CBMF Memo.qxp - Donna Esplen Design

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CBMF Memo.qxp - Donna Esplen Design
C B
MF
CANADIAN
BROADCAST
MUSEUM
F O U N D AT I O N
F O N D AT I O N
DU MUSÉE
CANADIEN DE LA
RADIODIFFUSION
C B
MF
CANADIAN
BROADCAST
MUSEUM
F O U N D AT I O N
F O N D AT I O N
DU MUSÉE
CANADIEN DE LA
RADIODIFFUSION
MISSION
THE CBMF/FMCR WILL COLLECT, PRESERVE AND CELEBRATE
THE HISTORY OF CANADIAN BROADCASTING. IT WILL CREATE
REAL AND VIRTUAL PUBLIC SPACES IN WHICH TO LEARN
ABOUT THE PROGRAMMING, THE PEOPLE, THE TECHNOLOGY
AND INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT OF RADIO AND TELEVISION
IN CANADA.
TO
A
FULFILL ITS
MISSION, THE FOUNDATION
HAS THREE GOALS:
To capture the unique contribution of Canadian
broadcasting by collecting key aspects of
broadcast programming, technology and
business in Canada, and to ensure these
artefacts are appropriately preserved for
both archival and exhibition purposes and
showcased in real and virtual spaces.
provide public access and
B Toservices
in order to create an
educational resource to explore
the historical, industrial, technical
and cultural importance of
broadcasting.
C
To create national and regional alliances
to facilitate archival and exhibition
opportunities and to encourage
Canada's broadcasting, production
and new media industries to preserve
their heritage for future generations.
PAGE 2 0F 16
C B
MF
9 August, 2012
John Traversy, Secretary General
Canadian Radio-television & Telecommunications Commission
Ottawa, ON
K1A 0N2
CANADIAN
BROADCAST
MUSEUM
F O U N D AT I O N
F O N D AT I O N
DU MUSÉE
CANADIEN DE LA
RADIODIFFUSION
Dear Mr. Traversy:
RE: APPLICATION 2012-0516-2, BCE INC. ON BEHALF OF ASTRAL MEDIA INC.
1
The Canadian Broadcast Museum Foundation/Fondation du
musée canadien de la radiodiffusion (CBMF/FMCR) is taking
this opportunity to register with the Commission its support for
the above-noted application. The Commission's July 10th
announcement acknowledges that intervenors "may wish
to discuss the proposed benefits package in terms of
incrementality, acceptability, and could request alternative
proposals with respect to any benefits that may be found to
be unacceptable to the Commission." The CBMF/FMCR is
hereby responding to that opportunity because of its interest in
being included in the Public Benefits package in the event that
the Commission should mandate that changes to its allocation
should be made.
2
The CBMF/FMCR was federally incorporated on January 3,
2001 and granted charitable status by the Canada Revenue
Agency on November 28, 2003. It is governed by a volunteer
Board of Directors drawn from the broadcasting industry and
the heritage sector across the country and is committed to the
celebration of Canada's radio and television legacy, the
assembly and preservation of the National Broadcast Collection
which constitutes an essential and irreplaceable electronic
record of the evolution of Canadian society. It now finds itself
the only institution in the country exclusively devoted to the
collection, preservation and celebration of Canada's
broadcasting heritage. In the event that Bell takes its place as
Canada's pre-eminent private broadcaster with approval of this
application, it follows that, along with numerous radio stations
and television channels, Bell also inherits an obligation to
maintain the precedent set by CTV Inc.and other broadcasters
in supporting Canada's principal radio and television heritage
initiative.
PAGE 3 0F 16
3
4
5
The arrival of radio and then television fundamentally changed
the way Canadians observed and documented the life and
times of the communities they served. Never before could the
daily discourse and actions of the mighty as well as those of
normal citizens be presented in the "first person", not filtered
and edited as in newspapers, journals and books.
This living record of who we are - what we do, what we think
and how we act - the very fragments of the proof of our
existence - have been captured, recorded, hoarded, stored,
misfiled and forgotten over decades of thousands of hours of
radio and television broadcasts. But many more thousands of
hours of this precious heritage have evaporated, faded, erased,
oxidized, crumbled to dust or been unceremoniously thrown
into dumpsters as casualties of the exigencies of today's
bottom line.
Very little of this legacy has been formally curated by design.
There has been no commitment to the preserving and storing
of such audio-visual archives. Certainly there has been
scarcely any institutional recognition of their historical value.
