MAKERSof BURNIE - Discover Burnie

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MAKERSof BURNIE - Discover Burnie
meet the
MAKERS of BU
BURNIE
IE
tasmania
2010/2011
There’s a story around every corner...
BURNIE FACT FILE
POPULATION: About 20,000
LOCATION: North West Tasmania, on Bass Strait
Tasmania’s most westerly city
CLIMATE: Cool temperate
AVERAGE RAINFALL: 970mm per annum
LONGITUDE: 145°
LATITUDE: 41°
CLOSEST AIRPORT: Burnie Airport
CLOSEST PASSENGER SEAPORT: Devonport
CLOSEST INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT: Melbourne
MEDIAN HOUSE PRICE (2010): $228,000 AUD
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PAPER
MAKERS
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MAKERS’
WORKSHOP
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IT ALL BEGAN…
At least 12,000 years ago the first Tasmanians walked across a land
bridge before the rising seas flooded the Bassian Plain in The Great
South Land, creating Bass Strait and the island of Tasmania.
For the next 12,000 years the descendents of these original 4000-5000
aboriginal people hunted and gathered, largely without tools and weapons.
They had to carry fire sticks, because it is believed they did not have the
knowledge of lighting fire.
Tasmania was unknown, until it was “discovered” by a Dutch seaman,
Abel Tasman, in 1642. Claimed by Captain James Cook in 1770,
British sovereignty was asserted when the first settlement in Tasmania
was established in 1803 on the Derwent River.
In 1828 London-based Van Diemen’s Land Company chose Burnie as
a settlement site because of its port, and a home was carved out of
the huge eucalypt forests of Emu Bay. Like all pioneers these first white
settlers were makers.
For the next 100 years the port of Burnie shipped timbers, minerals and
produce from the region,
and the people of Burnie made things.
They made paper and pulp from the timber, they made chemicals for
paint products, they made acids for industry, and in keeping with the
technologies of their time, they made a mess of their environment.
In the early 1990s Burnie’s generational reliance on big companies was
shaken to the core, when several companies closed under the pressure
of global markets and environmental issues.
The people of Burnie were desperate to find a new way of looking at
things. Upon reflection, they imagined an alternative future for the town
and their families and set about making it happen. They cleaned up the
environment and looked at the past, present and to the people who most
inspired them. The Makers.
These days, the people of Burnie make giant machines to mine ore and
specialised machinery for aquaculture and agriculture.
They produce wonderful cheese, single malt whisky and milk. They make
delicious and healthy things to eat from local produce. They make paper
by hand from recycled materials, and they make inspirational and
functional artworks inspired by the natural and industrial environment.
They make a noise at performances and footy matches and make peace
in natural places of reflection and recreation. They make time to look out
for each other and improve their environment.
The people of Burnie have interesting stories to tell and invite you to
discover them for yourself.
WHISKY
MAKERS
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CHEESE
MAKERS
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GARDEN
MAKERS
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BURROW
MAKERS
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HISTORY
MAKERS
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MEET THE
MAKERS
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BURNIE
MAP
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WHERE TO
STAY
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BURNIE
A PAPER TOWN
BURNIE TODAY
Burnie is Tasmania’s most westerly city, located on the North West
Coast about 40 minutes from Devonport. It has a northerly aspect
and is nestled around Emu Bay on Bass Strait.
The 20,000 residents enjoy a vibrant shopping district that
spills onto the beach for seafood and coffee. Burnie has
surprising restaurants and cafés to linger in. It has a dynamic
cultural life, galleries, performances, exhibitions and community
events.
Fantastic food is made in Burnie like whisky and cheese. The best
milk in the world for cheese making is produced in the area.
There are well stocked delis to tempt you with gourmet treats.
Burnie’s hills hide impressive gardens and parks, and it is
surrounded by beautiful beaches, sparkling water and fresh air.
In some areas people live in perfect art deco or federation homes
and public spaces featuring buildings by contemporary Tasmanian
architects and designers.
But there is no escaping the presence of a busy container port, the
rail hub or the factory framework lining the highway around Emu
Bay on the eastern approach to Burnie. A factory which evolved over
75 years manufacturing high volumes of paper for world markets.
In its hey day The Pulp employed 3500 people, and after 75 years
of supporting the families of Burnie, the mill finally ceased
operation in June 2010.
BUT PAPER IS STILL MADE IN BURNIE
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CREATIVE PAPER IS STILL
MADE IN BURNIE
In the 1990s Creative Paper began as a Work for the Dole
project, exploring paper making by hand, using traditional
methods and unique local fibres.
Fibres as unique as roo poo and wombat poo, apple pulp,
lavender and rainforest leaves. All manner of plants and
recycled materials can be used to make paper if they have the
right properties.
Expertise has been developed and techniques refined over the
years and Creative Paper now produces a range of value added
items for specialist markets. The beautiful folios, journals, cards
and paper products are produced by hand from a range of
unique papers hand made in Burnie.
