Puppy`s - Farmingville Animal Hospital

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Puppy`s - Farmingville Animal Hospital
The Farmingville Animal Hospital
840 Horseblock Rd. Farmingville, NY 11738
Phone: 631-698-8000 Fax: 631-698-2016
http://www.farmingvilleanimalhospital.com
We Welcome Our Newest Patient .......
_____________
(puppy’s name)
Date of Birth: _______________
Date of First Visit: ____________
Weight at First Visit: _____________
First Veterinarian: ____________________________________
Hospital Hours: M-Th 8-8, Fri 8-5, Sat 8-5
Phone: 631-698-8000
After Hours Emergencies: Animal Emergency Service 631-698-2225
FARMINGVILLE ANIMAL HOSPITAL
840 Horseblock Rd. Farmingville, NY 11738
Phone: 631-698-8000 Fax: 631-698-2016
What’s inside?
Overview of Your Puppy’s First Few Visits With The Vet… 1-2
Vaccines…3
Vaccine Reactions…4
Heartworm Disease…5
Flea & Tick Prevention…5
Intestinal Parasites…6
Low Blood Sugar & Diet…7
Microchips & Pet Insurance…8
Puppy Play Dates …9
Eating Poop? ...9
Toys & Training Tips…10
Crate Training…11
Housebreaking …12
Spaying and Neutering…13-14
How Old Your Dog Really Is…15
Personal Health Chart…16
FARMINGVILLE ANIMAL HOSPITAL
840 Horseblock Rd. Farmingville, NY 11738
Phone: 631-698-8000 Fax: 631-698-2016
Your puppy’s first visit (6-8 weeks of age)
 Care & instruction overview with a technician
 General physical exam
 Intestinal parasite exam (i.e. stool sample)
 Preventative deworming (recommended by the Centers for Disease
Control for all puppies regardless of their stool sample results)
 Appropriate flea/tick preventative
 1st set of core vaccinations
Distemper/Adenovirus/Parvo/Parainfluenza combination
Your puppy’s second visit (10-12 weeks of age)
 General physical exam
 2nd set of core vaccinations
Distemper/Adenovirus/Parvo/Parainfluenza combination
 Possible introduction of non-core vaccines
Leptospirosis
Lyme
Bordetella
Canine Influenza
 Appropriate flea/tick preventative
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FARMINGVILLE ANIMAL HOSPITAL
840 Horseblock Rd. Farmingville, NY 11738
Phone: 631-698-8000 Fax: 631-698-2016
Your puppy’s third visit (15-16 weeks of age)
 General physical exam
 3rd set of core vaccinations (to be repeated in one year)
Distemper/Adenovirus/Parvo/Parainfluenza combination
 Rabies vaccination (repeat in one year)
 2nd set of appropriate non-core vaccines (repeat in one year)
Leptospirosis
Lyme
Bordetella
Canine Influenza
 Appropriate flea/tick preventative
 Heartworm preventative
Your puppy’s final visit of the year (6 months of age)
 General physical exam
 Spay or neuter procedure
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FARMINGVILLE ANIMAL HOSPITAL
840 Horseblock Rd. Farmingville, NY 11738
Phone: 631-698-8000 Fax: 631-698-2016
Vaccines
What are they for?
There are several vaccines which are separated into two categories:
core vaccines and non-core vaccines. The core vaccines are what every dog
should be vaccinated for on a regular basis. The non-core vaccines are given
to dogs that are at a high risk for a particular virus/disease.
Core Vaccines
 Rabies
 The rabies vaccine is mandatory by NYS law. It is a viral infection
that affects all mammals (including people!) and is 100% fatal.
 Distemper/ Adenovirus/Parvovirus/Parainfluenza combination
 These viruses are the leading cause of death in unvaccinated
puppies and are easily spread from one dog to another.
Non-core Vaccines
 Lyme’s
 A disease transmitted through deer ticks. If your pet is infected it
is generally treatable and is often not fatal.