They survive as personal memoirs and the guarded treasures
of obsessive collectors. But, mainly, they survive through sheer
neglect, at the back of closets and in dusty storage rooms,
only to be rediscovered because of renovations or, most often,
a death in the family. If someone remembers there is a
Foundation, we may hear from them but, sadly, it's usually
mentioned just in passing when someone recalls that a box
of old tapes and pictures from the ‘50s had been picked up for
waste disposal.
6
DISMANTLING THE CBC LP AND CD ARCHIVES
DON MESSER’S JUBILEE
There is a sad irony in the fact that the commonplace, the
mundane, the so called ephemeral, are the true finds that are
sought by archeologists digging through the detritus of past
societies and civilizations - whether at the bottom of Mayan
sacrificial wells or the volcanic ash layered over the ruins of
Pompeii. Who were these people, how did they live, how did
they interact with each other in the conduct of their daily lives?
HOWDY-DOODY
PAGE 4 0F 16
ART HOLMES RECORDING
THE BLITZ FOR CBC RADIO
7
We have a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to create a legacy for
Canadians that was not possible 100 years ago - the actual
voices and images of Canadians at work, at play, facing the
trials and tribulations of the Depression, two World Wars, the
mechanization of the West, technological evolution, changes in
fashion, the sea change of the Baby Boomers coming of age,
the urbanization of Canada. We still have among us some of
those who were born before we were forged as a nation at
Vimy Ridge. But tempus fugit. We are losing the pioneers,
the last chance to preserve the oral and visual record of the
first person observations of the people who were there, the
ones who lived through most of the century that Sir Wilfred
Laurier stated "would belong to Canada".
8
9
RADIIO-CANADA
JOURNALISTS IN MONTREAL
THE ARMY SHOW
RADIO CANADA AT WAR
And we have much to learn from our history. PostConfederation, the CPR - and decades later the CNR provided the means to move people and goods east and west
across vast distances, to create communities and develop the
industrial infrastructure that would sustain them. Canadians
had to make an important choice about taking on the cost of
building a national railway system. There was a cheaper
alternative - simply routing through the US - but our wise forbearers realized that an all-Canadian railway system would be
fundamental to our existence as a nation. And many decades
later, this same lesson came to the fore when it came time to
build our microwave railway, from Victoria to Sydney - the
longest TV network in the world - completed in 1958, adding
Newfoundland in 1959, and delivering the key building block
to the realization of the vision of John Aird for a domestic
radio service to counter our absorption into the American
radio system.
In the years immediately following Confederation, Alexander
Graham Bell began experimenting with acoustic telegraphy in
Brantford, ON and in 1876 he provided the first demonstration
that transmitting voice over distance by wire was possible. In
1880, the Bell Telephone Company of Canada was
launched and, within decades, the telephone had
captured the popular imagination in Canada. It is
hardly surprising that, less than a century later,
Canadians were spending more time on the
phone than any other nationality.
ALEXANDER GRAHAM BELL
PAGE 5 0F 16
10
DIAMOND JUBILEE BROADCAST-1927
11
Also driven to address the need for human communication
was Quebec-born Reginald Fessenden who, unable to obtain
investment by Canada, had moved away to perfect a new
method of sending Morse code more effectively than had
Marconi, and it was he who, in 1900, first wirelessly transmitted
the sound of the human voice between two 50-foot towers.
Radio had been born. By 1919, the Government of Canada
had begun to license radio stations. Radio receivers quickly
became a popular household feature, bringing news and
entertainment into homes throughout the country. Its potential
as a tool of citizenship became apparent and, at the instigation
of a young Graham Spry, the celebration of Canada's Diamond
Jubilee in 1927 featured the first coast-to-coast radio broadcast
from Ottawa, carried by a network of 23 stations.
In the next decade, Canada would evolve the elements of
the broadcasting system that became the communications
backbone of the nation with private and public stations
providing daily news and public affairs, music and drama,
quiz games (and hockey!) as well as special coverage of
major national events. For the millions of listeners then living
in rural or remote communities, radio became a lifeline and a
leveler, substantially enhancing the quality of their lives at the
same time as it expanded their knowledge of the country and
the wider world.
