Greater Houston Partnership

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Greater Houston Partnership
“The Houston region’s economic future is tied to its ability to attract companies to
locate, expand and maintain their operations here, and for Houston area companies
to sell their products and services abroad and / or to operate overseas.”
2005 – 2015 Strategic Plan
Chamber of Commerce • Economic Development • World Trade
Overview 5 Mission 12 Mission Directives 17 Vision 1 21 Vision 2
Vision 3 Vision 4
Appendix
31
41
49
55
Strategic Plan Table of Contents
2005 – 2015 Strategic Plan
“The North Star has traditionally been used to guide navigation. The Star itself is not fixed…therefore, the North Star reflects whichever star is furthest to the north.”
—Janice Karin
Overview
The New North Star for the Coming Decade
2005 – 2015
A True Synthesis of Roles
It has been 14 years since the Greater Houston Partnership developed a strategic plan. During that time period, the Partnership has
evolved as the organizational umbrella for what had been three distinct entities — Houston Chamber of Commerce, Houston Economic
Development Council and the Houston World Trade Association.
This 10-year Greater Houston Partnership strategic plan outlines a bold, but achievable vision that consolidates Partnership roles and
embraces one compelling theme — Building Economic Prosperity in the Houston Region.
The 10-year strategic plan becomes the “North Star.”
This 10-year strategic plan requires an infusion of effort, consolidation,
collaboration and focus on industries that will make Houston a business
magnet, thus serving as the “North Star” to guide business development.
Continued and sustained development of these industries will bring new jobs,
establish new areas of leadership and attract new talent. This, in turn, will drive
sustained economic prosperity in the 10-county region.
The plan serves the 10-county region.
This plan embraces new ideas. It identifies the Partnership’s job as bringing
economic prosperity to the 10-county region. Thus, when referenced, Houston is
interpreted as encompassing and being the 10-county region.
This strategic plan outlines the Partnership’s primary and overarching purpose in four visions, with two overarching and mutually supportive
categories — business development and public policy — that will drive and
sustain economic growth.
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Overview, continued
Business Development
Houston’s economic prosperity will be driven by net job creation
and new capital generated.
Business Development
The Partnership will actively support and promote business development. We
will develop and implement an aggressive marketing / business development
plan to grow 600,000 net regional jobs and $60 billion in capital investment
by the end of 2015, thereby establishing Houston as a global business magnet.
We will achieve these goals in collaboration with regional business leaders,
governmental entities and institutions.
Houston’s existing economy will thrive. New businesses will come.
This plan recognizes that Houston’s economy will expand based on developing
unrivaled leadership in key business segments — aerospace, alternative
energy, biotechnology, education, energy, entrepreneurial enterprises, health
care, information technology, nanotechnology and petrochemical — that
will enrich the businesses already here and attract new talent to develop the
next phase of economic growth. Each segment is capable of solidifying and
expanding Houston’s presence as a global business magnet. The Partnership
will work closely with the business community to develop high-impact, highyield projects that will contribute to job growth and capital investment in the
targeted business segments.
Houston will lead as a global region. Houston’s diversity will be embraced.
As the world becomes an increasingly global marketplace, Houston will
capitalize on its natural assets and the diversity of its skilled workforce to
proactively expand its stature as a global business hub.
The combined forces of multimodal transportation assets, the strengths of the
region’s knowledge workers and the international leadership role that Houston
already plays in the diplomatic and world trade arenas, will be shaped into an
environment that puts Houston on the map much more visibly from a global perspective.
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Public Policy
Houston’s public policy will create an ideal environment in which
to do business and it will attract the talent of the future.
Public Infrastructure
The Partnership will make certain that public policy enables and helps sustain a
regional infrastructure that will support business development activities. It will develop, advocate, lobby and promote policies that support
infrastructure development.
This plan recognizes that Houston must be on the forefront of developing
quality of place initiatives that attract top talent. As competition for talent
becomes fiercer in the coming decade, Houston will be prepared to welcome
young people, top knowledge workers, and other skilled laborers and
internationally focused business leaders for whom quality of place is critically important.
Overview
The Greater Houston Partnership will serve as the leader and convener of ideas and initiatives that support the objectives outlined in this strategic plan.
Clear, ambitious goals will define priorities.
This plan addresses the need for the Partnership to align itself organizationally
along the lines of business development and public policy. By organizing this
way, the Partnership will make certain all activities support clear goals and
strategies designed to achieve stated objectives in both areas. This alignment
also enables the Partnership to prioritize activities — saying “yes” to some
initiatives and “no” to others — based upon supported Partnership visions and goals.
The 10-year plan will attract new sources of investment.
This plan will require significant new sources of funding and investment, and a
major expansion of our Membership.
Achievement of this plan will allow the Partnership to lead, accelerate business
development, achieve policy focus and take full advantage of the next era of
opportunities.
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Jodie L. Jiles
2005 Chairman
Greater Houston Partnership
The Power of the Region: Ignite Ideas. Achieve New Levels.
As Greater Houston Partnership Chairman of the Board, I am confident that we
will focus our efforts and make economic prosperity within the Houston region
our collective objective.
“What will the Houston region achieve if we focus
our efforts and make economic prosperity our
collective objective?”
We are unique in that we, in the Houston region, have a history of “taking it to the next level,” whatever the challenge. When people in Houston see
potential, we attract talent; we solve the unsolvable. Whether it’s building
the Astrodome, the “Eighth Wonder of the World,” or creating innovation in
the field of human heart transplants, Houston is the beacon that calls to and
illuminates new possibilities.
Our challenge now becomes one of asking “How will the Greater Houston
Partnership build on its past and stretch toward dazzling possibilities for the future?”
Our next era is around the corner. The Houston region is poised to shape it, to
build on our community’s diversity, the resources of the Partnership’s Members
and those of the larger business community. We are positioned to consolidate
efforts and become the region of choice for global business, global talent and
college graduates — the new generation of Houstonians, the best in the world.
Houston’s core strength is its ability to embrace diversity, welcome people to
contribute, think truly big thoughts and rise to challenges.
Through this strategic plan, we will achieve dramatic results for the region. We
will ignite the imagination of the talent to get us there. We will collaborate. We
will convene, lead and galvanize the region’s strengths toward new levels of
economic prosperity. This plan will inspire the region to focus, to invest and to
participate in the next level.
By the end of 2015, we will have brought new prosperity to the Houston region.
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Bruce LaBoon
Chairman
Strategic Planning Task Force
Jeff Moseley
President and CEO
Greater Houston Partnership
A New Process for Achieving Consensus
A New Vision for Collaboration in the Future
A Common Direction for the Coming Decade
This document started with the question, “What is the best path for building
economic prosperity in the Houston region over coming decades?” The
process began with a blank slate, nothing set in stone. The Greater Houston
Partnership Board of Directors formed a Strategic Planning Task Force that
synthesized visions from the community, ideas from other communities and
information about the Houston region from a global perspective.
I want to thank the committee members whose work is reflected in this plan. I
also acknowledge the stakeholders and Partnership staff who gave shape to
our thoughts and challenged the committee to raise the bar on what we might achieve.
The process was open and dynamic. Members of the Partnership and
stakeholders representing virtually every aspect of the Houston region were
asked to provide input, including organizations such as the Port of Houston,
METRO, Texas Medical Center and chambers of commerce — just to name a
few. Our team interviewed representatives of leading industries, government
entities and educational institutions. We also looked outward, to other cities
and regions within the United States, whose energy and drive distinguish them
and position them for the future.
The Greater Houston Partnership’s strategic plan isn’t about the Partnership;
it’s about a greater Houston today and an even greater Houston tomorrow. This
document invites everyone who reads it to become part of the team to achieve
our visions.
I would be remiss if I did not express two more things. First, I have been
honored and privileged to participate in this process as committee chairman.
Second, this planning process would not have succeeded without the
outstanding advice, support and guidance of Andrea Kates and Steven Walker
of SUMA Partners.
It has been 14 years since the Greater Houston Partnership crafted a formal
strategic vision.
During these same 14 years, some fields such as traditional manufacturing
have been totally redefined. Some business forces such as global commerce
have shifted significantly. Many opportunities such as nanotechnology have
emerged as new possibilities for exploration. We have attracted a diverse
community of talent, and that is one of our core strengths. And, we have
created an environment that is fertile for entrepreneurs.
This strategic plan is predicated on a new definition of Houston’s place in the
sun. Namely, that what is good for Houston as a region is closely linked to new
competitive realities on the global playing field.
The plan will help drive the region toward some common directions that will
lead the charge for vitality in the business community. The visions in this
strategic plan reflect a spirit of building on current strengths, but reach with a
clear sense of purpose toward priorities that will seize the opportunities that lie
in the future.
This plan demands that we use new tools — tools that give Houston the inside
track in a global race for excellence, tools that cost money. This plan lays the
framework for using those tools and challenges us to raise the necessary funds.
At the end of the coming decade, we will all be able to look back to the ideas
reflected in this strategic plan that captured our imaginations and see a new
face of Houston — young people and new industries eager to move here,
renewed vitality in our core industries, a leading position in the global arena.
Let us embrace a common direction together.
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“The timing is perfect for a call to action. The Houston region knows that when we
marshal our resources and focus our assets, we have incredible collective power. The
diversity of our community, the talent we bring to the table now and the new people
that we attract will drive our success over the next 10 years and beyond.”
