Electric Guitar For Beginners

Comments

Transcription

Electric Guitar For Beginners
Electric Guitar For Beginners A Short Book To Help You Start Playing Guitar Salma Yousif 2 Table Of Contents Intro Chapter 1: Basic Information 1.1
1.2
1.3
1.4
1.5
1.6
3 Sitting posture and using a Pick Time signature and counts String Chart Note value Tree Tuning Review of Chapter 4 7 9 10 11 13 Chapter 2: Learning to Read Diagrams 2.1 Strumming 2.2 Reading Notes 2.3 6 Preparatory Notes 2.4 Reading a Tablature 2.5 Reading Chord Diagrams 2.6 Review of Chapter Chapter 3: Solo Effects 3.1 Vibrato 3.2 Hammer On 3.3 Pull Off 3.4 The Slide 3.5 The Bend 3.6 Review of Chapter 14 15 17 22 28 32 41 Chapter 4: Summary and Conclusion Bibliography 2 42 43 44 46 48 50 51 52 54 3 Introduction This book is made to help those who plan on taking up playing the electric guitar as something they would like to learn as a hobby or for other purposes. I taught myself how to play by doing plenty of research within books and websites, and after reading through plenty of books and websites; I finally bought my first electric guitar. I immediately began learning and in about a month I was practicing songs that I knew and enjoyed listening to and I was able to play them, and I enjoyed that too. So I decided to write a book about learning to play the guitar on your own because I thought that if I could do it so could anyone else. So whatever knowledge of how I learnt to play I would put it in a shorter form and in a book for others to learn from. The book will show you starter things such as how you should be holding the guitar and the pick and how your fingers should be laid across the fret board, as well as time signatures and note charts, its all really just basic things for the first chapter but after that you will learn to strum correctly and the different ways of reading what you’re supposed to play, and then it will move on from that to commonly used effects for a lead guitar, like used in a solo. By the end of the book you should understand the basic information, the different ways of reading what is to be played, and the solo effects that are the most commonly used. At the very end I’ve concluded with some extra advice after moving on from my book. This should help you get a start on learning how to play electric guitar. You’ll find photos at of famous guitarists at the start of every chapter just to get you inspired and motivated! Good luck! 3 4 Chapter 1: Basic Information In this chapter you learn about the importance of posture and how to hold a Pick, Time Signatures and Counts, The String Chart, Note review, and Tuning. Body Here is a diagram of an electric guitar: Bridge Tremolo Bar Frets Fingerboard Nut Tuning Pegs / Fretboard Pickups Switch Pickups Neck Johnny Allen Hendrix AKA: Jimmi Hendrix 1942-­‐1970 4 Headstock 5 Chapter 1.1: Sitting Posture/Using a Pick Sitting Posture It is important to be in a comfortable posture while playing the guitar, this is because it makes it easier for you to play and hold the guitar. It makes moving your arm from different frets and sliding much easier. The reason why you’re sitting is because you’re still a beginner, once you’ve become better at playing you’ll be able to strap up and play standing. Also sit in a comfortable chair without arms. This is the correct way to be holding the guitar. 5 6 Your thumb should be place in the middle of the back of the neck. Place your fingers on the strings firmly and directly behind the frets. Using A Pick 6 This is what a guitar pick looks like. The pick should be held in the manner shown in the picture. It should be held firmly between the thumb and the index finger. This is to avoid mistakes while playing such as the pick dropping. 7 Chapter 1.2 Time Signature and Counts Time Signature Time signatures and counts are usually figured out by the pace of a song that you plan on playing and whether it’s at a slow pace or a fast pace. 4/4 or C time = four counts per measure Try practicing yourself. Tap your guitar and count: X X X X 1 2 3 4 Now, try saying the word “Pop-­‐ci-­‐cle”. Use this word specifically because of it’s rhythmic sound. This is called a triplet. Divide each count into three taps (or a triplet) and try this: 1 2 3 Pop ci 7 cle X X X X X X X 4 X X 8 Counts (Notes and Rests) Note symbols show you how many counts or beats are played in a single measure, whether its four counts or a one half count. The rest symbols indicate how many counts you should rest for in a measure. Note Counts Rest Counts Whole Note (Play) Whole Rest (Rest – Don’t Play) Four Counts Half Note Two Counts Quarter Note One Count Eight Note or One Half Count 8 Four Counts Half Rest Two Counts Quarter Rest One Count Eighth Rest One Half Count 9 Chapter 1.3: Strings and The String Chart Strings Strings are what make the noise on your guitar and are made of metal. Guitars can have up 6,7 or 12 strings, but mostly you will find 6 strings on a guitar. Those strings are (lowest)E,A,D,G,B,E(highest). The String Chart This is a chart of what the strings are and at the bottom there is a simple saying that should help you remember the strings in order. E A D G B E Thickest S tring 9 Thinnest String Every Adult Dog Growls Barks Eats 10 Chapter 1.4: Note Value This is a review of the notes you learned in Chapter 1.2 and how they are split up. They are put in this chart: 10 11 Chapter 1.5: Tuning The simplest way to tune a guitar is simply with an auto tuner. Here is a common tuner: TUNER This is a Yamaha YT-­‐100 Guitar/Bass Auto Tuner. You can choose to plug in your guitar using a guitar cord or simply use the built in microphone. How to use it: There is a list of strings on the row next to guitar and below each string there is a light bulb. TUNER Above that row there are 3 bulbs, 2 red and 1 green bulb. The green bulb will only light when the string you have plucked is the correct pitch. By plucking any string, for 11 12 example the 1E string (thinnest/Highest), the bulb underneath it will light up. When the red light bulb on the left side of the green bulb with this sign “b” begins to flash quickly, it indicates that you should tighten the strings to make the pitch higher and the flashing will begin to slow down as you tighten to show that you are close the correct pitch for that certain string, and the red light bulb on the right side of the green bulb with this sign “#” will flash quickly to show that you should loosen the string and the flashing will slow down once you’re close to the correct pitch and the green bulb will light to indicate that the string you are plucking is creating the correct sound. You tighten the guitar strings by turning the peg left or loosen your guitar strings by turning the peg right. The tuning pegs are on the headstock of your guitar: 12 13 1.6: Review of Chapter 1 Chapter 1.1 Key Points: • Sitting in the correct posture is important so that playing the guitar is much easier especially since you’re still a beginner. • Fingers should be placed firmly and directly behind frets. • Hold the pick firmly to avoid mistakes while playing Chapter 1.2 Key Points: Time signatures are based on the pace of a song There are four counts per measure Dividing each count into three parts is called a “Triplet” Note symbols indicate how many counts there are to a note • Rest symbols indicate how many counts you should rest for in a measure. •
•
•
•
