Enrichment - California Association For The Gifted

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Enrichment - California Association For The Gifted
Conference February 27 March 1, 2015 “Enrichment Strategies
for Bilingual Students”
Dr. Janet Saenz Mexican Association for the Gifted Professor Emeritus – University of Tlaxcala, México Definition
What
is Enrichment? Enrichment is a form of differentiation, as is extension. They can, of
course, overlap, though each has its own essential characteristics.
Enrichment might be said to involve: •  staying with a theme, subject or skill and developing it in depth; •  ‘rounding out’ the basic curriculum subjects with a wider context; •  relating learning to new areas; •  and/or providing pupils with experiences outside the ‘regular’
curriculum (breadth). Extension, on the other hand, gives students opportunities for accelerated
progress and access to new, more challenging concepts or content, etc.
Most evidence submitted to the Education and Employment Committee for
its Report on the Highly Able (1999) supported the use of both enrichment
and extension to improve provision for the more able. Indeed, many
activities in school involve the two in combination. When this happens, the
result is of particular value in the development of the able child, a process
which has been dubbed a ‘two-way stretch’ (Eyre and Marjoram, 1990). Enrichment has been defined in a number of ways. One such is that of
Teare (1997), who described it as:
•  A higher quality of work than the norm for the age group or grade
level •  Work covered in more depth •  A broadening of the learning experience •  Promoting of higher levels of thinking •  The inclusion of additional subject areas and/or activities •  The use of supplementary materials beyond the normal range of
resources. Enrichment is sometimes seen in terms of the development of certain
qualities of mind. These include problem solving, creative thinking, initiative
and self-direction, discovery, higher order thinking skills, profound personal
interests, self-acceptance, and the courage to be different. Opportunities for these kinds of enrichment should be created throughout
the curriculum, as well as beyond lesson time – and both in and out of
school. An important feature of enrichment is that it should enhance the
curriculum and also the interests of the student experience. It is certainly
important that all learners should receive an enriched diet in their everyday
school life, but the word ‘enrichment’ when applied to more able learners
usually implies something markedly extra or beyond what is normally
offered. As Freeman (1998) expressed it, enrichment is not a supplementary
diet which depends on whether there is enough money for ‘extra’ material
rather, it should be an integral part of the educational program. Why is Enrichment an Important Focus in the Education of
Gifted and Talented Pupils?
Able children need as much motivation and recognition as other pupils, and
sometimes more. There is often a need to guard against the assumption,
especially in mixed ability classes, that these children will motivate
themselves and keep themselves interested. This belief is not borne out by
the research.
It is also evident from a scrutiny of ousted reports (Wallace 2000) that even
in a ‘good’ school there is all too often not enough differentiation of
classroom activities to motivate the very able child. Enrichment can have an
important contribution to make here.
A project devised by the National Association for Gifted Children initiated
enrichment activities in seven schools. The views of students, parents and
teachers were then sought on the benefits of the activities. Ten key points
emerged from the study:
1.  Enrichment activities can be of great benefit to a more able
student’s experience of school.
2.  Able students are highly motivated by challenging activities which
are different from those they do in class.
3.  Able students welcome the opportunity to discuss and debate,
especially when given a suitable stimulus or ‘framework.
4.  Brainteasers and puzzles seem to be particularly enjoyed by more
able students, and can make suitable starters to any enrichment
activity.
5.  Enrichment activities are enjoyable and should form part of a
program for more able students, but what happens in the classroom
daily is also of vital importance to a child’s overall experience in
school.
6.  Continuity is an extremely important element in any project, and planned
activities must be realistic and achievable.
7.  It is particularly important to honor any commitments to the students, as
they remember what they were promised and may be looking forward to
it keenly.
8.  It is preferable to use lesson time for enrichment projects if possible, as it
eliminates problems with attendance and competing commitments.
9.  Monitoring and evaluation are important. It is extremely valuable to
collect student feedback – even though this is time consuming - as this
can enhance and inform future projects.
10. Parents have many insights and experiences to contribute, and a way
should be found to effectively include parents as much as possible in the
development of enrichment activities. (Counsell 2005)
What Are the Key Issues to Consider?
The first step in devising enrichment opportunities should be to identify who
should receive them. To do this most effectively means establishing
consistent methods of assessment in all contexts, and at all levels, and
using them flexibly and imaginatively. Of course, students of all abilities
should be given enrichment opportunities now and then as suggested in the
research. Apart from the obvious benefits, this will encourage seemingly
‘average’ students to show unexpected abilities and interests.
Some able children, despite their above average ability, are not used to, or
happy with, encountering risk or the unfamiliar. They may fear that they will
be unable to cope or that they will not be able to handle new or different
subjects and strategies of learning . The best way to help them is to let
them meet failure and new experiences in a climate of support and
understanding.
It is important to allow students of high ability to work together on occasion.
Enrichment sessions, outside the classroom, allow a ‘gathering of like
minds’ (Teare, 1997), even if the school’s normal grouping policy is to mix
abilities.