Mission — The Greater Houston Partnership is the primary advocate of Houston’s business
community and is dedicated to building regional economic prosperity.
Economic
Prosperity
Business Development
Via Marketing
(Role: Economic Development, World Trade)
Public Policy
Via Advocacy
(Role: Community and Workforce Development)
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Build Economic Prosperity in the Houston Region
Mission Focus — Economic Prosperity in the Houston Region 2005 – 2015
1
2
3
4
Vision
1 — Business Magnet
The Greater Houston Partnership will lead and facilitate initiatives that establish the Houston region as a business
magnet. The Partnership will support and promote visible initiatives that differentiate Houston and capitalize on
core strengths and resources.
Vision
2 — Gateway to Global Markets
The Greater Houston Partnership will lead and facilitate initiatives that establish the Houston region as the leading
gateway to global markets.
Vision 3 — Infrastructure that Sets Houston Apart
The Greater Houston Partnership will be the proactive visionary to build and maintain an infrastructure and
business environment that set Houston apart, nationally and globally, as the most attractive place for business.
Vision 4 — Public Policy that Places Houston in the Top Four U.S. Regions for Business
The Greater Houston Partnership will be the aggressive driver of local, regional, state and federal public policy that makes Houston one of the top four regions in the United States for business.
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“Houston needs local leadership to set vision and future direction. Strategic planning
must focus on a series of goals that lead to the accomplishment of this vision. Before
starting a journey we have to know where we are going.”
Mission — The Greater Houston Partnership is the primary advocate of Houston’s business
community and is dedicated to building regional economic prosperity.
Economic
Prosperity
Business Development
Via Marketing
(Role: Economic Development, World Trade)
Public Policy
Via Advocacy
(Role: Community and Workforce Development)
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Mission Directive 1
Create new jobs, attract new businesses and build increased revenues for Member companies and future business interests
1
Vision 1 —Business Magnet
The Greater Houston Partnership will lead and facilitate initiatives that establish the Houston region as a business
magnet. The Partnership will support and promote visible initiatives that differentiate Houston and capitalize on
core strengths and resources.
Goals
1Establish the Greater Houston Partnership as the regional leader and
facilitator of business interests
3 Develop and implement an aggressive marketing and business
development plan to grow 600,000 net regional jobs and $60 billion in
capital investment by the end of 2015
2 Create nationally recognized centers of excellence, innovative projects
and targeting initiatives in aerospace, alternative energy, biotechnology,
education, energy, entrepreneurial enterprises, health care, information
technology, nanotechnology and petrochemical
2
Vision 2 —Gateway to Global Markets
The Greater Houston Partnership will lead and faciliate initiatives that establish the Houston region as the leading
gateway to global markets.
Goals
1Establish Houston as one of the top four international trade regions in
the United States
3 Develop and implement a plan to substantially increase direct foreign
investment in the region by the end of 2015
2 Increase foreign trade in the region to $225 billion over the next 10 years
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Mission — The Greater Houston Partnership is the primary advocate of Houston’s business
community and is dedicated to building regional economic prosperity.
Economic
Prosperity
Business Development
Via Marketing
(Role: Economic Development, World Trade)
Public Policy
Via Advocacy
(Role: Community and Workforce Development)
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Mission Directive 2
Advocacy on behalf of membership and future business interests
3
4
Vision
3 — Infrastructure that Sets Houston Apart
The Greater Houston Partnership will be the proactive visionary to build and maintain an infrastructure and
business environment that set Houston apart, nationally and globally, as the most attractive place for business.
Goals
1Aggressively engage Houston’s business and education leaders in local,
regional and federal initiatives related to infrastructure
2 Develop and facilitate the implementation of an infrastructure plan that:
a.promotes and funds special projects that build quality of place
b.fosters Houston as a region of choice for employers and employees
Vision
4 —Public Policy that Places Houston in the Top Four U.S. Regions for Business
The Greater Houston Partnership will be the aggressive driver of local, regional, state and federal public policy
that makes Houston one of the top four regions in the United States for business.
Goals
1Lead the state in driving business-focused public policy that fosters
economic development
2 Establish the Greater Houston Partnership as the regional facilitator
to address issues, and the driver and supporter of policies that grow
business and increase foreign trade
3 Aggressively advocate, lobby and promote policies and legislation that
position the region’s business community as a national and global leader
4 Initiate and enhance collaboration with other organizations and key
stakeholders to promote and develop public policy
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Vision 1 — Business Magnet
The Greater Houston Partnership will lead and facilitate initiatives that establish the Houston region
as a business magnet. The Partnership will support and promote visible initiatives
that differentiate Houston and capitalize on core strengths and resources.
Vision 1
The Greater Houston Partnership will lead and facilitate initiatives that establish the Houston region as a
business magnet. The Partnership will support and promote visible initiatives that differentiate Houston
and capitalize on core strengths and resources.
Vision 1 — Houston as a Business Magnet
Goals
1 Establish the Greater Houston Partnership as the regional leader and facilitator of business interests
2 Create nationally recognized centers of excellence, innovative projects and targeted initiatives in aerospace, alternative energy, biotechnology, education, energy, entrepreneurial enterprises, health care, information technology, nanotechnology and petrochemical
3Develop and implement an aggressive marketing and business development plan to produce 600,000 net regional jobs and $60
billion in capital investment by the end of 2015
Objectives
The Strategic Planning Task Force achieved consensus on the following objectives:
• Evaluate trends
Examine the region’s current leading industries and create specific
strategies to achieve our goal for net job growth. Create a formal system
for incorporating new industries into the strategy
• Build on core competencies that attract new businesses to the region
Identify and support specific initiatives in industries that are primed
for growth as determined by market demand, economic opportunities,
breakthrough research and critical mass of talent
• Create programs that demonstrate the value of the Greater Houston
Partnership to Members and prospects
Increase revenues and opportunities for companies (Members and
prospects) in the region
• Develop consistent messaging and proactive communications
initiatives
Promote specific initiatives by highlighting opportunities and
advancements within each industry segment to companies and
organizations, nationally and globally
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Vision 1
The Greater Houston Partnership will lead and facilitate initiatives that establish the Houston region as a
business magnet. The Partnership will support and promote visible initiatives that differentiate Houston
and capitalize on core strengths and resources.
The Five Key Elements to Becoming a Business Magnet
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Centers of excellence, innovative projects and targeted initiatives:
The Partnership will lead and facilitate
projects in core industries that will attract
new jobs and capital investment to the
region. Research of national, state and
regional industry clusters will drive selection criteria.
Houston Regional Employment
Build on core industry concentrations
Attract and retain a strong talent pool
Stay ahead of growth trends
Proactively seek out business
development opportunities
Element 5 Communicate Houston’s unique positioning
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Element 1
Element 2
Element 3
Element 4
“We should establish our reputation as the best place in America to grow business, including
small and minority enterprises. We need a strategic plan that will direct us forward then enlist
the support of those willing and capable of doing their part to turn the plan into reality.”
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Vision 1
The Greater Houston Partnership will lead and facilitate initiatives that establish the Houston region as a
business magnet. The Partnership will support and promote visible initiatives that differentiate Houston
and capitalize on core strengths and resources.
Element
1 — Build on Core Industry Concentrations
Houston is home to a diverse and dynamic industrial base that will propel the region to the forefront in the 21st
century. We will identify key industries where Houston may lay claim to a unique set of business assets that drive
focused efforts to build centers of excellence, create innovative projects and develop targeted initiatives that
will build revenues and attract talent.
The industry sectors identified by the Strategic Planning Task Force and community stakeholders include aerospace, alternative energy,
biotechnology, education, energy, entrepreneurial enterprises, health care, information technology, nanotechnology and petrochemical.
The following is a summary of strengths that Houston brings to each of these 10 sectors:
A Aerospace — Since Johnson Space Center (JSC) opened more than 40 years
ago, the aerospace industry has maintained a commanding presence in
the Houston region. One of NASA’s largest R&D facilities, JSC manages the
design, development and assembly of the International Space Station. It also
is home to the space shuttle program operations and management; it serves
as NASA’s lead center for life sciences research and applications; it controls
human spaceflights; and it is integral to implementing the “Vision for Space
Exploration.” Key enabling technologies in areas such as materials, life sciences,
propulsion, electronics and energy storage are developed at JSC through
industry collaboration and are readily transferred to a host of industries
throughout the region and around the world. �
B Alternative Energy — ��������������������������������������������������
Within the Houston region, extensive research and
development is under way on developing energy sources that are not based on
the burning of fossil fuels or the splitting of atoms (e.g., solar, geothermal, wind,
tides, hydroelectric and hydrogen fuel cells). Renewed interest in this field
comes from the long-range effects of greenhouse gas emissions, produced
through the burning of fossil fuels and from energy waste byproducts. The
Partnership is working with area organizations to develop and demonstrate
advanced hydrogen and fuel cell technologies to reduce our nation’s
dependence on oil, improve our air quality and maintain our economic competitiveness.
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C Biotechnology — ��������������������������������������������������
The Houston region is a research powerhouse, with
leadership in five life science areas: bio-defense and infectious disease,
cardiovascular medicine, genetics/genomics, nanotechnology and oncology. BioHouston, an offspring of the Greater Houston Partnership, serves as a
catalyst, bringing together people in the commercial, service, governmental,
academic and entrepreneurial/venture capital sectors to promote collaboration
and creation of new companies. The region’s goal is to create an environment
that will stimulate technology transfer and research commercialization, thereby
generating economic wealth and making Houston a global competitor in life
science commercialization.
