North - Town of Ladysmith

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North - Town of Ladysmith
Town of Ladysmith
2006 Community Profile
Community Profile 2006
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Nanaimo 23 km
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Community Profile 2006
History
Future
Location
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Population 7
Demographics Age Marital Status / Families
Income
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Real Estate 11
Housing
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Education
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Workforce Education Elementary Education Secondary Education Post-Secondary Education
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Local Economy
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Business Data Labour Force Major Employers
Economic Sectors
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Transportation 20
Highway
Port Facilities
Air Ferry Rail Bus 20
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Utilities
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Water & Wastewater
Garbage Collection
Recycling
Organic Waste Electricity
Natural Gas
Telecommunications
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Taxation 23
Property Taxes Payroll Taxes Income Taxes 23
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Planning and Permitting 24
Community Planning Commercial Development
Industrial Development
Waterfront Development
Permits
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Business Support Services
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Business Incentives
Business Assistance
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Resident Support Services 27
Early Childhood
Youth Seniors
Employment New Residents 27
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Quality of Life
28
Community Cost of Living Local Government
Public Safety Fire Protection & Rescue
Parks and Recreation Waterfront Activities Theatres, Music & Arts Service and Social Clubs
Community Events
Regional Attractions Community Facilities Library
Health Care Climate
Media 28
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Town of Ladysmith
Table of Contents
Table of Contents
Town of Ladysmith
Community Profile 2006
Positioned at the base of hillsides
and fronted by the beautiful
Ladysmith Harbour, our turnof-the century town is a soughtafter place to live, work and play.
With a population of over 7,200,
Ladysmith still retains its small
town atmosphere. Ladysmith has
experienced prosperity, first with
coal then with timber. In the year
2000, Ladysmith ranked as one of
the prettiest towns in Canada and is
continuing to enhance community
amenities, while at the same
time actively pursuing economic
diversification.
Ladysmith celebrated its centennial
in 2004, showing not only its
reverence to its hardworking past,
but also its visionary and bright
future.
Light industrial, commercial,
tourism and recreational
opportunities as well as various
types of residential development are
being actively explored. An exciting
multi-use harbour development is
currently on the drawing board,
which will entertain a variety of
land uses. Light and heavy industrial
parcels with ready access to road
and the sea are now available.
History
It all started when Harry Smith
was born in Wittlesey, England in
1787. This young lad grew up to
be a remarkable military man and
fought in many military campaigns.
While in South America in 1812,
Harry married Juana Maria de Los
Delores de Leon. After a stint in
North America and France, Harry
and Juana moved to South Africa
in 1828 where he became Cape
Colony’s first governor renowned
for his fairness and humanity while
Juana was famed for her charitable
works.
In 1837 Harry and Juana were
posted to India. After a major
campaign, he was knighted and
became Lieutenant General Sir
Harry Smith and Juana became
Lady Smith. In 1851 those who
remembered them in South Africa,
honoured Harry and his wife by
renaming a town in Orange Free
State “Harrismith” and one in Natal
“Ladysmith”.
Later, in 1899 during the Boer
War, the Boers besieged British
troops garrisoned in Ladysmith
under the command of Sir George
White. It took 118 days for
Ladysmith to be relieved by General
Buller. Among those delighted to
receive the news of the victory,
was James Dunsmuir, who learned
of it while standing above Oyster
Bay on Vancouver Island as he
contemplated plans for a new town. The town itself was well underway,
but no name streets had been laid
out. Dunsmuir declared to his
engineer that the town would be
called “Ladysmith”. The streets were
to be named after British Generals
who distinguished themselves in the
South Africa conflict.
And that, as they say, is history.
Coal was first mined on Vancouver
Island by the Hudson’s Bay
Company in the mid 1800’s. The
Company needed the fuel for
foraging and Vancouver Island coal
was coveted by West Coast factories,
the British Admiralty and West
Coast American shipping lines.
Companies were soon opening coal
fields in such places as Nanaimo,
Comox and Extension. Ladysmith
owes its beginnings to this coal
mania; it was coal baron James
Dunsmuir who established the town
as a shipping point for coal and as
a bedroom community for miners
working the nearby Dunsmuir
Collieries. Many of Ladysmith’s
commercial and residential
buildings were originally located
in Extension and Wellington and
Community Profile 2006
moved to Ladysmith in the early
1900’s.
The coal boom lasted three
decades. In her peak days,
Ladysmith boasted over 15 hotels,
many businesses and even a house
of ill repute. Coal was the primary
industry in town, but suffered some
heavy blows. Thirty-two miners
were killed in a mine explosion in
1909 and in 1912 Ladysmith miners
joined in on the Cumberland strike
which lasted until World War
I. In 1931 the seam at Extension
ceased to be productive and the
mine was closed. Economically, this
staggered Ladysmith and for five
years the town’s population spiralled
downwards.
A gale blew down thousands
of trees behind Ladysmith in
1931. These were eventually sold
to Comox Logging & Railway
Company. The company soon
opened up operations in Ladysmith
to harvest the downed timber.
Within two years the company’s
payroll numbered 300 and
Ladysmith was reborn. In the
more than 50 years since then,
the company’s name has changed
several times (from Comox Logging
and Railway to Crown Zellerbach to
Crown Forest Products to FletcherChallenge Canada). Timber indeed
became king!
In the mid 1980’s a different
movement emerged. Ladysmith
took several steps to reverse a drab,
run-down exterior to brighten the
lives of its own citizens, to attract
business and to entice the travelling
public to pull off the highway and
visit the hillside community.
Through the support of
provincial and federal agencies
and the landowners themselves,
Ladysmith undertook to revitalize
its downtown, rehabilitate the
aging structures and improve
the streetscape. This heritage
revitalization project continues to
exceed expectations and has been
highly successful.
Ladysmith has become such
a popular place to live that the
population has soared from 4300 in
the mid 80’s to well over 7,000 by
2005. She is once again be a “city”,
but in her heart, she remains the
“Town of Ladysmith”.
Ladysmith is a community that
maintains a small town feeling,
manages growth, welcomes new
people and builds community spirit
and involvement. Community
spirit is demonstrated through
participation at community
celebrations, care for our
neighbourhoods, and respect for our
heritage. Our community is warm
and inviting.
Ladysmith is a complete
community that balances the
need for economic growth
with environmental protection,
ensuring a diversity of housing,
while maintaining and developing
the necessary support facilities. Ladysmith supports cultural and
environmental stewardship through
partnerships that fosters community
ownership. Economic benefits are
derived from planned, sustainable
growth and development.
As such, the Town of Ladysmith
has drafted the following vision
statement:
Town of Ladysmith
Future
Ladysmith is a spirited community
that values its small town feeling
and offers residents a full and
healthy way of life. The citizens
work together as stewards of
their heritage, environment and
economy.
Town of Ladysmith
Community Profile 2006
Port Hardy
Location
Incorporated in 1904, Ladysmith
now has a total land area of 14.82
square kilometres. By highway the
Town is 25 km south of Nanaimo
and 88 km north of Victoria and
is located in the Cowichan Valley
Regional District. The community
offers the advantages that proximity
to a major urban centre can provide,
combined with a tranquil setting
and small town atmosphere.
Located on the 49th parallel, the
town boundaries are from Grouhel
Road and just beyond Gladden Road
to the north, extending south to the
North Cowichan boundary on the
west side of the Island Highway, to
Glen Avenue along Chemainus Road
and up to the power line corridor
in the west and east side of Woods
Island. The entire area covers
approximately 1,482 hectares.
While part of Canada’s more
moist Mediterranean climate, any
local will say that the mountains
that surround this beautiful town
also shelter it from much of the
rain other Vancouver Island
communities may get from time to
time. Lush, green and picturesque,
Ladysmith is also close to many
amenities that make this location
unequalled. Ladysmith is only
15 minutes away from the Duke
Point Terminal and less than 30
minutes to Departure Bay Terminal
in Nanaimo - only a hop and a skip
to reach the hustle and bustle of
Vancouver. Victoria is less than 90
minutes away.