Chapter 1.3 Key Points: • Guitars can have up to 6, 7 or 12 strings. • Using the quote “Every Adult Dog Growls Barks Eats” helps with remembering the strings. Chapter 1.4 Key Points: • Review on how notes are broken up Chapter 1.5 Key Points: • It’s easiest to tune a guitar with an auto tuner. • Tuning pegs are located on the headstock of your guitar. 13 14 Chapter 2: Learning to Read Diagrams In this chapter you will learn how to strum and the different strumming techniques, how to read notes and learn 6 preparatory notes to practice, you will also learn how to read a tablature and how to write notes into tabs. Lastly you will learn to read 8 different chord diagrams and learn how to play them and you will also learn how all 8 of the chords are written in tablature. Anthony Joseph Perry AKA: Joe Perry 1950-­‐Present 14 15 Chapter 2.1: Strumming Simply placing your fingers on the fretboard will not make any sounds unless you strum the strings. Strumming or stroking is what makes it easier for more than one string to be heard all together depending on speed and patterns. Here is a common strumming pattern: 1 & 2 & 3 & 4 & To practice strumming form a G major chord (refer to chapter 2.5 for information on chords) which would be: 1 2 3 4 The pattern above contains 8 strums. The arrows that are pointing down indicate that you should strum downwards. 15 16 The arrows that are pointing up indicate that you should strum upwards. Notice that the pattern starts with a downwards strum and ends with an upward strum so that if you switch chords it’s like starting the pattern all over again and makes the song rhythm flow better. 1 & 2 & 3 & 4 & 1 & When playing this pattern, make sure that you keep time between strums. Repeat without pause (which also makes the song rhythm that you’re playing flow) and it may be helpful for you to count out loud: 1 and 2 and 3 and 4 and 1 and 2, etc. The “and” is considered and offbeat (strum up!) Make Sure!: • The volume of strumming up and down is equal • Not to strum too hard or it will cause a sound that you most likely will not enjoy. • Not to strum too softly of it will cause a small wimpy sound; make them all an “even” stroke. • Most of the strumming comes from the wrist never keep a stiff wrist. • Not to forget to use your elbow, make a swinging motion with it. Move it up and down. Now try making up your own kind of strumming pattern! 16 17 Chapter 2.2: How to Read Notes Reading notes is what every guitar player should be able to do or at least try it out. Reading guitar sheet music can be very frustrating, especially if you’re trying to teach yourself. Just take a deep breath and we can start by covering the names of the lines and spaces on the music staff and learning about the parts of the staff itself. However, throughout this section in chapter 2, if you find it too difficult, simply move on to 2.4 and 2.5, where you can learn to read a tablature or chord diagrams which are directly related to guitar and make learning songs a lot easier. Music is written on a staff, which is made up of 5 lines and 4 spaces. Guitar music is written in treble clef, which is a G like symbol at the start of the staff. Music is divided into measures by vertical lines called bar lines, and every measure has 4 counts (refer to Chapter 1.2). A repeat sign can be used on any bar line in any measure. It is a double bar line but with two dots in front of it. When you see this sign, it means repeat everything that came before the repeat sign. 17 Begin Repeat End Repeat 18 On every piece of sheet music, you will find 5 lines and 4 spaces on the staff. Music notes follow the alphabet in order: A B C D E F and G being the last note. Between each note except for B – C and E – F, there are sharp notes and flat notes. Sharp notes are just notes that are played slightly higher than the original note and flat notes are played slightly lower than the original note. This is the symbol for a sharp note: This is the symbol for a flat note: They all fit onto a line or space on the treble clef. E is the lowest note on the staff and it is on the last line, followed by F being the lowest note on the last space:
As you can see on the lines, there are the notes: E G B D F. You can remember these notes by reciting the phrase “Every Good Boy Deserves Fudge” 18 19 In between the lines, which are the spaces, there are the notes: F A C E. As you can tell, the notes form the word “face” which should make that easy to remember as well. It may be difficult to remember all the names of the lines and spaces but if you just keep working at it then it will easily come to you when you need it. However, the most difficult thing about reading guitar notes is that there can be different ways to play a certain note. For example, the F note, which is in the first space at the bottom of the staff, can be played as 3rd Fret 4th string on the guitar, or it can be played on the 8th fret 5th string on the guitar, or lastly, the 13th fret of the 6th string (thickest/lowest). Take a look at what notes look like on the fingerboard (aka fretboard). 19 20 It may look complex and confusing, but if you look closely it really helps you with telling you where common notes go all the way up to the 17th fret, excluding the sharp and flat notes because you’re still a beginner and the chart is easier to read without them in it, however that doesn’t mean ignore them. Lets examine the chart of notes closely now: Notice that the open strings and the notes on the 12th fret are identical: Also notice that the notes on the high E string (highest/ thinnest string) is identical to the notes on the low E string (lowest/ thickest string). Learning these notes are important because these also are the same notes that make up chords that you will be learning in section 2.5, so try learning them. Now that the 2 things that you were to know about the charts have been revealed, this should make it easier for you to practice them. 20 21 On this page, just fill in the names of the string on the side of the diagram and then the notes onto the fingerboard (aka fretboard) then practice them on your guitar. Cover up the completed ones, no cheating! 21 22 Chapter 2.3: 6 Preparatory Notes There are 5 notes that you should examine to prepare you for getting used to reading notes and being able to recognize them. In this section you will learn the 5 notes and practice playing them while also focusing on practicing reading music and note values. You will also be using these 5 notes in chapter 3 so make sure you know them! Here are the 5 notes that you will be looking at: E 22 Ο 1 2 3 4 1st string, open *Note: When you see this symbol: Ο In a diagram, it means that string is played as an open string. 23 F 1 2 3 4 1st string, 1st fret, finger 1 Before you continue, you need to know about your fretting hand. Your fretting hand is the hand you use for playing guitar. The index finger is named finger 1, the middle finger is named finger 2, the ring finger is named finger 3, which makes your pinkie finger, finger 4. The thumb is placed behind the neck of the guitar. The same applies to guitarist who uses their right hand instead of left. 1 2 3 4 23 24 G 1 2 3 4 1st string, 3rd fret, finger 3 Stop here for a bit, and look at these notes and really analyze their position on the staff because right now you’re going to practice playing them. -­‐ First practice them normally using quarter notes = 1 beat each note. 24 25 -­‐ Now try it once with quarter notes = 2 beats (If you don’t remember what quarter notes are, go back to chapter 1.2 to review time signatures and note counts) Now continue learning the next three notes! : B 25 1 2 3 4 2nd string, open Ο 26 C D 26 1 2 3 4 2nd string, 1st fret, finger 1 1 2 3 4 2nd string, 3rd fret, finger 3 27 -­‐ Now practice these notes using just quarter notes = 1 beat each note. -­‐ Now try practicing these notes a mixed up more -­‐ Now try practicing these notes with quarter notes = 2 beats each note. (If you don’t know what a quarter note is, go back to chapter 1.2 to review time signatures and counts) Here is the last bit for this section, it is a melody, go and give it a try! Notice how the notes on the staff go up like stairs? Also notice how the go up in the exact order as mentioned in lesson 2.2. Be sure to remember the names of the notes and where they go on the staff and your guitar, don’t just remember where to put your fingers. 