DEducation —����������������������������������������������������
The Census Bureau’s 2004 American Community Survey
showed that 29.0 percent of adults in our region have a bachelor’s degree or
higher, versus 27.0 percent nationwide. Houston’s ability to retain and attract
a well-educated and skilled workforce is directly linked to the intellectual and
innovative talent working in the region. From Nobel laureate instructors at
Rice University to cutting-edge researchers at elite institutions such as NASA’s
Johnson Space Center, Texas Medical Center, The James A. Baker III Institute for
Public Policy, etc. Houston has a competitive edge for the coming decade. Vision 1
The Greater Houston Partnership will lead and facilitate initiatives that establish the Houston region as a
business magnet. The Partnership will support and promote visible initiatives that differentiate Houston
and capitalize on core strengths and resources.
E Energy — ������������������������������������������������������������
The Houston region is the U.S. energy headquarters and work
center for virtually every segment of the petroleum industry. Forty-seven
percent of Houston’s economic base employment is energy related. The
more than 3,600 energy-related establishments located within the region
include nearly 600 exploration and production firms, more than 170 pipeline
transportation establishments and hundreds of manufacturers and wholesalers
of energy-sector products. The region’s strengths range from the capability
to build and manufacture structures and equipment needed to develop
and produce energy to the knowledge management and intellectual capital
required to support and supply the world’s future energy needs. Houston
has the largest concentration of human capital and infrastructure for energy
research, development and production in the nation.
HInformation Technology — ���������������������������������������
The Houston metropolitan area’s strong
information technology industry supports innovation, business development
and an entrepreneurial culture, and it is sustained by numerous
communications, data processing and software publishing services, and
computer and electronics manufacturing firms. The region is home to more
than 300 software development companies, more than 350 establishments
providing telecommunications services and more than 100 providing on-line
data services. Additionally, Houston’s ability to keep pace with the technical
breakthroughs in the information technology sector makes it one of the prime
hubs for advancement and development.
F Entrepreneurial Enterprises — �����������������������
Evidenced by more than 85,000
�������������
small
businesses and fueled by a “can do” attitude of its business owners and
inhabitants, entrepreneurs thrive in the region. A dynamic economy,
well-developed information technology sector, talented workforce, businessfriendly environment, low costs of living, ease of doing business and an
outstanding quality of life create an environment supportive of new start-ups.
Entrepreneurs will help to build the regional economy.
I Nanotechnology — ����������������������������������������������������������
Houston is the birthplace of nanotechnology, the world’s leading center for the study of Buckyballs and Buckytubes, and the destination
of two of the three Nobel prizes awarded thus far in this rapidly emerging
field. Houston’s prestigious Rice University houses The Center for Nanoscale
Science and Technology as well as The Center for Biological and Environmental
Nanotechnology. And, five major research institutions of the Texas Medical
Center have formed the Alliance for NanoHealth, the first collaborative research
endeavor bridging the gaps between medicine, biology, materials sciences,
public policy and nanotechnology.
G Health Care — ����������������������������������������������������������������
There are a wealth of medical facilities in the Houston region,
and many are located in the Texas Medical Center — the largest collection
of health care facilities and academic medical institutions in the world.
The medical center serves more than 5 million patients each year. Its three
universities have research budgets totaling more than $600 million per year,
including nationally recognized clinical research programs. And, there has been
a recent expansion of high-technology research in areas such as the human
genome project, biomedical imaging, nanotechnology, proton therapy, adult
stem cell transplantation and transgenic murine models of human disease.
J Petrochemical — ������������������������������������������������������������
The Texas Gulf Coast has a crude operable capacity of 3.853
million barrels of refined petroleum products per calendar day. This is 86.2
percent of the Texas total and 22.8 percent of the U.S. total. The Houston MSA
has more than 380 chemical manufacturing establishments, with aggregate
employment exceeding 34,200. The Houston-Gulf Coast region has nearly
40 percent of the nation’s base petrochemicals manufacturing capacity and
dominates U.S. production of three major resins — polyethylene (38.7 percent
U.S. capacity); polypropylene (48.4 percent U.S. capacity); and polyvinyl
chloride (35.9 percent U.S. capacity).
“We see Houston as a vibrant, visionary, community, technologically advanced, with the infrastructure to
design, create and develop integrated products and services that build life-enhancing experiences for citizens
across the region and around the world.”
— Greater Houston Partnership Technology Infrastructure Task Force
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Vision 1
The Greater Houston Partnership will lead and facilitate initiatives that establish the Houston region as a
business magnet. The Partnership will support and promote visible initiatives that differentiate Houston
and capitalize on core strengths and resources.
Element
2 — Attract and Retain a Strong Talent Pool
It takes people to make industry work. Talented people are at the root of economic success and resulting
competitive advantages that the Houston region enjoys. Knowledge workers are our future.
The Texas Workforce Commission forecasts that employment (including selfemployed) in the Gulf Coast Workforce Development Area will grow by 481,900,
or 18.7 percent, between 2002 and 2012. Of this growth, 37.7 percent will be
in management, business, finance, professional and scientific occupations
— occupations for which a bachelor’s degree or more advanced education is prerequisite.
In 2004, only 29.0 percent of the region’s adult population held at least a
bachelor’s degree, according to the Census Bureau. The need to increase the
number of people with college degrees — through migration, increased access
to higher education or both — is manifest.
Employment Growth by Occupation 2002-2012
Gulf Coast Workforce Development Area*
2002
Change 2002 – 2012
Management/Business/ Finance
258,000 — 10.0%
Professional/Scientific
489,050 — 19.0%
Business & Personal Services
468,400 — 18.2%
Sales
274,450 — 10.7%
Management/Business/ Finance
50,850 — 19.7%
Professional/Scientific
130,650 — 26.7%
Business & Personal Services
136,350 — 29.1%
2012
Management/Business/ Finance
308,850 — 10.6%
Professional/Scientific
619,700 — 27.1%
Business & Personal Services
604,750 — 28.3%
Sales
41,950 — 15.3%
Office/Administrative Support
11,650 — 16.2%
Office/Administrative Support
39,800 — 9.6%
Sales
316,400 — 8.7%
Office/Administrative Support
456,250 — 8.3%
Farming/Fishing/Forestry
11,650 — 0.5%
Farming/Fishing/Forestry
850 — 7.3%
Farming/Fishing/Forestry
12,500 — 0.2%
Construction/Installation
302,600 — 11.7%
Construction/Installation
50,750 — 16.8%
Construction/Installation
353,350 — 10.5%
Production/Transportation/Materials
Production/Transportation/Materials
Moving
Production/Transportation/Materials
Moving
Moving
355,150 — 13.8%
30,700 — 8.6%
385,850 — 6.4%
2,575,750 — 100.0%
28
TOTAL
481,900 — 18.7%
*Defined as Austin, Brazoria, Chambers, Colorado, Fort Bend, Galveston, Harris, Liberty, Matagorda, Montgomery, Walker, Waller and Wharton counties.
Source: Texas Workforce Commission, 2004
3,057,650 — 100.0%
Vision 1
The Greater Houston Partnership will lead and facilitate initiatives that establish the Houston region as a
business magnet. The Partnership will support and promote visible initiatives that differentiate Houston
and capitalize on core strengths and resources.
Element
3 — Stay Ahead of Growth Trends
Future industry trends are not the same as the current snapshot. Houston’s future depends upon capitalizing on
growing markets and transforming our current resources into high-yield initiatives by 2015.
The Texas Industry Cluster Initiative
This project was launched by the State of Texas to identify its economic development opportunities.
The report outlined specific strategies for maximizing growth in a variety of industry clusters, by
region. The following findings are directly relevant to Houston’s future.
Houston’s unique strengths, as outlined in the State’s report, include the following:
• Advanced technologies across multiple markets — aerospace, energy, information technology, medical and nanotechnology
• Logistics hub — airports, broadband, highways, information technology and ports
• Center for distribution and supply chain fulfillment
Source: Engines of the Texas Economy, 2005
The following emergning business industries represent potential applications that track with projected growth trends:
Cybersecurity
Homeland security
Logistics / supply chain solutions
Nanotechnology
New processes in refining and chemicals
Source: Engines of the Texas Economy, 2005
Personalized health information
RFID smart cards
Supercomputing
Wireless applications
The key to becoming a business magnet is to ensure the Houston region’s
current strong economic capabilities are closely linked to future trends.
The Partnership must implement a process for monitoring changes in
economic, regulatory and competitive drivers based on independent,
objective metrics. Economic and industry trends will drive the direction
taken by Houston’s centers of excellence, innovative initiatives and
exceptional enterprises.
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Vision 1
The Greater Houston Partnership will lead and facilitate initiatives that establish the Houston region as a
business magnet. The Partnership will support and promote visible initiatives that differentiate Houston
and capitalize on core strengths and resources.
Element
4 — Proactively Seek Out Business Development Opportunities
The Greater Houston Partnership will initiate an aggressive business development effort to ensure that the
Houston region develops a powerful global presence. A comprehensive marketing campaign will be developed
and implemented to communicate the virtues of doing business in the Houston region. This effort will focus
on communicating the business advantages emanating from the growth opportunities envisioned within the
centers of excellence.
