May 30 - Jun 6 - Cascadia Weekly

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May 30 - Jun 6 - Cascadia Weekly
Alan Rhodes, P.06 * The Hammers, P.14 * Advice Goddess, P.28
c a s c a d i a
REPORTING FROM THE
HEART OF CASCADIA
WHATCOM SKAGIT ISLAND LOWER B.C.
{05.30.12}{#22}{V.07}{FREE}
8
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Appliance Art Revival: Down the street and on the walls, P.16
Ted Rall’s Reality: The age of revolt, P.8 :: Coppelia and Copland: Northwest Ballet’s double-header, P.15
FOOD 30
a
s
c
a
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i
a
B-BOARD 24
c
FILM 22
A glance at what’s happening this week
Scotland comes to Ferndale in the guise of the
Bellingham Highland
Games June 1-3 at Ferndale’s Hovander
Homestead Park
ART 16
MUSIC 18
2 ) .4[05.z.12]
MUSIC
Ferndale
Sin and Gin Tour: 6:45pm, downtown Bellingham
Sin and Gin Tour: 6:45pm, historic Fairhaven
Band Pops Concert: 8pm, Performing Arts Center,
WWU
VISUAL ARTS
WORDS
Gallery Walk: 6-9pm, downtown Anacortes
Art Walk: 6-10pm, downtown Bellingham
Buffy Cram, Anakana Schofield: 7pm, Village
Books
STAGE 15
/#0-.4[05.zx.12]
GET OUT 14
./0-4[06.y.12]
Bard on the Beach: Begins tonight, continues
through Sept. 22
Briseis: 8pm, iDiOM Theater
Good, Bad, Ugly: 8pm, Upfront Theatre
The Project: 10pm, Upfront Theatre
ONSTAGE
WORDS 12
DANCE
Spring Dance Showcase: 7pm, Firehouse Performing Arts Center
CURRENTS 10
Fidalgo Youth Symphony: 7pm, McIntyre Hall,
Mount Vernon
DO IT 2
MAIL 4
VIEWS 6
!-$4[06.x.12]
Treasures of Aaron Copland: 2pm, Mount Baker
Theatre
Coppelia: 7:30pm, Mount Baker Theatre
Capstone Concert: 7:30pm, Performing Arts
Center, WWU
Folk Dance Party: 7:30pm, Fairhaven Library
ONSTAGE
MUSIC
Dead Parrots Society: 7:30pm and 9:30pm, Fraser
4, WWU
Triples: 8pm, Upfront Theatre
Briseis: 8pm, iDiOM Theater
Thoroughly Modern Millie: 8pm, Anacortes Community Theatre
Hodgepodge: 10pm, Upfront Theatre
A Ninja Must Be Silent: 11pm, iDiOM Theater
Ain’t No Heaven Seven Jazz Band: 2-5pm, VFW
Hall
Bellingham Sings Benefit Concert: 7:30pm,
Amadeus Project
WORDS
Clete Barrett Smith Book Launch: 2-4pm, Whatcom Middle School
James Brotherton: 7pm, Village Books
05.30.12
#22.07
DANCE
MUSIC
CASCADIA WEEKLY
Shakespeare Northwest Fundraiser: 2-4pm,
Rexville Grange
Upright Citizens Brigade: 6pm, Performing Arts
Center, WWU
Triples: 8pm, Upfront Theatre
Briseis: 8pm, iDiOM Theater
Thoroughly Modern Millie: 8pm, Anacortes Community Theatre
Hodgepodge: 10pm, Upfront Theatre
A Ninja Must Be Silent: 11pm, iDiOM Theater
DANCE
MUSIC
Spring Dance Showcase: 7pm, Firehouse Performing Arts Center
Coppelia: 7:30pm, Mount Baker Theatre
Capstone Concert: 7:30pm, Performing Arts
Center, WWU
2
ONSTAGE
Festival of Music and Art: 3-10pm, Maple Hall,
La Conner
Moon Mountain Music Festival: Today through
Sunday, Moon Mountain Lodge, Sedro-Woolley
COMMUNITY
Bridge of Aloha Festival: 10am-8pm, Ferndale
Events Center
Farmers Day Parade: 10:30am, historic downtown
Lynden
Bellingham Roller Betties: 5pm, Orca Pavilion,
WCC
GET OUT
headline two days of music happening at the
COMMUNITY
Highland Games: 7am-8pm, Hovander Homestead
Park, Ferndale
Girls on the Run: 10am, Fairhaven Park
Doxie Walk: 10am, Fairhaven train station
Anacortes Waterfront Festival: 10am-6pm, Cap
Sante Marina
Sin and Gin Tour: 6:45pm, downtown Bellingham
0(
!
June 1-2 in every nook,
Blast from the Past: Through Sunday, throughout
Sedro-Woolley
FOOD
The perennially popular Acorn Project will
WORDS
Ann Spiers, Susan Erickson: 7pm, Village Books
cranny and alley of the Wild Buffalo
GET OUT
Highland Games: 6pm, Hovander Homestead Park,
Anacortes Farmers Market: 9am-2pm, Depot Community & Arts Center
Bellingham Farmers Market: 10am-3pm, Depot
DANCE
Coppelia: 2pm, Mount Baker Theatre
Silk Road Showcase: 6:30pm, Leopold Crystal
Ballroom
MUSIC
Whatcom Chorale: 3pm, First Congregational
Church
Piano Recital: 7pm, Firehouse Performing Arts
Center
B-BOARD 24
.0)4[06.z.12]
FILM 22
Summer Fine Art Exhibit Opening: 11am-4pm,
Jansen Art Center, Lynden
Printmakers Reception: 5-8pm, Smith & Vallee
Gallery, Edison
MUSIC 18
VISUAL ARTS
FOOD 30
Market Square
Marquee Celebration: 6:30pm, Lincoln Theatre,
Mount Vernon
GET OUT
Highland Games: 7am-8pm, Hovander Homestead Park, Ferndale
Muddy Mayhem: 9am, Hannegan Speedway
Anacortes Waterfront Festival: 10am-6pm, Cap
Sante Marina
STAGE 15
COMMUNITY
GET OUT 14
Ted Rall: 2pm, Village Books
ART 16
WORDS
FOOD
(*)4[06.{.12]
WORDS 12
Community Breakfast: 8am-1pm, Rome Grange
WORDS
More than 30 established and
emerging artists will show their
works at an opening reception
for “On to the Next One: NW
Printmaker Open Call” June
2 at Edison’s Smith & Vallee
Gallery
CASCADIA WEEKLY
#22.07
05.30.12
DO IT 2
MAIL 4
Adria L. Libolt: 7pm, Blaine Library
Poetrynight: 8:30pm, Amadeus Project
VIEWS 6
High School Choir Concert: 4pm and 7pm,
McIntyre Hall, Mount Vernon
CURRENTS 10
MUSIC
3
FOOD 30
thisweek
B-BOARD 24
FILM 22
MUSIC 18
ART 16
STAGE 15
4: Mailbag
8: Rall’s reality
Art Director:
Jesse Kinsman
ô [email protected]
kinsmancreative.com
11: Police blotter, Index
ARTS & LIFE
GET OUT 14
15: Ballet double-header
16: Art and appliances
18: Tuneful time travel
WORDS 12
CURRENTS 10
22: Aquatic abomination
23: Film Shorts
REAR END
24: Bulletin Board, Sudoku
25: Wellness
26: Crossword
27: Free Will Astrology
28: Advice Goddess
29: This Modern World, Tom the
Stefan Hansen
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cascadiaweekly.com
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Alan Rhodes, P.06 * The Hammers, P.14 * Advice Goddess, P.28
c a s c a d i a
REPORTING FROM THE
HEART OF CASCADIA
WHATCOM SKAGIT ISLAND LOWER B.C.
Dancing Bug
{05.30.12}{#22}{V.07}{FREE}
DO IT 2
30: Time for Thai
ING, P.18
A STAR IN THE MAK
Appliance Art Revival: Down the street and on the walls, P.16
05.30.12
Ted Rall’s Reality: The age of revolt, P.8 :: Coppelia and Copland: Northwest Ballet’s double-header, P.15
#22.07
STA F F
Graphic Artists:
20: Clubs
CASCADIA WEEKLY
L E T T E RS
Music & Film Editor:
Carey Ross
Eext 203
ô [email protected]
cascadiaweekly.com
Production
10: Last week’s news
TOC
Arts & Entertainment
Editor: Amy Kepferle
Eext 204
ô [email protected]
cascadiaweekly.com
6: Gristle & Rhodes
14: Fun on the field
4
mail
Editor & Publisher:
Tim Johnson
E ext 260
ô [email protected]
cascadiaweekly.com
VIEWS & NEWS
VIEWS 6
Cascadia Weekly:
E 360.647.8200
Editorial
Seen in the skies above the Ski to Sea celebration in
Fairhaven over the weekend. A friend of the pilot explained,
“Never piss off a fisherman!”
MAIL 4
Contact
©2012 CASCADIA WEEKLY (ISSN 1931-3292) is published each Wednesday by
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NEWSPAPER ADVISORY GROUP: Robert Hall, Seth Murphy, Michael Petryni, David Syre
COLUMBIA’S BEST HILL
I would like to support first grader Nathan
Long’s plea to save the best sledding hill in Bellingham, above Squalicum Park and scheduled to
be leveled.
Nathan’s hill is great for more reasons than just
sledding. There’s a great view from the hill—on
clear days the Twin Sisters are visible to the east,
plus it’s a great spot to watch a sunset. It’s a
great place to sit and watch a game in the existing baseball diamond, or just have a picnic!
But my number one reason for wanting to save
the hill is that when I ride my bike, it’s really fun
to ride up one side and down the other! To me
and Nathan, it seems this hill is more valuable as
a hill, than as another baseball field that’ll only
be used a limited number of days each year.
Thanks for writing, Nathan, and inspiring me
to write.
Sam Crawford, Kathy Kershner, Pete Kremen, Ken
Mann, and Carl Weimer for voting to complete
this project.
—Eric Hirst, Bellingham
FIREWORKS ARE SYMBOLS
Criminalize fireworks on the Fourth of July?!?
The notion is so fundamentally un-American that
it would be laughable if the backers of that proposal weren’t serious.
Coal trains rumble through our town every
hour of every day and night. Their 100-decibel
horns disturb the peace, shatter sleep, and irritate animals all year long. Amidst that reality,
the Weekly ran a multipage opinion in support of
an effort to criminalize fireworks on the Fourth
of July. Truth is stranger than fiction because
fiction has to be plausible.
—Brad Howard, Bellingham
—J. Shaw, old guy, Bellingham
RECONVEYING THANKS
I very much appreciate the Whatcom County
Council’s work on and support for the transfer
of land from the state Dept. of Natural Resources, known as the reconveyance. These 8,700
acres, mostly in the Lake Whatcom watershed,
will serve the long-term interests of Whatcom
County residents. Protection of this land from
logging and creation of a backcountry park will
help protect our most important water supply,
provide wildlife habitat and create a terrific outdoor recreation opportunity. Special thanks to
Fireworks aren’t toys, they are symbols.
If the hazards and toxicity of fireworks are
sufficient to warrant giving them up, then we
should give them up completely. The symbolism
of banning personal fireworks and giving them to
the authorities is too offensive and disrespectful
to their traditional meaning for Americans.
It’s time to move on. That freedom stuff is
passe, there’s a war against a fundamental human emotion going on, not coincidentally the
exact emotion that is most evoked by war.
Funny, that.
—Ken Whitely, Bellingham
)DWKHU·V'D\
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CURRENTS 10
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VIEWS 6
Saturday, June 16th, 9am
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VIEWS
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WORDS 12
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FOOD 30
THE GRISTLE
6
views
CITZENS UNITED AGAINST CITIZENS UNITED: Do states
have rights? Do citizens have rights?
Two dozen states—including Washington—appealed federal health care, arguing in part the new
law raised the costs of state-provided health care.
Now, similar numbers—including Washington—have
joined with Montana to ask the U.S. Supreme Court
to permit state-level restrictions on campaign expenditures and disclosures. Justices ruled out such
restrictions in their sweeping January 2010 decision
on Citizens United vs. the Federal Elections Commission.
In Citizens United, the Supreme Court argued that
money in elections equals a form of constitutionally
protected free speech, which opened the floodgates
for unlimited, anonymous corporate campaign donations. Unlimited dark money invites corruption, Montana Attorney General Steve Bullock asserted in his
challenge to the decision.
Corporate corruption through political spending
could and did happen in Montana, Bullock argues,
prompting the state’s Corrupt Practices Act, passed
by referendum in 1912 by voters who’d lost trust in
a political system in thrall to the state’s mining interests. The state has an interest in protecting its
elections for state offices, he maintains.
Washington voters had similar thoughts when they
pressed for a referendum in 1970, believing the public had a right to know about the financing of political activity in this state. Initiative 276 became law
in 1973 after being approved by 72 percent of voters.
The state’s Public Disclosure Law establishes reporting requirements and sets limits on contributions to
state and municipal elections.
“The public’s right to know of the financing of
political campaigns and lobbying and the financial
affairs of elected officials and candidates far outweighs any right that these matters remain secret
and private,” the Act argues in its preamble. The law
does not seek to (and indeed could not) govern federal elections.
Writing on behalf of 21 states and the District of
Columbia, attorneys argue, “Although the states’
laws governing corporate campaign expenditures
vary in important respects, they all seek to ensure
that such expenditures do not undermine principles
of accountability and integrity in state and local
elections, while protecting residents’ rights to participate in the electoral process.”
Particularly vulnerable in this regard are Washington’s high court elections. The state Supreme Court
frequently rules on matters of profound interest to
corporations. Even before Citizens United, unions
and business interests in this state had aggressively
stepped up their spending on those otherwise quiet
races, in effect threatening to place justice itself on
the auction block.
Yet while Citizens United has flooded elections with
a sea of millions of dollars in unregulated special-interest money, drowning out the voices of individual
citizens, perhaps the ruling’s most immediately offensive aspect is its failure to distinguish between
the individual and the corporation. One can vote,
after all; the other cannot.
In his dissent from the opinion of the majority, Justice John Paul Stevens wrote, “Corporations have no
consciences, no beliefs, no feelings, no thoughts, no
OPI N IONS
T H E G R IST L E
BY ALAN RHODES
Rhodes for President
RUSH LIMBAUGH AND ME
THE REPUBLICAN Party
has gotten itself into quite a fix.
Their candidate will most likely be
Mitt Romney, an empty suit that
nobody seems excited about, including most Republicans. Tea Party
Republicans were pretty fired up by
Rick Santorum, a peppy cheerleader
for the Christian Taliban, but he’s
dropped out. Another dropout, Newt
Gingrich, a morally rancid gasbag,
never had a chance, of course, nor
did Ron Paul, who keeps hanging
around like a clueless party guest
who won’t go home.
I’m not a Republican, but I feel
sorry for them since they’re getting stuck with Romney, a fumbling
shapeshifter who looks like he wandered off the set of Mad Men. To help
the GOP out, I recently announced
on my blog that I’m going to the Republican convention this summer to
offer myself as a dark horse presidential candidate.
Apparently Rush Limbaugh reads
my blog because he telephoned me.
Here’s a partial transcript of our
conversation:
Rush: Are you even a Republican?
Me: Not really, although I like Abe
Lincoln, and Eisenhower was a
nice guy. I guess I like dead Republicans. Most living Republicans
are batshit crazy.
Rush: So, you’re a Democrat?
Me: Nah, the Democrats have turned
into wimps. FDR must be rolling
over in his grave.
Rush: Well, what are you? A Libertarian?
Me: Nope, most libertarian ideas
are nutty. I do, however, agree
with Ron Paul that drugs should
be legalized. That would have
been good for you, Rush, back
when you were strung out on
OxyContin and using your housekeeper to score your dope.
Rush: (unintelligible sputtering)
Look, Republicans need to run a real
conservative against Obama. Do you
have conservative credentials?
Me: Absolutely. I’m a lifelong member of the American Civil Liberties
Union, an organization passionately dedicated to protecting the
First Amendment. How’s that for
conservative?
Rush: (more sputtering)
Me: And I donate regularly to the
Planned Parenthood Action Fund.
What’s more conservative than keeping big government out of women’s
personal health care decisions?
Rush: (angrily) Let’s move on. Global
warming: a complete hoax, right?
