as a catalyst to

Comments

Transcription

as a catalyst to
as a catalyst to
Post Secondary
Education
Skilled &
Talented
Workforce
ECONOMIC
DEVELOPMENT
Existing
Business
Enterprises
New
Investments /
Research &
Development
New Business
Enterprises
November 2011
Introduction .............................................................................................................................. 1
Executive Summary................................................................................................................. 3
Purpose ................................................................................................................................... 6
Methodology ............................................................................................................................ 7
Composition of a Community Workforce ................................................................................. 8
The Holistic Approach ............................................................................................................. 9
Background ........................................................................................................................... 11
A Diversified Economic Base ............................................................................................. 11
Accessibility To Post Secondary Education ....................................................................... 13
Geographical Proximity to Post Secondary Institutions .................................................. 14
Education Attainment Rates ........................................................................................... 15
Post Secondary Education For The Workforce .................................................................. 16
The Mainstream Student ................................................................................................ 16
Employed Workforce ...................................................................................................... 18
Unemployed Workforce .................................................................................................. 21
Apprenticeships .............................................................................................................. 22
The Employer Commitment ............................................................................................... 24
Re-skilling the Existing Workforce .................................................................................. 25
Requirements of Existing Business & Industry ...................................................................... 27
Brantford-Brant Trends ...................................................................................................... 28
Specific Skill Requirements................................................................................................ 31
Skilled Trades .................................................................................................................... 33
Sector Requirements ......................................................................................................... 34
Future Opportunities for Expansion of Post Secondary Education ........................................ 36
Research and Development Is Key.................................................................................... 36
Building on Existing Enterprises ............................................................................................ 38
Economic Development Strategies .................................................................................... 38
Food Manufacturing / Processing Sector ....................................................................... 40
Plastics & Rubber Sector................................................................................................ 41
Chemical Sector ............................................................................................................. 42
Primary and Fabricated Metals Sector ........................................................................... 43
Biotechnology Sector ..................................................................................................... 44
Logistics Sector .............................................................................................................. 45
Pursuing New Enterprises ..................................................................................................... 47
Aerospace Industry ............................................................................................................ 47
Health Industry ................................................................................................................... 48
The Green Economy .......................................................................................................... 49
Utilities ............................................................................................................................ 51
Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing and Hunting industry ........................................................ 51
Construction ................................................................................................................... 51
Manufacturing................................................................................................................. 52
Administration and Support, Waste management and remediation services.................. 52
Transportation & Warehousing ....................................................................................... 52
Common Denominators ......................................................................................................... 53
Waste / Wastewater Management ..................................................................................... 53
Renewable Energy ............................................................................................................. 54
Advanced Manufacturing ................................................................................................... 54
Laboratory Occupations ..................................................................................................... 55
Skilled Trades .................................................................................................................... 56
Tourism .............................................................................................................................. 57
Agribusiness ...................................................................................................................... 59
Post Secondary Training & Education for the Future of Brantford-Brant ............................... 60
Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities Accredited Programming in Brantford-Brant 63
Brantford-Brant Institutions ................................................................................................ 64
Programming – College & University ................................................................................. 65
Programming – Private Career College ............................................................................. 66
Programming Details ............................................................................................................. 67
Laurier Brantford University ............................................................................................... 68
Mohawk College - Brantford Campus ................................................................................ 75
Nipissing University - Schulich School Of Education, Brantford Campus .......................... 80
Allanti School Of Hairstyling And Aesthetics, Brantford ..................................................... 82
Brantford Flight Centre ....................................................................................................... 82
Medix School - Brantford ................................................................................................... 83
Shaun - David Truck Training School, Brantford ................................................................ 84
Summit College, Brantford ................................................................................................. 84
Transport Training Centres Of Canada Inc., Brantford ...................................................... 85
Appendix A ............................................................................................................................ 86
Introduction
The Grand Valley Educational Society (GVES) is a not-for-profit organization dedicated to the
enhancement of post secondary education in Brantford and Brant County. Since our
inception in 1996 our goal has been to expand and enhance post secondary education.
From our initial goal of securing a University presence, which was realized in 1999 with the
opening of a Laurier University campus, the GVES continues to strive to capitalize on the
potential of post secondary education as a catalyst to economic growth and stability. Our
vision is to ensure that there exists locally, the education and training required that will create
a highly skilled workforce that will not only support existing business and industry, but also be
a major attractor for new (and global) business and industry.
This report will highlight the link between skills, training and education through Ministry of
Training, Colleges and University (MTCU) accredited programming and the economic
sustainability for a vibrant and growing Brantford-Brant. It is important to note that MTCU
accredited programming spans Colleges, Universities, Private Career Colleges and
Apprenticeships that contribute substantially to a talented and skilled workforce.
The Institute for Competiveness and Prosperity released a report that measured and
monitored Ontario’s competitiveness compared to other provinces and the United States. A
constant theme in published research and reports is the need for Ontario to invest more in
post secondary education.
Improving the quality of life for all generations in our workforce will require a strong
commitment from the community as a whole. It is vital that everyone, from government to
private citizen, recognize the value and importance of continued education as the
cornerstone to a highly talented workforce and strong local economy:
 Current statistics indicate that over 90 percent of employment opportunities require
some form of post secondary education (diploma, degree, apprenticeship)
 “Entry level” positions, requiring lower skill sets are quickly disappearing and
employers have increased their expectations of new hires. The skill sets required are
not restricted to technical or sector specific experience but include areas of
communication, teamwork, decision making, and problem solving.
It is proven through multiple local, regional, provincial and national reports that the availability
of a highly skilled workforce is a major attractor to new business and industry. Global
enterprises have the capacity to substantially increase the competitiveness of our community:
 New business and industry establishing a presence in Brantford-Brant will assist in
creating, maintaining and expanding a diversified economic base crucial to community
prosperity
 An expanded and diversified economic base will “raise the bar” for earning potential
and quality of life for Brantford-Brant residents
 Increased presence of new and sustainable business enterprises will encourage
people to live, work, play and stay in Brantford-Brant
 Employment opportunities provided by a diversified economic base will reduce the loss
of intellectual capital and help us to retain this skilled and talented labour force
Grand Valley Educational Society
1
[email protected]
Economic stability is dependent on existing business and industry remaining competitive in
the face of global competition:
 The skills, talents and abilities of the workforce will have a major and direct impact on
the success of existing business and industry in our communities
 The workforce will be a key element in assisting business and industry in developing
new and innovative processes, technologies and products
 A skilled workforce drastically reduces the employer cost for training, and allows the
employer to focus resources and attention on more “sector specific” training and
education
 A workforce with the appropriate training, skills and attitudes will determine whether or
not business and industry is able to quickly adapt to the “ever changing” global market
It is impossible to ignore the value of a trained and ready workforce—a catalyst to economic
development and growth—a foundation to a strong local economy—a driving force to a
healthy mix of economic diversity.
Most economists agree that the level of education attained across the workforce is an
important determinant of the quality of an economy’s human capital. David Ladler stated “To
the extent that a more educated and better trained labour force is able to produce more
output because it embodies more human capital, the proportion of the economy’s labour
force that has received higher education affects the level of the economy’s productivity as
measured by output per person-hour of work.” The ideas that spill out of post secondary
education improve and create products, services and processes and lead to new companies
and whole new industries.
In the same way that continuous investment is needed to replace depreciated facilities and
equipment and meet new production requirements, continuous investment in training is
needed to maintain and upgrade human capital.
This investment requires full cooperation from everyone—public sector, private sector,
educators and employment supports. This is about investing in ourselves and our
community. Training and education can provide solid solutions and a competitive advantage
that will pave the way to sustainable employment, new business opportunities and new
investments.
Grand Valley Educational Society
2
[email protected]
Executive Summary
Of particular interest when compiling input for this report is that there was substantially more
input regarding processes associated with post secondary education, than there was
regarding the need for specific skills or occupations.
Training and education is the foundation to workforce development. For Brantford-Brant to
initiate a proactive strategy there needs to be a commitment of supports to a broader
definition of “workforce”; one that recognizes low income earners, displaced workers, the
unemployed, the underemployed, main stream students and seasoned workers that are “at
risk”.
Numerous benefits can be achieved through the re-skilling and upgrading of individuals who
are currently employed. Not only will this increase the skill level of our entire workforce to
more advanced levels, but when an employee is faced with voluntary or involuntary
unemployment it will ultimately enable them to make a more timely transition to new
employment opportunities.
Financing is always a concern! Lack of financial assistance and supports are a key barrier to
workforce development, for both individuals and businesses. Government services need to
be expanded to incorporate the employed workforce to assist with re-skilling and upgrading.
Financial supports and services should be provided to an individual immediately upon loss of
employment. A special training initiative should be implemented that will assist low income
earners, the underemployed and the “at risk” workers that will provide the necessary supports
and encourage them to excel and achieve an improved quality of life.
Pilot programs should be implemented that offer flexibility in programming and alternate
methods of delivery directed at the employed workforce to determine best practices. This
programming: should be in conjunction with employers located in Brantford-Brant; promoted
by local employers to all employees and; costs offset through funding directed at training
initiatives.
We need to respect that post secondary education is a “business” that requires a “critical
mass” to sustain any training or education being offered locally. With the substantial growth
of small to medium enterprises, individually there may not be the critical mass required.
There is an immediate need for Brantford-Brant to dedicate the resources to create a Training
Coordination Centre. Employers would liaise with this office to indicate their training needs in
addition to the number of employees requiring the training. By centralizing the coordination
of training needs across multiple sectors and occupations, training could be sourced that is
not only relevant but cost effective. This would also ensure that Brantford-Brant has a
continuous, current and accurate picture of the training needs in our community, and can
respond with the implementation of timely and actionable strategies.
Research and development is key to attracting large enterprises that have an established
global presence. Canada as a whole has an “innovation deficit” which directly impacts
productivity and international competitiveness. Post secondary institutions need to work
closely with the Brantford-Brant community to determine avenues for implementing strong
research and development activities that are focused on leading edge technologies,
Grand Valley Educational Society
3
[email protected]
processes or services which will ultimately be an attractor for large enterprises and the
catalyst to making Brantford-Brant an Educational Centre of Excellence.
To capitalize on the existing skills of our workforce and the sectors in our community,
curriculum should be created that has the capacity to be applicable to many occupations in
numerous sectors. This is clearly demonstrated by the emerging “green economy”;
programming which may not even exist that combines this emerging field with existing
clusters in Brantford-Brant such as food processing, logistics or pharmaceuticals.
Occupations also have the capacity to span multiple sectors; lab technicians are found in
health care, food processing, plastics & rubber, chemical, aerospace, pharmaceuticals,
consumer goods and green initiatives. Consider the benefits of having a “generic” lab
technician that can successfully obtain employment in multiple sectors and at any time can
choose to specialize in a particular sector.
By focusing on developing post secondary programming applicable to numerous sectors,
workforce development becomes less focused on knowing where specific sectors are going
in the future, and increases the focus on ensuring that our local labour force has an evolving
supply of skills applicable to a broad range of occupations and sectors.
Employers are investing in training, and understandably their primary focus is training that
has a direct impact on their business and provides the greatest return on investment. Often
this training is OEM or proprietary training which, in many cases, is already recognized at a
global level. Stronger partnerships and articulation agreements should be established
between post secondary education and proprietary/OEM trainers to not only improve career
pathways but also provide blended solutions that are globally recognized and more
responsive to fluctuating market needs.
There has been a fundamental shift in employer expectations of the labour force. Not only
have entry level skills increased substantially, employers are looking for individuals that have
a “blending” of skills, both technical and competency based. Workforce development in
Brantford-Brant needs to address core issues associated with skills training and upgrading
that have been identified by business and industry including:
 Improved coordination of business needs with academic curriculum planning
 Financial support for employers to invest in training programs for their employees
 Faster and more realistic recognition of skills acquired in the workplace
 Faster recognition of credentials of immigrants
 Revisions to apprenticeship programs including more time with employers on the job;
alternate delivery methods of class/theory learning; greater emphasis on skilled trades
and revision of journeyperson to apprenticeship ratios that recognizes the growth of
small to medium enterprises
Improved pathways are a concern for every component of the workforce. Fast tracking of
career training and, recognition and exemptions for life-work skills are a priority for the
employed and unemployed workforce. Career choices are not always based on interest or
aptitude, but on the time commitment to achieve certification. Exemptions should not be
costly, and not always the sole determinant of an exemption. Post secondary institutions
require improved credit transfers for the mainstream student; consider Alberta which has an
extensively developed articulation system that enables students to transfer between
programs at any of the post secondary institutions.
Grand Valley Educational Society
4
[email protected]
In addition to addressing financial issues such as tuition levels, loans and grants, resources
should be committed to improving the awareness of the value of post secondary education at
(or before) the high school level. Information about the costs and benefits of post secondary
education should not only be directed at the students, but also parents and families. The
odds of a student in Ontario attending PSE when at least one parent had a university degree
are double that of a student whose parents had a high school diploma or less. Awareness of
the value of post secondary education needs to be at the forefront. Programming offered at a
local level should be innovative and include supports that are sensitive to the Aboriginal
communities of Six Nations of the Grand River and the Mississauga’s of the New Credit;
resources need to be dedicated to improved linkages and partnerships that will clearly
demonstrate the value of post secondary education, particularly to the youth.
Post secondary education and training needs to be innovative in the delivery of training
programs that will reflect a stronger commitment to workforce development to meet future
needs and demands. Apprentices that spend one day in class and four days in the
workplace would provide for ease of scheduling without disruption to work; blended delivery
methods for the employed workforce that would combine in-class and on-line learning;
expanded programming offered after hours and during the summer months are just some
suggestions received.
For Brantford-Brant to move forward and become a sustainable and vibrant community of the
future it’s time to take the abstract theories of improving workforce development through post
secondary education and turn them into realistic and tangible solutions.
Grand Valley Educational Society
5
[email protected]
Purpose
The purpose of this report is to identify a strategic direction that will lead to Brantford-Brant
becoming a centre of Educational Excellence that champions workforce development.
This strategic direction will look at the post secondary education that is currently available,
where there is opportunity for expansion of post secondary education, and how to effectively
capitalize on those opportunities.
Ultimately, this vision will lead to a highly skilled workforce in Brantford-Brant that will
perpetuate economic development. The intent is to focus on how to realistically provide
access to education that will raise the skills of our local labour force to ensure that BrantfordBrant is in a position to attract state-of-the-art business and industry to our community and
provide critical training and educational supports to existing business and industry.
To identify these strategies, this report reviews three main elements:
1. The skills, training and education required by local business and industry
2. The current MTCU accredited training and education available at a local level
3. Skills, training and education that will be a key attractor for future business and
industry
The report includes background information that will clearly show the impact and value of
post secondary education on workforce development and how skills, training and education
lead to strong and viable economic development.
Grand Valley Educational Society
6
[email protected]
Methodology
Information contained within this report was sourced through:
 Local community organizations and associations
 On-line research (local to national)
 On-line survey directed at local employers
 Personal interviews & meetings
 Telephone interviews
Brantford-Brant has a wealth of information! Over the years, reports have been completed on
such critical workforce issues as; skill deficiencies, employer concerns, economic diversity,
tools to encourage the growth and stability of local business and, opportunities to attract new
enterprises.
The skills, training and education required by local business and industry was sourced
through current information and data already available through multiple organizations and
associations throughout Brantford-Brant. Information was obtained using on-line research,
published reports and direct contact, through organizations such as:
 City of Brantford and County of Brant Economic Development
 Brant Human Resource Network
 Brantford-Brant Chamber of Commerce
 Brantford-Brant Business Resource Enterprise Centre
 Enterprise Brant
 Workforce Planning Board of Grand Erie
The report also contains information solicited from 178 employers through a direct on-line
survey (see Appendix A). The survey results were further supplemented with conversations
with employers and key organizations in Brantford-Brant that have direct contact with
employers.
The GVES would like to express their gratitude to those organizations that broadcasted the
on-line survey link to their membership database, and encouraged employer feedback into
this report.
The report also profiles the MTCU accredited programming currently available through
Private Career Colleges, College and Universities that have a presence in Brantford-Brant.
We appreciate the time and resources that these institutions committed to provide us with
program and course information.
To identify the skills, training and education that will be a key attractor for future business and
industry, the report reviews sector trends and linked these trends with local information
including opportunities highlighted in the recently commissioned economic development
strategies of both the City of Brantford and the County of Brant.
Grand Valley Educational Society
7
[email protected]
Composition of a Community Workforce
Traditional views of post secondary education focus on the unemployed or mainstream
student. Particularly with community/government programs and services, supports are
directed at the unemployed and often the fastest route to employment, whereas post
secondary institutions often target the mainstream student.
The future workforce of Brantford-Brant will come from four primary sources:
 Individuals newly entering the workforce
 New immigrants to our area
 Educational upgrading/lifelong learning by those already in the workforce
 Educational upgrading/career transition for the unemployed
To accurately reflect the future workforce, any strategic direction must incorporate a more
comprehensive definition. For Brantford-Brant to take a proactive approach there needs to
be a commitment to ensure that supports and services are adjusted to reflect this broader
composition. Consider the following profiles of a complete labour force:
Low income earners
Individuals already employed, but are unable to achieve a sustainable quality of life either
due to wages or hours worked
Displaced workers
People who have lost their jobs due to business closures/restructuring
Unemployed
Individuals who are currently unemployed, but are not a displaced worker
Underemployed
Individuals who are employed in positions which are below their experience and/or
educational level
Main stream students
Recent graduates of secondary school that are considering a career path and registering
in post secondary education
Seasoned workers
Individuals who have been employed in the same occupation who are at risk due to
under-developed or out of date skills
Grand Valley Educational Society
8
[email protected]
The Holistic Approach
Workforce development is not a new idea and it continues to be of major concern to many
municipalities throughout Ontario. What is known is that workforce development is:
 directly tied to economic development of a region
 an extremely complex issue that continues to evolve
For many years, particularly during strong economic conditions, workforce development was
a “problem focused” approach to addressing issues such as low skilled workers or the need
for more employees in a particular sector. Everyone is familiar with the technology boom of
the 80’s and 90’s which saw an influx of individuals seeking technology certifications. Sector
based workforce development traditionally focused on matching the skills of the workforce to
the needs of an industry or sector already present in the region (such as healthcare or
manufacturing). Programming was developed and implemented to mirror the needs of
sectors that were encountering difficulties recruiting appropriate candidates.
Today’s approach to workforce development needs to incorporate a more holistic approach
and take into consideration the overall needs of the region, opportunities that exist within a
region and individual participants’ barriers.
Workforce development in a region must have a proactive strategy with a dual purpose;
support existing business and industry in the region AND create a workforce that will attract
new business and industry. It is universally acknowledged that a skilled and available
workforce is one of the key attractors for companies considering locating to a particular
region.
The critical question then becomes – what needs to be in place to ensure the success of a
workforce development strategy? Economists and economic specialists have been able to
identify six primary conditions that are required to ensure the success of any workforce
strategy:
Assessment of Community Needs
An analysis of the regions current and anticipated needs should be undertaken. This
strategy is designed to identify the requirements of existing businesses in the region, both
current and for the future.
Employee Outcomes
Any strategy must incorporate a means to measure success. These measurements could
be; increased salaries or a higher rate of employment; increased levels of education and
skills, or more consistent levels of employment (retention). However, it should be noted
that this data is often difficult to collect.