Creative Paper has, over time, become the nucleus for all
manner of orbiting artists and creative ideas. In November 2009
Creative Paper moved from its old factory home to be front and
centre at Burnie’s new visitor centre, the Makers’ Workshop.
No
Not only do we get to make paper but we get to
experiment with new fibres and colours. Every sheet we
make is unique and individual.
I love explaining the process to visitors who take the tour,
because most people can relate to some aspect of it.
They get something out of it and are happier for their
experience.
ce.
DARREN SIMPSON
paper maker
PAPER PEOPLE MAKERS
Artists, Pam Thorne and Ruth Rees collaborated on
numerous large papier maché projects in Burnie
between 1996 and 2007, before continuing with their
individual arts practices.
You can find their life sized papier maché sculptures
at the Makers’ Workshop, Burnie Regional Art Gallery,
Hellyers Road Distillery, Pioneer Village Museum and
the Burnie City Council offices.
PAPER MAKING TOUR
You are invited to keep the Burnie paper making
tradition alive and try your hand at making paper
with the support of experienced and informative
paper makers at the Makers’ Workshop.
Learn the art of making paper by hand, and leave
your watermark on your own unique sheet when
you take the paper making tour.
TOUR DEPARTURE TIMES DAILY
9:15am
12:45pm
3:45pm
10:00am
1:30pm
4:30pm
TOUR COSTS
Adults
Children (5-14)
Concession
Family (2Ad + 2Ch)
Groups of 10+
10:45am
2:15pm
11:30am
3:00pm
$15
$8
$12
$40
$10pp
T: 03 6430 5830
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MAKERS’ WORKSHOP
WHERE IT ALL COMES TOGETHER
MAKERS’ WORKSHOP
The stark architectural lines of Burnie’s newest visitor attraction
dominate the western end of Burnie’s main beach. Recently opened,
this contemporary structure is a new concept for Burnie – part
museum, part arts centre and part visitor information centre.
The Makers’ Workshop is a place that honours Burnie’s history,
makers, innovators and artists. It includes the visitor information
centre, a café, gallery and gift shop, a paper making workshop,
interpretative displays and working artists.
Since the 1930s no matter where Burnie was on its journey
through existence, its fate has been wrapped in paper. Stories of
those paper making connections and The Pulp are told at the
Makers’ Workshop.
Significant moments in Burnie’s history are etched onto the glass
case surrounding Burnie’s town clock. This clock was originally
installed in the Burnie Town Hall tower in 1913 as a memorial for
one of Burnie’s favourite sons, Captain William Jones.
The clock tower served as a landmark for more than six decades
until the town hall site was redeveloped in 1976. It was kept in
storage at the museum until restoration and installation in the
Makers’ Workshop in 2009.
The clock is a marker of time and in this case has been used as
a vehicle to tell the significant moments in time from Burnie’s
settlement to its development into one of Australia’s largest
container ports.
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MAKERS’ STUDIOS
Depending on the day, there may be one or several makers
working on site at the Makers’ Workshop, producing any number
of interesting things, including papier maché sculptures, hand
woven baskets, glass beads, jewellery, hats, paintings, prints,
wood work, violins, glass ware and of course paper.
In total there are five studio spaces (with four of them looking
suspiciously like converted shipping containers) located
throughout Makers’ Workshop.
You are encouraged to meet the Makers and have a conversation
about what they’re making or see their objects for sale in the
gift shop. The gift shop sells products from over 50 Tasmanian
artists, makers and suppliers as well as imported items.
ELPHINSTONE
R1500 LHD LOADER
At the Makers’ Workshop you can find the first loadhaul-dump (LHD) purpose designed underground loader,
designed by Dale Elphinstone and his team at their
Burnie engineering facility.
At the time it was designed there was nothing like it
in the world. It met the need for a machine that could
extract ore from underground mines and haul it long
distances. International success led to a range of
loaders, trucks and other hard rock mining machinery,
later marketed by the giant Caterpillar Corporation.
Still operating in Burnie as Caterpillar Underground
Mining, the company sells its equipment world wide and
provides jobs for hundreds of people.
VISITOR INFORMATION CENTRE
About 40 volunteers are rostered to the
information counter and help visitors with
enquiries about Burnie and travels throughout
the region and Tasmania.
MAKERS’ WORKSHOP
SKILLED VOLUNTEERS
In Studio One, skilled volunteers spend hours constructing
by hand a beautiful range of albums, folios, journals,
and cards. Visitors are welcome into the studio for a
closer look and a friendly conversation.
2 Bass Highway, Burnie
Reception T: 03 6430 5831
Café T: 03 6430 5884
Tours T: 03 6430 5830
E: [email protected]
Open: Daily from 9:00am to 5:00pm
(Closed Christmas Day, Boxing Day, New Year’s Day,
Good Friday and ANZAC Day)
Cost: Entry to the Makers’ Workshop is free.
There is a fee for the paper making tours.
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WHISKY MAKERS
TAKE A DRIVE AROUND
Not only are there interesting things to see in
Burnie itself, but if you drive along the Surrey
Trail into the surrounding hills you can discover
fabulous cheese, a whisky distillery, gardens, an
alpaca park and fly fishing dams.