Campbell River
Courtenay
Tofino
Parksville
Horseshoe Bay
Port Alberni
Vancouver
Nanaimo
Ladysmith
Duncan
Port Renfrew
Tsawwassen
Gulf
CANADA
U.S.A.
Islands
Bellingham
Swartz Bay
Victoria
Seattle
North
Community Profile 2006
Ladysmith experienced a strong
population growth in the mid-90s,
increasing by 50% since 1990. From
2000 to 2005, Ladysmith’s estimated
population has grown by nearly
7%. This level of steady growth is
expected for the entire Cowichan
Valley Regional District through the
end of the decade.
The growth is ultimately due to the
heightened desirability of Ladysmith
as a place to live, work and play
– whether that is for a young family,
active adults and seniors.
Ladysmith Population Estimates
Population
Change
% Change
1981
4,558
-
-
1986
4,393
-165
-3.6%
1991
4,875
482
11.0%
1996
6,456
1,581
32.4%
2001
6,587
131
2.0%
Population
2000
6,821
2001
6,874
2002
6,954
2003
7,067
2004
7,130
2005
7,292
Source: BC Municipal Population Estimates, BC Stats
Official Census Population Growth
Population
Year
Official Census Average
Annual Growth Rate
1981-1986
-0.72%
1986-1991
2.19%
1991-1996
6.48%
1996-2001
0.40%
Town of Ladysmith
Ladysmith’s population growth in
2005 was one of the highest in the
province. Most of this growth is a
result of relocations. Census 2001
estimated that 1% of the population
of Ladysmith relocated from outside
the province in the year prior to
Census, and a total of 5.2% relocated
to Ladysmith in within the previous
five years.
Furthermore, according to
Statistics Canada, 42.5% of
Ladysmith residents who moved to
the community did so from within
British Columbia between 1996 and
2001. Demographics
Source: Statistics Canada, Census 1981-2001
Population
Source: Statistics Canada, Census 1981-2001
LadysmithPopulationestimates1986-2005
8,000
7,000
6,000
5,000
4,000
3,000
2,000
1,000
05
04
20
03
20
02
20
01
20
00
20
99
20
98
19
97
19
96
19
95
19
94
19
93
19
92
19
91
19
90
19
89
19
88
19
87
19
19
19
86
0
Source: BC Municipal Population Estimates, BC Stats
Town of Ladysmith
Community Profile 2006
Age
LadysmithResidentsbyageGroup
The Town of Ladysmith is growing
in size, and the age make-up of the
town is also changing. Ladysmith’s
median age has increased from 37.5
years in 1996 to 41.1 in 2001. The
increase in retired and semi-retired
residents has contributed to the
trend, increasing the town’s “over
15 years old” population from 78%
to 80.1% between 1996 and 2001.
age85andover
(120)
75-84(420)
100%
65-74(640)
90%
55-64(660)
80%
45-54(985)
70%
60%
Medianagecomparison
50
45
41.1
41
38.4
37.4
40
35
30
25
50%
25-44(1,720)
40%
20-24(275)
30%
15-19(445)
20%
5-14(985)
10%
0-4(330)
20
0%
15
10
5
0
Population
Ladysmith
victoria
vancouver
Bc
Source: Stats Canada, 2001 Census
Source: Stats Canada, 2001 Census
LegalMaritalStatus
Marital Status / Families
Separated
210
Ladysmith Families
Total Number of Families
2,010
Married-Couple Families
1,435
Common-Law Couple Families
225
Lone-Parent Families
355
Widowed
385
Married
2,895
Single
1,265
Source: Stats Canada, 2001 Census
Source: Stats Canada, 2001 Census
Average Persons in Family Unit Comparison
Ladysmith
CVRD
BC
Married-couple families
2.9
2.9
3.1
Common-law families
2.8
2.9
2.6
Lone-parent families
2.4
2.6
2.5
Source: Stats Canada, 2001 Census
Divorced
515
Community Profile 2006
Income
Town of Ladysmith
MedianHouseholdincomecomparison
In 1996, Census reported the
average income of Ladysmith
residents to be $24,612. This
increased to $29,785 in 2001,
therefore augmenting by 21%, only
slightly more than the BC average
of 20%.
Average household income in
Ladysmith stands at $50,156.
$47,000
$46,000
$45,000
$44,000
$43,000
$42,000
$41,000
Ladysmith cvRD
victoria
Bc
Source: Stats Canada, Census 2001
LadysmithFamilyandHouseholdincomecomparison
(2000)
30%
25%
20%
15%
Population
10%
5%
0%
under
$20,000-
$40,000-
$60,000-
$80,000-
$100,000
$20,000
$39,999
$59,999
$79,999
$99,999
andover
Familyincome
Householdincome
Source: Stats Canada, Census 2001
Ladysmith Family and Household Data
Family Income
Household Income
Average Family Income
$55,608
Average Household Income
$50,156
Median Family Income
$48,824
Median Household Income
$43,333
Persons per family
2.8
Persons per household
2.4
Source: Stats Canada, Census 2001
Town of Ladysmith
Community Profile 2006
PersonaltaxationSourceoftotalincome2001
LadysmithPersonaltaxationSourceofincome
70
60
Pension
$52,895,000
50
investment
40
$14,579,000
employment
$159,720,000
30
Self-employed
20
$8,313,000
10
other
$15,233,000
0
employment
taxexempt
investment
Self-
other
Source: BC Stats, 2001 Census and Canada Customs and Revenue Agency
Ladysmithpercentoftotal
Bcpercentoftotal
Source: BC Stats, 2001 Census and Canada Customs and Revenue Agency
PersonaltaxationStatistics-totalincomeoftaxableReturns
$45,000
$40,000
Earnings 2001
$35,000
All persons with earnings
$30,000
Average earnings (all persons
with earnings)
$20,000
Worked full year, full time
$15,000
Average earnings (worked full
year, full time)
$10,000
$5,000
Source: Stats Canada, 2001 Census
$0
1996
1997
1998
Ladysmith
1999
2000
2001
Bc
Source: BC Stats, 2001 Census and Canada Customs and Revenue Agency
Dependency on the Safety Net: Benefits Recipients - September 2004
Basic Income Assistance Recipients
Age Group
Employment Insurance Beneficiaries
Ladysmith
BC
Ladysmith
BC
3.2%
3.2%
-
-
19-24
-
1.9%
2.9%
2.3%
25-54
1.9%
1.7%
3.7%
3.3%
55-64
-
0.7%
1.8%
1.6%
19-64
2.0%
1.5%
3.3%
2.9%
Under 19
Source: BC Stats using administrative files from the BC Ministry of Human Resources and Human Resources Development Canada. Basic Income Assistance
includes those receiving temporary assistance only.
10
taxexempt
employed
$25,000
Population
Pension
$9,563,000
3,125
$29,785
1,350
$43,452
Community Profile 2006
averageSingleFamilyHomePricesand
“Heritage by the Sea” is not just
a marketing tag line. It describes
a large part of the housing in
Ladysmith. Nestled between rolling
hills on the one side and an active
harbour on the other, “ocean view”
is a real estate term in high usage. Residential housing has seen a boom
in the last few years, adding to the
inventory of heritage homes and
character living spaces.