27 28 Chapter 2.4: Reading a Tablature Guitar Tablature is a simple easy method of music notation that guitarist use to learn a song, or share music between one another. Often, guitar tabs are used to help identify music notes as well. Here is what a guitar tablature looks like: 1st String, Thinnest/Highest Strings E B G D A E 6th String, Thickest/lowest Open String Fret Number, (ex: first string, 3rd fret) Reading the tablature is very simple. The 6 horizontal lines represent the 6 guitar strings. The numbers on the line represent the fret number where the string should be picked/ played. 28 29 Lets take a look at 3 preparatory notes in this book, written as tabs: E Ο 1 2 3 4 1st string, open Tabs: E -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐0-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ Remember that B -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ when there is a ‘0’ G -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ that means its an D -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ open string. A -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ E -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ F 1 2 3 4 1st string, 1st fret, finger 1 29 30 Tabs: E -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐1-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ B -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ G -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ D -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ A -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ E -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ G 1 2 3 4 1st string, 3rd fret, finger 3 Tabs: E -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐3-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ B -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ G -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ D -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ A -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ E -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ 30 31 Now try playing the notes mixed up but this time, read them in tabs: E -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐0-­‐-­‐0-­‐-­‐1-­‐-­‐0-­‐-­‐1-­‐-­‐3-­‐-­‐1-­‐-­‐0-­‐-­‐1-­‐-­‐1-­‐-­‐3-­‐-­‐1-­‐-­‐0-­‐-­‐1-­‐-­‐3-­‐-­‐0-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ B -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ G -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ D -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ A -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ E -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ E -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐3-­‐-­‐3-­‐-­‐1-­‐-­‐3-­‐-­‐1-­‐-­‐1-­‐-­‐0-­‐-­‐1-­‐-­‐0-­‐-­‐0-­‐-­‐3-­‐-­‐1-­‐-­‐0-­‐-­‐1-­‐-­‐3-­‐-­‐1-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ B -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ G -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ D -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ A -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ E -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ As you can see, with tabs, there is no indication of time signatures, or whole notes or half notes or any of that. Tabs are full of flaws, they’re easy for wanting to learn a song quickly and then it’s up to the guitarist to figure out how to play it by analyzing the original song it self. Professional guitar players use musical notes mainly but they always get started off with guitar tablatures for quick recording of what they come up with and sharing it. When reading tablature, sometimes you may notice that two numbers are aligned with each other. It’s nothing confusing, just simply play those notes at the same time, and this leads us to chords. Here is what a simple and easy example of aligned notes formed to make a chord look like: E -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐0-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ B -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐0-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ G -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐0-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ D -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐2-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ A -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐2-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ E -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐0-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ 31 32 Chapter 2.5: Reading Chord Diagrams In this section of chapter 2, you will learn about guitar chords and power chords. A guitar chord is a group of typically 3 or more notes sounded together. The notes can be played on separate strings or all the strings together. Reading guitar chord diagrams are really simple and easy. You will learn what guitar chords look like on a tablature. Guitar chords are not commonly used in musical notation so you’re just going to review the chord diagrams and their tabs. You’re going to review the 5 easiest major chords first, and then you will review the 3 easy minor cords. So that means that there are 8 chords in total that you will cover in this book. 5 major chords: E Major Remember to use your fretting hand guide on page 23! How to play this chord: -­‐ Place finger 1 on string G (3rd String), 1st fret. th
nd
-­‐ Place finger 2 on string A (5 th String), 2 nd fret. -­‐ Place finger 3 on string D (4 String), 2 fret. all strings at once. -­‐ Strum 32 1 2 3 4 Ο Ο Ο The ‘Ο’ underneath a string means that the string is an open string and is still played. 33 Tabs for the E Major chord: E -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐0-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ B -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐0-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ G -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐1-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ D -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐2-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ A -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐2-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ E -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐0-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ C Major How to play this chord: -­‐ Place finger 1 on string B (2nd String), 1st fret. -­‐ Place finger 2 on string D (4th String), 2nd fret. -­‐ Place finger 3 on string A (5th String), 3rd fret. -­‐ Strum all strings at once, except for the low E string (6th String) 33 1 2 3 4 X Ο Ο The ‘X’ means do not play that string. 34 Tabs for the C Major chord: E -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐0-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ B -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐1-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ G -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐0-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ D -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐2-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ A -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐3-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ E -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐0-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ D Major How to play this chord: -­‐ Place finger 1 on string G (3rd String), fret 2 -­‐ Place finger 2 on string E (1st String), fret 2 finger 3 on string B (2nd String), fret 3 -­‐ Place 1 2 3 4 X X Ο -­‐ Strum all strings at once, except for low E string th
