Internet tax bill passes Senate

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Internet tax bill passes Senate
...
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THE GORILLAS COACH REPORT
OF NORTH GEORGIA
FACILITY PROVIDES HAVEN
FOR RETIRED PRIMATES
LIFE, E1
SPORTS, D1
TO GIVE THE NEWS IMPARTIALLY, WITHOUT FEAR OR FAVOR
Tuesday, May 7, 2013
Obama,
GOP at
odds over
prison
UTC moves closer to basketball
hires, athletic director says
Vol. 144, No. 144 • • •
Politics of a pill
Opening ‘morning-after’ drug access to girls
as young as 15 years old sparks debate
■ Republicans say they don’t
want the Guantanamo Bay
facility to be shut down.
Legislation expected
to face stiff opposition in
GOP-controlled House
By Chris Carroll
Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON — Local
Republicans in Congress condemned President Barack
Obama’s renewed commitment
to close the Guantanamo Bay
prison in Cuba, freshening their
own arguments against transferring detainees and putting
Americans in harm’s way.
“All of the prisoners housed
at Guantanamo are terrorists,”
said U.S. Sen. Richard Shelby, RAla. “They pose an obvious threat
to our national
security, and
they should not
be allowed to
set foot on our
soil.”
Last week at
a hastily called
news conference, Obama
Richard
vowed in surShelby
prisingly striking terms to reset his focus on
a first-term promise from 2009:
Defy conservatives in Congress,
shutter Guantanamo and transfer
up to 166 prisoners to other countries or a Supermax-style prison
in Illinois.
“I think it is critical for us to
understand that Guantanamo is
not necessary to keep America
safe,” Obama said, calling the
prison inefficient and expensive.
“It hurts us in terms of our international standing.”
The president’s call to action
came in the midst of a hunger
strike in which 21 indefinitely
held detainees are being force-fed
through their noses. His remarks
also surfaced as military officials
sought an extra $200 million to
repair and replace deteriorating
facilities at the prison, according
to The New York Times.
But through statements and
votes, most Senate Republicans
from Tennessee, Alabama and
Georgia have joined the majority
of their colleagues in obstructing
the president. By and large, they
cite safety concerns that are likely to imperil Obama’s renewed
efforts on Guantanamo, whatever they may be.
“The American people expect
us to keep them safe,” Sen. Lamar
By Chris Carroll
Washington Bureau
The Associated Press
A pharmacist holds a box of emergency contraceptive levonorgestrel, the morning-after pill.
New rules permitting 15-year-olds to get the morning-after pill without a prescription are
being debated by politicians and parents.
“What is the
message we
are sending
our kids? I
have a hard
time seeing
how this is in the best
interest of our children.”
By Kate Harrison
Staff Writer
T
he “morning-after pill”
may be only 1.5 mg, but for
both sides of the debate
surrounding it, the tablet
carries a lot of weight.
Advocates of making the pill more
accessible to younger teens say the
emergency contraceptive is crucial
to lowering the rate of unwanted
pregnancies. But some local critics
and concerned pharmacists say the
pill’s power can encourage choices
that young teens aren’t ready to
handle.
Last week, regulators with the
U.S. Food and Drug Administration
lowered the age limit for people
buying Plan B One-Step emergency
contraception and its generic counterparts from 17 to 15.
The FDA also decided to make
the contraceptive available on store
shelves alongside condoms and
other widely used family planning
products, instead of behind pharmacy counters.
The decision has been cheered by
those who have long argued that the
pill is safe for any female of a reproductive age to use.
— Julie Baumgardner,
president and CEO of
Chattanooga-based familyadvocacy organization First
Things First
“It’s important
to educate girls
on effective
methods
of disease
prevention
and contraception so that
if they do engage in sexual
activity, they can protect
themselves from pregnancy
and disease.”
— Bea Lurie,
president and CEO of Girls
Inc. of Chattanooga
See PILL, Page A7
See PRISON, Page A7
WASHINGTON — Get
ready, Amazon hounds and eBay
fiends of America: Start Googling
“Internet sales tax.”
The phrase got closer to
reality Monday thanks to some
rare bipartisan consensus in a
gridlocked Capitol. Senators
voted 69-27 on a bill that would
give states the ability to force
all Internet retailers to collect
sales taxes that online shoppers
currently must pay but largely
don’t.
Those same retailers then
would be forced to remit the
proceeds to the state where the
shopper lives.
The Marketplace Fairness Act
now heads to the House, where
passage hinges
on whether suspicious Republicans believe
collecting an
already-owed
tax amounts to
a new one.
In floor
debate Mon- Lamar
day, Sen. Lamar Alexander
Alexander, a
Tennessee Republican and a
key player in the bill’s rise, found
himself fighting a new generation of conservatives who said
the bill creates onerous regulations for small businesses dealing with a lukewarm economy.
Among Alexander’s foes was
Sen. Ted Cruz, a tea party Texas
Republican whose name has
been mentioned in 2016 presidential buzz.
