State Press Contests Winners 2014 Section

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State Press Contests Winners 2014 Section
October 2014
Special Section
C
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Front row, from left: Pat Zechman, Southern Standard, McMinnville; Shirley Nanney, Carroll
County News-Leader, Huntingdon; Alaina Akens, Elizabethton Star; Eddie West, Carthage
Courier; Dale Gentry, The Standard Banner, Jefferson City; Chad Howard, The Paris
Post-Intelligencer; Tony Stinnett, Cannon Courier, Woodbury; Susan Campbell, The
Tullahoma News; Harry Hill, The Tullahoma News; Sadie Fowler, Shelbyville Times-Gazette;
and Lee Swets, Memphis Business Journal.
Second row, from left: Pam Sohn, Chattanooga Times Free Press; Joan Garrett McClane,
Chattanooga Times Free Press; John Molley, Johnson City Press; Jason Davis, The
Mountain Press, Sevierville; Darren Reese, The Greeneville Sun; Mike Hutchens, Union City
Daily Messenger; Damaris Higgins, The Erwin Record; David Sheets, The Erwin Record; Keith
Whitson, The Erwin Record; Andrea Agardy, The Tullahoma News; Dessislava Yankova,
K
Gallatin News Examiner; Tena Lee, Gallatin News Examiner; Beth Braden, The LaFollette
Press; Brent Schanding, The LaFollette Press; Chris Smith, The Leaf-Chronicle, Clarksville;
Cherish Matthews, Gallatin News Examiner; Josh Cross, Gallatin News Examiner; and
Susanne Reed, Hamilton County Herald, Chattanooga.
Third row, from left: Jack McElroy, Knoxville News Sentinel; Alison Gerber, Chattanooga
Times Free Press; Buzz Trexler, The Daily Times, Maryville; Kenny Cummings, The Jackson
Sun; Tim Hodge, The Daily Herald, Columbia; Jared Felkins, The Lebanon Democrat; David
Thomas, The Jackson Sun; Steve Harbison, The Greeneville Sun; Christen Coulon,
Independent Appeal, Selmer; Brandon Hicks, Elizabethton Star; Rick Locker, The
Commercial Appeal, Memphis; Chris Cannon, The LaFollette Press; and Dwane Wilder, The
LaFollette Press.
Front row, from left: Joan Garrett McClane, Alison Gerber,
Pam Sohn and Chris Vass, Chattanooga Times Free Press.
Second row, from left: Damaris Higgins, Keith Whitson and
David Sheets, The Erwin Record; Chris Cannon, Dwane
Wilder, Brent Schanding, and Beth Braden, The LaFollette
Press; Brandon Hicks, Lynn Richardson, and Alaina Akens,
Elizabethton Star.
Third row, from left: Kenny Cummings, Nichole Manna, Jordan Buie and David Thomas, The Jackson Sun.
All photos by Donn Jones,
Donn Jones Photography
C
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Page 2 • State Press Contests Awards
UT, TPA announce State Press Contests winners
NASHVILLE—Newspaper writers, editors,
designers and publishers won top awards
July 11 in the Tennessee Press Association’s
2014 newspaper contest, co-sponsored by the
University of Tennessee.
The Chattanooga Times Free Press, the
Jackson Sun, Elizabethton Star, the LaFollette
Press and the Erwin Record won the top
general excellence awards at the association’s
luncheon ceremonies held in Nashville.
General excellence honors are based on total
points accumulated for awards in five circulation categories.
This marks the fifth year in a row the
Jackson Sun has won the general excellence
award and the second year in a row that the
Elizabethton Star has also won the general
excellence award in its category.
Other awards highlights:
• The Chattanooga Times Free Press
received 14 first-place awards in the
category of newspapers with a combined
weekly circulation of 200,000 or more.
• Elizabethton Star captured 11 first-place
awards in the category of newspapers
with a combined weekly circulation
between 15,001 and 50,000.
• The LaFollette Press won six first-place
awards in the category of newspapers
with a combined weekly circulation
between 5,001 and 15,000.
As part of the annual contest, UT’s Edward
J. Meeman Foundation honors newspapers
with $250 awards in the categories of editori-
als, best single editorial and public service.
The Chattanooga Times Free Press won all
three Meeman Awards for newspapers in its
circulation group. The Daily Herald (Columbia) also swept all three for newspapers
with between 50,001 and 200,000 combined
weekly circulation. The Independent Herald
(Oneida) won the top award for editorials and
best single editorial in the category of papers
with weekly combined circulation of 5,000 or
less.
The Meeman Foundation was established
in 1968 at UT to fund the contests, provide
professional critiques of journalists’ work and
support journalism students and faculty.
Among the other top winners were:
• The Jackson Sun with five awards: makeup and appearance, local features, best
business coverage, headline writing and
best website.
• The (Nashville) Tennessean with five
awards: Sunday editions, best graphics
and/or illustrations, best personal column, best education reporting and best
special issue or section.
• The Memphis Business Journal with five
awards: makeup and appearance, best
graphics and/or illustrations, investigative reporting, best business coverage
and best website.
The Arkansas Press Association judged
a total of 1,577 entries from 79 of the association’s 122 member newspapers. UT has
co-sponsored the annual contest since 1940.
Awards Luncheon Factoids
•
•
•
•
•
•
148 registrants
131 registrants from 46 newspapers
56 registrants from 18 dailies
75 registrants from 28 non-dailies
10 registrants from 4 associate members
Paper with the most registrants: The
Tennessean, Nashville, with 14
Contests
•
•
•
•
1,577 entries from 79 newspapers
975 entries from 55 non-dailies
602 entries from 24 dailies
Most entered category: Best Single
Feature, with 137 entries
• 547 awards presented
• Paper with the most awards: Chattanooga
Times Free Press, with 27
• Paper with the most first place awards:
Chattanooga Times Free Press, with 14
Photo by Donn Jones • Donn Jones Photography
Close to 150 people attended the 2014 University of Tennessee/Tennessee Press
Association State Press Contests luncheon on July 11 in Nashville.
The Tennessee Press Association
thanks the following:
• UT President Dr. Joe DiPietro
• The University of Tennessee Office of Communications and
Marketing and UT staff members Dr. Tonjanita Johnson, Gina
Stafford, Charles Primm, Amy Blakely, Lola Alapo and
Erica Jenkins
We are grateful for the excellent relationship that has existed
for 74 years, since 1940. UT has participated in the implementation of the UT-TPA State Press Contests and has provided
plaques and certificates and assisted in various other facets
of the awards event.
• Terri Likens, editor of the Roane County News, Kingston,
2013-14 Contests Committee chairman
• Members of the 2013-14 TPA Contests Committee for their
contributions, guidance and support.
State Press Contests Awards • Page 3
Presenting the 2014 winners!
Make-Up and
Appearance
Group I
1. Memphis Business Journal
Lee Swets
“Excellent newspaper with strong
stories and illustrations. Nice
clean look, and relevant business
information.”
2. The Erwin Record
Keith Whitson, Keeli Parkey
and David Sheets
3. Hamilton County Herald,
Chattanooga
Karen Dunphy
4. The Ashland City Times
Tim Adkins and Randy
Moomaw
5. Cannon Courier, Woodbury
Tony Stinnett, Teresa Stoetzel
and Mike West
Group II
1. Gallatin News Examiner
Sarah Kingsbury, Mike Towle,
Cecil Joyce, Gannett Design
Studio, Jamie Stade,
Dessislava Yankova, Tena Lee,
Josh Cross and Jennifer Easton
Jamie Combs, Alaina Akens,
Missy Hale, Brandon Hicks
Danny Davis and Janie
McKinney
“Good quality print, layout.
Consistency. Good looking paper
overall.”
2. The Newport Plain Talk
Rick Hooper, Seth Butler, Tina
Pierson and Katie Pittser
3. The Paris Post-Intelligencer
Michael Williams, Ken Walker,
Karen Geary, Leslie Sensing, Lesley Jones and Tommy Priddy
4. Shelbyville Times-Gazette
David Melson, Carol Spray,
Mary Cook and Sadie Fowler
5. The Lebanon Democrat
Jared Felkins, Sara McManamy-Johnson, Andy Reed, Kimberly Jordan and Caitlin Rickard
Group IV
1. The Jackson Sun
Staff
“Normally don’t like black screens/
white type, but it was actually a
good idea for the gang package
of Feb. 3.”
“Editorial pages are very good.”
“’The Life’ sections are mostly very
good. Avoid doing too much on
some pages there.”
“Might want to cut back on the
cutouts, especially on sports
pages. Use sparingly. But overall
everything comes together.”
John Stout and Mike Murphy
Group V
1. Chattanooga Times Free
Press
Staff
“Nice use of white space on the
front covers AND on the inside.
There’s not too much, looks like
a serious news publication, and
easy to read. Headlines on insides
of paper are limited and consistent. Thank you.”
4. The Leaf-Chronicle,
Clarksville
Staff
“While the front pages appear to
have a wide variety of font types,
it seems there is a system to using
the different ones and don’t come
across as random, but maybe a
little busy looking. Ads and copy
is evenly spaced throughout the
whole paper and create a natural
flow for reading. The copy and ads
don’t compete with each other.”
5. Johnson City Press
Don Armstrong, Robert Pierce,
2. The Tennessean, Nashville
Tennessean Staff
2. The Daily Times, Maryville
Buzz Trexler, Amanda Greever,
Richard Dodson and Mike Sisco
3. Bristol Herald Courier
Staff
3. News-Herald, Lenoir City
Steve Meadows
1. Elizabethton Star
Brian Reese, Bryan Stevens,
Group I
1. Cannon Courier, Woodbury
Dan Whittle and Ken Beck
“The stories flow well. They’re
clean and pull the readers in. The
descriptions made them stand
out. Good variety of coverage,
but work a bit on your design.
Think outside the boxes, and take
that statement literally. Great job
overall.”
2. The Erwin Record
Keith Whitson and Thomas
Knisley
See WINNERS, Page 4
Best News
Photograph
Group V
Paul Efird –
Knoxville News
Sentinel
2. The Standard Banner,
Jefferson City
Dale Gentry and Kim Cook
Group III
Local Features
First place award
“All of the headline fonts worked
well together and weighted
differently depending on the story
being highlighted. The nameplate
is attractive with professional
integrity.”
5. Grainger Today, Bean Station
Robert Turner
4. News Sentinel, Knoxville
Staff
Knoxville’s Efird wins AP Photo of the Year 2013
“The photos all printed beautifully and the colors really pop all
throughout the paper. The
illustrations that accompany the
different sections (Homefinder
and the Classifieds pages) really
add a personal touch.”
4. The Elk Valley Times
Fayetteville
Lucy Williams, Sandy Williams,
Laurie Pearson, Paul Henry,
Amber Gentry, Ryan Sandmeyer
and Jonathan Mangrum
3. The Commercial Appeal,
Memphis
Kim Coleman
At left, Adam Yeoman, Chief of Bureau for The Associated Press for
Tennessee, Kentucky and Mississippi, presented the 2013 Tennessee
AP Photo of the Year award to Paul Efird of the Knoxville News Sentinel. His aerial photo shows emergency workers responding to a crash
involving a passenger bus, a tractor-trailer, and a sport utility vehicle
near Dandridge in northeast Tennessee on Oct. 2, 2013. Eight people
were killed and 14 were injured when the bus crossed the median and
struck the other two vehicles. The tractor-trailer caught fire and the bus
overturned. Efird also won first place in Best News Photograph for Group
V in the 2014 State Press Contests Awards.
Page 4 • State Press Contests Awards
WINNERS, from Page 3
3. Independent Herald, Oneida
Ben Garrett
4. Herald & Tribune,
Jonesborough
Kristen Swing, Charlie Mauk,
Lynn Richardson, April
Richardson and Kasey Jones
5. Pulaski Citizen
Margaret Campbell, Tracy
Ayers and Cary Jane Malone
Group II
1. The LaFollette Press
Brent Schanding, Beth Braden,
Phillip Boshears and Chris Cannon
“Writing, photography and layout
are strong. Very engaging reads.”
2. The Advocate & Democrat,
Sweetwater
Jessica Cross and Tommy
Millsaps
3. The Standard Banner
Jefferson City
Steve Marion and Gayle Page
4. Gallatin News Examiner
Dessislava Yankova, Josh
Cross, Jennifer Easton and Sarah
Kingsbury
5. News-Herald, Lenoir City
Jeremy Nash and Jeremy
Styron
“Outstanding work. Great features
with good photos. You covered a
lot of ground at Bonnaroo from
concerts to food to fashions. I
really enjoyed it.”
“Of course, the Bonnaroo coverage was great – nice pictures and
stories covering a wide variety of
topics from food to fashions and
finally the concerts. Bonnaroo
appears to have come a long
way since I was stuck in traffic for
hours trying to get to Atlanta in
2002. The perspectives on dads
was good as was the conservation
story. Truly a wide ranging entry.”
2. Elizabethton Star
Ashley Rader, Kayla Carter,
Max Hrenda, Brandon Hicks and
Danny Davis
3. The Paris Post-Intelligencer
Ken Walker, Melanie Howard,
Karen Geary, Lesley Jones and
Gay Francisco
4. The Lebanon Democrat
Sara McManamy-Johnson,
Laurie Everett and Jared Felkins
5. Crossville Chronicle
Missy Wattenbarger, Heather
Mullinix, Caroline Selby, Gary
Nelson, Michael Moser and Ed
Greif
Group IV
1. The Jackson Sun
Staff
“Excellent cross section of
coverage.”
Group III
1. The Tullahoma News
Kali Bolle, Andrea Agardy and
Marian Galbraith
2. The Daily Herald, Columbia
Tim Hodge, Ric Bohy, Kelly
Quimby and Susan Thurman
Photo by Donn Jones • Donn Jones Photography
The 2014 Meeman Award winners, from left, are Pam Sohn, Chattanooga Times Free Press; Joan Garrett
McClane, Chattanooga Times Free Press; Patricia Zechman, Southern Standard, McMinnville; Eddie West,
Carthage Courier; Cherish Matthews, Gallatin News Examiner; and Tim Hodge, The Daily Herald, Columbia.
3. The Daily Times, Maryville
Staff
Jonesborough
Kristen Swing and Charlie
Mauk
4. Johnson City Press
Gary Gray, Jennifer Sprouse
and Sue Legg
3. The Bartlett Express
Matt Saxton
Group V
1. News Sentinel, Knoxville
Staff
“This series does an excellent job
of examining the Iraq War from a
variety of perspectives.”
Group II
1. Gallatin News Examiner
Dessislava Yankova
3. The Tennessean, Nashville
Tennessean Staff
3. The Standard Banner,
Jefferson City
Steve Marion
Group I
1. Herald & Tribune,
Jonesborough
Lynn Richardson
“This feature contained all the
elements of mystery and intrigue
wrapped in a secretly lived life
among an unsuspecting
community. Great work and likely
very well read.”
Dr. Tonjanita Johnson, vice president for communications and marketing of the University of Tennessee, addressed the attendees before the
awards were presented about the relationship between TPA and UT.
5. The Dunlap Tribune
Nathan Hickey
2. Chattanooga Times Free
Press
Todd South, Dan Henry, Casey
Phillips, Kevin Hardy, Susan
Pierce, C B Schmelter and Joan
Garrett McClane
Best Single Feature
Photo by Donn Jones • Donn Jones Photography
4. Cannon Courier, Woodbury
Ken Beck
“This is great work! It’s the sort of
compelling story readers love. It
contains all the elements of mystery and intrigue wrapped around
a life lived in secret. I’m sure this
was well-read and appreciated by
readers of the newspaper. Good
work!”
2. Herald & Tribune,
2. Hickman County Times,
Centerville
Bradley A. Martin
4. Weakley County Press,
Martin
Brad Gaskins
5. Manchester Times
Josh Peterson
Group III
1. The Mountain Press,
Sevierville
Gail Crutchfield
“Beautifully and thoughtfully written. The story gives a real sense of
what this family is going through,
both with Regen’s illness and with
the community support. I would
have liked a few more details on
Regen’s illness and prognosis,
though it’s clear the situation is
very grave. Still, this story captured the positive power of faith
and hope. Nicely done.”
2. The Mountain Press,
Sevierville
Jason Davis
3. Shelbyville Times-Gazette
Chris Siers
4. Elizabethton Star
Nathan Baker
5. Shelbyville Times-Gazette
David Melson
Group IV
1. Bristol Herald Courier
Michael Owens
“A fascinating snapshot of a
moment in American history.”
2. The Jackson Sun
David Thomas
3. Cleveland Daily Banner
Rick Norton
4. The Daily Herald, Columbia
Bailey Loosemore
5. Kingsport Times-News
Jeff Bobo
Group V
1. Chattanooga Times Free
Press
Joan Garrett McClane
“A disturbing look at a segment
of society that the news media
rarely delves into with this much
thoughtfulness and depth. Gripping.”
