Newsletter Fall 2010 - California State University, Fullerton

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Newsletter Fall 2010 - California State University, Fullerton
California State University, Fullerton
California State University, Fullerton
Titan Excellence Award Recipients
July 2010
Photo Credit: Jaime E. Hamilton
Roman Hernandez, Adaptive Technology Specialist
Nominator: Paul Miller, Director, Disabled Student Services
Laura Neal, Industry Specialist-Arts, Entertainment and
Communications
Nominator: Sean Gil, Associate Director, Career Center
Martha Poledna, Office Manager
Nominator: Dr. Kandy Mink Salas, Dean of Students
Consider nominating your
colleague today! Student
Affairs TEA Months
are July and December.
Nominations are accepted
year round.
Fall 2010
Inside This Issue:
2
Lea M. Jarnagin, Ed.D.
Assistant to the Vice President for Student Affairs
Photos Credit: Associated Students, Inc., Edward Salas,
Jaime Hamilton, Karen Tapia, Kelly Lacefield, Patrick O’Donnell,
Public Affairs, Stephen Weissbart & Student Academic Services.
3
CSUF Members
Speak Up About
Diversity Issues
6
Art 4 Health
6
PASA Friendship
Games Celebrates
25 Years!
our colleagues gain an understanding of what the
student issues at our institution are, advocate on
behalf of the students, and set up programs and
activities that help students as they move through
After nearly four decades of service in higher the institution.
education, Dr. Robert L. Palmer, Vice President
for Student Affairs will retire at the end of 2010. That said, the emphasis does change over time. At
I took this opportunity to sit down with him and the beginning of my career there was quite a bit of
ask him to reflect on his 36 years providing student unrest and activism with a focus on trying
leadership to student affairs divisions first at the to change society. I see less activism on the part of
State University of New York, Buffalo and for the students now. I think there’s a buildup of things
past 13 years at Cal State Fullerton. His that we focus on from time to time. For example,
thoughtfulness, insights and passion for the alcohol abuse is on the rise across the country and
profession he refers to as “the perfect career choice I think that’s a reflection of society in general.
for me” came through loud and clear. Here’s what
he had to say.
Another issue is financial support, “How am I
going to cover the cost of my education?” That’s
How has the profession changed in the past 36 an increasing concern as the cost of education has
years?
escalated in every sector – private and public.
7
Titan Parent
Association
I think the same basic issues are still with us and
will probably always be here. How do we help
students navigate through the higher education
experience? We will always be facilitators to help
7
Titan Up the Party
If you would like more information
about Titan Excellence Awards
please visit the TEA website at
etd.fullerton.edu.
Aaron Tapper, Assistant Athletic Director, Facilities
Nominator: Brian Quinn, Director of Athletics
(Not Pictured)
Above: Dr. Kandy Mink Salas, Martha Poledna, Paul Miller, Roman Harnandez, Dr. Robert L. Palmer, Laura Neal, and Sean Gil.
Titans Making a Difference: Women's Volleyball
Mel Franks
Sr. Associate Athletic Director, Media Relations
Photo Credit: Matt Brown
The 2010 Cal State Fullerton women's
volleyball team is enjoying its most
successful season ever, yet the coaches and
players still find the time to give back to
their community.
The Titans joined athletes and coaches
from professional, college and high school
teams as instructors at Orange County
Parks Sports Day at Craig Regional Park
in Fullerton on Sunday, Oct. 10th.
OC Park Sports Day was an event staged
by Orange County Parks (ocparks.com)
for children ages 6 to 17 years to learn the
Editor
Lea M. Jarnagin, Ed.D.
Assistant to the Vice
President for Student Affairs
8 - Fall 2010 | Spotlight on Student Affairs
skills of soccer, baseball, basketball,
football, racquetball, softball and
volleyball.
The Titans taught alongside
USC football alumnus Anthony
Davis, former Angels pitcher
David
Frost,
racquetball
national champion Rocky
Carson, the Hope University
softball team, the Fullerton
High School basketball team
and the Los Angeles Galaxy
Street Team. The event ran from
noon to 4 p.m. 