Me: Well, I realize you have to say
that to run as a Republican, so
I guess I can ignore irrefutable
scientific evidence along with
the best of ’em. In fact, I’ve had
practice. My doctor keeps telling me that eating three bowls
of Ben and Jerry’s Chubby Hubby
ice cream every night is bad for
me, and I’ve been ignoring him
for years.
VIEWS EXPRESSED ARE NOT NECESSARILY THOSE OF CASCADIA WEEKLY
Rush: All right, skip it. Do you at
least have solid Christian values?
Me: Well, I like Jesus a lot—he said
terrific things about being nice
to each other—but I’m a secular
humanist, which is good. I won’t
persecute gay people because I
think God approves, and I won’t
start any wars because I think Jesus wants me to.
Rush: You’re not conservative! You’re
just exploiting conservatism for
your own sick, perverted pleasure,
you... slut! (Hangs up)
Well, before long I’ll be off to
the Republican convention to run
as a dark horse. I don’t actually
know where the Republicans are
having their convention, so I’d
better Google that.
Oh, my god! They’re meeting in
Tampa. In August! Have you ever
been to Florida in August? These
people really are crazy. Forget it.
Maybe I should go to the Democratic convention instead and run
as a dark horse there. It wouldn’t
be an unreasonable thing to do, as
I’ve been frequently disappointed
by Obama. Let’s see where the
Democrats are meeting. Charlotte!
Have you ever been to Charlotte,
North Carolina in the summer?
These people are crazy, too. No
wonder the country is a mess. The
people making important decisions can’t think straight.
Maybe I should scrap this idea
and just stay in Bellingham where
the summers are glorious. Unlike
the Republicans and Democrats, I
would be making a sane decision.
I probably should be president.
B-BOARD 24
FILM 22
MUSIC 18
#22.07
$12 for individuals, kids 12 and under free!
Tickets on sale at Village Books,
Community Food Co-op, The RE Store,
Garden Spot Nursery and Bakerview Nursery
For more information: 360 647-7093
www.sustainableconnections.org
VIEWS 6
CURRENTS 10
Tickets (available early June)
MAIL 4
June 23 & 24, 10am-4pm
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05.30.12
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ART 16
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CASCADIA WEEKLY
desires. Corporations help structure and
facilitate the activities of human beings, to be sure, and their ‘personhood’
often serves as a useful legal fiction.
But they are not themselves members of
‘We the People’ by whom and for whom
our Constitution was established.”
A large majority of Americans agree,
believing that corporations already
exert too much influence on our daily
lives and our political process. An ABCWashington Post poll conducted in February, 2010, indicated that 80 percent
of those surveyed opposed the court’s
Citizens United decision. In equally
strong terms, a Hart Research poll released last year found that nearly four
in five of registered voters support passage of a constitutional amendment
to overturn Citizens United. Such an
amendment—for indeed that is what it
will take to reverse more than a century of legal thought—would distinguish
the corporate from the biological. Resolutions calling for such an amendment
have passed in several states and cities
across the country.
Bellingham may join the effort.
City Council members Michael Lilliquist and Seth Fleetwood introduced the
topic last week.
“The first week of June has been
named ‘Resolutions Week’ by a broad
coalition of organizations nationwide’”
Lilliquist said. “Dozens of cities, counties, and state legislatures across America have already passed resolutions
calling for a Constitutional amendment
to overturn Citizens United.”
If passed by council, the resolution
would join Bellingham’s voice to other
cities around the nation in support of
“amending the United States Constitution to declare that corporations are
not entitled to the constitutional rights
of natural persons, and further to ensure that the expenditure of corporate
money to influence the electoral process is no longer a form of constitutionally protected speech and may be
subject to justifiable regulation for the
common good,” the resolution asserts.
Congress hasn’t authority to overturn a
ruling of the U.S. Supreme Court; however, Congress can amend the foundational document upon which their rulings are based.
An amendment clarifying who may
participate in our democratic processes
is well in keeping with the history of the
Constitution and its amendments. Fully
half of all amendments passed since
1860 have sought to define these matters. The last of these, lowering the age
requirement of voters, was passed by
Congress in 1971 in just four months.
It can be done.
FOOD 30
THE GRISTLE
7
Choose local businesses taking action for a healthy community.
FOOD 30
currents
P OL I T ICS
F U ZZ BU ZZ
I N DE X
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#22.07
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B-BOARD 24
N E WS
8
BY TIM JOHNSON
(NO)BAMA
CHOICES WE MAKE IN
PRESIDENTIAL ELECTIONS ARE
NOT ENOUGH
CLIMATE CHANGE.
Mass species extinction.
Sstemic poverty and discrimination. Inequality of wealth.
Atrocious health care costs. Wall Street run amok. Congress paralyzed.
“These are industrial-strength atrocities,” Ted Rall argues in the award-winning satirist’s newest book. “They
cannot be eliminated or significantly mitigated by pressing those in charge for small-bore reforms.”
Unfortunately, the powerful engine for social change, the
progressive Left, has been conked out for a human lifetime.
“There hasn’t been a Left in the United States since the
late 1960s,” Rall argues. “We have liberals. But when elections roll around, liberals invariably roll over and vote for
Democrats. When elected, Democrats have always sold out
their nominal values.”
A functioning Left, Rall maintains, represents the interests and desires of the common person, the ordinary
working person whose labor is exploited for the benefit of
capitalists and the ruling classes.
“The Left fights for all that is good and right on the world,”
the nationally syndicated cartoonist and author writes.
“The Left represents the fundamental idea that everyone is
equal and thus entitled to a share to the earth’s bounty. The
Left pushes for better working conditions, higher wages, a
better justice system, a government that serves the people
rather than the other way around. The Left fights racists,
misogynists, homophobes, and bigots of all stripes. The
Left,” Rall says, “defends the natural environment.”
But the Left has been gone for 50
years. The enerrgy of social change has
faded. In the vacuum, “the rich got
richer, the poor got poorer, the planet
got hotter and dirtier, the media got
more useless, and there was nothing we
could do about it,” he says.
For a brief moment in 2007, the Left
thought
perhaps they’d found their
# WHO: Ted Rall
“Hope and Change” agent in Barack
WHAT: The Book
Obama,. It's an illusion Rall’s book
of O: From Hope,
takes pains to explore. The real Hope
the Disgust, to
and Change resides within ourselves, he
Revolt Under
argues. The challenge is reigniting that
Obama.
WHEN: 2pm
sense of collective outrage that can litSun., June 3
erally change the world.
WHERE: Village
“The rise of the Tea Party and Occupy
Books
movement,
the general disenchantment
INFO: www.
of
the
country
with the mainstream povillagebooks.com
litical system, the polarization of left
and right, abandonment of the vital center—is something
that has resulted from Obama. He was the best that the system had to offer, and he still wasn’t good enough. Because
of that, he exposed the fact that the system itself is the
problem. Not the man.
“Under George W. Bush,” Rall notes, “it was possible to
consider that if you had elected a smarter, better intentioned president with better advisors that you would end
up with better results. But, really, if anything—at least in
the area of war policy and civil liberties—Obama is worse
than Bush. So you have to ask yourself—this man is intelligent, he’s about as liberal as the system is going to give
you. And he is not liberal enough.
Cascadia Weekly: Your new books follows a thread intro-
duced in your previous book, which called for a new
American revolution. That book came out shortly
after Obama was elected. Now you’re back with
this book, just before Obama is seeking reelection, again calling for revolt. Someone might think
you’ve got something personal against Obama.
Ted Rall: No, I think the system is the problem.
And if that’s the case, you have to get rid of
the system.
We thought in 2008 that we had a choice
between a Democrat and a Republican. But
what we really had was a choice between taking politics into the streets, where it belongs,
or just sitting home on our asses and watching
TV. Oh, and vote.
We outsource our politics like we outsource
our jobs. We vote, and then we think, “Well, we
did our part. We’re done. Let’s watch sports.”
Voting, as an isolated exercise, just doesn’t
matter. What matters is starting to think
about real politics, which—whether through
the Occupy movement or Tea Party or something else—takes to the streets and demands
accountability.
CW: Someone who cursorily read your book might
think it is an attack against Obama, the man. But,
it strikes me as more of a critique against the Office of the President.
TR: Make no mistake, I think Obama is a shitty
president. But the point is, he is the best shitty
president we’re going to get.
More of a concern to me, there has been a
constant shift to the Right regardless of who is
in office. I don’t think that is representative of
any real shift in the attitudes of Americans, but
There has been a constant
shift to the Right regardless
of who is in office. I don’t
think that is representative
of any real shift in the
attitudes of Americans, but
a shift in the systems that
elevate people to the Office of
President.
a shift in the systems that elevate people to the
Office of President.
The systems that we use to elect our president are no longer responsive to us, the individual voter.
In 2007, every step of the way, Obama told
us about himself and what he was going to do in
office. And we chose to ignore that.
In my lifetime, I confess I’ve not seen a presidential candidate who has lied less than this
one. Obama lied, though. He said he would revisit NAFTA, that he would include a public
NOBAMA, CONTINUED ON PAGE 12
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WORDS 12
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CASCADIA WEEKLY
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FILM 22
BY TIM JOHNSON
LAST WEEK’S
NEWS
MAY22-28
05.yy.12
TUESDAY
Whatcom County Council agrees 5-2 to proceed with a plan
to acquire 14 square miles of forest preserve parkland around
Lake Whatcom, the largest acquisition of public land in county
history. The cost of the land transfer—about a third of the
total watershed—is estimated at $33.45 per acre.
CURRENTS
NEWS 8 10
A coalition of Washington education groups files a citizen
initiative to ask voters to allow 40 public charter schools in
the state over the next five years. The coalition, including the
League of Education Voters and Stand for Children, has until
July 6 to collect nearly 250,000 valid voter signatures.
05.yz.12
VIEWS 6
WORDS 12
GET OUT 14
STAGE 15
ART 16
MUSIC 18
t
k
h
e
e
Wa
at s
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FOOD 30
currents ›› last week’s news
An Everett man suspected of murder is in Whatcom County
Jail, accused of shoplifting. Derec Donnelly, 31, is suspected in
05.y{.12
THURSDAY
Five people are arrested in connection with the
kidnapping of a one-year-old child in Maple Falls. The
Whatcom County Sheriff's Office reports Scott Vaughn,
32, allegedly kicked in the locked door of a loft cabin
and attacked two men inside with a metal pry bar.
Vaughn took the child from her crib, and threatened
both men, saying that if they reported the assault to
the police he would return and kill them. Vaughn is
believed to be the child’s father. He was just released
from an Oregon prison the previous day. Deputies say
Vaughn was assisted by his father, his sister and two
other accomplices. The child is recovered unharmed.
Whatcom County Sheriff’s deputies arrest a
man wanted on multiple felony charges including
a drive-by shooting involving the use of an assault
weapon in Skagit County. After Visente Galvez-Cruz
refused orders to surrender, deputies entered an
Everson home and found the 19-year-old hiding in a
clothes dryer. They recovered cocaine and an AR-15
assault rife.
A woman granted a medical release from Whatcom County Jail dies from hepatitis. The Bellingham
Herald reports the 28-year-old resident of Lummi
Island was last booked into jail April 2. A release
was granted to her Tuesday to receive treatment for
a condition reportedly stemming from intravenous
drug abuse.
05.y|.12
FRIDAY
The Washington State Patrol arrests a 38-yearold Everett man accused of threatening to kill Gov.
Chris Gregoire. The agency says the threats were
sent via the governor's web page.
05.y}.12
SATURDAY
The U.S. Coast Guard rescues two divers caught in
strong currents west of Whidbey Island. Then crews
also rescue the people who were operating their dive
boats. The dive boats had intentionally been grounded on Smith Island, and couldn't be re-launched due to
rough weather. One diver is treated for hypothermia.
10.y~.12
SUNDAY
Running neck and neck throughout the day with
team Astromech, the team from Barron Heating wins
first place for the second consecutive year at Ski
to Sea. More than 500 teams competed in seven legs
over the 93.5 mile course.
05.y.12
MONDAY
A crane barge arrives in Penn Cove to help raise a
sunken fishing vessel that's threatening Whidbey
Island's famous mussel beds. The state Dept. of
Ecology reports responders have already recovered
1,400 gallons of oil that leaked from the derelict
boat after it caught fire and sank two weeks ago.
The mussels' peak spawning season is now, and their
harvest has been closed until they are cleared by
toxicity tests.
CASCADIA WEEKLY
#22.07
05.30.12
DO IT 2
MAIL 4
WEDNESDAY
the murder of 23-year-old Luis Verduzco in an apparent attempt to steal his drugs. Verduzco was found
dead in the backyard of a vacant Everett house April
24. Donnelly was arrested Wednesday night at Macy’s
in the Bellis Fair Mall for stealing clothes. He will be
transferred to Everett custody.
10
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Hiway 9 – Van Zandt
On May 21, a man was reported walking near Sunset and James streets to
the hospital. He was not wearing pants.
Bellingham Police gave him a ride the
rest of the way.
index
145 million tons of coal would cause as much carbon pollution
as a year's worth of gasoline for the states shown in white.
FOOD 30
FUZZ
BUZZ
CHEEKY BEHAVIOR
SKI TO SEA WEEKEND
On May 22, the business complained
of another strange letter being left
for them.
On May 23, another business reported
receiving suspicious letters.
On May 27, Bellingham Police issued a
ticket to someone drinking in public on
Holly Street.
On May 15, someone threw bricks
through the windows of a business on
West Magnolia Street in Bellingham.
On May 27, Bellingham Police broke up
a loud party of drunks on Garden Street
at 12:54am.
On April 23, an empty suitcase was
found on the sidewalk of Potter Street
in Bellingham.
On May 28, Bellingham Police issued a
ticket to someone drinking in public at
3:15pm on Holly Street.
SLUMBER UNDER
LUMBER
On May 28, Bellingham Police issued
another ticket to someone drinking in
public on Holly Street at 9:30pm.
On May 28, Bellingham Police issued
another ticket to someone drinking in
public on Holly Street.
On May 5, an evening stroller in Blaine
noted a buzzing and rustling sound
coming from under a tarp. Police
peeled back the tarp and discovered
a transient peacefully dozing in his
sleeping bag. ”The gentleman was offered and politely refused assistance,”
police noted, “and promised to call if
he changed his mind. He was left to his
slumbers for the time being.”
MAKING THE POINT
On May 20, Bellingham Police responded to a report of an argument in which
one man reportedly had a gun in his
hand.
On May 15, a man was reported firing
a BB gun in the plaza of the Performing Arts Center on Western Washington
University campus. University Police
arrived. They took away his BB gun.
SUSPICION OF BEING
BOMBED
On May 21, a man threatened to bomb
a bar on Bellingham’s East Holly Street
in the late evening.
On May 22, Bellingham Police attempted to calm a customer who was bombed
at a bar on West Holly Street in the
early morning.
B-BOARD 24
FILM 22
MUSIC 18
ART 16
STAGE 15
each year if all of several proposed coal export facilities are built, as much carbon pollution as
produced by all the automobiles in all of the Western states combined. Powder River Basin coal
generates 8,500 BTUs per pound, and that 1 million BTUs produces 212.7 pounds of CO2.
{
MILLIONS of tons per year of Peabody
Energy coal proposed to be shipped from
the proposed Gateway Pacific Terminal at
Cherry Point.
z
MILLIONS of tons per year of coal Kinder
Morgan plans to ship from a proposed
terminal at the Port Westward Industrial
Park near Clatskanie, OR.
y|
x
MILLIONS of tons per year of Ambre
MILLIONS of tons per year of coal
Energy coal proposed to be shipped from
the proposed Millennium Bulk Terminals in
Longview in its first phase of operation.
proposed to be shipped out of central
Oregon by “Project Mainstay” being
considered by the Port of Coos Bay.

|
MILLIONS of tons of coal per year Ambre
Energey plans to ship from a facility on the
Columbia River in eastern Oregon that will
transfer coal from rail to barges that will be
towed downriver to Port Westward.
MILLIONS of tons per year of coal Rail
|
x{|
FIVE million tons of coal releases as much
COMBINED total, in millions of tons per
year of coal shipped from these proposed
export terminals.
climate-changing carbon pollution as all
the gasoline burned in a year by 2.6 million
residents of Washington.
SOURCES: Sightline Institute
America plans to ship from the Port of
Grays Harbor’s Marine Terminal 3.
GET OUT 14
MILLIONS of tons of greenhouse gas carbon dioxide that will be released into the atmosphere
WORDS 12
On May 27, Bellingham Police returned
to Maritime Heritage Park at 10pm to
issue another ticket for drinking in
public.