 Leptospirosis
 A deadly bacterial disease spread in the urine of wildlife (e.g.
raccoons, opossums, etc). Only about 50% of dogs treated for
Leptospirosis will survive.
 Bordetella
 More commonly referred to as “kennel cough”. The vaccine is
often required by boarding or grooming facilities.
 Canine Influenza
 An emerging respiratory disease that occurs most frequently in
high-density dog populations (e.g. shelters, boarding facilities, or
dog shows).
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FARMINGVILLE ANIMAL HOSPITAL
840 Horseblock Rd. Farmingville, NY 11738
Phone: 631-698-8000 Fax: 631-698-2016
Vaccine Reactions
Although vaccines are safe and effectively help to prevent serious and
potentially fatal diseases, a small percentage of dogs will have an allergic
reaction. Always monitor your pet for 6-8 hours after any vaccination, since
allergies to vaccines can develop at any age.
 Mild Reactions
Lethargy
Muscle soreness
Decreased appetite
Mild fever (normal: 100-102.5⁰F)
Diarrhea
 Moderate-Severe Reactions
Swelling of the face
Hives or significant itching
Difficulty breathing
Vomiting
Diarrhea
Significant lethargy
Collapse
If your pet shows any of the mild signs mentioned above, please inform
the doctor upon your next visit.
If your pet shows any of the mild-severe signs mentioned above, call
and return IMMEDIATELY for the necessary treatment (631-698-8000)! If a
problem occurs after our regular hours, immediately call and go to the
24 hour Animal Emergency Service in Selden (on the corner of North Ocean
Ave and Middle Country Road: 631-698-2225) or the nearest emergency
clinic.
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FARMINGVILLE ANIMAL HOSPITAL
840 Horseblock Rd. Farmingville, NY 11738
Phone: 631-698-8000 Fax: 631-698-2016
Heartworm Disease
What is it?
Heartworm disease can be fatal if it is not treated. With heartworm
disease, parasitic worms live in the right side of heart. Symptoms include
weight loss, coughing, exercise intolerance, and may lead to heart failure.
How can my dog get it?
Heartworm disease is spread through mosquitoes. If a mosquito bites
an infected dog and then bites yours, it can infect your dog.
Is it common?
The prevalence of heartworm disease has significantly diminished over
the past several years. This is a direct result of the effective heartworm
prevention products that most dogs are regularly given.
How do I protect my dog?
Fortunately, the prevention tablet is 99% effective and only needs to be
administered once a month along with an annual blood test.
Flea & Tick Prevention
Why Should I Control Fleas & Ticks?
Other than just making your dog itchy, fleas can lead to anemia,
tapeworms, and skin infections.
Different ticks can lead to several diseases such as Rocky Mountain
Spotted Fever, Lyme’s disease, and Ehrlichiosis.
How Do I Control Fleas & Ticks?
There are several topical flea/tick controls. Beware of over the counter
products which may be harmful to your pet. Ask your veterinarian to help
you decide which product is best for your pet!
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FARMINGVILLE ANIMAL HOSPITAL
840 Horseblock Rd. Farmingville, NY 11738
Phone: 631-698-8000 Fax: 631-698-2016
Intestinal Parasites
On your pet’s first visit, and all annual visits, a stool sample should be
run to screen for any intestinal parasites. Intestinal parasites are microscopic
and generally are not seen with the naked eye.
What should I know about intestinal parasites?
Parasites can be transmitted from one dog to another, most often
through their feces. Some can also be transmitted to humans by walking
through the grass barefoot and/or not washing your hands well. Be sure to
have your pet tested regularly and treated accordingly. Many heartworm
medications aid in the prevention of intestinal parasites and should be used
regularly (see pg 5).
Is there more than one type?
There are several types of intestinal parasites, most commonly:
 Roundworms: Live freely in the bowel and cause gas/diarrhea.
 Hookworms: Dangerous blood-sucking parasites that cause
severe anemia. They cause dark brown-black diarrhea.
 Tapeworms: Carried by fleas and are passed to the dogs after
swallowing the flea.
