caretakers and educators on the
proper use and care of hearing aids. This
phase also provides those recipients with
a supply of batteries and local AfterCare
contact information for access to followup services and provide continual education and training to local program team.
Phase three involves the AfterCare program, providing additional counseling,
batteries, repair and replacement of hearing aids and earmolds as needed, conduct
outreach to follow-up with recipients
within 60 days of the hearing aid fitting,
identify new hearing aid candidates for future phase I activities, collect important
hearing healthcare information from those
recipients to evaluate the impact, deliver
monthly services over the phone, at servSee gIfT, Page D4
State ECD kicks off broadband assessment
By LAURA MILITANA
HERALD-CITIZEN Staff
COOKEVILLE — Having access to broadband
internet is critical now and in the future with regards to economic development of Tennessee.
But first, the problems in getting access need to
be identified.
“Tennessee’s economic future is directly tied to
our broadband access,” Tennessee Department of
Economic and Community Development Commissioner Randy Boyd said. “Broadband access impacts our quality of life, educational opportunities,
healthcare and our businesses’ ability to compete.”
With that in mind, the ECD has launched a
statewide assessment of broadband access and
usage in Tennessee. It is an impartial survey of
broadband access, adoption and usage of Tennessee’s rural, suburban and urban communities.
“First, we have to define the problem and that involves three things,” he said. “One, work on the
defintion of broadband. Second, what is the penetration of broadband access across the state? And
last, we start estimating the cost.”
He noted that the department has looked at other
states and how those have addressed the problem.
“It’s critical now and in the future, especially with
regards to education,” he said. “Many students
need access to the internet at school. It’s also essential for entrepreneuers. It allows anyone to start
a business — and even access their business —
from anywhere in the country. And it’s also essential with regards to telehealth, something that’s in
its infancy, but will be taking off soon.”
The department determined the need for a
statewide assessment of broadband access and
usage during his initial set of listening tours across
the state in early 2015. Elected leaders, business
executives and economic development profession-
als in all nine TNECD regions told Boyd and department officials that a lack of broadband access
may hurt future economic development efforts in
rural Tennessee.
TNECD Assistant Commissioner for Rural Development Amy New said broadband access is crucial to driving workforce development and
furthering entrepreneurism in rural areas.
A survey is available for households or businesses/non-profits/governmental entities and consists of a speed test, what the person most uses the
See ECD, Page D2
1420 Neal Street
Cookeville TN
931-526-2191
Providing the best in coverage from homeowners and auto, to meeting all of your commercial business insurance needs, since 1946.
Chuck Sparks,
Agency Manager
D2 — HERALD-CITIZEN, Cookeville, Tenn. — www.herald-citizen.com — Sunday, January 31, 2016
BUSINESS
Real Estate Transfers
Note: Listed below are the transfers of real estate properties which occurred in Putnam
County on the dates indicated. This information
was obtained from open, public records maintained in the office of the Register of Deeds in
the Putnam County Courthouse. The number
following the entry is the civil district in which
the property is located.
Wednesday, Jan. 20
From Danny K. Roberts and Pamela E. Roberts
to Ghadir Radman, Stonebridge, lot #7, 1st;
From Rachel A. Gilliam Brown and Chadrick
Lewis Brown to Wesley P. Flatt III, The Villager,
1st.
Thursday, Jan. 21
From Master Builders LLC to Jason Pitts and Jodi
Pitts, Southern Hills Village, phase III, lot #8, 16th;
From Earl Wilcox, personal representative, James
Lewis Wilcox estate, to Earl Wilcox, 4th;
From Ryan Christopher Inman to Craig S. Terry
and Rebecca Barrett Terry, Meadows, lot #42, 1st;
From Rubin Lublin TN PLLC substitute trustee,
Jane H. Johnson and Ronnie Johnson to John R.
Ammons, 344 Vinson Ave., 1st;
From Steven D. Lewis and Nancy S. Lewis to
Christopher J. Morack and Sunshyne Morack, Lake
Valley, lots #69 and 70, 3rd;
From Adelheid E. McWilliams to Nathaniel L.
Mainord and Melissa Mainord, 7th;
From Olga N. Martin to Mario R. Bean and Lisa
K. Bean, 15th.
Friday, Jan. 22
From Bank of New York Mellon to Tyler Brown,
Lake Valley, lot #26, 3rd.
Monday, Jan. 25
From David Storm and Donna Kay Storm to
Robert Swann and Ashley Swann, Blackburn Hills
Estates, 7th;
From Donna M. Harris aka Donna M. Matson to
Howard A. Hunter and Joy Hunter, Bunker Hill
Park, lots #27 and 28, 2nd;
Quitclaim from Yvette Clark to Tim D. Clark,
Jerry Gaw subdivision, lot #1, 1st;
From J. Michael Patterson to Cookeville Eye
Group GP, Perimeter Place Properties LTD, phase
II, lot #4, 1st;
From John Jeffery Gabbard and Lisa C. Gabbard
to Dan Parks and Melissa O. Parks, Huntington
Woods, phase III, lot #97, 1st;
From Marlene Denise Massa to Shannon A. Reese
and Albert Reyes, Apple Valley Estates, lot #109,
1st.
Tuesday, Jan. 26
Quitclaim from James Chase McMillan and Natalie Bates McMillan to NJ 14 Partners AKA NJ
Fourteen Partners, Meadows, lot #39;
From Mark Keith Tyree, Thomasina Elise Tyree
and Rubin Lublin TN PLC to Quicken Loans Inc.,
4552 Windsong Dr., phase VI, lot #50, 7th;
From Vanderbilt Mortgage and Finance Inc. to J.
Jesus Lopez Fuentes, 20th;
From G. Gaylon Miller to Jason G. Miller, Apple
Valley Estates, lot #106, 1st;
From Georgia Evelyn Netherton, successor, Smith
Trust, to Paul E. Moore, 1303 Park Dr., lot #120,
1st;
From Montgomery G. Turner Sr. to Meadows
Family Real Estate Partnership, Copper Springs,
phase I, lot #2, 1st;
From Jerry M. Montgomery and Linda K. Montgomery to George Henry and Danita Henry, 1st;
From Jerri Pryor to Harold Terry Huddleston,
Pryor Division, 2nd;
From Kenneth Craig Pyle and Tashia Pyle to
Christopher R. Wilson, 125 West Commercial
Ave.;
From Mike Wells and Tommye Rene Wells to
Roger David Huseman and Diane Rae Huseman,
3rd;
From John Robert Bruzda and Anna L. Bruzda to
Wanda Phillips, White’s Pointe, lot #1, 6th;
Quitclaim from Mark Jared and Amy Jared to
Tony Christopher Landers, 2550 Industrial Dr. and
2450 Industrial Dr.
Wednesday, Jan. 27
From Jamie D. Winkler, trustee, Michael A. Davis
and June H. Davis to Farm Credit Mid-America,
Cumberland Cove, section #74, lot #18, 4th;
From Lucas Wade Gunter and Melissa Jean
Gunter to Paul R. Bybee and Judy F. Bybee, Forest
Oaks, lots #7 and 8, 1st;
From John Phillips and Vera Lee Hunter estate to
Paige Mills and Ralph Mills, Deberry Heights, section G, lot #4, 1st.
ECD: Broadband assessment
continues through March 15
From Page D1
internet for and other questions. It takes about 20
minutes to complete.
The ECD contracted with national consulting
firms Strategic Networks Group (SNG) and NEO
Fiber to come up with the questions.
In addition to the assessment, TNECD will partner with the telecommunications industry and other
stakeholders to identify access gaps and evaluate
options and costs to build out unservered and underserved areas of the state. TNECD will also offer
recommendations for operational and funding
models.
“We have to find a way to make sure every citizen
has an opportunity to have their voice heard by taking this survey,” Boyd said. “Anyone can go to the
closest library and get online and take it.”
Visit www.tn.gov/broadband to take the survey.
It will be available through March 15.
VECustomer Share donation
AP file
This file photo shows Google’s new self-driving car during a demonstration at the
Google campus in Mountain View, Calif.
Regulators get input — sort of
— on self-driving car rollout
By JUSTIN PRITCHARD
Associated Press
SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP)
— California regulators deciding how to permit the future
rollout of self-driving cars
have been told by consumer
advocates that their cautious
approach was right on, and by
companies developing the
technology that the current
course will delay deployment
of vehicles that promise huge
safety benefits.
The state’s Department of
Motor Vehicles heard the comments Thursday at a workshop
as it wrestles with how to keep
the public safe as the imperfect
technology matures — but not
regulate so heavily that the
agency stifles development of
the vehicles.
The agency sought suggestions of possible changes to a
draft of precedent-setting regulations it released last month.
Those regulations will govern
how Californians can get the
cars once companies move beyond their current testing of
prototypes.
Because California has been
a hotbed for the development
and regulation of the technology, what happens in the state
has ripple effects nationally.
What the DMV had hoped
would be a technical discussion Thursday about legal language instead drifted toward
broad statements about the
technology’s merits.
Most vocal were advocates
for the blind — a group that
has not been central to the regulatory debate. Several argued
the technology could change
their lives, and the agency
should not get in the way.
“Please don’t leave my family out in the waiting room,”
said Jessie Lorenz, who is
blind and relies on public transit to get her 4-year-old daughter to preschool. Lorenz would
prefer to use a self-driving car
for that — or even a “spontaneous road trip.”
She said she has taken a ride
in a self-driving car that
Google Inc. has been developing, “and it was awesome.”
DMV attorney Brian Soublet
said the agency appreciates the
potential benefits for disabled
people, but its focus has to be
on the safety of the entire motoring public.
Google wants California to
clear the road for the technology — and has expressed disappointment in the DMV’s
draft regulations, which say
self-driving cars must have a
steering wheel in case onboard
computers or sensors fail. A licensed driver would need to sit
in the driver’s seat, ready to
seize control.
“We need to be careful about
the assumption that having a
person behind the wheel” will
make driving safer, Chris
Urmson, the leader of
Google’s self-driving car project, told the agency.
Google has concluded that
human error is the biggest danger in driving, and the company wants to remove the
steering wheel and pedals from
cars of the future, giving people minimal ability to intervene.
Urmson said that if the draft
regulations are not changed,
Google’s car would not be
available in California. While
Google has been testing on
roads here for several years —
with trained safety drivers behind the wheel, just in case —
it might deploy cars without
steering wheels in Texas,
where regulators hailed the
technology when Google
began testing prototypes there
last summer.
California’s DMV is still
months away from finalizing
any regulations.
Under the draft framework,
an independent certifier would
need to verify a manufacturer’s assurances that its cars
are safe. Google and traditional automakers want manufacturer self-certification, the
standard for other cars.
Once a company receives
that verification, manufacturers would receive a permit for
three years.
Consumers could lease the
cars, but manufacturers would
be required to keep tabs on
how safely they are driving
and report that performance to
the state. Drivers would need
special,
manufacturer-provided training, and then get a
special certification on their licenses.
If a car breaks the law, the
driver would be responsible.
John Simpson of the nonprofit Consumer Watchdog
commended the DMV on
Thursday “for putting safety
first. I think you got it exactly
right” in the draft, he said.
Earlier this month, federal officials announced an aggressive plan to get the technology
to the public’s hands sooner
than later.
In written guidance, the National Highway Traffic Safety
Administration, projected that
“fully automated vehicles are
nearing the point at which
widespread deployment is feasible.”
It remains unclear just how
the bullish federal approach
will affect California’s regulatory process.
Neither Google nor traditional automakers have said
they think the cars are ready
yet, but at least a dozen companies are developing the technology and nearly as many
have permission to test in California. Google has suggested
a model could be ready for
limited use sooner than the
public realizes.
Several times during Thursday’s workshop, DMV officials urged commenters to
offer specific changes to the
draft regulations, sometimes in
reaction to comments that the
regulations fell short.
Speaker Curt Augustine of
the Alliance of Automobile
Manufacturers said his organization did not agree with the
DMV’s third-party certification requirement.
DMV attorney Soublet asked
for proposed fixes, invoking a
saying his father told him:
It only takes one wrecking
ball to demolish a house, but a
whole crew to build one.
The agency has been working
on regulations for testing and
now deployment for nearly
three years — and regulations
on deployment were supposed
to be final a year ago.
Survey: U.S. consumer confidence slips in January
Sharon Parrott, VECustomer share program board member, presents Charles Looper,
Monterey Civitan Club president, a check for $1,000.
WASHINGTON (AP) — American consumers
lost some confidence this month after the stock
market tumbled and the economy showed signs
of weakness, the University of Michigan said
Friday.
The university’s index of consumer sentiment
slipped to 92 in January from 92.6 last month. A
year ago, the index stood at 98.1.
Richard Curtin, chief economist for Michigan’s
surveys, blamed a drop in stocks that caused an
“an erosion of household wealth, as well as
weakened prospects for the national economy.”
The Dow Jones industrial average has dropped
more than 6.5 percent so far this year, largely on
fears that China’s slowing economy is dragging
down global growth.
And the U.S. government reported Friday that
the U.S. economy expanded at an anemic 0.7
percent annual pace from October through December.
Submission guidelines
The Herald-Citizen welcomes submissions from area businesses to be published in the Sunday Business section.
Below are the guidelines to use for
submissions.
• Benefit and fundraising events may have the information
placed in our daily community calendar free of charge.
- However, we can run a photo of the check presentation after
the event, provided it is for $200 or more.
Advertising may be purchased for additional coverage of the
event.
• Charitable events and fundraisers sponsored by non-profit
organizations will receive a one-time group photo of all participating sponsors to promote the event.
• Business briefs will be a maximum of 10 inches (250 words
max), with the H-C reserving the right to edit as necessary.
• New businesses will be listed in our “New Business Li-
censes” segment of the paper the first Sunday of the month
when the licenses are released.
- At various times, certain new businesses will be selected to
have a photo of their business also featured on the business
page.
- The list of licenses include the owner, name and location of
the business.
• Announcing a new location for a business will be handled
as advertising — unless the business has a new owner.
• Re-opening an already established
business under the same ownership will also be handled as advertising.
• Ribbon cutting photos for new businesses will be scheduled
through the Chamber of Commerce and are reserved for
Chamber members.
• Employee of the Month announcements and awards will be
handled as paid advertisements — with the exception of recog-
nition presented by governmental entities, schools, etc.
• Any new employee announcements will be handled as paid
advertisements.
• Honoring employees for number of years of employment
will be done in increments of five years and will be done with
group photos and not individual photos.
• Submissions to the H-C offering special prices or percent
off discounts for purchases with a percent of the proceeds
going to benefit a certain group will be handled as advertising.
• Certain submissions for awards received and changes in
staff and programming will be handled as advertising.
• Any in-store promotion winners will need to be handled as
advertising.
The Herald-Citizen has the right to reject or edit any
submission.
HERALD-CITIZEN, Cookeville, Tenn. — www.herald-citizen.com — Sunday, January 31, 2016 — D3
BUSINESS
Hold on
for now
D
ear Dave: My husband was laid off a
month ago from a job
making $80,000 a year. We
have no debt except our house
payment. We owe about
$82,000 on it, but it’s valued
at approximately $300,000.
We’ve also got an emergency
fund of
$30,000,
Dave
and I work
Says
part-time
making
about
$2,000 a
month
while he
collects
unemployment and
looks for
another
job.
Dave
Do you
Ramsey
think we
should sell
our home?
We’ve also got a boat that’s
worth about $18,000 we could
sell.
Sheila
Dear Sheila: The first thing I
want you to do is take a step
back and breathe. Yes, you
guys just hit a big bump in the
road. But the good news is
you’re in pretty good shape financially to handle things for
a while.
At this point, I’d strongly
recommend selling the boat
over selling the house. Boats
are a lot easier to replace than
nice homes, and the process
isn’t nearly as traumatic on the
family. You can also dip into
your emergency fund a little
bit, but for the next little while
you need to make sure you’re
living on a really tight, bare
bones budget. I’d love to see
you not have to touch the
emergency fund, because he’s
gone out and found at least a
part-time position while he’s
searching for something in his
field. I know that’s tough to
do once you’ve gotten used to
making $80,000, but there are
jobs out there that will help
you guys get through this.
As long as he’s being diligent in seeking a new job, and
you’re budgeting and watching what you spend together, I
think for now you should keep
the house. God bless you
both!
Dear Dave: Do you recommend having people keep their
W2 numbers as close to their
tax return numbers as possible, even if they might have to
pay at the end of the year or
have more taken out? Every
year I get a big tax return. But
after listening to you I began
to think that if I did a better
job of planning I would have
more money throughout the
year.
Charlie
Dear Charlie: I like your
thinking, and you’re absolutely right. That’s exactly
what I recommend people do
when it comes to their income
taxes. Of course, you don’t
want to have to pay out a big
chunk of cash. But a little
number crunching and planning ahead of time can help
you avoid those kinds of situations.
You really don’t want a big
refund, and here’s why. If you
get a fat tax refund every year,
all it means is you’ve loaned
money to the government interest-free for the entire year.
Then, at the end of the year
they gave it back to you. Some
people seem to think Santa
Claus has shown up when this
happens, and that’s completely
wrong. You’ve had too much
taken out of your check every
payday during the previous
year, and then you got it back.
Try to adjust your W2 so that
you are hitting within $100 or
so at the end of the year. Then
you’ll have more of your own
money in your own pocket
throughout the entire year!
Dave Ramsey is a personal money management
expert, a national radio
personality and author of
The Total Money
Makeover. For more financial advice, plus special
offers to readers, visit
www.davesays.org.
Fiat Chrysler bets on SUV craze, sees Jeep sales soaring
By DEE-ANN DURBIN
Associated Press Writer
DETROIT (AP) — Fiat Chrysler says
the worldwide SUV craze is here to
stay, and it’s leaning heavily on the Jeep
brand to improve its fortunes.
The Italian-American carmaker predicts Jeep sales will nearly double to 2
million worldwide by 2018, fueled by
low gas prices and new models. To keep
up, Fiat Chrysler plans to cut production
of small cars in the U.S. so it can build
more Jeeps.
The world’s seventh-largest carmaker
raised its Jeep sales targets Wednesday
after releasing disappointing full-year
earnings for 2015.
Fiat Chrysler reported 2015 net profit
of 377 million euros ($409 million),
down from 632 million euros a year earlier and lagging analyst expectations.
Fourth-quarter net profit fell 40 percent
to 251 million euros.
Jeep was the bright spot. Fiat Chrysler
sold 1.3 million Jeeps worldwide in
2015, up 21 percent from the previous
year. Without Jeep, Fiat Chrysler’s sales
were lackluster. The company sold 4.6
million vehicles overall, up slightly
from 2014.
North American revenue jumped 33
percent to 70 billion euros ($76 billion).
Jeep sales rose 25 percent in the U.S.,
where Fiat Chrysler says low gas prices
are now a “permanent” fixture and more
customers are gravitating to SUVs and
trucks.
Fiat Chrysler CEO Sergio Marchionne
said the company wants to find a partner
to build small cars like the Dodge Dart
AP photo
In this 2015 file photo, salesperson Andrew Montalvo, left, talks to a
customer checking out the interior of a 2015 Grand Cherokee Limited
in Doral, Fla.
and Chrysler 200 so it can make more
Jeeps at its U.S. plants. Marchionne said
Jeep plants are currently running at a
pace that is “unsustainable.”
Marchionne didn’t say which U.S.
plants could start making more Jeeps.
But last year’s contract with the United
Auto Workers union promised new vehicles for the Belvidere, Illinois, and
Sterling Heights, Michigan, plants that
now make the Dart and 200. The
Belvidere plant is shut down this week
because of slow demand, while the Ster-
ling Heights plant is scheduled to close
for six weeks next month.
“Whatever we put in place will deal
with demand and unmet demand as we
see it today,” Marchionne said.
Europeans also bought a record number of Jeeps last year, helping Fiat
Chrysler’s European revenue rise 13
percent to 20 billion euros ($22 billion).
But Fiat Chrysler’s revenue slumped
by 25 percent in Latin America, hurt by
economic weakness in Brazil and Argentina. Revenue also fell 22 percent in
Asia, pressured by price competition
from Chinese automakers and an interruption in shipments after the Tianjin
port explosion.
“Brazil came out of left field and left
most of us staring at uncertain market
conditions,” Marchionne said in a conference call with analysts. “It’s very difficult to call the bottom of this market.”
A slowdown in demand for imported
cars in China was also unexpected,
Marchionne said. As a result, the company is refocusing its plans for Alfa
Romeo’s growth on North America and
Europe and away from China. The rollout of new Alfa vehicles will slow, but
the company will stick to its plan of offering seven new models, including two
utility vehicles, by 2020.
Full-year net revenue for Fiat Chrysler
was 113 billion euros ($123 billion), up
18 percent, and slightly beating analyst
forecasts of 112 billion euros as compiled by information company FactSet.
Fiat Chrysler said it expects net revenue of 110 billion euros and a net profit
of 1.9 billion euros in 2016.
In 2014, Fiat Chrysler set a target of
selling 7 million vehicles per year by
2018. On Wednesday, Marchionne
shifted away from that volume target
and said the focus should instead be on
hitting financial targets like revenue and
net profit, which were revised upwards.
The 2015 results included Ferrari,
which was spun off from its mass-market parent at the start of this year. Ferrari
net profit dropped 4 percent last year.
Fiat Chrysler’s shares fell 2 percent to
close at $7.45 on the New York Stock
Exchange.
Tips on how to avoid tax return preparer fraud
NASHVILLE — The Tennessee Department of Commerce & Insurance’s
(TDCI) Division of Consumer Affairs
is offering consumers tips to avoid tax
return preparer fraud. Although Tax
Day isn’t until April 18th, the Division
encourages you to file early and vet
your tax preparer to avoid fraud.
“If you decide to have a tax return preparer prepare and file your income tax
return, it is important to choose that
person carefully,” TDCI Deputy Commissioner Bill Giannini said. “Finding
a qualified professional takes a little
planning and some research, but remember, you are responsible for everything on your return, even when
someone else prepares it.”
Tax return preparer fraud or misconduct can happen to anyone, even if you
hire a preparer who you believe is professional and honest. For example, a
preparer might change your tax return
after you’ve approved and signed it, altering income or credits to obtain a bigger refund and then keeping some or all
of it.
In some cases, the preparer might
steal your whole refund by changing di-
rect deposit information. Another common fraud situation can occur when the
preparer files a return without your authorization — he or she might have
your information from a prior year, and
use that information to file a return for
the current year. Or perhaps you met
with a preparer and then chose not to
hire that person, but the preparer filed
a return using your information anyway.
The Division of Consumer Affairs
urges Tennesseans to do research before trusting anyone with important tax
information:
Check the preparer’s qualifications
Make sure the preparer has a PTIN
(Preparer Tax Identification Number)
— this is required for all professional
preparers.
Find out if the preparer is affiliated
with any professional associations.
Ask the preparer about his or her education and training — what background
does that person have that qualifies him
or her to prepare your return?
Check the preparer’s history
Check with the Better Business Bureau in your area to see if the preparer
has had complaints filed about him or
her.
Check with professional associations
to see if the preparer has had any disciplinary actions, and for the status of the
preparer’s license:
For Certified Public Accountants
(CPAs): If the preparer is a CPA, verify
his or her license with the Tennessee
Board
of
Accountancy
at
www.verify.tn.gov. For more information about the Tennessee Board of Accountancy, visit www.tn.gov/regboards
or call 888-453-6150.
For attorneys: Verify an attorney is licensed to practice law in Tennessee by
visiting the Board of Professional Responsibility’s website directory at
www.tbpr.org.
For Enrolled Agents: Verify the status
of an enrolled agent by contacting the
IRS Office of Enrollment at 855-4725540 or [email protected]
Ask about charges and fees
Avoid preparers who base their fee on
the amount of your refund.
Try to obtain a clear estimate, preferably in writing, for the preparation and
filing services.
Find out what services the preparer
offers
Does the preparer offer electronic filing?
Will the preparer be available after
April 15 if you have questions or problems? Consider whether the preparer
will be around to answer questions
about your return months or years after
it is filed.
Ask around
Do you know anyone who has used
this preparer? Were they satisfied with
the service? If not, why not?
Protect yourself
Always get a complete copy of your
tax return. Verify that the preparer
signed it and included a PTIN.
Avoid any preparer who asks you to
sign a blank return or requires the refund to be direct-deposited to a bank
account under the preparer’s control.
Note: Be careful when a preparer
claims he or she can get you a larger refund than other preparers. Remember,
even if your preparer handles everything involved in completing your tax
return, you are still responsible for its
accuracy.
AP sources: Panel proposes ban on air shipments of batteries
By JOAN LOWY
Associated Press
WASHINGTON (AP) — A U.N. panel
has recommended that cargo shipments
of rechargeable lithium batteries be
banned from passenger airliners because the batteries can create fires capable of destroying planes, said aviation
officials familiar with the decision.
The International Civilian Aviation Organization’s air navigation commission,
the agency’s highest technical body,
also proposed in a closed-door meeting
Wednesday that the ban be lifted if new
packaging can be developed that provides an acceptable level of safety.
Final approval from the ICAO toplevel council is still needed. The council
is scheduled to take up the matter in late
February.
The officials spoke on condition that
they not be named because they weren’t
authorized to speak publicly.
Lithium-ion batteries are used to
power everything from cellphones and
laptops to hybrid and all-electric cars.
About 5.4 billion lithium-ion cells were
manufactured worldwide in 2014. A
battery is made up of two or more cells.
A majority are transported on cargo
ships, but about 30 percent are shipped
by air.
Federal Aviation Administration tests
show a single damaged or defective battery can experience uncontrolled temperature increases that can spread
throughout a shipment. It’s not unusual
for tens of thousands batteries to be
shipped in a single cargo container.
In FAA tests, the overheating batteries
have released explosive gases that,
when ignited, have blown the doors off
cargo containers and sent boxes of batteries hurtling through the air before becoming engulfed in flames.
Engineers from FAA’s technical center
AP file
This file frame grab from video provided by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) shows a test at the
FAAs technical center in Atlantic City, N.J., last April, where a cargo container was packed with 5,000
rechargeable lithium-ion batteries. A U.N. aviation panel is recommending a ban on shipping rechargeable
batteries as cargo on passenger airliners because the batteries can create fires capable of destroying
planes.
told a public meeting last year that the
explosions are forceful enough to knock
the interior panels off cargo compartment walls. That would allow halon, the
fire suppression agent used in airliners,
to escape, leaving nothing to prevent
fires from spreading unchecked.
Safety experts believe at least three
cargo planes have been destroyed by
lithium battery fires since 2006. Four pilots died in those accidents.
The proposed ban wouldn’t apply to
cargo planes despite efforts by the International Federation of Air Line Pilot Associations to include cargo operations.
George Kerchner, a rechargeable bat-
tery industry official, said the commission ignored other possible solutions
short of a ban to make shipments safer
like more stringent packaging, limiting
the batteries’ state of charge, and new
labeling requirements.
A ban could hinder “the ability of medical device manufacturers to ship lifesaving medical device batteries,” said
Kerchner, executive director of PRBA
— The Rechargeable Battery Association.
Last March, an organization that represents aircraft manufacturers — including the world’s two largest, Boeing
and Airbus — told ICAO that airliners
aren’t designed to withstand lithium
battery fires and that continuing to accept battery shipments is “an unacceptable risk.”
Six months later the U.S. decided to
back a ban. But the battery industry,
shippers and the International Air Transport Association, a global airline trade
group, have strongly resisted. They say
the risk is primarily due to shady manufacturers, mostly in China, that evade
packaging and handling regulations.
The Transportation Department is
barred from imposing its own ban under
a 2012 law Congress passed at the behest of industry.
D4 — HERALD-CITIZEN, Cookeville, Tenn. — www.herald-citizen.com — Sunday, January 31, 2016
BUSINESS
More than one million users
budget with EveryDollar
Walter Stasiuk, right, fits a patient in the Ukraine with a hearing aid during a trip in 2015.
GIFT: Local hearing aid business owner
volunteers time to give the gift of hearing
From Page D1
ice centers and schools and provide continual education, monitoring and evaluation for the
local program team.
“There are countless people
who have been helped through
this program,” Stasiuk said.
“I’m happy to have been a part
of just a few.”
In 2010, Starkey Hearing
Foundation joined the Clinton
Global Initiative and made a
commitment to provide 100,000
hearing aids annually, for a total
of one million this decade.
This gift of hearing is made
possible through donation of
used hearing aids through the recycling program. Components
are removed from custom and
standard hearing aids for use in
the rebuilding process, the instrument is rebuilt back to specification, cleaned and buffed,
have ear hooks installed, tested,
inspected, listened to and graded
by power level, packaged and
made ready for missions and
then given to people in need.
Stasiuk’s office is one place to
donate used hearing aids.
“Anyone who purchases hearing aids also donate to the Foundation,” Stasiuk said. “A portion
of every dollar from that purchase goes to the Foundation.”
He is also a part of the Hear
Now program, which helps people pay for hearing aids based on
their income.
Free hearing tests are also
available at his office, located in
the Infinity Building at 1080
Neal St. in Cookeville.
Call 931-520-7070 for more information.
After tough holiday season,
small retailers are strategizing
By JOYCE M. ROSENBERG
AP Business Writer
NEW YORK (AP) — A disappointing holiday
shopping season has small and independent retailers thinking about how to get customers interested
in shopping in 2016.
After holiday sales fell 25 percent compared to a
year earlier at Standout Style Boutique, a women’s
clothing store in Chicago, owner Tamika Maria
Price is making plans for a brighter year.
To double her Facebook advertising to establish
more of an emotional connection with shoppers.
She’s also planning events like networking sessions
and style and makeup lessons at the store that she
hopes will turn attendees into long-term customers.
Price felt she needed to do more than simply slash
prices because she more than doubled her discounts
on some items during the holiday season, more
than she expected. That contributed to her drop in
revenue.
“That tears a whole in your bottom line when
you’re already reasonably priced,” she says.
January is the time for retailers to evaluate every
aspect of their business and start making changes
to improve sales, says Bob Phibbs, CEO of The Retail Doctor, a consulting company based in Coxsackie, New York. The type of merchandise they
sell, the appearance of their stores, their marketing
programs and staff training should all be re-examined, he says.
Strategizing is particularly important after a tough
holiday season. Sales fell short of expectations
across the retail industry; the National Retail Federation estimated sales rose 3 percent to about $626
billion, below the trade group’s 3.7 percent forecast. Unusually warm weather cut into demand for
merchandise like sweaters and coats, but revenue
was also hurt by stores’ need to discount to compete with other retailers.
A slow holiday season can be particularly difficult
for small and independent retailers who don’t have
the sales volume and financial resources to compete with the huge discounts offered by big national
chains. Small retailers’ profit margins tend to be
thinner than the big players, giving them less wiggle room on discounts.
Business has been especially disappointing for retailers in parts of the country where the economy
is weaker. The plunging price of oil has led to the
layoffs of thousands of energy workers in states
like Texas and North Dakota. Retailer Cynthia Sutton-Stolle felt the impact during the holidays, when
customers shopped more conservatively at her
home decor and gift shop, The Silver Barn, in
Columbus, Texas.
“They will still come in and buy, but maybe not
as often or buy a smaller piece,” Sutton-Stolle says.
She estimates her fourth-quarter revenue was down
10 percent from a year earlier.
To boost her sales this year, Sutton-Stolle plans to
focus more on the gift side of her business, which
has been more lucrative than home decor. She also
plans to create an online store.
“It will give us a chance to not be so regionally
connected and be a bit more national in scope,” she
says.
Some retailers figured out their strategy during
the season when sales weren’t as strong as expected. Although Rod Brown had events like bourbon tastings in his men’s clothing store, The Shirt
Box, he had to do much more reaching-out as the
season progressed to get shoppers to come in.
After mailing a discount coupon to customers,
Brown and his four staffers called hundreds of people to remind them to take advantage of the promotion for $25 off a $100 purchase. Many did
come in, and The Shirt Box’s sales for the season
ultimately turned out as Brown expected.
“This was not a year of setting records, but maintaining where we were,” says Brown, whose store
is located in Farmington Hills, Michigan, outside
of Detroit.
Customers appreciated the personal contact with
Brown and his staff, who know their best customers’ tastes and sizes. So he plans to continue
staying in close contact with them this year.
“We’ve learned that it’s the least costly and most
effective way to be in touch with customers,”
Brown says.
GE Aviation cutting more 7 percent
of engineering workforce
EVENDALE, Ohio (AP) —
GE Aviation is cutting 238 engineering jobs in southwestern
Ohio and 69 at other U.S. sites
as it trims more than 7 percent
of its engineering workforce.
A spokesman for the General
Electric Co. unit based in the
Cincinnati suburb of Evendale
said Thursday that the cuts are
not due to any decline in business.
No jobs will be affected in the
Dayton-area, but sites in West
Chester Township will be affected by reductions, said
spokesman Rick Kennedy.
Kennedy said the cuts are necessary as the company’s new jet
engines move from development and testing to production.
He said the company is unable
to maintain its current level of
more than 4,300 engineers in
the United States.
Affected engineers will receive severance benefits and
continue getting wages and
medical coverage for an amount
of time based on how long
they’ve worked at the company,
he said.
Notifications will begin at the
end of January.
GE Aviation still will employ
more than 3,000 engineers in
the area after the cuts and has
offered voluntary early retirement to several hundred eligible
engineers, Kennedy said.
“Significant effort has been
made to move as many engineers as possible to other positions at GE Aviation and other
GE businesses,” he said.
According to the company,
several new engine programs
are in their early development
cycle, including advanced military programs.
Email your business news to
[email protected]
NASHVILLE — Ramsey Solutions’ EveryDollar has surpassed 1 million users just 10 months
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Why stay in a bad job? Reasons
can be practical or emotional
By JOYCE M. ROSENBERG
AP Business Writer
NEW YORK (AP) — When workers say they
hate their jobs or their bosses are abusive, people
wonder: Why don’t you quit?
