Reframing Violence Prevention Efforts

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Reframing Violence Prevention Efforts
Reframing Violence Prevention Efforts
Destie Hohman Sprague, MECASA, [email protected]
Regina Rooney, MCEDV, [email protected]
4/13/15 Reframing Violence Preven6on Efforts: The Shi? to Healthy Sexuality & Healthy Rela6onship Educa6on Destie Hohman Sprague, MECASA
Regina Rooney, MCEDV
Introduc6ons Regina! ¨  Des6e! ¨  Who else? ¨ 
1 4/13/15 What to expect in this workshop
Agenda ¨  Objec6ves ¨ 
What do I put on my sticky notes?
2 4/13/15 What is the state of teen rela6onships? What are the characteris6cs of teen rela6onships? ¨  What models are young people relying on as they form rela6onships? ¨ 
Background informa6on and stats ¨ 
More than half of America’s teens know friends who have experienced some sort of da6ng abuse. ¤ 
hWp://www.loveisrespect.org/wp-­‐content/uploads/2008/07/tru-­‐
tween-­‐teen-­‐study-­‐feb-­‐081.pdf 3 4/13/15 Background informa6on and stats q  Approximately 9 percent of high school students have been hit, slapped or physically hurt on purpose by a boyfriend or a girlfriend within the last year. q  hWps://data.mainepublichealth.gov/miyhs/files/2013Maine
%20High%20School%20Detailed%20Tables/Maine%20High
%20School%20Detailed%20Tables.pdf q  This number does not account for the verbal, sexual or emo6onal abuse teens also face in abusive rela6onships. Background information and stats
¨ 
Among those who ever experienced rape, physical violence, or stalking by an in6mate partner, more than 1 in 5 female vic6ms (22.4%) and more than 1 in 7 male vic6ms (15.0%) experienced some form of In6mate Partner Violence (IPV) for the first 6me between the ages of 11 and 17 years. ¤ 
hWp://www.cdc.gov/violencepreven6on/pdf/
cdc_nisvs_ipv_report_2013_v17_single_a.pdf 4 4/13/15 Background informa6on and stats 1 in 5 Mainers are vic6ms of rape or aWempted rape in their life6me: 28.5% of women, and 7.4% of men. ¨  14,000 Maine residents may be vic6ms of unwanted sexual ac6vity each year. (Maine Crime Vic6miza6on Report, 2011) ¨ 
Background information and stats
¨ 
¨ 
13% of Maine girls, and 11% of boys, have been
forced to have sexual intercourse in their lifetimes.
18% of girls and 9% of boys have been forced to
have sexual contact.
(MIYHS, ME CDC, 2011)
5 4/13/15 Background information and stats
¨ 
¨ 
20% of high school students have been the target
of offensive sexual comments at school or on the
way to/from school.
10.5% of students have been the target of
comments or attacks at school or on the way to/
from due to their masculinity or femininity.
(MIYHS, ME CDC, 2011)
What is the health impact? Young women who have experienced Adolescent
Relationship Abuse (ARA) have higher rates of:
• 
Depression and anxiety
• 
Disordered eating
• 
Suicidality
• 
Substance abuse
Kim-Godwin YS, et al 2009;Howard DE,et al ,2008; ,Brossard RM, et al ,2008)
6 4/13/15 What is the health impact? ¨ 
Study of girls who experienced abuse: n  32.1% became pregnant while in an abusive rela6onship n  58.8% of those pregnancies were unwanted Miller et al, 2007 ¨ 
More than one third (38.8%) of adolescent girls tested for STI/HIV have experienced da6ng violence. Decker et al, 2005 What is the health impact? Nearly half of Maine sexual assault survivors report
depression, as opposed to 17.5% of their peers.
¨  Over a third of Maine sexual assault survivors
report an anxiety disorder diagnosis, as opposed
to 14.2% of their peers.
¨  Of Maine youth who experience forced sexual
contact OR forced sex, 35-37% consider suicide,
as compared with only 9-10% of their peers.
¨ 
(Maine CDC 2006, Maine CDC 2013)
7 4/13/15 Where have we been? q What has the work to address abuse and sexual violence looked like to this point? q Messages? q Approaches? q Accomplishments? Shi?ing the Framework 8 4/13/15 Reframing sexual violence preven6on P = >RF + <PF Preven6on = decreasing risk factors, plus increasing protec6ve factors Reframing sexual violence preven6on Risk Factors: -­‐ harmful gender norms & hyper-­‐masculinity -­‐ sexual objec6fica6on -­‐ coercive sexual behaviors in media and social sekngs -­‐ Social norms re: male sexual en6tlement & female sexual submissiveness -­‐ acceptance and expecta6on of sexual violence 9 4/13/15 Reframing sexual violence preven6on Protec6ve Factors: -­‐knowledge of normal sexual func6ons -­‐ nego6a6on skills around sexuality -­‐ comfort with the sexuality and gender expression of one’s self and others -­‐ recognizing and respec6ng consent Reframing sexual violence preven6on 10 4/13/15 Reframing sexual violence preven6on Healthy sexuality educa6on: Begins at birth Starts with body comfort (social, biological) Centers on body empowerment & boundaries Includes communica6on and consent as core concepts Reframing da6ng violence preven6on 11 4/13/15 Reframing da6ng violence preven6on A shared mission ¨  Appropriate messages for all ages ¨  Applies to many types of rela6onships ¨  Focuses on ac6on ¨ 
Reframing da6ng violence preven6on Healthy Rela6onship Educa6on… ¨ Skill Building ¤  Respect ¤  Communica6on ¤  How to support a friend ¤  Iden6fying safe/helpful adults ¤  How to seek help ¤  Media literacy ¤  Gender stereotypes 12 4/13/15 Reframing da6ng violence preven6on Provides another model TEEN POWER AND CONTROL WHEEL
EQUALITY WHEEL FOR TEENS
O
NONVI LENCE
VIOLENCE
l
se
ica
xu
s
y
ANGER/EMOTIONAL
al
ABUSE:
ph
PEER PRESSURE:
Putting her/him down.