On May 21, a Bellingham business reported they’d received a suspicious letter at the post office.
CURRENTS
NEWS 8 10
On May 27, Bellingham Police issued a
ticket at 7:30pm to someone drinking
in public at Maritime Heritage Park.
y}y
MYSTERY MAIL
VIEWS 6
On May 27, Bellingham Police spoke to
a disorderly drunk in Fairhaven.
MAIL 4
On May 26, police issued tickets to two
drunks swilling liquor near Bellingham
High School.
DO IT 2
On May 26, police arrested a minor who’d
attempted to shoplift booze from a convenience store north of Bellingham.
On March 24, Bellingham Police reported a woman had been aggressively
panhandling in the parking lots of a
shopping center on Meridian Street,
resulting in numerous complaints.
Four businesses requested that she be
trespassed from the area. Officers located her and told her not to return to
those businesses. She said she understood.
05.30.12
On May 26, Bellingham Police issued a
ticket to someone drinking in public on
Holly Street.
#22.07
On May 26, Bellingham Police lectured
a drunk in Birchwood neighborhood.
On May 19, Bellingham Police received
several reports of a man walking down
the middle of Boulevard Street in the
late evening, creating a traffic hazard.
The man also created a hazard for the
efforts of police to solve the problem.
He was booked into jail.
CASCADIA WEEKLY
On May 26, Bellingham Police steadied
a highly intoxicated person in the parking lot at Sunset Square.
11
doit
currents ›› Ted Rall
WOR DS
CASCADIA WEEKLY
#22.07
05.30.12
DO IT 2
MAIL 4
VIEWS 6
CURRENTS 10
WORDS
WORDS12
12
GET OUT 14
STAGE 15
ART 16
MUSIC 18
FILM 22
B-BOARD 24
FOOD 30
WED., MAY 30
12
NOBAMA,
WESTERN CONNEC T IONS: Wilson Library
cataloguer Leslie Hall, the final speaker for
the spring Western Connections brown bag
series, leads a “Who Do You Think You Are?
How My Book on Revolutionary Georgia Led Me
to Atlanta and Paula Deen” at noon at Village
Books, 1200 11th St.
FROM PAGE 12
option in health care, that he’d close
Guantanamo, that he’d rein in Wall
Street.
But he has lied less than many.
He said he was going to expand the
war in Afghanistan. He did. He said
he was going to continue the war in
Iraq. He did. He said he was going
to continue many of the policies that
began under Bush. And he has.
We chose to ignore him.
I think we do need to demystify
Obama. There’s an effort in the book
to do that. I think people do need
to see Obama for who he is, to understand that he is not awesome, but
that he is the man in charge. He is a
right-wing Democrat.
But the answer is not to vote for
Romney, or some other deeply flawed
character. The answer is to understand at a deep level that the system
sucks. And this is what it produces.
CW: For all the grievances the Right
gins up about Obama, they ignore the
complaints against him expressed by
the Left. The civil liberties abuses,
the increasing military/surveillance
state—these are things it seems a
united voice might roll back.
TR: There are a lot of things you simply are not allowed to talk about in
a two party system; and the parties
largely agree on matters like torture
and surveillance.
Look at the trouble Obama has
had even mentioning problems in
the private equity markets. You cannot criticize that, you cannot even
try to distinguish it from what we
might call classic, functional capitalism. As president, you cannot say
you are anti-war. You can’t say you
are anti-home invasion.
The parties have agreed upon
these issues. Both are expansionist,
militaristic, pro-violence. Both have
agreed to expand domestic spying.
Both have agreed to do nothing regarding the aggregation of wealth in
fewer and fewer hands.
Forget about solutions’ the system doesn’t even offer options.
CW: I imagine at least one party will
circle their wagons around this president and denounce the views expressed in your book.
TR: The writings I’ve done against
Obama have gotten me cancelled
from countless liberal publications.
WWW.VILLAGEBOOKS.COM
DOUBLE READING: Buffy Cram reads from
Radio Belly and Anakana Schofield reads from
Malarky at 7pm at Village Books, 1200 11th St.
671-2626
FRI., JUNE 1
POE TRY DUO: Ann Spiers and Susan J. Erickson read from their new poetry collections—
What Rain Does and The Art of Departure,
respectively—at 7pm at Village Books, 1200
11th St.
WWW.VILLAGEBOOKS.COM
JUNE 1-2
BOOKFAIR BENEFIT: Fifteen to 25 percent
of purchases made by customers supporting a
Bookfair to benefit Bellingham Public Schools
will be donated after purchases are tallied
up this weekend. The event happens from
9am-11pm both days at Barnes & Noble, 4099
Meridian St.
647-7018
The truth is, organized Democrats
are just as blind in their obedience to
their power structures as Republicans
were blind to their own under Bush.
Back in the day, we used to ask
ourselves, “What would Bush have to
do for Republicans to admit he was
less than awesome?” If he was caught
having sex with dogs, would that do
it? I don’t think it would have.
What would Obama have to do
before Democrats would throw him
under a bus?
CW: Does the President’s “evolving position” on same-sex marriage suggest
to you that he is able to be persuaded,
that sufficient numbers might change
his mind on a topic? He was himself
a community organizer and must at
some level believe in that process.
TR: He can certainly be reached
through public opinion. But realize,
that is all that has happened.
Among the majority of likely Obama
voters, most favor gay marriage.
The question really is, did he
lead on this? No. If he hadn’t made a
statement, would it have made any
difference? Did he speed up acceptance of gay marriage by making the
statement? I don’t think so. Would
the absence of his statement of support slowed it down? I don’t think
so, either.
Because the polls really haven’t
moved on this since he issued his
statement, it suggests he took no
political risks whatsoever. He has
not advocated any change from
current law on the subject. He just
expressed support for what is now
the default public opinion on gay
marriage.
If anything, the gay marriage
issue is a perfect example of the
dysfunction of the system. If you
have a president who is just following the polls, adjusting to their adjustments, we don’t really need that
president at all. That is not leadership on an issue.
CW: If people were sufficiently informed
and properly empowered, what should
be their next steps? Options seem limited.
TR: I personally believe that the Occupy movement needs to be taken
to the next level, becoming a more
active force for positive change.
It’s not an engine for change, it’s a
campground. Get out of the parks.
Occupy the entire country.
People need to stop thinking
about the two-party system, and
start thinking about what matters
and propose solutions outside the
box. We’re in such a permanent state
of crisis, and it is not like there is an
alternative set of conditions.
The political class thinks it can
ignore the people it purports to represent. And they’re right for now. But
not forever. A reckoning is at hand.
CW: We face a grim choice in November.
Because it is either this man, and what
we might agree have been his marginal
advances, or a full rollback to the neocons. Not a breadth of options.
TR: Voters are in a terrible place, yes.
They have to stop thinking about
themselves as voters and start thinking about themselves as citizens.
SAT., JUNE 2
BOOK LAUNCH: Clete Barrett Smith launches
his new book, Alien on a Rampage: Intergalactic
Bed & Breakfast #2, from 2-4pm at the commons at Whatcom Middle School, 810 Halleck
St. There will be a book signing and afterparty. Entry is free.
WWW.CLETEBARRETTSMITH.COM
RECLAIMING THE DEAD: Bellingham author
James Brotherton reads from his debut novel,
Reclaiming the Dead, at 7pm at Village Books,
1200 11th St.
671-2626
SUN., JUNE 3
TEEN POE TS: Talented young women from
Shuksan Middle School will share their poetry
at a reading to benefit the Brigid Collins Family Support Center at 5pm at Village Books,
1200 11th St. Booklets of their poetry will be
available for purchase.
671-2626
MON., JUNE 4
A WARDEN’S REFLEC T IONS: Adria L.
Libolt shares stories and reflections from her
autobiographical book, A Deputy Warden’s Reflections on Prison Work, at 7pm at the Blaine
Library, 610 3rd St.
332-8146
POE TRYNIGHT: Read your original verse at
poetrynight at 8:30pm at the Amadeus Project, 1209 Cornwall Ave. Sign-ups start at 8pm.
WWW.POETRYNIGHT.ORG
TUES., JUNE 5
NEX T HUSBAND: Bellingham author Rae
Ellen Lee reads from her new memoir, My Next
Husband Will Be Normal, at 7pm at Village
Books, 1200 11th St. The book focuses on what
happened after Lee’s husband realized he was
really a she.
WWW.VILLAGEBOOKS.COM
WED., JUNE 6
KINGDOM OF MEN: Idaho author Kim Barnes
reads from her book of fiction, In the King-
doit
THURS., JUNE 7
REAMDE: Bestselling author Neal Stephenson reads from his new book of science
fiction, Reamde, at 7pm at Village Books,
1200 11th St.
WWW.VILLAGEBOOKS.COM
B-BOARD 24
671-2626
FOOD 30
dom of Men, at 7pm at Village Books, 1200
11th St.
BLAST FROM THE PAST: Sidewalk sales, arts
and crafts, food vendors, a quilt show, bike
races and fun rides, a children’s costume
parade, live music, a car show and much,
much more will be part of a “Blast from
the Past” happening Fri.-Sun. throughout
Sedro-Woolley. Most events are free.
MUSIC 18
JUNE 1-3
FILM 22
COM M U N I T Y
STAGE 15
FARMERS DAY PARADE: Head to Lynden for
today’s Farmers Day Parade. Activities kick
off at 9:30am with an open-air market,
and the parade begins at 10:30am between
Third and 10th streets in the town’s
historic downtown district. The event
honors the economic and social impact of
the agricultural industry in Lynden and
its surrounding area. Trucks, tractors and
horse-drawn wagons will be interspersed
with floats, bands and a variety of other
entries.
GET OUT 14
SAT., JUNE 2
ART 16
WWW.SEDRO-WOOLLEY.COM
CURRENTS 10
VIEWS 6
MAIL 4
WWW.BELLINGHAMROLLERBETTIES.COM
COT TAGE SCHOOL BENEFIT: A silent auction, live entertainment, food and more will
be part of an annual benefit for the Cottage
School starting at 7:30pm at the Leopold
Crystal Ballroom, 1224 Cornwall Ave. Tickets
will be $20 at the door.
DO IT 2
WWW.NWHAWAIIOHANA.WEBS.COM
ROLLER BE T T IES: The Bellingham Roller
Betties will host a double-header starting at
5pm at Whatcom Community College’s Orca
Pavilion. Tickets are $6 for kids and $14 for
adults.
WORDS
WORDS12
12
WWW.LYNDEN.ORG
ALOHA FESTIVAL: Northwest Hawai’i
‘Ohana presents the inaugural “Bridge of
Aloha” Festival from 10am-8pm at the
Ferndale Events Center, 5715 Barrett Rd.
The event will feature Hawaiian music, hula
and Polynesian performances, food vendor
booths, cultural workshops and more.
Admission is $5-$7.
WWW.LINCOLNTHEATRE.ORG
WED., JUNE 6
GREEN DRINK S: Network with likeminded
environmentally aware folks at the monthly
Green Drinks happening from 5-7pm at
Backcountry Essentials, 214 W. Holly St.
Entry is free.
WWW.RE-SOURCES.ORG
#22.07
SIGN CELEBRATION: Attend a celebration and lighting ceremony at 6:30pm
for the new marquee at Mount Vernon’s
Lincoln Theatre, 712 S. First St. The event
is the culmination of more than a year of
fundraising for “Project 85,” the effort
to commission and install the sign on the
front façade in honor of the Lincoln’s 85th
birthday.
CASCADIA WEEKLY
SUN., JUNE 3
05.30.12
[email protected]
13
FOOD 30
Getout
B-BOARD 24
H I K I NG
RU N N I NG
SK I I NG
JUNE 1-2
GOOD T IME GIRLS: Remember the “Sin &
Gin” tours from last summer? Well, the original
Good Time Girls are back—along with a few new
faces—for more lively historical walking tours.
Things kick off this weekend with the original
“Sin & Gin” tours happening at 6:45pm Fri.-Sat.
in downtown Bellingham, a new “Sin & Gin”
tour starting at 6:45pm Fridays at Fairhaven’s
Sycamore Building, and an afternoon “Historical
Walking Tour” beginning at 2pm every Saturday in
Fairhaven. All tours will be offered through Aug.
25. Tickets are $10-$20.
GET OUT 14
STAGE 15
ART 16
MUSIC 18
FILM 22
WWW.GOODTIMEGIRLSBHAM.COM
DAVID WILLOUGHBY
WORDS
GET OUT1214
CURRENTS 10
VIEWS 6
MAIL 4
DO IT 2
05.30.12
#22.07
CASCADIA WEEKLY
14
C YCL I NG
doit
BY GRACE JACKSON
The Hammers
HOMEGROWN FUN ON THE FIELD
A FEW weeks ago, I was part of a monumental event that rocked
Bellingham’s foundation to the core. No, it wasn’t an earthquake; it was
something far more substantial and beautiful than that. This unforgettable milestone was the first home game of the Bellingham United
Football Club’s—also known as the “Hammers”—inaugural season.
I, along with a crowd of about 1,400 other fans, witnessed the
birth of our very own semi-professional, homegrown soccer team.
Bellingham United is all about local people, local pride and local
passion. Those of us in the stands were proud to see the Hammers
embody the spirit of the world’s most popular game. It was a historic,
tectonic-plate-shifting event. If you missed that inaugural game, or
the two home games that followed, don’t miss the home game Sun.,
June 3.
I’ve never been a big fan of sports, so I was surprised at how much
I enjoyed this. The games are fast, furious, full of passion and beauti-
ful soccer, which can be magical to watch.
This local football club is the essence of
Bellingham because they celebrate the values of community, courage and athleticism
through the sport of soccer. According to
head coach Lance Calloway, 16 players from
a pool of 36 are from Bellingham or grew up
in Whatcom County.
Calloway said it took
a lot of time to recruit
players, create the
framework of a strong
team and do it the
right way. He, along
with Bellingham United
club president and cofounder Jeff McIntyre,
ATTEND hoped to create a fun
WHAT: Bellingham
environment
where
United Football
young kids can watch
Club takes on
very talented players
Khalsa Sporting
and respect what they
Club
are doing on the field.
WHEN: 3pm Sun.,
June 3
It’s a great opportunity
WHERE: Civic
for families to come
Stadium
out, see the team workCOST: $4-$8
ing hard and committed
INFO: www.belling
to the team goal of exhamunited.com
cellence in soccer.
Bellingham has a tremendous soccer legacy and culture. Starting at a young age,
with the Whatcom Development League and
then the Whatcom Football Club (the Rangers program), our kids have every opportunity to excel in soccer. My daughter plays
for a Rangers team and it’s an impressive
organization. She’s learned a lot, not only
in terms of soccer, but also how to excel by
setting goals and becoming the best possible person she can be.
I went to that first game out of sheer curiosity, but I left as a converted and obsessive
Hammers fan, having experienced the most
fun I’ve had in a long time. We plan on going
to every home game and possibly some away
games as well.
The Hammers are back in town this weekend
at Civic Stadium. Tickets are cheaper than a
movie and inherently more exciting. Attending a home game is the ultimate in “buying
local.” Come see why Bellingham United is
the highest-scoring team in the Pacific Coast
Soccer league. Bring a date or bring your parents; just come out, rally the team and join
the homegrown fun.
JUNE 1-3
HIGHLAND GAMES: The annual Bellingham
Highland Games take place Friday through Sunday
at Ferndale’s Hovander Homestead Park, 5299
Nielsen Ave. In addition to Scottish athletic and
dance competitions, there’ll be plenty of live
Celtic music, a pipe band competition, games
for kids, caber salutes, parades and much more.
Entry is $10-$13.
WWW.BHGA.ORG
SAT., JUNE 2
TRAILS DAY PROJEC T: Join REI and the Washington Trails Association for a National Trails
Day project from 8:30am-2:30pm on the Excelsior
Pass Trail.
WWW.WTA.ORG
GIRLS ON THE RUN: All can participate in the
“Girls on the Run 5K” starting at 9am at Bellingham’s Barkley Village. Cost is $15.
WWW.WHATCOMYMCA.ORG
SUN RACE: The Greater Bellingham Running Club
hosts the annual “Race Beneath the Sun” starting
at 10am at the upper pavilion at Fairhaven Park.
Cost is $3-$8.
WWW.GBRC.NET
DOXIE WALK: Bring your dachshunds along to
take part in the 8th annual Doxie Walk beginning at 10am at the Fairhaven train station, 401
Harris Ave.