 Whipworms: Large intestinal worm that causes gas and diarrhea.
 Coccidia: A microscopic protozoa causing severe damage to the
intestines and diarrhea.
 Giardia: A one-celled parasite that lives in the intestines and
causes diarrhea.
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FARMINGVILLE ANIMAL HOSPITAL
840 Horseblock Rd. Farmingville, NY 11738
Phone: 631-698-8000 Fax: 631-698-2016
Low Blood Sugar (Juvenile Hypoglycemia)
Juvenile Hypoglycemia is seen in very young dogs, particularly toybreeds, due to their inability to store sugar.
Possible causes of Juvenile Hypoglycemia are:
 Parasites
 Diarrhea
 Low body temperature
 Poor nursing/diet
With very young and small puppies it may be beneficial to supplement
their diet with a small amount of honey or karosyrup, which both have high
sugar contents. To administer, dab your finger into the syrup and let your
puppy lick it off your finger. If he doesn’t lick it off your finger, you can try
to rub it on his mouth. This may be done twice a day, or as directed by the
veterinarian, until your puppy has reached an appropriate size and weight.
What Should I Feed My Puppy?
It is advised that you read the nutritional adequacy statement of the
pet food you choose. This can usually be found on the bottom or side of the
bag in smaller print. Although all dog food sold in stores must meet
regulations set by AAFCO, a food that was used in a feeding trial is ideal.
Therefore, look for a nutritional adequacy statement that says “Animal
feeding tests using AAFCO procedures substantiate that this food provides
complete and balanced nutrition for growth”.
If you have a large breed puppy (>50lb as an adult) make sure you
purchase dog food formulated for large breeds as they have specific energy
requirements. The guaranteed analysis on the back of the bag should
indicate a Calcium level <1.2%.
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FARMINGVILLE ANIMAL HOSPITAL
840 Horseblock Rd. Farmingville, NY 11738
Phone: 631-698-8000 Fax: 631-698-2016
A Few Important Topics
Microchips
Why should I do this?
Microchips are a safe and simple way to be sure your pet’s
identification is never mistaken. What if your pet runs out the door
and you didn’t have time to put his collar on? Luckily most shelters and
animal hospitals have a universal scanner. Universal scanners read
most microchips to help identify your pet and return him to you asap!
How do they work?
A small microchip is injected under your puppy’s skin with a
needle. You then register the microchip with the company to give
them all of your contact information. If your pet ever runs away and is
brought to a veterinarian/shelter that scans them, his chip number will
appear. The veterinarian/shelter will contact the 24-hour microchip
company who can then notify you within minutes!
Pet Insurance
There are a few different companies which offer pet insurance plans. It
is something to be considered on a patient to patient basis. Please discuss it
with your veterinarian and ask for a pamphlet if you have not been provided
one.
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FARMINGVILLE ANIMAL HOSPITAL
840 Horseblock Rd. Farmingville, NY 11738
Phone: 631-698-8000 Fax: 631-698-2016
A Few More Important Topics
Puppy Play Dates
Your puppy can go outside in your backyard with healthy vaccinated
pets at 7 weeks old. However, do not bring your puppy to pet stores, dog
parks, or around other unvaccinated pets until his vaccines are completed at
16 weeks old.
Puppies are very susceptible to several life threatening diseases. For
their safety, they should only be around other vaccinated pets in an enclosed
environment you trust, until your puppy is fully vaccinated.
Eating Poop?
This unpleasant habit is known as coprophagy. Unfortunately it is a
tough habit to break and often it is just a compulsive behavior. Possible
causes, although less often the reason, are malnutrition, boredom, or excess
confinement. Fortunately, other than the possible transmission of intestinal
parasites (so be sure all of your pets are negative!), few problems are caused
by this habit.