Grand Valley Educational Society
9
[email protected]
Ties with Employers
The importance of direct and consistent ties with employers cannot be stressed enough.
This strategy will assist individuals to identify the skills required, obtain the necessary
training and find work quickly with employers who are hiring.
“Employer leadership is key to
long-term reform of workforce
development systems.”
Robert Giloth
Employer input is also vital to assist in shaping
curriculum that responds to both current and
future employer needs. This employer network
can help to identify such issues as a lack of
general skills (English) or more sector specific
skills which can be the basis to concrete solutions
(such as creating a brand new certification
program).
Ties to Community Resources
Workforce development strategies benefit from a strong network of ties to community
resources. Programs and strategies must incorporate the economic trends of the entire
region. Labour markets are no longer restricted by city or neighbourhood boundaries, and
community resources often have long established ties with surrounding regions.
Assistance for the Workforce
Particularly during unstable economic conditions, the financial situation of individuals has
a direct impact on workforce development. Whether financial support during training and
upgrading or individualized services such as childcare, these supports are a vital
component of workforce development.
A strong strategy will provide the necessary assistance to the individual while they are
developing their skills—whether it is direct financial support or assisting the individual with
connecting with other government or nonprofit organizations and supports.
Adaptability
Programming offered to individuals to improve their skills must be flexible and open to
change when workforce conditions change. One indicator of adaptability is whether
institutions have in place the mechanisms to listen to what the community is saying, and
responding to the input in a timely manner. It is in the best interest of institutions to have
these mechanisms in place as this will determine the long term sustainability of their
programming.
However, institutions are faced with the issue of organizational culture and process.
Often, post secondary programming may be two - three years in the development and
approval process. This is in direct conflict with the need to continually update outcomes
and programming in response to the current situation of the job market and employers’
needs.
Grand Valley Educational Society
10
[email protected]
Background
A Diversified Economic Base
Residents of Brantford-Brant will remember the peak of manufacturing of the 1980’s
followed by the historical decline in the Brantford manufacturing base with the closures of
such cornerstones as White Farm Equipment, Massey Ferguson and Koehring Waterous.
Brantford-Brant is a prime example of the catastrophic effects of a region that is reliant on a
single industry or sector.
A diversified economic base is the foundation to a sustainable and vibrant region.
Diversification requires a healthy balance of industries and sectors in addition to a balance
of (a) small and medium enterprises and (b) large enterprises.
Regions have experienced substantial growth in Small and Medium Enterprises (SME’s)
over recent years. Ninety-eight percent of businesses in Canada have fewer than 100
employees and contribute slightly more than 30 percent to Canada’s GDP. Roughly 21
percent operate in goods-producing industries; the remaining 79 percent operate in service
industries (source: Industry Canada, July 2011).
The Ontario Business Report published by the Ministry of Economic Development and
Trade, reported that 97 percent of SME’s in Ontario employed fewer than 20 people and
self-employed individuals comprised more than half of all SMEs and 11.4 percent of all
workers in Ontario. Further, Ontario SMEs operated in all major industry sectors and
Ontario laid claim to relatively more firms in the wholesale/retail, professional services,
tourism and knowledge-based sectors.
Table 1
Distribution of SMEs, Gross Domestic Product across Canada, 2004
SME Share
Region
GDP Share
(% Canada)
Source: SME Financing Data Initiative, Statistics Canada, Survey on Financing of Small and Medium Enterprises, 2004.
Statistics Canada, CANSIM, Table 384-0002, Gross Domestic Product, Expenditure-Based, by Province and Territory.
Atlantic Provinces
6
6
Quebec
22
20
Ontario
36
40
Prairie Provinces
22
21
British Columbia
15
12
Territories
<1
<1
100
100
Canada Total
Grand Valley Educational Society
11
[email protected]
This trend is also reflected in Brantford-Brant and supported by information provided by the
Workforce Planning Board of Grand Erie which indicated over 34,000 people are employed
in Small to Medium Enterprises in a diverse number of sectors:
Employment By Industry & Employers By Percent of Overall Total Businesses (2 Digit NAICS)
Brant Census Division - December 2010
NAICS SECTOR
Goods-Producing sector
11
Agriculture, forestry, fishing, hunting
21
Mining, quarrying, and oil and gas extraction
22
Utilities
23
Construction
31-33
Manufacturing
Service-Producing sector
41-45
Trade (wholesale and retail)
48-49
Transportation and warehousing
51
Information and cultural industries
52-53
Finance, insurance, real estate and leasing
54
Professional, scientific and technical services
55-56
Business, building and other support services
61
Education services
62
Health care and social assistance
71
Arts, entertainment and recreation
72
Accommodation and food services
81
Other services
91
Public Administration
TOTALS
SME
Employment
% of Total
Businesses
1605
33
121
3037
5188
6%
0%
0%
13%
6%
6713
1761
325
2526
1438
2290
425
2627
623
3532
2279
214
34737
16%
6%
0%
14%
8%
9%
1%
5%
2%
4%
9%
0%
100
Source: Statistics Canada, Canadian Business Patterns December 2010
Note: Those industries representing less than 1% of the total number of business show as 0
It is evident that Brantford-Brant is experiencing the trend in increased numbers of SMEs
coupled with a notable decline of large enterprises in our region. Both SMEs and large
enterprises have valuable contributions to make to a region and Brantford-Brant has a
demonstrated need to find a healthy and sustainable balance of both.
As much as SMEs contribute to the diversity of our economic base, large enterprises often
have the capacity to provide increased levels of employment opportunities (particularly with
apprenticeships) that will help retain our intellectual capital. They offer resources to fund
significant research and development; the resources to integrate a region with the global
economy and; the ability to contribute substantially to a much needed infrastructure and
services vital to a community through their tax contributions.
Grand Valley Educational Society
12
[email protected]
Accessibility To Post Secondary Education
Obtaining a post secondary education (PSE) is a crucial requirement for Ontario’s
workforce. With a cross-section of all demographic and socio-economic groups in PSE, a
dual benefit ensues: the province acquires the human capital needed for Ontario’s
economic success, and graduates experience lower rates of unemployment, greater job
stability and higher earnings (Berger, Motte, & Parkin, 2009).
Post secondary Education and the Labour Market in Ontario (Torben Drewes, 2010)
indicates that significantly more students are graduating from Ontario’s colleges and
universities, and when they enter the workforce they are making more money than their less
educated counterparts. Graduates are not only finding jobs; they’re out earning high school
graduates by almost 25 percent, and the gap between earnings has more than doubled in
the last 20 years.
87% of local employers responding to the on-line survey indicated that having post
secondary education available locally is of value to their organization. The survey also
asked employers to indicate what they believed to be the value to their organization, and
the responses were as follows:
To coordinate training and upgrading for current employees
42.4%
To encourage current employees to upgrade their skills
50.0%
To improve the skills of the general workforce
72.7%
To expand the labour pool for recruitment of new hires
78.8%
These respondents also indicated additional benefits of having local accessibility to PSE,
which were not necessarily connected to the level of skills and education, but more towards
socio-economic benefits. The added value factors are: student volunteerism contributes
substantially to the available volunteer base in the community; students are ideal for part
time and seasonal employment opportunities; PSE provides an economic generator for the
community.
Grand Valley Educational Society
13
[email protected]
Geographical Proximity to Post Secondary Institutions
Studies have shown that geographical proximity to post secondary educational institutions
is an important factor in encouraging increased participation rates, and that rural students
tend to pursue college rather than university education (Frenette, 2006). This is often
attributable to proximity issues, with colleges more likely to be present within commutable
distance for rural students, as opposed to universities, which tend to be located in larger
urban environments.
Ontario participants in Youth in Transition Survey:
Total
No.
%
High School Only
No.
%
Other PSE
No.
%
University
No.
%
Urban
89,552
82%
10,559
12%
30,958
35%
48,035
54%
Rural
18,966
18%
3,709
20%
9,523
50%
5,735
30%
Note: numbers may not add up to total due to rounding.
In Ontario, 89,552 (or 82 percent) of the students lived in an urban area, while18, 966 (or
18 percent) lived in a rural area. The information also reveals that a higher proportion of
urban students (54 per cent) than rural students (30 percent) chose to attend university.
Similarly, a lower proportion of urban students (35 percent) than rural students (50 percent)
enrolled in other forms of post secondary education (such as colleges).
However, pursuing post secondary education in general was much more popular among
urban students: only 12 percent of them did not pursue any post secondary education, as
opposed to 20 percent of rural students. These results seem to indicate that proximity has
an important influence on the decision to attend PSE and on the type of post secondary
education that is chosen.
Overall, Ontario’s university participation rate for rural students (30 percent) is lower than
the rate for the rest of Canada (41 percent), though urban youth present similar university
participation rates both in Ontario and in the rest of the country. Yet for students living in
both rural and urban areas, the proportion of students who chose not to pursue PSE is
significantly lower in Ontario than in the rest of Canada.
Grand Valley Educational Society
14
[email protected]
Education Attainment Rates
The Workforce Planning Board of Grand Erie stated in their March 2011 report on raising
educational attainment that Grand Erie residents have a lower education attainment level
than the Ontario average, and this has been an issue for more than a decade.
Education attainment rates from Brant Census Division from Statistics Canada, 2006 Consensus:
Total Population 15 years and over
No certificate, diploma or degree
Secondary school diploma or equivalent
Apprenticeship or trades certificate or diploma
College; CEGEP or other non-university
certificate or diploma
University certificate or diploma below the
bachelor level
University certificate; diploma or degree
Total Population aged 15 - 24
No certificate, diploma or degree
Secondary school diploma or equivalent
Apprenticeship or trades certificate or diploma
College; CEGEP or other non-university
certificate or diploma
University certificate or diploma below the
bachelor level
University certificate; diploma or degree
Total Population aged 25 - 34
No certificate, diploma or degree
Secondary school diploma or equivalent
Apprenticeship or trades certificate or diploma
College; CEGEP or other non-university
certificate or diploma
University certificate or diploma below the
bachelor level
University certificate; diploma or degree
Total Population aged 35 - 64
No certificate, diploma or degree
Secondary school diploma or equivalent
Apprenticeship or trades certificate or diploma
College; CEGEP or other non-university
certificate or diploma
University certificate or diploma below the
bachelor level
University certificate; diploma or degree
Grand Valley Educational Society
15
Brant
(Census division)
Ontario
28.5%
28.4%
9.6%
19.6%
22.2%
26.8%
8.0%
18.4%
2.8%
4.1%
11%
20.5%
45.2%
37.2%
2.0%
10.3%
39.9%
38.6%
2.3%
9.8%
0.7%
2.1%
4.6%
7.3%
14.6%
28.5%
8.7%
29.3%
8.7%
23.8%
6.0%
24.3%
2.4%
4.5%
16.3%
32.7%
21.0%
28.2%
11.3%
22.7%
15.0%
25.4%
9.6%
21.3%
3.5%
4.7%
13.3%
24.0%
[email protected]
Post Secondary Education For The Workforce
The Mainstream Student
For new or recent secondary school graduates the first trend for consideration is whether
they are even choosing to pursue post secondary education. Overall data and statistics
indicate that students in Ontario are more likely to pursue post secondary education (PSE)
than students in the rest of Canada.
According to the Higher Education Quality Council of
Ontario (an agency of the Government of Ontario)
parental education is a key determinant of who
goes to college or university. Recently released
studies in 2011 “Access to Post-secondary
Education:
How
Ontario
Compares”
and
“Educational Pathways of Youth in Ontario: Factors
Impacting Educational Pathways” found that
throughout Canada, having no family history of
college or university is the most significant obstacle
to post secondary education (PSE).
The odds of a student in
Ontario attending PSE when at
least one parent had a
university degree are double
that of a student whose
parents had a high school
diploma or less.
HEQCO June 2011
In fact, a single year of parental post secondary education has a greater positive impact on
the likelihood of a son or daughter attending PSE than does an extra $50,000 in parental
income. For Ontario students, coming from a low-income household is even less of an
obstacle to college or university education than is the case anywhere else in Canada.
Academic performance is a clear
indicator of PSE participation. High
school students averaging grades
between 90 and 100 percent went
on to PSE at a rate ten times higher
than youth averaging 70 to 79
percent. HEQCO June 2011
Another major determinant to post
secondary participation are student grade
and test scores (university in particular) and
the effects of these scores on PSE
participation are found to be the strongest in
Ontario.
Based on the Youth in Transitions Survey (YITS-A) and subsequent report.
Under-represented Groups in Post Secondary Education in Ontario: Evidence from
the Youth in Transition Survey the data found that Aboriginal and disabled youth are
strongly underrepresented in Ontario post secondary institutions (particularly in university),
and that Ontario does not compare favourably to other regions of Canada.
This information was further confirmed by reports released through the OECD (Organization
for Economic Co-operation and Development) an international organization that promotes
policies that will improve the economic and social well-being of people around the world.
Grand Valley Educational Society
16
[email protected]
An interesting trend that emerged was based on whether or not the individual has a chosen
or established career path. Those individuals that did have a career path were foremost
concerned with selecting a specific institution that provided the relevant training. The list of
potential institutions is then reviewed for reputation which was defined as “programming
that is recognized, preferably on an international level, for its relevance to either a specific
business sector or for professional development.”
The issue of career path is most prominent for the mainstream student and their choice of a
post secondary institution, and results in two distinct “streams” for selection criteria:
A mainstream student with a chosen career path lists their top criteria as:
1. Training relevant to their career
2. Recognized certification
3. Prefer institutions that are closer to their home
4. Institutions that spend more on scholarships and teaching
5. Offer higher level of non-academic student services
A mainstream student without a chosen career path lists their top criteria as:
1. Prefer institutions that are closer to their home
2. Institutions that spend more on scholarships and teaching
3. Offer higher level of non-academic student services
Recommendations:
In addition to addressing financial issues such as tuition levels, loans and grants, resources
should be committed to improving the awareness of the value of post secondary education
at (or before) the high school level. Information about the costs and benefits of post
secondary education should not only be directed at the students, but also their parents and
families.
As students struggle with making career choices, more emphasis should be placed on
choosing a career path that will allow the student to adapt to the changing labour market.
Having post secondary education at a local level will assist in ensuring the cost of education
is kept at a minimum while students begin this career path.
Local post secondary education should include resources to recognize and support the
Aboriginal communities of Six Nations of the Grand River and the Mississauga’s of the New
Credit. There is a need to strengthen existing post secondary partnerships and create
improved linkages to the Aboriginal communities to promote post secondary education.
Local post secondary education should include resources to recognize and support the
needs of the disabled community, and strengthen outreach particularly to disabled youth.
Grand Valley Educational Society
17
[email protected]
Employed Workforce
Brantford-Brants’ human capital can also be enhanced through additions to PSE credentials
by those already in the labour force. These contributions can come from workers
completing their first PSE credential as well as those seeking to add to credentials already
earned. The motive can be to improve prospects in their current positions or to switch jobs
or even sectors entirely.
Unfortunately life-long learning has not received the same research attention in Ontario as
have other types of post secondary education. Key questions that need to be answered
include:
 What is the potential demand for adult education in Ontario?
 What are the barriers to participation?
 What is the potential of colleges, universities and private career colleges to meet this
demand?
For individuals who are currently employed including; low income earners, under-employed
and seasoned workers, the criteria for choosing post secondary programming varies
drastically from the mainstream student.
The most prominent barrier for the employed workforce is balancing work, family and social
life—and this is often viewed as more important than upgrading skills and abilities.
Through on-line research / surveys and interviews it was determined that due to the sheer
number of unique situations, it was impossible to create a priority ranking of criteria for this
segment of the workforce. However, some common factors and trends did emerge:
1. Cost is a major influence for the
employed, and determines whether
or not they will even consider
pursuing
post
secondary
education. The lack of government
funding and supports is a major
barrier particularly for low income
earners and the underemployed.
“Availability is huge. Post secondary
education in the community can be seen as
a great equalizer, enabling those of modest
means the opportunity to be successful with
hard work and dedication and become
gainfully employed taxpayers in our
community.”
2. Having relevant courses and
programs available locally not only
assists with the overall costs, but also contributes substantially to balancing work, family
and social life. 42 percent of employers responding to the survey indicated that location
was critical for front line workers but only 22 percent indicated it was a priority for senior
management.
3. Employers that provide financial support and incentives for training and upgrading
(i.e. 75 percent of course cost upon successful completion) are finding that most
employees simply are not taking advantage of the benefit. Even though employees are
encouraged by the employer to upgrade their skills and training, employees indicate that
education outside of the workplace is secondary to family and social life.
Grand Valley Educational Society
18
[email protected]
4. 74 percent of employers responding to the
on-line survey indicated that training is not
mandatory in their organization. The
remaining 26 percent indicated mandatory
training for (a) promotion to supervisory
positions or (b) compliance with
regulations. Of particular interest is that in
both cases the training is normally
provided on site, primarily by private
training organizations and during the
employees scheduled work day.
“It is difficult to encourage
employees to take additional
training or education outside of
work, even if it means that they
may have additional opportunities
within the organization.”
5. The length of the program and/or the number of courses required for successful
completion has a major influence not only for the choice of institution but also for
career choice. Even though an individual may have a career preference, they may opt
for an alternate career if the time commitment is substantially less.
6. There is general dissatisfaction with recognition and exemptions for life/work skills
acquired, particularly for the seasoned worker. Even when challenge exams are
available, individuals feel that not only are they costly but also ineffective for
determining their actual skill
level.
7. Middle and senior management
are more apt to enroll in on-line
courses as their first choice of
program delivery. However, if
this method of delivery is not
available, preferences are for
half day courses available
locally, which allows for better
scheduling of work
responsibilities.
“Having local courses available would mean
that business owners and managers
specifically could participate more easily
without having to leave town, pay for hotels,
etc. Half day courses would be helpful so
that those management employees do not
have to leave their businesses for a full day
at a time.”
8. Even when there is a long term financial incentive, employees are hesitant to commit
the resources to training and upgrading. Some employers, including those with
unionized environments, indicated that elements of the pay scale are determined by
additional training and education. For example;
 the more trades certificates an employee possesses, the higher the pay scale
 for an employee to be considered for supervisory/management positions they must
have relevant supervisory training and education
9. Method of delivery is also of concern; individuals are looking for not only alternate
methods of delivery, but more flexibility in programming. Issues identified included:
time restrictions for completing all course requirements to achieve degree/diploma;
options for combining methods of delivery such as on-line and in class setting and the
opportunity to fast track for certification.
Grand Valley Educational Society
19
[email protected]
Recommendations:
Lack of financial assistance and supports are a major barrier to the employed workforce.
Government services need to be expanded to incorporate financial supports to the employed
workforce to assist with re-skilling and upgrading of training and education. This financial
assistance would be directed at “generic” skills that would increase the marketability of the
individual.
The process of qualifying for financial assistance and government supports should be based
on a personalized and individualized review of each application and acknowledge the
constraints particularly for low income, underemployed and at risk seasoned workers.
Pilot programs should be implemented that offer flexibility in programming and alternate
methods of delivery directed at the employed workforce to determine best practises. This
programming: should be in conjunction with employers located in Brantford-Brant; promoted
by local employers to all employees and; costs offset through funding directed at training
initiatives.
Fast tracking of career training and recognition and exemptions for life-work skills are a
priority for the employed workforce. Career choices are not always based on interest or
aptitude, but on the time commitment to achieve certification. Exemptions should not be
costly, and where exemption exams are available, they should not be the sole determinant of
exemption.