Design & Layout
Jaime E. Hamilton
Receptionist & Publication
Assistant
8
8
Vice President for Student Affairs Office
Langsdorf Hall 805
P.O. Box 6830 Fullerton, CA 92834
657-278-3221
www.fullerton.edu/sa
[email protected]
Dr. Robert L. Palmer
Supporting Veterans
Titan Excellence
Award Recipients
July 2010
Titans Making a
Difference:
Women’s Volleyball
I do find, too, that more and more students enter
the university experience with issues relative to
mental health. I really feel there’s an upswing on
that. The more access you provide, the more
issues you have to deal with – but access is a good
thing! We have to be prepared to try to meet the
needs of all students. Our student populations
are becoming more diverse. No two students
enter the institution with the same needs or same
expectations. You have to deal with students to
meet their own unique needs.
W
What do you see as some future directions in
h
higher education? How might these affect
student affairs?
I think this whole business of accountability in
education will continue to be emphasized. I
think more and more as costs go up and
investments go up and expectations go up, people
w
want to know, “are we getting the bang for the
buck?” This whole business of evaluation and
assessment will be key to higher education. In
student affairs, given the nature of our work, we
h
have to be able to really show value-added. What
w
we do for the institution and for the students will
Continued on page 4
California State University, Fullerton
Supporting Veterans
Susan Leavy
Acting Director, Women’s Center/Adult Reentry/Veterans Student Services
Photos Credit: Karen Tapia
Veterans Student Services Program at
California State University Fullerton is
the recipient of a U.S. Department of
Education, Fund for the Improvement of
Postsecondary Education (FIPSE) grant.
The three year, $318,000 grant will allow
CSUF to increase academic, co-curricular
and personal support for the 450 military
veteran students enrolled at CSUF.
Veterans Student Services had its start in
2008 in response to Troops to College,
a partnership between California State
University, California Community Colleges
and the University of California. The
initiative encouraged veteran support
programs to be made available at California’s
public institutions of higher education.
CSUF currently provides veteran student
Veteran Affairs staff,
and
psychological
support services.
Two programs funded
by the grant are particularly unique to male veterans. The incidence of sexual
CSUF’s veteran students. Beginning fall offences against women is a major concern.
2011 new student veterans will have the Women experience post traumatic stress
opportunity to enroll in “University 300”. differently than their male counterparts
The course is modeled after Freshman and female veterans often receive a lesser
Program’s University 100 courses, and amount of social acceptance. Programs
provides a cohort learning experience to and services for women will concentrate on
introduce new students to the University these issues.
environment.
Specific instruction on
library research and test-taking skills, Unique programming for veteran students is
reading
and
in the beginning stages.
Veterans Student Services coordinated
comprehension Below(Left):
With the infusion of
a Wall of Heroes to honor student veterans and
will be embedded families of veterans in November 2010.
funds from the FIPSE
in the 10-week
grant we are better
Student Ryan Starrett looks at the faces of
course. Students (Right):
positioned to support
the men and women who served, or are serving in
the military, on the Wall of Heroes.
programming
including
discussion
groups, female veteran support services,
VA certification, advocacy and a Student
Veterans Association. Expanded services
resulting from the FIPSE grant include
programs and services including a
mentorship program, tutoring, expanded
female veteran services, on-site visits with
2 - Fall 2010 | Spotlight on Student Affairs
will be introduced to programs and services
that assist in academic success as well as
personal connectivity and social support.
A second critical component is a focus on
female veterans. CSUF’s veteran student
population is approximately 20% female.
Women in the military face distinctive
personal and social issues as compared to
and honor our courageous veteran students.
The Veterans Student Services Program
Coordinator is Joseph Chang, an Army
veteran who served in Iraq. He can be
reached by visiting UH 245, calling (657)
278-8660 or e-mail [email protected]

California State University, Fullerton
   
  
Juanita E. Razo
Associate Dean, Leadership & Multicultural Development Programs,
Dean of Students Office
Nancy Page Fernandez, Ph.D.
Director, Freshman Programs
Photos Credit: Bruce Chambers
As a comprehensive regional university with a global outlook, Cal
al
State Fullerton has shown a great commitment to preparing our
ur
students, faculty and staff to be culturally competent individuals.
als.
