37 indicted in suspected heroin ring - Vindy.com Media Server

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37 indicted in suspected heroin ring - Vindy.com Media Server
CYAN
» TODAY’S ISSUE
MAGENTA
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BLACK
TRIBUTES, A7 • WORLD, A10 • BUSINESS, B5 • WEATHER & TV, B6 • VALLEY LIFE, C3 • SOCIETY, C4
TAPPING INTO CRAFT BEER CRAZE PHANTOMS COACH CANFIELD’S DREAM
Sharon buzzes with excitement
John Wroblewski to lead team
Little Leaguers vie for state title
VALLEY FOOD | C1
SPORTS | B1
SPORTS | B1
50% OFF
vouchers.
SEE DETAILS, A2
FOR DAILY & BRE AKING NEWS
LOCALLY OWNED SINCE 1869
WEDNESDAY, JULY 22, 2015
50¢
37 indicted in suspected heroin ring
By JOE GORMAN
[email protected]
INSIDE: List of suspects
indicted. A4
YOUNGSTOWN
“The Usual Suspects” isn’t
just a movie.
When it comes to the drug
trade, it’s real life.
Authorities fanned out
across Mahoning and Trumbull counties Tuesday to begin rounding up 37 people
a Mahoning County grand
jury secretly indicted for
their suspected roles in a
Bunch
Rushton
heroin distribution ring.
Among them is Ashanti
Bunch, 39, a one-time member of the Ayers Street Playas
East Side gang. He once told
a judge that he had more
children than times he’d
been shot, although he could
not remember how many
times at that point in 2001.
He had seven children then.
Those indicted face charges of engaging in a pattern of
corrupt activity, as well as
additional counts ranging
from trafficking in heroin to
money laundering and others.
A news release said Terrence Rushton, 32, who has
addresses in Youngstown
and Campbell, was the leader of the ring.
Besides Rushton, 12 others
are described as primary or
midlevel dealers in the ring.
They are Bunch, of Lansd-
Police question a
man Tuesday on
Bellview Avenue,
Youngstown, as
officers fanned
out across the
region to round
up those secretly
indicted for their
suspected roles
in a heroin
ring.
ROBERT K. YOSAY
THE VINDICATOR
See INDICTED, A4
AUSTINTOWN
KASICH TOUTS EXPERIENCE AS HE OFFICIALLY JOINS CROWDED GOP PRESIDENTIAL RACE
Racino
‘We’ll prove them wrong again’ tax setup
won’t aid
schools
School board asks
commissioners for
Raccoon Road work
By ROBERT CONNELLY
[email protected]
AUSTINTOWN
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Ohio Gov. John Kasich acknowledges the crowd after announcing his run for the 2016 Republican Party nomination for president during a campaign rally Tuesday at Ohio
State University in Columbus. Kasich, 63, launched his campaign before a crowd of 2,000.
By MARC KOVAC
and DAVID SKOLNICK
[email protected]
“They said it couldn’t be done. We
proved them wrong again,” Kasich,
a Republican, said numerous times
COLUMBUS Tuesday at Ohio State University
during a nearly 45-minute speech
aying he’s beaten the that sometimes went off on tangents,
as the governor has done at times
odds his entire political during State of the State addresses.
Kasich, the 16th Republican cancareer, Ohio Gov. John
didate to announce for the 2016
Kasich vowed to do the same presidential election, said he’d bring
his heartland sensibilities and big
ideas to the national stage. It’s been
in his bid for president.
S
known for months that Kasich would
run. He made the decision public
Tuesday.
“I have decided to run for president of the United States,” Kasich
told a cheering, chanting, sign-waving crowd of supporters. “I believe
I do have the skills, and I have the
experience and the testing – the testing, which shapes you and prepares
you for the most important job in the
world.”
See KASICH, A4
INSIDE
State Sen. Joe Schiavoni
believes the state superintendent of public instruction
should be replaced based on
the state official’s handling of
the Youngstown Plan. A3
Gov. Kasich faces criticism
over the planned closing of the
Youngstown Developmental
Center by mid-2017. A4
Campaign roundup, A10
After about a 20-minute
explanation from the Mahoning County commissioners, it became clear that the
racino tax increment financing district, or TIF, would not
benefit Austintown schools
directly.
T he tow nsh ip school
board invited all three county commissioners to its work
session Monday afternoon
to discuss the TIF for Hollywood Gaming at Mahoning Valley Race Course. The
presentation ended with the
school board’s asking for
help with repainting Raccoon Road, a county road
that runs along the school
campus and is closest to
Austintown Middle School.
A letter was sent to the
Mahoning County school
board, now known as the
Mahoning County Educational Service Center, in fall
2013 notifying it of the TIF
district. County Commissioner David Ditzler said the
commissioners received a
letter back from the county
board of education “that
they acknowledged receipt”
of the letter.
Due to the way the TIF is
See TIF, A4
inside
INDEX
Business . . . . . . . . B5
Classifieds . . . . C5-7
Comics . . . . . . . . . C8
Courts . . . . . . . . . . A6
Crossword . . . . . . C5
Editorial . . . . . . . . A9
Legal ads. . . . . . . . B4
Lotteries . . . . . . . . A2
Society. . . . . . . . . . C4
Sports. . . . . . . . . .B1-4
Tributes. . . . . . . .A7-8
TV Grid . . . . . . . . . B6
Valley Life. . . . . . . C3
Weather. . . . . . . . . B6
PLEASE RECYCLE
MAHONING COUNTY COURT
today 2 get year in jail for mansion arson, park vandalism
NEW TRAINING FACILITY
A new manufacturing training center
to provide future workers with the
training needed to fill available jobs
could open in the city in three years.
BUSINESS, B5
A HARD-HITTING ROLE
If you thought
Jake Gyllenhaal’s
transformation
for last year’s
“Nightcrawler”
was extreme, look
at the actor in
“Southpaw.”
VALLEY LIFE, C3
By JOE GORMAN
[email protected]
YOUNGSTOWN
The two people who admitted
destroying a historic mansion in an
arson and also vandalizing Lanterman’s Mill in Mill Creek Park said
at their sentencing they were under
the influence of drugs used to cope
with life’s ups and downs.
Judge Lou A. D’Apolito of Mahoning County Common Pleas Court
said, however, they needed to learn
how to deal with adversity by not
getting high.
He sentenced Alexis Little, 20,
and Brian McKinney, 21, both of
Youngstown, on Tuesday to five
years’ probation, which includes a
year in the county jail, for the fire
that destroyed the
Firestone mansion
in North Lima last
October a nd t he
spray-painting of
the mill just a couple
of days later.
The judge said the
McKinney mix was a volatile
one that led to both
incidents.
“Two wrong people together at
the wrong time who each thought
See ARSON, A2
A1 - 07/22/15
ROBERT K. YOSAY | THE VINDICATOR
Alexis Little, left, of Youngstown wipes her eyes as
her attorney, Holly Hanni, looks on during sentencing Tuesday in county common pleas court.
CYAN
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DAILY BRIEFING
TONIGHT: Mostly clear.
High in the upper 70s.
Low in the mid-50s.
NUMBERS IN THE NEWS
$89 billion
Associated Press
The annual revenue generated by Amazon, the global
e-commerce powerhouse company that began in July
1995. The Seattle-based company is led by its 51-year-old
founder, Jeff Bezos.
LOTTERIES
TUESDAY’S NUMBERS
MULTISTATE
Mega Millions . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . 20-30-62-65-74
Mega Ball . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Megaplier . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Tuesday’s Mega Millions jackpot was
worth an estimated $152 million.
Tonight’s Powerball drawing is worth an
estimated $80 million.
OHIO
EVENING DRAWINGS
Pick 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-4-8
Pick 4 . . . . . . . . . . 1-3-7-4
Pick 5 . . . . . . . . 2-2-1-2-3
Rolling Cash 5 . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . 3-24-27-31-33
YEARS AGO
Today is Wednesday, July 22,
the 203rd day of 2015. There
are 162 days left in the year.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
On this date in:
1587: An English colony fated to vanish under
mysterious circumstances is established on Roanoke Island off North
Carolina.
1796: Cleveland, Ohio, is
founded by Gen. Moses
Cleaveland.
1934: Bank robber John
Dillinger is shot to death by
federal agents outside Chicago’s Biograph Theater.
19 6 3 : S o n n y L i s t o n
knocks out Floyd Patterson in the first round of
their rematch in Las Vegas to retain the world
heavyweight title.
1995: Susan Smith is convicted by a jury in Union,
S.C., of first-degree murder for drowning her two
sons. (She later was sentenced to life in prison,
and will not be eligible for
parole until 2024.)
2011: Anders Breivik massacres 69 people at a Norwegian island youth retreat after detonating a
bomb in nearby Oslo that
killed eight others in the
nation’s worst violence
since World War II.
2014: A Hamas rocket explodes near Israel’s main
airport, prompting a ban
on flights from the U.S.
and many from Europe
and Canada.
VINDICATOR FILES
1990: Ohio spends about
$1.1 million a year in rent
for office and other space
in Mahoning, Trumbull
and Columbiana counties
for agencies, and much of
that money goes to the area’s rich and famous, an
analysis of state records
shows. Youngstown Mayor Patrick Ungaro, who
wants the state to build
an office tower in the city,
says the situation reflects
a “political system that
sells its soul.”
Federal railroad officials
are predicting a new era
in ground transportation
where trains zip over a
magnetic field at 300 mph
and says it could be reality by the end of the 1990s.
DAY DRAWINGS
Pick 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-9-2
Pick 4 . . . . . . . . . . 5-8-6-1
Pick 5 . . . . . . . . 0-8-7-8-3
Check Keno numbers at ohiolottery.com.
PENNSYLVANIA
EVENING DRAWINGS
Pick 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-2
Pick 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-8-9
Pick 4 . . . . . . . . . . 6-5-3-8
Pick 5 . . . . . . . . 6-7-3-5-6
Cash 5 . . . 4-21-23-39-42
DAY DRAWINGS
Pick 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-8
Pick 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-6-7
Pick 4 . . . . . . . . . . 3-4-1-3
Pick 5 . . . . . . . . 7-4-8-2-1
Treasure Hunt. . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . 9-12-14-20-27
Seventy-seven women
from age 27 through 80 attend Cooperative Extension Service’s three-day
“Homemakers Camp” at
4-H Camp W hitewood
i n A shtabu la Cou nt y.
There’s swimming, boating, water-exercise class,
crafts and singing around
the campfire.
1975: The Youngstown
Board of Education votes
to submit three proposals
to the state board of education that could yield
more than $1.6 million
in state and federal aid,
including $795,000 for
reading and mathematics programs.
Ohio EPA a nd Youngstown officials will meet
to pla n i mplement ation of the cleanup of the
Mahoning River.
1965: B&I Management
Inc. a nnounces pla ns
to build two apartment
projects worth $10 million in the Valley: Central
Park West in Austintown
Township and Arlington
Arms in Niles.
About 3,500 residents
turn out for a summer
ba nd concert in Wick
P a r k f e a t u r i n g lo c a l
musicians.
Si x-yea r-old R icha rd
Thompson is in satisfactory condition in St. Elizabeth Hospital with a deep
slash of his head inflicted by a watermelon peddler who believed the boy
tried to take a watermelon from his truck.
1940 : The bodies of a
small girl still clutching
a doll and a woman believed to be her mother
are found in the Mahoning River under the Marshall Street Bridge.
Beaver Township Fire
Chief Earl Brubaker and
Fireman Homer McCormick are killed instantly,
and five other volunteer
firemen are injured when
their speeding firetruck
careens off a curve and
rolls more than 2 miles
south of North Lima.
A crowd estimated at between 10,000 and 12,000
people jam Idora Park
for the annual picnic of
the Jewish Community
Center.
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ARSON
Continued from A1
they had the weight of the
world on their shoulders,”
Judge D’Apolito said.
The pair pleaded guilty
May 27 to a fourth-degree
felony arson charge and a
cha rge of
vandalism,
a fifth-degree felony.
Lawyers for
bot h sa id
t hei r c l ients have
D’Apolito no cr im inal records
and a history of substance
abuse, but bot h have
checked themselves into
counseling and accepted
responsibility for their actions.
The mansion was a twostory, 2,720-square-foot
house w it h eight bedrooms. It was built at its
original site adjacent to the
Firestone tire-testing facility in 1880 by the Lower
family, relatives of millionaire businessman Harvey
Firestone. The house also
was known as the Lower
Homestead.
Tom and Connie Ellison
bought the home in 2011
and were renovating it to
sell at the time of the Oct.
21 fire.
McKinney apologized
to the Ellisons, saying he
had just learned at the time
that he could not join the
armed services because he
failed a background check
and he was devastated and
turned to drugs.
Judge D’Apolito asked
him why he decided to destroy property. McKinney
said he had no answer.
“I honestly can’t say why
I did, either,” McKinney
said. “I wasn’t in my right
state of mind. We just acted
on a crazy impulse.”
ROBERT K. YOSAY | THE VINDICATOR
Mahoning County Deputy Sheriff Ed Maloney leads away Brian
McKinney after McKinney was sentenced to a year in the county
jail Tuesday for his role in burning down the Firestone Mansion in
North Lima and vandalizing Lanterman’s Mill at Mill Creek Park.
Little also apologized to
the Ellisons and the park
board, saying she was going through several crises
at the time, including worries about her mother’s
health and a friend who
was injured in a car accident.
When the judge asked
her why they picked the
mansion to set ablaze, she
said she had seen it once
and was told it was vacant.
Connie Ellison told the
judge they were impressed
by the handiwork inside
the home when they first
saw it and had the home
moved about 900 feet.
She said it was impossible
for her and her husband
to own the mansion, but
they wanted to fix it up for
someone else to have.
“The question of why this
crime was committed and
the emotional scars will remain forever,” Ellison said.
Little and McKinney
were spotted on v ideo
getting gasoline near the
mansion, and authorities
found several gas cans.
While they searched the
car, authorities also found
the spray paint used in the
vandalism at the mill.
The two also must pay
about $1,000 restitution to
Mill Creek Park and about
$150,000 restitution to
the Ellisons. They have to
register as arson offenders
with the sheriff’s office for
10 years.
Ones,” the acclaimed
drama about two prison
escapees, one black and
one white.
The following year, Bikel
NEW YORK starred on Broadway as
Capt. Georg von Trapp in
Theodore Bikel, the
the original 1959 producTony- and Oscar-nomtion of “The Sound of
inated actor and singer
Music.”
whose passions included
But many viewers knew
folk music
him best for his portrayal
and politiof Tevye in stage produccal activtions of “Fiddler on the
ism, died
Roof.” Although he did not
Tuesday
appear in the original 1964
morning
Broadway version or the
of natural
1971 film, he played Tevye
causes
at UCLA
Bikel more than 2,000 times on
stage from 1967 onward.
Medical
Center in Los Angeles, said
his agent Robert Malcolm. ESPY ratings soar
with Jenner tribute,
He was 91.
The Austrian-born Bikel network platform
was noted for the diversity
LOS ANGELES
of the roles he played, from
The ESPY Awards, higha Scottish police officer to
a Russian submarine skip- lighted by Caitlyn Jenner’s
per, Jewish refugee, Dutch acceptance of a trophy for
bravery, proved a ratings
sea captain and former
champion.
Secretary of State Henry
The telecast, which
Kissinger. He sang in 21
moved from its traditional
languages.
ESPN cable home to a big“No one loved theater
ger stage with broadcast
more, his union better
sibling ABC, drew 7.75 milor cherished actors like
lion viewers last WednesTheo did. He has left an
day to rank as the mostindelible mark on genera- watched ESPY ceremony
tion of members past and
ever, more than double
generations of members to the previous high of 3.6
come,” Actors’ Equity Asmillion in 2006. Last year’s
sociation, which Bikel led
ceremony was watched by
as president from 1973 to
2.2 million.
1982, said in a statement.
It was the No. 5 program
He also appeared on nu- of the week, according to
merous television shows,
Nielsen company numrecorded books on tape,
bers released Tuesday.
appeared in opera proJenner, who as Bruce
ductions and issued more Jenner was the 1976 Olymthan 20 contemporary and pic decathlon champion,
folk-music albums.
urged acceptance for
He received an Oscar
transgender people as she
nomination for his 1958
accepted the Arthur Ashe
portrayal of a Southern
Courage Award. Jenner’s
sheriff in “The Defiant
own journey into woman-
hood will be profiled on
the E! reality series “I Am
Cait,” debuting Sunday.
Baseball’s All-Star Game
was the No. 1 program of
the week with 10.9 million viewers, but posted a
record-low rating.
NEWSMAKERS
Stage and film star
Theodore Bikel dies
Power Equipment
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NEWS BUREAUS
Warren/Niles: 330.392.0176.
Fax 330.392.5202. Warren area toll
free to Youngstown 330.369.4485.
Salem/Lisbon: 330.332.1033.
Fax 330.747.6712.
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the publisher.
BIRTHDAYS
Actor Orson Bean (“Dr.
Quinn, Medicine Woman”)
is 87. Actress Louise
Fletcher is 81. Singer Chuck Jackson is 78.
Actor Terence Stamp
is 77. Game-show host
Alex Trebek is 75. Singer
George Clinton is 74.
Singer-actor Bobby Sherman is 72. Actor Danny
Glover is 69. Writer-director
Paul Schrader is 69. Singer Don Henley is 68. Actorcomedian-director Albert
Brooks is 68. Musician Al
Di Meola is 61. Actor
Willem Dafoe is 60. Singer
Keith Sweat is 54. Singer
Emily Saliers of the Indigo
Girls is 52. Actor-comedian
David Spade is 51. Actor
John Leguizamo is 51.
Bassist Pat Badger of
Extreme is 48. Actor Rhys
Ifans (“Notting Hill”) is 48.
Musician Daniel Jones
(Savage Garden) is 42.
Singer Rufus Wainwright is
42. Actress Franka Potente
(“The Bourne Identity”)
is 41. Actor Keegan Allen
(“Pretty Little Liars”) is 28.
Actress Selena Gomez
(“The Wizards of Waverly
Place”) is 23.
‘Archie’ cartoonist
Tom Moore dies
EL PASO, TEXAS
Tom Moore, the “Archie”
cartoonist who brought
to life the escapades of a
freckled-face, red-haired
character, has died in
Texas. He was 86.
Moore, who began
drawing cartoons while
in the U.S. Navy during
the Korean War, died early
Monday while in hospice
care in his hometown of El
Paso, his son Lito BujandaMoore told The Associated
Press on Tuesday. He said
his father was diagnosed
with throat cancer within
the past week and chose
not to undergo treatment.
Moore drew Archie
Andrews and his friends
on and off from 1953 until
he retired in the late 1980s.
Annual sales of the comic
regularly surpassed half a
million during the 1960s,
according to the El Paso
Times.
Associated Press
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A2 - 07/22/15
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digest
Cow reported stolen
Suspected pot found
BLACK
THE VINDICATOR | WEDNESDAY, JULY 22, 2015
A3
Mill Creek MetroParks looks to fill 3 positions
By JORDYN GRZELEWSKI
[email protected]
AUSTINTOWN
A cow weighing about
1,800 pounds was stolen
from a township property this
month.
According to a police report filed Monday, a fence
on the property of an Omalia Drive residence was cut
where a homeowner believed
someone lured his cow out of
the yard.
The cow was taken sometime between July 11 and
July 12, and the homeowner
called police dispatch at 9:19
p.m. July 14 on the issue. The
case was forwarded to the
detective division.
YELLOW
LOCAL & STATE
E-MAIL: [email protected]
METRO
MAGENTA
YOUNGSTOWN
Mill Creek MetroParks soon will
fill a few positions within the park
administration that have remained
vacant for some time.
One of those positions – development director – will be in charge
of fundraising efforts for the park.
That position has remained unfilled
for about a year.
The importance of fundraising
was the topic of discussion at a June
30 board meeting at which members
of the park board voted 3-2 to put a
15-year levy renewal with additional
millage on the November ballot.
Board president Lou Schiavoni,
who voted against the levy proposal,
said at the time that the park leadership should come up with alter-
nate f u nd ra isi ng
methods, including
a renewed focus on
development.
“I think we have
to tighten our belts
a little bit” and at the
same time come up
Schiavoni
with ways to bring in
revenue for capital
improvements, Schiavoni said in an
interview.
“There’s a lot of grant opportunities out there, and we need to take
advantage of them,” he said, adding
that contributions from estates and
wealthy donors are other funding
avenues the development director
should pursue.
The responsibilities of the development director position, interviews
for which are set to begin next week,
include administering fundrais-
ing and “strategic
acquisition of additional financial resources.” Mill Creek
MetroParks Executive Director Aaron
Young said he expects that individual
Young to collaborate with
the foundations that
raise money for the park.
The position, for which the park
received about 40 applicants, comes
with an annual salary of between
$52,130 to $78,390, depending on
the candidate’s experience and the
park’s finances.
That salary range also applies to
the human-resources director position, for which the park management is doing interviews. There have
been 151 applicants in this round of
hiring, Young said.
Filling that position, he says,
will allow him to focus more on
long-term planning for Mill Creek
MetroParks, and less on day-to-day
operations, since he is fulfilling the
responsibilities of that job.
The park employs 63 full-time
staff members, nearly 100 part-time
staff members and more than 100
seasonal employees.
The park also is looking for a park
planner, a position in the planning
and natural-resources department.
The candidate hired for that job will
earn between $38,350 and $57,720
per year.
“I’m [eager] to get some of these
existing positions filled so we can
kind of get caught up to speed,” said
Young, who took over as executive
director in January.
YOUNGSTOWN
Police found eight bags
of suspected marijuana on a
Liberty man during a traffic
stop about 3:50 p.m. Monday
on the North Side.
Officers George Anderson
and Jeffrey Savnik pulled
over a car driven by Daniel
Wargo, 19, of Iowa Avenue,
for an improper turn at Saranac and Logan avenues.
Reports said officers
smelled marijuana in the car,
and Wargo had a large bulge
in his pockets, which is where
the marijuana was. He received a citation for possession of marijuana.
PLAN IN NEUTRAL
CANFIELD
“You’re going to burden
parking owners,” he said.
Hermina Gross of A1, who
wasn’t at Tuesday’s meeting,
told The Vindicator that the
deck of about 200 spaces,
with about half of them unoccupied, is “struggling to
fill it up. We put $200,000 in
improvements in last year.
We need more customers
and not more expenses.
We’re indoors. I don’t know
why we don’t have more
customers. We’re looking
for business.”
The area that would be
impacted by this proposal borders the Mahoning
River on the south; South
Avenue, Commerce Street
to Watt Street on the east;
Wood Street on the north;
and Belmont Avenue on the
west.
Among the lots in that
area are five owned by the
Youngstown Central Area
Community Improvement
Corp.
City residents will have
before them a half-percent
income-tax increase on the
special Aug. 4 ballot. City
leaders say that this increase
is to maintain the services
the city offers now.
Canfield is asking for a
half-percent raise on the city
income tax to
generate a n Officials are
a d d i t i o n a l optimistic
$1.5 million about voter
annually. The turnout for
city enacted the special
its 1 percent election. A5
i nc ome t a x
i n 19 7 2 . I f
passed, the effective incometax rate would be 1.5 percent
Jan. 1.
For example, a city resident who works in the city
earning $100,000 a year currently pays $1,000, and that
would increase to $1,500 if
the half-percent income tax
is approved by voters.
City Manager Joe Warino
has said general-fund expenditures have risen while
general-fund revenues have
steadied or gone down. The
difference between the two
was a surplus of $170,372 in
2010; a deficit of $613,149 in
2011; a surplus of $743,373
in 2012; a deficit of $245,080
in 2013; and a surplus of
$97,540 last year.
Warino explained that
there was an influx of about
$200,000 in 2011 due to selling a city-owned property
and another influx of about
$358,000 in 2012 from selling
stock. He added that the city
eliminated longevity pay for
employees a few years ago,
bringing about $20,000 back
to the general fund.
Warino also has cited
money lost from local government funds, both from
the state and county, and the
loss of the estate tax. Those
three combined brought in
$525,191 in 2010 compared
with $248,482 in 2014.
That also is combined
See PARKING, A5
See CANFIELD, A5
WARREN
New meeting time
LAKE MILTON
Craig Beach Village Council has changed the time of its
public-safety meeting to discuss police and fire issues to
5 p.m. today. It will take place
at the municipal justice building, 2538 Grandview Road.
Guard is robbed
WARREN
A security guard for ValleyCare Trumbull Memorial Hospital reported being robbed
in the east parking lot of the
hospital at 11:20 p.m. Monday. The security guard said
$20 was taken.
More Digest on A8
Agenda Thursday
West Branch Local
School board, special meeting for strategic planning,
2 p.m., followed by work
session, 5:30 p.m., and regular meeting at 7:30 p.m.,
high-school media room,
14277 Main St., Beloit.
Springfield Township
trustees, special meeting
regarding fire business,
noon, administration building, 3475 E. South Range
Road, New Springfield.
Mahoning County commissioners, 10 a.m., commissioners’ hearing room,
county courthouse, 120 Market St., Youngstown.
Newton Falls Exempted
Village school board, special meeting 5 p.m., board
room, Jr. High school, 9071⁄2
Milton Blvd.
AGENDA runs daily. Items for the
column should be sent to The Vindicator Regional Desk at least two days in
advance.
Surplus food
Price Memorial A.M.E.
Zion Church, 920 Dryden
Ave., Youngstown, food giveaway 10 to 11 a.m. Thursday.
Proper identification required. Bring bags.
New Bethel Baptist
Church, 1507 Hillman St.,
Youngstown, food giveaway 9 to 10 a.m. Thursday. Bring identification and
containers.
Food-distribution notices are to be
submitted by 3 p.m. the day before
they are to be published.
Residents
to vote on
half-percent
tax increase
By ROBERT CONNELLY
[email protected]
Child-rape sentence
Kyle Harris, 20, of North
Park Avenue Extension in
Champion was sentenced to
15 years to life in prison Tuesday in Trumbull County Common Pleas Court for raping a
2-year-old relative.
He pleaded guilty to rape,
gross sexual imposition and
pandering obscenity before
Judge Andrew Logan.
Harris’ father reported
in January that Harris had
been staying with him at his
house on Laird Avenue for
a couple of weeks because
he was homeless. While Kyle
Harris was at ValleyCare
Trumbull Memorial Hospital
being treated for an infection, his father found Harris’
cellphone. On it were pictures showing his 2-year-old
daughter being sexually
abused.
CANFIELD
ROBERT K. YOSAY | THE VINDICATOR
The Youngstown Planning Commission postponed a recommendation on licensing downtown public parking lots and garages, such as
this one on Front Street, for another month. During that time, city officials will discuss the proposal with lot and garage owners.
City panel puts parking proposal on hold to discuss in detail
By DAVID SKOLNICK
[email protected]
YOUNGSTOWN
After hearing complaints
about a proposal to license
downtown public parking
lots and garages, the city’s
planning commission applied the brakes in order to
discuss it further.
The commission had a
Tuesday public hearing on
the plan proposed by Mayor
John A. McNally, who serves
as a member.
At the hearing, three officials with parking decks
and garages wanted more
details on the plan, with two
of them objecting to it.
Based on the recommendation of McNally, the commission decided Tuesday
to wait a month to make a
recommendation to city
council on the parking proposal.
The mayor said before the
next meeting he plans to
talk with downtown parking lots and garages about
possible adjustments to the
IT SOUNDS LIKE OVERREGULATION, AND
THE COST OF OVERREGULATION HAS TO BE
PASSED ALONG TO SOMEONE. EXTRA COSTS
AND EXTRA REGULATIONS MEANS ADDITIONAL COSTS
TO CUSTOMERS.”
Ray Jaminet Jr., co-owner of downtown parking lot
plan.
“I still want to move on
licensing,” McNally said.
“Parking lots need to be better identified.”
There are about 3,000
public parking spots downtown, said Bill D’Avignon,
director of the Community
Development Agency and
deputy director of the city’s
planning department.
The proposal includes a
charge of $1 per space annually and requires specific
rules for lots and garages to
obtain licenses including
readable signs at entrances
displaying the international parking symbol – a white
letter “P” at least 14 inches
in height on a purple circular background that is at
least 22 inches in diameter
– as well as specific signs
displaying parking rates.
The city would also inspect the lots and garages
annually.
“It sounds like overregulation, and the cost of overregulation has to be passed
along to someone,” said Ray
Jaminet Jr., who co-owns
a lot with about 400 spots
on East Front Street. “Extra
costs and extra regulations
means additional costs to
customers.”
Bob Kranitz of A1 Parking
on West Boardman Street
said at Tuesday’s hearing
that the city’s rules on lots
and garages shouldn’t be
universal as there are different issues for each.
YOUNGSTOWN
Schiavoni: Remove
Agreement means reservists state superintendent
will demolish 12 structures
By DAVID SKOLNICK
[email protected]
YOUNGSTOWN
The cit y finalized an
ag reement w it h t he
Youngstown Air Reserve
Station that will start with
the demolition of 12 vacant
structures and could evolve
into an effort to have reservists do much more in
Youngstown.
About a half-dozen reservists will demolish one
of the houses around Taft
E lementa r y School on
Thursday, and do the rest
next month, said Col. James
Dignan, commander of the
910th Airlift Wing at the reserve station in Vienna.
The city is providing the
materials, tools, equipment
and supervision for the reservists.
“This is something quite
IT’S A WIN-WIN
AS OUR RESERVISTS GET REALWORLD TRAINING WHILE
HELPING THE CITY DEMOLISH THESE STRUCTURES.”
Col. James Dignan,
910th Airlift Wing
unique,” Dignan said. “It’s
a win-win as our reservists get real-world training
while helping the city demolish these structures.”
Taft is on the South Side
with the demolition work
done around the school on
Boston and Avondale avenues.
“There are more than 90
children who walk to Taft,”
said Mayor John A. McNally,
chairman of the board of
control. “It will be good to
remove the blight.”
The comma nder a nd
t he cit y boa rd of control signed an agreement
Tuesday to have reservists
do various neighborhood
blight-removal projects in
Youngstown.
“We’d like to be able to
expand the program in the
city,” McNally said. “Certainly the South Side area
has a lot of demolition
needs.”
McNally said he would
next like the reservists to
install stop signs and street
signs, particularly on the
North Side. There are about
600 street signs that need to
be installed, he said.
“These small projects are
important to citizens,” McNally said. “This is a good
program and it will help the
community.”
By DENISE DICK
[email protected]
YOUNGSTOWN
State Sen. Joe Schiavoni
believes the state superintendent of public instruction
should be replaced based on
the state official’s handling
of the Youngstown Plan and
the actions of one of his subordinates.
Schiavoni, of Boardman,
D-33rd, along with Democrats from the state house
and senate believe Richard
Ross, state superintendent
of public instruction, should
either resign or be removed
from office.
“I think the school board
needs to seriously consider
removing Dr. Ross,” he said.
“They have the power to do
that.”
The Ohio Department
of Education’s response is
brief.
“Dr. Ross is fully committed to continuing his work
A3 - 07/22/15
CYAN
as state superintendent,” Mike
Perona, a n
ODE spokesman, said in
an email.
The state
Schiavoni superintendent is appointed by the state school
board. Eleven of the board’s
members are elected while
the eight at-large members
are appointed by the governor.
The Plain Dealer reported
this week that state school
board members were upset
that Ross didn’t inform them
about the Youngstown Plan,
even when they visited the
community to talk to residents about the district and
its progress or lack thereof
since an academic distress
commission was appointed
See SCHIAVONI, A5
MAGENTA YELLOW
BLACK
CYAN
A4 THE VINDICATOR | WEDNESDAY, JULY 22, 2015
KASICH
Continued from A1
He added, “I believe I know
how to work and help restore
this great United States.”
The formal announcement
capped months of speculation, fueled by out-of-state
visits by Kasich to early primary and caucus states. After
Tuesday’s announcement,
Kasich left for New Hampshire, where he’s frequently
campaigned. He also will
make stops in South Carolina, Iowa and Michigan
through Saturday.
Kasich will have to jockey
for position quickly to qualify for the first Republican
presidential debate Aug. 6 in
Cleveland, with the top 10
candidates in national polls
to be picked to participate.
Kasich is currently in 12th
place in polls.
The governor acknowledged that people say, “I
don’t know if he can win,” but
“together we’ll prove them
wrong again.”
Democrats criticized Kasich’s performance in office,
pointing to local government cuts and tax policies
that they said benefit wealthy
residents.
U.S. Rep. Tim Ryan of
Howland, D-13th, who backs
Democrat Hillary Rodham
Clinton for president, said:
“After seeing firsthand how
John Kasich has led Ohio
over the last five years, it is
unbelievable that he thinks
he should be president of
the United States. Throughout his career as a member
of Congress, a Wall Street
banker and Ohio’s governor,
John Kasich has proved many
times that he will always put
the desires of the wealthy and
special interests before the
needs of the middle class.”
Dave Johnson, Columbiana
County Republican chairman and a Kasich backer
who attended the event, said
the governor “did a fantastic
job as I expected he would.
John Kasich has a homespun
style of speaking. One of the
themes woven throughout
was people have been betting against him his entire
life and no one thinks he can
win the presidency and he
will. It was a great message. It
was a terrific start.”
Mahoning County Republican Chairman Mark Munroe, who also backs Kasich
and attended the speech,
said, “As I watched the governor, I was struck by how
fortunate the country is to
get the talents of John Kasich in the White House. He’s
strong, tough. He’s a listener.
His message was: Through
hard work, you can change
the world.”
Kasich used the event to
offer his credentials for the
White House and to outline
his priorities if successful in
next year’s Republican primary and general election.
He talked about the importance of “very big ideas,” reciting his past electoral successes at the Ohio Statehouse
and in Congress.
He also referenced policy
decisions by his gubernatorial administration to help
needy residents.
“If you’re drug-addicted,
we’re going to try to rehab
you and get you on your feet,”
he said. “If you’re mentally
ill, prison is no place for you.
Some treatment and some
help is where you need to be.
If you’re the working poor,
we’re going to give you an opportunity to take a pay raise
and not bang you over the
COLUMBUS
Robin Tarr’s brother has
lived at the Youngstown Developmental Center for the
past 30 years.
Mary Bowers’ brother has
lived there for 33.
Both men are disabled and
need around-the-clock care.
And both are facing the
prospect of finding other residences due to the planned
closing of the Austintown facility by mid-2017.
Tarr and Bowers are holding out hope that state lawmakers will be able to counter the closure. On Tuesday,
they and dozens of others
stood across the street from
the building where Gov. John
Kasich formally launched his
presidential bid, letting their
voices on the issue be heard.
“We want everyone to know
that Kasich has turned his
back on Ohio’s most vulnerable citizens, like my brother
here, who’s very medically
needy,” Tarr said. “He needs
24/7, eyes-on-only care,
which he cannot receive in
the community. Due to Kasich’s [veto], my brother’s losing the only home he’s ever
known.”
She added, “We know that
there’s a budget surplus. He
[Kasich] should have never
turned his back and thrown
these vulnerable citizens out
of there.”
TIF
Continued from A1
organized, no school board
action was needed for the
TIF district to progress.
“If the board would have
responded to the letter other
than just making us believe
that you [the Austintown
school board] were in the understanding of it, we would
have called you into a meeting and explained it to you,”
said Carol Rimedio-Righetti,
Mahoning County commissioner. “As a courtesy, we
sent it. If you would have had
a question on any of it ... we
would have set up a meeting
and had you downtown or
come up here and explain it
to you.”
“They voted in and did it,
and they just have to notify
us,” said Vincent Colaluca,
superintendent of Austintown schools. “We definitely
would have been asking the
commissioners not to do
something like this, especially in 2013 [when] we were losing money from the federal
government and the state ...
or done some other type of
YELLOW
BLACK
LOCAL & STATE
head because you’re trying to
get ahead.”
Those experiences and
others, he said, position him
well to serve as the nation’s
chief executive.
Kasich provided a snapshot of his national priorities, including increased support for the armed forces, the
elimination of burdensome
and unnecessary regulations
and, at the top of the list, a
balanced federal budget.
On nat iona l securit y,
he said, “I’m a person that
doesn’t like to spend a lot of
money, but in this case, national security climbs to the
very top of the heap, because
we must be strong.”
On over-regulation: “We’ll
tame the bureaucracy, we’ll
restore some com mon
sense,” and “get rid of all
those stupid rules.”
On a balanced federal
budget: “I promise you that
my top priority will get this
country on a path to fiscal
independence, strength, and
we will rebuild the economy of this country because
creating jobs is the highest
moral purpose, and we will
move to get that done.”
Kasich also called for more
national unity. He refrained
from criticizing other presidential candidates directly.
“There are some that will
try to divide us – we see it all
the time,” he said. “I don’t pay
attention to that nonsense. At
the end of the day, it’s about
being together because, you
know, it says, ‘We The People.’”
He added, “I’m just a flawed
man” who is “trying to honor
God’s blessings in my life. ...
The light of the city on a hill
cannot be hidden. America
is that city, and you are that
light.”
Protesters criticize Kasich over plan
to close local developmental center
By MARC KOVAC
[email protected]
MAGENTA
Tarr and Bowers are taking
issue with Kasich’s decision
to veto a closure commission provision added to the
biennial state budget, which
would have required review
of the planned closing of YDC
and a comparable facility in
the Dayton area.
YDC serves residents in
Mahoning, Portage, Stark,
Wayne, Ashland, Columbiana and eight other counties.
About 85 residents with severe and profound disabilities who need extensive daily
support live at YDC. Those
residents will have to seek
other services, potentially at
one of eight remaining staterun facilities – the closest
one is near Cleveland – or in
home or community-based
settings.
Some YDC residents moved
to the center after the closing of the Apple Creek Developmental Center in Wayne
County nearly a decade ago.
State officials cite decline
in the number of people living in state-run centers over
the past eight years among
reasons for the closures.
But family members and
employees at YDC counter
that the state has been pushing residents to find other living options.
“They talk about dwindling numbers, but they ordered the numbers down,”
said Sean Murphy, who has
worked at YDC for 15 years.
“We deal with the profound
and the severely disabled.
These people can’t survive in
the public.”
DeWayne Shealey, another
15-year employee of YDC,
added, “He’s really turning
his back on the really unfortunate individuals that we
take care of every day and ...
chooses to ignore the pleas
of the parents and the family
members.”
Ernie Barkett, a sophomore economic student from
Youngstown State University,
said the closure commission
would give the families of
YDC residents and employees the chance to make a case
for keeping the center open.
“We really believe that the
review is the best way to go,”
he said. “It would ... give these
people a second chance. We
believe the privatization in
those facilities [isn’t] the best
for them. They’re all elderly
[residents]. Moving them this
late in the game when they’ve
been there 15-20 years is a
bad idea.”
Senate Minority Leader
Joe Schiavoni of Boardman,
D-33rd, and other lawmakers are pushing for the Legislature to override Kasich’s
closure commission veto.
On Tuesday, the protesters
held signs and hoped the governor and his administration
would hear their message.
TIF that some of that money
would have come back to the
school district” then.
The TIF is a 50 percent
district, meaning it will take
about $8.7 million over the
first 10 years the racino is
open to be used for infrastructure improvements
in the three TIF corridors.
The other $8.7 million is to
be paid like normal taxes by
Hollywood Gaming. About
$1 million of the TIF funding
was used to build the road
from Silica Road for the racino, so a little less than $7
million is still available, Ditzler explained.
He further said that if the
TIF district had been 100 percent, the local school board
would have needed to agree
to the TIF district. Ditzler, a
former Austintown Township trustee, said township
officials pursued a 50 percent
TIF district to avoid the public perception of a tax break
to the new industry on state
Route 46.
“The racino pays 100 percent of the taxes it would
normally pay. It’s just divvied
up in a different fashion to
be able to improve the infra-
structure,” Ditzler said.
The first time TIF funds can
be touched is 2016, and that
first draw will repay that road
work for the racino. The first
draw for infrastructure work
will be 2017, and at that point,
the TIF board will assess and
prioritize road projects.
County commissioners
pointed out that paying for
road improvements with TIF
funding opens up the budget
of Mahoning County Engineer Patrick T. Ginnetti for
work in other parts of the
county not near the racino,
such as Struthers and Poland.
Colaluca said Monday the
commissioners were invited
to attend as school officials
were looking over the budget
and trying to determine the
financial impact of the racino’s operating in the township.
“We’ve been asking for Raccoon Road to be adjusted and
repainted for eight years now.
All we’re asking for is painting. It’s very unsafe,” Colaluca
said. Ditzler said the Raccoon
project definitely will be
among projects considered
by the TIF district board.
WWW.VINDY.COM
INDICTED
Continued from A1
owne Boulevard; Michael
Cain, 37, of Cherry Hill Avenue; Raymond Wright,
36, of Kendis Circle; Keith
Johnson, 26, of Idora Avenue; Hiawatha Johnson, 28,
of North Bon Air Avenue;
Charles Frohman, 31, of
West Liberty Street, Girard;
Trevon Howell, 25, of South
Whitney Avenue; Brandon
Williams, 24, of Idlewood
Avenue; Shenika Rushton,
33, of Halls Heights; Randy
Cox, 34, of Maplecrest Drive,
Austintown; Heidi Smith,
31, of Woodledge Drive,
Mineral Ridge; and James
Vespasian, 33, of Ridgeway
Street, Struthers.
As of Tuesday evening,
seven of the 12 were in
custody. Terrence Rushton also was in custody.
A 76-page, 261-count indictment says members
of the ring engaged in the
selling of heroin and other
drugs from June 29, 2014,
to April 29 of this year.
Cain also was a member
of the Playas with Bunch,
and the two of them were
sentenced to two years in
prison in 2001 for engaging in a pattern of corrupt
activity. Bunch and Rushton a lso have pend i ng
weapons charges in common pleas court.
Collaborating on the investigation was Attorney
General Mike DeWine’s
Heroin Unit and the Mahoning Va l ley Law Enforcement Task Force.
Yo u n g s t o w n P o l i c e
Chief Robin Lees said the
investigation is a perfect
example of how different
law-enforcement agencies
can work across borders,
which is why he has officers assigned to different
task forces.
He also said the passage
last year of the safety tax
for the Mahoning County
Sheriff’s Office was a big
help because it allowed
the jail to stay fully open
so those who are arrested
can be housed there.
Lees, who served in several anti-drug units during his time as a police
officer, said it is not surprising that people such
as Bunch stay in the drug
trade.
“It’s a little frustrating,”
Lees said. “It just serves
to illustrate the point that
they will return to what
they know best.”
L e e s s a id s entenc e s
need to be longer to deter those who want to sell
drugs.
Assistant County Prosecutor Martin Desmond,
who works with the task
f or c e a nd p r o s e c u t e s
major drug crimes, said
Product malfunction led
to Ohio fireworks mishap
Associated Press
WESTLAKE, OHIO
The state fire marshal
says an apparent product
malfunction led to a fireworks mishap that injured
nine people in northeast
Ohio.
The fire marshal determined that American
Fireworks did not break
any laws during a June 28
show at Crocker Park.
“We’re definitely going to
be realizing less money than
anticipated” from the racino,
Colaluca said. “[We got] double hard hit for us with the
governor’s new budget. We’re
losing money for that, too.”
The biggest project involved with the racino TIF is
the improvement of Meridian Road from the Trumbull
County line to Cornersburg.
That project’s cost is estimated to be between $12 million
and $15 million and would be
done in three phases. “That’s
in need of improvement badly,” Ditzler said.
The superintendent also
asked for the county’s assistance in explaining to residents that the racino does
not mean a new flow of revenue for the schools. Colaluca
specifically mentioned two
renewal operating levies on
the November ballot before
township residents.
“This is something that
we’re going to need [the community] to support us on,
and these two renewals are
vital. Basically, we would be
thrown into fiscal emergency if those were not to pass,”
Colaluca said.
HEROIN INDICTMENTS | Who they are
A Mahoning County grand jury secretly indicted more than 30
people Thursday on charges of being involved in a ring that sold
heroin, and police began rounding them up Tuesday:
Brown
Carter
Gonzalez
Grist
Hanshaw
S. Rushton
Shugart
Vespasian
Michael Cain, aka “Dough,”
37, Cherry Hill Avenue.
Raymond Wright, 36,
Kendis Circle.
Terrence Rushton, 32,
Halls Heights.
Keith Johnson, aka “Bear,”
26, Idora Avenue.
Hiawatha Johnson, aka
“Yoda,” 28, North Bon Air
Avenue.
Ashanti Bunch, aka “AD,”
39, Lansdowne Boulevard.
Rodney Carter, 33, Choice
Court.
Corbin Detwiler, 33,
Highland Avenue, Rogers.
Diego Gonzalez, 26, North
Garland Avenue.
Jujuan McKeithen, 40,
West Midlothian Boulevard.
Jeff Wess, age not given,
Ayers Street.
Kelvin Crenshaw, 28, East
Lucius Avenue.
Charles Frohman, 31, West
Liberty Street, Girard.
Trevon Howell, 25, South
Whitney Avenue.
Marquis Huffman, East
Ravenwood Avenue.
Samuel A. Richard, aka
“Loud,” Cambridge Avenue.
Brandon Williams, 24,
Idlewood Avenue.
Shenika Rushton, 33, Halls
Heights.
Kia Brown, 28, East Boston
Avenue.
there is one simple reason
why people continually
return to the drug trade
even after they’ve been to
prison.
“ G r e e d ,” D e s m o n d
sa id. “They k now t hey
can make money selling
drugs.”
Grand jurors found that
Rushton – who has previous convictions for receiving stolen property
and possession of heroin
– had boxes of ammunition for handg uns and
assault rifles, a stun gun,
body armor, a .25-caliber
handgun, 9 mm handgun
and more than $1,500 in
Albert Santiago, 28, West
Middleton Road, Columbiana.
Randy Cox, 34, Maplecrest
Drive, Austintown.
Jason Currie, 31, South
Kimberly Avenue, Austintown.
Kim Davis, 42, state Route
164, Lisbon.
Nick Davis, no age given,
Mayfield Drive.
Natalie Habib, 22, South
Salem-Warren Road, North
Jackson.
Katie Grist, 28, Market
Street.
Lucas Hanshaw, 32, Kerrybrook Drive.
Darla Harrison, no age
given, North Osborne Avenue.
Stephanie Morehead, 26,
Harbor Drive, Lake Milton.
Dominic Pelligrini,
no age given, Dumont Drive,
Mineral Ridge.
Mark Piroch, 26, North
Main Street.
Alana Reese, 21, Williamsburg Drive, Canfield.
Michael Shugart, 28,
Lansdowne Boulevard.
Heidi Smith, 31, Woodledge
Drive, Mineral Ridge.
Matthew Treharn, 29,
Woodward Avenue.
James Vespasian, 33,
Ridgeway Street, Struthers.
Joseph Zimmerman, 36,
New Road, Austintown.
cash.
Shenika Rushton was
found to have two handguns and large quantities
of ammunition as well.
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A4 - 07/22/15
CYAN
MAGENTA YELLOW
BLACK
CYAN
MAGENTA
CANFIELD
Continued from A3
ROBERT K. YOSAY | THE VINDICATOR
A proposal from Youngstown Mayor John A. McNally would require downtown parking lots and garages,
including this one on Commerce Street, to be licensed and pay a $1-a-spot fee annually. A city commission delayed a vote to recommend the plan to city council Tuesday.
Continued from A3
Dave Kosec, the CIC’s project manager, asked if spots
for employees of downtown
buildings owned by the
agency – which are included
in lease agreements – would
be subject to the $1 fee.
D’Avignon said the CIC
wouldn’t have to pay for about
99 percent of its spaces.
When asked about the $1
fee, D’Avignon said he didn’t
IT SOUNDS TO
know where he came up
ME LIKE THIS IS
with the figure.
A SIMPLE ORDI“It’s pretty arbitrary,” he
said. “I didn’t think asking $1 NANCE AND IT DOESN’T
a space was much, but if it’s FINANCIALLY IMPACT THE
an issue, we can discuss it.” OPERATORS TOO MUCH.”
Richard Mills, a downtown building owner, said,
Richard Mills,
“It sounds to me like this is
downtown building owner
a simple ordinance and it
doesn’t financially impact
standards for parking would
the operators too much.”
He added “establishing be beneficial.”
English Center earns grant
Staff report
YOUNGSTOWN
The English Center received a $14,300 grant from
the International Institute
Fund.
The center staff teach
English to Mahoning Valley residents who are from
other countries. The grant
represents nearly one-third
of the Elm Street center’s annual budget.