It can happen at any company. Staffers may feel
that their atmosphere is unpleasant or contentious. But they may not leave, and instead
spend years being unhappy.
The reasons for staying include practical considerations like a good paycheck and benefits and
experience that will look good on a resume. But
often there are emotional reasons that stop employees from mustering the energy to look for a
new job.
“If you’re depressed and down in general, and
you’re in a very negative place, it’s very hard to
launch a job search,” says Belinda Plutz, owner
of Career Mentors, a consultancy based in New
York.
Many people cling to a bad situation out of fear
that if they get a new job, it might not work out
— much like the old saying, “better the devil you
know than the devil you don’t know,” Plutz says.
But she finds that people who have been laid off
in the past often find it easier to make a move,
believing they’ll again land on their feet.
There may also be deep-seated psychological
factors at work when an unhappy worker stays
put.
“There’s a bad feeling that may not be conscious, but it’s there: ’I don’t deserve better,’”
says Nancy Kulish, a psychoanalyst and author
of psychological books who practices in Birmingham, Michigan.
In some cases, employees have had abusive or
selfish parents who gave their children the unconscious belief that they must accept whatever
poor treatment they receive, Kulish says.
“I’m worthless, and I’m lucky to be here. That’s
what they’re told,” Kulish says. The adult worker
may not understand this dynamic feeds justifications for not seeking something better.
Parents’ attitudes about working may also influence an unhappy employee to stay. Katie McDonald despised her job at a telecommunications
company, where the corporate atmosphere limited her autonomy and stifled her creativity. Her
parents were very conservative about staying in
a job, and she believes that helped discouraged
her from leaving.
“I was locked in this ridiculous notion of, I have
a ’good’ job, and it would be foolish to leave and
give up this security,” says McDonald, who has
small businesses including a corporate writing
company based in Toronto.
Sometimes the practical reasons and emotional
ones pile up. Three months into her public relations job at a Boston financial services company,
Sara DiVello was miserable. Her boss was abusive, insulting and undermined DiVello, keeping
her out of important meetings. DiVello felt she
couldn’t leave; she hoped for a year-end bonus
and also didn’t want a prospective employer to
think she was unreliable for quitting so soon.
“They’re afraid you’re going to do it to them
and they won’t hire you,” she says.
The atmosphere didn’t improve under a different manager.
“I kept thinking, ’I can solve this. I can make it
work,’” says DiVello. After three years, she had
had enough, realized she needed to feel good
about herself and her work, and she quit. She
now teaches yoga.
For some people, a bad work environment
comes as an unpleasant surprise soon after
they’re hired, while for others, the bad times start
later, with a new boss or reorganization. But
some people go to work for companies understanding that while they’ll give a big paycheck,
they face long hours and a difficult atmosphere,
says Roy Cohen, a career counselor based in
New York.
He cited hedge funds and law firms as examples.
“In certain industries, there will be abusive behavior In order to benefit from some of the
riches, you’ve got to put up with it,” Cohen says.
The status of working at a high-profile company
can also make some people stay even when they
feel oppressed. But the cachet can disappear if
bosses are uncaring or hostile when a staffer has
a family or health problem, Cohen says.
“None of us ever expects something horrible to
happen, but it’s inevitable it will happen in our
lives in some way, and a company doesn’t necessarily respect that,” he says.
Japan economy minister
quits over graft allegations
By ELAINE
KURTENBACH
AP Business Writer
TOKYO (AP) — Japan’s economy minister resigned Thursday as he fended off corruption allegations, in a setback for Prime Minister Shinzo
Abe’s effort to rev up growth in the world’s thirdlargest economy.
Akira Amari choked back tears as he announced
his resignation in a televised news conference. He
denied wrongdoing but apologized for causing
“concern and trouble” and for undermining public
trust in the government with a “very embarrassing
situation.”
The corruption scandal surfaced last week after
the magazine Weekly Bunshun reported that Amari
and his aides accepted at least 12 million yen
($103,000) in cash and hospitality from the unnamed construction company.
As economy and fiscal minister since late 2012,
Amari has been one of the most trusted members
of Abe’s Cabinet. He also served as Japan’s top negotiator for the 12-nation Trans-Pacific Partnership
trade pact. Amari, 66, is a career politician and son
of a lawmaker who was first elected in 1983.
With Amari’s departure, Abe has lost a key ally
as he is gearing up for an upper house election in
the summer.
Political donations and their handling are peren-
nial weak spots for Japanese lawmakers. The allegations against Amari have become fodder for attacks by Communist Party, Democratic Party of
Japan and other members of the opposition, who
otherwise are unable to effectively challenge the
ruling Liberal Democrats’ overwhelming majorities in the lower and upper legislatures.
During questioning in parliament, Amari said he
did not recall clearly the details of meetings in his
office with the construction company.
Shukan Bunshun said that on one occasion, a construction company employee met with Amari in his
office in November 2013, handing him an envelope
containing 500,000 yen in cash and an expensive
Japanese sweet called “yokan.”
Asked about the gift, Amari said Thursday that he
wasn’t sure what was inside the bag, but that it was
“very heavy.”
His resignation comes amid mounting signs
Japan’s economic recovery is faltering, raising
pressure on its central bank to inject still more cash
into the economy on top of its already massive
monetary stimulus.
Data released Thursday showed weak retail sales
in December. Other major monthly data are due for
release Friday.
Abe apologized over the scandal and said Amari’s
resignation was “very regrettable.” He said
Nobuteru Ishihara, a former environment minister,
would take on Amari’s posts.
Nissan to recall Altimas for third
time to fix hood latches
DETROIT (AP) — Nissan is recalling nearly 930,000 Altima
midsize cars worldwide — some for a third time — to fix a latch
problem that could let the hood fly open while the cars are moving.
The new recall covers cars from the 2013 to 2015 model years
including 846,000 in the U.S. that were made at factories in
Smyrna, Tennessee, and Canton, Mississippi.
Tired of renting your own
property? Let us do it for you!
Over 20 years experience.
Call Devon or Michelle at Falcon
Realty Property Management.
931-528-2158
HERALD-CITIZEN, Cookeville, Tenn. — www.herald-citizen.com — Sunday, January 31, 2016 — E1
We’re here to provide help whether you need workers or need to work....
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Look in today’s classified under the following headings • 215 Employment • 241 Healthcare Employment
• 205 Jobs Wanted • 277 Sales Employment
Phone 931-526-9715
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Legals
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Classified Index
Legals
Find It Fast In H-C Classified
BID NOTICE #16012601
NOTICE
The City of Cookeville Electric
Department will receive sealed
bids until FEBRUARY 16, 2016
@ 2:00PM CST on the following:
ITEM 1.
QUANTITY: 2
DESCRIPTION
STATIONARY LEAD ACID BATTERY SYSTEM
SPECIFICATION #: 20160126
Delivery dates must be supplied
and will be evaluated as part of
the bid.
Specifications may be obtained
at the office of the City of
Cookeville Electric Dept. Service Center, 55 W Davis Rd.
The City Council reserves the
right to reject any or all bids and
hereby declares that all bids not
meeting or exceeding specifications will be rejected.
Joseph A. Peek, Director
Cookeville Electric Department
1/31
The Town of Monterey will be
accepting sealed bids for Janitorial services until 2:00 p.m. on
Monday, February 8, 2016 at
which time bids will be opened.
Specs can be picked up at
Monterey City Hall, 302 E Commercial Ave. between the hours
of 7:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
Monday – Friday or by calling
931-839-3770. All bids need to
be dropped off or mailed to
Monterey City Hall, 302 E Commercial Avenue, Monterey, TN
38574 and must be marked
“Janitorial Sealed Bids”. The
Town of Monterey reserves the
right to reject any and/or all bids.
1/27, 28, 29, 31 2/1, 5, 7
ERIC NICHOLS
The State of Tennessee, Department of Children’s Services, has
filed a Petition for Termination of
Parental Rights as to Henry Elliott Barnwell and William Dre’Andrious Barnwell. It appears that
ordinary process of law cannot
be served upon you because
your whereabouts are unknown.
You are hereby ORDERED to
serve upon Jill Marsee, Attorney
for the Tennessee Department
of Children Services, 600
Hearthwood Court, Cookeville,
Tennessee 38506, (931) 6463010, an Answer to the Petition
for Termination of Parental
Rights filed by the Tennessee
Department of Children Services, within five (5) days of the
last day of publication of this notice, and pursuant to Rule
39(e)(1) of the Tenn. R. Juv. P.
you must also appear in the Juvenile Court of Cumberland
County, Tennessee at Crossville, Tennessee on the 23rd day
of March, 2016, at 8:30 a.m., for
the Hearing on the Petition for
Termination of Parental Rights
by the State of Tennessee, Department of Children’s Services
If you fail to do so, a default
judgment will be taken against
you pursuant to Tenn. Code
Ann. § 36-1-117(n) and Rule 55
of the Tenn. R. of Civ. P. for the
relief demanded in the Petition.
You may view and obtain a copy
of the Petition and any other
subsequently filed legal documents at the Juvenile Court
Clerk’s Office, Crossville, Tennessee.
1/17, 24, 31, 2/7
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931-526-9715
THE FOLLOWING
ORDINANCES PASSED ON
SECOND AND FINAL
READING 1-21-16:
1650 Bilbrey Park Dr.
ORDINANCE #O15-12-33 amending the zoning code pertaining to the location of wireless communication towers and
antenna arrays located within
the property boundaries of a legal nonconforming auto salvage
yard in the CL (Local
Commercial) and RM8 (MultiFamily Residential)
Districts.
ORDINANCE #O15-12-35 rezoning a portion of properties
located on Lone Oak Drive and
identified as Parcels 12.00,
12.01 & 13.00 on Tax Map 66A,
Group A from RS10 (SingleFamily Residential) to CG (General Commercial).
_________________
Cathy McClain, CMC
City Clerk
FOR SALE
By Owner
1/31
3 bedroom, 2 bath, brick Ranch House
with one car garage.
Cookeville office opened in 1987
by Arnold E. Lefkovitz
ALL TYPES OF
Nicely decorated with beautiful colors.
Hardwood floors, granite countertops
and glass door kitchen cabinets. Covered
back porch, fenced back yard,
outbuilding with attached shed.
BANKRUPTCIES
Chapter 7 Chapter 11 Chapter 12 Chapter 13
•
•
•
More than 35 years of experience filing
tens of thousands of bankruptcies.
• STOP Garnishments • STOP Foreclosures
• STOP Repossessions • STOP Debt Harassment
ADOPTIONS
DIVORCE
CHILD CUSTODY
WILLS & PROBATE
$149,900
00
SHOWN BY APPOINTMENT ONLY
312-A East Broad St., Cookeville
Serving Cookeville & the Entire Upper Cumberland Area
528-5297
www.lefkovitz.com
Code
535
720
102
053
420
104
103
435
425
530
305
310
055
010
123
210
105
432
740
820
108
110
112
215
615
750
835
315
100
540
630
515
113
035
610
241
114
855
825
725
015
815
325
330
205
001
605
050
840
710
510
505
735
730
845
320
410
525
040
830
140
120
030
121
545
122
745
005
850
810
805
415
125
715
277
290
127
025
020
620
625
405
130
550
283
430
727
520
705
135
931-644-1182 before 10:00 P.M.
We are a debt relief agency. We help people file for relief.
© 2014 Lefkovitz & Lefkovitz
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TO PLACE YOUR AD CALL
526-9715
Herald-Citizen
We’ve Got It All
1300 Neal Street
Cookeville, Tennessee
OPEN HOUSES SUNDAY JANUARY 31
JJULIO
U LIO UUNZUETA
NZU ETA
AMY
AMY LEE
LE E
9979-0141
79 - 0 141
528-1573
1578 BRADSHAW BLVD
UPSCALE HOME
Over 4000 sq. ft., full brick home, offers 3BR/
4BA, three car garage, fenced in yard, walk in
closets in every bedroom, SS appliances, 12’
ceilings, hardwood and tile floors, seperate
living room area and large bonus room on
2nd floor. $435,000 FRC 173519
DIRECTIONS: East on Spring St., R on Hey
111, L on Old Sparta Rd., L on Bob Bullock
Rd., R on Hickory Flatts, R on Bradshaw
Blvd., Home on right.
12:00 - 2:00 PM
SCOTT
SCOT T W
EAVE R
WEAVER
8881-6717
81- 6 717
528-1573
BBRANDY
R AN DY DDILLON
I LLON
2284-1228
8 4 - 12 2 8
DELORES
DE LOR ES FORD
F OR D
2260-6223
6 0 - 6 223
1989 BEAR CREEK ROAD
BRAND NEW CONSTRUCTION
located in NE Putnam County! 3BR/2BA, 2
car garage, hardie siding, brick, located in the
Highlands at Bearcreek Subd., Must see!
$209,900 FRC 172482
2180 BEAR CREEK ROAD
BEAUTIFUL HOME
on 1.43 acres, 3BR/2BA with almost 1700 sq.
ft. Gorgeous hardwood floors with a great
floor plan. Won’t last long. $174,900 FRC
173791
1039 RIVERBEND
3B/2A BRICK RANCH
with hardwood floors, great room overlooks
large fenced yard, fireplace, seperate formal
dining room, 2 car garage. $229,900 FRC
172053
DIRECTIONS: North on Washington, R on
Paran, R on Bear Creek, R on Bear Creek
Point, House on right.
DIRECTIONS: North on Washington, R on
Paran, R on Bear Creek, R on Bear Creek
Point, House on right.
DIRECTIONS: North on Wasnington, R on
Bear Creek, L on Bear Creek Roint, R on
Bear Creek Circle, L on Bear Creek Circle,
Home on right.
DIRECTIONS: East on Spring, R on 111, L
on Old Sparta, L on Riverbend, House on
left.
1:00 - 3:00 PM
1:00 - 3:00 PM
1:00 - 3:00 PM
1:00 - 3:00 PM
NEW LISTING
NEW LISTING
2252-9141
5 2 - 9141
528-1573
528-1573
1985 BEAR CREEK ROAD
BRAND NEW CONSTRUCTION
located in NE Putnam County! 3BR/2BA, 2
car garage, hardie siding, brick, located in the
Highlands at Bearcreek Subd., Must see!
$209,900 FRC 172481
NEW LISTING
LEE
LE E LEHMAN
LE H MAN
NEW LISTING
WAYNE
WAYN E RRUSSELL
USSE LL
2260-3743
6 0 - 3 74 3
528-1573
528-1573
1440 THOMAS CIRCLE
FULL BRICK ONE LEVEL HOME
Many updates, new hardwood floors, 3BR/
2BA and 2,260 sq. ft., formal dining room,
formal living room, large family room, large
bonus room too! 3 car garage attached, large
private lot in the city limits of Cookeville!
$179,900 FRC 169112
234 EAST 8TH STREET
WALK TO TTU!
Craftsman, new construction, Cookeville City.
Just a short distance from the square. Bonus
room and office add to the style of this home.
Spacious kitchen, custom cabinets w/granite
counter tops, island eating and SS
appliances. Beautiful hardwood, tile showers,
double vanity & jet tub. $337,900 FRC 170121
DIRECTIONS: East on Spring, R on Old Ky.,
L on Maple, R on Hillwood, L on Thomas,
House on right with sign.
DIRECTIONS: North on Washington, L on
8th Street, Home on right.
1:00 - 3:00 PM
1:00 - 3:00 PM
NEW LISTING
NEW LISTING
2239-3130
3 9 - 3 13 0
528-1573
564 OLD QUALLS ROAD
GREAT LOCATION NE PUTNAM
and walking distance to Algood School.
Home comes with storage building and nice
large level lot you can enojy from the back
deck while watching the horses next door.
Eat in kitchen w/bay window, FDR and over
sized family room, 2 master BR’s or a 2nd
large BR for a teenager. Great fmaily home
with lots of possibilities. $187,400 FRC 172441
1432 TURNBERRY
$374,900 FRC#173799
www.FirstRealty.net
1650 TURNBERRY
$624,900 FRC# 173796
www.FirstRealty.net
554 W CHARLENE
$41,800 FRC# 173788
www.FirstRealty.net
846 JAMES STREET
$176,200 FRC# 173786
www.FirstRealty.net
KELLY DAVIS 644-0370
KELLY DAVIS 644-0370
JANICE K MOORES 260-2605
JANICE K MOORES 260-2605
NEW LISTING
PRICE CHANGE
PRICE CHANGE
1597 DUNCANS CHAPEL ROAD
$189,900 FRC# 173814
www.FirstRealty.net
CRYSTAL ODOM 261-9652
CHAD & AMY CROUCH 979-1191
22 AC 2063 BROWNTOWN ROAD
$132,000 FRC# 173772
www.FirstRealty.net
CHAD & AMY CROUCH 979-1191
CRYSTAL ODOM 261-9652
PRICE CHANGE
DIRECTIONS: East on Broad, L on Old
Qualls, Home on left.
2.18 AC 3234 BENNETT ROAD
$239,000 FRC# 173761
www.FirstRealty.net
1982 RICKMAN MONTEREY HWY
$149,900 FRC# 172420
www.FirstRealty.net
4539 EWING DRIVE
$133,500 FRC# 171239
www.FirstRealty.net
207 ESSEX COURT
$19,900 FRC# 171506
www.FirstRealty.net
2 AC 294 TELEPHONE LANE
$47,000 FRC# 173389
www.FirstRealty.net
89 AC 213 OLD SPIVEY LANE
$249,900 FRC# 173643
www.FirstRealty.net
1:00 - 3:00 PM
KELLY DAVIS 644-0370
DELORES FORD 260-6223
JIM MIX 644-1468
KATHY DUNN 265-4575
KATHY DUNN 265-4575
WANDA MAYNORD 260-9772
2AC 2700 OLD WALTON ROAD
$299,500 FRC# 173179
www.FirstRealty.net
3489 PHILLIPS CEMETERY ROAD
$119,900 FRC# 173738
www.FirstRealty.net
1.15 AC 496 S PLANTATION DRIVE
$439,900 FRC# 170411
www.FirstRealty.net
KATHY DUNN 265-4575
PATT JUDD 260-6133
MIKE BRADY 260-2406
4101 N PLANTATION DRIVE
$399,000 FRC# 171397
www.FirstRealty.net
CHAD & AMY CROUCH 979-1191
CRYSTAL ODOM 261-9652
4342 PLANTATION DRIVE
$259,900 FRC# 172061
www.FirstRealty.net
CHAD & AMY CROUCH 979-1191
CRYSTAL ODOM 261-9652
1464 PLANTATION DRIVE
$359,900 FRC# 173760
www.FirstRealty.net
CHAD & AMY CROUCH 979-1191
CRYSTAL ODOM 261-9652
4613 PLANTATION LANE
$279,900 FRC # 173463
www.FirstRealty.net
CHAD & AMY CROUCH 979-1191
CRYSTAL ODOM 261-9652
2 AC 294 TELEPHONE LANE
$47,000 FRC# 173389
www.FirstRealty.net
3826 POST OAK CIRCLE
$149,900 FRC# 173308
www.FirstRealty.net
205 REBECCA PLACE
$249,900 FRC# 172080
www.FirstRealty.net
179 SANDY ROAD
$129,000 FRC# 171438
www.FirstRealty.net
412 SOUTH PLANTATION DRIVE
$339,700 FRC# 173666
www.FirstRealty.net
2431 SUGAR CREEK ROAD
$79,900 FRC# 172897
www.FirstRealty.net
KATHY DUNN 265-4575
KELLY DAVIS 644-0370
4 AC 2234 QUINLAND LAKE RD
$119,900 FRC# 172479
www.FirstRealty.net
CHAD & AMY CROUCH 979-1191
CRYSTAL ODOM 261-9652
PATT JUDD 260-6133
BRENDA TROXELL 260-2440
JOYCE GRAY 260-8741
KEVIN CUMMINS 229-9789
EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY
REALTOR
®
MULTIPLE LISTING SERVICE
MLS
116 S. LOWE AVENUE 528-1573 • 1-800-948-3728
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK • Monday-Friday 8am-5pm • Saturday 8am-4pm • Sunday 12pm-4pm • Voice Mail After Hours
E2 — HERALD-CITIZEN, Cookeville, Tenn. — www.herald-citizen.com — Sunday, January 31, 2016
001
Legals
001
Legals
THE TOWN OF MOTNEREY
WILL HAVE A WATER/SEWER
COMMITTEE MEETING ON
MONDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2016
AT 6:30 P.M. AT THE
MONTEREY MUNICIPAL
BUILDING. THE ITEMS ON
THE AGENDA ARE:
1. DISCUSS THE SEWER BIDS
OPENED ON JANUARY 25,
2016
2. DISCUSSION ON TURBS AT
WATER PLANT
3. DISCUSSION ON CLEANING THE CLEARWELL AT THE
WATER PLANT
1/31
nessee in Book P page 28-29,
being a tract of land 140 feet in
length and 100 feet in width."
NOTICE OF PROBATE COURT
LAND SALE
Said sale will be 20% payable on
the day of the sale and the balance payable upon confirmation
and receipt of the deed.
RE: ESTATE OF CLARENCE D.
PHILLIPS, deceased
JOHNNY MICHAEL PHILLIPS,
Personal Representative
In obedience to a Decree of Probate Court of Putnam County, at
Cookeville, Tennessee, made at
the January 12, 2016 session, in
the above styled case. I will on
the 13th day of February 2016 at
10:00 a.m. on the premises at
112 West Stewart Ave.,
Monterey, Tennessee sell to the
highest and best bidder the
house and real property in said
Decree described as follows:
"Lots 21, 22, 23, and 24, in block
# 53 as shown by the Cumberland Mountain Coal Company's
Plat of Town of Monterey, Tennessee, of record in Register's
Office of Putnam County, Tenn
The said real property is further
described as property located at
112 West Stewart Avenue,
Monterey, Tennessee 38574
(Map 071B, Grp B, Ctrl Map
071B, Parcel 008.00). The said
real property is that as described in a Warranty Deed from
Frank R. Adams and wife, Jessie
Lee Adams, to Clarence D. Phillips and wife, Donia Phillips, recorded in Warranty Deed Book
147, page 711.
MARCIA BORYS
CIRCUIT AND PROBATE
CLERK
1/17, 1/31, 2/7
HC
Since 1903
Herald-Citizen
To Subscribe Call
931-526-9715
005
Public Notices
Some secrets need
to be shared.
SEXUAL
ASSAULT
it's not
your fault!
For confidential help
or information, call
(931)526-5197 • 1-800-707-5197
020 Statewide Classifieds
$1000 WEEKLY!! Mailing Brochures From Home. Helping
home workers since 2001.
Genuine Opportunity. No Experience Required. Start Immediately www.CentralMailing.NET
020 Statewide Classifieds
CAN YOU DIG IT? Heavy
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Offer Training and Certifications
Running Bulldozers, Backhoes,
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Placement. VA Benefits Eligible!
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025
Special Notices
EVERY YEAR, thousands of
lives are cut short before
they are ever begun by
abortion. Please remember,
it’s a “LIFE” not a “Choice.”
FOR YOUR
CONVENIENCE
CLASS A CDL FLATBED
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WORKS! ONE call & your 25
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nessee newspapers for $275/wk
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or 38 Middle TN newspapers for
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050
Lost and Found
105
Cleaning
0 FIRST CARPET CARE 0
TOM'S CARPET CLEANING
++ 25YRS EXP++ LIC'D++
+ PUTNAM GUARANTEED +
349-2288
Same day service/Saturdays
108
Concrete,Masonry
BELLIS! CONCRETE
Complete Concrete Work
Slabs, driveways, bsmts, sidewalks
Stamped & colored concrete,
acid staining, exposed aggregate.
Serving Cookeville Area Since 1997
Licensed, insured. Drug free workplace. 858-6240 / 528-6240
COOKEVILLE CONCRETE
Driveways, slabs, all types of
stamped concrete, all types of
metal bldgs. 20% disc to all Sr
Citizens. Winter time special.
40 yrs exp. Lic/Ins. (931) 284-8663
110
Construction Work
FOUND male black & white
bobtail cat, area of South Maple BOB'S Construction: Specializ& Neal St. Call (931)854-1373 to ing in concrete, brick/block, additions, remodels, hardwood/tile,
identify and claim.
roofing, building packages, and
all your construction needs.
103 Auto Svc. & Repair Lic'd/Ins'd. Quality Work • Affordable Prices 931-319-6107.
J &A AUTO SERVICE
Great service at discount prices!
TOWING AVAILABLE
931-260-6459
105
Cleaning
B&B ROOFING
Roof Repairs & Replacements.
Home Repairs & Remodeling,
Comm/Res. Lic'd/Ins'd. Free Est.
Call (931)526-6557
ALL TYPES of Backhoe Work,
All types of Water lines, Footers;
WOULD LIKE to clean homes. all types of Basement Water
Proofing; Top soil, Field Dirt deDependable, ref's & exp'd.
livered. (931)252-1486, 510-0696
Call 931-260-8070
HERALD-CITIZEN, Cookeville, Tenn. — www.herald-citizen.com — Sunday, January 31, 2016 — E3
110
Construction Work
METAL ROOFS & BUILDINGS
and CONCRETE JOBS
Call (931)284-8249
FLATT CONSTRUCTION For
all your building needs. Any
home repair, plumbing, garages,
decks, porches, siding, roofing,
additions.(931)265-5687
120
Painting/Wallpaper
135
Yard Work/Related
YARD MAN
FREE Est., experienced
Low rates, great work.
Mowing.
931-432-2494 or 931-261-4629
WOULD LIKE to do yard work
Call
(931)650-1005
AFFORDABLE LAWN CARE
PAINTING/ STAINING / P.
Make Appt. (931)260-1659
W A S H , w i n d o w s c r e e n s , Lic'd/Ins'd - FREE ESTIMATES
Plumb., Elec., Storm Doors. 38
DODSON LAWN CARE!
yrs exp. Exc. Ref's. Call David,
• Commercial - Residential
931-445-3796 or 265-0639.
• Mowing
BUDGET PAINTING CO.
• Landscaping
Int/Ext Painting & Log/Deck • Sod
Staining, Power Wash Vinyl, • Seed & Aerate
Driveways. FREE EST. Lic./Ins. • Mulch
Call 931-525-6482
• Fertilize
15 years experience.
KERBY PAINTING
Use Commercial
CHECK OUT MY WORK
Equipment Call (931) 260-8646
Go to www.kerbypainting.com
Ask for Mike (931) 979-3122
BUSHHOGGING GARDEN
TILLING, FRONT END LOADBUENA VIEW PAINTING
ER, DIRT & GRAVEL WORK
Res/Comm, Lic'd/Ins'd, Painting,
LAWNMOWING,Reasonable
Interior & Exterior, Water damRates. Exp'd(931)261-7871
age, Wall Repairs, WINTER
SPECIALS. 931-255-1542
Greener Grass Landscaping &
www.buenaview.com
Lawncare. Veteran owned & operated, complete lawn care &
121
Pest Control landscaping services, free estimates, yearly contracts available,
Kyle Farley 931-239-6183 or
Wesley Goff 931-265-8841
140
ALL STAR PEST CONTROL
OF TENNESSEE
Complete Termite Service
Lic'd/Ins‚'d. Bonded.
All work guaranteed
Free Estimates.
MARTY KELLY
931-526-8550
Charter # 4252
125
Home Renovation
Other
"JACKSON'S MOVING SERVICE"
Need to move? We have the 20'
box truck & men to do the job. No
stress for you & your furniture. Ref's
Avail. Call for free Est. 931-268-9102
LADIES,
Do you need time to just relax
and be stress free? Can!t afford
the high costs of going to the
spa? If so call me today to book
your FREE spa party for you
and your friends!!!
(931) 349-1352.
Ask for Rebecca.
BOULDIN HOME REPAIR &
REMODELING. Plumbing, electri-
cal, painting, dry wall, bathroom &
kitchen remodels. Carpentry work.
30 yrs exp. Free Est. 239-6061
REPLACEMENT WINDOWS &
DOORS. Call today for free inhome Est. Serving Mid. TN for
12 years. 931-Windows
127
Sheetrock,Drywall
GANTT'S AUTO TRIM
& UPHOLSTERY
Complete Auto and Boat Interiors.
Owner Wayne Gantt
931-372-7606
DISABLED? Having trouble
getting your social security or
LUNA'S DRYWALL
VA disability?
Sheetrock Work: Hang, finish,
touch up. No job too big/small. We can help! Call Disability
Consulting @ 877-453-9151
Insured. 931-212-6899
130 Tree Service/Related
OLD TIMERS TREE SERVICE
4 generations of tree care.
Specialize in dangerous tree
removal. Grind stumps. Lic/Ins.
T. Bowman 537-2466;260-5655
M & M TREE SERVICE
We trim, top & remove trees.
Also stump removal.
Free Est. Lic/Ins
Call 432-4382 or 260-6304
ALLEN'S TREE SERVICE
Stump grinding, tree removal, topping.Lic'd/Ins'd.
Roger Allen owner,
537-6493 / 979-6493
FARLEY TREE SERVICE
Trimming & Removal.
Free Est. Lic'd/Ins'd.
All wk guaranteed
(931)520-0114,
cell 239-6184
EVERGREEN TREE service We
top, trim, prune & remove trees.
Jeff Burchett & Shawn Roberson. Satisfaction guaranteed
Fully Ins'd (931)319-1199, 261-8870
135
Yard Work/Related
RHETT BUTLER's
LAWN CARE
Mowing, Landscaping, Mulching,
Yard Maintenance
Call local cell 544-3303
LAWN MOWING: Gutter cleaning, light hauling. odd jobs, remove old barns & buildings, garage cleaning. Free Est, Reasonable rates. 432-0863 / 510-4040
MOWING, LANDSCAPING,
Pressure Washing, hauling,
cleaning, odd jobs. Free Est.
Call 265-5775
BUSHHOGGING
FREE ESTIMATES
(931) 510-8505
215
Employment Opp.
ADMINISTRATIVE ASSOC 2
J. E. Owen Chair of
Excellence
Tennessee Tech University
Complete position summary and
application procedure available
at https://jobs.tntech.edu. Application deadline is February 1,
2016. Tennessee Tech University is an AA/EEO employer
and does not discriminate on the
basis of race, color, religion, ethnic or national origin, sex, disability age (40 and over), status as
a protected veteran, genetic information or any other category
protected by federal or state law.
Inquiries regarding the nondiscrimination policies should be
directed to [email protected]
215
Employment Opp.
13 TEMPORARY Farm Workers Needed. Little River Leaf
LLC - Hopkinsville, KY. Perform
all duties of Tobacco, Straw/Hay,
Row Crop, Fruit/Vegetable, &
Greenhouse/Nursery Production;
including seeding, planting,
spraying, irrigating, harvesting,
storing, & packaging; and other
alternative work. Employment
Dates: 03/31/2016 – 01/31/2017.
$10.85/hr. Piece rates may be
offered. Worker guaranteed 3/4
of contract hours. Tools provided
at no cost. Free housing
provided to non-commuting
workers. Transportation & subsistence reimbursed when 50%
of contract is met. Random drug
testing may be done after hire at
employer’s expense. Apply for
Are you an up-coming or re- this job at the nearest Tennesscent graduate with an AA or ee Career Center or call 931BA in Electrical or Mechanical
Engineering, looking for inter- 526-9701 and reference job oresting work in the automation der 540215295.
field? Join our team working with Local 70 yr old Co. looking for
PLC’s, vision systems, robotic various driving positions. Repacking systems, CAD/CAM quires Class B CDL, tow motor
systems and other real-world exp. a plus. Apply: Builders
manufacturing applications. Supply, 50 Scott Ave, Ckvl
Stable, growing company with
national market that’s locally Local Upholstery shop looking
owned & debt free looking for for a FT Seamstress to sew fabtalented, eager people willing to ric such as leather, vinyls & fablearn. EEOE. Fax resume to: ric. Must have sewing exp. Call
931-738-2019 or mail to Box (931)261-3733
1149, H-C, PO Box 2729, Ckvl,
LOOKING FOR A STABLE
TN 38502-2729
JOB WITH A GROWING
AUTO TECHNICIAN
COMPANY??
Locally owned business looking
for Exp'd Tire Tech & Oil Change Tri State Distribution, Inc., is now
Tech. MUST BE honest, de- hiring for entry level positions on
pendable, have positive attitude all shifts. If you want to work in a
& have own tools. Uniforms clean & safe working environprovided & Benefits. Open Mon ment, for a stable company who
thru Fri - NO Weekends. Inform- offers competitive wages + beation received will be kept con- nefits, such as paid vacations &
fidential. Apply in person or send holidays, & group health, dental,
resume to: Doc's Auto & Tire, 233 vision, disability, & life insurance,
W. Broad St, Ckvl,TN 38501.
this is the place for you. High
BUSY MEDICAL Clinic seeking School Diploma or GED equivalimmediate opening for medical ent + background check/pre-hire
assistant w/exp. Call Heather or drug screen Req’d. Apply in person during normal business
Brenda 931-839-6642
hours or send resume to 600
BV REP 1x2.5 Goodwill ad to
Vista Drive, Sparta, TN, 38583
run 1/6, 1/7, 1/8, 1/17, 1/18,
or by fax at 931-738-2019. Tri
1/20, 1/21, 1/22, 1/31, 2/1, 2/2,
State Distribution is an EOE.
2/4, 2/5, 2/14, 2/15, 2/17, 2/18,
MAMMA ROSA's now taking
2/19, 2/28, 2/29
applications for pizza
maker/cook. P/T, afternoon into
Message
#1 Services:
Free
evening hours. Apply in person.
Need help
finding a job?
• Résumé Assistance
• Weekly Job Fairs & Hiring Events
• Connections to Local Employers
• Training & Certifications
565-C S. Jefferson Ave.
JOB #
(931)
520-8789
62950
COOKEVILLE RV is seeking a
customer service/parts clerk for
their rapidly growing team. Ap210
Child/Elder Care plicants must love people and be
willing to learn the RV parts industry.Previous parts exp a plus
I WOULD LIKE TO SIT
but not necessary. Paid Holiwith the elderly
days, vacation, and company
Call Mary @ (931)319-3538
uniform supplied. Please apply
I WOULD like to house clean in person or email resume to
or sit with elderly people part- [email protected]
time. 931-252-3893, 372-2540.