COFFEE MAKERS
Burnie has surprising restaurants and cafés to linger in.
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Makers’ Workshop
Little Penguin Observation Centre
Burnie Regional Art Gallery
Pioneer Village Museum
Round Hill Lookout
Fernglade Platypus Trail
Tasmanian Cheese Tasting Centre
Hellyers Road Whisky Distillery
Emu Valley Rhododendron Garden
Guide Falls
Guide Falls Alpaca and Animal Park
Natone Hills Fly Fishery
Upper Natone Reserve
As soon as coffee is in your system, there is a
general commotion. Ideas begin to move... discussions
arise and conversation ceases to be a struggle.
gle.
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1 3
4
To Stanley
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Fernglade
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Stowport
Natone
Ridgley
11 10
ver
West
Ridgley
iver
Emu R
Visitors can experience the distilling process first hand with an
interpretative behind the scenes tour. Whisky tasting is a must,
then relax in the café overlooking the lush pastures of Emu Valley.
To Devonp
port
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Blythe Ri
On the 29th January 1999 the first barrel of whisky was filled
at Hellyers Road Distillery. The single malt whisky has its own
distinct Tasmanian flavour, attributed to the clean local water
and high quality ingredients.
Upper
Burnie
iver
am R
HELLYERS ROAD DISTILLERY
Burnie
Centre
To Penguin
HELLYERS ROAD DISTILLERY
Upper
Natone
12 13
153 Old Surrey Road, Burnie
T: 03 6433 0439
Open: 7 days 10:00am to 4:30pm (closed public holidays)
Entry into the distillery café and gift shop is free but charges
apply to the daily distillery tours, which include whisky tasting.
Tewkesbury
Hampshire
To West Coast &
Cradle Mountain
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The salt laden atmosphere, temperate
climate, clean air, clear water and lush
pastures allow the dairy herds to graze
all year round.. An environment nothing
short of perfect for cheese making.
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MILK MAKERS
THE BURNIE
FARMERS’ MARKET
About 30 stallholders gather together early on the
first, third and fifth Saturday mornings of each
month to sell their freshest and best produce to
the local community.
The market is located at the southern end of the
Wivenhoe Showground with vehicular access via
Smith Street. There’s ample parking on
site, but remember the early bird catches the
worm, and the market finishes at about 12:00pm.
TASTE OUR CHEESE
See what all the fuss is about...
Visitors can taste our cheese for themselves at
The Cheese Tasting Centre.
CHEESE MAKERS
The secret to making world-class cheese is using world-class
full cream milk.
Our local cheese plant sources milk from about 100 dairy
farms, within a 120 kilometre radius of Burnie. It is superb dairy
country. The salt-laden atmosphere, temperate climate, clean air,
clear water and lush pastures allow the dairy herds to graze
all year round. An environment nothing short of perfect for
cheese making.
The facility was founded in 1955 by Milan Vyhnalek, a
Czechoslovakian migrant whose vision was to make great
cheese in the tradition of the master cheese makers of Europe.
Now owned by National Foods, the factory produces some of
Australia’s most loved cheese brands, including the multi-award
winning cheeses of Tasmanian Heritage, the broad appeal and
mild flavours of Australian Gold as well as the sharp and crumbly
cheddars of Mersey Valley.
It has an exemplary team of dedicated technical employees,
many of whom are now second and third generation cheese
makers, and some, who have brought their master cheese
making skills from as far away as France and Switzerland.
From rich, creamy Camemberts, to sweet, intense Blues and
uniquely sharp Cheddars, our brands are widely recognised for
their quality and success. Just recently Tasmanian Heritage’s
Red Square Washed Rind took home the coveted title of Grand
Champion Cheese at the recent Australian Grand Dairy Awards.
Discover for yourself how wonderful these delicious cheeses are
by visiting the Cheese Tasting Centre in Burnie.
There is a wide selection of specialty cheeses
from the premium range, as well as odd shaped
cheese at factory prices. Cheese samples
are available for free tastings and fantastic,
perfectly ripe cheeses are ready for you to buy
and eat today.
You can grab a ploughman’s lunch in, or a picnic
basket to take out.
THE CHEESE TASTING CENTRE
145 Old Surrey Road, Burnie
T: 03 6433 9255
Open: 7 Days, Monday to Friday 9:00am to 5:00pm
Weekends and public holidays 10:00am to 4:00pm
(Closed Good Friday, Christmas and Boxing Day)
Cheese tasting finishes ½ hour prior to closing
Shhh...
CHEESE BUYERS’ TIPS
• The Cheese Tasting Centre sales assistants
are very knowledgeable about their products.
Ask them for their advice if you are unsure.
• Ask about the perfect date to eat
your cheese.
• Look out for the specials. There are some great
bargains to be found in the dairy cases, at
factory outlet prices.