303-9202
JUNE 2-3
BIG BIRD FLY-IN: The Bell Air RC Flyers hosts
its 23rd annual Big Bird Fly-In from 9am-4pm
Sat.-Sun. in Ferndale on Red River Rd.
WWW.BELLAIRRCFLYERS.COM
WATERFRONT FEST IVAL: Celebrate marine heritage at the annual Anacortes Waterfront Festival
happen from 10am-6pm Sat. and 10am-5pm Sun.
at the Cap Sante Marina and beyond.
WWW.ANACORTES.ORG
SUN., JUNE 3
MUDDY MAYHEM: Sign up for a three-mile race
over dirt hills and mud pits at 9am at Hannegan
Speedway, 4212 Hannegan Rd. Cost is $60-$75.
WWW.MUDDY-MAYHEM.COM
GARDEN TOUR: As part of Everybody Bikes
Summer Rides series, take part in a School Garden
Tour beginning at 1pm at the Youth Grown Garden, 1020 N. State St.
WWW.EVERYBODYBIKE.COM
TUES., JUNE 5
K AYAK BASICS: Sharmon Hill of Moondance
Kayak Tours will lead a “Kayak Basics” clinic at
7pm at REI, 400 36th St.
647-8955 OR WWW.REI.COM
WED., JUNE 6
BIKE BASICS: A “Bike Maintenance Basics”
workshop begins at 7pm at REI, 400 36th St.
Register in advance for the free workshop.
647-8955
doit
MAY 31-JUNE 1
BARD ON TH
THE BEACH: The
Taming of the Shrew kicks
off Bard on th
the Beach’s new
season with aan 8pm showing
Thurs. at Vancouver,
Van
B.C.’s
Vanier Park. The
T Shakespearian offe
offering shows in
repertory wit
with Macbeth, The
Merry Wives of Windsor, and
King John thr
through Sept. 22.
Tickets are $2
$21-$40.
SPRING DANCE SHOWCASE: Bellingham Dance
Company presents its Spring
Dance Showcase with shows
at 7pm Thurs.-Fri. at the
Firehouse Performing Arts
Center, 1314 Harris Ave.
Tickets are $12-$15.
WWW.BARDONTHEBEACH.ORG
WWW.BARD
JUNE 1-2
MIXED BAG: Through June,
view showing
showings of Triples at
Upfront Theatre,
8pm at the U
1208 Bay St. At 10pm, stick
around for “Hodgepodge”
“H
shows. Ticket
Tickets are $8-$10.
733-8855 OR
O WWW.
THEUPFRONT.COM
THEUPFRONT.C
this weekend. How did that come about?
JB: The collaboration first came about when I
was asked by another ballet company in Bellevue to work with their dancers on a production this spring. It was a very diverse program,
which included “Treasures,” which I choreographed. The three-part medley to Billy the
Kid, Rodeo, and The Red Pony was set to Western themes from the American vernacular.
CW: Isn’t it kind of crazy to produce two separate
performances in one weekend?
JB: It is a little stressful, but that is why I just
love my dancers and my crew. They are always
having a lot of fun, so the atmosphere is indescribably wonderful. Everyone realizes that to
perform on a high level for the audience you
have to being enjoying every minute of what
you are doing or the audience won’t enjoy it.
CW: Why should people come to your shows?
JB: People always enjoy NBT performances.
They can see the work that goes into every
aspect of each production and the inspiration they feel from our dancers.
IMPROVAGA
IMPROVAGANZA:
The Dead
Parrots Socie
Society performs
“Behind the Improv,”
I
at
7:30pm and 9:30pm
9
Fri. at
WWU’s Fraser 4. At 4:30pm
the Dead Parrots
SSat.,
t watch
t h th
perform with members of
the Upfront Theatre. At
6pm, New York City’s Upright
Citizens Brigade will perform
at the Performing Arts Center
Mainstage. Ticket prices
vary.
650-6146
THOROUGHLY MODERN MILLIE: The musical known as
Thoroughly Modern Millie opens
this weekend with showings
at 8pm Fri.-Sat. at the Anacortes Community Theatre,
918 M Ave. Tickets are $20.
WWW.ACTTHEATRE.COM
NINJA MUSICAL: View
a tale of “love among the
shadows” when Colossus!
Theatre Productions presents
A Ninja Must Be Silent: An
Original One-Act Musical at
11pm Fri.-Sat. at the iDiOM
Theater, 1418 Cornwall Ave.
Tickets are $5.
WWW.IDIOMTHEATER.COM
WWW.
BELLINGHAMDANCECOMPANY.
FOOD 30
B-BOARD 24
COM
JUNE 1-2
CAPSTONE CONCERT:
Western Washington University’s theatre and dance
departments present their
annual “Capstone Concert”
at 7:30pm Fri.-Sat. at the
school’s Performing Arts
Center (room 16). Tickets
are $8.
650-6146
FOLK DANCE PART Y:
Kafana Republic will perform
at the Fourth Corner Folk
Dancer’s monthly dance
party from 7:30-10:30pm at
the Fairhaven Library, 1117
12th St.
380-0456
SUN., JUNE 3
AFRO-BRASILIAN FEST IVAL: Western Washington
University’s Capoeria Club
hosts an Afro-Brasilian Festival from 10am-4pm at the
school’s Carver Gym.
WWW.BELLINGHAMCAPOEIRA.
BLOGSPOT.COM
SILK ROAD SHOWCASE:
Maggie Rose, Banat Sahar,
Katy Houseman, Mahala
Dancers, Alyssa Springs,
Blonde Ambition, Portico
Dance Company, and other
special guests will perform
at a “Silk Road Showcase” at
6:30pm at the Leopold Crystal Ballroom, 1224 Cornwall
Ave. Admission is $5.
WWW.
BELLINGHAMBELLYDANCE.COM
WORDS 12
to the stage, they do so in a big way. Elaborate sets, live
music and contributions from a plethora of dancers and community members are par for the course. We caught up with
artistic director John Bishop to see
what’s happening with the dance company this weekend. Trust us, it’s a lot.
Cascadia Weekly: Have you performed
Coppelia—one of the world’s most
produced ballets around—before?
John Bishop: This is the second time
we are performing Coppelia. We perATTEND
formed it in 2000 and are excited
WHAT: Coppelia
about bringing it back.
WHEN: 7:30pm June
CW: What was the motivation for stag1-2 and 2pm Sun.,
June 3
ing it again?
WHERE: Mount
JB: I think it is a good fit for the
Baker Theatre, 104
Northwest Ballet Theatre because
N. Commercial St.
it is a ballet that blends well with
COST: $15-$24
dancers we have, giving even
INFO: 734-6080 or
www.mountbaker
younger dancers the opportunity to
theatre.com
dance quite a bit in the production.
WHAT: Treasures of
And the story and choreography is
Aaron Copland
extremely enjoyable for both dancWHEN: 2pm Sat.,
ers and audience.
June 2
WHERE: Mount
CW: What’s it about?
Baker Theatre
JB: A young man sees a beautiful girl
COST: $15-$24
reading a book on balcony and blows
her a kiss as his fiance watches from
behind. The girl turns out be a lifelike doll created by an
eccentric inventor. There are lots of crazy and comical
twists and beautiful dances throughout the whole ballet.
CW: How many people are involved with putting this on?
JB: Counting artistic staff, cast, crew, volunteers and contributors, I count about 150 on this weekend’s production. It also requires an incredible amount of time and
energy over the course of six months to bring the production to the stage.
CW: The Starry Night Orchestra is back for this show. Is it
important to have live music for a ballet?
JB: The orchestra really makes such a difference. In the
overall ballet design of things, it provides the soul for the
production. This is now the second time for Bellingham to
have a full-length classical ballet with orchestra. In this
way, NBT wants to serve this community by celebrating
the marriage of ballet and live music.
CW: You’re also presenting “The Treasures of Aaron Copland”
FILM 22
MAY
A 31-JUNE
31-J
7
WHEN THE Northwest Ballet Theatre brings classics
MUSIC 18
DA NCE
201-5464 O
OR WWW.
ART 16
IDIOMTHEATER.COM
IDIOMTHEATER
STAGE 15
16
NORTHWEST BALLET THEATRE’S BUSY WEEKEND
EEKEND
WWW.ROOTEDEMERGING.ORG
GET OUT 14
Coppelia and Copland
BRISEIS: Ge
Get a behind-thescenes peek aat the Trojan War
when Glenn Hergenhahn’s
H
fabulous tragicomedy
trag
Briseis
shows for the final weekend
at 8pm Thurs.-Sat.
Thurs
at the
iDiOM Theater,
Theate 1418 Cornwall
Ave. Tickets aare $10.
BY AMY KEPFERLE
CURRENTS 10
MAY
A 31-JUNE
31-J
2
VIEWS 6
THEUPFRONT.COM
THEUPFRONT.C
WWW.SHAKESNW.ORG
OPEN MIC: Comedians,
dancers, thespians and other
performers are invited to an
all-ages Masquerade Open
Mice starting at 5:30pm
at the Old Foundry, 100 E.
Maple St. Tickets are $7-$10
and proceeds will benefit
Rooted Emerging programs.
MAIL 4
733-8855 O
OR WWW.
DO IT 2
PROF I L ES
05.30.12
DA NC E
GOOD, BAD, UGLY: Watch
“The Good, the Bad and the
Ugly” at 8pm every Thursday
at the Upfront Theatre, 1208
Bay St. At 10pm, stick around
for “The
The Proje
Project.” Entry is
$4-$7.
FEAST OF FOOLS: Shakespeare Northwest will host
“Feast of Fools,” a fundraising kickoff event for this
summer’s season, from 2-4pm
in Skagit County at the Rexville Grange, 19299 Rexville
Grange Rd.
#22.07
T H E AT ER
THURS., MAY 31
SAT., JUNE 2
CASCADIA WEEKLY
staGe
STAGE
15
doit
FOOD 30
visual
OPENINGS
BY AMY KEPFERLE
CREATIVITY IN ACTION
of competitors checked their safety gear. Helmets were fastened, coveralls were zipped, knee and elbow pads were secured and goggles were
affixed just so.
Then, without further ado, the racers climbed into their washing machines—and a host of other derby cars fashioned out of old appliances and
assorted parts—and proceeded to make their way down a semi-steep hill in
a manner that wasn’t so much Indy 500 as it was pure vaudeville.
Those lining the street howled and clapped as the racers haphazardly
made their way to the finish line. After all, it’s not every day it’s possible (or legal) to see sane humans making their way down city streets
in conveyances typically found only in utility rooms, kitchens, garages
and basements.
The spectacle was only one part of the Appliance Depot’s annual Appliance Art Revival, but it’s the one that, every June, puts the action in
art and draws attention to the company’s mission, which is to keep our
community healthy and to model environmental sustainability by reducing the number of appliances entering the waste stream.
With creative reuse at its forefront, the event is meant to make sure
CASCADIA WEEKLY
#22.07
DO IT 2
Appliance Art Revival
05.30.12
MAIL 4
VIEWS 6
CURRENTS 10
WORDS 12
GET OUT 14
STAGE 15
ART 16
MUSIC 18
FILM 22
B-BOARD 24
GALLERIES
16
IN THE moments before the big race was to get underway, a gaggle
PROFILES
people know that recycling doesn’t have to just
mean putting cans and bottles in one bin and
plastics and newspapers in others. In other
words, it can be fun.
Those who want to get a closer look at the
unique derby cars that will be careening down
Maple Street before coming to a rest at Cornwall
Avenue can do so from 10am-3pm Sat., June 2
during the Bellingham Farmers Market at the Depot Market Square. Then, after heading home to
put their fresh produce away, they can come back
downtown and line up to watch the action.
But, as per the event’s art-related moniker,
that’s not all that’s on the roster.
For the past month, a variety of quirky and
fabulous art pieces fashioned mostly out of used
appliance parts—some of
which are quite difficult to
recognize once they’ve been
repurposed—has been peppered throughout Boundary
Bay Brewery. After the race,
attendees are encouraged to
// )
WHAT: 4th
make their way to Boundary’s
annual Appliance
beer garden for an auction
Art Revival
of the pieces, which features
WHEN: Derby
works by a variety of area artstarts at 5pm Sat.,
ists including Karin K. MuelJune 2. From 6:308:30pm, there’ll
ler, Shirley Erickson, Graham
be an art auction.
Schodda, and others.
At 7pm, listen to
Whether you go home with
live music from the
one
of the pieces, there’s no
Yogoman Burning
doubt
that—after watching
Band and special
guests
the thrills of the race and
WHERE: Maple
checking out and bidding
and State streets,
on the crazily creative conBoundary Bay
coctions—you’ll ever look at
Brewery
your toaster, refrigerator or
COST: Entry is $6
for the art auction
blender the same way again.
and music
But that’s kind of the
INFO: http://reuse
point.
By keeping what could
works.org
be refuse out of the dump,
those at the Appliance Depot are making sure people are aware of all that
they do. Adding on to their aforementioned mission of culling items from the waste stream, they
put this credo in motion by providing job-training
programs through the salvage, repair and sale of
reconditioned appliances.
In the moments before the derby cart race gets
underway, onlookers probably won’t be thinking
about the do-good aspects of the Appliance Depot—but that’s as it should be. But if you see a
dented washing machine coming to rest at the
bottom of the hill, rest assured, it’ll be put to
good use.
U P COM I NG E V EN TS
FRI., JUNE 1
GALLERY WALK: From 6-9pm, attend
the monthly Gallery Walk throughout
downtown Anacortes. Entry is free and
open to all.
WWW.ANACORTESNOW.COM
ART WALK: Peruse a variety of galleries, businesses and restaurants from
6-10pm as part of the Art Walk happening
throughout downtown Bellingham. Check
out the listings below, get the roster
online or pick up maps at participating
locations.
WWW.DOWNTOWNBELLINGHAM.COM
ALLIED ARTS: View “Contrast & Harmony,” featuring works from Deb Steinkamp,
Richard Nevels, Chris Murphy, and John
D’Onofrio, from 6-9pm at Allied Arts, 1418
Cornwall Ave. The colorful multimedia
exhibit can be viewed through June 30.
WWW.ALLIEDARTS.ORG
HONE Y SALON: Abstract artist Christopher Murphy will be on hand to show off
his reverse glass oil paintings from 6-9pm
at Honey Salon, 310 W. Holly St. The
works will be on display through July 3.
WWW.HONEYBELLINGHAM.COM
AMADEUS PROJEC T: Emerging artists
from WWU— Laurel Kam, Christopher
Popek, Joe, Rudko, Jake Reller, Sam Case
and Tyna Ontko—will show their works
from 6-10pm at the Amadeus Project,
1209 Cornwall Ave. The art will be up
through June, and there’ll be an artists’
talk June 15.
WWW.THEAMADEUSPROJECT.ORG
BUETHORN STUDIO: Candace N. Buethorn will unveil her new collage work, “Dawn
of the Hot-N-Ready,” from 5-9pm at
Buethorn Watercolor Studio, 301 W. Holly
St. The celebration is a culmination of her
fifteenth year in business and six months
in her new downtown location.
WWW.CANDACEBUETHORN.COM
WATERFRONT ART ISTS: See the works
of 17 of Bellingham’s most versatile artists exhibiting a variety of genres from
6-10pm at the Waterfront Artists’ Studios,
1220 Central Ave. (across from Jalapenos).
WWW.WATERFRONTARTIST
STUDIOCOLLECTIVE.BLOGSPOT.COM
FISHBOY: Head out of downtown proper
to view the works of R.R. Clark from
6-10pm at the Fishboy Gallery, 617 Virginia St. (near Trader Joe’s).
WWW.FISHBOYGALLERY.COM
SAT., JUNE 2
JANSEN ART OPENING: Attend opening
day of a Summer Fine Art Gallery exhibit
from 11am-4pm at Lynden’s Jansen Art
Center, 321 Front St.
WWW.JANSENARTCENTER.ORG
PRINTMAKERS OPENING: Attend an
opening reception for “On to the Next
One: NW Printmakers Open Call” from
5-8pm at Edison’s Smith & Vallee Gallery,
5742 Gilkey Ave. The works will be up
through June 30.
WWW.SMITHANDVALLEE.COM
ONGOI NG E X H I BI TS
ART ISANS NORTHWEST: View works
from as many as 100 Whatcom County artists on a regular basis at Artisans Northwest Art Crafts & Eats, 1215 Cornwall Ave.
WWW.ARTISANSBELLINGHAM.COM
ART WOOD: View a “New Work Show”
through June at Artwood, 1000 Harris Ave.