The center provides classes in reading, writing, listening and speaking skills that
help its students adapt to
American culture, find employment, qualify for college
or trade school courses and
prepare for and pass tests
and licensing exams.
The language program
SCHIAVONI
Continued from A3
in 2010 to guide the district
out of academic morass.
The Youngstown Plan,
passed by both houses of the
Legislature last month, the
same day it was introduced,
calls for that academic distress commission to be dissolved and a new one appointed in its place.
That commission would
have three members appointed by the state superintendent, one by the mayor
and the fifth, who must be a
district teacher, appointed
by the school board. That
commission would appoint
a state-paid chief executive officer who would have
broad authority to manage
and operate the school district.
Dav id Ha nsen, ODE’s
expects to assist 90 to 120
people with their English
skills this year.
Other International Institute Fund awards:
$1,800 to Beatitude House,
its English Language Learners Program includes English as a Second Language
classes for adults and tutoring for children as well as
food distribution, a summer
camp and other services
to families whose first language is not English.
$2,700 to the Festival of
Nations, a set of et hnic
group performances, food
and memorabilia showcases that’s part of Youngstown
State University Summer
Festival of the Arts.
$2,700 to the Organización
Civica y Cultural Hispana
Americana, the agency’s
Multi-Level Practical English for Speakers of Other
Languages Project teaches English to adult immigrants with an emphasis
on elements of daily life,
such as banking, house and
apartment rentals, schooling options and doctor’s office visits.
The International Institute Fund, established in
1985, promotes the interests
of foreign-born people and
encourages the social integration of all U.S. citizens.
The fund’s grants are administered by the Community Foundation of the Mahoning Valley.
BLACK
THE VINDICATOR | WEDNESDAY, JULY 22, 2015
LOCAL & STATE
E-MAIL: [email protected]
PARKING
YELLOW
with further cuts on the
way from the most-recent
biennial budget signed by
Republican Gov. John Kasich.
A part of that budget included eliminating taxes
on small businesses. That
means the state budget will
continue the current 75 percent tax cut for businesses
under $250,000 in business
income, and then the taxes
are eliminated in fiscal year
2017, which begins July 1,
2016.
For sma ll businesses
above that income level,
Ohio will establish a new 3
percent tax rate.
“We won’t see the effect of
it until 2016,” Warino said.
“If we have to exempt small
businesses, that will certainly be another cut of the
pie we can’t absorb.”
Warino said there were
“probably well over 100
small businesses in the city”
but only a handful above
that $250,000 threshold.
Those include Giant Eagle,
Star Extruded Shapes Inc.,
Farmers Bank and Fairway
Ford.
This is one of the reasons
city leaders decided against
a 0.375 tax increase. City
leaders, worried about future state cuts back in April,
decided to pursue the halfpercent increase.
Residents, such as Frank
Micchia, have questioned
why the city pursued a special election ballot. Warino
and other city officials have
said they want the half-percent income tax vote to be
by itself on the ballot and
not “muddied” by other ballot issues.
He has not publicly said if
he is against or supportive
of the income-tax increase.
“There’s a reason we
haven’t increased the [income] tax since 1972 and all
A5
the things we’ve had in the
city” have been able to be
maintained with that 1 percent rate, said Don Dragish Jr., president of Canfield
City Council.
He echoed Warino that
Kasich has cut the city’s
budget 17 percent and compared it to homeowners and
their finances. “It would be
hard to maintain the same
amount of living” with 17
percent cuts “and that’s
what we’re trying to say,”
Dragish said.
“If it fails, we will put it
back on in November,”
Dragish said.
The deadline for the November ballot is 4 p.m. Aug.
5, the day after the special
election.
A social media campaign
began July 1 with a Facebook page named Canfield Citizens’ Initiatives,
which has been pumping
out specific revenue figures
explaining why the city is
asking for additional funds.
Officials optimistic about turnout
By ROBERT CONNELLY
[email protected]
CANFIELD
newal levy, candidates for
city council and the school
board, as well as an operating levy for Mill Creek
MetroParks.
“Hopefully, we can get as
many of the voters out there
as we possibly can because
this is an important election,” said Don Dragish Jr.,
council president.
The elections board reduced the city’s voting precincts from 10 to 8 and the
special election will cost
Canfield about $10,000.
That’s because the city is
picking up the cost of running those eight precincts,
while November elections
have the costs split among
the entities on the ballot.
Kale-Pesta said cutting
two precincts saved the city
about $2,000 per precinct.
CANFIELD CITY
Half-percent income tax on
Residents have quesAug. 4 ballot.
tioned the city’s decision
6,066 registered city
to have a special-election
voters
ballot on a proposed half 2012 primary turnout:
percent income tax before
34.16
percent
voters in two weeks.
2014 primary turnout:
The Canfield issue is the
only special-election issue
20.35 percent
in Mahoning County on
City to spend about
Aug. 4.
$10,000 on special elecThe Mahoning County
tion ballot
Board of Elections said
Source: Mahoning County
there are 6,066 registered
Board of Elections
city voters. Turnout for the
2012 primary was 34.16 perThere had been a limited
cent and for the 2014 prinumber
of absentee balmary was 20.35 percent.
lot
applications
and early
Joyce Kale-Pesta, elecvoters so far in the special
tions board director, said
election, elections board ofvoter turnout “changes draficials said. The first day of
matically” in special elecearly voting was July 7.
tions. “It’s a lot fewer voters,
especially in the August
one,” she said. “Usually in
special elections it is voter
knowledge [of an election],
and a lot of people don’t
know they have them.”
She also said, “I’m always optimistic about voters. I’m hoping [turnout]
will be at least 15 percent.”
City officials said they
wanted the issue to be
a lone and not against
other issues in November.
That includes a schools re- 330-802-2906
• 724-301-6216
724-301-6216
school choice director, resigned last week after a
Plain Dealer article reported
that he had omitted charter
schools’ failing grades from
the evaluations of agencies
overseeing charter schools.
Hansen is the husband of
Gov. John Kasich’s chief of
staff and campaign manager.
Both of those issues present problems with trust,
Schiavoni said.
“It seems that he [Ross]
tells people what he needs
to tell them in order to get
‘mission accomplished,’” he
said.
The Youngstown Plan has
faced criticism because it
didn’t include input from
parents, educators, cit y
school board members or
community leaders and because of the perception that
it was rushed through the
Legislature.
Jurors report for
2014 murder case
Staff report
YOUNGSTOWN
Jurors reported to Mahoning County Common Pleas
Court on Tuesday for selection in an aggravated-murder case.
Matthew Cochrane, 26,
of West Hylda Avenue, is
charged in the death of Dajhon Neely, 20, of Liberty.
Neely was shot March 29,
2014, on South Avenue near
the junction with Interstate
680 while he was inside a
car. He died two days later.
Detectives said Neely and
Cochrane
were a rg uing via text
message
over a female
before t he
shooting.
J u d g e
Cochrane M a u r e e n
Sweeney is
hearing the case.
Cochrane also faces two
counts of felonious assault
because there were other
people in the car with Neely.
Cochrane was not arrested in connection with the
crime until May 2014.
During a heart attack, every minute matters. So, know the warning signs. If you experience
them, call 911. And count on the Nationally Accredited Chest Pain Centers at Northside
Medical Center and Trumbull Memorial Hospital for emergency heart care.
A5 - 07/22/15
CYAN
MAGENTA YELLOW
BLACK
CYAN
A6 THE VINDICATOR | WEDNESDAY, JULY 22, 2015
MAGENTA
YELLOW
BLACK
LOCAL & STATE
WWW.VINDY.COM
O’Brien, Letson
Videos show how shootout unfolded planning to run
for Ohio Senate
WARREN 2013 HOMICIDE
By ED RUNYAN
[email protected]
WARREN
Surveillance videos from
two cameras mounted outside the Sunoco gas station
on West Market Street show
how the Oct. 26, 2013, shooting death of Richard Rollison
IV unfolded.
The Trumbull Count y
Prosecutor’s office released the
videos Tuesday,
after the criminal case against
ONLINE
“Boo”
VIDEO TaShawn
Walker, 27, conSee video for
this story at c l u d e d w i t h
vindy.com Walker pleading
guilty Monday
to reduced charges.
Walker, of Baytown, Texas,
was sentenced to 17 years in
prison for involuntary manslaughter, carrying a concealed weapon and improperly handling firearms in a
motor vehicle.
Over the span of nine minutes, the videos show Rollison, 24, of Niles, parking his
sport utility vehicle beside
one of the gas pumps. Robert McKinney was his passenger, according to Chris
Becker, asssistant prosecutor.
First McKinney and then
Rollison walk over to another SUV parked at another
set of pumps to talk to the
driver, Phillip Honzu.
Rollison, who got inside
the front passenger seat of
Honzu’s vehicle, remained
there for about nine minutes,
until a short time after a car
driven by Thomas Walker,
46, father of TaShawn Walker, pulled up to pumps behind Rollison’s and Honzu’s
vehicles.
A little more than a minute before shots were fired,
Thomas Wa lker wa lked
toward the store, while
TaShawn Walker headed
straight for Rollison’s SUV.
Moments later, he was joined
by a second man and then a
third, as they stood near the
passenger front door of Rollison’s SUV.
With McKinney inside the
SUV, one of the three men
tried unsuccessfuly to open
the passenger door.
TaShawn Walker, 27, then
walked toward Honzu’s SUV
and stopped at the driver’s
door next to Honzu. Rollison
got out of Honzu’s SUV and
walked in front of it.
TaShawn Walker, who appeared to be talking to Rollison, moved toward Rollison. They stood facing each
other, slightly circling each
other, until Rollison walked
away from Walker, his back
turned, in the general direction of his own vehicle.
Rol lison turned pa r tway back toward Walker
two times, from 10 feet or
so away, possibly talking to
Walker, until Walker’s arm
rises from his side, and the
gun flashes as he fired three
times.
Rollison then ran toward
the back of his vehicle, where
he fell to the ground and
didn’t get up. He died later at
the hospital.
Becker provided identifications for the men in the
By DAVID SKOLNICK
[email protected]
WARREN
SPECIAL TO THE VINDICATOR
This screen shot of a video released by the Trumbull County
Prosecutor’s office is from a surveillance camera at the Sunoco gas
station on West Market Street in Warren. A shootout occurred Oct.
26, 2013, which led to the death of Richard Rollison IV of Niles.
video. Becker said Rollison
was hit by bullets from at
least two guns, that Rollison
also fired his gun and that
shots were fired from four to
five guns.
After Walker started firing
his gun, his father and the
two other men dove away
from the area. TaShawn
Walker ran quickly to get beside his father’s car because
McKinney was firing at them
from inside Rollison’s SUV.
TaShawn Walker ducked
and continued running past
his father’s car and to the
west along Market Street and
disappeared. His father and
the two other men eventually drove away, after McKinney drove away, leaving
Rollison writhing in pain.
In addition to the Rollison, Walker and Honzu vehicles, two other cars were
near Walker as he fired. One
apparently not connected
to the fight had to wait un-
til Walker stopped firing to
drive away because Walker
was firing just over the hood
of the car.
The 12:54 a.m. shootout
occurred a short time after
TaShawn and Thomas Walker left a tavern in Warren
Township, where they purportedly confronted people
they said were celebrating
the death of TaShawn Walker’s brother, Taemarr Walker,
24, exactly one week earlier.
Rollison had been at the tavern that night, his father has
said.
Taemarr Walker died in a
confrontation with a Warren
police officer. His death and
Rollison’s death touched off
a period of tension in the
city.
Becker said he doesn’t
know the motive in the Rollison killing, partly because
the people who witnessed
the incident refused to cooperate with investigators.
3 men arrested after running from police
By ROBERT CONNELLY
[email protected]
BOARDMAN
A car stolen in Austintown was recovered hours later overnight Monday
in Boardman, and three men are arrested in the case.
Mark J. Butcher, 18, of Youngstown,
was arrested on misdemeanor charges
of obstructing official business and
theft without consent. His bail was set
at $1,250 and he bonded out, a police
report said. Butcher has a trial on the
misdemeanor charges at 11 a.m. Aug. 4
in Mahoning County Area Court here
after he was arraigned Tuesday morning.
George J. Adams, 16, of North Four
Mile Run Road in Austintown, was
arrested on misdemeanor charges of
obstructing official business and theft
without consent as well as a minor
misdemeanor for curfew violation. He
was booked on the scene and released
COURTS
MAHONING COUNTY
MARRIAGE LICENSES
Larry A. Garchar, 29, of 957 Fifth St.,
Struthers, and Evelyn F. Akpadock,
28, of Pittsburgh.
Austin C. Zimmerman, 19, of Lititz,
Pa., and Kayla L. Falb, 21, 13402
Green Beaver Road, Columbiana.
Anthony J. Grenga, 25, of 3191 Paradise Ave., Canfield, and Sarah A.
Hoelzel, 22, 1326 Raspberry Lane,
Mineral Ridge.
Zachary T. Cuculich, 35, of 5971 Gibson Road, Canfield, and Sarah L.
Gavalier, 30, of same.
Ralph T. Meacham, 65, of 1776 N.E.
River Road, Lake Milton, and Mary
A. Reese, 65, of same.
Sterling V. Owens, 24, of 80 N. Raccoon Road, Apt. 53, Youngstown, and
Tenia L. Ferrell, 22 of 830 Palmer
Ave., Youngstown.
Louis D. Ross, Jr., 46, of 171 S. Cadillac Drive, Boardman, and Jennifer S.
Stanko, 45, of 200 Lake Pointe Circle,
Canfield.
Jack R. McDonald, 23, of 1450 Fox
Run Lane, Canfield, and Olivia B.
Governor, 20, 4400 S. Raccoon Road,
Canfield.
Luis A. Galletti Negroni, 24, of 381
Kendall Ave., Apt. 5, Campbell, and
Katiria Almodovar Flores, 25, of
same.
Justin R. Whitaker, 26, of 300 Meadowbrook Ave., Boardman, and Stephanie M. VanBrocklin, 29, of same.
DOCKET
David Haskins et al v. 7112 Columbia
Inc., order of magistrate.
John O. Meckulch v. Nicholas S. Limberty, dismissed.
Daniel Yemma v. Michelle M. Bellamy
et al, foreclosure.
Kenneth McCown et al v. Joe Koch
Construction Inc. et al, order of
magistrate.
Samuel Kelley et al v. Ernest Brown et
al, dismissed.
Daniel R. Yemma v. Blackstone Real
Estate LLC, foreclosure.
Tiger Industries Oil and Gas Leasing
LLC v. Dean A. Schultz et al, order of
magistrate.
Judy McMurray v. Alonzo Daniels,
order of magistrate.
Sandra Hairston v. Ashley Ranea
Dothard, order of magistrate.
Eugene West III v. Waine Thomas,
order of magistrate.
Donna E. James v. Maxine Watkins,
order of magistrate.
Donna E. James v. Natasha L. Watkins, order of magistrate.
State v. Jason J. Herig, sentenced to
10 months in prison.
State v. Elijah Johnson, forfeited.
State v. Christopher Little, forfeited.
State v. Tiana N. Jones, forfeited.
State v. Jasan D. Martin, sentenced to
seven years in prison.
State v. Lorin N. Charlton, sentenced
to five years’ probation through
APA.
State v. Craig Bruner Jr., pleads guilty.
to a relative.
C h a s e A . Mc K i n n e y, 18 , o f
Youngstown, was arrested on a felony
charge of receiving stolen property
and misdemeanor charges of obstructing official business and theft without
consent. His bail was set at $6,250. He
has a preliminary hearing on the felony charge July 28 and a pretrial hearing
the same day on the misdemeanor
charges. He also was arraigned Tuesday morning in Boardman court.
According to an Austintown police
report, a woman from Nottingham
Drive reported her car stolen from her
driveway at 8:25 p.m. Monday. A nextdoor neighbor called police on two
males in their garage on an attempted
theft about the same time.
According to the Boardman police
report, township police were called to
the 6700 block of Appleridge Circle at
12:13 a.m. Tuesday about a suspicious
vehicle parked on the street in front of
a home. Authorities found the car, con-
State v. Lewis Robinson III, sentenced
to 18 months’ probation through APA.
State v. Erich Henkel, sentenced
to two years’ probation through
APA and license suspended for six
months.
State v. Samuel Johnson, license suspended for six months.
State v. Elijah Johnson, sentenced to
one year on three counts, served
concurrently.
State v. Jeffrey D. Shaughnessy, dismissed.
State v. Jason T. Sobnosky, sentenced
to four years in prison.
State v. Jason Sobnosky, sentenced
to one year on two counts, served
concurrently.
State v. Brianne Henkel, sentenced to
two years’ probation through APA.
State v. Ashley Bowser, pleads guilty.
State v. Isiah Ware, pleads guilty.
State v. Gary Wellendorf, sentenced
to two years’ probation through
APA and license suspended for six
months.
State v. Gary Wellendorf, sentenced
to two years’ probation through
APA and license suspended for six
months.
State v. Alvin A. Kennedy, pleads
guilty.
First National Bank of Pennsylvania
v. Thomas R. Skelton et al, order of
magistrate.
Cach LLC v. Michael E. Halstead, order
to disburse.
Laura Catcott v. Bel Park Anesthesia
Associates Inc. et al, settled.
Kenneth R. Burton et al v. Ayasha
Cummings et al, dismissed.
ABL Wholesale Distributers Inc. v.
Austintown Beverage Depot Inc. et
al, order of magistrate.
State Farm Fire and Casualty Co. v.
S&N Insulation Inc. et al, order of
magistrate.
Jesus Avalos v. Angelisa M. Pate et al,
forfeited.
Natl. Amateur Bowler Rankings.com
LLC v. Joe Danyi et al, settled.
SKW Prep LLC v. Margaret Rose Drennen et al, forfeited.
SKW Prep LLC v. Laurie Missik Olenick
et al, forfeited.
Huntington National Bank v. Ruth I.
Driscoll et al, order of magistrate.
Maurice Jones et al v. Anthony
Cheshire et al, decision of magistrate.
Robert A. Ray v. Piedmont Television
of Youngstown LLC et al, settled.
Lora Digiacomo et al v. Ralph T. Clinkscale Jr. et al, dismissed.
Nationstar Mtg. LLC v. Robert F.
Shields et al, foreclosure.
Beth A. Simkunas v. Charles W. Kelso
Jr. et al, order of magistrate.
Daniel R. Yemma v. Gary N. Wright et
al, foreclosure.
Nationstar Mtg. LLC v. Victor Kirin et
al, decision of magistrate.
Beneficial Fin. I Inc. et al v. Earl C.
Thurmond, deceased, et al, foreclosure.
Vickie M. McCormick et al v. Austintown Township Trustees et al, order
of magistrate.
Haileh Almed v. Ford Motor Co.,
settled.
firmed it was the same stolen car from
Austintown and noted that the vehicle
was still warm.
An officer used a flashlight between
two houses across the street from the
car and saw three males take off running as two jumped a fence and the
third ran across Applewood Boulevard. Butcher was captured first in the
Talmer Bank parking lot, and authorities using thermal imaging found Adams hiding behind a trash bin of La-ZBoy Furniture, 770 Boardman-Poland
Road.
Both Butcher and Adams said they
were picked up by a male named Chase
and that he was driving the vehicle.
At 2:10 a.m. Tuesday, officers located McKinney on Oakridge Drive
and identified him as one of the men
who ran from police. McKinney said
they ran from the officers because they
ran from a bill of about $31 at Steak ‘n
Shake in Boardman.
Daniel R. Yemma v. JLM Real Est.
Investments LLC et al, foreclosure.
Daniel R. Yemma v. John M. McKnight
et al, foreclosure.
Daniel R. Yemma v. Sarah J. Jaster et
al, foreclosure.
Daniel R. Yemma v. Adam R. Black et
al, foreclosure.
Farmers Natl. Bank of Canfield v.
Antoinette C. Pace et al, decision of
magistrate.
Daniel R. Yemma v. Larrin Habeger et
al, foreclosure.
Daniel R. Yemma v. John Edward
Scherl et al, foreclosure.
Daniel R. Yemma v. Melinda K. Nitz et
al, foreclosure.
Bryan Christopher Phelps v. Ryan
Gelardi et al, dismissed.
Daniel R. Yemma v. Dwayne L.
Townsend et al, foreclosure.
Daniel R. Yemma v. Sherry L. George
et al, foreclosure.
Daniel R. Yemma v. Daniel Illencik et
al, foreclosure.
Bastista Holdings LLC et al v. Ronald
Banks et al, judgment entered.
Jerry Joseph Hughes et al v. Robert
Alexander Hughes et al, order of
magistrate.
First National Bank of Pennsylvania
v. Multiland Inc. et al, judgment for
plaintiff.
Tyler Howell v. Tiara Monique Berger,
dismissed.
Calvin Brown Sr. v. Heather Maravola,
dismissed.
Jessica Kaminsky v. Steffin Chaney,
order of magistrate.
Frances R. Kidd v. Carol Boerio, order
of magistrate.
State v. Joseph A. Benedetti, sentenced to four years in prison.
State v. Ross Seliga, dismissed.
State v. Jonathan David Shellenberger, pleads guilty.
State v. Bruce Clinkscale, sentenced to
two years, served consecutively to
another case.
State v. Christine Smith, sentenced
to two years’ probation through Mahoning County Probation Dept.
State v. Edward McLane, pleads guilty.
State v. Daisy Robinson, pleads guilty.
State v. Quintin Prieto, pleads guilty.
State v. Nicole Myers, sentenced to
one-year rehabilitation through APA.
State v. Fabian Donjuan, sentenced to
two years’ probation through APA
and to register as a sex offender.
State v. Luis A. Laviena, pleads guilty.
State v. Joseph Fatica, sentenced to
six months in prison on counts one
and two, served concurrently, and to
pay restitution.
State v. Ross Vaughn, sentenced to
three years’ probation through APA.
State v. Richard Hickson, pleads
guilty.
State v. Richard D. Sutton Jr., pleads
guilty.
Deutsche Bank National Trust Co. v.
Richard L. Hedrick et al, order of
magistrate.
Executive Financial Enterprises Inc.
v. James Pittman Jr., magistrate’s
decision adopted.
Deutsche Bank National Trust Co. v.
John C. Draia et al, dismissed.
BIRTHS
ST. ELIZABETH BOARDMAN
HOSPITAL
Stephanie Ellsworth and Rocky Angiuli, Canfield, girl, July 20.
Kari Holden and Matt Karlovic,
Hubbard, girl, July 20.
Marissa Hughes and Robert Petty,
East Liverpool, boy, July 20.
ST. JOSEPH WARREN
HOSPITAL
Naqkeei McCrae and Lamont Wagner Jr., Warren, girl, July 17.
Marteesha Calhoun and Kalen Seawood, Warren, boy, July 20.
MAHONING VALLEY BIRTH
CENTER
Wesley and Kari White Peska,
Kinsman, boy, July 20.
Editor’s Note: ValleyCare Health
System of Ohio, which operates
Northside Medical Center and
Trumbull Memorial Hospital, no
longer provides birth announcements for publication in The
Vindicator.
State Rep. Sean O’Brien
will run next year in the
open race for the Ohio
Senate rather than seek
a fourth term in the state
House.
“I’ve had the opportunity
to represent the 63rd House
District and I look forward
to expanding that work into
the 32nd” Senate District,
said O’Brien, a Democrat
from Bazetta.
Former state Rep. Tom
Letson of Warren, who represented the 64th House
District for eight years, announced last month that he
would run next year in the
Democratic primary for the
32nd, which includes all of
Trumbull and Ashtabula
counties and a portion of
Geauga County.
This will set up a Democratic primary between the
two next year.
Letson unsuccessfully
ran last year for an Ohio
Supreme Court seat, getting 27.4 percent of the vote
against incumbent Justice
Sharon Kennedy.
It was an unsuccessful
year for Ohio Democrats,
with Letson receiving the
lowest percentage of any
of the party’s candidates
who ran statewide. He even
lost in his home county of
Trumbull, receiving 45.8
percent of the vote.
The 32nd Senate District
is strongly Democratic with
Trumbull as its most-populous county.
Republicans control the
state Senate 23-10.
Capri Cafaro, a Democrat from Liberty, was appointed in 2007 to the state
Senate seat to replace Marc
Letson
O’Brien
Dann, who resigned after
being elected attorney general. Cafaro was elected
in 2008 and re-elected in
2012.
The state’s term-limits
law prohibits Cafaro from
seeking re-election next
year. She has said she
doesn’t plan to run for a political office next year.
“Those are big shoes to
fill, as she’s done a great
job,” O’Brien said of Cafaro.
O’Brien, a former Trumbull County assistant prosecutor, was first elected in
2010 in the 63rd District,
which takes in about half
of Trumbull. If O’Brien had
opted to seek re-election to
his House seat and won, he
wouldn’t be able to run for
it in 2018.
House seats are for two
years while Senate positions are for four years.
The 64th District, which
Letson, an attorney, represented for eight years ending Dec. 31, 2014, includes
the rest of Trumbull County and a southern portion
of Ashtabula County.
Dec. 16 is the filing deadline for the March 15 primary. Neither O’Brien nor
Letson have filed nominating petitions to run.
Hubbard Councilman
Ben Kyle, D-1st, announced
last month that he would
run in the 63rd House race
next year.
HUBBARD
Library collects
school supplies
Staff report
HUBBARD
Hubbard Public Library,
436 W. Liberty St., will be
collecting school supplies
through Aug. 15 for students who would not be
able to afford the necessary
back-to-school supplies.
All patrons who donate
will be able to have any accrued fines on their Hubbard library account waived
as follows: Donating three
packaged items will waive
up to $5 in fines; donating
five items will waive up to
$10.
This program applies to
fines and is not applied to
lost and/or damaged materials or accounts in collections. Fine-free patrons
and community members
are also encouraged to participate, but donations will
not be credited to future
fines.
All supplies must be in
their original packaging.
Accepted supplies include : No. 2 penc i l s ;
A6 - 07/22/15
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three-ring binders (1 inch
or 3 inch); basic calculators; colored markers; colored pencils; composition
notebooks; crayons (8, 16
or 24 count); erasers (cap,
regular and jumbo); folders (2-pocket and pocket
folders with brads); glue
sticks; highlighters; loose
leaf paper (college- or wideruled); pencil boxes/bags;
pens (black, blue, or red);
rulers; scissors (blunt-tip
and regular); spiral notebooks (1, 3, or 5 subject);
tabbed dividers (5-tab or
8-tab); tissues; and white
school glue.
All supplies brought in for
fines at the Hubbard Public
Library will be donated to
both Hubbard schools and
St. Patrick’s of Hubbard.
Each school will distribute the supplies to students
that fit the requirements.
For details about the School
Supplies for Fines Drive
and the requirements and
restrictions, call the library
at 330-534-3512, ext. 3.
MAGENTA YELLOW
BLACK
CYAN
E-MAIL: [email protected]
MAGENTA
KIMBEL, John W., of Vienna;
Borowski Funeral Service/Oak
Meadow Cremation Services in
Warren.
LIVOSKY, Helen, 90, of Poland,
formerly of Campbell; calling
hours Friday from 10 to 11 a.m. at
St. John Orthodox Church in
Campbell; Wasko Funeral Home.
MASTERS, Arley McLaughlin, of
Newton Falls; Borowski Memorial
Home.
TIRONE, Christopher M. “Michigan,” 25, of Youngstown; StatonBorowski Funeral Home in Warren.
ZICKAR, Frank R., of Sharon, Pa.;
calling hours Thursday from 4 to
7 p.m. at J. Bradley McGonigle Funeral Home and Crematory Inc. in
Sharon.
ZIMMERMAN, James Robert, 69,
of Youngstown; Higgins-Reardon
Funeral Homes, Austintown Chapel.
LULA MAE “TINA” PRICE JONES, 85
CHINO HILLS, CALIF. - Funeral
services were held Tuesday, July
21, 2015, at the Friendship Church
in Yarba Linda, Calif., for Mrs. Lula
Mae “Tina” Price Jones, 85, who
departed this life July 7, 2015, at
Parkview Hospital, Riverside, Calif.
Mrs. Jones was born March 17,
1930, to Alex and Arana Price,
coming to Youngstown in 1943.
She attended local high
schools and graduated from Renee Trussell School of Cosmetology in 1958, and worked at BJ and
Rose Brown Hair Salons.
After moving to California 35
years ago, she owned her hair salon and was an excellent hair weaver. She enjoyed sewing, attended
crafting and upholstering classes,
and loved going to the casino.
She leaves her children, Jewel
McMullen of Youngstown, Connie
Williams Sims of Riverside, Patricia Early of Riverside, Sandra
(Tim) Jones of Chino Hills, Pamela
Jones of Las Vegas, Ernel Jones
of Cleveland; siblings Rose Brown
and Leon (Patsy) Price, all of
Youngstown; 34 grandchildren; 15
great-grandchildren; and five
great-great-grandchildren.
She was preceded in death by
her parents; husbands Cornelius
Jones and Herman “Moon”
McMullen; siblings Annie “Puddin”
Jackson, Frank Price, Cora “Puddin” Ringo and Joann Graves Ford;
grandchildren Robert Chapman
Jr., Kevin and Kelvin “Truck”
Chapman, Ernell Jones Jr., Renee
and Antwan Jones, and PaTina
Early.
07-22-15
SHERRIN G. BIELIK, 56
YOUNGSTOWN - Sherrin G. Bielik, 56, of the city’s west side,
passed away early Tuesday morning, July 21, 2015, at St. Elizabeth
Health Center in Youngstown, following a lengthy illness.
Sherrin was born July 1, 1959, in
Youngstown, the daughter of the
late Robert and Margaret Wheeler
Hawkins, and was a lifelong area
resident.
She was a 1977 graduate of
Western Reserve High School, attended Kent State University, and
graduated with a Bachelor’s Degree in Education from Youngstown State University.
Mrs. Bielik was a Language Arts
teacher at Summit Academy Secondary School in Youngstown for
the past 10 years. Prior to teaching at Summit Academy, Sherrin
taught at Wilson High School and
at Paul C. Bunn Elementary
School, and she was the CEO of
the YWCA of Salem. Sherrin was
also a longtime Destination Imagination coach and official.
She was a member of Christ
Church Presbyterian, where she
served as elder and was active in
various church functions.
Mrs. Bielik was a very dedicated teacher who loved her students. She enjoyed reading, travel, shopping, and she especially
loved the time spent with her
family.
Sherrin leaves her husband of
nearly 34 years, James E. Bielik;
two sons, James R. Bielik (fiancé
Heather Putt) of Youngstown and
LAKE MILTON - Jennifer Lyn
Schippert, 36, passed away on
Sunday, July 19, 2015, at University
Hospitals in Cleveland, surrounded by her family.
She was born Aug. 29, 1978, in
Warren, daughter to John and
Bonnie (Moore) Schippert.
“Jen” was a 1996 Jackson Milton High School graduate, where
she had a passion for playing high
school basketball. She attended
Youngstown State University and
worked as a cook for many local
Per Tracy’s request, there were restaurants. Jen had a great love
for animals, and her dogs, Chase,
no services or calling hours.
Jasper, Geno, and Pepper always
Arrangements have been entrusted to the professional care of took up a special place in her
heart. Her affinity for her dogs
the Rossi & Santucci Funeral
Home, 4700 Market St., Boardman. earned Jen the affectionate nickname of “Aunt Ruff” from her
Burial took place at Forest
niece, Kamryn.
Lawn Cemetery, Boardman.
Left to celebrate Jen’s memory
Family and friends may visit
are her mother, Bonnie (Mark
www.rossisantuccifh.com to view
this obituary, sign the guest book Schaffer) Schippert; her father,
and send condolences to the Fike John (Jean) Schippert; her twin
sister, Jodi (Jonathan) Moebus;
family.
In lieu of flowers, material con- her stepbrothers, Scott (Kristina)
tributions may be made in Tracy’s Schippert and John (Heather)
name to the Herbert L. Fike Memo- Schippert; her stepsister, Sheila
rial Fund at any Huntington Bank. Schippert; and many nieces and
nephews.
Jen was preceded in death by
her grandma, Helen Moore.
The family will receive friends
from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. on Thursday, July 23, at the Lane Family
STRUTHERS – Betty A. McQuillen-Rezendes, 79, formerly of Austintown, died Thursday, July 16,
2015, at 6:35 p.m. at Masternick
Memorial Health Care Center in
New Middletown.
She was born June 11, 1936, in
Youngstown, the daughter of the
late John and Margaret Fundziak
Vrabec.
Betty worked as an assembler
at Packard Electric for 30-plus
years, retiring in 1996. She was
known as the “nut lady,” as she
had sold big bags of nuts. Prior to
working at Packard, Betty worked
at the Dog House in Austintown
and also Morgan’s Restaurant.
Betty enjoyed doing many
things, including belonging to
TOPS and Weight Watchers. She
and her husband were on the CB
radio, and her handle was “Turtle.” She was a founding and charter member of the FOE No. 3298
Ladies Auxiliary in Austintown,
where she was a past president
and Golden Eagle, and a member
of the Golden Triangle Eagles in
Eustis, Fla., and belonged to many
bowling leagues at Wedgewood,
as well as a traveling league, the
Croatian Home on the Westside of
Youngstown. She also enjoyed
golfing, having a hole-in-one at
the Glow Ball Tournament at Meander Golf Course.
Survivors include her children,
Chester A. McQuillen III of Las Vegas and Peggy “Emmy” McQuillen
of Struthers; her grandchildren,
Tina (Andy) Neal of Tucson, Ariz.,
Mara McQuillen of Mesa, Ariz., Karli J. Miller of Lafayette, Ind., and
Lance Miller of Youngstown; and
six great-grandchildren, Denise
Santiago, Danielle, Natalie, and
Andrew Jackson Neal, Alexandria
Grijalva, and Noah Cocio.
She is also survived by several
nieces, nephews, great-nieces and
great-nephews, especially her
Kimmy, who helped care for her.
Other than her parents, Betty
was preceded in death by her two
husbands, Chester A. McQuillen,
Jan. 26, 1953 to Nov. 29, 1996, and
Kenneth J. (Lisa) Bielik of Austintown; and a daughter, Kristen R.
Bielik of Canfield.
A brother, David Hawkins, and a
sister, Wendy L. Richmond, are deceased.
Family and friends may call
from 5 to 7 p.m. Thursday, July 23,
at Kinnick Funeral Home, 477 N.
Meridian Road, Youngstown.
Family and friends may also
call from 10 to 11 a.m. Friday at
Christ Church Presbyterian, 1933
Canfield Road, Youngstown, where
funeral services will take place at
11 a.m.
Committal services will follow
at Lake Park Cemetery in Youngstown.
Visit kinnickfuneralhome.com
to view this obituary and to send
condolences online to Sherrin’s
family.
07-22-15
WILLIAM THEODORE PROCH, 79
William Rezendes, Feb. 20, 1999 to
August of 2001; her companion,
Frank Keppeler, 2003 to 2011; her
son, John A. McQuillen; and her
siblings, Frank Vrabec, Tom Vrabec, Mary Yaskulka, and Jean
Brown.
The family would like to thank
the staff and the rehab unit at
Masternick Memorial Health Center for all of the care they gave to
their mother and grandmother.
Funeral services will be at the
Lane Family Funeral Homes, Austintown Chapel, at 11 a.m., Friday,
July 24, 2015, where Father John
Keehner will celebrate Betty’s life.
Family and friends may gather
at the funeral home Thursday, July 23, 2015, from 5 to 7 p.m., where
there will be an Eagles service at
6 p.m.
Betty will be buried next to her
husband, Chester, at Green Haven
Memorial Gardens in Canfield.
In lieu of flowers, memorial
contributions may be made to the
Purple Cat, 4738 McCartney Road,
Lowellville, OH 44436, because
she loved her Terisa.
07-22-15
JAMES PHILLIP MILLIKIN, 64
CANFIELD – James Philip Millikin, 64, passed away Saturday
morning at his residence.
James was born Nov. 9, 1950, in
Youngstown, a son of the late
George and Elizabeth Tierney Millikin.
He graduated from Salem High
School and retired after working
as a cable engineer for various
cable companies, including Storer
Cable, Adelphia, Armstrong and
Comcast.
James was a member of the
Moose Lodge, Elks Lodge, the Eagles Lodge, VFW and the DAV Auxiliary. James was very knowledgeable about computers and was
able to build a computer from
scratch. He enjoyed teaching his
children all about computers. He
loved watching classic movies.
James leaves his two daughters, Heather (Lawrence) Stratton
of Canfield and Erin (Brian) Hamilton of Silver Spring, Md.; two
grandchildren, Kristina and Ryan;
and two great-grandchildren, Kaylee and Titus.
He was preceded in death by
his parents, George Millikin and
Elizabeth (Frank R.) Franko.
Per James’ wishes, there will
be no calling hours or services.
Funeral Homes, Austintown Chapel, 5797 Mahoning Ave. A memorial service will follow at 7:30 p.m.
In lieu of flowers, memorial
contributions may be made to Angels for Animals, 4750 W. South
Range Road, Canfield, OH 44406.
Family and friends may visit
www.lanefuneralhomes.com to
send condolences.
07-22-15
BETTY A. MCQUILLEN-REZENDES, 79
THOMAS-PIPPINS, Joyce Marie,
of Atlanta, formerly of Youngstown.
A7
JENNIFER LYN SCHIPPERT, 36
TRACY D. FIKE, 58
JONES, Lula Mae “Tina” Price,
85, of Chino Hills, Calif., formerly
of Youngstown; F.D. Mason Memorial Funeral Home in Youngstown.
BLACK
THE VINDICATOR | WEDNESDAY, JULY 22, 2015
TRIBUTES
BOARDMAN – Tracy D.
Fike, 58, was called to
her heavenly home and
reunited with the love
of her life early Friday morning,
July 10, 2015.
Tracy will always be remembered and loved by her family and
friends for her sense of fun and
laughter.
She was born June 3, 1957, in
Cincinnati, the daughter of James
and Joan (Fries) Andrews.
Upon graduating from high
school, Tracy earned her BacheMCQUILLEN-REZENDES, Betty A., lor’s Degree in Sociology from
BARR, Harold L., 80, of West
79, of Struthers, formerly of AusMiddlesex, Pa.; visitation today
Central Michigan University.
tintown; visitation Thursday from
from 4 to 7 p.m. at Smith Funeral
She was a proud homemaker
5 to 7 p.m. at Lane Family Funeral and a faithful wife, mother and
Home.
Homes, Austintown Chapel.
grandmother. She enjoyed socialBROWN, Michael S., of Niles;
izing, shopping, and cooking along
MILLIKIN, James Phillip, 64, of
Borowski Funeral Service/Oak
with having a passion for ice
Canfield; no calling hours; Lane
Meadow Cremation Services in
cream and cake.
Family Funeral Homes, Canfield
Warren.
The love of her life, her husChapel.
band, Herbert L. Fike, whom she
CRAWFORD, Sally Ann, 80, of
Youngstown; calling hours SaturONDICH, Albert, 64, of Hubbard; married Aug. 16, 1980, died April
21, 2014.
day from 1 to 2:15 p.m. at DavidStewart-Kyle Funeral Home.
Tracy leaves behind to hold onson-Becker Funeral Homes in
PROCH, William Theodore, 79, of to her precious memories, two
Struthers.
New Castle, Pa.; visitation Thursdaughters, Kristina Atwood and
FIKE, Tracy D., 58, of Boardman; day from 4 to 7 p.m. at R. Cunning- Pamela (John) Datko, both of
no calling hours; Rossi & Santucci ham Funeral Home and Crematory Boardman; four grandsons, Justin,
Funeral Home.
Inc.
Vincent III and Christopher Atwood and Ethan Datko; and three
HOLISKY, Bernice J., 76, of LeeROMANKO, Mary S., 89, of
tonia; calling hours Thursday from Boardman; calling hours Thursday sisters, Kim (Gary) Steilen of Mich9 to 10:30 a.m. at Woods-Rettig Fu- from 9 to 10 a.m. at St. Stanislaus igan, and Michelle (George)
Schultz and Kerry (Bryon) Steneral Home.
Kostka Catholic Church; Kubinaphens, both of Kentucky.
HUDSON, William H., of Hermit- Yuhasz-Wasko Funeral Home.
Tracy was preceded in death by
age, Pa., formerly of Cadiz; calling
SCHIPPERT, Jennifer Lyn, 36, of her parents and husband.
hours Thursday from 5 to 8 p.m. at Lake Milton; calling hours ThursJ. Bradley McGonigle Funeral
day from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. at Lane
Home and Crematory Inc. in Shar- Family Funeral Homes, Austintown
on, Pa.
Chapel.
YELLOW
Arrangements are being handled by the Lane Family Funeral
Homes, Canfield Chapel.
Friends and family may visit
www.lanefuneralhomes.com to
view this obituary and give their
condolences.
NEW CASTLE, PA. - William Theodore Proch, 79, passed away the
evening of July 20, 2015.
Born Nov. 25, 1935, in New Castle, he was the son of Michael and
Mary Chekas Proch.
He is survived by his wife of 58
years, Bonnie Louise White Proch,
whom he married on July 27, 1957.
William graduated from Shenango High School in 1954. He
then attended Youngstown State
University. He was employed for
48 years at LTV Steel as a plant
manager, and retired in 2002.
William was a member of the
Eagles, Shenley Senior Center, and
the National Managers Association. He enjoyed dancing, boating,
and traveling. Most of all, he loved
spending time with his grandchildren. He was a former member of
the Holy Trinity Ukrainian Orthodox Church, until its closing. He
then became a member of St. Elias Orthodox Church.
In addition to his wife, Bonnie,
William is survived by one daughter, Bonnie L. (Andrew) Bakes of
Girard; two sons, Gary W. (Cheryl)
Proch of Parma and Mark A. Proch
of Springville, Pa.; one brother,
Joseph Proch of New Castle; one
sister, Olga Herman of New Castle;
eight grandchildren, Keri Proch
Daugherty, Matthew, Zachary, and
Kaitlyn Proch, Brandon and Melanie Bakes, and Gabriel and Delaney Proch; and two great-grandchildren, Ryan Daugherty and Ma-
son Owen.
In addition to his parents, he
was preceded in death by four sisters, Mary Russell, Helen Proch,
Katherine Yarema, and Irene Miller; and four brothers, Leo, John,
Michael, and Walter Proch.
Visitation will be held on Thursday from 4 to 7 p.m. at the R. Cunningham Funeral Home and Crematory Inc., 2429 Wilmington
Road. A funeral service will take
place on Friday at 10 a.m. at the
St. Elias Antiochian Orthodox
Church, 915 Lynn St., with the Rev.
Richard Salley officiating.
Burial will be at the St. Nicholas
Orthodox Cemetery.
Memorial contributions can be
made to St. Elias Antiochian Orthodox Church, 915 Lynn St., New
Castle, PA 16101.
Visit www.cunninghamfh.com
to offer online condolences.
07-22-15
MARGARET DIPINTO, 78
STRUTHERS - Margaret DiPinto,
78, passed away Monday morning,
July 20, 2015, at Maplecrest Nursing Home, after complications following an aneurysm.
“Margie” was born Jan. 28,
1937, in Carteret, N.J., to Paul and
Elsie Stefura Kish.
The Kish family moved to
Campbell during her youth, and
she graduated from Campbell Memorial High School. She married
Jack DiPinto in 1957.
Margie worked for 13 years at
the Kroger Company and then for
another 25 years at Giant Eagle
until her retirement in 2008. Her
home was her palace, and she
loved entertaining family and
friends. An avid cooker/baker, no
one ever left her house hungry.
She enjoyed gardening and just
hanging out with her friends in
the backyard.
Other pastimes included daily
lunch and galavants with her
friend, Darla Dellick, casino jaunts,
and visiting her grandchildren in
California. She looked forward to
summer Sunday afternoons sitting with her beloved dog, Rocky,
high school friends, Dorothy and
Dee, neighbor Louise, sister Betty
and their personal chef, Greg St.
Pierre. Friday afternoons were reserved for her hair appointment
with Cathy and the girls at the C&L
Salon.
Mrs. DiPinto was a 50-year
member of St. Nicholas Church in
Struthers, as well as a member of
the ladies Bagnolese Club and the
Jednota Club.
Mrs. DiPinto is survived by her
sons, Jack DiPinto of Redondo
Beach, Calif., and Paul DiPinto
(Cathy Safarek) of Struthers;
grandchildren Breana and Nico
DiPinto of Redondo Beach and Mi-
chael Safarek of Youngstown; siblings Betty (Larry) Matzye of
Struthers, Paul (Dorothy) Kish of
Campbell, Shirley (Rudy) Zura of
Campbell and Sue (Jerry) Macala
of Rancho Cucamonga, Calif. She
loved and adored each and every
one of her 15 nephews and nieces
and their offspring. She also
leaves cousins in New Jersey and
John and Teresa Gabriele of
Struthers.
Mrs. DiPinto was preceded in
death by her parents, Paul and Elsie Kish; and brothers Mike Kish
and Butch Kish.
A prayer service will be held
Saturday at 9:15 a.m. at the Cunningham-Becker Funeral Home,
Poland Chapel, followed by a Mass
of Christian Burial at Christ Our
Savior Parish at St. Nicholas Roman Catholic Church in Struthers,
with Fr. Bernard Gaeta officiating.
Interment will follow at the Lake
Park Cemetery.
Friends may call on Friday from
4 to 7 p.m. at the funeral home.
Visit www.beckerobits.com to
send condolences.
07-22-15
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MAGENTA
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A8 THE VINDICATOR | WEDNESDAY, JULY 22, 2015
MAGENTA
ATLANTA – Celebration of
Life services were held on July 11,
at the Israel Missionary Baptist
Church for Joyce Marie ThomasPippins, who was born Jan. 29,
1943, to James Jay Thomas and
Erma Thomas. She was raised in
Youngstown and attended the
Tabernacle Baptist Church.
She left Youngstown in 1976,
and married Dea. Alton L. Pippins.
To this union, two children were
MARVIN V. HAMILTON, 82
born, Dea. Michael Pippins and
Brenda J. Pippins-Martin.
MCDONALD - Marvin V. HamilJoyce went to Dekalb College
ton, 82, passed away on Saturday,
and graduated in 1985, with a deJuly 18, 2015, at his residence.
gree in Nursing. Mrs. Pippins was
Marvin was born May 28, 1933,
employed with St. Elizabeth
in Clarksburg, W.Va., the son of
Health Center, Grady Memorial,
the late Alva E. and Mildred A. RoPiedmont, ValleyCare Northside
mesburg Hamilton.
and Dekalb Medical Centers.
Marvin retired in 1993, after 30
In 1978, she became a member
years as a security officer for
of the Israel Missionary Baptist
General Motors. He served his
Church, under the leadership of
country during the Korean conthe Rev. William Smith, where she
flict, in the U.S. Army, as a medic.
was an active member of the
He was a member of the Four Mile
Smith Gospel Choir, January birth
Run Christian Church, Argus F&AM
month, deaconess ministry, hospiNo. 545 Masonic Lodge of Canfield his son, Marvin V. Hamilton II and
tality committee, Mission in Acand was a lifetime member of
his brother, Alva T. Hamilton.
tion and Pastor’s anniversary
V.F.W. No. 4922 of McDonald. He
Funeral services will be held on committee. She was also affiliated
enjoyed fishing and hunting, and
Friday, July 24, at 11 a.m., at the
with the Golden Dome chapter of
was an avid Cleveland Indians and Blackstone Funeral Home in GirABWA (American Business Women
Browns fan.
ard. Interment will follow at Girard Association).
Marvin married the former Ed- City Cemetery, with military honOn Tuesday, June 30, after a
na P. Eddy, on Nov. 28, 1953. After
ors.
prolonged illness, Joyce departed
48 years of marriage, Edna died
The family will receive relatives this life and made her transition
on Sept. 26, 2002.
and friends on Thursday from 6 to to her heavenly resting place.
He is survived by his sons, Ran- 8 p.m., with a Masonic service held
She was preceded in death by
dall B. (Cindy) Hamilton of Valenat 8 p.m.
her parents, Jay and Erma Thocia, Calif., and Rodney B (Linda)
The family requests any mateHamilton of Canfield; sister Joy
rial contributions be made to the
Lee Boone of Katy, W.Va.; four
Salvation Army, in Marvin’s memgrandchildren, Ryan (Sarah) Ham- ory.
ilton of Canfield, Krista Hamilton
BERNICE J.