DELIVERY DRIVERS Needed
for Ckvl area. Daytime & Even215
Employment Opp. ing shifts avail immediately. Use
own vehicle. Cash paid weekly.
FACILITIES ASSOCIATE 10
Call 525-1583 for more info
(Electrical Shop Supervisor)
Experienced Tile Installer
Facilities & Business
needed for CNC Construction.
Services
Please call (931)319-5613
Tennessee Tech University
A complete position summary I am a young Christian mom
and application procedure avail- going thru a divorce with a 3
able at https://jobs.tntech.edu. year old. Needing transportation
Applicants will be required to ap- to get to work. (931)823-0489
ply online and electronically upload a cover letter, resume, copy JANITORIAL/MAINTENANCE
of valid driver's license, and con- wanted. Janitorial cleaning &
tact information for two work ref- light maintenance for commererences. Application deadline cial property. Exp. preferred.
February 3, 2016. Tennessee Send resume to HLM, 315 N
Tech University is an AA/EEO Washington Ave, S# 209, Ckvl,
employer and does not discrim- TN 38501.
inate on the basis of race, color, 9 TEMPORARY Farm Workers
religion, ethnic or national origin, Needed. Kuegel Tax and Acsex, disability, age (40 and counting Inc. - Owensboro, KY.
over), status as a protected vet- Perform all duties of Tobacco,
eran, genetic information or any Straw/Hay, & Row Crop Producother category protected by fed- tion; including seeding, planting,
eral or state law. Inquiries re- spraying, irrigating, harvesting,
garding the nondiscrimination storing, & packaging; and other
policies should be directed to alternative work. Employment
[email protected]
Dates: 04/01/2016 – 12/15/2016.
HOME CAREGIVERS is seek- $10.85/hr. Piece rates may be
ing experienced, mature, com- offered. Worker guaranteed 3/4
passionate, dependable care- of contract hours. Tools provided
givers to work in-home care in a t n o c o s t . F r e e h o u s i n g
the Putnam Co. area. Duties provided to non-commuting
would include personal care, workers. Transportation & sublight housekeeping & meal prep. sistence reimbursed when 50%
If you are interested & have a of contract is met. Random drug
genuine desire to assist the eld- testing may be done after hire at
erly give us a call at 931-528- employer’s expense. Apply for
8 5 8 5 o r s e n d r e s u m e t o this job at the nearest Tennesswww.homecaregiverstn.com ee Career Center or call 931Orientations are beginning soon 526-9701 and reference job order 544786995.
so please give us a call.
215
Employment Opp.
POSITION VACANCY
The Upper Cumberland Development District has an opening
for a CHOICES HCBS Qualified
Assessor. Complete in-home assessments including, but not limited to, Pre-Admission Evaluations (PAE) and Medicaid financial applications; compile all financial and medical documentation necessary for eligibility determination; coordinate with
physicians’ offices to obtain
medical documentation; determine needs, community resources and coordinate services
with agencies/groups for older
adults and individuals with disabilities.
Qualifications include:
• Licensed Practical Nurse,
Registered Nurse, Licensed
Social Worker, Physician
Assistant, Nurse Practitioner, or
a Licensed Physician
• Computer skills
• Written and verbal communication skills
Interested applicants should
submit a resume to Melissa Sliger no later than 4:30 p.m. on
February 8, 2016 to Upper Cumberland Development District,
1225 South Willow Avenue,
Cookeville, Tennessee 38506.
Equal Opportunity Employer
3 TEMPORARY Farm Workers
Needed. Robertson Farms LLC Calhoun, KY. Perform all duties
of Tobacco, Straw/Hay, Row
Crop, Fruit/Vegetable, & Greenhouse/ Nursery Production; including seeding, planting, irrigating, harvesting, storing, & packaging; other alternative work.
Employment Dates: 03/20/2016
– 12/24/2016. 3 months of verifiable experience required.
$10.85/hr. Piece rates may be
offered. Worker guaranteed 3/4
of contract hours. Tools provided
at no cost. Free housing
provided to non-commuting
workers. Transportation & subsistence reimbursed when 50%
of contract is met. Random drug
testing may be done after hire at
6 TEMPORARY Farm Workers employer’s expense. Apply for
Needed. Mark Luttrull - Trenton, this job at the nearest TennessKY. Perform all duties of To- ee Career Center or call 931bacco, Straw/Hay, & Row Crop 526-9701 and reference job orProduction; including seeding, der 530852925.
planting, spraying, irrigating, harvesting, storing, & packaging;
and other alternative work. Employment Dates: 04/01/2016 – 3 TEMPORARY Farm Workers
12/20/2016. $10.85/hr. Piece N e e d e d . R o d M u r p h y rates may be offered. Worker Eddyville, KY. Perform all duties
guaranteed 3/4 of contract of Tobacco, Straw/Hay, Row
hours. Tools provided at no cost. Crop, & Fruit/Vegetable ProducFree housing provided to non- tion; including seeding, planting,
commuting workers. Transporta- spraying, irrigating, harvesting,
tion & subsistence reimbursed storing, & packaging; and other
when 50% of contract is met. alternative work. Employment
Random drug testing may be Dates: 04/01/2016 – 12/20/2016.
done after hire at employer’s ex- $10.85/hr. Piece rates may be
pense. Apply for this job at the offered. Worker guaranteed 3/4
nearest Tennessee Career Cen- of contract hours. Tools provided
ter or call 931-526-9701 and ref- a t n o c o s t . F r e e h o u s i n g
provided to non-commuting
erence job order 540187015.
workers. Transportation & subNEEDED CNA for 24 hours a sistence reimbursed when 50%
week, $15+/hr. References and of contract is met. Random drug
proof of CNA license & CPR testing may be done after hire at
training needed. (931)858-6012 employer’s expense. Apply for
this job at the nearest TennessN o w H i r i n g C o n s t r u c t i o n ee Career Center or call 931laborers, concrete worker, 526-9701 and reference job orequip. operators. Drug Screen der 544310695.
Req'd. Apply in person/mail resumes to HR 165 W Broad St
Ckvl TN 38501, fax 931-526-5171.
SUBCONTRACTOR: Above
NOW HIRING for PT & FT Desk Ground Pool Installer
Clerk. Apply in person @ Americas Best Value Inn, 897 So Pool & Spa Depot of Ckvl, TN is
Jefferson Ave.
looking for Exp'd subcontractors
for above ground pool installaSFEG CORP in Smithville, TN tions for the 2015 season. Subhas a job opening for a Screw contractor must provide their
Machine Set-Up Operator. Hours own worker's compensation, liare Monday thru Thursday 5:00 ability insurance, & equipment.
am to 3:30 pm.
Position is FT & weekends are
req'd. Excellent pay & career opJob Responsibilities/Duties
portunity. Please apply in perSets up and operates screw ma- son at 1470 Interstate Dr, Ckvl,
chine to perform turning, boring, TN 38501 or send resume to
threading and related opera- [email protected]
tions on metal bar stock. Must
be able to set-up, operate and
make adjustments as needed to
Acme, Traub and Brown Sharpe TELEMARKETING POSITIONS
Machines. Must be able to read available immediately. Work
Blue Prints and use various FT or PT. Cash paid weekly. Call
gauges and measuring instru- 525-1583 for more info.
ments. Must be able to work with
vendors on tool design for any
new products. Compensation The Town of Monterey will be
based on experience and skill accepting applications for a F/T
level.
“Water Clerk” until Wednesday,
February 10, 2016. Applications
Must be able to pass drug can be picked up at Monterey
screen and background check. City Hall, 302 E Commercial Avenue, between the hours of 7:30
Send resumes to SFEG Corp - a.m. and 4:00 p.m. Monday-Fri625 Miller Rd, Smithville, TN day. The Town of Monterey is an
37166 Attn: Human Resources equal opportunity employer.
215
Employment Opp.
15 TEMPORARY Farm Workers Needed. Tobacco Way
Farms LLC - Hopkinsville, KY.
Perform all duties of Tobacco,
Straw/Hay, Row Crop, Fruit/Vegetable, & Greenhouse/Nursery
Production; including seeding,
planting, irrigating, harvesting,
storing, & packaging; other alternative work. Employment
Dates: 04/01/2016 – 02/01/2017.
3 months of verifiable experience required. $10.85/hr. Piece
rates may be offered. Worker
guaranteed 3/4 of contract
hours. Tools provided at no cost.
Free housing provided to noncommuting workers. Transportation & subsistence reimbursed
when 50% of contract is met.
Random drug testing may be
done after hire at employer’s expense. Apply for this job at the
nearest Tennessee Career Center or call 931-526-9701 and reference job order 544805155.
10 TEMPORARY Farm Workers Needed. Tucker Farms
Group LLC - Shelbyville, KY.
Perform all duties of Tobacco,
Straw/Hay, Tobacco Seed,
Fruit/Vegetable,
&
Greenhouse/Nursery Production;
including seeding, planting, irrigating, harvesting, storing, &
packaging; other alternative
work. Employment Dates:
04/01/2016 – 01/20/2017.
$10.85/hr. Piece rates may be
offered. Worker guaranteed 3/4
of contract hours. Tools provided
at no cost. Free housing
provided to non-commuting
workers. Transportation & subsistence reimbursed when 50%
of contract is met. Random drug
testing may be done after hire at
employer’s expense. Apply for
this job at the nearest Tennessee Career Center or call 931526-9701 and reference job order 544249695.
WISE STAFFING
NOW HIRING For FICOSA
Long term positions with hire in
at 90 days.
Starting pay $9.20 with incremental raises
Full benefits after hire in.
We have other positions available in Sparta, Cookeville, and
Crossville starting immediately.
Come by our office in Cookeville
773 South Jefferson Ave. Application hours are 8:30-11a and
1:30-4p Mon-Thurs. You can
also apply online before coming
to the office at
wisestaffinggroup.com
1 TEMPORARY Farm Worker
Needed. Young’s Farm Partnership - Simpsonville, KY. Perform
all duties of Tobacco Production;
including seeding, planting, irrigating, harvesting, storing, &
packaging; other alternative
work. Employment Dates:
03/09/2016 – 01/01/2017.
$10.85/hr. Piece rates may be
offered. Worker guaranteed 3/4
of contract hours. Tools provided
at no cost. Free housing
provided to non-commuting
workers. Transportation & subsistence reimbursed when 50%
of contract is met. Random drug
testing may be done after hire at
employer’s expense. Apply for
this job at the nearest Tennessee Career Center or call 931526-9701 and reference job order 521490875.
EXPERIENCED
PLUMBERS NEEDED
ZR 1X3 Charles Stone H&C ad
to run Sundays, Wednesdays &
Fridays TFN (Plumbers)
Residential and
commercial experience.
Salary based on
experience, including
Retirement, vacation and
insurance.
[email protected]
CharlesStoneHeating
&Cooling,LLC
315TransportDrive,
Algood
Oremailresumeto
[email protected]
JOB #
63072
LEGITIMATE JOB placement
firms that work to fill specific positions cannot charge an upfront
fee. For free information about
avoiding employment service
scams, write to the Federal
Trade Commission, 600
Pennsylvania Avenue, NW,
Washington, DC 20580, or you
can go online to
http://www.fraud.org/.
This message is a public service of
the Herald-Citizen &
Regional Buyers Guide.
E4 — HERALD-CITIZEN, Cookeville, Tenn. — www.herald-citizen.com — Sunday, January 31, 2016
215
Employment Opp.
283
Trucking Emp.
410
Cycles & ATVs
Residential and
commercial experience.
Salary based on
experience, including
Retirement, vacation and
insurance.
[email protected]
CharlesStoneHeating&
Cooling, LLC
315 Transport Drive,
Algood
Oremailresumeto
[email protected]
290
241
305
JOB #
63073
Health Care Emp.
Schools/Instruction
NO HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA NEEDED. How often
do you see that? Putnam
County Adult High School can
show you a way to complete
the credits you missed when
you were in school before.
Flexible schedule -- days or
evenings. Individualized
study. Possible credit for work
or armed services training.
Relaxed atmosphere. Free.
If you are between 18 and
118 and want information
about registering, call
528-8685. This could be your
year to graduate. If you can
dream it, you can do it.
KAWASAKI VULCAN classic
1470cc motorcycle in excellent
condition. 37,703 miles, 4 speed
gearbox and runs strong. Sells
with saddle bags (leather lyke), 2
helmets, T-bag, trailer hitch and
misc items. 931-261-3582.
425
2000 Taurus V6, AT, runs good,
142k $1,400; 2007 Dodge Charger V6 AT, runs/looks good.
203k $4,200. (931)529-4408
DENTAL OFFICE Seeks Dental
Assistant with at least two years
experience. PT. Please inquire
at Quality Dental Care 845 W.
Jackson St. Ckvl, TN 38501
JOB #
62364
BETHESDA
Health Care Center
We are an equal opportunity employer
283
Trucking Emp.
CDL DRIVER: Class A OTR
w/good record needed. Flexible
time out & routes. For more info,
call business hrs: 615-390-2787
430
Trucks For Sale
Autos for Sale
Business Opp.
WHEN IT comes to earnings or
locations there are no guarantees. For free information about
buying a biz op or franchise
without getting scammed, write
to the Federal Trade CommisLocal fast paced surgery center sion, Washington, D.C., 20580
is seeking a surgical scrub or call the National Fraud Infortechnologist or LPN. ENT and mation Center, 1-800-876-7060.
instrumentation processing ex- This message is a public service
perience is preferred. Current of the Herald-Citizen & Regional
BLS/ CPR certification is re- Buyers Guide.
quired. Monday thru Friday. No
call and no weekends. If inter315
Financial Services
ested please send resume to
[email protected]
IT'S ILLEGAL for companies
P&T Healthcare has openings doing business by phone to
in all shifts for Direct Support promise you a loan and ask you
Providers. Openings are in Ckvl, to pay for it before they deliver.
Livingston & Smithville area. For free information about avoidCompetitive pay! Must pass ing advance fee loan scams,
background check, possess a write to the Federal Trade Comvaild ID, proof of insurance. Con- mission, Washington, D.C.,
tact Cindy McCann 615-597-9963 20580 or call the National Fraud
Information
Center,
PRN, PT, FT positions for: Phys- 1-800-876-7060. This message
ical Therapist, Physical Therap- is a public service of the
ist Assistant, Rehab Tech, and Herald-Citizen & Regional BuyReceptionist at Outpatient PT ers Guide.
practice in Ckvl, TN. Resumes: FEDERAL LAW allows you to
[email protected] Li- correct your credit report for
cense required for PT, PTA. free. For more information about
credit repair scams, write to the
REP 1X3 Bethesda Health Care Federal Trade Commission,
ad to
run Friday,
LPNs,
RNs,January
CNAs 29, Washington, D.C., 20580 or call
2016 through Wednesday Feb- the National Fraud Information
Dietary
Aide & Cook Center, 1-800-876-7060. This
ruary
10, 2016.
message is a public service of
Now hiring RN for all shifts, LPN
the Herald-Citizen & Regional
for 2nd and 3rd shift, CNA for 2nd
Buyers Guide.
shift and 3rd shift, Cook and an
aide all shifts. All positions full time.
410
Cycles & ATVs
We offer top pay and benefits
including 401k Retirement,
2007 HARLEY DAVIDSON
Employee Stock Ownership,
DYNA Super Glide,
Health, Dental, Life, Vacation
garage kept, alarm system,
Package, Scholarship program
lots of chrome. $9,500.
for nurse advancement.
(931)528-0348 / 260-0405
(931) 525-6655 - Phone
(931) 525-3581 - Fax
444 One-Eleven Place
Cookeville, TN 38506
Autos for Sale
GERMAN AUTO SALES
330 W. Broad St.
528-0199
50 clean vehicle to choose from.
Many w/low miles including domestics and
imports: Audi,
BMW, Saab, VW, Volvo, Honda,
Mazda, Toyota. Backed by a 3
month 3,000 mile warranty.
ZR 1X3 Charles Stone H&C ad DRIVERS WANTED. 18 mos
to run Sundays, Wednesdays & flatbed experience. CDL license.
Fridays TFN (HVAC Installers) Home weekends. 931-686-2977
EXPERIENCED HVAC
INSTALLERS NEEDED
425
2001 ISUZU FRR: $13,750: 6cyl
turbo diesel, 6sp, 123k, Exc.
cond. Locally driven, xtra cab,
clean int, storage boxes, ramp,
chrome wheels. 7,000lb
front/14,000lb rear. (931)979-0736
505
Misc. Wanted
2003 FORD Econoline: Burgundy, seats 6, AT, Power win- WANTED OLD APPLIANCES &
JUNK - WILL PICK UP
dows, locks, & drivers seat, all
CALL 931-510-4138
new front brake system. $4,000
WANTED: 60's,70's,80's,90's
obo. Call (931)854-7899
Memorabilia/Vinyl Records/Collectibles!! Marshall Browning
Small
615-561-4530
Ads Get
noticed
also.
510
510
Misc. For Sale
1,150 FT of Cedar Lumber
$1,000 obo.
Call (931)432-4825
Misc. For Sale
CHERRY BR set $250; (2) twin
beds both $250; 65in flat screen
TV $225; loveseat w/recliners
$100; Recliner $50. Call
(931)854-0645, 644-5937
100 GAL Aluminum Transfer
Tank. Diamond plate L-shaped
tank accommodates tool box.
Filler caps on both sides. Outlet
on bottom allows direct plumbing into fuel system. Heavy duty
brackets added for stability.
$400. Call (931)260-9155
FREE
WOOD SKIDS
Available at the rear of the
Herald-Citizen
1300 Neal Street,
Cookeville, TN. 38501
258 pds of standard weight
plates. 1 tricep bar, 1 curl bar, 1
weight bar, & 4 dumbell handles.
Collars incl'd. Good cond $125.
Call 931-761-5809
Kenmore dehumidifier 50
pints. Electronic, auto shutoff,
used little, in orig box $150;
Fridgidaire range works great,
looks new, clean oven, manual
incl'd. $150. (931)525-6244
NHC
HEALTHCARE
We desire quality people to give quality care.
Position Available:
CNA
• Great Work Environment
• Competitive Pay
• Excellent Benefits Including
• Retirement Plan
• Tuition Program
• Direct Deposit
Care is Our Business
Production Supervisors
Hutchinson FTS, Inc., a progressive worldwide automotive supplier, has an
immediate need for 1st and 2nd shift production supervisors. We offer competitive
wages and benefits including 401 (k), medical/dental/vision, prescription card and
paid holiday/vacation.
Responsibilities:
• Plans work and supervises production procedures and personnel and ensures
attainment of department production schedules.
• Directs reduction departments and regulates and coordinates functions of office
and shop.
• Introduces efficient production line methods and initiates and directs procedures
to increase company output.
• Analyzes operations and oversees set up for new jobs.
• Prioritizes work schedules.
• Distributes work orders for machinery and manning requirements.
• Directs department to be compliant with all customer delivery and quality
requirements.
• Directs production operations to be complaint with all company quality operating
system requirements.
Requirements:
• Two year technical degree level of knowledge.
• Minimum of 3 years of experience in supervisor, leadership capacity.
• Working knowledge of blueprint reading and SPC, a plus.
• Strong computer skills required with working knowledge of related software
programs.
•Stronginterpersonalskills.
•Employeerelationsandleadershiptrainingaplus.
HC
Pleasesendresumeforconsiderationto:
[email protected]
(E.O.E.)
Since 1903
Herald-Citizen
To Subscribe Call
931-526-9715
Bledsoe County Correctional Complex has immediate openings for
Correctional Officer. Applications accepted onsite Monday through Friday
8 AM until 3 PM. Interviews held weekly.
• Starting Salary: $2255/month
• $600 Correctional Officer Sign-On Bonus
• 3 on/2 off, 2 on/3 off, 2 on/2 off Schedule Rotation
• 12 Hour Shifts
• Off Every Other Weekend
• Medical, Dental, Vision Available for Employee and Eligible Dependents
• 401K
• Retirement Plan
• Paid Time Off
• Possible Salary Adjustment with Proof of an Associate or Bachelor
Degree which can Result in a Starting Salary of $2368/month
Contact Human Resources at (423)881-6180
Follow us online @ www.tn.gov/correction * www.facebook.com/TNDepartmentofCorrection
https://twitter.com/TNTDOC1 * https://www.youtube.com/TNTDOC1
Be sure to check out www.tn.gov/hr for additional employment
opportunities.
The Department of Correction is an Equal Opportunity Employer.
34 Gracey St., Sparta, TN 38583
Apply in Person
EOE
Full-time Position Available - Welding Technology Instructor
The Tennessee College of Applied Technology –
Livingston is accepting applications for the position of
Welding Technology Instructor to teach at the main
campus.
Minimum Qualifications:
• A technical diploma or A.A.S. with AWS or NCCER
certifications preferred.
• Minimum of three years of experience working as a
welder.
• Must be a good communicator with effective verbal and
written skill.
• Must be able to organize and provide theoretical &
practical instructional activities to enable students to
become AWS certified.
• Computer skills required.
• Ability to interact with adult & high school students.
• Must have a sincere desire & interest to teach as well as
remain current in the welding profession.
• Must have evidence of potential ability to instruct,
sincere interest in teaching.
• Must possess strong interpersonal skills and high
standards of personal and professional ethics.
Responsibilities: Teach all aspects of the Welding
Technology curricula including gas metal arc (MIG), tungsten
inert gas (TIG), shielded metal arc (STICK) oxyacetylene
fusion (GAS) inner shield welding, flux core welding, flame
cutting, brazing, and soldering. Monitor, grade and evaluate
individual student progress. Maintain appropriate records
and submit timely reports. Assist in recruitment and
placement of students. Maintain good public relations with
business and industry.
Salary is commensurate with experience and according to
salary guidelines established by the Tennessee Board of
Regents.
Interested applicants must submit a resume, completed
TCAT application, and three (3) professional references.
Applications can be picked up or printed on our website at
www.tcatlivingston.edu.
Deadline for applications and resumes is February 18, 2016
by 4:00 p.m. or until the position is filled.
Send completed applications to:
Ms. Suzanne Smith
Tennessee College of Applied Technology-Livingston
P.O. Box 219, 740 Hi Tech Drive
Livingston, TN 38570
EOE/AA/Title IX/Title VI/ADA Employer
A TENNESSEE BOARD OF REGENTS INSTITUTION
Mueller Refrigeration, LLC
Mueller Refrigeration, LLC, a division of Mueller Industries, is a leading manufacturer of
refrigeration valves & components to Original Equipment Manufacturers throughout the world.
Located in Hartsville,TN, approximately 1 hour from Nashville, the company is experiencing
significant growth & is seeking individuals in the Customer Service & Drafting Department.
Mueller offers 401-K match, competitive benefits, paid vacation, holidays, & annual bonus!
Customer Service Representative
The individual will work closely with a select group of customers, building relationships with key
accounts, sales personnel, & other internal divisions. The ideal candidate will be proficient in MS
Access, Word & Excel, have previous experience with international shipments & document
requirements, & be willing to work in a team envirionment. Two year degree preferred.
Draftsman
Develop detailed drawings & specifications according to engineering sketches & proposals. Lay out
& draws schematic, orthographic, or angle views to depict functional relationships of components,
assemblies, systems, & machines. Computes mathematical formulas to develop & design detailed
specifications for components or machinery, using computer assisted equipment. Consolidates
details from a variety of sketches, makes necessary calculations, & prepares drawings with view &
dimensions in accordance with engineering standards. Knowledge of SolidWorks, Excel, Word
data, & Access preferred. A minimum of GED/High School Diploma required.
Assemblers wanted $9.50 - $12.00 per hour with benefits
Mueller Industries is an Equal Opportunity Employer.
Send Resumé to:
Al Frillman
Human Resource Department, Mueller Refrigeration
121 Rogers Street, Hartsville, TN 37074
Or E-Mail to [email protected]
HERALD-CITIZEN, Cookeville, Tenn. — www.herald-citizen.com — Sunday, January 31, 2016 — E5
510
Misc. For Sale
HAVING A HARD TIME SEEING the print in your favorite
Newspaper, Magazine or Bible
or ever had trouble reading the
telephone directory or a map?
Now Available
Deluxe Framed
MAGNIFYING SHEET
ONLY $3.25 EA. PLUS TAX
GET ONE TODAY!!
! Start Seeing
! Start Reading
Herald-Citizen
1300 Neal Street
Cookeville, TN. 38501
931-526-9715
Pets & Supplies
720 Apts/Duplex For Rent
2BR 1.5BA Condo: Recently TOTALLY FURNISHED 2BR,
updated, extremely nice, pool, 1.5BA Condo. Located close
W/D HU. $675mo + dep. No pets to TTU/Hosp. $850/mo.in(931)265-0083
cludes maintenance fee and
water bill for more info. please
2BR 1BA Duplex Sparta @ call (931)267-4607
POM- A -POO shots & wormed O'Connor Rd. W/D HU. CHA
written health warranty. $400.
S m a l l p e t s o k . $ 4 4 5 / m o zz 1.50 Chelsea Place Proper(931)319-0000
P/U 1,
from
19 to
$ 4 2 5 / d e p . ( 9 3 1 ) 2 6 5 - 7 5 0 7 ties
NICE
2 &Thurs.,
3 BRAug,
APTS.
run TF Sunday Only
705
Wanted To Rent 2BR, 1.5BA Condo in middle of $450 - $600 / mo.
town. 15A Denton Ave.
Water, Sewer, Appliances
$675/mo, $675/dep. Call
Equal Housing Opportunity
PUBLISHER'S NOTICE: All real estate adver(
9
3
1
)
9
7
9
7
0
1
4
Furnished; WD Hookup;
tised in this newspaper is subject to the Federal
Fair Housing Act of 1968 and the Tennessee Human Rights Act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation or discrimination
based on race, color, religion, sex, familial status
or national origin, handicap/disability or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or
discrimination." This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which
is in violation of the law. Our readers are informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. Equal Housing Opportunity, M/F.
2BR, 1BA Duplex in Algood.
No pets/smoking, appls furn'd.
$450/mo + dep. Call 526-3968
Capshaw Area. Upscale condo
in residential neighborhood.
3BR, 2BA, walk-in closets, fireplace, hdwd & tile flrs, W/D HU,
2c gar, great storage. No pets.
$1250/mo. 528-2356, 239-6937
1300 Neal St., Cookeville, TN
931-526-9715 (FAX) 526-1209
Garage/Yard Sales
PLANNING A
YARD SALE???
715
Rooms for Rent
You MUST go to your
city’s business office to
obtain a permit.
JOB #
59963
City of Algood
215 W Main St.
Algood, TN
or
City of Cookeville
45 E. Broad Street
Cookeville, TN
530
STAR MOTOR INN
FOR RENT
Weekly, starting at $180
free internet, frig, guest laundry, 1 , 2 & 3 Bedroom Apts, Houses.
Many locations
movie rentals. Pet Friendly FALCON REALTY,
Construction Crews welcome.
528-2158
526-9511
falconrealtycookeville.com
720 Apts/Duplex For Rent
1, 2, & 3 BR APARTMENTS
Apartments with W/D Hook-Up
Amenities include 2 swimming
pools, fitness center & laundry
facility all on site
Boats & Equip.
Cable, Water/Appl's Furnished
OVER 100 LOCATIONS
Kids Welcome; Some Pets in
Designated Apts.
Tracker Jon Boat 14 ft. New
Open Mon - Fri
trailer, trolling mtr & battery,
SOARD PROPERTIES
depth/fish finder + anchor. Ask526-1988
ing $1,899.00 Rick 931-260-3838
Storage units available
540
Firewood/Stoves
FIREWOOD SALE
$45 or $55/rick. We can deliver
Call (931)349-4219
FOR SALE SEASONED OAKFIREWOOD - $50/Rick, In
Town, You Haul 931-372-7697
OAK FIREWOOD
$65/rick delivered
Call 931-808-5347
545
CYPRESS CREEK APTS
Leasing 1, 2, & 3 Bedroom Apts
Security Deposit only $250!
600 W. 8th Street • Cookeville
931-372-1605 - EHO*
FOR RENT 1, 2, & 3 BR Apartments, 3BR Homes. Clean, &
well maintained, conveniently
located. NO PETS. Call for availability Mon- Fri
JUDD PROPERTIES 526-2119
SAXONY APARTMENT
HOMES
931-526-7711
1009 BROWN AVE. 2BR 1.5BA
$525/mth Appls furn'd, WD/HU. Gray Hunter Arms: 2BR, 1BA.
No pets. (931)239-6937
Peaceful, cable/water pd.
$595/mo. 528-1441.
1, 2, 3 & 4 BR APTS /
HOUSES NEW $280 - $800
JOB #
CH&A; Pool; No Pets.
15674
Chelsea Place Properties
526-6161
725
Houses For Rent
1, 2, 3, & 4 BR Houses & Apts
Starting at $325/mo or
$81.25/wk . Pets OK.
Stevens Realty LLC
866-806-3815 O/A
www.stevensrentals.com
"We Now Offer Weekly Rentals"
740
Comm & Indus/Rent
740
Comm & Indus/Rent
10TH ST: Medical Office/Retail.
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Park Village Shopping Ctr. 1600 RETAIL & OFFICE SPACE
SF. $1200/mo. (931)265-3545
Great locations, competitive
rents. Call 372-8720
3,000 SF mfg space. 2 offices, 2
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
docks 575/mo. 650 SF work
space 185/mo. 528-8173
825
Homes For Sale
$0 CASH to Move In!!!
Northgate Business Park:
4800 SF Ground level &
3000 SF Suite avail. 261-7903
OFFICE / RETAIL SPACES
Locations on S. Jefferson
$395-$850. 979-5550
OFFICE SPACE FOR RENT, 1
big office space 2500 sq.ft.or 2
smaller offices 1250 sq.ft., 715
E. Spring St., 931-526-2208.
New custom built homes at spec
home prices! Ready for you and
your family. New Home, full warranty, extra nice large home
sites, fully landscaped. Prices
start at $133,900.
Call Now!
Very Limited Number For Sale!
Call Greg Baugh Construction
at 931-261-3110
3BR, 2BA, 139 Anderson St,
Sparta. $89,500. $500 finders
fee if sold. See zillow website for
photos. 931-808-7452
2BR/1BA, Near Tech, Basement, Hdwd Floors, CH&A, W/D
incl, No Pets/Smoking, min 6
mo. Lease req'd, 950/mo,
950/deposit, call 931-260-4100
1X3 PLANNING a Yard Sale ad
to run under the 515 heading in FURNISHED ROOM, frig, microwave, TV, utilities incl'd.
the classified section TFN.
$90/wk. Smaller BR $75/wk.
Small dep Call/text (931)252-6295
Live within the city limits
of Algood or Cookeville?
720 Apts/Duplex For Rent
FREE TO GOOD HOMES
ONLY! (2)Dogs: 1 male 1/-1/2
yrs old, black mixed breed, 1 Female puppy 6 mos, black mixed
breed. Pls call 858-2020
Herald-Citizen &
Regional Buyers
Guide
WHY NOT SUBSCRIBE
TODAY?
515
545
www.grayhunterarmsapartments.com
In town country setting. Secluded 2BR, 1BA 1200 SF Apt.
All appls, W/D HU, No
SMK/pets.Utilities incl'd.
Ref/Cr.Ck. req. $750/mo. Eve:
931-858-1080 lve msg. 126 3rd
Ave N., Baxter, TN
TERRACE VIEW Town Homes
offers 3BR town homes in a
1BR APT in Monterey. No pets. country setting. Call for availabilStove, frig, W/D HU, plus depos- ity…931-528-7633. 1366 Cresit. Call 839-3406.
cent Dr, Ckvl. Office hours Tues2BR, 1BA. Stove, refrig, DW, day & Thursday
www.perryreid.com/teraceview
CH/A, cable pd. $360/mo. Small
EHO
pets OK!! Call 526-1988.
3BR 2 full BA's Like New, Extremely Nice, next to TTU W/D,
yard maint furn'd. $1000 mo +
dep. NO PETS/SMOKING,
(931)265-0083
3BR 2BA, full bsmnt, in Colonial
Est behind the mansion.
$950/mo.Lease req‚d. leave
msg. 644-3582
3BR, 1.5BA brick, carport, utility rm, DW, hdwd flrs, fireplace,
$750/mo, $700/dep. 510-2694
3BR, 1BA in town. Remodeled,
new everything. CHA, W/D HU,
No pets/smoking $800/mo 979-2077
3BR, 2BA Garage, CHA, near
NE school/Bilbrey Park.
$700/mo Also apt $420. 528-6924
4/2 H-Wood/fml din. in Algood
$875/mo + Dep. No Smoking,
No Pets. 931-979-6355 OA
BRICK RANCH 3/1.5. No
smoking/pets. Dep, ref's req'd.
$800/mo. Call (931)260-3800.
MONTEREY 3BR, 1BA. CHA,
appls, W/D HU. detached garage, hardwood floors $600 +
dep. No pets. 839-6259
730
Mobile Homes/Rent
2BR 1BA in town, water/appls
furn'd. NO PETS. $300/mo +
dep. Ref's req'd. (931)260-2032
2BR/1BA Newly Remod'd,
Country Set., 1yr lease req'd. No
pets $350/mo + dep. 858-1998
As a member of Saint Thomas Health, Middle
Tennessee’s largest and most comprehensive health
care system, we have great opportunities for
candidates that are looking to join a top notch
organization that is committed to providing quality
patient services.
Coder (Inpatient/outpatient surgery experience,
RHIT/CCS/CIC or CIC required)
RN ICU (Fulltime days, PRN days and nights)
Staff Pharmacist (PRN)
Social Worker (Bachelors or Master Social
Worker licensure)
RN (PRN, Gero-psych experience preferred)
OR Circulator (Fulltime, RN licensure required)
Environmental Services Technician
LPN (Fulltime and PRN)
Registered Nurse - (Float, all shifts)
Occupational Therapist (PRN)
RN - Emergency Dept. (Fulltime and Part-time)
Salary is commensurate with experience. We offer a
competitive benefits package for full-time/part-time
including a 403(b) plan.