Element
5 — Communicate Houston’s Unique Positioning
The Greater Houston Partnership will create and implement a focused communications and marketing
campaign, directed to business decision-makers, both nationally and globally.
A Create awareness and encourage relevant organizations and companies to begin using Houston as a focal point for their activities in those segments
D Position Houston (as compared with other regions) as the market leader
in our targeted industries
E Strongly communicate the quality of place issues that support the workforce of the future to business decision-makers and potential employees
B Encourage commitment of financial and human resources by key
business decision-makers to the Houston region
Real Per Capita Personal Income
The goal is to grow real per capita
income by 2.7 percent per year,
exceeding the compound annual growth rate of 1.94 percent recorded
from 1969 to 2003.
30
Constant 2004 Dollars per Year
C Enable Members and prospects to build economic prosperity (jobs and
revenues) via strong, focused messaging
50,000
45,000
40,000
35,000
30,000
25,000
20,000
15,000
10,000
5,000
0
1969
1974
1979
— BEA Estimate
1984
1989
1994
1999
— Projected +2.7% CAGR
2004
2009
2014
Vision 2 — Gateway to Global Markets
The Greater Houston Partnership will lead and facilitate initiatives that establish
the Houston region as the leading gateway to global markets.
Vision 2
The Greater Houston Partnership will lead and facilitate initiatives that establish the Houston region as
the leading gateway to global markets.
Vision 2 — Gateway to Global Markets
Goals
1Establish Houston as one of the top four international trade regions in the United States
2Increase regional foreign trade to $225 billion over the next 10 years
3Develop and implement a plan to substantially increase direct foreign investment in the region by the end of 2015
Objectives
The Strategic Planning Task Force achieved consensus on the following objectives:
• Measure Houston against global competitors
Incorporate attributes that define a “global region” into our benchmarking
• Galvanize strengths through collaboration – Facilitate coordination of assets to portray Houston as an international
hub for commerce (regional ports and airports, I-69 Corridor,
infrastructure, talent, international residents, industry leadership, etc.)
– Collaborate with the Houston Airport System to become one of the top
10 largest international passenger gateways in the United States
– Increase the Port of Houston’s containerized shipping ranking to one of
the top four in the United States
– Increase Houston’s Consular Corps ranking to number one in the country
– Pursue highly visible international commerce initiatives
• Implement a business development and marketing campaign
– Develop and implement an aggressive international business
development and marketing campaign targeted at specific international
points of origin that are identified as significant international trade and
investment sources aligned with our centers of excellence
– Create awareness about the capabilities of the regional ports and
airports, the I-69 Corridor, the regional railroad infrastructure and other
regional entry points
– Inform global decision-makers about the region’s advantages as a
destination area capable of global distribution
“We will establish ourselves as the international trade portal, with strong links to Central and South
America, India, China and Mexico. We will capitalize on our strengths and continue to diversify our
business base.”
33
Vision 2
The Greater Houston Partnership will lead and facilitate initiatives that establish the Houston region as
the leading gateway to global markets.
Globalization is an economic phenomenon, and its impact has revolutionized businesses in the Houston region. Houston’s role as a
business magnet offers tremendous opportunities to strengthen and expand regional commerce in the global marketplace.
The recommendation is to select key industries where Houston may lay claim to
a unique set of business assets and competitive advantages. Then we will drive
focused efforts to centers of excellence, create innovative projects and develop
targeted initiatives that will fuel international commerce and revenues and
attract talent.
One look at the statistics on foreign trade leads to the conclusion that this is one
of the chief drivers of the region’s economy. A 2001 Partnership study estimated
that 38 percent of the jobs in the metropolitan area are supported directly or
indirectly by international business. Houston’s existing international infrastructure, including the Port, the potential
of a freight/rail district, the I-69 Corridor, the Houston Airport System and the
Internet, is the foundation for future prosperity. This foundation enables the
Houston region to develop into one of the world’s pre-eminent international
commerce centers.
The Partnership will collaborate with business leaders, government entities and organizations to increase global commerce.
Value of Foreign Trade
Port of Houston Foreign Tonnage
Increase foreign trade passing through Houston over the next 10 years
Increase foreign tonnage by 20 percent by the end of 2015
250
250
2015
$225 billion
200
Tons (000.000)
$ Billions
200
2004
$104.6 billion
150
100
1992
$39.2 billion
100
50
— Goal
‘93
‘95
‘97
‘99
‘01
‘03
‘05
‘07
Source: World Institute of Strategic Economic Research
34
— Actual
— Trend
50
0
150
‘09
‘11
‘13
‘15
0
1990
1994
1998
2002
2006
2010
2014
Vision 2
The Greater Houston Partnership will lead and facilitate initiatives that establish the Houston region as
the leading gateway to global markets.
The following is a summary of strengths that Houston brings to international commerce:
1 Overview — In 2004, Texas ranked first among the states in value of
merchandise exports. Houston exports to the Americas represented
38 percent of its total exports. Between 1991 and 2004, the total dollar
value of Houston-Galveston customs exports and imports almost
tripled. In 2004, the Houston-Galveston customs district ranked as
the sixth-largest exporter by dollar value in the nation, with nearly
$40 billion in exports. There are more than 3,000 Houston area firms,
foreign government offices and nonprofit organizations involved in
international business. Nearly 470 Houston firms with subsidiaries in 129 countries, and more than 600 firms in Houston report having foreign
ownership. Of the world’s 100 largest non-U.S.-based corporations, at
least 51 have operations in Houston.
2 International governmental representation — More than 80 nations
have consular offices in the region, ranking the Houston Consular Corps
among the nations largest. At least 42 foreign governments maintain
trade and commercial offices here. Between 1992 and 2004, the number
of consulates in Houston increased by almost 50 percent. Houston
represents the third-largest consular corps in the United States, behind
New York and Los Angeles.
3 International population — More than 1 million Houstonians (more
than one in five) are foreign-born. The steady rise in immigration
supports Houston’s position as an international center. The region’s
number of foreign-born almost doubled between 1990 and 2003. Major
employers of the Houston area are international in scope. Employees
of these companies are transferred internationally, bringing back with
them knowledge and experience of competing abroad.
4 Support for Internationalism — The World Energy Cities Partnership
(WECP), an organization comprised of 14 international member-cities,
has named the Partnership as its Permanent Secretariat. WECP’s forum encourages city administrations to exchange expertise
and experience in the petroleum industry and in economic and
infrastructure development strategies, with the emphasis on economic
and business development.
Greater Houston Partnership affiliate
The World Energy Cities Partnership (WECP)
Globalization and World Cities Ranking
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
London
Paris
New York
Tokyo
Chicago
6. Frankfurt
7. Hong Kong
8. Los Angeles
9. Milan
10.Singapore
Houston must be on this list by 2015.
Source: Globalization and World Cities Roster, 1999
•
•
•
•
encourages cities with energy-based economies to:
provide a worldwide network of industry support services and resources;
facilitate trade missions for local businesses to travel to member
cities and capitalize on business development opportunities
provide information, liaisons and support to prospective
firms interested in investment and business opportunities, in order to facilitate access to each other’s markets; and
share experiences and contacts and provide support for each other in tackling common industry issues.
35
Vision 2
The Greater Houston Partnership will lead and facilitate initiatives that establish the Houston region as
the leading gateway to global markets.
International Multimodal Transportation Hub
From its founding, Houston has been known as “the place where the railroads meet the sea.” From these beginnings, Houston has grown
and developed a world-class, multimodal transportation system serving inter-regional and international traffic. As the economic engine of
the state, Houston has developed into a major international transportation hub.
Surface Transportation
The Greater Houston region has one of the most extensive and dynamic
roadway and transit networks in the country. The region continues to plan for
significant system growth to meet the demands of a growing population and
business community. Roadway traffic is projected to grow from 125 million
vehicle miles traveled per day in 2002 to 218 million vehicle miles traveled
per day by 2025. To meet this challenge, $65 billion in roadway and transit
improvements are planned. This investment is forecasted to result in a 60
percent reduction in future congestion, even though the region will be adding
approximately 3 million additional residents. The region also is investing in
maximizing the efficiency of the surface transportation system by improving
traveler safety, moving vehicles that block travel lanes and synchronizing traffic
signals for more efficient traffic progression.
Sea Ports
The Port of Houston is the sixth-largest port in the world and the second
largest in the United States. It ranks first nationally in foreign tonnage.
Exponential growth is forecast. The Port’s Barbours Cut terminal handles
more than 90 percent of Texas’ waterborne container shipping market, with
80 percent of those containers accessing the Port via the region’s roadways.
Significant investment in the Port’s new Bayport Container Terminal will triple
the Port’s container capacity.
The Port of Galveston is home to a growing cruise line business. It owns and
operates for-hire public wharves, transit sheds, open and covered storage
facilities, warehouses and freight-handling facilities. The Port of Texas City is
the largest private petrochemical port in the United States and ranks as the
eighth-largest port in the country. Both ports are located in Galveston County.
36
Port Freeport, located in Brazoria County, is the 12th-largest port in the
United States in terms of tonnage. It has a 400-foot-wide, 45-foot-deep
channel and more than 7,500 acres available for development, including 1,400
environmentally mitigated acres.