For individuals who are attempting to balance education and training with work, family and
social life, the availability of local post secondary education is vital, in addition to alternate
methods of delivery.
Grand Valley Educational Society
20
[email protected]
Unemployed Workforce
It was interesting to note that trends for the unemployed and displaced worker, closely
mirror that of the employed workforce. The common denominator throughout the
unemployed workforce (as it relates to post secondary education) is that they often have
numerous financial obligations that cannot be ignored.
Particularly with the displaced worker, they have difficulty with:
 Understanding the need for post secondary training and education
 Deciding on an alternate career if the sector they were in is in decline
 Investing the resources in training and upgrading when they believe they will ultimately
be in positions where they will be making less money
As with the employed workforce, the sheer number of unique situations makes it impossible
to create a priority ranking of criteria for this segment of the workforce. However, those
areas in common for both the employed and unemployed workforce include:
1. Cost is a factor for the unemployed and qualifying for government funds and supports is
a major determinant as to whether they will consider pursuing post secondary education.
Input from Employment Resource specialists indicated that they have encountered
individuals who waited until their employment insurance and/or severance expired
before even looking into training or upgrading.
2. The length of the program and/or the number of courses required for successful
completion has a major influence not only for the choice of institution but also to career
choice. This criterion was further impacted by whether or not the individual will receive
financial assistance and support during the length of the training program.
3. Dissatisfaction with recognition and exemptions for life/work skills acquired, particularly
for workers who may have been doing a particular occupation for a long period of time,
but simply do not possess recognized certification.
Recommendations:
The process of qualifying for financial assistance and government supports for training and
upgrading should be based on a personalized and individualized review of each application
and be expanded to incorporate all unemployed and displaced workers immediately at the
time of loss of employment.
Fast tracking of career training and recognition and exemptions for life-work skills are a
priority for the unemployed workforce. Career choices are not always based on interest or
aptitude, but on the time commitment to achieve certification. Exemptions should not be
costly, and where exemption exams are available, they should not be the sole determinant of
an exemption.
Grand Valley Educational Society
21
[email protected]
Apprenticeships
Another component of the Ontario post secondary system is apprenticeship training.
Apprenticeship is broadly defined as vocational training in the skilled trades that is primarily
undertaken on the job under the supervision of certified journeypersons. Apprentices are
paid by their employers and receive a portion of their training in a classroom, usually
through a College of Applied Arts and Technology (CAAT). On completion of their training,
they write a series of exams and, if successful, are certified in their trade.
Apprenticeships in Ontario are grouped into seven general categories: building
construction, electronics, food and services, industrial and related mechanical, metal
fabricating, motor vehicle and heavy equipment, and other. Twenty-one trades are
designated as compulsory, meaning that anyone employed in the area must be either
certified or in a registered apprenticeship program.
What is clearly evident is that the apprenticeship and skilled trades system requires
modernization to ensure that the system is more responsive to our economic diversity. To
address this, the province has established the Ontario College of Trades which is
anticipated to be fully operational by 2012.
Although manufacturing has experienced a substantial decline in recent years, a strong
skilled trades component is vital to the economic prosperity of Brantford-Brant. Key issues
that have been identified with the current apprenticeship system include:
 The need to attract more people to pursue careers in the trades, particularly youth and
under represented groups
 Providing the skilled trades sector with more authority to assist with critical decisions
involving compulsory certifications, ratios and program delivery
 Removing barriers and increasing access for internationally trained workers
 Out of date equipment at colleges and training centres
Ratios
The impact of ratios on small businesses is greatest, and taking into consideration the
substantial growth in small and medium enterprises, has the most detrimental effect. The
economies of rural communities are at an even greater disadvantage as these small
communities are less likely than large cities to have large companies which are able to
take on new apprentices.
In many rural communities, small business (under 20 employees) represents the highest
number of companies, reaching as high as 80 to 90 percent. Ontario workers who wish to
learn their trade in small businesses may be unfairly restricted from entering the workforce
in their chosen trades due to ratio requirements.
This lack of opportunity for young people to learn skilled trades in their home communities
contributes to the ‘out-migration’ of rural Ontario youth.
Grand Valley Educational Society
22
[email protected]
Recommendations:
The mandate of the Ontario College of Trades affirms the need for modernization. Part of
this modernization needs to include improved mechanisms that will remove the barriers and
increase access to apprenticeships for internationally and/or out of province trained workers.
With the influx and substantial growth of Small to Medium Enterprises in Ontario, and
particularly Brantford-Brant, ratios for apprenticeships need to reflect the economic diversity
in Ontario. Improved mechanisms to enable these small to medium enterprises to participate
in apprenticeships are required in all sectors.
When reviewing the skilled trades sector, although large enterprises may have the greatest
number of employees and apprentices, it is vital to include small to medium enterprises to
assist with critical decisions involving compulsory certifications, ratios and program delivery.
Current tax credits for employers hiring apprentices include the Ontario Apprenticeship
Training Tax Credit (ATTC), the Apprenticeship Job Creation Tax Credit (AJCTC) and the
Ontario Co-operative Education Tax Credit (CETC). Incentives for employers to take on
apprentices may have to be reviewed if small to medium enterprises are enabled to take on
apprentices.
There are serious concerns expressed by employers and apprentices alike that the number
of locations to complete their in class training is diminishing substantially. This, coupled with
a desire to spend more time in the workplace with current equipment and processes,
suggested that alternate methods of delivery should be considered (i.e. one day of class and
four days in the workplace). This would require a complete review of the number of in-class
hours required, and would have a substantial impact if small and medium enterprises were
included in more apprenticeship opportunities.
Grand Valley Educational Society
23
[email protected]
The Employer Commitment
It is clearly evident that the workplace has changed substantially over the last 20 years. In
many cases the lower skilled “entry level” positions have disappeared and employers have
higher expectations of their employees in both technical and business skills.
In addition to financial incentives provided by
employers to their employees to encourage
continued training and upgrading, many employers
provide
“in-house”
proprietary/OEM
(Original
Equipment Manufacturer) training to their employees.
This “corporate” training is provided by private
companies who typically have an area of expertise,
specialize in a particular sector or are recommended
by a supplier/manufacturer.
“specialized training is done in
house by private trainers
recommended by the supplier”
Identified advantages of this “corporate” training are:
 Many corporate training and certification programs are already recognized on a global
level and this is particularly true of proprietary/OEM training.
 Corporate training can lead to multiple credentials versus a “single stream” degree or
diploma approach through colleges/universities.
 Training programs offered in house are on-going versus the “terminal” approach of a
degree or diploma.
 Corporate training programs offered by private organizations are customized and
specialized. Course content, method of delivery, scheduling (particularly for 24/7
operations), recognition of existing skill base are all taken into consideration during the
development phase. This customization enables the employer to offer training that is
specific to their sector or industry versus the pre-established programming of higher
education.
 Proprietary/OEM programs are quick to respond to changes in technology, processes,
research and labour market needs and offer the most current content. Financial
constraints and regulatory processes often prevent higher education from immediate
response to changes in the market.
 Particularly with proprietary/OEM programs the reputation and recognition of the
credential is often more substantial than similar programming offered through higher
education.
Recommendations:
Post secondary institutions need to work together with proprietary/OEM trainers to offer
blended solutions that are globally recognized and are more responsive to market needs. A
component to this solution would include the need for post secondary institutions to
implement a process for improved recognition of these in-house training programs and create
improved PSE pathways.
Articulation agreements are currently in place for improved pathways between colleges and
universities and a similar process could be applied to proprietary/OEM trainers.
Grand Valley Educational Society
24
[email protected]
Re-skilling the Existing Workforce
Very little research exists on the importance and value of re-skilling the existing workforce.
Although there are numerous reports and papers that are sector specific, there is a lack of
an overall view of re-skilling the workforce as a whole.
Any community that has experienced a drastic decline in a particular sector realizes that
long term employees in that sector have difficulty transitioning to new employment
opportunities as their skills are so sector specific and/or out of date.
It is understandable that employers that provide training to their employees will focus their
resources on the training that directly contributes to productivity and profitability of their
business. The proprietary/OEM (Original Equipment Manufacturer) training is mandatory
for their employees as it has an immediate and direct impact on the business. Employees
participate in this training knowing that it is a requirement of their job and will assist them in
transitioning to new technologies or processes.
Where there is substantially less commitment from both employers and employees, are the
skills that have an indirect impact and yet have still been identified as vital to the success of
an employee. Earlier in the report it was highlighted that employers are looking for
employees that have skills in (i.e.) communications, decision making, problem solving and
project management. These skills are critical to any organization that requires individuals
working together to achieve goals and objectives.
However, these skills are often viewed as “personal” development and the skills acquired
are considered transferrable—ultimately increasing the marketability of the employee to
additional internal or external employment opportunities.
Compounding the problem of developing indirect skills are additional issues related to:
Economic Instability
 As a “doing more with less” society, resources are at a premium. Employers will
invest their training resources in areas they believe will achieve the largest return
on their investment.
Economic Diversity
 With the substantial growth of small to medium enterprises, these employers often
lack the resources to make the investment in these indirect skills. The smaller
workforce often makes it cost prohibitive to offer in-house training and any training
that does occur cannot have a detrimental impact on work responsibilities.
Accessibility
 Having the training locally for upgrading and re-skilling of the workforce is an
important issue for both employers and employees. Knowing where to access the
training; being cost conscious of training costs (direct and indirect); the length of
the course or program offered and some form of credential, influences the decision
to participate in training and upgrading.
Grand Valley Educational Society
25
[email protected]
Recommendations:
By re-skilling and upgrading the employed workforce, it is anticipated that when faced with
voluntary or involuntary unemployment, the individual would transition to new employment
opportunities in a more timely manner, and thus reduce the overall cost and impact of
unemployment.
With the growth of small to medium enterprise, employers often do not have the “critical
mass” to offer training and upgrading. The creation of a central office for Training
Coordination should be established for Brantford-Brant. Employers that have training needs
would contact the Training Coordination office and indicate not only the needs, but the
number of employees requiring the training and when these employees would be available to
participate in the training. This central office would maintain a database of these employer
training needs, and when sufficient numbers were achieved, would source relevant and cost
effective training and assist with venue / scheduling of the training.
A neutral and central office for coordinating of training would enable Brantford-Brant to:
 have a current and accurate picture of training needs based on employer input
 liaison with the appropriate post secondary trainers and educators to develop and
implement cost effective solutions

implement a strategy for workforce development that is timely and actionable
Benefits of re-skilling and upgrading the employed workforce:
 Increases the skill level of entire workforce to more advanced levels
 Workforce will be more flexible and responsive to evolving business needs
 Helps employers to identify and develop potential in employees
 Increases the talent pool for promotions and lateral movements in companies

Provides increased opportunity to re-deploy skills, particularly during economic
uncertainty
Grand Valley Educational Society
26
[email protected]
Requirements of Existing Business & Industry
Any employer will tell you that having training and education available locally will be of benefit
to their organization, both for recruiting new hires and upgrading existing employees.
The Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities have identified that in addition to job
specific knowledge and skills, employers of today look for a broader set of skills. This has
been reinforced by the Conference Board of Canada which profiled the foundation skills for
employability:
Academic
Provides the foundation for good communication skills, a capacity to analyze, evaluate
and solve problems and to learn new assignments and new ways of doing the job
when technology changes
Personal Management Skills
Positive attitude, ability to take responsibility and be accountable, ability to deal with
changes in the workplace and be innovative, and have respect for others
Teamwork Skills
Skills needed to work with others on a job and to achieve the best results
The general consensus (derived from employer input across Canada) is that the workforce of
today needs to support tomorrow’s labour market and will require:
 outstanding skills in problem-solving, mathematics and science
 values such as creativity, ambition and entrepreneurship
 intellectual curiosity and self-confidence
 scientific and engineering talent investing in research and development
In essence the next generation of Canadian business people will need to be global-savvy,
ambitious leaders, innovative thinkers and smart risk takers.
Training and education is vital to supporting business and industry in Brantford-Brant to
enable employers to nurture and foster a future workforce that will contribute substantially to
their success.
Post secondary institutions are focused on the success of the student, and this focus needs
to go beyond the period of education into the students’ future employment. Both the Ministry
of Education and the Ministry of Research and Innovation have acknowledged the need to
strengthen the links between training and employment and specifically in its “Innovation
Agenda”, the Ministry of Research and Innovation calls for “more cross-fertilization between
business, education and other fields of study to give graduates the full range of skills needed
for innovation.”
What is particularly interesting regarding employer input in published reports, and through the
GVES on-line survey, is that employers have substantially more comments about the process
and intent of education, than they did for specific careers or their individual skill requirements.
Grand Valley Educational Society
27
[email protected]
Through the GVES research, and completing a comparison to other published reports, the
top issues identified by employers in regards to training and education are as follows:
 Improved coordination of business needs (current and projected) with academic
curriculum planning
 Financial support for employers to invest in training programs for their employees
 Faster and more realistic recognition of skills acquired in the workplace
 Faster recognition of credentials of immigrants
 Revisions to apprenticeship programs including more time with employers on the job;
alternate delivery methods of class/theory learning; greater emphasis on skilled trades
 Improved training opportunities for seasoned workers to expand their skill base and
enable them to remain active in the workforce
Brantford-Brant Trends
Brantford-Brant has a diversified economic base, which provides for stronger economic
stability, and is due in large part, to the substantial growth in small to medium enterprises.
This diversification creates additional challenges to providing training and education at a
local level:
 There must be a “critical mass” of people to sustain any training and education
programs.
 There must be related employment opportunities for graduates of programming to
ensure we retain the intellectual capital.
Rather than starting with specific training needs, the GVES felt it important to begin with
trends that have been identified by local business and industry regarding training and
education.
1. Reskilling and upgrading the existing workforce is a higher priority than developing the
skills of new hires.
Business and industry have identified that re-skilling and upgrading their existing
workforce is a higher priority with a greater return on investment. New and/or senior
positions are traditionally filled by internal promotions of existing employees and
typically require less investment of resources.
2. Advances in technology and global competition require business and industry to
continually invest resources in proprietary/OEM/sector specific training.
Many of these programs are: already recognized on a global level; provided on site;
flexible in delivery and content and; respond quickly to changes in technology,
processes, research and market needs.
Grand Valley Educational Society
28
[email protected]
3. As regulations change continually, employers are faced with investing in training that is
mandatory.
Due to government and regulatory changes, employers are faced with investing in
mandatory training for employees, such as Good Manufacturing Practices for
consumer goods. Training budgets are focused first on mandatory training and
second on developing internal employees for promotions or lateral movement.
4. Employers encourage and assist their employees to obtain training that will result in a
blending of skills.
In the case of skilled trades, for example, this may result in an employee having
multiple trades certificates, making the employee a more valuable asset to the
organization. There is a noted preference that employees work towards multiple
credentials on a career “path”.
“it is difficult to find people who have a good blend of skills: e.g. technology
to customer service; understanding the business bottom line; how to
manage projects and priorities”
5. Cost effective and flexible post secondary education is critical if employers are going to
encourage their existing workforce to upgrade their skills.
Although some post secondary institutions offer on-site training, employers indicate it
is not always cost effective. Further, employers are interested in more flexibility of
training and delivery methods. What is of particular interest is that:




some employers indicated that there
wasn’t a need for an institution to
have a physical presence locally, but
“is there a way to divide programs
that the training should be offered
to reduce the cost and weekly
locally
commitment to increase
involvement
– but lead to the
employers see a real value for
same certificate/degree results
offering alternate methods of training
only over a longer period of time?”
delivery that would combine the
mainstream student with the
employed workforce
flexibility in program offerings and
evening / day time classes are vital to assist employers in dealing with staff
shortages and workload. Better accommodation of work schedules is a priority
(i.e. one day of school, four days of work)
although post secondary institutions have made great improvements in (i.e.
technology transfer), there has been little change or improvements to delivery
methods.
Grand Valley Educational Society
29
[email protected]
6. The assessment process to recognize and give credit for skills and abilities learned on
the job requires modernization.
Post secondary institutions need to improve the process and cost for credit
recognition, particularly for OEM/proprietary training that is already recognized on a
global level. There is an opportunity for post secondary institutions to expand their
articulation agreements to include proprietary/OEM trainers and programs.
7. There is overwhelming support for an independent, neutral, central point for coordinating
of training activities in Brantford-Brant.
This is particularly evident with the small to medium enterprises. Consensus is that
having a central point would allow all employers to document their training needs,
and when a sufficient number of employers indicate the need, the central point could
source a viable and cost effective course or program.
8. The largest barrier to training continues to be cost.
The employers we surveyed indicated that cost is the single biggest impediment
to investing more in formal workforce training. The corollary to this finding is
that 65 percent of employers view financial incentives as the most important
factor in increasing support for training
Ontario Chamber of Commerce, June 2011
Whether mandatory or voluntary, the direct and indirect costs associated with
training, combined with lost production of employees participating in the training
continue to be the most pronounced barriers, particularly for small to medium
enterprises that typically have more limited resources than larger enterprises.
Recommendations:
Workforce development in Brantford-Brant needs to go beyond identifying skills required by
existing and future employers and address core issues identified by employers including:
 Improved coordination of business needs (current and projected) with academic
curriculum planning
 Financial support for employers to invest in training programs for their employees
 Faster and more realistic recognition of skills acquired in the workplace
 Faster recognition of credentials of immigrants
 Revisions to apprenticeship programs including more time with employers on the job;
alternate delivery methods of class/theory learning; greater emphasis on skilled trades
 Improved training opportunities for seasoned workers to expand their skill base and
enable them to remain active in the workforce
Grand Valley Educational Society
30
[email protected]
Specific Skill Requirements
Overall there is a definite trend towards “competency” based training versus “skills” based
training. This is clearly reflected in the Human Resource Development Canada Essential
Skills, numerous publications and the input obtained for this report.
“increasingly, the
differences in human
capital between countries
will depend not on the
quantity of education, but
on quality - the success of
education systems at
developing people’s full
talents and abilities across
the course of their lives,
from preschool to the
workplace”
Organization for Economic
Cooperation and Development
The Ontario Chamber of Commerce (OCC) – Business
case for lifelong learning a job-based training report
(June 2011) indicates “in response to the emergence of
knowledge as a key factor of economic growth,
employers have begun to place a greater emphasis on
the skills and education of the workforce…There is a
growing awareness that success in global value chains
requires both more advanced knowledge to enable a
higher degree of economic specialization, and more
elastic knowledge to facilitate continual technological
upgrading and organizational innovation. In other
words, demand for employees that possess a mix of
both “hard” and “soft” skills is rising as companies
respond to intensified global economic competition.
Through their 2010 employer survey, the OCC confirmed that “more advanced and multidimensional skills are required to support future economic growth in the province. Of the 98
percent of respondents who had offered some form of support for workforce learning and
development over the past two years, the five skills they invested in most heavily were, in
order:
 Technical skills
 Management/leadership skills
 Interpersonal skills
 Computer skills
 Professional designations
“if a new hire has had
It is important to note that during the on-line survey
conducted for this report, and reports and surveys
conducted by other organizations and associations (i.e.
Workforce Planning Board of Grand Erie, Canadian
Chamber of Commerce, Ontario Chamber of
Commerce), there is a definite trend in employer
responses that reflect a greater concern about process,
delivery and curriculum regarding training and
education than comments about specific skill
shortages.