(6 string) and string A (5th string) Tabs for the D Major chord: E -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐2-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ B -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐3-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ G -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐2-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ D -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐0-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ A -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐x-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ E -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐x-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ 34 35 G Major How to play this chord: -­‐ Place finger 1 on string A (5th String), fret 2 -­‐ Place finger 2 on string E (6th String), fret 3 -­‐ Place finger 3 on string E (1st String), fret 3 -­‐ Strum all strings at once. Tabs for the G Major chord: E -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐3-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ B -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐0-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ G -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐0-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ D -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐0-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ A -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐2-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ E -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐3-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ A Major 35 1 2 3 4 Ο Ο Ο 1 2 3 4 X Ο Ο 36 How to play this chord: -­‐ Place finger 1 on string D (4th String), fret 2 -­‐ Place finger 2 on string G (3rd String), fret 2 -­‐ Place finger 3 on string B (2nd String), fret 2 -­‐ Strum all strings at once, except for low E string (6th string) Tabs for the A Major chord: E -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐0-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ B -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐2-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ G -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐2-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ D -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐2-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ A -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐0-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ E -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐x-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ The 3 minor chords: A Minor How to play this chord: -­‐ Place finger 1 on string B (2nd String), fret 1 -­‐ Place finger 2 on string D (4th String), fret 2 -­‐ Place finger 3 on string G (3rd String), fret 2 -­‐ Strum all strings at once, except for low E string th
(6 String) 36 1 2 3 4 X Ο Ο With minor chord diagrams there is usually a lower case ‘m’ to indicate that the chord is a minor chord. 37 Tabs for the A Minor chord: E -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐0-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ B -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐1-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ G -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐2-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ D -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐2-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ A -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐0-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ E -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐x-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ E Minor How to play this chord: -­‐ Place finger 2 on string A (5th String), fret 2 finger 3 on string D (4th String), fret 2 -­‐ Place -­‐ Strum all strings at once. Tabs for the E Minor chord: E -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐0-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ B -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐0-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ G -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐0-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ D -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐2-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ A -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐2-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ E -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐0-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ 37 1 2 3 4 Ο Ο Ο Ο 38 D Minor 1 2 3 4 X X Ο How to play this chord: -­‐ Place finger 1 on string E (1st String), fret 1 -­‐ Place finger 2 on string G (3rd String), fret 2 -­‐ Place finger 3 on string B (2nd String), fret 3 -­‐ Strum all strings at once, except for low E string (6th String) and string A (5th String) Tabs for the D Minor chord: E -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐1-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ B -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐3-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ G -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐2-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ D -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐0-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ A -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐x-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ E -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐x-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ 38 39 Try playing a song using Major Chords: This is an old American folk song, as you can see the first chord that is played is an A major, and it is played on the 3rd word. That means that you begin strumming that chord on that word. Since you’re a beginner just use the basic strumming pattern that you learn in chapter 2.1, it may seem a bit boring after you practice with it for a while but after that you can try out your own strumming patterns. Also remember that the last strum you make before switching to another chord should be upwards so it keeps the pattern flowing and so that the song sounds nice! 39 40 Now try playing a song with using Minor chords: This is an old American lullaby, for this song, as you can see, the chords stop showing up for it after the 3rd verse, that means that as you play the other verses you just play it in the same pattern that it was played in for the first 3 verses. Also use the strumming pattern that you practiced in chapter 2.1, and if you want, you can make up your own strumming patterns! Power Chords Power chords are fun and easy to play, and are most commonly used when playing certain hard rock styles of music. However power chords aren’t necessary right now since you are still a beginner and should try practicing the 8 chords that are mentioned above. 40 41 Chapter 2.6: Review of Chapter Chapter 2.1 Key Points: • A strumming pattern usually contains 8 strums • Always end a pattern with an upwards strum so that the pattern and the song flow well • Strumming up and down should be equal, not to hard and not too soft. Chapter 2.2 Key Points: A music staff is made up of 5 lines and 4 spaces. Guitar music is written in treble clef Musical notes are in alphabetical order from A-­‐G Notes on the fretboard can be played in on many other different frets and strings and not just one • All notes on the low E (6th string) and high E (1st string) are identical, and all the notes on the 12th fret are identical to the names of the strings •
•
•
•