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GARDEN MAKERS
EMU VALLEY
RHODODENDRON GARDEN
Emu Valley Rhododendron Garden has about 20,000 plants on
an 11ha landscaped site just 8km south of Burnie. Surrounded
by native bushland and laced with lakes, wildlife, waterways,
bridges and design features, this beautiful garden is a place for
relaxation and contemplation.
The location’s unique temperate climate makes it one of
the only known places where the entire range of the world’s
rhododendrons can be grown in the same garden.
The first rhododendrons were planted in 1981 by volunteers
who have continued to develop the garden. It now features a
tea room overlooking the valley and some fabulous private
picnic spots.
EMU VALLEY RHODODENDRON GARDEN
55 Breffny Road, Burnie
T: 03 6433 1805 M: 0438 330 478
Open: 7 days in season (August to the end of April)
9:00am to 5:00pm,
Cost: An entry fee applies, children are free
Ih
have enjoyed seeing that original vision shared with
friends over 30 years ago, become a reality. I get a great
deal of pleasure from being there. It’s a beautiful place
and it’s out in the open.
ope
en
en.
MAURICE KUPSCH
KUP
PSCH
garden maker
aker
GUIDE FALLS ALPACA
AND ANIMAL PARK
Carolyne Menzies and her family run the Guide Falls
Alpaca and Animal Park, which is a fully working stud
farm with 80 alpacas located next to Guide Falls, about
15 minutes drive south of Burnie.
The $5 fee includes guided tour of a working farm to
see alpacas, birds, peacocks, rabbits, ferrets, sheep,
goats, trout and other animals. You can enjoy a cuppa
in the tea room and explore the gift shop which has an
extensive range of alpaca fleece, yarn and garments.
GUIDE FALLS ALPACA AND ANIMAL PARK
309 West Ridgley Road, West Ridgley
T: 03 6435 7535
Open: Daily 9:30am to 5:00pm
(closed Christmas Day and Good Friday)
NATONE HILLS FLY FISHERY
Tours Cost: $5 per adult and $2 per child
Natone Hills Fly Fishery is located 18km south of Burnie at Upper
Natone. The dams are well stocked with a variety of
good sized healthy rainbow and brown trout. Visitors can
experience fly fishing all year round in this private fishery
(No licence is required).
Alp
Alpaca hair is a hollow fibre, which makes it
lighter and warmer than sheep’s wool. Once you
have knitted with alpaca yarn, it is difficult to go
back to using other fibres because it is so soft
and easy to work with.
ith.
The shoreline has no hazards making it comfortable for
experienced fishermen and beginners. Gear hire and group
lessons are available. Day visitors are welcomed or you can
stay overnight.
CAROLYNE MENZIES
spinner and garment maker
You can go bushwalking, platypus spotting and bird watching if
fishing isn’t your thing, and enjoy the sights and sounds of the
native wildlife.
NATONE HILLS FLY FISHERY
Greta Road, Upper Natone
T: 03 6436 2357 or 03 6436 2181
Open: Daily 10:00am to 5:00pm or by arrangement.
Bookings preferred
Cost: From $50 per day
GUIDE FALLS
Located at West Ridgley about 19km south of Burnie,
Guide Falls is the most accessible waterfall in the
Burnie hinterland.
There are two picnic areas and walking tracks to enjoy.
The falls have water year round but are most
spectacular in winter and spring.
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BURROW MAKERS:
BACK FROM THE BRINK
In the mid 1980s rock anthems heralded Burnie’s
environmental shame across Australia. Bass Strait,
FERNGLADE PLATYPUS TRAIL
surrounding Burnie, was red with pigment from the paint
Fernglade has a reputation for being one of the most
factory, acid rain etched cars, sulphur steam spewed from
factory chimneys and chemicals infected our waterways.
reliable places for observing platypus in the wild in
Tasmania. A place decorated by nature with moss and
ferns. A place of quiet contemplation, investigation
and observation.
And, apart from the town’s reputation, Burnie’s burrow makers
At Fernglade an interesting interpretative trail has been
suffered more than most. Sensitive little penguins and
developed along the riverbank linking two picnic areas.
platypus were not built for survival in polluted environments.
By the mid 1990s, after a disastrous mill strike and several
factory closures, with population declining and few prospects,
the people of Burnie embarked upon a journey to re-invent
their future.
One of the things they universally loved about Burnie was
its wildlife, especially the little penguins and the platypus.
So they started the rehabilitation process.
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The water is clean, although stained by the natural
tannin, and platypus thrive there. Platypus are best
viewed in the morning or evening.
Tasmania is the only state of
Australia with clearly defined
biogeographical boundaries.
The variety of fauna is
limited compared with that
of mainland Australia, but is
prolific in numbers and rich
in archaic and endemic forms.
LITTLE PENGUIN
OBSERVATION CENTRE
The Little Penguin Observation Centre was constructed at
Parsonage Point on the western end of West Beach, but not
before hundreds of penguin igloo apartments were hand
made and cleverly located by local volunteers. Their latest
project involves rebuilding native sea bird habitat further west.
Around dusk, from November to April, little penguins noisily
waddle ashore to nest in their burrows, and every evening
during the season Friends of Burnie Penguins offer free
interpretative tours for visitors.