2. News Sentinel, Knoxville
See WINNERS, Page 5
State Press Contests Awards • Page 5
WINNERS, from Page 4
Kristi L. Nelson
3. The Tennessean, Nashville
Peter Cooper
4. The Tennessean, Nashville
Brian Haas
5. The Commercial Appeal,
Memphis
Tom Charlier
Community Lifestyles
Group I
1. Herald & Tribune,
Jonesborough
Kristen Swing, Charlie Mauk,
Jeanne Cope, Lisa Whaley, Lynn
Richardson, April Richardson
and Kasey Jones
“Nice use of photos, great layout,
stories”
2. The Erwin Record
Keith Whitson, Keeli Parkey,
David Sheets, Thomas Knisley,
Brenda Sparks, Donna Rea and
Damaris Higgins
3. Independent Herald, Oneida
Cora Queener
4. Pulaski Citizen
Margaret Campbell, Taren
Eastep, Paul Manke, Tracy Ayers,
Dan Watson and Cary Jane
Malone
5. Carroll County News-Leader,
Huntingdon
Shirley Nanney
Group II
1. News-Herald, Lenoir City
News-Herald staff
2. Grainger Today, Bean Station
Tracey Wolfe, Robert Turner
and Ann Cason
3. The Elk Valley Times,
Fayetteville
Lucy Williams, Sandy Williams,
Laurie Pearson and Paul Henry
4. The Sparta Expositor
Amye Anderson
5. Independent Appeal, Selmer
Sandy Whitaker
Group III
1. Shelbyville Times-Gazette
Sadie Fowler, Jason Reynolds,
Jim Davis and John Carney
“Good content that is
well-displayed.”
2. Elizabethton Star
Bryan Stevens, Alaina Akens,
Janie McKinney, Brandon Hicks,
Brian Reese and Mark Stevens
3. The Lebanon Democrat
Jared Felkins, Bonnie Bucy,
Pam Wingett and Kimberly
Jordan
Alamo
Gale Cavness
4. Crossville Chronicle
Missy Wattenbarger and
Caroline Selby
1. Independent Appeal, Selmer
Brian Azevedo, Andrew Alexander and Jeff Whitten
5. The Daily Post-Athenian,
Athens
Greg Moses
“Active writing about interesting
subjects edged out others.”
Group II
“Active writing draws you in and
keeps you.”
Group IV
1. Citizen Tribune, Morristown
Chantelle Moody, Joshua
Dean, John Gullion, Denise
Williams and Glenna Howington
“Overall great use of resources,
good coverage and excellent
presentation.”
2. Bristol Herald Courier
Jan Patrick, Joe Tennis, Tom
Netherland , Mary Dutton and
Hetty Canter
3. The Jackson Sun
Staff
2. The LaFollette Press
Chris Cannon and Dwane
Wilder
3. The Dickson Herald
John Bailey
4. Marshall County Tribune,
Lewisburg
Louis Scheuchenzuber and
Anthony Puca
5. Robertson County Times,
Springfield
Will Borthick
Group III
4. The Daily Times, Maryville
Melanie Tucker and Steve
Wildsmith
1. Union City Daily Messenger
Mike Hutchens and Kevin
Weaks
5. The Greeneville Sun
Kathy Knight and Velma
Southerland
“Kudos to the writers and editors
for a professional writing tone not
seen in many papers in this category. Mike Hutchens is especially
talented, always conscious that a
good lead grabs readers and good
flow keeps them until the end
Weaks is good, too. Well-rounded
stories and a wide-range of topics.
The top pick, no doubt.”
Group V
1. Chattanooga Times Free
Press
Joan Garrett McClane, Casey
Phillips, Clint Cooper, Susan
Pierce, Shawn Ryan, Lin
Parker, Sara Jackson and Laura
W. McNutt
“Very professional writing. Either
experience of great editing made
stories sing. Solid leads and story
flow that will keep readers engaged. The feature on Jeff Lamb
the best of the lot. Excellent.”
2. Elizabethton Star
Jamie Combs, Rick Sheek, Tim
Chambers, Wes Holtsclaw and
Matt Hill
3. The Mountain Press,
Sevierville
Christopher James and Jason
Davis
4. The Newport Plain Talk
Seth Butler
5. Southern Standard,
McMinnville
Jeffery Simmons
Group IV
1. The Daily Times, Maryville
Marcus Fitzsimmons, Grant
Ramey and Buzz Trexler
“Quality work by all involved.
Great stories and strong writing.”
“Just an overall great job by everyone involved. You should all be
proud of the work you are putting
out. Enjoyed the opportunity.”
“Really great use of quotes and
sources. Writing styles are strong
and the little bits of wit thrown
in add to the overall enjoyment
of reading. Good leads, many of
them that could be trite. They go
just to the edge but not over.”
2. The Jackson Sun
Brandon Shields, Craig Thomas and Jordan Buie
3. Bristol Herald Courier
Jim Sacco, Nate Hubbard,
Tim Hayes, Allen Gregory and
George Stone
4. The Daily Herald, Columbia
Marion Wilhoite and Justin
Lamb
5. The Greeneville Sun
Darren Reese, Tate Russell and
Wayne Phillips
Group V
1. The Commercial Appeal,
Memphis
Geoff Calkins
“Good writing, good storytelling, good reporting, emotion in
stormy, out-of-the-box subject
matter. These columns had it all.
Loved the column about superstitions of Grizzly fans.”
2. Chattanooga Times Free
Press
Stephen Hargis
3. News Sentinel, Knoxville
Evan Woodbery and Mike
Strange
4. The Tennessean, Nashville
David Climer, Jeff Lockridge,
Jim Wyatt, Nick Cole, Chip Cirillo
and John Glennon
See WINNERS, Page 6
First place award
“Fun, interesting stories attractively presented.”
Best News
Photograph
Group I
2. The Tennessean, Nashville
Tennessean Staff
Eddie West –
Carthage Courier
3. News Sentinel, Knoxville
Staff
Best Sports Writing
Group I
1. The Erwin Record
Curtis Carden
“Best all around.”
2. Carthage Courier
Scott Winfree
3. Carroll County News-Leader,
Huntingdon
Ron Park, Russell Bush and Jim
Steele
4. Pulaski Citizen
Andrew Powell, Johnny Phelps
and Scott Stewart
5. Crockett County Times,
A Defeated Creek resident was killed while traveling on his bicycle along
Highway 80, Friday afternoon. The broken bicycle lies in the foreground
as Tennessee Highway Patrol troopers talk with witnesses in the
background. (Oct. 10, 2013)
Page 6 • State Press Contests Awards
WINNERS, from Page 5
First place award
Best News
Photograph
Group II
Jeremy Styron –
News-Herald,
Lenoir City
Best Sports Coverage
Group I
1. Cannon Courier, Woodbury
Tony Stinnett
“Tony Stinnett is not only prolific
but a talented writer. Coverage is
outstanding, but it would add to
the newspaper’s credibility to add
other bylines, even if by Stinnettedited stringers or volunteers. The
sports photos by Joel Franklin are
very good. I liked the variety of
sports covered and the depth of
coverage on primary sports.”
2. The Erwin Record
Keith Whitson, Keeli Parkey,
Adam Campbell and Curtis
Carden
3. Carthage Courier
Scott Winfree and Jennifer
Bush
4. Independent Herald, Oneida
Ben Garrett and LeEtta Boyatt
5. Dresden Enterprise
Kenneth Coker
Group II
1. The LaFollette Press
Brent Schanding, Chris
Cannon and Dwane Wilder
“This is the best paper of the
bunch. When you consider that 90
percent of the work (and maybe
more if he lays out his own pages)
is done by one guy, it’s unbelievable the depth and quality of the
coverage and the overall appearance of the paper. Just WOW!”
Shelby Holt, 11, of Loudon spends a quiet moment in reflection during a Veterans Day ceremony on the Loudon County Courthouse lawn. (Nov. 13-14, 2013)
“The LaFollette Press may provide
the best coverage of sports of
any paper I’ve read, and that’s
a bunch. The remarkable thing
is that the lion’s share is done by
one guy – Chris Cannon. I don’t
know how much they pay him,
but it isn’t enough! The photos
he takes are outstanding and his
writing is always on point. I found
one misspelled word in 10 sports
sections; I’m going to say it was a
typo. From turkey hunting for the
disabled to Bassmasters to team
sports, his coverage was always
in depth. No surface reporting
and moving on by this guy. Just
outstanding.”
“Some of the best photos I’ve seen
and, ironically, they were taken
by the guy who writes most of the
copy for the sports section. He
is beyond prolific and his shots
are better than most by full-time
sports photographers.”
“Either there isn’t much editing
needed or this paper has a good
editor! The display is the best
I’ve seen. Every section is special
and the main topic gets in-depth
coverage. It must be a pleasure
for readers to grab a copy of this
paper every week.”
2. News-Herald, Lenoir City
Jonathan Herrmann
3. Robertson County Times,
Springfield
Will Borthick and Chris Lynn
4. Manchester Times
Josh Peterson, Milton Stanley
and Derek Harryman
5. The Elk Valley Times,
Fayetteville
Paul Henry, Lucy Williams,
Sandy Williams, Evan Buck and
Whitney Creasy
Group III
1. Elizabethton Star
Jamie Combs, Wes Holtsclaw,
Tim Chambers, Allen
LaMountain, Matt Myers, Rick
Sheek, Curtis Carden and Danny
Davis
“Just the best one. Nice use of
graphics. Attention given to all
sports. Photos are great. Layouts
are well-done.”
“Just a very solid sports section.”
“Maybe it was just the selections,
but it seemed like basketball was
only local sport covered in winter
issues. Is there wrestling or swimming/diving or anything else like
that in Tennessee? If not, spring
is a great time to submit sections
with many different sports within
a single issue.”
Photo by Donn Jones • Donn Jones Photography
Terri Likens, editor of the Roane County News, Kingston, the 2013-14 Contests Committee chairman, tells the
attendees at the 2014 State Press Contests Awards about the committee’s work.
“Photos were all pretty nice. A
few jumped out and exceptional,
and there were no weak photos in
regards to picture quality – clarity,
filling the frame, etc. “
“Front pages were all nice. Headlines filled the boxes drawn for
them- a bewildering oversight
many times. No butting headlines
and photos spaced well.”
2. The Newport Plain Talk
Seth Butler, Caleb Chrisman
and Chris Taylor
3. The Lebanon Democrat
Andy Reed, Jared Felkins, Sara
McManamy-Johnson, Kimberly
Jordan, Caitlin Rickard, Cory
Schuren, George Page, Jeff Neal
and Matt Masters
4. Shelbyville Times-Gazette
Chris Siers and Gary Johnson
5. The Tullahoma News
Zach Birdsong
Group IV
1. The Greeneville Sun
Darren Reese, Tate Russell and
Wayne Phillips
“Enjoyed getting to see this entry.
Strong work by all involved.”
“General good work overall. Everyone involved should be proud.”
Pretty comprehensive.”
“Great packages. Love the movie
poster look on the football package. Very creative.”
See WINNERS, Page 7
State Press Contests Awards • Page 7
WINNERS, from Page 6
“Love the big art and all the color.
They layout is good as well, very
easy to read. Enjoyable to look
at, even for a non-sports fan. The
dotted rules and shading helps
the reader’s eye travel around the
page with ease.”
2. The Daily News Journal,
Murfreesboro
Tom Kreager, Adam Sparks
and Will Borthick
3. The Daily Herald, Columbia
Marion Wilhoite and Justin
Lamb
4. The Leaf-Chronicle
Clarksville
George Robinson and Luke
Thompson
5. The Jackson Sun
Staff
Group V
1. Chattanooga Times Free
Press
Staff
“The depth and breadth of coverage is amazing. The info in the
Page2bits is incredible.”
“Tried to be picky and find something glaring to criticize. Couldn’t
do it. Lots of info in your Page2bits. You have it all: consistency
and breadth of coverage. The blitz
sections were fantastic and very
reader friendly. Great packaging.
You bring sports pages, and all
their variety to life. Your readers
are well served. You win because
you hit all the major elements the
best.”
2. The Jackson Sun
Staff
3. Chattanooga Times Free
Press
Staff
4. Johnson City Press
John Stout, Robert Pierce, Don
Armstrong, Kelly Stout and Kelly
Hodge
5. The Commercial Appeal,
Memphis
Louis Graham
Best Graphics and/or
Illustrations
Group I, Group II, Group III
Group IV, Group V
1. The Tennessean, Nashville
Michael Campbell, Merry Eccles, Bill Campling, Elena Bragg
and Martha Stroud
”Love!! The quality of all the
graphics is excellent. Its readability is great and the subject
gets across quickly/easily to the
reader. The wide variety is also
great while keeping everything
fresh and not recycling ideas on
different stories.”
2. The Jackson Sun
Brian Goins, Merry Eccles,
Martha Stroud, Drew White and
Bill Campling
Denney, Ralph Hood, Donna
Rea, Ray Knapp and Bryan
Stevens
3. Memphis Business Journal
Terry Hollahan
4. Herald & Tribune,
Jonesborough
Lynn Richardson, Kristen
Swing, Marcy Hawley, Frances
Lamberts and Jack VanZandt
5. Chester County
Independent, Henderson
Mary Dunbar and James A.
Webb
Group II
3. News Sentinel, Knoxville
Don Wood
1. The Daily News, Memphis
Staff
“Professional, clean cut. Easy to
read. Extremely informational.”
4. The Daily News Journal,
Murfreesboro
Staff
“Well written editorials and
columns. I particularly enjoyed
reading Dan Conaway columns.
Very clean page.”
2. Elizabethton Star
Brian Reese and Alaina Akens
5. Johnson City Press
Mike Murphy and Ken Walters
3. Independent Appeal, Selmer
Amber Hamm, Christen Coulon and Brian Azevedo
Editorials
1. Memphis Business Journal
Lee Swets
4. Carroll County News-Leader,
Huntingdon
Karen Weathers
5. Mt. Juliet News
Mark Rodgers and Laurie
Everett
Group I
1. Independent Herald, Oneida
Ben Garrett
“Nice layout, subject matter.”
2. The Erwin Record
Keith Whitson, Pettus Read,
Damaris Higgins, Connie
“The Memphis editorial raised
some very interesting and thought
provoking points. I also enjoyed
the column on Linda Shubert’s
son. From the low point, we can
rise, if we want too.”
“A lot of pertinent questions
raised in the city’s bond editorial.
I enjoyed the architecture and the
fundraising columns. I found both
interesting, particularly asking
why. Something we do in our
business every day.”
“Wide ranging and consistent.”
“Packaging and chocks of info
stuff help the reader. Like the oldschool use of cartoons.”
“Clean look. Good photos and you
display them”
2. The Tennessean, Nashville
Tennessean Sports Staff
3. The Commercial Appeal,
Memphis
Kyle Veazey, Geoff Calkins,
Ronald Tillery, Jason Smith, Phil
Stukenborg and John Varlas
4. News Sentinel, Knoxville
Evan Woodbery
Sunday Editions
Dailies
1. The Tennessean, Nashville
Tennessean Staff
“Excellent job on special reports.
Overall excellent publication.
Favorite was the Text and Driving
special report insert.”
A firefighter is silhouetted by smoke following the eruption of a storage building at Smith Equipment, U.S. 231
North in Deason, causing a cloud of smoke visible 6 miles away in Shelbyville. No one was hurt. (June 14, 2013)
“I loved the column about talking
politics. It is so true. Enjoyed the
Botanical Garden editorial. As a
tweeter-less person, I learned a lot
about the dos and don’ts”
2. Manchester Times
Josh Peterson, Janet Galyen
and Weldon Payne
3. News-Herald, Lenoir City
News-Herald editorial staff
4. Hickman County Times,
Centerville
Bradley A. Martin
5. Grainger Today, Bean Station
Tracey Wolfe
Group III
1. Southern Standard,
McMinnville
James Clark
“Nice job, I like the emphasis on
local and state issues, with a clear
argument made on each issue.”
“One concern: You have only indicated the three unsigned editorials
for consideration, so I’m not sure
whether to take the staff columns
into account, as well. Other papers
See WINNERS, Page 8
First place award
Best News
Photograph
Group III
David Melson –
Shelbyville
Times-Gazette
Page 8 • State Press Contests Awards
WINNERS, from Page 7
listed every staff-written column,
as well as any unsigned editorials. I especially like The Scoop by
James Clark, about the city legal
fees.”
2. The Daily Post-Athenian,
Athens
Doug Headrick
3. The Tullahoma News
Susan Campbell, Andrea
Agardy and Marian Galbraith
4. Elizabethton Star
Mark Stevens and Rozella
Hardin
5. The Lebanon Democrat
Jared Felkins
Group IV
1. The Daily Herald, Columbia
Chris Fletcher
4. Cleveland Daily Banner
Rick Norton
“Exceptional work in a very strong
category.”
5. The Greeneville Sun
John M. Jones Jr.
“As an editor, I have been through
much of this as we built a new
hospital and are struggling to
keep it open. We know what will
happen if it closes. This editorial
makes it clear what will happen if
this hospital fails.”
Group V
1. Chattanooga Times Free
Press
Pam Sohn
“The topics of these editorials are
not only of state and national
interest, but also important at the
local level. While issues specific
to Chattanooga, they are topics
being discussed in communities
across the nation. Well crafted
and executed.”
“Local, state and national interest
in the editorials. Excellent topics
put into local perspectives.”
“Controversial issues presented so
average reader can understand.
Well argued.”
“Energetic writing. A fast read on
what could have been too in-theweeds for readers. Wonderful job
of explanatory journalism.”
“Well displayed and executed.”
2. Citizen Tribune, Morristown
Mike Fishman and John
Gullion
3. News Sentinel, Knoxville
Scott Barker
3. The Leaf-Chronicle,
Clarksville
Chris Smith
First place award
Best News
Photograph
Group IV
Greg Williamson –
The Leaf-Chronicle,
Clarksville
2. The Tennessean, Nashville
Ted Rayburn
4. The Commercial Appeal,
Memphis
Jerome Wright
Best Single Editorial
Group I
1. Independent Herald, Oneida
Ben Garrett
“Exceptionally well written piece
that said what needed to be said
about as well as anyone could
say it.”