A few suggestions that may help are to:
Remove the feces from the yard daily
Provide regular exercise and stimulation
Add Adolph’s meat tenderizer or fresh pineapple to your dog’s
food (intended to make the feces less appetizing)
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FARMINGVILLE ANIMAL HOSPITAL
840 Horseblock Rd. Farmingville, NY 11738
Phone: 631-698-8000 Fax: 631-698-2016
Toys
Toys are advantageous for you and your dog by
saving your furniture and soothing your pet, so be
sure to pick the best for both of you
1. A rope toy
2. A softer squeaky toy (which you may want to remove when it’s time for
you to get some sleep)
3. A hard rubber toy or kong (you may put peanut butter or soaked kibble in
it & freeze it to occupy your pup for a while)
4. Discourage any chewing of shoes, socks, or small toys that may be
swallowed
Training Tips
1. Don’t allow the puppy to do anything now, that you will consider
unacceptable when he is an adult.
2. Do not roll your puppy onto his back or side (alpha-roll) to “make him
submissive”.
3. If the puppy nips you, do not hit or punish him. Instead, said “OUCH” in a
sharp quick tone and ignore him for 5 seconds. Resume play. If he nips
again repeat the “OUCH” & ignore him for another 5 seconds. He must
learn that his bites hurt us & they are unacceptable.
4. Expose your dogs to as many novel items as possible in his first few
weeks. This includes other vaccinated healthy pets, vacuums, baths, car
rides, strollers, children and men. These are common fears in adults so it
is best to expose them to these things today!!
25% of dogs are abandoned to shelters in their first year of life. Only ¼ of those make it back out.
Please take training seriously!
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FARMINGVILLE ANIMAL HOSPITAL
840 Horseblock Rd. Farmingville, NY 11738
Phone: 631-698-8000 Fax: 631-698-2016
Crate Training
Why should I use a crate?
A crate makes it much easier to housebreak your puppy.
It is a safe place for your puppy so he doesn’t get into anything
dangerous or expensive (e.g. rugs, furniture, or medications)!
It will essentially be your puppy’s own bedroom.
It teaches your puppy boundaries (you own the house, not him)!
When should the puppy be in the crate?
Whenever the puppy is home alone
When you are sleeping (he sleeps when you sleep)
If he didn’t go to bathroom when you brought him out to do his
business (see pg 12)
What if he doesn’t like the crate?
Similar to having a baby, if he cries, do not take him out and let
him sleep with you. As long as everything is OK (i.e. he didn’t go to
the bathroom in the crate and he went outside within the last 4-6
hours) let him cry.
It may be a frustrating adjustment period but it is well worth it.
What should be in the crate?
A soft blanket/pillow/bed and a chew toy
Water is optional. Either way make sure he stays hydrated.
With young puppies, sometimes a loud ticking clock placed on top
of the crate is comforting (resembling the mother’s heartbeat).
A sheet may be used to cover the back half of the crate as a safe
comfort area making them feel less vulnerable.
*A PUPPY SHOULD NEVER BE IN THE CRATE WITH A COLLAR ON!!*
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FARMINGVILLE ANIMAL HOSPITAL
840 Horseblock Rd. Farmingville, NY 11738
Phone: 631-698-8000 Fax: 631-698-2016
Housebreaking Using The Crate
The easiest and most efficient way to housebreak your puppy is
by using a crate and immediately training him to go to the bathroom only in
a designated area. Although paper training may seem like good transition
step, it only forces you to have to retrain him to then go to the bathroom
outdoors.
Make sure you walk the puppy on a leash and do NOT play with him
until he does his business! If your puppy does not go to the bathroom after
about 5 minutes on-leash outside, put him back in the cage and repeat it
every half hour (if possible) until he succeeds. Then praise him with lots of
well-deserved attention and play time. If you don’t play/reward then he
will learn that going to the bathroom means his outside fun is over. As a
result he will learn to hold it when you bring him outside, not to go
immediately.
If your puppy has an accident inside, DO NOT punish him. Instead,
swiftly pick him up and place him on the grass. If he then finishes in the
yard, praise him emphatically! 
Keep in mind, the crate should only be large enough for the puppy to
stand up, turn around, and take one step forward/backward. If the crate is
too large, the puppy will likely go to bathroom in the crate since he can
move away from it. If you have a large breed dog, it may be easier (and
more practical) to buy a crate that he will fit into as an adult, and place a
divider in the crate while he is a puppy.