It may not have seemed possible once, but Burnie
has cleaned up its act when it comes to our burrowing
neighbours, with the help of a clear vision and thousands
of volunteer hours.
LITTLE PENGUIN FACTS
The Little Penguin Observation Centre is located on the
(Fairy Penguins or Eudyptula minor)
western end of West Beach linked to the city via a
• These flightless seabirds are the smallest of
all penguins.
beach boardwalk.
• They are found along the southern Australian
coastline and breed in colonies.
• They are perfectly adapted to life at sea and can
easily dive to 30 metres.
• They live on small school fish, krill and squid.
• They usually return to their burrows within an hour
of darkness and flock ashore because there is
safety in numbers.
• See them in Burnie from November to April.
FREE GUIDED TOURS
From October to February Friends of Burnie Penguins
offer free Penguin Interpretation Tours. Go to the Little
e ho
Penguin Observation Centre about one
hour after dusk.
T: 0437 436 803
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HISTORY MAKERS
PIONEER VILLAGE MUSEUM
A charming c1900 Federation streetscape has been frozen in
time at Burnie’s Pioneer Village Museum. See how ordinary
people lived 100 years ago with a street full of stores and
rooms that provide a window into lives past. A time when
Burnie was prospering and reaping the benefits of the West
Coast mineral boom.
Each of the stores in the street features a trade or profession
important to the functioning of a pioneering community. There
is a saddlery and a boot maker’s shop, a blacksmith’s forge, a
printer, photographer and even a dentist.
Discover the personal treasures and memorabilia, tools of
trade and goods that were made and sold in the era. It is
easy to get lost in the charm and detail of the grocery store
and boarding house or be relieved that as far as kitchen and
laundry appliances go, things have moved on significantly
over the past 100 years.
THE PIONEER VILLAGE MUSEUM
Little Alexander Street, Burnie
T: 03 6430 5746
Open: Monday to Friday 10:00am to 3:00pm
Cost: Adults $6.00, Concession $4.50, Children $2.50
FINDING THE UNIQUE BUYS
If you are interested in purchasing or looking at
works by local artists, some of Burnie’s cafes
and restaurants feature changing exhibitions of
local work.
These include Rialto Gallery Restaurant,
Muddled, Hot Mother Lounge, Reino’s and
Around the Corner Eatery.
Makers’ Workshop, Burnie Regional Art Gallery
and Indigo House also sell local art work in their
retail outlets.
Be sure to keep your eyes and ears open for
other great places to shop.
GLASS MAKER
BURNIE REGIONAL
ART GALLERY
Established in 1978, this substantial regional gallery
serves the north-west and west coasts of Tasmania.
In its two largest exhibition spaces the gallery presents a
vibrant and varied exhibitions program of art and craft
made by talented Tasmanian and other Australian artists.
The Gallery has a fine permanent collection, and the
focus is on works on paper, including many fine prints by
some of Australia’s most famous artists. This reflects the
importance of the paper industry in Burnie’s past history.
BURNIE REGIONAL ART GALLERY
Burnie Arts & Function Centre, Wilmot St, Burnie
T: 03 6430 5875
Open: Monday to Friday 10:00am to 4:30pm
Weekends and public holidays 1:30pm to 4:30pm
Cost: Admission into the gallery is free
DEAN WALKER DESIGNS
In 2006 Dean Walker won the Australian Jeweller of
the Year award. After 20 years in the jewellery trade, he
opened his own workshop and retail space in Burnie.
His Columnar Court gallery features a fantastic collection
of works from Tasmanian artists, including hiss own
exquisite jewellery.
DEAN WALKER DESIGNS
Shop 6 Columnar Court, Burnie
T: 03 6432 3022
Open: Monday to Friday 9:00am to 5:30pm
Saturday 9:00am to 2:00pm
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meet the MAKERS of
DARREN SIMPSON
DEAN JUPP
JAN MARINOS
Darren has been making paper at Creative
Paper since it started.
Burnie born Dean has been a paper maker
since 2000. When he first started his
mentorship at Creative Paper he found it
extraordinary that you could make different
papers from plant fibres.
As a paper maker artist, the process of
observing, collecting and experimenting with
fibres inspires me to learn new ways of
making art. To tell a story; to recall beautiful
places I have been and memorable experiences
I would like to share.
paper maker
In 1996 he joined a training scheme getting
long term unemployed people ready for work
and has been making paper by hand ever since.
I was born in Burnie and now I have my own
family here. I am really proud of Creative Paper
and what it has become. I feel a part of it,
because in a small way I helped to build it.
T: 03 6430 5830
paper maker
The visitors are fascinated by the roo poo
and wombat skat paper, but my favourites are
the coloured cotton papers, cordeline and red
hot poker papers. For me it’s all about the
colour that different raw materials can create.
T: 03 6430 5830
paper maker and textile artist
Jan now lives in north west Tasmania. She is an
art teacher specialising in paper making and
has her own arts practice.