Visit www.blackstonefuneralof Newton Falls, Blake Hamilton of home.com to view this obituary
LEETONIA - Bernice J. Holisky,
Coventry, Conn., and Kelsey (Jaand to send any condolences to
76,
died Monday, July 20, 2015, at
mie) Buehler of Aiken, S.C.; a
the family.
Omni Manor Health Care Center in
great-granddaughter, Sophia
Youngstown.
Buehler; and his special lady
Mrs. Holisky was born Sept. 24,
friend, Ruthie Snovak of Youngs1938, in Salem, a daughter of the
town.
late Ernest L. and Jennie J. Cross
He was preceded in death by
07-22-15
Baker.
WEST MIDDLESEX, PA. – Harold
L. Barr, 80, of Sharon-Bedford
Road, passed away at 4:46 p.m. on
Sunday, July 19, 2015, at his residence.
Harold was born Sept. 18, 1934,
in Frankstown, Pa., to Florence
May Helsel Barr and John Eugene
Barr.
He married Thelma Jean Gordon on July 25, 1959.
Harold worked for 37 years at
Valley Mold and Iron as a crane
operator and later as a mobile
mechanic, before retiring. He was
an active member of the United
Methodist Church in West Middlesex. He was also a veteran, having
served his country in the U.S. Army.
Survivors include his loving
wife, Thelma of their residence;
two daughters, Deborah J. Colberg of Locast Grove, Va., and
Shari L. Burkman and husband
Duane of Canton, Ga.; one son, Richard L. Barr and wife Crystal of
Canton, Ga.; one sister, Jean
McCloskey of Altoona, Pa.; five
grandchildren; and three greatgrandchildren.
He was preceded in death by
his parents; five sisters, Verna,
Mary, Ethel, Ester, and Julia; and
four brothers, John, Clair, Ted
and, James.
Visitation will be held from 4 to
7 p.m., today, July 22, 2015, at the
Smith Funeral Home, 3126 Main St.
in West Middlesex.
A funeral service, with full military honors, will take place at
11 a.m. on Thursday, July 23, 2015,
at the funeral home. The Rev.
Wade Barto of the United Methodist Church of West Middlesex will
officiate. Interment will follow at
Haywood Cemetery in West Middlesex.
Memorial contributions may be
sent to the church.
07-22-15
VIOLA MARGARET “PENNY” WULFERT, 60
AUSTINTOWN - Viola Margaret
“Penny” Wulfert, 60, formerly of
Girard, passed away peacefully
Sunday morning, July 19, 2015, at
Briarfield Manor.
Viola was born March 20, 1955,
in Youngstown, a daughter of Carl
and Grace Marie Dutrow Wulfert,
and was a lifelong area resident.
Penny was a 1975 graduate of
Chaney High School and she enjoyed playing bingo, working
seek-and-find word puzzles, and
visiting with people.
She was a member of the First
Presbyterian Church of Girard.
Penny leaves to cherish her
memory her father, Carl Clifford
“Cliff” Wulfert of Austintown; two
cousins, Pamela Case-Paul of Girard and Larry Means of Austintown; and many, loving extended
family members and friends.
She will always be remembered
as a very loving, cheerful, and
happy person, and will be truly
and sadly missed by all who knew
and loved her
Her mother, Grace Marie Wulfert, preceded her in death.
Family and friends may call
from 1 to 3 p.m., Thursday, July 23,
at Kinnick Funeral Home, McClurkin Memorial Chapel, 222 S. State
St., Girard, where funeral services
will follow at 3 p.m.
Interment will take place at
Churchill Cemetery in Liberty
Township.
Penny’s family would like to
thank the staff of Briarfield Manor, and the staff of St. Elizabeth
Health Center in Youngstown, especially the neuro-intensive care
staff, for the kindness shown and
care given to Penny.
Penny’s family suggests that
memorial contributions be made
in Penny’s name to First Presbyterian Church of Girard, 890
Churchill Road, Girard, OH 44420.
Please visit kinnickfuneralhome.com to view this obituary
and to send condolences online to
Penny’s family.
07-22-15
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JOYCE MARIE THOMAS-PIPPINS
HAROLD L. BARR, 80
YELLOW
BOARDMAN HIGH SCHOOL
Drug testing starts
for fall athletes
By JORDYN GRZELEWSKI
[email protected]
BOARDMAN
mas; her brother, Timothy Allen;
and her beloved daughter, Brenda
J. Martin; and husband Alton Pippins.
She leaves to cherish her memory, her son, Michael Pippins; two
granddaughters, Jenecia and Joi
Pippins; one great-grandson, Jayden Pippins; sisters Barbara Jean
Thomas, Theresa Thomas, Carmen
(Danny) Reynolds, and Raquel
(Fred) Walker; brothers Raymond
(Patricia) Thomas, Lawrence Thomas, Leonard (Yvonne) Thomas,
James Thomas, and Ronnie (Mattie) Hill; stepmother Emma Thomas-Lewis; uncle Robert Adkins;
sisters-in-law Jimmie N. Edwards
and Delores Pippins; goddaughter
April Cline; extended family, Callie
Hill, Cleola Evans, Sarah Kendrick,
Carrie Mitchell, Annie Mae Smith
and Willene Arnold; and a host of
cousins, nieces, nephews and
friends.
07-22-15
HOLISKY, 76
Bernice had worked as a dietician and managed Bea’s Boarding
Home in Leetonia. She was a
member of St. Patrick Catholic
Church and the Eagles Auxiliary,
Leetonia.
Her husband, Paul R. Holisky,
whom she married June 8, 1957,
preceded her in death on June 15,
2009.
She is survived by a daughter,
Pamela Marie (Lewis) Skruck of
McDonald; a son, Paul D. (Melissa)
Holisky of Girard; six sisters, Delores Newton of Leetonia, Mary
(John) Bukovina of Mineral Ridge,
Patricia (David) Smith of Washingtonville, Tammy (James) Maynard
of Leetonia, Christine (Kurt)
Kampfer of Leetonia, and Shirley
(John) Ferry of Leetonia; two
brothers, Anthony Baker of Zephyrhills, Fla., and Wilson (Patti) Baker of Elkton; a sister-in-law, Oralee
Baker of Sebring; three grandchildren; and two stepgrandchildren.
Bernice was preceded in death
by a brother, Ernest D. Baker; and
a granddaughter, Ariann Holisky.
A Mass of Christian Burial will
be held at 11 a.m. on Thursday, July 23, 2015, at St. Patrick Catholic
Church, with the Rev. Richard Murphy officiating.
Burial will follow at Mt. Calvary
Cemetery.
Friends may call at the WoodsRettig Funeral Home in Leetonia
from 9 to 10:30 a.m. on Thursday.
Family and friends may visit
www.familycareservices.com to
view this obituary and send condolences.
07-22-15
The school district will
begin drug testing fall athletes today.
This round of testing
begins the second year of
mandatory drug testing for
student athletes and drivers.
Superintendent Frank
Lazzeri characterizes last
year’s implementation of
mandatory testing as “outstanding,” say ing only
three out of approximately
750 students – about half
of Boardman’s high-school
population – tested positive.
“Just the opportunity the
kids are given to say no to
drugs helps them avoid
the peer pressure,” Lazzeri
said. “It gives them an excuse to make a good choice
in their life.”
The policy, which at
first was voluntary for that
group of students, will expand this year to become
voluntary for extracurricular groups such as student
council.
Eventually it will become
mandatory for that student
population as well, Lazzeri
said.
He also expects to expand the program to the
middle schools two years
from now, a step he plans to
recommend to the board of
education.
Tests, which can detect
drug use within a period
of about 90 days, are taken
from hair samples.
Student drivers and athletes must be tested before
they are permitted to drive
to school or begin their
sports season.
They also are entered
into a pool for random drug
testing throughout the
year. About 100 students
were drawn from that pool
last year.
D r u g
testing cost
the district
roughly
$38,000 last
school year.
Lazzeri said
he expects
Lazzeri
to lower that
cost this
year because he found a
cheaper option, but thinks
the cost is worth what the
community gets out of the
policy.
“I think taxpayers realize even though it’s an additional cost to them, it’s
a good program in that” it
might steer a child away
from a life of drug addiction, he said, noting that
addiction-related crimes
end up costing taxpayers
money because of the resources law enforcement
officials must devote.
“If it saves one life, if it
prevents kids from making
bad choices ... it’s worth it,”
he said.
Lazzeri says drug testing
is not meant to be punitive;
if a student does test positive, the student would be
offered help and would not
be excluded from participating in the chosen sport
or club.
It’s one of several methods by which the school
district is trying to combat
drug use among students.
Another anti-drug measure is YesFest, an annual
event that connects students with community
outreach opportunities and
encourages them to make
good choices.
The school district’s focus on preventing drug use
sharpened after several
Boardman graduates died
of drug overdoses in recent
years.
“It’s not easy. You can’t
reach every child. But we
will not give up on any
child,” Lazzeri said of the
district’s efforts.
CAMPBELL HIGH SCHOOL
Board will move forward to fix damage to light pole, bleachers
Staff report
many fans worried about of repairing the bleachers we are on schedule to see
CAMPBELL Campbell’s fall football sea- and installing a new light these improvements, al-
son.
But the board of education
passed a resolution Tuesday
to move forward with repairing the damage.
A claim paid by Liberty
Mutual Insurance will cover
the estimated $228,361 cost
pole. If the repairs are not
done in time for the fall season due to weather or other
circumstances, the claim
allots the district $27,000 to
rent a mobile light pole for
a month.
“With great anticipation,
though we have a contingency plan just in case,”
Superintendant Matthew
Bowen said.
Campbell’s first home
game will take place at
7 p.m. Aug. 28 against
Lakeview High School.
ened officers and staff and pulled
away from police who tried to
take her into custody. The pool
manager at some point used pepper spray on her, reports said.
Hill was arrested on charges of
Charged after standoff
resisting arrest, disorderly conWARREN
duct and menacing.
Timothy Miller, 48, the man
who barricaded himself in his
Warrant in theft case
house at 1037 Southern Blvd. on
HUBBARD
Monday afternoon and refused
Police filed a warrant Tuesday
to come out for about four hours,
for the arrest of Jasmine Smith,
was charged with three criminal
20, of Youngstown, on a charge
offenses Tuesday.
of theft. According to a police
He faces felony charges of inreport, Smith attempted to cash
ducing panic and misdemeanor
a $990 handwritten check from
discharging firearms and using
Downtown Coffee Cafe on North
weapons while intoxicated. It’s un- Main Street in Hubbard at Check
known when he will be arraigned. Smart on Gypsy Lane on June 27.
He was taken to a local hospital
The Downtown Coffee Cafe
for an evaluation Monday night.
bookkeeper said the check was
Family members called police forged, and Smith did not work
about 4:30 p.m. after hearing
for the business.
a gunshot in his house. Police
called the Mahoning Valley Crisis DUI, drug charges
Response Team to assist.
LIBERTY
Miller walked out of the house
Police arrested Jason Marble,
and was taken into custody
35, of Youngstown on Monday
about 8:50 p.m. His only injuries on charges of driving under the
were bruises resulting from bean influence, possession of drugs
bags being fired at him to try to
and possession of drug-abuse
stun him so he could be taken
instruments.
into custody.
A police report states that
Marble
was unconscious behind
Refuses to leave pool
the wheel while his car was rollYOUNGSTOWN ing toward Belmont Avenue.
A Columbus woman was taken Once he was revived, Marble told
to the Mahoning County jail
paramedics he had consumed an
Monday after reports said she re- undetermined amount of Vicofused to leave North Side pool for din, according to the report. The
violating pool rules.
report also states that Marble
Police were called to the pool
had a Vicodin pill and a hypoderat 602 Tod Lane about 6:45 p.m., mic needle in his possession.
where reports said an off-duty
Marble will be arraigned Tuesday
police officer working pool secu- in Girard Municipal Court.
rity tried to get Caprice Hill, 28, to
Sign up for band camp
leave and she refused.
According to police reports,
YOUNGSTOWN
she was asked to leave because
Parents and guardians of
she was pushing children into the Youngstown City Schools eighthwater and did not stop even after through-12th-graders may sign
being asked to stop several times. them up for band camp. The
Reports said Hill swore, threat- camp runs from Monday to Aug.
19 at the Chaney Campus, and
transportation will be provided to
participants at designated sites.
There is a $20 fee to cover
each student’s instrument rental
for this summer’s band camp, as
well as for the school year. The
camp runs from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
next week and the following week,
and from 3 to 6 p.m. through
the end. Contact Band Director
Shawn Marko at 330-720-5754 or
Natalie Griffin, secretary, at 330744-6985 for information.
in Farmington Township will be
closed from 7 to 9 p.m. Friday for
the West Farmington Festival 5K
Race. The township will also close
Larson-West Road from Girdle
Road to Curtis-Middlefield Road.
The recommended detour
route is east on Larson-West;
south on state Route 534; and
west on Route 88.
This fall, the Campbell
Memorial High School football team will once again
play under the lights.
Last May, a light pole blew
over during a thunderstorm
and damaged the school’s
bleachers. Because of this,
METRO
digest
Closed for block party
WARREN
Belmont Street at Mercher
and North Park in Warren will be
Arrested on DUI charge closed from 3 to 7 p.m. Saturday
CAMPBELL for a block party.
Police arrested Michael Kantaras, 67, of Campbell at Gordon Talent show, awards
Avenue and 14th Street on a
WARREN
charge of driving under the influThe 300 students enrolled
ence of alcohol or drugs Monday. in the Inspiring Minds summer
He will be arraigned Friday in
enrichment mark the end of the
Campbell Municipal Court.
program Friday with an awards
ceremony and talent show.
Planning meeting set
The awards ceremony begins
BELOIT at 1 p.m. followed by the programThe West Branch school board wide talent show at 1:45 p.m.,
will have a special meeting for
both in the cafetorium at Warren
strategic planning from 3 to 6
G. Harding High School. The free
p.m. today in the media room at
six-week program for students in
the high school, 14277 Main St.
third through 12th grades works
to prevent the summer learning
Police probe thefts
loss, offering art, sports, swimHUBBARD ming lessons, yoga, community
Township police are investigat- service, college visits, business
ing thefts reported Monday by
tours, cooking lessons and field
two businesses on Truck World
trips. Parents, community supBoulevard.
porters and partners are expected at Friday’s event.
The owner of C.B. Shop told
police he returned to his busiTraffic-stop drug arrest
ness Monday to find that it was
STRUTHERS
unlocked and that someone had
A traffic stop Monday at Waltaken $100 in cash.
nut Street and Elm Street led to
A Flynn’s Tire employee told
an arrest of a man on charges
police someone had gotten past
the warehouse’s locked gates and of possession of drugs and drug
taken $2,320 worth of items from paraphernalia. A police report
states that Timothy Valley, 31,
the company’s service trucks.
of Youngstown, had suspected
Roads closed for race
marijuana and a grinder with susWEST FARMINGTON pected marijuana residue in his
vehicle. He will be arraigned today
Girdle Road between Larsonin Struthers Municipal Court.
West Road and state Route 88
A8 - 07/22/15
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Published Daily | Youngstown, Ohio
WEDNESDAY
T H E P E O P L E ’ S PA P E R U Founded June 1869
JULY 22, 2015
VINDY.COM | A9
Betty H. Brown Jagnow, President & Publisher
Mark A. Brown, General Manager
Past Publishers
William F. Maag Sr., February 28, 1850–April 10, 1924
William F. Maag Jr., July 26, 1883–February 29, 1968
William J. Brown, June 14, 1913–August 14, 1981
BLACK
Doyle
McManus
EDITORIAL
Hillary’s
economic
platform
intrigues
Tennessee shooting spree
calls for vigilance, patience
A
DER A NGED GUNM A N’S
deadly attack on two U.S. military
facilities in Chattanooga, Tenn.,
last week underscores the validity of the
heightened terrorism consciousness in
this country.
As such, it also underscores the necessity for a thorough investigation into this
particularly brazen rampage and a comprehensive review of intelligence procedures designed to lessen the threat of
such seeming “lone-wolf” attacks on our
homeland.
On Thursday, 24-year-old Muhammad
Youssef Abdulazeez sprayed dozens of
bullets at a military recruiting center at
a strip mall in Chattanooga, then drove
to a Navy-Marine training center a few
miles away and shot up the installation,
killing four Marines and one Navy sailor.
The bullets smashed through windows
and sent service members scrambling for
cover. The triggerman himself was shot
and killed.
According to U.S. Attorney Bill Killian, federal officials are investigating
the shooting spree as an “act of domestic terrorism.” Indeed the horrific attack conjures up images of the April 2014
shootings at the Fort Hood Army post in
Texas that left three people dead and
more than a dozen wounded and the
2009 attack there that killed 13 people
and wounded more than 30.
It is but the latest in a series of similar
troubling incidents.
Federal authorities have charged 62
people with planning attacks on the
homeland on behalf of the Islamic State
or trying to provide material support to
the terror group over the past two years.
An internal congressional document
shows that federal authorities have uncovered more U.S.-based terror plots or
attacks in the first half of 2015 than in any
year since terrorists crashed planes into
the New York City World Trade Center
towers and the Pentagon in Washington,
killing 3,000.
Such data clearly illustrate the need for
vigilance on the part of U.S. authorities
and all Americans to work assiduously
to lessen the threats against our courageous military personnel and against all
Americans. It also, however, underscores
the necessity for patience and avoiding
rash, shortsighted policies.
After all, the motives behind Abdulazeez’s attack remain cloudy. Yes, he was
a convert to Islamic ideology. But authorities have not yet discovered any documented evidence of the man from a
dysfunctional family showing any signs
of strong allegiance to the Islamic State,
al-Qaida or other affiliates in the world’s
growing global terror network.
DON’T ARM RECRUITING STATIONS
As such, proposals that call for arming
all military personnel at recruiting stations and other soft targets are unwarranted. Stricter security of such agencies,
including patrols by local and state lawenforcement officers, may be warranted.
Arming military personnel inside them
is not prudent, at least not yet. Military
recruiting and reserve stations are designed to be open and welcoming to the
public, not off-putting and fearful symbols of a military state.
“I think we have to be careful about
over-arming ourselves, and I’m not talking about where you end up attacking
each other,” Gen. Ray Odierno, chief of
staff of the Army, said recently. Instead,
he said, it’s more about “accidental discharges and everything else that goes
along with having weapons that are loaded that causes injuries.”
Before implementing any structural
changes to current operating procedures
that Americans may later regret, we encourage a strict and comprehensive investigation to play out.
Right now, there are far more questions
than answers swirling around the Chattanooga massacre: How did Abdulazeez
obtain his firearms? What motivated
him to carry out the deadly rampage?
Did he act alone or in alliance with ISIS or
another terrorist group?
Until they are fully answered, America
should not act by the seat of its pants with
premature strategies that could very well
undermine the very freedoms our military works so valiantly to protect.
Unelected judges, bureaucrats
acquire too much power,
trample will of the people
The U.S. Supreme Court
recently ruled that the Const it ut ion somehow c onveys a fundamental right
to cha nge t he def init ion
of ma r r iage. T h is r u l i ng
essentially vacated the voice
of approximately 30 million
Americans from 13 states,
including Ohio, who had
a l ready acted to protect
the traditional definition
of marriage – through the
ballot box.
Many now fear, confirmed
by the solicitor general, that it is
possible, if not likely, that ministers will face lawsuits or government investigations if they
don’t agree to abandon their
deeply held religious beliefs
and officiate at gay weddings.
Using this new Supreme Court
decision, government agents
and lawyers are more likely
than ever before to target
Americans who still – in the
words of President Obama –
dare to “cling to their faith.”
As a man of faith, I share
t hei r c onc er n s. W h i le I
don’t t h i n k gover n ment
shou ld ever be i nvolved
in reg ulating t he private
morality of American citiz en s, I a lso don’t t h i n k
the term “marriage” – the
building block of our society – can, with the stroke of
a pen, be cha nged. Even
some liberal scholars have
acknowledged that the court
overstepped its constitutional
authority by circumventing
the people’s role in our democratic process or using reasoning without constitutional
roots. This type of abuse of
power is creating a widening fracture in our society.
We must ask ourselves: If the
courts can dictate this, then
what will they dictate next?
EXECUTIVE BRANCH OVERREACH
The Supreme Court isn’t
alone in being a branch of the
federal government making
sweeping policy changes that
it shouldn’t be. The executive
Bill Johnson
branch, through regulation, is
enacting thousands of policies that directly and indirectly impact almost every
aspect of our lives. These
u n e l e c t e d Wa s h i n g t o n
bureaucrats a re not
accountable to the American
people, despite their legislating via regulation.
Today, regulators, at the
president’s direction, are
actively tr ying to put the
coal industry out of business and raise our electricity
costs through regulations issued by the EPA and the Office of Surface Mining. The
unelected commissioners at
the Federal Communications
Commission recently voted to
begin regulating the Internet
– the effects of which we’ll feel
after the lawsuits have been
settled. Bureaucrats at the Department of Health and Human Services are determining
what can – and cannot – be
included in Americans’ health
insurance policies. The Food
and Drug Administration issues diet dictates and calorie
counts on America’s food producers, and, today, most aspects of financing a home are
governed by Washington; not
coincidentally, fewer families
are receiving mortgages to
buy homes.
Unelected citizens – be they
judges or bureaucrats – imposing their will on their fellow citizens is not healthy for
our democratic republic.
Chief Justice John Roberts was correct in his dissent of the Supreme Court’s
recent ruling when he said
that only through our democratic process are both sides
able to claim ownership in
the final outcome of important policy decisions like this.
UR FOUNDERS
DID NOT WANT
POLICY SET BY THE
UNELECTED – THAT ’S WHY
O
THEY BROKE FREE OF KING
GEORGE AND THE BRITISH
EMPIRE TO ESTABLISH SOMETHING NEW, WHERE THE WILL
OF THE PEOPLE WOULD DETERMINE THE COURSE OF
GOVERNMENT.
SOUL OF NATION IGNORED
That means that in the final outcome, in a system
of government “of, for, and
by the people,” relying on
a forced v ictor y t hrough
t he n a r r ow e s t of c ou r t
decisions to trample the will
of the people – regardless
of the issue – will not fully
speak for the heart and soul
of our nation. Such big gover n ment over re ach w i l l
ultimately lose the hearts and
minds of our people.
Our Founders did not want
policy set by the unelected –
that’s why they broke free of
King George and the British
Empire to establish something new, where the will of
the people would determine
the course of government.
We can do better than this
era of top-down government.
We must do better. We owe it
to our children and our grandchildren. We owe it to those
before us that put their lives
on the line to create America, and all those generations
since that paid the ultimate
sacrifice to preserve it.
We cannot afford to remain
silent on these issues.
Republican Bill Johnson is the U.S. House
representative for Ohio’s 6th District, which
includes Columbiana County and portions of
Mahoning County.
Correction
J. Michael Thompson is no longer
president of the Mahoning County Bar
Association. George Millich recently succeeded Thompson as president of the organization. An editor’s identification of
Thompson as president of the group in a
letter to the editor published Tuesday was
incorrect.
SCRIPTURES
And I will pour on the house of David
and on the inhabitants of Jerusalem the
Spirit of grace and supplication; then
they will look on Me whom they pierced.
QUOTE OF THE DAY
“There are so many men, and
some women, who served and
sacrificed and happened to
be held prisoner – and somehow to denigrate that, in any
way, their service I think is
offensive.”
Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., in
response to remarks by GOP
presidential candidate
Donald Trump that questioned McCain’s military
service and heroism
Zechariah 12:10 NKJV
For most of a generation,
Democrats have divided into
two broad camps on economic policy. There are “growth
Democrats,” who argue that
a rising tide will lift all boats;
that was the reigning view
during the Bill Clinton administration under Treasury
Secretaries Robert Rubin and
Lawrence H. Summers. And
there are “fairness Democrats,” who argue that the
central problem is inequality.
That’s the view of the party’s
progressive wing, led today by
Sen. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts and Sen. Bernie
Sanders of Vermont.
As she began spelling out her
views for the 2016 presidential
campaign, Hillary Rodham
Clinton faced a choice: Which
Democrat was she going to be?
Her answer: She wants to
be both. “I believe we have to
build a growth and fairness
economy,” she said last week.
“You can’t have one without
the other.”
Politically, that put Clinton
exactly where she wants to
be: to the left of her husband’s
long-ago administration, which
progressives think was too solicitous toward Wall Street, but
to the right of Sanders, who’s
running as the scourge of the
billionaire class.
So her economic policy
speech included a dose of the
pro-worker Hillary, calling
for stronger union bargaining power and demanding
equal pay for equal work, but
also the pro-business Hillary,
extolling entrepreneurs and
promising to be “the smallbusiness president.”
RECYCLED OBAMA
There was recycled Obama
administration policy too: a
higher minimum wage, an infrastructure bank, investment
in education and renewable
energy. In economic policy
a Hillary Clinton presidency
would look more like a third
Obama term than a third Bill
Clinton term.
But she offered some intriguing new elements as well
– policies that could not only
help her bridge the gaps between her party’s wings but
also make her pitch more than
just a warmed-over version of
the last eight years.
She promised proposals to
promote long-term investment by businesses instead
of a chase for quarterly results
- a problem she called “shorttermism.” (It may be the first
time any presidential candidate has ever said that.)
“Too many pressures in
our economy push us toward
short-termism,” Clinton said.
“Everything is focused on the
next earnings report or the
short-term share price, and the
result is too little attention to the
sources of long-term growth: research and development, physical capital and talent.”
She promised proposals for
“making sure stock buybacks
aren’t used only for an immediate boost in share prices,” a practice economists fear is soaking
up funds that might go to more
productive investments. And
she said she wants to make sure
stock markets “work for everyday investors, not just high-frequency traders.”
Clinton hasn’t spelled out
any details yet. But it sounded
as though she may propose
changing Securities and Exchange Commission rules to
make it harder for companies
to buy back their own stock,
an idea Warren and other progressives have championed.
Aides said Clinton also plans
to propose changes in the tax
treatment of capital gains – income from investments – to
reward long-term investors.
Laurence Fink, chairman of
the investment firm BlackRock, has proposed lengthening the holding period for
long-term capital gains) from
one year to three years, and
perhaps making all gains taxfree after 10 years.
Clinton has managed not
only to find a sensible starting point in the middle of the
Democratic Party; she’s introduced some useful new ideas
to the campaign and launched
a debate that will force rivals
in both parties to respond.
Los Angeles Times
A9 07-22-15
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BLACK
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digest
Gun-firing drone
sparks probe
CLINTON, CONN.
An 18-year-old Connecticut man may be in trouble
with federal aviation officials
after posting a video online
that shows shots being fired
from a drone that had been
jury-rigged with a handgun.
The Federal Aviation Administration said Tuesday
it is investigating whether
Austin Haughwout of Clinton violated its regulations,
which prohibit the careless
or reckless operation of a
model aircraft.
Haughwout’s father told
WFSB-TV last week that his
son created the drone with
the help of a Central Connecticut State University
professor. The 14-second
video shows a four-propeller
drone with a semiautomatic
handgun strapped on top
hovering as it fires four
shots in a wooded area.
Car bomb kills 14
BAGHDAD
An Iraqi police official in
Baghdad says a car bomb
detonated in front of a busy
clothing store, killing 14 people and wounding 30.
The explosion happened
in the predominantly Shiite
district of New Baghdad late
Tuesday. A hospital official
corroborated the casualties.
Both spoke on the condition
of anonymity because they
are not authorized to brief
the media.
No one has claimed responsibility for the attack,
however, the Islamic State
group has been targeting
Shiites across the country
as it seeks to destabilize the
Shiite-led government in
Baghdad.
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BREAKING NEWS
JULY 22, 2015
THE VINDICATOR | A10
Go to vindy.com for regional,
national and world news, 24/7.
Walker OKs guns
for Wisconsin guard
Associated Press
ities say the shooter was 24-year-old
MADISON, WIS. Muhammed Youssef Abdulazeez, a
Republican Gov. Scott Walker issued an executive order Tuesday authorizing Wisconsin National Guard
personnel to carry firearms while
on duty in the wake of an attack on
a pair of military facilities in Chattanooga, Tenn.
The governor’s order directed Maj.
Gen. Don Dunbar, who oversees the
Wisconsin National Guard, to arm
guard personnel “as reasonably necessary.” Walker also said in a news
release that he ordered Dunbar to
review the long-term security plans
for all of the guard’s facilities.
“Safety must be our top priority,
especially in light of the horrific attack in Chattanooga,” Walker said
in the release.
Dunbar immediately ordered
the posting of armed guardsmen
at the guard’s four storefront recruiting stations in Eau Claire, La
Crosse, Madison and Milwaukee,
said Maj. Paul Rickert, the guard’s
spokesman. Visitors to those locations should be prepared to have
their bags searched, Rickert said.
The guard began a security review
Monday evening after learning the
order was about to come down, he
added.
Walker’s order comes after a gunman killed four U.S. Marines and
a Navy sailor at two Chattanooga
military facilities Thursday. Author-
naturalized U.S. citizen originally
from Kuwait. Police killed him.
Abdulazeez’s motives remain
unclear, although authorities are
treating it as a domestic terrorism
investigation.
Walker’s order would not affect
non-Wisconsin National Guard military offices in the state, which are
federally run.
Walker, who is seeking the 2016
presidential nomination, called Friday for an end to a ban on service
members’ carrying guns in federally operated military recruiting offices. Jeb Bush and Donald Trump,
two other Republicans seeking the
presidential nomination, called for
an end to the ban on the same day
as Walker.
Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal, yet
another GOP presidential hopeful,
issued an executive order Friday authorizing his state’s National Guard
leader to arm personnel. A number
of other governors have issued similar orders as well.
Mea nwh i le, Dona ld Tr u mp
pushed back ever harder Tuesday
against Republicans fed up with his
provocations, disclosing one opponent’s cell number in a fiery speech
and lashing out at an influential
newspaper as part of an in-your-face
escalation of the feud.
Fellow GOP presidential con-
MATTHEW PUTNEY | THE COURIER VIA AP
Republican presidential candidate Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker speaks at a fundraising event for Rep. Pat Grassley at the PIPAC Centre on the Lake on Sunday in Cedar
Falls, Iowa. On Tuesday, Walker issued an executive order authorizing Wisconsin
National Guard personnel to carry firearms while on duty.
tender Sen. Lindsey Graham called
him a “jackass,” only to see floods
of Trump supporters jam his phone
line after Trump read Graham’s
number to an audience.
Trump is now at odds with much
of the Republican establishment after a series of incendiary comments,
topped by his weekend mocking of
Arizona Sen. John McCain’s experience as a tortured prisoner of war in
Vietnam.
Since then the real-estate developer and reality-TV host has intensified his criticism of McCain and his
record on veterans issues in the Senate, even as politicians from both
parties and veterans groups have
rushed to McCain’s defense.
Associated Press
NEW YORK
Netanyahu faces
criminal probe
JERUSALEM
Israel’s prime minister faced a new scandal
Tuesday after the attorney
general ordered a criminal
investigation into excessive
spending at his residences.
Though the investigation
shows no sign of threatening Prime Minister Benjamin
Netanyahu’s hold on power, it
nonetheless gave him a new
headache at a time of growing international isolation and
domestic turmoil with a narrow and fractured coalition.
Netanyahu and his wife,
Sara, have for years faced
scrutiny over their spending
and have fended off accusations that their lifestyles are
out of touch with regular
Israelis. The prime minister
long has been saddled with
an image as a cigar-smoking,
cognac-swilling socialite,
while his wife has come under
fire for her own expensive
tastes and purported abusive
behavior toward staff.
Action delayed on
transportation bill
In a speech to hundreds of supporters in Bluffton, S.C., on Tuesday,
Trump kept on McCain, accusing
him of being soft on illegal immigration.
“He’s totally about open borders
and all this stuff,” Trump said.
Elsewhere in South Carolina on
Tuesday, one of his rivals, former
Florida Gov. Jeb Bush, walked a fine
line on Trump, criticizing his fellow
candidate’s rhetoric on immigration and McCain but saying Trump’s
supporters are “good people” with
“legitimate concerns.”
An editorial in The Des Moines
Register, in early-voting Iowa, urged
him to “pull the plug on his bloviating side show” and quit the race.
E.L. Doctorow,
‘Ragtime’ author,
dies in NY at 84
Study: Dads gain
3 to 5 pounds
Many men gain a new
sense of responsibility and
purpose when they become
fathers. A new study suggests they also gain 3 to 5
pounds.
The research wasn’t designed to prove fatherhood
causes weight gain and
raises more questions than
it answers. But one outside
expert, while noting its limitations, said the research
is provocative and should
spark further study.
Doctors pay attention
to the weight gain of mothers — both before and after
pregnancy. But the waistline
of dads? That’s not on most
doctors’ radar, said Tom
Wadden, director of the
University of Pennsylvania’s
Center for Weight and Eating Disorders.
BLACK
NEW YORK
KAREN WARREN | HOUSTON CHRONICLE VIA AP
Carie Cauley, left, Rev. Hannah Bonner and Rhys Caraway protest, after the death of Sandra Bland,
as they sit in front of the Waller County Sheriff’s Office and county jail Monday in Hempstead, Texas.
Authorities said Bland hanged herself in the jail three days after being pulled over by police on a traffic
violation and then arrested after purportedly kicking an officer during the stop. Bland’s family is ordering an independent autopsy, lawyers said.
Police video shows traffic stop
escalating when woman balks
Associated Press
T he con-
HEMPSTEAD, TEXAS v e r s a t i o n
A police dashboard video
released Tuesday shows that
a Texas state trooper drew a
stun gun on a black motorist
and said, “I will light you up”
when the woman refused to
get out of her car during a
routine traffic stop.
The roadside encounter
between the trooper and the
driver swiftly escalated into
a shouting confrontation
as the officer tried to pull
28-year-old Sandra Bland
from her vehicle. Days later,
she was found dead in jail
in a case that has caused her
family and supporters to
dispute whether she hanged
herself with a plastic garbage
bag in her cell, as authorities
have said.
The video posted by the
Texas Department of Public Safety shows the trooper
stopping Bland for failure to
signal a lane change. After
he hands her a written warning, the trooper remarks that
Bland seemed irritated. The
Illinois woman replies that
she is irritated because she
had changed lanes to make
way for the trooper’s car.
quickly turns
hostile when
t he of f icer
asks Bla nd
to put out
her cigarette
Bland
and she asks
why she can’t
smoke in her own car. The
trooper then orders Bland
to get out of the vehicle. She
refuses, and he tells her she
is under arrest.
Further refusals to get
out bring a threat from the
trooper to drag her out. He
then pulls out a stun gun
and makes the threat about
lighting Bland up.
When she finally steps out
of the vehicle, the trooper
orders her to the side of the
road. There, the confrontation continues off-camera
but is still audible. The two
keep yelling at each other as
the officer tries to put Bland
in handcuffs and waits for
other troopers to arrive.
Out of the camera’s view,
Bland goes on protesting
her arrest, repeatedly using
expletives. At one point, she
screams that he’s about to
break her wrists and complains that he knocked her
head into the ground.
The trooper said in an affidavit that after handcuffing
her for becoming combative,
she swung her elbows at him
and kicked him in his shin.
In the affidavit released
Tuesday, trooper Brian Encinia said he then used force “to
subdue Bland to the ground,”
and she continued to fight
back. He arrested her for assault on a public servant.
The trooper has been
placed on administrative
leave for violating unspecified police procedures and
the Department of Public
Safety’s courtesy policy.”
Writer E.L. Doctorow,
who w r yly reimagined
the American experience
in such
novel s a s
“Ragtime”
a nd “T he
March” and
applied its
lessons to
t he past
and future
Doctorow
i n f ic t ion
and nonfiction, has died. He was 84.
His son, Richard Doctorow, confirmed he died
Tuesday at a New York hospital from complications
of lung cancer. He lived in
New York and Sag Harbor.
Considered one of the
major authors of the 20th
century, Doctorow enjoyed
critical and popular success over his 50-year career.
He won the National Book
Award for fiction in 1986
for “World’s Fair” and the
National Book Critics Cir-
cle award in 1989 for “Billy
Bathgate” and in 2005 for
“The March.”
Besides his 10 novels, he
published two books of
short stories, a play called
“Drinks Before Dinner”
and numerous essays and
articles.
Edgar Lawrence Doctorow was born Jan. 6,
1931, in New York. He was
named after Edgar Allan
Poe, whom he often disparaged as America’s “greatest
bad writer.” His father, David Doctorow, ran a music
store, and his mother, Rose
Doctorow, was a pianist.
Doctorow graduated from
the Bronx High School of
Science and from Kenyon
College in Gambier, Ohio.
He attended graduate school
in at Columbia University
but left without completing
a doctorate. He also served
in the U.S. Army, stationed
in Germany.
World mayors at Vatican urge
action to stop climate change
Associated Press
VATICAN CITY
Mayors f rom a round
the world declared Tuesday that climate change is
real, man-made and must
be stopped as a matter of
moral imperative, gathering at the Vatican to an-
nounce new measures to
fight global warming and
bask in Pope Francis’ ecological star power.
The Vatican invited the
60 mayors to a two-day
conference to keep up pressure on world leaders ahead
of U.N. climate negotiations
in Paris later this year.
Let’s talk about
getting you more
from Medicare.
WASHINGTON
With a deadline looming
for a cutoff of highway aid to
states, Senate Republicans
failed Tuesday to muster
enough votes to take up a bill
that would extend transportation programs for six years.
Democrats complained
they’d had only an hour to
read the 1,040-page bill.
Senate Majority Leader
Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., said
he would give Democrats
more time, but added he
intends to push forward
with the bill even if it means
keeping the Senate in session over the weekend.
Associated Press
Federal appeals court overturns some
Blagojevich Senate-seat convictions
Associated Press
viser to the president’s former
CHICAGO U.S. Senate seat.
A federal appeals court
Tuesday overturned some of
the most-sensational convictions that sent former Illinois
Gov. Rod Blagojevich off to a
lengthy stint in prison, ruling
that the Democrat did not
break the law when he sought
to secure a Cabinet position
in President Barack Obama’s
administration in exchange
for appointing an Obama ad-
The 7th U.S. Circuit Court
of Appeals in Chicago also
ordered the resentencing
of Blagojevich, offering the
58-year-old a ray of hope
that he could end up serving
less than his original 14-year
term.
T he t h r e e a pp e l l a t e
judges dismissed five of 18
corruption counts against
Blagojevich, while affirming
13 counts.
Kevin Green
330-224-6705 (TTY: 711)
Talk with your local licensed
Humana sales agent today.
8 a.m. – 5 p.m., Monday – Friday
[email protected]
Humana is a Medicare Advantage organization with a Medicare contract.
Enrollment in a Humana plan depends on contract renewal. Reach Humana
sales and customer service at 1-800-336-6801 (TTY: 711), 8 a.m. – 8 p.m.,
Monday – Friday.
Y0040_GHHHXDEEN Accepted
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The Cavaliers improve their
perimeter shooting by signing
free agent Richard Jefferson.
Page B4
WEDNESDAY
JULY 22, 2015
THE VINDICATOR | B1
Phantoms’ new coach brings experience
By TOM WILLIAMS
[email protected]
YOUNGSTOWN
Two months before your
wedding, a job search enters
the mix.
Stressful recipe for most,
right?
But John Wroblewsk i,
the new head coach of the
Youngstown Phantoms, says
his life has remained steady
despite the uncertaint y
since the American Hockey
League’s Rochester Americans replaced its coaching
staff in May.
“You’d think it’s been a
tumultuous summer, but
internally we’ve been calm,
believing the right thing
would come along,” Wroblewski said Tuesday after being announced as the Phantoms’ fourth head coach in
their seven USHL seasons.
The announcement came
three days before his wed-
ding in Buffalo.
It’s hard to
imagine too
many candidates with a
more varied
coaching reWroblewski
su me t ha n
Wroblewski, 34. The previous two seasons, he was an
assistant with the Americans, the top farm club of the
National Hockey League’s
Buffalo Sabres.
Before that, he spent two
seasons (2011-13) as head
coach of the ECHL’s Gwinnett Gladiators after being
an assistant for a year with
the Wheeling Nailers, the
Pittsburgh Penguins’ ECHL
team.
His junior hockey experience includes working with
the U.S. National Under-18
from 2009-10, the Phantoms’
first season in the USHL.
One of his players was
Brandon Saad, who a season
before had been one of the
Mahoning Valley Phantoms’
top scorers in their final season in the North American
Hockey League. After winning two Stanley Cups with
the Chicago Blackhawks,
Saad was traded last month
to the Columbus Blue Jackets.
“I also was on the National Team’s staff from 2007-
09, and saw the Phantoms
transition from the [NAHL]
games at The Ice Zone to the
[Covelli Centre],” Wroblewski said.
His varied experience
made an impact with Phantoms co-owner Troy Loney.
“He’s played in our league,
been an assistant at this level,” Loney said. “He played
four years in college [Notre
See PHANTOMS, B4
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
GOING TO STATE
Canfield 11-12 team opens play Saturday in Painesville
By TOM WILLIAMS
[email protected]
I
CANFIELD
N 2013 WHEN CANFIELD’S
9-10 Little League baseball
team finished fourth in the
state tournament, the coaches learned a valuable lesson about
pitching.
“We basically ran out,” said
Dave Rose, who is helping Duke
Starr coach this year’s Canfield’s
11-12 district champions. “We put
kids on the mound who normally
did not pitch for us.
“Hopefully we’ve learned from
our experience,” Rose said. “Pitching is our strength [and] should
keep us in games.”
W hen Little League’s state
tournament begins Saturday in
Painesville, Canfield will have
eight pitchers on its roster of 13:
Brandon Mikos,
Alex Iannizzaro,
SATURDAY
Trey Dye, Cory
Rose, Luke HolCanfield
land. Brent Hervs. New Alr m a n n, D om
bany, 12:30
D e b on i s a nd
p.m., PainesAlex Smyzczynville Kiwanski.
is Recreation
The ot her
Park, 301 Lattea m memtimore St.,
bers a re Sa m
Painesville.
Sta r r, Mickey
Velasquez, Pat
Guerrieri, Mike Pelini and Steve
Zordich. Also coaching is Stoy
Holland.
This year’s state tournament format is double-elimination. Teams
that lose early will be busy.
Little League’s maximum is
85 pitches in a game. If a player
throws 20 or fewer, he can pitch
the next day. If it’s between 21-35,
one day of rest is required. If the
total is between 36-50, two days of
rest follows. If it’s between 51-65,
three days of rest is needed. More
than 65 triggers a four-day break.
“One of the biggest challenges
of the tournament is matching
up your pitching staff with your
games,” Rose said.
Head coach Duke Starr said
teams in the winners bracket will
get days off and that is Canfield’s
DAVID DERMER | THE VINDICATOR
goal.
“First two days, we play, but if Canfield shortstop Tre Dye throws the ball to first base during the Little League 11-12 district championship game on July
we keep winning we get some 11 at Boardman’s Fields of Dreams. Canfield won, 1-0, to advance to the state tournament in Painesville.
time off,” Starr said. “We’ll be here
[practicing] on those off days.”
HOPEFULLY WE’VE LEARNED FROM OUR EXPERIENCE. PITCHING IS OUR STRENGTH [AND]
Canfield’s team was compiled
SHOULD KEEP US IN GAMES.”
See CANFIELD, B4
Dave Rose, Canfield coach
Scrappers rally to beat
Yanks in series opener
By STEVE RUMAN
[email protected]
NILES
DAVID DERMER | THE VINDICATOR
The Scrappers’ Mark Mathias rounds second base and heads for third after a double by Emmanuel Tapia in the first inning against the Staten Island Yankees.
The Mahoning Valley Scrappers
own the worst home record in the
New York-Penn League. The Staten
Island Yankees own the league’s
best road mark.
On Tuesday at
SCRAPPERS 5
YANKEES
4 Eastwood Field, a
pair of trends were
Next: Staten Island
at Mahoning Valley, broken when the
Scrappers recorded
today, 7:05 p.m.
a 5-4 come-frombehind, 10-inning victory over the
Yankees in front of 3,279 fans.
Trailing 4-3 in the eighth, the
Scrappers tied things up thanks to
an Emmanuel Tapia home run.
In the bottom of the 10th, Mark
Mathias reached on a one-out
single, advanced to second, then
scored the winning run on a twoout bit by Austin Fisher.
“I just wanted to get on base any
way I could and then you hope to
make things happen from there,”
Mathias said. “Once I got on second, I was pretty confident that
someone would knock me home.”
The Scrappers (12-18) have won
three of their last four games, and
Mathias has provided the biggest
spark. In his last three games, the
second baseman is 9-for-15 with
a double, two triples a home run
and six runs scored.
“You have to have patience
and trust in yourself,” Mathias.
“I struggled here early, but I kept
my head in the game. I also made
a slight adjustment in my stance
and stayed focused and it has paid
off.”
The Scrappers’ victory dampened an otherwise joyful return
to Eastwood Field for Yankees
manager Pat Osborn. A product of
the University of Florida, Osborn
was a second-round draft pick of
the Cleveland Indians in 2002. He
spent that entire summer and a
part of 2013 playing for the Scrappers.
“It’s crazy coming back here, so
many memories went through my
mind when I walked into the stadium,” Osborn said. “For me, this
See SCRAPPERS, B4
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CYAN
Brewers
top Tribe
in Garza’s
return
Associated Press
MILWAUKEE
Matt Garza pitched six shutout
innings in his return from the
disabled list, Jean Segura hit a
two-run homer for his first extrabase hit in more than six weeks,
and the Milwaukee Brewers beat
the Cleveland Indians 8-1 Tuesday night.
Cleveland starter Danny Salazar (8-5) allowed only two hits
t hrough si x innings but was hurt
by both in losing
his first start since
the All-Star break.
Gerardo Parra
hit Salazar’s first
pitch for the first
8
of his two triples. BREWERS
1
Parra scored on a INDIANS
groundout, and Next: Cleveland at
S e g u r a’s home Milwaukee, today,
run in the second 2:10 p.m.
made it 3-0.
It was Segura’s first extra-base
hit since June 5, a span of 192
plate appearances. He had 38
singles in that time.
Garza (5-10) scattered six hits,
walked two and struck out four.
He held the Indians hitless in six
at-bats with runners in scoring
position.
Cleveland grounded into three
double plays against Garza, who
had not pitched since July 2 due
to tendinitis in his right shoulder. He did not make any minor
league rehab starts.
The Indians had two runners
on base in the second, fourth and
fifth, but failed to score during
Garza’s 83 pitches.
Royals rally
to beat Cole,
Pittsburgh
Associated Press
KANSAS CITY, MO.
Jarrod Dyson hit a two-run single in the eighth inning to lead
the Kansas City Royals to a 3-1
victory over the Pittsburgh Pirates on Tuesday night.
Dyson scored later in the inning on Alcides Escobar’s single
to put the Royals
up 3-0, and they
won for the 11th
time in 14 games.
Wade Davis (61) struck out An3
drew McCutchen ROYALS
1
swinging to end PIRATES
the eighth with Next: Pittsburgh at
t wo Pi rates on Kansas City, today,
base to pick up the 8:10 p.m.
victory.
Greg Holland survived a shaky
ninth, allowing a run on four
hits and a walk, but struck out
Gregory Polanco with the bases
loaded for his 21st save in 24 opportunities.
Pirates starter Gerrit Cole (134), who leads the majors in victories, was charged with all three
runs and five hits in 71⁄3 innings.
With one out in the eighth,
Omar Infante reached on a fielding error charged to second baseman Neil Walker. Alex Rios’ single moved Infante to third and
Rios took second on the throw
to third.
Dyson followed with a sharp
single to right, driving in Infante
and Rios. When Gregory Polanco fumbled the ball, Dyson advanced to second, stole third and
scored on Escobar’s single.
MAGENTA YELLOW
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B2 THE VINDICATOR | WEDNESDAY, JULY 22, 2015
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SPORTS NHL expansion team could drive up Penguins’ value
digest
UAB to resume playing
football in 2017
By JENN MENENDEZ
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (TNS)
Initial bids for an NHL
expansion team were due
BIRMINGHAM, ALA. Monday, a purchase that ulUAB football can take the field timately will cost investors
again in 2017 and remain an FBS at least $500 million to set up
program.
shop in a new hockey town
Athletic director Mark Ingram
such as Las Vegas or Quebec
said Tuesday that rifle will return City.
in the upcoming season, while
That might be a good thing
bowling will compete in 2016for the Pittsburgh Penguins.
17 and football in two years.
Experts say the high fee
UAB dropped all three sports in
for an expansion franchise
December to cut costs and ancould drive up the price of
nounced six months later they
the Penguins, a successful
would be reinstated.
and known commodity.