Regional Airports
There are 12 Texas Airport System Plan (TASP) airports located within the
region. This includes three airports that serve commercial traffic and nine
general and private aviation facilities. Additionally, there are many other
private airfields or airparks located throughout the region that serve private
companies and individuals. The Houston Airport System, comprising George Bush Intercontinental
Airport (IAH), William P. Hobby Airport and Ellington Field, is a major factor
in the regional and state economies. The System is responsible for more than
$8 billion in economic activity annually, and it generates more than 90,000
jobs for the region. IAH, the System’s primary air cargo facility, can handle
30 million tons of cargo a month, and recently opened a new $125 million air
cargo facility containing 550,000 square feet of storage space for processing
and distribution.
Freight Rail
Houston is a critical link for freight movement due to the rapid growth of
the Port of Houston and increased trade resulting from NAFTA. Regional
stakeholders are working together to develop a comprehensive plan of
short- and long-range improvements, including the ultimate development of a
high-speed, high-capacity loop that could bypass congested areas.
Vision 2
The Greater Houston Partnership will lead and facilitate initiatives that establish the Houston region as
the leading gateway to global markets.
The
Woodlands
Tomball
Prairie
View
Spring
Dayton
Hooks Airport
Bush
Intercontinental
Airport
Humble
Lake
Houston
Multiple
Rail Yards
Katy
Natural Gas
Pipeline Hub
Mont
Belvieu
Pipeline
Hub
Port of
Houston
West Houston
Lakeside Airport
Katy
Liberty
Baytown
Airport
HOUSTON
Baytown
Trinity
Bay
Pasadena
Rosenberg
Sugar
Land
La Porte
Municipal
Airport
Barbours Cut
Container
Terminal
Hobby
Airport
Houston
Hull
Airport
Richmond
Anahuac
Ellington
Airport
Controlled
Access Highway
System
Houston
Ship
Channel
Bayport
Container
Terminal
Pearland
Airport
Missouri
City
Houston
Southwest
Airport
Galveston
Bay
Friendswood
League
City
Houston
Gulf
Airport
Intracoastal
Waterway
Alvin
Texas
City
Port of
Texas City
NORTH
Port Bolivar
Port of
Galveston
Wharton
To Port of
Freeport
Scholes
Airport
Galveston
Gulf of
Mexico
Vision 2
The Greater Houston Partnership will lead and facilitate initiatives that establish the Houston region as
the leading gateway to global markets.
Interstate 69 (I-69)
Currently undergoing environmental review, I-69 is the combination of two
federally designated high-priority corridors that traverse the region. When
completed, I-69 will serve as the most direct trade route linking the industrial
centers of Mexico, the United States and Canada. It is a key component to the
continued growth and development of all Texas ports. The Texas Department
of Transportation’s Trans-Texas Corridor project is leveraging off current studies
for its TTC-69 plan that will incorporate existing and new highways, railways
and utility rights-of-way in a network across Texas.
Pipelines
Pipelines are instrumental in transporting product into, out of and within the
region. Fifteen of the nation’s 20 largest petroleum products and crude oil
pipeline operators have corporate or divisional headquarters or ownership
interests in Houston. These 15 control more than 64,000 miles, or 45.8 percent,
of the nation’s 139,901 miles of liquid pipelines. Fourteen of the nation’s
20 largest natural gas transmission companies have corporate or divisional
headquarters in the region, accounting for 57.5 percent of the nation’s 195,038 miles of gas pipelines. [Regarding regional / statewide transportation
projects] “We have put together a string of amazing
systems that are vitally important and that generate
better business for all of us.”
— County Judge Robert Eckels, Harris County
38
Greater Houston Partnership affiliate
The Alliance for I-69 Texas
was created in 1994 by the Greater Houston Partnership to promote
the development of I-69 in Texas. Membership includes government
and business interests in 34 counties from east to southeast Texas.
Designated by Congress as a high-priority corridor, I-69, when
completed, will be the most direct interstate linking the industrial
centers of Mexico, the United States and Canada.
• Federal statute identifies the general location of I-69 in Texas as U.S.
59 from Texarkana to Laredo and two legs into the lower Rio Grande
Valley along U.S. 77 from Victoria to Brownsville and U.S. 281 from
George West to Progreso.
• I-69 Texas has been selected as one of only seven transportation
construction projects in the United States that will receive accelerated
environmental review under an Environmental Streamlining Executive
Order announced in 2002.
• Environment and location studies are under way along the
approximately 950 miles of I-69 in Texas. These studies are projected
to be complete by 2010, with construction targeted to begin on some
segments as early as 2006.
• The Texas Department of Transportation’s Trans-Texas Corridor project
is leveraging off the Corridor 18 and 20 studies for its TTC-69 plan
that will incorporate existing and new highways, railways and utility
rights-of-way in a network across Texas.
Vision 2
The Greater Houston Partnership will lead and facilitate initiatives that establish the Houston region as
the leading gateway to global markets.
Port of
Seattle
Winnipeg
Quebec
40
Montreal
5
84
15
94
Minneapolis
Port
Huron
90
Pipeline
Corridors
Windsor
Port of
Cleveland
35
80
Houston
Detroit
80
Ports of
Los Angeles/
Long Beach
70
25
10
30
Dallas
69
45
49
20
Juarez
Port of
Charleston
Memphis
40
35
El Paso
64
40
Oklahoma
City
40
8
Atlanta
55
10
35
37
Houston
Laredo
Monterrey
75
Port of Houston
Port of Texas City
Port of Galveston
Port of Freeport
Reynosa
Port of
Altamira
Cancun
Cozumel
Port of Lazaro
Cardenas
Port of
Jacksonville
Port of
Miami
Port of
Havana
Mexico
City
95
Port of
New Orleans
10
San Antonio
20
16
Austin
Port of
Manzanillo
Port of
New York
-New Jersey
70
Kansas
City
Phoenix
80
Indianapolis
15
5
Pittsburg
Chicago
Denver
Port of
Oakland
Toronto
Port of
Veracruz
Vision 3 — Infrastructure
The Greater Houston Partnership will be the proactive visionary to build and maintain an infrastructure and
business environment that set Houston apart, nationally and globally, as the most attractive place for business.
Vision 3
The Greater Houston Partnership must be the proactive visionary to build and maintain an infrastructure and business
environment that set Houston apart, nationally and globally, as the most attractive place to do business .
Vision 3 — Houston’s Infrastructure
Supports Business
Goals
1Aggressively engage Houston’s business and education leaders in local, regional and federal initiatives related to infrastructure
2Develop and facilitate the implementation of an infrastructure plan that:
a.promotes and funds special projects that build quality of place
b.fosters Houston as a region of choice for employers
Objectives
The Strategic Planning Task Force achieved consensus on the following objectives:
• Identify critical components that drive success with regard to quality
of place
Serve as a leader or steward to ensure that Houston offers basic building
blocks that are conducive to business — affordable housing, air quality,
education, green space, health care, transportation and regional
mobility
• Set priorities based on research
– Benchmark against other regions and cities to prioritize infrastructurerelated topics that contribute to economic prosperity (jobs, revenues,
talent, etc.)
– Pinpoint initiatives that have the potential to create new jobs, draw new
industries and increase revenues for companies in the region
– Align infrastructure initiatives with growth prospects for Houston’s
centers of excellence
42
• Lead initiatives that keep policy aligned with regional economic
prosperity
– Leaders must exemplify a visionary spirit in addressing quality of place
– Develop excellence initiatives that differentiate overall quality of life
Vision 3
The Greater Houston Partnership must be the proactive visionary to build and maintain an infrastructure and business
environment that set Houston apart, nationally and globally, as the most attractive place to do business .
Quality of Place — The key to supporting a region identified as a business
magnet is an infrastructure agenda designed to make certain it compares
favorably with competitor cities. Infrastructure initiatives must address issues,
including aesthetics, affordable housing, air quality, cost of living, education, entertainment and recreation, health care,
information technology infrastructure, mobility, power, transportation and
water quality.
Regional prosperity will require a concerted effort from every sector to attract
and retain knowledge workers and create a true quality of life for Houstonians.
Greater Houston Partnership affiliate
The Quality of Life Coalition,
a group of representatives led by the Greater Houston Partnership
from Houston’s civic, business and environmental communities,
mobilizes public and private sectors to fund and improve Houston’s
aesthetics, flood control and recreational amenities. This focus
on quality-of-life factors is essential to Houston’s ability to attract
businesses and skilled workers. Recommendations include planting
trees, landscaping freeways, adding parks, improving waterway
water quality and establishing a canoe trail system, among others.
43
Vision 3
The Greater Houston Partnership must be the proactive visionary to build and maintain an infrastructure and business
environment that set Houston apart, nationally and globally, as the most attractive place to do business .
Air Quality — The Partnership has led the effort to improve the region’s air
quality through formation of organizations such as the Business Coalition
for Clean Air, the Texas Environmental Research Consortium and the Texas
Clean Air Working Group. These organizations work to develop a consensus
on air quality goals and strategies, improve air quality science and implement
effective reduction programs without jeopardizing jobs or economic progress.
Business sectors and individual companies pursue new technologies and
programs that make them, and the region, leaders in innovative approaches to
cleaning the air. After successfully addressing the one-hour ozone standard, the Texas
Commission on Environmental Quality now plans to achieve the new eighthour ozone standard set for the region. They will accomplish this by working
alongside the Partnership and other stakeholders with a vested interest in public health, quality of life and economic vitality. By working together, businesses, elected officials, the public sector, trade
associations, environmental groups and citizens will have tremendous impact
on air quality, ensuring the region a competitive advantage to attract and
retain businesses.