Grand Valley Educational Society
31
exposure to, for
example, multiple
computer systems or
multiple machines, it
makes it much easier for
me to train them on
systems and machines
specific to our business”
[email protected]
One of the questions posed to employers in the on-line survey for this report was whether
or not they had difficulty, on a regular basis, recruiting for a particular position. The result
was that 50 percent of the respondents indicated Yes and 50 percent indicated No.
Keeping in mind that the survey was not directed to any specific sector or type of position,
the respondents were asked for further clarification on their responses, which were then
grouped for ease of reporting.
Employers that did not have difficulty recruiting for positions indicated that this was primarily
due to two reasons:
 A highly mobile workforce and;
 Promotions were done internally, creating positions for new hires that required less
technical and sector specific skills.
Employers that did have difficulty, indicated competency and skill based challenges with
recruiting as follows (in no particular order):
 Difficulty finding new hires with a good blend of skills, both technical and competency
based
 Bilingual / Multi lingual
 Middle management and executive level positions
 Technical Sales Representatives / Sales Representatives
 Planners, financial analysts
 Third Party Collections

Specialized positions in utility and water treatment (environmental technicians)







Skilled Trades
General Machinists/Machinist Apprentice
Fluidpower Technicians
Quality Assurance Technologists
Qualified tig welders
Electrical Technician, Industrial Millwright Mechanic, Millwright
CNC Programmer / CNC Machinist


RN, RPN
Occupational therapy and physiotherapy assistants

Lawyers

Workers in agriculture
Recommendations:
The economic diversity of Brantford-Brant is clearly reflected in the wide range of occupations
that employers have difficulty recruiting for. However, the common denominators with the
greatest number of responses are supervisory, skilled trades, healthcare, agriculture,
environmental with all responses indicating a need for blending of technical and competency
based skills.
Grand Valley Educational Society
32
[email protected]
Skilled Trades
This is the one constant area of concern by employers who are anticipating a critical shortage of
skilled trades people in the not too distant future.
Information and input obtained indicates that employers feel that there is a general
misconception by the workforce that there is no future in skilled trades, particularly with youth.
Many attributed this perception to the negative media headlines, which are leading youth to
believe it is not a sustainable career.
However, the need for skilled and specialty trades will be a constant in any region of Ontario,
including Brantford-Brant. Construction and manufacturing have been, and will continue to be a
constant, and with the looming retirement rate of baby boomers, many employers anticipate a
critical shortage.
Employers believe that the most vital action for a solution is to improve awareness of the multiple
opportunities available in skilled and specialty trades. Building a Twenty-First Century
Workforce: A Business Strategy to Overcome Canada’s Skills Crisis, published by the Canadian
Chamber of Commerce, 2008 indicated that 42 percent of people aged 13–24 said they would
be unlikely to consider a career in the skilled trades, as compared to 26 percent who said they
would likely consider that option. Interestingly, although 60 percent of parents said they would
be likely or very likely to recommend a career in the skilled trades to their children, 59 percent of
young people polled said that their parents have not encouraged them to consider skilled trades
as a career option.
This is a clear indication that more must be done to educate the workforce about the diverse
skilled trades careers available, and eliminate the undeserved stigma associated with skilled
trades
Grand Valley Educational Society
33
[email protected]
Sector Requirements
The Workforce Planning Board of Grand Erie 2011 Local Labour Market Plan is an exceptional
report that reviews specific sector requirements in the Brant-Haldimand-Norfolk area. An
overview of the content of this report is as follows:
Employers identified the increased requirements for health and safety, WHMIS, continuous
improvement performance and report writing have increased the entry level skills.
Specialty Trade Contractors
In 2010, employers within this sector identified that workers within this field must have
advanced technical skills and an excellent knowledge of environmental and legislative
requirements for the industry. They recommended that new training on business
management, environmental and legislative regulations be incorporated into existing
apprentice training programs. They also stressed that experiential learning or cooperative
education for youth is essential to introduce young people to the skills, work environment,
and demands of the industry.
Manufacturing
Even during times of economic instability, and the potential of lay-offs, employers in
Fabricated Metal, Machinery and Plastics and Rubber Products manufacturing identified
technical skill shortages in the areas of: tool and die workers, machinists, qualified welders
and crane operators. Employers also indicated the need for blending of skills for these
workers including essential skills such as written and oral communication, computer
operations, problem solving and task management.
Agriculture
Technology and advanced farming mechanisms are replacing some of the physical labour
required to meet today’s production demands. Further many new markets are opening as
agriculture transitions into bio-energy, nutraceuticals, green energy and sustainability.
In order to meet the demand for the future, new entrants with advanced business and
science skills will be required for the industry to grow. Recommendations for the Agricultural
industry include: developing and upgrading skills in green jobs and bio-products; advanced
levels of business management and crop science, upgrading skills to meet changes in
technology, regulations and regulatory compliance and, awareness to encourage young
people to enter farming careers.
Warehousing and Storage
Product orientation, forklift training and health and safety top the list of skill shortages for
these industries. Employers noted that many individuals seeking work as forklift operators
have their licenses, but lack the job-related experience required in the workplace. This poses
health and safety concerns to an industry highly dependent on the safe movement of goods.
Additional skills shortages were noted in basic computer literacy. Many inventory systems
are database driven and require workers to be familiar with computers.
Grand Valley Educational Society
34
[email protected]
Sector Requirements cont’d
Administrative and Support
Participants in this sector identified challenges in finding people with the skills and training
required for three specific occupations: security guards, court reporting and collections
agents. Each requires specific skill sets or unique training. Employers also noted that
changing legislative requirements pertaining to criminal reference checks, bonding, and
similar related criteria increases the requirements for new entrants.
In addition, specific job related skills require increased levels of expertise in computer training
(Windows and Microsoft applications), conflict management, and supervisory skills.
Repair and Maintenance
Employers in the Repair and Maintenance sector rely heavily on skilled and semi-skilled
employees, often requiring a college education and apprenticeship as the minimum
requirement. 78 percent of employers indicated that their greatest challenge is an
inadequate supply of qualified new hires, followed by high training costs. Potential
employees are lacking both technical skills such as; electrical mechanics specific to
refrigeration and air conditioning, commercial construction training, torch and rig experience
and quality millwrights and essential skills such as problem solving, customer service and the
ability to follow directions.
Tourism
Generally speaking, an industry is considered a tourism industry if it would cease to
exist, or continue to exist only at significantly reduced levels of activity, as a direct result
of the absence of tourism. The five industry groups included in tourism are as follows:
transportation, accommodation, food and beverage services, recreation and
entertainment and travel services. It is projected that the supply of labour for Ontario’s
tourism industry could fall short of demand by 9.5% in 2025. Primary skills required for
tourism include: oral communication, problem solving, computer use, money math,
numerical estimation with other important skills such as customer service, leadership
and teamwork.
Food Manufacturing
Employers indicated a growth in training requirements for their employees in safety
legislation, continuous performance measures, reading manuals and instructions, and
completing daily reporting requirements. Skill shortages were largely related to skilled trade
journey persons, people with specific knowledge of niche markets, quality assurance
technicians, and qualified packagers and general labourers. Most employers noted that
many job seekers are lacking the basic education and mechanical/technical skills needed to
efficiently operate equipment. Others noted that many people seeking employment lack the
personal management skills (essential skills) required to improve and achieve production
requirements.
Millwrights, electricians, and maintenance workers with food related experience were noted
as difficult to obtain, and 50 percent of the participants noted that the food industry is a
difficult environment to train apprentices because of the Hazardous Analysis Critical Control
Point (HACCP) requirements.
Grand Valley Educational Society
35
[email protected]
Future Opportunities for Expansion of Post Secondary Education
One of the key components of this report is to identify opportunities for expansion of post
secondary education that will contribute to economic development and a vibrant BrantfordBrant, through a well-educated labour force.
This well educated workforce will enhance the prosperity of Brantford-Brant, and through this,
the citizens of our community will benefit. The attraction of new enterprises and the utilization
of knowledge and skills to create new ideas will contribute substantially to greater economic
productivity. While workforce development is critical, our ability to successfully attract and
retain this talent will ultimately be a determining factor in our competitiveness.
Not only do good companies attract good people; good people attract good companies.
However, we are encountering a major challenge! Anyone involved in workforce or business
development will acknowledge that the rate of change experienced in our economy is more
rapid than our ability to provide a skilled workforce using the present strategies of education
and workforce development.
Research and Development Is Key
Companies look for a strong local labour force, with creative workers that have the
entrepreneurial spirit and the ability to invent and innovate. Any successful centre of
educational excellence that has attracted global business and industry has incorporated
research and development at its very core.
In 2010, The Honourable Gary Goodyear, Minister of State for the Federal Economic
Development Agency for Southern Ontario (FedDev Ontario) stated "In order to keep the
economy growing and create new jobs in southern Ontario, we need to develop, attract and
retain the next generation of leading researchers. This investment will help increase
business innovation, bring new ideas to market and strengthen the local economy."
The Federal Government has made financial commitments to expanding research and
development through MITACS Inc., a national research network that connects Canadian
businesses and organizations with the next generation of skilled workers. Through such
programs as “Elevate” and “Globalink” there is support for internships and individual training
programs for PhD graduates and post-doctoral fellows in southern Ontario in addition to
bringing top third-year undergraduate students from Indian Institutes of Technology to
southern Ontario for research internships, professional skills training and exposure to the
region's top industrial innovators.
These programs provide business opportunities for highly-trained workers, increase
research-based innovation in the private-sector and demonstrate to international students
that southern Ontario is a great place to research, work and live.
The need for innovation is further emphasized by Ontario Centres of Excellence. Created
in response to Ontario’s most critical competitive challenges, OCE facilitates economic
growth through support for industrially relevant R&D, the opening of new market
opportunities and the commercialization of leading edge discoveries.
Grand Valley Educational Society
36
[email protected]
Their mission is to build strong industry and academic relationships and to stimulate
knowledge transfer. In essence they work directly with academia and industry to bring
partners together to turn ideas into income. In their 2009/10 annual report, the OCE has
indicated an even greater emphasis on research outcomes that will advance industry by
turning ideas into globally competitive products and services.
According to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD)
innovation strategy - “Getting A Head Start On Tomorrow – 2010”, human capital is the
essence of innovation and universities, colleges and private career colleges are essential
components in the innovation system, both producing and attracting the human capital
needed for innovation. Firms in several OECD countries now invest as much in research
and development, software, databases and skills, as in physical capital such as equipment
or structures. They stress that the creation, diffusion and application of knowledge are
essential to the ability of firms and countries to innovate and thrive in an increasingly
competitive global economy, and that science continues to be at the heart of innovation.
Recommendations:
Post secondary institutions need to work closely with the Brantford-Brant community to
determine avenues for implementing strong research and development into current and
future programming.
Wherever possible, this research should be focused on leading edge technology, processes
or services that could ultimately tap into funds and supports through government bodies such
as Ontario Centres of Excellence or MITACS Inc.
Grand Valley Educational Society
37
[email protected]
Building on Existing Enterprises
Economic Development Strategies
Both the City of Brantford and the County of Brant have invested the resources to create
Economic Development Strategic Plans. As the purpose of this report is to profile
opportunities within Brantford-Brant, a review of both Strategic plans was completed to
determine commonly identified issues and/or opportunities.
In both strategic plans, emphasis was placed on workforce development. Specifically
highlighted is the need to develop higher levels of education across the workforce and to
develop more diverse and adaptable skills. Key recommendations in the strategies include:
 Working with post secondary institutions to encourage programming in technology and
sciences to promote the development of local business clusters
 Encourage post secondary programming that creates higher quality employment
opportunities by supporting the attraction and retention of workers in the new economy
 Use continued feedback from businesses to document their present and future skills
needs
 Encourage local companies to engage in internal workforce training, to benefit both the
company and to increase the capacity of employees to meet present and future needs
 Encourage workers to commit to life long learning to broaden their skills and achieve
greater employability for future opportunities
The reports emphasize that workforce development will be a key factor in the long-term
economic vitality of the community, and that it will be a community partnership involving all
levels of stakeholders that is needed to achieve success. Education will be the key to
attracting, retaining and developing the talent with the Brantford-Brant community. Leaders
of the community and champions of education will need to find new, and sometimes
uncomfortable, ways of working together to take the abstract theories of workforce
development and turn them into realistic solutions.
Although the public sector does create some jobs, an economy must be built on
employment in the private sector.
When considering new opportunities for training and education, it must be stressed that
“new” does not preclude post secondary education directed at existing business and
industry that have the potential for further growth in our community.
In order to identify sectors or careers that show potential, the first step is to profile the
current status of Brantford-Brant. Data and information provided by the Brantford-Brant
economic development website (http://www.brantfordbrant.com) indicate that after
completion of a competitive analysis on Brantford-Brant, it is confirmed that our area has a
competitive advantage with respect to industrial business operating costs.
Grand Valley Educational Society
38
[email protected]
This competitive advantage combined with an analysis of manufacturing sectors showing
potential for growth concluded that Brantford-Brant has strong potential in existing sectors,
and were confirmed as target sectors through the Brantford Economic Development
strategy:
 Food Manufacturing / Processing
 Plastics and Rubber Products
 Chemical Manufacturing
 Machinery Manufacturing
 Advanced Manufacturing
 Primary and Fabricated Metals
 Pharmaceutical / Nutraceutical
 Warehouse Distribution
These are existing “clusters” within Brantford-Brantford and offer the opportunity for
substantial growth and expansion, both in business and in education, particularly when
paired with emerging sector opportunities such as the Green Economy.
Continued access to a centre of learning can be crucial to the success of the business.
This is the nucleus of a cluster, created by the interdependency of the people involved with
the institution, which tends to grow over time. This has been the Waterloo experience,
where this clustering effect has created a world-renowned centre of high technology
businesses.
Larger size firms will often look for the existence of similar size firms as proof that the region
has an appropriate workforce, both in size and skill base. Unless there is an existing
“cluster”, many corporations believe there is no proof that the area is a good place to locate
a business.
There is a consensus that the County and City should work with post secondary institutions
to find ways to have them deliver the courses necessary to maximize the potential of such
clusters in the area.
In the Brant Economic Development Strategic Plan it was identified that it is “imperative to
enhance the education and skill levels of the workforce to meet the needs of the emerging
economy and help to foster “sustainable employment”. The reference to sustainable
employment is similar to the earlier reference in this report to a “career path”. In essence,
the goal is to provide the skills and education that allows an individual to be employed in a
wide variety of occupations and take advantage of multiple sector opportunities, whether at
a time of their own choosing or when forced to by circumstances.
Information obtained from Ontario Works for the Economic Development Strategy has a
very clear message. “If employers are raising the alarm about the supply of labour, and
service providers are scrambling to respond, it’s already too late. There is a risk of
employers pulling up stakes and moving to a location where there is already a supply of
workers like the ones they need, either because of post-secondary institutions feeding a
constant supply of graduates, or similar companies from which they can poach talent, or
both. Workforce supply efforts in our communities must become more nimble and
responsive, while remaining based in the current and projected needs of current and
prospective employers.”
Grand Valley Educational Society
39
[email protected]
The goal becomes to develop a workforce that is multi-skilled and can adapt quickly to a
wide variety of opportunities, and that our community can rapidly deploy skills that are in
line with specific sector and industry needs.
Building on the existing skills of our workforce, and existing sector clusters is best achieved
by creating curriculum that has the capacity to be applicable to many occupations. Knowing
where business and industry is going in the future becomes less important, provided our
community ensures there is a workforce with an evolving supply of skills that are applicable
to a broad range of occupations.
Food Manufacturing / Processing Sector
With the area already recognized as a food processing cluster, the arrival of Ferrero
Canada in 2006 capped that recognition. This signalled that Brantford-Brant is a good
place for food processors to conduct business and this makes the attraction of more
firms a higher possibility.
Ontario is a world leader in food technology research and development, and the agri-food
sector has a proven track record in export marketing. The Toronto perimeter combined
with the South-Eastern region (Waterloo, Wellington, Hamilton, Brant, Haldimand/Norfolk)
represent about two-thirds of the Ontario food processing industry’s labour force.
State-of-the-art procedures and technology has resulted in a gradual shift from dairy
commodities to new value-added products that use milk ingredients/components for food
and non-food applications such as: diet products, nutraceuticals, pharmaceuticals and
functional foods. As technology becomes more sophisticated, the need for workers with
the necessary education to operate automated/computerized equipment and processes
in a more complex environment will increase.
The Ontario Ministry of Agriculture and Food cites water and waste management as a
key challenge for food producers: The food processing industry is faced with major
surcharges for the disposal of waste-water. Costs incurred by several large companies
are in excess of $1 million annually; Waste disposal or treatment can result in costs as
much as $10,000 - $15,000 annually for large organizations, while smaller businesses
pay several thousand dollars a year.
Occupations
Logistics
Laboratory technicians
Computer programmers
Water & Waste Management
Specialists in process, marketing/sales, production, export
Regulatory Specialists; Regulatory inspectors
Skilled trades including:
electronic instrument technicians
industrial electricians / mechanical & electrical maintenance
millwrights; stationary engineers
high-speed packaging mechanics
Grand Valley Educational Society
40
[email protected]
Plastics & Rubber Sector
Ontario is home to a unique cluster of plastics companies encompassing the full length
of the supply chain — from resin and material suppliers and mold-makers to processors,
as well as a range of end-user industries including automotive, electronics, packaging
and construction.
The plastics and rubber sector is a large and fragmented industry featuring nearly
18,000 establishments in North America, thousands of products, dozens of processing
technologies, and a variety of polymer and other raw material requirements. The
industry includes polymer manufacturers, additive suppliers, concentrate producers,
compounders, plastics processors, machinery manufacturers, mold makers, and plastics
recyclers.
The rising demand for rubber products is likely to create opportunities for workers who
have background in computer science, engineering, and sales and marketing. Because
of the industries on-going automation and innovation, it offers employment opportunities
for prospective workers with knowledge of advanced equipment and methods.
Occupations
Waste & wastewater management
Air quality management
Logistics
Packaging
Laboratory technicians
Process specialists
Electronic instrument technicians (e.g. programming, robotics)
Skilled trades including:
industrial electricians
millwrights
stationary engineers
high-speed packaging mechanics
mechanical & electrical maintenance
Grand Valley Educational Society
41
[email protected]
Chemical Sector
Ontario is Canada's biggest chemical producer, and is the birthplace of Responsible
Care®, the chemical industry's global initiative to ensure the safe and environmentally
sound management of products and processes.
Ontario’s chemical companies include:
 Allied manufacturing
 Research & Development facilities
 Lubricants
 Paints
 Medical gases for home and hospital use
 Laundry detergent
 Adhesives
 High-tech fabrics and products
 Industrial & Commercial Coatings
Advanced materials impact a wide range of industries, including aerospace, automotive,
construction, defense, electronics, medical/biotechnology, packaging and
telecommunications. Advances in composites have for example, created fibers to
replace bulkier materials, saving weight and energy, while reducing the number of parts
used and lowering assembly costs. Emerging trends in advanced materials include:
 Ceramic materials
 Coatings
 Composites
 Metal alloys
 Plastic polymers
 Biological materials
Occupations
Chemical Technologist & Technician
Waste Management
Wastewater Management
Logistics
Chemical Engineer
Central Control & Process Operator
Materials Scientist
Chemist
Metallurgist
Grand Valley Educational Society
42
[email protected]
Primary and Fabricated Metals Sector
The primary metal industry is concentrated in Ontario and the greatest level of skill
shortages in this industry are in trades that are familiar with new computerized
production machinery and computerized design specialties.
