March 3, 2016 - chicopeeregister.com

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March 3, 2016 - chicopeeregister.com
Register
Chicopee
Local news. Local stories. Local advertisers.
Public Safety
Page 4
RiverMills
FREE
Page 8
Meet Your Merchants
Pages 10 & 11
Volume 18 • Number 6
THURSDAY, March 3, 2016
City crowns their
Colleen and Court
EnTEENpreneurs
pace themselves
for pitch contest
By Tyler W. Leahy
Staff Writer
CHICOPEE – After months
of collaborative work, Chicopee
High School students are ready
to flex their creative muscles
at the second annual “JA
EnTEENpreneur Challenge”
hosted by Junior Achievement
of Western Massachusetts.
Chicopee High School
seniors Luis Williams, Stephanie
Lane, Toriel McPherson, Magda
Potrykus, Jordan Figueroa and
Naomi Costoso-Martinez will
compete in a 90-second pitch
contest, explaining a product that
they have developed together.
“I’m a little nervous to see
what other schools will bring to
the table, but I’m excited. It’s
something new and it’s a very
different learning experience,”
said McPherson.
Utilizing empty Ice
See contest page 7
Chicopee native
regarded as
‘Outstanding
Future
Professional’
By Tyler W. Leahy
Staff Writer
CHICOPEE – Chicopee
native Jessica Fournier has diligently strengthened her potential
as a future physical education
and health
professional. Her
outstanding work
has caused
those in her
Springfield
College
community and
beyond to
Jessica Fournier
take notice.
Fournier has been selected by the Massachusetts
Association of Health, Physical
Education, Recreation and
See future page 9
By Emily Thurlow
Staff Writer
T
hough the number 13
isn’t typically associated with good
fortune, after the results of
the annual Coronation Ball
were revealed, it seems
as though one Chicopee
Comprehensive High School
student might beg to differ.
The luck of the Irish was
apparently with 17-year-old
Kyleigh Morin who donned
the number as she was presented to a crowded room
at the Castle of Knights on
Saturday and walked away
with a crown having been
named this year’s Colleen.
“It’s…it’s just awesome!” Morin said, overwhelmed with joy after her
name was announced. “It’s
really amazing and I can’t
wait to get this year started
[as the city’s Colleen].”
As a High Honors student, Morin is not only the
captain of the Varsity Tennis
team, but vice president of
the Student Council, Key
Club, and Student Advisory
Committee, as well. In addition to working the front end
at Doogan’s Deli, she’s also
completed an internship with
state Rep. Joseph Wagner, DChicopee. As the recipient of
the John and Abigail Adams
Scholarship, she has future
Hitting HOPE with a high note
By Tyler W. Leahy
Staff Writer
CHICOPEE – The Pioneer
Va l l ey c h a p t e r o f H O P E
Worldwide has a sense of servitude that resonates within its
members. To help fund their
efforts, the group is bringing Christian rock headliners
Kutless and 7eventh Time Down
to Chicopee.
HOPE is hosting a fundraising concert in the Chicopee
Comprehensive High School
Auditorium on Thursday, March
10 at 7 p.m. Tickets, which cost
$20 per person, must be purchased in advance at thelighthouseevents.com. Proceeds of
the concert will aid the selffunding Pioneer Valley chapter
of HOPE Worldwide’s programmatic efforts to aid the impover-
ished in the region, as well as a
potential new venture to help the
needy internationally.
“Our goal is to raise money
to not only fund our local chapter programs for 2017, but also
to make funds available for families to travel work on community medical brigades in underdeveloped countries,” said HOPE
member and concert organizer
Cathy Morgado. “We’d love
to subsidize their cost and be
able to send local people, from
Western Mass., to areas in need
and serve.”
Morgado explained that
her husband, Marco Morgado,
intends to serve on a medical
brigade in Honduras with one
of their two sons. She intends to
serve internationally the following year.
Within the Pioneer Valley,
HOPE’s efforts include a back
to school picnic put on for area
homeless shelters, a Christmas
party for foster families within the Springfield Department
of Children and Families unit
and food drives for Lorraine’s
Soup Kitchen. HOPE has also
carried out a mentorship program with the Center for Human
Development, working with
incarcerated youth.
“On Saturdays we actually have a bible study group for
these teenagers,” said Morgado.
“We do bible study with them
and give them an opportunity
to talk about life. These are kids
that have already been interested
in pursuing a relationship with
God and knowing more about
the bible, as well as just figuring
See HOPE page 8
plans to attend Bridgewater
State University with aims to
major in Political Science.
Joining Morin in representing the city in the
upcoming St. Patrick’s Day
Parade in Holyoke as members of the 2016 Court are
fellow CCHS students, Ella
Dion, Kaylee Krajewski,
and Anna Kot, as well as
See coLLEEN page 7
Show us your
silly smiles!
A
pril Fools’ Day is celebrated every year on the
first of April by playing
practical jokes and spreading
hoaxes and we at The Chicopee
Register
wanted
to join in
on the silliness!
We’re asking readers
to send in
silly snapshots or
pictures of
pranks you could pull with The
Chicopee Register in hand. The
winner of this contest will grace
the front page of the April 7 edition! Send in your submissions to
[email protected] by
March 31. We’re already sporting our smiles!
You can follow the Chicopee Register on facebook!
Watch for breaking news and updates to local stories.
Community Calendar
T
his calendar is intended to promote free
events in Chicopee or events directly benefiting a Chicopee based non-profit organization.
To place an event on the calendar, email the listing
with date, time, place, organization hosting and a
brief description of what will be happening to [email protected] by the end of the work
day on Thursdays. The item will remain on the calendar until it has happened or has been cancelled.
Mercy Medical
Center Welcomes
RIVERBEND
MEDICAL GROUP
OFFICES:
AGAWAM
230 MAIN STREET
413-789-6800
Mercy Medical Center and the Sisters of Providence Health
System are pleased to welcome RiverBend Medical Group
into our family of providers and network of services.
RiverBend Medical Group, the largest physician practice
in the area, brings over one hundred providers and thirty-
SPRINGFIELD
305 BICENTENNIAL HIGHWAY
413-733-4101
five years of experience providing outstanding primary
CHICOPEE
444 MONTGOMERY STREET
413-594-3111
RiverBend’s physicians, physician assistants, nurse prac-
WESTFIELD
395 SOUTHAMPTON ROAD
413-533-2900
WILBRAHAM
70 POST OFFICE PARK
413-598-7770
RiverbendMedical.com
and specialty care to this community.
titioners, certified nurse midwives and staff members will
continue to practice at RiverBend’s current locations in
Agawam, Chicopee, Springfield, Westfield and Wilbraham.
Saturday, March 5
HEALING HANDS OF LIGHT
SPIRITUALIST CHURCH is hosting a Psychic
Fair/Medium’s Day/Bake Sale on Saturday, March
5 from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. on 465 Granby Road. The
event will feature 15-minute private readings for
$20.
Sunday, March 6
CARD, COIN & COLLECTIBLE SHOW
will take place on Sunday, March 6 from 9 a.m. to
2 p.m. at the Chicopee Boys & Girls Club, located
on 580 Meadow St. General admission is $1 and
kids 10 and under get in for free. The event has
over 40 tables and is handicap accessible. The
show features coins, sport and non-sport cards,
sets, wax boxes, autographs, vintage cards, car
supplies, Magic cards, toys, and more. All proceeds will benefit the Boys & Girls Club. Door
prizes are drawn every 30 minutes. For more information, call 413-593-6046.
Thursday, March 10
A FUNDRAISING CONCERT FOR THE
PIONEER VALLEY CHAPTER OF HOPE
WORLDWIDE will be held Thursday, March
10 at 7 p.m., in the Chicopee Comprehensive
High School Auditorium. The concert will feature
Christian rock headliners Kutless and 7eventh
Time Down to Chicopee. Tickets, which cost $20
per person, must be purchased in advance at www.
thelighthouseevents.com. Proceeds of the concert
will aid the self-funding Pioneer Valley chapter of
HOPE Worldwide’s programmatic efforts to aid
the impoverished in the region, as well as internationally.
The Sisters of Providence Health System and RiverBend
ONGOING
share vision and common values grounded in an
CANCER HOUSE SEEKS JEWELRY
DONATIONS. The Cancer House of Hope will be
hosting the sale on Saturday, March 19 from 9 a.m.
to 3 p.m. at the CHD location at 246 Park Street,
West Springfield. Donations of vintage and costume jewelry in any amount is requested so we can
prepare them for the sale. For any donation drop
off information, please call the Cancer House of
Hope at 413-733-1858 or just drop by from 10 a.m.
to 4 p.m., Monday through Friday.
FISH DINNERS will be sold beginning with
Ash Wednesday, Feb. 10 and all Fridays of Lent
except Good Friday, March 25 in the church hall
at Immaculate Conception Church, 25 Parker St.
Indian Orchard from 4:30 to 7 p.m. Eat in or
take out fried or baked fish, mashed or French
fried potatoes, cole slaw –Adults $11 and children
$5. Desserts sold separately. Also frozen pierogi, golabki, and kapusta available for purchase.
Everyone is welcome.
unwavering focus on our patients and commitment to the
very highest quality care.
A member of the Sisters of Providence
Health System and Trinity Health
Page ◆ March 3, 2016
Friday, March 4
AJAC SIGNUPS: Signups will be held at
Papa Gino’s, 611 Memorial Drive, Chicopee on
the following dates and times: March 4 from 6:30
to 8 p.m. March 5 from 4 to 6 p.m. March 8 and
10 from 6:30 to 8 p.m. March 12 from 12 to 2 p.m.
March 14, 16, 18 from 6:30 p.m. March 19 from
4 to 6 p.m. March 22 and 24 from 6:30 to 8 p.m.
March 26 from 12 to 2 p.m. and 4 to 6 p.m. March
28 and 30 from 6:30-8:30 p.m. For more information contact Fran Bowen at 593-0722.
BLOOD DONATIONS: Upcoming blood
donation opportunities in Chicopee include
Chicopee High School, 820 Front St. on March 4
from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. If you would like to donate
blood simply visit redcrossblood.org or call 1800-RED CROSS (1-800-733-2767) to make an
appointment or for more information. All blood
types are needed to ensure a reliable supply for
patients. A blood donor card or driver’s license or
two other forms of identification are required at
check-in. Individuals who are 17 years of age (16
with parental consent in some states), weigh at
least 110 pounds and are in generally good health
may be eligible to donate blood. High school students and other donors 18 years of age and younger also have to meet certain height and weight
requirements.
MercyCares.com
Chicopee
Register
◆
City of
Chicopee
meeting
notifications
Thursday, March 3
City Council, 7:15
p.m., City Council
Chambers, Fourth
Floor, City Hall Annex,
274 Front St.
Monday, March 7
Design and Visual
Communication
Advisory,
5
p.m., Chicopee
Comprehensive
High School, 617
Montgomery St.
Tuesday, March 8
Local Emergency
Planning Committee, 9
a.m., Chicopee Public
Library, 449 Front St.
Culinary Arts
A d v i s o r y, 1 1 : 4 5
p.m.
Chicopee
Comprehensive
High School, 617
Montgomery St.
C h i c o p e e
Historical Commission,
3:30 p.m., Polish
Center for Discovery,
Elms College, 33 South
St.
Wednesday, March 9
Drafting Advisory,
11:45 a.m., Chicopee
Comprehensive
High School, 617
Montgomery St.
Chicopee Housing
Authority Board of
Commissioners, 5:30
p.m., Chicopee Senior
Center, 7 Valley View
Court
Mobile Home
Rent Control Board, 6
p.m., Chicopee Public
Library, 449 Front St.
Chicopee Zoning
Board of Appeals, 6:30
p.m., City Council
Chambers, 4th Floor,
City Hall Annex, 274
Front St.
Thursday, March 10
M a c h i n e To o l
Technology Advisory,
5 p.m., Chicopee
Comprehensive
High School, 617
Montgomery St.
Neighborhood
Meeting, 6:30 p.m.,
RiverMills Center, 5
West Main St.
Planning Board,
7 p.m., City Council
Chambers, Fourth
Floor, City Hall Annex,
274 Front St.
NOTICE
ERRORS: Each advertiser is
requested to check their advertisement the first time it
appears. This paper will not
be responsible for more than
one corrected insertion, nor
will be liable for any error in
an advertisement to a greater
extent than the cost of the
space occupied by the item
in the advertisement.
Chicopee
Register
in the city
◆
Friends host annual Fine Art Exhibit during month of March
CHICOPEE – The
Friends of the Chicopee
Public Library’s 12th
Annual Fine Art
Exhibit will be held now
t h r o u g h We d n e s d a y,
March 30 in the Henry J.
Bazan Community Room
of the Chicopee Public
Library, Emily L. Partyka
Central Branch on 449
Front St., Chicopee. It is
free and open to the public. This year’s exhibit
will be judged by classical painter and teacher Christina Grace
Mastrangelo. She is an
academically trained artist
from Wilbraham, and is an
award-winning artist both
locally and internationally. Mastrangelo has had
multiple solo and group
shows in Florence Italy, a
solo show at the D’Amour
Museum of Fine Art in
Springfield, and is currently represented by the Guild
Gallery on Newbury Street
in Boston. The public is invited
to an Opening Reception
that will be held on
T h u r s d a y, M a r c h 1 2
from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m.
There will be an Awards
Ceremony at approximately 7 p.m. Refreshments
will be served and musical entertainment will be
provided by jazz vocalist Teresa Hayward, a
Chicopee native, and pianist Charles Savage, who
are both currently attending
The Hartt School of Music
at Hartford University and
accompanied by bassist
Leo Catricala, who recently
graduated from Hartt. Ever since this annual
exhibit started, the interest, participation and attendance has increased dramatically each year. It is
sponsored by the Friends
of the Chicopee Public
Library and its very generous patrons, and funded
in part by a grant from
the Chicopee Cultural
Council, a local agency
which is funded by the
Massachusetts Cultural
Council, a state agency. The Fine Art Committee
includes Co-Chairs Nancy
C. Michon and Francine
Jasinski Hayward, as well
as Art Committee Members
E i l e e n H o d g e , C a r o l
Czepiel, and Maureen
McDonald. It is recommended that
visitors, especially if coming from a long distance,
call the library at 413594-1800 to check exhibit
hours, which will vary and
change through the month.
Additional information about the Friends can
be found at friendsofchicopeepubliclibrary.org
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March 3, 2016 ◆
Page ◆
public safety
Narcotic taskforce seizes 4 kilos
of cocaine in 72 hours
SPRINGFIELD Members of the Hampden
County Narcotics Task Force
(HCNTF) comprised of members of the Massachusetts
State Police, Springfield,
Holyoke, Chicopee police
departments and the Hampden
County Sheriff ’s Office,
seized four kilograms of
cocaine and arrested three
suspected drug traffickers in
two separate raids.
The first raid occurred on
Friday, Feb. 19 at 35 Pine St.
in Springfield, which resulted in the seizure of approximately two kilograms of
cocaine and the arrest of Pablo
Torres, 46, of 38 Ledyard St.
in Springfield, and Samuel
Hernandez, 40, of 64 Osgood
St. in Springfield. Both were
charged with trafficking in
cocaine over 200 Grams and
conspiracy to violate narcotic
drug laws. The raid was led
by the Massachusetts State
Police assigned to District
Attorney Gulluni’s Office,
the Department of Homeland
S e c u r i t y, a n d t h e D r u g
Enforcement Agency (DEA).
The raid occurred after
◆
arrest logs
the interception of
over 200 Grams and
illicit narcotics by
conspiracy to viothe Department of
late narcotic drug
Homeland Security.
laws.
The subsequent
The
raid
investigation then
occurred after the
led investigators to
interception of
35 Pine St. A district
illicit narcotics by
court search warthe Department
rant was applied for
of Homeland
and obtained. Once
S e c u r i t y. T h e
Juan Rosario
officers set up surinvestigation then
veillance and identiled investigators
fied the participants
to 71 Adams St.,
of the illegal trafApt. 4L. A district
ficking they moved
court search warin and arrested the
rant was applied
conspirators without
for and obtained.
incident.
Once officers set
The second
up surveillance
raid took place on
and identified the
Monday, Feb. 22
participant of the
at 71 Adams St.,
illegal traffickApartment 4L, in
ing they moved in
Juan Rosario
Springfield. The raid
and arrested the
carried out by the
alleged trafficker
Task Force resulted
without incident.
in the seizure of
The raid was led
approximately two kilograms by the Massachusetts State
of cocaine and the arrest Police assigned to Gulluni’s
of Juan Rosario, 37, of 71 office, the Department
Adams Street, Apartment 4L, o f H o m e l a n d S e c u r i t y,
Springfield, for the following and the Springfield Police
charges: trafficking in cocaine Department.
T h e C h i c o p e e Po l i c e
Department responded to 542 calls
for service from Monday, Feb. 22 to
Sunday, Feb. 28. The department’s
police officers made 11 arrests or
summons arrests. Those arrested will
appear at future dates in court and
are innocent until proven guilty.
Tuesday, Feb. 23
Richard A. Adams, 19, homeless, was arrested at 7:20 p.m. on
Front Street for a WMS warrant.
Wednesday, Feb. 24
Edwin Harrison, 36, of 42
Deerborn St., Springfield, was
arrested at 1:49 a.m. on Center
Street on charges of assault and battery with a dangerous weapon and
misleading a police officer.
William Aponte, 42, of 80
Northampton Ave., Apt. 3FLR,
Springfield, was arrested at 4:44
p.m. on Chicopee Street on charges
of operating after license or right to
operate revoked and a number plate
violation.