BERNARD DEROME, TELEJOURNAL 1974
12
Perhaps not surprisingly, it was hockey that first established
Canadian radio with Canadian listeners. In the United States,
Saturday night had become the weekly time to go to the
movies so American radio networks paid little attention to their
schedules for that evening. In Canada, there were far fewer
movie theatres per capita and their distribution was spotty
outside major urban centres. Add that to the exigencies of
the climate and most Canadians opted to gather round the
radio and listen to Foster Hewitt's "Saturday Night Hockey"
that quickly became "Hockey Night in Canada".
PAGE 6 0F 16
THE SIGNIFICANCE
OF PRIVATE
RADIO
13
The private broadcasting sector has made incalculable
contributions to Canada's broadcast heritage with radio
pioneers such as Allan Waters, E.S (Ted) Rogers, Allan Slaight,
Lloyd Moffat, Jack Kent Cooke, John Bassett, Jim Pattison,
G.R.A. (Dick) Rice, Geoff Stirling, Gord Rawlinson and many
others, who took a chance and put their entrepreneurial skills
JOHN
to work to create a Canadian broadcast industry that is the
BASSETT
envy of nations around the world.
14
RED ROBINSON - 1955
15
TED
ROGERS
ALLAN
WATERS
It was 1954 when a young teenaged boy in Vancouver
discovered a new kind of music that would eventually be
called 'rock and roll' and 'rhythm and blues'. He was 16 years
old when he first went on the air at CJOR playing music for
'teenagers'. He's still doing it today. His name is Red
Robinson. Red has been lauded for his outstanding
accomplishments by induction in the Canadian Association
of Broadcasters Hall of Fame as well as many other others
from the province of British Columbia and the city of Vancouver.
Red's one of only three Canadian radio personalities to have
been honoured by the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in
Cleveland, Ohio in 2005.
Then there was Gordon Sinclair, the 'Godfather' of Canadian private
radio commentators. The former globe trotting Toronto Star reporter's
'News and Views' at 11:50 Monday through Friday on CFRB Toronto was
'appointment radio' for over a million Southern Ontario listeners every
day. Sinclair joined CFRB in 1943 and remained there until his death
40 years later. Gordon's daily commentary on June 5, 1973 praising
America for its humanitarian works around the world and decrying the
fact that the U.S. Red Cross was broke and nobody was offering a
helping hand, became so popular that U.S. News & World Report
published a full transcript. Gordon's editorial was released as a 45rpm
in both Canada and the U.S. It was known as "The Americans" and
became a million selling record in North America (when re-recorded by
CKLW Windsor News Director Byron MacGregor). Gordon and Byron
donated their entire proceeds from the sale of the record to the Red
Cross. In 1981, U.S. President Ronald Reagan, during his first state
visit to Canada, praised Sinclair for giving the United States an inspiring
tribute in one of its darkest hours. "The Americans" was resurrected
after the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks and again after Hurricane
Katrina devastated the southern U.S. coast in 2005.
GORDON SINCLAIR
PAGE 7 0F 16
PUBLIC RADIO
AND
TELEVISION
16
Canadian public radio developed rapidly, with series like
"Citizens' Forum" that ran for 26 years, adventures like "Carry
on Canuck", "L for Lanky", "Ghostwalker" and "Fighting Navy"
became enormously popular. Kids tuned in to listen to "Just
Mary" or "Maggie Muggins", and "Woodhouse & Hawkins"
pioneered Canadian radio comedy and "The Wayne and
Shuster Show" quickly followed. "The Happy Gang" became
a noontime treat in 1937 and lasted for decades. In Quebec,
"Un Homme et son péché ", "Le Cabaret du soir qui penche",
and "Caravane", drew large audiences to their radios, as did
popular drama series like "La Bôite à Surprise", "La Pension
Velder", "Vie de Famille", and "Le Curé du Village" and many
more. These shows and hundreds like them from private radio
could tell us a great deal about Canada in the 1930s and 40s
… but, with a very few exceptions, they cannot because of the
thousands of hours of programming produced in these years,
only a very few still exist.
WAYNE & SHUSTER / HAPPY GANG / FRUM & MAITLAND / BARBARA ANN SCOTT / BOBINO & BOBINETTE
17
In the early days of Canadian radio, preservation of programs
was not considered a priority and its cultural significance was
rarely recognized. In the post-war decades that followed,
archiving of programs in private stations was random
at best. At the CBC, some effort made to tuck away
transcriptions or tape recordings of selected shows
but, over time, much of this material has deteriorated.
18
Even more poorly represented are programs from the initial
decades of Canadian television, the 1950's to the 1980's.