Rapid technological change, especially in the plastics portion of the industry, new
warehousing and communications technologies such as Electronic Data Interchange
(EDI) and evolving technologies in rapid prototyping will create a need for highly
adaptive and skilled workers.
Occupations
Engineers
Mold & Pattern makers
Maintenance personnel
Millwrights
Tool & Die
Industrial Electricians; Industrial Mechanics
Pipefitters
Research & Development
Waste Management
Logistics
Laboratory Technicians
Robotics & Automation
Welders
Grand Valley Educational Society
43
[email protected]
Biotechnology Sector
The Canadian Environmental Protection Act defines biotechnology as "the application of
science and engineering in the direct or indirect use of living organisms in their natural or
modified forms". Biotechnology opportunities exist in a variety of sectors:
 new biotechnology firms (NBFs)
 university departments of microbiology/related disciplines
 research institutes engaged in biotechnology research
 established corporations with biotechnology divisions
 venture capital firms
 regulatory bodies
 industrial associations
 scientific bodies
 suppliers of equipment and materials
The biotechnology industry is highly educated with approximately 43 percent of
employees having a university degree. Ontario is home to more than half the country's
brand-name pharmaceutical and medical devices industries, and almost half the medical
biotechnology industry.
Employment in biotechnology is typically broken down into five broad categories:
Research and development (medical and pharmaceutical), Manufacturing, Sales and
marketing, Distribution, Administration
Opportunities exist in:
 Pharmaceutical
 Biopharmaceutical; Nutraceutical; Health
 Nanobiotechnologies
 Food; Beverage
 Agriculture; Agrobiotech products (transgenic seeds, plants, produce)
 Industrial enzymes (food, detergents, diagnostics, fine chemicals)
 Bioremediation (soil and sludge)
 Biotreatment wastewater)
 Veterinary vaccines
 Forest biotechnology
 Mining and energy sectors (mineral/energy recovery)
 Pulp and paper (biological wastewater and enzyme treatments)
Occupations
Chemists
Chemical Technologists and Technicians
Technical Sales Specialists
Research Scientists
Analytical Chemists
Specialized Manufacturing Expertise
Quality Control
Regulatory Specialists
Laboratory Analysis
Grand Valley Educational Society
44
[email protected]
Logistics Sector
Logistics involves all the activities required for sourcing, obtaining, converting and
managing the integrated supply and demand of goods and require large-scale facilities
to stage and configure deliveries to all areas.
Generally aligned with global trade movement and broad regional population growth, the
continued growth of this sector seems likely to continue, whether driven by goods to,
through or from Ontario.
Logistics companies look for excellent highway access and locations that are positioned
appropriately to their incoming and outgoing shipments. Tracts of low cost land near to
the preferred highway are the key factor.
There has been a widespread increase in the number of third-party service providers
(3PLs), as well as their reliance on contemporary information system services. The
most common outsourced activities focus on transportation of goods (outbound and
inbound transportation, and freight forwarding), customs (brokerage and clearance) and,
to a lesser degree, warehousing.
Technology and information management are key business drivers impacting the supply
chain function, in addition to increasingly stringent regulations in areas of:
 International regulations governing border crossing, customs, U.S. import security,
and international trade
 Provincial regulations (e.g., inter-provincial trade barriers, labour, and occupational
health and safety)
 Environmental regulations (e.g., Kyoto Protocol)
 Food regulations (e.g., U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and Canadian
Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) regulations)
 Transportation regulations (material storage and dangerous goods)
Occupations
Managers / Supervisors
Analyst Roles
Regulatory Specialists
Logistics Information Systems (Systems and Data)
Inventory Analysts; Planners; Managers
Purchasers; Contractors; Buyers
Logistics and Supply Chain Specialists
Engineers
Technical Sales
Account / Client Management
Warehousing and Operations
Instructors / Trainers at the Post Secondary Level
Grand Valley Educational Society
45
[email protected]
Recommendations:
An analysis of manufacturing sectors showing potential for growth concluded that BrantfordBrant has strong potential in existing sectors:
 Food Manufacturing / Processing
 Plastics and Rubber Products
 Chemical Manufacturing
 Machinery Manufacturing
 Advanced Manufacturing
 Primary and Fabricated Metals
 Pharmaceutical / Nutraceutical
 Logistics / Warehouse Distribution
These existing “clusters” within Brantford-Brant offer the opportunity for substantial growth
and expansion, both in business and in education, particularly when paired with emerging
sector opportunities such as the Green Economy.
Common denominators identified for these clusters include:
 Waste & Wastewater Management; Air Quality Management
 Analytical Chemist; Chemist; Chemical Engineer; Chemical Technologist / Technician
 Laboratory Technician; Laboratory Analysis; Quality Control
 Materials Scientist; Research Scientists; Research & Development
 Logistics and Supply Chain Specialist
 Regulatory Specialist; Process Specialist
 Technical Sales; Account Management
 Managers & Supervisors
 Industrial Electricians; Millwrights
Building on the existing skills of our workforce, and existing sector clusters is best achieved
by creating curriculum that has the capacity to be applicable to many occupations in
numerous sectors. Particularly in the case of environmental training opportunities, often
programs do not even exist to provide the training and education necessary to support new
processes and technologies in a particular sector.
By focusing on developing programming applicable to numerous sectors, workforce
development becomes less focused on knowing where specific sectors are going in the
future, and increases the focus on ensuring that our local labour force has an evolving
supply of skills applicable to a broad range of occupations and sectors.
This alternative view of programming parallels employer expectations for new hires; they
are looking for candidates that have a blend of training and skills that will enable them to
adapt and respond quickly to market changes.
Grand Valley Educational Society
46
[email protected]
Pursuing New Enterprises
Utilizing information from the
1. The Workforce Planning Board of Grand Erie
2. City of Brantford Economic Development Strategy
3. County of Brant Economic Development Strategic Plan
there is a clear opportunity to capitalize on existing clusters and assets within Brantford-Brant
and simultaneously pursue new enterprises.
Aerospace Industry
Approximately 33% of Canada's highly skilled aerospace workforce is employed in Ontario
and over half of the major skill sets in the aerospace industry, include management,
scientific, engineering, technical and skilled trades occupations.
Occupations
Aircraft Mechanics and Aircraft Inspectors
Instrument, Electrical and Avionics Mechanics, Technicians
Machinists; Tool & Die Makers
Machining and Tooling Inspectors
Aerospace Engineers; Mechanical Engineers
Drafting Technologists and Technicians
Systems Designer/Engineer
Supply Network Management
Brantford Municipal Airport - A Hidden Gem
An excellent opportunity for the expansion of an existing asset is the Brantford Municipal
Airport. Located approximately 7 km southwest of downtown Brantford, within the County
of Brant, the airport is closely accessible to Highway 403, with connections to Highways
401, 402, 407 and the QEW.
The airport is a modern, full service aviation facility, certified by Transport Canada, and is a
Canadian Customs Port of Entry with handy Canpass privileges. Offering full aircraft and
instrument maintenance services, the five maintenance and aircraft service businesses on
the field have a national reputation for quality work.
In addition to meeting the needs of corporate, commuter
and commercial operators, the airport is a prime location
for pursuing post secondary education and training
associated with the aerospace sector. This location is
ideal for (i.e.) flight training and/or aircraft maintenance
programming. Flight training conveniences include: WiFi
availability, Instrument approach, Fuel services – AVGAS
& JET, Short and long term aircraft storage hangers, onsite restaurant. The airport is central to major
international airports in Southern Ontario – Toronto,
Hamilton, London, Kitchener-Waterloo and Sarnia.
Grand Valley Educational Society
47
[email protected]
Health Industry
The Health industry is experiencing new and evolving trends that will impact the skills
requirements of not only health care providers at all levels, but also the supporting sectors.
Medical Laboratory Technologies
Will be impacted as new tests and testing procedures are developed, increasing the
volume and complexity of tests
Waste & Water Management
Waste and water management will include biomedical waste resulting from the provision
of human health care, related medical research and teaching, the operation of
laboratories, morgues and funeral establishments, the use of biotechnology (such as the
production and testing of vaccines), and from mobile health care activities.
Nanobiotechnologies
Nanomedicine is the monitoring, repair, construction and control of human systems at the
molecular level and will influence the research and development of medical devices,
treatment and therapies, biopharmaceuticals.
Information Technology will assist in addressing health care challenges in remote and
rural areas
Telehealth
The use of communications and information technology to deliver health and health
care services, information and education through an interactive communication
medium.
Telemedicine
The use of machines that are specially designed to measure and record a patient’s
vital signs at home then transmit the information directly to a hospital nursing station.
Patient Care Management
Technological progress has had a considerable impact on the delivery of care with the
introduction of integrated care delivery systems and microchip cards.
The 350-bed Brant Community Healthcare System, a 2010
Hamilton-Niagara Top 10 Employer and recipient of the Employer
of the Year Award by the Ontario Registered Practical Nurses
Association, is an affiliated teaching site of McMaster University
Michael G. DeGroote School of Medicine.
Brantford General Hospital is a regional acute care health centre
and the Willett site provides urgent care and community outreach
programs. Accreditation Canada determined the Brant
Community Healthcare System exceeds the national compliance
rates for hospital Quality Dimensions & Standards by up to 32% in
all categories and achieves all Required Organizational Practices
for patient safety.
Grand Valley Educational Society
48
[email protected]
The Green Economy
The single most dominant trend is the potential of the “Green Economy” influence on
existing clusters in Brantford-Brant. Emerging green opportunities will have a profound
affect on the skills and education required by our workforce. These opportunities will
redefine the skill sets required in multiple sectors, and create new positions that may not
even exist today (consider the future of nano technologies).
Most people associate the green
economy with alternate energy sources.
However, the green economy
As public policy now demands that
employers take action, many are deeply
encompasses all activities “undertaken
concerned about hiring, training, reby firms in measuring, preventing,
training
and retaining qualified people to
limiting or correcting environmental
fill emerging “green” jobs. WPO
damage, as well as those that engage in
clean or resource-efficient technologies,
that reduce emissions and/or that
minimize waste disposal problems”.
This encompasses everything from alternative and renewable energy to “green practises”
that improve (i.e.) manufacturing processes to minimize the use of raw materials and
reduce waste materials.
The Workforce Planning Board of Grand Erie, Hamilton Training Advisory Board and
Niagara Workforce Planning Board partnered to examine the impact of the green economy
and developed a working definition of green jobs as “work in agricultural, manufacturing,
research and development, administrative, and service activities that contribute
substantially to preserving or restoring the quality of land, air and water.”
In short, it is a restorative (not destructive) economy. More specifically, the green economy
includes economic activities related to the following: reducing the use of fossil fuels,
decreasing pollution and greenhouse gas emissions, increasing the efficiency of energy
usage, recycling materials, and developing and adopting renewable sources of energy.
The report released by the Niagara, Grand Erie and Hamilton partnership “The Future of the
Green Economy” also identified that “Green collar jobs are another important concept to the
green economy. These are occupations that facilitate the reduction of waste and pollution,
improve the environment, and pay a living wage with benefits that can support a family and
offer potential for upward mobility”.
In their report “The Future of the Green Economy”, released in 2011 the WPO indicate that
“many reports project that growth in environmental employment will surpass the average
employment growth in the near future” and that “for Ontario to be a leader in the green
economy, the demand for new jobs must be met with the necessary supply”.
Grand Valley Educational Society
49
[email protected]
ECO Canada (Environmental Careers Organization) in their 2010 report indicated that
companies were experiencing hiring difficulties for qualified employees and determined that
the following were “high demand” occupations for environmental employment:
























Environmental engineer or engineering specialty (civil, mechanical, etc.)
Engineering technologist or technician
Operations manager/project manager
Machine operator
Waste water technician
Sales representative
Researcher / research & development
Hydrologist
Health and safety technician
Drivers
Waste management workers
Mechanic or electric technician
Agronomist
Abatement / remediation/site assessment/hazardous waste handler
Scientist
Geologist
Laboratory technicians
Environmental consultant
Policy & legislation analysts
Driller
Renewable energy technicians
Water quality
Land use planner / civil designers
Finance & Accounting
In addition to positions and opportunities that are directly related to environmental
occupations, there are substantial “green” opportunities required in a wide variety of
sectors. Most people do not fully appreciate the multitude of “green” processes and
technologies that are currently being capitalized upon in these sectors.
Grand Valley Educational Society
50
[email protected]
The following chart provides an overview of various sectors and clusters that currently exist
in the Brantford-Brant area, and the “green” opportunities that either currently exist, or will
exist in the near future.
Utilities
Renewable & Sustainable Energy
Bioenergy
Hydrogen and Fuel Cells
Energy Saving Lighting and HVAC
Energy Storage and Charging Systems
Water Distribution and Supply
Waste Distribution
Wastewater Collection
Environment and Energy
Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing and Hunting industry
Organic Agriculture
Sustainable Agriculture
Bio-remediation
Ecosystem Restoration
Environmental Biology
Environmental Management
Earth and Atmospheric Science
Natural Resources Management
Sustainable and Organic Farming
Sustainable and Organic Wineries
Agroforestry
Sustainable Forestry Management
Reforestation
Construction
Building Renovation Technician/Technology
Sustainable Building Design and Construction
Sustainable Energy and Building Technology
Environmental Engineering Science Certificate
Architecture, Community Design and Green Infrastructure
Sustainable Development, Property Management
LEED Certified Green Buildings
LEED Eligible Building Materials
Energy Star, LEED, and Efficient Equipment
Restoration and Renovation
Grand Valley Educational Society
51
[email protected]
Manufacturing
Demand for managers, engineers, materials handlers and operators who are “green
specialists” for both direct and indirect employment opportunities. Producing alternative
energies for example, creates opportunities for the manufacturer, installation and
maintenance of the machinery used to create the energy.
Organic Certified Food
Paper Products Made from Recycled Inputs
Use of Recovered Scrap Metals in Metal Manufacturing
Clean Technology Products
Modifying Manufacturing Process to Lessen Environmental Impact
Manufacturing using local resources for regional distribution
Administration and Support, Waste management and remediation services
Environmental Technician
Water and Waste Water Technician
Chemical Engineering Technician/Technology
Pollution Mitigation, Control and Remediation
Waste Management, Reduction and Recycling
Environmental Consulting
Energy Efficient Landscaping
Soil remediation (brownfield redevelopment initiatives)
Janitorial, Landscaping, Other Services
Transportation & Warehousing
Transportation Logistics (Air, Ground & Marine)
Transportation Engineering Technology
Operations and Transportation Management
Heavy Duty Equipment / Truck and Transport Repair
International Transportation and Customs
Transportation of Waste
Use of Flex- or Bio-Fuels
Mass Transit (Public Transportation)
Specialized Freight Transportation for Wind Turbine Blades & Towers
Grand Valley Educational Society
52
[email protected]
Common Denominators
Waste / Wastewater Management
Ontario has a strong environmental industry, with leading-edge technologies to provide
solutions to problems involving the use of air, land, water and energy, and offer expertise in
the areas of:
 Water and wastewater treatment/water conservation
 Solid and hazardous waste/recycling
 Site remediation and reclamation
 Energy conservation/renewables
 Air pollution control
 Monitoring/instrumentation/labs
Business and industry are: evolving away from a the traditional view of pollution control to
one of pollution prevention and waste minimization; examining waste/water management in
an effort to reduce treatment/disposal costs and lower liability and insurance costs.
Emerging trends and technologies include;
 Bioremediation (e.g. soil and sludge)
 Biotreatment
 Water and wastewater treatment technologies
 Liquid and solid waste management
 Environmental instrumentation, geomatics and analysis
 Engineering and consulting services
 Environmental laboratory
 Health Care Industry (infectious waste, pathological waste, genotoxic waste, chemical
waste, radioactive waste, wastes with high content of heavy metals). Focus is on new
technologies including: steam sterilization, chemical disinfection, microwave and
macrowave technology, with strong emphasis on waste reduction versus disposal
Grand Valley Educational Society
53
[email protected]
Renewable Energy
The new economy will focus heavily on energy and environment-related products and
services to support renewable and sustainable energy. Potential growth areas pursuing
new advances in processes and technologies include: Photovoltaic Electricity, Solar
Thermal; Wind and, Bioenergy. The sectors that will form the basis for the new economy
include:
 Energy conservation
 Air pollution monitoring and control
 Water and wastewater treatment
 Solid waste management and recycling
 Industrial and hazardous waste treatment
 Environmental software and consulting services
 Site remediation and brownfield redevelopment
 Instrumentation and monitoring equipment
Occupations
Installers / Technicians
System designers and integrators
Sales and marketing staff
Project management
Power and mechanical engineers
Welders
Electrical power line and cable workers
Advanced Manufacturing
Manufacturing in Ontario is not dead, but it is evolving into more sophisticated means of
efficiently producing goods.
Advanced Manufacturing is characterized by high levels of sophisticated automation
including the integration of robotics, software, information systems, sensing, optics,
imaging etc.
The nature of the work is different than on a conventional manufacturing line. In
Advanced Manufacturing, the emphasis is most often on ensuring that the process is
doing the job of manufacturing, rather than the workforce itself making the products.
Ontario is the leader of Canada’s manufacturing sector and boasts the leading edge in
Advanced Manufacturing Technologies (AMT) development. AMT involves new
manufacturing techniques and machines, combined with information technology,
microelectronics, and new organizational practices in the manufacturing process.
Nanotechnology is a future manufacturing technology that will make products lighter,
stronger, cleaner, less expensive and more precise. Ontario’s goals for nanotechnology
include: the creation of new more durable, lighter and easier to use and recyclable
materials; development of smaller components allowing for the design of more powerful
computers and; increases in the potential of alternative energies.
Grand Valley Educational Society
54
[email protected]
Laboratory Occupations
Occupations associated with laboratory and testing are predominant in clusters that
already exist in Brantford-Brant.
Health Care
Manufacturing
Food
Pharmaceuticals/ Nutraceuticals
Plastics & Rubber
Machinery
Nanotechnologies
Chemicals
Automotive
Aerospace
Green Initiatives
Occupations
Chemical Engineers
- i.e. Biochemical, biotechnical, industrial waste/waste treatment
Chemical Technologists and Technicians
- i.e. chemical laboratory analyst, quality control technician (food/chemical),
chemical / food technologist, biochemistry technologist
Medical Laboratory Technicians
- i.e. medical laboratory aide/assistant
Electroencephalographic and Other Diagnostic Technologists
- i.e. EMG / ENP / END / EP / EEG technologist
Other Assisting Occupations in Support of Health Services
- i.e. clinical laboratory helper, physiotherapy/rehabilitation assistant, optical
laboratory assistant
Dental Technologists, Technicians & Lab. Bench Workers
- i.e. dental technician, dental laboratory bench worker
Geological and Mineral Technologists and Technicians
- i.e. groundwater technologist, welding technologist
Grand Valley Educational Society
55
[email protected]
Skilled Trades
Skilled trades are not limited to Ontario’s manufacturing sectors; they impact
construction, electronics, food and services, industrial and related mechanical, metal
fabricating, motor vehicle and heavy equipment, just to name a few examples.