Andrew L. Subin
CRIMINAL DEFENSE
WWW.ARTWOODGALLERY.COM
CHUCK ANUT BREWERY: Works by
photographer Jeanie McGee are currently
on display at the Chuckanut Brewery &
Kitchen, 601 W. Holly St.
LET THERE BE ROCK.
FOOD 30
doit
B-BOARD 24
WWW.CHUCKANUTBREWERYANDKITCHEN.COM
CONCRE TE HERITAGE: In conjunction
with the Skagit County Historical Museum,
view “The Stump Ranch” through the summer at the Concrete Heritage Museum, 7380
Thompson Ave.
FOURTH CORNER FRAMES: “Here’s Looking At You” will be up through May 31 at
Fourth Corner Frames, 311 W. Holly St.
734-1340
GALLERY C YGNUS: View an exhibit
featuring works by Becky Fletcher and Patty
Detzer through June 24 at La Conner’s Gallery Cygnus, 109 Commercial Ave.
WWW.GALLERYCYGNUS.COM
FILM 22
MUSIC 18
CONSULTATION
(360) 734-6677
www.andrewsubin.com
ART 16
WWW.BELLINGHAMFOG.COM
FREE
Buy Dad a Beer on Dad’s Day
Vienna Lager is Back!
HoPPY Hour (Bar/Patio) Su-Th 4-6
Friday $8 Liter Stein Night
GOOD EARTH: Irene Lawson’s “Pattern
Play” can be viewed through June at Good
Earth Pottery, 1000 Harris Ave.
STAGE 15
714-0815 OR WWW.FISHBOYGALLERY.COM
FOG: View a variety of works by noted artists at the Fairhaven Originals Gallery, 960
Harris Ave.
Drug, Alcohol &
Driving Related
Offenses
@;@=3E;4D7I;@9 5A?–[email protected]@
GET OUT 14
(360) 853-7041
FISHBOY GALLERY: Check out the contemporary folk art of RR Clark from 12-5pm
every Mon.-Fri. at the FishBoy Gallery, 617
Virginia St.
WWW.GOODEARTHPOTS.COM
WORDS 12
JANSEN ART CENTER: Sign up for classes
and workshops at Lynden’s new Jansen Art
Center, 321 Front St.
WWW.JANSENARTCENTER.ORG
CURRENTS 10
MONA: “Everett DuPen and His Legacy,”
“Veruska Vagen: Somewhere in Time,” “Tulipieres: The Tulip Vase Revisited,” and “Works
on Paper from the Permanent Collection”
can be seen through June 10 at La Conner’s
Museum of Northwest Art, 121 S. First St.
VIEWS 6
WWW.MUSEUMOFNWART.ORG
MAIL 4
QUILT MUSEUM: “Deep Spaces” and Carol
Taylor’s “Contemporary Art Quilts: Working
in a Series” can be viewed through June 24
at the La Conner Quilt & Textile Museum,
703 Second St. Entry is $5-$7.
WWW.LACONNERQUILTS.COM
DO IT 2
SCOT T MILO GALLERY: The Women Painters of Washington’s “Summer Daze” can be
viewed through June 28 at Anacortes’ Scott
Milo Gallery, 420 Commercial Ave.
th
eV
en
era
ble
p
Chog
yan Trungpa Rin
och
e
y
#22.07
CASCADIA WEEKLY
We offer other classes and events. Please
see our website for up-to-date listings.
b
ng
wi
dra
WWW.WHATCOMMUSEUM.ORG
ink
Rigon
g-kha (pen and
WWW.WESTERNGALLERY.WWU.EDU
WHATCOM MUSEUM: “From the Melting
Pot into the Fire: Contemporary Israeli
Ceramics,” “Art of Recycling,” and “ARTIFACTual” can currently be viewed at the
Whatcom Museum’s Old City Hall and the
Lightcatcher Building.
Free Meditation
Instruction at 6:30pm.
Meditation from 7-7:45.
Class from 8-8:45.
The
p
eri
lou
s ro
ute
to
WWW.SKAGITCOUNT Y.NET
WESTERN GALLERY: Graduating art
students will show their work at a “Senior
Students Art Show” through June 9 at
WWU’s Western Gallery.
Monday Nights
Open House
Meditation and Talk
05.30.12
WWW.SCOTTMILO.COM
SK AGIT HISTORICAL MUSEUM: “The
Murrow Brothers: Peak of Their Professions”
shows through Dec. 21 at La Conner’s Skagit
County Historical Museum, 501 4th St. The
exhibit celebrates the lives of the sons of
Skagit County who made an impact on their
world.
17
FOOD 30
music
CASCADIA WEEKLY
#22.07
05.30.12
DO IT 2
MAIL 4
VIEWS 6
CURRENTS 10
WORDS 12
GET OUT 14
STAGE 15
ART 16
MUSIC
18
MUSIC 18
FILM 22
B-BOARD 24
SHOW PREVIEWS › › RUMOR HAS IT
18
BY CAREY ROSS
JD McPherson
SOUNDS THAT SWING
WHEN THREE
separate people, unrelated to and
independent of each other, reach out to me to tell me
about an upcoming show, it’s a pretty clear sign I should
listen to what they’ve got to say and who they’re saying
it about.
This is exactly what happened when JD McPherson decided to come to town.
To be clear, the three people who passed on the recommendation were not Tom Waits, Nick Lowe, or John Prine—
although it easily could’ve been (provided I was acquainted
with any of those legendary songwriters, that is), as all
three are reportedly big fans of this Oklahoma crooner.
That’s pretty heady stuff for a guy who used earn his living
in front of a classroom rather than behind a microphone.
McPherson, however, seems to be taking it all in his Brylcreemed, analog-loving stride.
To call McPherson a throwback artist would be an apt
description, but if that description brings to mind another
slammin’ soul singer from the Daptone roster a la Sharon
Jones or Charles Bradley, you’ve found
yourself lost in the wrong musical era.
To meet up with the musical tradition from which McPherson draws and
then so effortlessly channels, you’ll
ATTEND have to travel back in time a little furWHO: JD
ther, to the days of Buddy Holly and
McPherson, Louis
early Elvis Presley, perhaps. Because
Ledford
the music that speaks to McPherson is
WHEN: 8pm
Thurs., May 31
also the stuff that made the 1950s so
WHERE: The Green great—and if you think a person raised
Frog, 1015 N. State
on punk rock and cattle ranching in the
St.
modern era can’t do Carl Perkins and
COST: $10
Jerry Lee Lewis justice, you obviously
MORE INFO:
www.acoustic
haven’t heard McPherson blow through
tavern.com
tracks like “North Side Gal” and “Scandalous” like a time traveler from a music scene past.
The truth is, Bellingham has frequently embraced such
nostalgia-inducing modern acts—and often long before
the rest of the world catches on. In that sense, McPherson
can be classed right alongside Jones and Bradley, which
means all signs point to his upcoming Green Frog show
presenting a prime get-in-on-the-ground-floor musical
opportunity. What I’m trying to say is, see McPherson now
before the whole world catches on, lest you have to buy
a pass to next year’s incarnation of Bumbershoot or Sasquatch to see what you so regrettably missed.
Rumor Has It
IF YOU’VE BEEN following the Last Band
Standing competition at the Underground
(early rounds took place at the bar every
Thursday night during May), you are probably already well aware that the final is upon
us—it takes place Thurs., May 31 at the
bar—and four local bands remain. Those
bands are, in no particular order, the Bad
Tenants, My Dad Bruce, Kowalski, and Black
Beast Revival. In order to reach the finals,
those four bands took down very many
other bands, some you know and love, and
some you’ve barely ever heard of. But if
you’d like to swear allegiance to one of the
remaining bands, I’m sure they’d love you
forever (even if they don’t share their winnings with you) if
you made your way
to the final show
and cast your vote
accordingly. Because
competitive democracy is
the principle upon
which this country
was founded and
it is the thing that
BY CAREY ROSS
makes us great. Or
something.
Also on the roster of worthy upcoming
events is the Urban Music Festival, which
will happen all weekend long (June 1-2) at
the Wild Buffalo. The festival is in its eighth
incarnation, so the mixture of music, art,
circus performers and more is clearly one
that fans find to be appealing. If nothing
else, it’s an inexpensive, easy way to catch
back-to-back sets by Acorn Project, who
headline both nights of the festival. And to
those who say (and I know you’re out there
as some of you have said this very thing
to me), “Really? Both nights? Come on,” to
you I reply thusly: When you plan and execute your own festival with great success
year after year, and your band works as hard
and has the kind of mad draw Acorn Project
does, you can headline two nights in a row
too. And, when that day comes, if you’re
anything like Acorn Project, fans will show
up in droves to watch you do it. Probably
I would add a "so there” onto the end of
that statement, but that part is negotiable
depending upon how childish I may or may
not be feeling in the moment.
But Acorn Project isn’t the only source
of entertainment to be found at the Urban
Music Festival. Also on hand (on stages
both inside and out) will be Polecat, Snug
Harbor, Dream Science Circus, Yogoman
Burning Band, Medium Troy, My Dad Bruce,
and many others, along with buskers, food
vendors, a silent auction, family activities and more. Some of it is free, some of
it isn’t, but all of it is pretty cheap at the
price—especially the free stuff. And you
can’t beat free stuff.
Open Daily @ 11AM
Best Happy Hour in the County
404 S. 3rd. Mt. Vernon
www.skagitbrew.com
360-336-2884
Upstairs Banquet Loft
To Go Orders
GOURMET TRINITY
TWENTY FREE WILLS AVAILABLE
BAND POPS: The Whatcom Wind Ensemble, Symphonic Band, and WWU band alumni will perform
at a “Band Pops!” concert at 8pm at Western’s
Performing Arts Center Concert Hall. The performance is free and open to the public.
650-3130
FAME CONCERT: Bellingham Sings will host
a FAME (Female Artists for Music Education)
benefit concert featuring local female musicians and a silent auction featuring the work
of Whatcom County women artists from 7:309:30pm at the Amadeus Project, 1209 Cornwall
Ave. Tickets are $20-$25.
The First 20 Clients Who Wish To
Leave a Gift of Any Size to a Local
Community Group Can Have Their
Wills Done Completely Free of Charge.
Daniel Sobel
GET OUT 14
WED., MAY 30
From A Community Focused Estate Planner
VISIT WWW.DANIELSOBEL.COM TO LEARN MORE
OR CONTAC T DANIEL SOBEL AT
(360) 510-7816
WWW.MCINT YREHALL.ORG
SUN., JUNE 3
WHATCOM CHORALE: “Comforting Words” will be
the theme of a sacred music concert featuring the
Whatcom Chorale and Whatcom Chorale Sinfonia
at 3pm at the First Congregational Church, 2401
Cornwall Ave. Tickets are $5-$15.
VIEWS 6
YOUTH SYMPHONY: Performers from the
Fidalgo Youth Symphony will perform at the
final concert of the season at 7pm at Mount
Vernon’s McIntyre Hall, 2501 E. College Way.
Tickets are $15.
CURRENTS 10
393-1687 OR WWW.BELLINGHAMSINGS.ORG
THURS., MAY 31
WORDS 12
Snug Harbor, Staxx Brothers (pictured), Polecat, SpaceBand, and more will be part of the very first Moon
Mountain Festival taking place June 1-3 at the Moon Mountain Lodge in Sedro-Woolley. The event takes
place rain or shine, and camping is encouraged.
STAGE 15
QuelFromage.com | 671.0203 | 1200 OLD FAIRHAVEN PARKWAY, SUITE 101 | Open Seven Days
ART 16
MUSIC 18
MUSIC
18
cheese + wine + chocolate
B-BOARD 24
Families Welcome
FILM 22
Full Lunch & Dinner Menu
FOOD 30
Great selection
of Ales & Lagers
musicevents
WWW.WHATCOMCHORALE.ORG
FRI., JUNE 1
DO IT 2
MAIL 4
PIANO RECITAL: David Brooks, Annie Brooks,
and Karissa Zadinsky will perform at a Piano
Recital beginning at 7pm at the Firehouse
Performing Arts Center, 1314 Harris Ave. Tickets
are $5 for students and $15 general.
734-2776
(360) 387-0374 OR WWW.LOVELACONNER.COM
WWW.PARADOX-NATION.COM
CHOIR CONCERT: Mount Vernon High School
choirs will present a celebration of music from
around the world for their school year finale at
4pm and 7pm at the town’s McIntyre Hall, 2501
E. College Way. Tickets are $6-$8.
WWW.MCINT YREHALL.ORG
WED., JUNE 6
MUSIC CLUB: Pianist Alexandra “Sasha” Tsirkel
performs a variety of works at the Bellingham
Music Club’s free monthly concert at 10:30am at
Trinity Lutheran Church, 119 Texas St.
671-0252
SAT., JUNE 2
THURS., JUNE 7
TRADIT IONAL JAZZ: The Ain’t No Heaven
Seven Jazz Band will perform during the
Bellingham Traditional Jazz Society’s monthly
dance from 2-5pm at the VFW Hall, 625 N State
St. Entry is $6-$10.
SEK ST I ENSEMBLE: Show up for an evening of
Finnish music when two groups from Finland—
the Seksti Ensemble and Jepokryddona—perform at 7pm at Lynden’s Jansen Art Center, 321
Front St. Suggested donation is $10.
734-2973 OR WWW.BTJS.WEBS.COM
WWW.JANSENARTCENTER.ORG
05.30.12
MOON MOUNTAIN FESTIVAL: Snug Harbor,
Staxx Brothers, Polecat, SpaceBand, and
Pickle Toss will be among the many musicians
taking part in the inaugural Moon Mountain
Music Festival Fri.-Sun. in Sedro-Woolley at
the Moon Mountain Lodge, 3980 Camp 2 Rd.
There’ll also be entertainment by the likes of
the DK and Morgan Show, local art exhibits,
food and drink, a beer garden and much more.
Cost is $45 for a weekend pass and $20-$50
for camping.
MON., JUNE 4
Learn the Transcendental Meditation Technique
June 1-4
For registration, times and directions, call 800 595-3186
www.tm.org/seattle
Instructor: Annie Skipper
Director, Seattle TM Program
CASCADIA WEEKLY
JUNE 1-3
0Z`V\Y
=63=6
[OL),:;
P[JHUIL&
#22.07
MUSIC AND ART: The La Conner Festival of
Music and Art presents music by the Swinomish
Blues Review and others from 3-10pm at the
town’s Maple Hall, 104 Commercial Ave. Tickets
are $20 and include music, jazz, food, wine
and art.
:PUJL PU)LSSPUNOHT
Diagnosis U Repair U Service U We Buy and Sell Volvos
New & used parts in stock U Visa, MasterCard and Discover
360.734.6117
rainbowautoservice.com
Open Monday to Thursday, 8-6
19
FOOD 30
B-BOARD 24
musicvenues See below for venue
addresses and phone
numbers
FILM 22
05.31.12
WEDNESDAY THURSDAY
ART 16
06.02.12
FRIDAY
SATURDAY
SUNDAY
Cheryl Jewell, Saltwater
Octet
Lindsay Street
Michael George Gonzales Trio
Holmes-Shea Band
Aaron Guest (Tap Room),
Yogoman Burning Band
(Beer Garden)
Happy Hour Music Puirt
na Gael
Fish Fry Fryday w/The Ames
Appliance Art Revival w/Yogoman
Burning Band
Open Mic
The Super Saturated Sugar Strings
Brown Lantern Ale
House
The Business
Karl Blau
Cabin Tavern
STAGE 15
06.01.12
WWU Faculty Jazz Collective
Blue Horse Gallery
Boundary Bay
Brewery
MUSIC
18
MUSIC 18
05.30.12
Karaoke
Conway Muse
Open Mic
Amara Grace
Cyndy's Broiler
Karaoke
Jam Night
Matney Cook and the Mudflat
Walkers, The Jaded Lovers
Green Frog
Stephen Ray Leslie and Old Day
Creek, Rainieros, 1 Uppers
Paul Klein
The Vonvettas,
Topless
He Whose Ox is Gored, In Aeona
David Lee Howard & The
Fabulous Volcanos
Grover’s Tab
The Clouds
J.D. McPherson, Louis
Ledford
TUESDAY
All-Ages Jam
Ron Bailey
Open Mic
The City of Lost
Children
Soul Night w/DJ
Yogoman
CURRENTS 10
Buy One Get One Free
Fish & Chips Every Friday!