Chapter 2.3 Key Points: • When you see the ‘Ο’ on a diagram, it means that the string it is underneath is to played open • Your fretting hand is the hand that you use to help identify how certain notes or chords should be played Chapter 2.4 Key Points: • Reading a tablature makes it easier for guitarist to share and write music Chapter 2.5 Key Points: • A, C, D, E, and G are the 5 easiest major chords to play • Lower case ‘m’ means it’s a minor chord. Ex: Am. 41 42 Chapter 3: Solo Effects In this chapter you learn 5 different solo effects in 5 different parts of the chapter. You will learn how to make that vibrating sound that you hear in sometimes in music, how to make it sound like you’re playing 3 notes at once but its really just a hammer on, or it could it be a pull off? Another cool solo effect is the slide, where you learn how to slide up and down the fretboard, and lastly learning to bend your strings to make notes seem higher than they actually are. Zacky Vengeance (Left) and Synyster Gates (Right) of Avenged Sevenfold: 1981-­‐Present 42 43 Chapter 3.1: Vibrato Vibrato is a old but great lead guitar effect and it is used in many types of rock, blues, metal, etc. The best method and the most commonly used method to playing this solo effect is to play the note and then, while you’re still holding your finger down, rock in back and forth (towards the headstock and then down to the body of the guitar) This is what Vibrato looks like in tabs: E -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐1~~-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐3~~-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ B -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐3~~-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ G -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ D -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ A -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ E -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ The ‘~’ symbol means play the vibrato effect both on tablature and musical notation. Now go back to chapter 2.3 and try to play all 6 preparatory notes using the vibrato effect. 43 44 Chapter 3.2: Hammer-­‐on The hammer-­‐on is a very important effect for playing rock lead guitarist. To perform this solo effect, simply pick a note with your first finger on your left hand (right hand if you play with the right) and without raising your finger from that note you press down hard using your third finger on a higher note. Try to hammer-­‐on from an open string note onto a note on the 2nd fret: To play this, simply pick the G string as an open string note, and then press onto the G string on the 2nd fret without picking the string again. 44 45 Now try the hammer-­‐on effect from one fret to another: This is what hammer-­‐on looks like in tabs: E -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ B -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ G -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐4h5-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ D -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ A -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ E -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ The ‘h’ is the symbol for hammer-­‐on in tablature, however in the diagram to the left, that is a more formal way of placing the hammer-­‐on in piece of music. To play this, simply place finger 1 on string G, fret 4 and pick that note, and then without picking the note again place finger 2 or 3 on the same string but on fret 5. You can choose to use finger 2 or 3 because fret 4 and 5 are close together so with this example you may use which ever finger you feel comfortable with, however if it were frets 4 and 6 then it is better for you to use finger 2 for the hammer-­‐on. Now go back to chapter 2.3 and try playing all the 6 preparatory notes 1 fret higher. Example of ‘1 fret higher’: if a note is played on the 1st fret, hammer-­‐on to the 2nd fret. 45 46 Chapter 3.3: Pull-­‐off The concept of playing the pull-­‐off effect is the opposite of playing the hammer-­‐on effect. So instead of picking a note and then hammering onto a higher note, you play a higher note and then pull-­‐off to a lower note. To play the pull-­‐off effect, you have to play the higher note (with finger 3) before playing the original note that you want to play (with finger 1). So, you play the higher note with finger 3 and pick it and then, while finger 3 is still on the higher note, press your finger one onto the desired note (original note) that you want to play (usually 2 frets down). Then pull finger three off the string with a snapping motion, and with that, the note that finger 1 is placed on will sound without having to pick it. This may all sound very confusing, but have a look at the diagram and you may have a better idea of how it works: 46 47 Finger 3 should be on the third string 4th fret, pick it and then place finger 1 on the same string but 2nd fret and remove finger 3 once you’ve placed finger one, and remove it with a snapping motion (quick motion). This is what the pull-­‐off looks like in tabs: E -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ B -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ G -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐4p2-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ D -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ A -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ E -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ The ‘h’ is the symbol for hammer-­‐on in tablature, however in the diagram to the left that is a more formal way of placing the hammer-­‐on in piece of music. Try this out with different notes on the fret board (refer to chapter 2.2). 47 48 Chapter 2.4: The Slide The slide is a very common solo effect that almost every guitarist uses within his or her solos. The slide is a technique where you play one note and then you slide your finger along that string to a different fret. The purpose of this effect is so that you are able to connect two or more notes smoothly. This is what the slide looks like in tabs: The ‘/’ symbol indicates that you should slide up E -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ the fretboard to a higher B -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ note, and when you see G -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐9/12-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ this symbol: ‘\’ it means D -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ you should slide down to a A -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ lower note. E -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ 48 49 Sometimes, the slide can be played as a single tone, and not connecting 2 or more notes. This is called an ascending immediate slide. This is what the slide looks like in tabs: The ‘/’ symbol indicates that you should slide up the E -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ fretboard to that certain B -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ note, and when you see this G -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐9/12-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ symbol: ‘\’ it means you D -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ should slide down to that A -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ certain note E -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ When it is an ascending immediate slide, you usually should begin the slide from about 3 frets lower or higher. Sometimes you can really begin from where ever you please but that depends on the song. Try practicing the slide with the 6 preparatory notes from chapter 2.3. 49 50 Chapter 2.5: The Bend Learning to bend notes is required to know when playing as the lead guitarist in a blues or rock song. To bend a note just simply pick the note you please and push the string up with your finger upwards towards the 6th string (low E string) and this will raise the pitch of the note. It is best to have very light-­‐gauge strings on your guitar when bending notes for an effective tone and you will begin to realize that it is easier to bend notes the higher you go up the fretboard. This is what the bend looks like in tabs: E -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ B -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ G -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐5^6-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ D -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ A -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ E -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ The ‘^’ symbol represents bends in tablature and sometimes you might just see it as: “-­‐-­‐-­‐5b6-­‐-­‐”. The reason why it says 5 bend to 6 is because your trying to bend the note on the 5th fret so that it sounds like 6th fret. Try practicing bending notes with the 6 preparatory notes in chapter 2.3. 