Even during economic decline, skilled trades organizations still indicate that there is a
strong and immediate need to attract more people to pursue careers in the trades.
Combining the growth in green occupations and the growth in small to medium enterprises,
the need for a modern and responsive skilled trades system has never been so vital.
Occupations
HVAC Technologist
Millwrights / Industrial Mechanic Millwright
Tool & Die
Industrial Electricians
Industrial Mechanics
Pipefitters
Welders
Stationary Engineers
High-Speed Packaging Mechanics
Grand Valley Educational Society
56
[email protected]t.ca
Tourism
Many communities in Ontario are turning to tourism as an alternative means of creating
economic prosperity. The Government of Ontario, through the Economic Developers
Council of Ontario, has created a project to encourage and advise communities as to
how to develop their local tourism sector. Tourism is another avenue for adding to
economic diversity and promotion of Brantford-Brant.
Brantford-Brant has a unique combination of urban and rural amenities, and is centrally
located in Southwestern Ontario. Less than one hour from Toronto - the 5th largest
urban concentration in North America, it is also within close proximity (110km/70miles) to
the Canada - United States border crossing at Niagara Falls.
Tourism has the potential to attract Entrepreneurial Residents. By focusing on the quality
of life, attractions and amenities tourism can be used to not only increase awareness of
our region, but also attract entrepreneurial residents who may ultimately start a new
enterprise.
Tourism employment is typically associated with the hospitality industry (food and
beverage, transportation, accommodation). However, equally important are the
opportunities generated through recreation and entertainment.
Arts & Culture
Brantford’s arts scene is thriving and home to an eclectic
mix of artists, musicians and authors. Our museums,
historical sites and galleries celebrate this region’s
culture from the earliest aboriginal peoples to present
days.
The Sanderson Centre for the Performing Arts hosts
world-class musical and theatrical events and is home to
the Brantford Symphony Orchestra.
Experience First Nations art and culture at the Woodland
Cultural Centre, or visit one of Brantford’s many
museums including the Bell Homestead National
Historical Site and the Glenhyrst Art Gallery of Brant.
Grand Valley Educational Society
57
[email protected]
Recreation
The Grand River Exceptional Waters region is a
significant part of Brantford-Brant history. Whether
you’re paddling a canoe, fishing or having a picnic
on its banks, you’re sure to appreciate the quiet
beauty of this Canadian Heritage River.
Brantford-Brant boasts one of the best urban trail systems in
Canada, with over 70 km of the Trans Canada Trail running
through our community - perfect for running, cycling or hiking.
Within a 30 minute radius of Brantford-Brant
there are over 40 different challenging golf
courses including the Brantford Golf and
Country Club, one of the oldest and most
prestigious golf courses in Ontario.
Grand Valley Educational Society
58
[email protected]
Agribusiness
In agriculture, agribusiness is a generic term for the various businesses involved in food
production, including farming and contract farming, seed supply, agrichemicals, farm
machinery, wholesale and distribution, processing, marketing, and retail sales.
The County has a foundation in the agricultural economy and the City was once a jewel in
the manufacturing of agricultural machinery. Despite continuing declines, employment in
the County for this sector is over twice the Ontario average as a percentage of total
employment in the County.
To capitalize on the potential of agribusiness, Brantford-Brant must take into account values
that not only support the vision of agribusiness, but reflect the views of the community.
These values were highlighted in the economic development strategy for the County and in
summary stress the need to have respect for the environment (air, land, water) while
valuing the agricultural history and heritage of the region.
The core strategies for agriculture include:
 Seek out new innovative business that utilize existing local groups
 Grow crops that have the potential to attract new business opportunities
 Establish joint ventures with complementary sectors such as tourism
 Continue to capitalize on the 100 mile diet
 Pursue expanded organic farming opportunities
 Create a distribution depot for agricultural products and other local goods, possibly in
conjunction with agribusinesses in other counties
From the Bountiful Brant website (http://www.bountifulbrant.com) there is clear evidence of
the substantial changes in agriculture from technology and processes to environmental
influences and strategies.
We had been planting windbreaks, thousands of Blue Spruce, Cedar, Douglas fir and
other trees since 1970 as a way to help combat wind erosion. Since doing the
Environmental Farm Plan, we´ve also switched to no-till farming practices, wherever
possible, on corn and soybean fields; and some of our lighter lands have been sown to
grass crops to further discourage wind erosion while providing feed for the animals.
Larry Chanda, farmer
Farm-Facts
 In Ontario, nearly 70% of farmers have voluntarily evaluated their farm practices with
an Environmental Farm Plan (EFP). Through the EFP process, farmers highlight
environmental strengths on their farm, identify potential areas of environmental
concerns, and set realistic goals and timetables for improvements.

Together farmers have invested over $100 million of their own money in on-farm
environmental improvements through this program alone. For every dollar that the
government invests to help farmers make environmental improvements, it is estimated
that farmers spend an additional $6 of their own money.
Grand Valley Educational Society
59
[email protected]
Post Secondary Training & Education for the Future of Brantford-Brant
Brantford-Brant has the opportunity to become an Educational Centre of Excellence by
capitalizing on existing sectors in our community, in addition to pursuing new and progressive
training and education opportunities that will attract future business and industry. Based on
the data and information contained within this report, it is important to identify institutions that
can help our community to achieve this goal.
Every effort has been made to compile an accurate listing, however the following is for
informational purposes only, is as accurate as possible at the time of this publication but may
not be all inclusive. The following information was obtained through the Ministry of Training,
Colleges and Universities website (www.tcu.gov.on.ca).
Advanced Manufacturing
College
Georgian
Conestoga
Fanshawe
St. Clair
Guelph
Laurier
McMaster
Queens
University
Ryerson
Toronto
UOIT
Western
York
Agriculture
Durham
Fleming
College
Kemptville
Ridgetown
University
Guelph
Trent
College
Fanshawe
Georgian
Mohawk
Sault
Seneca
University
Ottawa
Ryerson
Waterloo
Western
Aviation
Algonquin
Cambrian
Canadore
Centennial
Confederation
Chemical
Cambrian
Durham
Lambton
Loyalist
College
Mohawk
Seneca
Sheridan
St. Clair
Grand Valley Educational Society
Brock
Guelph
Laurentian
McMaster
Ottawa
Queens
Ryerson
60
University
Toronto
Trent
Waterloo
Western
Windsor
York
[email protected]
Environmental
Algonquin
Cambrian
Canadore
Centennial
Conestoga
Confederation
Durham
Fanshawe
Fleming
Georgian
Humber
College
Loyalist
Mohawk
Niagara
Northern
Ridgetown
Sault
Seneca
Sheridan
St. Clair
St. Lawrence
Algoma
Brock
Carleton
Guelph
Lakehead
Laurentian
Laurier
McMaster
Ottawa
Queens
University
Ryerson
Toronto
UOIT
Waterloo
Western
Windsor
York
Food Processing
College
University
Durham
Conestoga
Carleton
Guelph
Trent
Hospitality
College
Algonquin
Centennial
Conestoga
Confederation
Durham
Fanshawe
Fleming
George Brown
University
Guelph
Ryerson
Georgian
Humber
La City
Lambton
Niagara
Sault
St. Clair
St. Lawrence
Lab Technician
Cambrian
Centennial
Durham
Fanshawe
Niagara
College
Northern
Seneca
Sheridan
St. Clair
St. Lawrence
Algoma
Brock
Carleton
Guelph
Lakehead
Laurentian
Laurier
University
Nipissing
Ottawa
Ryerson
Toronto
UOIT
Western
York
Logistics
Algonquin
Centennial
Humber
College
Mohawk
Newnham
Seneca
Grand Valley Educational Society
University
N/A
61
[email protected]
Machine Manufacturing (related training)
College
Canadore
Loyalist
Conestoga
Mohawk
Confederation
Northern
Durham
Sault
Fanshawe
Sheridan
Georgian
St. Clair
Humber
McMaster
Ryerson
Toronto
University
UOIT
York
Millwright
Cambrian
Conestoga
Confederation
Durham
George Brown
College
Lampton
Northern
Sault
Seneca
Sheridan
University
N/A
Pharmaceutical/Biotechnology
College
Durham
Seneca
Grand Valley Educational Society
Guelph
Ottawa
Ryerson
62
University
Western
UOIT
[email protected]
Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities
Accredited Programming in Brantford-Brant
A talented and well educated workforce is not only a major attractor to new business and
industry, but also vital to support existing business and industry in Brantford-Brant, it was the
goal of the GVES to identify, as accurately as possible, the current MTCU accredited training
and education being provided in the Brantford-Brant area.
The challenge when compiling the information for this report is that organizations and
institutions offering this accredited programming are continually evolving. Whether: refining a
program to better reflect market needs; moving programmes to other campuses or facilities or
delaying programming due to low enrollments, individual courses and programs may not
always be available or as listed.
Although care has been taken in preparing the information, the GVES cannot guarantee the
accuracy of the programming and courses listed for each institution or organization. Program
and course offerings are continually being expanded and refined; therefore, the content listed
is for informational purposes only.
The GVES would like to thank the organizations and institutions in Brantford-Brant for their
time and assistance in submitting their information for this research project. We recommend
that anyone looking for MTCU accredited programming contact the individual organization or
institution to receive the most current course and programme offerings.
For ease of access, the report includes contact information for each of the organizations and
institutions including website addresses. This again is for information purposes only and the
GVES is not responsible for any of the operation or content of the websites, nor for any of the
information, interpretation, comments or opinions expressed on these websites.
One of the challenges with this component of the report was the website research, which did
not always readily provide information that was specific to programming in Brantford-Brant.
However, the MTCU website (http://www.tcu.gov.on.ca/eng/) does provide a feature for
selecting a location when searching for a specific college or university.
Grand Valley Educational Society
63
[email protected]
Brantford-Brant Institutions
The following is a listing of local organizations and institutions providing training accredited by
the MTCU:
UNIVERSITIES
Laurier Brantford University Campus
73 George Street, Brantford, ON, N3T 2Y3
http://www.wlu.ca/homepage.php?grp_id=37
519.756.8228
Nipissing University Schulich School of Education Brantford Campus
50 Wellington St., Brantford, ON, N3T 2L6
http://www.nipissingu.ca/departments/brantford/Pages/default.aspx
519.752.1524
COLLEGE
Mohawk College, Brantford Campus
411 Elgin Street, Brantford, ON, N3S 7P5
http://www.mohawkcollege.ca/maps-directions/brantford.html
519.759.7200
PRIVATE CAREER COLLEGES
Allanti School of Hairstyling and Aesthetics, Brantford
134 West Street, Brantford, ON, N3T 3G3
http://www.hairstylingschools.com/
 519.751.1653
Brantford Flight Centre, Brantford
110 Aviation Avenue, Brantford, ON, N3T 5L7
http://www.flybfc.com
 519.753.2521
Medix School, Brantford
39 King George Road, Brantford, ON, N3R 5K2
http://www.medixschool.ca/campuses/brantford_Ontario_Canada/index.php
 519.752.4859
Shaun - David Truck Training School, Brantford
10 Spalding Drive, Brantford, ON, N3T 6B8
http://www.shaundavidtts.com/
 519.720.9349
Summit College, Academic and Career Studies, Brantford
301 - 446 Grey Street, Brantford, ON, N3S 7L6
http://summitlearning.ca/avt/Brantford/436/0
 519.756.6886
Transport Training Centres of Canada Inc., Brantford
35 Sharp Road, Brantford, ON, N3T 5L8
http://www.ttcc.ca/ontario/locations/brantford/
Grand Valley Educational Society
64
 519.757.0378 ext. 203
[email protected]
Programming – College & University
Laurier Brantford University Campus
Business Technology Management
Contemporary Studies
Environment and Society
Geography
Human Rights & Human Diversity
Journalism
Leadership
Philosophy
English
Public Relations
Youth & Children’s Studies
Children's Education and Development
Criminology
Environmental Studies
Health Studies
Indigenous Studies
Law & Society
Media Studies
Psychology
French
Religion & Culture
Nipissing University-Schulich School of Education - Brantford Campus
Primary/Junior Academic Program
Junior/Intermediate Academic Program
The Brantford campus offers a collaborative Concurrent Bachelor of Arts (BA) /Bachelor
of Education (BEd) program with Wilfrid Laurier. One can earn a BA (Honours) in
Contemporary Studies from Laurier and a BEd from Nipissing.
Mohawk College - Brantford Campus
Police Foundations
Law & Security Administration - Private
Security
Police Foundations
Health, Wellness & Fitness
Health, Wellness & Fitness (Co-op)
Early Childhood Education
General Arts and Science (1 yr)
General Arts and Science (2 yrs)
Child & Youth Worker
Instructor for Blind & Visually Impaired –
Orientation & Mobility
Grand Valley Educational Society
Advanced Police Foundations
Pre-Justice
Business – General
Personal Support Worker
Social Service Worker
Pre-Health
Office Administration – General
Educational Assistant
Instructor for Blind & Visually Impaired –
Rehabilitation Teaching
65
[email protected]
Programming – Private Career College
Allanti School of Hairstyling and Aesthetics, Brantford
Cosmetology (Hairstyling) & Full Aesthetics Course
Brantford Flight Centre, Brantford
Commercial Pilot Licence
Flight Instructor Rating
Medix School, Brantford
Pharmacy Assistant
Developmental Service Worker
Medical Office Assistant
Community Service Worker
Intra Oral Dental Assistant
Personal Support Worker
Shaun - David Truck Training School, Brantford
AZ Truck Driver Course & DZ Truck Driver Course
Summit College, Academic and Career Studies, Brantford
Customer Service Program
Office Administration - General
Workplace Ready: Elemental Retail
Supply Chain Resource Management
Training Program
Transport Training Centres of Canada Inc., Brantford
AZ & Backhoe Program
Backhoe Program
Heavy Equipment Program
Construction Program
Silver, Gold
Bronze, Gold, Platinum
Bulldozer Program
Grader Program
Excavator Program
Loader Program
Straight Truck Program (DZ)
Transport Training Program (AZ)
Grand Valley Educational Society
66
[email protected]
Programming Details
The GVES felt it important to provide a listing of courses for the various programmes
available to provide a more accurate overview of the skills that a graduate will acquire. It is
interesting to note that unless an individual has a specific interest in a programme or its
graduates, there is a general lack of knowledge as to what the end certification reflects.
This information may be of particular interest to:
 employers who are looking for upgrading or re-skilling their internal workforce.
Although the interest may not lie in full certification, there may be individual courses
that are of particular interest.
 individuals who want a better understanding of what is available in Brantford-Brant and
may be looking at transitioning into a new career
 organizations promoting Brantford-Brant to new investors by providing a picture of the
skill base that is being developed locally
 employment resource specialists and agencies who are counseling individuals on
future career opportunities
Grand Valley Educational Society
67
[email protected]
Laurier Brantford University
Business Technology Management Program
Business in a Networked Society
Information Technology [1]
Software Development
Management of Information Systems I [3]
Management of Information Systems II
Systems Analysis and Design
Seminar in Business Technology Management
Technology and Innovation Management
Data and Knowledge Management
Business Law
Influence, Persuasion and Negotiation
Statistics for Management
BTM Introduction to Project Management
Advanced Seminar in Business Technology Management
Fundamentals of Finance [5]
Introduction to Financial Accounting
Introduction to Managerial Accounting
Interpersonal Communications in Contemporary Society
Operations Management [4]
Business Change Management
Ethics and Organizational Responsibility
Marketing [2]
International Business
Directed Studies
Directed Studies II
Business Strategy and Enterprise Architecture
Children's Education and Development
Children, Toys and Media
Special Topics in Children's Education & Development
Children's Rights
Children and Music
Children's Education & Development Service Learning
Child and Youth Studies
Psychology
Mathematics and Teaching I
Mathematics and Teaching II
History
English
Youth Cultures
Contemporary Studies
Regional Ecosystems I
Regional and World Issues
The World in the 21st Century
Criminology Contemporary Issue
Disease and Society
Indigenous People and Anthropology
Environmental Issues & Responses
Contemporary Studies Methodologies
Navigating the Information Environment
Organizational Studies
The Media in a Global World
People of the Longhouse
Ancients and Moderns
Economic Globalization
Law, Morality & Punishment
The Methods of Science
Evaluation Research
Other World Views
Children, Toys & Media
Education In Other Countries
Maple Syrup & Climate Change
Risk: Aboriginal Communities
Unearthing the Kenyan Truths
Applied Democracy
Reconsidering Race & Oppression
Gender Theories & Cultures
Wal Mart: Contemp. Capitalism
Food & Community
Brantford Industry
Beauty in the Classroom
Grand Valley Educational Society
Regional Landscapes in Context
Indigenous People in a Contemporary World
Social & Political Thought
Science and its Critics
Science and Its Critics I
Foundations of Scientific Inquiry
Indigenous Peoples II
Applied Scientific Reasoning
Organizational Leadership
Individual in the Community
Aging: Realities & Myths
Art in the Contemporary World
Introduction to Human Rights
Print Culture
Health & Disease: Eden to ER
Blending Economic Theory & Law
Encounters with the Global
World Views
Understanding Popular Culture
Educational Technology
Media Marketing & Children
Social Justice Through Doc.
Consumerism and Identities
War in the Contemporary World
Africa: Perceptions, Misperceptions, Realities
Understanding Food & Culture
Dem, Citizenship & the Enviro.
Getting the Message
Science & Society
Youth Cultures
68
[email protected]
LAURIER BRANTFORD UNIVERSITY
Contemporary Studies continued
Architecture & Power
Classical Texts & Issues
The City & the Modern World
Play & Leisure
Censorship: Info Stops Here!
Memory
Historical Narrative & Fiction
Islam and the West
Problems in the Public Realm
Food
Youth Cultures
The City in Contemporary Life
Community: Theory/Practice
Human Rights in Cross-Cult Per
Part. Dev't in Public Space
Contemporary Social Problems
Finding Common Ground
Responsibility to Protect
Schooling Behind Bars: Educ.
Community Internship
In Search of the Everyday
Popular Film & Contemporary Culture
Interdisciplinary in Practice
Work
Criminology
Introduction to Criminology
Criminology Contemporary Issue
Women, Law and Crime
Gangsters, Goodfellas and Wiseguys: North American
Perspectives of Organized Crime
Psychology of Crime
Restorative Justice
Murder in Canada
Social Sc. Research Methods I
Law, Morality & Punishment
Victimology
Police and Society
Forensic Investigation
Criminal Investigation /Tech.