Such sessions can be a valuable means of meeting these students’
particular needs and might also be used to celebrate high achievement in a
supportive environment. It goes without saying that enrichment sessions of
this kind need to be arranged and timetabled sensitively. Freeman (1998)
highlights some potential difficulties with ‘separate’ enrichment sessions.
Children who have taken part in them have been known to experience
problems with their peer- group when they return to lessons in the regular
classroom. There is also a risk that external activities may not be tied into or
followed up by classroom work which would help embed and consolidate the
extended learning. These are not, of course, factors which should
discourage the practice, but they need to be taken into account in the
planning process.
Rather than plan separately for enrichment, it is best to design the tasks,
materials and opportunities in the course of the normal planning of lessons
or schemes of work. This is an aspect of the principle of integrating
enrichment opportunities with the mainstream curriculum, and also with
other in school and out -of school activities. A criticism of enrichment
activities has often been that they are simply a bolt-on extra, rather than
ensuring continuity and progression as part of a coherent strategy. Staricoff
(2005) pressed the case for a ‘thinking skills’ approach to provision for the
gifted and talented, seeing it as an essential element of the general
classroom atmosphere. An ‘open-ended, questioning, discussion filled, and
enrichment based approach to the curriculum’ not only benefits children
already recognized as able, but allows children to reveal high abilities that
might sometimes be unexpected. This may result from their being exposed
to a teaching approach ‘based on the premise of enriching for every child in
the classroom.’
Freeman (1998) warns that enrichment activities for the highly able often
lack clear goals. This problem is particularly noticeable in ‘decontextualized’
activities out of class or out of school. Eyre and Marjoram (1990) advocate
applying a model of enrichment at whole school level, incorporating into the
curriculum itself a focus on higher order skills and ‘outstanding qualities’.
This enables clear goals to be set for any enrichment opportunity, whatever
the context. Eyre and Marjoram describe two models – Bloom’s Taxonomy
of Educational Objectives (1956) and Renzulli’s Enrichment Triad Model
(1977). The Bloom taxonomy emphasizes the higher order thinking skills of
analysis, synthesis and evaluation. Renzulli’s model presents three types of
activity: general exploration, group training and investigations of problems
which through research and creative processes, result in a product. Both
models allow teachers to identify processes and qualities that they wish their
pupils to develop. Eyre and Marjoram (1990) describe and list these in
detail. It goes without saying that the opportunities most likely to have real
and long-term effects are those with two essential features. They will be
wide in range, and they will be integrated with all planning for provision,
assessment and progression at whole school level.
Planning for enrichment opportunities in the classroom can be incorporated
into existing planning documentation. Of course, not all enrichment
opportunities can be planned for. Teachers need to be alert to the special
interests of individuals and groups - interests which may emerge in lessons
but not be appropriate for all the class to pursue in depth. They also need to
recognize where students already have skills or knowledge in what at any
given moment is being taught. Teachers might provide further resources,
information, or talking points for such pupils in subsequent lessons, or they
could encourage students to broaden their existing knowledge or pursue
these interests at another time.
Revised Bloom’s Taxonomy (2000)
In 1999, Dr. Lorin Anderson, a former student of Bloom's, and his colleagues published an updated
version of Bloom’s Taxonomy that takes into account a broader range of factors that have an impact on
teaching and learning. This revised taxonomy attempts to correct some of the problems with the original
taxonomy. Unlike the 1956 version, the revised taxonomy differentiates between “knowing what,” the
content of thinking, and “knowing how,” the procedures used in solving problems. The Knowledge
Dimension is the “knowing what.” It has four categories: factual, conceptual, procedural, and
metacognitive. Factual knowledge includes isolated bits of information, such as vocabulary definitions and
knowledge about specific details. Conceptual knowledge consists of systems of information, such as
classifications and categories. Procedural knowledge includes algorithms, heuristics or rules of thumb,
techniques, and methods as well as knowledge about when to use these procedures. Metacognitive
knowledge refers to knowledge of thinking processes and information about how to manipulate these
processes effectively. The Cognitive Process Dimension of the revised Bloom’s Taxonomy like the original
version has six skills. They are, from simplest to most complex: remember, understand, apply, analyze,
evaluate, and create.
Bloom’s Taxonomy
Creating
Evaluating
Analyzing
Applying
Understanding
Remembering
Average Student
Gifted Student
Dr. Janet Sáenz
Derechos en trámite
Belia Chaidez – Tema: Manzanas
Carlos Guillermo – Tema: Cultura Maya
Fernando Lara – Tema: Canarios
Ma. Elena Hernández – Tema: Plantas Medicinales
A Brief Synopsis of Howard Gardner's
Eight Intelligences
Howard Gardner names eight intelligences and proposes that these
intelligences be deliberately included in curriculum for the inclusion of all
kinds of learners and the expansion of their thinking and learning potential.
These eight are not an exclusive list, but their use in classrooms will greatly
enhance student involvement and thinking development. Many excellent
teaching lessons will include several of these intelligences:
MUSICAL/RHYTHMIC
Students sing, dance, listen, and respond to music. They develop musical
abilities and talents and learn to distinguish tone, mood, melody, and
rhythm. Rhyme, rap, chanting, dance, songs, and jump-rope rhymes are all
ways to access this intelligence.