Nicolas E. Merrill, 27, of 9
Radner St., Springfield, was arrested
at 11:25 p.m. on Sunnyside Street
on charges of possession of an open
container of alcohol in a motor
vehicle, refusing to identify self as
a motor vehicle operator and resisting arrest.
Thursday, Feb. 25
Alec Bermudez, 21, 125
Meadow St., Apt. 2, Chicopee, was
arrested at 3:14 a.m. on John Street
on charges of use of motor vehicle without authority and operating
a motor vehicle with a suspended
license.
A 14-year-old juvenile was
arrested at 11:58 a.m. on Dare Way
on a charge of school disturbance.
Richard A. Flaherty, 56, of 165
East Main St., Apt. 405, Chicopee,
was arrested at 4:02 p.m. on East
Main Street on a charge of assault
and battery on a person over 60
years old disabled with an injury.
Timothy L. Pittsinger, 31, of
77 State St., Chicopee, was arrested
at 10:28 p.m. on State Street for a
WMS warrant.
Friday, Feb. 26
A 16-year-old juvenile was
arrested at 7:39 a.m. on Montgomery
Street on a charge of school disturbance.
Allen Oliver Bryant, 32, of 118
Cheyenne Road., Springfield, was
arrested at 4:39 p.m. on Grape Street
for two counts of a WMS warrant
and charges of two counts of possession to distribute a class B drug,
subsequent offense, possession of
a class B drug, subsequent offense
and possession of a class E drug.
Brandon Mancini, 28, of 15
Sergeant Ave., Chicopee, was arrested
at 11:30 p.m. on Sergeant Avenue as a
fugitive from justice on a court warrant.
Compiled by Staff Writer
Tyler W. Leahy
&
EARN AN ELMS COLLEGE BACHELOR’S DEGREE AT HCC
Accelerated college degree programs:
• Accounting • Business Management and Marketing
• RN-BS • Psychology • Healthcare Management
Information Sessions
Holyoke Community College Kittredge Center, Room 203
March 8
March 19
4 - 7 p.m.
10 - 12 p.m.
CLASSES FORMING FOR FALL 2016
Contact information: Joyce Desorcy z [email protected]
Elms: 413-265-2382 z HCC: 413-552-2721 z Cell: 413-427-6553
www.elms.edu/hcc
Information Sessions also available by appointment
Page ◆ March 3, 2016
Chicopee
Register
◆
in the city
◆
Area millennials engage with legislators
By Tyler W. Leahy
Staff Writer
SPRINGFIELD –
Area young professionals
and students participated
in a roundtable discussion, officially launching
a statewide senate effort
to enable millennials to
shape ideas for future legislation.
Among participants at the “Millenial
Engagement Initiative”
event held in Springfield
at TechSpring on Feb. 12
was Ludlow resident Spiro
Marangoudakis.
“I think it’s really
great that the senate leadership cares about what
we think. Millennials are
a large demographic and
both the economy and
society have changed
very quickly over the last
five to 10 years,” said
Marangoudakis.
Marangoudakis is
a May 2011 graduate of
Brown University’s doctoral Molecular Biology,
Cell Biology and
Biochemistry program.
He is also co-founder of
Piddx, Inc., a marketplace for local skills and
services, and founder
of a consulting service,
Fractal Dynamics. A current Master of Business
Administration candidate
at Northeastern University,
Marangoudakis also serves
as treasurer for the Lesser
Committee and serves on
the board of directors of
Suit Up Springfield.
Led by Senator Eric
P. Lesser, D-Longmeadow
and Sen. President Stanley
R o s e n b e rg , m i l l e n n ials ranging from age 16
to age 35 working in a
variety of sectors in the
Greater Springfield area
discussed issues pertinent
to young professionals in
the region. State Senator
Donald Humason, Jr.
and Springfield Mayor
Dominic Sarno also helped
shaped the discussion.
L eg i s l a t ive a r e a s
of focus of Greater
Springfield millennials
included the immense
cost of college attendance,
workplace healthcare
costs, transportation difficulties and attracting more
millennials to Western
Massachusetts.
“From ongoing discussions over the course
of several months, we’re
going to have a very concrete and specific set of
priorities that we can then
Irish Center hosts tour of Ireland
CHICOPEE – The
Irish Cultural Center is
sponsoring a 10-day Autumn tour to Ireland on
Oct. 13 through Oct.
2 2 , v i s i t i n g D i n g l e ,
Killarney and Bunratty.
Tour includes round-trip
airfare, round trip bus
from Elms College to
Boston’s Logan Airport,
all breakfast/dinner
meals, top rated hotels,
day trips, attractions and
Irish driver/guide gratuity. Cost of the tour is
$2,580 per person sharing, $2,880 for single.
An information session
is planned for Sunday,
Feb. 28 at 1 p.m., in the
Dooley Campus Center
at Elms College, Room
207, 291 Springfield St.
in Chicopee.
For more information, call Rose Baker
at 413.519.2135 or visi t i r i s h c e n t e r w n e . o rg .
Tour is limited and will
be filled on a first-come,
first-serve basis.
Public AuctioN
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 23RD AT 11:00 A.M.
RECEIVER’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE
• CHICOPEE •
6 ROOM / 4 BEDROOM
2 STORY
COLONIAL STYLE HOME
“CLOSE PROXIMITY TO SCHOOLS, SHOPPING & ROUTE 391”
231 Chicopee Street CHICOPEE, MASSACHUSETTS
To be sold on the Premises
Features:
• 2 Story Colonial Style Home •
• Total of (6) Rooms, w/ (4) Bedrooms & (1 ½) Baths
• ± 1,555 S/F of Total Living Area • Gas FWA Heat • Full Basement •
• Carpet, Hardwood & Ceramic Tile Floors • Public Water & Sewer
★ Two Car Detached Garage ★
Sale Per Order of Mortgagee
Attorney Dennis P. Powers
1391 Main Street, Springfield, MA
Attorney for Receiver
Terms of Sale: $5,000.00 Deposit Cash or Certified Funds.
5% Buyer’s Premium Applies.
Other Terms to be Announced at Time of Sale.
Aaron Posnik
AUCTIONEERS - APPRAISERS
West Springfield, MA • Philadelphia, PA
413-733-5238 • 610-853-6655
TOLL FREE 1-877-POSNIK-1 (767-6451)
MA Auc. Lic. #161 • PA Auc. Lic. #AY000241L
www.posnik.com • E-mail: [email protected]
Chicopee
Register
Area millennials engage with legislators at TechSpring in Springfield on Feb. 12.
file as legislation,” said
Lesser.
As “Millennial
Engagement Initiatives”
transpire over the next
several months, notes will
be taken to amass a report
that will help guide specific policies.
“I think there are two
things here that we are
really looking to generate
some feedback on: one is
specific policy…the other
piece is, if you look at
from 1985 until now and
you think about how much
change has happened,
literally every sector of
American life is different,”
said Lesser. “One sector of
life that isn’t all that different is government and
how we operate and interact within government.”
Lesser later added
that the student debt crisis
is arguably the most significant challenge faced
by the millennial demographic.
Throughout the
roundtable discussion,
millennials chimed in on
issues they feel are especially pertinent to growth
in the greater Springfield
area.
Turley Publications staff photo by Tyler W. Leahy
“From the economy shifting, to college
becoming more expensive, to healthcare becoming more expensive, there
are a wide range of issues
that present themselves,”
said Marangoudakis. “To
me, jobs are the number
one issue in the area, and
job readiness as well…
between job training and
education, those are the
two things that are really
going to help us.”
Marangoudakis also
expressed his concerns
with the ongoing opioid
crisis, and along with
other attendees, expressed
a desire for an east-towest rail system connecting Springfield to Boston.
The “Millenial
Engagement Initiative”
was launched by Sen.
President Rosenberg,
who appointed 30-yearold Lesser to spearhead
the effort. The initiative,
aimed at increasing millennial involvement in
the political process, will
be carried out through a
variety of public meetings
across the state throughout
the year.
Parks and Rec host an egg-cellent event
CHICOPEE – Join
the Parks and Recreation
Department for a popular community event on
Saturday, March 26 at
Upper Szot Park at 10
a.m. The event is geared
at children ages 10 and
under. Activities include
a coloring contest, Easter
Bonnet contest, the egg
hunt, and a visit from the
Easter Bunny. Coloring
sheets are available in the
office. Pre-registration is
NOTICE
ERRORS:
Each
advertiser is requested to check
their
advertisement the first time
it appears. This
paper will not be
responsible
for
more than one
corrected insertion, nor will be liable for any error
in an advertisement to a greater
extent than the
cost of the space
occupied by the
item in the advertisement.
mandatory either at the
office or by mailing in the
registration form that is
being sent out to schools
for kindergarten through
fourth graders. Organizers
request patrons bring their
own coloring sheet and
homemade Easter bonnet to the event. After
checking in, your child
will receive a goody bag.
The Egg hunts are organized by age beginning
with the years 3 and
under, followed by the 4
to 7 ages and ending with
the 8- to 10-year-olds.
Colored Easter eggs are
scattered along the field
and are filled with candy
and possibly a special
ticket redeemable at the
site for a prize.
Afterwards, the Easter
Bunny is making an
appearance at Szot so parents bring your cameras to
take pictures of your little
ones! Refreshments and
balloons as well!
The cost is $5 for residents and $7 for non-residents and signups end on
Thursday, March 24 at 5
p.m. There is a maximum
number of participants we
can have so sign up soon!
Dupont Middle School
will be used as a rain/snow
site on this day.
For more information
contact the Parks at 5943481.
JR
Specializing in Portuguese
meat and fish products including
PRESUNTO CASEIRO,
CHOURIÇA and BACALHAU
Fresh Fish every Wednesday
Call ahead for the
Lobster Special each week
274 East Street, Ludlow, MA 01056 • Paulo Dias, Proprietor
Tuesday-Saturday 8-6 • Sunday 8-1 • Closed Mondays
March 3, 2016 ◆
Page ◆
opinion
Nerdy notations
A
bout this time, a year ago, I was gearing up to attend a collegiate conference
for Sigma Tau Delta, a national honor
society for English students. Essentially, the
conference acted as a gathering of literary nerds
sharing argumentative research papers on works
written hundreds of years ago and bearing some
soul through their own personal short fiction,
nonfiction and poetry.
A self-classified
nerd, I’ll admit spending
a week surrounded by literal bookworms made me
feel like a pseudo-nerd
at most. Regardless, the
following months were
spent rekindling my
love of pleasure
reading – and
reflecting on
w h a t wa s a
bizarre trip to
New Mexico.
S t i l l , t o d a y,
I think of the
Sigma Tau Delta
trip as the greatest
example of my quirks.
T h e t r ave l i t i n e r a r y
had a stellar start, as I slept through my 4:15
a.m. alarm, in turn missing the carpool I had
arranged with some friends. After a double-digit
number of wake up calls, I dashed out the door
nearly two hours later than intended, speeded
excessively to Bradley International Airport
(not endorsing that decision, by the way) and
somehow arrived with ample time to spare.
Duly surprised that I made it, my two colleagues had already contacted the rest of our
group, waiting for a different flight, to let them
know I probably wasn’t going to make it. At
this time, my decision to attend a small college
felt somewhat validated. Explaining my near
mishap to a professor whom I saw every single
day and considered a mentor was much easier
than explaining it to a near stranger.
As far as the rest of the trip goes, my spotty
memory sums up whom I am pretty well –mostly remembering useless details and losing track
of the big picture. At this point in time, I don’t
recall what advice Gary Dop and other authors
had about making writing a lifestyle during
their presentations. I do, however, remember
a wiry kid from Indiana acting out an improvisational rendering of his grandmother in the
hotel lobby, yelling expletives at other students
and bystanders, telling them to get off of her
property.
I don’t exactly recall what questions audience members had about my way-too-personal
nonfiction piece that I will never read again. I
remember deciding to get dinner at a spot called
The Library. Ironic, right? If there is a restaurant named The Library while you’re at an
English conference, you have to give it a whirl.
The Library was very deceiving to say the least.
There were bookshelves and the backdrop was
ornate, but far behind a plethora of flat screen
televisions playing college basketball. It turns
out The Library was really just an Albuquerquecentric joint reminiscent of a popular wing joint
with a catchy slang name... but perhaps even
more uncomfortable and inappropriate.
Essentially, now that a year has passed,
it seems that I haven’t committed any of the
most important writing tips picked up at the
conference to memory. I have some observations, however. The landscape surrounding
Albuquerque is breathtaking. Jackrabbits are
odd-looking creatures. People in the desert love
motorcycles – loud ones, too. The altitude is
legitimate, as made apparent by daily nosebleeds. Albuquerque may be the most hospitable
city I have ever been to. People are extremely
polite and welcoming. The Native American
history museums in New Mexico are very moving and were worth the trip all on their own. Put
green chile sauce on everything – it’s delicious.
Authentic horchata should also be a staple in
every person’s diet.
WE CARE
ABOUT
YOUR NEWS!
◆
‘Today was good. Today was fun.
Tomorrow is another one.’
By Joan E. B. Coombs
Guest Columnist
F
asten your seatbelts!
March 2 is “Read Across
America Day!”
In 2006, the National
Education Association founded this reading
awareness day on
the birthday of the
beloved children’s
author, Dr. Seuss.
Yes, Theodor Seuss
Geisel, (1904-1991)
became an award
winning, globally
known author, illustrator and originator
of characters, who
are all loved for
their enjoyable wit
and wisdom.
Geisel, of German heritage, attended schools in
Springfield. Two little known
events could have discouraged him. As a 14-year-old
Boy Scout, during wartime, he
excelled in a contest for selling Bonds. But, during the onstage award ceremony Theodor
became unduly embarrassed
because by error, the awards
were short-ordered. About
to receive his award, none
were left! The famous presenter, the former President
Theodore Roosevelt asked
him, “What are you doing
here?” (Apparently, thereafter, Geisel did not prefer public appearances.) Also, as an
eager, Central High art student,
he was instructed to: “draw as
it is”. But Theodor yearned to
“draw as he saw it.” (Aren’t
we glad he did later?) In 1921,
Geisel gradated from Central
High School. At this event there were enough awards.
As a student at New
H a m p s h i r e ’s D a r t m o u t h
College, Geisel expressed
his creativity and graduated in 1925. Pursuing a PhD
in English, he studied at
England’s Lincoln College,
Oxford. There he met his future
wife, Helen, a writer, who encouraged
him to pursue a
career as an illustrator and cartoonist in America.
Throughout their
40-year marriage
(1927-1967) Geisel
expressed his creative genius with
cartoons, illustrations, poetry, prose,
scripts, and internationally published books.
During a European voyage in 1936, the rhythm and
sounds of the ship’s engine
actually inspired Geisel’s first
children’s book, “And to think
That I Saw It on Mulberry
Street!” Unwittingly it was
rejected by 27 publishers.
Ready to burn the manuscript,
Geisel was interrupted by a
former Dartmouth classmate.
Although new to the children’s
books industry, this friend had
Vanguard Press publish it in
1937.
Later, in 1954, Life magazine noted that children weren’t
learning to read because their
books were boring. William
E. Spaulding, of Houghton
Mifflin publishers, compiled
a list of 348 important words
for first graders. Notably, he
challenged Geisel to write a
book using 250 words: “Bring
back a book children can’t put
down.” His book, “The Cat in
the Hat” was written in nine
months. Using 236 words, it
achieved international success.
In 1956 Dartmouth
University awarded Geisel
an honorary doctorate. Dr.
Seuss achieved global fame,
profoundly influencing great
reading habits among millions of children and adults
across America and beyond.
He authored over 40 children’s
books, selling 600 million copies, with many books being
translated into 20 languages.
Dr. Seuss’s prolific writing
continued through 1990, when
he wrote, at 80 years young,
“Oh, the Places You’ll Go!”
In 2002, The Dr. Seuss
National Memorial Sculpture
Garden opened at the
Springfield Museums with help
from his second wife, Audrey
Geisel. His adult step-daughter, Lark created sculptures of
Geisel and his book characters. In 2004 Children’s librarians across the country began
presenting annual Theodor
Seuss Geisel Awards. And, the
“Geisel School of Medicine” is
instituted at Dartmouth.
D r. S e u s s wo u l d b e
amazed at how many children
and adults recite lines from his
books! Perhaps today thousands of enthusiastic readers
will say: “Today was good.
Today was fun. Tomorrow is
another one.”
Joan Coombs shares a
weekly series of light humor
– “slices of life, fresh from
the oven of experience” –
through her column. She’s a
former resident of Chicopee,
and writes about national
topics, as well as lesserknown events that occur in
day-to-day life.
Last week’s “Where is
it?” was of a miniature
plane on Granby Road.
E
ach week the Chicopee Register will feature a "Where
Is It?” photo in the opinion section. The feature photo
could be of a local building, item, sign place, or landmark. Readers are asked to pick their brains to figure out where
it is or even what it is. Check here each week to test your
knowledge of the area where we live and work. Do you know
where this week's photo is?
The answer to this
week’s “Where Is It?”
will run in next week’s
edition, along with a new
trivia photo for you to
consider. Do you know
where this week’s photo
was taken? Join the fun
and submit your answers
for this weeks “Where
Is It?” photo to [email protected] or
24 Water Street. Palmer,
MA 01069.
PATRICK H. TURLEY
CEO
KEITH TURLEY
President
DOUGLAS L. TURLEY
Vice President
EDITOR
Emily Thurlow
[email protected]
ADVERTISING SALES
Wendy Delcamp
[email protected]
SPORTS EDITOR
Dave Forbes
[email protected]
SOCIAL MEDIA
@ Chicopee Register
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www.chicopeeregister.turley.com
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FOR ADVERTISING
413.592.3599
Fax: 413.592.3568
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Wendy Delcamp
[email protected]
EDITORIAL DEPARTMENT
413.682.0007
Fax: 413.289.1977
Editor
Emily Thurlow
[email protected]
Staff Writer
Tyler W. Leahy
[email protected]
WEB
www.chicopeeregister.turley.com
You can follow the Chicopee Register on facebook!