Madness, Pollution & Crime
Offender Rehabilitation
Organized Crime: International Perspectives
Crime Prevention
Transitional Justice
Advanced Criminological Theory
Jurisprudence
Special Topics: Practicum
Crime in Film
Apology & Forgiveness in Crime
Youth Gangs in Canada
Yakuza: Asian Org. Crime I
Advanced Directed Studies in Criminology
Youth Justice
Multiple Murder
Aboriginal Peoples and the Law
Advanced Quantitative Methods in Criminology and
Criminal Justice
Theories of Criminal Conduct
White Collar Crime
Introduction to Social Science Research Methods
Theories of Crime
Crime and the Justice System
Alcohol, Drugs, Dom. Violence
Global Justice
Corporate Deviance & Crime
Crime, Media and the Law
Mean Justice: Criminal Injustice, Ethics & Rights
Evaluation Research
Comparative Criminal Justice
Crimes Against Humanity
Statistics in Criminology and Criminal Justice
Deviance and Diversity
Penology
Outlaw Biker Gangs
Psychology & Criminal Justice
Adv Sem Investigative Crime
Death Penalty in the World
Qualitative Research Methods
Terrorism
Environment and Society
Environment and Society
Introduction to Environmental Studies
Environmental Problems and Approaches
Environmental Communication
Climate Change and Society
Geography
Introduction to Physical Geography
Urban Economic Geography
Atmosphere and Hydrosphere
Global Resource and Environmental Issues
Grand Valley Educational Society
Geomorphology and Soils
Introduction to Human Geography
Cultural Geographies
69
[email protected]
LAURIER BRANTFORD UNIVERSITY
Health Studies
Physical Determinants of Health
Canadian Health Care Systems
Aging: Realities & Myths
You Are What You Eat
Principles of Epidemiology
Health Policy & Politics
Barbie, Bulimia & Botox
Health Networks
Health Studies Practicum
Passing On
Social Determinants of Health
Disease and Society
Health and Nutrition
Madness, Pollution & Crime
Health Care Evaluation
Global Health & Social Justice
Health and Gender
Current Developments in Health Studies
Understanding Health Behaviour
Human Sexuality & Health
Human Rights & Human Diversity
Human Rights & Human Diversity
Introduction to Human Rights
Development Theories, Strategies & Issues
Journalism, Human Rights and International
Development
Crimes Against Humanity
Global Health & Social Justice
Gender Theories & Cultures
Cross-Cultural Perspectives on Human Rights
Journalism & Social Change
Multiculturalism
Children's Rights
Rights in Canada
United Nations in 21st Century
Race & Oppression
International Internship/Field Place
Indigenous Studies
Indigenous Perspectives
Indigenous Women
Indigenous Peoples in a Contemporary World
The People of the Longhouse
Special Topics
Indigenous Community Organizing
Indigenous Research Applications
Indigenous People & Anthropology
Indigenous Education
Indigenous Health & Wellness
Indigenous Community Studies
Native – Settler Relations
Indigenous Research Theories & Methods
Journalism
Reporting and Writing
Journalism Law & Ethics
Media Culture: Journalism & Dem.
Journalism & Social Order
The Information Environment
Journalism, Internet & Media
Tech. Skills: Print Journalism
Tech Skills: Broadcast Journalism
Tech Skills: New Media Journalism
Public Relations
Journalism & Social Advocacy
News Writing & Copy-editing
Professional Practicum
Long Form Journalism: Print
Topics in Public Opinion
Photojournalism
Journalism, Human Rights and International
Development
Grand Valley Educational Society
Reporting and Writing II
Journalism & Democracy
Journalism & Social Change
Navigating the Info Environ.
The Media in a Global World
Print Journalism
Broadcast Journalism
New Media
Intro: Public & Media Relations
News Photography
Interviewing & Reporting
Public Speaking
Social Documentary
Magazine Writing
New Media Research Methods
Journalism Project
70
[email protected]
LAURIER BRANTFORD UNIVERSITY
Law & Society
Law and Society I
Law and Society II
Women, Law and Crime
The Role of Harm Canadian Law
Rights in Canada
The Canadian Legal System I
The Canadian Legal System II
Aboriginal Peoples and the Law
Crime and the Justice System
Leadership
Historical Profiles Leadership
Introduction to Social Science Research Methods
Organizations & Social Change
Ethics and Organizational Responsibility
Organizational Strategy
Human Aspects of Organizations
Evaluation Research
International Organizations
Leadership, Culture and Change
Power and Governance in Org.
Adv. Organizational Leadership
Organizational Leadership
Social Sc. Research Methods I
Social Science Research Methods II
Development Theories, Strategies & Issues
Teams in Organizations
Public Speaking
Leaders and Organizations
Economic Globalization
Influence Persuasion and Negotiation
Cooperative Organizations
Project Management Practicum
Media Studies
Reporting and Writing
Reading Media
Navigating the Info Environ.
Journalism, Internet & Media
Social Documentary
Media and Modernity
Journalism & Democracy
The Media in a Global World
Crime, Media and the Law
Youth & Children's Studies Program
Studying Youth and Children: An Introduction
Introduction to Psychology
Introduction to Psychology I
Introduction to Psychology II
Developmental Psychology II: Adolescence and Young
Adulthood
Children’s Rights
Youth and Children Through the Ages
Senior Seminar in Youth & Children’s Studies
Youth & Children's Studies Community Service Learning
Developmental Psychology I: Infancy and Childhood
Not in My Family: Alcoholism, Drug Abuse and Domestic
Violence
Seeking Justice: The Family and Law in Canada, 18671969
Sociology of Families
Children and Music (online learning)
Youth Cultures
Tolkien and Fantasy
Women, Gender and Popular Culture
Social Determinants of Health
Psychology of Exceptional Children, Youth and Adults
Indigenous Education
Sociology of Education
Children, Toys and Media
Children's Literature
Youth Culture in Film
Youth Justice
Educational Psychology
English
Reading Fiction
Reading Drama
Children's Literature
Strategies in Analysis of Effective Writing
Comic Drama
Postcolonial Literatures
Contemporary American Literature
Women and Print Culture
The Woman Writer: Theory and Practice
Feminist Theory and Cultural Practice: Fiction by
Minority Women
Grand Valley Educational Society
Reading Poetry
The Experience of Poetry
Tragic Drama
Studies in Stylistics
Literature and Social Change
Postcolonial Literature: Poetry and Drama
Reading Culture: Strategies and Approaches
Texts and Representations
Women in Fiction
Shakespeare's Comedies and Romances: Gender and
Genre
71
[email protected]
LAURIER BRANTFORD UNIVERSITY
English continued
Shakespeare's Tragedies and History Plays
Tolkien and Fantasy
The English Literary Tradition II
American Literature to 1900
Contemporary Canadian Fiction
Canadian Drama in English
Cyborg Fictions
Drama of the Romantic Period
Narrative Forms
The Politics of Transgression and Desire
Medieval Drama
Creative Writing: Short Story
Early Romantic Literature
British Literature 1900-1920
Origins of Modern Drama
Arthurian Traditions
Human Rights in Contemporary Cultural Forms
The British Novel in the 19th Century
The Narratives of Empire
Restoration and 18th-Century Literature
Chaucer II: Romances, Dream-Vision and Other Works
Literature of the 16th Century
17th-Century Literature
Later Victorian Literature: Dissonance and Decadence
Postmodernism and the Role of the Reader
Shakespeare and Film
The English Literary Tradition I
Canadian Fiction Before 1980
American Literature of the Early 20th Century
Canadian Poetry in English
Indigenous Writers in English
Literary Theory
Prose Narrative in the Romantic Period
Rhetoric in Literary and Non-Literary Texts
Advanced Literary and Cultural Theory
Creative Writing: Poetry
Old English I: Language and Literature
Later Romantic Literature
British Literature 1920-1939
Canadian Women's Writing
Contemporary Drama
18th-Century Fiction
The Novel after 1900
Old English II: Literature in Context
Chaucer I: The Canterbury Tales
Writers of the Middle Ages
Studies in the 17th-Century: Drama
Mid-Victorian Literature: Culture and Anarchy
Modernism to Postmodernism
French
Québec Culture II: From French Canadian to
Practical French II
Québécois
French Culture III: From the "Arc de Triomphe" to the
French Culture II: The French Battlefield from the Edit de
"Tour Eiffel"
Nantes to the Revolution
Practical French I
Language through Popular Culture I
Francophone Culture
Language through Popular Culture II
French Pronunciation: Norm and Variation
A Journey through French Literature
Innovations in French Cinema
French Culture IV: Modern Times
French Culture I: The French Battlefield from Fortified Castles to the Saint-Barthélémy
Psychology
Archaeology, An Introduction
Archaeological Laboratory Methods
Introduction to Human Osteology
Environmental Archaeology
Cultural Resource Management in Archaeology
Development of Archaeological Theory
Advanced Field Archaeology
Post-Excavation Analysis
Grand Valley Educational Society
Archaeology: Methods, Theory and Practice
Introduction to Field Archaeology
Archaeology and the Physical Sciences
Technology I: Tools, Techniques and Material Culture
Analytical Archaeology
Forensic Archaeology
Theory in Archaeology I
Theory in Archaeology II
72
[email protected]
LAURIER BRANTFORD UNIVERSITY
Health Administration Program
Physical Determinants of Health
Canadian Health Care Systems
Health Studies Practicum
Applied Scientific Reasoning
Organizational Strategy
Human Aspects of Organizations
Influence, Persuasion and Negotiation
Functional Areas of the Organization
Fundamentals of Finance
I Health Policy: Social and Political Forces in Health
Care Systems
Aging: Realities and Myths
Critical Disabilities Studies
Multicultural Competence
Health and Nutrition
Diversity and Aging
Health Care Evaluation
Health Policy in the Welfare State
Special Topics in Health
Critical Perspectives on Health and Sexuality
Indigenous Health & Wellness
Organizations and Social Change
Non-Governmental Organizations
Organizational Leadership
Conceptualizing Medicalization: Midwifery and the
Health Care System
Social Determinants of Health
Health Networks
Introduction to Social Science Research Methods
Social Science Research Methods II
Teams in Organizations
Leadership, Organizational Culture and Change
Introduction to Business Organization
Interpersonal Communication
Introduction to Financial Accounting
Not in My Family: Alcoholism, Drug Abuse and Domestic
Violence
Entrepreneurship and New Ventures
Global Health and Social Justice
Development of the Health Professions
Principles of Epidemiology
Organizational Behaviour
Health and Gender
Death and Dying
Directed Studies
The Legal Context of Organizations
Occupations and Professions
Understanding International Organizations
Power and Governance in Organizations
Advanced Topics in Leadership
Directed Studies
Public Relations
Functional Areas of the Organization
Organizational Leadership
Introduction to Public and Media Relations
Influence, Persuasion and Negotiation
Technical Skills: Print Journalism
Interpersonal Communication
Reporting and Writing I
Organizational Strategy
Journalism, the Internet and Emerging Media
Public Speaking
International Development
Economic Globalization
The United Nations in the 21st Century
Crimes Against Humanity
Introduction to Macroeconomics
Introduction to Microeconomics
Economic Development
Women, Migration and Diaspora
Global Health and Social Justice
International Internship/Field Placement
Organizations and Social Change
Power and Governance in Organizations
The Making of the Third World: Historical Origins and
Development
Grand Valley Educational Society
Development Theories, Strategies and Issues
Understanding International Organizations
Transitional Justice
Disease and Society
Introduction to Human Rights
Introduction to Global Studies
Journalism, Human Rights and International Development
Multicultural Competence
Social Documentary
Non-Governmental Organizations
Co-operative Organizations
73
[email protected]
LAURIER BRANTFORD UNIVERSITY
History
French Canada Before Confederation
French Canada After Confederation
Canadian Art
Science and Environment in Canadian History
Canadian External Relations
History of Canada to Confederation
History of Canada since Confederation
Canada since 1945
Social History of Pre-Industrial Canada
Social History of Modern Canada
Québec in the 20th Century
Canadian Business History
Canadian Labour History
History of Ontario since 1791
History of Western Canada
Canadian Military History
Native Peoples of Eastern Canada
Native Peoples of Western Canada
Seeking Justice: The Family and Law in Canada, 1867- The History of the Canadian Constitution, 1534 to the
1969
Present
Reading Seminar on Nature and Environment in
Reading Seminar on Families and Education in Canada
Canadian History
and the US
Reading Seminar on Canadian Historiography
Reading Seminar on Local History
Reading Seminar on Canada in the 20th Century
Reading Seminar on the History of Canada to 1900
Reading Seminar on Science, Culture and Society in Canadian History
Studying Religion
Religion & Culture
Management
Fundamentals of Finance or Financial Management I
Organizational Behaviour I
Introduction to Business Organization
Human Resources Management
Financial Management I
Financial Management II
Organizational Behaviour II
Business Law
Functional Areas of the Organization
Introduction to Financial Accounting
Building and Managing Products, Services and Brands
Operations Management I
Operations Management II
Introduction to Microeconomics
Introduction to Macroeconomics
Articulation Agreement between Laurier Brantford and Nipissing University
BA/BEd Primary/Junior Academic Program
(18.0 Laurier and 2.0 Nipissing Arts credits) for the
Bachelor of Arts portion
BA/BEd Junior/Intermediate Academic Program
BA (18 Laurier and 2.0 Nipissing Arts credits)
BEd (6.42 credits for the Bachelor of Education)
Laurier Brantford has articulation agreements with the following colleges / universities:
Algonquin College
Cambrian College
Conestoga College
Fanshawe College
Niagara College
Nipissing University
Mohawk College
Grand Valley Educational Society
74
[email protected]
Mohawk College - Brantford Campus
Police Foundations
Enforcement Field Careers
Fitness & Lifestyle Mgmt in Policing
Community Services
Use of Force: Basics
Canadian Criminal Justice System
Criminal Code
Interviewing & Investigation
Traffic Management
Criminal Code & Fed. Statutes
Investigation & Evidence
Diversity and First Nations
Interpersonal & Group Dynamics
Fitness & Wellness Mgmt
Fitness & Wellness Mgmt 2
Fitness & Lifestyle Mgmt 3
Principles of Ethical Reasoning
Criminal & Civil Law
Police Powers
Youth in Conflict with the Law
Provincial Offenses
Police Powers and the Law
Community Policing
Issues in Psychology
Advanced Police Foundations
Report Writing & Court Preparation
Personal Fitness Training for Policing
Court Testimony
Police Vehicle Safety & Skills
Search Authority & Liability
Police Applicants: Process & Prep
Diversity & First Nations: Canada
Use of Force: Mechanical Skills
Provincial and Criminal Court
Lifestyle Management in Policing
History, Myth & Reality
Public Safety Professionalism
Document & Evidentry Jurisprudence
Investigative Analysis
Defensive Tactics
Interpersonal Dynamics
Literature
Law & Security Administration - Private Security
Enforcement Field Careers
Canada Customs & Immigration
Fitness & Lifestyle Mgmt in Security
Community Services
Surveillance
Case Management: Punish or Rehabilitate
Security License Requirements
Powers of Arrest
Provincial & Federal Offences
Canadian Criminal Justice System
Interviewing & Investigation
Issues in Psychology
Fitness & Wellness Mgmt
Fitness & Wellness Mgmt 2
Fitness & Lifestyle Mgmt (LASA)
Use of Force: Basics
Correctional Worker: Support or Obstruction
Project analysis and Development
Security Technology
Security Management
Principles of Ethical Reasoning
Criminal & Civil Law
Diversity and First Nations
Interpersonal & Group Dynamics
Pre-Justice
Diversity & First Nations: Canada
License Requirement Standards
Crime in the News
Victimology
Prison Systems
Insurance Fraud
Impact of Terrorism
Justice Career Skills
Canadian Crime Stories
Crime Trends
Victimless Crimes
Civil Law
Wrongfully Convicted
History, Myth & Reality
Police Foundations (Co-op)
Enforcement Field Careers
Principles of Ethical Reasoning
Community Services
Canadian Criminal Justice System
Criminal Code
Youth in Conflict With the Law
Investigation & Evidence
Crime & Society
Work Experience 1 Police Foundations
Grand Valley Educational Society
Fitness & Wellness Mgmt 1
Fitness & Wellness Mgmt 2
Fitness & Lifestyle Mgmt 3
Criminal & Civil Law
Police Powers
Provincial Offenses
Diversity and First Nations
Interpersonal & Group Dynamics
75
[email protected]
MOHAWK COLLEGE - BRANTFORD CAMPUS
Law & Security Administration - Private Security (Co-op)
Enforcement Field Careers
Powers of Arrest
Community Services
Surveillance
Security License Requirements
Security Management
Canadian Criminal Justice System
Investigation & Evidence
Crime & Society
Fitness & Wellness Mgmt
Fitness & Wellness Mgmt 2
Fitness & Wellness Mgmt 3
Correctional Worker: Support or Obstruction
Use of Force: Basics
Principles of Ethical Reasoning
Criminal & Civil Law
Diversity and First Nations
Interpersonal & Group Dynamics
Health, Wellness & Fitness
Exercise Physiology
Intro to Fitness Assessments
Intro to Health & Wellness
Facts and Figures
Flexibility: Range of Motion
C.P.R. 'C'/AED Recertification
Prescription - Aerobic Training
Fitness Equipment & Facilities
Health Issues in Canada
Sport Injuries
Bus Plan: Personal Trainer
Aerobic Assessments
Diversity and First Nations
Anatomy
Strength Assessments
Counselling Prescription
Aerobic Assessment
Nutrition
Prescription - Strength Training
Principles of Weight Mgmt
Fitness - Special Populations
Loss, Grief and Caregiver Support
Personalized Training Plan
Public Safety & Security Fitness
Sports Psychology
Interpersonal & Group Dynamics
Health, Wellness & Fitness (Co-op)
Exercise Physiology
Intro to Fitness Assessments
Intro to Health & Wellness
Facts and Figures
Flexibility: Range of Motion
Stress in Emergency Services
Prescription - Aerobic Training
Public Safety & Security Fitness
Sports Psychology
Interpersonal & Group Dynamics
Anatomy
Strength Assessments
Counselling Prescription
Aerobic Assessments
Nutrition
Prescription - Strength Training
Principles of Weight Mgmt
Aerobic Assessments
Diversity and First Nations
Personal Support Worker
PSW Consolidation - A
PSW Consolidation - B
Communication
Literature
Dementia & Mental Health
Health & Illness 1
Developmental Psychology
PSW Practicum 1
PSW Practicum 2
Foundations of PSW 2
Grammar and Communication
Palliative Care
Computers - PSW
Instructor for Blind & Visually Impaired – Orientation & Mobility
Uncontracted Braille
Habilitation & Rehabilitation
Basic Orientation & Mobility Skills
Principles Of Orientation & Mobility
Long Cane Techniques
Orientation & Mobility Practicum
Daily Living Skills / Orientation & Mobility Instructor
Fieldwork Visits II (O&M)
Grand Valley Educational Society
Growth and Development
Assessment & Program Plan
The Eye & Low Vision
Adaptive Techniques
Problem Based Learning II
Sensory Development
Fieldwork Visits I
76
[email protected]
MOHAWK COLLEGE - BRANTFORD CAMPUS
Instructor for Blind & Visually Impaired – Rehabilitation Teaching
Contracted Braille
Communications
Growth & Development
Assessments And Program Planning
The Eye & Low Vision
Problem Based Learning II
Sensory Development
Fieldwork Visits II (Rehab)
Advanced Contracted Braille
Leisure Counselling & Activities
Habilitation & Rehabilitation
Basic Orientation & Mobility Skills
Adaptive Techniques
Independent Living Skills
Fieldwork Visits I
Rehabilitation Practicum
General Arts and Science (1 yr)
Art Through The Ages
Introduction to Business
Literature
Computer Software Applications
History, Myth & Reality
Group Dynamics-Hum Serv Perspe
Mathematics
Introductory Psychology
Canadian Studies: Canadian Identity
Alternative Strategies
Race & Ethnic Dynamics
Introductory Anthropology
Sociology 1
Sociology 2
Biology
Preparatory Chemistry (G.A.S.)
Grammar & Composition for G.A.S.
Success Strategies
Issues in Health and Healing
Mathematics 1 - G.A.S.