The Cultural Diversity requirement in our General Education
on
curriculum as well as programs such as Study Abroad, EMBRACE,
CE,
and SafeSpace are a few examples of how CSUF aims to increase
ase
knowledge about multiculturalism and promote sensitivity, whic
hich
are especially important on a campus as diverse as ours.
uses,
Recent events such the hate incidents occurring on local campuses,
aw
the first amendment issues raised at UCI ,the anti-immigrant la
law
an
nd
passed in Arizona, the bullying and suicides of LGBT youth, and
her
the same sex marriage debate, all raise concerns about whether
ty,
Americans are adequately educated about issues of diversity,
inclusion and community. Related is American’s ability to be
globally conscious. There are workplace implications too as
lly
companies find themselves in need of employees who are culturally
us
competent and competitive in a world economy. As a campus
ral
that has earned numerous awards and recognition for its cultural
ust
diversity and contributions to the state’s workforce, CSUF must
continue to ask itself whether the university can do more to
lly
educate students to become socially responsible and interculturally
na
competent individuals who are prepared for leadership roles in
global community.
ff
On October 1, 2010, over 900 students, faculty, staff
d
and community members participated in an “Unfinished
s,
Conversation”- a one day event comprised of a keynote address,
ns
dialogue sessions, and a film showing and discussion. All sessions
ty
were facilitated by Lee Mun Wah, a nationally acclaimed diversity
The
trainer and creator of such films as “The Color of Fear” and “The
ge
Last Chance for Eden.” The goal of the program was to engage
participants in an open and authentic dialogue about diversitty.
rs,
The program was sponsored by Academic Affairs, Student Affairs,
ASI, Inc., AICA, HHD, School of Nursing, Mihaylo College of
Business & Economics, Freshman Programs, the Multicultural
ral
he
Leadership Center, International Education & Exchange, the
WoMen’s Center, Housing and Residence Life, the Department of
Counseling, and Greek Life.
The “Unfinished Conversation” offered a rare opportunity for
participants to share personal stories related to race, gender
der
and ability. A key point emphasized throughout the day wass the
importance of understanding personal histories and life stories as
a means to know others deeply. Mun Wah also emphasized the
importance of taking personal responsibility and speaking up in
response to acts of intolerance and discrimination. In the words of
Lee Mun Wah, “Just because you don’t talk about it, it doesn’t mean
it goes away; just because you don’t do it, doesn’t mean it goes away.”
He encouraged participants to take personal responsibility by taking a
stand and speaking up as a means to fight intolerance. 
“Just because you don’t talk
about it, it doesn’t mean it goes
away; just because you don’t do
it, doesn’t mean it goes away.”
Lee Mun Wah
Spotlight on Student Affairs | Fall 2010 - 3
California State University, Fullerton
Dr. Robert L. Palmer
Continued from page 1
best for the students and what helps meet
continue to be scrutinized. Assessment is an their needs. Again, the underlying principle
area we’re going to have to focus on more of student affairs always has been and always
than we ever have before.
will be is that education is broad and
comprehensive, and it takes place in a
How do you balance your role as a variety of settings and it’s not just cognitive
student advocate with the increasing and intellectual development, but it’s also
responsibilities of a university officer as psychological and social growth. That
you move up the leadership ladder of an drives everything we do so you have to make
institution?
sure, as the institution sets a direction, that
those key principles are inherent and a part
These are not mutually exclusive but of the mission and goals of the institution.
unfortunately, you have a lot less direct
contact with the students. If you reach the Thinking for a moment of the new
level of vice president, you still have to professionals coming out of graduate
maintain that contact. But the reality is that programs getting ready to take on the
you have less and less direct student challenges of advocating for students,
interaction as you move up. But the good what advice or words of wisdom would
thing is, as you move up, you’re in the you offer?
business of setting policy and directions that
influence how things are done for and with First of all, I think when you enter this
students. At the vice president level, you profession you can’t enter it as a job. This is
want to make sure that you are constantly not just a job. It’s more than that. You’ve
whispering in the ear of the president, got to have a passion for this type of work.
“remember the students, remember the You have to first of all truly believe that
students.”
higher education as a social institution is
extremely important. In fact, I certainly
You’re always engaging in activities and embrace that it may be the most powerful
sessions that set the course of the institution social institution ever devised by man
and you do that from a perspective of because of the formative effect it has on so
“student first” as the chief student affairs many things – the broader society, the
officer. So you’re always focusing on what’s individual, things that are important to the
4 - Fall 2010 | Spotlight on Student Affairs
advancement of society.
If you value higher education then the next
step is focusing on the work we do -helping students take advantage of the
opportunities that higher education
provides. And along with that, you have to
really look at who receives the benefits of
your work, and that’s the students. You
have to believe in them. You have to believe
it’s important to help guide and direct these
students toward their goal. You have to love
students. If you love the students, you will
love your work.
Thinking now about your career, what do
you think you’ve enjoyed the most just
about being in the field?