To apply, visit the Saint Thomas website at www.sth.org/careers
EOE
Pets & Supplies
LOOKING FOR A PET? Adopt
your new best friend!
Visit us online at www.aarftn.com to see all of our rescued
dogs, cats, puppies and kittens!
Meet the dogs and cats for adoption at our adoption events call, email or visit our website for
our event schedule. All pets are
fully vetted and already fixed.
A.A.R.F. is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit, no-kill animal
rescue/foster organization run by
volunteers. Please be part of the
solution to end animal overpopulation - spay or neuter your pets.
A.A.R.F. (All About Rescue and
Fixin' Inc.)
931-260-8018 (voicemail only) •
www.aarf-tn.com
HAPPY JACK Kennel Dip II:
Controls stable flies, fleas, ticks
& mange mites. Do NOT use on
cats!!!
PUTNAM FARMERS CO-OP
(526-7147) (kennelvax.com)
BLUE PITS 5wks, check photos
on FB under Tamra Chavis Animated Profile. If interested call
931-349-0185. Not Registered
FREE TO APPROVED HOMES:
Adult neutered pot bellied pigs.
Healthy, good temperament pets
avail. Also Spay/Neuter assistance for pet pigs. Call the Pig
Refuge 6-9 AM. 498-5540.
Adoption
info
at
www.9sites.com
Mueller Refrigeration Co. LLC
Mueller Refrigeration Co. LLC, a manufacturer of Refrigeration & Air
conditioning components, has immediate openings for the following positions:
CNC Set-up Operator ($14.00-$20.00 per hour)
Experience setting up & operating CNC lathes is required. Good
troubleshooting skills, blueprint reading, & ability to work any shift is required.
A minimum of a High School Diploma or GED required; Vocational or
Technical Certificate preferred. Minimum 3 yrs. experience.
Industrial Air Purification, Inc. is a turnkey design and installation company that
represents the largest manufacturers of products in our market. IAP is seeking talented
individuals for the following positions:
Machine Operators ($11.50 and up per hour)
Operates a variety of machine tools to produce precision parts, applying
knowledge of mechanics, shop mathematics, layout, & machining procedures.
A minimum of High School Diploma or GED is required. Vocational or
Technical Certificate preferred. Minimum 1 yr. experience required.
M i l l w r i g h t / I n s t a l l a t i o n Te c h n i c i a n ( w e e k d a y s o r w e e k e n d s , P T o r F T ) . Prior
experience with mechanical contracting associated with round ductwork, setting
equipment with scissor lifts/forklifts/cranes, and minor welding/sheet metal fabrication/
electrical. Good understanding of OSHA regulations. Ability to converse with customer.
Valid and clean driver’s license required. Travel overnight is required (typical trips are 1
to 3 days). Payment up to $17.50 an hour, plus perdiem, bonuses, etc.
Benefits include 401K (with company match), paid vacation, medical & dental
coverage, quarterly & annual profit sharing bonus!
I n s t a l l a t i o n S u p e r v i s o r ( F T ) . Plan and assist with installations. Conduct service calls.
Communicate with customer through phone and email. Computer skills desired (Word,
Excel, Adobe, Outlook, etc.). Prior hands-on experience with mechanical contracting
associated with round ductwork, minor welding/fabrications, and setting equipment.
Travel overnight is required. Payment up to $22.50 an hour, plus perdiem, bonuses, etc.
Send Resumé to:
Al Frillman
121 Rogers Street
Hartsville, TN 37074 or
[email protected]
I n s i d e S a l e s ( F T ). IAP is looking for an aggressive and well organized person to
perform inside sales and assist sales manager. Computer skills desired (Word, Excel,
Outlook, Adobe, and QuickBooks). 30 to 40K salary doe, plus commissions.
Review our company at: www.IndAirPur.com
Apply in person Mon to Fri (8 to 4) at: IAP, 2544 Hwy 70 East, Cookeville TN
Email resume to [email protected]
E6 — HERALD-CITIZEN, Cookeville, Tenn. — www.herald-citizen.com — Sunday, January 31, 2016
825
830
Homes For Sale
Open Houses
SUNDAY, JANUARY 31
12:30 - 2:00
124 Whites Point Drive
From PCCH: E. on Broad/Buck
Mtn. Rd, R on Whites Point,
home on L. $314,900. Hostess:
1830 BAYVIEW $170,000: 3BR, Gina Key. See our ad in Sunday,
January 31th's Herald-Citizen
2BA under construction.
classified for more details.
260-4227 or 261-7979
American Way Real Estate
LandJcontractors.com
526-9581 / 267-3271
SUNDAY, JANUARY 31
2:00PM -4:00PM
501 Scenic Lane, Ckvl City
FROM PCCH: E on Spring St,
go under Hwu 111, L on Whitson Chapel, R on McCully, home
oncorbner of Scenic Ln & Mc240 PISTOLE RD. 100% Finan- Cully. See signs. $169,900.
cing. New 2 story, Stone/Siding, Hosting Agent: Connie Mc4BR, 3BA, flex room, 2440 sq ft Cormick. See our display ad in
+ garage, $189k (931)544-3849. Sunday January 31st's HeraldCitizen classified for more dembuilders.org
tails.
RE/MAX Crossroads LLC
THE Upper Cumberland Team
520-7777
Connie: 931-260-0440
7157 COLEMAN CIRCLE
SUNDAY, JANUARY 31
$199k. New & Ready to Move
1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
Into! 3BR, 2BA Craftsman Style.
1059 Riverbend
260-4227 or 261-7979
E on Spring, R on 111, L on Old
LandJcontractors.com
Sparta, L on Riverbend, house
on L. $229,900. Host: Delores
Ford. See our display ad in
Sunday January 31st's HeraldCitizen Classifieds for more details.
FIRST REALTY CO
528-1573
Delores: (931)260-6223
7161 COLEMAN CIRCLE
$199k. 3BR, 2BA under construction. 260-4227 or 261-7979
LandJcontractors.com
SUNDAY, JANUARY 31
1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
FSBO 720 Liberty Ct. 3 BR, 2.5
2180 Bear Creek Circle
BA + bonus rm, on cul-de-sac, 2
Car Gar, 2,600 SF Cape Cod. No on Washington. R on Bear
Creek, L on Bear Creek Point, R
$245,900 obo. 931-526-4365
on Bear Creek Circle, L on Bear
Creek Circle, home on R.
$174,900. Hostess: Brandy
Dillon. See our display ad in
Sunday January 31st's HeraldCitizen classified for more details.
FIRST REALTY CO
528-1573
Brandy: (931)284-1228
READY TO BUILD? 6 lots on
Boyd Farris Rd. Let us build your
home. 260-4227 or 261-7979
SUNDAY, JANUARY 31
LandJcontractors.com
1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
1989 Bear Creek Pointe
830
Open Houses From PCCH: No on Washington,
R on Bear Creek, L on Bear
SUNDAY - JANUARY 31
Creek Pointe, house on R.
2PM - 4PM
$209,900. Hosting: Amy Lee.
720 Liberty Ct.
Listing Agent: Chad Crouch. See
From PCCH E on Spring, N on our display ad in Sunday JanuO l d K e n t u c k y R , L o n ary 31st's Herald-Citizen ClasJamestown Rd, R on Liberty Ct., sifieds for more details.
Village Green S/D on Cul-deFIRST REALTY COMPANY
sac. Smart kitchen re-model.
528-1573
Family room w/fireplace, master
Chad: (931)979-1191
BR on main level. Up-stairs 2
Amy: (931)881-6717
BR's + bonus room. 2.5 BA's. 2c
garage +2c carport or pavilion
$245,900 OBO.
For Sale by Owner
526-4365
SUNDAY, JANUARY 31
12:30 PM - 2:00 PM
3559 Manassas
E on Spring, L on Dry Valley, R
on Buck Mtn, L on Old Qualls, R
on Shenandoah, L on Manassas, home on R. $295,000.
Hostess: Beverly Pierce. See
our display ad in Sunday, January 31th's Herald-Citizen classified for more details.
American Way Real Estate
931-526-9581
Beverly 252-5222
12:30-2:00 PM
Connie McCormick
260-0440
520-7777
SUNDAY, JANUARY 31
12PM - 2PM
1578 Bradshaw Blvd
From PCCH: E on Spring, R on
Hwy 111, L on Old Sparta Rd, L
on Bob Bullock, R on Hickory
Flatts, R on Bradshaw Blvd,
home on R. Host: Julio Unzueta.
See our display ad in Sunday,
January 31st's Herald-Citizen
Classified for more details.
FIRST REALTY CO
528-1573
Julio: (931)979-0141
SUNDAY, JANUARY 31
1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
564 Old Qualls Rd
East on Broad, L on Old Qualls,
home on L. $187,400. Hosting:
Scott Weaver. Listing Agent:
Chad Crouch. See our display
ad in Sunday January 31st's
Herald-Citizen Classifieds for
more details.
FIRST REALTY COMPANY
528-1573
Chad: (931)979-1191
Scott: (931)239-3130
SUNDAY, JANUARY 31
1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
234 East 8th St
From PCCH: No on Washington,
L on 8th St, home on R.
$337,900. Hosting: Wayne Russell. Listing Agent: Chad Crouch.
See our display ad in Sunday
January 31st's Herald-Citizen
Classifieds for more details.
FIRST REALTY COMPANY
528-1573
Chad: (931)979-1191
Wayne: (931)260-3743
SUNDAY, JANUARY 31
1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
1440 Thomas Circle
From PCCH: East on Spring, R
on Old Ky Rd (Neal St), L on
Maple, R on Hillwood, L on
Thomas, house on R w/signs.
$179,900. Hosting: Lee Lehman.
Listing Agent: Chad Crouch. See
our display ad in Sunday January 31st's Herald-Citizen Classifieds for more details.
FIRST REALTY COMPANY
528-1573
Chad: (931)979-1191
Lee: (931)252-9141
Open Houses
SUNDAY, JANUARY 31
12:30 P.M. - 2:00 P.M.
4198 Hwy 70E
East on Spring, cross over I-40,
home on L. $150,000. Hostess:
Andrea Dyer. See our display ad
in Sunday, January 31st's Herald Citizen classified for more
details.
American Way Real Estate
526-9581 / 239-4700
835
Cyy pprr eess s Cr
C
C r ee
eek
APARTMENTS
Leasing
1, 2 & 3 Bedroom
Apartments
Security Deposit
only $250!
Farms For Sale
Housing Vouchers Welcome
Restrictions Apply
White Cty near Ckvl By Owner: 72 AC 1.2m off 111 airport
exit $6500/ac; 59 AC close in
Hwy 84, panoramic views
$5576/ac; 74 AC near Old Ky
Rd, $4034/ac. 10% dn, can divide. Call 432-1718
840
600 W. 8th Street
Suite A, Cookeville
931-372-1605
Lots & Acreage
Small
Ads Get
noticed
also.
1.4 acres - City water & electric.
Near Center Hill Lake. 1-40 @
Exit 273. $29,000. 931-260-9513
LOT 4 SALE: Hawkins Hill S/D,
.48 acres $16,000. Buffalo Valley Rd just off Hawkins Crawford. Call (931)432-1092.
Home Sweet Home
$ 75,000
$69,000
$65,000
240 Bryant Avenue
317 Circle Drive
435 Lusk Avenue
MLS# 173236
MLS# 172713
MLS# 170386
$ 125,000
$135,000
$149,500
150 Battlefield
302 Mirandy
211 Minnie Wheeler
MLS# 172925
MLS# 173540
MLS# 172174
$ 199,500
$249,500
1374 Village Court
2218 Shelby Drive
$314,900
124 Whites Point Drive
MLS# 173603
MLS# 170645
MLS# 170642
Office: (931) 526-9581 or Direct (931) 267-3271
[email protected]
AMERICAN WAY REAL ESTATE
FEATURED HOMES
2211 Browns Mill Road
1375 Pilot Drive
3559 MANASSAS
$295,000
MLS 173340
HOSTESS:
Beverly Pierce
931-252-5222
DIRECTIONS: E. on Spring,
L. on Dry Valley, Rt. on Buck
Mt. Rd., L. on Old Qualls, Rt.
into Shenandoah, L. on
Manassas, home on Rt.
$234,900 MLS 173608
$274,900 MLS 173527
110 Mountain Harbour
1028 Nottingham Drive
$275,000 MLS 172549
$135,000 MLS 173818
124 WHITES POINT DRIVE
$314,900
MLS 170642
HOSTESS:
Gina Key
931-267-3271
DIRECTIONS: East on Broad
Street/Buck Mountain Road,
Right on Whites Point Drive,
home on left.
501 SCENIC LANE
$169,900 MLS# 173578
CROSS ROADS, L.L.C.
SUNDAY, JANUARY 31
1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
1985 Bear Creek Pointe
No on Washington, R on Bear
Creek, L on Bear Creek Pointe,
house on R. $209,900. Hosting:
Amy Lee. Listing Agent: Chad
Crouch. See our display ad in
Sunday January 31st's HeraldCitizen Classifieds for more details.
FIRST REALTY COMPANY
528-1573
Chad: (931)979-1191
Amy: (931)881-6717
830
S
SUNDAY’S
U N D AY ’ S O
OPEN
PEN H
HOUSES
OUSES
12:30-2:00 PM
DIRECTIONS: FROM PCCH: East on Spring St., Go
under HWY 111, Left on Whitson Chapel, R ight on
McCully, Home on Right on Corner of Scenic Lane
& McCully Rd.
Open Houses
A
AMERICAN
MERICAN W
WAY
AY
R E A L ESTATE
REAL
E S T AT E
O P E N S U N D AY 2 : 0 0 - 4 : 0 0
Just listed! 4BR/3BA brick with 2800SF,
Hardwoods, Newly Updated Kitchen, Full
Basement offers Large Den/Family
Room, Mini Kitchen with Mother-In-Law
Quarters, Large Corner Lot, Call Today!
830
12:30-2:00 PM
4198 HIGHWAY 70 E
$150,000
MLS 173769
HOSTESS:
Andrea Dyer
931-239-4700
DIRECTIONS: East on
Spring Street/Highway 70,
cross over I-40, home
on left.
Dedicated
710 S. JEFFERSON AVE.
COOKEVILLE, TN
9 3 1 - 5 2 6 - 9 5 8 1 o r To l l F re e 8 6 6 - 3 1 9 - 5 6 5 5
A m e r i c a n - Wa y. C o m
The Natalie Stout Team
Amber Flynn
931-510-3716
Natalie Stout
931-267-9509
Amanda Wiegand
931-267-1310
Determined Dependable
The Realty Firm
410 E. Spring • Suite G
Cookeville, TN 38501
931.520.7750 phone 931.520.7728 fax
w w w. T h e R e a l t y F i r m A g e n t . c o m
Sell your unused
items in the classifieds.
Call today and place your
advertisement in the
classified columns of
the Herald-Citizen
WORKING FOR YOU!
5 2 6 - 9 7 1 5
Herald-Citizen
1300 Neal St., Cookeville
Herald-Citizen
Sunday, January 31, 2016
SPORTS
F
CHS splits at Warren County
By BEN CRAVEN
HERALD-CITIZEN Sports Staff
McMINNVILLE — The Lady Cavs were able
to pull out another big district win late as they
beat the Warren County Lady Pioneers for the
second time this season 48-40, but the boys
struggled and fell 54-48 to a Warren County
team that the Cavs dominated in their last
matchup.
However, the night was not boring as both
games were pretty close the whole way.
For the Lady Cavs (14-9, 4-3 6-AAA), they
just couldn’t seem to keep the Lady Pioneers
from hanging around.
Both defenses were on point as the Lady Cavs
pulled down 30 rebounds to the Lady Pioneers’
(7-19, 0-7 6-AAA) 16 but couldn’t seem to ex-
tend their lead, flirting with an around 6-point
advantage for most of the game.
“They played the exact defense we thought
they would play,” commented CHS head coach
Mindy Odom. “I think that’s the best defense
they have. We do a lot of things together in the
summers, so we kind of know each other pretty
well. It’s one of those games where you call
something and they might know it, but you still
have to execute. We have a lot of things we
could have called that they don’t know, but I
thought they did a really good job of defending
us tonight.”
“I thought our defense was good. They got
super hot down the stretch, and we were fortunate enough to be able to finish the game.”
However, late in the fourth quarter, Warren
County made a comeback and looked like they
might be able to take over the game.
With 1:40 left in the game, Warren County’s
Marlee Smith made a layup and the foul shot to
bring the Lady Pioneers within two at 42-40.
But once again, the Lady Cavs turned on the
free throw shooting and defense late in a game.
Toiya Gwynn made two free throws, Courtney
Savage made two, and Sydney Bean made 2-of4, while the Lady Cavs defense kept the Lady
Pioneers from scoring the rest of the game.
“At two and a half minutes, I felt like we were
kind of backing into it,” Odom said. “But then,
once we settled down and started attacking the
rim again, we were fine. We went to the free
throw line and hit enough to win. We’ll take it
any way we can get it.”
See CHS, Page F4
Cookeville’s
Toiya
Gwynn
drives to the
basket during the Lady
Cavaliers’
48-40 win
over Warren
County on
Friday night
in McMinnville.
Ben Craven |
Herald-Citizen
TENNESSEE TECH BASKETBALL
Down goes Belmont
Second-half
surge helps
Tech hand
Belmont first
OVC loss
Thomas Corhern | Herald-Citizen
Upperman’s Gracie Maynord drives
past a Macon County defender during
the Lady Bees’ 77-47 victory over the
Tigerettes on Friday night in Baxter.
UHS
sweeps
Macon
County
By THOMAS CORHERN
HERALD-CITIZEN Assistant Sports Editor
BAXTER — The Upperman basketball
teams picked up two big wins on Friday,
using strong defensive efforts to hold off
Macon County as the Bees and Lady Bees
continue their push into the home stretch of
the District 8-AA slate.
The Lady Bees got the evening going as
they
topped
Macon
County 77-47, then the
boys followed that up with
a 68-52 win in the nightcap.
In the girls contest, the
Lady Bees had no problem, surging out to a 25-14 lead by the time
the first quarter had ended, then took a 4824 halftime lead.
All the while, Upperman’s Gracie
Maynord was on fire. The previous time the
Lady Bees took on the Tigerettes in
Lafayette, Maynord poured in 23 points. On
Friday, Maynord matched that total to lead
UHS (22-2, 9-0 8-AA).
“Gracie shot the ball well again (Friday),”
said UHS girls head coach Dana
McWilliams. “She’s done that for us all season and she’s just an unbelievable shooter.
Her teammates do such an unbelievable job
of finding her and getting her open. She requires so much attention from the defense.”
Akira Levy also added 17 points, while
Sarah Eldridge scored 15.
Kassidy Brooks led MCHS (8-16, 1-9 8AA) with 19 points, while Kyndal Bullington scored 11.
In the boys contest, Macon County kept it
close for a little while, trailing 17-11 after
the first quarter.
But Upperman kept the Tigers scoreless
from the final minute of the opening period
to nearly the three-minute mark of the second quarter, outscoring MCHS 15-5 in the
second to take a 32-16 lead at the intermission.
The Bees added a little bit more to their advantage, outscoring Macon 23-19 in the
third quarter, but the Tigers chipped away
slightly, outscoring UHS 17-13 in the final
eight minutes.
“That was a good win for us,” said UHS
boys head coach Bobby McWilliams.
See UHS, Page F4
By CRAIG DELK
Special to the HERALD-CITIZEN
COOKEVILLE — Tennessee
Tech already believed it was one
of the best teams in the Ohio Valley Conference prior to Saturday
night’s game against Belmont.
The Golden Eagles proved that
belief was well-justified.
Tech overcame a nine-point
second-half
deficit, outscoring Belmont
34-15 over the
final 11:16 as it
knocked off the
Bruins 89-79 in
front of a rauMen’s
cous crowd of
4,428 at the Basketball
Eblen Center.
“We just got locked in,” said
Tech senior forward Ryan Martin, who had a double-double
with 18 points and 13 rebounds.
“We knew it was time to win. We
said at halftime, ‘We’re up three,
and they’re going to have a run.’
It was just about us weathering
the storm, and we did.”
The victory pulled Tech (16-7,
8-2 OVC) within a half-game of
Belmont for first place in the
OVC East division.
Coming into the matchup,
Golden Eagles head coach Steve
Payne said he wanted his team to
play loose and not worry about
the standings.
“No matter what, we were
gonna be in the mix, and we’ll be
in the mix when this thing comes
down to the end,” Payne said.
“We’re a good-enough team.
We’ve gotta keep getting better,
and you can’t get worse and you
can’t stay the same. You’ve gotta
get better every day, and that was
the key.”
Martin added, “We feel as if the
Tony Marable | Herald-Citizen
two (OVC) games we lost, we
Tennessee Tech’s Anthony Morse dunks the ball over a Belmont defender during the Golden Eagles’ 89- weren’t supposed to lose those.
79 victory over the Bruins on Saturday night at the Hooper Eblen Center. The loss was Belmont’s first
See MEN, Page F3
this season in Ohio Valley Conference play.
Tech women come up short
in double-overtime thriller
By BEN CRAVEN
HERALD-CITIZEN Sports Staff
Tony Marable | Herald-Citizen
Tennessee Tech’s Yaktavia Hickson dives to save the ball from going
out of bounds during the Golden Eagles’ 80-79 loss in double-overtime to Belmont on Saturday night at the Hooper Eblen Center.
COOKEVILLE — The buzzer
sounded at the end
of the second overtime with the ball
soaring toward the
basket.
The crowd held
Women’s
its breath, then let
out a collective Basketball
sigh as Samaria
Howard’s pull-up jumper missed the
target and the Tennessee Tech
Golden Eagles fell to the Belmont
Bruins 80-79.
But the game wasn’t all bad.
Sophomore Yaktavia Hickson had
the best game of her career as she
put up 23 points, shot a perfect 3-of3 from behind the arc, and shot a
perfect 4-of-4 from the free throw
line.
“Well, when I come into games,
I’m just trying to make sure I play
my hardest and play my best for my
teammates,” Hickson commented. “I
just wanted to make sure I came out
and left it all on the floor and give it
all for my team.”
And although Samaria Howard had
a rough start, she ended up with 21
points, a team-high six rebounds,
and four assists. Howard also hit a
huge three with less than a second in
See WOMEN, Page F3
F2 — HERALD-CITIZEN, Cookeville, Tenn. — www.herald-citizen.com — Sunday, January 31, 2016
SPORTS
SCOREBOARD
TO-DO LIST
SUNDAY, JANUARY 31
■ On Television
Sunday, Jan. 31
No events scheduled.
MONDAY, FEBRUARY 1
UPPERMAN HIGH
Basketball at DeKalb County — 6 p.m.
AROUND THE UPPER CUMBERLAND
White County basketball hosts York Institute — 6 p.m.
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 2
COOKEVILLE HIGH
Basketball hosts Pickett County — 6 p.m.
UPPERMAN HIGH
Basketball at Murfreesboro Central Magnet — 6 p.m.
MONTEREY HIGH
Basketball hosts Clarkrange — 6 p.m.
AROUND THE UPPER CUMBERLAND
Livingston Academy basketball at Smith County — 6 p.m.
White County basketball hosts Nashville Central Christian — 6 p.m.
DeKalb County basketball hosts Macon County — 6 p.m.
York Institute basketball hosts Cannon County — 6 p.m.
Jackson County basketball at Cumberland County — 6 p.m.
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 3
No events scheduled.
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 4
AROUND THE UPPER CUMBERLAND
Clay County basketball at Van Buren County — 6 p.m.
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 5
TENNESSEE TECH
Track and Field at Mayo Invitational — all day
COOKEVILLE HIGH
Basketball hosts White County — 6 p.m.
UPPERMAN HIGH
Basketball at Cannon County — 6 p.m.
MONTEREY HIGH
Basketball at Jackson County — 6 p.m.
AROUND THE UPPER CUMBERLAND
Livingston Academy basketball hosts York Institute — 6 p.m.
Clarkrange basketball hosts Pickett County — 6 p.m.
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 6
TENNESSEE TECH
Track and Field at Mayo Invitational — all day
Women’s basketball at Jacksonville State — 2 p.m.
Men’s basketball at Jacksonville State — 4:30 p.m.
AROUND THE UPPER CUMBERLAND
Smith County basketball at York Institute — 6 p.m.
Clay County basketball hosts East Robertson — 6 p.m.
SPORTS BULLETIN BOARD
DSSP “I Matter” 5K Run
The fifth annual Daniel Seal
Suicide Prevention and “I Matter” 5K run will be held on April
2 at Tennessee Tech at 8 a.m.
Online registrations are available at danielsealsuicideprevention.org and Active.com.
1-Shot Athletics Spring Skills
and Drills Camp
The 1-Shot Athletics Spring
Skills and Drills basketball camp
will be held March 28 through
April 1 at Cane Creek Gymnasium.
The camp will run from 7 a.m.
to 5 p.m. each day.
Registration fees through
March 11 are $65 for the week,
increasing to $75 after that date
or $20 per day.
Register
online
at
the
Cookeville Leisure Services
website — www.cookevilletn.gov/ls/camps/athcamps/ — or
in the office at the Cane Creek
Gymnasium.
For more information, call
(931) 526-9767.
Dale Hallow Spring
Bass Classic
The second annual Dale Hollow
Spring Bass Classic, hosted by
Sunset Marina and Resort, will
be held on April 23 and 24.
There is a $150 entry fee for the
first 150 boats.
Come experience spring bass
fashing tournament-style on
AUTO RACING
6 a.m.
FS1 — IMSA, Rolex 24 at Daytona, at Daytona
Beach, Fla.
Noon
FS1 — IMSA, Rolex 24 at Daytona, at Daytona
Beach, Fla.
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
11 a.m.
CBSSN — Lehigh at Boston U.
FOX — Villanova at St. John's
NBCSN — George Washington at George
Mason
Noon
CBS — Maryland at Ohio St.
1 p.m.
CBSSN — Temple at South Florida
2 p.m.
BTN — Northwestern at Iowa
3 p.m.
CBSSN — UConn at UCF
ESPNU — Wichita St. at Evansville
FSN — UTEP at Louisiana Tech
4 p.m.
FS1 — California at Colorado
4:15 p.m.
BTN — Rutgers at Michigan St.
5:30 p.m.
ESPNU — Virginia Tech at Pittsburgh
6:30 p.m.
BTN — Wisconsin at Illinois
7:30 p.m.
ESPNU — Oregon at Arizona St.
EXTREME SPORTS
11 a.m.
ESPN — Winter X Games, Skiing and Snowboarding, at Aspen, Colo.
FIGURE SKATING
3 p.m.
NBC — ISU, European Championships, Men's
& Women's Free Skates, at Bratislava, Slovakia (taped)
GOLF
Noon
GOLF — PGA Tour, Farmers Insurance Open,
final round, at La Jolla, Calif.
2 p.m.
CBS — PGA Tour, Farmers Insurance Open,
final round, at La Jolla, Calif.
GOLF — LPGA Tour, Pure Silk Bahamas
LPGA Classic, final round, at Paradise Island, Bahamas
NBA BASKETBALL
2:30 p.m.
ABC — Chicago at L.A. Clippers
5 p.m.
NBA — Boston at Orlando
8 p.m.
NBA — Minnesota at Portland
NFL FOOTBALL
6 p.m.
ESPN — Pro Bowl, Team Rice vs. Team Irvin,
at Honolulu
NHL HOCKEY
4 p.m.
NBCSN — NHL All-Star Game, at Nashville,
Tenn.
SOCCER
7:25 a.m.
FS2 — FA Cup, Everton at Carlisle United
9:55 a.m.
FS1 — FA Cup, Chelsea at MK Dons
3 p.m.
ESPN2 — Men, International friendly, United
States vs. Iceland, at Carson, Calif.
WINTER SPORTS
5 a.m.
NBCSN — FIS World Cup: Alpine Skiing,
Women's Slalom, at Maribor, Slovenia
6:30 a.m.
NBCSN — FIS World Cup: Alpine Skiing,
Men's Giant Downhill, at GarmischPartenkirchen, Germany
WOMEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
11:30 a.m.
BTN — Minnesota at Michigan
Noon
FS2 — St. John's at DePaul
SEC — Kentucky at Florida
1 p.m.
ESPNU — South Florida at SMU
2 p.m.
SEC — Alabama at Tennessee
4 p.m.
SEC — Missouri at Mississippi
5 p.m.
ESPN2 — South Carolina at Texas A&M
world-renowned Dale Hollow ■ High School Basketball
Lake.
Cookeville girls 48,
Entry forms can be picked up at
Warren County 40
the Byrdstown Town Hall.
WCHS
7
5
14 14 — 40
9
10
13 16 — 48
Registration begins at 9 a.m. on CHS
WCHS — Allison Hitchcock 14, Elsa Eckenrod
Feb. 17 at the Town Hall.
9, Marlee Smith 5, Kristen Rowland 4,
Winfree 3, Megan Patch 3, Rylan
Call (931) 864-6215 for more Saydee
Moore 2.
CHS — Sydney Bean 13, Megan Whitson 12,
information.
Toiya Gwynn 11, Heidi Smith 6, Courtney
Savage 4, Riley Masters 2.
Where to play table
tennis in Cookeville
Play table tennis at no cost
(ages 10 to 99) at Cookeville
YMCA (one table, Tuesday afternoons from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.),
Cookeville Mall (two tables
and robot, Tuesday and Thursday nights from 6 p.m. to 9
p.m.) and the indoor tennis
courts at 1995 North Willow
Avenue (three tables and robot,
Friday nights from 7 p.m. until
closing.
With a small cost, tables are
available at city recreation and
leisure services when available.
For more information, call
(931) 858-5150 or e-mail [email protected]
Upper Cumberland Paddlers
Upper Cumberland Paddlers is
a group of canoeists and kayakers in the Upper Cumberland
area. The group paddles mostly
in the Cookeville area, but also
schedules other trips outside the
lake. There are rental kayaks
available. For more information
or to join the group on its next
trip, call Joanne at (931) 2391775.
Warren County 54,
Cookeville boys 48
WCHS
5
18
17 14 — 54
CHS
12 10
13 13 — 48
WCHS — Isaiah Grayson 17, Trevor Gaines
14, Krojhn Calbert 9, Isaac Golden 7, Holden
Baker 5, Chance Hobbs 2.
CHS — Bryric Savage 16, Jacob Wilberscheid
15, Trey Bundrant 8, Noah Hilliker 7, Ayden
Gist 2.
MELBOURNE, Australia (AP)
— Angelique Kerber upset Serena
Williams 6-4, 3-6, 6-4 to win the
Australian Open title on Saturday,
ending the six-time champion’s unbeaten streak in finals here and
winning a major title for the first
time.
Williams was an overwhelming
favorite at Melbourne Park, where
she had won all six previous times
she’d reached the final, and was
trying to equal Steffi Graf’s Openera record of 22 Grand Slam singles titles.
Belmont 80, Tennessee Tech
women 79, 2OT
BELMONT (14-7)
Thompson 1-2 2-2 4, Smith 5-15 5-6 18, Roy
4-8 2-4 10, McCabe 1-10 4-4 6, Maggard 723 0-0 20, Joubran 2-3 2-4 6, Jones 3-8 4-4
12, Harmeyer 2-7 0-1 4. Totals 25-76 19-25
80.
TENNESSEE TECH (7-16)
Nicholson 1-2 0-0 2, Parson 1-7 7-8 9, Hickson
8-15 4-4 23, Jennings 2-5 0-0 4, Howard 924 2-2 21, Brooks 0-1 0-0 0, Goolsby 3-9 46 11, Harper 0-2 1-2 1, Smith 2-4 0-0 4, Dean
2-5 0-0 4. Totals 28-74 18-22 79.
BU
17 19 12 12 9 11 — 80
TTU
17 12 22 9 9 10 — 79
3-Point Goals — Belmont 11-36 ISmith 3-8,
Roy 0-1, McCabe 0-2, Maggard 6-17, Jones 25, Harmeyer 0-3), Tennessee Tech 5-11 (Parson 0-1, Hickson 3-3, Jennings 0-1, Howard
1-2, Brooks 0-1, Goolsby 1-3). Rebounds —
Belmont 62 (McCabe 12), Tennessee Tech 40
(Howard 6). Assists — Belmont 15 (McCabe
5), Tennessee Tech 13 (Howard 4). Fouled Out
— McCabe. Personal Fouls — Belmont 18,
Tennessee Tech 21. A — 3,113.
TCU 75, Tennessee men 63
TENNESSEE (10-11)
Moore 4-10 2-2 10, Schofield 2-6 0-0 5, Punter
Jr. 9-19 3-5 24, Hubbs III 1-7 0-0 2, Baulkman 1-5 0-0 3, Alexander 1-5 2-2 4, Mostella
3-9 1-2 9, Reese 0-0 0-0 0, Phillips 2-6 1-2
6, Woodson 0-2 0-0 0. Totals 23-69 9-13 63.
TCU (10-11)
Abron 2-4 2-3 6, Washburn 4-9 6-10 14, Collins
2-4 3-5 9, Trent 4-10 6-9 15, Parrish 4-12 46 14, M. Williams 0-1 2-2 2, Brodziansky 0-1
0-0 0, Miller 1-4 0-0 2, Shepherd 6-10 1-3 13.
Totals 23-55 24-38 75.
Halftime-Tennessee 41-27. 3-Point Goals-Tennessee 8-31 (Punter Jr. 3-11, Mostella 2-7,
Baulkman 1-3, Schofield 1-4, Phillips 1-4,
Moore 0-1, Hubbs III 0-1), TCU 5-12 (Collins
2-3, Parrish 2-5, Trent 1-4). Fouled OutMoore. Rebounds-Tennessee 41 (Alexander
11), TCU 46 (Washburn 9). Assists-Tennessee 15 (Moore 6), TCU 18 (Trent, Washburn, M. Williams 5). Total Fouls-Tennessee
25, TCU 16. A-5,761.