Ingram says the NCAA has told
“Psychologically, it may
UAB that football can resume in
help a buyer who’s interested
2017 and remain in the Football
in purchasing the Penguins,
Bowl Subdivision. UAB supportbetween the team and the
ers pledged enough money to
development rights, to kind
cover the projected $17 million
of justify to themselves that
cost to operate football over the
I can go up to $750 million or
next five years.
$800 (million) or $850 (milThe NCAA won’t subject UAB
lion) because I don’t have to
to FBS requirements for three
do all that work,” said John
academic years beginning with
Clark, a professor in sports
2015-16. The Blazers would be eli- marketing at Robert Morris.
gible immediately for postseason
“In the Penguins case I
play and a Conference USA title.
FSU’s Fisher says ’Noles
working on problems N.Y. - PENN LEAGUE
PINEHURST, N.C.
Florida State coach Jimbo
Fisher says the Seminoles are
“stepping up” their process of
educating players about domestic violence and other issues,
after a pair of high-profile allegations overshadowed the program
in recent weeks.
Fisher says the team has
started a four-step program to
address the problems, and that
character-building exercises have
been part of the FSU football culture for years.
Running back Dalvin Cook
has been suspended from the
team indefinitely after it was alleged that he punched a woman
outside a Tallahassee bar, which
subsequently led to him being
charged. That news came not
long after freshman quarterback
De’Andre Johnson was kicked off
the team after video showed him
punching a woman in the face in
a bar. Fisher says that it’s not just
a Florida State problem, “but a
national problem.”
DeAndre Jordan happy
after free agent ‘fiasco’
LOS ANGELES
DeAndre Jordan thought the
Dallas Mavericks offered everything he wanted, including a fresh
start and a bigger offensive role.
When Jordan thought about
it a little more, the craziest freeagent recruitment story in recent
NBA history ended with him back
on the Los Angeles Clippers. The
league rebounding champion
was reintroduced Tuesday by the
Clippers, who managed to keep
Jordan after he changed his mind
about his verbal commitment to
Dallas. While referring to his free
agency as “this whole fiasco,”
Jordan gave a bit of insight into
his reasoning for his flip-flop.
Pacers to occasionally
wear ‘Hoosiers’ unis
INDIANAPOLIS
The Hickory Huskers are coming to the NBA next season.
The Indiana Pacers will celebrate the upcoming 30th anniversary of “Hoosiers” by wearing the
maroon and gold uniforms that
Jimmy Chitwood and the Huskers
made famous in the beloved film.
The Pacers said Tuesday that the
Hickory uniforms will be worn in
select 2015-16 games through a
partnership with Metro-GoldwynMayer Studios, the company that
debuted “Hoosiers” in 1986.
Pacers President Larry Bird
says the team is honored to wear
the uniforms “because of the attention it will bring to the storied
history of Indiana basketball and
the success of that movie.”
Surfer who fended off
shark returns home
Mick Fanning sat up on a high
stool, straight backed and good
humored, recounting the story
he will be telling for the rest of his
days, about how he fought off a
shark with his bare hands during
a surfing competition in South
Africa.
It sounds like the plot of a
movie, but this three-time world
champion is no fictional Crocodile Dundee-style character. He’s
the real thing: his shark-wrestling
exploits were broadcast live. Fanning arrived back in Australia on
Tuesday and appeared at a news
conference in Sydney before
heading home to the Gold Coast,
the burgeoning city surrounding
Surfers Paradise beach.
He says: “It was so close. I’m
doing OK, though. I haven’t got a
scratch on me. Just more of an
emotional, mental sort of trauma
right now.”
Wire report
McNamara Division
W
L Pct.
GB
Brooklyn (Mets)
18
12 .600
—
Staten Island (Yanks) 18
12 .600
—
Hudson Valley (Rays) 17
13 .567
1
Aberdeen (Orioles) 15
15 .500
3
Pinckney Division
W
L Pct.
GB
Williamsport(Phillies)21
10 .677
—
State College (Cards) 15
15 .500 51⁄2
West Virginia (Bucs) 15
16 .484
6
Auburn (Nationals) 13
17 .433 71⁄2
Mah. Valley (Indians) 12
18 .400 81⁄2
Batavia (Marlins)
9
21 .300 11 1⁄2
Stedler Division
W
L Pct.
GB
Lowell (Red Sox)
17
14 .548
—
Tri-City (Astros)
16
15 .516
1
Connecticut (Tigers) 14
16 .467 2 1⁄2
Vermont (Athletics) 12
18 .400 41⁄2
Tuesday’s Games
Aberdeen 1, State College 0
Connecticut 2, Batavia 1
Hudson Valley 7, Williamsport 6, 12
innings
Lowell 2, Tri-City 1
Mahoning Valley 5, Staten Island 4, 10
innings
Auburn 2, Vermont 0
West Virginia 5, Brooklyn 3
Today’s Games
Tri-City at Lowell, 11:05 a.m.
Auburn at Vermont, 6:05 p.m.
Staten Island at Mahoning Valley, 7:05
p.m.
Connecticut at Batavia, 7:05 p.m.
Williamsport at Hudson Valley, 7:05 p.m.
Brooklyn at West Virginia, 7:05 p.m.
State College at Aberdeen, 7:05 p.m.
Thursday’s Games
Auburn at Vermont, 6:05 p.m.
Staten Island at Mahoning Valley, 7:05
p.m.
Tri-City at Lowell, 7:05 p.m.
SOCCER
2015 CONCACAF GOLD CUP
FIRST ROUND
Top two in each group and two best thirdplace teams advance to quarterfinals
GROUP A
GP W
D
L GF GA Pts
x-United States
3
2
1
0
4 2 7
x-Haiti
3
1
1
1
2 2 4
x-Panama
3
0
3
0
3 3 3
Honduras
3
0
1
2
2 4 1
x-advanced to quarterfinals
Tuesday, July 7
At Frisco, Texas
Panama 1, Haiti 1
United States 2, Honduras 1
Friday, July 10
At Foxborough, Mass.
Honduras 1, Panama 1
United States 1, Haiti 0
Monday, July 13
At Kansas City, Kan.
Haiti 1, Honduras 0
Panama 1, United States 1
GROUP B
GP W
D
L GF GA Pts
x-Jamaica
3
2
1
0
4 2 7
x-Costa Rica
3
0
3
0
3 3 3
El Salvador
3
0
2
1
1 2 2
Canada
3
0
2
1
0 1 2
Wednesday, July 8
At Carson, Calif.
Costa Rica 2, Jamaica 2
El Salvador 0, Canada 0
GOLF
BOYS’ U.S. JUNIOR AMATEUR
At Colleton River Plantation Club,
Pete Dye Course, Bluffton, S.C
Yardage: 7,366; Par: 72
Partial Second Round — Tuesday
(Play was suspended due to darkness
with 78 players still on course)
Brendan O’Reilly, Hinsdale, Ill., 71-69—140
Reese Ramsey, Austin, Texas, 71-70—141
Wells Padgett, Wichita, Kan., 72-70—142
Sahith Theegala, Chino Hills, Calif., 7072—142
Brody Blackmon, Sulphur Springs, Texas,
69-73—142
Andy Zhang, China, 72-70—142
Joshua Sedeno, Roseville, Calif., 7271—143
John Pak, Scotch Plains, N.J., 74-69—143
Bryan Baumgarten, Granite Bay, Calif.,
72-72—144
Eugene Hong, Sanford, Fla., 72-73—145
Cooper Sears, Old Hickory, Tenn., 7174—145
Philip Barbaree, Shreveport, La., 7174—145
Wilson Furr, Jackson, Miss., 73-72—145
Matthew Ruel, Oldsmar, Fla., 75-70—145
Noah Gillard, Greenwood, Ind., 73-73—146
Spencer Ralston, Gainesville, Ga., 7472—146
Ivan Camilo Ramirez, Colombia, 7373—146
Parker Coody, Plano, Texas, 73-73—146
Kaiwen Liu, China, 78-69—147
Eric Bae, Pinehurst, N.C., 73-75—148
Logan Lowe, Grass Valley, Calif., 7474—148
Cheng Jin, China, 74-74—148
Ahmed Ali, Palo Alto, Calif., 74-74—148
Jake Chanen, Phoenix, 73-76—149
Tyler Strafaci, Davie, Fla., 74-75—149
Thomas Simpson, Canada, 74-75—149
Michael Sanders, Davidson, N.C., 7574—149
Matthew Wolff, Agoura Hills, Calif., 7475—149
Connor O’Brien, Rowayton, Conn., 7575—150
Will Chandler, Atlanta, 74-76—150
Trent Phillips, Inman, S.C., 78-72—150
Ben Sigel, Deephaven, Minn., 74-77—151
Michael Feagles, Scottsdale, Ariz., 7774—151
Dan Erickson, Whittier, Calif., 76-75—151
Hunter Wolcott, Burns, Tenn., 77-74—151
Matt Liston, Louisville, Ky., 76-75—151
Marco Hugo Steyn, South Africa, 7774—151
Cooper Dossey, Austin, Texas, 76-76—152
Chun An Yu, Taiwan, 75-77—152
Michael Saccente, New Smyrna Beach,
Fla., 81-71—152
Rij Patel, Hunt Valley, Md., 77-75—152
Justin LaFrance, Milford, Mich., 7973—152
Chris Nido, Palmetto Bay, Fla., 77-75—152
Ethan Ng, New York City, 76-77—153
Brad Dalke, Hobart, Okla., 75-79—154
Christian Baliker, Simpsonville, S.C., 7678—154
Marcos Montenegro, Argentina, 8074—154
Thomas Longbella, Chippewa Falls, Wis.,
80-74—154
J. J. Gresco, Scottsdale, Ariz., 79-75—154
Parker Sexton, Germantown, Tenn., 7777—154
Christopher Gotterup, Little Silver, N.J.,
79-76—155
Jacob Bergeron, Slidell, La., 78-77—155
Cullen Plousha, Carlsbad, Calif., 7581—156
Isaiah Choi, San Ramon, Calif., 83-73—156
Jack Parrott, Columbia, S.C., 77-79—156
Jack Trent, Australia, 76-80—156
Brandon Gillis, Nashua, N.H., 76-81—157
Easton Paxton, Riverton, Wyo., 7978—157
John Felitto, Mountainside, N.J., 7780—157
Lane Wallace, Yukon, Okla., 79-78—157
think it helps them a little
bit.”
The franchise has been
on the market since June
3, when it retained Morgan
Stanley to explore the possibility of a sale. It was most
recently valued by Forbes
at $565 million and ranked
the 10th most valuable NHL
team largely because of its
long-term lease at Consol
Energy Center, a lengthy
string of sellouts, development rights where the Civic
Arena stood, a strong television rights package and
healthy merchandise sales.
“In my personal opinion
in the case of the Penguins,
I would not be surprised if
they saw a premium price
for the franchise,” said Larry Grimes, president of the
Maryland-based Sports Advisory Group, which advises
investors on purchasing professional teams.
“It’s one of the most wellestablished franchises in the
league with a rabid fan base,
stars locked up, Stanley Cups
under their belt. It’s a strong
franchise in what appears
to be a strong market. I had
seen articles last week that
indicated the price could
be as high as $850 million. I
would not doubt that.”
NHL commissioner Gary
Bettman said in June that
expansion fees will be at
least as high as $500 million,
maybe more. Juxtaposed
with the Penguins position,
that has led experts to believe the club’s value could
swell to $850 million or
more.
“I think it’s certainly going to help drive the price
for the Penguins above $500
million, absolutely,” said
Grimes, who has no personal
involvement in the process.
“When you look at the Penguins franchise versus some
of the other franchises that
have changed hands over the
past few years, Pittsburgh is
an infinitely stronger position.”
Experts point out that investors with the financial
means to buy a major league
team often allow personal
hubris to play a part. And ultimately, it only takes one
buyer to pay that much.
“You get some of these
multibillionaries, and now
you’re a rich guy with a microphone in your mouth,”
said Ron Dick, an associate
professor of sports marketing at Duquesne.
“It really plays into a person’s ego to be the owner of
a team.”
An $850 million price tag
might seem a tad high, Dick
said, but he understands it
doesn’t really matter what
he thinks.
“It all depends on how
much somebody will pay.
These people have made so
much money in other businesses. How bad do they really want it?” he said. “Even
if it loses money, how important is it to be the owner
of (Sidney) Crosby, (Evgeni)
Malkin? I think there’s someone out there that would pay
it. It doesn’t matter what we
think it’s worth. It’s like selling a house. It’s not an index.
If one person says ’I’ll pay it!’
that’s all we need. One. And
if they start bidding against
each other you could be at
$850 million, definitely.”
One expert, Mike Ozanian, a writer and analyst at
Forbes, stuck by the original
valuation of $565 million in
a piece published Sunday,
citing the land rights as the
only factor that could see
that number skyrocket to
$850 million.
“I still say the team and
their lease at Consol Energy
Center is worth about $565
million,” Ozanian wrote.
“The only way you get to
$850 million (is) by adding
in the Civic Arena development.”
Williamsport at Hudson Valley, 7:05 p.m.
Connecticut at Batavia, 7:05 p.m.
Brooklyn at West Virginia, 7:05 p.m.
State College at Aberdeen, 7:05 p.m.
TOUR DE FRANCE
TV & RADIO
Noon (ESPN2) Golf: Senior British
Open.
Noon (GC) Women’s golf: LPGA
Meijer Classic.
1 p.m. (MLBN) MLB: Mariners at
Tigers or Orioles at Yankees.
3 p.m. (GC) Golf: PGA Tour Canadian
Open.
6:30 p.m. (GC) Golf: PGA Tour RBC
Canadian Open (recorded).
6:45 p.m. (WBBW-AM 1240)
Baseball: Yankees at Scrappers.
7 p.m. (CBSSN) Minor league baseball: Altoona Curve at Akron
Rubber Ducks.
7 p.m. (ESPN2) Pan American
Games: Basketball, track and
field, boxing, soccer, volleyball.
7 p.m. (MLBN) MLB: Dodgers at
Mets.
7 p.m. (Root) (WNIO-AM 1390)
(WLLF-FM 96.7) MLB: Nationals
at Pirates.
7 p.m. (STO) (WKBN-AM 570) MLB:
White Sox at Indians.
8 p.m. (ESPNU) BAsketball: TBT
Tournament.
8 p.m. (NBCSN) Cycling: Tour de
France Stage 18 (recorded).
10:30 p.m. (TNN) World Team
Tennis: San Diego at California.
TUESDAY’S BOXSCORE
SCRAPPERS 5, YANKEES 4, 10 INNINGS
Staten Island
Scrappers
ab r h bi
ab r h
Hendrix cf 5 1 2 1 Castro ss
5 0 1
Holder ss 4 0 0 0 Tom lf
5 1 2
Jackson rf 5 1 2 1 Mathias 2b 5 2 2
Bridges 3b 5 0 0 0 Tapia 1b
3 2 2
Zehner lf 3 1 1 2 Marabell rf 5 0 1
Wagner 2b 4 0 0 0 Fisher 3b
5 0 1
Alexand.dh 4 0 1 0 Haggerty dh 4 0 0
Krill 1b
4 0 0 0 Goihl c
4 0 0
de Oleo c 4 1 1 0 Sayles cf
3 0 1
Totals
38 4 7 4 Totals
39 5 10
bi
0
0
0
2
2
1
0
0
0
5
Staten Island 000 220 000
0 — 4
Scrappers
300 000 010
1 — 5
E—Tapia (7, pickoff), Castro (7, fielding). PB—de
Oleo (3), Goihl (2). LOB—Staten Island 7,
Scrappers 8. SB—Zehner (3), Tom (10), Sayles
(5), Castro (7). 2B—Jackson 2 (10), de Oleo (8),
Tapia (9). HR—Zehner (3), Tapia (2).
IP
H
R ER BB SO
Staten Island
Acevedo
1.2
5
3
3
1
1
Mesa
2.1
2
0
0
1
2
Carter
3
0
0
0
0
1
Roeder (BS, 1)
2
1
1
1
0
2
Schaub (L, 2-1) 0.2
2
1
1
1
0
Scrappers
Shane
4.1
7
4
4
1
6
Carter
2.1
0
0
0
1
4
Perez
1.1
0
0
0
1
1
Zapata (W, 2-3)
2
0
0
0
0
2
WP—Acevedo. IBB—Tapia. Umpires—HP: Josh
Havens; 1B: Brandon Mooney. T—3:16. A—3,279.
STANDINGS
Tuesday — Rest Day
(After 16 stages)
1. Chris Froome, Britain, Sky, 64:47:16.
2. Nairo Quintana, Colombia, Movistar,
3:10 behind.
3. Tejay Van Garderen, United States,
BMC Racing, 3:32.
4. Alejandro Valverde, Spain, Movistar,
4:02.
5. Alberto Contador, Spain, Tinkoff-Saxo,
4:23.
6. Geraint Thomas, Britain, Sky, 5:32.
7. Robert Gesink, Netherlands, Lotto NLJumbo, 6:23.
8. Vincenzo Nibali, Italy, Astana, 7:49.
9. Bauke Mollema, Netherlands, Trek
Factory Racing, 8:53.
10. Warren Barguil, France, Giant-Alpecin,
11:03.
11. Tony Gallopin, France, Lotto-Soudal,
12:02.
12. Romain Bardet, France, AG2R La
Mondiale, 13:10.
13. Mathias Frank, Switzerland, IAM
Cycling, 14:23.
14. Samuel Sanchez, Spain, BMC Racing,
15:18.
15. Pierre Rolland, France, Europcar, 15:55.
16. Jarlinson Pantano, Colombia, IAM
Cycling, 17:04.
17. Andrew Talansky, United States,
Cannondale-Garmin, 23:15.
18. Serge Pauwels, Belgium, MTNQhubeka, 24:18.
19. Thibaut Pinot, France, FDJ, 31:54.
20. Alexis Vuillermoz, France, AG2R La
Mondiale, 36:29.
Also
159. Tyler Farrar, United States, MTNQhubeka, 2:46:44.
Today — The first stage in the Alps, 100
miles from Digne-les-Bains to Pra Loup
with five categorized climbs.
Saturday, July 11
At Houston
Jamaica 1, Canada 0
Costa Rica 1, El Salvador 1
Tuesday, July 14
At Toronto
Jamaica 1, El Salvador 0
Canada 0, Costa Rica 0
GROUP C
GP W
D
L GF GA Pts
x-Trinidad
3
2
1
0
9 5 7
x-Mexico
3
1
2
0 10 4 5
x-Cuba
3
1
0
2
1 8 3
Guatemala
3
0
1
2
1 4 1
x-advanced to quarterfinals
Thursday, July 9
At Chicago
Trinidad and Tobago 3, Guatemala 1
Mexico 6, Cuba 0
Sunday, July 12
At Glendale, Ariz.
Trinidad and Tobago 2, Cuba 0
Guatemala 0, Mexico 0
Wednesday, July 15
At Charlotte, N.C.
Cuba 1, Guatemala 0
Mexico 4, Trinidad and Tobago 4
QUARTERFINALS
Saturday, July 18
At Baltimore
United States 6, Cuba 0
Jamaica 1, Haiti 0
Sunday, July 19
At East Rutherford, N.J.
Trinidad and Tobago 1, Panama 1, Panama
advanced 6-5 on penalty kicks
Mexico 1, Costa Rica 0, ET
SEMIFINALS
Today
At Atlanta
United States vs. Jamaica, 6 p.m.
Panama vs. Mexico, 9 p.m.
THIRD PLACE
Saturday
At Chester, Pa.
Semifinal losers, 4 p.m.
CHAMPIONSHIP
Sunday
At Philadelphia
Semifinal winners, 7:30 p.m.
Drew Bernard, Charlotte, N.C., 80-78—158
Jack Melville, Maple Glen, Pa., 78-80—158
Pete Kuhl, Morton, Ill., 78-81—159
Austin Vukovits, Fishers, Ind., 81-79—160
Billy Basham, Louisville, Ky., 79-81—160
Anthony Bolden, Mokena, Ill., 82-78—160
Bryce Hammer, Sioux Falls, S.D., 7585—160
Carlo Villaroman, Philippines, 80-80—160
Ari Gulugian, Irvine, Calif., 80-80—160
Walter Brinker, Sanford, N.C., 83-78—161
Bennett Buch, Sykesville, Md., 82-80—162
Ashkaan Hakim, San Ramon, Calif., 8182—163
David Baker, Auburn, Ala., 80-83—163
Jaxon Lynn, Canada, 79-86—165
Subin Lee, Englewood, Colo., 78-88—166
Aaron Ramos, Goodyear, Ariz., 81-86—167
George Markham, Phoenix, 84-84—168
Allen Smith, Durham, N.C., 86-86—172
Gabriela Coello, Venezuela 75-71—146
Aneka Seumanutafa, Frederick, Md. 7571—146
Maria Vesga, Howey in the Hills, Fla. 7274—146
Kristen Gillman, Austin, Texas 74-72—146
x-Beth Lillie, Fullerton, Calif. 75-72—147
x-Shannon Brooks, Vienna, Va. 73-74—147
x-Kathleen Scavo, Benicia, Calif. 7572—147
x-Mimi (Xiaoyi) Chen, China 76-71—147
x-Brooke Seay, Rancho Santa Fe, Calif. 7572—147
x-Haylin Harris, Tucson, Ariz. 73-74—147
x-Simar Singh, Los Altos, Calif. 75-72—147
Failed to Qualify
x-Katherine Zhu, San Jose, Calif. 7473—147
x-Binny Lee, Frisco, Texas 72-75—147
x-Camille Enright, Plano, Texas 73-74—147
Courtney Zeng, Orlando, Fla. 71-77—148
Lauren Comegys, Austin, Texas 7375—148
Morgan Baxendale, Windermere, Fla. 7771—148
Sarah Shipley, Hastings, Mich. 76-72—148
Chandler Rosholt, Cedar Park, Texas 7573—148
Athena Yang, Winter Haven, Fla. 7474—148
Brooke Hamilton, New Zealand 74-74—148
Alyssa Lamoureux, Seminole, Fla. 7573—148
Jessica Spicer, Bahama, N.C. 77-72—149
Alex Wright, Midlothian, Va. 77-72—149
Dominique Galloway, Rio Rancho, N.M.
75-74—149
Lauren Beaudreau, Lemont, Ill. 75-74—149
Selena Costabile, Canada 75-74—149
Julia Ford, Shrewsbury, Mass. 79-70—149
Ellen Secor, Portland, Ore. 75-74—149
Fumie (Alice) Jo, China 77-72—149
Megan Furtney, South Elgin, Ill. 7673—149
Anna Zhou, Palo Alto, Calif. 75-74—149
Selina Zeng, Oak Brook, Ill. 75-74—149
Valery Plata, Colombia 78-71—149
Belinda Hu, San Ramon, Calif. 77-72—149
Madeline Chou, Santa Ana, Calif. 7574—149
Alli Kim, Murrieta, Calif. 81-68—149
Emily Mahar, Australia 74-75—149
Clare Amelia Legaspi, Philippines 7575—150
Brittany Kwon, Bremerton, Wash. 7773—150
Hannah Ko, Anaheim, Calif. 75-75—150
Madelein Herr, New Hope, Pa. 74-76—150
Roshnee Sharma, Canada 71-79—150
Mari Nishiura, Mililani, Hawaii 77-73—150
Ada Wong, San Marino, Calif. 78-72—150
Mikhaela Fortuna, Philippines 73-77—150
Morgan Goldstein, Las Vegas 74-76—150
Claire Cameron, Martinsville, Ind. 7575—150
Ashley Czarnecki, Greenville, S.C. 7575—150
Jackie Rogowicz, Yardley, Pa. 77-74—151
Kenedee Peters, Lacey, Wash. 76-75—151
Bibilani Liu, Cupertino, Calif. 74-77—151
Aiko Leong, Honolulu 75-76—151
Ya-Chun Chang, Taiwan 76-75—151
Elizabeth Wang, San Marino, Calif. 7972—151
Katrina Prendergast, Sparks, Nev. 7675—151
Anina Ku, Basking Ridge, N.J. 75-76—151
Jennifer Cleary, Wilmington, Del. 7874—152
Jaelyn Tindal, Rock Hill, S.C. 76-76—152
Kory Nielsen, Kent, Ohio 74-78—152
Greta Bruner, Conroe, Texas 74-78—152
Sadie Englemann, Austin, Texas 7478—152
Macy Fox, Marble Falls, Texas 75-77—152
Maria Fernanda Martinez Almeida, Mexico
76-77—153
Delaney Shah, North Potomac, Md. 7182—153
Jessica Sloot, Fruit Heights, Utah 7479—153
Tiffany Kang, Suwanee, Ga. 78-75—153
Sarah Willis, Eaton, Ohio 78-81—159
GIRLS’ U.S. JUNIOR AMATEUR SCORES
At Tulsa Country Club, Tulsa, Okla.
Yardage: 6,067; Par: 70
Second Round — Tuesday
(x-playoff)
Megan Khang, Rockland, Mass. 67-65—132
Sophie Liu, Canada 66-70—136
Jaravee Boonchant, Thailand 67-69—136
Muni He, China 67-69—136
Yu Sang Hou, Chinese Taipei 68-69—137
Andrea Lee, Hermosa Beach, Calif. 6770—137
Mika Liu, Beverly Hills, Calif. 71-67—138
Malia Nam, Kailua, Hawaii 70-68—138
Aubree Jones, Covington, Tenn. 6870—138
Mariel Galdiano, Pearl City, Hawaii 7168—139
Maria Fassi, Mexico 73-66—139
Lucy Li, Redwood City, Calif. 70-69—139
Jessica Mangrobang, Chula Vista, Calif.
72-67—139
Angel Yin, Arcadia, Calif. 70-70—140
Han Hsuan Yu, Taiwan 73-68—141
Lauren Hartlage, Elizabethtown, Ky. 6972—141
Kendall Griffin, Sebring, Fla. 72-69—141
Katherine Muzi, Walnut, Calif. 71-70—141
Hannah O’Sullivan, Chandler, Ariz. 7368—141
Gina Kim, Chapel Hill, N.C. 72-69—141
Karah Sanford, Escondido, Calif. 6973—142
Marni Murez, Manhattan Beach, Calif. 7270—142
Courtney Dow, Frisco, Texas 68-74—142
Yu Chiang Hou, Taiwan 73-69—142
Hailee Cooper, Montgomery, Texas 7072—142
Kelly Sim, South Korea 71-72—143
Sabrina Iqbal, San Jose, Calif. 74-69—143
Jayna Choi, Collierville, Tenn. 74-69—143
Annika Cedo, Philippines 71-73—144
Emily Cox, Lancaster, S.C. 70-74—144
Ellie Slama, Salem, Ore. 70-74—144
Allisen Corpuz, Honolulu 72-72—144
Naomi Ko, Canada 74-70—144
Kaitlin Milligan, Norman, Okla. 72-72—144
Yujeong Son, South Korea 75-69—144
Lois Kaye Go, Philippines 70-74—144
Yealimi Noh, Concord, Calif. 72-72—144
Sierra Brooks, Sorrento, Fla. 75-69—144
Sarah Spicer, Bahama, N.C. 71-73—144
Chakansim (Fai) Khamborn, Thailand 7471—145
Eun Jeong Seong, South Korea 73-72—145
Lilia Khatu Vu, Fountain Valley, Calif. 7273—145
Monica Dibildox, Mexico 76-69—145
Kelly Su, Scottsdale, Ariz. 72-73—145
Kelsey Zeng, Orlando, Fla. 73-72—145
Maria Balcazar, Mexico 75-70—145
Evelyn Arguelles, Mexico 74-71—145
Alyaa Abdulghany, Newport Beach, Calif.
72-73—145
Rose Huang, China 73-72—145
Adeena Shears, Elizabeth, W.Va. 7273—145
Pauline Del Rosario, Philippines 7373—146
Jennifer Koga, Honolulu 71-75—146
Pajaree Anannarukarn, Thailand 7571—146
U.S. OPEN CUP
QUARTERFINALS
Tuesday, July 14
Los Angeles Galaxy (MLS) 0, Real Salt
Lake (MLS) 1
Tuesday, July 21
Philadelphia Union (MLS) 1, New York Red
Bulls (MLS) 1, Philadelphia advanced on
4-3 penalty kicks
Sporting Kansas City (MLS) 3, Houston
Dynamo (MLS) 1
Today
Orlando City (MLS) at Chicago Fire (MLS),
8:30 p.m.
SEMIFINALS
Aug. 11-12
Orlando City-Chicago Fire winner at
Philadelphia Union (MLS)
Real Salt Lake (MLS) at Houston Dynamo
(MLS)-Sporting Kansas City (MLS)
winner
CHAMPIONSHIP
Sept. 29-30
Semifinal winners
TODAY
8 a.m. (NBCSN) Cycling: Tour de
France Stage 17.
10:30 a.m. (FS1) Truck racing:
NASCAR practice.
12:30 p.m. (MLBN) MLB: Mets at
Nationals or Dodgers at Braves.
2 p.m. (STO) (WKBN-AM 570) MLB:
Indians at Brewers.
6 p.m. (FS1) Soccer: CONCACAF
Gold Cup semifinal.
6:45 p.m. (WBBW-AM 1240)
Baseball: Yankees at Scrappers.
7 p.m. (ESPN) MLB: Orioles at
Yankees.
7 p.m. (ESPN2) Pan American
Games: Basketball, track and
field, cycling, boxing, women’s
soccer, volleyball.
8 p.m. (NBCSN) Cycling: Tour de
France Stage 17 (recorded).
8 p.m. (Root) (WNIO-AM 1390)
(WLLF-FM 96.7) MLB: Pirates at
Royals.
9 p.m. (FS1) Truck racing: NASCAR.
THURSDAY
8 a.m. (NBCSN) Cycling: Tour de
France Stage 18.
9 a.m. (GC) Golf: European Masters.
THE LINE
MLB
Odds
Underdog
National League
LA Dodgers
6-7
ATLANTA
Chicago Cubs (1) Even-6
CINCINNATI
CINCINNATI (2) Even-6
Chicago Cubs
WASHINGTON
6-7
NY Mets
SAN DIEGO
Even-6 San Francisco
ARIZONA
Miami
51⁄2 -61⁄2
Favorite
NOTICES
BASEBALL
Brookfield High School softball team —
will host a 10u tournament at Brookfield
Park from July 30-Aug. 2. For details, call
Ken Forsythe 330-502-0750 or Dave DeJoy
(724) 734-3445.
Howland Athletic Club — will hold the
Chris Deemer memorial wood bat tournament July 24-26 for boys 10-under and
12-under. Visit howlandac.com, call 330883-9660 or 330-984-7456 or email [email protected]
howlandac.com.
Liberty Township Baseball Association
— will hold all-star tournaments for ages
7-8, 9-10, 11-12 (46/60), 11-12 (Cal Ripken)
and 13-14 (Pony) from July 25-Aug. 1 or
2. Registration deadline is today. Call Jim
Spisak at 330-539-5539.
Ohio Cardinals — travel baseball team will
hold tryouts for next year’s 13U team on
July 25 at Koch’s Fields in Austintown.
Contact head coach Britt Taylor for more
details at 330-979-5115.
CHEERLEADING
Canfield High — will hold a cheerleading
camp for grades K-8 on Aug. 10-12 from 9
a.m. to noon. Email [email protected]fielschools.net.
COACHING
Mathews — girls basketball program
seeks an assistant varsity coach and an
eighth grade coach. Contact the varsity
coach, Joe Bornemiss at 330-531-2461.
Springfield — seeks an assistant cheerleading coach. Send a resume to
[email protected]fieldlocal.us.
Youngstown Christian — seeks a 5-6 grade
football coach. Email resume to athletic
director Dolph Carroll at [email protected]
FOOTBALL
Southington — junior high school students
TRANSACTIONS
BASEBALL
American League
BOSTON RED SOX — Signed CF Andrew
Benintendi, Tate Matheny, Jagger
Rusconi and Nick Hamilton; RHPs Travis
Lakins, Ben Taylor, Kevin Kelleher, Marc
Brakeman, Daniel Zandona, Max Watt,
Nick Duron, Trevor Kelley and Adam Lau;
LHPs Logan Boyd, Logan Allen, Matt Kent,
Bobby Poyner and Brad Stone; OFs Jerry
Downs, Kyri Washington and Tyler Spoon;
Cs Austin Rei and Andrew Noviello; 1B
Tucker Tubbs; 2B Chad De La Guerra; 3B
Mitchell Gunsolus and SS Yomar Valentin
to minor league contracts.
KANSAS CITY ROYALS — Reinstated
LHP Jason Vargas from the 15-day DL.
Optioned RHP Yordano Ventura to Omaha
(PCL).
National League
ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS — Optioned
OF Danny Dorn to Reno (PCL). Recalled
RHP Dominic Leone from Mobile (SL).
LOS ANGELES DODGERS — Activated
OF Carl Crawford from the 60-day
DL. Optioned RHP Brandon Beachy to
Oklahoma City (PCL). Designated RHP
Preston Guilmet for assignment.
MILWAUKEE BREWERS — Reinstated
RHP Matt Garza from the 15-day DL.
Optioned RHP Tyler Cravy to Colorado
Springs (PCL). Signed SS Luis Avila,
RF Bryan Connell, SS Aaron Familia, CF
Jesus Lujano, SS Luis Manon, C Moises
Perez and C Jose Sibrian to minor league
contracts.
PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES — Placed RHP
Chad Billingsley on the 15-day DL, retroactive to July 19. Optioned RHP David
Buchanan to Lehigh Valley (IL).
ST. LOUIS CARDINALS — Purchased the
contract of OF-1B Stephen Piscotty from
Memphis (PCL). Optioned OF Tommy
Pham to Memphis. Designated INF Ty
Kelly for assignment.
WASHINGTON NATIONALS — Recalled
RHP Joe Ross from Syracuse (IL).
Optioned INF Wilmer Difo to Harrisburg
(EL).
American Association
AMARILLO THUNDERHEADS — Signed
OF Dexter Kjerstad.
JOPLIN BLASTERS — Released RHP Jesus
Colome.
KANSAS CITY T-BONES — Signed OF Kyle
Richards.
LAREDO LEMURS — Signed C Ryan Ortiz.
Can-Am League
QUEBEC CAPITALES — Released INF
Cedric Vallieres.
OTTAWA CHAMPIONS — Signed LHP Dan
Meyer. Released RHP Jose Figuereo.
Frontier League
JOLIET SLAMMERS — Signed RHP Dan
Tobik.
NORMAL CORNBELTERS — Signed RHP
Rob Blanc. Released RHP Casey Cannon.
SCHAUMBURG BOOMERS — Released
RHP Edwin Carl.
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS MINERS — Signed
OF Joe Jensen.
TRAVERSE CITY BEACH BUMS —
Released C Shane Rowland.
WINDY CITY THUNDERBOLTS — Signed
RHP Jacob Ezell.
B2 - 07/22/15
CYAN
American League
Seattle
DETROIT
51⁄2 -61⁄2
NY YANKEES
Even-6
Baltimore
HOUSTON
51⁄2 -61⁄2
Boston
OAKLAND
7-8
Toronto
LA ANGELS
8-9
Minnesota
Interleague
Tampa Bay
6-7 PHILADELPHIA
Cleveland
Even-6
MILWAUKEE
COLORADO
6-7
Texas
St. Louis
6-7 CHI WHITE SOX
Pittsburgh
KANSAS CITY
51⁄2 -61⁄2
Home Team in CAPS
interested in playing football this season
should know the football team will begin
practice today at 9 a.m. at the field house
and game field. For details, call 330-2404809.
Mt. Calvary Son of Thunder — football
team still has openings for boys ages
6-12. Kids can turn 13 years old after Jan.
1, 2015. Contact coach Ed Bolling at 330747-4445 for more details.
SOCCER
Youngstown State — will hold a residential Elite ID camp from July 26-29 at
Farmers National Bank Field. For more information, visit ysusports.com or email
[email protected]
SOFTBALL
Lady Spartans Fastpitch — is having travel tryouts on Aug. 5 for 10u girls from
4-5:30 p.m. and 12u from 5:30-7 p.m.
Tryouts on Aug. 6 are for 14u girls from
4-5:30 p.m. and 16u from 5:30-7 p.m.
Tryouts are at Boardman High School. For
questions, contact Mike Trell at 330-5091615 or Marco Marinucci at 330-550-4492.
Ben Franklin Ladies — slow pitch softball tournament will be held Aug. 15-16 at
Gaston Park in New Castle, Pa. The first
annual event has an entry fee of $180
and cash prizes to be awarded. Contact
John Frank at 724-651-2299 or Angelo
Fornataro at 724-658-7479.
Warren Softball Association — seeks
men’s, women’s and co-ed teams for its
Sunday fall league, which begins Aug. 23.
Registration deadline is Aug. 16. Contact
Marc at 330-507-2652 or email [email protected]
yahoo.com.
Streak Fastpitch — will hold tryouts July
30, Aug. 2 and Aug. 9 in New Middletown.
Visit www.streakfastpitch or contact
Mike Thorpe at 330-540-1530.
To submit a notice, or if you see a notice
that should no longer run, please email
[email protected] or fax 330-747-6712.
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
HOUSTON ROCKETS — Re-signed F K.J.
McDaniels to a multiyear contract.
TORONTO RAPTORS — Signed F Ronald
Roberts to a multiyear contract.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
BUFFALO BILLS — Released OT Wayne
Hunter.
KANSAS CITY CHIEFS — Waived DB
Justin Cox.
HOCKEY
National Hockey League
ARIZONA COYOTES — Named Mike Bavis
and Doug Janik as assistant coaches for
Springfield (AHL).
BUFFALO SABRES — Re-signed F Johan
Larsson to a one-year contract.
COLORADO AVALANCHE — Renewed
their affiliation with Fort Wayne (ECHL)
with a two-year agreement.
DETROIT RED WINGS — Agreed to terms
with RW Teemu Pulkkinen on a one-year
contract.
American Hockey League
BAKERSFIELD CONDORS — Named Gerry
Fleming coach and Jean-Frangois Houle
and Tony Borgford assistant coaches.
Announced Edmonton (NHL) assistant
general manager Bill Scott will serve as
general manager.
OLYMPIC SPORTS
U.S. Olympic Committee
USOC — Announced the addition of Robert
Wood to the U.S. Olympic Committee’s
board of directors.
COLLEGE
NCAA — Announced Mark Hollis was
named vice chair of the Division I men’s
basketball committee for the 2015-16 season and chair of the committee for the
2016-17 season.
COLLEGE OF CHARLESTON — Named
Jimmy Holton volunteer assistant baseball coach.
NEBRASKA — Announced women’s sophomore basketball G Chandler Smith will
transfer.
PURDUE — Announced men’s basketball F
Jacquil Taylor was granted a medical hardship waiver by the Big Ten, restoring his
freshman season of eligibility.
SC AIKEN — Named Mark Vanderslice
men’s basketball coach.
SAINT AUGUSTINE’S — Announced the
resignation of women’s basketball coach
Rachel Bullard.
SAN JOSE STATE — Promoted Liz
Jarnigan to senior associate athletics director/senior woman administrator.
SUSQUEHANNA — Announced the resignation of softball coach and athletics
administrator Kathy Kroupa to accept a
position as associate athletic director for
internal operations and senior women’s
administrator at The Citadel.
TEXAS RIO GRANDE VALLEY —
Announced men’s sophomore basketball
G Dinero Mercurius has transferred South
Florida. Announced the resignation of
women’s tennis coach Stephanie Vallejos
to accept the same position at LouisianaLafayette.
UAB — Announced the reinstatement of
rifle for the upcoming season, bowling in
2016-17 and football in 2017.
UALR — Announced men’s junior basketball F Thomas Brandsma transferred from
Angelo State.
MAGENTA YELLOW
BLACK
CYAN
SPORTS BY THE NUMBERS
Source: ESPN
NBA Las Vegas Summer League-best scoring
average for Seth Curry of the New Orleans Pelicans. Seth, the younger brother of Golden State
Warriors star Steph Curry, has reportedly signed
with the Sacramento Kings.
B3
“Expanding the playoffs to more
than four teams is paramount.
You’re not getting the best possible
pool.”
BRET BIELEMA, Arkansas
football coach, on the College Football Playoff:
MLB ROUNDUP | Tuesday’s other games
that required a syringe for no immediate comment.
The U.S. Attorney’s office in
panel of the 9th U.S. Circuit San Francisco didn’t immeCourt of Appeals overturned diately respond to a phone
that conviction in April, and call seeking comment.
the government had until
Bonds’ legal victory is unWednesday to fi le for a Su- likely to win over critics who
preme Court review.
concluded he cheated by usThe jury deadlocked on ing performance-enhancing
three counts accusing Bonds drugs, or help him with Hall
of making false statements of Fame voters.
when he denied receiving
In his third year on the
steroids or human growth Hall ballot in 2015, Bonds rehormone or any substance ceived 202 votes for 36.8 perthat required a syringe for cent from the Baseball Writself-injection from the train- ers’ Association of America.
er, Greg Anderson. The gov- A player must garner at least
ernment dismissed those 75 percent of the vote to be
counts in August 2011, and elected.
the 9th Circuit barred a retriBut it brings to a close
al on the obstruction charge, one of the most high-prociting double jeopardy.
file prosecutions to emerge
“The finality of today’s de- from an investigation of the
cision gives me great peace,” Bay Area Laboratory Co-OpBonds, who turns 51 on Fri- erative that began in 2002
day, said in a statement. “As and saw the convictions of
I have said before, this out- Olympic track gold medalcome is something I have ist Marion Jones, elite sprint
long wished for. I am re- cyclist Ta mmy Thomas
lieved, humbled and thank- and former NFL defensive
ful for what this means for lineman Dana Stubblefield
me and my family moving along with coaches, distribforward.”
utors, a trainer, a chemist
Major League Baseball had and a lawyer.
SAN FRANCISCO self-injection. An 11-judge
After a nearly decade-long
steroids prosecution, Barry
Bonds emerged victorious
Tuesday when federal prosecutors dropped what was
left of their criminal case
against the career home
runs leader.
The government’s pursuit of Bonds ended quietly
with a onepa rag raph
mot ion by
the U.S. Department of
Justice a nnouncing Solicitor GenBonds eral Donald
B . Ve r r i l l i
Jr. will not ask the U.S. Supreme Court to review the
appellate decision that overturned Bonds’ obstruction
of justice conviction.
A jury found the former
San Francisco Giants star
guilty in 2011 for giving a
meandering answer to a federal grand jury in 2003 when
asked whether his personal
trainer gave him anything
BLACK
QUOTABLE
Feds drop their case
against Barry Bonds
Associated Press
YELLOW
THE VINDICATOR | WEDNESDAY, JULY 22, 2015
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
E-MAIL: [email protected]
24.3
MAGENTA
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Mariners 11, Tigers 9
DETROIT
Franklin Gutierrez’s pinch-hit
grand slam in the eighth inning
lifted the Mariners to a wild
victory over the Tigers, pushing
Detroit one loss closer to a trade
deadline that could have drastic
consequences in Motown. The
Tigers had come back from a 5-1
deficit and led 8-6 when Neftali
Feliz (1-3) allowed five runs in the
eighth. Feliz, who was picked up
by Detroit on July 11 after refusing a minor league assignment
from Texas, allowed a run on a
wild pitch before giving up Gutierrez’s opposite-field drive.
Astros 8, Red Sox 3
HOUSTON
Chris Carter hit a two-run homer
and rookie Carlos Correa drove
in two runs as the Houston Astros used a big fifth inning to roll
to a victory over Boston, extending the Red Sox’s losing streak
to six games. Rookie Vince Velasquez (1-1) allowed seven hits
and three runs for his first career
win in his seventh major league
start. The Astros trailed by two
before a four-run fifth where
they scored two runs on an error
before Correa’s ground-rule RBI
double made it 4-3.
Yankees 3, Orioles 2
NEW YORK
Little-used Brendan Ryan hit a
tiebreaking RBI double in the
sixth inning, helping New York
beat Baltimore in the opener of
a series between AL East rivals.
Alex Rodriguez had a sacrifice
fly and Chase Headley an RBI
double off Wei-Yin Chen (4-6) on
the Taiwanese left-hander’s 30th
birthday.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Braves 4, Dodgers 3
ATLANTA
Chris Johnson drove in two
runs while Alex Wood overcame
control problems on a hot night
for Atlanta. The Braves, who had
lost seven of nine overall, improved to 18-6 at home in games
decided by two runs or fewer. It
was a tough evening for the NL
West-leading Dodgers, who have
lost consecutive games for the
first time since June 22-23 at
the Chicago Cubs. Los Angeles
starter Brett Anderson left the
game in the third after irritating
his left Achilles tendon.
Mets 7, Nationals 2
WASHINGTON
Pinch-hitter Eric Campbell put
New York ahead with his two-run
single in the seventh inning, and a
stagnant Mets lineup finally came
through with several clutch hits
to back Jacob deGrom. Fresh off
his dominant display in the AllStar Game a week ago, deGrom
(10-6) allowed two runs and three
hits over six innings in surpassing
his win total from last season. He
struck out eight without a walk to
beat the division-rival Nationals
for the first time in four tries.
INTERLEAGUE
Rays 1, Phillies 0
PHILADELPHIA
Nathan Karns homered and
pitched five innings, ruining the
major league debut of Philadelphia’s Aaron Nola. Karns (5-5)
allowed three hits, struck out
four and walked two, marking
the 14th game where the righthander has allowed two earned
runs or less.
Cardinals 8, White Sox 5
CHICAGO
Matt Holliday hit his sixth career grand slam, powering Michael Wacha and the Cardinals
past the White Sox. Holliday
homered for the first time since
May 12. He returned last Friday
after missing 31 games because
of a strained right quadriceps.
Holliday connected in the fourth
inning for his fourth homer.
Mark Reynolds added a solo
shot in the fifth. Wacha (11-3)
gave up five runs in five innings.
Trevor Rosenthal pitched the
ninth for his 28th save in 30
chances.
Rangers 9, Rockies 0
DENVER
Shin-Soo Choo hit for the cycle
and Matt Harrison earned his
first win in 14 months as the Texas Rangers routed the Colorado
Rockies. Delino DeShields had a
career-high four hits and Prince
Fielder homered for the Rangers,
who won for only the third time in
13 games. Choo, who had three
RBIs, doubled in the second inning, homered in the fourth and
singled in the fifth. He completed
the cycle with a triple to center
leading off the ninth.
Associated Press
MLB STANDINGS & BOXSCORES
STANDINGS
AMERICAN LEAGUE
East Division
W
L Pct
GB
New York
51
41 .554
—
Tampa Bay
48
48 .500
5
Toronto
47
47 .500
5
Baltimore
46
46 .500
5
Boston
42
52 .447
10
Central Division
W
L Pct
GB
Kansas City
56
36 .609
—
Minnesota
50
42 .543
6
Detroit
46
47 .495 10 1⁄2
Cleveland
44
48 .478
12
Chicago
42
49 .462 131⁄2
West Division
W
L Pct
GB
Los Angeles
52
40 .565
—
Houston
52
43 .547 1 1⁄2
Texas
44
49 .473 81⁄2
Oakland
43
51 .457
10
Seattle
43
51 .457
10
Monday’s Scores
L.A. Angels 11, Boston 1, 1st game
Philadelphia 5, Tampa Bay 3
Detroit 5, Seattle 4
Pittsburgh 10, Kansas City 7
Colorado 8, Texas 7
L.A. Angels 7, Boston 3, 2nd game
Tuesday’s Scores
N.Y. Yankees 3, Baltimore 2
Tampa Bay 1, Philadelphia 0
Seattle 11, Detroit 9
Houston 8, Boston 3
Milwaukee 8, Cleveland 1
Kansas City 3, Pittsburgh 1
St. Louis 8, Chicago White Sox 5
Texas 9, Colorado 0
Minnesota at L.A. Angels, late
Toronto at Oakland, late
Today’s Games
Tampa Bay (Odorizzi 5-6) at Philadelphia
(Morgan 1-2), 1:05 p.m.
Cleveland (Co.Anderson 2-1) at Milwaukee
(Lohse 5-10), 2:10 p.m.
Texas (M.Perez 0-1) at Colorado (J.De La
Rosa 6-4), 3:10 p.m.
Baltimore (Gausman 1-1) at N.Y. Yankees
(Nova 1-3), 7:05 p.m.
Seattle (Montgomery 4-3) at Detroit (An.
Sanchez 9-7), 7:08 p.m.