Clearly, for me, the most enjoyable and
rewarding aspect is to watch the
metamorphosis that takes place with
students when they enter and over the time
they’re here and where they are when they
graduate. There is a clear growth that is
measurable, you can see it, and know that
you had some influence in directing that.
I think it’s clear that education is not just
about imparting knowledge, but helping
students develop a compass. And it doesn’t
stop at graduation.
That’s just the
California State University, Fullerton
beginning really. And you see all those
things that you’ve helped influence. The
good thing about being around for 36 years,
you can see over the scope of time the
marvelous things that students have done
with their lives, and from time to time
someone will come back and say, “hey look,
I remember you helping me.” That is what
this is all about.
this
hi – for
f 20 years. That’s
Th ’ a long
l
time!
i ! But
B
what I enjoy most about it, I think is being
able to be a part of building something.
Institutions aren’t stagnant; they’re moving,
breathing, living organizations. I’ve been
fortunate in my career to work for and with
presidents and colleagues that are builders as
well, who have a vision for the institution
and are moving toward advancing a mission
that will help that vision become clear.
What do you think you’ve enjoyed most CSUF is totally different than when I
about being a Vice President?
arrived 13 years ago. Now, I can’t take sole
credit for that.
Well, I’ve been a VP -- I was thinking about
President Gordon has given
leadership to the institution and put
together a good team; all of us have
helped influence the growth in size
stature of this place. We have
36 years in Student Affairs, 13 at Cal and
an interesting group of leaders at
State Fullerton
CSUF. They’re very creative, they’re
not adverse to risk, and they’ll go
forward with the notion of
advancing the institution for the
betterment of students and the
we serve. I know I’ve helped
SUNY Buffalo – Research 1 institution region
influence that in a lot of ways, and
with professional schools (law, medical) that is the most rewarding part,
other than working with students.
Years of Service
Institution Background
SUNY includes all public institutions,
including the community colleges – 63
institutions
SUNY & CSU systems are largest
systems in the US
Thinking about the 36 years in the
field, what do you think have been
some of your greatest challenges?
Declining budgets – I’ve gone
through several cycles throughout
my career and they are the most
challenging because there’s a tendency to
cut back on things that are not viewed by
some as being essential. In other words,
when there are cut backs, very often access
programs, support programs, are seen as
non-essential. That’s a fight to keep those
things at the forefront of decision makers
and help advance the notion of those as
being true priorities and not just being some
niceties you can have, or that you have as an
addition. Those are real challenges in tough
times. In a nutshell, dealing with advancing
the mission and philosophy of Student
Affairs in tough budget times has been my
greatest challenge.
What are some things people don’t know
about you that might surprise them?
As an undergraduate I was training to be a
painter. I was an art major with an
emphasis in painting primarily. But you
know the times, the student activism, the
pressing issues of the day drew me to higher
education as the mechanism to level the
playing field, and it was the best career
choice I ever made. I have no regrets about
the profession I chose. However, now that I
am ending this phase, I may go back and see
if I can really develop those talents in
painting. I do have an inclination, I
enjoyed it immensely, but I am nowhere
near where I’d like to be. So, I’d like to
refocus on that a bit. I have a little studio I
have put together in my home. It’s all set
up; it’s ready to go, so once I retire, I’ll really
spend some time there. 
Spotlight on Student Affairs | Fall 2010 - 5
California State University, Fullerton
Art 4 Health
Misti D. Osmialowski
Executive Assistant, Executive Director's Office, Student Health and Counseling Center
Photos Credit: Laura Rockwell
The Student Health and Counseling Center held its 4th Annual
Art 4 Health Opening Reception and Art Auction on Friday,
October 15, 2010, from 3:00-6:00 p.m. The art show highlighted
the artwork of 41 artists; 66 percent of whom are current students.
Out of the 105 art pieces, there were four Best of Show winners.
Natalie Salim and Shauday Deeble tied for Best of Show Student
and each received a $200 scholarship. Lauren Gallegos was
presented with the Best of Show Alumni award and received
gallery space in the TSU for three months beginning in January,
and Raven (Laura) Mansen was recognized with the Best of Show
Faculty/Staff Award. The event was a huge success, with nearly
all artists and jurors in attendance, as well as many of their family
members and friends. The opening reception was a collaboration
of the Student Health and Counseling Center, the Division of
Student Affairs, the College of the Arts, and Health and Human
Development. The Arts Inter-club Council held their Art Festival,
providing entertainment for attendees. 