According to BC Assessment, the
2005 average assessed value of a
single family home was $59,063 for
land, and $112,363 for a building. However, as per the Multiple Listing
Service data, single family homes
in Ladysmith sold for an average
$234,000 in 2005.
numberofHousesSold2001-2005
$250,000
180
$200,000
140
100
Residential Lot
Vacancies
193
Residential Farms
2
Residential ALR
2
Other residential
54
80
60
$50,000
40
20
$0
0
2001
2002
2003
Average Sale Price
2004
2005*
Homes Sold
Source: Multiple Listing Service. Data provided by Island Homes Realty. * 2005 data up to November 29, 2005
LadysmithnewHomeconstruction1989-2004
250
200
150
100
50
0
1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004
Source: Town of Ladysmith
Dwellingunits
SingleFamilyDwellings
Source: Town of Ladysmith based on Building Permits Issued 1989-2004
Occupied Private Development
Occupied Private Development Comparison
Total Number of Dwellings
2,685
Owned Dwellings
2,020
Rented Dwellings
660
Dwellings Constructed before
1991
Dwellings constructed
between 1991-2001
Housing
275
120
$100,000
2,491
Residential Strata
160
$150,000
Overall Residential Composition
Residential Properties
200
Town of Ladysmith
Real Estate
1,900
785
Ladysmith
BC
Average monthly payments for
owner-occupied dwellings
$760
$904
Average gross monthly payment
for rented dwellings
$664
$751
$145,385
$230,645
Average value of dwelling
Source: Stats Canada, 2001 Census
Source: Stats Canada, 2001 Census
Building Permits Comparison
2002
2003
2004
2005
Residential Starts
35
35
113
100
Residential Values
$3,452,146
$4,098,433
$13,196,758
$11,011,701
Residential Additions and Renovations
$1,693,245
$460,940
$568,766
$577,674
Source: Town of Ladysmith
11
Town of Ladysmith
Community Profile 2006
Workforce Education
Workforceeducationattainment(25-64yearsofage)
Ladysmith boasts a high level of
educated and skilled individuals,
many of whom have sought further
education and training geared
towards local work opportunities.
With the proximity of Malaspina
University-College and other higher
education institutions located on
Vancouver Island, as well as trades
and professional development
institutions, Ladysmith workers are
able to meet the challenges of ever
changing market forces.
universityGraduate
Degree/certificate
3.30%
universityBachelor
Degree7.20%
PostSecondary
certificate/Diploma
42.10%
SomePostSecondary
HighSchool
15.70%
Diplomaonly
14.40%
LessthanHigh
SchoolDiploma
17.30%
Source: Stats Canada, Census 2001
Education
Labourmarketlevelofschoolingattainedbyagegroup
100%
universitycertificatedegree/diploma
80%
collegecertificate/diploma
60%
tradescertificateordiploma
40%
Highschoolgraduationand/orsome
postsecondary
20%
Highschool
0%
age20-34
age35-44
age45-64
Source: Stats Canada, Census 2001
Labourmarketbyagegroup
Workforce Education Attainment (25 to 64 years of age)
Less than High School Diploma
445
High School Diploma Only
370
Some Post Secondary
405
Post Secondary Certificate/Diploma
12
age20-34,
935
1,085
University Bachelor Degree
185
University Graduate Degree/Certificate
85
age45-64,
1645
Source: Stats Canada, Census 2001
age35-44,
1060
Community Profile 2006
Ladysmith’s public schools are
administered by School District 68
Nanaimo-Ladysmith.
Ladysmith Primary
Kindergarten to Grade 3
287 students
Student to Teacher Ratio: 19:1
510 Sixth Avenue
245.3912
Principal Peter Skipper
Secretary Kristin Houvenaeghel
Ladysmith Intermediate
Grades 4 to 7
363 students
Student to Teacher Ratio: 19:1
317 French St.
245.3351
Principal Bob Aspen
Secretary Donna Laffin
North Oyster Elementary –Area “H”
Kindergarten to Grade 7
191 students
Student to Teacher Ratio: 16.7:1
13470 Cedar Rd.
245.3330
Principal Don Andersen
Secretary Renee Rapton
Source: School Performance Reports 1999-00 to 2003-04/
Ministry of Education Information Department and School
District 68 Nanaimo-Ladysmith
Post-Secondary Education
Ladysmith Secondary School’s
Grade 12 graduation rate is higher
than the average for the area. 79%
of first-time Grade 12 students
graduate, while the graduation rate
for the School District is 72%, and
the BC provincial average is 75%
for the 2003-2004 school year. The
same year, 115 students graduated
from Ladysmith Secondary and 55
with honours.
Malaspina University-College’s
main campus is located 30 minutes
north in Nanaimo. Malaspina also
has campuses in Duncan, Parksville/
Qualicum, and Powell River.
The University-College offers a
comprehensive range of academic
programs, including graduate and
undergraduate degrees, as well as
technical, career and trade programs
leading to diplomas and certificates.
The University of Victoria, Royal
Roads College and Camosun College
are located in Victoria, some 80 km
from Ladysmith and offer a variety
of undergraduate and graduate
programs.
Ladysmith Secondary
Grades 8 to 12
905 students
Student to Teacher Ratio: 18.6:1
710 Sixth Ave.
245.3043
Principal John Blain
Secretary Heather Slowski
Education
Davis Road Elementary
Kindergarten to Grade 7
109 students
Student to Teacher Ratio: 18.4:1
444 Parkhill Terrace
245.7187
Principal Rob Hoban
Secretary Darleen Michell
Secondary Education
Town of Ladysmith
Elementary Education
Chemainus Native College & Stu”ate
Lelum Secondary
Includes Secondary, Co-Op and
Foundation Skills for Language
Teacher Development Program
5091 Jones Road
245.3522 Principal David Doyle
13
Town of Ladysmith
Community Profile 2006
Number of Properties by Classification
Business Data
Ladysmith is a vibrant town that
is characterized mostly by small
businesses against a backdrop of a
handful of major primary industries. The town has grown in recent years
due to a renewed push in tourism,
the revitalization of the downtown
core, and the increase in population.
Businesses
200
Light industry
6
Major Industry
5
Recreation & nonprofit
29
Farms
4
Managed Forests
1
Utilities
20
Source: Town of Ladysmith per BC Assessment
Building Permits Issued and Value Comparison
Residential starts
2002
2003
2004
2005
35
35
113
100
Residential values
$3,452,146 $4,098,433 $13,916,758 $11,011,701
Residential additions and renovations
$1,693,245
Commercial
$1,090,414 $1,197,444
Industrial
Institutional
Total Permit Value
$460,940
$568,766
$577,674
$698,800
$857,770
-
-
$20,000
$125,000
$107,200
$1,315,000
$1,142,265
$2,900,000
$6,342,405 $7,071,817 $16,371,589 $15,472,145
Local Economy
Source: Town of Ladysmith
newBusinessincorporationsinLadysmith
40
35
30
25
20
15
10
5
0
1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004
Source: Ministry of Finance and Corporate Relations. BC Stats January 2005
14
Community Profile 2006
BusinessLicensesissued2000-2005
473
500
450
384
400
350
300
250
244
326
294
270
200
150
100
50
0
2000
2001
2002
2003
2004
2005
Source: Town of Ladysmith
Business Licenses Issued 2000-2005
2001
2002
2003
2004
2005
Apartment buildings
10
10
10
10
12
13
Banks and financial
institutions
4
5
5
5
5
5
Hotel, motel, restaurant
under 1,500 sq.ft.
4
5
6
7
9
10
Hotel, motel, restaurant
1,501-3,000 sq.ft.
4
4
5
5
6
7
Hotel, motel, restaurant over
3,000 sq.ft.
2
3
4
5
5
6
Resident/home-based
businesses
79
90
100
114
132
162
Resident/non home-based
businesses
59
63
67
75
90
108
Non-resident
40
47
52
61
75
104
Retail stores under 1,500
sq.ft.
22
23
25
24
30
38
Retail stores 1,500-3,000
sq.ft.
7
7
9
9
9
8
Retail stores over 3,000 sq.ft.
11
11
9
9
9
9
Sawmills/drysorts
2
2
2
2
2
3
244
270
294
326
384
473
Total
Local Economy
2000
Town of Ladysmith
Ladysmith has seen an increase
of business licenses issued in the
last five years. The overall increase
from 2000 to 2005 is 92% with
significant increases across the board
including the hospitality sector,
such as hotel, motel and restaurants,
in addition to retail establishments. Home-based businesses, including
consulting and owner-operator
home-based enterprises, as well as
the non home-based businesses,
which covers most service and nonretail establishments, have seen a
dramatic increase during the same
period.