50 51 Chapter 3.6: Review of Chapter Chapter 3.1 Key Points: • Common way of playing the vibrato effect is simply holding the note and shifting your finger up and down to make the sound vibrate. • The symbol for vibrato in tablature is ‘~’ Chapter 3.2 Key Points: • The hammer-­‐on is a very common solo effect • Usually hammering onto a higher note 2 frets up the fretboard. • The symbol for hammer-­‐on in tablature is ‘h’ Chapter 3.3 Key Points: • The pull-­‐off is the opposite of the hammer-­‐on • Make sure when lifting finger 3 to make a snapping motion (pulling off quickly from the higher note) • The symbol for pull-­‐off in tablature is ‘p’ Chapter 3.4 Key Points: • The slide is common in almost every guitarist’s solo • The purpose is to connect 2 or more notes smoothly. • Ascending immediate slides can start from anywhere to get to a certain note • The symbol for the slide in tablature is ‘/’ or ‘\’ Chapter 3.5 Key Points: • When bending, push the string up towards the 6th string (low E string) • When you’re bending a note, you’re aiming for a higher pitch than the original note. • The symbol for the bend in tablature is ‘^’ or ‘b’ 51 52 Chapter 4: Summary and Conclusion Hopefully now that the book has come to an end that you have learnt what you wanted to know about electric guitar and you feel that you have enough knowledge to excel and begin to learn new things for yourself, but before we come to a complete end with the book, you have to try playing a song! Or at least an intro to a song? Give it a shot!: Smoke on Water intro by: Deep Purple E -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ B -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ G -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐0-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐3-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐5-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐0-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐3-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐6-­‐5-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ D -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐0-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐3-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐5-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐0-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐3-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐6-­‐5-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ A -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ E -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ Repeat that intro for a while and you may recognize it. You also notice that the 6 and 5 are quite close that means you should play them a little quicker than the other notes, but still keep a steady tempo (beat). Try this intro as well: Paint it Black intro by: The Rolling Stones E -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐0-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐0-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐0-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐0-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐0-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐0-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ B -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐5-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐7-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐8-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐10-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐8-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐7-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ G -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ D -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ A -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ E -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ Continued on the next page… 52 53 E -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐0-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐0-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐2-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ B -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐5-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐4-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐7-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐0h2h4h-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐5p4p2h4-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ G -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ D -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ A -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ E -­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐ The last bit of this intro does seem a bit odd, but just look at it closely and it’s really not hard at all. In conclusion, you have now completed the book so good luck on learning after the book! Who knows, you may end up becoming a great famous guitarist like ones shown in the pictures in the throughout the book!  53 54 Bibliography/ Credits The Pictures and their citations: Jimmi Hendrix: Helgeson, Matt. "Jimi Hendrix To Grace Cover of Rock Band? News - Www.GameInformer.com." Home - GameInformer.com.
Los Angeles Times, 17 Feb. 2010. Web. 26 Nov. 2011.
<http://www.gameinformer.com/b/news/archive/2010/02/17/rep
orts-of-jimi-hendrix-rock-band-title-surface.aspx>.
Guitar: "Electric Guitar Products, Buy Electric Guitar Products from
Alibaba.com."Manufacturers, Suppliers, Exporters & Importers
from the World's Largest Online B2B Marketplace-Alibaba.com.
Web. 26 Nov. 2011. <http://www.alibaba.com/productgs/261508690/Electric_Guitar.html>.
Joe perry: Fricke, David. "100 Greatest Guitarists: David Fricke's Picks:
Joe Perry | Rolling Stone."Rolling Stone | Music News, Politics,
Reviews, Photos, Videos, Interviews and More. Jann S. Wenner,
2011. Web. 18 Nov. 2011.
<http://www.rollingstone.com/music/lists/100-greatestguitarists-of-all-time-19691231/joe-perry-19691231>.
G chord diagram: "Twinkle Twinkle Little Star for Guitar." Best Acoustic Guitars
- Acoustic Guitar Reviews and Free Lessons. SBI. Web. 18
Nov. 2011. <http://www.play-acoustic-guitar.com/twinkletwinkle-little-star-for-guitar.html>.
54 55 Whole note: Collins, Michelle. "Free Music Clip Art: Whole Note." Squidoo
: Welcome to Squidoo. Squidoo. Web. 26 Nov. 2011.
<http://www.squidoo.com/whole-notes-music-clip-art>.
Half note: Collins, Michelle. "Free Music Clip Art: Half Note." Squidoo :
Welcome to Squidoo. Squidoo.Web. 26 Nov. 2011.
<http://www.squidoo.com/music-clip-art-half-note>.
Quarter note: Collins, Michelle. "Free Music Themed Clip Art: Quarter
Note." Squidoo : Welcome to Squidoo. Squidoo. Web. 26 Nov.
2011. <http://www.squidoo.com/free-clipart-quarter-note>.
Eighth note 1: Collins, Michelle. "Free Music Themed Clip Art: Eighth
Note." Squidoo : Welcome to Squidoo. Squidoo.Web. 26 Nov.
2011. <http://www.squidoo.com/eighth-note-free-clip-art>.
Eighth note 2: Collins, Michelle. "Free Music Themed Clip Art: Eighth Notes
2." Squidoo : Welcome to Squidoo. Squidoo. Web. 26 Nov.
2011. <http://www.squidoo.com/eightht-notes-free-clip-art>.
Whole rest: Ibrahim, Mohamed. "Whole Rest Clip Art - Vector Clip Art
Online, Royalty Free & Public Domain." The Online Royalty
Free Public Domain Clip Art - Vector Clip Art Online, Royalty
Free & Public Domain. Clker. Web. 26 Nov. 2011.
<http://www.clker.com/clipart-28638.html>.
Half rest: 55 56 "Half Rest, a Image by ACMilan2 - ROBLOX (updated
7/26/2010 12:56:34 AM)." Free Games at ROBLOX.com.
ROBLOX Corporation. Web. 26 Nov. 2011.
<http://www.roblox.com/Half-Rest-item?id=31484461>.
Quarter rest: "Quarter Rest Black, No Stroke Clip Art - Vector Clip Art
Online, Royalty Free & Public Domain." The Online Royalty
Free Public Domain Clip Art - Vector Clip Art Online, Royalty
Free & Public Domain. Clker. Web. 26 Nov. 2011.