Ohio Valley Conference
men’s standings
West Division
OVC
W
L
Eastern Illinois
6
4
Murray State
5
4
UT Martin
3
5
Austin Peay
3
6
Southeast Missouri 2
7
SIU Edwardsville
1
9
East Division
OVC
W
L
Belmont
8
1
Tennessee Tech
8
2
Tennessee State
6
2
Morehead State
6
3
Jacksonville State
4
6
Eastern Kentucky
3
6
MCHS
14 10
15
8 — 47
UHS
25 23
22
7 — 77
MCHS — Kassidy Brooks 19, Mattie Goolsby
5, Jenna Russell 2, Kaylynn Dalton 8, Lyndsey Belton 2, Kyndal Bullington 11.
UHS — Riley Hurst 7, Akira Levy 17, Brooke
Farris 4, Lexie Strickland 2, Sarah Eldridge
15, Gracie Maynord 23, Ashlyn Medley 2,
Abby Greenwood 7.
Class AA No. 6 Upperman
boys 68, Macon County 52
MCHS
11
5
19 17 — 52
UHS
17 15
23 13 — 68
MCHS — Seth Carlisle 22, Michael Ashburn 6,
Tyler Carlisle 6, Trace McPherson 9, Clay
Carnahan 5, Riley Phillips 2, Heston King 2.
UHS — Ben Guffey 14, Austin Shrum 11,
Austyn McWilliams 22, Josh Endicott 15,
Jake Dronebarger 2, Brendan Ely 2, Dylon
Cushing 2.
Class A No. 5 Jackson County
girls 46, Clarkrange 38, OT
JCHS
12 10 3
8 13 — 46
Clark
8
6 7 12 5 — 38
JCHS — Cameron Sherrell 21, Kassidy Allen
9, McKenzie Flynn 9, Jaycie Woolbright 5,
Kaitlyn Pippin 2.
Clark — Zoie Crouch 14, Gracie Bush 8, Hannah Garrett 8, Breanna Bush 3, Charity
Crabtree 3, Katelyn Beaty 2.
JCHS
16
8
17 16 — 57
Clark
18 20
14 21 — 73
JCHS — James Coe 16, Colby Brown 10,
Jonah Smith 10, Isaac Phillips 7, Dylan Penley 6, Conner Brown 4, Theo Bowman 2, Joe
Brown 2.
Clark — Hunter Crouch 23, Ryan Miller 21,
Austin Monday 14, Coleman Linkous 6,
Cobe Hayes 4, Emory Lane 3, Chase Fowler
2.
For the second time in as many
majors, though, she fell short.
Williams won the Australian Open, ■ College Basketball
French Open and Wimbledon titles
Tennessee Tech men 89,
last year before losing to Roberta
Belmont 79
Vinci in the U.S. Open semifinals.
BELMONT (16-7)
She was so close to a calendar-year Luke 1-4 0-0 3, Barnette 5-11 0-0 14, Brad3-15 2-2 10, Egekeze 4-6 0-0 11,
Grand Slam in 2015, but no has no shaw
Bradds 3-5 2-2 8, Smith 4-9 0-0 12, Windler
chance to push for that honor after 2-4 0-0 5, Laidig 0-0 0-0 0, Mercer 2-3 0-0 5,
McClain 4-10 2-3 11. Totals 28-67 6-7 79.
losing the first major of the year.
TENNESSEE TECH (16-7)
The 34-year-old Williams hadn’t Thomas 3-5 2-6 8, Jugovic 0-5 0-0 0, Rowe 819 6-7 26, Martin 4-8 9-9 18, Morse 3-6 1-5
lost a set in the first six rounds at 7, Rogers 7-12 4-4 20, Ramsey 4-6 1-2 10.
Totals 29-61 23-33 89.
Melbourne Park until dropping the Halftime-Tennessee
Tech 39-36. 3-Point
first on Saturday night against No. Goals-Belmont 17-45 (Smith 4-9, Barnette 49, Egekeze 3-5, Bradshaw 2-11, Mercer 1-1,
7-seeded Kerber.
Luke 1-3, Windler 1-3, McClain 1-4), Ten-
Overall
W
L
9
13
11
11
11
12
10
14
5
17
4
18
Overall
W
L
16
7
16
7
15
6
12
9
8
17
12
12
Ohio Valley Conference
women’s standings
SIU Edwardsville
UT Martin
Belmont
Southeast Missouri
Eastern Kentucky
Austin Peay
Tennessee State
Jacksonville State
Morehead State
Murray State
Tennessee Tech
Eastern Illinois
OVC
W
L
9
1
7
1
6
2
6
3
5
4
5
4
4
5
4
6
3
6
3
6
3
7
0
10
Overall
W
L
14
9
14
7
14
7
13
9
11
9
7
15
9
13
9
13
9
14
7
13
7
16
1
21
Southeastern Conference
men’s standings
SEC
Texas A&M
South Carolina
Kentucky
LSU
Florida
Georgia
Vanderbilt
Arkansas
Ole Miss
Tennessee
Auburn
Alabama
Mississippi State
Missouri
W
7
6
6
6
5
4
4
4
3
3
3
2
2
1
L
1
2
2
2
3
4
4
4
5
5
5
6
6
7
Overall
W
L
18
3
19
2
16
5
13
8
14
7
11
8
12
9
11
10
13
8
10
11
9
11
11
9
9
11
8
13
Southeastern Conference
women’s standings
SEC
Class AA No. 4 Upperman
girls 77, Macon County 47
Clarkrange boys 73,
Jackson County 53
Kerber upsets Serena Williams
to win Australian Open title
nessee Tech 8-23 (Rowe 4-9, Rogers 2-6,
Ramsey 1-2, Martin 1-3, Thomas 0-1, Jugovic 0-2). Fouled Out-None. Rebounds-Belmont 39 (Bradds 9), Tennessee Tech 37
(Martin 13). Assists-Belmont 21 (Bradshaw
8), Tennessee Tech 9 (Jugovic 4). Total
Fouls-Belmont 27, Tennessee Tech 13. A4,428.
South Carolina
Texas A&M
Mississippi State
Florida
Vanderbilt
Missouri
Kentucky
Arkansas
Tennessee
Georgia
Auburn
Ole Miss
Alabama
LSU
W
8
5
5
5
4
4
4
4
3
3
3
2
2
2
L
0
2
3
3
3
4
4
4
4
5
5
5
6
6
Overall
W
L
20
0
15
5
18
4
17
4
15
5
17
4
15
4
9
12
12
8
15
6
13
8
10
10
13
8
8
13
■ National Football League
NFL Playoffs
All Times EST
Wild-card Playoffs
Saturday, Jan. 9
Kansas City 30, Houston 0
Pittsburgh 18, Cincinnati 16
Sunday, Jan. 10
Seattle 10, Minnesota 9
Green Bay 35, Washington 18
Divisional Playoffs
Saturday, Jan. 16
New England 27, Kansas City 20
Arizona 26, Green Bay 20, OT
Sunday, Jan. 17
Carolina 31, Seattle 24
Denver 23, Pittsburgh 16
Conference Championships
Sunday, Jan. 24
AFC
Denver 20, New England 18
NFC
Carolina 49, Arizona 15
Pro Bowl
Sunday, Jan. 31
At Honolulu
Team Rice vs. Team Irvin, 7 p.m. (ESPN)
Super Bowl
Sunday, Feb. 7
At Santa Clara, Calif.
Denver vs. Carolina, 6:30 p.m. (CBS)
2016 Pro Bowl Rosters
Sunday, Jan. 31
At Aloha Stadium
Honolulu
TEAM IRVIN
Coach: Winston Moss, Green Bay
Offense
Quarterbacks: Russell Wilson, Seattle; Jameis
Winston, Tampa Bay; Teddy Bridgewater,
Minnesota.
Running backs: Devonta Freeman, Atlanta;
Todd Gurley, St. Louis; Latavius Murray,
Oakland.
Wide receivers: Julio Jones, Atlanta; A.J.
Green, Cincinnati; DeAndre Hopkins, Houston; Allen Robinson, Jacksonville.
Tight ends: Tyler Eifert, Cincinnati; Delanie
Walker, Tennessee.
Fullback: Patrick DiMarco, Atlanta.
Tackles: Andrew Whitworth, Cincinnati; Tyron
Smith, Dallas; Branden Albert, Miami.
Guards: Marshal Yanda, Baltimore; Zack Martin, Dallas; David DeCastro, Pittsburgh.
Centers: Alex Mack, Cleveland; Travis Freder-
ick, Dallas.
Defense
Co-captain: Darren Woodson.
Defensive ends: Ezekiel Ansah, Detroit;
Michael Bennett, Seattle; Carlos Dunlap,
Cincinnati.
Defensive tackles: Jurrell Casey, Tennessee;
Calais Campbell, Arizona; Geno Atkins,
Cincinnati.
Outside linebackers: Anthony Barr, Minnesota;
Lavonte David, Tampa Bay; Sean Lee, Dallas.
Inside linebackers: Derrick Johnson, Kansas
City; NaVorro Bowman, San Francisco.
Cornerbacks: Richard Sherman, Seattle;
Desmond Trufant, Atlanta; Adam Jones,
Cincinnati; Dominque Rodgers-Cromartie,
New York Giants.
Safeties: Reshad Jones, Miami; Malcolm Jenkins, Philadelphia; Harrison Smith, Minnesota.
Special teams
Punter: Sam Koch, Baltimore.
Placekicker: Dan Bailey, Dallas.
Return specialist: Darren Sproles, Philadelphia.
Special-teamer: Justin Bethel, Arizona.
Long-snapper: Jon Weeks, Houston.
TEAM RICE
Coach: Andy Reid, Kansas City
Offense
Quarterbacks: Eli Manning, New York Giants;
Derek Carr, Oakland; Tyrod Talor, Buffalo.
Running backs: Adrian Peterson, Minnesota;
Doug Martin, Tampa Bay, Chris Ivory, N.Y.
Jets.
Wide receivers: Odell Beckham, Jr., New York
Giants; Jarvis Landry, Miami; Amari Cooper,
Oakland; T.Y. Hilton, Indianapolis.
Tight ends: Travis Kelce, Kansas City; Gary
Barnidge, Cleveland.
Fullback: John Kuhn, Green Bay.
Tackles: Joe Thomas, Cleveland; Joe Staley,
San Francisco; Kyle Long, Chicago.
Guards: Josh Sitton, Green Bay; Logan Mankins, Tampa Bay; Richie Incognito, Buffalo.
Centers: Eric Wood, Buffalo; Nick Mangold,
New York Jets.
Defense
Co-captain: Eric Davis.
Defensive ends: Khalil Mack, Oakland; Everson Griffen, Minnesota; Cameron Jordan,
New Orleans.
Defensive tackles: Gerald McCoy, Tampa Bay;
Aaron Donald, St. Louis; Fletcher Cox,
Philadelphia.
Outside linebackers: Tamba Hali, Kansas City;
Julius Peppers, Green Bay; Elvis Dumervil,
Baltimore.
Inside linebackers: Bobby Wagner, Seattle;
Clay Matthews, Green Bay.
Cornerbacks: Marcus Peters, Kansas City;
Vontae Davis, Indianapolis, Brent Grimes,
Miami; Jason Verrett, San Diego.
Safeties: Eric Berry, Kansas City; Mike Adams,
Indianapolis; Charles Woodson, Oakland.
Special teams
Punter: Johnny Hekker, St. Louis.
Placekicker: Josh Brown, New York Giants.
Return specialist: Tyler Lockett, Seattle.
Special-teamer: Cedric Peerman, Cincinnati.
Long-snapper: Morgan Cox, Baltimore.
■ National Hockey League
NHL All-Star Rosters
Atlantic
Forwards — Patrice Bergeron, Boston; cJaromir Jagr, Florida; Leo Komarov, Toronto;
Dylan Larkin, Detroit; Ryan O’Reilly, Buffalo;
Steven Stamkos, Tampa Bay.
Defensemen — Aaron Ekblad, Florida; Erik
Karlsson, Ottawa; P.K. Subban, Montreal.
Goaltenders — Ben Bishop, Tampa Bay;
Roberto Luongo, Florida.
Metropolitan
Forwards — Nicklas Backstrom, Washington;
Claude Giroux, Philadelphia; r-Evgeny
Kuznetsov, Washington; Evgeni Malkin,
Pittsburgh; cx-Alex Ovechkin, Washington;
Brandon Saad, Columbus; c-John Tavares,
N.Y. Islanders.
Defensemen — Justin Faulk, Carolina; Kris
Letang, Pittsburgh; Ryan McDonagh, N.Y.
Rangers.
Goaltenders — Braden Holtby, Washington;
Cory Schneider, New Jersey.
Central
Forwards — Jamie Benn, Dallas; Matt Duchene, Colorado; c-Patrick Kane, Chicago; rJames Neal, Nashville; Tyler Seguin, Dallas;
Vladimir Tarasenko, St. Louis; x-Jonathan
Toews, Chicago.
Defensemen — Dustin Byfuglien, Winnipeg;
Roman Josi, Nashville; Shea Weber,
Nashville.
Goaltenders — Devan Dubnyk, Minnesota;
Pekka Rinne, Nashville.
Pacific
Forwards — Johnny Gaudreau, Florida; Taylor
Hall, Edmonton; Joe Pavelski, San Jose;
Corey Perry, San Jose; c-John Scott, Arizona; Daniel Sedin, Vancouver.
Defensemen — Brent Burns, San Jose; Drew
Doughty, Los Angeles; Mark Giordano, Calgary.
Goaltenders — John Gibson, San Jose;
Jonathan Quick, Los Angeles.
Standings and schedule
All Times EST
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Florida
49 29 15 5 63 135 108
Tampa Bay 49 27 18 4 58 130 117
Detroit
49 25 16 8 58 122 124
Boston
49 26 18 5 57 147 131
Montreal
50 24 22 4 52 136 134
Ottawa
50 23 21 6 52 139 155
Buffalo
50 20 26 4 44 114 136
Toronto
48 17 22 9 43 114 134
Metropolitan Division
Washington 47 35 8
4 74 158 104
N.Y. Rangers 49 27 17 5 59 142 129
N.Y. Islanders47 25 16 6 56 130 118
Pittsburgh
48 24 17 7 55 121 120
New Jersey 50 25 20 5 55 114 118
Carolina
51 23 20 8 54 123 135
Philadelphia 47 21 18 8 50 109 127
Columbus
51 19 27 5 43 133 163
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Chicago
53 33 16 4 70 147 122
Dallas
50 31 14 5 67 162 133
St. Louis
52 28 16 8 64 129 128
Colorado
52 27 22 3 57 143 142
Nashville
50 24 18 8 56 129 131
Minnesota 49 23 17 9 55 121 115
Winnipeg
49 22 24 3 47 126 140
Pacific Division
Los Angeles 49 30 16 3 63 129 113
San Jose
48 26 18 4 56 142 129
Arizona
49 24 20 5 53 131 146
Anaheim
47 22 18 7 51 101 111
Vancouver 50 20 19 11 51 122 139
Calgary
48 21 24 3 45 126 146
Edmonton 50 19 26 5 43 122 149
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss.
Friday’s Games
No games scheduled
Saturday’s Games
No games scheduled
Monday’s Games
No games scheduled
■ National Basketball Association
Standings and schedule
All Times EST
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W
L
Pct
Toronto
32
15 .681
Boston
27
21 .563
New York
23
26 .469
Brooklyn
12
36 .250
Philadelphia
7
41 .146
Southeast Division
Atlanta
27
21 .563
Miami
26
21 .553
Charlotte
22
25 .468
Washington
21
24 .467
Orlando
20
25 .444
Central Division
Cleveland
34
12 .739
Chicago
26
19 .578
Indiana
25
22 .532
Detroit
25
23 .521
Milwaukee
20
29 .408
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W
L
Pct
San Antonio
39
8
.830
Memphis
28
20 .583
Dallas
27
22 .551
Houston
25
25 .500
New Orleans
18
28 .391
Northwest Division
Oklahoma City
36
13 .735
Portland
22
26 .458
Utah
21
25 .457
GB
—
5½
10
20½
25½
—
½
4½
4½
5½
—
7½
9½
10
15½
GB
—
11½
13
15½
20½
—
13½
13½
Denver
Minnesota
18
30 .375 17½
14
34 .292 21½
Pacific Division
Golden State
43
4
.915
—
L.A. Clippers
31
16 .660
12
Sacramento
20
27 .426
23
Phoenix
14
34 .292 29½
L.A. Lakers
9
40 .184
35
Friday’s Games
Boston 113, Orlando 94
Cleveland 114, Detroit 106
New York 102, Phoenix 84
Miami 107, Milwaukee 103
Oklahoma City 116, Houston 108
Dallas 91, Brooklyn 79
Utah 103, Minnesota 90
Portland 109, Charlotte 91
L.A. Clippers 105, L.A. Lakers 93
Saturday’s Games
Golden State 108, Philadelphia 105
Toronto 111, Detroit 107
New Orleans 105, Brooklyn 103
Indiana 109, Denver 105, OT
Memphis 121, Sacramento 117
Washington 123, Houston 122
Cleveland 117, San Antonio 103
Sunday’s Games
Chicago at L.A. Clippers, 3:30 p.m.
Atlanta at Miami, 6 p.m.
Boston at Orlando, 6 p.m.
Phoenix at Dallas, 7 p.m.
Golden State at New York, 7:30 p.m.
Minnesota at Portland, 9 p.m.
Charlotte at L.A. Lakers, 9:30 p.m.
Monday’s Games
Cleveland at Indiana, 7 p.m.
Detroit at Brooklyn, 7:30 p.m.
Memphis at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
Washington at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m.
Dallas at Atlanta, 8 p.m.
Orlando at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m.
Chicago at Utah, 9 p.m.
Toronto at Denver, 9 p.m.
Milwaukee at Sacramento, 10 p.m.
■ Transactions
Friday
BASEBALL
American League
BALTIMORE ORIOLES — Assigned OF Joey
Terdoslavich outright to Norfolk (IL).
BOSTON RED SOX — Agreed to terms with
LHP Robbie Ross on a one-year contract.
KANSAS CITY ROYALS — Agreed to terms
with RHP Ian Kennedy on a five-year contract. Designated RHP Louis Coleman for
assignment.
MINNESOTA TWINS — Assigned LHP Logan
Darnell outright to Rochester (IL).
TEXAS RANGERS — Agreed to terms with
LHP Jake Diekman on a one-year contract
and with RHP Steve Johnson on a minor
league contract.
TORONTO BLUE JAYS — Agreed to terms
with INF Maicer Izturis on a minor league
contract.
National League
CHICAGO CUBS — Agreed to terms with
RHPs Stephen Fife, Brandon Gomes, Jean
Machi, Jonathan Pettibone and Drew Rucinski; LHPs Luis Cruz and Jack Leathersich;
INFs Jesus Guzman, Munenori Kawasaki
and Kristopher Negron; OF Juan Perez; and
C Tim Federowicz on minor league contracts.
NEW YORK METS — Agreed to terms with 2B
Neil Walker on a one-year contract.
PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES — Claimed LHP
Bobby LaFromboise off waivers from the
L.A. Angels.
Atlantic League
LONG ISLAND DUCKS — Signed RHP John
Brownell.
Can-Am League
NEW JERSEY JACKALS — Traded LHP
Francsico Gracequi to Sioux Falls (AA) for C
Richard Stock.
ROCKLAND BOULDERS — Signed LHP
Richard Salazar and INF Luis Gonzalez.
Frontier League
RIVER CITY RASCALS — Signed LHP
Michael Gunn and 1B Willi Martin.
WINDY CITY THUNDERBOLTS — Signed
RHPs Brandon Boyle and Tyler Murphy.
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
HOUSTON ROCKETS — Recalled F Montrezl
Harrell and G/F K.J. McDaniels from Rio
Grande Valley (NBADL).
NEW YORK KNICKS — Signed F Thanasis
Antetokounmpo to a 10-day contract.
PHOENIX SUNS — Signed G Jordan McRae
to a 10-day contract.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
DETROIT LIONS — Named Michael McCarthy
quality control-offensive line coach, Harold
Nash Jr. strength and conditioning coach
and Matt Harriss vice president of football
operations.
KANSAS CITY CHIEFS — Signed TE Travis
Kelce to a contract extension.
PHILADELPHIA EAGLES — Agreed to terms
with OT Lane Johnson on a six-year contract.
HOCKEY
National Hockey League
COLORADO AVALANCHE — Assigned D
Mason Geersten from San Antonio (AHL) to
Fort Wayne (ECHL).
MONTREAL CANADIENS — Assigned D Dalton Thrower from St. John’s (AHL) to Brampton (ECHL).
NEW JERSEY DEVILS — Recalled G Ken Appleby from Adirondack (ECHL) to Albany
(AHL).
PITTSBURGH PENGUINS — Assigned D Harrison Ruopo from Wilkes-Barre/Scranton
(AHL) to Wheeling (ECHL).
SAN JOSE SHARKS — Assigned F Nikita Jevpalovs from San Jose (AHL) to Allen (ECHL).
American Hockey League
AHL — Suspended Hershey LW Jakub Vrana
two games.
BINGHAMTON SENATORS — Assigned F
Alex Wideman to Evansville (ECHL).
ECHL
ADIRONDACK THUNDER — Added G Joe
Spadaccini as emergency backup.
ALLEN AMERICANS — Released F Casey
Thrush.
BRAMPTON BEAST — Signed F Steve Mele.
ELMIRA JACKALS — Signed D Taylor Love.
SOCCER
Major League Soccer
NEW YORK RED BULLS — Re-signed G Kyle
Reynish. Signed D Connor Lade to a multiyear contract.
SPORTING KANSAS CITY — Agreed to transfer F Krisztian Nemeth to Al-Gharafa SC in
Qatar.
North American Soccer League
NEW YORK COSMOS — Signed M Yohandry
Orozco.
COLLEGE
BOISE STATE — Named Zak Hill quarterbacks
coach and co-offensive coordinator. Promoted offensive line coach Scott Huff to cooffensive coordinator and wide receivers
coach Junior Adams to passing game coordinator.
LIMESTONE — Named Jordan Manning assistant track and field coach for jumps.
MICHIGAN — Named Warde Manuel athletic
director and signed him to a five-year contract.
NORTH CAROLINA — Named Chad Scott
tight ends/hybrids coach. Announced
women’s basketball coach Sylvia Hatchell
will serve a one-game suspension by the
school and an additional game by the NCAA
for for making contact with an official Sunday’s game and women’s assistant basketball coach Tracey Williams-Johnson will be
suspended for one game by the NCAA for
the same incident.
NOTRE DAME — Agreed to terms with football
coach Brian Kelly on a six-year contract.
SHENANDOAH — Named Jimmy Bowman
assistant softball coach and Maddie Taghon
women’s assistant lacrosse coach.
THIEL — Named Tim Heffernan offensive line
coach and run game/recruiting coordinator.
Saturday
BASEBALL
American League
KANSAS CITY ROYALS — Signed OF Travis
Snider to a minor-league contract.
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
HOUSTON ROCKETS — Assigned G-F K.J.
McDaniels and F-C Donatas Motiejunas to
Rio Grande Valley (NBADL).
FOOTBALL
National Football League
LOS ANGELES RAMS — Named Skip Peete
running backs coach.
COLLEGE
BIG TEN CONFERENCE — Suspended Wisconsin hockey player Jedd Soleway for one
game for hitting a player from behind in a
Jan. 29 game against Alaska.
HERALD-CITIZEN, Cookeville, Tenn. — www.herald-citizen.com — Sunday, January 31, 2016 — F3
SPORTS
Tech Homecoming scheduled for Oct. 22
TTU Sports Information
COOKEVILLE — Tennessee Tech
University’s second century begins with
the 2016 Fall semester, and one of the
grandest events on the calendar will be
the annual Homecoming festivities and
football game.
This year’s Homecoming weekend will
be Oct. 21-22, with the Golden Eagle
football team hosting Southeast Missouri on Saturday afternoon as the headline event.
The 2016 Homecoming dates were announced jointly this week by Athletics,
Alumni Relations and Student Affairs,
all of which play a large role in the festivities.
“Homecoming
on
college campuses is an
American tradition,
and Tennessee Tech
come back to
Athletics alumni
our campus every year
to make Homecoming
at Tennessee Tech a very special time,”
said Kevin Anderson, Director of
Alumni Engagement and Annual Giving. “It is time for our alumni to make
their plans to return this fall and make it
one of the best Homecoming weekends
we’ve ever hosted.”
Director of Athletics Mark Wilson said
this year’s Homecoming will include the
added luster of being a headlining game
of new head coach Marcus Satterfield’s
first season at the helm of the Golden
Eagles.
“Coach Satterfield and his staff are
working hard every day toward developing a brand of Golden Eagle football that
will be exciting to watch and rewarding
to support,” Wilson said. “We have a really good schedule of home games, and
the Homecoming game promises to be
an outstanding event.”
Tech’s student Homecoming Committee will select the actual Homecoming
MEN: Rowe topped Tech
with 26 points in victory
From Page F1
The rest of the way, we want to
take care of the job and win
every game from here on out.
Every team really wants to do
that, but we really believe that
we’re the best team in this conference.”
Torrance Rowe topped Tech
with 26 points, while Hakeem
Rogers shot 7-of-12 and added
20 points off the bench. Mason
Ramsey gave the Golden Eagles
a fourth double-digit scorer as he
chipped in 10 points and three
steals.
The Bruins (16-7, 8-1) — who
saw their nine-game winning
streak come to an end — pulled
to within 82-79 on Evan Bradds’
two-handed putback slam with
1:25 remaining. However, the
Golden Eagles ended the game
on a 7-0 run.
Tech — which improved to 120 at home — trailed 64-55 after
Kevin McClain’s driving basket
with 11:16 remaining. From
there, the Golden Eagles responded with an 11-0 run that
was capped by Rogers’ steal and
layup with 7:53 left.
“Our fans had a lot to do with
that,” Payne said. “It was a great
environment for basketball. And
our guys competed. Belmont is
so well-coached, they’ve got
such good players and they’re
such a great program that we
knew they were going to make a
run.”
The Bruins started the second
half on fire, draining five 3pointers in the first 4:05 to take
a 51-45 advantage following
Craig Bradshaw’s deep trey from
the right side.
Taylor Barnette led Belmont
with 14 points, while Nick Smith
(12), Amanze Egekeze (11) and
Bradshaw (10) also finished in
theme later this spring, but the weekend
will include all of the familiar activities,
such as the Homecoming Parade, Hall of
Fame Induction dinner, departmental
dinners and lunches, and a variety of displays and activities in the 98.5 Kiss FM
Tailgate Park.
Saturday morning will be highlighted
by the Homecoming Parade, which is
the focal point of numerous Parade
Watch Parties, plus breakfast from both
the Roaden University Center and the
Alumni Building on Dixie Avenue.
“Homecoming is always one of the
most anticipated events of the year,”
said Katie Williams, Interim Dean of
Students. “It’s an exciting and special
time for our students. They get excited
about the friendly competition among
student groups while also celebrating
the history and traditions of the university and welcoming back so many former students.”
One special added feature this year will
be the celebration of the 50th anniversary of the world-renowned Tennessee
Tech Tuba Ensemble.
To purchase Tennessee Tech football
season tickets, or for additional information on Homecoming, please visit or call
the Athletics Ticket Office in Eblen Center at (931) 372-3940.
Choi, Brown tied for lead at Torrey Pines
By DOUG FERGUSON
AP Golf Writer
SAN DIEGO (AP) — K.J. Choi one-putted his last
six holes Saturday to salvage an even-par 72 and a
share of the lead with Scott Brown going into a final
round at the Farmers Insurance Open that seems to
have everyone nervous.
The biggest threat might be a forecast of high wind
and big rain, and tee times were moved up as early
as possible to try to avoid it.
Inside the ropes, the final round figured to be wide
open with 16 players separated by three shots.
Choi was headed the wrong direction until he made
a pair of birdies, saved par on three straight holes and
then hit wedge to 3 feet on the par-5 18th for one last
birdie that allowed him to join Brown at 9-under 207.
Brown, whose lone PGA Tour victory was nearly
three years ago in Puerto Rico, would not seem to
be a candidate to thrive on the South Course at Torrey Pines, the longest on the PGA Tour and a U.S.
Open site. But he managed to keep it in play, which
is key no matter how far anyone hits it. He had a 70
and goes into Sunday with a great chance to win and
earn the Augusta native his first trip to the Masters.
Jimmy Walker, already a winner on two other Cal-
ifornia courses, was the anomaly. He couldn’t seem
to keep it in play off the tee by hitting only three fairways and still managed to gouge enough shots out
of the rough and hole enough putts for a 68 that put
him one shot behind.
Gary Woodland, tied with Choi going into the third
round, birdied his last hole for a 73 to join Walker at
one shot behind.
Phil Mickelson and Rickie Fowler each missed the
cut, though Torrey Pines still has a local favorite to
cheer. That would be Michael Kim, the Cal grad who
went to Torrey Pines High School and grew up
watching Mickelson and Tiger Woods win here. Kim
had a 70 and was among four players at 7-under 209.
Another shot back was a group that included Dustin
Johnson, who didn’t make a birdie until the 13th hole
and still managed to limit the damage to a 74.
Choi hasn’t won since The Players Championship
in 2011, which gave him a five-year exemption that
ends this year. He was an assistant captain in the
Presidents Cup in October, and showed he still has
plenty of game. Giving him 30 yards off the tee to
Johnson and Woodland, he rarely was out of play
and dropped shots mainly on a three-putt bogey at
No. 5 and a poor chip across the green at No. 7 that
led to double bogey.
SOUTHERN HILLS
Tony Marable | Herald-Citizen
Tennessee Tech’s Mason Ramsey shoots a jumper under
pressure during the Golden Eagles’ win over Belmont on
Saturday at the Hooper Eblen Center.
double figures.
Belmont led by as many as six
points in the first half before
Tech rallied. After McClain’s
deep 3-pointer from the top of
the key made it 36-34 with 2:07
left, the Golden Eagles ended the
half on a 5-0 run, with Rowe’s 3pointer making it 39-36 at the
break.
The Bruins shot 10-of-22 from
3-point range in the first half, but
went cold late in the second half
as they shot 7-of-23 from beyond the arc in the final 20 minutes.
“They shot 45 (3-pointers),
which helped us keep them off
the free-throw line,” Payne said.
“That was important for us.”
Another key was limiting Belmont big man Evan Bradds. The
junior came into the game
ranked first in the nation in
field-goal percentage (.720)
while also ranking second in the
OVC in scoring (18.7 ppg). He
finished 3-of-5 from the floor
for eight points, though he still
had a solid all-around game
with nine rebounds and five assists.
The Golden Eagles are off for a
week, returning to action on the
road Saturday at Jacksonville
State before ending a two-game
road swing at Tennessee State on
Feb. 10.
Benson hits a hole-in-one
On Dec. 24, Gary Benson made a hole-in-one, using a 7-iron on No. 6 at Southern Hills.
It was witnessed by Ruth Richmond.
WOMEN: Gave up 62 rebounds to Bruins
From Page F1
the first overtime to tie the game at 69 and force
the second overtime.
“It just happened,” Hickson added. “(Howard) is
just so aggressive, she gets to the basket, she wants
the ball in her hands, and she wants to score. I take
that after her.”
While the Golden Eagles (7-16, 3-7 OVC) were
able to force Belmont (14-7, 6-2 OVC) to turn the
ball over 18 times to Tech’s seven and score 19
points off turnovers, the Golden Eagles were
grossly outrebounded by the Bruins 62-40.
“It’s hard to beat a team when you give them 23
offensive rebounds,” commented Tech head coach
Jim Davis. “And we gave Morehead State 25 offensive rebounds. I’m ashamed to say that. That’s
never supposed to happen in a game of basketball
with a well coached team. Obviously we’re not a
well coached team.”
Despite the rebounding woes, Tech posted better
shooting percentages all around than Belmont. The
Golden Eagles shot 38 percent from the field, 46
percent from 3-point range, and 82 percent from
the free throw line, while the Bruins shot 33 percent from the field, 31 percent from behind the arc,
and 76 percent from the free throw line.
“It was a great game to watch,” Davis said. “It
didn’t turn out the way we wanted, but my hat’s
off to our young ladies. They played their hearts
out. We didn’t play good always, especially on the
defensive end. I thought we played as good an offensive game as we’ve played all year long, but
they made one more shot.”
Belmont came out to an early lead, but Tech was
able to come back and end the first quarter tied at
17.
In the second quarter, Belmont was able to build
their lead all the way back up to 10 points. However, Belmont fouled with less than a second remaining in the half, and Hannah Goolsby banked
in a three at the buzzer to cut the advantage to
seven points at 36-29.
Midway through the third quarter the Golden Eagles found themselves down ten points once again.
Tech then scored 13 straight points capped off by
a 3-pointer from Hickson to take the lead back 4946 with 47 seconds in the third. The run was ended
by two free throws from Belmont’s Sierra Jones,
and with one second left in the third, Howard stole
the inbound pass and layed it in for a 51-48 advantage.
At the beginning of the fourth quarter, the Golden
Eagles hit a bit of a skid as Howard missed her first
four shots.
The Bruins took advantage of the opportunity as
Jones hit a three with 4:54 in the fourth to tie the
game at 53, and Darby Maggard hit knocked down
another three with 4:09 in the fourth to take the
lead at 56-53.
The lead changed hands two more times before
Hannah Goolsby reclaimed it off of two free
throws with 1:36 left in regulation at 60-59.
Belmont’s Jenny Roy made a free throw with
1:21 on the clock to tie the game at 60, and neither
team could score again before time expired.