Boston (Miley 8-8) at Houston (McHugh
10-5), 8:10 p.m.
Pittsburgh (Morton 6-3) at Kansas City
(Volquez 8-5), 8:10 p.m.
St. Louis (Lynn 7-5) at Chicago White Sox
(Danks 5-8), 8:10 p.m.
Minnesota (Pelfrey 5-6) at L.A. Angels
(C.Wilson 7-7), 10:05 p.m.
Toronto (Doubront 1-0) at Oakland (Gray
10-4), 10:05 p.m.
Thursday’s Games
Baltimore at N.Y. Yankees, 1:05 p.m.
Seattle at Detroit, 1:08 p.m.
Minnesota at L.A. Angels, 3:35 p.m.
Toronto at Oakland, 3:35 p.m.
Chicago White Sox at Cleveland, 7:10 p.m.
Kansas City at St. Louis, 7:15 p.m.
Boston at Houston, 8:10 p.m.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
East Division
W
L Pct
GB
Washington
50
42 .543
—
New York
49
45 .521
2
Atlanta
45
49 .479
6
Miami
38
55 .409 12 1⁄2
Philadelphia
33
63 .344
19
Central Division
W
L Pct
GB
St. Louis
59
34 .634
—
Pittsburgh
54
39 .581
5
Chicago
49
42 .538
9
Cincinnati
41
49 .456 161⁄2
Milwaukee
42
52 .447 171⁄2
West Division
W
L Pct
GB
Los Angeles
53
42 .558
—
San Francisco
49
44 .527
3
San Diego
44
49 .473
8
Arizona
43
48 .473
8
Colorado
40
52 .435 11 1⁄2
Monday’s Scores
Washington 7, N.Y. Mets 2
Philadelphia 5, Tampa Bay 3
Cincinnati 5, Chicago Cubs 4
Atlanta 7, L.A. Dodgers 5
Pittsburgh 10, Kansas City 7
Colorado 8, Texas 7
Arizona 3, Miami 1
San Diego 4, San Francisco 2
Tuesday’s Scores
N.Y. Mets 7, Washington 2
Tampa Bay 1, Philadelphia 0
Atlanta 4, L.A. Dodgers 3
Chicago Cubs at Cincinnati, 7:10 p.m.
Milwaukee 8, Cleveland 1
Kansas City 3, Pittsburgh 1
St. Louis 8, Chicago White Sox 5
Texas 9, Colorado 0
Miami at Arizona, late
San Francisco at San Diego, late
Today’s Games
L.A. Dodgers (Bolsinger 4-3) at Atlanta
(Teheran 6-4), 12:10 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (Hendricks 4-4) at Cincinnati
(Leake 7-5), 12:35 p.m., 1st game
N.Y. Mets (Syndergaard 4-5) at
Washington (Zimmermann 8-5), 12:35
p.m.
Tampa Bay (Odorizzi 5-6) at Philadelphia
(Morgan 1-2), 1:05 p.m.
Cleveland (Co.Anderson 2-1) at Milwaukee
(Lohse 5-10), 2:10 p.m.
Texas (M.Perez 0-1) at Colorado (J.De La
Rosa 6-4), 3:10 p.m.
San Francisco (M.Cain 1-1) at San Diego
(Shields 8-3), 3:40 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (Beeler 0-0) at Cincinnati
(Cingrani 0-3), 6:10 p.m., 2nd game
Pittsburgh (Morton 6-3) at Kansas City
(Volquez 8-5), 8:10 p.m.
St. Louis (Lynn 7-5) at Chicago White Sox
(Danks 5-8), 8:10 p.m.
Miami (Fernandez 2-0) at Arizona (Ray
3-4), 9:40 p.m.
Thursday’s Games
Washington at Pittsburgh, 7:05 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers at N.Y. Mets, 7:10 p.m.
Kansas City at St. Louis, 7:15 p.m.
Milwaukee at Arizona, 9:40 p.m.
Miami at San Diego, 10:10 p.m.
INTERLEAGUE
BREWERS 8, INDIANS 1
Cleveland
Milwaukee
ab r h bi
ab r h bi
Kipnis 2b 4 0 2 0 GParra lf
4 2 2 1
Lindor ss 4 0 0 0 Lucroy c
5 0 0 1
Brantly lf 3 0 1 0 Braun rf
3 1 0 0
CSantn 1b 2 0 1 0 Lind 1b
4 0 1 1
Moss rf
YGoms c
Bourn cf
Urshela 3b
Salazar p
DvMrp ph
McAlst p
R.Webb p
Crocktt p
Manshp p
AAdms p
Totals
4
4
4
4
2
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
2
1
0
2
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
CGomz cf
1
ArRmr 3b 4
HPerez 3b 0
Segura ss 4
Gennett 2b 4
Garza p
2
Blazek p
0
WSmith p 0
SPetrsn ph 1
Cotts p
0
KDavis ph 1
Knebel p
0
32 1 9 1 Totals
33
1
0
0
2
1
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
8
1
0
0
3
1
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
9
1
0
0
2
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
7
Cleveland
000 000 100 — 1
Milwaukee
120 000 41x — 8
E—Lindor (5). DP—Cleveland 1, Milwaukee 4.
LOB—Cleveland 7, Milwaukee 6. 2B—Kipnis (28),
Y.Gomes (9), Urshela (3). 3B—G.Parra 2 (4).
HR—Segura (4). SB—Segura (14).
IP
H
R ER BB SO
Cleveland
Salazar L,8-5
6
2
3
3
3
8
McAllister
0
3
3
1
1
0
R.Webb
2-3
0
1
0
0
0
Crockett
0
1
0
0
0
0
Manship
1-3
1
0
0
0
0
A.Adams
1
2
1
1
0
0
Milwaukee
Garza W,5-10
6
6
0
0
2
4
Blazek H,4
1-3
2
1
1
0
1
W.Smith H,7
2-3
0
0
0
0
2
Cotts
1
1
0
0
1
1
Knebel
1
0
0
0
0
2
McAllister pitched to 4 batters in the 7th.
Crockett pitched to 1 batter in the 7th.
HBP—by Salazar (Braun).
Umpires—Home, Brian Gorman; First, Mark
Carlson; Second, Ryan Blakney; Third, Tripp
Gibson.
T—2:58. A—34,379 (41,900).
ROYALS 3, PIRATES 1
Pittsburgh
Kansas City
ab r h bi
ab r h bi
GPolnc rf 4 0 0 0 AEscor ss 4 0 1 1
NWalkr 2b 4 0 0 0 Mostks 3b 4 0 0 0
McCtch cf 4 0 0 0 L.Cain cf
4 0 0 0
SMarte lf 4 0 2 0 Hosmer 1b 3 0 1 0
Kang ss
4 1 2 0 KMorls dh 2 0 0 0
PAlvrz dh 3 0 0 0 S.Perez c
3 0 0 0
Morel 3b 3 0 0 0 Infante 2b 3 1 1 0
Ishikaw ph 1 0 1 1 Rios rf
3 1 2 0
Stewart c 3 0 1 0 JDyson lf
3 1 1 2
SRdrgz 1b 4 0 2 0
Totals 34 1 8 1 Totals
29 3 6 3
Pittsburgh
000 000 001 — 1
Kansas City
000 000 03x — 3
E—N.Walker (5), G.Polanco (5), Infante (9). DP—
Pittsburgh 1. LOB—Pittsburgh 9, Kansas City 3.
2B—S.Marte (18), Kang (12), Infante (20), Rios
(8). SB—S.Marte (19), P.Alvarez (2), J.Dyson
(15). CS—Kang (3).
IP
H
R ER BB SO
Pittsburgh
G.Cole L,13-4 7 1-3
5
3
2
0
6
Caminero
2-3
1
0
0
0
0
Kansas City
J.Vargas
1 1-3
1
0
0
1
2
Blanton
3 2-3
2
0
0
0
5
Madson
1
0
0
0
0
0
K.Herrera
1 2-3
1
0
0
1
2
W.Davis W,6-1 1-3
0
0
0
0
1
G.Holland S,21-24 1
4
1
1
1
2
HBP—by G.Cole (K.Morales).
Umpires—Home, Gerry Davis; First, Tony
Randazzo; Second, Will Little; Third, Phil Cuzzi.
T—3:02. A—38,163 (37,903).
RANGERS 9, ROCKIES 0
Texas
Colorado
ab r h bi
ab r h bi
DShlds cf-lf6 1 4 2 Blckmn cf 4 0 2 0
Odor 2b
5 0 2 1 LeMahi 2b 4 0 1 0
Fielder 1b 4 1 2 1 Tlwtzk ss 4 0 0 0
Rosales 1b 0 0 0 0 Descals ss 0 0 0 0
Beltre 3b 4 0 0 0 Arenad 3b 3 0 2 0
JHmltn lf 5 1 1 0 WRosr 1b 4 0 0 0
Kela p
0 0 0 0 Stubbs lf
4 0 1 0
ShTllsn p 0 0 0 0 Hundly c
3 0 1 0
Andrus ss 5 2 2 0 BBarns rf 3 0 1 0
Choo rf
5 3 4 3 Kndrck p
1 0 0 0
Chirins c 4 1 2 1 Flande p
1 0 0 0
MHrrsn p 2 0 0 0 Paulsn ph 1 0 0 0
Rua ph
1 0 0 0 Brothrs p
0 0 0 0
Patton p 0 0 0 0 Betncrt p
0 0 0 0
LMartn cf 1 0 0 0
Totals 42 9 17 8 Totals
32 0 8 0
Texas
030 121 011 — 9
Colorado
000 000 000 — 0
E—Andrus (17), Flande (1). DP—Texas 4. LOB—
Texas 11, Colorado 7. 2B—DeShields (13), Odor
2 (10), Choo (16), Arenado (24). 3B—DeShields
(6), Choo (2). HR—Fielder (15), Choo (12). SB—
Choo (2). CS—DeShields (3). S—M.Harrison.
SF—Odor.
IP
H
R ER BB SO
Texas
M.Harrison W,1-1 6
7
0
0
1
2
Patton
1
1
0
0
1
1
Kela
1
0
0
0
0
1
Sh.Tolleson
1
0
0
0
0
0
Colorado
Kendrick L,3-11 4 1-3 10
6
5
2
2
Flande
2 2-3
3
1
1
0
2
Brothers
1 1-3
4
2
2
1
0
Betancourt
2-3
0
0
0
0
1
WP—K.Kendrick.
Umpires—Home, Tom Hallion; First, Dan Bellino;
Second, Chris Segal; Third, Alfonso Marquez.
T—3:06. A—43,012 (50,398).
CARDINALS 8, WHITE SOX 5
St. Louis
Chicago
ab r h bi
ab r h bi
Wong 2b 4 1 0 0 Eaton cf
2 2 0 0
Grichk cf-lf 5 0 0 0 Saladin 3b 5 2 3 2
Hollidy dh 4 2 2 4 Abreu 1b
5 0 1 1
JhPerlt ss 4 1 1 0 MeCarr lf
3 0 0 1
Heywrd rf 4 1 1 0 AvGarc rf 3 0 0 0
Molina c 5 0 3 2 LaRoch dh 4 0 1 0
MCrpnt 3b 5 0 2 1 AlRmrz ss 4 0 1 0
Rynlds 1b 2 2 1 1 Soto c
3 1 1 1
Pisctty lf 4 1 1 0 Shuck ph
1 0 0 0
Bourjos cf 0 0 0 0 CSnchz 2b 4 0 1 0
Totals 37 8 11 8 Totals
34 5 8 5
St. Louis
012 410 000 — 8
Chicago
000 230 000 — 5
E—Reynolds (5), Piscotty (1). DP—St. Louis
1, Chicago 1. LOB—St. Louis 9, Chicago 7.
2B—Heyward (19). 3B—Jh.Peralta (1). HR—
Holliday (4), Reynolds (9), Saladino (2), Soto (6).
SF—Me.Cabrera.
IP
H
R ER BB SO
St. Louis
Wacha W,11-3
5
4
5
5
2
8
Maness H,12
1
2
0
0
0
1
Tuivailala H,1
2-3
0
0
0
1
0
Siegrist H,17 1 1-3
0
0
0
1
1
Rosenthal S,28-30 1
2
0
0
0
2
Atlanta
201 010 00x — 4
E—K.Hernandez (3), Pederson (3), J.Peterson
(7). DP—Los Angeles 1, Atlanta 2. LOB—Los
Angeles 6, Atlanta 9. 2B—Tsao (1), C.Johnson
(7), Uribe (8). 3B—Markakis (1). HR—Ju.Turner
(12), Puig (5). S—B.Anderson.
IP
H
R ER BB SO
Los Angeles
B.Anderson
2 2-3
5
3
3
2
2
Tsao L,1-1
1 1-3
2
1
0
1
2
Baez
2
2
0
0
0
2
Jo.Peralta
1
1
0
0
1
2
Howell
1
0
0
0
1
0
Atlanta
Wood W,7-6
6 2-3
6
3
3
4
3
Frasor H,2
1-3
0
0
0
0
0
Avilan H,11
1
0
0
0
0
1
Ji.Johnson S,8-11 1
0
0
0
0
0
Tsao pitched to 2 batters in the 5th.
Umpires—Home, James Hoye; First, Bill Welke;
Second, John Tumpane; Third, John Hirschbeck.
T—3:20. A—33,816 (49,586).
METS 7, NATIONALS 2
New York
Washington
ab r h bi
ab r h bi
Grndrs rf 5 2 2 1 MTaylr cf
4 0 0 0
Tejada ss 5 1 1 1 Espinos 2b 4 0 1 0
DnMrp 3b 5 0 1 1 Harper rf
3 0 0 0
Duda 1b 3 0 1 0 YEscor 3b 4 1 1 0
WFlors 2b 4 1 2 2 CRonsn 1b 4 0 1 0
Niwnhs lf 3 1 0 0 Dsmnd ss 3 0 1 0
Mybry ph-lf2 0 0 0 WRams c 3 1 1 2
Plawck c 4 1 1 0 dnDkkr lf
3 0 0 0
deGrm p 2 0 0 0 J.Ross p
2 0 0 0
Campll ph 1 0 1 2 Barrett p
0 0 0 0
Mejia p
0 0 0 0 Rivero p
0 0 0 0
Parnell p 0 0 0 0 Uggla ph
1 0 0 0
Cuddyr ph 0 1 0 0 Roark p
0 0 0 0
Famili p
0 0 0 0 dlsSnts p
0 0 0 0
Lagars cf 4 0 1 0
Totals 38 7 10 7 Totals
31 2 5 2
ASSOCIATED PRESS
New York Yankees center fielder Jacoby Ellsbury makes a diving catch on a ball hit by the Baltimore
Orioles’ Chris Davis to end the top of the fourth inning of a game Tuesday in New York.
Chicago
Rodon L,3-3
4
7
7
7
3
D.Webb
3
2
1
1
2
M.Albers
1
0
0
0
0
Da.Jennings
1
2
0
0
0
HBP—by Rodon (Wong, Jh.Peralta). WP—D.
Webb.
Umpires—Home, Alan Porter; First, Mark
Ripperger; Second, Brian O’Nora; Third, Ben
May.
T—3:06. A—29,728 (40,615).
RAYS 1, PHILLIES 0
Tampa Bay
Philadelphia
ab r h bi
ab r h
Jaso lf
4 0 2 0 OHerrr cf
3 0 0
McGee p 0 0 0 0 Galvis ss
4 0 1
Jepsen p 0 0 0 0 CHrndz 2b 4 0 0
TBckh ss 0 0 0 0 Howard 1b 4 0 0
SouzJr rf 4 0 0 0 Asche lf
3 0 0
Longori 3b 4 0 0 0 DBrwn rf
4 0 2
Loney 1b 4 0 0 0 ABlanc 3b 2 0 0
Forsyth 2b 3 0 1 0 Rupp c
2 0 0
Kiermr cf 4 0 0 0 Nola p
2 0 1
Elmore ss 4 0 1 0 LGarci p
0 0 0
Boxrgr p 0 0 0 0 Francr ph
1 0 0
Rivera c 4 0 1 0 JGomz p
0 0 0
Karns p
2 1 1 1 Diekmn p
0 0 0
Geltz p
0 0 0 0
Cedeno p 0 0 0 0
JButler ph 1 0 1 0
Guyer lf 0 0 0 0
Totals 34 1 7 1 Totals
29 0 4
6
1
0
1
bi
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Tampa Bay
001 000 000 — 1
Philadelphia
000 000 000 — 0
E—Forsythe (5). DP—Tampa Bay 1. LOB—Tampa
Bay 7, Philadelphia 6. 2B—Jaso (4), Galvis (9).
HR—Karns (1). CS—C.Hernandez (4).
IP
H
R ER BB SO
Tampa Bay
Karns W,5-5
5
3
0
0
2
4
Geltz H,13
1-3
0
0
0
0
0
Cedeno H,12
2-3
0
0
0
0
1
McGee H,13
1
1
0
0
1
1
Jepsen H,21
1
0
0
0
0
2
Boxberger S,24-26 1
0
0
0
0
1
Philadelphia
Nola L,0-1
6
5
1
1
1
6
L.Garcia
1
1
0
0
0
1
J.Gomez
1
1
0
0
0
1
Diekman
1
0
0
0
0
2
J.Gomez pitched to 1 batter in the 9th.
HBP—by Karns (A.Blanco).
Umpires—Home, Ted Barrett; First, Chris
Conroy; Second, Gabe Morales; Third, Scott
Barry.
T—2:52. A—28,703 (43,651).
LATE MONDAY
ROCKIES 8, RANGERS 7
Texas
Colorado
ab r h bi
ab r h bi
DShlds cf-lf4 0 0 0 Blckmn cf 3 2 1 1
Odor 2b
5 1 1 1 LeMahi 2b 4 1 1 1
Fielder 1b 4 1 2 3 Tlwtzk ss 4 1 2 2
Beltre 3b 5 0 3 2 Stubbs pr 0 1 0 0
Hltn rf-lf-rf 5 0 0 0 CGnzlz rf
5 1 2 0
Andrus ss 4 0 1 0 Arenad 3b 5 1 1 2
Rua lf
3 1 1 0 Paulsn 1b 4 0 2 2
Choo ph-rf 1 0 0 0 Hundly c
4 0 0 0
Schprs p 0 0 0 0 BBarns lf
3 1 1 0
Telis c
4 1 2 1 Rusin p
2 0 0 0
NMrtnz p 2 2 0 0 Logan p
0 0 0 0
Bass p
0 0 0 0 Kahnle p
0 0 0 0
Rosales ph 1 0 0 0 Hwkns p
0 0 0 0
Patton p 0 0 0 0 McKnr ph 0 0 0 0
SFrmn p 0 0 0 0 Axford p
0 0 0 0
LMartn cf 0 1 0 0
Totals 38 7 10 7 Totals
34 8 10 8
Texas
002 030 101 — 7
Colorado
340 000 001 — 8
One out when winning run scored.
E—Tulowitzki (8), Rusin (1). LOB—Texas 7,
Colorado 9. 2B—Beltre 2 (16), Rua (3), Arenado
(23). 3B—LeMahieu (3). HR—Tulowitzki (12).
SB—LeMahieu (11). S—Rusin.
IP
H
R ER BB SO
Texas
N.Martinez
4
7
7
7
2
2
Bass
1
0
0
0
0
0
Patton
1 1-3
0
0
0
1
1
S.Freeman
1 1-3
0
0
0
3
2
Scheppers L,3-1 2-3
3
1
1
0
0
Colorado
Rusin
6
7
5
2
1
5
Logan H,17
2-3
1
1
1
0
0
Kahnle H,8
1-3
1
0
0
0
0
Hawkins H,3
1
0
0
0
0
1
Axfd W,2-2 BS,2-18 1
1
1
1
2
0
HBP—by N.Martinez (Tulowitzki).
Umpires—Home, Alfonso Marquez; First, Tom
Hallion; Second, Dan Bellino; Third, Chris Segal.
T—3:31. A—35,027 (50,398).
BOXSCORES
AMERICAN LEAGUE
MARINERS 11, TIGERS 9
Seattle
Detroit
ab r h bi
ab r h bi
AJcksn cf 6 1 2 1 Kinsler 2b 5 2 2 0
Seager 3b 5 2 2 0 Cespds lf
4 1 1 2
N.Cruz dh 5 2 1 1 VMrtnz dh 4 1 1 0
Cano 2b
4 2 3 1 JMrtnz rf 5 3 2 2
S.Smith rf 3 2 1 1 Krauss 1b 2 0 1 0
Ackley lf 2 0 0 1 JMarte ph-1b3 0 0 0
Trumo ph 1 0 1 0 Cstllns 3b 4 2 3 1
CTaylr pr-ss0 0 0 0 Avila c
3 0 1 1
Gtirrz ph-lf 1 1 1 4 Romine ss 5 0 1 1
Miller ss-lf 4 0 1 1 Gose cf
2 0 0 1
Morrsn 1b 5 1 1 0 RDavis ph-cf 1 0 0 0
Zunino c 4 0 1 0
Totals 40 11 14 10 Totals
38 9 12 8
Seattle
401 001 050 — 11
Detroit
012 040 110 — 9
E—A.Jackson (3), Seager (9). DP—Seattle 1.
LOB—Seattle 10, Detroit 8. 2B—Cano (24),
S.Smith (21), Zunino (8), Kinsler (21). HR—N.
Cruz (22), Gutierrez (2), Cespedes (14),
J.Martinez (27), Castellanos (7). SB—A.Jackson
(11). CS—Avila (1). SF—Ackley.
IP
H
R ER BB SO
Seattle
T.Walker
4 1-3
7
6
5
0
4
D.Rollins
1-3
1
1
1
1
1
Wilhelmsen
1 2-3
2
1
1
2
2
Beimel W,1-1
2-3
0
0
0
1
0
Rodney H,4
2-3
2
1
1
0
2
Ca.Smith S,8-9 1 1-3
0
0
0
1
1
Detroit
Greene
4 2-3
6
5
5
2
1
B.Hardy
1
3
1
1
0
0
Albuquerque H,6 1-3
0
0
0
0
0
Krol H,1
2-3
0
0
0
0
1
B.Rondon H,2
1-3
1
0
0
1
0
Feliz L,1-3 BS,4-10 1
4
5
5
1
2
A.Wilson
1
0
0
0
1
1
HBP—by T.Walker (V.Martinez), by A.Wilson
(Zunino), by Greene (N.Cruz). WP—Rodney 2,
N.Feliz.
Umpires—Home, Jeff Nelson; First, Chris
Guccione; Second, Cory Blaser; Third, Laz Diaz.
T—3:55. A—34,088 (41,574).
ASTROS 8, RED SOX 3
Boston
Houston
ab r h bi
ab r h bi
Betts cf 4 1 1 2 Altuve 2b 3 2 2 1
Pedroia 2b 4 0 0 0 MGnzlz 1b 2 1 1 0
Bogarts ss 4 0 2 1 ClRsms rf 1 0 0 0
Ortiz dh 4 0 0 0 Correa ss
3 0 1 2
HRmrz lf 4 0 1 0 Gattis lf
3 0 0 1
Sandovl 3b 4 0 0 0 Singltn 1b 1 0 0 0
B.Holt 1b 3 0 1 0 Valuen 3b 4 0 0 0
De Aza rf 3 1 2 0 Conger c
3 1 1 0
Hanign c 3 1 1 0 Carter dh
3 2 2 2
Hoes rf-lf 4 0 1 0
Mrsnck cf 4 2 1 0
Totals 33 3 8 3 Totals
31 8 9 6
Boston
003 000 000 — 3
Houston
100 042 01x — 8
E—Hanigan (1). DP—Boston 1, Houston 2. LOB—
Boston 3, Houston 6. 2B—Betts (23), Bogaerts
(21), B.Holt (16), Hanigan (3), Correa (12),
Conger (6). 3B—Marisnick (3). HR—Carter (16).
SB—Altuve (27), Marisnick (12). SF—Correa.
IP
H
R ER BB SO
Boston
B.Johnson L,0-1 4 1-3
3
4
4
4
3
Masterson
1 2-3
4
3
3
0
2
Layne
1
0
0
0
0
0
Tazawa
1
2
1
1
0
1
Houston
Velasquez W,1-1 6
7
3
3
0
7
W.Harris
1
1
0
0
0
0
Neshek
1
0
0
0
0
0
J.Fields
1
0
0
0
0
1
HBP—by Masterson (Ma.Gonzalez,
Ma.Gonzalez). WP—Masterson.
Umpires—Home, Jordan Baker; First, Paul
Emmel; Second, Jerry Meals; Third, Andy
Fletcher.
T—3:01. A—26,913 (41,574).
YANKEES 3, ORIOLES 2
Baltimore
New York
ab r h bi
ab
MMchd 3b 3 0 0 0 Ellsury cf
5
Pareds dh 4 1 1 0 Gardnr lf
3
A.Jones cf 4 1 2 0 ARdrgz dh 2
C.Davis rf 4 0 1 0 Teixeir 1b 4
Wieters c 3 0 1 1 BMcCn c
3
JHardy ss 4 0 1 1 CYoung rf 4
Snider lf 1 0 0 0 Headly 3b 4
Remld ph-lf2 0 1 0 Gregrs ss
4
Schoop 2b 4 0 0 0 B.Ryan 2b 4
Parmel 1b 3 0 0 0
Totals 32 2 7 2 Totals
33
r
1
0
0
0
1
0
0
1
0
h
1
1
0
2
1
2
2
1
1
bi
0
0
1
0
0
0
1
0
1
3 11 3
Baltimore
000 002 000 — 2
New York
110 001 00x — 3
LOB—Baltimore 6, New York 10. 2B—Ellsbury
(5), Teixeira 2 (19), Headley (14), B.Ryan (1).
S—Gardner. SF—A.Rodriguez.
IP
H
R ER BB SO
Baltimore
W.Chen L,4-6 6 1-3 10
3
3
0
3
Tom.Hunter
2-3
1
0
0
2
1
Matusz
1
0
0
0
0
1
New York
Eovaldi
5 2-3
4
2
2
3
4
Wlsn W,3-0 BS,1-1 1
2
0
0
0
0
Betances H,15 1 1-3
1
0
0
0
2
A.Miller S,21-21
1
0
0
0
0
1
WP—Eovaldi.
Umpires—Home, Mike Everitt; First, Tim Welke;
Second, Todd Tichenor; Third, Tim Timmons.
T—2:48 (Delay: 0:15). A—37,993 (49,638).
LATE MONDAY
ANGELS 7, RED SOX 3
Second Game
Boston
Los Angeles
ab r h bi
ab r h bi
Betts cf 3 0 0 0 Giavtll 2b
3 1 0 0
Pedroia 2b 4 0 0 0 Calhon rf
4 1 1 0
Bogarts ss 3 1 2 1 Trout dh
3 2 1 1
Ortiz dh 4 1 2 2 Pujols 1b
3 3 2 3
HRmrz lf 4 0 0 0 Aybar ss
4 0 2 2
Sandovl 3b 4 0 0 0 Joyce lf
3 0 0 0
Victorn rf 3 0 0 0 DnRrts cf 4 0 1 1
De Aza ph 1 0 0 0 C.Perez c
4 0 1 0
Napoli 1b 3 0 2 0 Fthrstn 3b 3 0 0 0
B.Holt ph 1 0 0 0
Swihart c 2 1 0 0
Totals 32 3 6 3 Totals
31 7 8 7
Boston
000 002 010 — 3
Los Angeles
014 010 10x — 7
LOB—Boston 5, Los Angeles 5. 2B—Napoli (12),
Aybar (17). HR—Ortiz (16), Trout (28), Pujols 2
(29). S—Featherston. SF—Bogaerts.
IP
H
R ER BB SO
Boston
S.Wright L,3-3
5
6
6
6
3
3
Layne
1
1
0
0
0
0
Ogando
1
1
1
1
0
1
Breslow
1
0
0
0
0
1
Los Angeles
Heaney W,4-0
7
5
2
2
0
4
Gott
2-3
1
1
1
2
0
J.Smith S,1-4 1 1-3
0
0
0
0
1
HBP—by S.Wright (Joyce). PB—Swihart 2.
Umpires—Home, Pat Hoberg; First, Bob
Davidson; Second, Hunter Wendelstedt; Third,
Marcus Pattillo.
T—2:34. A—38,042 (45,957).
NATIONAL LEAGUE
BRAVES 4, DODGERS 3
Los Angeles
Atlanta
ab r h bi
ab r h bi
Pedrsn cf 4 0 0 0 JPetrsn 2b 4 1 0 0
HKndrc 2b 4 0 1 1 Maybin cf 4 1 1 0
JuTrnr 3b 4 1 1 1 Markks rf 4 2 2 1
AGnzlz 1b 4 0 1 0 CJhnsn 1b 4 0 3 2
Crwfrd pr-lf0 0 0 0 Uribe 3b
3 0 2 1
VnSlyk lf-1b2 0 0 0 JGoms lf
3 0 1 0
Puig rf
4 1 1 1 Avilan p
0 0 0 0
Howell p 0 0 0 0 JiJhnsn p
0 0 0 0
KHrndz ss 2 0 1 0 ASmns ss 4 0 0 0
Callasp ph 1 0 0 0 Lvrnwy c
3 0 1 0
ABarns c 2 0 0 0 A.Wood p 2 0 0 0
Grandl ph 1 0 0 0 Frasor p
0 0 0 0
BAndrs p 0 0 0 0 EPerez lf
1 0 0 0
Tsao p
1 1 1 0
Baez p
0 0 0 0
Guerrr ph 1 0 0 0
JoPerlt p 0 0 0 0
Ethier rf 1 0 0 0
Totals 31 3 6 3 Totals
32 4 10 4
Los Angeles
B3 - 07/22/15
110
010
CYAN
000
—
3
New York
000 100 204 — 7
Washington
000 020 000 — 2
E—C.Robinson (3), den Dekker (1). LOB—New
York 8, Washington 3. 2B—Duda (23), Y.Escobar
(15). HR—W.Ramos (9). SB—Granderson (8).
CS—Desmond (3).
IP
H
R ER BB SO
New York
deGrom W,10-6
6
3
2
2
0
8
Mejia H,2
1
1
0
0
0
1
Parnell H,5
1
0
0
0
0
1
Familia
1
1
0
0
0
1
Washington
J.Ross L,2-2
6 1-3
4
3
2
0
4
Barrett BS,2-2 1-3
1
0
0
0
0
Rivero
1 1-3
1
0
0
1
1
Roark
1-3
4
4
4
1
1
de los Santos
2-3
0
0
0
1
1
HBP—by Familia (Harper), by J.Ross (Duda).
Umpires—Home, Mike Muchlinski; First, Mark
Wegner; Second, Marty Foster; Third, Mike
Winters.
T—2:54. A—37,721 (41,341).
LATE MONDAY
PADRES 4, GIANTS 2
San Francisco
San Diego
ab r h bi
ab r h bi
Pagan cf 4 0 1 0 Solarte 3b 5 1 3 1
Panik 2b 4 1 2 0 Amarst ss 2 1 1 0
MDuffy 3b 4 0 1 0 Kemp rf
3 1 2 2
Posey c
4 0 1 1 Gyorko 2b 3 0 1 1
Pence rf 4 0 0 0 Alonso 1b 3 0 2 0
Belt 1b
3 0 1 0 DeNrrs c
3 0 0 0
BCrwfr ss 3 0 0 0 Venale lf
4 0 0 0
GBlanc lf 4 1 1 1 UptnJr cf
4 1 1 0
THudsn p 2 0 0 0 Kenndy p
2 0 0 0
Y.Petit p 0 0 0 0 Mdlrks ph 1 0 0 0
Adrianz ph 1 0 0 0 Maurer p
0 0 0 0
Vglsng p 0 0 0 0 Benoit p
0 0 0 0
HSnchz ph 1 0 0 0 Wallac ph 1 0 0 0
Kimrel p
0 0 0 0
Totals 34 2 7 2 Totals
31 4 10 4
San Francisco
001 010 000 — 2
San Diego
002 011 00x — 4
E—Amarista (10). DP—San Francisco 1, San
Diego 1. LOB—San Francisco 7, San Diego 9.
2B—Gyorko (8), Alonso (10). 3B—Upton Jr. (2).
HR—G.Blanco (3), Kemp (10). CS—B.Crawford
(3). SF—Gyorko.
IP
H
R ER BB SO
San Francisco
T.Hudson L,5-8
4
5
3
3
4
3
Y.Petit
2
4
1
1
0
2
Vogelsong
2
1
0
0
0
1
San Diego
Kennedy W,5-9
6
6
2
2
1
6
Maurer H,10
1
1
0
0
0
2
Benoit H,14
1
0
0
0
0
0
Kimbrel S,26-27
1
0
0
0
0
0
T.Hudson pitched to 3 batters in the 5th.
HBP—by Vogelsong (De.Norris), by Kennedy
(B.Crawford).
Umpires—Home, Clint Fagan; First, Chad
Fairchild; Second, Sam Holbrook; Third, Greg
Gibson.
T—3:13. A—35,033 (41,164).
DIAMONDBACKS 3, MARLINS 1
Miami
Arizona
ab r h bi
ab r h bi
ISuzuki rf 3 0 1 0 Inciart rf
4 0 1 0
Prado 2b-3b3 0 0 0 Pollock cf 2 1 0 0
Yelich lf
4 0 2 0 Gldsch 1b 2 0 1 0
Bour 1b
2 0 1 0 DPerlt lf
4 0 1 2
McGeh ph 1 0 0 0 WCastll c 4 0 0 0
Rojas pr-2b 0 0 0 0 JaLam 3b 4 1 2 0
Hchvrr ss 3 0 0 0 Owings 2b 4 0 2 0
Dtrch 3b-1b3 1 1 1 Ahmed ss 2 1 1 0
Realmt c 3 0 1 0 RDLRs p
3 0 0 1
Gillespi cf 4 0 0 0 OPerez p
0 0 0 0
Phelps p 2 0 1 0 Ziegler p
0 0 0 0
B.Hand p 0 0 0 0
Morse ph 1 0 0 0
Cishek p 0 0 0 0
DSolan ph 1 0 0 0
Totals 30 1 7 1 Totals
29 3 8 3
Miami
000 000 100 — 1
Arizona
002 001 00x — 3
E—Dietrich (4). DP—Miami 2, Arizona 4. LOB—
Miami 8, Arizona 7. 3B—Ahmed (2). HR—Dietrich
(4). SB—Goldschmidt (17). CS—Owings (2).
IP
H
R ER BB SO
Miami
Phelps L,4-6
5 2-3
7
3
3
4
3
B.Hand
1-3
0
0
0
0
0
Cishek
2
1
0
0
1
2
Arizona
R.De La Rosa W,7-57
5
1
1
5
1
O.Perez H,7
1-3
2
0
0
0
0
Ziegler S,15-17 1 2-3
0
0
0
1
2
Umpires—Home, Larry Vanover; First, Ron
Kulpa; Second, Vic Carapazza; Third, Brian
Knight.
T—2:58. A—17,668 (48,519).
MAGENTA YELLOW
BLACK
CYAN
B4 THE VINDICATOR | WEDNESDAY, JULY 22, 2015
MAGENTA
42 touchdowns, while rushing for
770 yards and 15 scores.
In other Titans news, Tennessee
wide receiver Justin Hunter has
been granted bond by a Virginia
judge after being charged with
malicious wounding.
The charge stems from a bar fight
in Hunter’s hometown of Virginia
Beach during the Fourth of July
weekend.
General District Judge Daniel
Lahne said Tuesday that Hunter
could be released on a $25,000
bond as long as he remains on
good behavior. Hunter was also
placed under a curfew.
Prosecutors said during Hunter’s
arraignment that he started a
fight on July 3 by punching a man
in the face twice. After the bar
was cleared, prosecutors said
Hunter punched the man again
WWW.VINDY.COM
while he was bent over spitting
out blood on the sidewalk.
Prosecutors say the man had
a broken jaw as a result of the
incident.
Minnesota Vikings: Adrian
Peterson and the Vikings have
agreed to restructure the final
three years of the running back’s
contract.
The Vikings made the announced
Tuesday, four days before players
will report to training camp.
Terms of the revamped deal
weren’t disclosed. In a statement
distributed by the Vikings, Peterson said he appreciates their willingness to address his contract to
provide him “additional security.”
Peterson’s existing deal called for
a $12.75 million salary this season, but neither of the two years
beyond that was guaranteed.
Buffalo Bills: Offensive tackle
Wayne Hunter’s chance to revive
his career with the Bills didn’t last
long.
The Bills announced they
released Hunter on Tuesday,
three weeks after signing him.
The move came a little over a
week before Buffalo players begin
reporting to training camp in
suburban Rochester.
The 6-foot-5, 318-pound player
had been out of football since being released by the St. Louis Rams
following the 2012 season. Hunter
was selected in the third round
of the 2003 draft by Seattle, and
also spent four seasons with the
Jets in a stint that overlapped
new Bills coach Rex Ryan’s tenure
in New York.
Associated Press
NBA
Jefferson
agrees
to 1-year
deal with
Cavaliers
Associated Press
CLEVELAND
Richard Jefferson has
experience, deep knowledge of the NBA and a deft
shooting touch.
The Cavaliers plan to
lean on all those attributes.
The free agent forward
has agreed to terms on
a one-year deal for next
season with Cleveland, a
person familiar with the
negotiations told The Associated Press on Tuesday.
The person spoke on condition of anonymity because Jefferson has not yet
signed his contract.
Jefferson, who came off
the bench for coach Rick
Carlisle
in Da llas
l a s t s e ason, w i l l
receive the
veter a n’s
minimum
sa la r y of
roughly
Jefferson
$1.5 m i llion. The 35-year-old averaged 5.8 points and 2.5
rebounds in 17 minutes
per game in his one season with Dallas and shot
a team-leading 43 percent from 3-point range.
He had been expected to
return to the Mavericks,
but he may have become
expendable when the club
signed shooting guard
Wesley Matthews.
Jefferson fills the roster
spot created by the retirement of Shawn Marion.
While Marion wasn’t a
major contributor on the
floor, he helped mentor
Cleveland’s younger players and Jefferson could
have a similar impact.
Li ke Ma r ion, Jef ferson is no stranger to the
playoffs, appearing in 105
postseason games. He has
also played for New Jersey,
Milwaukee, San Antonio,
Golden State and Utah.
ESPN f irst repor ted
Jefferson’s deal with the
Cavs.
Cleveland has been in
the market for wing players like Jefferson, the No.
13 overall pick in the 2001
draft, this summer. The
Cavs remain interested in
re-signing free agent J.R.
Smith, who declined his
$6.4 player’s option when
free agency opened. Smith
is expected to meet with
the team later this week.
The streaky shooter,
who came to Cleveland in
a midseason trade from
the New York Knicks, had
a disappointing NBA Finals. The Cavs were without All-Star guard Kyrie
Irving and forward Kevin
Love against Golden State
and needed someone to
pick up the scoring slack
and help LeBron James.
But Smith didn’t deliver,
and his sha k y performance — he shot 31 percent from the f loor —
raised speculation about
whether he would be back
for a second season with
the Cavaliers.
The team, though, remains interested in Smith
and vice versa.
BLACK
SPORTS
NFL | News & notes
Tennessee Titans: Heisman
Trophy winner Marcus Mariota
has agreed to a contract.
The Titans finalized the deal with
the former Oregon quarterback
on Tuesday. Terms were not immediately available.
Mariota, the No. 2 overall pick in
the draft, is expected to be an
immediate starter for the Titans,
who went 2-14 last season.
Mariota says, “I am very grateful
and honored to have this opportunity. I look forward to the future
with my teammates, and I’m truly
excited to be part of this team.”
Mariota left Oregon after his
redshirt junior season. In 2014,
the 6-foot-4 222-pounder from
Hawaii directed the most efficient
offense in the country and led all
quarterbacks with a 90.9 rating.
Mariota threw for 4,454 yards and
YELLOW
CANFIELD
Continued from B1
from six teams that play at
Canfield Baseball Club.
Last year, Canfield won
the state tournament and
represented Ohio in the
Great Lakes regional tournament in Indianapolis.
Canfield qualified for the
championship round and
was eliminated by Chicago’s Jackie Robinson West,
the regional champion that
eventually was disqualified for using players from
beyond its Little League
boundaries.
Mikos was on Canfield’s
state champion team and
Starr says the experience he
picked up is “invaluable.
“He’s been there and that
can go a long way helping us
out. It’s a chance for him to
step up and be a leader for
these guys.”
In last year’s state title
game, Mikos pitched against
West Hamilton.
“It was fun to be on ESPN,”
Mikos said of the regional in
Indianapolis. “I hit my first
home run [in a televised
game]. It’s a great memory.”
Last summer, Canfield’s
10-11 team without Mikos
finished second in the district to Boardman, which
went on to finish state runner-up after losing to West
Hamilton.
“Having him back is obviously a tremendous boost
for us,” Starr said of Mikos.
Iannizzario, who relieved
Mikos in the sixth inning
of Canfield’s 1-0 win over
Boardman in the district title game, said Mikos’ knowlLegal Notices
DAVID DERMER | THE VINDICATOR
Mahoning Valley right fielder Connor Marabell, right, and center fielder Silento Shane chase after the
baseball after Marabell was unable to make a diving catch against Staten Island on Tuesday night at
Eastwood Field. The Scrappers beat the Yankees, 5-4, in 10 innings.
Legal Notices
LEGAL NOTICE
LEGAL NOTICE
IN THE COURT OF COMMON PLEAS OF
BLAIR COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA
ORPHAN’S COURT DIVISION
The Austintown Township Board of
Trustees shall hold a Public Hearing on
Monday, August 3, 2015, at 7:00 P.M., at
the Township Building, 82 Ohltown Road,
Austintown, Ohio, for consideration of the
following requests:
IN RE: MIA ELIZABETH VESEY,
a minor.
:Docket No.: 2015 AD 31
TO:
AUSTINTOWN TOWNSHIP TRUSTEES
–RESOLUTION 2015-04-13-06
CRAIG WRIGHT
NOTICE
SCRAPPERS
Continued from B1
is where it all began. This
was my start in professional baseball and it’s where I
learned so many valuable
lessons that led me to where
I’m at today.
“I just always look back
and remember this as a really neat area and a great
place for players to get their
start.”
Osborn spent six years
in the Indians’ organization. He was a teammate of
Shaun Larkin at Akron when
he first entertained the idea
of pursuing a coaching or
managerial position. Larkin now manages the Lake
County Captains.
“Shaun and I were going
through infield practice one
day when the subject was
brought up,” Osborn said.
“We both talked about how
we wanted to stay in baseball after our playing days
were over. We both shared
the same passion for the
game, for learning the ins
and outs of baseball.”
After being released by
the Indians, Osborn played
for Southern Maryland in
the Independent League for
three years before becoming
their manager in 2013.
“I was in the right place at
the right time,” Osborn said.
“Our manager, Butch Hobson, was retiring and he recommended me to take over.
It really opened a door.”
In 2014, Osborn was hired
by the Yankees to coach in
the Gulf Coast League. He
was promoted to manage
Staten Island earlier this
PHANTOMS
Hometown: Neenah, Wis.
Age: 34.
Junior playing experience:
U.S. National Team Development, 1997-98; U.S. Junior National Team, 1997-99.
College: Notre Dame, 19992003. His senior year was
his best, scoring 17 goals and
making 16 assists.
Pro playing career: A right
winger, he played four seasons
for the ECHL’s Fresno Falcons.
His best season was his last
(2006-07) when he scored 20
goals and made 23 assists. In
his third season, he had 109
penalty minutes.
Coaching: Wroblewski began his coaching career
with Team USA in 2007. In the
2009-10 season, he was an assistant with the 18-under team
that included Brandon Saad,
a Mahoning Valley Phantom
the season before. Wroblewski said he was “shocked when
[Saad] slipped to the second round of the [2011] NHL
part.
“I’m looking forward to
[again] dealing with guys on
all different levels,” the native of Neenah, Wis., said.
“In the pros, you only deal
with them as hockey players.”
His ent husiasm for a
chance to mold a team impressed Loney.
“In the pros, you have
players hopping in and out
all the time,” said Loney,
whereas junior hockey “gives
a coach the ability to grow a
team and mentor a team.”
Wroblewski and Loney
said assistant coaches Brad
A PETITION HAS BEEN FILED ASKING THE
COURT TO PUT AN END TO ALL RIGHTS
YOU HAVE TO YOUR CHILD, MIA ELIZABETH VESEY. THE COURT HAS SET A
HEARING TO CONSIDER ENDING YOUR
RIGHTS TO YOUR CHILD. THAT HEARING
WILL BE HELD IN COURTROOM NO. FOUR,
BLAIR COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 423 ALLEGHENY STREET, HOLLIDAYSBURG, PENNSYLVANIA ON AUGUST 13, 2015 AT 1:30
P.M. YOU ARE WARNED THAT EVEN IF
YOU FAIL TO APPEAR AT THE SCHEDULED HEARING, THE HEARING WILL GO
ON WITHOUT YOU AND YOUR RIGHTS TO
YOUR CHILD MAY BE ENDED BY THE
COURT WITHOUT YOUR BEING PRESENT.
YOU HAVE A RIGHT TO BE REPRESENTED
AT THE HEARING BY A LAWYER. YOU
SHOULD TAKE THIS PAPER TO YOUR
LAWYER AT ONCE. IF YOU DO NOT HAVE
A LAWYER OR CANNOT AFFORD ONE, GO
TO OR TELEPHONE THE OFFICE SET
FORTH BELOW TO FIND OUT WHERE YOU
CAN GET LEGAL HELP. YOUR RIGHTS
MAY ALSO BE SUBJECT TO TERMINATION
IF YOU FAIL TO FILE EITHER AN ACKNOWLEDGMENT OF PATERNITY OR
CLAIM OF PATERNITY PURSUANT TO 23
PA.C.S.A SECTION 5103 (RELATING TO
ACKNOWLEDGMENT AND CLAIM OF PATERNITY) AND FAIL TO EITHER APPEAR
AT THE HEARING FOR THE PURPOSE OF
OBJECTING TO THE TERMINATION OF
YOUR RIGHTS OR FILE A WRITTEN OBJECTION TO SUCH TERMINATION WITH
THE COURT PRIOR TO THE HEARING.
Midpenn Legal Services
205 Lakemont Park Boulevard, Altoona, PA
16602
Telephone: 1-800-326-9177
NOTICE TO BIRTH PARENTS
PENNSYLVANIA ADOPTION MEDICAL
HISTORY REGISTRY
This is to inform you about an adoption law
provision relating to medical history information. As the birth parent of a Pennsylvania born child, who is being or was ever
adopted in the past, you have the opportunity to voluntarily place on file medical history information. The information which
you choose to provide could be important
to your child's present and future medical
care needs.
PHANTOMS COACH
John Wroblewski
Continued from B1
Dame], then had pro experience.”
After four seasons with the
Fighting Irish, Wroblewski
played four seasons with the
ECHL’s Fresno Falcons.
“His experience is unique,”
Loney said.
Wroblewski replaces Anthony Noreen, who guided
the Phantoms to three playoff berths in his four seasons
as head coach. Last month,
Noreen left the Phantoms
to become the head coach
of the ECHL’s Orlando Solar
Bears.
Wroblewski is the first
Phantoms head coach to
come f rom outside t he
team.
“We had a number of
quality candidates for this
position, but John proved
to us through the interview
process that he was the best
man to lead this club moving forward,” said Phantoms
general manager Jason Koehler, who was promoted to
full-time GM when Noreen
left. “We’re excited that we
get to bring Youngstown an
outstanding young coach
that has had success and experience at high levels.”
After four seasons working with professionals, Wroblewski said he’s looking forward to making an impact
on players who need more
than on-ice advice. He said
there was no hesitation on
his part about returning to
the junior level.
“I’m looking forward to
working with players again
on a daily basis,” said Wroblewski, explaining that pro
coaches spend much less
time with players. “I want to
make an impact on people’s
lives. That is the intriguing
year at the age of 34.
“It seems like just yesterday I was here going through
the same learning phase
that my players are now experiencing,” Osborn said.
“In that regard, it’s very beneficial because I understand
the struggles. It’s a neverending learning process. But
I’m lucky, I have a very good
group of guys.”
Osborn said he has fond
memories of “an (Eastwood
Field) fan base that was really into its baseball.”
He credits his Scrappers
manager, Chris Bando, for
helping him both on and off
the field. He still keeps in
close contact with a number of players from the ‘02
Scrappers.
“Just looking around here,
I can’t help but have a great
feeling,” Osborn said.