CTV has undertaken gradually to digitize those elements of
its news coverage that are still extant but little remains of the
entertainment programs it carried during those years, most of
which were licensed from independent producers. With respect
to CBC/Radio-Canada, a 1994 study by Library and Archives
Canada determined that, of all the programming produced by the
Corporation in radio and TV from 1936-1984, only 166,000 hours
(or 16%) had been retained. The rest has vanished or, in very
rare instances, has been held in private collections in less than
ideal environments. In 1998, CBC/SRC undertook an archival
project at both network and regional levels with the result that,
by the time the project concluded in 2003 about 50% of the
material that had been retained was catalogued and preserved.
FRAGGLE ROCK / THE FRIENDLY GIANT / MR. DRESSUP, CASEY & FINNEGAN / MY PET JULIETTE
PAGE 8 0F 16
FAST
FORWARD
19
20
It is 2017. Canadians from coast to coast to coast - those
born here and those who have chosen to make Canada their
home - are joining in the celebration of the 150th birthday
of the world's second largest national land-mass. It is a
celebration of achievement, of conquering distances and
geographic and climatic challenges to weld a nation out of
wilderness. And significantly, it is a celebration of our ability
to harness the communications innovations of the late 19th
and 20th centuries (telegraph, telephone, radio, television,
satellites) to link distant and diverse regions and weave
their peoples into a functioning political and social entity.
So come 2017: we celebrate Canada's 150th birthday - but
without access to more than 80 percent of the sound and
moving image record of the last 100 years of our history.
This national tragedy has occurred because Canada, alone
among developed nations, has failed to address appropriately
the preservation of its remarkable broadcasting heritage.
PAGE 9 0F 16
LEARNING
FROM
OTHERS
CANADA HAS MUCH TO LEARN FROM OTHER COUNTRIES THAT HAVE EXPLORED A
RANGE OF PROCESSES AND PARTNERSHIPS TO ADDRESS THEIR INDIVIDUAL RADIO
AND TELEVISION LEGACY REQUIREMENTS. A FEW INTERESTING EXAMPLES FOLLOW:
21
In Australia (pop: 22.6 million) , the National Film and Sound
Archive (formerly ScreenSound Australia) receives an annual
appropriation of $25 million and its 232 employees work with
the broadcasters and filmmakers to collect, preserve and
provide public access to that country's audio-visual heritage.
22
In France (pop: 65.4 million), l'Institut national de l'audiovisuel
utilizes a budget of CAD $151 million and its 980 employees to
support and add to its collection of 4 million hours of domestic
radio and television programming, 750,000 of which are
currently available online. Each year, new programming from
120 radio and television services are collected under legal
deposit, adding some 800,000 hours annually to the national
collection.
23
Even in smaller countries like Ireland, (pop: 4.5 million) the
government this year increased the percentage of the annual
TV licence fee that is to be devoted to archiving Irish broadcast
programming. Seven percent of the licence fee revenue (or
CAD $17.3 million) will now be dedicated to preservation,
archiving and providing access to domestically produced radio
and television programming and related artefacts, under the
general supervision of the Broadcasting Authority of Ireland.
PAGE 10 0F 16
24
In the United States (pop: 312 million) federal responsibility
for broadcast heritage is assigned to the Library of Congress
Packard Campus for Audio-Visual Conservation. This state-ofthe-art facility acquires, preserves and provides access to the
world's largest and most comprehensive collection of films,
television programs, radio broadcasts and sound recordings.
It can preserve and migrate all audiovisual media formats
(including obsolete formats dating back 100 years) and ensure
their long-term safekeeping in a petabyte-level digital archive.
25
26
Dedicated Broadcast Museums, Sound and/or Image Archives
are maintained in many other countries (India, Finland, Japan,
New Zealand, Mexico, and several in the United States) where
the electronic record of national history is acknowledged to be
of lasting cultural significance. This same principle has now
been embraced by both the United Nations and the European
Union.
In 2010, Irina Bokova, Director General of UNESCO,
pointed out that "Audiovisual heritage is by nature fragile.
UNESCO, in partnership with the Coordinating Council of
Audiovisual Archive Associations, and heritage bodies around
the world, has taken a leading role to preserve and share these
ephemeral documents." She went on to note that "… savouring
this heritage is conditional on its survival. The world's
audiovisual heritage is endangered….Its disappearance
would represent an irremediable impoverishment of the
memory of the world."