Source: Town of Ladysmith
15
Town of Ladysmith
Community Profile 2006
Labour Force
LabourForcebyoccupations
occupationsuniquetoprimaryindustry
Local Economy
180
trades,transportandequipmentoperatorsandrelatedoccupations
520
800
Salesandserviceoccupations
45
art,culture,recreationandsport
Socialscience,education,governmentserviceandreligion
225
Healthoccupations
160
100
naturalandappliedsciencesandrelatedoccupations
Business,financeandadministrationoccupations
470
Managementoccupations
230
0
100
200
300
400
500
600
700
800
900
LabourForceindicatorsbyGender
Ladysmith Labour Force Indications Comparison
140
Ladysmith
BC
120
Participation Rate
59.3%
65.2%
100
Employment Rate
52.9%
59.6%
80
Unemployment Rate
10.7%
8.5%
60
Source: Stats Canada, Census 2001
Female
Female
53.4
48.6
40
Male
65.3
20
Male
Female
57.6
9.3
Male11.9
0
ParticipationRate
LabourForcebyindustry
Wholesalesand
retailtrade,
16.6%
unemploymentRate
Source: Stats Canada, Census 2001
estate,5.5%
Healthand
Manufacturing
andconstruction
industries,20.0%
Businessservices,
15.1%
agricultureand
otherresourcebasedindustries,
otherservices,
5.4%
21.0%
Source: Stats Canada, Census 2001
employmentRate
Financeandreal
education,16.4%
16
250
occupationsuniquetoprocessing,manufacturingandutilities
Labour Force by Class of Worker
Number
All classes of workers
2,980
Paid Workers
2,630
Employees
2,540
Self-Employed (incorporated)
90
Self-Employed (unincorporated)
345
Other
110
Source: Stats Canada, Census 2001
Community Profile 2006
Ladysmith Major Employers
Number of
Employees
Sector
Product/Service
School District #68 (Ladysmith only)
125
Education
Public School
Ladysmith & District General Hospital
120
Healthcare
Primary Healthcare Centre
49th Parallel
60
Retail
Grocery
Ladysmith Press
60
Printing
Printer
Town of Ladysmith
60
Government
Municipal Government
Safeway
42
Retail
Grocery
Pharmasave
30
Retail
Pharmacy
Ladysmith Credit Union
25
Financial Services
Credit Union
Limberis Seafood Processors
25
Agribusiness
Clam & Oyster Processing
Rexall
23
Retail
Pharmacy
Number of
Employees
Sector
Location
School District #68 Nanaimo-Ladysmith
2,100
Education
Nanaimo-Ladysmith
Nanaimo Regional General Hospital
1,648
Healthcare
Nanaimo
Malaspina University-College
1,400
Education
Nanaimo & campuses
RMH/NCO Teleservices
1,200
Call Centre
Nanaimo
School District #79 Cowichan
1,145
Education
Cowichan Valley
Catalyst Paper
1,000
Forestry
Crofton
Health Authorities
930
Healthcare
Cowichan Valley
BC Ferries
697
Transportation
Nanaimo
TimberWest Forest
636
Forestry
Nanaimo
Hayes Industries Ltd
608
Forestry
North Cowichan
Harmac Pacific Ltd
579
Forestry
Nanaimo
City of Nanaimo
490
Government
Nanaimo
Cascadia
488
Forestry
Duncan
Cowichan Tribes
303
Government
Duncan
Western Forest Products
263
Forestry
Duncan
Department of Fisheries and Ocean
250
Government
Nanaimo
Island Savings Credit Union
215
Financial Services
6 locations in CVRD
Regional District of Nanaimo
210
Government
Nanaimo
BC Hydro
150
Utility
Nanaimo
Town of Ladysmith
Major Employers
Largest Employers in the Region
Local Economy
17
Local Economy
Town of Ladysmith
Community Profile 2006
18
Economic Sectors
Marine
Fishing, marine manufacturing and
related services is a complementary
sector to the Ladysmith economy. With a marina and harbour easily
accessible, local marine relatedindustry companies have a distinct
advantage in terms of location,
expertise and customer base.
Island life means a high level of
adequately experienced labour force
as well as the presence of supporting
marine-sector industries. Further
development of marine services
and manufacturing is possible in
the existing industrial park as well
as through the development of the
mixed-use waterfront area.
Forestry
Forestry and value-added products
have traditionally found a home in
the area. With a number of mills
operating in and near Ladysmith,
this is an important activity
with a great number of highly
skilled residents employed in the
sector. Training and educational
opportunities already exist to serve
new and expanding businesses.
Added-value wood products
manufacturers are also present in
the community, taking advantage of
the proximity to Vancouver Island’s
forestry centres.
Aquaculture
Primarily shellfish processing,
aquaculture is a sector with many
opportunities. Some shellfish
– oysters, clams, scallops and others
- growers and processors are located
in Ladysmith and neighbouring
Nanaimo, as productions costs,
market access and growing
conditions are superior in the area. Support services are also nearby for
the industry, including supplies,
workforce and transportation to
markets.
Services
There is no shortage of servicebased organizations in Ladysmith. Realtors, health care, legal and
financial professionals are practicing
in the community.
Ladysmith remains open to the
addition of professional services
such as those in small firm or officebased environments. New office
space is planned in the Heritage
Downtown core as well as in the
mixed-use waterfront development
opportunity.
The exceptional high-quality living
environment drives this sector,
as well as the proximity to larger
markets.
Technology
Pioneering new technology is
an value-added economic sector
taking shape in the area. New
sewage treatment technology,
community-wide organic collection
and composting and other ground
breaking innovative advancements
are being piloted and tested in
Ladysmith.
The advent of fiber-optics in
addition to other high-tech
advantages are creating new avenues
for technology development in
Ladysmith.
Retail
The retail sector, located
primarily in the downtown core
and at Coronation Mall, is a major
source of economic activity in
Ladysmith. There are over 50 retail
establishments, from groceries to
clothing to gifts. A December 2003 study established
that there is adequate parking in the
downtown core with about a 65%
occupancy rate, allowing for ample
space to accommodate customers
to the downtown shops. There are
approximately some 695 parking
spaces in the immediate radius of
the downtown shops.
Coronation Mall is located adjacent
to the Trans Canada Highway, and
therefore can attract customers
travelling north or south.
For more information, contact the
Downtown Business Association
or Coronation Mall Merchants
Association.
Community Profile 2006
originofvisitorstotheinformationcentre
50%
45%
40%
35%
30%
25%
20%
15%
10%
5%
0%
Localvancouver
otherBritish
islandResidents
columbia
2004
Restofcanada
unitedStates
other
2005*
Source: Ladysmith Chamber of Commerce * 2005 data up to October 18, 2005
tourisminformationMostRequested
event/attractions
Dining
transportation
accommodations
adventure/
Recreation/Parks
Town of Ladysmith
Tourism
Tourism remains a strong draw
to Ladysmith because of its scenic
location, waterfront recreation,
hiking trails and shopping
experience. The Ladysmith
Chamber of Commerce, which
operates a visitors’ centre, keeps
track of all visitors who come in to
seek information about Ladysmith
and the area. Constant efforts are
made to enhance the tourism aspects
of the community.
Ladysmith hospitality is at its
prime. 41% of stays are overnight
and average 2.75 nights per visit.
Maps/Directions
Source: Ladysmith Chamber of Commerce
Film Ladysmith is a member of the
Vancouver Island Film Association.
The municipality has adopted a
film permit package containing
information on applications,
permits, fees and contracts. This
package is available through
City Hall. The municipal film
coordinator is Bruce Anderson,
Manager of Development Services.