“I believe the Senate should
treat the Internet as a safe haven,”
Cruz said, adding that “momand-pop retailers” can’t afford
“accountants and lawyers and
people designed to deal with”
the bill’s requirements.
But Alexander noted the bill
exempts online businesses that
haven’t cleared $1 million in
annual sales.
See TAX, Page A7
Israeli airstrike in Syria aimed at Iran
By Josef Federman and Karin Laub
The Associated Press
BEIRUT — From Israel’s perspective, its
airstrikes near Damascus were more about
Iran than Syria: Tehran’s shipment of guided
missiles destroyed in the weekend attacks
would have posed a potent threat had the
weapons reached Iranian proxy Hezbollah
in Lebanon.
While Israel says it has no interest getting involved in the Syrian civil war, it could
find itself drawn into the conflict if Syrian
leader Bashar Assad’s Iranian patrons continue to use his territory to ship arms to
Hezbollah.
Repeated Israeli strikes would almost
certainly prompt Syrian retaliation, yielding
INSIDE
■ Syrian rebels say they shot down regime
helicopter, A5
■ White House: Assad likely behind
chemical weapons use, A6
a nightmare scenario in which Israel finds
itself in a Syrian morass teeming with jihadi
rebels, sectarian hatred and chemical weapons.
For the West, it offers another compelling
argument that the Syrian war must somehow be brought to an end.
Today’s poll
See SYRIA, Page A6
VOTE ONLINE
been canceled?
VIDEO
TOP 5
things
to know
today
Scan with
a QR
reader
after 7
a.m.
Yesterday’s results
as of 9 p.m. Monday
Do you believe
in Bigfoot?
Should the 3
State, 3 Mountain
Q
Challenge have
© 2013 Chattanooga Publishing Co.
Internet
tax bill
passes
Senate
Q
timesfreepress.com
Yes: 32 percent No: 67 percent
GOLFING
BUDDIES
U.S. Sen. Bob Corker, left,
stands with President Barack
Obama on the golf course at
Andrews Air Force Base on
Monday. Joining the president
and Corker on the course were
U.S. Sens. Saxby Chambliss,
Republican from Georgia,
and Democrat Mark Udall of
Colorado. Golf Digest ranked
Corker and Chambliss among
the top golfers in Congress in
its 2011 review.
A story is on A4.
INDEX
Advice . . . . . . . . E4
Business . . . . . . C1
Classified . . . . . . F1
Comics . . . . . .E2-3
Editorials . . . . .B6-7
Life . . . . . . . . . . . E1
Metro . . . . . . . . . B1
National . . . . . . . A4
Newsmakers . . . A2
Obituaries . . . .B2-3
The Associated Press
Puzzles . . . . E2, F3
Sports . . . . . . . . D1
Stocks . . . . . . .C2-3
Television. . . . . . E5
Weather . . . . . . . C4
World . . . . . . . . . A5
A2 • Tuesday, May 7, 2013 • • •
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CONTACTUS
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METRO/
REGION
■ GUNFIRE DEATH Blood
splatter still stained the
porch where 20-year-old
Wendell Washington drew
his last breaths after shots
were exchanged with another gunman late Sunday night,
according to Chattanooga
police. Washington was
shot about 11:15 p.m. at 3687
Northrop St. in Lupton City.
Homes dot the hill line, some
worn weary from the elements and in need of repair
while others were freshly
renovated. The blue home
marked with a no-trespassing sign where Washington
was shot in the chest had an
oxygen mask left on the rail
of the porch. Yellow crime
scene tape marked the nearby power pole. Neighbors
said the gunfire sounded like
firecrackers.
■ CHICKEN RULES Two
Chattanooga City Council
members said Monday they
think an ordinance to allow
chickens within city limits
first needs to be vetted by
the Animal Control Board
before even seeing the light
of day on council. “I’m going
to ask that it be deferred to
the people it should go to
first,” said Councilwoman
Carol Berz. “That’s why we
EARLY EMAIL
■ LOOKOUT DOCTOR
Lookout Mountain’s only
medical doctor plans to stay
on the mountain — despite
a proposal for a new “town
center” falling through that
was due to house a new
doctor’s office. Family practitioner Dr. Bill Moore Smith
plans to build a new office
in the corner of the Lookout
Mountain United Methodist Church at 1300 Lula Lake
Road. “The church ... they
have voted to sell a piece
of that parking lot to build
[Smith’s] office there,” said
Michael Hubble, superintendent for the Chattanooga
District of the Holston Conference of the United Methodist Church. “I think it’s a
win-win,” Hubble said.
Start your day with the
latest news. Sign up for
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inbox.
appointed them.” The City
Council is set to talk today
and vote on an ordinance
that would allow up to 10
hens within Chattanooga city
limits. Nearby Signal Mountain is the only other municipality in the area that allows
backyard chickens. Councilman Chris Anderson, who
is sponsoring the proposed
ordinance, said he thinks
there should be no problems
with the council hearing
since the council heard it
once before three years ago.