Watch for breaking news and updates to local stories.
Page ◆ March 3, 2016
The Chicopee Register is
published every Thursday by
Turley Publications, Inc., 24
Water St., Palmer, Mass. 01069.
Telephone (413) 283-8393, Fax
(413) 289-1977.
Turley Publications, Inc. cannot
assume liability for the loss of
photographs or other materials
submitted for publication.
Materials will not be returned
except upon specific request
when submitted.
Where is it?
Turley Publications photos staff photo
The Chicopee
Register welcomes submissions of news in or
related to Chicopee and
its residents. Our "People
News," is filled with
submitted engagement
announcements, wedding announcements,
birth announcements,
your new baby or news
about your 25th or 50th
anniversary celebrations.
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Chicopee Register, c/o
Turley Publications, 24
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@ Chicopee Register
The Chicopee Register is published by
Turley Publications, Inc. • www.turley.com
Chicopee
Register
◆
business
◆
Patrick’s offers family pub experience
By Tyler W. Leahy
Staff Writer
CHICOPEE – Nestled
in Chicopee’s historic
downtown, a new restaurant and bar celebrates
the tradition of the city,
pledges to be welcoming
to all and honors its owners’ Irish lineage.
Patrick’s Food &
Spirits, located at 154
School St., pays homage
to its neighborhood’s rich
manufacturing-era history,
adorned with maps and
photographs that had been
archived by the Chicopee
Public Library. Subtle
Irish cultural decorations
supplement the Chicopee
relics.
“Chicopee Center has
a neat history and being
part of that history is pretty interesting,” said Sharon
Gage, Patrick’s Food &
Spirits owner, noting that
the oldest section of the
building was built in 1890.
“We were able to pick out
photos of places that were
within walking distance of
here for our decorations.”
Gage, and her
husband, Keith, West
Springfield residents, had
been looking for a new
project, culminating in
their decision to buy the
154 School St. property in
September 2015. Patrick’s
officially opened its doors
last November. Most
recently, the property had
housed Spectator’s Sports
Bar & Grill. Decades ago,
it was utilized as a men’s
club for Chicopee residents.
The food and spirits
hub’s name was inspired
by Sharon Gage’s greatgreat-grandfather, Patrick
O’Loughlin, whom immigrated to the United States
in 1859, settling in the
Hartford, Conn. area.
“We’d like Patrick’s
to be a family pub, where
during the daytime people will feel comfortable
bringing their kids or
grandparents, or whomever. We encourage it to be
multigenerational,” said
Gage. “We want it to be
comfortable for all generations and welcoming to
everyone.”
Gage explained that
she feels Patrick’s dining
experience sets it apart
from other pubs, with an
emphasis on top-notch
food quality at affordable
pricing, boasting an extensive menu of American
foods and a few signature
Irish dishes. The menu
offers early bird special
and buy-one-get-one-halfoff options.
Currently, Patrick’s is
open from 11 a.m. until
2 a.m. on Thursdays,
Fridays and Saturdays.
Gage said there is a plan
to add more hours eventu-
ally, as her and her husbands learn a system that
works best for them and
explore hiring additional
staff.
“ We ’r e b u i l d i n g
gradually and hitting our
stride,” said Gage. “We’re
excited. Chicopee Center
is very easy to get to from
just about anywhere, and
once you get here, there is
plenty of parking. And the
experience is both clean
and inexpensive.”
Gage noted that location was a key factor in
deciding to buy the 154
School St. property and
open Patrick’s.
“There’s a lot of foot
traffic, there is a great
parking lot and we were
able to purchase the building along with the business,” said Gage. “It was
very attractive to us.”
Entertainment is a
key component of the
Patrick’s experience, with
Sharon Gage was inspired
to name her Irish pub,
Patrick’s Food & Spirits,
after her great-great-grandfather, Patrick O’Loughlin,
who immigrated to the
United States in 1859.
Turley Publications staff photo
by Tyler W. Leahy
live performances by local
musicians nearly every
weekend. On March 17,
St. Patrick’s Day, the pub
will celebrate by serving
corned beef and cabbage
meals, as well as hosting
an Irish karaoke contest.
COLLEEN
from page 1
Turley Publications staff photo by Tyler W. Leahy
Chicopee High School seniors Stephanie Lane, Luis Williams and Toriel McPherson
display their product, a protective earphones case, which they will pitch at the
EnTEENpreneur Challenge hosted by Junior Achievement of Western Massachusetts.
CONTEST
from page 1
Breakers candy tins, the
students designed a protective case for earphones
that can easily be fastened
to a backpack, and personalized with photos and
other designs.
“Most students like to
jam out…especially here
at CHS,” said Williams.
“We’re a school very
involved in our athletics…
we find that while working
out, music really helps us
focus, but we found that our
wires would fray throwing
our earphones in our gym
bags. We wanted to make
a case for them that was
affordable, self-sufficient
and customizable.”
The Pacers will
present their product at
9:45 a.m. at the UMass
Springfield Center on
March 3. The pitch contest
is part of the new Junior
Achievement Blended
Company Program,
designed to unlock the
innate ability in students
to solve a problem or fill
Chicopee
Register
a need in their community
through an entrepreneurial
spirit.
L o c a l bu s i n e s s e s
and colleges sponsor
the JA EnTEENpreneur
Challenge, including
Chicopee-based sponsors
Panera Bread, Arbor Kids
and Chicopee Savings
Bank Foundation. Elms
College’s new Center
for Entrepreneurial
Leadership sponsored an
Elevator Pitch Camp at
the college on Feb. 12 for
all students.
“This opportunity
with JA allows us to learn
the process of working
together and I’ve actually enjoyed the trials and
struggles of it. It’s about
identifying a problem
and finding a solution,”
said Williams. “We have
learned that we work better together and that’s
something that we with
pride, as Chicopee High,
stand for.”
At
the
JA
EnTEENpreneur
Challenge, students will be
judged by mother-daughter duo Tracey Noonan
and Dani Vilagie, creators
of Wicked Good Cupcakes
and former contestants on
the hit reality show Shark
Tank.
The students intend to
sell their product for $4
in the school store, double
the cost of constructing it.
Profits will help offset the
cost of upcoming senior
week activities as graduation rapidly approaches.
“I appreciate Junior
Achievement giving these
students real-life experience,” said business teacher Robbin Lussier, whom
has overseen the students
working on their product.
“The creativity of trying
to make a product and
bring an idea to reality is
an invaluable experience
for these students working
together, and they really
had to think about pricing
and cost, working through
the math. I loved that it
sparked new thought for
them.”
The pitch contest and
a trade fair, which will
allow students to display
their product to attendees, is open to the public
beginning at 9:45 a.m.
Chicopee High School student, Lauren Foley.
“We have such a special city…it’s wonderful
to see so many meritorious young women coming forward to represent
Chicopee,” said Mayor
Richard Kos.
Brand new to the
annual event this year
was the “Irish Spirit
Award.” Instead of a distinction like the popular “Miss Congeniality”
award, Chicopee Parade
Committee member Mary
O’Brien Rodowicz said
the committee wanted to
offer special recognition to
the young lady that “went
above and beyond helping
others” and exemplified
what it meant to be a “team
player.” This unique honor
was presented to 17-yearold CCHS student, Caitlin
O’Brien.
Kristen Hubert, the
2014 Colleen, offered up
congratulations to the newest Colleen and her Court,
suggesting they, “enjoy
every minute” as the experience passes by so quickly.
The aforementioned
six young women were
among a total of 34 contestants that are currently
attending CCHS, CHS,
and the Pioneer Valley
Performing Arts Charter
School. To be eligible for
the unique honor, ladies
had to be between the ages
of 17 and 22 and a resident of Chicopee. Unlike
the neighboring city of
Holyoke’s competition,
applicants are not required
to have an Irish background.
“Although I do not
have Irish heritage, I’ll
always have it in my heart,”
Turley Publications staff photos by Emily Thurlow
Kyleigh Morin, 17, was overwhelmed by the announcement of being named the 2016 Colleen.
said Tricia Gouin, who
earned her title in 1992.
“That’s what great about
our city. We have so many
different backgrounds that
unify to celebrate this culture.”
During the evening
of the 62nd Coronation
Ball, each contestant was
escorted to a stage where
her biography was read
before the judges and
attendees. All contestants
received scores on their
accomplishments, personality and poise. After the
panel of judges had narrowed down their selection
to five, contestants were
asked how they felt about
social media. Though the
majority of contestants presented their opinions of the
positive strides the technology has brought to society,
Morin also noted a number
of negative side effects it
had presented, as well.
Awards were also presented at the annual St.
Patrick’s Parade President’s
Dinner held earlier in the
year. There, Chicopee
Parade Committee members were honored for their
contributions as both members of the team and in the
city. Commendations were
presented to Tom Knightly,
Atkinson Award recipient,
as well as Elin Gaynor,
Woods Award recipient.
John R. Beaulieu also
received his official sash
as 2016 President of the
Chicopee St. Patrick’s Day
Parade Committee.
In addition to the
titles, Morin and her Court
were also presented with a
number of gifts, including
jewelry, as well as a trip
to Ireland for the Colleen,
courtesy of Doyle Travel
of Chicopee. Since 1984,
Bridal Corner of Chicopee
has continued to donate the
gowns that are to be worn
in the Holyoke St. Patrick’s
Day Parade.
As part of their win,
the 2016 Colleen and
her Court will ride the
float designed and built
by the Chicopee Parade
Committee, through the
streets of Holyoke with the
Chicopee contingent on
March 20 during the annual St. Patrick’s Day Parade.
The Colleen and Court
will also ride the float in
Chicopee’s Memorial Day
Parade, East Longmeadow’s
Fourth of July Parade, and
“Chicopee Day” at the Big
E in September.
All competitors of the
Colleen Contest are eligible to apply for one of the
Parade Committee’s scholarships, awarded at a reception in June.
March 3, 2016 ◆
Page milling about at
◆
rivermills
Ms. Massachusetts Senior America ‘Living Again’
support group
Pageant to be held May 22
HOLYOKE – Ms.
Massachusetts Senior
America Pageant to be
held Sunday, May 22 at
1 p.m. at Holyoke High
School Orientation will
take place March 1 at
Holyoke Senior Center. Contestants are
judged on talent, evening
gown, interview and philosophy of life and must
be 60 years of age or
older.
For those that
are interested, contact
Lorraine Gorham, state
director 413-534-1318 or
Joanne Impoco 413-5257065, pageant coordinator.
Three-part alzheimer’s program begins March 7
CHICOPEE – The
Chicopee Council on
Aging is offering a threepart Alzheimer’s Essential
Skills Program on March
7, 14 and 21 from 1 to 3
p.m. at RiverMills Center,
5 West Main St.
The free program
will be presented by the
Alzheimer’s Association.
“Communication” is
the topic for March 7.
“Understanding Behaviors”
is the topic for March 14.
“Safety at Home” is the
topic for March 21.
Organizers request
interested parties register at RiverMills, or call
413-534-3698. For more
information, call Program
Coordinator Holly Angelo
at 534-3698.
Alzheimer’s Caregivers Support Group meets on March 16
CHICOPEE – The
Chicopee Council on
Aging at RiverMills Center
offers a monthly support
group for Caregivers of
those with Alzheimers
Disease. Anyone who
cares for someone with
Dementia/Alzheimers is
encouraged to attend.
T h e A l z h e i m e r ’s
Caregivers Support Group
meets the third Wednesday
of each month from
3:30 to 5:30 p.m. in the
classroom at RiverMills
Center, 5 West Main St. in
Chicopee.
For more information,
contact Laurene Kendall,
Social Services coordinator, at 413-534-3698. The
next group will be March
16 and then April 20.
starts March 8
CHICOPEE – The
Chicopee Council on
Aging at RiverMills Center
offers a monthly support
group for those who have
suffered the loss of a loved
one. Anyone who wants to
have the support of others going through similar
losses and an opportunity
to discuss ways of coping
is encouraged to attend.
Irene Remillard, a certified bereavement leader,
leads the discussion.
The ‘Living Again’
Support Group meets the
second Tuesday of each
month at 1 p.m. in the
classroom at RiverMills
Center, 5 West Main St. in
Chicopee.
For more information,
contact Laurene Kendall,
Social Services coordinator, at 413-534-3698.
The next group will meet
March 8 and then April
12.
35. Steals
38. Acts insincerely
39. City in Belarus
40. Anticipates
43. Paris airport
44. Deal with
45. No (Scottish)
47. Opens lock
48. Central parts
49. Sheep disease
50. Indicates position
51. Doing many
things at once
55. Khoikhoin
peoples
57. Informal alliance
between countries
58. Long poems
59. The state of being
poorly illuminated
CLUES DOWN
1. Portico
2. Delicacy
3. Punish with an
arbitrary penalty
4. Household god
(Roman)
5. Public television
station
6. __ Lilly, drug
company
7. Degraded
8. Free from danger
9. Low bank or reef
of coral
10. Exclamation of
surprise
11. Lies down in rest
12. Give an education
to
16. Provides
17. Fat from a pig
18. Belonging to a
thing
22. Branches of a
bone
25. Having a
cheerless aspect or
disposition
27. Edema (archaic)
28. Bo __, “10”
please see answers on page 14
Page ◆ March 3, 2016
29. Unfledged or
nestling hawk
30. Surrenders
32. Type of dessert
34. Planted with trees
35. Washington town
36. Listen in
37. Inwardly
38. Chinese province
40. Garrison
41. Converts
thermal energy to
mechanical work
42. Holy people
44. Lowest point
between two
peaks
46. Boundaries
48. Utter obscenities
51. ___ and cheese
52. Member of the
cuckoo family
53. Type of
microscope
54. ___ and Barbie
56. Michigan
Are you ‘Fit to a T?’
CHICOPEE –Do
you know your Blood
Pressure? Cholesterol
level? Weight? T-score?
For those that had to
think twice about what a
“T-score” is, chances are
you’re not alone. It’s all
about your bones. If you
want to shop ‘til you drop,
golf ‘til your legs ache
and line dance ‘til you’re
84 – knowing that your
bones won’t let you down
– here’s what you need to
know.
“Fit to a T” bone
health and osteoporosis education program,
for men and women of
all ages will take place
on Wednesday, March
16 from 2 to 3 p.m. in
the Garden level classroom. This program is
sponsored by Bone and
Joint Imitative USA and
National Network of
Libraries of Medicine.
Free resources and refreshments will be provided.
Registration required.
The Chicopee Senior
Center at RiverMills is
located at 5 West Main
St. in Chicopee. If interested, sign up in person at
the Rivermills Center or
call 534-3698. For more
information, contact Violet
Suska, ext.117.
email your
senior news
to chicopeeregister
@turley.com
Healthy Eating 101 will be offered March 17
C H I C O P E E
– A Healthy Eating 101
course will be offered
on Thursday, March 17.
“Carb counting at breakfast: Start your day off
right” will start at 8:30
a.m. This diabetes-friendly discussion will give
CLUES ACROSS
1. Sold at a higher
price
8. Instill fear
13. Can be
domesticated
14. Oohed and ___
15. Make too simple
19. Plutonium
20. Necessary for
breathing
21. Make happy
22. Mythological bird
23. A baglike structure
in a plant or animal
24. Put on __
25. Type of dough
26. Blushed
30. Celestial object
31. Point __ National
Seashore
32. Purplish red
33. Towards the mouth
or oral region
34 Portuguese musical
genre
◆
you the tools for how to
count carbs at breakfast,
as well as ideas for what
would be a good, balanced
breakfast. Casserole, fresh
fruits cup, and coffee or
tea will be featured. A
suggested donation is $2.
Registration required.
The Chicopee Senior
Center at RiverMills is
located at 5 West Main
St. in Chicopee. If interested, sign up in person at
the Rivermills Center or
call 534-3698. For more
information, contact Violet
Suska, ext.117.
Turley Publications submitted photoThe
Pioneer Valley chapter of HOPE Worldwide is pictured
conducting a food drive for Lorraine’s Soup Kitchen in April 2015.
HOPE
from page 1
out their lives.”
Based in Chicopee,
the Pioneer Valley chapter of HOPE Worldwide is
a grassroots organization
with an advisory board,
working together to produce charitable efforts
locally. Morgado noted
that many of its members
met each other through
Pioneer Valley Church
of Christ on Montcalm
Street.
“We’re trying to pull
in the community. We
want to be an avenue for
people to go through to
help out and make a difference. Some people just
don’t know where to go
and we’re trying to make
it easy, acting as a liaison
between groups that need
help and volunteers that
don’t know where to volunteer,” said Morgado.
Morgado said that a
fundraising concert posed
the best option for an
event, because there are
so many layers of promotion. In addition to HOPE
itself, local radio station
Q99.7 as well as Kutless
and 7eventh Time Down
have been promoting the
March 10 event.
“We’re really hoping this concert will bring
in the money we need to
really do more volunteering both locally and internationally,” said Morgado.
“We’re also intending for
it to be an opportunity
for people to learn about
what we do and there will
be more information for
interested volunteers at the
concert.”