A young puppy must be “bathroom-walked” outside:
 Every 4 hours during the day (6 during the night)
 After a meal
 Just before bedtime
 As soon as you wake up
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FARMINGVILLE ANIMAL HOSPITAL
840 Horseblock Rd. Farmingville, NY 11738
Phone: 631-698-8000 Fax: 631-698-2016
Female Spay
(Ovariohysterectomy)
What does it involve?
The procedure consists of the surgical removal of the ovaries and
uterus and is usually performed at 6 months of age. Generally she will be
able to go home with you the following morning.
When should she be spayed?
The spay is usually performed at 6 months of age or older. Contrary to
popular belief, it is NOT better for her to go through her first heat cycle
before being spayed. In fact, it puts her at a higher risk of developing
mammary cancer.
Why should I spay her?
Intact dogs (or not spayed) are prone to mammary gland cancer and a
severe uterine infections (pyometra). When this occurs, it must be treated as
an emergency, because it is life threatening! Also, if you spay your dog you
will have no worries of unwanted puppies or her heat cycle.
But people say….
 That it will make her fat
- This is a common myth. Obesity is most often due to excess
caloric intake and lack of exercise.
 That it will change her personality
- Dogs’ personalities do not fully develop until 1-2 years of age.
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FARMINGVILLE ANIMAL HOSPITAL
840 Horseblock Rd. Farmingville, NY 11738
Phone: 631-698-8000 Fax: 631-698-2016
Male Neuter
(Orchiectomy)
What does it involve?
The procedure consists of the surgical removal of the testicles.
Generally, he will be able go home with you the same night.
When should he be neutered?
The neuter is usually performed at 6 months of age or older.
Why should I neuter him?
Intact dogs (or not neutered) are more prone to roam and therefore
are at a higher risk to be hit by cars. Neutering him will also decrease the
chance of prostate enlargement/cancer and completely eliminate the chance
of testicular cancer.
But people say….
 That it will make him fat
- This is a common myth. Obesity is most often due to excess
caloric intake and lack of exercise.
 That it will change his personality
- It may reduce the level of aggression but it will not drastically
alter the dog’s personality or take the place of any obedience
training.
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FARMINGVILLE ANIMAL HOSPITAL
840 Horseblock Rd. Farmingville, NY 11738
Phone: 631-698-8000 Fax: 631-698-2016
How Old is My Dog Really?
Many of us have heard that to figure out your dog’s true age you just
multiply it by 7. However, this isn’t accurate because it varies according to
your dog’s weight and breed. Use the chart below1 to figure out your dog’s
age in human years.
Giant Breeds
(90+ lbs)
Large Breeds
(51-90 lbs)
Med. Breeds
(21-50 lbs)
Small Breeds
(under 21lbs)
1 Year
12
14
15
15
2 Years
20
22
24
24
3 Years
30
29
29
28
4 Years
35
34
34
32
5 Years
42
40
38
36
6 Years
49
45
42
40
7 Years
56
50
47
44
8 Years
64
55
51
48
9 Years
71
61
56
52
10 Years
78
66
60
56
11 Years
86
72
65
60
12 Years
93
97
69
64
13 Years
101
82
74
68
14 Years
108
88
78
72
15 Years
115
93
83
76
1
Pets age faster than people. Fort Dodge ® Animal Health 2004.
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___________________’s Personal Health Chart
Weight
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Age:____________
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Age:____________
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Age:____________
Date ___________
Age:____________
Date ___________
Age:____________
Date ___________
Age:____________
Date ___________
Age:____________
Date ___________
Age:____________
Date ___________
Age:____________
Date ___________
Age:____________
Date ___________
Age:____________
Date ___________
Age:____________
Distemper
Adenovirus
Parainfluenza
Parvo
Date Of Birth ______________
Corona
Lepto
Lyme
Bordetella
Rabies
Heartworm
Fecal