She collects little bits of Tasmania and
incorporates them into her art work.
www.tasmanianhandmadepaper.com
JANINE MORRIS
KIT HILLER
MARY LEWIS
Janine’s pockets are always full of treasure.
She loves collecting both natural and man-made
materials on beaches, in forests and on farms.
Kit has been painting and printing for as long as
she can remember and exhibiting for 25 years.
She has won the Portia Geach Memorial Award
(Australia’s most prestigious women’s portrait
prize) in 2009, 1987 and 1986.
Mary made her first glass beads in the late
1970s in the USA. Since 2004, she has lived in
Tasmania where she creates beautiful beads
and wearable art using the finest Venetian
Murano glass and specialty glass from around
the world.
fibre artist
She sees beauty in old rope, driftwood and the
beach glass and ceramic - tumbled for a lifetime
- from broken to beautiful.
The endless possibilities for combining
natural dyes, silk, paper and found objects
is fascinating to me. Collecting and making
baskets, jewellery and clothes is how I express
my connection to the places I love.
www.secondsister.com.au
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painter and print maker
My work is very closely connected to my
everyday life. I am inspired by the plants and
birds from my garden and the landscapes are of
places I go.
www.kithiller.com
glass bead maker
At the torch, the molten glass speaks to
something deep within me; time stops, the
outside world ceases to be, and I’m swept away
in the alchemy of colours, flame and my own
creative journey.
E: [email protected]
BURNIE tasmania
...where will the stories take you?
RUTH REES
PAM THORNE
FRANKIE GOODWIN
Ruth was part of an extraordinary 10 year
collaboration with Pam Thorne which created
the life sized papier maché sculptures at
Creative Paper.
A life time of making things led to painting and
finally to papier maché, where in 1998 a joint
project with fellow painter Ruth Rees, saw an
extraordinary collaboration that lasted 10 years
and created a small population of life sized
paper people.
Frankie’s collaboration with papier maché artist
Pam Thorne on a number of projects led to a
fascination and love of paper and its potential.
papier maché artist
Her individual work is often a female figure and
sometimes performance musicians, because of
a fascination with the interaction of the body
and the instrument.
To be able to make an idea emerge out of
paper is very satisfying.
papier maché artist
I am addicted to the papier maché art form
and have enjoyed collaborating on the larger
projects but now I am exploring individual ideas
in my work.
E: [email protected]
SUSAN McARTHUR
milliner
Susan is studying contemporary art at the
University of Tasmania and she is mad about
hats.
In 1990 Susan started making hats and has
just never stopped.
Her current work has a strong military influence
but she also draws inspiration from the plants in
her Tasmanian country garden.
I love making hats and I love wearing hats.
A hat says stop! I am here. So make a stand
and wear a hat.
GREG LING
woodcraftsman and
instrument maker
Greg grew up fiddling with bits of wood and
whittling with his pocket knife, but it wasn’t until
his early 30s that he started getting serious
about wood turning and instrument making.
Working with wood it very tactile and soothing.
Huon pine is my favourite timber because it is
the most unique of all the Tasmanian timbers,
but they all have their own unique properties.
paper sculptor
She uses a combination of handmade paper
and recycled materials to create paper jewellery,
delicate lamps and other functional objects.
I love the idea of taking something familiar
and turning it into something beautiful. I
choose paper because it is so versatile. The
possibilities are endless!
ss!
www.handmadepaperartists.com
MAUDIE BRYAN
glass artist
I work from my studio at Chasm Creek,
east of Burnie, nestled between the bush
and Bass Strait. Most of my work has some
visual connection with the sea and natural
environment.
When Maudie first embarked on the journey
of making her living from arts, her plan was
to share her fun creations with people and,
through her work, to make them smile.
E: [email protected]
www.susanmcarthur.com.au
19
meet the MAKERS of
OBIE
ANNE DUNHAM
LUCIA LEON
Obie is a self-taught artist who has been
painting most of his life.
Anne has been teaching art in North West
Tasmanian schools for 20 years. She has been
a glass artist for 12 years.
Lucia began her journey with ceramics in 2004,
but she has been making things and teaching
craft for many years.
I create functional items and sculptures
using glass complimented with metal and
Tasmanian timbers. The main influence of
my work is centred on our beautiful natural
environment, including the microscopic world.
Her works combine elements of her South
American heritage with the colours of her
new home. Her brightly coloured ceramics
depict her friends and her love of the natural
environment.
I love working with glass because it is such an
alluring medium, it luminates and glows.
love vibrant and energetic colours because
I lo
they represent life and happiness from where I
come from.
om.
picture maker
His paintings feature gorgeous colours with
whimsical characters (mostly women) often flying
around landscapes of rocks, moons and flowers.
I paint girls because I like the flow of their
hair, legs and dresses. I like the female form in
all its shapes and sizes.