Chicopee
Register
◆
in the city
On the shelf at the
Celebrate Red Cross Month by
giving blood in March
DEDHAM – During
Red Cross Month in
March, the American Red
Cross encourages eligible
donors to join in its lifesaving mission by giving
blood. Since 1943, every
U.S. president has designated March as Red Cross
Month to recognize how
the Red Cross helps people down the street, across
the country and around the
world. Red Cross Month is
a celebration of the everyday heroes. Donors of all
blood types are needed to
help accident and burn victims, patients undergoing
organ transplants, those
receiving cancer treatments and others who rely
on blood products. Make
an appointment to become
a hero to patients in need
by downloading the free
Red Cross Blood Donor
App, visiting redcrossblood.org or calling 1800-RED CROSS (1-800733-2767). Upcoming blood
donation opportunities in
Chicopee include an event
on March 4 from 8 a.m. to
1 p.m. at Chicopee High
School, 820 Front St.
and another on March 15
from noon to 6 p.m. at the
Moose Family Center, 244
Fuller Road.
If you would like
to donate blood simply
download the American
Red Cross Blood Donor
App, visit redcrossblood.
org or call 1-800-RED
CROSS (1-800-733-2767)
to make an appointment
or for more information.
All blood types are needed
to ensure a reliable supply
for patients. A blood donor
card or driver’s license or
two other forms of identification are required at
check-in. Individuals who
are 17 years of age (16
with parental consent in
some states), weigh at least
110 pounds and are in generally good health may be
eligible to donate blood.
High school students and
other donors 18 years of
age and younger also have
to meet certain height and
weight requirements.
FUTURE
erative games. Fournier also
serves as president to the
Physical Education Club at
Springfield College. She is a
member of Kappa Delta Pi,
a national education honor
society.
As Fournier quickly
approaches the conclusion
of her undergraduate studies,
she has both finite short-term
and long-term goals in mind.
“I will be actively
searching for employment
as a Physical Education and
Health teacher beginning this
fall. Hopefully there will be
some job openings. I really
want to focus my attention
on promoting a well-rounded
fitness curriculum that aligns
with the common core,” said
Fournier. “I really want to
spend a year or two investigating different avenues in
the health and wellness field
before applying to graduate
school. I often think about
teaching at the college level,
or becoming an administrator. Time will tell, but for
right now, I look forward to
finding a job and making a
difference in lives of the children I work with.”
Currently, Fournier
is a student teacher at
Munger Hill, Abner Gibbs
and Franklin Elementary
Schools in Westfield. She
has previously honed her
craft as a student teacher at
Glenbrook Middle School in
Longmeadow.
Fournier explained that
working with young students
is gratifying to her because
she assists them in incorporating movement and healthy
choices into their daily lives.
Setting a strong example is
pertinent, too.
“It is so important that
all children incorporate
movement and healthy choic-
from page 1
Dance (MAHPERD) to
receive the Outstanding
Future Professional
Award. The award is given
annually to undergraduate
students that have demonstrated dedication to the
health, physical education,
recreation and dance professions and have shown
contributions to their college and community.
“I was honored and
humbled to receive this nomination from my professors,”
said Fournier, a 2012 graduate of Chicopee High School.
“I am so grateful for having a
supportive family, and amazing teachers and professors
that have taught me the
importance of working hard,
being organized and carrying myself in a professional
manner.”
The award will be
presented to Fournier at
M A H P E R D ’ s Aw a r d s
Banquet on Sunday, April 10
at the DoubleTree Hotel in
Milford.
A senior at Springfield
College, Fournier is
approaching a May 2016
graduation. She has studied in Springfield’s Dual
Certification Program in
Physical Education and
Health/Family and Consumer
Sciences, working to complete a rigorous double major
program while maintaining a
3.6 grade point average.
Fournier has presented at
two MAHPERD conventions
previously, she explained.
In 2013 she presented on
assessment techniques and
in 2014 she presented on
cooperation as well as coop-
Chicopee
Register
◆
Chicopee Public Library
CHICOPEE - The Emily L.
Partyka Central Library of the
Chicopee Public Library Youth
Services Department is offering
the following programs for children and families for the month
of March. The library is located at 449 Front St. in Chicopee.
Financial assistance for teen programs is made possible with LSTA
funds administered through the
Massachusetts Board of Library
Commissioners. For more information or to register for an event,
call the library at 413-594-1800,
ext. 4. Additional information
about Teen Programs and to connect via social media, visit chicopeepubliclibrary.com/teenspot/
contact.
Programs for Children
and Families
• CHILDREN’S WALKIN CRAFT will be held on
Wednesday, March 16 at 3:30
p.m. Locals are invited to make a
St. Patrick’s Day creation.
• LEARN THE UKULELE
on Saturday, March 5 at 1 p.m.
Join in on this fun program led by
es in their daily lives at a very
young age. So many illnesses
can be prevented if children
are taught the importance of
good nutrition, about taking
care of their bodies, the dangers of substance abuse, and
the necessity to be physically
fit, just to name a few,” said
Fournier. “I pride myself in
being a role model by setting
good examples.”
Teaching has long been
Julie Ann Stepanek. The program
consists of a 45-minute ukulele
lesson where people can learn the
fundamentals of ukulele playing.
This is followed by a 45-minute
strum-along, sing-along where
people play along to fun (and
easy) songs that are projected onto
a screen. This program is for ages
6 and up.
• LITTLE ONES LAPSIT is
a program designed for babies 9
months to 24 months. This is a
registration-only program helps
introduce babies to group play,
songs, stories and activities. Little
Ones Lapsit will be take place on
Thursdays at 10:30 a.m. on the
following dates: March 3, 10, 17
and 24.
• MINECRAFT FOR
GRADES 3 TO 5 will be held on
Tuesday, March 15 at 3:30 p.m.
Play Minecraft together in the
computer lab. Register by calling, emailing or signing up at the
children’s desk.
• MINECRAFT PARTY: A
night of games and crafts based
on the beloved video game will be
held on Wednesday, March 30 at
6 p.m. for ages 5 and up. Register
part of Fournier’s identity.
She spent six years teaching
swim lessons for the city of
Chicopee. Last summer
she was hired as the activities program director for
Exeter Elms Campground
in New Hampshire – a role
she plans to pursue again
while launching her professional career as a physical education and health
professional.
by calling, emailing or signing up
at the children’s desk.
• MUSIC AND MOVEMENT
is scheduled for Friday mornings
at 10:30 a.m. This is a program for
babies, toddlers and preschoolers.
Join in for songs, finger plays and
dancing. Music and Movement
will be held on March 11 at 10:30
a.m. Registration is not required.
• PAJAMA STORY TIME
is Family Night at the library.
Join in for stories, songs and a
craft while sporting pajamas on
Thursday, March 10 at 6:30 p.m.
and Thursday, March 24 at 6:30
p.m.
• PRESCHOOL STORY
TIME focuses on children ages
2.5 to 5 years of age. The program
promotes and nourishes a lifelong
interest and love of stories through
books, finer plays, and songs. It
also includes a simple craft for the
children to enjoy. Preschool Story
Time will be held on Tuesday,
March 15 and March 29 at 10:30
a.m. in the morning.
• READ TO ROVER is a
program brought to us by K-9
See library page 20
Petro’s Restaurant
Breakfast & Lunch
We are family owned with excellent service and mouthwatering food!
We have the BEST ham you can get in town, sliced fresh off the bone!
The BEST Fish & Chips & Seafood in Town!
Fridays 4-7pm ~ Dine-in or Take Out
COME TRY OUR BREAKFAST & LUNCH SPECIALS
351 Front Street, Chicopee, MA ❖ 413-331-4422
Open Monday-Sunday 6am to 2pm
The Western New England Spring
Bridal Show
Sunday, March 6, 2016 • 11am - 4 pm
MassMutual Center • Springfield, MA
Don’t Miss This Spectacular
Spring Bridal Event!
• Featuring The Area’s Finest Wedding Professionals
• The Area’s Best Bridal Fashion Show
• Don’t Miss The Wedding Cake Design Contest
• Thousands of Dollars in Door Prizes and Giveaways
Register
to win a pair of
Diamond
Earrings
From
Brad Matthew
Jewelers
• Preregister Online for a CJC Events Goodie Bag
Tickets are $6.00 in advance, $8.00 at the door
Paid admission includes 1 year subscription to BRIDE’S magazine
Don’t Miss The Early Bird Bridal Gown Blowout!
$
Designer
199
Gown Sale
Only At The Western New England Bridal Show 3/6/16
CASH, DEBIT, VISA, MASTERCARD, AND DISCOVER ACCEPTED
SALE STARTS AT 10:30
COME EARLY FOR BEST SELECTION
ALL SAMPLE BRIDAL GOWNS PRICED $199
Originally Priced from $800 to $2000
OVER 100 SAMPLES TO CHOOSE FROM
Call (413) 737-7555
or visit our website
for more information:
www.cjcevents.com
Featuring The
2016
Wedding
Cake
Design
Contest
March 3, 2016 ◆
Page Meet Your Merchants
2016
Olde Time Service O
AUTO REPAIR & MAINTENANCE
533-8463 • 1-855-OLDE TIME (5553-8463)
Brian Kennedy
Propietor
All Makes & Models
Antiques, Muscle Cars, Classic Corvette
HONEST • CLEAN • TRUSTWORTHY
ur doors opened in May 2006 with myself and a helper
at our first location in South Hadley. By the end of our
second year, we had outgrown that location and moved
to Chicopee. My son, Corey joined me and together we created
a family business. He now is the shop manager and is my right
arm of the business. We both have the same values, work ethic
and appreciation for our customers. While having training in our
modern day automotive headaches, he can also change points
and condensor (if you remember those!) He loves to work with
the older classics and drives one himself. I think what I’m trying to
convey to you is that we, Olde Time Service, are the automotive
shop of yesterday. Just give us a call and ask for Brian or Corey.
What is the biggest problem people have when trying
to get their vehicle serviced or when it breaks down?
TRANSPORTATION!!!
We are still teamed up with a local car dealer and we still pick up the tab on a day of rental when your
vehicle is in for repairs. Any repairs $125 and over will get you a rental FOR FREE. If the repair is less
than $125 and you still require a rental, I will get one for you for $25 a day.
Have you ever had a repair on your vehicle and the repair or part fails in less than a year? Did you pay
to get it repaired again? Did you feel like you were taken advantage of because of some fine print or
lack of communication? I don’t agree with this also! My repairs to your vehicle are warrantied for 12
months and/or 12,000 miles! This INCLUDES PARTS AND LABOR!) My warantee is for all repairs as
long as the vehicle has not been modified beyond manufacturer’s specifications.
These are two more ways that we at Old Time Service
are doing to make inconveniences more convenient.
• Lube, Oil, Filter
• Rotate Tires
• Check Brakes
• Replace Wiper Blades
4499
$
*Trucks and some models slightly higher
• Front Brakes
• Pads
• Rotors
Labor All Inclusive
$
24995
*Trucks and some models slightly higher
35 GLADDU AVENUE, CHICOPEE, MA 01020
~ RIGHT BEHIND GIOVANNIS RESTAURANT ~
Page 10 ◆ March 3, 2016
Chicopee
Register
Meet Your Merchants
2016
Our local businesses are a vital part of the community. Thank you for supporting them!
BRAD’S SERVICE CENTER
Massachusetts
Academy of Ballet
4 OPEN SQUARE WAY STUDIO 403 HOLYOKE MA 413/536-6200
WWW.MASSACADEMYOFBALLET.COM
COMPLETE EMISSION, DRIVEABILITY, ALL SYSTEM DIAGNOSTICS
& REPAIR SERVICE, ALL MAKES & MODELS, STATE APPROVED
EMISSION REPAIR FACILITY, STATE-OF-THE-ART HUNTER 4 WHEEL
ALIGNMENT, MA STATE INSPECTIONS, MAINTENANCE SERVICE,
COMPLIMENTARY SHUTTLE SERVICE
Service Hours: Mon.-Fri. 7am-5pm
Inspection Hours: Mon.-Fri. 8am-5pm; Sat. 8am-12pm
Blue Seal
of Excellence
RECOGNIZED
BUSINESS
Like
Us On
592-5187
760 Front Street, Chicopee, MA
www.bradsserv.com
MAIN STREET LAUNDROMAT
95 Main Street, Indian Orchard, MA 01151 • 413-543-9049
CLEAN, FRIENDLY NEIGHBORHOOD LAUNDROMAT
You won’t
find a better
laundromat!
Come see for
yourself!
O
ur community businesses have
been the heartbeat of Main Street
America for generations. And,
when asked to name a favorite restaurant, service, or shop - you’re sure to cite
a unique local business.
Embracing the idea of community
businesses that provide personalized
service is key, but we often overlook that
their survival depends on our patronage.
Consider that the next time you head out
to make a purchase. Remind yourself of
the quality experience of shopping local
Chicopee
Register
and how your community benefits.
Remind yourself Main Street is the heartbeat and those businesses are essential
to our local economy.
Think outside of the big box –
support community businesses.
CONVENIENT
DROP OFF SERVICE
DAILY UNTIL 4:30
Valet Laundry
Available for $1 lb.
($10 minimum)
• Clean Machines
• Full Laundry Bar
• Free Wifi
OPEN EVERY DAY 7AM-9PM
413-543-9049
www.turley.com
Check us out
on Facebook
March 3, 2016 ◆
Page 11
@turleysports
www.turleysports.com
acebook.com/turleysports
Sports
Chicopee earns
second seed in
Division 1
Colts
confident
heading for
postseason
By Gregory A. Scibelli
Turley Publications
Sports Staff Writer
REGION – The Chicopee
boys basketball team is hoping
to win the Central/West Division
1 Championship this year and
will host a quarterfinal game
with the No. 2 seed at 16-4.
The Pacers will host Pope
Francis on March 5 at 4 p.m.
among quarterfinals matchups.
No. 6 Agawam returns to the
playoff picture as they travel to
No. 3 Amherst.
The only first round matchup to occur earlier this week is
between Leominster and No. 8
Chicopee Comp. Comp enters
the tournament at 15-5, but had
a weaker schedule, hurting their
Walker rating when seeds were
announced last Saturday afternoon at the Naismith Memorial
Basketball Hall of Fame.
If Comp can get by
Leominster, they would go to
No. 1 Putnam on March 4.
Like the girls, the Division
2 field is very small with
By Gregory A. Scibelli
Turley Publications
Sports Staff Writer
CHICOPEE – The
Chicopee Comp girls basketball team knows what the
rest of Division 1 knows,
Central is going to be very
difficult to get by.
Last Wednesday night,
the Colts showed they were
ready for the tournament as
got a convincing win over
Holyoke, 54-41.
Team defense was one
big key to victory for the
Colts, coach Tony Couture
said, and he is looking for
that to be a big factor in the
tournament as they try to be
the team that shuts down
Central.
Central is 15-5 heading into the playoffs, and
own victories over many of
the teams in the Division
1 bracket. But against the
Golden Eagles, a 72-26
thumping.
See RAMS page 16
Lady Colts
earn second
seed in
Division 2
“We were not at our
best in that game and we
were missing a key player
in Alyssa Stefanelli,” said
Couture. “We have been a
lot better since she came
back and that showed
against Holyoke.”
Stefanelli scored 13
points to support a teamhigh 14-point effort by
Breanna Tack in the victory.
Holyoke had trouble
rebounding in this matchup
and also did not shoot well
throughout the game. The
Knights failed to gain any
real momentum and allowed
Comp to pull away in the
third quarter.
“Holyoke is a very
good team,” said Couture.
“We knew coming in they
would be tough. These are
the teams that we want to be
playing going into the tournament.”
See COLTS page 13
Selenya Gonzalez takes a jump shot.
Turley Publications photos by Gregory A. Scibelli
Chicopee grabs seventh in D1
By Gregory A. Scibelli
Turley Publications
Sports Staff Writer
REGION – The road to the
Central/West Massachusetts
girls basketball championships began earlier this week,
with seeds being announced last
Saturday in a meeting held at
Naismith Memorial Basketball
Hall of Fame.
Central earned the top seed
in Division 1 with a dominant
season. But Chicopee Comp and
Holyoke will be vying for the
chance to go to the finals and
try to knock down the Golden
Eagles.
Central went 16-4, but
none of those losses came in
the region. The Golden Eagles
played out of state competition
early in the year before returning to the region and dominating
all the competition.
Comp had an excellent
See division page 16
Page 12 ◆ March 3, 2016
Comp boys win season finale
CHICOPEE – The Chicopee
Comprehensive boys basketball
team closed out the regular season last Wednesday night, celebrating their senior night with
a 62-40 win over South Hadley.
The Colts were in control of the
game and lead almost throughout. The game was fast-moving
and intense, but South Hadley
had trouble generating baskets
early in the game. The Colts took
advantage and increased their
lead throughout the middle of
the game. The Colts were led by
four double-digit scorers. Steve
Velasquez had 19 points while
Eric Perez and Bruce Carey had
14 points each. Ed Popvichenko
had 13 points. The Colts finished
the regular season at 15-5. They
opened up the postseason hosting Leominster Tuesday night.
If they win, the Colts will go to
Putnam on Friday night.
Turley Publications photos by
Gregory A. Scibelli
Eric Perez twists and start to
make a shot.
Comp’s Eric Perez makes a pass
to his left.
Andrew Lebel moves the ball
quickly to his right.
Chicopee
Register
◆
Locals named to
2016 Western
Massachusetts Senior
All-Star Games
SPRINGFIELD
– The Naismith Memorial
Basketball Hall of Fame
announced today the
team rosters for the 2016
Western Massachusetts
Senior High School AllStar Games. The 2016 AllStar event will be held on
Friday, March 25 on the
Jerry Colangelo Court
of Dreams at the Hall of
Fame. A total of 60 players were selected from
different divisions within
the region to participate in
three games that will showcase the top seniors in their
final high school contest.
Colby Forbush, of
Granby, was named to the
Division 2, 3, 4 Team 1.
“The Basketball Hall
of Fame is pleased to host
the top players in Western
Massachusetts as they
conclude their outstanding
high school careers,” said
John L. Doleva, President
and CEO of the Naismith
Memorial Basketball Hall
of Fame. “The annual
Western Massachusetts
Senior All-Star Games
allow us to recognize the
basketball talent that originates from our region,
the birthplace of basketball. We couldn’t be more
proud of these fantastic
student-athletes.”