“The people of Scott County have
been given a rare second chance.
That 75 percent of the population
who says they will use it will have
to come through and patronize
the facility or it won’t survive the
federal government’s rural-hospital-killing regulations. Powerful
work.”
2. The McKenzie Banner
Joel Washburn
3. Cannon Courier, Woodbury
Mike West
4. Herald & Tribune,
Jonesborough
Lynn Richardson
5. Herald & Tribune,
Jonesborough
Lynn Richardson
Group II
1. Weakley County Press,
Martin
Brad Gaskins
“Well-argued piece with an
engaging style of writing.”
2. The Advocate & Democrat,
Sweetwater
Thomas Wilson
3. Gallatin News Examiner
Mike Towle
4. The LaFollette Press
Brent Schanding
5. Marshall County Tribune,
Lewisburg
Karen Hall
Group III
1. The Tullahoma News
Susan Campbell
“This writer has a strong voice and
isn’t afraid to use it. Biting. Descriptive. Once again proving that
the best editorials don’t reflect the
community, but lead it.”
2. The Mountain Press,
Sevierville
Stan Voit
3. The Lebanon Democrat
Jared Felkins
4. The Daily Post-Athenian,
Athens
Doug Headrick
5. The Mountain Press,
Sevierville
Stan Voit
Group IV
1. The Daily Herald, Columbia
Chris Fletcher
“Subject brought to light with
powerful writing. Kept readers to
the last line. Heart
wrenching.”
2. Bristol Herald Courier
Christine Uthoff
3. The Daily Times, Maryville
Robert Norris
4. The Daily News Journal,
Murfreesboro
Jim Leonhirth
5. The Leaf-Chronicle,
Clarksville
Chris Smith
Group V
1. Chattanooga Times Free
Press
Pam Sohn
“This is an issue that is being debated in many states as demand
for water by homeowners, cities
and industry continues to rise.
Great job of explaining the politics
surrounding it, as well as water
problems facing unprepared
urban sprawl.”
2. Chattanooga Times Free
Press
Pam Sohn
3. The Tennessean, Nashville
Ted Rayburn
4. The Commercial Appeal,
Memphis
Jerome Wright
5. News Sentinel, Knoxville
Scott Barker
Best Personal Column
Group I
1. The Erwin Record
Keith Whitson
“Good job capturing that
hometown feeling.”
“Nice story about a family who
has weathered the storm. It was
stores like his that made small
town America what it was. It is a
shame it is fading along with the
owners of the small town retail
store.”
2. Carthage Courier
Scott Winfree
3. Herald & Tribune,
Jonesborough
Lynn Richardson
4. Independent Herald, Oneida
Paul Roy
Alpha Company 3rd Platoon 1st Battalion, 327th Infantry Regiment soldiers Cpl. Joseph Dunlap, left, and Sgt.
Robert Saffel help Spc. Daniel Nakitare after his MRAP hit an IED while on patrol in the Nangarhar Province,
Afghanistan. (Feb. 23, 2013)
5. Herald & Tribune,
Jonesborough
Lynn Richardson
See WINNERS, Page 9
State Press Contests Awards • Page 9
WINNERS, from Page 8
Group II
1. News-Herald, Lenoir City
Jeremy Styron
“Very well written, showing either
a great deal of research or
general knowledge.”
2. Grainger Today, Bean Station
Carolynn Elder
3. Gallatin News Examiner
Mike Towle
“I wonder how many people went
out to find a Dobro recording after
this column published. I’ll bet a lot.
It certainly made me curious to
find out what made Mike’s music
so special to you.”
2. The Commercial Appeal,
Memphis
Geoff Calkins
3. The Commercial Appeal,
Memphis
Wendi C. Thomas
4. Manchester Times
Josh Peterson
4. Chattanooga Times Free
Press
David Cook
5. News-Herald, Lenoir City
Jeremy Styron
5. The Tennessean, Nashville
Gail Kerr
Group III
1. Elizabethton Star
Mark A. Stevens
“Very nice piece. I’m sure it
touched everyone who had relationship with a pet.”
2. The Paris Post-Intelligencer
Ernest Williams
3. The Daily Post-Athenian,
Athens
Greg Moses
4. Roane County News,
Kingston
Terri Likens
5. Crossville Chronicle
Gary Nelson
Group IV
1. Bristol Herald Courier
Christine Uthoff
“If journalism is the chronicling of
the human condition – and it is –
this is journalism.”
2. The Daily Herald, Columbia
Chris Fletcher
3. The Daily Times, Maryville
Buzz Trexler
4. The Jackson Sun
Dan Morris
5. Johnson City Press
Jan Hearne
Group V
1. The Tennessean, Nashville
Peter Cooper
“A moving, meaningful tribute to
a friend and mentor. It was a joy
to read.”
“Pure, heartfelt narrative. Your
pace was so smooth and even the
column almost read itself to me.
To continue the theme, you hit all
the right notes.”
Best Personal Humor
Column
Group I
1. Hamilton County Herald,
Chattanooga
Jay Edwards
We will make or break our hospital
We need a hospital.
For the past 18 months, that has
been the lament of many Scott
Countians – over cups of coffee at
McDonald’s, in checkout lines at
Save-A-Lot or Walmart, on Facebook walls.
It’s cliché, but sometimes you
really don’t know how much you’ll
miss something until it’s gone, and
over the last year and a half, Scott
County has been awakened to the
realization of what it means to be
without a hospital and the emergency care that a hospital provides.
The prospects of being in a
serious car accident, or suffering
from a heat attack or stroke, and
not having an emergency room
physician merely minutes away is
frightening. When foul weather
prevents air-evac helicopters from
flying, the situation becomes even
more precarious. From Oneida,
the nearest hospital is more than
a half-hour away, even by ambulance.
There are probably many
reasons why the hospital closed in
“Nice piece. Takes me back to the
many times I’ve played golf and
watched some knucklehead
decide to teach his girlfriend how
to play golf on a Saturday. Well
written, compelling and funny.”
3. Memphis Business Journal
Bill Wellborn
2. Macon County Times,
Lafayette
Tilly Dillehay
4. Herald & Tribune,
Jonesborough
Lynn Richardson
First place award
Best Feature
Photograph
Group I
Lacy Hilliard –
The Tomahawk,
Mountain City
First place award
Best Single
Editorial
Group I
Ben Garrett –
Independent
Herald, Oneida
May 2012, but it boils down to one
simple matter: the hospital was not
profitable.
Pioneer Health Services has
made an investment in Scott
County. The hospital can only be
sustainable this time around if
we – the citizens of Scott County
– make the same investment in
Pioneer Health Services.
There are certain stigmas
attached to rural hospitals. The
perception is that the larger hospitals in urban settings are more
sophisticated, with better diagnostic equipment, better physicians
and better care. While there are
many things rural hospitals are
not equipped to do because it does
5. Memphis Business Journal
Bill Wellborn
Group II
1. Manchester Times
not make sense from a financial
standpoint, the doctors, nurses and
specialists at community hospitals
receive the same training and certifications and are held to the same
standards as their counterparts at
larger hospitals in larger cities.
Certainly, it will be up to Pioneer
Health to earn our trust. The
doctors and nurses employed by Pioneer Community Hospital of Scott
must provide care that inspires that
trust.
But, in turn, it’s up to us to put
trust in the hospital. Our local
physicians and the rest of us as potential patients must buy into this
effort. If we don’t, all the work that
has gone into making the hospital
re-opening a reality will be in vain.
The jobs, the tax dollars, the industrial recruitment tool and, most
importantly, the health care the
hospital provides will all be lost.
“We need a hospital.” That has
been our mantra.
We’ve got a hospital.
Let’s use it.
Dec. 5, 2013
Josh Peterson
“I have written similar columns,
though haven’t addressed these
issues in a sarcastic manner. Not
See WINNERS, Page 10
Page 10 • State Press Contests Awards
WINNERS, from Page 9
saying I wouldn’t though! Good,
attention-grabbing column. As an
editor, I can certainly appreciate
the challenges this gentleman
faces with such a wide variety of
submissions.”
2. The Rogersville Review
Sarah Proffitt
3. The LaFollette Press
Beth Braden
4. Manchester Times
Josh Peterson
5. Gallatin News Examiner
Mike Towle
Group III
1. The Tullahoma News
Andrea Agardy
“We’re all nerds of one kind or
another, and that’s what makes
this so appealing.”
2. Crossville Chronicle
Heather Mullinix
3. Crossville Chronicle
Gary Nelson
4. The Paris Post-Intelligencer
Ernest Williams
First place award
Best Feature
Photograph
Group II
Chris Cannon –
The LaFollette
Press
‘Just say no’ to prescriptions for over-the-counter medicines
Let’s start with the obvious
and say this up front: methamphetamine is a serious problem in
Weakley County. Nobody disputes
this. The numbers speak for themselves.
In the last year alone, 30
children have been placed in the
foster care system or with relative
caregivers due to meth-related child
abuse or neglect. That’s heartbreaking and expensive, costing
taxpayers $107 per day for each
displaced child.
At least nine homes in Weakley
County have been quarantined, at
a cost of $7,000 per home, due to
meth-making activities. Authorities say the number of meth labs
uncovered in the county is already
132 percent higher than last year.
They also say they’ve seen an increase in violent crime committed
by those addicted to meth, and we
believe them.
Take, for example, the recent
meth-related search of a mobile
home on Chestnut Glade Road. In
that incident, sheriff’s investigators
5. The Daily Post-Athenian,
Athens
Greg Moses
Group IV
1. The Greeneville Sun
Allison Adams
First place award
Best Single
Editorial
Group II
Brad Gaskins –
Weakley County
Press, Martin
and the Department of Children’s
Services were conducting an
investigation when one of the
suspects allegedly pointed a gun
at authorities and was shot. That’s
the occupational hazard our law
enforcement officers face each time
they respond to a suspected meth
lab site.
Meth is dangerous, highly
addictive and can be made in the
privacy of one’s home using recipes
readily available on the Internet
and ingredients readily available
at local pharmacies and grocery
stores. How do you stop that?
Weakley County officials and
municipalities believe they can
curb it by requiring prescriptions
for all products containing ephedrine and pseudoephedrine, both
without confusing the reader. You
managed it beautifully.”
“Very, very funny. Again, I laughed
all the way through it. You have a
real gift.”
2. The Greeneville Sun
Allison Adams
“Terrifically funny column that
could have been predictable, but
wasn’t.”
3. Herald-Citizen, Cookeville
Bob McMillan
“Very clever dialogue
constructions. That’s hard to do
4. The Leaf-Chronicle,
Clarksville
required ingredients for making
meth.
At the County Commission
meeting June 27, at the urging of
Sheriff Mike Wilson, commissioners adopted a resolution asking
the county’s municipalities to pass
ordinances requiring prescriptions
to purchase ephedrine and pseudoephedrine.
In other words, if Greg in Sharon
or Sue in Gleason has a bad case of
allergies and needs some Sudafed
to clear things up, they must first
visit a doctor to get a prescription.
Law-abiding citizens will have to
spend even more money to get an
over-the-counter remedy for the
sniffles. Those without insurance
will be punished more than those
with it.
We applaud the Weakley County’s Sheriff’s Department and all
local police departments for their
efforts to fight the meth problems.
We also know local governments
have the best interest of their
respective communities in mind.
And for that reason, they should
Karen Parr-Moody
5. The Daily Herald, Columbia
Chris Fletcher
Group V
1. Chattanooga Times Free
Press
Mark Kennedy
“Thoroughly entertaining with
perfect humorous metaphors
throughout.”
just say no to requiring prescriptions for an over-the-counter
medicine.
Besides, those who want to
obtain such medicines for illegal
purposes, as well as those who
need it for legitimate reasons, will
likely do the same thing: drive to
the next county, or the next town,
that doesn’t require a prescription.
New solutions are needed to
combat a growing meth problem,
but punishing law-abiding citizens
for the actions of a small minority
doesn’t seem fair. We don’t know
what the answer is to curtailing
the meth epidemic, but requiring a
prescription for an over-the-counter
sinus remedy doesn’t seem to be it.
The Martin Board of Mayor and
Aldermen will discuss the issue
at their meeting Monday. We urge
them, as well as elected officials in
Greenfield, Dresden, Sharon and
Gleason, to carefully consider this
proposed measure, one many of its
citizens literally may not be able to
afford when sickness strikes.
July 3-4, 2013
2. The Commercial Appeal,
Memphis
Geoff Calkins
3. Chattanooga Times Free
Press
David Cook
4. News Sentinel, Knoxville
Sam Venable
5. News Sentinel, Knoxville
Sam Venable
Best Spot News
Coverage
Group I
1. Carthage Courier
Eddie West
“Very thorough story on such a
horrible incident.”
2. The Erwin Record
Keith Whitson and Keeli
Parkey
3. Carroll County News-Leader,
Huntingdon
Shirley Nanney
4. Carroll County News-Leader,
Huntingdon
Shirley Nanney
5. The McKenzie Banner
Ernie Smothers
Group II
1. The Standard Banner,
Jefferson City
Steve Marion
See WINNERS, Page 11
State Press Contests Awards • Page 11
WINNERS, from Page 10
4. The Jackson Sun
Staff
“Writing was so good, I felt I was
at the scene of the fire.”
5. The Jackson Sun
Nichole Manna
2. Robertson County Times,
Springfield
Nicole Young
3. The Elk Valley Times,
Fayetteville
Lucy Williams and Laurie
Pearson
4. The Elk Valley Times,
Fayetteville
Lucy Williams, Sandy Williams,
Paul Henry and Laurie Pearson
5. Gallatin News Examiner
Dessislava Yankova, Josh
Cross, Jennifer Easton, Sherry
Mitchell and Sarah Kingsbury
Group III
1. Elizabethton Star
Ashley Rader, Bryan Stevens,
Brian Reese, Brandon Hicks and
Mark Stevens
“Outstanding local tie-in to what
was a national story. This is good
work, well-played and no doubt
read thoroughly. A real keepsake
for the community as well as for
the family. Good job!”
2. Southern Standard,
McMinnville
James Clark
3. Shelbyville Times-Gazette
David Melson
4. Southern Standard,
McMinnville
Donna Anderson, Duane Sherrill and James Clark
5. The Tullahoma News
Andrea Agardy
“Great job making an over-saturated subject interesting. We see
articles all the time about meth, so
it’s hard to make an article about
it stand out from the rest. You
nailed it. Articles were very easy to
read and entertaining.”
1. The LaFollette Press
Beth Braden
“Excellent coverage of a sad situation; solid writing.”
5. Robertson County Times,
Springfield
Nicole Young and Cheri
Reeves
Group III
1. News Sentinel, Knoxville
Staff
2. Bulletin Times, Bolivar
Amelia Carlson
“Strong coverage on a very sad
situation. Articles kept public
informed, up dated. Great headlines; solid writing.”
“By far the winner. The story
blended news and reaction beautifully. Good use of quotes and
details to tell the tale. Impressive
amount of deadline reporting and
sources.”
3. Mt. Juliet News
Laurie Everett
2. Grainger Today, Bean Station
Tracey Wolfe
“Congratulations on being first in
one of the most competitive fields
I have judged in a decade.”
4. Herald & Tribune,
Jonesborough
Karen Sells
3. The LaFollette Press
Beth Braden and Brent
Schanding
“Great reporting. Cannot think of
one criticism. Covered everything
in depth. Very interesting!”
2. The Commercial Appeal,
Memphis
Jody Callahan and Samantha
Bryson
5. Independent Herald, Oneida
Ben Garrett
4. Gallatin News Examiner
Tena Lee, Jennifer Easton,
Dessislava Yankova and Sarah
Kingsbury
2. The Tullahoma News
Susan Campbell, Andrea
Agardy and Brian Justice
See WINNERS, Page 12
Group V
Group II
1. Elizabethton Star
Ashley Rader, Brian Reese and
Mark Stevens
3. Chattanooga Times Free
Press
Ben Benton
4. The Tennessean, Nashville
Peter Cooper, Linda Zettler,
Cindy Watts, Tom Wilemon and
Tennessean Staff
5. News Sentinel, Knoxville
Staff
Best News Reporting
Group I
1. Independent Herald, Oneida
Ben Garrett
First place award
Best Feature
Photograph
Group III
Brandon Hicks –
Elizabethton Star
Group IV
1. The Leaf-Chronicle,
Clarksville
Philip Grey
“This package is a fine example of
strong reporting and writing done
by journalists who know their
beat. The online reporting kept
readers abreast of developments,
and the print package provides all
the available details.”
“The writers take pains to thoroughly and clearly explain what
will happen because of the Pentagon’s restructuring. And they took
the time to delve deeply rather
than reporting the ‘headline’
numbers.”
2. The Daily Herald, Columbia
Ric Bohy
3. Bristol Herald Courier
Kevin Castle
Cloudland High senior Austin Bell, shown working on a project, earned second place in the American Welding
Society’s chapter competition, then took fourth place at the state welding competition.
Page 12 • State Press Contests Awards
WINNERS, from Page 11
3. Crossville Chronicle
Michael Moser
4. Southern Standard,
McMinnville
Duane Sherrill
5. The Paris Post-Intelligencer
Melanie Howard
Group IV
1. Bristol Herald Courier
Michael Owens
“This is really great work. I can
see the progress in the reporting.
I can see the impact as well. The
reporter followed a great trail of
documents, held people accountable and was incredibly fair to
the AG and attorneys considering
the e-mails he had in his hands.
Sometimes stories like this can
be written in a ‘gotcha tone’ that
feels like overkill, but I’m just thoroughly impressed with all of this
work. Great job.”