With mountains at its back and
the sea at its feet, Ladysmith
offers a diversified look and is an
ideal location for filming. “Big
Bully” starring Rick Moranis and
“Long Way Home” starring Jack
Lemmon are just two of the films
that have utilized the ambience of
Ladysmith’s main street. Recently,
the TV movie “Marker”, and NBC series pilot “Eureka” were filmed in
Ladysmith.
Some of Ladysmith’s filming attributes include:
Versatile downtown with heritage buildings
A variety of settings; town, beach, country, ocean and forest
Outdoor amphitheatre overlooking harbour
Available commercial spaces suitable for interior shoots
A large number of rentable RV’s for dressing rooms
Parking areas for RV’s
Ladysmith’s Festival of Lights has an extensive inventory of Christmas
lights and displays perfect for Christmas-theme productions
Antique stores for props and costumes
Inventory of vintage cars
Local Economy
other
19
Highway
The Trans Canada Highway (Island
Highway) runs north-south along
the eastern side of Vancouver
Island. In 2002, the highway was
upgraded as it curves through
Ladysmith with 4 traffic lanes,
turning lanes and improved access
to neighbourhoods, commercial
areas and the harbour.
Ladysmith is strategically located
to offer easy north-south access to
the transportation hubs of Nanaimo
and Victoria.
Nanaimo 23 km
Airport 9 km
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Town of Ladysmith
Community Profile 2006
Davis
Lagoon
Chemainus 15 km
Stocking
Lake
20
ng
ek
Banon
anon
West B
Creek
Creek
Distance to:
Victoria
88 km (55 miles)
Duncan
28 km (18 miles)
Nanaimo
23 km (14 miles)
Campbell River
176 km (109 miles)
Stoc
kin
g
C
C re
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Sto
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Transportation
Duncan 28 km
Victoria 88 km
Community Profile 2006
alongside of 13.5 meters. The port
is serviced by rail and a custom port
of entry is on location. There is a
public warehouse and two bonded
warehouses on site.
Fisherman’s Wharf, located at the
foot of Ludlow Road, offers a host
of services for commercial as well as
pleasure boaters. A free boat launch
was constructed by the Ladysmith
Rotary Club, adjacent to the
Fisherman’s Wharf. Tourist docks
are available – 91.4 metres with 1.2
metres wide floats and 30.5 metres
with 2.4 metres wide floats
The Ladysmith Marina, formerly
the Ivy Green, is slated to undergo
a major face lift over the next few
years. Already offering some 150
moorage slips, the marina will
be upgraded and expanded. The
Ladysmith marina is home to the
Ladysmith Yacht Club.
Maritime Society Marina is
located off Ludlow Road between
Fisher������������������������������
man’s Wharf and Slack Point. Private and public moorage, for
locals and visitors. There are some
100 moorage slips with power to the
docks.
Nanaimo Port Authority operates
a commercial deep sea port and is
the closest full-service ocean port
facility to Ladysmith. It operates
four berths – three at the Assembly
Wharf and one at Duke Point Deep
Sea Terminal. The Assembly Wharf
berths are 182.88 meters long and
range in depth from 10.1 meters
to 12.4 meters. The Duke Point
Deep Sea Terminal’s berth is 170
meters in length and has a depth
Air
The Nanaimo Airport (YCD) is the
closest commercial airport located
on Highway 1, just 9 km north
of Ladysmith. It longest runway
measures 1,525 metres (5,000 feet). Passenger service is provided by Jazz
Air Inc., connecting to Air Canada,
which offers 7 daily flights to
Vancouver International Airport.
The Nanaimo Airport also offers
private, charter, air cargo and
courier services. Air cargo is offered
by Air Canada Regional Airlines,
Nav Air Charters and Northern
Hawk.
Harbour Air Seaplanes and
Baxter Aviation also offer float
plane service from Nanaimo to
destinations such as Vancouver,
Richmond, in addition to providing
charter service.
Ferry
Getting to Vancouver Island from
the mainland is made possible
through an extensive ferry system. The closest passenger and cargo
ferries to Ladysmith are located
in Nanaimo –Duke Point is
approximately 15 minutes away, and
Departure Bay is about 25 minutes.
Duke Point/Tsawwassen: 8
weekday daily sailings, 7 on
Saturdays, 6 on Sundays.
Departure Bay/Horseshoe Bay: 8
daily sailings.
Complete details can be found at
www.bcferries.ca.
Rail
Commercial freight is available
on the Esquimalt and Nanaimo
Railway (E&N) which runs along
the Trans Canada Highway through
Ladysmith. VIA Rail passenger service is
available daily on the “Malahat”
which runs from Victoria to
Courtney. Stops in Ladysmith,
from either direction, are made by
request. Transportation
Ladysmith’s harbour is classed
as a deep sea port, and is used for
both commercial and pleasure
water activities. There are three
different waterfront access points in
Ladysmith:
Town of Ladysmith
Port Facilities
Bus
Ladysmith is served by Vancouver
Island Coach Lines which offers
passenger and freight service with
stops in two locations: Coronation
Mall and 49th Parallel Grocery
Store. A total of 12 buses run to the
north part of the island and another
12 daily south to Victoria.
21
Utilities
Town of Ladysmith
Community Profile 2006
Water & Wastewater
Organic Waste
Telecommunications
Water and wastewater services are
provided by the Town of Ladysmith. The wastewater treatment plant
was built for a 12,000 population,
with a secondary system designed
for an additional 10,000 population
and up to 30,000, therefore ensuring
more than adequate services for the
growing community.
Residential customers pay a
one rate monthly fee for water,
wastewater, garbage, recycling and
organic waste.
Water Usage Rates
The Town of Ladysmith is one
of the first BC municipalities to
implement a community-wide
composting program. Unique
and innovative, the organic waste
collection program is aimed at
continuing the Town of Ladysmith’s
commitment to the environment
and the enhancement of quality of
life. The program began town-wide
in February 2006.
Telus and Bell offer telephone
and internet services. Telus
has a Remote Line Unit located
in Ladysmith. Information on
residential and commercial rates can
be found at www.telus.com.
Shaw offers cable and high-speed
internet services, while other local
companies also offer internet access
and web hosting services through
dial-up, and DSL.
Residential
Commercial
Industrial
$25 per quarter
for first 20 cubic
metres, $0.45 per
additional cubic
metre
Wastewater Usage Rates
Residential
$39 per quarter
Commercial
varies by class
Industrial
varies by class
Hydro-electrical power is delivered
to Ladysmith by BC Hydro, a crown
corporation. Residential Rates
Residential garbage collection
services are available and rolled
into the cost with water and sewer
services. Garbage collection allows
for one can on alternating weeks,
with a $2 charge for each extra bag. Further information is available at
the Town of Ladysmith.
Commercial and industrial users
must make their own arrangements
at this time.
Residential pick-up is included in
the garbage collection. There is no
limit to the number of recycling
bags which can be put to the curb. For more information on this
program, check out www.ladysmith.
ca
Commercial and industrial
recycling is not yet available
through the Town of Ladysmith. Special arrangements must be made
at this time.
$0.0605 per kWh
Commercial under 35kW $0.0680 per kWh
Commercial over 35kW
Energy charge for first 14,800 kWh $0.0680
Energy charge for additional kWh $0.0327
Demand charge for first 35kW- nil
Demand charge for next 115kW-$3.48 per kW
Demand charge for all additional kW- $6.68
per kW
Garbage Collection
Recycling
22
Electricity
Industrial Rates
Demand charge $4.625 per kV.A
Energy charge $0.0273
Source: BC Hydro - bchydro.com
Natural Gas
Natural Gas is provided by Terasen
Gas, a shareholder held private
company. Residential Rate
Basic charge $10.50
Commodity charge per GJ $13.220
Small Commercial Rate 1
Basic charge $9.45
Commodity charge per GJ $14.614
Small Commercial Rate 2
Basic charge $33.53
Commodity charge per GJ $13.192
Large Commercial Rate 1
Basic charge $61.00
Commodity charge per GJ $9.839
Large Commercial Rate 2
Basic charge $97.82
Commodity charge per GJ $9.631
Large Commercial Rate 3
Basic charge $201.51
Commodity charge per GJ $9.429
Source: Terasen Gas - terasengas.com. All rates are effective as of October 1, 2004.