A committee made up
of local coaches and media
members that represent
each division on the boys
and girls side selected the
teams. The players will
be divided into six teams:
two girls teams, two boys
teams of Division 2, 3
and 4 players and two
boys teams of Division 1
players. Only graduating
seniors are eligible for the
All-Star Games.
The first game of the
evening will feature the
Division 2, 3 and 4 boys
teams at 5:30 p.m., followed by the girls matchup
at 7 p.m. The final game
of the evening will showcase the boys Division 1
teams at 8:30 p.m.
For the sixth year,
the Naismith Memorial
Basketball Hall of Fame
will recognize one boy
and one girl as the Western
Massachusetts Players of
the Year. A special presentation will be made
to the recipients during
halftime. A panel of local
media members selects
the award winners, who
are recognized for their
achievements on the court,
in addition to their sportsmanship and character off
the court.
Tickets for the AllStar game will be available at the Hall of Fame
box office the night of the
games and will be good
for all three games that
evening.
COLTS
ing out and playing great
defense. Our seniors all
played a great game as
well.”
The Colts were celebrating senior night,
with Stefanelli, Alicia
Lacosse, Molly Willette,
Grace Smith, and Jenna
Herd all being honored
before the game. Willette
would contributed seven
points in the win.
Cavanaugh led
Holyoke with 22 points.
She was again great from
the free throw line with
nine made shots. Natacha
Hernandez-Santiago had
eight points in the defeat.
Comp and Holyoke
may meet again, as they
as are seeded No. 2 and
No. 3, respectively in the
tournament. If both teams
win in the quarterfinals, it
would set up that rematch
next week.
from page 12
Holyoke stayed
close early, with Callie
Cavanaugh leading the
way early in the game.
The Knights trailed 158 after one quarter, but
pulled within one point in
the second.
The Knights trailed
by three at halftime when
Comp came out of the
gate and scored 10 unanswered points in the first
4:00 of the third quarter.
Stefanelli was on fire
out of the gate. She nailed
four three throws and
took a steal that resulted
in a layup. Tack also had
two baskets to help the
cause.
Comp took care of
the ball when they were in
possession, and Holyoke
did not have any answers
in the second half.
“Everyone really worked hard in this
game,” said Couture. “We
had five girls on the floor
that were always box-
Chicopee
Register
Gregory A. Scibelli
is a sports staff writer for
Turley Publications. He
can be reached at [email protected] or by calling 413-283-8393 ext. 258.
Sports
◆
Ryan McDonough
sets to take a shot just
past the blue line.
Pacers hold off South Hadley
CHICOPEE – The
Pacers finished off the
regular season with a
three victories and a
tie in their final four
games and have a 13-6-1
record heading into the
Western Massachusetts
Division 3A tournament.
On Feb. 20, the Pacers
defeated South Hadley
5-4 at Fitzpatrick Rink
in Holyoke. Riley Clark
had three points with a
goal and two assists.
Nick Amo, John Baker,
Nick Beem, and Brett
Geoffroy also scored
for the Pacers. Jonathan
Santos got the win in
goal, allowing four goals
and making 22 saves.
The Pacers would close
out the regular season in
second place in the FayWright Division with a
12-3-1 record.
Nick Beem tries to work out of the side.
Turley Publications photos by Gregory A. Scibelli
Riley Clark makes a collision while fighting for possession of the puck.
Nick Amo tries to corral the puck to make a shot on
goal.
Goalie Jonathan Santos deflects the puck off to his
side.
Orioles draw Pacers in playoff opener
By Gregory A. Scibelli
Turley Publications
Sports Staff Writer
REGION – With a
loss last Thursday night
against Longmeadow, the
Minnechaug hockey team
will be taking the No. 2
seed in the upcoming
Division 3 Tournament.
The Falcons went 164 in an impressive turnaround season after not
making tournament during the past couple of
years. The Falcons had
a great year against the
tough teams in the Berry
Division and finished
with a 9-3 record, good
for second place behind
Longmeadow.
The Falcons open up
the tournament against
No. 3 East Longmeadow,
a team they split the season series with.
The Falcons beat the
Spartans 3-2 in the first
matchup in December,
but were upended 2-1 in
their most recent contest
on Feb. 18.
Longmeadow earned
the No. 1 seed and captured the Berry Division
title this year, defeating
Minnechaug twice this
year. The first time, it was
an 8-4 thumping. But the
Falcons came back and
gave the Lancers a better
matchup on Feb. 25, losing 4-3.
Minnechaug faces
East Longmeadow at 6
p.m. March 3. If victorious, they will face the
Longmeadow/Westfield
semifinal winner on March
10 at 8:30 p.m.
The Division 3A field
will include six teams.
No. 1 Amherst earned a
top seed and semifinal
berth with a 16-1-3 record.
Chicopee Comp will go
No. 2 at 12-5-3.
The quarterfinal round
was held Tuesday night
with a matchup between
Fay-Wright Division oppo-
nents. No. 5 Belchertown
faced No. 4 Chicopee. The
winner will face Amherst,
which has a co-operative
program with Palmer. The
game is scheduled for
Saturday afternoon at a
time to be determined.
Comp will await the
winner of the St. Mary/
Wahconah matchup. That
semifinal will also be held
on Saturday at a time to be
determined.
T h e D iv i s i o n 3 A
finals are set for March 10
also at 5:30 p.m.
All playoff games
will be played at Olympia
I c e C e n t e r i n We s t
Springfield.
March 3, 2016 ◆
Page 13
◆
in the classroom
◆
St. Stan’s celebrates 40-year anniversary
CHICOPEE – St.
Stanislaus School recently
celebrated the 40th anniversary of the rebuilding
of the school after the fire
in 1975. Bishop Mitchell
Rozanski celebrated Mass
at 4 p.m. on Saturday,
Feb. 6, followed by a
pasta dinner and Dance in
their school cafeteria and
gymnasium. Members
of the original rebuild-
ing committee, headed by
William Zaskey, were in
attendance and dedicated
a plaque commemorating the rebuilding of the
school. Grade 7 and 8 students served the pasta dinner, which was prepared
by administration and volunteer parents and teachers. Sarah the Fiddler was
the entertainment for the
evening.
Grade 8 students Emily Boutin and Anna Moran serve
lunch.
Turley Publications submitted photos
Grade 7 and 8 students are pictured with Sister Cecelia Haier, Principal and Karen Shea, assistant principal, Bishop
Mitchell Rozanski, Father Joseph Benicewicz, Pastor, and William Zaskey.
Chicopee Comprehensive High School
Second Term Honor Roll
Grade 9 High Honors
D arlen A rdila , B ryan A timbo , G avin
Bogalhas, Allen Cantin, Susan Cheng,
Iris Correa Berly, Rosemary Costello,
C aitlyn C rochiere , R yan C yr, T haomi
Dao, Sydney Demers, Leo Dion, Devin
D onahue , J ordan D unphy, K athr yn
Edler, Emmanuela Filev, Natanya Furgal,
G rant G alica , M aria G arcia H errera ,
Hope Gauthier, Amelia Gibson, Ashley
Girouard, Angela Hamel, Arriana Hasiuk,
K enneth H eisler, S ean I nacio , M egan
Kalbaugh, Andrew Karpolyuk, Autumn
K elley, J oseph K laus , M ackenzie
L achance , G riffin L anglois , J ericho
L axa , J oshua L axton , A ndrew L e B el ,
Lauren Leclerc, Jessica Maleko, Ariella
Manno, Nyah Martineau, Alaysha Marty,
Madelina Montemagni, Kevin Mrozinski,
Jacob Mulligan, Nicholas Murphy, Susan
Nadeau, Alexis Navedo, Karina Nofal,
Emily Pavoni, Viktoriya Perevala, Sadie
Petta, Brittany Pietskowski, Samantha
Ramos, Steven Reid, Madison Robare,
Z oe R obinson , C alvin R omanowicz ,
V incent R ossi , J oshua S aez , H eena
S hafique , D aisy S hah , A rhum S haikh ,
Maherah Shaikh, Loredana Sili, Isabella
Silva, Isabella Spear, Natalie St. George,
B rayden S tallman , S aniya S tewart ,
Sarah Szukala, Kayla Tompkins, Graham
Topor, J alene Tremble , T horn Tuttle ,
Catalina Ulloa-Hiltz, Yahelis Viana Diaz,
Cory Waring, Samantha Wegrzyn, Haley
Whitehead, and Victoria Zyskowski.
Grade 10 High Honors
Rosanna Aiello, Hayli Black, Olivia Blais,
Lyndsey Brennan, Bittany Brzoska, Brian
C an , J ennifer C heng , L auren C isek ,
Abigail Conde, Steven Corrales, Chelsea
Crochiere, Loussyan Darwich, Morgan
Davis, Jenny Eliza, Anthony Fappiano,
Maciej Federkiewicz, Zariah Feliciano,
Kristen Foster, Samuel Hurley Sanchez,
Oksana Kagan, Nolan Kazalski, Rebekah
Kincaid, Tatyana Kodreanu, Hubert Kula,
Magen Lindsey, Mark Maksyuk, Abdullah
M alik , W arren M c K instry, A nthony
Nichols, Giovanni Paz, Georgia Perreault,
J onathan P oirier, K risten P rovost ,
Hannah Reidy, Hannah Robinson, Michael
Sergneri, Justin Shephard, Roman Sosnin,
Nicholas Stamborski, Marcus Stevenson,
and Ethan Sutherland.
Grade 11 High Honors
Nicholas Beaulieu, Haley Brault, Emily
B yrnes , H annah C hapdelaine , L uis
C ortes C ruz , M adison C zerniawski ,
A yman D arwich , R yan D eady, Z ahra
D ehneh , L illyana E sparra , R ebecca
G authier, C ristal G onzalez , Z achary
Gray, Anna Kaletin, Lyubov Kodreanu,
K elsey L acoste , M adison L anglois ,
A llison L epine , J aclyn L epsch , A qsa
Maham, Morgan Makusiewicz, Jonathan
Marchia, Willard McKinstry, Cali Miller,
Mikaela Montemagni, Michael Murawski,
Tuan Nguyen , M ariah O’Connor, V idhi
Patel , M ichael Polanco , B enny Q iu ,
Audra Raymond, Ashley Rouleau, Elisha
Rudenko, and Jacob Tompkins.
Grade 12 High Honors
M atthew B arnes , K atarina B ernash ,
Daniel Blais, Alexander Celetti, Anthony
C hampagne , Felicia D elaney, B randon
Descoteaux, Caitlin Devin, Kyle Devlin,
Samuel Drake, Brandon Ewing, Casandra
Feen , J asmine F uentes , A lyssa G uiel ,
J ulia K arpolyuk , A manda L abonte ,
A licia L acosse , S tarrlenna L afleur,
Michael Langevin, Jeremy Lewis, Karol
Liebersbach, Desirae Lindsey, Stephanie
Lopes, Robert Machia, Sylwia Madro,
J oel M adru , A ndrew M ercer, J oseph
Moreno, David Nawrocki, Nhung Nguyen,
J anelle O’B rien , B riana O’C onnell ,
Amanda Perez, Brianna Rodriguez, Adam
R ousseau , B radley S argent , B rady
S eymour, A lyssa S tefanelli , S halyn
Sullivan, Matthew Tetreault, Samantha
Thibault, Omar Torres, Julia Urawski,
Oscar Vidal Rubio, and Aaliyah WalterDrobiak.
Grade 9 Honors
Nicholas Adamczyk, Mia Alessandroni,
Haley Arsenault, Matthew Aube, Taylor
Beauregard, Ashley Bewsee, Kathleen
Brooks, Leanna Bushey, John Byrnes,
C heyenne C antela , Z achary C lapp ,
C ameron C orliss , Felicity C orrales ,
M ichael C ray, A aron C ritch , R oger
DesRochers, Christopher Dunlap, Emily
Dupont, Olvin Eliza, Kortnee Fairbanks,
H annah F lowers , T homas F redette ,
Brynn Friedhaber, Kasandra Goldrick,
S elenya G onzalez , C ameron G ower,
M arvin H enriquez , K ayla H ildebrand ,
Vanessa James, Madeline Julian, Natalya
K aletin , C allie K azalski , M ikayla
Kenneson, Amber Kilmer, Emily Koske,
Emma Labarre, Antoinette Lacaprucia,
D akota L afountain , E milie L aizer,
Veronika Latoshkina, Benjamin Laxton,
Adam Lebeau, Aaron Lessing, Breanna
Lowery, Nathan Machnacz, Adrian Mack,
S ara M ann , F lavia M arques , J ailene
M arrero , A ine M assey C onway, A liza
McLeish, Amber McCabe, Cody Miller,
D ayshla M orales , K iara M orales , Y
N guyen , Z achary N ichols , J ada O rtiz
Roman, David Pikulyak, Shania Pinero
Fernandez, Emilee Proulx, Ryan Provost,
Page 14 ◆ March 3, 2016
J asmine R amos , M a tthew R ender,
B randon R icardo , J ayden R odriguez ,
Juan Rodriguez, Samantha Rodriguez,
Katherine Rose, Mikayla Roy, Johnathan
S aez , J ustina S aez , Korrine S anchez ,
Christian Sanmiquel, Ivan Santiago Vega,
Jessica Semprit, Ashley Serrano, Marina
S hevchenko , J ackson S mith , K osal
Srey, Lea St. Pierre, Amber Stasiowski,
Madison Stefanelli, Matthew Terkelsen,
Luis Torres Figueroa, Luis Torres, Tiana
Tran, Diana Tverdokhlebova, Jada Tyndal,
K yle V ezina , P aul V incelette , N oor
Wabdan, and Patrick Wells.
Grade 10 Honors
A lex A ntuna , S ara A uthier, L auren
B ailey, K yle B ennis , Timothy B oren ,
Aaliyah Brown, Alexys Brunelle, Lirian
C olon M artinez , A lice C ruz - Perez ,
Danyelle Cubi, Jaiden Demers, Tanner
D emers , C arina F acchini , M elissa
Feilen, Fernando Fernandez, Cameron
F lynn , R egina F ranco M aldonado ,
Genesis Garcia, Makala Gogal, Jonelle
Gorecki, Armand Hebert, Carly Houle,
Kailey Houle, Jonathan Hoyt, Samariah
J ohnson , C rystalyn K ennedy, A nna
Korman, Makayla Lapierre, Alexander
Luna, Stephanie Mahar, Gavin Mardeuse,
Anthony Marra, Jason Martins, Amanda
McCollum, Aliza Meon, Mark MercedRivera, Angelica Morales, Daniel Nhiv,
Ashley O’Donnell,Ethan Pajak, Timothy
P atterson , J ustin P elletier, Tyler
Perreault, Michael Pimental, Vladimir
Popovichenko, Paige Provenzano, Marzena
Przybylowicz, Dylan Richards, Garrett
Riopelli, Deishanett Rivera, Jerry Rivera,
Brianna Robles, Kiara Rodriguez, Edriana
Roman, Nickolas Rondeau, Alexandria
R ousseau , D anielle R usciano , G race
Sargent, Jacob Serrano, John Simpson,
Payton Silwa, Erik Stadtlander, Tyler
S tafinski , J essica S tepchuk , M arcin
Szmyd, Shane Tuck, Nelson Walton, and
Hannah Woodill.
Grade 11 Honors
A rgeo A lfarone , T imothy A nderson ,
Michelle Arbuzova, Stephanie Beaulieu,
Gabriel Angelo Benites, Brittany Beyette,
C aroline B iela , J essica B udynkiewicz ,
Kurtlen Burkott, Christopher Carlson,
A bigail C hapman , G abriela C havez ,
Jonathan Chouinard, Spencer Colllins,
Ricardo Cruz, Julianna Darsch, Celine
D elaronde , A llyson D esjeans , C ora
Desrochers, Johan Diaz Martinez, Luis
Diaz, Elliot Dion, Jack Dudley, Collin
G agnon -S aine , B randon G allacher,
Ciara Gamache, Derek Girouard, Stacy
Gonzalez, Austin-Earl Gower, Brandon
Graham, Kathy Jaracz, Trevor Johnson,
Arianna Kelly, Darren Kibler, Skye Kim,
C olin K laes , K ayla L arkin , S tephen
L aroche , B ridget L awlor, R achelle
Lemieux, Haleigh Lepage, Jeniret Liberato,
Jordan Lupien, Christopher Maleko, Gena
M elfi , M yranda M ichel , Perla N ater
A lvarez , J ovan O rtiz , K iara Pedraza ,
Autumn Phillips, Corey Phillips, Nicklaus
Picard, Lauren Pouliot, Jacob Prince,
A lliyah R amirez , N icholas R icardo ,
Jessika Richards, Tiana Riopelle, Natasha
Rivera, Nelson Rivera, Brian Rohan, Tyler
R ollins , D ominic R omano , E van R oy,
Erika Saletnik, Aldina Sliwa, Zachary
St. Laurent, Dennis Syriac, Rafal Szmyd
Jennifer Tedeschi, Damonique ThompsonMartin, Dominic Trybus, Hannah Turgeon,
Abigail Uszynski, Devin Valentine, and
Brittany Vasilanko.