BODILY / KINESTHETIC
Students learn through touch and movement. Field trips, math and science
manipulatives, gymnastics, role-playing, sign language, and many artistic
and physical expressions provide access to this intelligence.
A Brief Synopsis of Howard Gardner's
Eight Intelligences
INTERPERSONAL
Students learn through developing empathy and connection with other
humans. Cooperative learning, interviews, partner-reading, inferences
based on oral and body language, discussions, and group problem solving
are ways to access this intelligence.
INTRAPERSONAL
Students learn through increased awareness of their own interests, abilities,
and strengths. Metacognition, development of increased self-esteem and
self-awareness, pride, and self-evaluation of work all are part of this
intelligence.
VISUAL/SPATIAL
Students learn through perceiving three-dimensional reality. Visualization,
architectural planning, orienting by maps and directional cues, planning and
executing mazes, imaging story maps, and planning three-dimensional
projects all access this intelligence.
A Brief Synopsis of Howard Gardner's
Eight Intelligences
LOGICAL / MATHEMATICAL
Students learn through reasoning and logic. Sequencing, scientific thinking,
cause and effect awareness, mathematical reasoning, and number sense
are all parts of this intelligence.
VERBAL/LINGUISTIC
Students learn through the use of language communication skills. Reading,
writing, oral speech, persuasion, phonics, spelling, and other composition
skills are all part of this intelligence.
NATURALISTIC
Students learn through the process of observing and recording changes in
nature.
Multiple Talent Approach
Multiple Talent Approach
Summary
1.  Talents Unlimited is designed to help teachers recognize and nurture the
Multiple Talents of students.
2.  Nearly all students are talented, that is, they can be above average in at least
one of the many important intellectual talents we can now measure.
3.  Dr. Calvin Taylor's approach to the teaching learning process is called the
Multiple Talent Approach.
4.  Talent research provides many new hopes because there are many high level
talents and different persons excel in different talents.
5.  Dr. Calvin Taylor states that there are several ways of being smart which are
related to the world-of-work.
6.  Taylor suggested a grouping of talents based upon world-of-work needs,
specifying at present only Academic talent and 5 other often extremely
important types: Productive-Thinking talent, Decision-Making talent, Planning
talent, Forecasting talent and Communication talent.
Multiple Talent Approach
Summary
7.  Each of the different talents can function in acquiring knowledge across
all subject-matter areas. In the Multiple Talent Approach, the students
develop their talents while they are simultaneously growing in
knowledge.
8.  Taylor feels that if the Multiple Talent Approach to education is used
greater numbers of our students will be successful both in cognitive and
affective components.
9.  The multiple Talent Approach is a complex process incorporating both
cognitive and affective components.
10. Nine out of ten children will be above average in at least one of the
talents.
11. Every student in the classroom can become successful in at least one
Talent area.
These successes will enhance his self-concept and enable him to
achieve more.
Productive Thinking
1.  Think of many ideas.
2.  Think of different ideas.
3.  Think of unusual ideas.
4.  Add to your ideas to make them better.
FORECASTING
1.  Make many, different predictions about the
causes of a situation.
2.  Make many, different predictions about the
effects of a situation.
Communication 1.  Give many, different single words to describe something.
2.  Give many, different single words to describe
someone's/something's feelings.
3.  Think of many, different comparison in the form of a
simile.
4.  Let others know that you understand how they feel by
sharing a personal experience.
5.  Make a network of ideas using many, different complete
thoughts in oral or written language.
6.  Show your feelings, thoughts and needs without using
words.
Decision Making
1.  Think of many, different things
you could do.
Alternatives 2.  Think of the different questions
you need to ask about these
things you could do.
Criteria 3.  Use your answers to help you
make a decision.
Weighing 4.  State your final decision.
Decision 5.  Give many, different reasons for
your decision.
Reasons Planning
1.  Think of what you are going to plan so someone will know
what your project is.
2.  Think of all of the materials and equipment you will need
for your project.
3.  Think of all steps needed to complete the project and put
the steps in order.
4.  Think of any problems that could keep you from
completing the project.
5.  Think of ways to improve your plan.
Activity Cards HALLOWEEN
BLOOM’S TAXONOMY:
KNOWLEDGE
INTELLIGENCE:
VISUAL-SPATIAL
VERBAL-LINGUISTIC
TALENT:
COMMUNICATION #1
ACTIVITY:
To play Bingo using Halloween descriptive vocabulary.
STEPS:
1.  Students select a Bingo card.
2.  The teacher.reads vocabulary words
3.  The student who marks all the pictures first
is the winner.
MATERIALS:
- Bingo with
Halloween
vocabulary.
HALLOWEEN
BLOOM’S TAXONOMY: INTELLIGENCE:
COMPREHENSION
APPLICATION
INTRAPERSONAL
VERBAL-LINGUISTIC
TALENT:
COMMUNICATION #5
ACTIVITY:
Read a Halloween story and answer questions about it.