Winners Club Members get a FREE PowerBucks
Lotto Ticket every day in June, with opportunities to
win every Sunday and Tuesday!
Choose your six numbers at the PowerBucks Kiosk,
then bring your ticket(s) every Sunday and Tuesday att 7pm
for the lotto drawings. Prizes are awarded for matching:
Winners Club Members can get
2-for-1 Fish & Chip meals at
Chefs or Thirst Bar every Friday in June! Ask your server for
details.
‡IRU
‡IRU ‡IRU
‡IRU
All other tickets provide entry into our Second Chance drawLQJVIRURQ7XHVGD\-XQHVWDUWLQJDWSP
CASCADIA WEEKLY
#22.07
05.30.12
DO IT 2
TOP PRIZE
TOP
PRIZE OF
OF
VIEWS 6
Blue Horse Gallery 8)PMMZ4Ut | Boundary Bay Brewing Co. 3BJMSPBE"WFt]Brown Lantern Ale House$PNNFSDJBM"WF"OBDPSUFTt
]The Business$PNNFSDJBM
"WF"OBDPSUFTt
| Cabin Tavern8)PMMZ4Ut]Chuckanut Brewery8)PMMZ4Ut]Commodore Ballroom(SBOWJMMF4U7BODPVWFSt
MAIL 4
WORDS 12
GET OUT 14
Edison Inn
MONDAY
URBAN MUSIC FESTIVAL/
June 1-2/Wild Buffalo
Nick Vigarino's Meantown Blues
Wild Turkeys
06.03.12 06.04.12 06.05.12
On June 2,
Northwood is giving away $1000
every hour from 7:30pm to 11:30pm.
Catch the Fever and go home with an
extra $1000! See Winners Club for details.
20
W W W. N O O K S A C K C A S I N O S . C O M
9 7 5 0 N O R T H W O O D R O A D U L Y N D E N WA
877.777.9847
WEDNESDAY THURSDAY
Open Mic w/Scot Casey
The Librarians
Make.Shift Art Space
Main St. Bar and Grill
06.01.12
06.02.12
FRIDAY
SATURDAY
East Coast Dave & Hillary Susz
The Penny Stinkers
Art Walk
Human Infest, On the Ground, Ol'
Doris, Cathoholix
Country Karaoke
McKay's Taphouse
06.03.12 06.04.12 06.05.12
SUNDAY
MONDAY
TUESDAY
The Shadies
Chris Cochrane,
Chambers, Mindmeld
Rap Battle
BALTIC COUSINS/June 2/
Shakedown
Brian Hillman
Old World Deli
FOOD 30
05.31.12
FILM 22
Honeymoon
05.30.12
MUSIC 18
MUSIC
18
See below for venue
addresses and phone
numbers
B-BOARD 24
musicvenues
Chico's Paradise
ART 16
Live Music
DJ Jester
DJ Jester
DJ Jester
Betty Desire Show, DJ
Postal
Throwback Thursdays w/
DJ Shortwave
DJ QBNZA
DJ Mike Tolleson
Falcon Grady (Terrace)
Falcon Grady (Packers)
Across Tundras, Orcco, Chambers
Baltic Cousins, Hounds of the
Wild Hunt, Falling Up Stairs
Midlife Crisis & the Alimony Horns
Midlife Crisis & the Alimony Horns
Bullet Creek
Bullet Creek
Steve Faucher
Stirred Not Shaken
Semiahmoo Resort
The Shakedown
Joe Sneva & the Neon
Sharks, Ticktockman, Cat
From Hue
Emily Wells, 1939
Ensemble (early), '90s
Night (late)
Silver Reef Hotel
Casino & Spa
Skagit Valley Casino
Skylark's
Kid'sax Quartet
Karaoke
Karaoke
DJ Postal, DJ Shortwave
Tom Waits Monday
Metal Tuesday w/DJs
Dog Shredder
MOGWAI/May 29/Commodore Ballroom
Temple Bar
The Village Inn
Karaoke
Washington Sips
Wild Buffalo
Live Music (early), DJ BamBam
(late)
Spin Jam Happy Hour
(early), Wild Out Wednesday w/Blessed Coast (late)
RAC, Wishbone
Takes All Kinds (early), DJ BamBam (late)
EMILY WELLS/
May 31/Shakedown
Steve "Otis" Meyer
SlimFatLips
Urban Music Festival
Urban Music Festival
STAGE 15
#22.07
Last Band Standing
(early), DJ BamBam
(late)
05.30.12
Bar Tabac
The Underground
GET OUT 14
Kim Field and the Mighty Titans
of Tone
Frenchy Lounge Night
WORDS 12
Gin Creek
Open Mic
CURRENTS 10
Boss Rhino, Boxcar Millionaires
Jack Hamilton
Royal
Rumors
Rattletrap Ruckus
Karaoke
VIEWS 6
Rockfish Grill
DJ Ryan I
MAIL 4
The Redlight
DJ Clint
DO IT 2
DJ Little
Andre Nickatina, MUMBLS,
Cool Nutz, Knucklehead
Buster Blue, Dillon
Warnek
Conway Muse 18444 Spruce/Main St., Conway (360) 445-3000 | The Green Frog /4UBUF4UtXXXBDPVTUJDUBWFSODPN | Edison Inn $BJOT$U&EJTPOt
| Glow&)PMMZ4Ut]
Graham’s Restaurant.PVOU#BLFS)XZ(MBDJFSt
Honey Moon/4UBUF4Ut]Jinx Art Space 'MPSB4Ut | Main Street Bar & Grill .BJO4U'FSOEBMFt
2982 | Nooksack River Casino.U#BLFS)XZ%FNJOHt
| Poppe’s-BLFXBZ%St| The Redlight /4UBUF4UtXXXSFEMJHIUXJOFBOEDPGGFFDPN]Rockfish Grill $PNNFSDJBM
"WF"OBDPSUFTt
]The Royal &)PMMZ4Ut]Rumors Cabaret3BJMSPBE"WFt| Semiahmoo Resort4FNJBINPP1LXZ#MBJOFt
| The Shakedown 1212
/4UBUF4UtXXXTIBLFEPXOCFMMJOHIBNDPNSilver Reef Casino )BYUPO8BZ'FSOEBMFt
]Skagit Valley Casino Resort /%BSSL-BOF#PXt
]Skylark’s Hidden Cafe 1300
UI4Ut]Swinomish Casino$BTJOP%S"OBDPSUFTt
|Temple Bar8$IBNQJPO4Ut] The Underground &$IFTUOVU4Ut | Underground Coffeehouse
7JLJOH6OJPOSE'MPPS886 | Village Inn Pub /PSUIXFTU"WFt | Watertown Pub $PNNFSDJBM"WF"OBDPSUFTt
| Wild Buffalo 8)PMMZ4UtXXXXJMECVGGBMPOFU]5PHFU
ZPVSMJWFNVTJDMJTUJOHTJODMVEFEJOUIJTFTUFFNFEOFXTQSJOUTFOEJOGPUPDMVCT!DBTDBEJBXFFLMZDPN%FBEMJOFTBSFBMXBZTBUQN'SJEBZ
CASCADIA WEEKLY
Poppe's
21
B-BOARD 24
FOOD 30
film
STAGE 15
ART 16
MUSIC 18
FILM 22
MOVIE REVIEWS › › MOVIE SHOWTIMES
DO IT 2
MAIL 4
VIEWS 6
CURRENTS 10
WORDS 12
GET OUT 14
The plot exposition and
characterization is so
botched and inadequate,
consisting of either good
or evil characters (with no
middle ground) fending
off piranha attacks in
various disjointed scenes
around a water park until
the credits start to roll
after barely 70 minutes
CASCADIA WEEKLY
#22.07
05.30.12
REVIEWED BY BEN RAWSON-JONES
22
the ramblings of a snooty reviewer who despises trashy fun. This aquatic abomination’s
2010 predecessor Piranha 3D supplied a good
dose of enjoyable escapism that toyed with
its lowbrow status and unleashed enough
clever pop culture references to stay afloat.
Piranha 3DD is merely stupid, as opposed to
trashy—and no fun at all.
You’d think that lines like “Josh cut off
his penis because something came out of my
vagina” would provide some melodramatic
impact or camp humor, but the execution
is so abysmally poor that such moments are
botched. The direction and editing is so poor
and incoherent that there is no visceral or
dramatic impact when a piranha swims out
of a young woman’s vagina while she is in the
process of losing her virginity.
There are also frequent moments of incongruity when there are cuts between long
shots and close-ups that simply do not match
up. The 3D is similarly a waste of space with
no effort made to create any shots that create
Piranha 3DD
DON’T HASSLE THE HOFF
A MAN stands in a swimming pool with his pants pulled down while
gaining sexual pleasure from the pumps spraying water over his genitals, only for a flesh-eating piranha to leap up and lodge itself inside
the man’s rectum. That sounds like a fairly embarrassing situation to be
caught in. Yet it pales in comparison to the humiliation that will be felt
by any cinemagoer who pays good money to see Piranha 3DD. Double
dire, deflated and desperate, it is so far beyond redemption on every
level that not even a gamely self-mocking supporting turn by David Hasselhoff can make a difference.
The plot exposition and characterization is so botched and inadequate,
consisting of either good or evil characters (with no middle ground) fend-
ing off piranha attacks in various disjointed
scenes around a water park until the credits
start to roll after barely 70 minutes. That’s a
merciful running time, with the credits fleshed
out to unbearable length by behind the scenes
footage of the making of this dud. It would have
been wiser to let Vincent Price’s iconic cackle
from Michael Jackson’s “Thriller” video play on
a loop while the credits roll, an admission that
the audience have been swindled.
Don’t be fooled into thinking that these are
the requisite immersive effect. Simply having
a fish swim towards the camera and bear its
fangs is not enough. As 3D films are significantly more expensive to watch than their 2D
counterparts, this is unforgiveable.
The only glimmer of hope surfaces when
David Hasselhoff walks into shot midway
through the movie, clutching a large glass of
whisky in the morning and crooning a love
song to two ladies in his hotel room bed. Fair
play for sending himself up, but before long
he is festooned on a lifeguard’s chair observing the piranha-produced bloodshed and doing little else apart from mocking his own
existence. Even that video footage of him
drunkenly scooping up a burger from the floor
and scoffing it provides a more respectable
outlet for his persona.
No thought has gone into making this movie
and contriving involving situations for the
viewer. Sympathies go out to both the Hoff
and Christopher Lloyd, who returns as the fearful fish expert, for their participation. Who’d
have thought that a movie entitled Piranha
3DD could be so bereft of titillation?
FOOD 30
film ›› showtimes
BY CAREY ROSS
B-BOARD 24
FILMSHORTS
FILM 22
Battleship: I imagine the pitch meeting for this
movie went something like this, "So, I know as board
games go, this one isn't even much fun. But we can
structure an entire script around the moment when
someone says, 'You sank my battleship!' Just think of
the possibilities." ★1(tISTNJO
Call 676-9990 for theaters and showtimes.
SNOW WHITE AND THE HUNTSMAN
Goon: What's better than a regular comedy? A
comedy about hockey. Trust me on this one. Then
see for yourself. ★★★★3tISNJO
PFC's Limelight See www.pickfordfilmcenter.com for
showtimes.
The Hunger Games: As predicted, this movie is
practically its very own economy, netting about
eleventy gajillion dollars in box-office revenue so
far. And it happens to be a decent film with nary
a wand-waver or glittery vampire in sight. Team
,BUOJTTMZGF★★★★1(tISTNJO
Call 676-9990 for theaters and showtimes.
Mar vel's The Avengers: As this is a solid film,
*hNTVSFUIF%WFSTJPOJTHSFBU#VUUIF%WFSTJPO
is so bitchin' (not my typical stance when it comes
UP%
XIZOPUTFFUIBUPOF ★★★★1(t
ISTNJO
Call 676-9990 for theaters and showtimes.
Mar vel's The Avengers 3D: Much like every
Quill: The Life of a Guide Dog: This is the
based-on-actual-events account of a blind man reluctant to accept help and Quill, the guide dog who
changes his mind, heart and whole life. ★★★★★
6OSBUFEtISNJO
Pickford Film Center See www.pickfordfilmcenter.
com for showtimes.
MUSIC 18
ART 16
STAGE 15
Open Nightly Except Monday
1055 N State St
SINCE 1988
B’ham 671-3414
Snow White and the Huntsman: Proving you
never know just what is going to capture Hollywood's fickle fancy comes the second movie about
Snow White this year. This one features Bella Swan,
who will take a break from seducing vampires long
enough to do battle with an evil queen who spends
her spare time listening to her talking mirror. ★★★
1(tISTNJO
Call 676-9990 for theaters and showtimes.
Sprout Film Festival: The goal of this film festival is "making the invisible visible" by highlighting
the stories and films by and about people with developmental disabilities. Prepare to be enlightened
and amazed. ★★★★★(tISNJO
Pickford Film Center May 31 @ 11:00am & 6:00
What to Expect When You're Expecting:
Great. An ensemble comedy based on a self-help
book about child rearing. I don't want to point any
fingers here, but He's Just Not that Into You, believe
we're all holding you responsible for this. ★★ (PGtISNJO
Call 676-9990 for theaters and showtimes.
CURRENTS 10
WORDS 12
GET OUT 14
COOKING OUTSIDE THE BOX
VIEWS 6
Piranha 3DD: See review previous page. ★3t
ISNJO
Call 676-9990 for theaters and showtimes.
PEP PER
SISTERS
BE RNIE
MAIL 4
The Dictator: Sacha Baron Cohen plays a ruthless
dictator who somehow wants to save his country from
democracy by exiling himself to the United States.
Whatever the premise (does he really even need one
BUUIJTQPJOU $PIFOBOEIJTMPXCSPXCSBOEPGTBUJSF
seem equal to the task. ★★★★3tISNJO
Call 676-9990 for theaters and showtimes.
The Mountain Runners: Remember when you
came to the Limelight to see this movie—which
chronicles the story of the Mt. Baker Marathon—
only to find it was sold out? Well, the fine folks
at the theater have held it over for you. You are
welcome. ★★★★★6OSBUFEtISNJO
PFC's Limelight See www.pickfordfilmcenter.com for
showtimes.
DO IT 2
Dark Shadows: I do not generally favor remakes.
And frankly, I'm growing weary of Tim Burton's and
Johnny Depp's cinematic love affair. I think it's
time to see other people, you two. ★★1(t
ISNJO
Call 676-9990 for theaters and showtimes.
Men in Black III 3D: For everyone who has ever
wanted to see Tommy Lee Jones in 3D, which also
happens to be no one. ★★★1(tISNJO
Call 676-9990 for theaters and showtimes.
05.30.12
Chernobyl Diar ies: Remember the good old days,
when all movie villains were our Cold War enemies?
Well, consider this a bizarro trip back in time, to
a place called Chernobyl where the villains aren't
so much burly Russian men as they are the hellish
products of prolonged exposure to radiation. The
found-footage genre goes nuclear. ★★★★3t
ISNJO
Call 676-9990 for theaters and showtimes.
Men in Black III: Will Smith, Tommy Lee Jones,
and Josh Brolin reunite for the third installment in
this alien-invasion franchise. Can a family-friendly
hit song about the movie by the former Fresh Prince
be far behind? ★★★1(tISNJO
Call 676-9990 for theaters and showtimes.
#22.07
The Best Exotic Mar igold Hotel: The fact that
everyone on the planet converged at the PFC to see
this movie during its opening weekend there should
indicate that this excellently cast and acted ensemble dramedy is a must-see. Feel free to converge
once again. ★★★★1(tISTNJO
Pickford Film Center See www.pickfordfilmcenter.
com for showtimes.
single other person on the planet, I saw this movie
during its debut weekend. And I'd like to commend
the Nerd King, Joss Whedon, for capably helming
this old-school superhero flick in such entertaining
fashion. ★★★★1(tISTNJO
Call 676-9990 for theaters and showtimes.
Whatcom Dispute Resolution Center
Celebrates 20 Years of
Creative Conflict Resolution!
RSVP to join us June 20, 2012 for our
anniversary luncheon
Info at www.whatcomdrc.org
CASCADIA WEEKLY
Bernie: So, do you want to see a movie starring
Jack Black, Shirley MacLaine, and Matthew McConaughey and directed by Richard Linklater? Even
if it's best that you not know too much of what the
movie's about lest it spoil your enjoyment of it?
Yes. Yes, you do. ★★★★1(tISNJO
Pickford Film Center See www.pickfordfilmcenter.
com for showtimes.