Grade 12 Honors
S age A breu , K arina A mlaw, A shley
Andino, Jordan Bailey, Kathia Barreto
R a m o s , Tr i s t o n B a r r o n , J e ff r e y
Barthelette, Kiarah Bergeron, Samantha
Blaine, Meghan Boone, Gregory
B outhiette , M atelynn B uckley, M alik
B urke , E lijah -C harles B urston , L ena
Cartier, Matthew Cayer, Ling Centeno,
Austin Coelho, Elaine Coto, Kiara Cotto
L acharite , M arissa C ox , I vany C ruz ,
Brittani Cundiff, Brianna Cuoco, Jhan
Diaz, Cameron Dupuis, Nicholas Fanos,
B randon Fields , M arissa G alindrez ,
Ronald Gardner, Joey Giguere, Meliany
G o n z a l e z , N a t h a n i e l H a m b u r g e r,
G arrick H anechak , E lisabeth H arvey,
Sara Hazeltine, Allison Heise, JennaLynn Herd, Emily Hiersche, Stephanie
H ill , K urtis H ilton , G riffin I melio ,
R ebecca I ves , J acqueline J ackson ,
A lyssa J ohnson , Taha K adhim , K elly
Kiely, Kauner King, Sara Koske, Kaylee
K rajewski , J onathan L abarre , A lex
Labrie, Anh Lang, Hunter Larochelle,
Luke Lashway, Hunter Laughlin, Kevin
Marafuga, Julianna Martinelli, Dominik
Medina, Yuneiry Medrano, Duane Miller,
Sara Monslave, Mikayla Morin, Victoria
Nicholas, Manuel Puyen Roche, Maureen
P ycko , B enjamin Q uenneville , J oseph
Recchia, Morganne Reitz, Destiny Rivera,
Joel Roches, Antonio Rodriguez, Dominic
Rollins, Jason Roy, Joshua Roy, Nicholas
R oy, J ared S aporito , Paige S eamans ,
Michael Serrano, Khizar Shaikh, Benjamin
S impson , G race S mith , S tephanie
Sullivan, Justin Szczur, Brieann Tobiasz,
E lijah Tomlinson , A llison U lasewich ,
J avier Vazquez , N athan Vezina , N ina
Walsh, Alexandra Wilbois, and Taylor
Wolowicz.
*Editor’s note: The Chicopee Register
would love to publish and acknowledge
the accomplishments of our community’s
students. To be included on this list, submissions must have information provided
directly from the college or university the
student has attended. Keep in mind that this
time of year, there is an influx of submissions so they will be published in the order
they are received.*
Holyoke Catholic
High School
Second Quarter Honor
Roll 2015-2016
Chicopee residents
Grades 9-12
First H onors : G rade 9 – K atherine
B outin , C a tarina M arafuga , S ara
Wolanski ; G rade 10 – D avid G arib ,
Edward Thomas; Grade 11 - Victoria
Bieniasz, Kristine Cao, Rebecca Duffy,
Finn Murray, Zachary Rattell; Grade 12
– Lexis Dotson/Dufault, Joshua Guntly,
Alliana Hasiuk, Maria Angelina Huber,
K evin J ohnson , N icole J ulian , K acie
O’Connell, Ruoyan (Violet) He. Second
Honors: Grade 9 – James Doherty, Adam
Juchniewicz, Kellie Serrao; Grade 10
– Mutian (Thomas) Ding, Briana Serrao;
Grade 11 – Kyle Wolanski; Grade 12
– Ziyan (Kevin) Dai, Danielle Julian, Mary
Roberge, Han (Winema) Wang. Honorable
Mention: Grade 9 – Rosemary Brault,
J ordan G uthrie ; G rade 10 – J ilin (
Emily) Hu, Julie Miner, Hang (Elvis) Yang,
J ie (C arol ) Z hu ; G rade 12 – J ustin
Lafreniere.
Chicopee
Register
◆
in the classroom
College Notes
University of Maine releases
fall 2015 Dean’s List
ORONO, MAINE The University of Maine
recognized Gerard Valliere,
of Chicopee, for achieving
dean’s list honors in the
fall 2015 semester.
◆
St. Stan’s students star
in enrichment program
By Tyler W. Leahy
Staff Writer
Endicott announces
Dean’s List students
B E V E R LY, M A
– Endicott College is
pleased to announce Laura
Beth Gibb, of Chicopee,
has been named to the
dean’s list students for
CHICOPEE – For St.
Stanislaus School first and
second graders, twelve
weeks of enrichment
learning culminated in
fall, 2015. Laura is the performances that boasted
daughter of Bruce and confidence, exuberance
Darla Gibb of Chicopee. and a deepened underShe is a Senior majoring standing of storytelling.
in Nursing.
Beaming, the students had
become acting stars.
On Friday, Feb. 26,
four classes of first and
second grade students
performed narrated skits.
The skits, inspired by
folk tales, often evoked
the University of New laughter from parents and
Hampshire have earned teachers in the audience
recognition through their and boasted whimsical
superior scholastic perfor- titles like “Why Cats Wash
mance. Highest Honors After Eating” and “The
are awarded to students Quarreling Fingers.”
who earn a semester grade
St. Stanislaus School
point average of 3.85 or hosted national awardbetter out of a possible 4.0. winning minstrel storytellStudents with a 3.65 to er and teaching artist Mary
3.84 average are awarded Jo Maichack, of Maichack
high honors and students Arts in Holyoke, as part
whose grade point aver- of a twelve-week STARS
age is 3.5 through 3.64 are (Students and Teachers
awarded honors.
Working with Artists,
Scientists, and Scholars)
Residency from the
Massachusetts Cultural
Council. Maichack’s program, “Tell It! Sing It!
al degree programs and Move It! Act It!,” trained
is home to Maine’s only students to act out folkmedical and dental schools. tales and performing arts
With coastal campuses in in support of literacy.
Portland and Biddeford,
“The key to making
Maine and one in Tangier, this program successMorocco, UNE attracts ful is having a repertoire
internationally recognized that suits the students,”
scholars in the sciences, said Maichack. “We build
health, medicine and the skills a little bit at a time.
humanities. It is one of a Children often have to
select group of academic hear things four times
institutions with a compre- before it can sink in.”
hensive health education
Maichack explained
mission that includes pro- that she models first
grams in medicine, phar- by telling a story to stumacy, dental medicine, dents, then progressing to
nursing and an array of exercises and eventually
allied health professions.
encouraging them to memorize the story themselves.
University of New Hampshire’s
announces Dean’s List recipients
DURHAM, N.H.
– The following Chicopee
students have been named
to the Dean’s List at
the University of New
Hampshire for the fall
semester of the 20152016 academic year:
Michelle Lacroix, has
earned Highest Honors;
Yamilex Bencosme, has
earned Honors; and Sofia
Carapeta, has earned
Highest Honors.
Students named
to the Dean’s List at
Locals named to Dean’s List
BIDDEFORD,
P O RT L A N D , M a i n e
– Jacklyn O’brien and
Madison Pirrone, both
of Chicopee, has been
named to the Dean’s List
for the 2015 fall semester
at the University of New
England. Dean’s List students
have attained a grade point
average of 3.3 or better
out of a possible 4.0 at the
end of the semester. The
University of New England
(UNE) is Maine’s largest
private university. It offers
dozens of undergraduate,
graduate and profession-
Scholar-athletes named to
NECC all-academic team
CHICOPEE – The
College of Our Lady of the
Elms is proud to announce
that more than 30 Elms
s c h o l a r- a t h l e t e s w e r e
named to the New England
Collegiate Conference
(NECC) Academic AllConference team for the
2015 fall semester. Elms led
the pack this semester, with
34 athletes named to the
team, followed by Lesley
University with 26 and Bay
Path University with 20.
To be eligible for
the NECC Academic AllConference, a student-athlete must post a minimum
grade-point average of 3.40
on a scale of 4.00 and must
be a sophomore or higher
in class standings.
A total of 187 studentChicopee
Register
athletes at colleges around
New England were named
to the NECC Academic
All-Conference team for
the fall semester. Scholarathletes who competed in
men’s and women’s cross
country, men’s golf, field
hockey, men’s and women’s
soccer, women’s tennis and
women’s volleyball were
eligible for fall NECC academic honors.
The Elms studentathletes from Chicopee on
the fall 2015 NECC AllAcademic Team are: Roger
Conklin, class of 2016,
men’s soccer, accounting/
marketing; Patrick Goonan,
class of 2016, men’s soccer, nursing; and Adam
Kuzdzal, class of 2016,
cross country, accounting.
Turley Publications staff photo by Tyler W. Leahy
St. Stanislaus School first graders recently performed a skit entitled
“Baby Go To Bed” during the culmination of a 12-week enrichment
residency by Mary Jo Maichack.
She has 26 years of experience as a professional
storyteller and musician,
engaging the students in
storytelling, song, dance,
and acting, with the purpose of building oral literacy.
She formats skits with
narration and chorus-like
refrains so that there are
as many opportunities for
student participation as
possible.
STARS Residencies
provide grants of $500 to
$5,000 to schools in support of creative learning
residencies of three days
or more in the arts, sciences and humanities.
The residency ending on
Feb. 26 was St. Stanislaus
School’s second received
of its kind, working with
Maichack in consecutive
years.
“This is important.
Especially in the younger
grades, you want children
College Notes
Atkinson named to
Husson University’s
Honors List
BA N G O R , M a i n e
- Chicopee resident,
Katharine Atkinson, has
been named to Husson
University’s Honors List
for the Fall 2015 semester.
Atkinson is a senior
who is currently enrolled
in Husson’s BS in Health
Sciences program.
Local students achieves
Dean’s List honors
ORANGE, Conn.
– The following Chicopee
r e s i d e n t s h av e b e e n
named to the dean’s list
at the University of New
Haven for the Fall 2015
semester: Cameron
Brouillard, Bachelor of
Science, Mechanical
Engineering, and Emma
Griffin, Bachelor of Arts,
Psychology.
Full-time undergraduate students must have a
3.50 or better cumulative
GPA for the semester to be
eligible for the Dean’s List.
O’Brien makes Husson
University’s President’s
List
BA N G O R , M a i n e
– Chicopee resident,
Madison O’Brien, has
been named to Husson
University’s President’s
List for the Fall 2015
semester.
O’Brien is a junior
who is currently enrolled
in Husson’s BS in Criminal
Justice/MS in Criminal
Justice Administration
program.
to have the opportunity
to bring the arts into their
programs. They learn confidence and it has a real
positive impact on their
reading, their verbal skills,
and it just brings in a lot
of fun, with music, dance
and art as well,” said St.
Stanislaus School administrator Karen Shea.
Shea noted that the
residencies granted by the
Massachusetts Cultural
Council are extremely
competitive and difficult to secure. While St.
Stanislaus has secured
Maichack’s residency in
each of the past two years,
there were prior years in
which the school applied
and was not chosen, Shea
said.
Maichack too stressed
the transferrable skills the
elementary students can
hone in just 12 weeks.
“All of the skills they
use in the program have
carry-over value. It really
taps into where they are
at developmentally, and it
also gives them a cultural
background, logical thinking skills and the ability
to find their own voices,”
said Maichack. The students that we worked with
for the second year in a
row have developed so
much confidence in themselves.”
Maichack has won
two national awards for
her storytelling albums
and completed numerous
other STARS Residencies.
She has performed some
3,000 shows since 1989.
Currently, she also serves
as Director of Marketing
and Development for the
Connecticut Storytelling
Center. In fall 2015, she
served as an advisor on
the creation of national
curriculum for Norman
Rockwell Museum.
BUSINESS
Turley Publications is liberal with regard to
its business coverage polices, but we do have
some standards folks need to understand. First,
local businesses and merchants are just as much
institutions in our towns as the library and schools.
Without them, there are no towns.
We will feature coverage of local businesses
that are new, have a major expansion, moving,
closing, under new management or ownership,
celebrating a milestone anniversary, or have
been thrust into the news realm. Merchants can
request that coverage through the editor, or for
our existing advertising clients, through their ad
representatives.
For more information on business coverage
for The Chicopee Register, please email
[email protected]
March 3, 2016 ◆
Page 15
◆
Alden Credit Union
– Wednesday,
March 23rd , 2016
Alden Credit Union will
hold its annual meeting at
the Hu Ke Lau on Memorial
Drive in Chicopee from 67pm. A light meal will be
provided.
3/3/16
Auction Notice –
Chicopee Self Storage
Facility Operator’s Sale for
non-payment of Storage
Charges pursuant to the
Power of Sale contained in
M.G.L. Chapter 105A, Sec­
tion 4. The following properties will be sold at Public
Auction on Thursday
MARCH 17, 2016 at 12:00
p.m., on the premises of
Chicopee Self Storage, 649
Meadow Street, Chicopee,
MA. All household furniture,
trunks, books, clothes, appliances, tools, antiques and
miscellaneous items held for:
#F158 WALTER L. BLAIR,
#G170 ANGEL DEVALLE
legals
GUZMAN. Tenants may
claim their merchandise up
to the time of sale by paying
their debts and vacating the
premises.
www.storageauctionusa.com
lic# 3183
3/3,3/10/16
Auction Notice –
S h e r i d a n S t r e e t Self
Storage Facility Operator’s
Sale for non-payment of
Storage Charges pursuant
to the Power of Sale contained in M.G.L. Chapter
105A, Section 4. The following properties will be
sold at PUBLIC AUCTION
on Thursday, MARCH 17,
2016 at 12:30pm, on the
premises of Sheridan Street
Self Storage, 105 Sheridan
Street, Chicopee, MA. All
household furniture, trunks,
books, clothes, appliances,
tools, antiques and miscellaneous items held for: Dawn
Lam #409. Tenants may
claim their merchandise up to
time of sale by paying their
rams
from page 12
◆
debt and vacating the premises.
www.storageauctionsusa.com
lic #3138
3/3,3/10/16
Commonwealth of
Massachusetts
The Trial Court
Probate and Family Court
50 State Street
Springfield, MA 01103
Docket No. HD16P0185GD
In the interests of
Edwin Khalil Hernandez
Of Chicopee, MA
Minor
NOTICE AND ORDER:
Petition for Appointment
of Guardian of a Minor
NOTICE TO ALL
INTERESTED PARTIES
1. Hearing Date/Time:
A hearing on a Petition for
Appointment of Guardian of
a Minor filed on 02/01/2016
by Iris Dones of Holyoke,
MA will be held 03/17/2016
08:15 a.m. Guardianship of
Minor Hearing Located 50
State Street, 4th Floor Spring­
field, MA 01103
2. Response to Petition:
You may respond by filing a written response to
the Petition or by appearing
in person at the hearing. If
you choose to file a written
response, you need to:
File the original with the
Court; and
Mail a copy to all interested parties at least five
(5) business days before the
hearing.
3. Counsel for the Min­
or: The minor (or an adult on
behalf of the minor) has the
right to request that counsel
be appointed for the minor.
4. Presence of the Min­
or at Hearing: A minor over
age 14 has the right to be
present at any hearing, un­less
the Court finds that it is not
in the minor’s best interests.
Date: February 1, 2016
Suzanne T. Seguin
Register of Probate
3/3/16
Tantasqua and Quabbin
both qualifying in the sixteam field.
The Warriors earned
the No. 2 seed at 18-2 and
will sit for more than a
week with an automatic
bid to the semifinal round.
The Warriors will face
either Taconic or Pittsfield
sometime next week.
Quabbin will travel to
Longmeadow for a quarterfinal game on March 4.
Quabbin is No. 6 with a
12-8 record.
The Division 3 field
has 12 teams involved.
Among them, Palmer has
earned the No. 3 seed with
an excellent 17-3 season. They are waiting for
the winner of the No. 6
Mount Greylock and No.
11 Frontier matchup to
find out their quarterfinal
opponent for March 4.
In Division 4, Granby
and Quaboag have both
earned first-round home
games.
The Rams will be the
No. 2 seed at 12-8 and
face the winner of the
Turners Falls and Pioneer
Valley Christian first
round game.
Quaboag is No. 3 at
8-11 and faces the winner
of the Hampden Charter
School of Science and
McCann Tech first round
matchup.
Hampden Charter
is the No. 6 seed at 164. They enter the tournament for the first time in
the school’s history with
their first round matchup
against McCann.
Tournament Director
Lou Conte said the first
round matchups were
scheduled to be held
on Tuesday, March 1.
However, with primary
elections scheduled for
that day, some matchups could be changed.
Quarterfinals were scheduled for Friday, March
4 with a few matchups
like Chicopee and Pope
Francis moved to other
days.
You can follow the
TurleySports on facebook!
division
from page 12
“
Well what do
you know - there’s a sale
downtown. I’ll save money
and support my community.
”
Some things never get old
Whether it’s local businesses advertising their products and services, local
calendars full of things to do, a press
release about a promotion or school
and town hall news- community newspapers are the only medium to publish
items that are important to you.
As a publisher and printer for over
50 years, Turley Publications, Inc.
remains committed to our community
newspapers as well as the towns and
people we serve.
Page 16 ◆ March 3, 2016
So no matter what the daily papers
are going through - community newspapers thrive because of their unique
local content. We’ll never grow old of
this long-standing tradition.
We are the local news
you come home to.
year with a 15-5 record.
They capped off the season when they defeated
Holyoke in a non-league
game last Wednesday
night. Comp received the
No. 2 seed while Holyoke
will go No. 3 at 13-7.
Comp will host a quarterfinal on March 3 against
either East Longmeadow
or rival Chicopee.
The Agawam girls
basketball will enter the
Division 1 Tournament
for the first time in a few
years, seeded at No. 6 and
opening up the tournament against Sci-Tech in
a first round game. They
went 12-8 this season
prided themselves on great
defense. But they will
need to find a way to generate more offense if they
are going to get past the
teams ahead of them.
No. 9 Minnechaug
is 7-13 and traveled to
Northampton Monday. If victorious, they will go to No. 1
Central on Thursday night.
The Division 2 field
is small, with Belchertown
earning the second seed
with a 16-4 record. They
automatically move
to the semifinals next
week to face Pittsfield
or Commerce. To reach
the semifinals against
Longmeadow, Tantasqua
will have to get through
N o r t h M i d d l e s ex o n
March 3.