2. The Jackson Sun
Nichole Manna, Jordan Buie
and David Thomas
3. The Leaf-Chronicle,
Clarksville
Tavia Green
4. Kingsport Times-News
Nick Shepherd
5. The Leaf-Chronicle,
Clarksville
Chris Smith and Mark Hicks
Group V
1. Chattanooga Times Free
Press
Joy Lukachick
“Many states have horrific challenges with their state prisons but
few get the sort of insight into
the myriad problems as revealed
in this hard-hitting series. This is
some of the best work I’ve seen in
a long while, certainly meriting
the top spot here. Excellent work!”
2. The Tennessean, Nashville
Tom Wilemon and Shelley
DuBois
3. News Sentinel, Knoxville
Staff
4. Chattanooga Times Free
Press
Joan Garrett McClane and
Todd South
5. News Sentinel, Knoxville
Jamie Satterfield and Don
Jacobs
Investigative Reporting
Group I
Actions at diversity meeting shameful
There was no door to stand in
front of that kept black students
from entering, and there were
no police officers arresting black
citizens as they attempted to eat at
a counter with the words “whites
only” emblazoned on the wall
above their heads.
But little else distinguished
Tuesday night’s event at the Manchester-Coffee County Conference
Center from those hate-filled, racist
gatherings of days past.
Organized and sponsored by the
American Muslim Advisory Council, headquartered in Murfreesboro,
the event, called “Public Disclosure
in a Diverse Society,” was billed
as an educational opportunity for
the public to learn about American
Muslims, as well as how the civil
rights of all citizens are protected
under the United States Constitution.
It was the result of a recent Facebook reposting by Coffee County
Commissioner Barry West in
which a man is pictured pointing
a gun at a camera with words that
read, “How to wink at a Muslim.”
West has since apologized for the
post and removed it, but not before
the story about his posting went
viral.
While, undoubtedly, some of the
nearly 1,000 people who attended
the event and preceding anti-Muslim and “free speech” rally were
there to listen and learn, the overwhelming majority had another
1. Memphis Business Journal
Cole Epley
“Very thorough and insightful
reporting on a topic that can raise
hackles quickly but requires real
research to explain well.”
First place award
Best Single
Editorial
Group III
Susan Campbell –
The Tullahoma
News
intention in mind – to intimidate,
undermine and disrupt the event.
Their stated reason for being
there? To protest what bloggers had
called the government’s attempts
to take away an individual’s First
Amendment rights to post whatever he or she chooses on social
media sites without repercussion.
The real reason, however,
became apparent shortly after the
presentation began.
Wrapped in American flags and
waving Bibles, the protesters shouted, “speak English” at a Muslim
man who has been in the United
States for three decades. They
cheered and clapped at photos of a
burned mosque in Columbia, Tenn.
They booed at photos of American Muslim soldiers killed while
serving their country in the United
States military. They accused all
Muslims of being terrorists and
yelled at them to “go home.”
Those who couldn’t get inside for
the presentation due to overcrowded conditions called law enforcement officers “communists.” One
man, who donned a confederate
Group II
1. The LaFollette Press
Brent Schanding
2. The Courier, Savannah
R. Kelly Jordan
“This is a thorough and interesting
look into a topic that is can easily
stir controversy but yet remain
opaque to the average reader
(and, for that fact, journalist). The
reporter did a very good job of
gathering information and presenting it in a clear and readable
fashion, and the supplemental
charts were very helpful for
context.”
3. Gallatin News Examiner
Sarah Kingsbury and Tena Lee
2. Herald & Tribune, Jonesborough
Kristen Swing
1. Elizabethton Star
Max Hrenda, Brian Reese and
Mark Stevens
3. The Portland Leader
Sonya Thompson
4. Herald & Tribune, Jonesborough
Lynn Richardson
5. Bulletin Times, Bolivar
Amelia Carlson
4. Grainger Today, Bean Station
Tracey Wolfe
5. Weakley County Press,
Martin
Brad Gaskins
Group III
“A good story fairly well told. At
points it’s a little unclear, the way
it jumps around from place to
place, and it’s a shame none of the
911 dispatchers were interviewed.
Good use of public records.”
2. The Mountain Press, Sevierville
Jeff Farrell
soldier’s cap, shouted, “Mohammed
was a pedophile!”
There is no doubt that the majority of people in Coffee County were
embarrassed and ashamed by the
actions of the people gathered at
this assembly, and that many, if not
the majority of those in attendance,
were from out of town.
Sadly, what could have been a
positive learning experience for the
people of Coffee County and Middle
Tennessee was derailed by anger,
prejudice and fear of the unknown,
which often happens during times
of tremendous social change and
upheaval.
These days, anger is further
stoked by social media, talk radio
and those whose livelihoods depend upon keeping people afraid
of those who look, act or worship
differently than themselves.
One of those out-of-towners who
attended the event whose livelihood has been greatly enhanced
by the anger was Pamela Geller,
blogger, political activist and
commentator, and the co-founder
of Stop Islamization of America,
an organization that has been
labeled as a hate group by both the
Anti-Defamation League and the
Southern Poverty Law Center.
On her blog “Atlas Shrugs,”
Geller has made false claims that
Muslims have sex with goats and
that President Obama’s mother
had nude pornographic photos
taken. On her blog, she also posted
a doctored photo of the President
urinating on an American flag.
According to the Southern Poverty Law Center, Geller has “mingled
comfortably with European racists
and fascists, spoken favorably of
South African racists, defended
Serbian war criminal Radovan
Karadzic and denied the existence
of Serbian concentration camps.”
Tuesday’s event was shocking
and scary for those who attended
hoping to learn more about the
Muslim culture and American
Muslims, and discouraging for
those Muslims and government
employees who were brave enough
to stand before the angry crowd
to make their presentations. It is,
more than anything, sad that we,
as a community, took this opportunity for understanding between
cultures and religions and turned it
into a witch-hunt.
Let’s hope that businesses and
industries looking to locate in our
area who are minority-owned do
not decide to go elsewhere due to
the vile actions of a few.
“Let us all hope that the dark
clouds of racial prejudice will soon
pass away, and that in some not too
distant tomorrow the radiant stars
of love and brotherhood will shine
over our great nation with all their
scintillating beauty.” Dr. Martin
Luther King Jr.
June 7, 2013
3. Shelbyville Times-Gazette
Jason Reynolds
4. Bristol Herald Courier
Michael Owens
4. Elizabethton Star
Kayla Carter and Brian Reese
5. The Daily Herald, Columbia
Tim Hodge, Ric Bohy, Bailey
Loosemore and Kelly Quimby
5. Shelbyville Times-Gazette
Jason Reynolds
Group IV
1. The Leaf-Chronicle, Clarksville
Philip Grey and Tavia Green
“Superb reporting and powerful
writing that revealed a surprising
fact about military suicides.”
“Powerful and surprising. Topnotch reporting and writing and
excellent use of documentary
evidence.”
“Powerful storytelling and all
based on documents and human
sources. Superb reporting and
investigative work.”
2. The Jackson Sun
Jordan Buie
3. The Jackson Sun
Nichole Manna
Group V
1. Chattanooga Times Free
Press
Joy Lukachick
“This is an excellent piece of work
from finding the always allusive
sources to the exhaustive work
to document what they said. Credible and complete.”
2. The Tennessean, Nashville
Walter Roche Jr.
3. News Sentinel, Knoxville
Jamie Satterfield
4. The Tennessean, Nashville
Anita Wadhwani, Tony
Gonzalez and Toni Dew
5. The Commercial Appeal,
Memphis
Marc Perrusquia and Jeff
McAdory
See WINNERS, Page 13
State Press Contests Awards • Page 13
Community must face up to problem of domestic violence
Freda Elliott was on her knees in
the closet when she died, begging
for her life and the lives of her
children.
“Parker, please don’t hurt my
babies,” the 42-year-old Culleoka
woman pleaded, overheard by a 911
dispatcher before Parker Ray Elliott,
who is now serving a life sentence
in prison, beat in the door with a
baseball bat.
He shot Freda and their 18-yearold daughter to death. He shot their
15-year-old son five times, but the
boy survived.
The gunfire was the tragic crescendo of 20 years of abuse. Freda
had tried many times to escape, but
nothing helped – not a restraining
order, a divorce or a move to a new
home. Her call to 911 on June 24,
2004, was a last desperate plea for
help from a system that failed her.
That was more than eight years
ago, but as a community we are still
WINNERS, from Page 12
Best Business Coverage
Group I
1. Memphis Business Journal
Michael Sheffield, Cole Epley
First place award
Best Feature
Photograph
Group IV
Helen Comer –
The Daily News
Journal,
Murfreesboro
First place award
Best Single
Editorial
Group IV
Chris Fletcher –
The Daily Herald,
Columbia
failing victims of domestic violence.
Two weeks ago, John Lee Fleming was sentenced to 30 years in
prison for murdering his girlfriend,
Tonya Thompson, in the Columbia
home they shared in September of
2011. Fleming was on probation for
threatening Tonya in front of police
officers. Neighbors thought they’d
seen him threatening her at gunpoint. And there were signs he beat
her just a few days before she died.
The story of Fleming’s sentencing
appeared in The Daily Herald the
same day that another Columbia
man allegedly choked and raped his
wife on Valentine’s Day.
and Andy Ashby
“Considering this publication is
dedicated to business coverage –
and does it quite well – it’s nearly
impossible not to give them top
honors in this category.”
2. Herald & Tribune,
Jonesborough
Karen Sells, Kristen Swing,
Lynn Richardson and Charlie
Mauk
3. The Erwin Record
Keith Whitson, Keeli Parkey
and Thomas Knisley
4. Chester County
Independent, Henderson
Mary Dunbar, James A. Webb
and Marney Gilliam
But the biggest headline read,
“City tops state in domestic abuse.”
Columbia has Tennessee’s highest
rate of domestic violence, the leader
of our battered women’s shelter
announced. Worse than Memphis,
and far worse than most other
major cities.
How can this be? How did we
reach this point? The same way
that domestic violence can grow
in homes like a cancer, becoming
more and more lethal. If you ignore
it, or hide it or fail to deal with it, it
only gets worse.
Clearly our criminal justice
system has failed to deal adequately with domestic violence. Police
officers have failed to make arrests
and to make thorough, accurate
reports. Prosecutors have failed to
go after these cases aggressively.
Judges have failed to give tough
sentences to offenders and ensure
they complete batterer intervention
programs.
Leaders across the board have
failed to assign adequate resources
to domestic violence. They’ve failed
to review the statistics, assess their
progress or conduct public information campaigns. They have failed to
make curbing domestic violence a
priority.
After the recent announcement,
Mayor Dean Dickey vowed that
Columbia will take steps to address
the city’s domestic violence woes.
We look forward to hearing more
details from him, and we hope to
hear from our police chief, sheriff
and district attorney very soon
about how they plan to address this
issue.
We especially want to hear about
how these agencies will work
together to stop the violence, as it
will take a concerted effort to help
our city down from its shameful No.
1 ranking.
But that’s not enough. The shame
belongs to the community as whole.
This problem starts in our homes
and in our neighborhoods, and any
lasting solution must reach there as
well.
We must acknowledge domestic
abuse. We must report it. We must
help victims escape it. We must get
abusers into intervention programs,
and if that doesn’t work, we must
help send them to prison.
We must teach our sons to
respect women. We must support
Hope House and other agencies that
fight domestic violence.
And those among us who are
doling out the abuse must look in
the mirror, admit what’s happening
and then seek help to stop it.
We can’t ignore domestic violence
any more. There are too many
Freda Elliotts out there begging for
our help.
March 3, 2013
5. Carthage Courier
Eddie West
and Marian Galbraith
writers followed it all the way to
the conclusion.”
Group II
1. Gallatin News Examiner
Sarah Kingsbury, Josh Cross,
Sherry Mitchell, Tena Lee and
Dessislava Yankova
“Great variety of coverage,
different reporters was a plus;
some strong pics and layout
enhancing stories.”
3. The Daily News, Memphis
Staff
4. The Rogersville Review
Sarah Proffitt
5. The Standard Banner,
Jefferson City
Steve Marion and Dale Gentry
Group III
“By far the best use of graphics
and photos.”
2. The Lebanon Democrat
Jared Felkins, Sara McManamy-Johnson and Caitlin Rickard
3. The Tullahoma News
Andrea Agardy, Marian Galbraith and Kelly Lapczynski
“Good variety of coverage, hard
news, features, different
reporters; some great pics;
layout and placement strong.”
1. Elizabethton Star
Kayla Carter, Ashley Rader,
Mark Stevens, Brian Reese, Bryan
Stevens, Brandon Hicks and
Carter Giegerich
4. The Newport Plain Talk
Rick Hooper, Duay O Neil and
Nelson Morais
2. Manchester Times
Josh Peterson, John Coffelt
“Loved that the reader was
included in the story and that the
1. The Jackson Sun
David Thomas and Jordan
Buie
Group IV
“Very strong entry that combined
reporting, writing and design to
give readers attractive, informative coverage. The stories that focused on smaller businesses were
good examples of small business
coverage that is sometimes the
most interesting to readers.”
2. The Daily Herald, Columbia
Tim Hodge, Bailey Loosemore
and Ric Bohy
3. The Daily Times, Maryville
Staff
4. Kingsport Times-News
Hank Hayes
5. The Leaf-Chronicle,
Clarksville
Jimmy Settle
See WINNERS, Page 15
Page 14 • State Press Contests Awards
2014 General Excellence Winners
Circulation Group I: Combined
weekly circulation of 5,000 or less
Circulation Group II: Combined
weekly circulation of 5,001-15,000
Circulation Group III: Combined
weekly circulation of 15,001-50,000
C
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Photo submitted by Elizabethton Star
Photo submitted by The Erwin Record
The Erwin Record took the General Excellence Award for
Group I. Pictured from left are Advertising & Marketing Services Director Damaris Higgins, News Editor Keeli Parkey,
Publisher Keith Whitson, Reporter Tommy Knisley, Advertising Assistant and Graphic Director David Sheets and Sports
Writer Curtis Cardin.
Photo submitted by The LaFollette Press
The LaFollette Press won the General Excellence Award for
Group II. From left are Beth Braden, Brent Schanding and
Chris Cannon. Beth is now editor-in-chief of Morgan County
News in Wartburg. Brent is the editor-in-chief of The LaFollette Press, and Chris is the sports editor.
The Elizabethton Star took the General Excellence award for
Group III. As Publisher Lynn Richardson stated in an email,
“It takes an entire team to win awards,” so she submitted a
staff photo. Some of the newspaper’s team were not able to
join them for the photo. Pictured from left, on the front row,
are Brandon Hicks, Janie McKinney, Sherry Shepherd, Brandy Trivett, Rozella Hardin, Lynn Richardson, Brian Reese,
Ashley Rader, Alaina Akens and Abby Morris-Frye. From left,
on the back row, are Cindy Treadway, Kristina Cruz, Judy
Richardson, Kathy Scalf, Delaney Scalf, Tommy Young, Bill
Parsons and Patsy Johnson.
C
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State Press Contests Awards • Page 15
Circulation Group IV: Combined
weekly circulation of 50,001-200,000
Circulation Group V: Combined
weekly circulation of 200,001 & above
2014 Make-up
& Appearance
Winners
Circulation Group I:
Memphis Business Journal
C
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WINNERS, from Page 13
Group V
1. Chattanooga Times Free Press
Dave Flessner, Mike Pare, Ellis Smith and Shelly
Bradbury
“This package entry is an outstanding example of business coverage in the newspaper’s market. Good variety
of well-written and well-edited stories packages in
professional way likely is popular with the newspaper’s
readers. Good work.”
2. News Sentinel, Knoxville
Staff
3. The Tennessean, Nashville
Tennessean Staff
Best Education Reporting
Photo by Kenneth Cummings • The Jackson Sun
The Jackson Sun won the General Excellence Award in
Group IV. Pictured, from left, are Carol Dix, Tyler Whetstone,
Beth Knoll, Amy McDaniel, Trenee’ Truex, Steve Coffman,
Josh Lemons, Nichole Manna, Nick McFerron, Craig Thomas,
Kelly South, Kenneth Cummings and David Thomas. Not pictured are Jordan Buie, Katie Gould, Michael Odom, Brandon
Shields and Megan Smith.
Group I
Photo submitted by Chattanooga Times Free Press
1. Herald & Tribune,
Jonesborough
Karen Sells and Kristen Swing
Members of the Times Free Press newsroom who were
among the winners of TPA awards.
See WINNERS, Page 16
C
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Page 16 • State Press Contests Awards
WINNERS, from Page 15
2. The Erwin Record
Keith Whitson, Keeli Parkey
and Thomas Knisley
3. Carroll County News-Leader,
Huntingdon
Shirley Nanney and Ron Park
2014 Make-up & Appearance Winners
Circulation Group II:
Gallatin News Examiner
Circulation Group III:
Elizabethton Star
1. The Leaf-Chronicle,
Clarksville
Staff
“Great package on school rezoning. Appreciate greatly the people
impacted up high. Your reporters
seem to do a really good job
making these bigger issues real for
people. Seriously great job.”
4. Chester County Independent, Henderson
Mary Dunbar and James A.
Webb
5. The Ashland City Times
Tim Adkins and Randy
Moomaw
Group II
1. The Advocate & Democrat,
Sweetwater
Jessica Cross, Michael
Thomason and Tommy Millsaps
“Clever use of headlines. Great
writing that was interesting to
read got these contestants top
marks!”