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YOGA
100
MIND & BODY
Kim Sandstrom, ND, LMP,
leads a Fitness Forum focused
on “Yoga for Runners & Walkers” at 7:15pm Thursday, June
7 at Fairhaven Runners, 1209
11th St. At the free event,
you’ll learn about common
patterns of muscular imbalance in runners and walkers and yoga poses that can
help reduce pain and quicken
your stride. Bring a yoga mat
or towel and wear comfy,
stretchy clothing. More info:
www.fairhavenrunners.com
200
MIND & BODY
Raw food chef and holistic
health coach Carol Roberge
leads a “Jump Start Your Energy This Summer” workshop at
6:30pm Wednesday, May 30 at
Mount Vernon’s Skagit Valley
Food Co-op. She’ll talk about
smoothies, sprouting, how to
make power-packed energy
bars and provide tips for take
along snacks that prevent the
midday energy lows. Cost is
$5-$10. More info: www.skagitfoodcoop.com
Find out how to “Take Control of Your Hormonal Health”
at a workshop with nutritionist Jim Ehmke at 6:30pm
Wednesday, May 30 at the
Community Food Co-op, 1220
N. Forest St. Entry is $5-$6.
More info: 734-8158
Learn how to raise your
emotional IQ when Paul Mulholland, MEd, leads an “Emotional Intelligence” course
from 6:45-8:15pm Monday,
June 4 at the Community Food
Co-op, 1220 N. Forest St. He’ll
share insights into the physiology of emotions, and show
how understanding emotions
helps us to handle daily frustrations and moods, clear
our minds for better decision
making, and foster stronger
relationships with others.
Cost is $12-$14. More info:
734-8158
“Building Bridges to the
Other,” a conversation with
Lorrie Gaffney focusing on
her experiences of compassionate listening and seeing in
Israel/Palestine and Ethiopia,
happens from 7-9pm Tuesday,
June 5 at the conference room
at Opportunity Council, 1111
Cornwall Ave. Entry is by do-
B’ham Screenwriting Workshops
3 to 6 p.m on the weekends
Intro Screenwriting 101
4 Saturdays in July - $230
Advanced Screenwriting 126
8 Sundays in July / Aug. - $400
100
MIND & BODY
nation. More info: 630-6400 or
[email protected]
nection” presentation from
2-4pm Wednesday, June 6 at
the Bellingham Unitarian Fellowship, 1207 Ellsworth St.
Experiential exercises will
heighten your awareness and
experience of the energies of
personal soul and global soul.
Bring notepads, pillows to sit
upon and either yoga mats or
blankets to lie upon. Entry is
free and open to the public,
but you should register in advance. More info: 733-3837 or
[email protected]
Wellness
educator
Anastacia Metcalf leads “A
Journey into Body/Mind Con-
After Hours
@
Brandywine
1317
Commercial St.
June 13
5:00–7:00 pm
Happy Hour
Join us to learn
more about action
to support the
Bellingham Home
Fund
360-671-5600, x5
www.KulshanCLT.org
Nancy Soans helms a
“Compassionate Communication” class at 9am Saturday,
June 9 at Mount Vernon’s
Skagit Valley Food Co-op.
Soans will guide you through
the deliberate process of observation, connection with
feelings, non-threatening and
non-judgmental dialogue. Entry is free, but registration is
requested. More info: www.
skagitfoodcoop.com
Learn about “The Allergy/
Asthma Connection: Sinus Relief and Immune Support” at a
presentation with Karl Mincin
Tuesday, June 12 at the Skagit
Valley Food Co-op in Mount
Vernon. Register in advance
for the free event. More info:
www.skagitfoodcoop.com
Co-Dependents Anonymous meets from 7-8:30pm
every Tuesday at PeaceHealth St. Joseph’s South
Campus, 809 E. Chestnut St.
Entry is by donation. More
info: 676-8588
Cerise Noah
REALTOR ®
Professional,
knowledgeable,
fun & friendly
to work with.
Windermere Real Estate Whatcom, Inc.
(360) 393-5826
ScriptDoctor911.com
(360) 527-2242
[email protected]
Curious about Lummi Island?
CASCADIA WEEKLY
#22.07
05.30.12
DO IT 2
Aubrey M. Horton
Hollywood Script Doctor
24
100
MIND & BODY
The Bellingham Laughter
Club meets at 4pm Sunday,
June 3 at Bellingham’s Elizabeth Park. Certified laughter
leaders will be on hand to lead
the way. Entry is free. More
info: 734-4989 or [email protected]
VIEWS 6
Deb Zucker, ND, leads a
“Personal
Sustainability”
workshop from 6:30-8:30pm
Thursday, May 31 at Bellingham’s Community Food Coop, 1220 N. Forest St. In this
class, Dr. Zucker will explore
what it takes to prioritize your
health in a truly sustainable
way. Cost is $5-$6. More info:
734-8158
MAIL 4
CURRENTS 10
WORDS 12
GET OUT 14
STAGE 15
ART 16
MUSIC 18
FILM 22
B-BOARD
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FOOD 30
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MIND & BODY
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MIND & BODY
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200
MIND & BODY
Intenders of the Highest
Good Circle typically meets
at 7pm on the second Friday
of the month at the Co-op’s
Connection Building, 1220 N.
Forest St. Len-Erna Cotton,
part of the original group in
Hawaii, is the facilitator. More
info: www.intenders.org
Learn
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MIND & BODY
Freedom Techniques (EFT)
at a variety of workshops in
Bellingham. More info: www.
eftsettings.com
A Grief Support Group meets
at 7pm every Tuesday at the
St. Luke’s Community Health
Education Center. The free,
drop-in support group is for
those experiencing the recent
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MIND & BODY
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MEDITATION
death of a friend or loved one.
More info: 733-5877
Attend a Meditation Hour
from 5:30-6:30pm every first
and third Wednesday of the
month at psychic Jill Miller’s
offices at 1304 Meador Ave.
Entry is $5. No registration
is required, but please be on
time, as the doors will close
right at 5:30. More info: www.
jillmillerpsychic.com
A Breastfeeding Café
meets at 10:30am every Monday at the Bellingham Birth
Center’s Life Song Perinatal
Wellness Center, 2430 Cornwall
Ave. Entry is $10. More info:
www.lifesongperinatal.com
VIEWS 6
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MAIL 4
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WORDS 12
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CASCADIAWEEKLY.COM
CASCADIA WEEKLY
#22.07
05.30.12
DO IT 2
MAIL 4
VIEWS 6
CURRENTS 10
WORDS 12
GET OUT 14
STAGE 15
ART 16
MUSIC 18
FILM 22
B-BOARD
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FOOD 30
rearEnd ›› ”Metal on Metal” — what’s that sound? — by Matt Jones
26
Across
1 Scrooge McDuck’s is
great
7 Big ___, Calif.
10 Boss Hogg’s
deputy
14 Full
15 Prefix for terrorism or tourism
16 542-year-old
Smurf
17 Does some comic
book work
18 With 61-across,
baking item
20 Court figure?
21 Stumped
22 Peccadillo
23 Talk incessantly
26 Words exchanged
at the altar
27 Classic Christmas
song sung by Burl
Ives
34 Drink of choice
for Chelsea Handler
36 Lymph ___
37 Go out with
38 Steinbeck extras
39 Stat in an airport
terminal
40 Parrot’s relative
42 Green Day drum-
mer ___ Cool
43 Goes quickly, oldschool
44 Egg producer
45 Typical line from
a gangster movie
bad guy
49 “___ was saying...”
50 It goes boom
51 Calendar pgs.
54 Lines on a
weather map
58 Woolly beast
61 See 18-across
64 “I just remembered...”
65 “That’s ___ and
you know it!”
66 Slippery and
snaky
67 Nobel Prizewinning physicist
Bohr
68 Precious
69 Way too precious
70 George and Jane’s
son
Down
1 “The Rocky Horror
Picture Show”
character Janet
___
2 Boredom, to Beaumarchais
3 Plan to lose
4 It may be a big
to-do
5 Small jazz combo
6 Shakespearean play
with the phrase
“The game’s afoot”
7 Irish or North
8 College home to
Joe Bruin
9 Well-worn comedy
bit
10 Postscript
11 iPod variety
12 ___ Dei (“The Da
Vinci Code” group)
13 ___ Club
19 Anti-drunk driving
org.
24 Epic that tells of
the Trojan Horse
25 Shield
28 “South Park” kid
29 “Viva ___ Vegas”
30 Includes
31 Brand known for
its first and second
name
32 Goneril’s father
33 Like morning
grass
34 Take to the polls
35 Gumbo ingredient
40 Custodian’s tool
41 5th or Madison
43 Required wear for
some food servers
46 Chemistry class
payment
47 Morales of “NYPD
Blue”
48 Bake sale organizer, maybe
52 Sponge by 3M
53 Full of lip
54 Computer debut
of 1998
55 George Takei
character
56 “What ___?”
57 Dish that simmers
59 Like some wolves
or gunmen
60 “The Amazing
Race” host Keoghan
62 ___-de-France
63 “Science Guy” Bill
©2012 Jonesin’
Crosswords
Last Week’s Puzzle
CANCER (June 21-July 22): “Some people tell
me I’d invented the sounds they called soul,” said
musician Ray Charles, “but I can’t take any credit.
Soul is just the way black folk sing when they leave
themselves alone.” I urge you to experiment with
this idea, Cancerian. In my astrological opinion, you
need to whip up a fresh, hot delivery of raw soul.
One of the best ways to do that might be to leave
yourself alone. In other words, don’t badger yourself.
Don’t pick your scabs and second-guess your enthusiasms and argue yourself into a knot. Create a nice
big space for your original self to play in.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): “Where’s the most
convenient place to discover a new species?” asks
The Second Book of General Ignorance. What do
you think the answer is, Leo? The Amazon Rainforest? The high mountainous forests of New Guinea?
Northwest Siberia? None of the above. In fact, your
best chance of finding a previously unidentified
life form is in your own garden. There are hundreds
of thousands of species that science still has no
knowledge of, and quite a few of them are near
you. A similar principle currently holds true for your
life in general. It will be close to home that you
are most likely to connect with fascinating exotica,
unknown influences, and far-out adventures.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Now and then my
readers try to bribe me. “I’ll give you $1,000,” said a
recent email from a Virgo woman, “if you will write
a sequence of horoscopes that predict I’ll get the
dream job I’m aiming for, which will in turn make me
so attractive to the guy I’m pursuing that he will beg
to worship me.” My first impulse was to reply, “That’s
all you’re willing to pay for a prophecy of two events
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Should you get
down on your knees and beg for love and recognition? No! Should you give yourself away without
seeking much in return? Don’t do that, either.
Should you try to please everyone in an attempt
to be popular? Definitely not. Should you dilute
your truth so as not to cause a ruckus? I hope not.
So then what am I suggesting you should do? Ask
the following question about every possibility that
comes before you: “Will this help me to master myself, deepen my commitment to what I want most,
and gain more freedom?”
PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Do you know why
flamingos have their distinctive orange-pink color?
It’s because of the carotene in the shrimp and other
food they consume. If they change their diet, their
feathers turn dull grey. That’s a dramatic example
of the adage, “You are what you eat.” Let’s use it
as a prompt to contemplate all the stuff you take
into the holy temple of your body, Pisces. Not just
the sandwiches and chocolate bars and alcohol, but
also the images, sounds, ideas, emotions, and energy you get from other people. Is the cumulative
effect of all those things giving you the shape and
color and texture you want to have? If not, this
would be a good time to adjust your intake.
Quill: The Life of a Guide Dog (NR) HD/100m.
Fri: (1:00); Sat: (12:15) - A moving Japanese film
Sprout Film Festival (G) DVD/90m.
Thu: 11AM, 6:00 Presented by ARC of Whatcom County
Bernie (PG-13) 35mm/104m. ALL AGES SCREENINGS
Wed: (11:00 AM) - Mommy Matinee; Thu: (3:30), 8:15
NEW PICKFORD FILM CENTER: 1318 Bay St. | 360.738.0735 | PickfordFilmCenter.org
Box Office Open 30 Min Before First Showtime - Mary’s Happy Hour: 4-6pm, M-F $1 Off Beer/Wine
NEW PRICING FOR STUDENTS: Students with Valid ID: $7.50 PFC/$6.50 Limelight
NOW SHOWING JUNE 1 - 7
at PFC’s Limelight Cinema
at 1416 Cornwall
NEW LOWER PRICES AT
The Limelight!
B-BOARD
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B-BOARD 24
FILM 22
MUSIC 18
ART 16
STAGE 15
GET OUT 14
a psychotherapist, she may coax you to tell stories
about what went wrong in your childhood. Seek
a chiropractor’s opinion and he might inform you
that most of your problems have to do with your
spine. Consult a psychic and chances are she will
tell you that you messed up in your past lives and
need a karmic cleansing. And if you ask me about
what you most need to know, I might slip you some
advice about how to access your untapped reserves
of beauty and intelligence. Here’s the moral of the
story, Sagittarius: Be discerning as you ask for feedback and mirroring. The information you receive will
always be skewed.
WORDS 12
The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel (PG-13) 35mm/124m
Judi Dench, Bill Nighy, Tom Wilkinson, Maggie Smith
“...what a charming, funny and heartwarming movie this
is, a smoothly crafted entertainment that makes good
use of seven superb veterans.” Roger Ebert
Fri: (3:30), 6:15, 9:00; Sat: (2:45), 5:30, 8:15
Sun: (12:00), (2:45), 5:30, 8:15
Mon - Wed: (3:30), 6:15, 9:00
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): If you go to
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): The state of
Kansas has a law that seems more confusing than
helpful. It says the following: “When two trains approach each other at a crossing, both shall come
to a full stop and neither shall start up again until
the other has gone.” From what I can tell, Capricorn, a similar situation has cropped up in your
life. Two parties are in a stalemate, each waiting
for the other to make the first move. At this rate,
nothing will ever happen. May I suggest that you
take the initiative?
The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel (PG-13) 35mm
Thu: (3:30), 6:15, 9:00
*Note: Thursday Screenings are 21 and Over
CURRENTS 10
tion this week is Oscar Wilde’s belief that disobedience is a primal virtue. Be ingeniously, pragmatically, and cheerfully disobedient, Gemini! Harness
your disobedience so that it generates outbreaks
of creative transformation that improve your life.
For inspiration, read this passage by Robert Anton
Wilson: “Every fact of science was once damned.
Every invention was considered impossible. Every
discovery was a nervous shock to some orthodoxy.
Every artistic innovation was denounced as fraud
and folly. The entire web of culture and progress,
everything on earth that is man-made and not
given to us by nature, is the concrete manifestation of someone’s refusal to bow to Authority. We
would be no more than the first apelike hominids if
it were not for the rebellious, the recalcitrant, and
the intransigent.”
dribble out. Other secrets will spill forth. Still others may shoot out and explode like fireworks. You
won’t be bored by this week’s revelations, Scorpio.
People’s camouflage may be exposed, hidden agendas could be revealed, and not-quite-innocent deceits might be uncovered. So that’s the weird news.
Here’s the good news: If you maintain a high level
of integrity and treat the brouhaha as good entertainment, you’re likely to capitalize on the uproar.
And that’s your specialty, right?
VIEWS 6
GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Your core medita-
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Some secrets will
Quill: The Life of a Guide Dog (NR) HD/100m.
Sun: (12:10); Mon - Wed: (4:00)
*See below for Fri & Sat Showtimes
MAIL 4
feeling a warm fuzzy feeling in your money chakra?
I hope so. The cosmos recently authorized you to
receive a fresh flow of what we might call financial
kundalini. Your insight into money matters should
be increasing, as well as your ability to attract the
information and influences you need to refine your
relationship with prosperity. It may even be the
case that higher levels of economic luck are operating in your vicinity. I’m not saying you will strike it
rich, but you could definitely strike it richer.
Bernie (PG-13) 35mm/104m. “I’m very serious
about this - read nothing else about this movie.
Every description out there, it seems, gives away
the first half of the story. But you should have the
opportunity to experience the movie the way I did,
in complete ignorance, enjoying its every weird turn.”