CHIEF DAN
GEORGE
/ BRUNO GERUSSI / BRYAN ADAMS / CELINE DION / FRED PENNER / RAFE MAIR / YOUNG LLOYD
ROBERTSON
PAGE 11 0F 16
MEANWHILE, BACK IN CANADA.....
27
The CBMF/FMCR National Broadcast Collection
With the diminished role of Library and Archives Canada's in
collecting and digitizing historical Canadian broadcast elements
and the accelerating disappearance of the technology needed
to access early forms of analog media, the CBMF/FMCR
developed the concept of the National Broadcast Collection for
Canada, a diversified collection intended to include all of the
identifiable broadcast materials currently resident in museums
as well as public and private archives throughout the country.
In the past several years, the Foundation has, despite playing
a passive role, built its own component of the Collection: more
than 36,000 items, with many thousands more waiting for
sufficient resources to be gathered to make accessioning
of additional material possible.
28
The intention is to create a national inventory of all these
collections with content described using consistent metadata
and eventually posted on the internet to guarantee national
accessibility. This process will also make it possible to
determine the condition of vulnerable elements (i.e. largely
analog recordings) sothat priority for preservation can be
determined.
29
The results of this undertaking, together with information about
radio and television collections, will form the foundation for
construction of a National Broadcast Heritage Internet Portal
to be created as a permanent memorial to Canada's 150th
birthday. It will document the last 100 years of this nation's
radio and television legacy; post-2017, working with creators
and the stations and networks who serve all elements of the
diverse and energetic Canadian audience, it will utilize
components of the CBMF/FMCR National Broadcast Collection
to continue to celebrate the creative and technical
achievements that will make it possible for them to
communicate with each other in the decades to come.
LEFT TO RIGHT:
PIERRE BURTON
PIERRE JUNEAU
JACK WEBSTER
FOSTER HEWITT
KNOWLTON NASH
PETER GZOWSKI
TRINA MCQUEEN
MAX FERGUSON
PAGE 12 0F 16
A NEW PLAYER...
A NEW ROLE
30
This application by BCE Inc. for authority to acquire effective control
of Astral and its licensed broadcasting subsidiaries will, if approved,
establish Bell Media with multiple holdings in radio, television and
digital media. Bell has a rich and storied heritage from pioneering
experiments with acoustic telegraphy in Brantford, Ontario to its lofty
pre-eminence in global telecommunications. Cast in the same mold
as Inventor-Entrepreneurs Thomas Alva Edison and Henry Ford, the
legacy of Alexander Graham Bell is secure.
31
As BCE makes application to complete its transformation from a
telecommunications-based corporation to Canada's most powerful
broadcaster, that role will bring with it new responsibilities that have
become part of Canadian regulatory tradition, one of the most critical
of which is the Commission's system of public benefits attached by
custom in exchange for non-competitive transfers of control of
broadcast undertakings. As it seeks to expand and redefine its
operations by adding "content" to "conduit", it is here that BCE can
manifest a clear and respectful appreciation of an important industry
with an equally rich and storied heritage that it hopes to enter. A
favourable decision by the CRTC will, instantly, transform BCE
into the nation's leading player in the multi-media multi-platform
convergence arena. Because of the sheer size of the Astral
purchase, much stands to be lost, especially at 83 local radio
stations where community identification has been key to success.
32
We know from past experience that one of the greatest causes of loss
of vintage broadcast artefacts is, in fact, transfers of ownership of
broadcast undertakings. It is the natural tendency of new owners to
'clean house' - to clear the decks for new people and processes. Not
surprisingly, they have little emotional attachment to or understanding
of many of the personalities and programming elements that often
mean a great deal to local audiences. Because of the sheer size of
the Astral purchase, much stands to be lost, especially at 83 local radio
stations where community identification has been key to success. It
is our hope that, after this acquisition is approved, BellMedia will
undertake to ensure that significant heritage elements identified are
appropriately protected. The CBMF/FMCR, is, of course, prepared to
accept these materials and assist in the transfer of ownership process.
PAGE 13 0F 16
33
It has become convention for the Commission to expect
public benefit funds to strengthen the broadcasting system
and improve the quality of service it can offer to its audiences
as well as to assist third parties who themselves make
substantial contributions to such related activities as media
education, minority representation and broadcast heritage.