In the first overtime, the lead switched three
times. Sally McCabe made Belmont’s two free
throws to give them the 69-66 lead with only three
seconds left. That’s when Howard came off a pick
and drained a three at the buzzer to force a second
overtime.
In the closing moments of the second overtime,
Tech looked to Howard to finish the game strong.
Howard hit a jumper with 30 seconds left to give
the Golden Eagles a slight 79-78 advantage. Maggard answered with a jumper to give Belmont the
one-point lead, and Howards last buzzer-beating
shot couldn’t find its target.
“What stands out to me is just the heart of our
young ladies, the way they fought, and the way
they never gave up,” Davis said. “I’m proud of
them for their effort. I’m proud of them for hangin
together, sticking together, and playing as a team,
but the bottom line is we didn’t achieve the objective. The season is running out. We’ve got six left.
We’re going to have to win a bunch in order to get
there.”
Up next, the Tech women travel to Jacksonville
State for another OVC matchup on Saturday.
“Master Strokes” Sponsored By:
• Cookeville
• Livingston
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F4 — HERALD-CITIZEN, Cookeville, Tenn. — www.herald-citizen.com — Sunday, January 31, 2016
SPORTS
Lady Blue Devils fend off Clarkrange in OT
By CRAIG DELK
Special to the HERALD-CITIZEN
CLARKRANGE — Jackson County
and Clarkrange added another classic
showdown to their rivalry on Friday
night.
The Lady Buffaloes forced overtime
with a wild finish as Gracie Bush buried
a pair of free throws with seven-tenths
of a second remaining, but the No. 5ranked Lady Blue Devils pulled away in
the extra session to win 46-38 at CHS.
“Knocking down big shots (was the
key),” JCHS senior point guard McKenzie Flynn said. “We had a bunch of
missed opportunities to put it away on
the free-throw line. We finally stepped
up and hit our free throws, and we took
care of the ball a little bit better.”
In the nightcap, the Buffaloes used a
big second quarter to get some separation as they won 73-57 and avenged a
loss to the Blue Devils earlier in the season.
The opener seemed as if it was headed
for a Jackson County victory in regulation, as the Lady Blue Devils led 33-30
and had two fouls to give with 10 seconds remaining.
JCHS exercised both of those, then
fouled again with 4.3 seconds remaining
to put Bush in a one-and-one situation.
She made the first but missed the second, and the Lady Blue Devils corralled
the rebound.
However, Flynn was unable to sink a
pair of charity tosses, and after a
Clarkrange rebound Bush drew a foul
with just seven-tenths of a second left.
The freshman calmly made both tosses
to send the game to overtime.
“Gracie hitting those two free throws
with seven-tenths of a second left, you
can’t pay money to get in those situations,” Clarkrange head coach Lamar
Rogers said. “That will help her
throughout her career.
“It was a typical game with us,” he
added. “Both teams had chances to win
it. They just made one or two more plays
Craig Delk | Contributed
Craig Delk | Contributed
Clarkrange’s Hunter Crouch (4) pump-fakes to get
Jackson County’s Colby Brown (10) into the air during the Buffaloes 73-57 victory on Friday in
Clarkrange.
than we did.”
Clarkrange momentarily took a lead in
the extra session when Zoie Crouch
made a pair of free throws. But Cameron
Sherrell drained a 3-pointer from the
right corner on the ensuing possession to
thwart the momentum.
On the other end, Crouch made 1-of-2
at the line to tie the game at 36-36 with
2:54 left. That proved to be the Lady
Buffaloes’ final point, as Sherrell made
1-of-2 free throws with 1:55 left, and
Kassidy Allen split the defense on a
driving layup to make it 39-36.
Jackson County’s Kaitlyn Pippin (center) tries to
keep the ball away from Clarkrange’s Katelyn Beaty
(left) and Charity Crabtree (right) during the Lady
Blue Devils’ 46-38 victory in overtime on Friday at
Clarkrange.
From there, the Lady Blue Devils made
7-of-8 at the line in the final 43.2 seconds. For the game, they made 15-of-25.
Sherrell topped JCHS (16-4, 4-2 District 7-A) with 21 points, Allen added
nine points and 10 rebounds, and Flynn
chipped in nine points.
After trailing by as many as nine (2314) in the third quarter, Clarkrange
surged back in the fourth quarter on the
strength of back-to-back 3-pointers from
Crouch. Her final 3 tied the game at 2727 with 5:43 remaining.
Following a layup by Jackson County’s
Jaycie Woolbright, the hosts capped the
comeback as Hannah Garrett completed
a traditional three-point play with 2:53
left.
The Lady Buffaloes had a chance to
put it away as Charity Crabtree tipped
away a JCHS pass with 1:11 remaining,
but Sherrell stole the ball right back on
the other end of the floor. She passed to
Flynn, who took the ball coast to coast
for a fast-break layup, giving Jackson
County a 31-30 lead.
Crouch topped Clarkrange (12-10, 2-3)
with 14 points, while Bush and Garrett
added eight each.
“We’ve got some young girls who are
getting on-the-job training,” Rogers
said. “I’m really pleased with how hard
we’ve played. We’ve got seven games
left and probably need 20 to get as good
as we can get. I told them this week that
it’s all about getting better for the tournaments and getting better every game.”
In the finale, both teams were on fire in
the first quarter, combining for nine 3pointers as Clarkrange took an 18-16
lead after one.
“You district games at home are so important, and you’ve gotta take care of
your home-court advantage,” Buffaloes
head coach Rodney Pile said. “Two
weeks ago, Jackson County did a great
job of that on their home court. (Friday),
I thought we did a good job of taking
care of our home court. If we play them
again in a neutral site, it’s gonna be a
heck of a game. Hopefully we’ll be
ready to play.”
The second quarter proved to be the
difference, as the Buffaloes opened with
a 12-2 run capped by a Hunter Crouch
layup to make it 30-18. They outscored
the Blue Devils 20-8 in the frame and
took a 38-24 advantage to the break.
“We relied on the 3 way too much,”
Blue Devils head coach Gary Flynn
said. “You can live by it and die by it,
and we died by it (Friday). But you’ve
gotta give them a lot of credit because
they played well, too.”
Clarkrange eventually led by as many
as 18 in the third quarter when Ryan
Miller completed a traditional threepoint play. Jackson County cut the
deficit to as little as nine early in the
fourth quarter, but the Buffaloes pulled
away to prevent the sweep.
Crouch and Miller led the Buffaloes
(16-6, 3-2) with 23 and 21 points, respectively, while Austin Monday added
14. Coleman Linkous corralled nine rebounds to go along with his six points.
James Coe topped the Blue Devils (119, 3-3) with 16 points. Colby Brown and
Jonah Smith added 10 each.
CHS: Hosts Pickett County Tuesday
From Page F1
Bean led the Lady Cavs in scoring
with 13 points, but she was followed
closely by Megan Whitson with 12
and Toiya Gwynn with 11.
Gwynn and Whitson almost posted
double-doubles as Gwynn pulled
down nine rebounds and Whitson
snagged eight. Gwynn also managed
four assists in the game.
The win brings the Lady Cavs
within two games of the second
place White County Warriorettes
(17-3, 6-1 6-AAA).
“Well, we’d like to be higher,”
Odom commented on the Lady
Cavs’ spot in the district. “We feel
like were in a good spot. We’ve got
a big game coming up next week,
and time will tell where we’ll be in
the end on that. Every game we play,
district-wise, there’s no gimmes, so
we have got to go out there and
play.”
“Stone Memorial is really tough.
Every time they play, they get better,
because they’re so young. So that’s
a tough team that we still have to
beat. We have to go out and see what
we can do against White County.
I’m sure it will be a great game
again. They’re all pretty good teams.
If somebody comes in and has a
great night, you better have a better
one.”
In the boys matchup, a huge second quarter for the Pioneers (12-15,
3-4 6-AAA) made the Cavs (18-6,
5-2 6-AAA) the ones hanging
around this time.
“Warren County really has great
size,” CHS head coach Kevin Bray
said. “They have great experience,
and I’ve said all year long that Warren County has got a good team.
They haven’t proven that every
night, but last night was the way I’ve
expected them to play. They just
outworked us, outplayed us, outcoached us, and they flat out beat
us.”
The Cavs came out strong and built
a seven-point lead in the first, 12-5,
but that would be the biggest lead of
the night for Cookeville.
Warren County took its first advantage of the game with 2:38 left in the
first half when Holden Baker sunk a
three to make it 21-19.
Bryric Savage answered with a
layup to take the lead back for the
Cavs at 22-21, but Warren County’s
Trevor Gaines made two free
throws with 40 seconds left in the
half to take the 23-22 lead into halftime.
The third quarter went back and
fourth with many tied scores and the
lead changing several times before
Warren County made a big stand.
After a tie game at 35-35, Isaiah
Thomas Corhern | Herald-Citizen
Upperman’s Austyn McWilliams soars to the basket for a layup during the
Bees’ 68-52 win over Macon County on Friday night in Baxter.
Ben Craven | Herald-Citizen
Cookeville’s Bryric Savage gets fouled putting up a layup in the
Cavaliers’ 54-48 loss in Warren County on Friday night.
Grayson made a big 3-pointer with
1:10 left in the third, and Chance
Hobbs sunk a pull-up jumper at the
buzzer to give WC a five point advantage going into the fourth quarter.
The Cavs caught up and tied the
game at 40 with a three from Trey
Bundrant, but the Pioneers began to
pull away once again.
It was a one-point game until
Grayson stole the ball and layed it in
with one minute remaining to give
the Pioneers a 51-48 advantage.
In the final minute, nobody could
seem to find the basket, but with 33
seconds in the game, Isaac Golden
scored his only points of the game
with two free throws that put the
dagger in the Cavaliers heart.
Savage posted yet another doubledouble as he tallied 16 points and
pulled down 13 rebounds.
Savage was helped by Jacob
Wilberscheid who scored 15 points,
Bundrant with eight, and Noah Hilliker added seven.
Also, while Ayden only scored two
points, he posted team-highs in assists with five and steals with three.
For now, the Cavs are in second
place in the district with a target on
their back.
“Of course, White County is one
and, as of right now, we’re two,”
commented Bray. “I haven’t even
looked at all the different scenarios
of what could happen as far as tie
breakers and such, but whatever the
matchups are in the post-season,
those are the games you have to win
to advance regardless of what order
you play teams. If you want to be
the best, you’ve got to beat the best
at some point. We’ve just got to
play better than we did (Friday
night).”
Up next, Cookeville has three
home games in a row starting with
Pickett County on Tuesday.
UHS: Three games this
week for Bees, Lady Bees
From Page F1
“Macon’s a really good team and they’ve
got all the parts. They have size and athleticism, good guard play, good post play.
Our kids came out ready to play. I was really happy with their intensity. We just
have to keep repeating that. These seniors
are really starting to step up and lead us a
little bit. I’m really proud of them.”
Austyn McWilliams led Upperman
(18-4, 6-3 8-AA) with 22 points, while
Josh Endicott scored 15 points, Ben
Guffey added 14 and Austin Shrum
added 11.
Endicott and Shrum completed doubledoubles as Endicott pulled down 13 rebounds and Shrum had 10 caroms.
Seth Carlisle led MCHS (15-9, 6-4 8AA) with 22 points, while Trace McPherson added nine points.
UHS returns to action on Monday night
for the first of three doubleheaders next
week, all on the road, which almost creates a little bit of a tournament feel with
the District 8-AA tournament at Tennessee Tech’s Hooper Eblen Center just
around the corner.
Upperman travels to DeKalb County on
Monday night in a make-up contest, then
heads to Central Magnet in Murfreesboro
on Tuesday, followed by Cannon County
on Friday.
“It really is a tournament feel with three
games next week,” Bobby McWilliams
said. “We’re doing the same thing that
everybody else has done at one point or
another, but we’re really excited where
we’re going with the direction of this
team. But with a road trip with three
nights in five days, it’s going to test our
character a little bit.”
Dana McWilliams added, “We talked
about that in the locker room and we are
going to treat it like a tournament. We’re
going to have to take it one game at a time
and prepare. We can’t look ahead and turn
around and be ready. I think it will be
good for us, in a way, to get ready for
tournament time.”
HERALD-CITIZEN, Cookeville, Tenn. — www.herald-citizen.com — Sunday, January 31, 2016 — F5
SPORTS
Detroit rookie skates fastest
lap at NHL skills competition
By TERESA M. WALKER
AP Sports Writer
NASHVILLE (AP) — Dylan Larkin is
very, very fast. That helped the only
rookie at this NHL All-Star weekend
make quite the debut.
The Detroit Red Wings forward won
not only the title of fastest skater at this
event but set the record for the fastest lap
around a full rink. He topped Mike Gartner’s time of 13.386 seconds in 1996 —
months before Larkin was born.
Larkin easily beat Predators defenseman Roman Josi on the first lap of the
first event Saturday night at the NHL
skills competition at 12.894 seconds.
That time easily stood to win the fastest
skater. He then skated a full lap in just
13.172 seconds despite a bobble in turn
three because he was going so fast.
Hometown favorite Predators captain
Shea Weber won the hardest shot at
108.3 mph.
The Eastern Conference won the skills
competition 29-12, giving John Tavares
and Jaromir Jagr the choice as captains
of which period to play their semifinal
game Sunday in the All-Star Game.
They chose the first period for the 3-on3 competition. Tavares, captain of the
Metropolitan Division, said they had to
give Jagr a chance to rest as captain of
the Atlantic Division.
“If we win, we get more rest,” Jagr
said. “If we lose, I can fly home right
away. I’m sorry Nashville. I’m honest.”
P.K. Subban won the one event —
breakaway — decided by fans voting by
Twitter, edging out Sharks defenseman
Brent Burns. Tavares of the New York
Islanders won the accuracy event in 12.2
seconds. The West won the skills challenge relay, and the East finished off the
shootout.
Fans gave John Scott, the enforcer
voted into as captain of the Pacific Division, a standing ovation when he took
Mark Humphrey | AP
Nashville Predators goalie Pekka Rinne (35) uses a guitar instead of a stick as Washington Capitals center
Evgeny Kuznetsov (92) shoots during the breakaway challenge at the NHL All-Star skills competition on
Saturday in Nashville.
part in the hardest shot. Traded by Arizona to Montreal on Jan. 15, and then
sent to the minors by the Canadiens,
Scott wore a black NHL All-Star jersey.
“He had a big smile on his face all
night,” Subban said of Scott.
Blackhawks forward Patrick Kane, the
NHL’s leading scorer at the break, was
booed heavily at every chance. He
helped Chicago oust the Nashville Predators in the first round of the playoffs
last spring.
Larkin kicked the night off in record
fashion. The rookie might have been
even faster, but he said he dug in too
hard and skated too fast, causing him
trouble with his footing in the turn.
Asked about topping Gartner’s mark,
Larkin had a quick question in response:
“Was I born?”
No. Larkin was born in July 1996,
months after Gartner set his mark at the
age of 36.
“Yeah, I did find that out later,” Larkin
said. “It’s crazy.”
Fans hoping to see Weber set the hardest shot record on home ice chanted for
“One more shot” after Weber hit 108.3
mph on his second, just missing Zdeno
Chara’s record of 108.8 mph in 2012.
Weber hit just 107.8 mph on the third
try, finishing shy of his winning shot last
year at 108.5 mph.
The event that brought out the All-Stars
creativity was the breakaway challenge.
Matt Duchene of Colorado donned a
cowboy hat, and Brandon Saad of
Columbus bounced the puck off his
stick. Subban failed to score after bouncing the puck off his stick and then kicking it off his right foot. Predators
forward James Neal used two pucks in a
bit of deception, and then brought out
country singer Dierks Bentley, who
scored on a two-on-one.
Burns had help from two children, his
son and teammate Joe Pavelski’s son,
with Florida goalie Roberto Luongo arguing with Cory Schneider of the Devils
for the right to guard the net. Pavelski’s
son passed to Burns’ son, who scored
into an open net as the goalies’ fight
spilled over to the side.
On his second attempt, Burns had the
arena lights turned down. Photos of
him growing hairier over the years
flashed on the video board to the “Star
Wars” theme, and Burns was wearing a
Chewbacca mask for his nickname
when the lights came back up. It just
wasn’t enough hair to top Subban’s
final try.
Subban won by donning a long mullet
wig in a nod to the 44-year-old Jagr,
wearing referee’s pants with Jagr laughing as the Montreal defenseman scored
only as Nashville goalie Pekka Rinne
lifted his left leg sprawled in front of the
net. Subban said he decided on his Jagr
tribute at the arena and credited trainers
for finding the wig, then adding highlights with spray paint.
He didn’t tip Jagr beforehand.
“I wanted it to be a surprise,” Subban
said. “It’s a tribute to the great player
that he is.”
Jagr was fine with the funny tribute and
has a job waiting with the traveling Jagrs
when Subban retires.
“He can be the tenth one ... with the
Montreal jersey,” Jagr said.
No. 1 Oklahoma rallies to beat LSU
The Associated Press
BATON ROUGE, La. (AP) —
Buddy Hield made seven of his
eight 3-pointers in the second
half on his way to a 32-point performance, Isaiah Cousins hit a
go-ahead
jumper with 4
seconds left and
No. 1 Oklahoma overcame
a
14-point
deficit to esMen’s
cape with a 77victory over
Top 25 75
LSU on Saturday.
Cousins finished with 18 points,
and Ryan Spangler had 16 points
and 10 rebounds for the Sooners
(18-2), who summoned the composure to rally down the stretch
amid a rabid, packed crowd energized by the Tigers’ strong play
for much of the game.
LSU didn’t go quietly. Antonio
Blakeney hit a pair of late 3s, and
the second tied it at 75 with 24
seconds left.
Ben Simmons had 14 points for
LSU (13-8), highlighted by a
crowd-pleasing reverse dunk.
But those same fans were left
frustrated, some hurling garbage,
when Khadeem Lattin blocked
Tim Quarterman’s driving shot as
time ran out. Many fans seemed
to think Quarterman was fouled.
Quarterman finished with a
team-high 18 points, and Craig
Victor scored 15.
No. 2 NORTH CAROLINA
89, BOSTON COLLEGE 62
CHAPEL HILL, N.C. (AP) —
Brice Johnson had 17 points and
11 rebounds, and North Carolina
beat Boston College for its 12th
straight win.
Marcus Paige had 12 points in
his highest-scoring game in three
weeks while Joel Berry II added
13 points for the Tar Heels (19-2,
8-0 Atlantic Coast Conference).
After shaking off a slow start,
the ACC leaders routed its lastplace team by forcing 23
turnovers and turning them into
30 points.
Eli Carter had 19 points to lead
the Eagles (7-14, 0-7).
They shot 44 percent and hit 10
3-pointers but couldn’t overcome
that season-worst turnover total
while losing both their eighth
straight overall and eighth in a
row in the series.
Bill Feig | AP
LSU forward Aaron Epps (21) blocks the shot of Oklahoma
guard Buddy Hield (24) as LSU guard Antonio Blakeney (2)
applies pressure in the first half in Baton Rouge, La., on
Saturday.
No. 4 KANSAS 90,
No. 20 KENTUCKY 84, OT
LAWRENCE, Kan. (AP) —
Wayne Selden Jr. scored a careerhigh 33 points, seven in overtime, and Kansas beat Kentucky
in the premier showdown of the
Big 12/SEC Challenge.
Frank Mason III added 13
points and eight rebounds for the
Jayhawks (17-4), who snapped a
three-game losing streak to the
Wildcats (16-5) by winning their
35th straight game at Allen Fieldhouse.
It wasn’t easy.
The Wildcats built an eight-point
lead midway through the second
half before Kansas switched to a
zone defense and mounted a
comeback. Perry Ellis made the
second of two free throws to tie
the game 76-all with 9 seconds
left, and Tyler Ulis coughed up the
ball at the other end before Kentucky got off a shot.
In fact, the turnover gave
Mason a chance for a half-court
heave that he nearly made.
But when the game went to
overtime, Selden simply took
over.
Ulis finished with 26 points and
eight assists for Kentucky.
No. 5 TEXAS A&M 72,
No. 14 IOWA STATE 62
COLLEGE STATION, Texas
(AP) — Danuel House scored 20
points, including a go-ahead 3
late in the second half that sent
Texas A&M over Iowa State in
the Big 12/SEC Challenge.
The Aggies (18-3) trailed 58-56
before House hit from beyond
the arc with about four minutes
left. On their next possession, the
senior guard worked his way inside for a layup.
House’s two free throws with
2:29 remaining made it 63-58.
House later missed a short
jumper, and freshman Tyler
Davis tipped it in for a sevenpoint lead.
Star forward Georges Niang
scored 15 points for the Cyclones
(16-5).
No. 7 XAVIER 86,
DEPAUL 65
ROSEMONT, Ill. (AP) —
Trevon Bluiett scored 15 points
and Xavier used an impressive
burst spanning the halves to put
away DePaul.
The Musketeers trailed 32-25
before they ripped off 29 of the
next 34 points to grab control.
J.P. Macura made a 3-pointer and
two free throws during a 17-1 run
over the final 3:43 of the first
half, and Bluiett had two layups
and a jumper to help Xavier open
a 54-37 lead with 16:13 remaining.
Macura and Larry Austin Jr. had
12 points apiece for the Musketeers (19-2, 7-2 Big East), who
have won three in a row since
their 81-72 home loss against
Georgetown on Jan. 19.
FLORIDA 88,
No. 9 WEST VIRGINIA 71
GAINESVILLE, Fla. (AP) —
Dorian Finney-Smith scored 24
points,
Brandone
FrancisRamirez hit three huge 3-pointers
and Florida upset West Virginia
in the Big 12/SEC Challenge.
It gave first-year Gators coach
Mike White a signature win and
surely will help his team’s
chances of making the NCAA
Tournament in March.
Florida (14-7) had lost its last
12 games against top-10 teams,
but put together arguably its most
complete outing of the season
against the Mountaineers (17-4).
Finney-Smith made 7-of-12
shots, including 5 of 7 from 3point range, and the Gators never
trailed after his first 3 off the
opening tip. His last one with
1:02 to play — as fans chanted
“S-E-C” and “overrated” — led
to a standing ovation.
Jaysean Page and Tarik Phillip
scored 15 apiece for West Virginia, which gave up its most
points of the season.
No. 10 PROVIDENCE 73,
GEORGETOWN 69
WASHINGTON (AP) — Ben
Bentil and Kris Dunn each
scored 26 points, and Providence
held off several second-half
charges by Georgetown.
Rodney Bullock added 10
points and 14 rebounds, but no
other Providence player scored
more than six.
The Friars (18-4, 6-3 Big East)
beat a Hoyas team looking to pull
off its second upset of a top 10
squad in the past two weeks.
Georgetown (13-9, 6-3), which
erased an 11-point deficit to beat
Creighton earlier in the week and
defeated No. 5 Xavier on Jan. 19,
couldn’t pull off the same magic
against Providence.
No. 11 VIRGINIA 63,
No. 16 LOUISVILLE 47
LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) —
Malcolm Brogdon and Anthony
Gill each scored 13 points and
Virginia used stifling defense to
rout Louisville for its fourth
straight victory.
The Cavaliers (17-4, 6-3 Atlantic Coast Conference) were
thorough on both ends, holding
the Cardinals to season lows in
shooting (33 percent) and points
nearly a year after losing 52-47
to Virginia last year in Charlottesville.
No. 13 SMU 80,
MEMPHIS 68
DALLAS (AP) — Nic Moore
scored 22 points and SMU rebounded from its first loss of the
season with a victory over Memphis.
Freshman guard Shake Milton
added 15 points for the Mustangs
(19-1, 8-1 AAC), who led for all
but 38 seconds back home in
Moody Coliseum. They had their
first double-digit lead 8 minutes
into the game.
SMU was the last Division I
team to lose this season, falling
89-80 to Temple in a snow-delayed game last Sunday. That
ended an 18-game winning
streak that was its longest in 60
years.
N.C. STATE 85,
No. 15 MIAMI 69
RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — Anthony “Cat” Barber scored 30
points to help North Carolina
State beat Miami.
Abdul-Malik Abu added 19
points for the Wolfpack (12-10,
2-7 Atlantic Coast Conference),
who shook off a month’s worth
of struggles with a confident performance. N.C. State led the entire second half and shot 51
percent for the game to snap a
three-game skid and earn its first
home win in 2016.
No. 17 BAYLOR 83,
GEORGIA 73
WACO, Texas (AP) — Rico
Gathers had 17 points and nine
rebounds, and Baylor used a
quick start to the second half to
beat Georgia in the Big 12/SEC
Challenge.
Gathers had one of Baylor’s
five three-point possessions dur-
ing a 17-2 run in the first 4 minutes after halftime to turn a 35-32
deficit into a 49-37 lead. The
Bears (17-4) scored just three
points before the first media
timeout in the first half.
Ishmail Wainright hit a tying 3pointer 12 seconds into the second half, and Al Freeman put
Baylor ahead for good with another in the Bears’ 34th consecutive home win against a
nonconference opponent.
No. 18, ARIZONA 80,
OREGON STATE 63
TUCSON, Ariz. (AP) — Gabe
York made six 3-pointers and
scored 24 points, both career
highs, and Arizona bounced back
from a rare home loss to beat
Oregon State.
Ryan Anderson added 13 points
and 12 rebounds for the Wildcats
(17-5, 5-4 Pac-12), who were
coming off an 83-75 loss to No.
23 Oregon on Thursday night
that snapped Arizona’s 49-game
home-court winning streak.
Tres Tinkle scored 16 for the
Beavers (12-8, 3-6), who stayed
with the Wildcats until the final
10 minutes. Gary Payton III had
nine points, seven rebounds and
six assists.
No. 19 INDIANA 74,
MINNESOTA 68
BLOOMINGTON, Ind. (AP)
— Thomas Bryant scored a career-high 23 points to help Indiana hang on for a victory over
Minnesota.
The Hoosiers (18-4, 8-1) barely
retained their share of the Big
Ten lead after blowing a 16-point
second-half lead. They’ve won
13 of their last 14.
Minnesota (6-16, 0-10) lost its
11th straight despite getting 21
points each from Nate Mason
and Kevin Dorsey, who led the
comeback.
No. 21 PURDUE 89,
NEBRASKA 74
WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. (AP)
— A.J. Hammons scored a career-best 32 points and grabbed
11 rebounds to lead Purdue over
Nebraska.
Rapheal Davis had 17 points
and six rebounds, and Isaac Haas
scored 13 for Purdue (19-4, 7-3
Big Ten). Caleb Swanigan contributed six points, 12 rebounds
and five assists for the Boilermakers, who improved to 5-0
against Nebraska (12-10, 4-5) in
Mackey Arena.
F6 — HERALD-CITIZEN, Cookeville, Tenn. — www.herald-citizen.com — Sunday, January 31, 2016
SPORTS
Michael Bennett does it all at Pro Bowl practice
By KALANI TAKASE
Associated Press
KAHUKU, Hawaii (AP) — Michael Bennett did his best imitation of Deion Sanders
on Friday.
Bennett, a Seattle Seahawks defense end and
member of Team Rice for Sunday’s Pro Bowl,
did a little bit of everything at Friday’s 45minute practice session on Oahu’s north
shore.
In addition to his duties on the defensive
line, Bennett lined up at wide receiver for one
play during the 7-on-7 portion of practice. He
caught a short pass from Tampa Bay quarterback Jameis Winston in front of Atlanta cornerback Desmond Trufant.
Bennett later lined up next to Philadelphia’s
Darren Sproles as dual punt returners during
special teams drills and was the recipient of
a reverse from the latter on one return.
“I got to play a little on offense and defense,
special teams, so I feel like Deion today. I feel
like a real weapon,” said Bennett, who will be
playing in his first Pro Bowl on Sunday.
KELCE THANKFUL
Fresh off signing a contract extension with
Eugene Tanner | AP
the Kansas City Chiefs, tight end Travis Kelce
Los Angeles Rams running back Todd Gurley (30) of Team took the practice field with Team Irvin.
Irvin runs with the football during the NFL Pro Bowl prac- Kelce said he signed the deal on the beach
tice at the Turtle Bay Resort on Friday in Kahuku, Hawaii. front Friday morning. “It makes you thankful,
Manning won’t share
retirement plans
By ARNIE STAPLETON
AP Pro Football Writer
ENGLEWOOD, Colo. (AP) —
What’s whispered into Bill Belichick’s ear stays in Bill Belichick’s ear.
Peyton Manning may have told
him, “This might be my last
rodeo,” but he’s not telling anyone
else anything about his thoughts
on retirement.
NFL Network cameras caught an
intriguing exchange between Denver’s quarterback and New England’s coach after Denver’s 20-18
win over the Patriots in the AFC
championship game on Sunday.
Manning didn’t want to talk
about the eavesdropped exchange
on Thursday, however.
He joked, “I don’t know if it’s
been confirmed or not, you know?
What happened to private conversations on the 50-yard line? I guess
they just don’t exist anymore. So,
no confirmation on that whatsoever. ... We’re on to Carolina.”
The Broncos (14-4) face the Panthers (17-1) in Super Bowl 50 on
Feb. 7.
What Manning said to Belichick
is apparently more than he’s told
his own coach regarding his
thoughts on retirement as this 18th
and very trying season comes to a
conclusion.
“He hasn’t said anything to me,”
Gary Kubiak said. “I know he’s
enjoying the playoffs and enjoying
this opportunity with this football
team. I can’t speak for him. He’ll
have to answer those questions.
But I know it’s special to have him
back in the huddle leading the way
and I’m just very proud of his
work getting back to be in this position.”
Manning’s favorite target, receiver Demaryius Thomas, said
Manning hasn’t said anything to
David Zalubowski | AP
Denver Broncos quarterback Peyton Manning, back,
looks to throw to wide receiver Andre Caldwell, front, during practice at the team’s headquarters Thursday in Englewood, Colo.
his teammates, either.
“Not at all. We’re assuming,”
Thomas said. “You never know
with him. He hasn’t said anything,
so I really don’t know what he’s
going to do.”
Manning, who regained his starting job this month after missing
the Broncos’ final seven starts
while dealing with a torn plantar
fascia near his left heel, was so
loose Thursday that his news conference at times resembled a
stand-up routine at a comedy club.
Asked about the Panthers’
propensity for fast starts and the
need to keep up with Carolina,
Manning said: “As you watch the
game unfold, you see the scoreboard and it’s 7-0, it’s 14-0, it’s
like the guy singing the national
anthem is still on the field, you
know, the game hasn’t started
yet.”
At one point, Manning was asked
for his recollections of Panthers
owner Jerry Richardson in the
league’s labor negotiations, and
Manning said he didn’t have a
good answer for the reporter although, “labor negotiations are
pretty boring if I can recall.
There’s one word for you.”
Another question was about the
four consecutive years a dualthreat QB has played in the Super
Bowl and the 50-year streak of a
pocket passer playing in the big
game.
“That is 100 percent for you guys
to decide,” Manning said when
asked if there were indeed two different types of QBs now. “... I
guess the only thing I’ll say is it
seems like every year they say the
pocket passer is a dying breed. I
kept saying, ‘I hope that’s not true.
I will be out of a job and my
brother will be pretty close behind
me.’ “
Kubiak said he’ll lean on his
leaders next week in San Francisco to make sure the team stays
focused on football. Asked what
his role was in that plan, Manning
said, “Set the curfew, basically.”
“I threw out 9,” he said. “That
didn’t get a lot of positive views.”
it humbles you to be in a situation like this,”
the third-year pro said.
“Obviously, thanks to the Chiefs organization, the Hunt family and everybody that has
made this thing work with John Dorsey and
Coach Reid and all of the coaching staff. For
them to put this much trust in me makes me
more motivated than ever to keep performing.”
NFL NORTH RIVALS TEAM UP
Green Bay Packers fullback John Kuhn has
an unusual teammate this week: Adrian Peterson of the rival Minnesota Vikings.
“Every time you come out to one of these
things it’s just great (because) you battle
against these guys all year long, everybody is
playmaker, everybody is the guys that you
prepare for when you play against them and
now they’re all on your team and it’s just
great to have all these great players in one
spot,” said Kuhn, who gave some insight into
a conversation he had with Peterson prior to
Thursday’s first practice.
“I know he has one speed, so I already told
him, ‘I am getting out of your way. I’m going
to let you be the man.’ He’s a great back, a
great talent and I’m excited to be in front of
him.”
GIVING BACK
One of the biggest thrills for Minnesota
Vikings safety Harrison Smith was getting to
spend some time with a young fan wearing
his jersey from the Make A Wish Foundation
after Friday’s Team Rice practice.
“It’s awesome,” said the fourth-year pro.
“This is what this game is about, is coming
out here and kind of giving back to the fans
and having this many kids from the Make A
Wish Foundation come out here and one of
them is even wearing your jersey, it’s humbling and it’s great to be able to put a smile
on their face.”
ALOHA SPIRIT
Winston, the top overall pick in last year’s
draft, has clearly adjusted to island life. The
Tampa Bay quarterback and first-time Pro
Bowler wore a flower lei around his neck during Team Irvin’s morning practice session.
“It’s my first time in Hawaii and I’m taking
everything in,” Winston said. “It’s a blessing
to be out there, so I’m just trying to have some
fun. Hawaii is a beautiful place.”
QUOTE OF THE DAY
Team Rice cornerback Dominique RodgersCromartie on playing against his New York
Giants’ teammates quarterback Eli Manning,
wide receiver Odell Beckham and kicker Josh
Brown, all of whom are on Team Irvin.
“If I get a chance to line up against those
guys I want to get a pick off Eli, I want to
frustrate Odell and I want to block one of
Josh’s kicks.”
Broken arm? Thomas Davis has had worse
By STEVE REED
AP Sports Writer
CHARLOTTE, N.C. (AP) —
Thomas Davis knows all about
pain and toughness.
So excuse the Panthers All-Pro
linebacker if he snickers at the notion that 12 screws and a plate in
his broken right forearm is about
to keep him from the biggest game
of his career.
“I’m still looking forward to
playing on Super Bowl Sunday,”
he says with a wide, knowing grin.