STEPS:
1.  Read a Halloween story.
2.  Answer questions about the story.
3.  Fill out the worksheet.
MATERIALS:
- Halloween story
-  Questionaire
- Pencil
HALLOWEEN
BLOOM’S TAXONOMY: INTELLIGENCE:
APPLICATION
BODILY KINESTHETIC
INTERPERSONAL
TALENT:
COMMUNICATION 6
ACTIVITY:
Dress up in a costume and participate in an event.
STEPS:
• 
• 
• 
Choose a costume and dress up!
Go to a Halloween activity with family and
friends.
Have fun!
MATERIALS:
- Costumes
HALLOWEEN
BLOOM’S TAXONOMY:
ANALYSIS
ACTIVITY:
INTELLIGENCE:
INTERPERSONAL
VERBAL LINGUISTIC
TALENT:
PRODUCTIVE THINKING
Order sentences or phrases to make a Halloween
story.
STEPS:
1.  Talk to your classmates about Halloween.
2.  Select an envelope with sentence strips..
3.  Analyze the ideas and form a story.
4.  Read it aloud to the class.
MATERIALS:
- Parts of several
stories with a
Halloween theme.
HALLOWEEN
BLOOM’S TAXONOMY: INTELLIGENCE:
ANALYSIS
VERBAL-LINGUISTIC
TALENT:
PRODUCTIVE THINKING
ACTIVITY:
Read about the history and customs of Mexico's “Day
of the Dead”, and also about the origins of Halloween.
STEPS:
1.  Analyze the history of both Customs and
Celebrations, in Mexico and the United
States.
2.  Develop a chart with comparisons of
similarities and differences.
3.  Present your project to your class.
MATERIALS:
-  Chart paper
-  Crayons
-  Markers
HALLOWEEN
BLOOM’S TAXONOMY:
SYNTHESIS
INTELLIGENCE:
VISUAL-SPATIAL
TALENT:
PRODUCTIVE THINKING
ACTIVITY:
Develop two Webs
STEPS:
1.  Design a web (Mind Map) about Halloween.
2.  Design a web about Day of the Dead.
3.  Use illustrations, photographs, etc. in each
webs.
MATERIALS:
- Photographs
- Scissors
- Coloured pencils
- Markers
- Glue
Plan de Clase – Planeación
“Altar de Día de Muertos”
PreEscolar
PreE.
K
Primaria
1
2
3
Pensamiento Productivo
Transformaciones, modificaciones,
cambios, estrategias, temas, recursos,
reciclaje, muestras, invenciones, etc.
4
Secundaria
5
6
7
Comunicación
1. Palabras únicas-algo.
2. Palabras únicas-sentimientos
3. Símil.
4. Cómo se sienten otros.
5. Red de ideas.
6. Sin palabras.
8
Preparatoria
9
10
11
Predicción
Causas.
Efectos.
Planeación.
Toma de Decisiones.
Área o contenido académico:
Ciencias Sociales - Tradiciones y costumbres mexicanas.
Material:
Fotocopia del Libro: Levy, Janice. (1995) El Espíritu de Tío Fernando: una historia del Día de los Muertos.
Illinois, Albert Whitman & Company, Morton Grove, Illinois
Los maestros podrán observar el video disponible en el CECAM de su zona
Motivación o calentamiento:
¿Se acuerdan ustedes de los 5 talentos no-académicos?
¿Cuáles son? (El maestro muestra el poster).
Ahora vamos a hacer una clase de Planeación .
Tengo algunas ilustraciones relacionadas con un cuento escrito sobre nuestras tradiciones en el “Día de
Muertos”. (El maestro mostrará las ilustraciones o leerá el cuento).
Maestro (a):
¿Quién recuerda cuál es el primero de los 5 pasos en el proceso de planeación? Así es.
“Dime que vas a planear para que alguien mas sepa qué proyecto vas a hacer”
Bien en esta clase vamos a planear una ofrenda o altar de muertos, entonces escriban:
Planeación de un altar u ofrenda de muertos.
Ahora vamos al paso No. 2: Enumera todo el material que vas a necesitar para tu proyecto. (Los alumnos
desarrollarán listas). El paso No. 3 dice: Dime en orden los pasos que se necesitan para completar tu proyecto.
(Los alumnos escriben). En el paso No. 4: Piensa y dime los problemas que pueden impedirte que termines o
completes tu trabajo. (Los alumnos contestan) El paso No. 5: Desarrolla ideas para mejorar tu plan.
(Los alumnos mejoran sus ideas y luego leen su plan).
12
Plan de Clase – Planeación
“Altar de Día de Muertos”
Respuesta del alumno:
Formato del producto o actividad:
Oral.
Estrategia organizacional:
Otro.
Grupo total.
Gráfico.
Grupo pequeño (3 o 4 personas).
Escrito.
Individual.
Corporal.
Refuerzo:
Conseguir o crear artículos, fotografías, cuentos, poesías, canciones, etc.
Desarrollar un Centro de Interés con fichas de actividades.