San Francisco Chronicle
Fri: (4), 6:30, 9:10; Sat: (12:30), (3), 5:40, 9:10
Sun: (2:30), 5:00, 7:30; Mon - Wed: 6:30, 8:55
DO IT 2
TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Have you been
BEER & WINE ALLOWED IN THEATRE 1: 21 & OVER ONLY
05.30.12
rumba,” said jazz musician Fats Waller, suggesting the
seemingly impossible mix of two very different types
of dancing. That’s an excellent clue for you to follow
up on, Aries. I suspect that in the coming week you
will have an unusual aptitude for hybridization. You
could do folk dancing and hip-hop moves simultaneously. It will make sense for you to do the cha-cha
as you disco and vice versa. You’ll have a knack for
bringing the spirit of belly dance into the tango, and
for breakdancing while you do the hokey-pokey.
T1
#22.07
ARIES (March 21-April 19): “Let’s waltz the
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): A solar eclipse happens when the moon passes in front of the sun and
blocks much of its light from reaching our eyes.
On a personal level, the metaphorical equivalent is
when something obstructs our ability to see what
nourishes us. For example, let’s say you’re in the
habit of enviously comparing your own situation to
that of a person you imagine is better off than you.
This may blind you to some of your actual blessings, and diminish your ability to take full advantage of your own talents. I bring this up, Libra,
because you’re in an especially favorable time to
detect any way you might be under the spell of an
eclipse—and then take dramatic steps to get out
from under it.
The Mountain Runners (NR) 90m. Continues!
Fri: 6:30 PM; Sat: (2:00), 6:30
Sun: 3:30, 5:50; Mon - Thu: 6:30
Goon (R) 92m. Best Hockey Comedy Ever
“Crude, violent and deeply enjoyable.” Movieline
Fri: (4:15), 8:45; Sat: 4:15, 8:45
Sun: 8:00; Mon - Thu: (4:15), 8:45
CASCADIA WEEKLY
FREE WILL
ASTROLOGY
T1: PLAYING IN THEATRE 1 THIS WEEK
BY ROB BREZSNY
FOOD 30
NOW SHOWING JUNE 1 - 7
that will supercharge your happiness and change
your life?” But in the end, as always, I flatly turned
her down. The truth is, I report on the music of the
heavenly spheres, but I don’t write the music myself.
Still, I sort of admire this woman’s feisty resolve to
manipulate the fates, and I urge you to borrow some
of her ferocity in the coming week.
27
The Merry Widow (From the Semperoper
Dresden) (NR) Opera in High Definition
Sun: 11:00 AM $16/$20 - Please note, this is
not our Opera in Cinema series.
FOOD 30
BY AMY ALKON
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THE ADVICE
GODDESS
WEDDING HER WHISTLE
CASCADIA WEEKLY
#22.07
05.30.12
DO IT 2
MAIL 4
VIEWS 6
CURRENTS 10
WORDS 12
GET OUT 14
STAGE 15
ART 16
MUSIC 18
FILM 22
I just turned 26, and I’m ready to be married. My previous two boyfriends dragged
their feet and then said the blood-boiling
line: “I will marry you…someday.” I met
a guy online, and we initiated a relationship on the basis that he was ready for
marriage. Four months after our first
kiss, I broke up with him after he, too,
expressed hesitation about marriage. He
insisted that he loves me but is hesitating
because I have a drinking problem and
PMDD (premenstrual dysphoric disorder).
Once a month, I take everything that I
love and tear it to shreds—as if in a werewolf state. I come to, devastated by my
actions. I need structure and commitment
from a loving partner for strength, and an
engagement now would help me transcend
my conditions. He wants me to do it alone
and wants to see improvement before he
commits. I want to make him realize how
cruel he was in insisting in his profile that
he was ready for marriage and not following through.
—Unwed
HI
LO
28
www.ReuseWorks.org
Pepper Sisters
Bayport Financial
Services
What’s Up!
Magazine
Cascadia Weekly
Copy Source
Z Recyclers
Bay City Supply
Time In Play Cafe
Cafe Rumba
WFC Country Store
Chuckanut Builders
You’re a fierce advocate of truth in
advertising—except when you’re the
one engaging in the sins of omission:
“I’m ready to be married. Oh, also,
once a month, I’ll try to rip out your
internal organs with a shrimp fork.
Any takers?”
Typically, when a man is ready for
marriage, he’s looking to settle down
with the right woman, not sprint to the
altar with the first woman he meets
who can fit into a size 8 long white
dress. If marriage actually were a cure
for alcoholism, people in AA would have
florists instead of sponsors, and church
basements would be packed with brides
tearfully confessing to being powerless
before a $10,000 wedding cake that releases a flock of white doves.
You likewise don’t marry a guy because your hormones turn you into a
werewolf once a month and you need
somebody to bolt the exits so no sheep
or cattle go missing. Per psychiatrist
Dr. Emily Deans in one of my previous
columns, biochemical options for dialing down turbo PMS include the 24-day
or three-month birth control pill; the
antidepressant bupropion; magnesium
malate supplementation (500 milligrams at bedtime); and cycling from
a low-carb diet to a higher-carb, lowprotein diet three days to a week before
your period starts.
At the moment, you’re married to
escaping your problems. Addiction
treatment specialist Dr. Frederick
Woolverton writes in his very helpful
book, Unhooked, that at the heart of
any addiction is avoidance of suffering.
Instead of feeling uncomfortable feelings and dealing with them, you hold
their little heads down and drown them
in a pond of cheap gin. And instead of
doing the grown-up thing and working
to overcome your addiction, you decide
that the “power greater than yourself”
will be the groom. But, only when you
don’t need a man to feel whole are you
healthy enough to choose one for the
right reasons. Then you see, over time
(a year, at the very least), whether you
and he make sense together. Marriage
is a lifetime commitment, not a lifeboat to rescue you from your troubles
already in progress: “Do you take this
woman…to have and to hold, and to
hold her hair back as she’s driving the
porcelain bus? O.K. then! You may now
detox the bride!”
YOUTH IS FLEEING
My friend is constantly dragging me to
parties to be her wing woman. She’s in
her late 40s but hits on hot young guys in
their early 20s who never reciprocate interest. Guys her age or older approach her,
but she blows them off. I’m sick of these
depressing evenings and of accompanying her to the mall so she can get “hipper
clothes.” Is there a kind way to tell her
she needs to rethink who she’s pursuing?
—Frustrated
How uplifting, spending your weekends watching Generation Y getting
hit on by Generation Why Are You
At This Party? Of course you want to
clue in your friend, “You could wear
head-to-toe Forever 21, and you’d still
look 49 and counting.” And you could
gently suggest she expand her dating
horizons to include men who are actual possibilities. But her persistence
in the face of failure suggests she’s
pretty attached to believing that
the answer to her datelessness can
be found at the mall. What you can
control is how you spend your time.
Extending yourself to make a friend
happy is nice; subjecting yourself to
regular misery is too nice and leads to
bubbling resentment. The next time
she tries to drag you along, tell her
you’re party-weary and tired of the
mall…but how about lunch or a hike?
Granted, out on the trail, you could
still witness the uncomfortable sight
of a cougar stalking its prey—but not
by changing out of its mom jeans.
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1317 Commercial St, Suite 201, Upstairs (above the Brandywine Kitchen and Uisce)
Learn bike-specific
postures & alignment
All proceeds
go to the HUB
Suggested
donation $10-20
STAGE 15
GET OUT 14
WORDS 12
A bike-specific yoga workshop to benefit the HUB,
our community bike shop!
CURRENTS 10
VIEWS 6
AMPM-ONDAYTHROUGH3ATURDAY
ART 16
#ORNWALL!VENUEs"ELLINGHAM7!
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05.30.12
DO IT 2
MAIL 4
With local Forrest Yoga instructors Wendy Bailey & Guy Ortiz
#22.07
All levels
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B-BOARD
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B-BOARD 24
* Domestic Partnerships * Modifications
FILM 22
*Paternity * Child Support
CASCADIA WEEKLY
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FOOD 30
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RECIPES
REVIEWS
SPAGHE T T I SAUCE TASTE-OFF: The La
Conner Chamber of Commerce will host a
“Spaghetti Sauce Taste-Off” from 4:307:30pm at the town’s Maple Hall, 104 Commercial Ave. Area restaurants and culinary
classes will contribute sauces. Entry is $5
for kids, $8 for adults.
WWW.LACONNERCHAMBER.COM
STAGE 15
ART 16
MUSIC 18
FILM 22
JUNE 1-2
JESSAMYN TUTTLE
GET OUT 14
WORDS 12
CURRENTS 10
VIEWS 6
MAIL 4
DO IT 2
05.23.12
#21.07
CASCADIA WEEKLY
30
PROF I L ES
THURS., MAY 31
STORY AND PHOTO BY JESSAMYN TUTTLE
Thai One On
RACHAWADEE CAFÈ FILLS A NICHE
IT WOULD be easy to miss Rachawadee Cafè, which is located in a tiny
storefront next to an alley on a side street in downtown Mount Vernon.
When someone describes a place as a hole in the wall, this is the sort
of spot you might envision. A narrow room with a brick wall and a checkerboard floor, a long counter running down the middle fills the space. It
looks like a diner, which is exactly what it was just a few years ago.
Now, however, the prep counter is covered with fresh vegetables and a
huge rice pot, the shelves above the kitchen are full of containers of fish
sauce and curry paste, and the old fry-up station at the front features
two huge woks. Young women move efficiently past each other in the narrow space with plates of noodles, cups of tea and bowls of rice.
Given the limited seating, it’s not surprising that much of Rachawadee’s
business is takeout, but given the opportunity I love to sit on one of the
eight red stools and watch wokfuls of food being expertly flipped about,
surrounded by the occasional burst of flame from the burners.
Rachawadee offers all the usual Thai dishes, from spring rolls to Phad
Thai, but everything is made fresh right in front of you, and flavors are
consistently bright and clean with lots of vegetables. Spicy, too, if you
ask for it—unlike many Thai places, Rachawadee means it when they give
out heat stars. My husband and I occasionally order five-star meals here,
but only if we have something milder to go with it, like a quart of rice.
Fried tofu (Tao Hoo Tod, $4.95) is a typical appetizer in Thai restaurants
and they do it well here: hot out of the wok and not too greasy. Served
with a sweet chile peanut sauce, it’s a soothing start to a spicy meal.
Fresh summer rolls ($6.95) are large, stuffed full
of basil, noodles, vegetables and either prawns
or tofu.
I love Thai salads, and Rachawadee makes a
very nice Larb Gai ($8.95), ground chicken tossed
with shredded carrot and onion and fresh cilantro,
served with chopped lettuce and a spicy dressing
of fish sauce and lime juice. We recently ordered
this with three star heat and my lips burned for
hours afterward in a very gratifying way.
Our very favorite dish here is one that we first
ordered accidentally and now cannot do without. Phad Ba Mee ($9.25) is a dish of plump egg
noodles stir-fried with egg, vegetables and meat,
with a compellingly deep smoky flavor. We usually
get it with pork, and if we could only order one
dish forever this would be it.
The Phad Kee Mao ($9.25) is
another of our favorites, rice
noodles with egg, tomatoes,
peppers and basil.
The soups here ($5.95 for
a bowl, $9.50 for a pot) are
fabulous. Hot and sour Tom
Yum is the best cure for a
/
cold ever: a quart of it, taken
WHAT: Rachahome and eaten by the fire,
wadee Cafe
will fix what ails you. I reWHEN: 11am-8pm
Mon.-Sat. (closed
cently tried their Num Sai,
Sundays)
which was a simple bowl of
WHERE: 410 W
broth with a few bean thread
Gates St., Mount
noodles, tofu, cabbage and a
Vernon
few rough meatballs of pork.
INFO:
(360) 336-6699 or
Eaten plain, it’s comforting
www.rachawadee
and simple, but it’s also a
cafe.com
great canvas for the various
condiments on offer.
Curries ($9.25) are offered in a variety of types:
red, green, panang, mussamun and pineapple. I
find them pleasant enough, but not all that exciting, as they’re made with a prepackaged curry
paste. They always seem to be popular though,
especially at lunchtime.
I much prefer the various stir-fries to the curries; these are always flavorful and full of mixed
vegetables. Our usual order is the eggplant with
beef, which we get very spicy, but I also like the
ginger or basil stir-fries. Like most other dishes
on the menu, all of these are available with chicken, pork, beef or tofu ($9.25), prawns or squid
($11.95) or scallops or “seafood” ($14.95). You
also have a choice of white or brown rice, which is
always a nice option.
In an area where good, reliable Thai food can be
hard to find, we’re delighted to have a place like
Rachawadee.
CRACKED CRAB CRUISE: San Juan
Cruises begins its weekly Cracked Crab
Cruise this weekend with sunset excursions
from 6:30-9:30pm Fri.-Sat. throughout
Bellingham Bay, Chuckanut Bay, and beyond. Cost is $59 and includes Dungeness
crab, baked chicken, salads, bread and
dessert. Outings happen weekend nights
through Sept. 15.
WWW.WHALES.COM
SAT., JUNE 2
ANACORTES MARKET: The Anacortes Farmers Market takes place from 9am-2pm every
Saturday through Oct. 27 at the town’s
Depot Community & Arts Center, 611 R Ave.
WWW.ANACORTESFARMERSMARKET.ORG
BELLINGHAM MARKE T: Get the freshest
produce—and much more—at the Bellingham Farmers Market from 10am-3pm every
Saturday through December at the Depot
Market Square on the corner of Chestnut
Street and Railroad Avenue.
647-2060 OR WWW.BELLINGHAMFARMERS.
ORG
SUN., JUNE 3
COMMUNITY BREAKFAST: Dine on pancakes, French toast, sausage, eggs and more
at the monthly Community Breakfast from
8am-1pm at the Rome Grange, 2821 Mt.
Baker Hwy. Cost is $2 for kids and $5 for
adults. FYI: This is the final breakfast of the
season. The event will return in September.
739-9605
TUES., JUNE 5
PASTRY DEMYST IFIED: Chef Anne Dubert
helms a “Puff Pastry Demystified” course
at 6:30pm in Mount Vernon at Gretchen’s
Kitchen, 509 S. First St. Cost is $40.
WWW.GRETCHENSKITCHEN.COM
JUNE 5-6
ALASK AN HALIBUT: Learn how to cook
Alaska’s famous fish three innovative ways
at “Alaskan Halibut” courses with Chef
Robert Fong from 6:30-9pm Tues. at the
downtown Community Food Co-op and
6-8:30pm Wed. at the Cordata Community
Food Co-op. Cost is $45.
383-3200
WED., JUNE 6
SWEETENER ALTERNATIVES: Former nutritional consultant Janis Walworth leads a
“Xyli-What? A Guide to Alternative Sweeteners” from 6:30-8:30pm at the Community
Food Co-op, 1220 N. Forest St. Cost is $25.
383-3200
THURS., JUNE 7
MEXICAN GRILL: Pulled pork tacos and
grilled mussels with tomatillo sauce will
be on the menu when Ana Jackson teaches
a “Mexican Grill” course from 6-9pm at
the Cordata Community Food Co-op, 315
Westerly Rd. Cost is $39.
383-3200
VANCOUVER
FOOD
FOOD 30
30
K’NAAN
Dan Mangan
Ani DiFranco
Sidi Touré
Emel Mathlouthi
MUSIC 18
ART 16
STAGE 15
Tickets: 604.602.9798 www.thefestival.bc.ca
VFMF Box Office #100, 2425 Quebec Street, Vancouver BC
Hey Rosetta!
VIEWS 6
BANYEN BOOKS & SOUND HIGHLIFE RECORDS
ZULU RECORDS NEPTOON RECORDS
GET OUT 14
The Head and the Heart
WORDS 12
The Barr Brothers | Serena Ryder | Good For Grapes | Shakura S’Aida | Pied Pumkin
The Cave Singers | Cedric Watson & Creole Bijou | Besh o droM | Minor Empire
The Once | Roy Forbes | Holly Near | Martyn Joseph | The Atomic Duo
Tret Fure | Chatham County Line | Wazimbo | Bette and Wallet | Bryan Bowers
Blitz the Ambassador | Los Gaiteros de San Jacinto | Murray McLauchlan
Marley’s Ghost | Alejandra Robles | Possessed by Paul James + MANY MORE!
CURRENTS 10
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FILM 22
B-BOARD 24
Lucinda Williams
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H’Sao
CASCADIA WEEKLY
#21.07
05.23.12
The Johnny Clegg Band
DO IT 2
MAIL 4
(DUO\%LUG
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Ramblin’ Jack Elliott
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Friday & Saturday, July 20 & 21 at 8 pm
Earn Tickets:
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877-275-2448
Seafood Trio
Open for Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner
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Friday & Saturday,
September 21 & 22 at 8 pm
Owned by Upper Skagit Indian Tribe
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