2. Gallatin News Examiner
Jennifer Easton, Tena Lee,
Sarah Kingsbury, Jesse Hughes
and Dessislava Yankova
3. News-Herald, Lenoir City
Stephanie Myers, Jeremy
Styron and Jeremy Nash
4. The Standard Banner,
Jefferson City
Dale Gentry and Steve Marion
5. Manchester Times
Josh Peterson, John Coffelt
and Marian Galbraith
Group III
1. Elizabethton Star
Ashley Rader, Max Hrenda,
Brian Reese, Brandon Hicks,
Mark Stevens and Bryan Stevens
“Awesome job, nice variety of
topics, well done and beautifully
presented stories.”
2. The Tullahoma News
Brian Justice, Marian Galbraith
and Andrea Agardy
3. Southern Standard,
McMinnville
Donna Anderson, Duane
Sherrill and James Clark
4. Shelbyville Times-Gazette
Jason Reynolds, John Carney,
David Melson and Chris Siers
5. The Lebanon Democrat
Jared Felkins, Mary Hinds,
Laurie Everett, Matt Masters,
Caitlin Rickard, Kimberly Jordan
and Sara McManamy-Johnson
Group IV
“I’m seriously impressed. The one
area I might suggest increasing is
inside the classroom stories. It’s a
tough balance to not make those
stories too cutesy, but it helps
in some ways to balance across
the board coverage of a school
system. You might do more of
those in practice, but not have
submitted them. I can understand
that. You chose stories that were
a wide range of topics and that
are amazingly well crafted impact
stories.”
2. The Jackson Sun
Staff
3. Bristol Herald Courier
David McGee, Allie Robinson
Gibson and Joe Tennis
4. The Daily Herald, Columbia
Bailey Loosemore, Kelly
Quimby and Kate Coil
See WINNERS, Page 17
State Press Contests Awards • Page 17
WINNERS, from Page 16
5. The Greeneville Sun
Kristen Buckles and Sarah R
Gregory
Circulation Group IV:
The Jackson Sun
Circulation Group V:
Chattanooga Times Free Press
Group V
1. The Tennessean, Nashville
Heidi Hall, Joey Garrison and
Tony Gonzalez
“The reporters, photographers,
videographers and online team
presented the most comprehensive package on various educational topics. Each member of the
team did a good job of helping
tell the stories. It was good to see
some variety in stories submitted.
It would have been easy to use
available resources to tell one story over and over again. Even when
the topics were related in a series,
the newspaper did a good job
of giving varied viewpoints and
detailed accounts that were also
easy to digest by the reader.”
2. Chattanooga Times Free
Press
Kevin Hardy and Joan Garrett
McClane
3. News Sentinel, Knoxville
Jamie Satterfield and Lydia X.
McCoy
4. The Commercial Appeal,
Memphis
Jane Roberts
Headline Writing
Group I
1. The Erwin Record
Keith Whitson
“Excellent attention-grabbing
headlines, and all local in nature.
Great job.”
2. Pulaski Citizen
Tracy Ayers
3. Chester County
Independent, Henderson
Mary Dunbar and James A.
Webb
4. The McKenzie Banner
Joel Washburn and Kesley
Colbert
5. Carthage Courier
Bob Stangenberg, Becky
Watkins and Scott Winfree
Group II
1. The LaFollette Press
“Great word play.”
2. Gallatin News Examiner
Mike Towle, Josh Cross and
Sarah Kingsbury
3. The Standard Banner,
Jefferson City
Dave Gentry, Dale Gentry and
Steve Marion
4. Manchester Times
Josh Peterson
5. Independent Appeal, Selmer
Christen Coulon and Andrew
Alexander
Group III
1. Elizabethton Star
Brian Reese, Mark Stevens and
Brandon Hicks
“The clear winner. While the bear
headline was a bit of a groaner, it
helped that the staff took it farther
in the subhead. The Heinz sight
headline was the best of any in the
category.”
2. Roane County News,
Kingston
Terri Likens
3. Shelbyville Times-Gazette
David Melson
4. The Tullahoma News
Susan Campbell
5. The Newport Plain Talk
Rick Hooper and Seth Butler
Group IV
1. The Jackson Sun
Craig Thomas, Steve Coffman
and David Thomas
“Clever, creative and correctly
accurate and appropriate. The
wordplay demonstrated here is
superb.”
2. The Daily Herald, Columbia
Chris Fletcher and Vanessa
Curry
5. The Leaf-Chronicle,
Clarksville
Chris Smith
Group V
3. Johnson City Press
Don Armstrong
1. Chattanooga Times Free
Press
Casey Phillips and Barry
Courter
4. The Daily Times, Maryville
Marcus Fitzsimmons and Mike
Sisco
“Excellent play on words and design to get attention to reader”
See WINNERS, Page 18
Page 18 • State Press Contests Awards
WINNERS, from Page 17
2. The Commercial Appeal,
Memphis
Beth Gooch
3. The Tennessean, Nashville
Karen Grigsby
Public Service
Group I
1. Carthage Courier
Eddie West
“Three very important campaigns
that all seemed to succeed. A+.”
“Very solid work and dogged
coverage of all three issues. Clearly
at the top.”
“All were very worthy causes of
great importance to the
Carthage area.”
“Topics and needs were covered
thoroughly in a variety of ways
that apparently got the
attention of local readers as well
as the ‘powers that be’ who were
able to effect change.”
“From what I read above, the
Courier had a large hand in
keeping an active resource center,
hiring additional resource officers
and stopping the Corps efforts to
limit fishing below the dam. Hard
to argue with success.”
2. The Tomahawk, Mountain
City
Lacy Hilliard, Angie Gambill,
Paula Walter and Ann Badal
3. Chester County
Independent, Henderson
Marney E. Gilliam
4. Mt. Juliet News
5. The Portland Leader
Sonya Thompson and Bonnie
Fussell
Group II
1. Gallatin News Examiner
Sarah Kingsbury, Mike Towle,
Jennifer Easton, Tena Lee, Josh
Cross, Sherry Mitchell, Dessislava
Yankova and Jesse Hughes
“An excellent array of news
coverage and editorials
providing invaluable
information to readers who would
otherwise be in the dark about
what their government and municipal agencies were up to.”
2. The Standard Banner,
Jefferson City
Steve Marion and Dale Gentry
3. The LaFollette Press
Brent Schanding, Chris
Cannon, Beth Braden and Allan
Miller
4. Independent Appeal, Selmer
Water wars spill across state lines
Georgia moves
to shift boundary
The Tennessee River is not to be
taken for granted.
And it shouldn’t be piped to
North Georgia in a land grab either.
In 1998, a Georgia planner
named Harry West, half jokingly
talked of sticking “a big straw” in
the Tennessee to bring water to
“thirsty Atlanta.”
The talk made headlines and
galvanized Tennessee state officials
to action, drafting a new permitting
law that bans what is called “interbasin transfers.” The bill quickly
passed unanimously.
In approving it, Tennessee lawmakers and policy wonks pointed
to the example of the Colorado
River, which once flowed from the
Rockies into Mexico and then to
the Gulf of California. Now after
being diverted hundreds of miles
to Los Angeles, San Diego, Phoenix
and other fast-growing cities and
acres of thirsty deserts converted to
croplands, 70 percent of the Colorado’s water is siphoned away.
What was once a lush delta in
Mexico where the river joined the
ocean is now dry.
Picture a stream in your backyard that starts from a spring two
houses up the street from you and
ends in a lake two houses down
from you. You and your four neighbors are a basin or watershed.
But the neighbor just upstream
from you decides to build a koi
Janet Rail, Betty Rail, Christen
Coulon, Amber Hamm, Sandy
Whitaker, Brian Azevedo, Drew
Wheeler, Olga Ford, Amanda
Rickman, Carol Pipkins and
Amanda Lowrance
5. Grainger Today, Bean Station
Tracey Wolfe
Group III
1. The Daily Post-Athenian,
Athens
Greg Moses
“The editorials were fantastic. I
loved the variety of the
tear sheets submitted. Your
community life editor personified
this category, ‘public service,’ by
taking the initiative to do all this
for good causes. I thought you
submitted a good mix of news
stories, columns and graphic elements. The designs looked good
and were very colorful. The results
of his campaigns show how much
influence your paper has on its
community because of its public
service.”
First place award
Best Single
Editorial
Group V
Pam Sohn –
Chattanooga
Times Free Press
pond and divert water from the
stream. He lets the excess water
from the pond run into his garden.
Any trickles left flow to the sewer
drain. Suddenly the stream in your
yard is much diminished. And by
the time it reaches the neighbor’s
lake on the other side of you – the
downstream side – it can no longer
keep the lake filled except in times
of very heavy rain.
Your upstream neighbor’s drain
is moving water out of your basin
and not returning any leftovers.
The Tennessee River is the
nation’s fifth largest river system
with a nearly 41,000-square-mile
drainage area – the basin or watershed of the river as it flows 652
miles from upper East Tennessee
through Knoxville, Chattanooga,
and Huntsville, Ala., and Eastport,
Miss., before it turns north and
runs back into the Volunteer State.
It crosses the state to form the
division between Middle and West
Tennessee before flowing finally
into the Ohio River at Paducah, Ky.
Diverting water from the Tennessee at Nickajack Lake and sending
it to Atlanta would be like the
neighbor’s koi pond that overflows
to the sewer. The water – even as
2. Shelbyville Times-Gazette
Staff
3. Elizabethton Star
Kayla Carter, Mark Stevens,
Brian Reese, Bryan Stevens and
Brandon Hicks
4. The Lebanon Democrat
Jared Felkins and Mary Hinds
5. Southern Standard,
McMinnville
Lisa Hobbs, Donna Anderson,
Duane Sherrill, Margaret Hobbs,
Brittany Nunley and James Clark
Group IV
1. The Daily Herald, Columbia
Staff
“What an impressive effort! The
Daily Herald’s staff did yeoman’s
work on this project, and the paper is to be commended for tackling an issue that isn’t going to be
a comfortable one to face for any
community. The thoroughness
of the reporting, the clarity of the
wastewater, treated or untreated –
never comes back to recharge the
stream.
Even within its own “basin,”
the Tennessee River in dozens of
ways serves 4.5 million people – an
increase in population of about 15
percent since 1990, according to a
U.S. Geological Survey report.
In 2005, the Tennessee Valley
Authority and the USGS determined that total water withdrawals
that year averaged 12,437 million
gallons per day. About 96 percent
was returned to the river.
Georgia, claiming that a botched
1826 land survey set its border
with Tennessee one mile too far
south and cheated Georgia of a
corner-hold on the river, wants to
move the state line and pipe away
hundreds of millions of gallons a
day.
Estimates now indicate metro
Atlanta and North Georgia would
need at least 264 million gallons a
day just to make up expected 2030
“net deficits” in the Chattahoochee
and Coosa river basins that now
serve them.
Why so much? Because Atlanta
is one of the few cities on the continent that was not built on a river
or water source that could sustain
it. And it keeps growing, but not
dealing with that growth in any
durable way.
Chattanoogans on average use
95 gallons of water per person per
day, according to Tennessee American Water Co.
In Atlanta, that per-person num-
ber is 151 gallons a day, according
to Georgia’ Environmental Protection Department. And that’s despite
summer watering bans and public
urgings for conservation.
Nonetheless, Georgia lawmakers
last week fast-tracked a new bill
– the 10th in about as many years
– seeking to move the state line
to the 35th parallel – the marker
Congress intended as the border
between the states.
And it’s all to give Georgia about
an acre of access to the Tennessee
River near Nickajack Cave.
This bill differs from previous
ones in that it wouldn’t move the
entire state line. Instead, it seeks a
1.5-square-mile strip of land, not
65.5 square miles.
Tennessee lawmakers mostly
have just shaken their heads.
“You can’t blame them,” said
Richard Floyd, R-Chattanooga.
“Poor planning in Atlanta, I guess,
and the urban sprawl. And one of
the things they forgot about was,
gosh, we might want a drink of
water some day. But not out of this
river.”
Time will tell. With growing
populations and expected increases
in temperatures in the coming decades, water will be the new gold.
Our state’s politicians may not
always be so faithful.
We hope Atlanta can find an
appropriate solution.
But the river in our backyard is
not it.
Feb. 24, 2013
writing, the forthright editorials,
the diverse op-ed contributions,
the excellent presentation – all of
these left a profound impression.
Top-notch work!”
watchdog and investigative
journalism to address a serious
public health threat. The solutions
discussion brought the public
service aspect home.”
2. The Jackson Sun
Staff
2. The Tennessean, Nashville
Anita Wadhwani, Tony
Gonzalez, Walter Roche Jr , Nate
Rau, Jessica Bliss, Maria De
Varenne, Toni Dew, Ted
Rayburn and Michael McCann
3. The Leaf-Chronicle,
Clarksville
Tavia Green, Philip Grey, Chris
Smith and Lester Black
4. The Greeneville Sun
Staff
3. News Sentinel, Knoxville
Jamie Satterfield and Lydia X.
McCoy
5. Cleveland Daily Banner
Christy Armstrong, Delaney
Walker, Joyanna Love, Greg
Kaylor and David Davis
4. The Commercial Appeal,
Memphis
Marc Perrusquia and Jeff
McAdory
Group V
1. Chattanooga Times Free
Press
Joan Garrett McClane, Todd
South and Doug Strickland
“Seamless blend of narrative,
Best News Photograph
Group I
1. Carthage Courier
Eddie West
See WINNERS, Page 19
State Press Contests Awards • Page 19
WINNERS, from Page 18
“Such a strong statement made by
just the photo. A great dramatic
shot that brings attention to the
newsstands. Great job.”
2. The Daily News Journal,
Murfreesboro
Helen Comer
3. Bristol Herald Courier
Earl Neikirk
2. The Hartsville Vidette
Marie Corhern
4. Kingsport Times-News
Ned Jilton
3. Macon County Times,
Lafayette
Tilly Dillehay
5. The Leaf-Chronicle,
Clarksville
Robert Smith
4. Brownsville States-Graphic
Jennifer Willis
5. Herald & Tribune,
Jonesborough
Charlie Mauk
Group II
Group V
2. Memphis Business Journal
Alan Howell
3. Mt. Juliet News
Laurie Everett
“Absolutely fantastic work by the
photo staff. The staff covered all
the angles for a traumatic event.”
5. Pulaski Citizen
Tracy Ayers
“Photography 101 is that readers
love children and they love patriotism. Great job taking advantage
of both. The way the shot focuses
solely on the girl and the flag, and
the way the noise is increased
among the men in the background, you perfected the focus
to draw the reader to the most
dramatic point of the photo.”
3. The Commercial Appeal,
Memphis
Mark Weber
2. Manchester Times
Josh Peterson
Best Feature Photograph
5. Gallatin News Examiner
Dessislava Yankova
“Excellent sequence of photographs from a unique perspective.
Well done.”
4. Chester County
Independent, Henderson
Mary Dunbar
2. The Tennessean, Nashville
Jae S. Lee
4. Gallatin News Examiner
Dessislava Yankova
1. The Tomahawk,
Mountain City
Lacy Hilliard
1. News Sentinel, Knoxville
Paul Efird and Michael Patrick
1. News-Herald, Lenoir City
Jeremy Styron
3. The LaFollette Press
Brent Schanding and Chris
Cannon
Group I
4. The Tennessean, Nashville
Larry McCormack
Group II
1. The LaFollette Press
Chris Cannon
“Fantastic photos! Each shot is
well composed, and the use of
light is exceptional.”
2. The Standard Banner,
Jefferson City
Dale Gentry
3. The Advocate & Democrat,
Sweetwater
Kristen Calhoun
4. The Standard Banner,
Jefferson City
Dale Gentry
5. The Courier, Savannah
Thad Mitchell
Group III
1. Elizabethton Star
Brandon Hicks
“I appreciated the technical
excellence demonstrated here.”
5. The Daily Post-Athenian,
Athens
Scott Power
Group IV
1. The Daily News Journal,
Murfreesboro
Helen Comer
“Beautiful photographs nicely
toned in glorious black and white.
Great subject matter, but the style
and composition was constant
throughout the series, a wise and
important part of the package.
The only negative aspect is that
the cutlines should have been as
polished as the images. A little
extra time, work there would have
helped immensely. Something to
remember for next time.”
2. The Mountain Press,
Sevierville
Curt Habraken
2. Kingsport Times-News
Ned Jilton
3. Shelbyville Times-Gazette
Jim Davis
3. Bristol Herald Courier
Earl Neikirk
4. Roane County News,
Kingston
Terri Likens
4. The Jackson Sun
Kenneth Cummings
See WINNERS, Page 20
5. The Commercial Appeal,
Memphis
Mike Brown
First place award
Best Feature
Photograph
Group V
Doug Strickland –
Chattanooga
Times Free Press
Group III
1. Shelbyville Times-Gazette
David Melson
“This shot is beautiful.”
2. Crossville Chronicle
Jim Young
3. Shelbyville Times-Gazette
David Melson, Jim Davis,
Jason Reynolds and Sadie
Fowler
4. The Paris Post-Intelligencer
Bill McCutcheon
5. Crossville Chronicle
Ed Greif
Group IV
1. The Leaf-Chronicle
Clarksville
Greg Williamson
“Strong action and follow through
on what was sure a stressful
situation.”
Shonda Mason wants to know what happened the night her son was murdered. Someone knows the truth. But
there is a code, and she’s not sure it can be broken.