I’m often inspired by rocky outcrops or rocky
coastlines, but mainly the ideas for my paintings
come from my imagination.
glass artist
T: 0438 371 787
E: [email protected]
www.obieart.com
RITCHIE ARÉS DOÑA
JOAN KELLY
JUNE HOPE
Woven fibres patterned the childhood of Ritchie
growing up in the Philippines where homes and
everyday utensils and packaging was woven
from fronds and leaves.
If you have no TV when you’re growing up
you learn quickly to entertain yourself. I draw
and I’ve been drawing and teaching art all my
life.
His work uses the patterns of his childhood and
the found objects of his present, transforming
discarded books and brochures into intricate
conical forms.
I used to paint very large prints, but before
painting each one, I’d prepare a miniature. I
have been painting them now for 20 years.
June discovered felt making in hometown
Melbourne and after a “Tree Change” in 2007
found her living in North West Tasmania, she
started exploring the medium. She now makes
fabulous felt objects from the fleece of her own
alpacas which she combines with silk and other
natural fibres.
paper folder
There’s a fantastic freedom in looking at
discarded objects with fresh eyes and seeing
their possibilities.
E: [email protected]
20
ceramicist
miniaturist
Joan is inspired by her Tasmanian environment
and regularly paints with students and friends in
the Burnie community.
T: 03 6431 6419
felt maker
Felting is an ancient technique that I use to
make contemporary wearable art. The process
is very tactile and physical and combines my
love of colour, fabric and texture.
E: [email protected]
BURNIE tasmania
...where will the stories take you?
MARIA PÉREZ-PULIDO
luthier
Maria grew up in the Canary Islands. At age 23
she was accepted to the Stradivari school of
violin making, Italy, graduating as a Luthier on
completion. In 1993 she migrated to Australia,
moving to Tasmania in 2005.
Here I have been able to tap into my creative
energy through the Tasmanian environment.
You just can’t do that in a big city.
Maria is currently doing her PhD, researching
the values of Tasmanian timber for violin
making.
DEAN WALKER
MARK LITTLER
In 2006 Dean was acclaimed Australian
Jeweller of the Year and he opened his own
workshop and gallery in Burnie.
There are three things I love about my job
making premium single malt whisky in Burnie,
the people, the process and the products. The
process has some similarities with processing
milk.
jewellery maker
Dean has a passion for his Tasmanian lifestyle,
and a desire to work with other makers of fine
art; a collection of which can be found
in his galley. Dean has an eye for beautiful
things and an imagination full of designs for
exquisite jewellery.
Dean Walker Designs
T: 03 6432 3022 – See page 17
www.stringsandtassiewood.com.au
whisky maker
Our single malt whisky has its own distinct
Tasmanian flavour. We use malted barley, the
best grade of oak timber in our bourbon casks,
clean local water and our own QA process to
produce our premium products.
Hellyers Road Distillery
T: 03 6433 0439 – see page 9
NEIL THORNE
MAURICE KUPSCH
CAROLYNE MENZIES
Neil started repairing and making molds and
decals in 1998 when he was a volunteer at
Creative Paper.
Maurice is one of a dedicated group of
volunteers and plant enthusiasts who have
spent the past 30 years creating the Emu Valley
Rhododendron Garden just south of Burnie.
Carolyne and her family run the Guide Falls
Alpaca and Animal Park, which is a working stud
farm with 80 alpacas and many other animals.
mold and decal maker
They are an essential part of the hand made
paper process, used to provide an edge to the
liquid pulp as it forms a sheet of paper.
One of my molds and decals should last a
lifetime. They’re made from Tasmanian celery
pine with non corrosive mesh, screws and trim.
They can withstand a life time in water.
E: [email protected]
garden maker
The temperate climate, makes it one of the
only known places where all the world’s
rhododendrons can be grown in the same garden.
spinner and garment maker
Only the best alpaca fleece is used for
spinning. The fibre is hand spun into hanks of
yarn and then knitted into garments.
I get a great deal of pleasure from being
there. It’s a beautiful place and it’s out in
the open.
I find the process of spinning very relaxing.
Once you start to spin nothing else matters,
it’s just you, the wheel, the wool and the world
goes away.
Emu Valley Rhododendron Garden
T: 03 6433 1805 – See page 13
Guide Falls Alpaca and Animal Park
T: 03 6435 7535 – See page 13
21
RO
AD
ACCOMMODATION
WES
T
MA
COOEE
PANORA
EL
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PO
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BO
OS
NE
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MOOREV
SERVICES
Burnie Arts & Function Centre ....................
Council Chambers .........................................
Hellyer College/Polytechnic ........................
Hospital (Regional) .......................................
Hospital (Private) ..........................................
Library .............................................................
Metro Cinemas ..............................................
Police Station ................................................
Post Offices ....................................................
Public Toilet .....................................................
RACT .................................................................
Tasmanian Visitor Information Centre ........
University of Tasmania (Cradle Coast Campus).
A
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THREE
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TOURIST FEATURES
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Burnie Inn (historic building) .....................
Burnie Park ...................................................
Tasmanian Cheese Tasting Centre ...........
Fern Glade .....................................................
Hellyers Road Distillery ................................
Little Penguin Observation Centre ..............