Draft. He had so much power,
you knew it would continue at
whatever level. He’s extremely
humble and grateful for what
for what he gets.” After winning his second Stanley Cup
championship with the Chicago Blackhawks last month,
Saad was traded to the Columbus Blue Jackets. “I know in
an ideal world the Blackhawks
would have kept Brandon
Saad, but with the salary cap,
teams have to make concessions. He’s going to be a nightmare for opponents when he’s
teamed with Ryan Johansen.”
Pro coaching: After one
year as an assistant with the
ECHL’s Wheeling Nailers, Wroblewski was head coach of the
ECHL’s Gwinnett Gladiators for
two seasons. After the 2011-12
season, he was named Coach
of the Year, In 2013, he joined
Chadd Cassidy’s staff with the
Rochester Americans, losing
that position in May when Buffalo Sabres’ GM Tim Murray
fired the Americans’ staff.
Tom Williams
Patterson and John Rohan
have been invited to remain
with the team.
Patterson, who played
t w o s e a s on s w it h t he
Youngstown SteelHounds,
has been with the Phantoms since 2010 when owner Bruce Zoldan replaced
original head coach Bob
Mainhardt with Curtis Carr.
Rohan joined the team last
summer before the Phantoms finished with the best
regular-season record in the
USHL.
“We value what they’ve
done and would like them to
remain,” Loney said.
edge can help.
“He kinda knows how it
all plays out because he’s
been there to experience it,”
the outfielder said.
Sam Starr, who plays second base, remembers the
fun of seeing friends playing
games televised by ESPN’s
networks.
“My family and I watched
the games after I came
home from baseball practice,” Starr said. “It was fun
getting to see people that we
know on television.
“Hopefully, we get to do
the same thing.”
If they do, pitching will be
the reason why.
“Our pitching is more
dominant than our hitting so I’d rather be in a 1-0
situation because I know
our pitching will pull us
through,” third baseman
Cory Rose said.
Iannizzario enjoys pitching but doesn’t mind sharing.
“If I’m not pitching any
place in the outfield is fine,”
he said. “I just want to do
what [is best] for my team.
Starr remembers the state
tournament two years ago
in Hamilton as a fun trip.
“It was an amazing experience for us,” the second
baseman said. “It was fun in
the hotel with the guys. We
played soft-baseball in the
hallways.”
Shortstop Trey Dye remembers how the team
went to Miami University
in Oxford and went on the
football field.
If things go well in Painesville, another road trip could
be in Canfield’s future.
The law makes it possible for you to file
current medical information, but it also allows you to update the information as new
medically related information becomes
available. Requests to release the information will be honored if the request is submitted by a birth child 18 years of age or
older. The law also permits that we honor
requests for information as submitted by
the adoptive parents or legal guardians of
adoptees who are not yet 18 years of age.
All information will be maintained and distributed in a manner that fully protects
your right to privacy.
You may obtain the appropriate form for
you to file medical history information by
contacting the Adoption Medical History
Registry. Registry staff are available to
answer your questions. Please contact
them at:
Department of Public Welfare
Adoption Medical History Registry
Hillcrest, Second Floor
Post Office Box 2675
Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 17105-2675
Telephone: 1-800-227-0225
Medical history information forms may also be obtained locally by contacting one of
the following agencies:
1.
County Children and Youth Service
Agency
2. Any private licensed adoption agency
3. Any County Court of Common Pleas
Justin B. Witt, Esquire
Counsel for Blair County Children, Youth
and Families
EVEY, BLACK, MAGEE, LEVINE,
ROSENSTEEL, MAUK, BRENNER &
KARN LLP
401 Allegheny Street, PO Box 415
Hollidaysburg, PA 16648
(814) 695-7581
LEGAL NOTICE
Project No. ADJ-15008B
Youngstown Armory Electrical Project
The Adjutant General’s Department
Youngstown Army National Guard
475 Victoria Rd
Youngstown, OH 44515 (Mahoning Co)
Bids Due: NO LATER THAN 2:30 p.m. Local
Time, Tuesday, August 4, 2015 at the Adjutant General’s Department, AGOH-DIMRPC, 2825 W. Dublin Granville Rd, Room
#W217, Columbus, Ohio 43235, Attn: State
Contracting Office.
A Pre Bid Meeting will be held on Friday,
July 24, 2015 at 11:00a.m. at Youngstown
Armory 475 Victoria Rd. Youngstown, OH
44515.
EDGE Participation Goal: 5% of contract
DOMESTIC STEEL USE REQUIREMENTS
AS SPECIFIED IN SECTION 153.011 OF THE
REVISED CODE APPLIES TO THIS PROJECT.
Contract
General Trades
Alternate 1
Alternate 2
Estimated Cost
$ 158,000.00
$ 63,000.00
$ 25,000.00
Bid Documents: Contract documents may
be obtained from SE Blueprint, 540 S Main
St Ste 211 Akron, OH. 330-376-1689 at the
cost of $100 per set, plus shipping, if requested.
The Contract Documents may be reviewed
for bidding purposes without charge during
business hours at the Adjutant General’s
Department.
B4 - 07/22/15
CYAN
Atty. Tim George, 1029 Youngstown Warren Road, Niles, Ohio 44446, on behalf
of Felix A Barrios, appeals the Ohio Revised Code 505.86 “Nuisance Abatement
Resolution – 2015-04-13-06” adopted by
the Austintown Township Trustees at a
public meeting held on April 13, 2015 declaring the structure located at 5849 Mahoning Avenue insecure, unsafe and structurally defective under Austintown Township Fire Code 311.1.1 abandoned premises
by the Austintown Township Fire Inspector. The resolution requires the property
owner to completely rehabilitate the building and bring it to a habitable state or raze
the building. Said property is zoned as a
Business B-2 District in Austintown Township, Mahoning County, Ohio.
AUSTINTOWN TOWNSHIP TRUSTEES
–RESOLUTION 2015-05-26-06
Margaret A. Gault, 1046 Genesee Drive,
Youngstown, Ohio, 44511, appeals the Ohio
Revised Code 505.86 “Nuisance Abatement
Resolution – 2015-05-25-06” adopted by
the Austintown Township Trustees at a
public meeting held on May 26, 2015 declaring the structures located at 6591 Fairview
Road insecure, unsafe and structurally defective under Austintown Township Fire
Code 311.1.1 abandoned premises by the
Austintown Township Fire Inspector. The
resolution requires the property owner to
completely rehabilitate the buildings and
bring the dwelling to a habitable state or
raze the buildings. Said property is zoned
as a Residential R-1 District for a depth of
150 feet with the souther remainder zoned
as an Agricultural-A-SER District in Austintown Township, Mahoning County, Ohio.
Texts of “Nuisance Abatement Resolution
– 2015-04-13-06” and “Nuisance Abatement Resolution – 2015-05-25-06” may be
viewed at the Zoning Office, 90 Westchester Drive, Austintown, Ohio, 44515, until
the time of the public hearing between the
hours of 8:00 A.M. and 4:00 P.M., Monday
through Friday.
James C. Davis, Chairman
Austintown Township Trustees
Darren L. Crivelli, Zoning Inspector
LEGAL NOTICE
The following matters are the subject of
this public notice by the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency. The complete public
notice, including any additional instructions
for submitting comments, requesting information, a public hearing, or filing an appeal
may be obtained at:
http://www.epa.ohio.gov/actions.aspx
or
Hearing Clerk, Ohio EPA, 50 W. Town St.
P.O. Box 1049, Columbus, Ohio 43216. Ph:
614-644-2129 email: [email protected]
VAP Covenant Not to Sue
Issuance/Denial/Revocation/AmendmentFinal Findings and Orders
CASTLO Industrial Park
100 South Bridge St, Struthers, OH
ID #: 15NFA565
Date of Action: 07/14/2015
Notice is hereby given that on July 14,
2015, the Director of the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency (“Ohio EPA”), pursuant to Ohio Revised Code (“ORC”) Chapter 3746 and Ohio Administrative Code
(“OAC”) Chapter 3745-300, issued a Covenant Not to Sue/Final Findings and Orders
to CASTLO Community Improvement Corporation, the Volunteer, for property known
as CASTLO Industrial Park Property (the
“Property”).
Final Issuance of Renewal
of NPDES Permit
Whitehouse Fruit Farm AMLC
9249 Youngstown-Salem Rd, Canfield, OH
Facility Description: Wastewater-SemiPublic
Receiving Water: UT to Meander Creek
ID #: 3PR00514*BD
Date of Action: 08/01/2015
This final action not preceded by proposed
action and is appealable to ERAC.
Draft NPDES Permit Renewal Subject to Revision
Sebring WWTP
900 N 18th St, Sebring, OH
Facility Description: Wastewater-Municipality
Receiving Water: UT of Sulfur Ditch
ID #: 3PC00011*LD
Date of Action: 07/22/2015
LEGAL NOTICE
The following matters are the subject of
this public notice by the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency. The complete public
notice, including any additional instructions
for submitting comments, requesting information, a public hearing, or filing an appeal
may be obtained at:
http://www.epa.ohio.gov/actions.aspx
or
Hearing Clerk, Ohio EPA, 50 W. Town St.
P.O. Box 1049, Columbus, Ohio 43216.
Ph: 614-644-2129
email: [email protected]
Air Pollution Model General Permit Available for Application
Date of Action: 07/20/2015
Notice is hereby given that the Director of
Environmental Protection (Ohio EPA) is
making available for application through
the Division of Air Pollution Control two
modifications to model general permits for
unpaved roadways and parking areas, and
three modifications to model general permits for storage piles. Ohio EPA provided a
30-day comment period on the draft terms
and conditions of these model general permits beginning on 05/04/2015 and
05/18/2015 respectively. After considering
all comments received, Ohio EPA developed
these final model general permits and began accepting applications on 7/20/2015.
Fax your ads Monday
through Friday to
(330) 747-0399.
MAGENTA YELLOW
BLACK
CYAN
MAGENTA
YELLOW
BLACK
BUSINESS
BUSINESS NEWS
Hall China assesses
damage from fire
Valley’s June jobless rate drops to 5.9 percent
digest
EAST LIVERPOOL
Hall China Co., 1 Anna St., a
century-old pottery plant, still
is assessing the damage from
a Monday evening fire, according to Vindicator broadcast partner 21 WFMJ-TV.
The fire was concentrated
in a large dryer at the plant.
An employee first noticed
smoke coming out of the
dryer doors about 5:30 p.m.
The fire was the result of
an equipment malfunction
but was put out quickly.
Most of the damage was
from water because of the
sprinkler system going off.
The plant, which employs 100, was still in full
production.
Rocksino unveils
Bernie Kosar VLT
By BRANDON KLEIN
[email protected]
YOUNGSTOWN
The Mahoning Valley unemployment rate continued
to remain below the 2014
rate in June.
In June, the Valley’s nonseasonally adjusted jobless
rate was 5.9 percent compared with 6.7 percent in
June 2014, according to data
released Tuesday by the
Ohio Department of Job and
Family Services.
“The bottom line in this
deluge of figures is that Ohio
and the Mahoning Valley
continue to recover from
the Great Recession,” said
George Zeller, a Clevelandbased economist. “But the
rate of recovery both in Ohio
and in the Valley continues
to be too slow to enable these
many thousands of workers
to find a new job, since our
growth rate remains continuously too slow and below
the national average.”
The number of unemployed went down from
17,000 in June 2014 to 14,900
in June 2015. Employment
went up from 235,700 in June
2014 to 237,100 in June 2015.
But the civ ilian labor
force dropped from 253,000
in June 2014 to 252,000 last
month.
FirstEnergy board
declares dividend
AKRON
The board of directors of
FirstEnergy Corp. declared
an unchanged quarterly
dividend of 36 cents per
share of outstanding common stock. The dividend will
be payable Sept. 1 to shareholders of record at the
close of business Aug. 7.
FirstEnergy is a diversified energy company with
10 electric distribution
companies, making it one of
the nation’s largest investorowned electric systems,
serving customers in Ohio,
Pennsylvania, New Jersey,
West Virginia, Maryland and
New York.
Staff reports
Selected local stocks
STOCK, DIVIDEND . . . . .CLOSE CHANGE
Aqua America, .61, . . 25.20
Avalon Holdings,. . . . . . 2.24
Clear Channel, .46 . . . 22.54
Cortland Bancorp, . . . 13.75
Farmers Nat., .12 . . . . . 8.18
First Energy, 1.44, . . . 33.31
Fifth/Third, .52. . . . . . 21.58
FirstMerit Corp., .64, . 20.57
First Niles Financial, .32,9.55
FNB Corp., .48, . . . . . . 14.42
General Motors, 1.20 . 30.42
General Electric, .88, . 26.85
Huntington Bank, .20, 11.60
JP Morgan Chase, 1.60, 69.11
Key Corp, .26, . . . . . . . 15.09
LaFarge, . . . . . . . . . . . .17.15
Macy’s, 1.25, . . . . . . . 71.75
Parker Hannifin, 1.92, 112.30
PNC, 1.92, . . . . . . . . . . 99.26
RTI Intl. Metals, . . . . . 28.98
Simon Prop. Grp.,5.20,182.05
Stoneridge . . . . . . . 11.30
Talmer Bank, . . . . . . . .17.57
United Comm. Fin., .04 .5.18
-0.24
0
-0.25
0
0.1
-0.66
0.3
-0.17
0
-0.13
-0.08
-0.3
-0.02
-0.15
-0.11
0
-0.39
-1.3
-0.27
0.13
-0.88
0.03
0.04
-0.11
Selected prices at 4 p.m. Tuesday.
Provided by Stifel. Not to be construed as an offer or recommendation to buy or sell any security.
NASDAQ S&P 500
Silver
10.74
9.07
$3.30
$0.02
17,919.29
5,208.12
2,119.21
$1,103.40
$14.77
pared with 7.1 percent last
June. A total of 5,700 were
unemployed, and 87,400
were employed.
Columbiana County also
saw a decrease in unemployment from last year with a rate
of 5.6 percent compared with
6.4 percent last year. A total of
2,800 were unemployed, and
47,600 were employed.
Ohio’s unemployment rate
was 5.2 percent last month,
which did not change from
May.
The U.S. unemployment
rate was 5.3 percent last
month, compared with 5.5
percent in May.
Manufacturing
training center
project proceeds
By DENISE DICK
[email protected]
YOUNGSTOWN
AP FILE PHOTO, JAN. 7, 2009
Monte Hawkins prepares to remove the fuel line attached to a Continental Airlines jet for the first biofuelpowered demonstration flight of a U.S. commercial airliner at Bush Intercontinental Airport in Houston.
Many in the industry believe that without a replacement for jet fuel, growth in air travel could be threatened by forthcoming rules that limit global aircraft emissions.
Airlines push for biofuels
to meet emissions goals
Associated Press
maker Boeing, which is co- in alternative fuels. Fulcrum
hopes to build facilities that
fuel research programs in turn household trash into
the U.S., Australia, China, diesel and jet fuel.
Brazil, Japan and the United
FedEx, which burns 1.1
Arab Emirates.
billion gallons of jet fuel a
Cars, trucks and trains can year, promised Tuesday to
run on electricity, natural buy 3 million gallons per
gas, or perhaps even hydro- year of fuel that a company
gen someday to meet emis- called Red Rock Biofuels
sions rules. But lifting a few hopes to make out of wood
hundred people, suitcases waste in Oregon. Southwest
and cargo 35,000 feet into the Airlines already had agreed
sky and carrying them across to also buy some of Red
a continent requires so much Rock’s planned output.
energy that only liquid fuels
These efforts are tiny next
can do the trick. Fuel from to airlines’ enormous fuel
corn, which is easy to make consumption. U.S. airlines
and supplies nearly 10 perburn through 45 million galcent of U.S. auto fuel, doesn’t
provide enough environ- lons every day. But airlines
mental benefit to help air- have little choice but to push
biofuels because the induslines meet emissions rules.
“Unlike the ground trans- try already is in danger of
port sector, they don’t have a missing its own emissions
lot of alternatives,” says Deb- goals, and that’s before any
bie Hammel, a bioenergy regulations now being conpolicy expert at the Natural sidered by the U.S. EnvironResources Defense Council. mental Protection Agency
That leaves so-called ad- and international agencies.
The industry’s internationvanced biofuels made from
agricultural waste, trash, or al trade group has pledged to
specialty crops that humans stop increasing emissions by
don’t eat. United Airlines 2020 even as the number of
last month announced a $30 flights balloons. By 2050, it
million stake in Fulcrum wants carbon-dioxide emisBioenergy, the biggest in- sions to be half of what they
vestment yet by a U.S. airline were in 2005.
NEW YORK ordinating sustainable bio-
The number of global fliers is expected to more than
double in the next two decades. In order to carry all
those extra passengers, airlines are turning to a technology very few can make
work on a large scale: converting trash into fuel.
They have no other choice.
As people in countries
such as China, India and Indonesia get wealthier, they
increasingly are turning
to air travel for vacation or
business, creating an enormous financial opportunity
for the airlines. The number of passengers worldwide
could more than double, to
7.3 billion a year, in the next
two decades, according to
the International Air Transport Association.
But many in the industry
believe that without a replacement for jet fuel, that growth
could be threatened by forthcoming rules that limit global
aircraft emissions.
“It’s about retaining, as
an industry, our license
to grow,” says Julie Felgar,
managing director for environmental strategy at plane
Gary M. Small, president
Net interest income was ond quarter of 2015 was sub-
YOUNGSTOWN and chief executive officer $13.9 million in the second stantially driven by strong
Youngstown-based Home
Savings & Loan Co. reported
earnings of $4.1 million in
the second quarter of 2015,
Home Savings’ parent company United Community Financial Corp. announced.
That’s a nearly 12 percent
increase from earnings of
$3.7 million generated in
the previous quarter, but a
sharp decrease from earnings of $42.4 million – which
includes the recognition of
$38.8 million from an income-tax benefit – generated
in the same quarter last year.
“Strong second-quarter
performance reflects effective execution of our 2015
business plan, which focuses
on commercial-loan growth
and continuous improvement in operating efficiency.
The Home Savings team delivered loan growth of approximately $59.6 million
for the quarter, with growth
in each business segment,”
Gold
181.12
MAHONING VALLEY
Home Savings reports $4.1 million
in earnings in second quarter of 2015
Staff report
Dow
JULY 22, 2015
THE VINDICATOR | B5
Mekael Teshome, a PNC
UNEMPLOYMENT
Bank economist, said the
Unemployment averages for
drop is consistent with deMahoning, Trumbull and
mographic shifts in Ohio
Columbiana counties.
and the nation.
MJ J ASOND J FMAMJ
Due to a drop in the labor
JUNE ’15
force, the year-over-year
5.9%
decline in local unemployment is “not entirely for the
right reasons,” he added, but
the economy still is making
JUNE ’14
progress within those con6.7%
ditions.
In Ma honing Count y, Source: U.S.
U S Department
Departme of Labor
the unemploy ment rate
last month was 5.8 percent,
down 0.8 percent from June month.
In Trumbull County, the
2014. There were 6,300 unemployed and 102,100 em- unemployment rate last
ployed in the county last month was 6.2 percent com-
NORTHFIELD
Former Cleveland Browns
quarterback and Valley native Bernie Kosar has his
own video lottery terminal
machine at the Hard Rock
Rocksino at Northfield Park.
The machine was unveiled
at noon Tuesday at the
Rocksino in the Cleveland
suburbs. A news release
said the machine “serves as
an extension of the appeal
of celebrity-themed VLTs
at the local level, as well as
Hard Rock Rocksino’s commitment to providing gaming content unique to the
region.”
This is in addition to
Kosar’s Wood-fired Grill, a
steakhouse within the Rocksino, and is similar to other
slot machines based on
celebrities, such as Michael
Jackson and Dolly Parton.
MARKET WATCH
WEDNESDAY
of United Community and
Home Savings, said Tuesday.
Home Savings is a wholly
owned subsidiary of United
Community and operates 32
full-service banking offices
and nine loan-production
offices in Ohio and western Pennsylvania. It is the
fourth-largest bank in the
Youngstown area.
“We are very pleased with
our consistent improvement
in quarterly earnings, return
on average assets and operating efficiency,” Small said.
Loans increased $90.7
million to $1.3 billion at
June 30, compared with
Dec. 31, 2014. Commercial
loans, up 23.9 percent or
$60.4 million, drove this
improvement. Residential
loans increased 3.5 percent
or $26.6 million.
Total deposits increased
$91.4 million to $1.4 billion
at June 30, compared with
$1.3 billion at Dec. 31, 2014.
quarter of 2015. That’s up
from the $12.7 million recorded in the second quarter of 2014 and level with the
previous quarter. Net interest
margin was 3.16 percent for
the second quarter of 2015
compared with 3.09 percent in the second quarter
of 2014, and decreased from
the 3.24 percent net interest margin recorded in the
previous quarter – a result of
continued pressure on earning asset yields because of a
change in loan mix that the
company expects to improve
during the next quarter.
Home Savings had a negative provision for loan losses
of $753,000 in the second
quarter of 2015 compared
with $1.6 million of provision loan expense in the
same quarter last year, and
$184,000 of provision expense
in the previous quarter.
The increase in the provision expense during the sec-
loan growth.
An increase in the mortgage banking, driven by an
increase in the volume of
loans sold into the secondary
market, helped to increase the
noninterest income from $3.4
million in the second quarter
of 2014 to $5.3 million in the
second quarter of 2015.
Total noninterest expense
was $12.2 million in the
second quarter of 2015, a
decrease of $2 million over
the second quarter of 2014
when adjusted for a $923,000
charge related to cost reduction initiatives that occurred
at that time.
Total noninterest expense
decreased $473,000 from the
previous quarter.
For the second quarter of
2015, the allowance for loan
loss as a percentage of total loans was 1.36 percent at
June 30 compared with 1.52
percent at Dec. 31, 2014, and
1.65 percent at June 30, 2014.
A new manufacturing
training center to provide future workers with
the training needed to fill
available jobs could open
in the city in three years.
The project is a joint effort of the Mahoning Valley
Manufacturers Coalition,
Youngstown; the Mahoning County Educational
Service Center; Eastern
Gateway Community College and Youngstown State
University, with Austintown and Struthers schools
joining in.
The initiative got a boost
this week when the state
Controlling Boa rd approved a $50,000 grant to
fund a feasibility study for
the center.
Jessica Borza, MVMC’s
executive director, said organizers hope the study,
being conducted by an architectural firm, is completed i n about t h ree
months.
The $50,000 grant is coming from the Local Government Innovation Fund.
“The whole premise of
the LGIF is to look to form
partnerships to improve efficiency,” Borza said. “Our
vision is to do exactly that.”
The involved entities recognize the need to provide
training for the manufacturing industry, but the equipment is expensive both to
buy and to keep current.
Rather than attempting to do it independently,
those educational institutions are joining forces to
create the center.
The proposed center will
incorporate science, technology, engineering and
mathematics education,
welding, manual/CNS machining, industrial maintenance/mechatronics and
aspects of manufacturing
eng i neer i ng prog ra mming.
Part of the study will determine the dollar amount
required as well as the location for the Youngstown
Mahoning Valley Manufacturing Training Center.
The facility will be in the
city, Borza said.
“We’d like it to be within
walking distance of YSU
and Eastern Gateway,” she
said.
How quickly the facility
would be up and running
depends on where it will be
located.
“It will depend on whether we move in to an existing
building or build one from
scratch,” Borza said.
Three years is the working assumption, she said.
After the cost is estimated, grant money as well as
funding from other sources
will be sought.
The facility primarily will
offer post-secondary training. School districts and
career and technical centers, however, may use it as
a way to expose students to
manufacturing and manufacturing trades, the executive director said.
Such a facility is needed
in the Mahoning Valley
because there’s a lack of
people with the needed
skills to fi ll available jobs.
Compounding the problem, officials have said, is
the number of people with
those skills who are at or
near retirement age.
RTI shareholders
approve acquisition
Staff report
“Innovation and scale are
PITTSBURGH critical to winning in both
Shareholders of RTI International Metals Inc. on
Tuesday approved the acquisition by Alcoa Inc., a
leading metals company.
RTI, a global supplier of
advanced titanium and
specialty-metals products
and services, was based in
Weathersfield Township for
more than 50 years before
its headquarters moved to
Pittsburgh in 2008.
RTI has a local plant in
Niles where 500 are employed, and three plants in
Canton.
More than 94 percent of
the shares voted at RTI’s
annual meeting of shareholders were in favor of the
transaction, representing
nearly 85 percent of all outstanding shares of RTI.
B5 - 07/22/15
CYAN
the titanium and aerospace
industries. Today’s vote
shows our shareholders
understand that RTI and
Alcoa are a natural strategic fit and that, together, we
will be better positioned to
compete in the global marketplace and to maximize
shareholder value,” said
Dawne Hickton, vice chairman, president and chief
executive officer of RTI.
“We look forward to taking
our innovative technologies to the next level as part
of Alcoa’s ongoing transformation as a lightweight,
multimaterial innovator.”
It was purchased by Alcoa
for $1.5 billion.
RTI and Alcoa expect the
merger to close Thursday.
MAGENTA YELLOW
BLACK
CYAN
B6 THE VINDICATOR | WEDNESDAY, JULY 22, 2015
TOMORROW
80°|59°
Partly sunny.
K
E
Y
S: Sunny
PC: Partly cloudy
REGIONAL FORECAST
75/58
9 a.m.
65 Pc.
12 p.m.
75 Pc.
3 p.m.
78 Pc.
6 p.m.
76 S.
9 p.m.
68 Cl.
12 a.m.
60 Cl.
3 a.m.
7 a.m.
59 S.
10 a.m.
69 Pc.
1 p.m.
77 Pc.
4 p.m.
80 S.
7 p.m.
77 Cl.
10 p.m.
70 Cl.
1 a.m.
8 a.m.
61 S.
11 a.m.
73 Pc.
2 p.m.
80 Pc.
5 p.m.
81 S.
8 p.m.
75 Cl.
11 p.m.
67 Cl.
2 a.m.
9 a.m.
65 S.
12 p.m.
75 Pc.
3 p.m.
80 Pc.
6 p.m.
79 S.
9 p.m.
72 Cl.
12 a.m.
65 Cl.
3 a.m.
58 Cl. 58 Cl.
4 a.m.
5 a.m.
57 Cl.
6 a.m.
60 Cl.
4 a.m.
60 Cl.
5 a.m.
60 Cl.
6 a.m.
56 Cl. 56 Cl.
57 Cl.
60 Cl.
61 Cl.
61 Cl.
Cleveland
Toledo
79/60
80/57
Ft. Wayne
Youngstown
80/61
77/55
Pittsburgh
77/55
Lake Erie
Northwest winds 5-15
knots. Sunny.
Water temp.: 75°
Columbus
Indianapolis
80/62
82/62
Cincinnati
83/62
Charleston
Louisville
82/63
85/68
TODAY'S NATIONAL FORECAST
L
L
L
H
H
H
L
THE ADVANCE FORECAST
FRIDAY
SATURDAY
SUNDAY
MONDAY
TUESDAY
82° 59° 82° 64° 82° 64° 82° 63° 82° 63°
Mostly sunny Partly sunny
Chance of Partly sunny
thunderstorms
KIDS CORNER
KIDS
WEATHER
50
Good
100
0
Kelly Pavlik Jr., Kindergarten
Xxxxxx
Grade X, Xxxx
Xxxxx
StadiumXxxxxx,
Drive Elementary,
Boardman
East-West vulnerable. South
deals.
NORTH
WA 6 2
TA K 9 7
UA K 8
V10 7 3
WEST
EAST
WJ 10 9 4
WK 7
TJ 10 5 3
TQ 4 2
UJ 9 3
UQ 10 7 4 2
V6 5
V8 4 2
SOUTH
WQ 8 5 3
T8 6
U6 5
VA K Q J 9
The bidding:
SOUTH WEST
NORTH EAST
Pass
1T
Pass
1V
1W
Pass
2U*
Pass
3V
Pass
6V All pass
*Fourth-suit forcing
Opening lead: Three of U
North had a difficult bidding
decision at his third turn. He had
five sure tricks in his own hand,
but nothing about the auction
suggested that his partner could
provide another seven. Still, he
couldn’t bring himself to bid just
three no trump with his fine hand.
3
Good
Wed
SKYWATCH
ALMANAC
For Tuesday, July 21, 2015
High 79/Norm 82 . . . . . Low 65/Norm 60
150
200 Records: High 99/1934 . . . Low 46/1965
2014 High 85 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2014 Low 60
Precipitation 0.25 . . . . . . . . . Normal 0.14
Precip. this month 4.00 . . . . Normal 2.97
FORECAST
6
9
12 Precip. this year 28.00 . . . . Normal 21.64
Average wind velocity . . . . . . . . . . 6 mph
Moderate
High
High humidity. . . . . . . . .93% at 11:51 a.m.
Moderate
POLLEN
BRIDGE
Partly sunny
AIR QUALITY
0
The leap to slam was a gamble
not really justified by his holding,
but we appreciate his problem.
South had only 10 tricks to
start with, so he had to assume
the king of spades was with East
to have any chance. That would
give him eleven tricks and some
chances for another – a 3-3 split
in spades first on the list. Declarer won the opening diamond lead
with the ace in dummy and immediately drew trumps. He cashed
the ace and king of trumps in his
hand and led the nine of trumps
to dummy’s 10, West discarding a diamond. This was followed
with a low spade from dummy,
and the king appearing from East
was a pleasant sight.
East reverted to diamonds,
won in dummy with the king.
South ruffed a diamond at this
point and something wonderful
happened. West, who was down
to 4-4 in the major suits, couldn’t
find a winning discard. West
chose to part with a heart, allowing South to cash the ace-king of
hearts and ruff a heart. This established the nine of hearts as a
winner and declarer’s 12th trick.
Well done!
© 2015 Tribune Content Agency LLC
7/22/15
27-WKBN-CBS
33-WYTV-ABC
33.2-MyTV
45-WNEO-PBS
19-WYFX-FOX
A&E
AMC
BET
BRAVO
COM
DIS
DISC
ESPN
ESPN2
FAM
FOOD
FS1
FSO
FX
HALL
HBO
HGTV
HIST
LIFE
NICK
ROOT
TCM
TLC
TNT
TRVL
TVLAND
USA
VH1
07/22/15
12:28 p.m.
No Set
First
Full
Last
New
Jul. 24
Jul. 31
Aug. 6
Aug. 14
PLANETS
Venus
Mars
Jupiter
Saturn
Rise
Set
8:50 a.m. 9:54 p.m.
5:10 a.m. 8:13 p.m.
8:17 a.m. 10:03 p.m.
4:03 p.m. 2:00 a.m.
SH: Showers
SF: Flurries
SN: Snow
6:30
7 pm
7:30
8 pm
8:30
RS: Rain/Snow
I: Ice
NATIONAL FORECAST
WORLD FORECAST
CITY
Wed
Albuquerque 92/65/pc
Atlanta
91/75/t
Atlantic City 88/60/pc
Baltimore
86/62/pc
Billings
92/61/t
Birmingham 93/76/t
Bismarck
88/66/pc
Boise
87/62/t
Boston
82/63/pc
Brownsville 95/79/pc
Buffalo
74/58/pc
Casper
88/58/pc
Charleston SC 96/78/t
Charlotte
93/72/pc
Cheyenne
82/56/t
Chicago
83/65/pc
Cincinnati
83/62/pc
Cleveland
79/60/pc
Columbus
81/63/pc
Dallas
98/79/pc
Daytona Beach 93/77/t
Denver
87/60/pc
Des Moines 82/65/pc
Detroit
81/61/pc
Fairbanks
76/55/pc
Greensboro 91/70/pc
Honolulu
88/74/pc
Houston
95/77/pc
Indianapolis 82/62/pc
Kansas City 82/65/t
Las Vegas
101/80/pc
Lexington
81/65/pc
Little Rock
91/74/t
Los Angeles 74/65/fg
Louisville
85/68/pc
Memphis
89/75/t
Miami Beach 93/79/t
Milwaukee
79/65/pc
Minneapolis 83/65/pc
Myrtle Beach 91/77/t
Nashville
88/71/t
New Orleans 93/79/t
New York
85/66/pc
Oklahoma City 94/74/t
Omaha
81/64/pc
Orlando
93/76/t
Philadelphia 87/66/pc
Phoenix
105/85/s
Pittsburgh
77/55/pc
Portland Me 80/62/pc
Portland Or 77/59/pc
Raleigh
92/72/pc
Rapid City
89/61/pc
Reno
87/61/t
Sacramento 88/59/pc
Salt Lake City 91/69/t
San Antonio 97/75/pc
San Diego
77/69/fg
San Francisco 70/59/fg
Seattle
74/57/pc
St. Louis
83/69/t
Tampa
90/80/t
Topeka
82/69/t
Tucson
99/77/t
Wash, DC
88/69/pc
CITY
Athens
Baghdad
Beijing
Berlin
Cairo
Copenhagen
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Jerusalem
London
Madrid
Mexico City
Moscow
New Delhi
Paris
Rio de Janeiro
Rome
Seoul
Singapore
Sydney
Tokyo
Toronto
Thu
93/68/pc
89/74/t
85/67/pc
86/66/pc
83/59/t
92/74/t
90/60/t
86/63/t
81/63/pc
95/78/pc
77/62/pc
90/51/pc
94/77/t
91/72/t
88/56/pc
85/69/pc
84/65/pc
81/64/s
83/65/pc
99/80/pc
92/75/t
94/61/pc
83/72/pc
84/68/pc
77/56/pc
86/68/t
89/74/pc
95/78/pc
84/67/pc
88/70/pc
101/79/pc
84/66/pc
94/77/pc
73/65/pc
86/68/pc
92/79/t
92/80/t
82/68/pc
85/69/pc
89/74/t
86/72/t
93/79/t
83/67/pc
97/75/pc
85/73/pc
92/76/t
86/65/pc
104/84/pc
79/59/pc
78/57/pc
82/64/pc
88/69/t
94/61/pc
87/57/pc
86/59/pc
91/66/pc
97/76/pc
76/68/pc
71/59/pc
75/60/pc
85/75/t
90/79/t
89/76/pc
96/78/t
88/66/pc
Fri
92/68/pc
90/73/t
84/67/pc
86/65/pc
87/58/pc
94/74/t
87/59/pc
89/63/s
75/63/t
95/78/pc
78/61/pc
88/55/pc
91/75/t
89/70/pc
85/56/pc
85/68/pc
84/65/pc
82/66/pc
83/63/pc
100/80/pc
90/75/t
92/61/pc
88/72/pc
82/67/pc
73/56/sh
85/67/pc
89/74/sh
95/78/pc
84/66/pc
93/75/t
103/79/s
84/65/pc
97/77/pc
76/65/pc
86/68/pc
96/78/t
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83/68/pc
86/67/t
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90/71/t
95/80/t
83/66/pc
99/75/pc
93/73/pc
90/76/t
85/65/pc
105/85/pc
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76/59/sh
84/61/pc
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88/59/s
91/67/pc
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72/58/pc
76/60/pc
90/75/t
88/79/t
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9 pm
9:30
10 pm
Wed
92/76/pc
117/85/s
89/70/pc
84/62/pc
97/75/s
70/56/pc
62/50/r
89/82/t
90/67/s
71/51/r
95/70/s
76/56/t
73/54/r
92/80/t
81/56/pc
72/65/r
100/74/s
89/74/t
91/80/t
66/49/c
86/78/pc
73/59/s
Thu
92/76/s
116/84/s
85/69/pc
74/60/pc
100/78/s
67/53/pc
67/54/r
89/82/t
92/67/s
72/52/pc
97/72/s
76/57/t
70/54/pc
92/79/t
76/57/pc
74/64/pc
98/74/s
86/74/t
90/80/t
65/46/r
84/77/t
75/60/s
Movies
10:30
11 pm
Fri
93/75/s
118/89/s
89/70/t
72/61/c
102/78/s
67/55/pc
66/54/s
89/82/t
95/68/s
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97/71/s
73/56/t
73/53/r
89/78/t
82/61/pc
78/66/s
93/73/s
80/73/r
87/79/t
67/49/r
89/78/t
78/63/s
Sports
11:30
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21.2-WBCB-CW
SPIKE
STO
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TBS
Each row must contain the
numbers 1 to 9; each column
must contain the numbers 1
to 9; and each set of 3-by-3
boxes must contain the
numbers 1 to 9.
6:08 a.m. Moonrise
8:48 p.m. Moonset
C: Cloudy
TVTONIGHT For complete TV & movie listings, see TV Week in Saturday’s Vindicator
SHOW
How to play:
Sunrise
Sunset
Unhealthy
Source: www.pollen.com
SUDOKU
T:: Storms
T
Storms
Erie
81/61
83/65
R: Rain
Today's high and tonight's low
Detroit
HOUR-BY-HOUR FORECAST
8 a.m.
61 Pc.
11 a.m.
74 Pc.
2 p.m.
78 Pc.
5 p.m.
78 S.
8 p.m.
72 Cl.
11 p.m.
61 Cl.
2 a.m.
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CL: Clear
Chicago
7 a.m.
59 Pc.
10 a.m.
69 Pc.
1 p.m.
76 Pc.
4 p.m.
78 S.
7 p.m.
74 Cl.
10 p.m.
64 Cl.
1 a.m.
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Mostly sunny.
HOUR-BY-HOUR FORECAST
YELLOW
WEATHER & TV TONIGHT
THEWEATHER
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77°|55°
MAGENTA
America’s Got Talent “Best of Audi- Last Comic Standing “The Premiere” (Season Premiere) Comics perform for 21 News 11PM (N) Tonight Show
tions” (N)
the judges. (N)
Arrow “The Climb” Oliver meets with Supernatural Crowley is faced with a Mike & Molly
Cougar Town
Dish Nation (N) OK! TV (N)
Ra’s al Ghul.
big challenge.
“Mike’s Feet”
CBS Evening
Wheel of Fortune Jeopardy! (N)
Big Brother Someone can be saved Extant “Cracking the Code” Molly tries Criminal Minds A congressman’s wife First News at
(:35) NCIS “So It
News/Pelley
from eviction. (N)
to create a virus.
disappears.
11p (N)
Goes”
ABC World News Entertainment The Insider (N) blackish “The
blackish
blackish “The
blackish
Modern Family Modern Family News Channel (:35) Jimmy KimTonight (N)
Prank King”
Dozens”
33 at 11
mel Live
How I Met Your The King of
How I Met Your The Walking Dead A truce requires The Walking Dead The defense of
Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Anger Manage- Family Guy
Mother
Queens
Mother
a sacrifice.
the prison.
“Closet”
ment
Expeditions With PBS NewsHour (N)
Life on the Reef Twenty thousand
NOVA Malaysian Airlines jet disappears. NOVA Salvaging the Costa Concordia. Newsline
Nightly Business
Patrick
green sea turtles.
Report
The Big Bang
Modern Family The Big Bang
MasterChef Creating steak meals for Home Free Couples compete for their First News on Fox (N)
Seinfeld
Seinfeld “The
Theory
Theory
cowboys. (N)
dream home.
Invitations”
Duck Dynasty
Duck Dynasty
Duck Dynasty
Duck Dynasty
Duck Dynasty
Duck Dynasty
Wahlburgers
Donnie-Jenny
Lachey’s Bar
Duck Dynasty
Duck Dynasty
(5:30) “300” (2007, Action) Gerard Butler, Lena Headey, “I Am Legend” (2007, Science Fiction) Will Smith, Alice Braga. Bloodthirsty
“I Am Legend” (2007, Science Fiction) Will Smith, Alice Braga. Bloodthirsty
David Wenham.
plague victims surround a lone survivor.
plague victims surround a lone survivor.
Fresh Prince
Fresh Prince
Frankie-Neffe
The Game
Frankie-Neffe
(:28) “White Chicks” (2004, Comedy) Shawn Wayans, Marlon Wayans.
The Game (N)
Housewives
Housewives/OC
Flipping Out
Million Dollar Listing San
Happens
Flipping Out
Flipping Out “It’s Sabotage”
Daily Show
Why? With
Key & Peele
South Park
South Park
South Park
South Park
Key & Peele
Why? With
Daily Show
Nightly Show
K.C. Under.
Jessie
Girl Meets
Jessie
Best Friends
I Didn’t Do It
Austin & Ally
“The Princess Diaries 2: Royal Engagement” (2004)
Airplane
Airplane Repo
Airplane Repo: Wheels Up
Alaskan Bush People
Alaskan Bush People
Airplane Repo (N)
SportsCenter
MLB Baseball Baltimore Orioles at New York Yankees. (N) (Live)
Baseball Tonight (N) (Live)
SportsCenter (N) (Live)
Interruption
2015 Pan American Games
NFL Live (N)
Melissa
Baby Daddy
The 700 Club
(:00) “Mean Girls” (2004) Lindsay Lohan.
(:02) “13 Going on 30” (2004) Jennifer Garner, Judy Greer.
Diners, Drive
Diners, Drive
Diners, Drive
My. Diners
My. Diners
My. Diners
My. Diners
Brew & ’Que
5 Restaurants Diners, Drive
Diners, Drive
2015 CONCACAF Gold Cup
NASCAR
Setup
NASCAR Racing
ICC Soccer
FOX Sports Live (N) (Live)
Game 365
UFC Unleashed
Road to the Octagon
World Poker Tour
World Poker Tour
Bull Riding Championship.
(4:30) “Transformers: Dark of the Moon”
“This Is the End” (2013) James Franco, Jonah Hill.
“This Is the End” (2013) James Franco, Jonah Hill.
(:00) The Waltons The Waltons Elizabeth falls from the The Waltons The family helps Eliza- The Middle
The Middle “Life The Middle
The Middle “The The Golden Girls The Golden Girls
log pile.
beth walk.
Skills”
Friend”
(5:45) “The Book of Life” (2014) Voices The Brink
“The Maze Runner” (2014) Dylan O’Brien, Kaya Scodelario. Youths find them- True Detective “Other Lives”
Last Week
Ballers
of Diego Luna.
selves trapped inside a massive labyrinth.
Tonight-John
Property Bro
Property Brothers
Desperate
Desperate
Property Brothers: Buying
Hunters
Hunters Int’l
Property Brothers
Pickers
American Pickers
American Pickers
American Pickers (N)
(:03) The Woodsmen (N)
(:03) Alone “Winds Of Hell”
Little Women
Little Women: LA
Little Women: LA
Little Women: LA
(:02) Little Women: LA
(:02) Little Women: LA
Thundermans
Every Witch
Talia, Kitchen
Full House
Full House
Full House
Full House
Jim Gaffigan
Impastor
Friends
(:36) Friends
Game 365
Pregame
Pirates Post.
Inside-Pirates
Driven (N)
MLB Baseball Pittsburgh Pirates at Kansas City Royals. (N) (Live)
“Mission: Impos- “Starring Adam West” (2013, Documentary) The life and “Walking Tall” (2004) The Rock. A sheriff and a deputy try Ray Donovan “Ding” Ray protects a “Jackass: Number Two” (2006)
sible III”
career of actor Adam West.
to rid their town of thugs.
quarterback.
Johnny Knoxville.
Jail
Cops
Cops
Cops
Cops
Cops
Cops
Cops
Cops
Cops
Cops
Jimmy Hanlin
Tribe Report
(5:30) Drennan Live (N) (Live)
MLB Baseball Cleveland Indians at Milwaukee Brewers. From Miller Park in Milwaukee.
Sharknado
“Sharknado 3: Oh Hell No!”
“Sharknado 2: The Second One” (2014) Ian Ziering.
“Sharknado 3: Oh Hell No!” (2015) Ian Ziering. Premiere.
Seinfeld
Seinfeld
Seinfeld
Big Bang
Big Bang
Big Bang
Big Bang
Big Bang
Big Bang
Conan
(:00) “Keeper of the Flame” (1942, Drama) Spencer Tracy, “Gilda” (1946, Romance) Rita Hayworth, Glenn Ford. A temptress pits her hus- (:15) “Boom Town” (1940, Adventure) Clark Gable, Spencer Tracy. Two wildcatKatharine Hepburn.
band against her former lover.
ters attempt to create a Texas oil empire.
My Giant Life
Leah Remini: It’s All Relative
Leah Remini:
Leah Remini:
Leah Remini:
Leah Remini:
I Am Jazz “All About Jazz”
I Am Jazz (N)
I Am Jazz (N)
(:00) Castle
Castle “Significant Others”
Castle A DJ is murdered.
Castle “Death Gone Crazy”
Castle “Recoil”
CSI: NY “Identity Crisis”
Man v. Food
Man v. Food
Man v. Food
Food Paradise International
Food Paradise
Man Fi. Food
Man Fi. Food
Trip Flip (N)
Gilligan’s Isle
Gilligan’s Isle
Gilligan’s Isle
Raymond
Raymond
Raymond
Raymond
Jim Gaffigan
The Exes (N)
King
Impastor (N)
Law & Order
Law & Order: SVU
Law & Order: SVU
Suits “Toe to Toe” (N)
(:01) Mr. Robot (N)
(:06) Complications
Dating Naked
“Couples Retreat” (2009, Comedy) Vince Vaughn, Jason Bateman.
Twinning “Twinvasion”
Dating Naked (N)
ODDLY ENOUGH
California woman offers home
as prize in dessert contest
Romanian music fest gives free UK lawmaker defends making
tickets in exchange for blood
14-cent expenses claim
BUCHAREST, ROMANIA
Romania is tapping into the Dracula legANTIOCH, CALIF. end, offering concert-goers free tickets in
A Northern California woman is offering a exchange for their blood.
sweet deal on her 1906 Craftsman home in
The campaign is part of a push to inJackson. She’s trading it for a great dessert. crease blood donations in a country where
The Contra Costa Times reports that Erin only 1.7 percent of the people donate blood.
Allard is hosting a dessert contest with the
Adrian Chereji, marketing director for the
2,267-square-foot century-old home as the
UNTOLD Festival, said Monday the “Pay with
grand prize. The four-bedroom, twoBlood” campaign, jointly organized with the
bathroom home has been restored and is
National Blood Transfusion Institute, aims to
valued at $390,000.
raise public awareness.
She says she opted for the competition
Mobile blood-collection units will be set up
because it can take months to sell a home in
in
42
Romanian cities for 10 days this month.
rural Jackson.
Donors
in Bucharest and Cluj will be eligible
Allard, who is a licensed real-estate agent,
has spent weeks checking details and legali- for free tickets for an electro-dance music
festival in the Transylvanian city of Cluj.
ties to make sure the competition goes off
Cut-price tickets will be offered to donors
without a problem.
elsewhere.
The contest will be judged by a panel of
Transylvania is the home of the fictional
food experts. Those looking to apply have
until Sept. 7 to submit a $100 entry fee and a blood-sucking Dracula featured in Bram
Stoker’s 1897 novel.
million-dollar recipe.
B6 - 07/22/15
CYAN
LONDON
A British lawmaker is defending claiming
9 pence ($0.14) on expenses for a short car
journey, saying such claims may look “odd”
but the mileage adds up.
Conservative lawmaker Rob Wilson said
the 352-yard journey in March 2014 was a
“constituency engagement.”
He also made several other small claims
for short journeys, including 13 pence for a
trip in his car to attend a business meeting.
Wilson told Metro News on Tuesday he
was an active lawmaker who often met with
local voters. He said many of his trips are
fairly short but add up because he takes a
number of them each week.
Beginning the end of July, British lawmakers will get a 10 percent pay increase from
$104,271 to $115,000 a year.
Associated Press
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COOKBOOK
WEDNESDAY
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THE KNOW
JULY 22, 2015
THE VINDICATOR | C1
Corner
Each week, this column offers
recipes from Valley cookbooks.
If your organization would like to
have its cookbook showcased,
please contact our features editor Barb Shaffer at 330-7471471, ext. 1282, or email her at
[email protected]
ST. MICHAEL PARISH’S
“BAKING BREAD TOGETHER II”
@vindicator
@valley24
— CONNECT WITH THESE FOOD FEATURES AT VINDY.COM/NEWS/VALLEYFOOD —
Brewtus Brewing Co. | Sharon, Pa.
“PUPPY CHOW” SNACK MIX
by MALLORY NAFFAH
1 stick butter
1 large box Crispix cereal
1 bag semisweet chocolate
chips
1 teaspoon vanilla
1 cup peanut butter
1 pound or more powdered
sugar
Place cereal in large mixing
bowl; set aside. Melt butter; add
chocolate chips and peanut butter and melt on stove. Add vanilla. Pour melted chocolate
mixture over cereal and toss well
using a spatula. Place powdered
sugar in a brown paper bag. Pour
chocolate cereal mix into bag
and shake well until each piece
is coated with powdered sugar.