Escribir calaveras, entrevistar a expertos en esta tradición mexicana y mucho mas.
Realiza un dibujo de tu plan.
Comentarios positivos cuando utilicen los comportamientos deseados en relación a los pasos del talento.
III. PLANEACIÓN
1. DIME QUE VAS A PLANEAR PARA QUE
ALGUIEN MAS SEPA QUE PROYECTO VAS A HACER.
2. ENUMERA TODO EL MATERIAL QUE VAS A
NECESITAR PARA TU PROYECTO.
3. DIME EN ORDEN LOS PASOS QUE SE
NECESITAN PARA COMPLETAR TU PROYECTO.
4.  PIENSA Y DIME LOS PROBLEMAS QUE PUEDEN
IMPEDIRTE QUE TERMINES O COMPLETES TU
PROYECTO.
5. DESARROLLA IDEAS PARA MEJORAR TU PLAN.
DIA DE MUERTOS
TAXONOMIA DE BLOOM
RECORDAR
INTELIGENCIAS
VISUAL – ESPACIAL
VERBAL – LINGÜÍSTICA
LÓGICO – MATEMÁTICA
ACTIVIDAD
Organiza una visita al mercado, para que observes todo lo que te puede
servir para decorar la ofrenda de tu salón.
PASOS A SEGUIR
1.  Visita el mercado de tu comunidad.
2.  Observa todos los productos que se exhiben para
el “Día de Muertos”.
3.  Enlista los productos e investiga sus precios.
4.  Forma equipos entre tus compañeros.
5.  Decidan cuales productos adquirirá cada equipo.
6.  Traten de repartir los productos, de manera que los
gastos sean equitativos.
MATERIALES
1.  Libreta
2.  Lápiz
DIA DE MUERTOS
TAXONOMIA DE BLOOM
APLICAR
CREAR
INTELIGENCIAS
CORPORAL – KINESTÉSICA
VISUAL – ESPACIAL
ACTIVIDAD
Construye un móvil con figuras que diseñes, relacionadas con el tema:
fantasmas, calaveras, esqueletos, brujas, etc.
PASOS A SEGUIR
1.  Selecciona entre los temas anotados, el de tu
predilección.
2.  Diseña algunas figuras para tu móvil.
3.  Reúne el material que pienses que sea el adecuado
para elaborar tu móvil.
4.  Arma tu móvil.
5.  Cuélgalo para decorar tu salón
MATERIALES
1. 
2. 
3. 
4. 
5. 
6. 
7. 
Cartulina
Pegamento
Lápiz
Colores
Tijeras
Palitos
Hilos
DIA DE MUERTOS
TAXONOMIA DE BLOOM
ANALIZAR
INTELIGENCIAS
VISUAL – ESPACIAL
ACTIVIDAD
Clasifica los objetos que se encuentran en una ofrenda por diversas
categorías.
PASOS A SEGUIR
1.  Observa una ofrenda y analiza todos los objetos
con que se encuentra decorada.
2.  Clasifícalos por diversas categorías.
3.  Puedes clasificarlos por: tamaños, colores, frutas,
alimentos, adornos, etc.
4.  Enlista los elementos de cada categoría e ilustra tu
trabajo con dibujos o recortes.
MATERIALES
1.  Libreta
2.  Lápiz
DIA DE MUERTOS
TAXONOMIA DE BLOOM
ANALIZAR
INTELIGENCIAS
VERBAL – LINGÜÍSTICA
ACTIVIDAD
Compara las tradiciones que tenían los antiguos pueblos mesoamericanos y
de otros lugares de nuestro planeta, para celebrar el "Día de Muertos".
PASOS A SEGUIR
1.  Algunas culturas mesoamericanas, acostumbraban
a festejar el "Día de Muertos".
2.  Investiga como era esta tradición entre cada
pueblo.
3.  Compara como se festejaban en la antigüedad y
como se festejan actualmente.
4.  Enlista las semejanzas y diferencias.
MATERIALES
1.  Libros sobre el Día de
Muertos
2.  Libros de Historia de
Mesoamérica
3.  Lápiz
4.  Libreta
DIA DE MUERTOS
TAXONOMIA DE BLOOM
ANALIZAR
INTELIGENCIAS
VERBAL – LINGÜÍSTICA
TALENTOS
COMUNICACIÓN #5
ACTIVIDAD
Debate sobre las teorías que acerca de los muertos, tenían algunos pueblos
antiguos como aztecas, mayas, egipcios, etc.
PASOS A SEGUIR
1.  Convoca a tus compañeros del grupo, para
participar en un debate sobre el tema.
2.  Explica las reglas de un debate.
3.  Pídeles que repasen sus investigaciones.
4.  Cada equipo va a defender la posición de cada uno
de los investigadores.
5.  Cada equipo tiene que desarrollar sus razones
basado en acciones.
6.  Infórmales el día y la hora en que se llevará a cabo
el debate.
MATERIALES
1.  Diversas fuentes de
consulta
DIA DE MUERTOS
TAXONOMIA DE BLOOM
CREAR
INTELIGENCIAS
VERBAL – LINGÜÍSTICA
TALENTOS
COMUNICACIÓN #5
ACTIVIDAD
Inventa calaveras para cada uno de tus compañeros y maestros.