Page 20 • State Press Contests Awards
WINNERS, from Page 19
5. Johnson City Press
Kayla Carter
Group V
1. Chattanooga Times Free
Press
Doug Strickland
“Many times the coverage ends
after the crime scene tape goes
down until court. Photographer
stuck with subjects through a
very difficult time. Requires a lot
of trust for everyone involved.
Excellent work.”
2. The Commercial Appeal,
Memphis
Yalonda James
3. News Sentinel, Knoxville
Michael Patrick
4. Chattanooga Times Free
Press
Dan Henry
5. News Sentinel, Knoxville
Adam Lau
Best Sports Photograph
Group I
1. Carroll County News-Leader,
Huntingdon
Russell Bush
“Cute shot & good composition;
unique take on a sports photo.”
2. The Moore County News,
Lynchburg
Robert Holman
3. The McKenzie Banner
Joel Washburn
4. The Erwin Record
Adam Campbell
5. The Hartsville Vidette
Marie Corhern
There’s no place like ‘Home’
Bill Masters helped many folks
in our country to furnish their
homes through his downtown
Erwin business of 56 years. In fact,
the store’s name, “Home Furniture,” resounded that purpose.
I worked beside Bill and his
family for nearly 30 years of their
56. The Erwin Record is just up the
street from their former business.
I still have furniture in my home
that I purchased from them.
Bill and his wife Marjorie were
always fair, offered delivery, stood
behind what they sold, were easy
to deal with and would let you
pay with installments if that was
what you needed. They were what
a family business in a small town
should be. They looked at meeting
the needs of those in our community, while attempting to make their
living at that as well until about
two years ago.
It had been a challenge to keep
the store open, while attending
to the health issues of their two
sons of the home. However, when
Bill had complications, it became
almost impossible for Marjorie.
Those who know her small frame
are amazed at the strength she
shows physically. Yet, her emotional strength seems to often be even
greater than that.
I don’t know that I ever heard
any member of the Masters family
complain. I am reminded of Job in
the Bible. Time after time, I have
watched them endure one hardship
after another, yet I never saw them
upset, questioning why it was coming to them or complaining.
Group III
First place award
Best Personal
Column
Group I
Keith Whitson –
The Erwin Record
I don’t claim to know their history to be able to speak of it. I don’t
know the details of all they have
gone through. I don’t know all of
the hardships they deal with on a
daily basis. I am sure things that
I take for granted are things they
struggle with – even to the smallest
details. I do know what I witnessed
for those 30 years working beside
them and what an impact they
have had on my life.
Their son Kent was born with
cerebral palsy. Most of his days
have been spent with pains and
discomfort in a wheelchair. Kent is
one person that I can’t be around
without crying. It’s not tears of sadness but of blessings. I am humbled
in his presence.
He always has a smile for people.
I used to go by the store when
I was having a bad day just to
receive one of those smiles from
Kent. He reminded me that if he
could smile and not complain, then
I surely ought to be able to. Many
times he would tell me, “Keith, it
could always be worse.”
I attend church with Masters’
son Dean. By the time I started to
Erwin Presbyterian, Bill was having to stay home with Kent. Later,
Marjorie had to stay home and take
felt it. Great job!”
1. Elizabethton Star
Danny Davis
2. The Daily Times, Maryville
Tom Sherlin
1. The Dickson Herald
Marty Allison
“Very unique shot. Whole frame is
full and crystal clear.”
“All eyes on the ball. Unique moment. Usually better to have ball
in frame but this has its own character. Nice clarity despite apparently being shot from the outfield
fence. Blueness of the eyes adds to
the photo’s drama as well.”
2. Elizabethton Star
Danny Davis
3. The Leaf-Chronicle,
Clarksville
Robert Smith
Group II
2. The LaFollette Press
Chris Cannon
3. The LaFollette Press
Chris Cannon
4. Robertson County Times,
Springfield
Bill Diehm
5. The Standard Banner,
Jefferson City
Dave Gentry
3. Roane County News,
Kingston
Goose Lindsay
4. The Mountain Press,
Sevierville
Jason Davis
5. The Mountain Press,
Sevierville
Jason Davis
Group IV
4. Kingsport Times-News
Ned Jilton
care of Bill and Kent.
Dean is a diabetic and has lost
his eyesight, but he doesn’t let it
slow him down. He attends church
regularly, sings in the choir, teaches
Sunday school from time to time
and is very active in organizing
the church’s involvement with
missionaries. He keeps up with
the missionaries and reports on
them weekly as part of a “Minute
for Missions” segment during the
worship service.
On top of everything else, Dean
was recently in the hospital with
his pacemaker. Marjorie was also
in the hospital and Bill has been in
and out of the hospital and nursing
home numerous times this year.
I am reminded that God will not
put more on us than we can bear.
I feel the Masters family has far
surpassed my level of strength.
Bill had to find strength early
in life. In fact, he was the nose
gunner on a BH-24 bomber during
World War II. His plane was shot
down over Yugoslavia and the crew
bailed out. Bill evaded the enemy
for 69 days before getting back to
friendly forces.
They were having a civil war
so most of the people didn’t have
much to share. Plus, it was also
in the winter. Dean remembers
his dad sharing tales about some
families who only had dried corn,
which they turned into meal that
was cooked with water. They had
no salt or sugar, just corn mush.
Some let Bill Masters and the other
men take handfuls, which they put
in their pockets so they could eat
Press
Dan Henry
5. Chattanooga Times Free
Press
Doug Strickland
Best Special Issue
or Section
on the run.
Bill Masters died last Tuesday
at the age of 87. I attended his
funeral this past Friday. It was the
first time I had seen Marjorie and
Kent in months. As I stood in line
to speak with the family, I noticed
the time Marjorie took to talk with
each person. It was the same care
she had shown to customers in the
store.
I read in the obituary that the
couple had been married for 65
years. I overheard Marjorie telling
the lady in front of me that the
funeral home had asked if she
wanted them to remove his wedding band before burial. She had
responded with “Why would I do
that?”
She went on to explain that Bill
hadn’t removed the ring since
their wedding. He even asked the
doctors to put tape around it rather
than remove it during his recent
surgery.
That marriage commitment 65
years ago was the first of many for
Marjorie and Bill. “For better or for
worse” had never been truer spoken than it was between them.
Before his passing, Bill wasn’t
satisfied in the nursing home or the
hospital. He always kept wanting
to be back home, even when it
was beyond Marjorie’s ability to
care for him. Home was a special
place for Bill – after all, it was part
of the name given to their family
business. Now home has a whole
new meaning for him, and I’m sure
the furnishings are majestic.
Oct. 30, 2013
4. The Erwin Record
Keith Whitson, Keeli Parkey,
David Sheets, Donna Rea,
Brenda Sparks, Damaris Higgins
and Thomas Knisley
5. The Ashland City Times
Tim Adkins and Randy
Moomaw
Group I
Group II
Group V
1. The Leader, Covington
Echo Day, Jeff Ireland, France
Gasquet, Teri Jennings and Andy
Posey
1. News Sentinel, Knoxville
Adam Lau, Michael Patrick and
Kevin Martin
“Nice coverage of editorial
content. Detail in content, typography, photos. Enjoyable read.”
1. The Standard Banner,
Jefferson City
Steve Marion, Gayle Page,
Dave Gentry, Kim Cook, Paul
Young, Ray Seabolt, Gary Fowler,
Shane Cook and Ronnie Housley
2. The Tennessean, Nashville
Jae S. Lee
2. The Tomahawk,
Mountain City
Angie Gambill, Paula Walter,
Lacy Hilliard and Ann Badal
5. Citizen Tribune, Morristown
John Gullion
1. The Daily Times, Maryville
Daryl Sullivan
3. The Commercial Appeal,
Memphis
Mark Weber
“I not only looked at this photo, I
4. Chattanooga Times Free
3. Mt. Juliet News
Laurie Everett, Mark Rodgers
and Charity Tombs
“This is a great publication that
manages to double as a resident’s sort of ‘annual report’ or
‘yearbook’ for the county as well
as a newcomer’s guide. Downright meaty in its size and in an
easy-to-handle format, it’s surely
something to be treasured in readSee WINNERS, Page 21
State Press Contests Awards • Page 21
WINNERS, from Page 20
er households as a year-round
resource for living and glimpse at
living in the county.”
“Excellent range of content,
wide-reaching, offers well-rounded glimpse of actual people and
real life in the county. Content is
accessible on every level to any
type of reader, visitor or resident,
and has resources for everyone
that will be saved, needed and
used year-round.”
“Clean, accessible, even welcoming design. Feels like a ‘top-notch,
big-city publication’ in many
ways, has just the right amount of
sophistication but doesn’t try too
hard or overwhelm its small-town
consumers. Ways to improve:
watch for stories or elements that
bleed into one another & need
more defining separation, and
jumps that may not be obvious
to follow. Column width is a little
much, hard to follow while reading. Lastly, watch the tiny details
that make a huge difference, such
as including addresses & contact
info for the businesses/organizations/people you write about (the
hospital) in the story, instead of
not at all or only including in the
Newcomers Information. Make
life easier on your readers. Don’t
make them work for anything, because they very likely won’t bother
and you’ll lose them.”
2. Gallatin News Examiner
Sarah Kingsbury, Hollie Deese,
Dessislava Yankova and Gannett
Design Studio
3. Robertson County Times,
Springfield
Chris Lynn and Eric Miller
4. Wilson Post, Lebanon
Tommy Bryan, Adam Brown,
Zack Owensby, Shannon
Hargis and Mary Anne Ferrell
5. Weakley County Press,
Martin
Mike Hutchens
Group III
1. The Lebanon Democrat
Charity Toombs, Mark
Rodgers, Jared Felkins, Sara
McManamy-Johnson, Kimberly
Jordan and Caitlin Rickard
“It was very well done. I loved the
variety of the well-written
articles and how the ads weren’t
in your face. It was a very attractive section with a great layout.”
2. Elizabethton Star
Bryan Stevens, Alaina Akens,
Missy Hale, Ashley Rader, Nathan
Baker, Maxwell Hrenda, Brandon
Hicks, Danny Davis, Janie
McKinney, Phyllis Davis and
Brian Reese
Mad House of Republicans
Now that self-proclaimed fiscally
conservative Republicans in the
House of Representatives have
effectively fallen on the sword, and
in the painful process jeopardized
800,000 jobs, threw billions down
a wormhole and trampled on the
democratic process itself – all
with nothing to show for it but
an internal civil war and an even
more despondent public – one has
to wonder at what point will a once
proud party reclaim the center?
Will leaders like Sens. Lindsey
Graham and John McCain, who
are at least willing to call shameless political theater for what it is,
wait until the party gets bludgeoned in the next election to try
to right the ship and rebrand the
message or will they straightaway
neuter people like Sen. Ted Cruz,
who has proudly served as mad
house ring leader for four weeks
and counting, ridiculously railing
against spending appropriations
in Obamacare, yet forcing the
economy out of $24 billion via the
shutdown, according to estimates
from Standard & Poor’s?
The previous figure I referenced
about the shutdown costing about
$300 million per day turned out to
be too conservative.
At a time when the GOP needs a
China-esque approach to public relations, in which Xi Jinping and his
machine pound home a message,
thinly veiled as it is, that the dear
leader is an “unadorned man of the
people,” as The Washington Post
put it, and is committed to cleaning
up corruption and tackling government waste, Cruz was at it again
First place award
Best Personal
Column
Group II
Jeremy Styron –
News-Herald,
Lenoir City
early this week, claiming near
omniscience when speaking about
the will of Americans erstwhile
browbeating his own colleagues.
“The single-most damaging
thing that has happened to Republicans for 2014 is all of the Senate
Republicans coming out, attacking
the House Republicans, attacking
those pushing the effort to defund
Obamacare and lining themselves
up opposite of the American people,” Cruz told CNN on Monday.
During negotiations leading up
to the shutdown, he said, “The
American people overwhelmingly
reject Obamacare,” and then after
the last minute deal to forgo the
stalemate and reopen shop, he divined a similar revelation from on
high: “Unfortunately, the Washington establishment is failing to listen
to the American people.”
Back in 2010 when we were
told – mostly by Tea Party types –
that we should be cowering in fear
about fictional death panels and
those menacing federal employees
who will strip us of our patient
rights, presumably because the
government is a mean-spirited,
monolithic ogre bent on squashing all freedom into futurity, 58
percent actually did favor repeal-
3. The Tullahoma News
Susan Campbell and Ryan
Sandmeyer
3. Herald-Citizen, Cookeville
Craig Delk and Thomas
Corhern
4. Union City Daily Messenger
Mike Hutchens
4. The Daily Times, Maryville
Amy Beth Miller and Amanda
Greever
5. Roane County News,
Kingston
Terri Likens
Group IV
1. Johnson City Press
Staff
“This was a very well done section.
The emphasis on news from
throughout the region rather than
puff pieces on local businesses
that have paid for an article make
it stand out. You get a true sense
of what has happened in the
communities in the coverage area
over the past year or what will be
happening soon.”
2. The Jackson Sun
Staff
5. Bristol Herald Courier
Jim Sacco, George Stone, Allen
Gregory, Tim Hayes and Nate
Hubbard
Group V
1. The Tennessean, Nashville
Nate Rau and Jessica Bliss
“Well written and reported, this
special section covers every angle
of texting and driving and why it
must be stopped. Great art and
photos, as well as compelling and
heartbreaking stories. This section
is a great public service and
should be distributed at schools
across the state.”
“Well written and reported, this
ing Obamacare, according to a
Rasmussen Reports survey at the
time. Forty-eight percent strongly
favored eviscerating the law, while
37 percent wanted it to remain in
place.
If this were 2010, Cruz might
have a point. But forward almost
four years, and only 33 percent
of voters surveyed now want
Obamacare repealed or defunded,
according to a Sept. 30 report from
Forbes. Two-thirds said they wanted to let the law stand and either
expand it or improve the legislation. The poll included people of
both parties, along with independents, and all voting demographics of consequence. The largest
demographic was whites between
the ages of 45-64.
Reasoning people tend to either
modify or change their opinions on
a particular topic when presented
with new or better information. Exempting that, thoughtful legislators
will at least entertain alternative
viewpoints if presented with a
compelling reason for doing so.
Thoughtful people in positions of
power, in turn, use these reasoning
capacities to cooperate with their
colleagues, and yes sometimes
compromise – a crucial strategy,
but one that’s all but lost these days
– in order to make decisions for the
betterment of the nation.
If a piece of legislation with a
noble core premise – say, providing
health insurance for people who
work for companies that don’t offer
insurance – was passed with some
admitted imperfections, the law
can be improved in subsequent
congressional sessions. The important point is that as a nation, we
decided to eschew the status quo in
favor of improving more people’s
lives, thus taking a collective stand
against an insurance industry that
has operated with near impunity
– and at sick people’s expense – for
the better part of a century. The bill
passed in a democratically elected
Congress and was upheld by the
Supreme Court.
The problem with Cruz and his
ilk, and indeed, with a lawmaker of any party who flirts with
deeply entrenched ideology, is
they purposefully live in a world
with blinders on, ignore information contrary to their views and
consume a daily drip of cable news
that presents them with the only
version of reality they are willing
to accept. This dangerous approach
to governance has already undermined the democratic process, as
well as the GOP, and left few if any
true leaders standing.
How long before the moderates
within the Republican ranks grow
tired of the asininity and invite
the obscurantists, who seem more
than happy to destroy the government if not their own party, to ride
their big-feeling and anachronistic
“don’t tread on me” mantra into
oblivion? Our government was
created with an intention to “form
a more perfect Union,” implying a
constant state of improvement, not
one that was flawless right out of
the gate or kowtowed to the whims
of a fatuous but loud few.
Oct. 23-24, 2013
special section covers every angle
of texting and driving and what
can be done to stop it. Great art
and photos, as well as compelling
and heartbreaking stories.”
“Good site with lots of information
and easy to get around.”
2. Chattanooga Times Free
Press
Joan Garrett McClane, Todd
South and Doug Strickland
3. The Portland Leader
Sonya Thompson, Crystal
Borders and Jamie Johnson
3. The Commercial Appeal,
Memphis
Marc Perrusquia and Jeff
McAdory
4. News Sentinel, Knoxville
Matt Lakin
Best Website
Group I
1. Memphis Business Journal
Staff
“Very good site that was very easy
to get around.”
2. Independent Herald, Oneida
Staff
4. Mt. Juliet News
Laurie Everett
5. The Erwin Record
Keith Whitson, Keeli Parkey,
Thomas Knisley, Damaris Higgins
and David Sheets
Group II
1. The Daily News, Memphis
Staff
“This website is simple to navigate
with great content. The photos
add visual interest to the website.
See WINNERS, Page 22
Page 22 • State Press Contests Awards
WINNERS, from Page 21
It’s a very clean, professional
look.”
“The content is timely with easy
click through links to the front
page news of particular days of
the week, which is great if you’ve
missed a day of news! Great special feature.”
“The only downside is that it’s
difficult to determine which lines
of text are links (to follow the
rest of the story) or just bolded
text since there’s little difference
between them.”
“Archived front page news –
great!”
2. Manchester Times
Josh Peterson, John Coffelt
and Derek Harryman
3. Wilson Post, Lebanon
Jennifer Horton, Tommy
Bryan, Zack Owensby, Amelia
Morrison Hipps, Sabrina Garrett,
Becky Andrews and Staff
4. The Standard Banner,
Jefferson City
Kim Cook and Dave Gentry
5. Gallatin News Examiner
Cherish Matthews, Tena Lee,
Josh Cross, Cecil Joyce, Sarah
Kingsbury, Dessislava Yankova,
Craig Harris and Chris Brooks
Group III
It was only a few minutes
before 3 p.m. on May 2, 2012, and
I wished the clock would stop
ticking. But in that moment, when
time refused to stand still and my
heart was breaking, something
mysterious, maybe magical,
happened.