Spread on paper towels to cool
and dust with more powdered
sugar if needed. Store in airtight
container.
Authentic
ale
on tap
FESTIVE NUTS
by PATRICIA HOYLE
⁄2
1
⁄2
1
⁄2
1
⁄2
1
⁄4
8
cup sugar
teaspoon ground cloves
teaspoon nutmeg
teaspoon cinnamon
teaspoon salt
ounces unsalted mixed
nuts
1 large egg white
1
⁄2 cup dried cherries
1
Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
Combine sugar, cloves, nutmeg
and cinnamon in a bowl, reserve.
In a separate bowl, toss the nuts
with the egg white then toss nuts
well with the sugar-spice mixture. Spread the nuts out on a
baking sheet, separating them
as much as possible. Bake for 15
minutes. Using a metal spatula, scrape up the nuts and break
them apart. Return to oven for 5
minutes to dry them thoroughly.
Let cool completely. Before serving, mix in dried cherries.
ROASTED PECANS
by ELSIE CANALE
1 pound pecans (other nuts
may be substituted, such
as walnuts, almonds)
1 cup sugar
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon cinnamon
1 egg white
Beat egg white until stiff; add
pecans. Toss well until coated.
Mix sugar, salt and cinnamon together; add pecans and toss well,
coating all. Put in single layer on
well greased cookie sheet. Bake
at 250 degrees for one hour.
Toss every 15 minutes.
TO OBTAIN A COPY
To get a copy of St. Michael Parish’s “Baking Bread Together II,”
stop by the parish office, 300 N.
Broad St., Canfield, open Monday through Friday from 9 a.m.
to 4 p.m. The cost is $10, but
to have a copy mailed to you,
include an additional $5 for
shipping and handling. For information contact Lynda Fuller, chairman of the cookbook
committee, by calling 330-5336019.
SHARON, PA.
Craft beer lovers in Sharon are buzzing with excitement these days. The
grand opening of the Brewtus Brewing Co. on July 10
marked the first time Mercer County has ever had an
active brew pub.
The pub, in downtown
Sharon, is in the former
Chestnut Bar and a stone’s
throw from the Three By
The River complex. The interior has been beautifully
re designed by co-owner
John LaRocca, who spent
20-plus years in the contracting business before
joining his partner, Brewmaster Jason Camerlengo,
in the venture.
Camerlengo is a Brookfield native and a 2007 graduate of Youngstown State
University with a degree
in business information
systems. He spent seven
years working in the technology field before starting
Brewtus. The influence of
his background is evident
in his approach to brewing
beer.
“We are incorporating
many of the newest and
most advanced technological tools in our brewing
process. It is pretty amazing how you can use tech
to make better beer if you
VALLEY VINO
Brian Fry
IF YOU GO
Where: Brewtus Brew-
ing Co.
Address: 23 Chestnut
Ave., Sharon, Pa.
Phone: 724-308-6293
Hours: Tuesday through
Thursday, 11 a.m. to 11
p.m.; and Friday and Saturday, 11 a.m. to midnight
Online: www.brewtus
brewing.com
research what’s out there
and are willing to make the
investment.”
One of the more impressive tools at Camerlengo’s
disposal is a state-of-the-art
reverse osmosis water purification system that regulates the parts per million
of salt, calcium sulfate and
calcium chloride to match
the water in a city such as
Munich or any other famous brewing city.
“The system allows us
to create water that is pre-
Next stop for the Burger Guyz
See BREWTUS, C2
JEFF LANGE | THE VINDICATOR
Owners of Brewtus Brewing Co. Jason Camerlengo (left) and John LaRocca sit at the bar on
the first floor of their location in Sharon, Pa.
The guys received a hot tip
that the 4 Star Diner in Cortland is putting out some awesome burgers. Check out the
results of their investigation
in next week’s Valley Food.
Taking a break
Mike and Mark are taking next month
off from their Signature Dish feature, but
they remain on the lookout for the biggest, hottest and tastiest dishes in the
Valley. Email them at [email protected]
gmail.com.
Impress guests by
grilling some apps
Family Features
When most people think of the
rich, smoky flavor of barbecue on
the grill, they’re thinking of a slab
of meaty ribs or a plump, juicy
chicken basted with their favorite
sauce.
This summer, wow your friends
and family by extending your
barbecue prowess to other menu
items, such as appetizers.
As any barbecue aficionado will
tell you, the secret is in the sauce.
A smoky, sweet blend like you
find in KC Masterpiece Barbecue
Sauce is the perfect combination
of rich tomato sauce, molasses and
spices to guarantee a delicious
meal for the whole family to enjoy.
Created by barbecue enthusiast
and physician Dr. Rich Davis, it
pleases palates with an authentic
barbecue taste that brings just the
right flavor for broiling, baking,
grilling, and using as an ingredient in recipes ranging from sides
to apps.
Another way to enhance grilled
foods and make the most of grilling
season is by using wood chips or
planks, along with Kingsford Charcoal, to build on the grill’s natural
smoky flavor and infuse other rich
tastes, such as hickory or apple.
Scatter dry chips directly on the
coals and wait for them to begin
smoking before placing food on
the grill.
Keep the lid closed while cooking
to create a stronger smoky flavor.
This appetizer, created by barbecue sauce expert and cookbook
author Ardie Davis combines the
best of barbecue sauce and seasoned wood flavors for an easy and
unique starter — perfect for summer entertaining.
Smoking the goat cheese adds
depth that perfectly complements
the sweetness of the barbecue
sauce and apricot preserves.
Find more mouthwatering barbecue recipes and preparation tips
at www.kcmasterpiece.com.
CEDAR PLANKED GOAT CHEESE
WITH APRICOT PRESERVES
Makes: 8 appetizer servings
Prep time: 10 minutes
Cook time: 20 minutes
1 oak or cedar plank, soaked in
water for at least an hour
1
⁄2 cup apple or pecan wood
chips, soaked in water and
drained
1 101⁄2 -ounce goat cheese log
1
⁄4 cup KC Masterpiece Kansas
top of plank. Cover grill.
City Classic barbecue sauce
⁄4 cup apricot preserves
While cheese is smoking (about 20
1 baguette cut into 1⁄2 -inch thick
minutes),
combine barbecue sauce
slices or crackers
and apricot preserves. Mix well.
Set up two-zone fire for indirect
grilling with Kingsford charcoal by
Using insulated gloves, remove
situating charcoal on only one side of cedar plank with cheese from grill.
grill, leaving other side void. Heat grill Place cheese on serving platter and
to 225 to 250 degrees.
top with apricot barbecue sauce.
Serve with baguette slices or crackSprinkle wood chips on heated
charcoal. Place soaked plank on void ers. Refrigerate or discard after 2
side of grill and place goat cheese on hours.
1
C1 - 07/22/15
CYAN
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C2 THE VINDICATOR | WEDNESDAY, JULY 22, 2015
MAGENTA
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Personalize
party treats
Peanut Butter
Perfection
Family Features
From “just-because” gatherings to birthday blowouts
and major holidays, you’ll
have everything you need to
personalize your party with
these quick party tricks.
Family Features
F
ROM CLASSIC
recipes passed
down through
generations to
new creations you
wouldn’t expect to find on
grandma’s table, there’s no
shortage of ways to pack
peanut butter into deliciously diverse dishes.
Celebrate your enduring
love for this sticky staple
with these winning entries
from Southern Peanut
Growers’ annual “PB My
Way” recipe contest showcasing PB lovers’ all-time favorite peanut butter dishes.
Find more inspiration for
cooking with peanut butter
at www.peanutbutterlovers.
com.
Festive Holidays Winner
Helen Fields, Paradise, Texas
⁄2 cup butter
⁄4 cup creamy peanut
butter
1 cup granulated sugar
1 sleeve (4 ounces) regular
saltine crackers
2 cups milk chocolate
chips
1
⁄2 cup peanut butter chips
1
⁄2 cup roughly chopped,
dry-roasted, salted
peanuts
1
3
Heat oven to 400 degrees.
Line 10-by-15-by-1-inch pan
with aluminum foil. Spray foil
with butter-flavored nonstick
cooking spray; set aside.
Put butter, peanut butter and
sugar in heavy-duty, 1-quart
saucepan over medium heat.
Stir constantly until butter and
sugar are melted; bring ingredients just to a boil. Boil mixture 3
minutes, stirring frequently.
While mixture cooks, lay saltines in single layer on prepared
pan.
Pour cooked mixture evenly over saltines. Place in oven
and cook 5 minutes. Remove
from oven and sprinkle chocolate chips over top. Let cool for 3
minutes, then spread chocolate
completely over top of saltines.
Sprinkle peanut butter chips
evenly over top of chocolate. Return pan to oven for 1 minute to
soften chips. Pull tines of a fork
through softened chips, partially covering chocolate. Sprinkle peanuts over top and gently
press peanuts down.
Let cool on rack for about 15
minutes, then place in freezer for 3 minutes. Remove from
freezer and break into pieces.
Store in airtight container.
NUTTY MONKEY GRANOLA
Breakfast or Brunch? Winner
Christine Yang, Garnerville, N.Y.
2
1
1
⁄4
1
⁄3
1
⁄4
1
⁄4
3
2
1
1
1
⁄4
1
⁄3
1
⁄4
cups old-fashioned oats
teaspoon baking powder
cup coconut flakes
cup chopped peanuts
cup sunflower seeds
cup pumpkin seeds
tablespoons ground flax
tablespoons chia seeds
banana
egg white
cup peanut butter
cup dried cranberries
cup chocolate chips
Heat oven to 375 degrees.
Line large baking sheet with
parchment paper.
PEANUT BUTTER
NOODLE NESTS WITH
SPICY ORANGE SHRIMP
Grand Prize Winner
Darlene Buerger, Peoria, Ariz.
1 tablespoon Sriracha
sauce
1
⁄4 cup orange marmalade
2 tablespoons soy sauce
1 tablespoon rice vinegar
1 tablespoon grated
ginger
8 ounces shrimp, peeled,
de-veined
1
⁄4 cup onion, diced
1
⁄4 cup red pepper, diced
2 tablespoons peanut oil
2 cloves minced garlic
1
⁄4 cup coconut milk, plus
extra
1
⁄4 cup creamy peanut
butter
1
⁄4 cup island teriyaki
sauce
2 teaspoons crystalized
ginger
1 teaspoon hot pepper
flakes (or to taste)
2 tablespoons brown
sugar
2 (12-ounce) packages
ramen noodles, cooked
according to package
directions
1 cup coleslaw mix
Peanuts and scallions,
for garnish
In medium bowl, combine Sriracha, marmalade,
soy sauce, vinegar and grated ginger. Stir to combine and
add shrimp. Refrigerate 20
minutes.
In large skillet over medium heat, saute onion and pepper in peanut oil until tender.
Add garlic and cook an addi-
tional minute. Reduce heat and
add coconut milk, peanut butter, teriyaki sauce, crystalized
ginger, hot pepper flakes and
brown sugar. Simmer sauce
2 to 3 minutes, adding additional coconut milk as needed. Pour off 1⁄4 cup of sauce and
add ramen noodles to remaining sauce.
In large skillet over medium
heat, cook shrimp 2 to 3 minutes on each side until tender.
Move shrimp to outer edge of
pan and cook coleslaw mix in
center just until it starts to wilt.
Add wilted slaw mix to ramen
sauce mixture.
Divide ramen among four
plates and top with 4 or 5
shrimp. Garnish with reserved
sauce, peanuts and scallions,
if desired.
SPICY PEANUT BUTTER GLAZED SALMON SKEWERS WITH WARM RICE SLAW
Family Favorite Winner
Janice Elder, Charlotte, N.C.
1 (20-ounce) can pineapple chunks in juice,
divided
11⁄2 pound salmon fillet,
skin removed
2 tablespoons soy sauce
11⁄2 cups packaged broccoli slaw mix
2 cups hot cooked rice
Salt and freshly
ground black pepper,
to taste
1
⁄2 cup creamy peanut
butter
2 tablespoons Asian
chili sauce (such as
Sriracha)
Juice and grated zest
of 1 fresh lime
1
⁄4 cup chopped salted
peanuts
Fresh lime slices, cilantro leaves and
chopped peanuts, for
garnish
Drain pineapple chunks, reserving juice.
Cut salmon into 1-inch
cubes.
Whisk peanut butter with
remaining pineapple juice,
chili sauce and lime juice, and
zest, blending well. Set aside.
Place 1⁄4 cup pineapple juice
Heat oven broiler; place
into bowl with soy sauce; add
oven rack 6 inches from broilsalmon, tossing to coat. Let
er element. Line broiler pan
stand about 15 minutes.
with foil and spray with nonGently stir 1⁄4 cup pineapstick spray. Thread salmon
ple juice and broccoli slaw
cubes and pineapple chunks
into hot rice, blending well.
onto 8 metal (or soaked bamSeason to taste with salt and boo) skewers, dividing equalblack pepper, then cover and ly. Place on broiler pan. Cook
keep warm.
2 minutes, then brush with
peanut butter mixture. Repeat brushing and broiling
until salmon is flaky, turning
as needed to brown evenly,
about 8 minutes total.
Divide warm rice mixture evenly among four serving plates; top with skewers.
Sprinkle skewers lightly with
chopped peanuts and serve
while warm. May be garnished with additional lime
slices and cilantro leaves, if
desired.
DECORATE WITH COLOR
Color adds a pop of personality to any party. Kick
it up a notch with a customized color palette that
matches your unique party
theme. Use the new Wilton
Color Right Color System to
take the guesswork out of
coloring icing, fondant, cake
batter and other treats. You
can easily mix the colors you
need to coordinate sweet
treats to match your party
decor.
Unlike traditional food
coloring, the Wilton Color
Right performance color system includes eight bottles of
ultra-concentrated base color and precise QuickCount
color formulas to make mixing and matching color a
piece of cake.
QuickCount color formulas show you drop by
drop how to whip up precise shades of color to match
unique party decor, logos
and themed character cakes.
Plus, new color formulas are
added to www.Wilton.com
and you can create custom
colors.
Another impressive, yet
easy, decorating trick is a
three color icing swirl, which
is easy to achieve using the
new Color Swirl Tri-Color
Coupler. It’s quick, easy and
looks professional.
BAKE WITH FLAVOR
Just like color, you can mix
and match flavor to bake delicious flavor-infused treats.
The Wilton Treatology Flavor System makes it easy to
infuse treats with unexpected yet perfectly-paired flavors, like these Fruity Cereal
Pinwheel Cookies.
Follow easy drop-by-drop
QuickCount flavor recipes to
make unique flavor-infused
desserts, like Horchata Cupcakes and Coconut Creme
Brulee Cookies and 30 more
unique recipes. Use individual flavor concentrates
such as Champagne, Sweet
Meyer Lemon, Fresh Basil,
Warm Cinnamon Graham,
Juicy Peach, Salted Caramel,
Creamy Vanilla Custard and
Toasted Coconut to infuse
icing, filling and cake batter
with unique tastes, or combine them to create your
own unique flavor combinations.
DISPLAY YOUR WAY
Now that your treats are
personalized for the party,
it’s time to show them off.
The Display Your Way Cupcake Stand is fit for any occasion. The fillable core is
perfect for incorporating
fun party details like ribbon, candy and even matching napkins. The adjustable
treat tower serves five to 25
cupcakes, so you can display
the perfect number of treats
for your guests.
Similarly, the Display Your
Way cake stand has a customizable center compartment that makes it fun and
easy to match your party
from top to bottom. Fill the
center compartment with
unique details like gradu-
BREWTUS
ORANGE-KISSED
PEANUT BUTTER BUNDT
Continued from C1
Dreamy Desserts Winner
Sally Sibthrope, Shelby Township, Mich.
6 tablespoons butter,
melted
1 cup creamy peanut
butter
Use blender to combine ba1
⁄
2 cup orange juice
nana, egg white and peanut but1 tablespoon orange zest
ter until smooth. Pour peanut
2 cups brown sugar,
butter mixture over oat mixture
packed
and stir until incorporated. Pour
2 eggs
mixture in even layer on bak1 teaspoon vanilla extract
ing pan.
2 cups all-purpose flour
Bake until crisp (about 20
11⁄2 teaspoons baking soda
to 30 minutes), removing from
1 teaspoon salt
oven and stirring every 10 min1 cup buttermilk
utes to allow granola to brown
Frosting:
evenly and break up into small1
⁄3 cup creamy peanut
er pieces. When granola is goldbutter
en and crisp, remove from oven
3 tablespoons orange
and stir in cranberries and chocjuice
olate chips (chocolate chips
1
⁄
2 teaspoon vanilla extract
should melt a little).
11⁄2 cups powdered sugar
1
⁄2 cup whipped cream
Allow to cool completeChopped peanuts, for
ly before storing in air-tight
container.
garnish
BLACK
FOOD
New mash-ups and recipes your family will love
PEANUT BUTTER
SALTINE BRITTLE
YELLOW
Combine first 8 ingredients in
large mixing bowl.
Heat oven to 350 degrees.
Generously grease and flour
Bundt pan. Set aside.
until just blended. (Don’t overmix or cake will be tough.) Pour
batter into prepared pan.
In large bowl mix together
butter, peanut butter, orange
juice and orange zest until well
combined and creamy. Beat in
sugar, eggs and vanilla.
Bake 45-50 minutes or until
toothpick inserted in center
comes out clean. Let cool in
pan for about 5-10 minutes,
then remove cake from pan and
let cool completely.
Combine flour, baking soda
and salt, then stir half into peanut butter mixture. Stir in half
of buttermilk. Add remaining
flour and buttermilk, mixing
For frosting, beat all ingredients together to pourable consistency. Pour over cake, and
sprinkle with chopped peanuts.
cisely like what they use in
breweries in any part of the
world. Since water is the
base of all beer, we can brew
much more authentic beers
with this process,” Camerlengo said.
Brewtus also has made
a big commitment to the
quality of its brewing ingredients. It uses three American-based supplier-importers, including one based
in Kent. Every ingredient
is imported directly from
the country of origin that
matches the style of beer
Camerlengo is brewing.
“If we’re brewing a Belgian
Abbey Ale, every ingredient
comes from Belgium, and
the water almost exactly
matches what they would
use there. It’s pretty great.”
Brewtus Brewing Co. also
is a full-service restaurant
offering a diverse list of piz-
C2 - 07/22/15
CYAN
FRUITY CEREAL
PINWHEEL COOKIES
Makes about 31⁄2 dozen cookies.
3 cups all-purpose
flour
1 teaspoon salt
1
⁄2 teaspoon baking
powder
1 cup (2 sticks) butter, softened
1 cup granulated
sugar
1 egg
3
⁄4 teaspoon Wilton
Treatology Sweet
Meyer Lemon Flavor
Concentrate
1 drop Wilton
Pink Color Right
Performance Color
1
⁄4 teaspoon Wilton
Treatology Fresh
Basil Flavor
Concentrate
1 drop Wilton
Blue Color Right
Performance Color
4 drops Wilton
Yellow Color Right
Performance Color
In large bowl, stir together flour, salt and baking
powder.
In separate large bowl,
beat butter and sugar with
electric mixer until light
and fluff y, about 2 minutes.
Add egg; beat well. Add
flour mixture and beat on
low until just combined.
Divide dough in half. Return half of dough to mixing
bowl. Beat in Sweet Meyer
Lemon Flavor and Pink
Color Right Color. Return
remaining half of dough
to clean mixing bowl; beat
in Fresh Basil Flavor and
Blue and Yellow Color Right
Colors.
On parchment paper, roll
dough into two 14-by-12inch rectangles, about 1⁄8 inch thick. Lightly brush
basil dough with water.
Place lemon dough onto
basil dough; peel away
parchment. Gently roll
dough with rolling pin and
trim uneven edges with
sharp knife. Using parchment, roll dough into very
tight log. Wrap in plastic wrap and refrigerate 3
hours or overnight.
Heat oven to 350
degrees.
Slice logs into 1⁄4-inch
slices. Space two inches
apart on parchment-lined
cookie sheet.
Bake 14-16 minutes, or
until edges of cookies are
dry. Cool on pan 5 minutes
on cooling grid. Remove
from pan; cool completely on grid.
ation tassels, photographs
or other unique party elements. Use the clear side
sleeve to fit a ribbon or craft
paper around the side.
From graduations, birthdays and anniversaries to
major holidays, each occasion calls for something
special. With these handy
tips and tools, you’ll always
be prepared, making it easier than ever to personalize
your party.
Find more recipes and tips
at www.Wilton.com.
zas and an impressive lineup of burgers, among other
offerings. I had the chance
to sample a pizza and taste
the beers with the owners.
Here’s a look at the beer
lineup:
Shenango Valley Steamer: A California Steam Beer with
lean lager flavor and a refreshing finish
Whisper Sister: A Milk Stout
with creamy texture and notes
of chocolate and coffee
Artificial Intelligence: An
American IPA with citrus pine
flavors balanced by malt
Struggle Buggy: A German
Maibock that is golden amber in
color with flavors of caramel and
fresh baked bread
Gum Shoe: A Heffeweizen
with clove and banana notes
that is cloudy in the glass
Haymaker: A Kolsch beer
that is perfect for summer
refreshment
MAGENTA YELLOW
BLACK
CYAN
5
THE
Television miniseries
released on DVD this week
include:
Fire Next
1 “The
Time”: “Parenthood”
couple Craig T. Nelson and
Bonnie Bedelia confront
global-warming catastrophes in 2017, as forecast in
CBS’ 1993 epic; list price
$10, out from Mill Creek.
MAGENTA
VALLEYLIFE
YELLOW
BLACK
TOMORROW IN VIBE
WEDNESDAY
JULY 22, 2015
THE VINDICATOR | C3
Jake Gyllenhaal transforms himself in ‘Southpaw’
Taylor
Swift
leads
nominees
with 9
Crimson
2 “The
Field”: Public TV’s
1910s World War saga dramatizes leaps in medicine,
culture; $35 DVD/$40 Bluray, PBS.
Dovekeepers”:
3 “The
Cote de Pablo in
Roma Downey-Mark Burnett production of Masada
siege, plus bonus makingof; $40 DVD/$50 Blu, CBS,
now at Amazon.com. (In
stores Aug. 11.)
By MESFIN FEKADU
AP Music Writer
NEW YORK
on the
4 “Dancing
Edge”: Chiwetel
Ejiofor, Janet Montgomery in 1930s London jazz
scene, with making-of;
$35 DVD/$40 Blu, PBS.
Worlds”:
5 “New
Jamie Dornan, Jeremy Northam in 17th century
royals vs. rebels actioner;
$40 DVD/$40 Blu, Acorn.
THE WEINSTEIN COMPANY
Jake Gyllenhaal stars in “Southpaw,” opening in theaters Friday.
“LIFE ON THE REEF”
(8 P.M., PBS): This threepart series explores Australia’s Great Barrier Reef.
“SHARKNADO 3: OH
HELL NO!” (9 P.M., SYFY):
Just when you thought
it was safe to go outside,
scary flying sharks once
again are filling the summer skies. This time, the
forecast calls for even more
madcap zaniness as a massive Sharknado wreaks
havoc along the Eastern
Seaboard, from Washington
to Florida. Fortunately, Ian
Ziering and Tara Reid are
back to battle the toothy
sea creatures. They’re
joined by David Hasselhoff,
Bo Derek and many other
folks that you may have to
go Google.
“HOME FREE” (9 P.M.,
FOX): “Home Free” is a new
reality series in which couples are challenged to renovate a rundown house with
the hopes of ultimately winning their own dream home.
Contractor Mike Holmes is
our host.
“LAST COMIC STANDING” (9 P.M., NBC): “Last
Comic Standing” returns
to give a new batch of
jokesters a chance to make
us laugh and win $250,000
in the process. This season’s judges include
Roseanne Barr, Keenen
Ivory Wayans and Norm
MacDonald.
“WHY PLANES VANISH”
(9 P.M., PBS): The inside
story of the search for
Flight MH370 features key
players from across the
globe.
TV LISTINGS, B6
ENTERTAINMENT NEWS
Randy, Mr. Lahey
comedy at Ford
Valley artist Jim Pernotto
is compiling works from his
former NYC exhibit gallery.
Hard-hitting role
By STEVEN REA
The Philadelphia Inquirer
I
f you thought Jake Gyllenhaal’s transformation for
last year’s “Nightcrawler”
was extreme – losing weight
and gaining a creepy intensity to play a feral freelance
video cameraman trolling
the streets of L.A. – look at the
actor in “Southpaw.”
You may not recognize the man.
As Billy “The Great” Hope, a pro
boxer who grew up in a Hell’s Kitchen foster home and now owns the
title of light-heavyweight champion
of the world, 34-year-old Gyllenhaal
is all muscle, sinew, tattoos, bling.
He’s a prizefighter who prides himself on the punishment he can take
in the ring — before he delivers the
final blows to his opponents. Billy’s
record? 43 and 0. And to see Gyllenhaal in “Southpaw,” which opens
Friday, is to believe it.
Harvey Weinstein, whose eponymous company is distributing the
Antoine Fuqua-directed drama, has
declared that this is the role that will
win Gyllenhaal his Oscar. While
hyperbole is typical of the veteran
showman, he may have to be taken
seriously this time around. Gyllenhaal trained six hours a day, seven
days a week for six months, running,
jumping, weightlifting and sparring
under the tutelage of former boxer
Terry Claybon.
“I was a Mike Tyson fan as a kid –
it’s kind of hard not to be when you
grew up in the ’90s,” Gyllenhaal says.
“But I was a man who knew very
little about boxing. ... And I knew
that to pull it off, I was going to have
to learn how to do it.”
In “Southpaw,” Gyllenhaal’s Billy
is living the life: a mansion in the
’burbs, a beautiful wife (Rachel McAdams), a daughter (Oona Laurence)
who loves him, a posse of friends
– including his longtime manager,
played by Curtis “50 Cent” Jackson –
at his side. Billy’s bouts have earned
him millions, but to assuage his
wife’s fears that he’s damaging his
body, and his brain, he agrees to a
hiatus.
Then, one evening, it all collapses.
His title, his family, his respect, his
property, his bank accounts — gone.
“Southpaw,” co-starring Forest Whitaker as the neighborhood boxinggym owner who trains Billy in his
against-the-odds comeback try, is
classic pugilist melodrama. Life is
brutal. Punching somebody over
12 rounds in the ring? Brutal. Going
to court to fight for custody of your
child? Brutal.
“There are so many things that
we’ve seen before in boxing movies,” says Gyllenhaal, on the phone
from Los Angeles last weekend and
not even feeling the need to mention those movies by name. (We will:
“Rocky,” “Raging Bull,” “The Fighter,”
“The Champ,” “Somebody Up There
Likes Me,” “Body and Soul.”)
“So, how do you make it seem original?” he asks. “For me, and for Antoine, the thing that’s original about
this movie is Billy Hope. It’s who he
is, and what he goes through, and
what he experiences. A guy who’s
trying to get his life back together
and learn how to become a dad and
learn how to become a man. ...
“That’s what’s at the heart of this
movie: a guy who’s been through
the system, knows how it works,
used his rage to beat the system, but
ultimately, it’s that same rage that
destroys him. And he has to find his
way back, learn how to grow up and
do good.”
Gyllenhaal says that he first met
Fuqua, the director of “Training
Day” and “The Equalizer,” a halfdozen years ago at one of “those
Hollywood lunch meetings where
somebody tells you how much they
want to work with you, and you don’t
believe them.”
So the actor, nominated for an
Academy Award for his work opposite Heath Ledger in 2005’s cowboy
love story, “Brokeback Mountain,”
went about his business — business
that included some very fine work in
“End of Watch” (2012) and “Prisoners” (2013).
“And then, about a year and a half
ago, we met again about this project, and Antoine was like, ‘I told you
when we met last time there is something I see in you that I want to bring
out.’ And I was like, ‘Really?’”
Really.
So, Gyllenhaal began his training – with Fuqua, who has boxed for
years, right alongside him. And the
actor came to appreciate what boxing was about.
“Obviously, it’s a brutal sport,” Gyllenhaal says. “But I also think it’s a
sport full of grace, and at the highest
level ... it’s about an exchange of the
minds.”
I WAS A MIKE TYSON FAN AS A KID – IT’S KIND OF
HARD NOT TO BE WHEN YOU GREW UP IN THE ’90S.”
Jake Gyllenhaal,
On taking on a role on a subject he knew little about
Taylor Swift’s star-studded
“Bad Blood” music video is
paying off: She’s the top nominee at next month’s MTV
Video Music Awards.
Swift is
nom i n at e d
for nine
moon men,
including
video of the
year for “Bad
Blood,” starring Selena
Swift
Gomez, Lena
Dunham
a nd more
of t he pop
star’s famous
friends.
Lamar, who
is featured on
“Bad Blood,”
is nominatSheeran
ed for video
of t he yea r
thanks to his
own hit, “Alright.” Other
nominees
for t he top
prize include
B e y o n c e ’s
Beyonce
“ 7/11,” E d
Sheeran’s “Think ing out
Loud” and “Uptown Funk”
by Mark Ronson.
The 2015 VMAs, hosted by
Miley Cyrus, will air live Aug.
30 from the Microsoft Theater
in Los Angeles.
Sheeran has six nominations, while Beyonce, Lamar
and Ronson have five each.
Swift’s “Blank Space” will
compete for best female video and pop video, while “Bad
Blood” is up for best collaboration, direction, editing, visual effects, art direction and
cinematography.
Fans can begin voting
Tuesday.
Beyonce, Sia, Nicki Minaj
and Ellie Goulding will battle
Swift for best female video,
while Sheeran, Lamar, Ronson, the Weeknd and Nick
Jonas will compete for best
male video.
Diplo, FKA twigs, Skrillex
and Minaj earned t hree
nominations each, while the
Weeknd, Ariana Grande and
Fetty Wap are double nominees.
Cyrus, who won video of
the year last year for “Wrecking Ball,” dominated the 2013
VMAs when she grinded on
Robin Thicke during a performance. Cyrus wrote in an
Instagram post Monday that
“MTV won’t let me perform
... so I’m hosting this year’s
VMAs.”
YOUNGSTOWN
The Randy and Mr. Lahey
show, from “Trailer Park
Boys,” a Canadian comedy
television show, will come to
Ford Family Recital Hall, 260
W. Federal St., on Sept. 19 for
an 8 p.m. performance.
Tickets are $20 in advance and $25 at the door.
A limited number of VIP
tickets are available for $45,
and include early admission, a meet-and-greet and
a cheeseburger with Randy
and Mr. Lahey before the
show.
Tickets go on sale at 10
a.m. Friday at ticketfly.com.
The Randy and Mr. Lahey
show is described in a news
release as a silly, sexist,
drunken hour and a half of
songs and skits, audience
participation, profanity,
Shakespeare and general
hilarity.
The innocent honesty
of an out-of-control ex-cop
trailer-park supervisor and
his sidekick Randy is for fans
18 and over.
RECORD REVIEWS
TAME IMPALA
Album: “Currents”
Grade: B
“Yes, I’m changing,” croons
Kevin Parker on track four of
“Currents,” Tame Impala’s third
album. It’s a statement of purpose set to a slow soul jam, but
by that point in the record, he’s
declaring the obvious: While
Tame Impala used to traffic in
neo-psychedelia with heavy
guitars and woozy vocals, now
Parker (who recorded “Currents” alone) is interested in the
keyboard-based grooves of ’80s
R&B and the production manipulations of contemporary
hip-hop. It’s a radical change, although maybe not entirely surprising, given his work on Mark
Ronson’s “Uptown Special.”
“Currents” opens with “Let
It Happen,” a nearly eight-minute, continually morphing track
that rides a steady disco beat. It
wouldn’t sound out of place on
a Daft Punk or a Caribou album.
Lyrically, “Currents” is largely a
break-up record: Parker could
as well be separating from Tame
Impala’s past musical style as
from a lover.
—Steve Klinge, Associated Press
WILCO
Album: “Star Wars”
Grade: B
“Star Wars” is Wilco’s shortest album, coming in at a featherweight 33 minutes, nearly the
same length as Against Me!’s
“blink and you’ll miss it” “Transgender Dysphoria Blues.” And
like that album, there’s a wonderful, punkish energy populating most of the songs on “Star
Wars.” Gone are the Grateful
Dead-style jammy breakdowns
of 10-minute plus tracks like
“One Sunday Morning” or “Spiders (Kidsmoke).” Instead, we
get jumpy pop statements like
“Random Name Generator” or
the fuzzy mid-’70s guitar groove
(courtesy of Nels Cline’s nearpeerless guitar work) of “Pickled Ginger.”
—Sean McCarthy, popmatters.com
JOSS STONE
Album: “Water for Your Soul”
Grade: C+
Joss Stone has never hid her
ambitions to conquer the globe.
In her public statements and
on her recordings, Stone’s persona has always been boastful and proud. She’s currently
on a world tour in which she
plans to visit 204 countries in
three years. Stone is also taking on world music on her reggae-based new album, “Water
for Your Soul.” The results are
somewhat mixed. Sometimes
the “riddims” set her free to pursue her muse in creative ways.
Other times, the beats seem to
slow her down when she should
be frolicking harder. It varies
from cut to cut, but on the whole
Stone’s music provides a pleasant soundtrack for everyday
living.
—Steve Horowitz, popmatters.com
C3 - 07/22/15
CYAN
MAGENTA YELLOW
BLACK
CYAN
Annie’s
Mailbox
MAGENTA
SOCIETY NEWS
YELLOW
BLACK
WEDNESDAY
ANNIE’S MAILBOX
JULY 22, 2015
THE VINDICATOR | C4
Every day in Society.
He
wants
romance,
but she
doesn’t
Dear Annie: I am a divorced male in my mid50s. A couple of years ago,
I met a divorced woman
through a mutual friend.
We share a common hobby, which led to us spending hours of time together,
often just the two of us.
I asked my lady friend
early on if she was interested in dating. She told
me she had recently been
through a bad breakup
with her live-in boyfriend.
She thought it would be
nice to have someone
with whom to go out for
dinner, but she wasn’t
interested in a sexual relationship with anyone.
I accepted that. As time
went on, however, we
became closer. Although
there was never anything
physical between us, we
had what I considered
“dates,” where I would pick
her up and we’d have dinner. I thought it was only a
matter of time before our
relationship became romantic and intimate.
I recently learned that,
for the entire time I have
known her, my lady friend
has been having a sexual
affair with another guy
who already has a live-in
girlfriend. When I confronted her, she neither
admitted it nor denied it.
Instead, she said her sex
life was none of my business.
I think I’ve been used
for two years. I enjoyed
our time together, but I
never would have spent
so much of it with this
woman if I’d known she
had a sexual partner. We
are no longer seeing each
other, and although that
is probably for the best, it
is awkward since we have
mutual friends.
What do you think?
Feeling Used
Dear Feeling: We think
this woman definitely took
advantage of you, but we
also believe you went into
this with different expectations. The woman needed someone to squire her
around for dinner and
such, and could not do so
with her already-attached
boyfriend. You were a convenience, and she misled
you. You, however, assumed there would be an
eventual sexual relationship with a woman who
told you upfront that she
wasn’t interested (the reason is irrelevant). If you had
instead considered her to
be simply a friend, with no
other agenda, you could
have enjoyed dinners out
and hobby time without
feeling used.
It’s time to let it go. You
made a mistake getting
involved with her, but it
shouldn’t shame you into
avoiding your mutual
friends. Hold your head
up, be civil around her, and
look for romantic companionship elsewhere.
Dear Annie: I thought
I was being respectful by
addressing ladies using
the title “Ma’am.” Recently, I said that to a woman
and she responded, ”My
name is Mrs. X. I am not
a ‘Ma’am!’”
What do you think?
Lafayette, La.
Dear Lafayette: We think
some people are too easily
offended. We all have a preferred term of address, but
we cannot expect others, especially strangers, to know
what that is. One doesn’t
chastise a person for being
polite. For those of you who
have been unintentionally
insulted and feel the need
to respond, simply correct
the person in a gentle manner so they will know for
next time.
© 2015 Creators Syndicate
Heloise
Broken
glass
requires
care
Dear Heloise: I dropped
a glass in the kitchen, and
it shattered all over the
tile floor. I tried sweeping
and vacuuming, but there
still were slivers left. I took
a slice of bread, placed
it over the slivers and
pressed gently. The slivers
stuck to the bread easily.
SPECIAL TO THE VINDICATOR
Youngstown Lions install president, members
Adam Costello, the outgoing president of the Youngstown Lions Club, presented the gavel to incoming President George Kolesar at an installation luncheon June 25 at the Upstairs Restaurant in Austintown. Past District Gov. Bob Booher installed the new officers and directors in a candlelight ceremony. Nicole Evanski of Lane Funeral Homes became the club’s newest member. New member Shirley Christian, a
judge in Mahoning County Common Pleas Court, was not able to attend. Ed Brant, a member for 41 years, received the Melvin Jones Award.
He serves as Santa at the club’s annual Christmas Party for developmentally disabled children. From left are Brant, Kolesar, Booher,
Costello and Evanski.
Staff report
COLUMBUS
Updated Heloise
Dear Heloise: After a
number of years of grilling cheeseburgers and
having to clean melted
cheese off the grill, I had a
“eureka” moment. I take a
slice of cheese, lay it in my
hand and fold all four corners into the center of the
slice. It makes a smaller
slice and eliminates most
of the mess.
Mike O., via email
SPECIAL TO THE VINDICATOR
Lyn Bliss, left, president of the Ohio Federation of Republican Women, stands with Carol Ann Robb, a
judge for Mahoning County Seventh District Court of Appeals, at a recent OFRW Tribute to Women at
Worthington Hills Country Club in Columbus.
Municipal Judges Association, Crestview Local
Superintendent’s Advisory
Committee and Columbiana County Community Corrections Planning
Board.
She and her husband, Ken
have been married 41 years.
FOOD SALES AND DINNERS
THURSDAY
SUNDAY
VFW
Circle
Col. Louis J. Campbell
Post 3538, 157 Lowellville Road,
Struthers, will serve spaghetti dinners from 4 to 7 p.m. Meals
include meatballs, salad, bread
and butter, and coffee. The cost
is $7 for adults and $3 for children under 8. Carryout orders
are $7.50 and will be available
only until 6 p.m. Containers will
be provided.
FRIDAY
Holy
Trinity Serbian Or-
thodox Church, 53 Laird Ave.,
Youngstown, will serve fish dinners from 3:30 to 7 p.m. at the
church hall. The menu will consist of baked or fried Icelandic
cod or fried haddock; sides of
Spanish rice, haluski, macaroni
and cheese, french fries or string
beans (choose two); coleslaw or
applesauce; bread and butter;
and coffee or tea. The cost is $10
for adults and $5 for children.
Dessert will be an additional
$1.50. Containers will be provided for takeouts. Orders will be
accepted from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.
at 330-792-1005.
SATURDAY
Youngstown
Shrine Club,
1697 W. South Range Road, North
Lima, will host its annual adultsonly prime rib roast event from 2
to 8 p.m. Saturday in its outdoor
pavilion. The event features a midafternoon light lunch and a full
prime rib dinner, including beverages, at 6 p.m. Tickets can be
bought in advance by calling Jim
Hazlett at 330-651-7185 or Hugh
Davenport at 330-519-1712. Prices are $35 each or $60 for couples. Nonmembers and ladies are
encouraged to attend.
Julie, this old, old Heloise
hint came from my mother’s
column more than 50 years
ago! I have said do not do
this for years, although you
can find this out-of-date
hint all over the Internet.
Is someone looking at old
hints books?
This old hint is not safe
for animals or small children who may get into the
trash. Use several damp
paper towels; in fact, I think
they work better!
Tribute to Women honors Judge Robb
Judge Carol Ann Robb
of the Mahoning County
Seventh District Court of
Appeals was among several
women honored recently
when the Federation of Republican Women gathered
for its Biennial Tribute to
Women at Worthington
Country Club.
Robb, of New Waterford,
received the honor for her
service to the community,
her promotion of Republican candidates and values,
and her support of election
candidates. Qualifications
for the award include serving in government offices,
accomplishing professional endeavors, successfully
raising a family and volunteering in civic and/or
church organizations.
Robb was nominated
by the Canfield Republican Women’s Club, where
she has been a supportive member for years and
has spoken to the group
on several occasions. The
club also has witnessed her
care for the community, the
party and the country.
She is a member of the
United Methodist Church,
Columbiana County Farm
Bureau, Columbiana County Bar Association, Ohio
Julie, via email.
They have three daughters
and a grandchild.
Robb engages in McKinley and Lincoln Day dinners, Republican luncheons
and county fairs, and she
supports military organizations.
She has presided in the
Columbiana County Municipal Court, where she
helped establish an initiative, Bridges Out of Poverty,
to address economic issues
and to aid in reducing recidivism. Fourteen county
courts have adopted this
program.
SOCIETY
to create a beautiful garden to
be enjoyed by everyone.
Zocolo will share the history
of the gardens from that dream
to today’s Fellows Riverside
Church will sponsor Gardens, the public garden in
Mill Creek Park.
health fair
The program is free and
YOUNGSTOWN open to the public. RegistraMartin Luther Lutheran
tion is required online at www.
Church, 420 Clearmount Drive, salem.lib.oh.us.
will host a health fair from 10
For information and/or help
a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday. It will
with registration call the library
take place in the church and in
at 330-332-0042.
its parking lot. Mobile services
will be available.
Poland church plans
For information call the
its annual Funfest
church at 330-788-8707.
digest
of Serbian Sis-
ters of Holy Trinity Serbian Orthodox Church, 53 Laird Ave.,
Youngstown, will serve chicken paprikash dinners from 11:30
a.m. until sold out at the Serbian Memorial Hall, in conjunction with the 83rd annual Serbian
Day Picnic. The menu will include salad, dessert and coffee. The prices are $10 for adults
and $5 for children. Barbecued
lamb and pork also will be available. Containers will be provided
for takeout orders. Libby’s Tamburitzans will provide musical entertainment during the dinner
in the hall. Also for sale will be
homemade apple strudel, cherry strudel and raised doughnuts.
No advance orders will be taken.
Sales are first-come, first served.
Knights
of Columbus, Coun-
cil 3930, 4500 Norquest Blvd.,
Austintown, will host a pasta dinner from noon to 5 p.m. at Immaculate Heart of Mary Church,
4500 Norquest Blvd., Austintown. All dinners include pasta,
meatballs, salad, bread, butter,
dessert and beverages. The cost
is $6.50 for adults, $3.50 for
children 6 through 9 and children
5 and under eat free. There will
be a 50-50 raffle and basket auction, and a DJ will entertain from
1 to 3. This is a benefit dinner for
Caitlin Lowen and her family.
POLAND
Garden program to
be feature at library
Heritage Presbyterian
Church, 1950 Mathews Road,
will be having its annual FunSALEM
fest from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Aug.
The Quaker Room at Salem
1 on the grounds of the church.
Public Library, 821 E. State St.,
In case of bad weather it will
will be the location for a hortake
place inside.
ticultural presentation at 6:30
The Funfest is free to the
p.m. July 29.
Lynn Zocolo, horticulture ed- public and for all ages. There
ucator at Fellows Riverside Gar- will be food, games and a
bouncy house.
dens, will present “A Gift of a
Garden,” the story of Elizabeth
For information call the
Rudge Fellows and her dream
church at 330-707-9031.
Dear Heloise: I started a
recipe the other day when
I realized one of the ingredients was buttermilk.
I had none. I substituted
plain yogurt, and the recipe turned out just fine.
Heidi W.
in Pennsylvania
Gold star for thinking
this through. This works
in most baked goods, but
not all. How lucky you
stumbled upon it! Baking
and cooking can be filled
with substitutions such as
this, which is why I wrote
my pamphlet Heloise’s
Seasonings, Sauces and
Substitutes. To order one,
please go to www.Heloise.
com, or send $3 and a long,
self-addressed, stamped (70
cents) envelope to: Heloise/
SSS, P.O. Box 795001, San
Antonio, TX 78279-5001.
No flour on hand? Try using pancake mix in most
recipes, but then be sure to
leave out any baking powder or soda listed in the
recipe.
Heloise
Dear Heloise : Many
recipes call for brown sugar, but do you have to pack
it in the measuring cup, or
can you just leave it loose?
Helen W., via email
If the recipe says to pack,
yes, you should. Generally,
brown sugar has some “air”
in it, so you want to eliminate that.
Heloise
Dear Heloise: My bottle
brushes and other brushes seem to get lost under
the sink. I store them in
the dishwasher, right in
the front, on the top shelf.
They are always clean and
handy when I need one.
B. Gray,
Kerrville, Texas
TAKING ORDERS
Holy
Trinity Serbian Orthodox Church, 53 Laird Ave.,
Youngstown, is taking orders for
apple or cherry strudel. The cost
is $10 each. Call 330-921-8819
to order. Pickup is from 3:30 to 7
p.m. Friday.
Send a money-saving or timesaving
hint to Heloise, P.O. Box 795000, San
Antonio, TX 78279-5000, fax it to
210-HELOISE or email it to [email protected]
Heloise.com.
© 2015 King Features Syndicate
C4 - 07/22/15
CYAN
MAGENTA YELLOW
BLACK
CYAN
Drivers
0000
NOTICES
Cemetery Lots
CDL Class A - Region/OTR,
drop/hook, van, reefer, flatbed. Earn up to $60k+/yr.
Sign on bonus considered
330-888-2962/330-980-5121
Forest Lawn in Boardman
6 plots, $4500.
Call 330-755-4711
DRIVERS
1000
Local trucking company currently seeks company employees, owner operators &
lease operators to service
our national retail account.
All runs are round trip, drop
& hook, that get you home
daily. Applicants must have
valid Class A CDL & clean
background. Full & Part
time positions available.
Additional
compensation
for doubles. Please call for
further info.: 330-538-6188
JOBS
TRUCK DRIVER
General Help
CDL/HAZMAT, local, steady
work. Home every night.
Call 330-505-8299
Green Haven Gardens
2 Spaces & vaults, Honor
Lot, number 140c 3-4,
$3500/offer. 330-759-3725
Legal Service
A Bankruptcy, Family &
Probate lawyer. Pay plans.
Free consult. 866-529-9010
Apartments
Leasing Person
Experienced Leasing Person
wanted for weekends at
lovely Austintown complex.
Prior sales and/or leasing
essential. Great customer
service skills essential too.
Apply in person at:
Four Seasons Apts.
Leasing Office
4222 New Rd.
Or e-mail resume to:
[email protected]
Burner/Scrap Burner
Must be proficient in all
phases of demolition work.
Must be able to follow instructions. Only experienced personnel should apply. Must be able to pass
physical & drug test. Call
724-495-6200
Drivers Wanted
Oil & gas company hiring
Class A CDL Drivers. Competitive wages & benefits.
Call 330-652-2924
DRIVING INSTRUCTOR
Available nights and weekends. Requirements: 21 yrs.
or older, clean driving record and held a driver’s license for at least 5 yrs.
Send resume to:
6714 Market St.
Boardman, OH 44512
Attn: Tracey
GUTTER CLEANER
At private residence. Must
be insured. 330-797-0367
Housekeeping
Experienced applicants
preferred. Apply at:
Austintown Super 8 Motel
5280 76 Drive
LABORER to wash trucks
and other duties. Please
call for appt. 330-539-6173
Roofer/Sider
Local company seeks 2 individuals with Roofing & Siding experience. Wage based
on experience.
330-758-8387
Warehouse
Worker
FT, Warehouse, $11
Mon.-Fri., 8:00-4:30
Previous experience a
must. Shipping, receiving, stocking, organization & inventory control.
Attn.: AFP
PO Box 544
N. Lima, OH 44452
or e-mail to: [email protected]
activefoam.com
Insurance
Account
Manager/CSR
Seeking an experienced,
licensed commercial lines
Account Manager/CSR to
provide support to sales
executives, handle new &
exisiting accounts & interact with carrier representatives. Competitive
salary & benefit package.
Send resume to:
Attn.: Personnel Manager
PO Box 159
Canfield, OH 44406
Sales & Marketing Positionfor property & casualty insurance. Large well known
insurance
company.
Licensed or exp. preferred.
Mail or email resume to:
State Farm Insurance
1295 Boardman Canfield Rd
Unit 1B
Youngstown, OH 44512
[email protected]
TRUCK DRIVER
Must have Class A CDL, 2
yrs. flatbed exp., good driving record & work ethic.