PASOS A SEGUIR
1.  ¿Has leído algunas calaveras escritas?
2.  Recuerda que son versos dedicados a las
personas, donde se resaltan en forma chusca,
algunas de sus cualidades.
3.  Analiza la personalidad de cada compañero o
maestro a quien vas a escribir una calavera.
4.  Inventa las calaveras.
5.  Colócalas en el periódico mural para que todos
puedan leerlas.
MATERIALES
1.  Fotocopias de calaveras
escritas
2.  Libreta
3.  Lápiz
DIA DE MUERTOS
TAXONOMIA DE BLOOM
CREAR
INTELIGENCIAS
VERBAL – LINGÜÍSTICA
VISUAL – ESPACIAL
TALENTOS
PLANEACIÓN
ACTIVIDAD
Diseña las bases de la Convocatoria para el Concurso de Ofrendas.
PASOS A SEGUIR
1.  Investiga todos lo referente a una ofrenda y lo que
se acostumbra colocarle en tu comunidad.
2.  Escribe las bases que debe contener la
Convocatoria para el Concurso de Ofrendas.
3.  Pide a tu maestro que te dé su opinión sobre las
bases.
4.  Elabora un póster muy atractivo para dar a conocer
las bases entre tus compañeros.
5.  Distribuye varias copias entre tus compañeros
6.  Pega algunas copias de la Convocatoria en lugares
visibles.
MATERIALES
1. 
2. 
3. 
4. 
5. 
Libreta
Lápiz
Cartulinas
Colores
Cinta adhesiva
DIA DE MUERTOS
TAXONOMIA DE BLOOM
EVALUAR
INTELIGENCIAS
VERBAL – LINGÜÍSTICA
LÓGICO – MATEMÁTICA
TALENTOS
TOMA DE DECISIONES
ACTIVIDAD
Según las bases de la Convocatoria para el Concurso de Ofrendas, juzga
cual de todas las ofrendas participantes reúne los requisitos para otorgarle
el primer premio.
PASOS A SEGUIR
1.  Lee las bases de la Convocatoria.
2.  Anota las características de cada ofrenda (Criterio)
y puntos acumulados.
3.  Decide cual de ellas llena todos los requisitos y da
tus razones.
4.  Otorga los premios a las mejores ofrendas, de
acuerdo a las bases de la convocatoria.
MATERIALES
1. 
2. 
3. 
4. 
Libreta
Lápiz
Premios
Convocatoria
DIA DE MUERTOS
TAXONOMIA DE BLOOM
EVALUAR
INTELIGENCIAS
VISUAL – ESPACIAL
TALENTOS
TOMA DE DECISIONES
ACTIVIDAD
Imagina que te han invitado a una Tienda de Regalos y como estás
planeando decorar tu ofrenda, puedes seleccionar algunos de los productos
que ahí se exhiben y que sean apropiados para tu proyecto.
PASOS A SEGUIR
1.  Observa los diversos objetos que se exhiben:
alternativas.
2.  Piensa con mas cuidado sobre cada alternativa,
utiliza tu criterio.
3.  Escoge la alternativa que pienses que es la mejor
decisión sobre el producto que prefieres para
decorar tu ofrenda.
4.  Da muchas y diferentes razones por haberte
decidido sobre esa alternativa.
MATERIALES
1.  Libreta
2.  Lápiz
DIA DE MUERTOS
TAXONOMIA DE BLOOM
ANALIZAR
INTELIGENCIAS
VERBAL – LINGÜÍSTICA
TALENTOS
PREDICCIÓN
ACTIVIDAD
Predice los efectos que puede haber si no se siguen llevando a cabo estas
tradiciones.
PASOS A SEGUIR
1.  Haz variadas predicciones sobre las causas de la
desaparición de algunas tradiciones mexicanas.
2.  Investiga cuales han sido las causas de la
desaparición de algunas tradiciones.
3.  Haz muchas y variadas predicciones sobre los
efectos de la desaparición de algunas tradiciones
en el país.
4.  Deduce cuales son los efectos mas graves de la
desaparición de las tradiciones.
5.  Pronostica como se pueden conservar algunas de
nuestras tradiciones más bellas.
MATERIALES
1.  Libreta
2.  Lápiz
3.  Fuentes de consulta
DIA DE MUERTOS
TAXONOMIA DE BLOOM
CREAR
INTELIGENCIAS
VERBAL – LINGÜÍSTICA
TALENTOS
PLANEACIÓN
ACTIVIDAD
Planea la Fiesta de Día de Muertos.
PASOS A SEGUIR
1.  Haz un repaso del Talento de Planeación.
2.  Enumera todo lo que vas a necesitar para llevar a
cabo este evento.
3.  Ordena los pasos que vas a necesitar para
completar este proyecto.
4.  Comenta con tus compañeros, qué problemas
pudieran impedir que se lleve a cabo esta fiesta.