Carmen Curiel
Director, Multicultural Leadership Center, Dean of Students Office
Photos Credit: Robert Bocalan
The rainy start did not dampen the mood or spirits of the
CSUF Pilipino American Student Association (PASA) 25th
Annual Friendship Games held on Saturday, October 30.
Friendship Games began in 1985 for the purpose of bringing
together PASA groups from various colleges for a day of fun
and friendly picnic games, performances, and to celebrate
SPUF – Spirit, Pride, Unity, and Friendship. A record 41
schools from California, Nevada, and Arizona, participated.
An estimated 6,000 people attended the event.
The day began in earnest with the CSUF PASA students
adjusting the program to minimize risk of injury both on
stage for the performances and on the ECS Lawn for the
games. This was “controlled chaos” at its best. Student
Co-Coordinators Keisha Macon and Jerell Rosales worked
closely with Dean of Students and ASI staff members to
ensure that each component of the day – roll call, the
games, and half-time show—was executed safely and in
keeping with the tradition of Kaibigan (meaning “friend”
in Tagalog, the major language of the Philippines), to
promote Filipino unity through education, responsibility
and character. This priority was reflected through the 13
food, clothing, and non-profit vendors who staffed booths
throughout the day.
Thankfully, the rain stopped just before the 7am registration
period and gave way to a cloudy but dry and fun-filled day.
This year, the PASA team from San Jose State University
won both the games competition and the 8 foot tall trophy
for demonstrating the most SPUF. The CSUF PASA looks
forward to hosting Friendship Games again next year, and
quite possibly, to its 50th anniversary. 
6 - Fall 2010 | Spotlight on Student Affairs
Above: Some of the highlights from this year’s event. Students competing in a heat of the Big
Ground Hog relay; Students arrive bright and early for registration; CSUF PASA members
pushing hard to win their heat of the Alpine Green relay; Team Millenia performs at halftime
show.
California State University, Fullerton
Titan Parent Association
Jolene Hill
Graduate Assistant, New Student Programs,
Dean of Students Office
Photo Credit: Jolene Hill
New Student Programs
has officially launched the
Titan Parent Association,
a community of proud
parents who wish to be
involved and informed
partners in their student’s success. Over the
previous year Titan Parents were given a hotline
phone number and dedicated e-mail address,
allowing them to contact the university with
any questions or concerns. They also received
exclusive invitations to events and activities
on campus, as well as an electronic quarterly
newsletter called the Titan Parent Connection.
This year Titan Parents have even more to look
forward to.
Titan Parents is proud to announce the
development of the first Titan Parent Advisory
Board. This outstanding group of parents will
be hand-selected to represent the parent voice
on campus. As we move into the spring, the
board will assist with events, activities, and
fundraising for Titan Parents. Here are some
of the events parents have to look forward to:
•February 2, 2011- Homecoming 2011Parents are invited to attend on-campus
tailgate festivities and cheer on the Titan
men’s basketball team.
•April 16, 2011- Night of the Pachyderm- This
Alumni-sponsored event includes a delicious
BBQ tailgate for alumni and parents, and
a ticket to an always exciting Titan baseball
game.
Titan Parents Fund, our annual fundraising
campaign, is also currently underway. Students
participating in the campaign have been sharing
campus updates, highlighting the completion
of new construction projects, and spreading
the word about the benefits of the Titan Parent
Association. We are in the middle of this
fundraising drive, and parents have already
made 392 pledges to financially support the
campus and students.
To learn how to become part of the Titan Parent
Association and receive the newsletter, updates,
and invitations to exclusive parents events feel
free to contact the Titan Parent Hotline at (657)
278-2958 or email [email protected]
The Titan Parent Association looks forward to
an exciting inaugural year! 
Jaclyn Blyleven
Health Educator, Student Health and Counseling Center
Jenell Bukky
Assistant Coordinator, Greek Life, Dean of Students Office
Photos Credit: Jaclyn Blyleven & Jenell Bukky
Two student groups, Peer Health University
Network (PHUN) and Greeks Advocating the
Mature Management of Alcohol (GAMMA)
collaborated with the Student Health and
Counseling Center to present a weeklong series
of activities focused on reducing high-risk
drinking and related negative consequences.
The week began with the University Police
Department hosting an impaired driving
obstacle course and field sobriety tests on Monday, October 18th. Students tested
their ability to drive a golf cart or complete field sobriety test while wearing impaired
vision goggles of high to low intoxication. Titan T.V. captured great moments of
students surprised by how difficult it was to drive the golf cart without hitting cones
or walk in a straight line during the field sobriety test.