Makers’ Workshop .......................................
Pioneer Village Museum .............................
Reserve
Fern Glade
ORMSBY
STREET
PHILLIP
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W I V EANN H O E
Cemetery
STREET
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APARTMENTS DOWN TOWN .................... A
BAYSIDE BURNIE ......................................... B
BEACH HOTEL ............................................... C
BEACHFRONT VOYAGER ............................. D
BURNIE BED & BREAKFAST ....................... E
BURNIE HOLIDAY CARAVAN PARK ........... F
BURNIE OCEAN VIEW MOTEL .................... G
GLEN OSBORNE HOUSE ............................ H
KING OF BURNIE ........................................... I
NATONE HILLS FISHERY
BED AND BREAKFAST ................................. J
NATONE LODGE ............................................ K
REGENT HOTEL BACKPACKERS ................ L
SEABREEZE COTTAGES, COOEE ................. M
SEABREEZE COTTAGES, BURNIE ............... N
THE DUCK HOUSE ........................................ O
TOP OF THE TOWN ...................................... P
WELLER’S INN .............................................. Q
WEST BEACH HOLIDAY VILLAS ................ R
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RIDGLEY 11 km
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VERNON PL
A
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22
ST
HI
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LAUNCESTON 147 km
DEVONPORT 48 km
ALG
Cooee Point
BURNIE surrounds
SEABREEZE COTTAGES
Bass Highway, Cooee
6 Mollison Street, Burnie
T: 0439 353 491
THE DUCK HOUSE
26-28 Queen Street, Burnie
T: 03 6431 1712
TOP OF THE TOWN
195 Mount Street,
Upper Burnie
T: 03 6431 4444
WELLER’S INN
36 Queen Street, Burnie
T: 03 6431 1088
Brett Boardman
Wolfgang Seivers
Lloyd Wilday
Dale Cumming
Tony Cross
Heather Walmsley
Emma Duncan
Bob Iddon
Winter Collection
The principal photographer for the
Meet the Makers of Burnie brochure
was Rick Eaves www.rickeaves.com
Emma Duncan
[email protected]
GRAPHIC DESIGN
OTHER CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS
WELLER’S INN
36 Queen Street, Burnie
T: 03 6431 1088
WEST BEACH
HOLIDAY VILLAS
Located behind the
BP Service Station
North Terrace, Burnie
T: 03 6431 5708
Permits are required and
available from the Makers’
Workshop information counter.
Burnie City Council has made
provision for free camping (max.
5 nights) for fully self-contained
vehicles, at Cooee Point.
Local caravan parks at Cooee,
Somerset and Wynyard welcome
visitors in motor-homes.
MOTOR-HOMES
REGENT HOTEL
BACKPACKERS
26 North Terrace, Burnie
T: 03 6431 1933
BURNIE HOLIDAY
CARAVAN PARK
253 Bass Highway, Cooee
T: 03 6431 1925
At the time of printing this brochure the
information contained here-in was true
and correct. Some information may change
over time and should be seen as indicative.
DISCLAIMER
In April 2010 by Burnie City Council
PO Box 973, Burnie, Tasmania 7320
T: 03 6430 5700
www.discoverburnie.net
[email protected]
THIS BROCHURE WAS PRODUCED
NATONE LODGE
122 Greta Road, Upper Natone
T: 03 6436 2357 or
M: 0417 753 630
52 Alexander Street, Burnie
T: 03 6432 3219
APARTMENTS, CARAVAN
HOLIDAY UNITS PARKS,
HOSTELS
APARTMENTS DOWN TOWN
PHOTOGRAPHY
www.discoverburnie.net
NATONE HILLS FISHERY
BED AND BREAKFAST
67 Greta Road, Natone
T: 03 6436 2181
GLEN OSBORNE HOUSE
9 Aileen Crescent, Burnie
T: 03 6431 9866
BURNIE BED & BREAKFAST
9 Halstead Street, Burnie
T: 03 6408 0439 or
M: 0458 075 241
GUEST
HOUSES,
B&Bs
BURNIE OCEAN VIEW MOTEL
253 Bass Highway, Cooee
T: 03 6431 1925
KING OF BURNIE
20 Edwardes Street, Burnie
T: 03 6431 3222
BEACHFRONT VOYAGER
MOTOR INN
9 North Terrace, Burnie
T: 03 6431 4866
BAYSIDE BURNIE
139 Wilson Street, Burnie
T: 03 6431 4455
MOTELS
CITY
COUNCIL
BURNIE
TOP OF THE TOWN
195 Mount Street,
Upper Burnie
T: 03 6431 4444
REGENT HOTEL
BACKPACKERS
26 North Terrace, Burnie
T: 03 6431 1933
KING OF BURNIE
20 Edwardes Street, Burnie
T: 03 6431 3222
BEACH HOTEL
1 Wilson Street, Burnie
T: 03 6431 2333
BAYSIDE BURNIE
139 Wilson Street, Burnie
T: 03 6431 4455
HOTELS
Where to stay
23
www.discoverburnie.net

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