Threatening to expose
someone’s weakness or
spread rumors. Telling
malicious lies about an
individual to peer group.
ISOLATION/EXCLUSION:
TEEN
POWER
AND
CONTROL
SEXUAL COERCION:
Manipulating or making threats
to get sex. Getting her
pregnant. Threatening to take
the children away. Getting
someone drunk or drugged
to get sex.
THREATS:
ys
ic a
Making and/or carrying
out threats to do something to hurt another.
Threatening to leave, to
commit suicide, to report
her/him to the police.
Making her/him drop
charges. Making her/him
do illegal things.
l
Seeking mutually
satisfying resolutions
to conflict. Accepting
changes. Being willing
to compromise.
Treating her like a servant.
Making all the decisions.
Acting like the “master of the
castle.” Being the one to
define men’s and women’s
roles.
INTIMIDATION:
Making someone afraid
by using looks, actions,
gestures. Smashing things.
Destroying property.
Abusing pets. Displaying
weapons.
Willingness to have open and
spontaneous dialogue. Having a
balance of giving and receiving.
Problem solving to mutual benefit.
Learning to compromise without
one overshadowing the other.
Talking and acting so
that she feels safe and
comfortable expressing
herself and doing things.
SHARED POWER:
RESPECT:
TEEN
EQUALITY
se
xu
Respecting her personal
identity and encouraging
her individual growth and
freedom. Supporting
her security in her own
worth.
al
TRUST AND SUPPORT:
Supporting her goals
in life. Respecting her
right to her own feelings,
friends, activities, and
opinions.
SELF-CONFIDENCE
AND PERSONAL
GROWTH:
Making light of the abuse
and not taking concerns
about it seriously. Saying
the abuse didn’t happen.
Shifting responsibility for
abusive behavior. Saying
she/he caused it.
Listening to her
non-judgmentally. Being
emotionally affirming and
understanding. Valuing her
opinions.
Taking mutual responsibility for
recognizing influence on the
relationship. Making decisions
together.
MINIMIZE/DENY/
BLAME:
VIOLENCE
NON-THREATENING
BEHAVIOR:
COMMUNICATION:
USING SOCIAL STATUS:
Controlling what another does,
who she/he sees and talks to,
what she/he reads, where she/he
goes. Limiting outside
involvement. Using jealousy
to justify actions
ph
NEGOTIATION AND
FAIRNESS:
Making her/him feel bad
about her or himself.
Name calling. Making
her/him think she/he’s
crazy. Playing mind
games. Humiliating one
another. Making
her/him feel guilty.
HONESTY AND
ACCOUNTABILITY:
Accepting responsibility for
self. Acknowledging past use
of violence. Admitting
being wrong. Communicating
openly and truthfully.
NONVIOLENCE
Produced and distributed by:
Developed from:
Domestic Abuse Intervention Project
202 East Superior Street
Duluth, MN 55802
218.722.4134
4 6 1 2 S h o a l C r e e k B l v d . • A u s t i n , Te x a s 7 8 7 5 6
512.407.9020 (phone and fax) • www.ncdsv.org
Adapted from:
Domestic Abuse Intervention Project
202 East Superior Street
Duluth, MN 55802
218.722.4134
Produced and distributed by:
4 6 1 2 S h o a l C r e e k B l v d . • A u s t i n , Te x a s 7 8 7 5 6
512.407.9020 (phone and fax) • www.ncdsv.org
Activity
¨ 
In groups of two or three, explore:
¤  What
are the implications of this change in framework?
¤  Think of two or three ways (each!) that you could
integrate these concepts into your work, your classroom,
or your community outside of ‘sex ed’.
Group Report-Out:
n  As
a team, report your top two ways to integrate these
concepts beyond sex-ed.
13 4/13/15 Resources ¨ 
Domes6c & Sexual Violence Services ¤  How to get in touch with an educator S/A and D/V educator, and the services they offer ¤  How advocates provide support and services ¨ 
Family Planning ¤  Chris6ne Letcher ¤  Curriculum resources & materials Ac6on Planning ¨ 
What do those s6ckies say? 14 4/13/15 Thank You & Ques6ons! Des6e Hohman Sprague, Program Director, MECASA, [email protected], 207-­‐626-­‐0034 ¨  Regina Rooney, Public Awareness Coordinator MCEDV, [email protected], 207-­‐430-­‐8334 ¨ 
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