Davis has overcome too much,
and at 32 come too far to even
think about missing this one.
He is the first known NFL player
to battle back and play after tearing
the same ACL three times. It’s
even more remarkable considering
he has returned to play at an AllPro level after his third surgery in
2011.
Now, in a cruel piece of irony, the
man who has waited 11 seasons to
play in a Super Bowl breaks his
arm in the NFC championship
game, giving him only two weeks
to recover. The injury came in the
second quarter of a 49-15 victory
over the Arizona Cardinals.
“I was devastated for him at the
time,” Carolina defensive tackle
Dwan Edwards. “The guy has
been through a lot and is the heart
and soul of our team. He’s our
emotional leader, our playmaker
on the field.”
Given what Davis has been
through, teammates aren’t surprised that he intends to face the
Denver Broncos on Feb. 7 in Santa
Clara, California.
“Knowing Thomas, he is used to
overcoming obstacles,” safety Tre
Boston said. “Hey, give me 12
screws and a plate in my arm and
I’m not playing for a month. But
nothing can hold back that guy.”
“I’m no doubting Thomas,”
cracked coach Ron Rivera.
Davis’ three knee injuries cut
short his seasons in 2009, 2010
Mike McCarn, File | AP
Carolina Panthers’ Thomas Davis warms up before the
NFC Championship game against the Arizona Cardinals
in Charlotte, N.C.
and 2011. Still, he is as fast as ever
and seems to be getting better each
season. He turned in perhaps his
best season in 2015, with 105 tackles and career highs in sacks (5.5),
forced fumbles (four) and interceptions (four).
And while he was going through
hundreds upon hundreds of grueling leg raises, squats and stretches
to rebuild his knee, Davis at times
did contemplate retirement. But,
mostly, those were fleeting
thoughts. In the back of his mind
was the Super Bowl.
“I never really look at it from a
personal standpoint,” he said. “It’s
great for this team to be in this position. We’ve worked so hard all
season long to accomplish this
goal and put ourselves in this position to possibly win the Super
Bowl, so it’s great to be in this position as a football team and I’m
just happy to be a part of it.”
Such an attitude epitomizes
Davis. To a man, teammates talk
about the time, pain and sweat it
took for him to come back from a
severe knee injury. Not once, not
twice, but three times. They say
it’s difficult for the average fan to
comprehend.
Broncos Pro Bowl linebacker
Von Miller knows something
about this — he had ACL surgery
in 2014.
“I only got one (and) it was hard
to come back,” Miller said. “So
with (three) I can’t even imagine
all the hard work that goes into
him getting back on the field. So I
think that speaks volumes to the
type of person that he is. ... He’s
going to be there. If he has a little
bit of energy, he’s going to be there
ready to play.”
Davis won last year’s Walter
Payton Man of the Year award for
his community work. A first-round
draft pick from Georgia, he has
played all 11 seasons in Carolina,
sticking with the Panthers through
good times and bad. He’s become
a local sports legend by overcoming the longest odds. It has the
makings of a Hollywood movie.
Now, says teammate Luke
Kuechly, all that’s missing is the
ending.
“We’re doing everything we can
to get him a (Super Bowl) ring,”
Kuechly said. “I think that would
be awesome. He deserves it.”
Luke and Von: the linebackers who make a difference
By BARRY WILNER
AP Pro Football Writer
Luke and Von.
Sounds like a beach band from the Sixties,
or maybe offshoots of the “Dukes of Hazzard.”
In reality, Luke Kuechly and Von Miller are exactly what successful teams need in the NFL.
The All-Pro linebackers are versatile, fierce
competitors, leaders and playmakers.
They will be watching in the Super Bowl as
much as Peyton Manning and Cam Newton.
Miller, the second overall draft pick in 2011,
won Defensive Rookie of the Year that season.
Kuechly, chosen ninth overall the next year,
succeeded Miller for that honor.
And in 2013, Kuechly was the league’s top defensive player, an award both he and Miller are
contenders for this season.
More important than that individual recognition, each will tell you, are the team marks
posted by Kuechly’s Panthers and Miller’s Broncos during their short but already memorable careers: Carolina has won three straight NFC
South titles, and Denver has taken the AFC West
in all five of Miller’s pro seasons.
“I’m a fan of him,” Newton says of Miller.
“Trying to find any and every way to alleviate
him being a pain, but that’s what this week of
preparation will be.”
Better prepare diligently for Miller, or else that
pain will be felt by just about everyone on the
Panthers’ offense.
Consider the damage Miller wrought last Sunday in the AFC championship game. He had 2½
sacks, an interception, constant pressure on Tom
Brady, and was a force against New England’s
meager running game.
Yes, Miller was everywhere, and it wouldn’t be
unfair to single him out as the biggest reason the
Broncos are in their second Super Bowl in three
years.
His skills are such that defensive coordinator
Wade Phillips is comfortable turning Miller
loose on the pass rush, dropping him in coverage
— especially to cover tight ends — and lining
him up almost anywhere on the field.
Phillips has called Miller the defense’s “catalyst.”
“He has great explosion,” Phillips said. “He’s
tremendously quick off the ball. He’s probably
the quickest in the league. That helps him first.
... He has that tremendous speed, but it’s explosive speed. Some guys can run fast, but it’s kind
of straight-line speed.
“He’s very athletic, can change directions and
accelerate really quickly. Great running backs
have the same thing. They have that acceleration
that they (use to) get through the hole.
“He’s the same way as a pass rusher or a defensive player. He’s there, they think that they can
block him and then he gets by them. He defeats
his guy most of the time and most every play.
That’s hard to do in this league.”
Kuechly isn’t as fast and might not be as strong
as Miller. He isn’t as dangerous on the pass rush
with seven career sacks in the regular season;
Miller had 11 in 2015.
He also plays inside, while Miller is an outside
linebacker.
None of which matters in big spots. Kuechly
makes plays in the middle of the field or near the
sideline. He finds the ball — or, as Panthers cornerback and fellow All-Pro Josh Norman has
said, “the ball finds Luke.”
And when the football is in his grasp, it’s a
good idea to look for him in the end zone.
Kuechly has had a pick-six in each of Carolina’s
playoff games this season. He excels at baiting
quarterbacks into ill-advised throws, though
doing so against Manning is difficult.
Kuechly already has a catchy nickname: “Captain America”. Miller eschews that kind of
recognition.
Panthers coach Ron Rivera, a former NFL linebacker himself, sees a victory next weekend as
just another step for his star defender. His comments also could just as easily apply to Miller.
“There are a lot of great players who never got
to play in a Super Bowl, so whether you have to
have that Super Bowl to cement who you are or
what you’re worth,” Rivera said.
“I don’t think Luke is really worried about that.
But I think it just kind of fast-tracks you and people take a lot quicker notice. At the end of the
day you can say on your business card ‘Super
Bowl champion.’ I mean that’s probably the next
thing.
David Zalubowski | AP
Denver Broncos outside linebacker Von Miller
runs through a drill during a practice at the
team’s headquarters Thursday in Englewood,
Colo.
Herald-Citizen
January 31, 2016
CLASSIC PEANUTS
OVER THE HEDGE
ARLO & JANIS
TANK McNAMARA
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BY CHARLES SCHULZ
BY MICHAEL FRY & T. LEWIS
BY JIMMY JOHNSON
BY JEFF MILLAR & BILL HINDS
G-2 — HERALD-CITIZEN, Cookeville, Tenn. — www.herald-citizen.com — Sunday, January 31, 2016
ZIGGY
BY Tom Wilson
BLONDIE
SHOE
BY DEAN YOUNG & JOHN MARSHALL
BY CHRIS CASSATT & GARY BROOKINS
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To Be Announced North Woods Law To Be Announced Finding Bigfoot (N) North Woods Law Finding Bigfoot ’
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Conan
Calamity (:45) ››› “Billy Rose’s Jumbo” (1962) Doris Day.
›››› “Ben-Hur” (1959, Historical Drama) Charlton Heston, Jack Hawkins.
And the Oscar Goes To... Å
›››› “Lawrence of Arabia” (1962) Peter O’Toole. Å
Dateline: Real Life
Dateline: Real Life
Dateline: Real Life
Dateline: Real Life
Dateline: Real Life
Dateline: Real Life
48 Hours: Hard Evid. 48 Hours: Hard Evid. 48 Hours: Hard Evid. 48 Hours: Hard Evid. 48 Hours: Hard Evid. 48 Hours: Hard Evid.
Bones ’ Å
Bones ’ Å
››› “Road to Perdition” (2002) Tom Hanks. Å
››› “The Town” (2010) Ben Affleck. Å (DVS)
›› “S.W.A.T.” (2003) Samuel L. Jackson. Å (DVS)
›› “Rules of Engagement” (2000) Tommy Lee Jones.
Bizarre Foods
Bizarre Foods
Food
Food
Bizarre Foods
Bizarre Foods
Bahamas Beach
Live
Live
Bizarre Foods
Bizarre Foods
Live
Live
Food Paradise Å
Food Paradise Å
Pawn
Pawn
Pawn
Pawn
Pawn
Pawn
Fameless Fameless Fameless Fameless Jokers
Jokers
Jokers
Jokers
Jokers
Jokers
Jokers
Jokers
Fameless Fameless Jokers
Jokers
Jokers
Jokers
Gunsmoke “Waco”
Andy Griffith Show
Griffith
Griffith
Griffith
Griffith
Everybody Raymond Raymond Raymond Raymond Raymond King
King
King
King
Gunsmoke Å
Gunsmoke Å
Bonanza Å
NCIS “Identity Crisis”
NCIS “Lost & Found”
(:05) Colony
“Gone in Sixty”
NCIS Å (DVS)
NCIS “Family” ’
NCIS “Chimera” ’
NCIS “Requiem” ’
NCIS Å (DVS)
WWE Monday Night RAW (N) ’ (Live) Å
In the Heat of Night
In the Heat of Night
In the Heat of Night
Blue Bloods Å
Blue Bloods Å
Blue Bloods Å
Outsiders Å
›› “The Game Plan” (2007, Comedy) Å
›› “Men in Black II” (2002, Action) Å
Outsiders Å
TUESDAY AFTERNOON/EVENING
12 PM
12:30
1 PM
FEBRUARY 2, 2016
1:30
General Hospital (N)
The Talk ’ Å
Bill Cunningham
Judge Mathis (N) ’
Criminal Minds Å
Steve Wilkos Show
Days of our Lives (N)
Curious
Curious
2 PM
2:30
The Doctors Å
Let’s Make a Deal (N)
Cops Rel. Cheaters
Divorce
Divorce
Criminal Minds Å
Jerry Springer (N) ’
Meredith Vieira
Arthur
Nature
3 PM
3:30
Dr. Phil ’ Å
Ellen DeGeneres
TMZ Live (N) Å
The People’s Court
Criminal Minds Å
Maury (N) ’ Å
The Dr. Oz Show (N)
Odd
Odd
4 PM
4:30
News 2 at 4pm (N)
News
Inside Ed.
The Real (N) Å
Jdg Judy Jdg Judy
Criminal Minds Å
Steve Harvey Å
News
News
Wild Kratt Wild Kratt
5 PM
5:30
New
ABC
News
CBS
Mod Fam Mod Fam
Jeopardy! News
Criminal Minds Å
FamFeud Celebrity
News
News
TN Learn Business
6 PM
6:30
News
Wheel
NewsChannel 5
Broke Girl Broke Girl
Big Bang Big Bang
Criminal Minds Å
FamFeud FamFeud
News
News
PBS NewsHour (N) ’
7 PM
7:30
8 PM
8:30
9 PM
9:30
FreshMuppets Marvel’s Agent Carter What Would You Do?
Super Bowl’s Greatest Commercials 2016 ’
(:01) NCIS ’
Two Men Two Men
The Flash (N) Å
iZombie (N) ’ Å
New Girl Grand
Brooklyn Grinder
FOX 17 News at 9:00
Criminal Minds ’
Criminal Minds ’
Criminal Minds ’
Simpsons
The Walking Dead ’ The Walking Dead ’ Middle
Game Night
Chicago Med (N) ’
Chicago Fire (N) ’
Finding Your Roots
American Experience (N) ’ Å
10 PM
10:30
11 PM
11:30
News
Jimmy Kimmel Live
Nightline
News
Late Show-Colbert
Corden
Mike
Mike
TMZ (N)
Dish Nat.
News
ET
Insider
Hollywood
Saving Hope (N) ’
Saving Hope (N) ’
Griffith
Griffith
Seinfeld Seinfeld
News
Tonight Show
Meyers
Mercy Street Å
Charlie Rose (N) ’
ABC
CBS
CW
FOX
ION
MNT
NBC
WCTE
2
5
11
3
9
13
4
8
The Chew ’ Å
Young
Bold
How I Met How I Met
Hot Bench Hot Bench
Criminal Minds Å
Maury ’ Å
News & More
Sesame
Cat in the
A&E
AMC
ANPL
BRAVO
COM
DISC
DISN
ESPN
ESPN2
FOOD
FREE
FX
HGTV
HIST
LIFE
NGEO
NICK
SEC
SPIKE
SYFY
TBS
TCM
TLC
TNT
TRAV
TRUTV
TVLAND
USA
WGN-A
46
58
52
62
65
47
54
31
32
50
53
30
51
44
25
48
55
34
64
63
27
59
26
28
49
45
57
29
15
Married at First Sight Married at First Sight (:01) Fit to Fat to Fit
(:02) Fit to Fat to Fit
Married at First Sight
Criminal Minds ’
The First 48 Å
The First 48 Å
The First 48 Å
The First 48 Å
Fit to Fat to Fit Å
Fit to Fat to Fit Å
(11:00) ›››› “Rocky” (1976)
›› “Man on a Ledge” (2012) Sam Worthington. Å
››› “The Rock” (1996, Action) Sean Connery, Nicolas Cage. Å
››› “The Fugitive” (1993) Harrison Ford, Tommy Lee Jones.
››› “Air Force One” (1997) Å
Pit Bulls-Parole
River Monsters Å
River Monsters Å
River Monsters Å
River Monsters Å
River Monsters Å
River Monsters Å
River Monsters “Amazon Apocalypse” Å
Wild Expectations ’ River Monsters “Amazon Apocalypse” Å
Real Housewives
Real Housewives
Real Housewives
Real Housewives
Real Housewives
Real Housewives
Real Housewives
Real Housewives
Real Housewives
Guide-Divorce
Happens Real Housewives
Guide
“Groundhog Day”
Tosh.0
Half Hour Daily
Nightly
At Mid.
Tosh.0
(:07) ››› “Groundhog Day” (1993) Bill Murray, Chris Elliott. Å
(3:46) ››› “Groundhog Day” (1993) Bill Murray. Å
(:24) ››› “Groundhog Day” (1993) Bill Murray. Å
Almost, Away
Almost, Away
Death Row
Moonshiners: Outlaw Moonshiners (N) ’
County Jail ’ Å
Moonshiners Å
Moonshiners Å
Moonshiners Å
Killing Fields (N) ’
(:01) Moonshiners ’ (:01) Killing Fields ’
Sofia
Sofia
Mako
Austin
Gravity
The Lion Jessie ’ Best Fr.
Girl Meets Liv-Mad. K.C.
Girl Meets Liv-Mad. Mako
“Let It Shine” (2012) Tyler James Williams.
Girl Meets K.C.
Bunk’d ’ Best Fr.
Jessie ’ Jessie ’
SportsCenter (N)
SportCtr NFL Insiders (N)
Question Around
Pardon
SportsCenter (N)
College Basketball Kentucky at Tennessee.
College Basketball Indiana at Michigan. (N)
SportsCenter (N)
SportsCenter (N)
NFL Live (N) Å
Re-Take Outside
Football Re-Take His & Hers Å
SportsNation (N)
Re-Take Question Around
Pardon
College Basketball
College Basketball
NBA Coast to Coast (N) (Live) Å
Pioneer
Contessa The Kitchen
Giada
Giada
Contessa Contessa Pioneer
Trisha’s Chopped
Chopped “Belly Up”
Chopped Junior
Chopped
Chopped (N)
Chopped
Chopped
Young
Young
Middle
Middle
Middle
Middle
Middle
Middle
Middle
Middle
Pretty Little Liars (N) Shadowhunters (N)
Recovery Road Å
Pretty Little Liars ’
Pretty Little Liars ’
The 700 Club Å
››› “Mean Girls”
How I Met How I Met How I Met How I Met Two Men Two Men Mike
Mike
The People v. O.J. Simpson
The People v. O.J. Simpson
››› “Thor” (2011, Action) Chris Hemsworth. ’ Å
›› “Thor: The Dark World” (2013) Chris Hemsworth.
Renovate Renovate Island
Island
Ellen’s Design
Bryan
Bryan
Holmes Inspection
Bryan
Bryan
Hunt Intl Hunters
Hunt Intl Hunters
Tiny
Tiny
Bryan
Income
Hunt Intl Hunters
Timber Kings Å
Digging Deeper
The Curse of
Digging Deeper
Digging Deeper
Digging Deeper
Digging Deeper
The Curse of
Digging Deeper
The Curse of
Drilling Down
The Curse of
Digging Deeper
Dance Moms (N)
Dance Moms (N)
(:02) Pitch Slapped
Little Women: Atlanta (:02) Dance Moms
Grey’s Anatomy ’
Grey’s Anatomy ’
Grey’s Anatomy ’
Grey’s Anatomy ’
Dance Moms Å
Dance Moms Å
Dance Moms Å
Alaska-Trooper
Alaska-Trooper
Mine Hunters
Mine Hunters
The Boonies
The Boonies
Mine Hunters
The Boonies
The Boonies (N)
Mine Hunters (N)
The Boonies
Mine Hunters
Blaze
Blaze
Alvinnn!!! Parents
Sponge. Sponge. Sponge. Sponge. Alvinnn!!! Alvinnn!!! Thunder Thunder Paradise Henry
Henry
Nicky
Full H’se Full H’se Full H’se Full H’se Friends
Friends
Friends
Friends
Wm. Basketball
The Paul Finebaum Show Paul Finebaum discusses all things SEC. (N) (Live)
College Basketball LSU at Auburn. (N) (Live)
College Basketball
SEC Now (N) (Live)
SEC Now
SEC Storied Å
(11:30) ›› “Happy Gilmore” ’
›› “Robin Hood: Men in Tights” (1993) Cary Elwes.
››› “Hitch” (2005) Will Smith, Eva Mendes. Premiere. ’
›› “Happy Gilmore” (1996) Adam Sandler.
››› “Hitch” (2005) Will Smith, Eva Mendes, Kevin James. ’
Expanse The Expanse Å
The Expanse (Season Finale) (N)
The Expanse Å
› “Silent Hill: Revelation” (2012) Å
›› “Silent Hill” (2006, Horror) Radha Mitchell. Å
›› “Resident Evil” (2002) Milla Jovovich.
12 Monkeys Å
American American Fam. Guy Fam. Guy New Girl New Girl Friends
Friends
Friends
Friends
Seinfeld Seinfeld Seinfeld Seinfeld Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Conan Daniel Sloss.
Broke Girl Conan
Red Danb (:45) ›››› “Forbidden Planet” (1956)
From
››› “Bad Day at Black Rock”
››› “Battle of the Bulge” (1965, War) Henry Fonda. Å
›››› “The Sting” (1973) Paul Newman.
(:15) ››› “The Verdict” (1982) Paul Newman. Å
Dateline: Real Life
Dateline: Real Life
Dateline: Real Life
Dateline: Real Life
Dateline: Real Life
The Little Couple (N) Rattled ’ Å
Kate Plus 8 ’ Å
The Little Couple ’
The Little Couple ’
The Little Couple ’
Rattled ’ Å
Bones ’ Å
Bones ’ Å
Bones ’ Å
Castle Å (DVS)
Castle Å (DVS)
Castle Å (DVS)
Castle Å (DVS)
Castle Å (DVS)
Castle Å (DVS)
Castle Å (DVS)
Castle Å (DVS)
CSI: NY “Heroes” ’
Bizarre Foods
Delicious
Food
Food
Bizarre Foods
Bizarre Foods
Bizarre Foods
Delicious
Booze Traveler (N)
Bizarre Foods
Delicious
Food Paradise Å
Food Paradise Å
World’s Dumbest...
World’s Dumbest...
World’s Dumbest...
Genius
Genius
Genius
Genius
Jokers
Jokers
Jokers
Jokers
Jokers
Jokers
Jokers
Jokers
Genius
10 Things 10 Things 10 Things Jokers
Jokers
Andy Griffith Show
Griffith
Griffith
Griffith
Griffith
Everybody Raymond Raymond Raymond Raymond Raymond King
King
King
King
Gunsmoke Å
Gunsmoke Å
Gunsmoke Å
Bonanza Å
Law & Order: SVU
Law & Order: SVU
Law & Order: SVU
Law & Order: SVU
Law & Order: SVU
Law & Order: SVU
Mod Fam Mod Fam Mod Fam Mod Fam Mod Fam Mod Fam Mod Fam Mod Fam Mod Fam Mod Fam Law & Order: SVU
In the Heat of Night
In the Heat of Night
In the Heat of Night
Blue Bloods Å
Blue Bloods Å
Blue Bloods Å
›› “Men in Black II” (2002) Will Smith
Outsiders (N) Å
Outsiders Å
Outsiders Å
Outsiders Å
WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON/EVENING
12 PM
12:30
1 PM
1:30
General Hospital (N)
The Talk ’ Å
Bill Cunningham
Judge Mathis (N) ’
Law & Order Å
Steve Wilkos Show
Days of our Lives (N)
Curious
Curious
FEBRUARY 3, 2016
2 PM
2:30
The Doctors Å
Let’s Make a Deal (N)
Cops Rel. Cheaters
Divorce
Divorce
Law & Order Å
Jerry Springer (N) ’
Meredith Vieira
Arthur
Nature
3 PM
3:30
Dr. Phil ’ Å
Ellen DeGeneres
TMZ Live (N) Å
The People’s Court
Law & Order Å
Maury (N) ’ Å
The Dr. Oz Show (N)
Odd
Odd
4 PM
4:30
News 2 at 4pm (N)
News
Inside Ed.
The Real (N) Å
Jdg Judy Jdg Judy
Law & Order “Flaw”
Steve Harvey Å
News
News
Wild Kratt Wild Kratt
5 PM
5:30
New
ABC
News
CBS
Mod Fam Mod Fam
Jeopardy! News
Law & Order Å
FamFeud Celebrity
News
News
TN Learn Business
6 PM
6:30
News
Wheel
NewsChannel 5
Broke Girl Broke Girl
Big Bang Big Bang
Law & Order Å
FamFeud FamFeud
News
News
PBS NewsHour (N) ’
7 PM
7:30
8 PM
8:30
Madoff Investment adviser Bernie Madoff. (N)
Broke Girl Mike
(:01) Criminal Minds
Arrow “Unchained”
Supernatural (N) ’
(:01) Hell’s Kitchen
American Idol (N) ’
Law & Order Å
Law & Order Å
The Closer ’ Å
The Closer ’ Å
Myst-Laura
Law & Order: SVU
Nature Å (DVS)
NOVA (N) ’
9 PM
9:30
American Crime (N)
Code Black (N) Å
Two Men Two Men
FOX 17 News at 9:00
Law & Order Å
Middle
Simpsons
Chicago P.D. (N) ’
Black Pharaohs
10 PM
10:30
11 PM
11:30
News
Jimmy Kimmel Live
Nightline
News
Late Show-Colbert
Corden
Mike
Mike
TMZ (N)
Dish Nat.
News
ET
Insider
Hollywood
Law & Order “Acid”
Law & Order Å
Griffith
Griffith
Seinfeld Seinfeld
News
Tonight Show
Meyers
Craftsman America Charlie Rose (N) ’
ABC
CBS
CW
FOX
ION
MNT
NBC
WCTE
2
5
11
3
9
13
4
8
The Chew ’ Å
Young
Bold
How I Met How I Met
Hot Bench Hot Bench
Law & Order Å
Maury ’ Å
News & More
Sesame
Cat in the
A&E
AMC
ANPL
BRAVO
COM
DISC
DISN
ESPN
ESPN2
FOOD
FREE
FX
HGTV
HIST
LIFE
NGEO
NICK
SEC
SPIKE
SYFY
TBS
TCM
TLC
TNT
TRAV
TRUTV
TVLAND
USA
WGN-A
46
58
52
62
65
47
54
31
32
50
53
30
51
44
25
48
55
34
64
63
27
59
26
28
49
45
57
29
15
Duck D.
Duck D.
Jep
Jep
Duck D.
Duck D.
Duck D.
Duck D.
Duck D.
Duck D.
Duck D.
Duck D.
Jep
Duck D.
Duck D.
Duck D.
Duck D.
Duck D.
Criminal Minds ’
The First 48 Å
The First 48 Å
(10:30) “Rocky II”
››› “Air Force One” (1997) Harrison Ford, Gary Oldman. Å
››› “The Fugitive” (1993) Harrison Ford, Tommy Lee Jones.
››› “The Bourne Supremacy” (2004) Matt Damon.
›› “The Day the Earth Stood Still” (2008) Å
Pit Bulls-Parole
To Be Announced
To Be Announced
Million Dollar LA
Million Dollar LA
Million Dollar LA
Housewives/Potomac Housewives/Potomac Housewives/Potomac Vanderpump Rules
Real Housewives
Housewives/Atl.
Newlyweds
Happens Newlyweds
Real
Guy Code Wild/Out Wild/Out Chappelle Key
(:44) South Park
South Pk Futurama Futurama Futurama Futurama South Pk South Pk South Pk South Pk South Pk South Pk South Pk South Pk Daily
Nightly
At Mid.
South Pk
Deadliest Job
Dual Survival
Survivorman: Wild
Naked and Afraid ’
Naked and Afraid ’
Naked and Afraid ’
Naked and Afraid ’
Dual Survival Å
Dual Survival Å
Dual Survival (N) ’
(:01) Dual Survival ’ (:02) Dual Survival ’
Sofia
Sofia
Mako
Liv-Mad. Gravity
The Lion “Let It Shine” (2012) Tyler James Williams.
Austin
Austin
Girl Meets K.C.
So Raven So Raven
Jessie ’ Liv-Mad. Mako
“Bad Hair Day” (2015) ’ Å
Bunk’d ’ Best Fr.
SportsCenter (N)
Outside
NFL Insiders (N)
Question Around
Pardon
NBA
NBA Basketball: Warriors at Wizards
NBA Basketball: Timberwolves at Clippers
NFL Live (N) Å
SportsCenter (N) (Live) Å
ESPNU National Signing Day Special (N) (Live)
SportsNation (N)
College Basketball Notre Dame at Miami. (N)
College Basketball Kansas State at Kansas.
SportsCenter (N)
SportsCenter (N)
His & Hers Å
Pioneer
Contessa The Kitchen
Giada
Giada
Contessa Contessa Pioneer
Southern Diners
Diners
Diners
Diners
Diners
Diners
Diners, Drive
Guilty
Top 5
Diners
Diners
Diners, Drive
Middle
Middle
Middle
Young
Daddy
“Step Up 2 St.”
Reba ’
Reba ’
Reba ’
Reba ’
Reba ’
Reba ’
Reba ’
››› “Mean Girls” (2004) Lindsay Lohan.
›› “Nanny McPhee” (2005) Colin Firth
The 700 Club Å
How I Met How I Met How I Met How I Met Two Men Two Men Mike
Mike
Mike
The People v.
›› “The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn Part 2” (2012)
›› “The Purge” (2013) Ethan Hawke. ’
›› “The Purge” (2013) Ethan Hawke. ’
Renovate Renovate Island
Island
Hunt Intl Hunters
Tiny
Tiny
Holmes Inspection
Bryan
Bryan
Bryan
Bryan
Hunt Intl Hunters
Hawaii
Island
Caribbean Beach
Bryan
Income
Hawaii
Island
Pawn
Pawn
Pawn
American Pickers ’ American Pickers ’ American Pickers ’ American Pickers ’ American Pickers ’ American Pickers ’ American Pickers ’ American Pickers ’ American Pickers ’ Pawn
American Pickers ’
Little Women: LA
Little Women: LA
Little Women: Atlanta Little Women: LA
Little Women: LA (N) Little Women: Atlanta Little Women: Atlanta Little Women: LA
Grey’s Anatomy ’
Grey’s Anatomy ’
Grey’s Anatomy ’
Grey’s Anatomy ’
Alaska-Trooper
Alaska-Trooper
Southern Justice
Southern Justice
Rocky Mountain Law Rocky Mountain Law Wicked Tuna
Wicked Tuna
Big Fish, Texas
Big Fix Alaska (N)
Big Fish, Texas
Big Fix Alaska
Blaze
Blaze
Alvinnn!!! Parents
Sponge. Sponge. Sponge. Sponge. Alvinnn!!! Alvinnn!!! Thunder Thunder Paradise Henry
Henry
Nicky
Full H’se Full H’se Full H’se Full H’se Friends
Friends
Friends
Friends
(9:00) SEC Now (N) (Live)
The Paul Finebaum Show Paul Finebaum discusses all things SEC. (N) (Live)
College Basketball Arkansas at Florida. (N)
College Basketball Mississippi at Missouri.
SEC Now (N) (Live)
Signing Day Featured
Death Rce ›› “Gamer” (2009) Gerard Butler. ’
››› “Source Code” (2011) Premiere. ’
›› “Dredd” (2012) Karl Urban, Olivia Thirlby. ’
›› “I, Robot” (2004) Will Smith. Premiere. ’
››› “I Am Legend” (2007) Will Smith, Alice Braga. ’
Colony Will’s first day.
›› “Silent Hill” (2006, Horror) Radha Mitchell. Å
››› “Hanna” (2011) Saoirse Ronan, Eric Bana. Å
›› “Resident Evil” (2002) Milla Jovovich.
Face Off Å
Face Off (N) Å
The Magicians Å
Face Off Å
American American Fam. Guy Fam. Guy New Girl New Girl Friends
Friends
Friends
Friends
Seinfeld Seinfeld Seinfeld Seinfeld Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Conan (N) Å
Broke Girl Conan
“Star Witness” (1931) “I Am a Fugitive From a Chain Gang” (1932)
“The Fallen Idol”
››› “Johnny Eager” (1942) Å
›››› “Madame Bovary” (1949) Å
››› “Love Letters” (1945) Jennifer Jones.
›››› “The Third Man” (1949) Å
Dateline: Real Life
Dateline: Real Life
Dateline: Real Life
Dateline: Real Life
My 600-Lb. Life (N)
Dateline on TLC ’
Skin Tight ’ Å
My 600-Lb. Life ’
My 600-Lb. Life ’
Skin Tight (N) Å
My 600-Lb. Life ’
Skin Tight ’ Å
Bones ’ Å
Bones ’ Å
Bones ’ Å
Castle Å (DVS)
Castle “Boom!” ’
Castle Å (DVS)
Castle Å (DVS)
Castle Å (DVS)
Castle Å (DVS)
Castle “Overkill” ’
CSI: NY ’ Å
CSI: NY ’ Å
Food
Food
Bizarre Foods
Bizarre Foods
Expedition Unknown Expedition Unknown Expedition Unknown Expedition Unknown Wild Things
Expedition Unknown Expedition Unknown
Food Paradise Å
Food Paradise Å
World’s Dumbest...
World’s Dumbest...
10 Things 10 Things 10 Things 10 Things truTV Top Funniest
truTV Top Funniest
truTV Top Funniest
truTV Top Funniest
Ad. Ruins Ad. Ruins Ad. Ruins Ad. Ruins Billy
Billy
truTV Top Funniest
Gunsmoke “Mannon” Gunsmoke Å
Griffith
Griffith
Griffith
Griffith
Griffith
Griffith
Raymond Raymond Raymond Raymond Younger Teachers King
King
King
King
Gunsmoke Å
Bonanza Å
NCIS “In the Zone”
Suits “Live to Fight...” Mod Fam Mod Fam Mod Fam Mod Fam
NCIS “Recoil” ’
NCIS Å (DVS)
NCIS Å (DVS)
› “G.I. Joe: The Rise of Cobra” (2009, Action) Å
›› “G.I. Joe: Retaliation” (2013) Dwayne Johnson.
In the Heat of Night
In the Heat of Night
In the Heat of Night
Blue Bloods “Mercy”
How I Met How I Met
Blue Bloods Å
Blue Bloods Å
Person of Interest ’ Person of Interest ’ Person of Interest ’ Person of Interest ’ Outsiders Å
G-4 — HERALD-CITIZEN, Cookeville, Tenn. — www.herald-citizen.com — Sunday, January 31, 2016
THURSDAY AFTERNOON/EVENING
12 PM
12:30
1 PM
1:30
FEBRUARY 4, 2016
2 PM
General Hospital (N)
The Talk ’ Å
Bill Cunningham
Judge Mathis (N) ’
Blue Bloods Å
Steve Wilkos Show
Days of our Lives (N)
Curious
Curious
2:30
3 PM
The Doctors Å
Let’s Make a Deal (N)
Cops Rel. Cheaters
Divorce
Divorce
Blue Bloods Å
Jerry Springer (N) ’
Meredith Vieira
Arthur
Nature
3:30
Dr. Phil ’ Å
Ellen DeGeneres
TMZ Live (N) Å
The People’s Court
Blue Bloods Å
Maury (N) ’ Å
The Dr. Oz Show (N)
Odd
Odd
4 PM
4:30
News 2 at 4pm (N)
News
Inside Ed.