<http://www.clker.com/clipart-quarter-rest-black-nostroke.html>.
Eighth rest: "Eighth Rest Solid Black Clip Art - Vector Clip Art Online,
Royalty Free & Public Domain." The Online Royalty Free
Public Domain Clip Art - Vector Clip Art Online, Royalty Free
& Public Domain. Clker. Web. 26 Nov. 2011.
<http://www.clker.com/clipart-eighth-rest-solid-black.html>.
Time signature: "Free Easy Piano Lessons Online - 5." Piano Keyboard
Guide.com - Free Piano Lessons - Learn Piano. SBI. Web. 26
Nov. 2011. <http://www.piano-keyboard-guide.com/easy-pianolessons.html>.
Note value tree: "Notation Test Preparation." Soundpiper Music: Music for
Children, Teachers and Parents. Carla Piper. Web. 26 Nov.
2011. <http://www.soundpiper.com/mln/notation.htm>.
Music staff with labels: Mulford, Bryan. "Parts Of The Music Staff @ Bryan
Mulford." Bryan Mulford. Thirty-Second Notes. Web. 26 Dec.
56 57 2011. <http://www.bryanmulford.com/blog/2010/07/13/partsof-the-music-staff/>.
Names of notes on staff: "» How To Read Sheet Music." Guitar Lessons (100% FREE) Learn How To Play Guitar Online. Web. 26 Dec. 2011.
<http://www.guitarlessons.com/guitar-lessons/guitar-theory-eartraining-and-reading/how-to-read-sheet-music/>.
Staff with repeat sign: Kraemer, Brandy. "Repeat Bar - Musical Symbols - Repeat
Signs and Bar Lines." Piano - How to Play Piano - About Piano
Music. The New York Times Company. Web. 26 Dec. 2011.
<http://piano.about.com/od/musicaltermsa1/g/GL_repeatbar.htm>.
Flat and sharp symbols, notes on fingerboard: "Know Your Notes - The Guitar Fingerboard." Professional
Graphic Art and Design by Artist D.L.Keur. Web. 26 Dec. 2011.
<http://www.zentao.com/guitar/theory/notes.html>.
Neck diagram: "Printable Neck Diagrams for Guitar." Professional Graphic Art
and Design by Artist D.L.Keur. Web. 26 Dec. 2011.
<http://www.zentao.com/guitar/theory/neck-diagrams.html>.
Black dot on notes diagram: Cathrien. "Short Story- The Black Dot." ''What Is worth
Fighting For?'' Blogger, 13 Feb. 2011. Web. 28 Dec. 2011.
<http://cbotermans16iskl.blogspot.com/2011/02/short-storyblack-dot.html>.
Fretting hand: 57 58 "Full Page Image with Words, Free Picture Exchange
Communication System Cards for Autism, Fetal Alcohol
Syndrome, and Special Needs Child." Do2Learn: Educational
Resources for Special Needs. Web. 28 Dec. 2011.
<http://www.do2learn.com/picturecards/printcards/coloring/larg
eimages/hand.htm>.
Guitar tab example: "Basic Guitar TAB Explained." PBguitars – Guitar Lessons in
Chesterfield Derbyshire with a Registered Guitar Teacher. PB
Guitars. Web. 29 Dec. 2011. <http://pbguitars.co.uk/basicguitar-tab-explained/>.
E major chord diagram: "Oh Susannah for Guitar." Best Acoustic Guitars - Acoustic
Guitar Reviews and Free Lessons. SBI. Web. 10 Jan. 2012.
<http://www.play-acoustic-guitar.com/oh-susannah-forguitar.html>.
C major chord diagram: "Learn Guitar Chords - The C Chords." Play Guitar Now Master the Mighty Axe!Midlife Rocker Media. Web. 10 Jan.
2012. <http://www.learn-to-play-rock-guitar.com/learn-guitarchords.html>.
D major chord diagram: "Twinkle Twinkle Little Star for Guitar." Best Acoustic Guitars
- Acoustic Guitar Reviews and Free Lessons. SBI. Web. 18
Nov. 2011. <http://www.play-acoustic-guitar.com/twinkletwinkle-little-star-for-guitar.html>.
A Major chord diagram: "Twinkle Twinkle Little Star for Guitar." Best Acoustic Guitars
- Acoustic Guitar Reviews and Free Lessons. SBI. Web. 18
58 59 Nov. 2011. <http://www.play-acoustic-guitar.com/twinkletwinkle-little-star-for-guitar.html>.
A minor chord diagram: "Hush Little Baby for Guitar." Best Acoustic Guitars - Acoustic
Guitar Reviews and Free Lessons. SBI. Web. 10 Jan. 2012.
<http://www.play-acoustic-guitar.com/hush-little-baby-forguitar.html>.
E minor chord diagram: "Hush Little Baby for Guitar." Best Acoustic Guitars - Acoustic
Guitar Reviews and Free Lessons. SBI. Web. 10 Jan. 2012.
<http://www.play-acoustic-guitar.com/hush-little-baby-forguitar.html>.
D minor chord diagram: "Dmin Guitar Chord." Best Acoustic Guitars - Acoustic Guitar
Reviews and Free Lessons. SBI. Web. 10 Jan. 2012.
<http://www.play-acoustic-guitar.com/dmin-guitar-chord.html>.
Song for major chords chapter: "Oh Susannah for Guitar." Best Acoustic Guitars - Acoustic
Guitar Reviews and Free Lessons. SBI. Web. 10 Jan. 2012.
<http://www.play-acoustic-guitar.com/oh-susannah-forguitar.html>.
Song for minor chords chapter: "Hush Little Baby for Guitar." Best Acoustic Guitars - Acoustic
Guitar Reviews and Free Lessons. SBI. Web. 10 Jan. 2012.