Community Profile 2006
2005 Tax Rate per Thousand Dollars of Assessment
Municipal Only
All Taxes
Residential
5.4160
9.8109
Commercial
18.6854
30.6000
Light Industrial
18.0001
30.7017
Major Industrial
97.4973
113.3368
Water Parcel Tax
$70
$70
Sewer Parcel Tax
$94
$94
Source: Town of Ladysmith *All taxes includes the Town of Ladysmith, Cowichan Valley Regional District, School District 68
and Library Board
Payroll Taxes
Workers Compensation
Average cost for all industries per $100 payroll
$1.98
Average rate for office workers per $100 payroll
$0.26
Maximum weekly benefit
$781.49
Town of Ladysmith
Property Taxes
Unemployment Insurance (Employment Insurance)
2.73%
Average new employer (premium)
2.73%
Maximum weekly benefit
$413.00
Source: InvestBC.com. Data is the same for all communities in British Columbia, and the rates are current as of January 1, 2005.
Taxation
Average among existing employer (premium)
Income Taxes
Personal income tax
Provincial
Federal
Capital Gains
8.00% - 14.50%
3.03% - 7.35%
Earned Income
16.00% - 29.00%
6.05% - 14.70%
Unearned Income (e.g. dividends)
3.33% - 19.58%
1.19% - 12.00%
Provincial
Federal
Small Business
4.5%
13.12%
Manufacturing
12.0%
22.12%
Non Manufacturing
12.0%
22.12%
Sales Tax
7.5%
7%
Corporate Income Tax
Source: InvestBC.com
23
Planning and Permitting
Town of Ladysmith
Community Profile 2006
24
Community Planning
The Town of Ladysmith has
formulated long-term development
strategies for the community. The
Official Community Plan is available
on the Town’s website or by
contacting City Hall. In addition,
the following bylaws are available
for viewing online:
Zoning Bylaw #1160
Building and Plumbing Bylaw
#1119
Sign and Canopy Bylaw #1176
Sign and Canopy Bylaw
Amendment #1335 and #1407
Subdivision Bylaw #1115
Since the website may not include
all revisions and amendments, it is
highly suggested that one request an
official version from City Hall.
Planning and zoning is a
function of the Development
Services Department which can
assist in interpreting the bylaws
for construction, renovation or
development projects.
Rocky Creek Industrial Park
Nanaimo
& Airport
Waterfront Area
Commercial (Downtown)
Ladysmith
Harbour
Commercial (Coronation Mall)
Trans-Canada Highway
Chemainus
South Ladysmith
Industrial Park
Commercial
Duncan
Victoria
Commercial Development
Commercial development
is directed principally to the
downtown core and the south
end (Coronation Mall), with
complementary commercial
areas provided to serve the mixed
use waterfront as well as local
neighbourhoods.
Additional commercial zoned
land can be found along the Island
Highway at the entrance of the
South Industrial Park.
The vibrant commercial
opportunities are in high demand
for entrepreneurs. As such, any
listing for properties for sale or lease
will be publicized through the many
local real estate companies. One
may also check out www.icx.ca.
Industrial Development
There are two designated industrial
parks in Ladysmith, one located on
the waterfront, the other, south of
town. Both have close highway
access, utilities on or near site, and
are properly zoned for industrial
activity.
The Rocky Creek Industrial Park
is located along the waterfront
and provides for primarily light
industrial uses. Lot sizes range from
0.5 to 1.5 acres with full municipal
road, sewer, water services as well as
gas, hydro and telephone utilities.
The South Ladysmith Industrial
Park is located at the south entrance
to Ladysmith and provides for a
range of industrial uses. Interim lot
sizes are a minimum 5 acres with
rural servicing levels. Municipal
water can be extended as well as gas,
hydro and telephone service.
Community Profile 2006
In December 2005, the Town
of Ladysmith issued a request
for expressions of interest for
the Ladysmith waterfront lands. This project is one of the few
remaining oceanfront development
opportunities released to the private
sector to undertake mixed-use
development of the waterfront.
The Waterfront Area Plan contains
a range of zones permitting multifamily residential, mixed-use
residential/commercial, parks and
recreation, water recreation and
marina, as well as commercial land
uses.
With the successful proponent, the
Town would promote waterfront
housing opportunities, while
creating a waterfront destination
resort. A comprehensive mixeduse development will expand and
diversify employment, strengthen
the downtown commercial area, and
increase the local tax base.
Permits
The Town of Ladysmith takes
pride in offering a streamlined and
efficient permitting process.
Businesses are required to hold
a business license which is issued
by the Town of Ladysmith. The
application for a business license
is available online on the Town’s
website, as well as at city hall,
and the process takes on average
less than 2 weeks. The cost of
the license is $100 and is good
throughout the CVRD.
Building permits are issued for
any construction, alteration or
repair of a building. Plans for the
construction or alteration need
to accompany the application for
the permit. On average, permits
are issued between 15 to 30 days,
depending on the scale of the
project. Costs of the permits are
established based on the extent of
the construction. Development
permits are issued within 2 to 4
Application Fees
OCP/Zoning
Amendment
$750
Subdivision
$50/lot
Development Permit
under $5,000
$100
$5,000 - $15,000
$250
over $15,000
$500
Source: Town of Ladysmith - synopsis only, refer to Bylaw
No. 1495 for up to date charges and fee details
weeks from the time the drawings
have been submitted. Any changes
required to the Official Community
Plan or Zoning takes approximately
3 months. On average, it may take about
2 months from choosing a site
for construction to the start of
construction itself - a streamlined
process aimed at speeding up
approvals for development in the
community.
Town of Ladysmith
Waterfront Development
Planning and Permitting
25
Business Support Services
Town of Ladysmith
Community Profile 2006
26
Business Incentives
Business Assistance
A number of programs are
available to assist businesses in
attaining success. Tax credit and
other incentives derive from the
federal or provincial governments.
British Columbia Incentive
Programs are handled by the
Ministry of Small Business and
Revenue – Income Taxation Branch:
-Film and Television Tax Credit
-Production Services Tax Credit
-Scientific Research and
Experimental Development Tax
Credit
-British Columbia Mining and
Exploration Tax Credit
-Book Publishing Tax Credit
-International Financial Activity
Act
The Town of Ladysmith can
provide assistance to entrepreneurs
wishing to set up a new business
in town – whether it is relocating
an existing company, expanding
to Ladysmith or starting a new
venture. Assistance can also be
provided for local businesses
regarding available programs
and local development issues. Contact the Development Services
Department for more information.
Additional services are provided
by nonprofit and government
programs, especially for start-up
businesses. Regional centres also
offer technical assistance, training
and funding advice:
FutureCorp Cowichan
746.1004
www.futurecorp.ca
There are also a number of federal
programs that can be used as
incentives and support services for
businesses:
-Scientific Research and
Experimental Development Program
-Industrial Research Assistance
Program
-Technology Partnerships Canada
-Business Development Bank of
Canada Venture Capital
-Natural Sciences and Engineering
Research Council of Canada
-PreCarn
-Film Tax Credit Programs
Community Futures - Nanaimo
753.6414
www.cfnanaimo.org
Some useful online resources
include:
Business Start-up Assistant
www.bsa.cbsc.org
Small Business BC
www.smallbusinessbc.ca
Women’s Enterprise Centre
www.womensenterprisecentre.ca
One Stop BC Registry
www.bcbusinessregistry.ca
Community Profile 2006
Youth
Young families will find a wealth
of services in Ladysmith. There
are a number of registered day-care
facilities and nursery schools located
right in the community. The Ladysmith Resources Centre
is one of the main sources of
information, support and assistance
to residents and can provide
referrals for preschool and child
care facilities.