The Real (N) Å
Jdg Judy Jdg Judy
Blue Bloods Å
Steve Harvey Å
News
News
Wild Kratt Wild Kratt
5 PM
5:30
6 PM
New
ABC
News
CBS
Mod Fam Mod Fam
Jeopardy! News
Blue Bloods Å
FamFeud Celebrity
News
News
TN Learn Business
6:30
News
Wheel
NewsChannel 5
Broke Girl Broke Girl
Big Bang Big Bang
Blue Bloods Å
FamFeud FamFeud
News
News
PBS NewsHour (N) ’
7 PM
7:30
8 PM
8:30
9 PM
Madoff Investment adviser Bernie Madoff. (N)
Big Bang Life in
(:01) Mom Angel-Hell
DC’s Legends
The 100 (N) ’ Å
American Idol “Hollywood Round No. 4” (N)
Blue Bloods Å
Blue Bloods Å
The Mentalist “Pilot”
The Mentalist Å
You, Me and
The Blacklist (N) ’
Discover Tennes
Live
One-One
9:30
Madoff: After the Fall
Elementary (N) Å
Two Men Two Men
FOX 17 News at 9:00
Blue Bloods Å
Middle
Simpsons
Shades of Blue (N)
Jammin’ Bluegrass
10 PM
10:30
11 PM
11:30
News
Jimmy Kimmel Live
Nightline
News
Late Show-Colbert
Corden
Mike
Mike
TMZ (N)
Dish Nat.
News
ET
Insider
Hollywood
Blue Bloods Å
Blue Bloods Å
Griffith
Griffith
Seinfeld Seinfeld
News
Tonight Show
Meyers
Tennes
Southern Charlie Rose (N) ’
ABC
CBS
CW
FOX
ION
MNT
NBC
WCTE
2
5
11
3
9
13
4
8
The Chew ’ Å
Young
Bold
How I Met How I Met
Hot Bench Hot Bench
Blue Bloods Å
Maury ’ Å
News & More
Sesame
Cat in the
A&E
AMC
ANPL
BRAVO
COM
DISC
DISN
ESPN
ESPN2
FOOD
FREE
FX
HGTV
HIST
LIFE
NGEO
NICK
SEC
SPIKE
SYFY
TBS
TCM
TLC
TNT
TRAV
TRUTV
TVLAND
USA
WGN-A
46
58
52
62
65
47
54
31
32
50
53
30
51
44
25
48
55
34
64
63
27
59
26
28
49
45
57
29
15
(:01) Nightwatch (N)
Criminal Minds ’
The First 48 Å
The First 48 Å
The First 48 Å
The First 48 Å
The First 48 Å
The First 48 Å
The First 48 Å
The First 48 (N) ’
(:02) The First 48 ’
(:01) The First 48 ’
“Terminator 3: Rise of the Machines” (2003)
›› “Resident Evil: Apocalypse” (2004)
›› “The Day the Earth Stood Still” (2008) Å
››› “The Bourne Supremacy” (2004) Matt Damon.
››› “Enemy of the State” (1998) Will Smith, Gene Hackman.
Pit Bulls-Parole
To Be Announced
Wild West Alaska (N) Alaska
Alaska
Alaskan Bush People Wild West Alaska ’
Alaska
Alaska
Wild West Alaska ’
Vanderpump Rules
Vanderpump Rules
Vanderpump Rules
Vanderpump Rules
Vanderpump Rules
Recipe for Deception Happens Top Chef Å
Recipe
Top Chef Å
Top Chef Å
Top Chef Å
Top Chef (N) Å
Guy Code Wild/Out Wild/Out Chappelle Key
South Pk (:15) South Park
Futurama Futurama Futurama Futurama South Pk South Pk Tosh.0
Tosh.0
Tosh.0
Tosh.0
Work.
Idiotsitter Daily
Nightly
At Mid.
Work.
Fast N’ Loud Å
Fast N’ Loud Å
Fast N’ Loud Å
Fast N’ Loud Å
Fast N’ Loud Å
Fast N’ Loud Å
Fast N’ Loud Å
Fast N’ Loud Å
Diesel Brothers: Trucked Out ’ Å
Diesel Brothers ’
Fast N’ Loud Å
Sofia
Sofia
Mako
Best Fr.
Gravity
The Lion Girl Meets Austin
K.C.
Liv-Mad. Mako
Girl Meets K.C.
“Bad Hair Day” (2015) ’ Å
›› “Frenemies” (2012) ’ Å
Jessie ’ Bunk’d ’ Best Fr.
Jessie ’ Jessie ’
SportsCenter (N)
SportCtr NFL Insiders (N)
Question Around
Pardon
SportsCenter (N)
College Basketball Teams TBA. (N) (Live)
30 for 30 (N)
SportsCenter (N)
SportsCenter (N)
NFL Live (N) Å
Re-Take Outside
Football Re-Take His & Hers Å
SportsNation (N)
Re-Take Question Around
Pardon
College Basketball Teams TBA. (N) (Live)
College Basketball Connecticut at Memphis.
College Basketball Utah at Oregon State. (N)
Pioneer
Contessa The Kitchen
Giada
Giada
Contessa Contessa Pioneer
Valerie’s Chopped
Chopped
Chopped
Kids Baking
Beat Flay Beat Flay Beat Flay Beat Flay Kids Baking
Last Man Last Man Last Man Middle
Middle
Middle
Middle
Middle
Middle
›› “Nanny McPhee” (2005) Colin Firth
(:45) ››› “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2” (2011) Rupert Grint
The 700 Club Å
›› “Step Up 3”
How I Met How I Met Anger
Anger
Two Men Two Men Mike
Mike
Baskets Baskets Baskets › “This Means War” (2012) ’
›› “Riddick” (2013) Vin Diesel, Karl Urban. ’ Å
›› “Thor: The Dark World” (2013) Chris Hemsworth.
Renovate Renovate Island
Island
Hawaii
Island
Caribbean Beach
Bryan
Ellen’s Design
Hunt Intl Hunters
Flip or
Flip or
Bryan
Income
Flip or
Flip or
Holmes Inspection ’ Bryan
Fixer Upper (N) Å
Quest-Lost Ark
(:03) Forged in Fire
(:01) Forged in Fire
Roanoke: Search for the Lost Colony Å
Forged in Fire Å
Forged in Fire Å
Forged in Fire Å
Forged in Fire Å
Forged in Fire Å
Forged in Fire Å
Forged in Fire Å
Runway: Junior
Runway: Junior
Runway: Junior
Runway: Junior
Runway: Junior
Runway: Junior
Runway: Junior
Runway: Junior
Child Genius: Battle
TBA
Runway: Junior
Project Runway: Junior Å
Alaska-Trooper
Alaska-Trooper
Naked Science
Hubble’s Cosmic
Challenger Disaster
Life on Mars: Rovers Alaska-Trooper
Alaska-Trooper
Alaska-Trooper
Alaska-Trooper
Alaska-Trooper
Alaska-Trooper
Blaze
Blaze
Alvinnn!!! Parents
Sponge. Sponge. Sponge. Sponge. Alvinnn!!! Alvinnn!!! Thunder Thunder Paradise Henry
Full H’se Full H’se Friends
Friends
Friends
Friends
›› “Monsters vs. Aliens” (2009) Å
Basketball College Basketball
The Paul Finebaum Show Paul Finebaum discusses all things SEC. (N) (Live)
Women’s College Basketball
Women’s College Basketball
SEC Now (N) (Live)
SEC Now
Walking ›› “Snitch” (2013) Dwayne Johnson, Barry Pepper. ’
Lip Sync Lip Sync Lip Sync Lip Sync Battle ’
Lip Sync Bar Rescue ’
››› “I Am Legend” (2007) Will Smith, Alice Braga. ’
›› “I, Robot” (2004) Will Smith, Bridget Moynahan. ’
“Haunting in Connecticut 2: Georgia”
“Haunting-CT 2”
››› “Ice Twisters” (2009) Mark Moses.
››› “Drag Me to Hell” (2009, Horror) Å
›› “The Grudge” (2004) Jason Behr Å
›› “The Devil’s Advocate” (1997) Keanu Reeves, Al Pacino. Å
American American Fam. Guy Fam. Guy New Girl New Girl Friends
Friends
Friends
Friends
Seinfeld Seinfeld Seinfeld Seinfeld Broke Girl Broke Girl Big Bang Big Bang Broke Girl Broke Girl Conan (N) Å
Broke Girl Conan
›› “Captain Kidd”
(:15) ››› “A Patch of Blue” (1965)
(:15) ›› “You’re a Big Boy Now” (1966)
›››› “East of Eden” (1955, Drama) Å
››› “Cool Hand Luke” (1967) Å
(:15) ››› “The Dirty Dozen” (1967, War) Lee Marvin. Å (DVS)
Dateline: Real Life
Dateline: Real Life
Dateline: Real Life
My 600-Lb. Life
My 600-Lb. Life
Dateline on TLC “Deception” ’ Å
My 600-Lb. Life ’
My 600-Lb. Life ’
Extreme Weight Loss “Michael” ’ Å
Skin Tight ’ Å
NBA Basketball New York Knicks at Detroit Pistons. (N)
NBA Basketball: Lakers at Pelicans
Inside the NBA (N)
Bones ’ Å
Bones ’ Å
Bones ’ Å
Castle Å (DVS)
Castle Å (DVS)
Castle Å (DVS)
My.- Monument
My.- Monument
Mysteries-Museum
Mysteries-Museum
Mysteries-Museum
Mysteries-Museum
Mysteries-Museum
Mysteries-Museum
My.- Monument
My.- Monument
My.- Monument
My.- Monument
Jokers
Jokers
Jokers
Jokers
Carbonaro Carbonaro Carbonaro Carbonaro Carbonaro Carbonaro Carbonaro Carbonaro Jokers
Jokers
Jokers
Jokers
Jokers
Jokers
Jokers
Jokers
Genius
Genius
Jokers
Jokers
Griffith
Griffith
Griffith
Griffith
Griffith
Griffith
Everybody Raymond Raymond Raymond Raymond Raymond King
King
King
King
Gunsmoke Å
Gunsmoke Å
Gunsmoke Å
Bonanza Å
Law & Order: SVU
Law & Order: SVU
Law & Order: SVU
Law & Order: SVU
Law & Order: SVU
Law & Order: SVU
Law & Order: SVU
Colony “Blind Spot”
Law & Order: SVU
Law & Order: SVU
WWE SmackDown! (N) ’ Å
In the Heat of Night
In the Heat of Night
In the Heat of Night
How I Met How I Met How I Met How I Met How I Met How I Met
Blue Bloods Å
Blue Bloods Å
Blue Bloods Å
Elementary ’ Å
Elementary ’ Å
Elementary ’ Å
FRIDAY AFTERNOON/EVENING
12 PM
12:30
1 PM
FEBRUARY 5, 2016
1:30
2 PM
General Hospital (N)
The Talk ’ Å
Bill Cunningham
Judge Mathis (N) ’
NUMB3RS ’ Å
Steve Wilkos Show
Days of our Lives (N)
Curious
Curious
2:30
The Doctors Å
Let’s Make a Deal (N)
Cops Rel. Cheaters
Divorce
Divorce
NUMB3RS “Blackout”
Jerry Springer (N) ’
Meredith Vieira
Arthur
Nature
3 PM
3:30
Dr. Phil ’ Å
Ellen DeGeneres
TMZ Live (N) Å
The People’s Court
Criminal Minds Å
Maury (N) ’ Å
The Dr. Oz Show (N)
Odd
Odd
4 PM
4:30
News 2 at 4pm (N)
News
Inside Ed.
The Real (N) Å
Jdg Judy Jdg Judy
Criminal Minds Å
Steve Harvey Å
News
News
Wild Kratt Wild Kratt
5 PM
5:30
6 PM
New
ABC
News
CBS
Mod Fam Mod Fam
Jeopardy! News
Criminal Minds Å
FamFeud Celebrity
News
News
TN Learn Business
6:30
News
Wheel
NewsChannel 5
Broke Girl Broke Girl
Big Bang Big Bang
Criminal Minds Å
FamFeud FamFeud
News
News
PBS NewsHour (N) ’
7 PM
7:30
8 PM
8:30
9 PM
9:30
Last Man Dr. Ken
Shark Tank (N) ’
(:01) 20/20 ’ Å
Undercover Boss (N) Super Bowl’s Greatest Halftime Shows (N)
The Vampire Diaries The Originals (N) ’
Two Men Two Men
Sleepy Hollow (N) ’ (:01) Second Chance FOX 17 News at 9:00
Criminal Minds Å
Criminal Minds Å
Criminal Minds Å
Middle
High School Basketball
Simpsons
Caught on Camera
Grimm (N) ’
Dateline NBC Å
Wash
Charlie
Live From Lincoln Center (N) Å (DVS)
10 PM
10:30
11 PM
11:30
News
Jimmy Kimmel Live
Nightline
News
Late Show-Colbert
Corden
Mike
Mike
TMZ (N)
Dish Nat.
News
ET
Insider
Hollywood
Saving Hope ’
Saving Hope ’
Griffith
Griffith
Bones ’ Å
News
Tonight Show
Meyers
Front and Center ’
Charlie Rose (N) ’
ABC
CBS
CW
FOX
ION
MNT
NBC
WCTE
2
5
11
3
9
13
4
8
The Chew ’ Å
Young
Bold
How I Met How I Met
Hot Bench Hot Bench
NUMB3RS “Traffic”
Maury ’ Å
News & More
Sesame
Cat in the
A&E
AMC
ANPL
BRAVO
COM
DISC
DISN
ESPN
ESPN2
FOOD
FREE
FX
HGTV
HIST
LIFE
NGEO
NICK
SEC
SPIKE
SYFY
TBS
TCM
TLC
TNT
TRAV
TRUTV
TVLAND
USA
WGN-A
46
58
52
62
65
47
54
31
32
50
53
30
51
44
25
48
55
34
64
63
27
59
26
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49
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15
Duck D.
Duck D.
Duck D.
Duck D.
Duck D.
Duck D.
Duck D.
Duck D.
Duck D.
Duck D.
Jep
Jep
Duck D.
Duck D.
Duck D.
Duck D.
Criminal Minds Å
The First 48 Å
The First 48 Å
Duck Dynasty Å
“Dawn of the Dead”
(11:30) › “Max Payne” (2008)
››› “Terminator 3: Rise of the Machines” (2003)
››› “Enemy of the State” (1998) Will Smith, Gene Hackman.
›› “Underworld: Evolution” (2006) Å
›› “Underworld: Rise of the Lycans” Å
Pit Bulls-Parole
To Be Announced
Alaska
Alaska
Treehouse
Treehouse Masters
Alaska
Alaska
Treehouse Masters
Real Housewives
Real Housewives
Housewives/Potomac Housewives/Potomac Housewives/Potomac Housewives/Atl.
Housewives/Atl.
Housewives/Atl.
Housewives/Atl.
The People’s Couch
The People’s Couch
“Pride & Prejudice”
Husbands Chappelle Chappelle Key
Key
(:44) South Park
South Pk Futurama Futurama Futurama Futurama Key
Key
Key
Key
Key
Key
Key & Peele Å
›› “Step Brothers” (2008) Will Ferrell. Å
Last Frontier
Last Frontier
Deadliest Job
Gold Rush: Pay Dirt
Deadliest Job
Deadliest Job
Gold Rush ’ Å
Gold Rush ’ Å
Gold Rush ’ Å
Gold Rush ’ Å
Gold Rush (N) Å
(:02) Gold Rush Å
Sofia
Sofia
Mako
K.C.
Gravity
The Lion ›› “Frenemies” (2012) ’ Å
Austin
Girl Meets Best Fr.
Liv-Mad. Mako
Gravity
Star-For. Mako
Liv-Mad. Mickey
››› “Finding Nemo” (2003)
Jessie ’ Jessie ’
SportsCenter (N)
SportCtr NFL Insiders (N)
Question Around
Pardon
SportsCenter (N)
NBA Basketball Indiana Pacers at Atlanta Hawks. (N)
NBA Basketball San Antonio Spurs at Dallas Mavericks.
SportsCenter (N)
NFL Live (N) Å
Re-Take Outside
Football Re-Take His & Hers Å
SportsNation (N)
Re-Take Question Around
Pardon
College Football All-Star Challenge. (Taped)
30 for 30
SportsCenter (N)
NBA
NFL Live
Chopped
Chopped
Chopped
Chopped
Chopped
Diners
Diners
Diners
Diners
Diners
Am. Diner Diners
Diners
Vacation Burgers Diners
Diners
Diners
Diners
Middle
Middle
Middle
“Willy Wonka”
Reba ’
Reba ’
››› “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2” (2011)
(:45) ›››› “Forrest Gump” (1994) Tom Hanks, Robin Wright, Gary Sinise.
Shadowhunters ’
The 700 Club Å
How I Met How I Met Mike
Mike
Anger
Anger
Two Men Two Men ››› “The Amazing Spider-Man” (2012) Andrew Garfield. ’ Å
“Captain America: The First Avenger” (2011)
››› “Captain America: The First Avenger” (2011) Chris Evans.
Renovate Renovate Island
Caribbean Flip or
Flip or
Bryan
Flip or
Flip or
Hunt Intl Hunters
Break
Break
Bryan
Income
Break
Break
Fixer Upper ’ Å
Holmes Inspection ’ Bryan
Timber Kings Å
10 Things About
Pawn
Pawn
Pawn
Pawn
Pawn
Pawn
Pawn
Pawn
Pawn
Pawn
Pawn
Pawn
American Restoration American Restoration To Be Announced
Smartest Smartest American Restoration
Little Women: Atlanta Little Women: Atlanta Bring It! Å
(:02) The Rap Game
Little Women: Atlanta (:02) Bring It! Å
The Rap Game Å
The Rap Game Å
The Rap Game Å
The Rap Game Å
Bring It! (N) Å
Bring It! (N) Å
Alaska-Trooper
Alaska-Trooper
History- UFOs
Bigfoot: The New Ev Mystery Bear, Arctic The Strange Truth
Nasca Lines
Secrets of the Druids Explorer
The Strange Truth
Explorer
The Strange Truth
Dora and Friends
Alvinnn!!! Parents
Sponge. Sponge. Sponge. Sponge. Alvinnn!!! Alvinnn!!! Thunder Thunder Paradise Parents
Harvey
Pig Goat Full H’se Full H’se Full H’se Full H’se Friends
Friends
Friends
Friends
Basketball Women’s College Basketball
The Paul Finebaum Show Paul Finebaum discusses all things SEC. (N) (Live)
Women’s College Gymnastics
Women’s College Gymnastics
SEC Now (N) (Live)
SEC Now
SEC Now
Gangsters: Most Evil Gangsters: Most Evil Forensic Forensic Cops ’
Vegas
Gangland ’ Å
Cops ’
Cops ’
Cops ’
Cops ’
Cops ’
Cops ’
Cops ’
Cops ’
Cops ’
Cops ’
Cops ’
Cops ’
››› “Scarface”
››› “Drag Me to Hell” (2009, Horror) Å
›› “The Grudge” (2004) Jason Behr Å
›› “The Devil’s Advocate” (1997) Keanu Reeves, Al Pacino. Å
›› “Angels & Demons” (2009) Tom Hanks, Ewan McGregor. Å
› “The Reaping” (2007) Hilary Swank. Å
American American American American New Girl New Girl Friends
Friends
Friends
Friends
Seinfeld Seinfeld Seinfeld Seinfeld Broke Girl Broke Girl Broke Girl Broke Girl › “Rush Hour 3” (2007) Jackie Chan.
Angie
Cougar
(11:15) “Sergeant York” (1941)
(:45) “It Happened One Night”
››› “The Sea Wolf” (1941)
››› “Leave Her to Heaven” (1945) Å
››› “Heaven Can Wait” (1943) Å
›› “The Love Parade” (1929) Lupino Lane
››› “The Smiling Lieutenant”
Dateline: Real Life
Dateline: Real Life
Dateline: Real Life
Dateline: Real Life
Dateline: Real Life
Say Yes Say Yes Say Yes Say Yes Say Yes Say Yes Say Yes Say Yes Love; Lust Swipe
Say Yes Say Yes Love; Lust Swipe
Bones ’ Å
Bones ’ Å
Bones ’ Å
Bones ’ Å
Bones ’ Å
Bones ’ Å
Bones ’ Å
››› “The Hangover” (2009) Å (DVS)
›› “The Hangover Part III” (2013)
Hawaii Five-0 Å
Ghost Adventures
Ghost Adventures
Ghost Adventures
Ghost Adventures
Mysteries-Museum
Mysteries-Museum
Mysteries-Museum
Mysteries-Museum
Mysteries- Cas.
Mysteries-Museum
Mysteries-Museum
Mysteries- Cas.
Tow
Tow
Tow
Tow
Tow
Tow
Fameless Fameless Fameless Fameless Funniest Funniest Funniest Funniest Funniest Funniest Funniest Funniest Funniest Funniest Funniest Funniest Funniest Funniest
Griffith
Griffith
Griffith
Griffith
Griffith
Griffith
Raymond Raymond King
King
King
King
Gunsmoke Å
Gunsmoke Å
Gunsmoke Å
Bonanza Å
› “Mr. Deeds” (2002) Adam Sandler.
Law & Order: SVU
Law & Order: SVU
Law & Order: SVU
Law & Order: SVU
Law & Order: SVU
Law & Order: SVU
Mod Fam Mod Fam Mod Fam Mod Fam Mod Fam Mod Fam Mod Fam Mod Fam Mod Fam Mod Fam Law & Order: SVU
Parks
Blue Bloods Å
Blue Bloods Å
Blue Bloods Å
Blue Bloods Å
Blue Bloods Å
Blue Bloods Å
Person of Interest ’ Person of Interest ’ Person of Interest ’ Person of Interest ’ How I Met How I Met Parks
SATURDAY MORNING
6 AM
6:30
7 AM
7:30
8 AM
8:30
9 AM
9:30
Nashville’s
Hanna
Ocean
Lucky
Dr. Chris
Dog
Dog
Dog
Dog
Sports
Animal Paid
Paid
Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU
Wild Am. Paid
Paid
Small
News Today
Astrob
Wild
Wild
Discover Old
FEBRUARY 6, 2016
SATURDAY AFTERNOON
10 AM 10:30 11 AM 11:30
12 PM 12:30
ABC
CBS
CW
FOX
ION
MNT
NBC
WCTE
2
5
11
3
9
13
4
8
News 2 at 6am (N) Good Morning
Weekend Morning Report (N) Å
Haney
Green
Dr. Pol
Dr. Pol
Paid
Paid
Think Big Kds
Paid
Paid
Paid
P. Chris
Paid
World
Haney
Holly
News Today
Today (N) ’ Å
Tiger
Tiger
Curious Nature
A&E
AMC
ANPL
BRAVO
COM
DISC
DISN
ESPN
ESPN2
FOOD
FREE
FX
HGTV
HIST
LIFE
NGEO
NICK
SEC
SPIKE
SYFY
TBS
TCM
TLC
TNT
TRAV
TRUTV
TVLAND
USA
WGN-A
46
58
52
62
65
47
54
31
32
50
53
30
51
44
25
48
55
34
64
63
27
59
26
28
49
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29
15
Tiny
Tiny
Tiny House Nation Tiny House Nation What Would
What Would
What Would
Rifleman Rifleman Rifleman Rifleman Rifleman Rifleman Rifleman Rifleman Rifleman Rifleman Rifleman Rifleman
Pets 101 ’ Å
Dogs 101 ’ Å
Dogs 101 ’ Å
Dogs 101 ’ Å
Too Cute! ’ Å
Too Cute! ’ Å
Housewives/Atl.
Housewives
Housewives
Housewives
Happens Couch
Atlanta
Paid
Paid
Comedy South Pk (:14) South Park
South Pk (:22) ››› “My Cousin Vinny” (1992) Joe Pesci.
Paid
Paid
Paid
Paid
Diesel Brothers ’ Diesel Brothers ’ Diesel Brothers ’ To Be Announced
Tmrrwla Sofia
Mickey The Lion Liv-Mad. Jessie
Mako
Mako
Best Fr. Austin
Girl
K.C.
SportsCenter (N)
College GameDay College Basketball
SportsCenter Å
SportsCenter (N) (Live) Å
Jalen
NFL
Profile
SportsCenter (N)
College Basketball
NFL’s Greatest Games Å
NFL Live Å
Be.Brunch Daphne Southern Farm
Pioneer Pioneer Trisha’s The Kitchen (N)
Valerie’s Giada
››› “Big Miracle” (2012) John Krasinski.
››› “Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory”
››› “Holes”
Anger
Anger
Two Men Two Men Two Men Two Men › “Ghost Rider: Spirit of Vengeance”
“Amazing Spdr”
Sarah
Sarah
Paid
Paid
Paid
Paid
Land
Land
Timber Kings Å
Timber Kings Å
Hillbilly: The Real Story Stories. Å
How the States Got Their Shapes Å
101 Objects that Changed the World ’
Paid
Paid
Paid
Paid
Paid
Paid
Paid
Paid
Little Women
“Cleveland”
Paid
Paid
Paid
Paid
Live Free or Die
Dirty; Survival
Dirty; Survival
Dirty; Survival
Sponge. Sponge. Alvinnn!!! Alvinnn!!! Sponge. Sponge. Sponge. Sponge. Harvey Pig Goat Rangers Alvinnn!!!
Gymnastics
SEC Now
SEC Now
Women’s College Gymnastics Women’s College Gymnastics
Paid
Paid
Paid
Paid
Bar Rescue ’
Bar Rescue ’
Bar Rescue ’
Bar Rescue ’
Paid
Paid
Zone
The Magicians
“House of Bones” (2009) Å
› “6 Souls” (2010) Å
Full H’se Full H’se Full H’se Angie
›› “Sky High” (2005, Comedy) Å
››› “Hot Tub Time Machine” (2010)
(:15) “The Man Who Would Be King”
(5:45) “The Young Philadelphians” Å
(:15) ››› “The Wind and the Lion”
Paid
Paid
Paid
Paid
Say Yes Say Yes Say Yes Say Yes Say Yes Say Yes Say Yes Say Yes
Law & Order ’
Law & Order ’
Law & Order ’
Law & Order ’
Law & Order ’
Law & Order ’
When Vacations
Mysteries-Museum Mysteries-Museum Mysteries-Museum Expedition Un.
Wild Things
Paid
Paid
Paid
Paid
Paid
Paid
Billy
Billy
truTV Top Funniest truTV Top Funniest
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FamFeud FamFeud FamFeud Rose.
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Rose.
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SATURDAY EVENING
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Rescue Wildlife
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Save Our
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›› “Planet of the Apes” (2001)
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51
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48
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34
64
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15
The Secret Tapes of the O.J. Case
Secret Tapes
The First 48 Å
(:02) O.J. Speaks: The Hidden Tapes ’
“The Green Mile”
››› “Twister” (1996, Action) Helen Hunt. Å
››› “Twister” (1996, Action) Helen Hunt. Å
Treehouse Masters Treehouse Masters Yankee Jungle (N) Pit Bulls-Parole
Treehouse Masters Pit Bulls-Parole
Real
Real Housewives
››› “The School of Rock” (2003) Jack Black.
›› “Legally Blonde” (2001) ‘PG-13’
(5:06) ›› “Step Brothers”
››› “Wedding Crashers” (2005) Owen Wilson.
››› “Zombieland” (2009) Premiere.
Deadliest Job
To Be Announced
Dual Survival Å
MythBusters (N) ’ Deadliest Job
Find
(:45) “The Princess and the Frog” (2009) K.C.
Lab Rats Lab Rats Best Fr. Austin
Jessie
Jessie
College Basketball Teams TBA. (N)
NBA Basketball: Thunder at Warriors
SportsCenter (N) (Live) Å
College Basketball College Basketball
College Basketball
College Basketball
Vacation Am.
Chopped
Chopped
Chopped
Chopped
Chopped
(4:30) “Signs”
“National Treasure: Book of Secrets”
›› “National Treasure” (2004) Nicolas Cage, Diane Kruger.
The People v.
Louie
(5:00) ›› “The Wolverine” (2013) ’
›› “Thor: The Dark World” (2013) ’ Å
Bryan
Bryan
Hunt Intl Hunt Intl Bryan
Bryan
House
House
Break
Break
Bryan
Bryan
Cnt. Cars Cnt. Cars Cnt. Cars Cnt. Cars Cnt. Cars Cnt. Cars Cnt. Cars Cnt. Cars Cnt. Cars Cnt. Cars
Counting Cars ’
“Kept Woman”
“Manson’s Lost Girls” (2016) Premiere.
Manson Girls
Cleveland Abd.
“Manson Lost”
Dirty; Survival
M.
M.
The Boonies
Human Race
The Boonies
Human Race
Henry
Henry
Game
Nicky
100
Thunder Full H’se Full H’se Friends Friends Friends Friends
Basket SEC Now College Basketball
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SEC Now
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Lip Sync Battle ’
›› “Cloud Atlas” (2012, Drama) Tom Hanks, Halle Berry, Jim Broadbent. Å
›› “Surrogates” (2009) Bruce Willis.
Broke
Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Angie
››› “Zoolander” (2001)
(5:15) “Swing Shift” ››› “Broadcast News” (1987) William Hurt. Å
EasyRi
And the Oscar Goes To... Å
Stories of the ER
Stories of the ER
Stories of the ER
Sex Sent Me
Sex Sent Me
Stories of the ER
“Life as Know”
›› “Valentine’s Day” (2010) Jessica Alba.
(:45) ›› “It’s Complicated” (2009) Meryl Streep.
Ghost Adventures Ghost Adventures Ghost Adventures Ghost Adventures The Dead Files
Ghost Adventures
World’s Dumbest... World’s Dumbest... World’s Dumbest... World’s Dumbest... World’s Dumbest... World’s Dumbest...
(5:00) “Mr. Deeds” Raymond Raymond Raymond Raymond Raymond Raymond King
King
King
King
Colony
Suits
NCIS “Reunion” ’
NCIS ’
NCIS ’
NCIS ’
“Batman Returns”
Blue Bloods Å
Blue Bloods Å
Blue Bloods Å
›› “Anger Management” (2003) Å
5 PM
5:30
New
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ABC
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Mike
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America MotorWk Sewing Quilting
X Games (N) Å
NFL Films (N)
College Basketball
Paid
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Rick
Jdg Judy Jdg Judy
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Lazy
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Martha Lidia
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COM
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FREE
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46
58
52
62
65
47
54
31
32
50
53
30
51
44
25
48
55
34
64
63
27
59
26
28
49
45
57
29
15
To Be Announced To Be Announced To Be Announced The First 48 Å
The First 48 Å
The First 48 Å
›› “U.S. Marshals” (1998, Action) Tommy Lee Jones.
››› “The Green Mile” (1999, Drama) Tom Hanks. Å
World’s-Pets
Animal Ads
Animal Ads
Treehouse Masters Treehouse Masters Treehouse
Atlanta Housewives
Vanderpump Rules Vanderpump Rules Vanderpump Rules Real Housewives
Real
“Step Brothers”
(:11) ›› “Starsky & Hutch” (2004) Ben Stiller.
(:25) ›› “Tower Heist” (2011) Ben Stiller. Å
Fast N’ Loud Å
Fast N’ Loud Å
Fast N’ Loud Å
Dual Survival Å
Dual Survival Å
Dual Survival Å
I Didn’t Jessie
Dog
Austin
Girl
Girl
Bunk’d Liv-Mad. Best Fr. K.C.
“Finding Nemo” ’
College Basketball College Basketball Teams TBA. (N)
College Basketball Teams TBA. (N)
College GameDay
College Basketball College Basketball
College Basketball
College Basketball
Kids Baking
Cake Wars
Worst Cooks
Chopped
Restaurant: Im.
Guilty
Top 5
(11:00) ››› “Holes” (2003)
›››› “Forrest Gump” (1994) Tom Hanks, Robin Wright.
››› “Signs” (2002)
“The Wolverine”
(11:00) “The Amazing Spider-Man” ’
››› “X-Men: First Class” (2011) James McAvoy. ’ Å
Land
Land
Fixer Upper Å
Fixer Upper Å
Fixer Upper Å
Fixer Upper Å
Income Property ’
Modern Marvels ’ Cnt. Cars Cnt. Cars Cnt. Cars Cnt. Cars Cnt. Cars Cnt. Cars Cnt. Cars Cnt. Cars Cnt. Cars Cnt. Cars
“Cleveland”
“Kept Woman”
“She Made Them Do It” (2012) Å
“I Killed My BFF” (2015) Å
Dirty; Survival
Dirty; Survival
Dirty; Survival
Dirty; Survival
Dirty; Survival
Dirty; Survival
Alvinnn!!! Alvinnn!!! Alvinnn!!! Sponge. Sponge. Sponge. Sponge. Henry
Thunder Thunder 2016 NFL Flag
SEC Rewind From Feb. 9, 2009.
College Basketball Missouri at Alabama.
SEC Now College Basketball
Bar Rescue ’
Bar Rescue ’
Bar Rescue ’
Bar Rescue ’
Cops ’ Cops ’ Cops ’ Cops ’
(10:30) “6 Souls”
› “The Reaping” (2007) Hilary Swank.
›› “Angels & Demons” (2009, Suspense) Tom Hanks. Å
Friends Friends Friends Friends Broke
Broke
Broke
Broke
››› “Zoolander” (2001) Ben Stiller.
Man King ››› “A Beautiful Mind” (2001) Russell Crowe.
(:15) “Swing Shift”
››› “Running on Empty” (1988) Å
Hard Evidence
Hard Evidence
Hard Evidence
Hard Evidence
Hard Evidence
Stories of the ER
(:45) “Life as We Know It”
››› “The Terminal” (2004) Tom Hanks. Å
(:45) ›› “Just Like Heaven” (2005)
Food
Food
Food Paradise
Food Paradise
Food Paradise
Food Paradise
Ghost Adventures
truTV Top Funniest truTV Top Funniest 10
10
10
10
World’s Dumbest... World’s Dumbest...
Reba ’ Reba ’ Reba ’ Reba ’ Reba ’ Reba ’ Reba ’ Reba ’ Reba ’ Reba ’ › “Mr. Deeds”
NCIS “Hiatus”
NCIS “Hiatus”
NCIS “SWAK” ’
NCIS “Shalom” ’
NCIS “Aliyah” ’
NCIS ’
Funny Videos
Funny Videos
›› “Batman Returns” (1992, Action) Michael Keaton. Å
Blue Bloods Å
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Raising Raising Commun Commun
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