Preparatory Physics
Developmental Psychology
Global Issues in the New Millennium
Adaptive Technology
Popular Culture
Canadian Politics
Society, Technology & Social Issues
General Arts and Science (2 yrs)
Art Through The Ages
Introduction to Business
Literature
Intro to Applied Research
Success Strategies
Group Dynamics
World History
Political Economy
Mathematics
Critical Thinking
Introduction Psychology
Developmental Psychology
Global Issues
Adaptive Technology
Popular Culture
Philosophy & Ethics
Modern World
Canadian Politics
Sociology 1
Sociology 2
Preparatory Biology (G.A.S.)
Preparatory Chemistry (G.A.S.)
Grammar and Communication
Computer Software Applications
Sociology of Work
History, Myth & Reality
Issues in Health and Healing
Mathematics 1 - G.A.S.
Preparatory Physics
Psychology of Defiance
Social Psychology
Canadian Studies
Alternative Strategies
Race and Ethnic Dynamics
Introductory Anthropology
World Religions: Comparative Study
Independent Study
Women's Studies
Society, Technology & Social Issues
Early Childhood Education
Active Citizenship
Creative Expression
Child Develop & Behaviour
Family Dynamics
Child Development & Behaviour
Inclusion in the ECE Classroom
Supervision & Administration
Issues In ECE
Parents As Partners
Health, Safety & Nutrition
Grand Valley Educational Society
Communication
Learning Environment
Par Teach Child Relation 1
Par Teach Child Relation 2
Learning Environment
ECE Curriculum 1
Field Placement 1 & Seminar
Field Placement 2 & Seminar
Field Placement 3 & Seminar
Field Placement 4 & Seminar
77
[email protected]
MOHAWK COLLEGE - BRANTFORD CAMPUS
Social Service Worker
Active Citizenship
Community Research: Principles
Prof & Career Development
Group Dynamics
Recreation Administration
Introductory Psychology
Field Placement Prep & Community Awareness
Recreation for Diverse Populations
Camp Experience
Recreation Programming
Recreation Practicum
Event Planning
Sociology 1
Sociology 2
Communication
Community Research: Applications
Philosophy of Leisure
Community Development
Introduction to Community and Leisure Services
Developmental Psychology
Intro Community & Leisure Service
Foundations of Inclusive Therapy Recreation
Therapeutic Recreation 1
Healthy Lifestyles and Wellness
Healthy Lifestyles 2
Practicum 1
Practicum 2
Practicum 3
Practicum Prep 2
Pre-Health
Advanced Human Biology
Advanced Chemistry
English 1 for Pre-Health
Plagues & People
Pre-Health Math 1
Pre-Health Math 2
Preparatory Biology (G.A.S.)
Preparatory Chemistry (G.A.S.)
English for Pre-Health G.A.S.)
Preparatory Physics (G.A.S.)
Success Strategies
Society Technology & Social Issues
Business - General
Understand Fin Statements
Pre-Health Math 2
Applied Accounting Systems
Management Accounting
Accounting 1
Spreadsheet Data Mgmt-Business
Personal Financial Management
Operations Management
Active Citizenship
College Communications
Microeconomics
Human Resource Management
Computer Applications for Bus.
Mathematics
Direct Marketing & Sales Promotion
Consumer Behaviour 2 H
Communications
Purchasing
Entrepreneurship & Bus Planning
Business Finance
Tax Practice-Option
Project Management
Business Law
Intro Organizational Behaviour
Business Writing and Reporting
Business Career Strategies
Macroeconomics
Database Management
Business Math of Finance
Business Statistics
Marketing 1
Marketing 2
Applied Selling
Office Administration - General
Active Citizenship
Financial Concepts for Office Admin
Internet and Web Page Development
Excel and PowerPoint Concepts
Admin Office Procedures
Document Processing and Simulations
Grand Valley Educational Society
Communications
Human Relations
Information Management
Computer Skill Building
Document Processing 1
Micro transcription
78
[email protected]
MOHAWK COLLEGE - BRANTFORD CAMPUS
Child & Youth Worker
Active Citizenship
Interviewing & Counselling
Prof Development in CYC
Introduction to Child and Youth Care Practice
Therapeutic Programming & Life Skills
Adolescence Treatment
Cognitive Behaviour Mod In CYW
Family Work
Community Intervention & Resources
Human Sexuality In CYW
Legislation Pol. & Proc.
Developmental Psychology
Sociology 1
The Abused Person
Communications
Introduction to Perinatal Nursing 1
Introduction to Group Dynamics
Intervention Strategies for CYW
Adv Therapeutic Programming
Assess & Treatment Strategies In CYW
Therapeutic Principles & Theories
Advanced Group Work
Health Care & Pharmacology
Introductory Psychology
Abnormal Psychology
Field Work Practicum
Field Work Practicum 2
Educational Assistant
Active Citizenship
Biology
Cultural Diversity in an Educ. Setting
Supporting the Eng Lang Learner
Life Skills & Job Coaching
Orientation: Practicum 1
Orientation: Practicum 2
Computers in Education
Exceptionalities 1
Exceptionalities 2
Exceptionalities 3
Introductory Psychology
Safety in an Educational Setting
College Communication
Autism Spec Disorder - ASD
Safety in an Educational Setting
Comm. Skills Educational Settings PT1
Comm Education Setting - Part 2
Foundations of Education
Personal and Interpersonal Dynamics
Classroom Skills
E.A. Role: Practicum A
E.A. Role: Practicum B
Mathematics
Developmental Psychology
Communications (Languages) - Required to
Graduate
Mohawk College has articulation agreements in Ontario with the following post secondary
institutions:
Brock University
Charles Sturt University
Laurier Brantford
Nipissing University
McMaster University
University of Waterloo
Grand Valley Educational Society
79
[email protected]
Nipissing University - Schulich School Of Education, Brantford Campus
Additional Qualifications Courses
English as a Second Language, Part I
Spec. Ed. Elect: Autism(Basic)
Visual Arts, Part I
Visual Arts, Part II
Reading, Part I
Developmental Reading, Part II
Reading, III
Primary Education, Part I
Primary Education, Part II
Developmental Reading, Part II
The Deaf/Blind, Part III
Spec. Ed. Elect: Gifted (Basic)
Spec. Ed. Elect: LD (Basic)
Special Education, Part I
Special Education, Part II
Spec. Ed. Part III (specialist)
Music-Vocal (P/J), Part I
Music-Vocal (P/J), Part II
Music-Vocal(P/J), III (Spec.)
Visual Arts, III (Specialist)
Guidance, Part I
Guidance, Part II
Guidance, III (Specialist)
Librarianship, Part I
Librarianship, Part II
Librarianship, III (Specialist)
Health & Phys Ed, P/J, Pt.1
Physical & Health Ed (P/J), I
Phys. & Health Ed. (P/J), II
Health & Phys Ed, P/J, Pt. III
Co-operative Ed., Part I
Co-operative Ed., Part II
Teaching the Deaf/Blind, I
Teaching the Deaf/Blind, II
French As a Second Lang, Pt. I
FSL Part II
Teaching the Blind, Pt I
Teaching the Blind, Pt II
Teaching the Blind, Pt III
Kindergarten
Concurrent Courses
Education & Schooling (P/J)
Language Arts - Part I (P/J)
Language Arts - Part I (J/I)
Curriculum Methods I (P/J)
Curriculum Methods III (P/J)
Educ. Psyc. & Spec. Ed. (J/I)
Curriculum Methods II (J/I)
Music Education - P/J
Social Studies - P/J
Math Education - J/I
English (First Language) (Int)
History (Intermediate)
Religious Studies (Int.)
Observation & Prac. Teaching I (J/I)
Observation & Prac. Teach. III (P/J)
Observation & Prac. Tech IV (P/J)
Observation & Prac. Teach. IV (J/I)
ESL
Education of Native Canadians
Dev. Psyc. for Educators
Health & Physical Education - J/I
Health & Physical Education - P/J
Visual Arts - P/J
Visual Arts - J/I
Educ. Psych & Spec. Ed. (P/J)
Language Arts - Part II (P/J)
Language Arts - Part II (J/I)
Education & Schooling (J/I)
Curriculum Methods I (J/I)
Curriculum Methods II (P/J)
Curriculum Methods III (J/I)
Math Education - P/J
Music Education - J/I
Social Studies - J/I
Geography (Intermediate)
Mathematics (Intermediate)
Observation & Prac. Teaching I (P/J)
Observation & Prac. Teaching II(P/J)
Observation & Prac. Teach II (J/I)
Observation & Prac. Teach. III (J/I)
Kindergarten Theory & Practice
Multimedia Technology
Religious Educ. - R.C. Schools
Sociology for Educators I
Sociology for Educators II
Science Education - J/I
Science Education - P/J
Additional Basic Qualification Courses
Intermediate ABQ - Mathematics
Intermediate ABQ - Geography
Education in the Primary Div.
Senior ABQ - Geography
Senior ABQ: Social Sciences
Intermediate ABQ - English
Intermediate ABQ - History
Senior ABQ: English
Senior ABQ - History
BA/BEd Primary/Junior Academic Program
(18.0 Laurier and 2.0 Nipissing Arts credits) for the
Bachelor of Arts portion
BA/BEd Junior/Intermediate Academic Program
BA (18 Laurier and 2.0 Nipissing Arts credits)
BEd (6.42 credits for the Bachelor of Education
Grand Valley Educational Society
80
[email protected]
NIPISSING UNIVERSITY - SCHULICH SCHOOL OF EDUCATION, BRANTFORD CAMPUS
Masters of Education
Education Law in Schools
Alternative Schooling
Supervision of Instruction
Evaluation of Curriculum
Curriculum Issues
Research Project + Seminar
Narrative Inquiry
Educational Leadership
Leadership in Action Research
Survey of Research Methods
Holistic Education
Organizational Theory
Interpersonal Relations
Dev. Curriculum-Adult Learning
Safe Schools
Issues in Special Education
Curricular Strategies
Organizational Management
Creativity and Learning
Principles-Curriculum/Instruct
Understanding Education
Ethics, Values & Decision-making
Articulation Agreements that Nipissing has in Ontario include:
Algonquin College
Canadore College
Fanshawe College
Laurier Brantford University
Mohawk College
Niagara College
Seneca College
Grand Valley Educational Society
81
[email protected]
Allanti School Of Hairstyling And Aesthetics, Brantford
Certificate in Hairstyling
Bacteriology
Decontamination and infection control
Properties of the hair and scalp
Draping
Shampooing, rinsing and conditioning
Haircutting
Artistry in hairstyling
Wet hairstyling
Thermal hairstyling
Permanent waving
Chemical hair relaxing and soft curl permanent
Thermal hair straightening
The artistry of artificial hair
Manicuring and pedicuring
The nail and its disorder
Chemistry
Certificate in Aesthetics
Manicure
Pedicure
Waxing - Hard and Soft
Hot Stone
3 Nail Systems
Facial Treatment
Microdermabrasion
Nail Art
Theory of massage
Facials
Facial makeup
The skin and its disorders
Removing unwanted hair
Cells, anatomy and physiology
Hair colouring
Eighteen braids
Razor cutting
Twenty up-dos
Point cutting, Tapering
Pin curls & barrel curls
Resume & Job search
Electricity and light therapy
The salon business
Body Treatment/Full Body Relaxation
Eyebrow/Lash Tinting
Eyelash Perming/Extensions
Up Do/class
Ion Detox Therapy
Laser Technology
Milady's Standard Fundamentals for Aestheticians
Theory - Milady's Standard Nail Technology
Brantford Flight Centre
Commercial Pilot Licence – trains individuals who currently have a Private Pilot license to be
employable as commercial pilot. Training meets the Transport Canada requirements for
experience and knowledge through practical flight training and ground school components.
Flight Instructor Rating – equips commercial pilots with the knowledge, skills and abilities to
teach people how to fly. The training meets the Transport Canada requirements for
experience and knowledge through practical flight training and ground school components.
Grand Valley Educational Society
82
[email protected]
Medix School - Brantford
Developmental Service Worker
Counselling Techniques
Abnormal Psychology
Developmental Psychology
Concepts in Behavioural Management
Introduction to Developmental Disabilities
Family Dynamics
Pharmacology
Medical Office Assistant
Medical Terminology
Anatomy & Physiology
Medical Transcription
Microsoft Office
Medical Billing Procedures, OHIP billing
P-HIPA
Well Baby Care
Keyboarding
Accounting/Payroll
Pharmacy Assistant
Role of the Technician
Compounding
Jurisprudence
Communication Skills
Pharmacology
Community & Hospital Systems & Procedures
Community Service Worker
Canadian Social Policy
Communication & Interviewing Skills
Human Development
Human Sexuality
Intro to Social Work Practice
Research Methodology
Crisis Intervention
Intra Oral Dental Assistant
General Dental Sciences
Principles and Techniques of Infection Control
Pharmacology and Medical Emergencies
Preventive Dental Assisting
Clinical Dental Assisting Procedures
Personal Support Worker
Assessing Client Needs
Following Care Plans Basic Personal Care
Safety Hazards
Records Documentation
First Aid
Crisis Prevention Intervention
Grand Valley Educational Society
Personal Care
Teaching Strategies
Report Writing
Human sexuality
First Aid
CPR
CPI
Nutrition
Reception Techniques
Health Information Management
Physiology
Business Writing/Grammar
Medical Office Management
Basic Pharmacology
Patient Preparation
Professionalism
CPR, First Aid & Vital Signs
Long Term Care Facilities
Computer Systems & Applications
Sterile Products
Practical Field Experience
Grammar
Legal Aspects
Selected Practice
Business Communications
Microsoft® Applications
Practice with Communities
Practice with Children & Adolescents
Practice with Individuals & Families
Dental Specialties
Direct Patient Care
Dental Radiography
Dental Practice Management
Office Skills and Communications
Computer Skills
Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation (CPR)
Basic Knowledge of Medical Conditions
Interpersonal Skills
Vital Signs
Planning & Implementation
WHMIS & Fire Safety
83
[email protected]
Shaun - David Truck Training School, Brantford
DZ
Classroom (40 hours)
Transportation of dangerous goods
Defensive driving
Hours of work
Truck handbook / workbook
Pre/post trip procedures
Trip planning / map reading
“Z” endorsement
AZ
Classroom (40 hours)
Transportation of dangerous goods
Defensive driving
Truck handbook / workbook
Pre/post trip procedures
Load & security
Trip planning / map reading
Weight distribution
TTSAO final test after graduation
Behind the Wheel (22 hours)
Advanced / progressive shift
Speed / space management
County / city driving
Backing techniques
Highway driving
Possible night time driving
Yard (8 hours)
Pre/post trip inspections
Safety around vehicles
Basic shifting techniques
Safe backing
Behind the Wheel (40 hours)
Advanced / progressive shift
Speed / space management
County / city driving
Multiple shifting techniques
Highway driving
Possible night time driving
Yard (40 hours)
Pre/post trip inspections
Safety around vehicles
Basic shifting techniques
Couple / uncouple procedures
Brakes / air brake systems
16 hours air brake (Z endorsement) theory and practical
14 hours dedicated backing
Straight backing
Safe backing
50 observation hours
Blind side backing
Summit College, Brantford
Customer Service Program
Graduates of the program can provide excellent service when greeting customers, can effectively
resolve complaints, perform financial transactions, provide refunds or exchanges, process
applications, and much more.
Office Administration - General
Graduates of the program gain the skills to confidently compile, verify, record and process
applications, licences, permits, contracts, registrations, requisitions, and/or other forms and
documents in accordance with established corporate procedures and schedules, using computerized
and manual processing systems. Additionally, graduates learn how to create and finalize detailed
reports and corporate presentations, act as liaison for staff, business affiliates and clients by providing
company information and directing the flow of communication.
Supply Chain Resource Management
The diploma is a comprehensive program of study that includes: purchasing and inventory; production
control; and management of company resources, personnel, and information. Graduates are prepared
for employment with manufacturing and construction companies, printing and publishing firms,
warehouses, and retail and wholesale establishments. Graduates have the specialized knowledge of
a wide range of technical topics (the purchasing process, inventory classification systems, production
scheduling, warehousing, etc.) to stand out in the field.
Retail Training
Graduates of the program can use point-of-sale operating systems, complete complex sales
transactions; and provide exceptional customer service.
Grand Valley Educational Society
84
[email protected]
Transport Training Centres Of Canada Inc., Brantford
DZ
Transportation of dangerous goods
Defensive driving
Hours of work
Truck handbook / workbook
Pre/post trip procedures
Trip planning / map reading
“Z” endorsement
AZ
Transportation of dangerous goods
Defensive driving
Truck handbook / workbook
Pre/post trip procedures
Load & security
Trip planning / map reading
Weight distribution
TTSAO final test after graduation
Programs
Construction Program
— Gold
Individual Programs
Pre/post trip inspections
Safety around vehicles
Basic shifting techniques
Safe backing
Advanced / progressive shift
Speed / space management
County / city driving
Multiple shifting techniques
Highway driving
Possible night time driving
Pre/post trip inspections
Safety around vehicles
Basic shifting techniques
Couple / uncouple procedures
Brakes / air brake systems
Backhoe Bulldozer Excavator Grader
Heavy Equipment
Operator — Silver
Heavy Equipment
Operator — Gold
Advanced / progressive shift
Speed / space management
County / city driving
Backing techniques
Highway driving
Possible night time driving
X
X
X
Rock
Truck
Dump
Truck
X
X
X
X
X
X
Skid
Steer
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
AZ
X
X
X
DZ
Automatic
X
X
X
Backhoe Bulldozer Excavator Grader Loader Skid Steer
Backhoe Program
Bulldozer Program
Excavator Program
X
X
X
Grader Program
X
Loader Program
Grand Valley Educational Society
X
85
[email protected]
Appendix A
Education = Future
The following on-line survey was made available through the GVES website (www.gves.ca) and
contact was made with local employers to invite them to complete the survey through:
 Newspaper advertisements
 Email broadcasts through the GVES and local organizations and associations
 Distribution of post card invitation to participate to local organizations and associations
The on-line survey received 178 responses, from a wide variety of sectors in Brantford-Brant.
Survey Content
The Grand Valley Educational Society is conducting a research project to determine how post secondary
education can support employers in our community. Your participation in our brief survey will help the GVES to
identify the skills, training and upgrading that will be vital to the economic future and prosperity of your
organization and our community.
1. Is having post secondary education available in Brantford-Brant of value to your organization?
 Yes
 No
2. If yes, please indicate:
 To coordinate training and upgrading for current employees
 To encourage current employees to upgrade their skills
 To improve the skills of the general workforce
 To expand the labour pool for recruitment of new hires
 Other (please list)
3. What, if any, post secondary education and/or training would you like to see available in Brantford-Brant
that would benefit your organization.
4. Beyond legislated and mandatory training, does your organization make it compulsory for existing
employees to upgrade skills, training and/or education?
 Yes
 No
Comments/Examples:
5. Does having access to post secondary education locally (Brantford-Brant) have any impact on you/your
employees' decision to participate in post secondary education?
 Yes
 Yes
 Yes
Front line/floor employees
Middle management
Senior management
 No
 No
 No
Other (please specify)
6. Are there any position(s) that you have difficulty recruiting on a regular basis?
 Yes
 No
Please indicate:
7. If training/upgrading was offered for these position(s) in Brantford through our post secondary
institutions, do you anticipate it would help you with your recruiting challenges?
 Yes
 No
Comments:
Grand Valley Educational Society
86
[email protected]