330-402-1732, 8am-5pm
Maintenance/
Janitorial
Truck Drivers - Need dump
truck exp. - Tandem & Triaxle. Class A or B, must
have good MVR. Call for
appt. 330-539-6173.
Maintenance/Security for
apartment complex. Will do
light maintenance, painting,
drywall, light plumbing,
electrical & cleaning.
Approx. 32 hrs./wk.
Fax resume: 330-792-6891
TRUCK DRIVERS
Full time Class A, part time
Class B, 2 yr. exp. local.
Call 330-544-3888
vindyjobs.com
Engineering
CAD Drafter/
Designer
Soft Touch Furniture is a
leader in manufacturing
hospitality furniture. We
are looking to add a CAD
Drafter/Designer to our
team. At least a 2 year degree. Must be experienced.
Full time. E-mail resume to:
[email protected]
touchfurniture.com
Health Care
C.N.A.
St. John XXIII Home is currently looking for full time
and part time CNAs for
11:00pm-7:00am & 3:00pm11:00pm shifts. Apply at:
2250 Shenango Valley
Freeway
Hermitage, PA 16148
EOE
Clinical Psychologist
Looking for Psychologist
with PhD, high rate of pay
for mental outpatient clinic.
Call 330-906-3166
Massage Therapist/
Chiropractic Asst.
Growing chiropractic office
in Warren Ohio is looking
for an experienced, licensed
Massage
Therapist
for
massage appts. also chiropractic assisting. Potential
income $600-$700/wk.
Fax Resume to:
330-652-0574
OPERATIONS
MANAGER
Office/Clerical
Secretary
Answering & assisting with
incoming calls. Offering
support for outside sales
team. Must have good communication skills, ability to
prioritize tasks, use computer & software programs.
Excel a must. Full time.
E-mail resume to:
[email protected]
touchfurniture.com
School-based, provide individual and group counseliing in a school setting. OH
license as counselor or social worker required. 25 Hr.
per wk starting in Sept.
Base salary plus billables.
330-501-8200
Local childcare center revamping staff. Looking for
Administrator. Must have 1
yr. exp. SUTQ knowledgeable. Must have at least a
Bachelor’s degree. Pay negotiable, based on exp.
Email resume to:
[email protected]
yahoo.com
Mercer County Head Start
The following
Entry Level Positions:
Rotating Classroom
Assistants: at $8.85/hr.
No benefits.
Substitute Classroom
Assistants: at $7/75/hr.
No benefits.
High School Diploma or
G.E.D. required
Send application, Cover Letter-Resume, Clearances to:
Mercer County Head Start
1901 Memorial Drive
Farrell, PA 16121
Attn: H.R. Dept.
Application deadline is
4:00 p.m., August 7, 2015
An Equal Opportunity
Employer Provider
Optometrist
Line Chefs
One day per week.
330-219-5555
[email protected]
Upstairs Restaurant now
hiring, full or part time.
Apply in person:
4500 Mahoning Ave.
Austintown, OH 44515
Full and part time
call center positions
are available with pay
and bonus potential!
Call Today
1-800-221-6710
ext. 611
Child Care Needed
Preschool Teacher &
Daycare Aides
The Child Care & Learning
Center of New Middletown
(formerly St. Paul Child
Care Center) has openings
for Preschool Teacher &
Daycare Aide positions.
Call 330-542-2510
ask for Kim
You have waited long
enough. Get your hands on
a new house today using
The Vindicator’s
Classifieds.
PHARMACY
TECHNICIANS
Local
long
term
care
pharmacy has positions
available for full time
entry level pharmacy technicians. Good communication skills and willingness
to be a team member.
Some evenings and weekends. Training provided, no
experience necessary. EOE.
Send reply to Box M62559
c/o The Vindicator
PO Box 780
Youngstown, OH 44501
R.N. Supervisor
Restaurants/
Food Service
Grill Cooks, Saute Cooks,
Servers & Bartenders
Competitive wages. Must
have experience. Apply in
person: 3535 Upland Ave.
Coitsville, OH.
Retail
CASHIER
Pat Catan’s is currently
seeking Part time Cashiers to complete our
staff. Candidates will
possess strong customer service skills & be
able to work a flexible
schedule including some
nights & weekends. We
offer
a
competitive
hourly rate & a fun, creative work environment!
Apply at:
3380 E. State St.
Hermitage, PA 16148
724-342-4570
EOE
Full time, 11:00pm-7:00am
shift. $1000 sign on bonus
after 1 year anniversary of
employment. Apply at:
St. John XXIII Home
2250 Shenango Valley
Freeway
Hermitage, PA 16148
EOE
Want to buy a bike or have one
to sell? Try Classified ads for
the best results! Call
(330) 746-6565.
vindyjobs.com
General Help
Health Care
Health Care
RNs & LPNs
RENTALS
vindyjobs.com
Skills/Trades
Apartment
Maintenance
Full time with health care
available. Knowledge of
electric,. plumbing, carpentry, drywall, painting, (complete remodeling). Rotating
call-out
responsibilities.
Willing to pay above industry norm for the right individual that goes above &
beyond the call of duty.
Please send resume & references to:
Box M58865 c/o
The Vindicator
PO Box 780
Youngstown, OH 44501
CAD Operator
Manufacturing company in
need of CAD Operator.
Send resume to:
1038 N. Cedar St.
New Castle, PA 16102
Cement Finisher. Call for
appt., 330-539-6173 or send
resume to:
[email protected]
CONCRETE FINISHERS
Exp. preferred. Call for
more info., 330-360-3552.
Local concrete business
seeks Concrete Laborer &
Finisher, some experience
preferred. 330-953-1737
COUNSELOR
Apartments
Unfurnished
Apartments
Unfurnished
Commercial/Industrial
For Rent
Apartments
Unfurnished
BOARDMAN/POLAND
330-565-0590 1, 2 & 3 Bdrm
apts. & townhouses. Senior
Discount. Starting at $450.
Newton Falls - karate,
dance or cheer + office
space, 2nd floor, 30x60, 12’
ceilings, water & sewer incl.
$350/mo. 330-872-0242
Austintown - Springwood.
1 story living, pet friendly.
Call 330-792-7517
Boardman: Chelsea Ct Apts.
$99 Special! 1 & 2 bed, 1
story. Call 330-758-4695.
Mineral Ridge
RIDGEWOOD APTS.
90 unit complex 1.5 mi. N.
of the I-80 interchange on
St. Rt. 46. Presently avail. 1
bed units. Number of extras
& priced right. On-site Mgr.
330-652-6008/330-545-6630
Poland - 2075 Wolosyn
1 bdrm., $460/mo. + elec.,
new paint & carpet.
Call 330-369-2071
REAL ESTATE
- Vienna, Ohio -
Professional
840 Old Furnace Rd.
Tue.-Sat., 10-5; Sun., 12-5
Closed Mon.
WEEKLY
PAYCHECKS!
Phone/Internet Sales
Concrete Laborer
& Finisher
Ford Nature Center
Desk attendant. PT, $8.15.
Visitor/customer
service.
Various facility support duties. Bring resume & fill out
application ASAP. EOE
3000
vindyjobs.com
Home care agency looking
for Operations Manager.
College degree or healthcare experience required.
Duties include working with
HR and referral sources.
Responsible for education,
training and marketing.
Send resume to:
P.O. Box 1552
Youngstown, OH 44501
Mill Creek MetroParks
Sales/Marketing
Must have proficient computer skills. Must have excellent customer service
and communication skills.
Prior sales experience preferred. Must be willing to
make cold calls. Must be
able to pass airport security
clearance and drug screen.
Full time position.
Email resumes to:
[email protected]
winner-aviation.com
PAINTERS needed full time
with 5+ yrs. exp. & full time
HELPERS. Valid driver’s license, references & background check. Work history
will be verified.
Call 330-559-3808, ask for
Joe to set up interview.
Professional needed for
Service Call work. Good
pay, year round.
Call 330-774-5540
Professional Remodlers
Good pay, full time, year
round work. 330-774-5540
Technical
vindyjobs.com
Telemarketing
Telemarketers
Experienced home improvement telemarketers, hourly
wage, great commission,
spiff, 100% paid benefits &
paid vacations.
For interview call Dee at
330-707-2222
Schools/Lessons/
Instruction
ETI TECHNICAL COLLEGE
2076 Yo.-Warren Rd.
Niles - 330-652-9919
Business Opportunities
Austintown
2 & 3 Bedroom
Deluxe Townhomes
Central a/c, rec rooms, 1.5
or 2 bath, sm. pets accepted, from $780/mo. Ask
about our move in special!
330-792-7051
www.cpwapartments.com
Austintown
Beat the Heat
at LeChateau
Our Warren, OH
location has a GREAT
business opportunity
for you to own &
operate your own
Flatbed delivery service!
BIG Income
Potential with small
start up costs
Be home EVERY
night with
your family!
Why work for
someone else, when
you can work for
YOURSELF!
Work with the #1
Home Improvement
Center in the Midwest.
For more information
visit: http://
www.menards.com/
main/c-19223.htm
For more information
call 715-876-4000 or
e-mail [email protected]
menard-inc.com
Boardman: Excellent, x-lg.
2-bedrooms, carports, no
pets, heat pd. 330-799-3375
Boardman
Come
Home to
Hitchcock
Apts.
Pet friendly apartments, 1
& 2 bdrm. suites, flexible
leasing options available.
Call today for current specials! 330-792-0792
www.cpwapartments.com
AUSTINTOWN
Beautiful 2-bdrm. apts., includes gas, heat & water,
$575/mo. Now offering
move in specials!
330-792-7685
www.cpwapartments.com
Austintown
Greenbriar Village
Studio - $445
1-Bdrm. - $530
2-Bdrm. Townhouse - $785
Call today - 330-423-0115
Pet friendly community.
Austintown
Jump Into
Summer Savings!
1/2 Off the 1st full mo.
rent. 1-Bdrm., $480+elec.
Call today! 330-792-7051
www.cpwapartments.com
Austintown
Mo.-Mo. Leases
Studio Apts. 330-792-0792
Furnished $440/mo.+elec.
Unfurnished $430/mo.+elec.
Call today! 330-792-7051
www.cpwapartments.com
Austintown
Newly Available
3-Bedroom duplex, finished
basement, pets welcome,
$700/mo. + utilities.
Call 330-792-7051
www.cpwapartments.com
Austintown Pembrook apts.
Now leasing studios-$350,
1 bdrm., $445 .$300 security deposit. 330-793-5022
Austintown
Townhomes
2-Bdrm., 1.5-bath, spacious
closets, washer/dryer hookups. Starting at $535/mo.,
low utility bills, pet friendly, carport included.
Call today! 330-792-7684
www.cpwapartments.com
Boardman - 2 Bdrm. Nice,
heat/water incl. $465/mo.
No pets. Call 330-272-1780
Boardman - 2 bdrm., a/c,
carport, $485 & up + util.
330-770-9136
Boardman - 2 bdrm., heat &
water pd., air, appl., garage.
Section 8 ok. 330-716-0912.
Boardman - Bonnie Place
Garden Apt., 2 bdrm., din.
rm., 1100 sq. ft., $550 +
electric. No pets. Carport.
330-565-7825
Boardman
Boulevard Club
Studio - $520
1-Bedroom - $590
ALL UTILITIES PAID
2-Bedroom from $680+elec.
330-619-4102
Make BIG Money With
Boardman
LOCUST MANOR APTS.
2-Bed top level apt., $525
Heat & water paid
Non-smoking building
Ideal for Srs. - No Pets
Call 330-718-5585
Boardman
Millcreek Village
2-Bedroom - $780-$965
Heat & Water Paid
Call today!
330-840-2771
Pet Friendly Community
For picture, floor plan &
complete details, visit us:
www.livewithsimco.com
General Help
ASK
ABOUT
OUR
99
$
STRUTHERS 330-565-0590
2 Bedroom duplex.
Pets Welcome. Senior
Discount. Starting at $350.
Yo. East: ESA Park accepting applications for 2 bedroom, regular rents only.
Call 330-747-7400
Houses For Rent
Liberty - 4127 Logan Way
3 bdrm. + den, newly remodeled, a/c, $650/mo. +
utilities. Call 330-727-8984
Yo. East, South & West
Newly renovated homes
available. Accepting Section 8. Call 330-742-7580.
SPECIAL
Yo. South - 2027 Pointview,
3 bdrm., $550 + utilities.
330-369-2071
• Studio & 1 Bedroom
• 1300 sq. ft./2 Bedroom
• Retirees Welcome
• Air Conditioning
Yo. South - 3 bdrm., 1 bath,
1 car garage, $450/mo.
Call Truman, 330-717-7524
330-758-6729
Canfield - 121 W. Main St.,
Apt. A, 1 bdrm., 1 bath, kit,
w/appl. lg. backyard, $450.
No pets. 330-758-8106.
Canfield - St. Andrews.
1-2 bed. Pd. heat & water.
Carport. $99 Special!
Call 330-533-7100
Canfield
1 bedroom starting $495
2 bedroom starting $575
CANFIELD SCHOOLS
HEAT & WATER PAID
Sr. Discounts
330-533-5454 - Carriage Hill
386 Fairground
GIRARD - Highland Ave.
1 bdrm. available, $425, no
pets. Call 330-506-9956
GIRARD/Liberty - 2 bdrm.
all util. pd. except electric,
no pets. Call 330-717-8268
Howland - Senior Apts., 1 &
2 bedroom, all utilities incl.,
starting at $550, 1st mo.
free. Call 330-530-8606
Hubbard
SHADOW RUN
Studio - $480
1-Bedroom - $615
All Utilities Paid
330-423-4820
Cats are welcome.
Liberty: 1 bed, $495;
2 bed from $510,
heat/water pd. Timber Ridge, 330-759-8811.
McDonald - Senior Apts., 1
& 2 bdrm., all util. included,
starting at $550, 1st mo.
free. Call 330-530-8606
Sales/Marketing
Yo. South/Upper - 3 bdrm.
Cape Cod, 1.5 bath, 1 car
garage, $550+ dep. No pets.
Call 330- 717-1259
Condos For Rent
Boardman - 2 Bdrm. Nice
quiet area, 1200 sq. ft.,
$750/mo. Call 330-787-2873
Boardman - 2 Bdrm., 2 bath,
garage with private entrance, move in ready, immpeccably maintained, no
pets. $950/mo. Silver Stone
Condos. Call 330-726-8888
or 330-233-2800.
Rooms For Rent
Daily/wkly Rates. May Motel, 330-538-2211 or Boardman Inn, 330-758-2315.
AUSTINTOWN
Commercial space for
lease. Includes all maintenance, water and trash,
412-4687 sq. ft. walk-in
suites. Existing doctor’s
office.
Large newly renovated
office, 4687 sq. ft. Large
reception area and business office. Back entry,
kitchen area, handicap accessible.
1st Month’s Rent Free!
Call 330-286-3413 or
330-792-1398
N. Jackson - office, retail,
choice of 400, 600 or 900
sq. ft., heat, water, sewer &
trash incl., $300/mo.
Call 330-872-0242
Sales/Marketing
SALES POSITION
AVAILABLE
Retail promotional booth sales.
Great earnings potential without
the long hours. Must have
reliable transportation and be
able to work weekends.
Prior sales experience helpful
but not necessary.
CALL 330-233-3443
General Help
General Help
EMPLOYERS!
FIND THE BEST LOCAL TALENT ON
Yo. South - Ridge Ave.
3 Bdrm., 1 bath, single family home, 1090 sq. ft.,
fenced lot, lease program,
$150 down, $149/mo.
Call 855-547-2240
Yo. West - 2 bdrm. house
1734 Silliman, $6000 as is.
330-783-2135, 9-2 only.
Condos For Sale
Canfield - 2 bdrm., St. Andres Ct. For details call:
330-507-1046
Liberty Twp. - 3 Bdrm., 1
bath, enclosed porch, lg.
shed, must see. $9500/best
offer. 330-539-5448.
NILES-Westwood Lake
Park-Florida type livingnew/used Homes, Beach,
Swimming, Lakefront lots.
330-544-1825; M-F, 11-5
6000
STUFF
Appliances
Appliance Sale
Refrigerators, $238; gas or
electric stoves, $198;
washers, $238; gas or
electric dryers, $148.
All with 90 day Warranty
Economy Furniture
2828 Market, Yo. 782-0331
30-Day Lay-A-Way
Refrigerator - Haier 3.3
cu. ft., 2 dr., black, great
for college dorm, used 1
yr., excellent shape, $80.
330-565-2448
WASHER & DRYER - gas,
very good condition, $285/
offer. Call 330-360-3711.
LOOKING FOR A BABY
SITTER, TREE TRIMMER
OR PLUMBER? Find
these and many more
services in our “CALL AN
EXPERT” column.
Appliances
Appliances
$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$
Sell That Unwanted Item
for QUICK CASH
Using The Family Rate Plan
$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$
• Private party only
• Only one item per ad
• Excludes pets, garage • Must include price
sales, real estate &
• Prepayment required
commercial items
• Rate is non-refundable
3 Lines - 3 Days - $5.00
Each additional line is $1.75
3 Lines - 7 Days - $9.50
Each additional line is $3.00
3 Lines - 14 Days - $15.00
Each additional line is $3.00
Call Classifieds - 330-746-6565
classifi[email protected]
General Help
General Help
Business and Vindicator
Box Delivery
We offer the opportunity to be your own
boss and manage your own business.
Earn above average profits being an
independent contractor, servicing
retail businesses and newspaper
vending racks; daily and Sunday.
Routes Currently Available in
Austintown & West Side
Requires a dependable vehicle capable
of transporting bundles of newspapers.
$100 SIGNING BONUS
General Help
General Help
Early morning delivery, done by 6:30 a.m. daily
and 7:30 a.m. weekend
Must be 18 years of age
Must have reliable transportation and
proof of car insurance
Heated warehouse and table provided to
prepare product for delivery
Meet new people
Many tax advantages in operating your own business
Most newspaper routes can be completed
in 1.5-2.5 hours per day
The following routes are available:
LPNs, 2nd Shift
LPN or RN, 2nd & 3rd Shifts
LPNs, 2nd & 3rd Shifts
For more information, please contact Human Resources
at 330-545-1550 or apply online at
www.windsorhouseinc.com
EOE ~ DFWP
LIBERTY TWP.
(TRU95630ESME)
JUST LISTED! Meticulous, 3
bdrm., 2.5 bath raised
ranch. Living room, dining
room, kitchen, family room,
double garage. Shed. Waterproofed basement. Beautiful, above ground pool.
Private, dead end street.
Approx. 1/2 acre lot with
wooded view. MUST SELL!
DON’T MISS OUT!
CALL TODAY! $133,500
S.T. Bozin & Co., Realtors
330-759-4100
Mobile Homes
Become an
Independent Contractor Carrier
Door-to-Door Commissioned Sales
Earn Top Level Commissions
Through Your Efforts!
Liberty Health Care Center - Youngstown
Windsor House at Champion - Warren
BOARDMAN
Sale or Land Contract
-5941 Stillson Pl. - $102,500
-890 Larkridge - $137,900
(Applewood Acres)
Lakeside Realty
Call Steve - 330-501-0278
Residential Lots
Austintown - 5 lots for
sale, various locations.
330-503-2351
Manage Your Own Business
General Help
Guardian Health Care Center - Youngstown
RN, 1st Shift, and LPN, 2nd Shift
Houses For Sale
Austintown - Cider Mill
Crossing, 2 story, great
rm./cathedral ceiling, finished basement, 5 bdrm.,
3.5 bath, all appliances, privacy
fence
&
pool.
$235,000. Call 330-398-1606
Condos For Sale
POLAND - Trotter’s Chase
3 Bdrm., 2 bath, 1640 sq.
ft., many upgrades, asking
$141,900.
Open
House,
Sun., 1-3. 695 E. Western
Reserve Rd., Unit 2501.
330-770-3334/330-953-3946
Vindy Opportunities
Windsor House, Inc.
Omni Manor Health Care Center - Austintown
4000
C5
For more information call
330-747-1471 ext. 1294
EOE
PEAS TO PICK OR
BEANS BY THE
BUSHEL, LOOK IN OUR
“FOODS/PRODUCE/
FARMER’S MARKET”
COLUMN.
Windsor House, Inc. is looking for full and part time
Registered Nurses and Licensed Practical Nurses for
several facilities in Mahoning and Trumbull Counties.
Must be licensed in the state of Ohio. Medical insurance for full-time employees starts at $25!
LPN, Flexible Shifts
BLACK
Commercial/Industrial
For Rent
Multiple Positions
Liberty Arms Assisted Living - Youngstown
YELLOW
THE VINDICATOR | WEDNESDAY, JULY 22, 2015
CLASSIFIEDS
WWW.VINDY.COM
MAGENTA
Sales Contractors Needed
Throughout our Distribution Area
Sell newspaper subscriptions on behalf of:
“The Vindicator”
Top sales reps are earning $600 per week
doing this, you can too.
For More information, please call:
330-747-1471 Ext. 1518
★ Search our entire database of over
29,000 registered LOCAL job seekers.
★ Search by previous experience, salary
expectations, location and much more.
For information contact the
VindyJOBS.com Sales Team
at 330-747-1471 ext. 1255
or [email protected]
West Blvd., Mill Creek, Brookfield, Glenpark - Rt. 294130
- 2 Hours daily - 6 Miles daily - 189 Customers
$800 Estimated Monthly Income
Hillman, Midlothian, Indianola - Rt. 798245 - 1.5 Hours
daily -12 Miles daily - 115 Customers
$750 Estimated Monthly Income
To apply, please call
330-747-1471, ext. 1294
or email:
[email protected]
E.O.E. M/F/D/V
CYAN
YELLOW
CLASSIFIEDS
BLACK
WWW.VINDY.COM
Farmers Market
Furniture
Medical Equipment
Beets & Pickles
Taking orders now!
* Bedding *
Catalpa Grove Farms
Mattress Sale
Wheelchairs - 2 electric,
$300 each. Stairglide, $500.
Call 412-583-5774
Columbiana, 330-482-4064
Blueberries, red raspberries
Ellsworth Berry Farm
330-538-3861
Our own Peaches, Lodi Apples, Plums, Corn. Huffman
Fruit Farm, 1 mi. S. of
Greenford on Lisbon Rd., 95, Mon.-Sat. 330-533-5700
Sweet Corn, U-pick Red
Raspberries & ready picked
black & red; Blueberries,
Zucchini, Beans, Pickles.
330-533-7221
Gasper’s Garden
Queen mat & box set, $98;
King set, $128; full set, $88;
Lawn/Garden
Equipment
Economy Furniture
2828 Market, Yo. 782-0331
Couch
Pennsylvania
House, 76”, $250 & 54”
loveseat,
$150,
neutral
print; Andy Warhol collection area rug, 8’x10’, $200.
Call 330-424-2313
Dining Room Suit
$600/offer. 330-629-2762
Lawn Tractor - Simplicity
GTH-16, 50” hydraulic deck,
hydrostatic, 16 hp. Briggs,
just serviced, manuals &
extra blades, looks new,
none better, $1900.
Salem - 330-314-2504
Riding Mower - Husqvarna,
38”, 3 yrs. old, moving,
must sell! $800.
330-550-3425
Firewood
AAA MATTRESSES on sale
now, $79, any size. 6534
Market St. 330-758-3217
Large pile of firewood.
CHEAP!
Call 330-770-1876
Sleepy Hollow Outlet
Mattresses starting $88!
330-782-5555 4931 Market
Tractor - Craftsman, 42”,
bagger, good condition,
$150. Call 330-509-0210.
Want to buy a bike or have one
to sell? Try Classified ads for
the best results! Call
(330) 746-6565.
Various pieces of furniture.
Call for information.
330-502-6265
Machinery/Tools
Automobiles
Automobiles
Scroll Saw - Rockwell/Delta, 24”, with stand, model #
62-110, very good condition,
$400. Wood Lathe - Craftsman, 9” swing, 30” between centers, with 18” extension bed & turning chisels, good condition, $130.
Router Table - Craftsman,
like new, $40. 330-547-6453
$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$
Sell That Unwanted Item
for QUICK CASH
Using The Family Rate Plan
$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$
Miscellaneous
AIR conditioner - 5000 BTU,
window unit, $85/best offer. Call 330-360-3711.
• Private party only
• Only one item per ad
• Excludes pets, garage • Must include price
sales, real estate &
• Prepayment required
commercial items
• Rate is non-refundable
3 Lines - 3 Days - $5.00
Each additional line is $1.75
3 Lines - 7 Days - $9.50
Each additional line is $3.00
3 Lines - 14 Days - $15.00
Each additional line is $3.00
Call Classifieds - 330-746-6565
classifi[email protected]
Apartments
Unfurnished
STUMPER - RAYCO, 1625A,
runs
new,
low
hrs.,
$4850/offer. 330-502-3611
CHOIR ROBES - 30, light
blue, free. Call Tues., Wed.,
Thurs., 9-12, 330-792-1221.
Furnace - gas, Trane XE90,
74,000 BTU, heats 1400 sq.
ft. home, like new, $350.
Evenings, 330-518-8314
TRAILERS & HITCHES
bennetttrailer.com
330-533-4455
Knowles collector plates, 80
w/boxes, never displayed,
$329/offer. 330-272-4848
Apartments
Unfurnished
Apartments
Unfurnished
WESTCHESTER
SQUARE APARTMENTS
•Studio Apartments
•Large One Bedrooms
•Junior One Bedrooms
•Two Bedroom Apartments
SENIOR
DISCOUNT
Sporting/Exercise
Equipment
Gun - 45acp Springfield Armory XDS, $500. Only Serious inquiries. 757-535-1784.
Gun - Springfield Armory
.45acp, 1911 Mil-spec. SS,
$600. Call 757-535-1784.
7000
PETS, ANIMALS
Pets Lost
CAT - grey, long haired,
male, Girard, Shannon Rd.
area. Call 330-539-6009.
DOG - small, black & white,
missing from Yo. North,
last seen Gypsy Ln., name
Barney. REWARD!
330-727-0578
Dogs
BOSTON TERRIERS
Available: black, brindle &
white. Call 330-782-5739.
Chia-Poos - Tiny non shedding pets. Males, $400; Females, $450. 330-856-4039
Malti-Poos,
Cav-A-Chon,
Toy Red Poodle, MaltePekes, Maltese, YorkiePoos, Mini Dachshund ShihPoo, Mal-Shih, Shih-Chon,
Toy Yorkies, Poodle mixes,
English Beabulls, & more.
1560 E. Liberty St., off Belmont (Girard, Ohio). Cash,
CC or Get Easy Financing at
www.ohiopuppy.com
330-259-1286
Rottweiler Pups - AKC, excellent bloodline, all shots,
9 wks., $750. 330-774-6956
YORKIE PUPS
AKC registered, $500 & up.
Call 330-856-4039
PEAS TO PICK OR BEANS
BY THE BUSHEL, LOOK IN
OUR “FOODS/PRODUCE/
FARMER’S MARKET”
COLUMN.
Apartments
Unfurnished
All Utilities Included
•Intercom Entrances
•Tennis Courts
•Beautiful Park-Like Setting
WESTCHESTER EXECUTIVE - Corporate Suites Available
•Private entrance & patios
•Spacious living areas
•Washer & dryer hookups
•Wooded setting
WESTCHESTER COMMONS
•Heat & water
•Carports included in rent
•Central Air
A Senior Citizen
Independent Living Complex
•Live in your own 2 bedroom home
•Heat and Water included in rent
•Senior Activities Day
•Washer/Dryer hookups in each unit
•Central Air
•Appliances
•Patio-Carport
•And Much More!
330-799-5758
Mon-Sat 10-5
Sun 12-5
07/22/15
ACROSS
1 Like some
eyebrows
6 Serengeti grazer
11 Get to safety
12 Diverse
13 Tropical lizard
14 Permit
15 Happy rumbles
16 Zorro’s marks
17 “Only Time” singer
18 Thigh neighbor
19 Icicle site
23 Answering
machine sound
25 Bramble
26 German physicist
29 Coup de -31 Lose brightness
32 Bridal notice word
33 Fundraisers, often
34 “Wheel” buy
(2 wds.)
35 Container weights
37 Vow
39 Poems of praise
40 Motel of yore
41 Crude metals
45 Twinge
47 Archeology find
48 They may be
cultured
51 Be important
52 Actor’s lines
53 Appear
54 Scout’s rider
55 Composer -Anderson
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
UGEND
©2015 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
All Rights Reserved.
VEPOR
DOINIE
CORLLS
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
Answer
here:
“
Underway
Excessive interest
Pharaoh’s amulet
Mongolian invaders
Stadium cry
Writer Grey
Pencil part
Highchair attire
Shinto or Zen
(abbr.)
10 Citrus drink
11 Not green
12 Prez backup
16 Make time (2 wds.)
18 Zeus’ spouse
20 Met role
21 Artery complement
22 Humorist -Bombeck
24 Omelet base
25 Topnotch
26 Glom -27 Leader
28 Just
30 “Brian’s Song” lead
36 -- de corps
38 More sultry
40 Part of MIT
42 Nostalgic style
43 Poem of lament
”
(Answers tomorrow)
HONEY
TONGUE
VENDOR
Jumbles: MOTTO
Yesterday’s
Answer: When Michael Collins piloted the Apollo 11 command
module on 7-21-69, he was — OVER THE MOON
44 Wizened
46 Dog food brand
47 Ditto
48 L.A. zone
49 Writer Umberto -50 Aleta’s son
51 Gibson or Blanc
DOWN
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
Check out the new, free JUST JUMBLE app
C6 THE VINDICATOR | WEDNESDAY, JULY 22, 2015
MAGENTA
ANSWER TO
PREVIOUS PUZZLE
CYAN
Free Pets
Boats
NOTICE: Screen
SeaRay
268
Sundancer
1988. 7.4L, MerCruiser, 695
hrs., sleeps 6, galley with
hot water, fridge & stove,
stand-up head with shower,
on triple axle Eagle trailer
with new tires & bearings.
Includes anchor, life jackets, safety equip. Owned
since 1990, $10,000/offer.
Call 330-337-6515
respondents carefully when
giving away animals.
8000
AUTOMOTIVE
Antique/Classic Cars
Chevrolet Caprice - 1969
New brakes, new int., 22”
rims, stereo system, many
extras, $10,500.
330-233-7062
MGB - 1977. 78,000 mi.,
looks
&
runs
great,
$3500/offer. 330-942-3618
Oldsmobile Toronado Trofeo - 1992, pearl white, no
rust, int. like new, elec.
problem, $2500.
330-793-0926
Porsche 928 - 1988
8 cyl., auto., leather, low
mi., AZ car, no rust,
$13,900. Call 330-533-2010
Automobile
Parts/Service
Alloy Wheels - Beautiful,
(4) 17” bolt pattern, fits all,
$250. Call 330-953-1033
Suncruiser 1995. 20 ft. pontoon boat with motor & full
cover, excellent condition,
lots of extras, $8500.
Call 330-509-8677
Sweetwater Pontoon - 24’,
2003, 90 hp. Yamaha motor,
full enclosure, many extras,
very, very nice, trailer incl.
$15,000. Dave 330-301-1055
Marine Liquidation Sale
CASH/CARRY
Area marine service center
liquidating inventory of
new & used marine motors,
(inboard/outboard) various
manufactureres
&
HP,
parts, lower units, boats &
trailers. 1 Day Sale, Sat.,
July 25, starting at 9 a.m.5511 Rt. 6, Andover, OH.
Call with inquiries
440-293-4015/814-671-0383
Motorcycles/Mopeds
Cargo Trailer - 2014,
Stealth Super-Lite, 5x8,
enclosed, outfitted for
motorcycle, $2800.
330-301-3116
Harley-Davidson Dyna Super Glide 2003. Springer
front end, 20,000 mi., customized with all the extras,
$6900/offer. 330-248-3350
Honda Goldwing - 1990
Pearl white & grey, approx.
85,000 mi., $6500/offer.
Call 330-540-2557
Kawasaki Ninja 250 - 2011
2600 mi., excellent
condition, $3200/offer.
Call 330-301-9586
Kawasaki Concord 14 - 2008
4500 mi., excellent condition, ABS brakes, new front
tire & sensors, $7000/offer.
Call 330-726-4129
Yamaha 250 Virago - 2007
Excellent condition, 2351
mi., many extras, $2200.
Call 330-550-6650
TRIKE - 1998 Harley-Davidson Ultra, rebuilt motor,
$14,500/offer.330-502-3611
vindywheels.com
Boats
Campers/RVs
Automobiles
Glastron GX235 - 2004
5 Liter, fuel injection, 220
hrs., looks new, excellent
condition, kept in inside
storage, asking $21,900.
330-716-2656
Club Car, 1986, $1000; 2000
E-Z Go, $3000. Both gas &
4-stroke. S - O - L - D!!
Cadillac DeVille - 1998
Blue, 61,000 mi., runs great,
beautiful, $4500/offer.
330-301-6876
Forest River Sierra - 2014
5th wheel, 5 slides, custom
storage shed, in Canfield
Park, on large treed lot,
$45,000. Call 330-550-0302.
Cadillac DeVille 1997. 4 dr.,
White Diamond, 32,800 orig. mi., new condition,
$7000. Call 330-469-5220
Motorcycles/Mopeds
Chevrolet Camaro - 2010,
first run limited edition,
synergy green, cyber gray
stripe, 6 spd., 7500mi., perfect, $25,000. 330-647-2171
Imperial 1983 - 19 ft., open
bow, I/O motor, all the extras,
excellent
shape,
$3500. Call 330-248-3350
TAKE PRIDE IN YOUR
YARD, CALL ONE OF
OUR ADVERTISERS
UNDER YARD WORK,
TREE SERVICE OR
LAWN MOWING.
Can-Am Spyder GS-SM5
2009. 3 wheeled, 5 spd., &
reverse, Corbin seat. Black
& silver, excellent condition, reduced to $8500. 330716-3277
Chevrolet Impala - 2008
V-6, flex fuel, 3.9L, white,
remote start, 136,500 mi.
Must see! $5995.
330-533-5139
Garage Sales
Garage Sales
Garage Sales
Austintown - Estate Sale!
104 N. Edgehill. Thurs., Fri.
& Sat., 10-4. Collectibles,
furniture, tools & lots of
misc. Something for all!
Please, no early sales!
Boardman - 156 Terrace
Ave. Fri. & Sat., July 24 &
25, 9-4. Baby clothes, strollers, + size clothes, some
with tags, household, holiday decorations, much more
Girard - 1402 Shannon Rd.,
July 21-24, 9 a.m.-?. Generator 5000, radial arm saw,
compressor, paint sprayer,
jet heater, elec. wheel
chair, kids toys, household,
patio furniture, ATV, MORE
Boardman - 5242 South
Ave., across from St. Luke’s
Church, Thurs.-Fri., 9-4 &
Sat., 9-3. Multi-Family!
Something for everyone!
Girard - 424 Hazel St.
Thurs. & Fri., 9-3
Clean, Organized Sale!
Great Bargains!
Austintown - Thurs. & Fri.,
July 23 & 24, 10am-4pm.
Christmas in July Sale!
- 4602 Norquest Blvd. No Early Sales
Austintown - Thurs.-Sat.,
8-4. 4451 Aspen Dr. Furniture, collectible cars, clocks,
girls clothes 7-12, misc.
Austintown - Thurs.-Sat.,
9-5. 2461 Vollmer Dr. Antiques, glassware, furniture,
patio
furniture,
dishes,
books, bookcases, misc.
household. All must go!
Austintown
308 N. Edgehill
Thurs.-Sun., 9-5
Many Items
Berlin Center - Clothing,
bedding/crib, toys, games,
furniture, misc. household,
all excellent condition.
Thurs., Fri. & Sat., 9-4
14945 Hoyle Rd.
Berlin Center - Fri. & Sat.,
9-4. Community Yard
Sales! 20 Families! Maps
avail. at Local Merchants.
Boardman - 796 Kiwana Dr.
Multi Family! PS3 & video
games, household items,
clothing, tools, toys, furniture. Wed. thru Fri., 9 -3.
Boardman - Applewood
Acres Neighborhood Sale!
Bristlewood,
Trailwood,
Teraview. Thurs.-Sat., 8-4.
Boardman - Thurs. & Fri.,
10-4. 156 Rockland Dr. Kids
& adult clothes, household,
toys, video games & more!
Canfield - 208 Willowbend
(The Preserves). Tons of
primitives, clothes, toys,
household. Thurs., Fri., 9-4.
Canfield - Thurs.-Sat., 9-3.
81 Laurel Hills Ln. Kids’
clothes, toys, electronics,
dishes , earrings, & more!
Liberty - 449 Arbor Circle
Thurs.-Sat., 9-2. Collectibles, sports cards, old records, toys, file cabinet,
weights, Beanies & misc.
Liberty - 4766 Logan Arms
Dr. Thurs., Fri. & Sat., 9-4.
Electrical tools,
power tools & misc.
N. LIMA
9223 Woodworth Rd.
July 23-25, 9am-3pm.
Multi Family Garage Sale!
Poland - Thurs. & Fri. 9-5
3004 Saginaw Dr.
Lots of household, kids, antiques, misc. & more!
Yo. South - 1231 E. Boston
Ave., Thurs., Fri. & Sat.,
10-5. Home goods, VHS, baby items, toys, books.
Yo. West - Garage Sale!
1912 Connecticut Ave.
July 23rd & 24th, 9-3
Everything going!
TODAY’S HOROSCOPE
Happy Birthday! In the next
year: You'll start your new year
finishing old business. As you revisit and revive projects, you'll find
that you have the experience, skills
and judgment that were missing
before. Big money months are
August, November and February.
A personal dream becomes real
as you carry your intention all the
way through the finish line. Aries
and Sagittarius people adore you.
Your lucky numbers are: 4, 29, 22,
19 and 17.
CELEBRITY PROFILES: She's
been a show-biz pro since her
childhood days of singing with
Barney. With her recent single
"Good for You" working the charts,
Selena Gomez lives up to the
Mars/Taurus placement she was
born under. This pop star came
to Earth when the sun was on the
cusp of Cancer and Leo, and the
moon was in headstrong Aries to
further amp that passionate firesign energy.
a ARIES (March 21-April 19).
There are times when genuine outrage is warranted, but those times
are few and far between. Mostly,
there's no good reason to get riled
up. Keep your cool, and everyone
around you will, too.
b TAURUS (April 20-May 20).
For those planning a trip, ignore
the rule about houseguests and
fish at your own peril. No matter
how charming and loved you are,
anything still lingering after three
days starts to smell.
c G E M I N I (May 21-June
21). Some people believe other
people's lifestyles are somehow an
affront to their own. It makes no
sense to you -- you're a live-andlet-live sort. Let them argue it out
while you're busy making money
today.
d CANCER (June 22-July 22).
Usually when you reach the point
of being irritated with absolutely
everyone in the world, the one
you're really mad at is you. Your
issue with yourself? You haven't
given yourself the much-needed
break you deserve.
e LEO (July 23-Aug. 22). Too
many ingredients spoil the soup
-- or the project, relationship,
schedule, etc. Stick to the recipe.
Great patience and restraint will be
required for exemplary results.
f V I R G O (Aug. 23-Sept. 22).
Certain friends bring out your
quick humor, and others make
you feel like you're always dodging
conversational quicksand. Why
put yourself in uncomfortable
situations? Choose your company
carefully.
g LIBR A (Sept. 23-Oct. 23).
As for that group of hotheads you
have to operate in, sometimes
you wonder how you landed in an
environment so rich in narcissism
and delusion. Your main goal will
be not to become like them.
YELLOW
BLACK
THE VINDICATOR | WEDNESDAY, JULY 22, 2015
CLASSIFIEDS
WWW.VINDY.COM
MAGENTA
h SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 21).
Before you invent a new way to get
to the goal, give the old one a try. If
it works, it will save you unnecessary effort. Your brain is best put
to work on a problem that hasn't
been solved by anyone yet.
i SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec.
21). Manipulation is when you trick
someone into wanting what you'd
like them to want. It leads to nothing good. You want to influence
others to be their best, but they
have to want that, too.
j CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19). This is a day when your
body knows more than you do
about what it needs. Listen to the
muscles and appetites that live in
you. Trust your physical instinct.
k A Q U A R I U S (Jan. 20-Feb.
18). You'll have some explaining to
do, not because your actions are
so outside the norm, but because
you'll be dealing with people who
simply don't get what's going on.
l P I S C E S (Feb. 19-March 20).
Today, the most effective solution
will be so obvious that it's easy to
miss. That's why the opinions of
inexperienced people will be so
valuable to you. The very young
and the very old will be especially
lucky to have on your side.
ASTROLOGICAL QUESTIONS:
"There's a girl I know. She's a
Scorpio, and ever since I met her,
I've been writing poetry, music,
raps, dancing and drawing. I never
used to do those things before,
but this girl makes me want to be
super-creative. I'm a Capricorn.
Do you think I should give her the
things I've made and written for
her? I don't want her to think I'm
weird."
She's your muse! It is a remarkable gift she has given you just by
being herself, as her energy has
opened up new possibilities inside
you. This awakening of hidden
talents is beautiful, and your willingness to act on the feelings and
turn them into unique expressions
of you is a wonderful happening.
Savor it and keep the spark alive
inside you.
Whether to show her your works
is a separate issue. Go carefully,
because Scorpios are very private
people, and if that privacy is invaded or threatened, they shut out
the perpetrator with an emotional
barrier that's nearly impossible
to break through. Get to know her
first. Establish rapport, friendship
and trust before introducing her to
your many talents.
Visit Holiday Mathis online at
www.creators.com.
© 2015 Creators Syndicate Inc. 07/22
C7
Automobiles
Automobiles
Trucks
Chrysler PT Cruiser - 2010
11,000 mi., silver, like new
condition, $9250.
Call 330-770-4632
Mercury Grand Marquis LS 2008, 27,000 mi., custom
trailer hitch, $5700.
724-654-5724/724-656-1144
Chrysler Sebring Touring
Conv. - 2008. White & black,
remote start, reduced to
$7500. Call 330-716-3277
MGB 1979. Complete frame
off restoration, mint condition,
$8500/offer.
Pics
available. 330-507-2844
Chevrolet Colorado - 2007
like new, white, 39,000 mi.,
4 spd., auto., a/c, cruise,
cap, new tires, tow package, $13,900. Pics available.
Call/text, 330-770-2311
Chrysler Sebring - 2005
Mechanic’s Special! Runs
good, oil light blinking,
$1500/offer. 330-240-1078
Nissan Ultima - 2000, runs
great, new tires & battery,
$1200/offer. 330-503-7454
Chrysler 300M - 2004
143,000 mi., $2500/offer.
Must see! 330-747-6592
Pontiac Solstice - 2006, red,
auto., 72,000 mi., $8500/offer. 330-533-0620
Chrysler Sebring Conv. 1998
125,000 mi., runs good,
$2200/offer. 330-793-5306
Toyota Avalon - 2001
Leather, loaded, great condition, $4500. 330-629-9084
Ford Escort - 1999
Runs great, 160,000 mi., 30
MPG, $750. 330-502-1451
Toyota Tercel - 1996, 2 dr.,
auto., solid, runs excellent,
$795 firm. 330-792-5702
Honda Civic EX - 2006
2-dr., 5 spd., black, very
well maintained, $6900/offer. 330-550-1514.
BRITTAIN
KIA Soul - 2014, green, 1.6
liter, 25,000 mi., $16,500/
offer. 330-758-3922.
Lincoln Towncar - 2000
Cartier Edition. Engine not
running, body very excellent
condition, fully loaded. Too
many extras to list. Must
call & see! $1100.
Call 330-788-5194
Lincoln Cartier - 2000
$4000, fully loaded. Call
330-783-2135, 9-2 only
vindywheels.com
Chevrolet. 57 E.
Martin St., E. Palestine,
OH. Local 1-800-589-7970
SUVs
Buick Rainier - 2006, loaded, leather, new tires, ruby,
AWD, $6700. 330-383-3222
vindywheels.com
Vans
Chevrolet Astro Ext. - 1992
Rockwood, 82,000 mi., very
good condition, stored in
heated garage, velor int.,
$4500. 330-792-0139
Chrysler Town & Country
2004. Handicap Van. Hand
controls, auto. ramp, 97,500
mi.,
good
condition,
$14,000. Call 330-272-5318
Plymouth Voyager - 1993
excellent condition, 92,000
mi., $2800. 330-726-8730
Wanted To Buy
A best price $325 & up for
most. Call 330-759-7807 or
after 6pm, 330-534-2634.
YOUNGSTOWN AUTO
WRECKING. Top dollar for
any vehicle. 330-743-1492.
ZZ TOP PRICES PAID
Honda Pilot LX - 2007. 4x4,
very clean, purchased from
original owner, timing belt
service complete, must see,
$8800. 330-501-5050.
$350-$550. 330-782-7925
You have waited long enough.
Get your hands on a new
house today using The
Vindicator’s Classifieds.
Asphalt Paving
Handyman
Plumbing
PANTALONE PAVING INC.
Over 60 yrs. exp. Drives,
Parking Lots. 330-652-9108
Appliances, Garage Doors
Plumbing, Hot Water
Tanks and Furnaces.
330-782-8105/330-788-0449
Frank’s Plumbing - heaters,
gas leaks, toilets, disposals
& faucets. 330-301-6876
W.R. CADE PAVING
Insured ~ Free Estimates.
800-275-4581 or
330-270-5830 - PA6516
Carpet/Floor Covering
Carpets by Jim Dunn All brands, sales, installation, restretching & repairs.
35 Yrs.+ Exp. 330-550-8649
Cement & Masonry
All Concrete Needs. Patios,
sidewalks, steps, patchwork. Insured 330-623-2067
SUMMER DECK SPECIAL All phases of
30 Yrs. Exp.
remodeling & home repair.
SR. DISC. 330-307-8583
Hauling
A&A&A Hauling-Moving
Free Est. 330-974-4191
Lowest Price!
AAA-A Hauling & Moving
Cleanouts, Free Estimates.
Sr. Disc. Call 330-303-0291
Electrical Work
AARDVARK Hauling. $0 &
up. Basement/cleanouts.
References. 330-518-5342.
A Better Free Estimates
Breaker boxes, rewiring,
lic., insured. 330-758-7074
ABC Hauling & Moving
Anything • Anytime • BBB
Accredited. 330-788-0579
Gulu Electric breaker boxes,
rewire. Lic. #12329. Bonded/Insured. 330-743-6510
Painting
Kirkner Electric New Breaker Boxes & Rewiring. City
lic./bonded. 330-747-5055.
Firewood
Large pile of firewood.
CHEAP!
Call 330-770-1876
Gutter Cleaning
& Installation
A Seamless Gutter Co.
Made at your home to fit
your home! 330-793-5646.
PEAS TO PICK OR
BEANS BY THE
BUSHEL, LOOK IN OUR
“FOODS/PRODUCE/
FARMER’S MARKET”
COLUMN.
DAVE The Painters
Home Improvements.
Call Dave - 330-507-2922
Pressure Washing
Power Wash Everything
Low/high pressure wash
cost $125. 330-881-3926
Yo. Painting & Pressure
Wash. Free Estimates.
Senior Disc. 330-651-0077
Plastering & Drywall
A1 Patch Plastering
30 Yrs. Exp. Texturing.
Sr. Disc. 330-793-2576
ABOVE BOARD DRYWALL
Jim Baker - 330-758-9079
- Ceiling & Wall Repair
- Textured Ceilings
J & R Plumbing, all types.
Lowest prices in town. Try
Us! Free Est. 330-770-6983
Roofing
Amish
Roofers
COMPLETE ROOF
REPLACEMENT
Call 440-636-3237
Chimney & Slate, roof &
spouting repair specialist.
Mike, 330-750-1591
VALANTINE ROOFING
330-793-3493
Septic Tank/Service
Shallow Creek Septics
Pumping septic tanks. Introductory price $125 for
average septic.
724-347-4633
Tree Service
A AND A Tree & Stump
Removal-Shrubs, trimming.
Insured. 330-792-4925.
J & L Tree Service
Family owned & operated
Fully insured - Free Est.
330-614-8578
John’s Tree Removal Trees,
stumps, brush, firewood.
Ins. free est. 330-542-3051
JONES TREE SERVICE
Insured ~ Free Estimates
Call 724-979-3007
TREE TRIMMING &
REMOVAL, firewood.
Call 330-651-1716
CYAN
C8 THE VINDICATOR | WEDNESDAY, JULY 22, 2015
MAGENTA
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WIZARD OF ID
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MARY WORTH
ZIGGY
DENNIS THE MENACE
MARMADUKE
C8 - 07/22/15
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