Ladysmith Resources Centre
721 First Avenue
245.3079
In addition to these services, the
Boys and Girls Club offers before
and after school care for younger
children. Ladysmith Family
and Friends operates a drop-in
playgroup for children 0 to 5 and
their parents at Aggie Hall.
The Ladysmith Resources Centre and the Vancouver Island Health
Authority published the “Ladysmith
Youth Resource Manual” in May
2005 which includes a complete
list of available services for youth
within the community. Furthermore, the Ladysmith Parks,
Recreation and Culture Department
offers extensive youth programs
throughout the year at the Frank
Jameson Community Centre.
Ladysmith Parks, Recreation and
Culture
810 6th Avenue
245.6424
Seniors
Ladysmith is a wonderful
community for seniors. There are
multiple private and subsidized
housing opportunities, as well as
services geared towards the golden
age such as the Seniors Outreach
Team, Seniors Page/Phoning Tree
and the 50+ Computer Club. More
information can be obtained from:
Seniors Housing Society of
Ladysmith
245.3020
Employment
New Residents
Newcomers to Ladysmith will find
it a welcoming community with a
number of services which make the
transition to the area much easier. In addition to contacting The Town
of Ladysmith City Hall for resident
information, new residents can also
contact:
Ladysmith Newcomers Club
245.7723
Welcome Wagon
245.0799
Resident Support Services
Employment Navigators offers
free employment services to all
unemployed, underemployed or
employment threatened individuals.
Some of their core services include
job postings, computer/Internet
access, resource information, oneone-one assistance with returning
to work or training and workshops
on computer basics, job search and
resumes, career assessments and
decision making, entrepreneurial
exploration and trades and
technology information. Visit their
comprehensive website at
www.employmentnavigators.com
Employment Navigators
710 First Avenue
245.7134
Town of Ladysmith
Early Childhood
27
Quality of Life
Town of Ladysmith
Community Profile 2006
Community
Ladysmith was named one of
the 10 prettiest towns in Canada
by Harrowsmith Country Life
Magazine in 2000, being called
“remote enough to feel free of urban
nuisances, urban enough not to feel
remote.” The Saturday Post put it
this way “in Ladysmith you have
neighbours; in Vancouver you have
people who live next door”. Ladysmith won first place in the
5,000-10,000 population category
“Communities in Bloom” contest
in 2003. Judges said: “Ladysmith
is truly a beautiful town. It
is architecturally attractive,
historically preserved, friendly, […]
Ladysmith has so many exceptional
natural resources it’s hard to focus
on just one.”
In 2002, the Heritage Society of
British Columbia awarded the Town
of Ladysmith with two special
honours: one for the Ladysmith
Heritage Artifacts Route, the
other for the rehabilitation of the
1943 Comox Logging and Railway
Machine Shop The Vancouver Sun called
Ladysmith a “gem of a town”, the
Business Examiner dubbed it “a
community that works and cares”,
and Ladysmith was featured in
Sea Magazine as a great stop on a
seaward adventure.
The Council also sanctions
a number of public advisory
committees and commissions to
best serve the goals of the Town of
Ladysmith. These include:
-Protective Services Committee
-Economic Development
Commission
-Advisory Planning Commission
-Heritage Revitalization Advisory
Commission
-Parks, Recreation and Culture
Commission
- Olympic Live Sites Committee
Local Government
The Town of Ladysmith is
governed by Mayor Robert
Hutchins and six Town Council
members. Municipal elections
are held every three years. Town
Department’s include:
-Administration
-Corporate Services
-Development Services
-Financial Services
-Public Works
-Parks, Recreation and Culture
-Protective Services (Fire/Rescue
and RCMP)
City Council
In office since
Mayor Robert Hutchins
1994
Scott Bastian
2005
Jan Christenson
2003
Doug Fraser
2003
Donald Fyfe-Wilson
2005
Robert Johnson
2003
Duck Paterson
1990
Provincial and Federal Representation
Name
Post
Contact Number In office since
Doug Routley
MLA CowichanLadysmith
250.387.3655
2005
Jean Crowder
MP NanaimoCowichan
613.943.2180
2004
Cost of Living
On the one hand being something
of a bedroom community and on
the other a truly special town in
its own right, the cost of living has
remained lower than that of some of
Ladysmith’s neighbours. Ladysmith
is part of the Cowichan Valley
Regional District, an area where
the cost of living is even more
affordable.
28
Average Estimated Household Expenditures
Duncan
(CVRD)
Nanaimo
Victoria
Vancouver
Food
$5,418
$6,311
$6,856
$7,943
Shelter
$7,930
$9,243
$10,567
$11,825
Transportation
$5,920
$6,659
$6,815
$7,022
Total
$19,268
$22,213
$24,238
$26,790
Source: FP Markets, Canadian Demographics 2003-2004. Duncan (CVRD) includes the City of Duncan, Cowichan 1,
Cowichan Valley RDA, Cowichan E. RDA, North Cowichan DM and others.
Community Profile 2006
numberofcriminaloffencescomparison2000-2004
Policing services are provided by
the Royal Canadian Mounted Police
(RCMP). There are seven municipal
officers, five provincial officers, two
First Nation officers, four public
service staff, and a Victim Service
Coordinator with two volunteers
serving the Ladysmith area.
90,000
80,000
70,000
60,000
50,000
40,000
30,000
Crime Rate Comparison 2004
20,000
Ladysmith
108
10,000
Victoria
189
Vancouver
131
BC Municipalities
131
Average BC
125
Source: Police Services Division, Ministry of Public Safety
and Solicitor General, British Columbia, July 2005. Crime
rate is per 1,000 population.
Fire Protection & Rescue
Ladysmith Fire/Rescue is
dispatched to approximately 140
calls per year by FireCom out of
Nanaimo Fire Hall Station #1.
Ladysmith
victoria
2000
2001
2002
vancouver
2003
2004
Source: Police Services Division, Ministry of Public Safety
and Solicitor General, British Columbia, July 2005
Parks and Recreation
Ladysmith has a number of leisure
services, programs and facilities
available to meet the needs of
local residents and visitors alike.
These include approximately 90
hectares of parks and open space,
a community centre, community
hall, and a senior’s centre. The
Department of Parks, Recreation
and Culture also establishes and
maintains the Ladysmith network
of hiking and walking trails while
ensuring ease of access to the many
natural areas in the community. The Frank Jameson Community
Centre includes an indoor
swimming pool complex (lap
pool, therapy/teach/leisure pool,
whirlpool, and sauna), gymnasium,
program and meeting spaces as well
as a new fitness and wellness centre.
A wide variety of community
education, active living, and leisure
services and programs are available
for every age and taste. Residents
with financial challenges may seek
assistance for inexpensive access to
programs and services through the
leisure access program.
There are many opportunities
to get involved with special
events, programs, and activities
throughout the year, and the
department embraces new ideas
with enthusiasm. People who can
share their talents and expertise
with others in the community will
find a welcome home here. For
more information about how you
can enhance your active living
and quality of life, contact the
department at 245.6424.
Waterfront Activities
Transfer Beach Park is located
across the Trans Canada Highway
from the town center. This
waterfront park and beach includes
landscaping features such as shrubs
and bedding plant displays which,
combined with the view, make
Transfer Beach a very popular spot
to stop on the Island Highway. Transfer Beach has all the amenities
to meet your needs: picnic facilities,
covered shelters, brick BBQ,
large adventure playground, open
fields, public washrooms, drinking
fountain, seasonal concession, a
water spray park, amphitheatre,
kayak centre and some lighting for
evening strolls. Transfer Beach
is well known for its warm, clear,
clean summer swimming water –
the warmest north of San Francisco.
Adventurous walkers can trek
south along the beach and within 15
minutes connect to the trails at the
Holland Creek estuary.
Quality of Life
Ladysmith Fire/Rescue provides
fire protection to the Town of
Ladysmith, parts of Saltair and the
Diamond Improvement District.