44
Cost of Living — From its outset nearly four decades ago, the ACCRA Cost-ofLiving Index has consistently shown that Houston enjoys living costs well below
the nationwide average. This enables the region a competitive advantage over
other major metropolitan areas of more than 2 million. In the 2005 survey:
• Houston’s overall after-taxes living costs were 12 percent below the nationwide
average for nearly 300 areas.
• Of the 20 metropolitan areas with populations of more than 2 million that
participated in the survey, Houston’s housing costs were 44 percent below the
average for the large metro areas, and its overall costs were 23 percent below
the average.
• Houston’s grocery prices, 21 percent below the major-metro average, were
also the lowest; its utility costs were 10 percent below the average; its
transportation costs were 9 percent below; its health care costs were 7 percent
below; and its costs for miscellaneous goods and services were 11 percent
below the average.
Vision 3
The Greater Houston Partnership must be the proactive visionary to build and maintain an infrastructure and business
environment that set Houston apart, nationally and globally, as the most attractive place to do business .
Education and Workforce — Maintaining a competitive edge in a knowledgebased economy means offering a wide range of opportunities for formal
education and workforce training. Houston is a major center of higher learning.
In fall 2004, the Houston region had 313,664 students enrolled in more than
60 degree-granting colleges, universities, institutes and technical schools.
These include Rice University, one of America’s elite teaching and research
universities, the University of Houston, the region’s largest public research
and teaching university, and numerous other private colleges, universities and
institutions. Houston has the education infrastructure to develop knowledge workers
Houston Higher Education Statistics
Colleges, Universities and Institutions
60+
Fall 2004 Enrollment
313,664
Degrees Awarded – 2003 Academic Year
25,000+
Vocational, Technical, Business Schools
100+
Sources: Houston Facts, 2005, Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board
Greater Houston Partnership affiliate
The Center for Houston’s Future
has identified four areas that must be addressed in order to
advance Houston’s global competitiveness. They include:
• innovation support with venture capital development;
• human capital and workforce development;
• regional economic development strategies; and
• leveraging global connections into global corporate services in the
areas of finance, accounting, law and media/advertising.
“The Houston region’s economic well-being increasingly depends upon its ability to nurture, attract and retain
skilled and creative knowledge workers and high-tech companies.”
— Houston Area Survey (2005), Stephen L. Klineberg
45
Vision 3
The Greater Houston Partnership must be the proactive visionary to build and maintain an infrastructure and business
environment that set Houston apart, nationally and globally, as the most attractive place to do business .
Health Care — Houston is one of the fastest growing regions of the country.
More than 4 million people live here. The region boasts the world’s largest
medical center. The Partnership’s Public Health Care Task Force represents public officials,
public and private health service providers, medical school administrators,
and business and community leaders. Recently, the task force examined the
public health delivery system in Houston and Harris County. They identified
the contrast between the region’s abundance of physicians and wide variety of
treatment available, juxtaposed with rapidly rising health care and insurance
costs, and made recommendations to alleviate the current health care
conditions. Included in the recommendations was the development of additional health
care centers designated with Federally Qualified Health Center (FQHC) status.
This designation allows significantly expanded access to health care for
underserved residents. Increased numbers of FQHCs also will help produce
more jobs and economic growth.
The Partnership will continue to convene leadership representing healthrelated issues that support the mission of building economic prosperity and
improving overall quality of place.
Texas Medical Center Overview
Area
800+ acres
Permanent Buildings
100+
Total Employment
65,300
Capital Investment (cumulative)
$8.2 billion+ as of December 2004
Patient Visits Per Year
5.2 million
Foreign Patients Per Year
10,456 in 2004
Licensed Beds
6,344 plus 373 bassinets
Student Enrollment
22,000
Combined Operating Budgets (all institutions)
$5.4 billion (2001)
Total Research Grants (200-2004)
$3.5+ billion
Sources: Texas Medical Center 2005 Facts and Figures and Houston Facts 2005
Regional Health Care Assets*
Physicians
10,497
Hospitals
99
Hospital beds
18,600
*Greater Houston 10-county region
Source: Houston Facts 2005
46
“Health care excellence in Houston is driven by the outstanding clinical and research activities in the world’s
largest medical center. The community is energized to expand technology transfer and commercialization
and create new companies whose products will improve health and create economic wealth.”
Vision 3
The Greater Houston Partnership must be the proactive visionary to build and maintain an infrastructure and business
environment that set Houston apart, nationally and globally, as the most attractive place to do business .
Information Technology Infrastructure — Information technology includes
broadband, telecommunications, information systems, networks, wireless
Internet and critical components essential to developing and maintaining an
infrastructure that gives Houston the competitive advantage. Sustaining a
strong information technology architecture allows industry, government and
business organizations to create, store, exchange and utilize information in its
various forms, from e-mail to multimedia presentations, and communicate with
key business and community interests on a daily basis.
Information technology recommendations include:
• Increasing community and institution-wide access to wireless Internet portals
and products;
• Revising procedures to automate and streamline production activities;
• Enhanced and alternative communications such as teleconferencing and
electronic file exchange;
• Using computer hardware and software to automate and augment clerical,
administrative and management tasks in organizations;
• Satellite technologies for remote business management and access to
information;
• Collocation and data management systems to provide security and redundancy
of information.
Mobility — Over the next decade, the Partnership must aggresively expand
the process to improve mobility throughout the region. Houston must continue
to make a concerted effort to explore all alternatives to establish a coordinated
system of mass transit improvement at the lowest possible cost.
The key initiatives include, but are not limited to, light rail expansion;
innovative toll road strategies; a major increase in bus service, including 1,000
new bus routes; an aggressive expansion of the I-10 freeway; development of
the I-69 Corridor; and implementation of a “smart streets” initiative.
Houston will continue to make a concerted effort to explore all alternatives
to establish a coordinated system of mass transit improvement at the lowest
possible cost.
Greater Houston Partnership affiliate
The Gulf Coast Regional Mobility Partners
(Houston-Galveston region) and The Houston-Galveston Area
Council seek to increase transportation funding and promote
regional issues, projects and priorities at the state and federal
levels. Recommendations focus on tollways, managed and high
occupancy lanes, freeway expansion, pass-through tolling, and
improvement of freight movement and at-grade crossing safety in
order to improve mobility and reduce congestion.
“The Partnership needs to be instrumental in dealing with air quality. It is a critical component of being a
region of choice.”
47
Vision 4 — Public Policy
The Greater Houston Partnership will be the aggressive driver of local, regional, state and federal public
policy that makes Houston one of the top four regions in the United States for business.
Vision 4 The Greater Houston Partnership must be the aggressive driver of local, regional, state and federal
public policy that makes Houston one of the top four regions in the United States for business.
Vision 4 — Public Policy
Goals
1Lead the state in driving business-focused public policy that fosters economic development
2Establish the Greater Houston Partnership as the regional facilitator to address issues, and the driver and supporter of policies
that grow business and increase foreign trade
3Aggressively advocate, lobby and promote policies and legislation that position the region’s business community as a national
and global leader
4Initiate and enhance collaboration with other organizations and key stakeholders to promote and develop public policy
Objectives
The Strategic Planning Task Force achieved consensus on the following objectives:
• Engage leaders in policy development
Position Houston business leaders on local, regional, state and federal
policy committees
• Establish solid working relationships
– Develop strategic collaborative relationships within the 10-county region
– Engage the region’s business leaders in local, regional, state and federal
committees and initiatives that elevate the region’s visibility
• Speak with one voice
– Create a unified voice for regional business interests
– Promote a unified public image
• Promote strengths
– Capitalize on current regional strengths
– Focus on specific sectors, industries and age groups
50
• Link Partnership goals to emerging trends
Create a dynamic mechanism for linking Partnership goals with
trends and to data regarding the economic prosperity drivers, thereby
anticipating and creating policy initiatives that will build the region’s
competitive economic strength
• Communicate and lobby based on priorities
Initiate a strong, proactive, coordinated and collaborative
communications strategy directed toward local, regional, state and
federal legislative bodies
Vision 4 The Greater Houston Partnership must be the aggressive driver of local, regional, state and federal
public policy that makes Houston one of the top four regions in the United States for business.
“What the Partnership does better than any other organization in Houston is bring together a broad group of
stakeholders to hammer out an issue. I can’t think of any other group with the clout and credibility to be able
to serve this role.”
The Greater Houston Partnership will build on existing strengths and trends for future growth potential by serving as the primary
advocate for key regional business interests and industries.
Its collaborative relationships with other organizations in the 10-county region will truly represent regional business interests.
The Partnership’s role as convener is an important component in its active
involvement in public policy issues that face the region. As the region’s
primary business advocate, the Partnership is a strong voice for cooperative
action shaping the direction on regional issues that support the organization’s
mission. The Partnership works with decision-makers at all levels to ensure the
region has the best business environment possible.
The I-69 Corridor initiative promises a new trade corridor that will enhance
Houston’s role as a trading and distribution center. The Port of Houston and
George Bush Intercontinental Airport have experienced tremendous growth
that calls for funding for additional improvements.
The quality of education, levels of educational attainment, air quality, mobility,
public transportation, workers’ compensation, asbestos and tort reform,
health care, quality of place, flooding, water quality, subsidence and homeland
security are ongoing public policy concerns that affect businesses in the region.
The Partnership supports government policies, laws and regulations that
enhance the ability of Houston area firms to conduct international business.