5.  Desarrollen nuevas ideas para mejorar su plan.
MATERIALES
1.  Póster del Talento de
Planeación
2.  Libreta
3.  Lápiz
DIA DE MUERTOS
TAXONOMIA DE BLOOM
RECORDAR
COMPRENDER
INTELIGENCIAS
VERBAL – LINGÜÍSTICA
TALENTOS
COMUNICACIÓN #1 y 3
ACTIVIDAD
Da muchas y variadas palabras para describir una ofrenda.
PASOS A SEGUIR
1.  Recuerda las características de una ofrenda.
2.  Observa fotografías de ofrendas.
3.  Piensa en muchas palabras con las cuales puedas
describirla.
4.  Piensa en variadas palabras que puedan describir a
una ofrenda.
5.  Piensa en muchas comparaciones que puedes
hacer entre la ofrenda de tu casa y la de tu salón.
MATERIALES
1. 
2. 
3. 
4. 
Ofrendas
Fotografías de ofrendas
Libreta
Lápiz
DIA DE MUERTOS
TAXONOMIA DE BLOOM
ANALIZAR
INTELIGENCIAS
VERBAL – LINGÜÍSTICA
TALENTOS
COMUNICACIÓN #2 y 4
ACTIVIDAD
Comunica a otro compañero, mediante palabras diferentes, tus impresiones
sobre la fiesta del "Día de Muertos".
PASOS A SEGUIR
1.  Enlista varias palabras con las que podrías
describir tus impresiones sobre la fiesta preparada
para el "Día de Muertos".
2.  Pregunta a otro de tus compañeros, cómo se sintió
durante la Fiesta de Día de Muertos y que te lo diga
utilizando diversas palabras.
MATERIALES
1.  Libreta
2.  Lápiz
DIA DE MUERTOS
TAXONOMIA DE BLOOM
RECORDAR
ANALIZAR
INTELIGENCIAS
VERBAL – LINGÜÍSTICA
TALENTOS
COMUNICACIÓN #3
ACTIVIDAD
Recuerda algunas tradiciones que se celebran en tu localidad y piensa en
muchas comparaciones similares, con la Fiesta del Día de Muertos.
PASOS A SEGUIR
1.  Enumera las diferentes tradiciones que se celebran
en tu comunidad.
2.  Recuerda como se celebra cada una (decoraciones,
actividades, etc.)
3.  Compara algunas tradiciones con la del Día de
Muertos y encuentra algunas similitudes entre
ellas.
MATERIALES
1. 
2. 
3. 
4. 
Libreta
Lápiz
Fotografías
Libros u otras fuentes de
consulta
DIA DE MUERTOS
TAXONOMIA DE BLOOM
CREAR
INTELIGENCIAS
TALENTOS
VERBAL – LINGÜÍSTICA
COMUNICACIÓN #5
VISUAL – ESPACIAL
CORPORAL – KINESTÉSICA
ACTIVIDAD
Inventa un cuento sobre una Fiesta de Día de Muertos.
PASOS A SEGUIR
MATERIALES
1.  Utiliza tu talento de Comunicación # 5 para inventar
una red de ideas en forma de un cuento original en
donde se lleve a cabo una Fiesta de Día de Muertos
2.  Elabora bellos dibujos para ilustrarlo. (visual espacial)
3.  Investiga el proceso para empastarlo.
4.  Lleva a cabo el proceso de empastado.
5.  Préstalo a tus compañeros para que lo lean.
1.  Libreta
2.  Colores
3.  Materiales para el
proceso de empastado
DIA DE MUERTOS
TAXONOMIA DE BLOOM
APLICAR
INTELIGENCIAS
TALENTOS
VERBAL – LINGÜÍSTICA
COMUNICACIÓN #6
CORPORAL – KINESTÉSICA
ACTIVIDAD
Utiliza materiales de re-uso, para construir, sin hablar algunos productos
originales para decorar tu ofrenda.
PASOS A SEGUIR
1.  Intégrate a un equipo.
2.  Nombren a un jefe del equipo.
3.  El Jefe del Equipo, acudirá al lugar donde se
encuentran los materiales de re-uso, seleccionará
lo que necesiten para elaborar su proyecto y los
llevará a su mesa de trabajo.
4.  Repasen los pasos del Talento de Comunicación #
6.
5.  Cada equipo trabajará sin hablar, para crear entre
todos, algunos productos originales para decorar
la ofrenda.
MATERIALES
1.  Materiales para reciclar
2.  Tijeras
3.  Pegamento
REFERENCES • 
Bloom, B. S. (Ed.). (1985). Developing talent in young people. New York:
Ballantine Books.
• 
Counsell, J. (2005). Report on the Esmee Fairbairn Foundation/National
Association for Gifted Children (NAGC) Project, Bletchley, NAGC
• 
Eyre, D and Lowe, H (eds) (2002). Curriculum Provision for the Gifted
and Talented in the Secondary School
• 
Eyre, D. and Marjoram, T., 1990. Enriching and Extending the National
Curriculum. London: Kogan Page.