South Hadley’s amazing 19-1 season landed
the Tigers top seed in
Division 3. They will face
the winner of the Mount
Greylock/Athol first round
matchup on March 3. The
Tigers have only lost to
No. 2 Hoosac this season.
They split two games with
the Hurricanes this year.
South Hadley swept No. 3
Hampshire this year also,
beating the Red Raiders in
the final two games of the
regular season to go a perfect 8-0 to win the Central
League.
Southwick, which
plays a weaker schedule,
went 15-5 and is seeded
No. 10. They faced Granby
in the opening round and
the winning team will
head to Hoosac Valley on
March 3.
Ware’s 17-3 record
tops Division 4’s bracket.
They will await the result
of the Pioneer and Turners
first round matchup to find
out who it will host on
March 3.
Other first round
matchups include No. 4
North Brookfield hosting
No. 13 Smith Vocational.
Pathfinder qualified for
the tournament on the final
day of the regular season
and head to Quaboag to
face the Cougars. The
winner there will face the
North Brookfield/Smith
winner in the quarterfinals
on March 3.
Monson received the
No. 3 seed at 12-8 and will
face the winner of No. 6
Lee and No. 11 Franklin
Tech.
Tournament Director
Lou Conte said preliminary round games were
scheduled for Monday
and quarterfinals are set
for Thursday, March 3.
All games are supposed to
start at 7 p.m. unless they
are otherwise agreed to by
the individual schools.
Chicopee
Register
Buzzin’ from Town to Town
Classifieds
Turley Publications’ Community Marketplace
For Sale
ANTIQUE AND PERIOD chairs –
Restored with new woven seats –
Many styles and weaves available.
Call (413)267-9680.
KING SIZE BED
SOLID WOOD HEADBOARD
AND FOOTBOARD INCLUDES
SIDE
RAILS
AND
ALL
SUPPORT
RAILS.
EXCELLENT
CONDITION.
$125. 413-589-1929
LA-Z-BOY LOVESEAT POWER
recliner. Chocolate brown. Like
new. $450. (413)427-8422.
Firewood
!!!!ALL SEASONED RED &
WHITE OAK!!!! Over a cord
guaranteed. Cut, split, prompt
delivery. Call D & D Cordwood
(413)348-4326.
FIREWOOD
Fresh cut & split $175.00.
Seasoned cut & split $200.00
All hardwood.
Tree length available
*Also have seasoned softwood for
outdoor boilers (Cheap).
Quality & volumes guaranteed!!
New England Forest Products
(413)477-0083.
LOG LENGTH FIREWOOD for
sale. 7-8 cords delivered. $750.00
delivered locally. Pricing subject to
change.
Seasoned firewood cut and split,
pre-stacked on pallets and
delivered. Also specialize in Heat
Treatment Certified kiln dried
firewood.
Wholesale
inquires
welcome. 1-800-373-4500
Wanted To Buy
NEW ENGLAND ESTATE
PICKERS
IN
THE
OLD
MONSON LANES BOWLING
ALLEY.
BUYING NOW!
ALL ANTIQUES AND
COLLECTIBLES
COMPLETE ESTATES
SETTLED!
(413)267-3729
TOP DOLLAR ON THE SPOT
FOR ALL GOLD AND SILVER
ITEMS, JEWELRY, COINS,
SILVERWARE, ETC!
Items
to
include:
old
advertising signs of all
subject matters! Furniture,
toys, trains, pedal cars,
model car kits from the 70’s,
old fishing items, military
items, sports stuff, old
paintings,
books,
coin
operated Coca Cola pinball
machines, etc. comic books,
postcards, magazines, old
letterman jackets, musical
instruments,
microscopes,
binoculars,
old
bicycles,
motorcycles,
vintage
automobiles! WE PURCHASE
CONTENTS
OF
BARNS,
GARAGES,
ATTICS,
BASEMENTS! LET US DO
THE WORK AND YOU GET
PAID!
SIMPLY BRING YOUR
ITEMS IN FOR A FREE
EVALUATION AND OR
CASH OFFER!
THURSDAY - SUNDAY
10:00 - 5:00
HONEST COURTEOUS
SERVICE!!!
64 MAIN ST. (RTE. 32),
MONSON, MA
Flea Market
YANKEE FLEA MARKET
1311 Park Street (Rt. 20)
Palmer, MA 01069
Over 130 vendors
Over 8,500 Square feet
6 days a week
Tues-Sat 10-5, Sunday 11-5
Year round, all indoor
Antiques, Collectibles,
Household furnishings and more!
Vendors Welcome, Apply within
Always buying, Free estimates!
(413)283-4910
Free Parking
Free Admission
Services
********A A CALL – HAUL IT
ALL********
LIFE ALERT. 24/7. One press of
a button sends help fast! Medical,
Fire, Burglar. Even if you can’t
reach a phone! Free brochure.
Call (800)457-1917.
PROMOTE YOUR PRODUCT,
service or business to 1.7 million
households
throughout
New
England. Reach 4 million potential
readers quickly and inexpensively
with great results. Use the Buy
New England Classified Ad
Network by calling (413)283-8393,
[email protected] Do they
work? You are reading one of our
ads now!! Visit our website to see
where your ads run
communitypapersne.com
Wanted
ATTENTION SMITH & WESSON
RETIREES Sell me your collection
of wooden gun grips and other
memorabilia. Call Tim (413)2464966.
BOATS/ RV’S WANTED!!! We
buy any condition. Running or not.
Competitive offer! Free towing
from anywhere! We’re nationwide!
Call for quote (888)553-8647.
OLD
CARPENTER
TOOLS
wanted. Planes, chisels, saws,
levels, etc. Call Ken 413-4332195. Keep your vintage tools
working and get MONEY.
Chicopee
Register
www.turley.com
✦
Call us toll free at 1-800-824-6548
Services
Want it!
Find it!
Buy it!
Sell it!
Love it!
Drive it!
Electrician
Services
BOB ROBILLARD’S ODD JOB
SERVICE,
Rubbish
removal,
attics, cellars, garages cleaned.
Light moving. Call someone you
know. (413)537-5090
HANDYMAN SERVICES
One call does it all
Storm Clean-up
Snowplowing,
High Lift Service,
Remodeling,
Roof Repairs,
Excavating
Fully insured. Free estimates.
Reasonable rates
www.rlhenterprises.net
(413)668-6685.
DRYWALL
AND
CEILINGS,
plaster repair. Drywall hanging.
Taping & complete finishing. All
ceiling textures. Fully insured.
Jason at Great Walls.
(413)563-0487
JAMES
FERRIS:
LICENSE
#E16303. Free estimates. Senior
Discounts. Insured. 40 years
experience. No job too small. Cell
(413)330-3682.
COLEMAN APPLIANCE SERVICE. Servicing all makes and
models of washers, dryers,
refrigerators, stoves, dishwashers,
air conditioners. Also dryer vent
cleaning. (413)536-0034.
Finance
SELL
YOUR
STRUCTURED
settlement or annuity payments for
cash now. You don’t have to wait
for your future payments any
longer! Call (800)938-8092.
Carpentry
HOUSE REPAIRS, CARPENTRY, wood & alum. trim, doors,
etc. 30+ years exp., insured.
Jim (413)219-3355
Home Improvement
A
HOME
IMPROVEMENT
Specialist. Decks, porches, water
in basement, backhoe, dump
truck. Loam, stone, fill, driveway
repair, loader, tractors (413)5632229.
Child Services
*NEW STATE LAW. Anyone
advertising caring of children must
list a license number to do so if
they offer this service in their own
home.
DELREO HOME IMPROVEMENT
for all your exterior home
improvement needs. ROOFING,
SIDING, WINDOWS, DOORS,
DECKS & GUTTERS. Extensive
references
available,
Fully
Licensed & Insured in MA. & CT.
Call GARY DELCAMP @ 413569-3733
SPECIAL EDUCATION ADVOCACY- Need assistance- Let us
help! From birth to age 22.
Special Ed Advocates of Western
Mass 413-246-3856
Log
On
Today
BAK RENOVATION & Painting
Specialists. Kitchens, bathrooms,
basements, interior/exterior renovations,
painting.
References
available. Fully licensed and
insured. Call Bob (413)533-9173.
www.turley.com
2016
TAX TIME
*****
Kitchen Table Taxes
A CALL WE HAUL
WE TAKE IT ALL
WE LOAD IT ALL
Lowest Rates,
accumulations, junk, estates,
attics, garages, appliances,
basements, demo services
10% disc. with this ad.
All Major CC's
CALL NOW (413)531-1936
WWW.ACALLWEHAUL.COM
DEPENDABLE
ELECTRICIAN,
FRIENDLY
service,
installs
deicing cables. Free estimates.
Fully insured. Scott Winters
electrician Lic. #13514-B Call
(413)244-7096.
Appliances
Services
PAINT AND PAPER Over 25
years experience. References. Lic
#086220. Please call Kevin 978355-6864.
BILL CAMERLIN. ADDITIONS,
service changes, small jobs for
homeowners, fire alarms. Fast,
dependable, reasonable rates.
Insured, free estimates. E280333.
24 hour emergency service.
(413)427-5862.
WE
RENOVATE,
SELL
&
PURCHASE (any condition) horse
drawn vehicles such as sleighs,
carriages, surreys, wagons, dr’s
buggies,
driveable
or
lawn
ornaments. Some furniture and
other
restoration
services
available.
Reasonable prices.
Quality
workmanship.
Call
(413)213-0373 for estimate and
information.
Demers & Sons
Belchertown, MA
15 Weekly Newspapers
Serving 50 Local Communities
CHAIR SEAT WEAVING &
refinishing - cane, fiber rush &
splint - Classroom instructor, 20+
years experience. Call Walt at
(413)267-9680 for estimate.
Computer Services
COMPUTERS SHOULDN’T BE
frustrating or frightening. I’ll come
to you. Upgrades, troubleshooting,
set-up, tutoring. Other electronics
too. Call Monique (413)237-1035.
READ IT!!!
Bulk trash removal, cleanouts,
10% discount with this ad. Free
Est. (413)596-7286
Miscellaneous
A PLACE FOR MOM. The
nation’s largest senior living
referral service. Contact our
trusted, local experts today! Our
service is free/ no obligation. Call
(800)417-0524.
✦
Personal & Small Business Tax Returns
"David The Tax Man"
Phone/Fax
413-289-0058
Credit Cards Welcome
[email protected]
David E. Whitney
Notary Public
Sixty-Five Jim Ash Road
Palmer, MA 01069-9814
www.kitchentabletaxes.com
CHANTEL BLEAU
ACCOUNTING SERVICES
For Full Accounting & Tax Service
Registered Tax Return Preparer
228 West St., Ware, MA 01082
413-967-8364
Call For An
Appointment
The IRS does not endorse any particular individual tax return preparer.
For more information on tax preparers go to irs.gov.
Income Tax Preparation
588 Center Street
Ludlow, MA 01056
www.ajefinancial.com
~ 29 years tax experience ~
(413)589-1671
SNOWBLOWER
TUNE UP & REPAIR
Bruce J. Charwick
A & M TUNE-UPS
Push lawnmowers, riding mowers
and small engine repair.
Work done at your home.
Call Mike
(413) 283-5596
62 Jim Ash Road
Palmer, MA 01069
(413) 348-7967
ACE
CHIMNEY
SWEEPS.
Cleanings, inspections, repairs,
caps,
liners,
waterproofing,
rebuilds. Gutterbrush Installations.
Local family owned since 1986.
HIC #118355. Fully insured.
(413)547-8500.
BILODEAU AND SON Roofing.
Established 1976. New re-roofs
and repairs. Gutter cleanings and
repairs. Licensed/ insured. Call
(413)967-6679.
Do You Owe Uncle Sam?
Do you find that you owe Uncle Sam 'year after year'?
If you typically pay to state of federal every year, we can help.
It's called TAX PLANNING.
It shouldn't have to hurt!
Melchiori Tax and Financial Services
IRS Problems?
Let a Professional Handle it for you.
Call us anytime!
Call your local Turley Publications
sales representative for information and
rates on advertising your tax service here!
413-283-8393 • 1-800-824-6548
Complete Tax Services:
Personal, Business, Corporations and Partnerships
Telephone (413) 786-8727 • Fax (413) 786-1833
[email protected][email protected] melchioritax.com
24 Southwick Street, Feeding Hills, MA 01030
CALL YOUR LOCAL TURLEY PUBLICATIONS SALES REPRESENTATIVE FOR INFORMATION AND RATES ON ADVERTISING YOUR TAX SERVICE HERE!
413-283-8393 • 1-800-824-6548
March 3, 2016 ◆
Page 17
Classifieds
Buzzin’ from Town to Town
Turley Publications’ Community Marketplace
✦
www.turley.com
✦
Call us toll free at 1-800-824-6548
Home Improvement
Garage Door Serv.
Plumbing
Pets
Help Wanted
ACO
MASONRY, HEATING &
AIR CONDITIONING
All types of masonry work.
Chimney repair, tile work, stucco,
stone, brick, block, concrete,
flat work, pavers, retaining walls.
Heating & Air Conditioning
Service & Installation
Furnaces, Sheet Metal
Power Washing
Licensed & Insured
Commercial & Residential
Free Estimates
Competitive Rates
Call Adam Ouimette
413-374-7779
MENARD GARAGE DOORS
Authorized
Raynor
dealer
specializing in sales, installation
service and repairs of residential
and light commercial overhead
garage doors and openers. Fully
insured. Free estimates. Call
(413)289-6550 or
www.menardgaragedoors.com
LINC’S PLUMBING LIC #J27222
Scheduling Replacement
Heating Systems Now
Call LINC’S
For Your Connection
(413)668-5299
RETIRED RACING
GREYHOUNDS AVAILABLE
FOR ADOPTION
spayed/neutered, wormed,
shots, heartworm tested,
teeth cleaned
Roofing
Make a Fast Friend!
EXPERIENCED
ROOFER
WORKS alone, quality work,
licensed. Best prices for sheds,
garages, and ranches. (413)7867924.
Greyhound Options Inc.
Call Mary at 413-566-3129
or Claire at 413-967-9088
or go to
www.greyhoundoptions.org
BUS OPERATORS
PUBLIC TRANSIT
Put your CDL to excellent use
while building a long-term career.
FT
positions
available
in
Springfield area and part-time
positions in Northampton Area.
Must have CDL with Passenger
Endorsement with no airbrake
restriction. All positions must be
able to work evenings and
weekends.
Review detailed
information
at
www.pvta.com
under Careers/SATCo or VATCo.
Upload cover letter and resumé
via our website or mail to: SATCo,
Attn: HR, 2840 Main Street,
Springfield,
MA
01107.
AA/EEO/DF
Instruction
C-D HOME IMPROVEMENT. 1
Call for all your needs. Windows,
siding, roofs, additions, decks,
baths, hardwood floors, painting.
All work 100% guaranteed.
Licensed and insured. Call Bob
(413)596-8807 Cell
CS Lic.
#97110, HIC Lic #162905
CERAMIC TILE INSTALLATION
Kitchen, bath, foyers. References.
Lic #086220. Please call Kevin
(978)355-6864.
HOME IMPROVEMENTS. REMODELING. Kitchens, baths.
Ceramic tile, windows, painting,
wallpapering, textured ceilings,
siding, additions. Insurance work.
Fully insured. Free estimates.
413-246-2783 Ron.
THE GROUT CREW Grout
Cleaning, sealing, color sealing,
re-grouting, re-caulking, individual
tile replacement. Free estimates,
fully insured (413)747-2739.
WATER DAMAGE
-CALL JAY (413)436-5782FOR REPAIRS
Complete
Drywall
Service.
Finishing,
Painting,
Ceilings
(Smooth or Textured). 39 years
experience. Fully insured
TRUCK DRIVERS
NEEDED
A & B CDL CLASSES + BUS
Chicopee, Ma (413)592-1500
UNITED TRACTOR TRAILER
SCHOOL
Unitedcdl.com
Pets
FREE ROOF INSPECTIONS. ALL
TYPES OF ROOFING, shingle,
flat and slate. Call Local Builders
(413)626-5296. Complete roofing
systems and repairs.
Fully
licensed and insured. MA CS
#102453, CT Reg. 0615780.
Lifetime
warranty.
Senior
Discount. 24 hour service.
Painting
KEN’S PAINTING SERVICES,
LLC
Interior/ exterior painting and
staining, wallpaper removal and
repairs, quality products and
workmanship. Fully insured.
Free estimates.
(413)896-8264.
NEW APPLICATIONS, GENERAL
repairs,
leaks
fixed.
Specializing in flat or low sloped
rubber membrane roofs. Quality
work. 25 years experience. Call
(413)668-7223.
QUABBIN PAINTING INTERIOR/
EXTERIOR PAINTING, handyman, house and deck powerwashing, deck staining, gutters
cleaned. Prompt professional
service. Fully insured.
Call 413-323-6425
[email protected]
Plumbing
GREG LAFOUNTAIN PLUMBING
& Heating. Lic #19196 Repairs &
Replacement of fixtures, water
heater installations, steam/HW
boiler replacement. Kitchen & Bath
remodeling. 30 years experience.
Fully insured. $10 Gift Card With
Work Performed. Call Greg
(413)592-1505.
KLARA IS A pocket sized terrier
mix, 2 years of age. Klara is a
perfect average rated girl, perfect
for a first time dog owner. Crate
trained, walks great on a leash!
Ok with other dogs! Located in
Worcester,
MA,
completed
application/home
visit/$200
adoption fee.
Applications found at
www.destinysroad
animalrescue.com
Horses
HORSEBACK RIDING LESSONS
offered year round at our state of
the art facility. Beginner to
advanced. Ages 4 years to adult.