It monitors issues at the federal level that affect the international business
climate and develops advocacy initiatives that represent Member business
interests before congressional and executive branch officials.
51
Vision 4 The Greater Houston Partnership must be the aggressive driver of local, regional, state and federal
public policy that makes Houston one of the top four regions in the United States for business.
The Greater Houston Partnership will create a business tax and regulatory environment that is second to none.
In the past, the Partnership joined a statewide coalition to lower the costs
of workers’ compensation by pushing for changes in Texas laws. Statutory
changes were implemented that provided workers’ compensation beneficiaries
with prompt, optimum, nationally accepted medical treatment, with an
emphasis on returning to work.
In conjunction with statewide tort reform efforts, the Partnership pushed for
legislative reforms.
The Partnership continues to push for permanent reinstatement of a state sales
tax deduction allowance on federal tax returns, which will save Texans nearly
$700 million in federal income taxes annually.
Over the next decade, the Partnership will continue to set priorities for policy
that creates an ideal environment for doing business.
“The ideal environment is one that has a diverse economic and ethnic base, offers a high-quality mass
transit system and provides employers with a large pool of highly qualified workers. Houston must continue
to attract new business to the area, work with governmental organizations on mass transit, air quality
and other quality of life issues and foster educational opportunities, both at the high school and higher
education levels.”
52
Vision 4 The Greater Houston Partnership must be the aggressive driver of local, regional, state and federal
public policy that makes Houston one of the top four regions in the United States for business.
The Greater Houston Partnership will serve as the region’s primary public policy advocate for business. The following issues are within the scope of the Partnership’s interests:
• Business Development
– Economic development
– Tax and regulatory issues
– World trade and investment
• Education and Workforce
– Public school accountability
– Public school finance
– Statewide education reform
• Environment
– Air quality
– Water quality
• Health Care
– Access and affordability
– Cost containment and efficiency
– Expansion of research and technology transfer
– Integrated regional health care delivery system
– Level 1 trauma capacity
• Information Technology Infrastructure
– Broadband and wireless infrastructure
– Emergency response and public safety
– Infosystems and networking
– Telecommunications
• Quality of Place
– Aesthetics
– Green space
– Infrastructure
• Transportation and Mobility
– Freight rail service
– Passenger rail
– Urban mobility
53
Appendix
“This type of plan won’t happen on its own. In the past, Houston has been the beneficiary of location
and the tremendous assets we have attracted in specific fields. Now, we have a new urgency to build
regional economic prosperity as a result of global competition, a flattening of the overall playing
field and aggressive initiatives from other regions.”
2005 Strategic Planning Task Force Members
Jodie L. Jiles
2005 Chairman
Greater Houston Partnership
First Albany Capital
56
Bruce LaBoon
Chairman
Strategic Planning Task Force
Locke Liddell & Sapp LLP
Chip Carlisle
2006 Chairman
Greater Houston Partnership
Wells Fargo Bank
Jeff Moseley
President and CEO
Greater Houston Partnership
Mike Ballases
JP Morgan Chase
Wayne McConnell
McConnell, Jones, Lanier & Murphy, LLP
Roland Rodriguez
Mir Fox & Rodriguez, P.C.
Joseph Dilg
Vinson & Elkins L.L.P.
Drayton McLane
Houston Astros Baseball Club
Priscilla Slade, Ph.D.
Texas Southern University
Charles W. Duncan Jr.
Duncan Interests
John Mendelsohn, M.D.
University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center
Gio Tomasini
Tomasini W2K
James Edmonds
Edmonds & Company
David Mendez
JP Morgan Chase
Stephen Trauber
UBS Investment Bank
Kelly Frels
Bracewell & Giuliani, LLP
Charles Miller
Meridian National, Inc.
Alan Vera
The Quest Business Agency, Inc.
John Hofmeister
Shell Oil Company
Walter Mischer Jr.
Mischer Investments, L.P.
Umesh Verma
Blue Lance
Harold Hook
Main Event Management Corp.
Robert Mosbacher Jr.
Mosbacher Energy Company
Massey Villarreal
Precision Task Group, Inc.
Bruce Leslie, Ph.D.
Houston Community College
Patrick Oxford
Bracewell & Giuliani, LLP.
Richard Weekley
Weekley Development Company
Jacqueline Martin
J.S. Martin Associates, LP
Jane Page
Crescent Real Estate Equities
Strategic Plan Consulting Team
SUMA Partners, L.P.
www.suma.com
Chip Carlisle
2006 Chairman
Greater Houston Partnership
From Plan to Action
As incoming Partnership Chairman, I want to express my personal
endorsement of this strategic plan and the process that created it. As Chairman,
I will work with the Executive Committee and the Board to institute a process
and discipline that will incorporate an annual review of this plan as part of
the prioritization and budget process. I will lead aggressive implementation
efforts to communicate the precepts outlined in the document to the Board,
the Membership and the community at large. I will align our governance,
committee structure and priorities to the visions that comprise the core of the
Partnership’s strategic focus — business development and public policy.
I am excited by the possibilities of developing Houston’s core assets into
“magnets” that will create economic prosperity for our Members and regional
businesses, that will attract the next generation of knowledge workers and set
Houston apart as a global hub for business. We will build the infrastructure and
create the public policy environment that distinguishes our region as a “quality
of place” leader.
I am motivated by the challenges embedded in this document. As a Board,
we will inspire others, attract new sources of capital and collaborate with our
Members, our stakeholders and other organizations.
This strategic plan allows me to set a new precedent for every chairman
whose leadership will help move the Greater Houston Partnership toward the
fulfillment of our 2015 visions — to embrace, to challenge, to inspire and to
align the Board toward the successful achievement of goals and objectives that
will take Houston to a new level of distinction over the next decade.
I pledge my support and leadership and thank the members of the Strategic
Planning Task Force and the community for setting us on a dynamic course.
57
The Greater Houston Partnership wishes to thank the following citizen leaders who
provided input on how we may serve the 10-county region over the next decade.
Stakeholders
Saba Abashawl
Executive Director, International Economic
Development
City of Houston, Houston Airport System
Peggy Boice
Director of Public Policy
United Way of the Texas Gulf Coast
Ron Cookston
Manager
Gateway to Care
Dennis Bonnen
State Representative
District 25
Michael Dee
Managing Director
Morgan Stanley
Iris Correa-Alvarez
President
Houston Hispanic Chamber of Commerce
Ron Bourbeau
CEO
South Montgomery County Woodlands Economic Development Partnership
George DeMontrond
President
DeMontrond Automotive Group, Inc
Angelos Angelou
Angelou Economics
Kevin Brady
United States Representative
District 8
Willie Alexander
President
W. J. Alexander and Associates
Charlene Anthony
Association General Contractors of America
Herb Appel
President
Greater Fort Bend Economic Development Council
Michael McAtamney
Director, West Region
TIAA-CREF
Bill Barnett
Director Emeritus
Baker Botts L.L.P.
Domingo Barrios
Grant Officer
Houston Endowment
John Beddow
Publisher
Houston Business Journal
Andrew Biar
Strategic Public Affairs
Craig Bland
Vice President and General Manager
Univision, TV 45
Jack Blanton
Director Emeritus
Greater Houston Partnership
58
John Breeding
President
Uptown Houston District
Jamie Brewster
President and Executive Director
Houston Intown Chamber of Commerce
Tom Britton
President
Greater Heights Chamber
Mike Byers
President
Humble Area Chamber of Commerce
Kirbyjon Caldwell
Senior Pastor
Windsor Village United Methodist Church
Deborah Cannon
President and CEO
Houston Zoo, Inc.
Nancy Chang
President and CEO
Tanox Inc.
Donna Cole
President and CEO
Cole Chemical & Distributing
Peter Diaz
General Manager
KHOU-TV, Channel 11
Donna Dishman
COO
PAWS Houston
George Donnelly
Managing Partner
Lilo Ventures
Jack Drake
President
Greater Greenspoint Management District
David Dunlap
Managing Partner
Jackson Walker, LLP
Robert Eckels
County Judge
Harris County
Mark Ellis
Council Member At-Large
Position 1
Rodney Ellis
Senator
State of Texas
Bob Eury
President
Central Houston, Inc
Peter Evans
Group Vice President
Jacobs
Stakeholders continued
Richard Everett
Chairman and CEO
Century Development
Henry Florsheim
President and General Manager
KTRK-TV, Channel 11
Doug Foshee
President and CEO
El Paso Corporation
Grace Fox
TAS Construction
Lupe Fraga
President & CEO
Tejas Office Products, Inc.
Mark Fury
Special Assistant
Harris County Precinct #3
Sylvia Garcia
County Commissioner
Precinct 2
James Howard Gibbons
Editor, Editorial Page
Houston Chronicle
Shelley Sekula-Gibbs
City Council Member
City of Houston
Ronald Girotto
President and CEO
The Methodist Hospital System
Tara Gresham
TD Industries
Kenneth Guidry, CPA
President and COO
Pannell Kerr Forster of Texas
Randy Hageman
Marek Brothers Systems, Inc.