• 
Freeman, J. 1998. Educating the Very Able: Current international
research. London: Ofsted/Her Majesty’s Stationery Office.
• 
Gardner, H. (1983). Frames of mind. New York: Basic Books.
• 
Sáenz, J.B. (2014) Antología de Innovaciones Educativas,7ª. edición,
México, Secretaría de Veracruz
• 
http://www.gtvoice.org.uk/sites/www.gtvoice.org.uk/files/8enrichment.pdf
REFERENCES • 
Schlichter, C. L. (1986). Talents unlimited: Applying the multiple talent
approach in mainstream and gifted programs. In J. S. Renzulli (Ed.),
Systems and models for developing programs for the gifted and talented
(pp. 352-390). Mansfield Center, CT: Creative Learning Press.
• 
Staricoff, M. (2005). G&T Provision in the Primary Classroom through a
Thinking Skills Approach. Available online at: http://www.nagty.ac.uk/
expertise/documents/westburyparkmarcellostaricoff.doc
• 
Teare, J.B. (2003) More Effective Resources for Able and Talented
Children. Stafford: Network Educational Press.
• 
Teare, J.B. (2004) Enrichment Activities for Able and Talented Children.
Stafford: Network Educational Press.
• 
Wallace, B (2000). Teaching the Very Able Child – Developing a Policy
and Adopting Strategies for Provision. NACE/Fulton.
Dr. Janet Sáenz
Dr. Janet Saenz completed a Bachelor of Science Degree in Education at the University of Southern
California; an M. A. Degree in Elementary Education and a Doctoral Degree in Administration and
Educational Leadership with an emphasis on Education of the Gifted and Talented, both from the University
of Alabama. She also studied at the Universities of Michigan, Minnesota, and at “Confratute” at the
University of Connecticut, with Dr. Joseph Renzulli
Her professional career was initiated as a teacher in the Los Angeles Unified School District where she was
selected to be a Master Demonstration Teacher for the University of Southern California after only two
years of service. She not only gave demonstration classes in all areas of the elementary school program
but also classes in beginning English to her Elementary School students from Mexico & Latin America.
She began her work in Mexico City at the American School Foundation, Mexico City, where she gave ESL
classes at the Pre-School and Primary Levels. Later she became a Professor at the University of Americas
(UDLA) and eventually Director of the Department of Education for many years. She has been a consultant
and trainer to Mexico’s public and private educational systems since 1985 in the area of Education of the
Gifted and ESL.
She currently works as professor for the M.A. Degree in Education of Gifted and Talented for the
Autonomous University of Tlaxcala; she was Coordinator/Professor of Certificate Programs for the
International Programs Office, College of Education, at the University of Alabama. As a founder/member of
AMEXPAS (Mexican Association for the Gifted), she is very active in helping to establish school-wide
Enrichment programs in Mexico. The California Association for Gifted (CAG) awarded the status of “Global
Affiliate” to AMEXPAS and recognized Dr. Saenz for many years of dedication and work promoting
Education of Gifted Mexican Children. She has been an educational consultant to the Educational
Outreach Department of JLP-NASA and was honored by the University of Tlaxcala as Professor Emeritus
for her many years of research and teacher training in rural, bilingual public schools and universities.
Dr. Janet Sáenz
She was a consultant to Lic. Jose Martinez, Secretary of Education of Nuevo Leon in the development of
Programs for the Gifted as well as ESL programs in more than 1000 public schools. Currently, she is a
teacher and advisor to public and private schools in many parts of Mexico, (Veracruz, Oaxaca, Tabasco,
Sinaloa, Chiapas, Tlaxcala, and others). She is conducting research in various rural and indigenous
communities .
She has appeared on more than 60 television and radio programs and recently helped to film a documentary
about Mexican Gifted Children for Televisa. She was appointed to the “Consejo Consultivo en Discapacidad”
which includes the area of Gifted students with or without physical disabilities. This important national group
of advisors meets every Monday afternoon in the official residence of Mexico’s presidents,(“Los Pinos”),
where recommendations are developed for all the Secretariats in the government, (Health, Education, Labor,
etc.). The members of this group have been appointed to this council for the 6 years. She has published many
articles and curricular manuals and is also writing several books about gifted children which will be useful to
parents as well as teachers throughout Latin America.
She has been an Educational Foundation of the Americas Board member for the past 15 years and is
chairperson of the Grants Committee. This foundation is based in San Antonio, Texas.
Aside from her academic activities, she is also an accomplished photographer and will soon present her 4th
exhibit which will be inaugurated by important public figures from the state of Tlaxcala since the theme is “The
Women of San Isidro, Tlaxcala”. Dr. Sáenz has captured the history and traditions of this Nahuatl town
wherein the women have worked in the fields since prehispanic times and some of the men stay at home to
embroider the traditional blouses, shirts and aprons worn by many participants in all processions and monthly
religious festivities. The proceeds from the sale of any of the photographs will go towards the purchase of
books for the trilingual library & cultural center which will soon be constructed in this community.
Gracias Dra. Janet Saenz
http://www.amexpas.net/
[email protected]

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