Boarding, sales and leasing also
available. Convenient location at
Orion Farm in South Hadley.
(413)532-9753
www.orionfarm.net
Help Wanted
HELP WANTED BACK up
bartender needed. For more info,
call Ed at the Granby American
Legion. 413-467-9545
SKY-TECH ROOFING, INC. 25
years experience. Commercial,
residential. Insured. Shingles,
single-ply systems. Tar/ gravel,
slate repairs. 24 hour Emergency
Repairs.
(413)536-3279,
(413)348-9568, (413)204-4841.
The Town of Hampden is seeking a
Tree Work
ATEKS TREE- HONEST, quality
tree service. From pruning to
house lot clearing. Fully insured.
Free estimates. Firewood sales.
(413)687-3220.
Pets
BE A RESPONSIBLE PET
OWNER - Financially needy? Call
for assistance to spay/neuter your
cat/dog.
(413)565-5383
CONCERNED CITIZENS FOR
ANIMALS.
Highway Superintendent
for the overall operations of the Highway
Department. Interested parties should
email a request for a full job description
to [email protected]
or call the Selectmen’s office at
413.566.2151 x100, Monday through
Thursday 9:00 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
for additional information.
FILL OUT AND MAIL THIS MONEY MAKER
or VISIT WWW.TURLEY.COM
TO PLACE YOUR AD
DEADLINES:
QUABBIN & SUBURBAN – FRIDAY AT NOON
HILLTOWNS – MONDAY AT NOON
CATEGORY:
Quabbin
Village Hills
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
Base Price
$26.00
Circulation:
50,500
21
Base Price
$26.50
22
Base Price
$27.00
23
Base Price
$27.50
24
Base Price
$28.00
25
Base Price
$28.50
26
Base Price
$29.00
27
Base Price
$29.50
28
Base Price
$30.00
Suburban
Residential
Circulation:
59,000
Hilltowns
Base Price
$30.50
30
Base Price
$31.00
31
Base Price
$31.50
32
Base Price
$32.00
33
Base Price
$32.50
34
Base Price
$33.00
35
Base Price
$33.50
36
Base Price
$34.00
37
Base Price
$34.50
38
Base Price
$35.00
39
Base Price
$35.50
40
Base Price
$36.00
Buy the Quabbin Village Hills or
the Suburban Residential ZONE
for $26.00 for 20 words plus
50¢ for each additional word.
Add $10 for a second Zone
or add $15 to run in
ALL THREE ZONES.
Name: ____________________________________________________ Phone: ______________________
First ZONE base price ___________
Address: _______________________________________________________________________________
10.00
Add a second ZONE ___________
Town: _____________________________________________________ State:_______ Zip:_____________
$
5.00
Add a third ZONE ___________
Number of Weeks: _________________________________________ X per week rate = $______________
Subtotal ___________
Includes
additional words
$
Run my ad in the
following ZONE(s):
Quabbin
❏
❏ Check# ___________
x Number of Weeks ___________
Suburban
Card #: _________________________________________________________________________________
TOTAL Enclosed ___________
Hilltowns
Credit Card:
❏ MasterCard
❏ VISA
❏ Discover
❏ Cash
Amount of charge: ___________________________________________________ Date: _______________
❏
❏
OUR CLASSIFIEDS ARE ONLINE 24/7 AND REACH 50 COMMUNITIES EVERY WEEK!
Page 18 ◆ March 3, 2016
Positions available at
Professional Medical
Services, Inc.
Highest competitive rates &
mileage paid. EOE.
Call Denise. (413)289-9018
DRIVERS:
LOCAL
EXPERIENCED Yard Hostler Evening
Openings! Great Pay & Benefits!
CDL-A, 1yr Exp. Req. Estenson
Logistics Apply: www.goelc.com
1-855-416-8511
DRIVERS: QUALITY HOME time!
Earn over $1250+ per wk. +
Monthly
Bonuses!
Excellent
Benefits. No-Touch! CDL-A 1yr
exp. 888-406-9046
FOSTER CARE: YOU can help
change someone’s life. Provide a
safe home for children and teens
who have been abused or
neglected.
Call
Devereux
Therapeutic Foster Care at 413734-2493.
FULL TIME CARPET &
UPHOLSTERY CLEANERS
No experience necessary, will
train. Must be neat, clean,
dependable,
and
have
an
excellent driving record
Call 413-583-8333
INSTALLATION
APPRENTICE
WANTED. Willing to train the right
candidate to install wood and gas
stoves. Full time. Great benefit
package
including
medical
insurance. Must be good with
heights. Some heavy lifting
required. General contracting
experience preferred. Apply in
person Olde Hadleigh Hearth and
Patio, 119 Willimansett St, Rt 33,
South Hadley.
LANDSCAPER- THE GARDENS
of Wilbraham, an active adult
condo
community,
has
an
opportunity
for
a
per-diem
landscaper. Prior experience in
landscaping is a major plus. Must
possess excellent people skills
and be able to pass a background
check.
Interested
candidates
should send a resumé to: The
Maintenance
Director,
The
Gardens of Wilbraham, 2 Lodge
Lane, Wilbraham, Ma. 01095. Email;
[email protected]
com
Fax: 413-596-5320 EOE Managed
by Athena Health Care Systems
MAINTENANCE
MECHANICPOSITION available for hard
working, skilled individual with
strong home improvement and
handyman
experience,
multifamily residential. Full time
employment with benefits to the
right candidate. Fax or mail your
letter of interest and resumé to
APS, INC., 476 College Highway,
Southwick, MA/ Fax 413-5695854.
Circulation: 9,800
29
CNA’s, PCA’s, HHA’S,
SIGN ON BONUS
WAS BROTHERS CONSTRUCTION now taking applications for all
positions (skilled laborers, CDL
drivers and licensed equipment
operators). Applications accepted
9:00am- 2:00pm M-F at 2378
Boston Road, Wilbraham, MA
(413)599-1994
Health Care
GOT KNEE PAIN? Back Pain?
Shoulder Pain? Get a painrelieving brace at little or no cost
to you. Medicare Patients, call
Health Hotline now! (800)2796038.
Chicopee
Register
Buzzin’ from Town to Town
Classifieds
Turley Publications’ Community Marketplace
Real Estate
✦
www.turley.com
Mobile Homes
Real Estate
For Rent
CHICOPEE, SPACIOUS 1983 by
Hu-Ke-Lau, 2 bedrooms, 2 baths,
14’x70’, air, appliances, shingles,
sheds, corner lot $59,900.
413-593-9961
DASAP.MHVILLAGE.COM
TOOMEY-LOVETT
109 West St.
Ware, MA 01082
413-967-6326
800-486-2121
West Brookfield:
508-867-7064
JILL A. GRAVEL, BROKER
gravelrealestate.com
Thinking of
Selling?
Call us today
for a Free
Market Analysis
of your home!
Buy Now! BE IN FOR SPRING!
WARE: NEW To The Market, Best
three family on the market, in
great shape, also 2 car garage,
won’t last!!
Call for a market plan
to sell your property!
It’s EASY!!!
Dorrinda
O’Keefe-Shea
Jill Stolgitis
Mary Hicks
Alan Varnum
Bruce Martin
Joe Chenevert
Michael
McQueston
978-434-1990
413-477-8780
508-612-4794
508-867-2727
508-523-0114
508-331-9031
508-362-0533
Your Ad Could
be Here!!
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the Federal
Fair Housing Act of 1968, which makes
it illegal to advertise any preference,
limitation or discrimination based on
race, color, religion, sex, handicap,
familial status (number of children and
or pregnancy), national origin, ancestry,
age, marital status, or any intention to
make any such preference, limitation or
discrimination.
This newspaper will not knowingly accept
any advertising for real estate that is in
violation of the law. Our readers are hereby
informed that all dwellings advertising in
this newspaper are available on an equal
opportunity basis. To complain about
discrimination call The Department of
Housing and Urban Development “ HUD”
toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. For the N.E.
area, call HUD at 617-565-5308. The toll
free number for the hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.
967-7355
www.Century21ToomeyLovett.com
Make sure
to ask for
a Free One Year
Home Warranty
when you list your
home with any
Gravel RE Agent!
CONTACT US AT
[email protected]
7 days a week
for any of your
Real Estate Needs!
ALL REAL ESTATE advertised
herein is subject to the Federal
Fair Housing Act, which makes it
illegal
to
advertise
“any
preference,
limitation,
or
discrimination because of race,
color, religion, sex, handicap,
familial status, or national origin,
or intention to make any such
preference,
limitation,
or
discrimination.” We will not
knowingly accept any advertising
for real estate which is in violation
of the law. All persons are hereby
informed
that
all
dwellings
advertised are available on an
equal opportunity basis.
LUDLOW 2 BR modern apt, ac,
dishwasher plus all modern
appliances. Extra storage and
parking. $795 includes HW.
(413)342-7009
WARE- BEAUTIFUL, SUNNY 3
BR TOWNHOUSE APT. $850
plus utilities, w/d hook-up, storage.
No smoking, no pets. Credit
check/references (413)320-5784.
Call us toll free at 1-800-824-6548
Commercial Rentals
Vacation Rentals
WARM WEATHER IS year round
in Aruba. The water is safe, and
the dining is fantastic. Walk out to
the beach. 3-bedroom weeks
available. Sleeps 8. $3500. Email:
[email protected] for more
information.
FOR RENT
For Rent
REAL ESTATE
ASSOCIATES
✦
PALMER
PARKING
LOTBuilding Site, for lease 1-4 acres.
Commercial - Industrial Zone, with
frontage on Rte 20. 1 mile to Exit
8, Pike. $900/mo/acre (413)3489335
Autos Wanted
$$$ AUTOS WANTED TOP Dollar
paid for your unwanted cars,
trucks, vans, big and small,
running or not. Call 413-534-5400.
Commercial Rentals
OFFICE SPACE AVAILABLE
now. Will sub-divide. Space 720
sq.ft. and less. Lots of extras. All
utilities, low rent. Call Pete at EZ
Realty (413)283-6400, evenings
413-283-4356
OFFICE SPACE SOUTH Hadley
1100 sq. ft. with parking. 138
College St., South Hadley. Call Bill
(413)563-7154
or
Lisanne
(413)536-8560.
SOUTH HADLEY 2 BR, 3rd fl.
Heat & HW included. Appliances.
No pets. $800/ mo. 1st, last,
security dep. (413)427-9414.
Find local opportunities or
list your open positions here!
For
Rent
www.turley.com
Reaching our online readers and homes in
50 local communities every week.
ADVERTISER NEWS
23 Southwick Street
Feeding Hills, MA 01030
(413) 786-7747
Fax: (413) 786-8457
◗ THE BARRE
GAZETTE
5 Exchange Street
P. O. Box 448
Barre, MA 01005
(978) 355-4000
Fax: (978) 355-6274
◗ QUABOAG CURRENT
80 Main Street
Ware, MA 01082
(413) 967-3505
Fax: (413) 967-6009
◗ THE CHICOPEE
REGISTER
(413) 592-3599
Fax: (413) 592-3568
◗ COUNTRY JOURNAL ◗ THE REGISTER
P.O. Box 429, 5 Main Street
Huntington, MA 01050
(413) 667-3211
Fax: (413) 667-3011
◗ THE SUN
(413) 612-2310
Fax: (413) 592-3568
◗ THE JOURNAL
REGISTER
24 Water Street
Palmer, MA 01069
(413) 283-8393
Fax: (413) 289-1977
◗ THE SHOPPING
GUIDE
24 Water Street
Palmer, MA 01069
(413) 283-8393
Fax: (413) 289-1977
24 Water Street
Palmer, MA 01069
(413) 283-8393
Fax: (413) 289-1977
◗ THE SENTINEL
P. O. Box 601
10 South Main Street
Belchertown, MA 01007
(413) 323-5999
Fax: (413)323-9424
◗ SOUTHWICK
SUFFIELD NEWS
23 Southwick Street
Feeding Hills, MA 01030
(413) 786-7747
Fax: (413) 786-8457
◗ THE TOWN
REMINDER
138 College Street, Suite 2
So. Hadley, MA 01075
(413) 536-5333
Fax: (413) 536-5334
◗ WILBRAHAM
HAMPDEN TIMES
2341 Boston Rd.
Wilbraham, MA 01095
(413) 682-0007
Fax: (413) 682-0013
◗ THE TOWN
COMMON
24 Water Street
Palmer, MA 01069
(413) 283-8393
Fax: (413) 289-1977
Register
ar
CLASSIFIEDS
Deadlines:
The deadline for all print classified
ads in the Quabbin and Suburban
Zones is Friday at noon for publication
the following week. The deadline
for the Hill Towns Zone is Monday at
noon. All online ads will be published
for 7 days including the corresponding
print editions.
◗ THE WARE
RIVER NEWS
80 Main Street
Ware, MA 01082
(413) 967-3505
Fax: (413) 967-6009
Find quick links to our newspaper web sites at www.turley.com – Many are also on
Chicopee
best
ound
◗ AGAWAM
the
Our publications
www.turley.com
Email: [email protected]
©Turley Publications, Inc, and MediaSpan.
Powered by MediaSpan.
March 3, 2016 ◆
Page 19
library
from page 9
for Kids. Children enjoy
reading to trained pediatric therapy dogs. Studies
have proven that reading
to therapy dogs improves
children’s reading ability. Stanley and Sadie
provide the library with
happy times and lots of
wags. Stanley will be at
the library on Wednesday,
March 9 at 4 p.m. Sadie
will be at the library on
Wednesday, March 23 at 6
p.m. Appropriate for ages
5 through 12. Register by
calling, emailing or signing up and at the children’s desk. Registration
is required. This program
is for children 5 and up.
• REGISTRATION
for the April session of
Little Ones Lapsit and
Terrific Twos will be the
week of March 28 through
April 1.
• TERRIFIC TWOS
is a program tailored especially for the 2-year-old
child. This small group
introduces the child to
story time and includes a
short play time and sim-
ple craft. Registration is
required for each fourweek session. Terrific
Twos will be held on
Wednesdays at 10:30
a.m. and on the following
dates: March 9, 16, and
23.
• The Chicopee Public
Library has a LEGO
BLOCK PARTY scheduled for Monday, March
14 at 3:30 p.m. This is a
WANT MORE
OUT OF THIS
CARD?
social and creative experience for children ages
6 to 12. Registration is
required.
Programs for Teens:
For students in middle
and high school
• TEEN TECH CLUB
TINKERCAD will be
held on Thursdays, March
3, 17, and 31 at 3 p.m.
Learn to use 3D modeling software Tinkercad to
make things to print on
the 3D printer. This program is open to students
in middle and high school.
Register by calling or
stopping by the children’s
desk. Teen Tech Club is
brought to the public by
federal funds from the
Institute on Museum
and Library Services
administered through the
Massachusetts Board of
Library Commissioners.
• ANIME CLUB will
be held on Thursdays,
March 10 and March 24
at 3 p.m. The program is
open to those ages 13 and
up. Read Manga, watch
anime, draw, discuss, and
do activities based on fandom and Japanese culture.
• GAMING DAY will
be held on Wednesday,
March 23 at 3 p.m. Play
WiiU on the big screen.
Participants are encouraged to bring their DS for
eight-player Smash Bros.
• SPRING TEEN
ART SERIES is coming
soon. Stay tuned for workshops on painting, collage,
and pastels.
Scouts get a taste
of the world…
GET THIS
CARD.
Sign up for Commonwealth Care Alliance.
If you’re 65 or older and have MassHealth Standard, you can
get more benefits with our Senior Care Options program all at $0 cost to you.
MH_PA0001 APPROVED
• Dental care including dentures
• Prescription and over-the-counter drugs
• Eyeglasses and hearing aids
Call now at 877-780-4711 (TTY 711),
Monday through Friday 8AM-8PM, or
visit commonwealthcarealliance.org.
Senior Care Options program is a plan with a contract with the Commonwealth of Massachusetts
/EOHHS Medicaid program. Enrollment in Senior Care Options program depends on contract
renewal. Enrollment is voluntary. The benefit information provided is a brief summary, not a
complete description of benefits. For more information, contact the plan. Limitations,
copayments, and restrictions may apply. Benefits, formulary, pharmacy network, and/or
provider network may change January 1 of each year. You must continue to pay your
Medicare Part B premium if it is not paid on your behalf.
Turley Publications submitted photos
CHICOPEE – Girl Scout Troop 64583 earned part of
their world thinking day badge by visiting the chef
rich at Log Cabin facilities in Holyoke and trying different flavors from select countries. Among the dishes on the menu were quiche, pizza, and pierogies.
Southview Cape Southview Garden
Master
Bedroom
Patio
Bedroom
Bath
Great Room
Upper Family
Room
Master Bath
Dining
Bedroom and bathroom
suites on first and second
floors continue to make this
our most popular plan.
energy efficient construction
attached garage
private basement with large windows
full appliance suite
granite, hardwood, AC & more!
Kitchen
Garage
Open to below
Closet
With
first floor
master suite
$264,900
www.southviewcondo.com • 413-589-7462
353 Fuller Street • Ludlow Massachusetts
Page 20 ◆ March 3, 2016
Family
Room
Master
Bedroom
Dining
Master
Bath
All your living on
one spacious floor.
This is the last of six garden units built.
Don’t miss this great opportunity to live
in Ludlow’s first open space neighborhood.
With privacy like no other condominium
and only minutes from all major shopping
centers, schools and highways.
energy efficient construction
attached garage
private basement with large windows
full appliance suite
granite, hardwood, AC & more!
Kitchen
Garage
Bedroom
$279,900
www.southviewcondo.com • 413-589-7462
353 Fuller Street • Ludlow Massachusetts
Chicopee
Register

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