Anthony Hall
Chief Admin Officer
City of Houston
Mary Margaret Hansen
President
Greater East End District
Robert Hebert
County Judge
Ft. Bend County
Don Henderson
Vice President and Managing Director
Hyatt Regency Houston
Thom Herrmann
Executive Liaison to the President
Memorial Hermann
Bill Higgs and Paul Redmon
Co-Founders
Mustang Engineering
Ann F. Hodge
President and CEO
Katy Area Chamber of Commerce
Richard Huebner
Executive Director
Houston Minority Business Council
Helen Huey
Consultant
HCA
David Huntley
Vice President, External Affairs
SBC
Ken Janda
Vice President
Apogee
Jim Jard
MetroNational
Limas Jefferson
Chairman and CEO
Jefferson Associates, Inc.
Michael Jhin
President and CEO Emeritus
St. Luke’s Episcopal Health System
Rich Kinder
President and CEO
Kinder Morgan
Tom Kornegay
Director
Port of Houston Authority
Bob and Elyse Lanier
Landar Holdings, L.P.
Quince Godge
Linbeck
Lee Hogan
Executive Chairman
St. Luke’s Episcopal Health System
Richard Lapin
Deputy Chief of Administration
City of Houston
Jay Gogue
President
University of Houston
Ned Holmes
Chairman and CEO
Parkway Investments/Texas
Carlos Lara
Lara and Associates
Allen Grainey
National Electrical Contractors Association
Roger Hord
President
West Houston Association
Jan Lawler
President
Economic Alliance Houston – Port Region
59
Stakeholders continued
Ann Lents
President and CEO
Center for Houston’s Future
Steve Miller
Chairman and President
SLM Discovery Ventures, Inc.
Jim Reinhartsen
President
Bay Area Houston Econonomic Partnership
Herb Lipsman
Senior Vice President, Marketing and Business Development
The Redstone Companies
Darcy Mingoia
President
Cy-Fair Houston Chamber of Commerce
Maurice Robison
Vice President – Healthcare
Irvine Team
Renee Logans
President and CEO
Access Data Supply, Inc.
Gasper Mir III
Executive General Manager –Strategic Partnerships
Houston Independent School District
Olga Llamas Rodriguez
Harris County
Precinct 2
Yolanda Londono
Community Affairs
JP Morgan Chase
Joseph Montes
US Small Business Regional Administration
Lisa Rowland
Vice President of Sales and Marketing
Humana, Inc.
Alex Lopez-Negrete
President and CEO
Lopez Negrete Communications Inc.
Francisco Javier Alejo Lopez
Trade Representative for North American States
Consulate of Mexico
Jeff Love
Managing Partner
Locke Liddell and Sapp, LLP
Karen Love
Director of Practical Growth
Pannell Kerr Foster of Texas, P.C.
60
Eric Munson
Regional Advocate, Region IV
Small Business Administration
James Nadler
Senior Medical Director
CIGNA HealthCare of Texas, Inc.
Tom O’Grady
Associate Vice President
HNTB Corporation
Wayne O’Neil
Senior Manager
Gilbane Building Company
Elena Marks
Director of Health Policy-Office of Mayor
City of Houston
Luis E. Perez
Deputy Director of Aviation
Marketing, Communications and Community Affairs
City of Houston, Houston Airport System
Michael McAtamney
Director, Western Region
TIAA-CREF
Sonia Perez
Sr. Vice President for External Affairs
SBC
Tracey McDaniel
Executive Director
Texas Department of Economic Development
Ray Perryman
Economist
The Perryman Group
Raymond Messer
President
Walter P. Moore and Associates
James Raborn
Partner
Baker Botts
Travis Middleton
Owner
Trademark Insurance Agency
Steve Radack
Commissioner, Precinct #3
Harris County
Jim Royer
CEO
TCB INC.
Kim Ruth
President, Houston Region
Bank of America
Abe Saavedra
Superintendent
Houston Independent School District
Alan Sadler
County Judge
Montgomery County
Robert Sakowitz
Hazak Inc.
Betsy Schwartz
Executive Director
Mental Health Association of Houston
Marc Shapiro
Consultant
JP Morgan Chase
Jim Slack, Jr.
Slack & Company Contracting, Inc.
L.E. Simmons
President
SCF Partners
Stakeholders continued
Matt Simmons
Chairman and CEO
Simmons and Company
Jordy Tollett
President and CEO
Greater Houston Convention & Visitors Bureau
Fred Welch
Executive Director
Pearland Economic Development Corporation
David Stedman
President and CEO
Economic Development Alliance for Brazoria County
Peter Traber
President and CEO
Baylor College of Medicine
Louie Welch
Former Mayor
City of Houston
Jack Steele
Executive Director
Houston-Galveston Area Council
Ann Travis
Office of the Mayor
City of Houston
James Willerson
President
University of Texas-Houston Health Science Center
Manfred Sternberg
President and CEO
Bluegate Corporation
David Turkel
Director, Economic Development
Harris County
Bill White
Mayor
City of Houston
Michael Stevens
Chairman
Michael Stevens Interests, Inc.
Bob Turnbull
Director, Economic Development
CenterPoint Energy
Damon Williams
Executive Director
Greater Southeast Management District
Kathryn Stream
Senior Vice President
Texas Medical Center
Sylvester Turner
State Representative
District 139
Ken Williams
Executive Vice President
Frost Bank
Tom Sullivan
Chief Counsel for Advocacy
SBA
Dawn Ullrich
Director, Convention and Entertainment
City of Houston
Larry Williams
Marek Brothers Systems, Inc.
Jack Sweeney
Publisher and President
Houston Chronicle
Richard M. Vacar, AAE
Director
City of Houston, Houston Airport System
Cynthia Tauss
Gulf Coast Regional Representative
Economic Development and Tourism,
Office of the Governor
State of Texas
Lori Vetters
President, Houston Region
Wachovia Bank, N.A.
Vic Tamborella
CEO
VT2 Media Design
Bill Teague
President and CEO
Gulf Coast Regional Blood Center
Tom Thierheimer
Britain Electric
Richard Wainerdi
President, CEO and COO
Texas Medical Center
Mark Wallace
President and CEO
Texas Children’s Hospital
Jacqueline Northcutt Waugh
President
BioHouston
Trish Wise
President and CEO
Greater Southwest Houston Chamber of Commerce
Dan Wolterman
President and CEO
Memorial Hermann Healthcare System
Martha Wong
State Representative
District 134
Jim Yarbrough
County Judge
Galveston County
Susan Young
President
South Main Center Association
Carrington Weems
Weems Interests
61
Definitions
Business development (page 12) – A merger of world trade and economic development into a single delivery system measured by new net jobs, capital
investment, direct foreign investment and exports.
Centers of Excellence (page 25) – Nationally and internationally recognized industries, institutions or organizations that serve to attract research dollars, and knowledge workers as well as drive job growth within their industry cluster.
Community development (page 12) – Foundational requirement for business and workforce development that begins with a formal assessment and
prioritization. Issues addressed are generally linked to infrastructure and may include cultural or social activities.
Economic development (page 12) – The creation of 600,000 net regional jobs and $60 billion in capital investment by 2015 in the 10 county Houston region. The Partnership plans to meet this goal through collaboration with governmental entities, business leaders and institutions. As part of the Partnership’s
economic development role, they will also take an active role in marketing the region.
Knowledge workers (page 28) – Highly skilled, highly educated, highly paid employees with unique talents. In general, knowledge workers provide skills
that cannot be outsourced and provide competitive advantage for their industry cluster.
Public policy (page 19) – As primary advocate for the business community to promote regional economic prosperity, the Partnership formulates positions
and actively lobbies on behalf of local, state and federal issues. The Partnership requires Board approval for a position to become part of the agenda for
lobbying activities.
Quality of place (page 43) – An integral component of community development. The Partnership links quality of place to the region’s ability to attract and
retain knowledge workers and provide a competitive advantage in workforce development.
Regional economic prosperity (page 17) – Economic vitality for the 10-county region (page 62) measured through 2015 by net jobs created, direct foreign
investment, exports and capital investment. Regional economic prosperity is the core concept of the Partnership’s mission (page 12).
Workforce development (page 12) – Training and retraining of the region’s labor pool to keep the Houston region globally competitive. This is a critical
component of community development. NOTE: Quotes used throughout this document are by stakeholders listed on pages 57-60 unless otherwise attributed.
62
What is the Greater Houston Partnership?
With a rich tradition of exceptional civic leadership, the Greater Houston
Partnership is the region’s premier volunteer-driven business organization. The
Partnership fulfills the multiple roles of a traditional chamber of commerce, an
economic development organization and an international trade association. The Partnership is governed by a 138-member Board of Directors. Each director
is the top regional official of their Member company, and collectively the
directors are responsible for setting overall policies for the Partnership. The
volunteer work of the Partnership is conducted through an extensive and
diverse committee structure, which includes four “Board-only” committees,
10 high-level “advisory” committees and 47 other committees and task
forces. Overall, 2,500 volunteers are actively involved in the development and
implementation of the organization’s policies and programs. A professional
staff of 79, supports the work of the volunteer leaders.
The success of the Partnership, in executing the strategic and annual plans
of the organization, depends on the active involvement of the Member
companies’ executives and select employee representatives. The nearly 2,000
Member firms of the Partnership span the entire Houston region and represent
a cross-section of dedicated, civic-minded companies and institutions — both
large and small. While two-thirds of the Partnership’s Members have fewer
than 50 employees, the vast majority of the region’s Fortune 500 companies are
actively engaged in Partnership initiatives on a daily basis.
San Jacinto
Montgomery
Liberty
Austin
Waller
Harris
Chambers
Fort Bend
Galveston
Brazoria
63
www.houston.org

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