“You wanna go out, baby?” I
asked, opening the French doors
to the backyard to let Sadie hop
into the bright south Louisiana
sun for the very last time.
When Amy and I moved from
Tennessee to Louisiana, Sadie
may have been the happiest of all
in our little family of three. Sadie
no longer had to be led around
on a leash. Our new house had
a beautiful little courtyard in the
back with curved brick walls and
3. The Leaf-Chronicle,
Clarksville
Alane Megna
5. Southern Standard,
McMinnville
Brittany Nunley
4. The Daily Herald, Columbia
Staff
Group IV
1. The Paris Post-Intelligencer
Chad Howard
1. The Jackson Sun
Staff
“Best of the pack. And you’ve got
the Eiffel Tower going for you.”
“Really nice website. Lots to offer
readers, even folks from out of
state. You can tell a lot of work has
gone into the site.”
“Pretty straightforward and user
friendly. Nicely segmented, and
glad to see that the top local news
click-menu doesn’t auto-update
in the annoying way that some
do. I wish the ‘Today’s edition’ box
was higher on the page, though,
at least above the calendar if not
higher. The Facebook section is
a good idea. A lot going on here,
but it’s not too much.”
2. Shelbyville Times-Gazette
John Carney, Chris Siers, David
Melson and Sadie Fowler
3. Elizabethton Star
Bryan Stevens, Max Hrenda,
Kayla Carter, Ashley Rader, Mark
Stevens, Brian Reese, Brandon
Hicks and David Cate
On my worst day,
I found peace on a
wing and a promise
Part 2 of 2
“I’ve always loved you without
words,
So many things you’ve never
heard,
I need a license for living; I’ve
got my papers in heaven,
You cannot take what I cannot
give.”
– Morten Harket, “I’m the One”
4. The Tullahoma News
Susan Campbell
“Very nice site on many levels. It’s
obvious the staff works hard to
keep it up to date and relevant.”
5. Citizen Tribune, Morristown
Seth Horn, John Gullion, Jean
Henderson and Sherry Collins
Group V
1. Chattanooga Times Free
Press
Staff
“It’s laid out like a page of news.
It’s very much like a newspaper
online without being a digital
copy of the newspaper. It is easy to
read and navigate and information is clearly given and easy
to find. Links provided to local
news, community news and job
postings.”
2. News Sentinel, Knoxville
Staff
3. The Commercial Appeal,
Memphis
Michael Erskine, Gary
Robinson, Ian Lemmonds,
Stephanie Norton and Stefanie
Holmes
4. The Tennessean, Nashville
Tennessean Staff
“Lots of good community content
and features.”
“I found the site very timely in its
coverage at all levels, be it local or
national.”
“Love the layout, how-to cooking
videos, use of photos and the
Wanted Galleries. A couple of videos were slow to load, but worked
fine once loaded.”
2. Johnson City Press
Sam Watson and Kristen
Swing
First place award
Best Sports
Photograph
Group I
Russell Bush –
Carroll County
News-Leader,
Huntingdon
First place award
Best Personal
Column
Group III
Mark A. Stevens –
Elizabethton Star
wrought-iron fencing. Sadie loved
to romp and play there.
So many times, sitting in that
courtyard, I watched Sadie marvel
at the world going by – a bicyclist,
a jogger, a cattle egret across the
way looking for insects in the
morning sun. Sadie would stick
her head through the fence and
wag her tail at passersby.
But on that day, right before
the clock struck 3, I was the
one taking it all in. I was trying
desperately to imprint images to
memory, and, maybe, just maybe,
that’s why I took special notice of
the little yellow butterfly hovering
above Sadie. It danced up and
down, fluttering directly above her
head.
See PEACE , Page 23
Andrea Agardy’s winning
Best Personal Humor
Column for Category III will
be in the November issue
of The Tennessee Press.
I CAN DO THIS WITH MY EYES CLOSED - Christopher Hones of
Huntingdon catches a fly ball in state tournament action.
State Press Contests Awards • Page 23
Whole family rallies to a member’s needs
Bristol native Billy Jones is a
newspaper reader. When he was
growing up on Windsor Avenue,
the paper was a staple in his home,
where parents and Roy and Lula
insisted on having reading material – specifically the Bible and
the newspaper – for their seven
children.
Now 88 years young and living in
Alabama, Jones still keeps tabs on
his hometown by reading the paper.
His subscription to the Bristol Herald Courier, received through the
U.S. mail, was an answer to a birthday wish several years ago, and the
subject of a previous column in this
newspaper.
“He just wanted to read it, because that’s where he grew up,” said
Jones’ niece, Elizabeth Hostetter,
who lives in Guntersville, Ala.,
about an hour’s drive from Billy’s
place in Eastaboga, Ala. “He likes
to read the obituaries. … He likes to
keep up with the people he might
have known.” He also enjoys the
PEACE, from Page 22
How strange, I thought. We had
no flowers in the courtyard, certainly nothing to attract butterflies. The
only creatures our courtyard ever
seemed to attract were frogs and
wasps.
Yet there it was, a little yellow
butterfly floating and flitting along,
staying right with Sadie every step
she made. But the clock ticked on,
and it was almost 3 o’clock. It was
time to leave the courtyard – and
Sadie’s tiny new friend – behind.
Dr. Scott Broussard was scheduled to arrive with his “Waggin’
Train” mobile veterinary unit.
Back inside the house, though,
3 o’clock came and went. Maybe
Dr. Broussard had an emergency, I
thought, and he won’t make our appointment. I stared out the window
for his “Waggin’ Train,” and, finally,
Dr. Broussard’s white van pulled in
front of the house.
I walked out onto the porch, and
Dr. Broussard extended his hand.
I tried to say, “Hello.” I tried to say,
“Thank you for coming.” But I
couldn’t. I could say only one thing.
“This is the worst day of my life,”
I said as I pushed opened the door,
and there was Sadie, wagging her
tail and ready, as always, to welcome visitors to our home.
After her introduction, Sadie
slipped quietly underneath my desk
and sat down on her haunches. She
hadn’t looked that small since she
was a puppy some 12 years ago. She
just sat and watched. Her heavy,
labored breaths seemed to have
disappeared, and she seemed just
perfect, sitting properly, sweetly.
comics.
That’s also why Hostetter, her
sister Brenda Cornutt and an untold
number of family members have
joined forces to grant Billy’s birthday wish this year: a trip back to
Bristol.
He arrived Thursday. The party
is Sunday from 2 until 4 p.m. in
Rosser Hall at First Baptist Church
in Bristol, Va., where Billy and his
parents were longtime members.
Anyone who knows him is invited.
“He’s just going to be tickled to
see people he hasn’t seen in years,”
Hostetter said earlier this week.
Billy moved to Alabama 12 years
ago, to live at Rainbow Omega, a
faith-based residential program for
people with developmental disabilities.
A birth injury left him with a
speech impediment; he also has cerebral palsy. He lived with his parents until their deaths – his father in
1972 and his mother in 1985.
That’s when the real magic appeared in this family.
Hostetter still gets a little choked
up when she talks about her grandparents’ will, and what it told her
parents, her aunts and uncles, and
all of her cousins.
They said, “You know we love all
of you equally, but Bill has special
needs, so the house will go to him.”
With barely a hiccup, a foundation of siblings and nieces and
nephews – including Hostetter’s
father who took the reins for a
while – pooled their resources to
create a support system for “Uncle
Bill” that goes far beyond seeing to
room and board. Hostetter took the
reins herself when her father died,
but she’s quick to explain that it was
and remains a family affair.
In a partnership that keeps
names and participation levels confidential, family members far and
wide contribute to Uncle Billy’s care.
It was her father’s requirement, she
said, and her grandfather’s wisdom
that no one would know who or
how much.
“The family’s just always known,
not what we need to do but what
we want to do,” Hostetter said. “It’s
a family thing. It’s the right thing
to do.”
And when something is required?
“All I really say is, there’s a need,”
Hostetter explains, “and the money’s
always been there.”
This weekend’s birthday celebration is indicative of that family
endeavor.
Family members have planned
and plotted, contacted old friends
and distant cousins, arranged for
the family to sit together for the 11
a.m. Sunday worship service at First
Baptist, and scheduled the 350-mile
trip to Bristol with one niece and
a return to Alabama with another
– just to give their uncle what he
truly desires for his birthday.
They’ve mailed, hand-delivered and posted fliers about town.
They’ve ordered a birthday cake.
And one great-great-nephew made
Uncle Billy a star in his own YouTube video. Check it out at youtube.
com/watch?v=HTcKoZhSSn0.
In the video, Billy reveals that his
favorite holiday is Christmas, oh,
and Easter, too.
He loves all the holidays, Hostetter said, relating how her uncle
starts asking about what they’ll
be doing on the next holiday the
moment the current one ends.
“It’s because he knows he’s going
to be with family,” she said. Friends,
too.
With the guest list awaiting him
Sunday, Uncle Billy likely will be
adding birthday parties to his list.
April 12, 2013
“She’s doing so good right now,” I
told Dr. Broussard. “She was so sick
yesterday, and now she seems so
happy. Maybe we’re rushing this.”
I wanted Sadie to stay little, underneath my desk, and wag her tail
when visitors came to the house. I
wanted Dr. Broussard to go away.
But he confirmed what our veterinarian in Lafayette and the staff at
the animal hospital in Baton Rouge
had already said. Sadie was very
sick, and it was only going to get
worse and quickly. Her little tum-
First place award
Best Personal
Column
Group IV
Christine Uthoff –
Bristol Herald
Courier
See PEACE , Page 24
First place award
Best Sports
Photograph
Group II
Marty Allison –
The Dickson
Herald
Payton Grove watches her hit sail into the outfield as she earns a double for Dickson County.
Page 24 • State Press Contests Awards
Dobro master lives in memory
Dobro great Mike Auldridge died
Saturday at age 73.
I got the word late that morning.
I was sitting in a South Carolina
hospital room, watching my father
recover from a stroke, pleased that
he’d just been told he would be able
to go home later that day.
A morning full of smiles and encouragement turned lousy as soon
as I picked up my cellphone and
heard about Mike. Dad understood:
PEACE, from Page 23
my was turning purple. She was
refusing food – even chicken and
mashed potatoes and watermelon,
her favorites. The pet hospital had
told us to let Sadie have “whatever
she wanted,” but Sadie wasn’t even
up for being spoiled. The cancer had
spread so quickly, so viciously, and,
now as her body continued to battle,
seizures were likely.
Across the room, Amy looked
at me. “What should we do?” she
asked.
I looked at Amy, and I looked at
Sadie. I looked back at Amy, and I
nodded. We loved her too much to
let her suffer. When the seizures
came as the pain overwhelmed her
little body, Sadie wouldn’t understand.
I didn’t want to take life from
her, but I knew I couldn’t take what
Sadie, torn apart inside from liver
cancer, could no longer give.
Dr. Broussard told us it would be
quick and that my sweet little dog
would simply go to sleep.
I went to the bedroom and
retrieved Sadie’s bed, where she
always slept while we were away at
work, and when I plopped it down
in the living room, Sadie jumped
in it.
It broke my heart. There in her
safe spot, where she dozed away
afternoons, would be where she
would depart this life.
Dr. Broussard went outside
and told us to spend a few more
moments with Sadie. I stroked Sadie
and kissed her head. Amy told her
how much we’d always love her.
“You’ve been,” Amy assured her,
“the best dog ever.”
My head was spinning as Dr.
Broussard returned, knelt down
beside Sadie, and gently raised her
leg and inserted the needle.
Sadie licked Amy’s hand and
went to sleep.
We had arranged a pet mortuary
to retrieve Sadie’s body to have
her cremated and returned to us
in a small wooden box. To make it
as easy as possible, the mortuary
staff had arrived shortly after Dr.
Broussard. Staff members wrapped
Sadie up in her little bed and took
her away.
He was there the first time I heard
Auldridge play, on my 15th birthday
at a northern Virginia listening
room called The Birchmere.
I turned on my laptop and wrote
an obit to send in to The Tennessean, taking care to write of Mike in
the past tense and to refer to him
as “Mr. Auldridge.” In life, he’d
recoil when people would call him
Mr. Auldridge, but on Saturday he
couldn’t do a thing about it.
I also took care to mention Mike’s
major musical accomplishments,
including transforming the Dobro
– an odd, loud, rattling collision of
metal and wood – into an instrument of grace and elegance, thus
saving the instrument from creeping oblivion and inspiring every
Dobro player who has come along
after him.
I mentioned his contributions to
albums by Emmylou Harris, Linda
Ronstadt, Patty Loveless and many
others and noted his role as founding member of groundbreaking
And there Amy and I stood in our
open doorway and watched as the
little silver pickup truck sent by the
mortuary pulled down to the end of
the cul-de-sac.
As the truck drove back past the
house, Amy grabbed me with a
force I had never felt in all the years
I’ve known her.
“Make them bring her back!” she
cried and fell into my arms.
But Sadie was gone. Our house
was silent; our hearts broken. I
took Amy by the hand and stepped
outside. The sun was shining and
a spring breeze was blowing. We
crossed the street and headed over
to the walking path that surrounded
the neighborhood lake.
We hadn’t made it very far when
directly in front of us fluttered a
little yellow butterfly – it looked
just like the one from the courtyard
that had fluttered and flitted around
Sadie. Was it? Up and up into the
sky it went, and as it did, our eyes
followed and there, in the same
direction where that silver pickup
was taking Sadie away, a rainbow
formed.
“It’s the Rainbow Bridge,” Amy
said. “It’s Sadie’s Rainbow Bridge.”
Many people know about the
Rainbow Bridge, and while no
one knows who wrote the famous
poem, the words are, nonetheless,
comforting and full of hope:
“Just this side of heaven is a
placed called Rainbow Bridge.
When an animal dies that has been
especially close to someone, that pet
goes to the Rainbow Bridge. … The
animals are happy and content, except for one small thing: they each
miss someone very special to them,
who had to be left behind. … But
the day comes when one suddenly
stops and looks into the distance. …
You have been spotted, and when
you and your special friend finally
meet, you cling together in joyous
reunion, never to be parted again.
The happy kisses rain upon your
face; your hands again caress the
First place award
Best Personal
Column
Group V
Peter Cooper –
The Tennessean,
Nashville
First place award
Best Sports
Photograph
Group III
Danny Davis –
Elizabethton Star
The Buffaloes’ Tyler DeVault puts
Union’s Tyler Wagner in a semiheadlock as Wagner reaches for a
loose ball at Steve Lacy Fieldhouse
Wednesday night.
bluegrass band The Seldom Scene.
What I didn’t write
I didn’t mention the ever-present
crease in his Jeans, or the way the
stage lights shone off his Dobro,
creating a poor man’s laser show. I
didn’t mention the way his playing
had welcomed me into a world of
See MEMORY, Page 25
beloved head, and you look once
more into the trusting eyes of your
pet, so long gone from your life,
but never absent from your heart.
Then you cross the Rainbow Bridge
together.”
When I think of Sadie, I am often
overcome with sadness still. It’s a
heartache that never leaves me.
But sometimes I let myself believe
in a little bit of magic, and I smile
and think of a little yellow butterfly
that led Sadie to Rainbow Bridge.
I’ve never seen that little butterfly
again, but I think I will when I
touch the sky and cross the bridge
on a happy reunion day.
April 28, 2013
State Press Contests Awards • Page 25
Are we there yet?
We’d reserved a 9:45 tee time,
and Fred said they’d probably pair
us with another twosome because
it was another busy Saturday morning. Not good, I thought, remembering other pairings we’d endured
there in the past.
Like the time one Fayetteville
attorney joined us and slaughtered
a big snake at the edge of the No.
9 fairway with what looked to be
a seven iron. Fred and I thought it
was a bit much – a nine would have
been plenty – but the way he was
swinging that club, we kept our
mouths shut.
We walked up to the first tee box,
and I saw a starter there holding a
clipboard. Where were we – Sandestin?
I took my receipt from my pocket
just in case, while Fred was realizing he couldn’t find his. Just then
MEMORY, from Page 24
roots music when I was young.
His tone was warm and lush, and
he had no interest in a gymnastic,
“watch what I can do” approach
that was off-putting to me. Auldridge didn’t play to impress; he
played to converse.
I didn’t mention how thrilling it
was to be in Mike’s presence, what
it was like to watch him in the
recording studio or what it was like
to stand onstage with him.
I didn’t mention that he’d been
told 10 years ago that he was
slowly dying of cancer, and that he
probably had eight years to live. I
didn’t mention that he’d survived to
see the birth of his first grandchild
in 2012, or that he was fearful that
cancer might take away his ability
to play music before it stopped his
heart’s beating. I didn’t mention
Mike’s artful command of expletives. Guess I won’t detail those
here, either.
I didn’t mention the recent night
at The Birchmere when Mike
performed with Vince Gill’s band.
Sapped of strength, Mike told Gill
during sound check that he’d have
to sit down during the show. Gill
could have said, “Sure, no problem,”
and ordered someone to grab Mike
a chair. Instead, he said, “I love to
sit. Let’s all sit,” so that Mike would
be an ensemble member rather than
be the poor old cancer guy who
couldn’t stand up.
I didn’t mention that I tell that
story anytime someone utters a
cross word about Vince Gill.
one of the guys from the pro shop
came driving up in a golf cart (right
into the tee box.)