<http://www.play-acoustic-guitar.com/hush-little-baby-forguitar.html>.
Syn Gates and Zacky V: 59 60 Fixler, Todd. "Avenged Sevenfold- Zacky Vengeance and
Synyster Gates | Flickr - Photo Sharing!" Welcome to Flickr Photo Sharing. Yahoo! Inc., 25 Mar. 2008. Web. 10 Jan. 2012.
<http://www.flickr.com/photos/theuniversalcynic/2376458246/>
.
Hammer-­‐on diagrams: Phillips, Mark, and Jon Chappell. "How to Add Guitar
Articulation with Hammer-Ons - For Dummies." How-To Help
and Videos - For Dummies. John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Web. 10
Jan. 2012. <http://www.dummies.com/how-to/content/how-toadd-guitar-articulation-with-hammerons.html>.
Pull-­‐off diagram: Phillips, Mark, and Jon Chappell. "How to Add Guitar
Articulation with Pull-Offs - For Dummies." How-To Help and
Videos - For Dummies. John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Web. 10 Jan.
2012. <http://www.dummies.com/how-to/content/how-to-addguitar-articulation-with-pulloffs.html>.
Slide diagrams: Phillips, Mark, and Jon Chappell. "How to Add Guitar
Articulation with Slides - For Dummies." How-To Help and
Videos - For Dummies. John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Web. 10 Jan.
2012. <http://www.dummies.com/how-to/content/how-to-addguitar-articulation-with-slides.html>.
Websites Bibliography: Using a Pick: Cross, Dan. "Learning Guitar - Lesson One - How to Hold a
Pick." Guitar at About - the Place to Find Guitar Tab and
Beginner Guitar Lessons. The New York Times Company.
60 61 Web. 09 Feb. 2012.
<http://guitar.about.com/library/weekly/aa071200g.htm>.
Chords: "Basic Guitar Chords | Beginner." Guitar Chords Magic | Free
Guitar Chords | Guitar Chord Charts. Web. 09 Feb. 2012.
<http://www.guitarchordsmagic.com/basic-guitar-chords/basicguitar-chords.html>.
Cross, Dan. "Essential Beginner Guitar Chords: Eight Chords
You Need to Learn Now!"Guitar at About - the Place to Find
Guitar Tab and Beginner Guitar Lessons. The New York Times
Company. Web. 09 Feb. 2012.
<http://guitar.about.com/od/freebeginnerlessons/ss/essential_ch
ord.htm>.
Strumming: Bay, William, and Mark Lonergan. You Can Teach Yourself Rock Guitar. Pacific, MO: Mel Bay, 1992. Print. "Guitar Strumming | Learn To Strum Your Guitar." Guitar
Chords Magic | Free Guitar Chords | Guitar Chord Charts.
Web. 09 Feb. 2012. <http://www.guitarchordsmagic.com/howto-play-guitar-chords/strumming.html>.
Note Reading: "» How To Read Sheet Music." Guitar Lessons (100% FREE) Learn How To Play Guitar Online. Web. 26 Dec. 2011.
<http://www.guitarlessons.com/guitar-lessons/guitar-theory-eartraining-and-reading/how-to-read-sheet-music/>.
Lineberry, F. W., and D. L. Keur. "Know Your Notes - The
Guitar Fingerboard."Professional Graphic Art and Design by
61 62 Artist D.L.Keur. Zentao. Web. 09 Feb. 2012.
<http://www.zentao.com/guitar/theory/notes.html>.
Lineberry, F. W., and D. L. Keur. "Guitar Lesson One Theory." Professional Graphic Art and Design by Artist
D.L.Keur. Zentao. Web. 09 Feb. 2012.
<http://www.zentao.com/guitar/lesson1/index.html>.
Reading Guitar Tablature: Bay, William, and Mark Lonergan. You Can Teach Yourself Rock Guitar. Pacific, MO: Mel Bay, 1992. Print. Cross, Dan. "How to Read Guitar Tablature - Learning
Guitar." Guitar at About - the Place to Find Guitar Tab and
Beginner Guitar Lessons. The New York Times Company.
Web. 09 Feb. 2012.
<http://guitar.about.com/od/tabchordslyrics/ss/read_guitar_tab.h
tm>.
"Tablature." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Mediawiki, 30
Dec. 2011. Web. 09 Feb. 2012.
<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tablature>.
Phillips, Mark, and Jon Chappell. "How to Add Guitar
Articulation with Slides - For Dummies." How-To Help and
Videos - For Dummies. John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Web. 09 Feb.
2012. <http://www.dummies.com/how-to/content/how-to-addguitar-articulation-with-slides.html>.
Cross, Dan. "Hammer-Ons in Guitar Tab - How to Read Guitar
Tablature." Guitar at About - the Place to Find Guitar Tab and
Beginner Guitar Lessons. The New York Times Company.
Web. 09 Feb. 2012.
<http://guitar.about.com/od/tabchordslyrics/ss/read_guitar_tab_
5.htm>.
62 63 Guitar Tabs: Paint it black tabs: "Paint It Black Tab by Rolling Stones @ UltimateGuitar.Com." ULTIMATE GUITAR TABS ARCHIVE | 300,000
Guitar Tabs, Bass Tabs, Chords and Guitar Pro Tabs! UltimateGuitar. Web. 09 Feb. 2012. <http://tabs.ultimateguitar.com/r/rolling_stones/paint_it_black_tab.htm>.
Smoke on the Water: "Smoke On The Water Tab by Deep Purple @ UltimateGuitar.Com." ULTIMATE GUITAR TABS ARCHIVE | 300,000
Guitar Tabs, Bass Tabs, Chords and Guitar Pro Tabs! UltimateGuitar. Web. 09 Feb. 2012. <http://tabs.ultimateguitar.com/d/deep_purple/smoke_on_the_water_tab.htm>.
63 

Similar documents