In fact, two of BellMedia's earlier acquisitions, CTV Inc. and
CHUM Limited, were long-term partners of the CBMF/FMCR
as a result of such benefits' commitments. In that spirit, the
Foundation approached BCE in May of this year, requesting
their consideration as a potential beneficiary of funds that will
flow from this extraordinary transaction and suggesting the
amount of $4 million over seven years. Heritage activities
identified included the CBMF/FMCR National Broadcast
Collection, the Oral History Collection, the Radio Days Archive,
the Broadcast Hall of Fame program and archive, and on-going
digitization of heritage materials … all of which are essential
background to mounting CBMF/FMCR National Broadcast
Heritage Internet Portal in 2017.
34
We note that Bell has proposed extending the term over which
public benefit funds will be delivered from seven to ten years.
Unless there are strong grounds on which to distinguish this
application from other media acquisitions (e.g., Standard
Broadcasting, CanWest Global, CTV Inc.), such a change will,
in fact be precedent-setting and accomplish by an individual
ruling attached to a specific acquisition what would more
properly result from introduction of reasoned Commission policy.
35
We note that Bell's proposed non-programming public benefits
relate primarily to:
*
*
Funding for its existing multi-year initiative in support of
mental health, Bell Let's Talk Day, and
Funding for expansion of communications services
including broadband video to remote communities in
the far north.
PAGE 14 0F 16
36
Bell is to be congratulated for its commitment to mental health
and to the above-noted charitable initiative launched in 2010
for which it has already earmarked millions of dollars. Directing
a portion of the regulated benefits from the Astral acquisition
broadcasting transaction to an established corporate initiative,
no matter how worthy, challenges the Commission's longstanding expectation of third-party - and broadcast-related direction.
37
There is no question that many of Canada's remote northern
communities are currently under-served and lack the range of
choice of services - communications and others - enjoyed by
their southern cousins. In fact, the same can be said for many
of the more southern rural environments where high-speed
broadband access is not yet universally available. These
marketing and service issues, dependent on geography
and population density, became thoroughly familiar to the
Commission during its decades of effort gradually to develop
high-quality telephone service across Canada.
38
However, whether addressing this largely telecommunicationsbased equity challenge constitutes the proper application of
broadcast-related public benefit funds - or whether it should
more properly flow from other policy initiatives of the
Commission or the Government of Canada - remains to
us unclear.
39
In the event that the Commission considers that some reassignment of Bell's proposed public benefit funding should
be undertaken, the CBMF/FMCR respectfully requests that it
encourage BCE Inc to include broadcast heritage - and
specifically our plan for creation of the National Broadcast
Heritage Internet Portal - as an appropriate recipient.
40
The Foundation requests permission to appear at the
forthcoming public hearing to provide additional information
about the issues identified above.
PAGE 15 0F 16
C A N A D I A N B R O A D C A S T M U S E U M F O U N D AT I O N
F O N D AT I O N D U M U S É E C A N A D I E N D E L A R A D I O D I F F U S I O N
B OARD OF D IRECTORS /
C ONSEIL D ' ADMINISTRATION
Douglas Thompson, Chair
Writer/Producer, Toronto, ON
David Taylor,
Attractions Strategy Group Inc.
Toronto, ON
Robert Underwood, Treasurer
Actra Fraternal Benefit Society
Toronto, ON
Thomas Curzon, Past Chair
Broadcasting Communications,
Toronto, ON
Peter Herrndorf, Founding Chair
NAC/CNA, Ottawa, ON
Elmer Hildebrand,
Golden West Broadcasting
Altona, AB
Marc Denis, Broadcaster/
Producer, Montreal, QC
Valerie Pringle, Broadcaster
Toronto, ON
Pierre Racicot
CBC Pensioners National Assoc.
Ottawa, ON
Art Reitmayer, Channel M
Vancouver, B.C.
Yours sincerely,
"Red' Robinson, Broadcaster
Vancouver, BC
Duff Roman, Broadcaster
Toronto, ON
Lorraine Thomson, Producer
Toronto, ON
Kealy Wilkinson
Executive Director
H ONORARY D IRECTORS /
C ONSEILLERS HONORAIRES
c.c.: [email protected]
Suite LL-1
1000 Yonge Street
Toronto, ON M4W 2K2
Phone: 416-367-4772
Fax:
416-367-3504
Juliette Cavazzi
Denise Donlon
Michael Francis
Felix (Fil) Fraser
The Hon. Flora MacDonald
Trina McQueen
Knowlton Nash
Gordon Pinsent
Lloyd Robertson
Senator Pamela Wallin
Jim Waters
PAGE 16 0F 16