He asked the starter how many
guys had just teed off.
“Four,” said the starter.
“Well, only one of them paid,”
Pro shop guy said. “It’s the Hurley
group.” Then he turned his cart
around and drove it back over the
tee box, apparently not wanting any
part of the Hurley group.
Fred, meanwhile, had located
his receipt, and we showed it to the
starter, an elderly man who still
looked confused by the news of the
Hurley group.
He told us the course was playing
at a “foursome pace,” and that the
twosome in front of us, who were
ready to tee off, said we were welcome to join them. Remembering
snakes and cell phones, I said they
could go on.
We watched them hit, one topping his ball just past the ladies tee,
the other smoking a beautiful drive
to the fairway below. A few minutes
later, it was our turn.
I stood on the tee, awash with
memories about this course, where
I’d spent so much time. It was going
to be a great day. Even the weather
was working out unexpectedly,
with cloud cover and temps in the
low 80s.
I pushed my tee into the soft
earth, placed a new Titleist on it,
stepped back, trying to picture a
great drive and remembering when
they seemed easy. I stepped back
toward the ball, carefree and ready,
fully expecting to shoot in the 70s.
Then I heard the words:
“Here’s a single that would like to
join you guys.”
I turned around and saw a young
guy sitting behind the wheel in his
cart. But it was what I saw next that
chilled me to the bone. Between
him and myself was walking a little
boy, about seven or eight, who was,
horror of horrors, carrying a ball
and a three-foot driver.
They all waited for one of the
obligatory responses: “Sure, that’d
be great,” or “You and your little boy
are welcome.” I opened my mouth,
but nothing came out. They looked
at me and I looked back, trying to
come up with anything that might
keep them from joining us:
“OK with me, the doctors say
this strain of swine flu isn’t even
contagious.” Or:
“Sorry, we’re with the FBI and
about to take down the Hurley
Gang. They probably won’t come
peacefully.”
Or even:
“Ever been in a Turkish prison?”
But I had nothing.
Fred just stared at the ground.
Then I looked down to see
the boy grinning up at me, and I
remembered even further back, to
hot days long ago and the smell of
freshly cut grass.
“Let’s play some golf, little buddy.”
Nov. 29, 2013
thought I should root for my favorite
musicians the way I would for
sports teams. Mike was my favorite
Dobro player, and Mike’s disciple,
Jerry Douglas, was getting the lion’s
share of Dobro publicity.
Douglas lived in Nashville; played
hundreds of recording sessions; and
was younger, more visible and more
talked-about than Mike. Classic case
of a student’s popularity eclipsing
his teacher’s.
One Birchmere night, I worked
up the nerve to speak to Mike for
the first time. I called him “Mr.
Auldridge,” and his face squinched
up, and then I told him, “I don’t understand why everybody’s talking
about Jerry Douglas, because you’re
the greatest Dobro player in the
world.”
He could have said, “I know.” He
could have said, “Thanks.” He could
have said, truthfully, “Jerry’s a real-
ly nice guy and a superb musician
capable of doing things no one has
ever done on a Dobro.”
Instead, he looked at me with
contempt and just said, “You need
to LISTEN to Jerry Douglas.”
As I later wrote in a letter to
Mike, those seven words taught me
that musicians aren’t sports teams;
that there’s no score to keep; that no
one has to worry about good, better
and best. Enduring music is born of
idiosyncrasy and invention, not of
competition.
“Free from that competition, we
can all go in search of our own
unique voice, and if we find it, then
the world can hear something it
hasn’t heard before” was my summation of his lesson.
Mike found it. He gave the world
something it hadn’t heard before.
First place award
Best Personal
Humor Column
Group I
Jay Edwards –
Hamilton County
Herald,
Chattanooga
See MEMORY, Page 26
First place award
Bes Sports
Photograph
Group IV
Daryl Sullivan –
The Daily Times,
Maryville
An early lesson
Most of all, I didn’t mention that
Mike taught me my first and most
important lesson in music. When
I was 17, I was a Seldom Scene
fanatic who, for some dumb reason,
KNOX WEST’S NATHAN COTTRELL (5) loses his helmet after being hit by the Maryville defenders Friday at
Shields Stadium in Maryville.
Page 26 • State Press Contests Awards
How to not get published
As the community newspaper in
Manchester, I understand that we at
the Manchester Times are going to
get some off-the-wall submissions
for the newspaper.
Some of the submissions I get are,
well, let’s say they are a little off the
mark. Some are excellent. I want to
let you know what you need to do
to get something published in your
community newspaper.
Better yet, perhaps I should give
you a list of how to NOT get published in the paper and I think you
will be able to figure out the rest.
Be messy. Over the years, I have
learned to decipher ridiculous shorthand that is so far off from anything
I learned it’s almost a new language. But I’ve really stopped trying
to do that because chances are, with
a scribbled mess on a half-used napkin next to a photo, I’ll not be able
First place award
Best Personal
Humor Column
Group II
Josh Peterson –
Manchester Times
to transcribe all of the submission
and will publish bad information or
have just wasted my time.
It’s almost like submitting a
resume – if it has a typo and you are
applying to be a copy editor, don’t
expect a phone call. Same goes for
submissions for the newspaper for
announcements or news – if it’s
messy, I’ll probably just throw it
away. Sorry.
Go over my head. As in most
all things in life, there is a chain
of command in the newspaper
business. I answer to publishers and
presidents of the company. I really
hate this line when people call:
“Yeah, did you get what I submitted? I didn’t send it to you, but the
president of the company and I are
great friends. I just went ahead and
sent it to him since we played golf
together one time way back a few
months ago in different groups.”
Good job name dropping. Bad
job submitting something you
really want in a good location in the
paper. Not that I would lose your
submission on purpose, but things
do get misplaced …
Tell me how to do my job. Look, I
watch “Criminal Minds” religiously,
but I generally don’t march into the
Manchester Police Department and
tell police chief Mark Yother how to
do his job. I also am a fan of “Law
Mind the Bones
“Hello, son of mine! Why are you
calling me?”
“I’m calling because I miss you
and wanted to hear your voice.”
“Seriously – why are you calling?”
“Mother, I’m calling because it’s
been a while since we’ve actually
talked.”
“It’s been 27 days since we’ve
actually talked.”
“See? I was right! Well, how have
you been?:
“I’m fine. What’s wrong? Something’s wrong, I just know it.”
“I’m fine, too, thank you.”
“You need something, don’t you?”
“Well, now that you mention it
…”
“I knew it! What do you need?
Money? Legal assistance? Please
don’t tell me you need legal assistance.”
“I need your Chicken Salsa Chili
recipe.”
“Who are you and what have you
done with my son?”
“I’ve been pressured by my peers
to enter a campus charity chili
cook-off contest, and I want to fix
your Chicken Salsa Chili. It’ll be a
winner!”
“Haven’t I warned you about
MEMORY, from Page 25
So did Jerry Douglas, and another
Auldridge acolyte, Rob Ickes. So did
Earl Scruggs, Kitty Wells, Donna
Summer, Joe South, Levon Helm,
Susanna Clark and so many others
who left us over the just-passed
year.
The night Mike died, the satellite
First place award
Best Personal
Humor Column
Group IV
Allison Adams –
The Greeneville
Sun
succumbing to peer pressure?”
“It’s for a good cause, Momma.”
“Son, the only thing you’ve ever
cooked is frozen pizza. The next
logical step is to learn how to safely
heat a Hot Pocket.”
“I can do this, Momma – I just
need your recipe.”
“Minor problem: You have no
kitchen in your dorm room.”
“I’m going to borrow my buddy’s
kitchen.”
“What about a Crock …”
“I’m borrowing a Crock-Pot, too.”
“I see.”
“I just need your recipe, Momma.”
“Do you know how to pick out,
prepare and poach fresh chicken?”
“I don’t have to pluck ‘em?”
“No, but you can poison people with
poorly prepared poultry if you don’t
practice precise procedures.”
radio bluegrass station featured a
lot of his music. I was driving back
toward Nashville, with my dad
safely mending at his home, when
I turned off the radio, reached for
my iPod and did the most appropriate thing I could do in the somber
moment.
I listened to Jerry Douglas.
Jan. 1, 2013
“Got it.”
“Can you spell salmonella?”
“S-A-M- …”
“Nope.”
“Momma, just tell me – in detail
See BONES, Page 27
First place award
Best Sports
Photograph
Group V
Adam Lau –
Knoxville News
Sentinel
and Order,” but I don’t tell every
lawyer in town how to practice law.
I think you see where I’m going.
I take suggestions and I try, as
well as anyone can, to take constructive criticism well because I’m
not perfect and anything I can do
to make the newspaper better for
you, I am for. But, I don’t take well
to demands of how I should handle
your particular submission. I know
that birth announcement is the
biggest news in the world to you,
but I’m sorry I can’t put it on page
one. I want everyone’s submission
to be accepted and printed, but we
do have protocols.
Submit incomplete information.
I had a photo emailed to me not too
long ago that was just a photo and
a name. It did not say what this
person was doing. Why they were
in the picture. Or why they had an
extremely painful look on their face.
I’m not sure what I was supposed
to do with that. Curiously, I did take
the time to email the sender and
request some more information,
and I did eventually get it. Unfortunately, on a busy day or in a busy
news week, I may not have time
to return an email very quickly. So
please, submit complete information including the basic who, what,
when, where and why with a phone
number so I can reach you.
I hope we have learned something. Keep your submissions
coming and we will keep trying to
get them in the newspaper.
Class dismissed.
Dec. 4, 2013
State Press Contests Awards • Page 27
2014 Headline Writing Winners
Circulation Group I:
The Erwin Record
Circulation Group IV:
The Jackson Sun
Circulation Group II:
The LaFollette Press
Circulation Group V:
Chattanooga Times
Free Press
Say your prayers, chipmunks
The chipmunks in our yard have made
two tactical errors. They have attacked
two things that my wife and I hold dear:
My cars and her hostas.
For a long time we were in denial. How
can something so cute be so destructive,
we thought? We have, after all, seen all
the Alvin movies; and we know that chipmunks speak English, breathe helium
and sing Beyoncé songs.
For a long time we preferred to think
we had moles in the yard because it’s easier to demonize an animal with a pointy
nose. I can weaponize a pitchfork and go
berserk on a mole mound. Chipmunks,
on the other hand, have little pug noses
and appear to run on AAA batteries.
They’re like free-range Beanie Babies.
I realized my wife was serious about
chipmunk eradication on the drive
to church Sunday morning when my
11-year-old called out from the back seat.
“Dad, pull over!” he shouted.
“What? Why?” I asked.
“Just pull over. I want to get that dead
possum in the middle of the road. Mom
said she would give me $5 per carcass.”
“I’m pretty sure she was talking about
chipmunk carcasses,” I said. “I know
she’s not going to give you cash for a pile
of possum guts.”
“Oh,” he said.
Sometimes I wonder about that boy.
I didn’t doubt for an instant, though,
that my wife had put a bounty on chipmunks’ pelts. Gardening is her way of
diffusing stress, but one winter a bunch
of chipmunks apparently ate the roots off
all of her hostas and she just about went
bonkers.
Alvin, hate to tell you this, buddy, but
that new, two-lane tunnel extension at
the end of your burrow might just be the
business end of my wife’s shotgun.
I personally became a combatant in the
chipmunk war one day when a manager
at the Toyota dealership summoned me to
the service desk.
“Mr. Kennedy, look at this,” he said,
BONES, from Page 26
Circulation Group III:
Elizabethton Star
– exactly what I need to do.”
“Maybe I should just come up there.”
“No, Momma.”
“If I come up there, I can walk you
through the recipe first-hand, and then
hang out with you and all of your little
friends at the chili cook-off!”
“No, Momma.”
“WE COULD WEAR COSTUMES AT
THE COOK-OFF! We could dress up as
chickens and wear sombreros! Do you see
where I’m going with the theme?”
“No, Momma.”
“And I have that Mexican blanket that
we can use as a tablecloth, and …”
“See? This is why I don’t call.”
“Oh, fine. I’ll just send you the recipe,
but I think you should buy and debone
a couple of rotisserie chickens instead of
cooking raw chicken. It would reduce the
health risk.”
“Deal.”
“Bones! Mind the wee bones! And
for heaven’s sake, don’t buy any dented
cans of beans or tomatoes to put into that
First place award
Best Personal
Humor Column
Group V
Mark Kennedy –
Chattanooga Times
Free Press
holding my car’s cabin air filter in his
hands. “Looks like you have a visitor.”
In the middle of the paper folds was
a little hollowed out spot. One of our
chipmunk friends had evidently climbed
into my car and turned my air filter into
a memory-foam mattress. What’s more,
the little critter had left nutshells in the
AC fan assembly, which now rattled like a
bingo-ball cage.
I felt my face go red.
I was immediately reminded of Bill
Murray’s eloquent monologue in the
film “Caddyshack,” just before he blasted
a gopher hole with explosives: “In the
immortal words of Jean-Paul Sartre, ‘Au
revoir, chipmunk.’”
Yeah. Au revoir, chipmunk.
I immediately thought about calling
Billy the Exterminator or The Turtleman
of Kentucky. I actually contacted a local
varmint catcher, but he was too busy to
help immediately.
Instead, I girded for war. I went to a
hardware store and bought chipmunk
traps, chipmunk repellent and a chipmunk sonar device that is supposed to
plug into a wall socket and drive the little
critters crazy with ultrasonic sound – it’s
the chipmunk equivalent of the Bee Gees’
greatest list. I talked nicely to our neighbor’s cat and told him that he could sun
in our driveway any time.
I think I’m ready, now. So bring it on
chipmunks. Punks.
Or as my shotgun-toting wife might
say, “Hosta la vista, baby.”
April 21, 2013
chili.”
“Why not?”
“Can you spell ptomaine poisoning?”
“T-O-M- …”
“Nope.”
“What does whatever you said have to
do with cooking chili?”
“If a can is dented, it could mean the
seal has been compromised, allowing
bacteria to form and contaminate the
can’s contents.”
“I did not know that.”
“If you’re not careful with this whole
absurd chili-cooking process, you could
cause your chili patrons to become
violently ill, and you’ll never win the
contest.”
“I had no idea that cooking a pot of
chili could be so dangerous.”
“Be sure to promptly refrigerate any
leftovers.”
“I’m so glad I called.”
“I wish you’d call more often.”
“I’ll call again in 27 days.”
“I can be there in four hours.”
“Touché, Momma. Touché”
Oct. 15, 2013
Page 28 • State Press Contests Awards
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First row, from left: Pat Zechman, Southern Standard, McMinnville; Jason Davis, The
Mountain Press, Sevierville; Alaina Akens, Elizabethton Star; Seth Butler, The Newport
Plain Talk; Dale Gentry, The Standard Banner, Jefferson City; Tim Hodge, The Daily Herald,
Columbia; Amanda Greever, The Daily Times, Maryville; Susan Campbell, The Tullahoma
News; Harry Hill, The Tullahoma News; Sadie Fowler, Shelbyville Times-Gazette; and Lee
Swets, Memphis Business Journal.
Second row, from left: Gary Nelson, Crossville Chronicle; Tracy Ayers, Pulaski Citizen;
Pauline Sherrer, Crossville Chronicle; Keith Whitson, The Erwin Record; Dessislava Yankova,
Front row, from left: Pat Zechman, Southern Standard, McMinnville; Tony Stinnett,
Cannon Courier, Woodbury; Shirley Nanney, Carroll County News-Leader, Huntingdon; Mary
Dunbar, Chester County Independent, Henderson; Marnie Gilliam, Chester County
Independent, Henderson; Amanda Greever, The Daily Times, Maryville; Kim Cook, The Standard
Banner, Jefferson City; Susan Campbell, The Tullahoma News; Harry Hill, The Tullahoma News;
Sadie Fowler, The Shelbyville Times-Gazette; and Lee Swets, Memphis Business Journal.
Second row, from left: Gary Nelson, Crossville Chronicle; Christen Coulon, Independent
Appeal, Selmer; Ed Greif, Crossville Chronicle; Keith Whitson, The Erwin Record; Susanne Reed,
Gallatin News Examiner; Andrea Agardy, The Tullahoma News; Chris Cannon, The LaFollette
Press; Tena Lee, Gallatin News Examiner; Pam Sohn, Chattanooga Times Free Press; and
Josh Cross, Gallatin News Examiner.
Third row, from left: Jack McElroy, Knoxville News Sentinel; Kenny Cummings, The Jackson
Sun; Nichole Manna, The Jackson Sun; Alison Gerber, Chattanooga Times Free Press; Scott
Winfree, Carthage Courier; Marie Corhern, The Hartsville Vidette; Eric Miller, Robertson
County Times, Springfield; Jared Felkins, The Lebanon Democrat; Steve Harbison, The
Greeneville Sun; and Rick Locker, The Commercial Appeal, Memphis.
Hamilton County Herald, Chattanooga; Beth Braden, The LaFollette Press; Chris Cannon, The
LaFollette Press; Brent Schanding, The LaFollette Press; Sonya Thompson, The Portland Leader;
and Alison Gerber, Chattanooga Times Free Press.
Third row, from left: Jack McElroy, Knoxville News Sentinel; Melanie Howard, The Paris PostIntelligencer; Kenny Cummings, The Jackson Sun; Scott Winfree, Carthage Courier; Joel
Washburn, The McKenzie Banner; Andy Reed, The Lebanon Democrat; Jared Felkins, The
Lebanon Democrat; Brad Martin, Hickman County Times, Centerville; and Rick Locker, The
Commercial Appeal, Memphis.
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