This fire protection area spans over
40 square miles.
The Fire/Rescue Department
consists of 30 paid-on-call
members including the Fire Chief,
Deputy Chief, Training Officer,
Captain, three lieutenants, and 23
firefighters.
Ladysmith Fire/Rescue provides
services in the following areas:
-Fire Suppression
-Steep Slope Rope Rescue
-First Responder/Medical Aid
-Hazmat
-Fire Investigation
-Fire Inspections
-Fire Prevention
-Juvenile Fire Setter Intervention
Motor Vehicle Accident/Vehicle
Extrication
0
Town of Ladysmith
Public Safety
29
Quality of Life
Town of Ladysmith
Community Profile 2006
30
Theatres, Music & Arts
Regional Attractions
Library
Community drama clubs and
local restaurants feature a variety
of musical entertainment on
weekends, so there is always
something going on.
The Arts on the Avenue is an
annual outdoor event which
features local artists each August. In November, a tour of local artists
is organized just in time for the
holiday season. One can also check out the Lady
Smith’s Little Theatre for unique
community performances. The
Chemainus Theatre and Port
Theatre in Nanaimo are within a 20
minute drive and offer a variety of
Ladysmith is at the crossroads
of some of the best tourism and
recreational opportunities. While
in Ladysmith, enjoy the heritage
downtown with its history and
shopping, the waterfront, hiking
trails and the many events which
occur throughout the year. But for
added fun, you may want to venture
out to neighbouring communities.
Cultural attractions such as the
BC Forest Discovery Centre and
the Quw’utsun Cultural Centre in
Duncan are unique experiences
for visitors and locals alike. Mix
in a tour of the Chemainus murals,
Duncan’s totems, or the Art District
of Nanaimo, and you will have a
wonderful time in the region.
At various times during the year,
wineries and artisans open their
doors to visitors and aficionados
alike. Hiking, kayaking and diving
are also activities which are very
popular nearby to Ladysmith.
The Vancouver Island Regional
Library (VIRL) has a branch located
at #3-740 1st Avenue in Ladysmith.
The VIRL has approximately
1,300,000 items in its collection.
The branch hours in Ladysmith are
Monday, Wednesday and Saturday
from 10 – 5 and Tuesday, Thursday
and Friday from 10 – 8.
Service and Social Clubs
The Leisure Guide is online
at www.ladysmith.ca and lists
the following: churches, clubs
and organizations, cultural
organizations, event organizations,
halls, preschools, schools, service,
support groups, sports/fitness and
youth.
Community Events
In the space of any given year,
Ladysmith hosts over a dozen
community-wide events open to the
public. These include: a New Year’s
Day polar bear swim, the Ladysmith
Home and Business Show,
Oysterfeast, the Vancouver Island
Paddlefest and Kayak Conference,
Holland Creek Crunch walk/run,
Canada Day celebrations, the Sweet
Pea Quilting Show, “Brits on the
Beach”, Ladysmith Celebrations,
Strongman Competition, Ladysmith
Show and Shine, Arts on the
Avenue, Artisan’s Old Fashioned
Christmas and, of course, the famous
Ladysmith Festival of Lights.
More details on these events and
dates can be obtained from the
Ladysmith Chamber of Commerce
at www.ladysmithcofc.com.
Community Facilities
Community Meeting/Banquet Halls
Capacity
Eagles Hall - Meeting Room
30-40
Ladysmith Inn Banquet Room
60
St. John’s Anglican Church Hall
70
Eagles Hall - Downstairs
80-85
Legion Hall
80-100
United Church Hall
80-100
Community Centre - Upper Hall
Eagles Hall - Main Floor
115
140-150
Aggie Hall
200
St. Mary’s Church Hall
200
Community Centre - Gym
300
Commercial Banquet Rooms
Capacity
The Printingdun Beanery
25
Ricky’s Restaurant
40
Lung Fung Restaurant
50
Community Profile 2006
Health Care
Climate
The Ladysmith Hospital is being
currently redesigned to become a
Primary Health Centre to provide
a range of health and community
services in one central location.
Presently, the Ladysmith and
District General Hospital is located
in the Central Island Health Service
area of the Vancouver Island Health
Authority (VIHA). The hospital
contains 32 acute care beds and 10
extended care beds and provides
the following services: medical
ambulatory (through urgent care),
diabetes day care clinic, adult
rehabilitation in-patient and outpatient services, medical in-patient
unit, transitional care, residential
care, adult day care, urgent care, as
well as medical imaging/diagnostics,
general x-rays and laboratory.
For more information about health
care options in Ladysmith, please
contact:
Ladysmith & District General
Hospital
1111-4th Avenue
245.2221
Ladysmith experiences a moderate
coastal climate characterized
by slight seasonal variations in
temperature, and it typically
receives over 1900 hours of bright
sunshine each year. The average
daily temperatures for January
and July are 2.7˚ C and 17.9˚ C
respectively. Ladysmith receives
on average 1077 mm of rainfall and
80.9 mm of snowfall per year.
Ladysmith Family Practice Clinic
1111-4th Avenue
245.6540
A number of private offices,
such as dentists, physiotherapists,
chiropractors, optometrists and
others are also located in the
community.
totalPrecipitation(mm)
200
150
100
50
o
ct
o
no ber
ve
m
be
r
De
ce
m
be
r
gu
st
m
be
r
Se
pt
e
Ju
ly
au
Ju
ne
ril
M
ay
ap
Ja
nu
ar
y
Fe
br
ua
ry
M
ar
ch
0
Source: Environment Canada. Measurements taken at
Nanaimo Airport.
averagetemperaturepermonth
30
Degreescelcius
25
20
15
10
5
st
em
be
r
o
ct
ob
e
no
r
ve
m
be
r
De
ce
m
be
r
Se
pt
ly
gu
au
ne
Ju
Ju
ril
ay
M
ap
y
ar
ch
M
ar
ar
Fe
nu
Ja
br
u
y
0
-5
averageHigh
averageLow
Source: Environment Canada. Measurements taken at Nanaimo Airport
Media
Print Media
The Ladysmith-Chemainus
Chronicle is published weekly and
covers Ladysmith and Chemainus
areas. It features news stories, local
cultural and sporting events, and
classifieds. They are also online at
www.ladysmithchronicle.com.
The Ladysmith-Chemainus
Chronicle
Box 400, 341A 1st Avenue
245.2277
Take 5 is a monthly publication
circulated in Chemainus, Saltair,
Ladysmith, Yellow Point,
Cedar, Cassidy, Chase River and
surrounding areas.
Take 5 News Magazine
Box 59, 622 1st Avenue
245.7015
The nearest daily newspaper is the
Nanaimo Daily News/Harbour Star
and the Times-Colonist in Victoria. Broadcasting
There are also three broadcasting
stations out of Nanaimo: Channel
A, CH TV and Shaw Cable channel.
Radio Stations
There are a great variety of radio
stations in the area, including:
89.7 FM “The Sun” (Duncan)
90.5 FM CBCV – CBC Radio
(Victoria)
94.5 FM CHLY – Radio Malaspina
(Nanaimo)
102.3 FM CKWV “The Wave”
(Nanaimo)
Quality of Life
Hillside Medical Centre
541 3rd Avenue
245. 2235
250
Town of Ladysmith
Ladysmith Health Unit
224 High Street,
245.7119
averagePrecipitationfor1999-2003
106.9 FM CHWF “The Wolf”
(Nanaimo)
690AM CBC - CBC Radio
(Vancouver)
31
This Community Profile is a collection of community
information and statistical data deemed accurate and up
to date as of the time of publication. While we have
made every effort to provide accurate information, we
cannot accept responsibility for third party data, and
anyone using the materials herein should make their
own verification to ensure that the information remains
current and correct. Thank you.
Town of Ladysmith
410 Esplanade, P.O. Box 220
Ladysmith, BC
V9G 1A2
t: 250.245.6400
www.ladysmith.ca

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