The Alcohol Town Hall Event was held in the evening on Tuesday, October 19th
in the Titan Student Union (TSU). The event featured a panel of campus and
community members who facilitated a discussion of strategies to prevent impaired
driving and encourage the legal and responsible use of alcohol. Panelist included
Marian Novak, Project Manager of Recording Artists Against Drunk Driving; Cpl.
Paul McClain, University Police Department; Joseph Lopez, president of Associated
Students Inc.; and Irene Umipig, Health Educator of Community Service Programs
Inc.
Included in the Alcohol Town Hall Event was a Resource Fair in the Atrium of
the TSU, featuring campus and community organizations. Participants included
Mothers Against Drunk Driving, CSUF Counseling and Psychological Services,
University Police Department, Community Service Programs, and CSUF Substance
Abuse, Awareness and Prevention Student Association.
To illustrate the fight against drinking and driving incidents, members of campus
Greek organizations and PHUN visually displayed alcohol awareness themes by
creating chalk murals on Wednesday, October 20th. Judges included Juanita
Razo, Associate Dean, Leadership and Multicultural Development Programs; Cpl.
Paul McClain, University Police Department; and Mary Becerra, Director, Health
Education and Promotion, CSUF Student Health and Counseling Center.
Alpha Chi Omega Sorority and Delta Chi Fraternity were recognized for their
outstanding chalk designs and ultimately for winning the GAMMA Spirit Award
for Alcohol Awareness Week.
On Monday, October 18th, a vehicle from a drinking and driving accident, sponsored
by Mothers Against Drunk Driving, was displayed on Titan Walk. Students from
Greeks Advocating Mature Management of Alcohol and the Peer Health University
Network placed red ribbons around the campus to signify Alcohol Awareness Week
and to enforce the anti-drinking and driving message.
Alcohol Awareness Week was a great success and we are looking forward to the event
in October 2011! 
Spotlight on Student Affairs | Fall 2010 - 7
California State University, Fullerton
Titan Excellence Award Recipients
July 2010
Photo Credit: Jaime E. Hamilton
Roman Hernandez, Adaptive Technology Specialist
Nominator: Paul Miller, Director, Disabled Student Services
Laura Neal, Industry Specialist-Arts, Entertainment and
Communications
Nominator: Sean Gil, Associate Director, Career Center
Martha Poledna, Office Manager
Nominator: Dr. Kandy Mink Salas, Dean of Students
Consider nominating your
colleague today! Student
Affairs TEA Months
are July and December.
Nominations are accepted
year round.
If you would like more information
about Titan Excellence Awards
please visit the TEA website at
etd.fullerton.edu.
Aaron Tapper, Assistant Athletic Director, Facilities
Nominator: Brian Quinn, Director of Athletics
(Not Pictured)
Above: Dr. Kandy Mink Salas, Martha Poledna, Paul Miller, Roman Harnandez, Dr. Robert L. Palmer, Laura Neal, and Sean Gil.
Titans Making a Difference: Women's Volleyball
Mel Franks
Sr. Associate Athletic Director, Media Relations
Photo Credit: Matt Brown
The 2010 Cal State Fullerton women's
volleyball team is enjoying its most
successful season ever, yet the coaches and
players still find the time to give back to
their community.
The Titans joined athletes and coaches
from professional, college and high school
teams as instructors at Orange County
Parks Sports Day at Craig Regional Park
in Fullerton on Sunday, Oct. 10th.
OC Park Sports Day was an event staged
by Orange County Parks (ocparks.com)
for children ages 6 to 17 years to learn the
Editor
Lea M. Jarnagin, Ed.D.
Assistant to the Vice
President for Student Affairs
8 - Fall 2010 | Spotlight on Student Affairs
skills of soccer, baseball, basketball,
football, racquetball, softball and
volleyball.
The Titans taught alongside
USC football alumnus Anthony
Davis, former Angels pitcher
David
Frost,
racquetball
national champion Rocky
Carson, the Hope University
softball team, the Fullerton
High School basketball team
and the Los Angeles Galaxy
Street Team. The event ran from
noon to 4 p.m. 
Design & Layout
Jaime E. Hamilton
Receptionist & Publication
Assistant
Vice President for Student Affairs Office
Langsdorf Hall 805
P.O. Box 6830 Fullerton, CA 92834
657-278-3221
www.fullerton.edu/sa
[email protected]

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