IN BUSINESS
■ LAWSUIT DENIED Gussie
Vann sued too late. On Monday a federal judge dismissed
a $20 million civil rights
lawsuit filed by Vann against
McMinn County for his
unlawful arrest, detention and
lack of access to a lawyer that
he believes resulted in a death
sentence, which was later
dismissed. The first hurdle
Vann’s attorney Robin Flores
had to clear — did Vann file
his lawsuit within the oneyear limit? U.S. District Judge
Curtis Collier decided Vann
didn’t get it done in time.
14.34
5.07
Dow
14,968.89
Nasdaq
3,392.97
■ VIAGRA ONLINE Men
who are bashful about needing help in the bedroom
no longer have to go to the
drugstore to buy that little
blue pill. In a first for the
drug industry, Pfizer Inc.
tells The Associated Press
that it will begin selling its
popular erectile dysfunc-
tion pill Viagra directly to
patients on its website. If it
works, drugmakers could
begin selling other medicines
that are rampantly counterfeited and sold online,
particularly treatments for
non-urgent conditions seen
as embarrassing. Think: diet
drugs, medicines for baldness and birth control pills.
IN LIFE
■ WRITING PROGRAM
Reading, writing, and arithmetic — the basics of an
education, right? But for
some youngsters, writing
is the hardest to conquer.
That’s why McCallie School
freshman English teacher
Erin Tocknell started the
Creative Writing Outreach
Program, a volunteer program that pairs McCallie
students with fourth- and
fifth-graders from Orchard
Knob Elementary and Calvin Donaldson Elementary
schools in Chattanooga.
IN SPORTS
■ COACH HIRINGS SOON
New UTC athletic director
David Blackburn told the
Chattanooga Quarterback
Club that he expects the
school’s basketball head
coaches will be hired soon.
He said he hopes to have each
list of candidates down to two
finalists by Wednesday.
NEWSMAKERS
Anthony judge:
Enough
evidence
to convict
Brothers win
CBS’ ‘Race’
The Associated Press
The Associated Press
ORLANDO, Fla. — The
judge who presided over the
trial of Casey Anthony says
he believes there was enough
evidence to convict the Florida
mother who was acquitted of
murdering her 2-year-old daughter.
Judge Belvin Perry told NBC’s
“Today” show on Monday that he
believes there was sufficient evidence for a first-degree murder
conviction, even though much of
it was circumstantial.
Anthony was acquitted almost
two years ago of killing her
daughter, Caylee, following a trial
that attracted worldwide attention. She was convicted of making
false statements to police and got
credit for time served.
The judge says he saw two
sides to Anthony. The one she
showed to jurors was a wrongfully accused mother grieving for
her child. The other was a woman
wasn’t afraid to shout and swear
at her attorneys.
Ritter protests
college’s
gay policy
Associated Press File Photo
Shania Twain announced 22 new show dates this fall to round
out the first year of her two-year Las Vegas Strip residency.
Twain announces fall
show dates inVegas
The Associated Press
The Associated Press
GRANTHAM, Pa. — Singersongwriter Josh Ritter says he
won’t play a central Pennsylvania Christian college again
unless it changes its policy
against “homosexual behavior.”
Ritter made the announcement on Facebook hours
after playing a Friday night
concert at Messiah College in
Grantham, Pa., southwest of
Harrisburg.
Messiah students and staff
have to sign a “community
covenant” promising to avoid
homosexual behavior and premarital sex.
Ritter calls the policy exclusionary and bigoted. He says
he’s donating his fee to an organization that provides crisis
intervention and suicide prevention services.
Messiah spokeswoman Beth
Lorow says the administration
is disappointed that Ritter is
speaking in favor of tolerance
but isn’t applying those principles to their religious freedoms.
LAS VEGAS — After nearly
a decade-long hiatus marred by
burnout, a painful divorce and
physical problems that affected
her ability to sing, country superstar Shania Twain said she’s finding her groove as a Las Vegas
headliner.
On Monday, Twain announced
22 new show dates this fall for
“Shania: Still the One,” a spectacle
at a 4,300-seat Caesars Palace concert hall that includes two trained
horses, a live band, and the 47year-old Canadian beauty clad in
sparkling bodysuits and thigh-high
boots. She’s also staging a run of
12 shows starting May 14.
“I couldn’t be any happier,”
Twain told The Associated Press
in a phone call from the Bahamas,
where she lives between shows.
“It turned out so beautifully and
I’m so proud of it.”
Twain made her debut in
December at the Colosseum,
home to fellow Canadian songstress Celine Dion, shortly after
parading down the Las Vegas Strip
on horseback. But perhaps more
significant than her regal grand
entrance amid a herd of 40 horses
was that the five-time Grammy
winner returned to performing at
all. Since releasing the 1997 album
“Come on Over,” which became
the best-selling country album of
all time, her life hit a feverish pace
of road shows and promotions
that continued even after the birth
of her son in 2001.
After her “Up!” tour wrapped
in 2004, it was unclear whether
the new mom would ever be back.
The singer known for “Any
Man of Mine” and “That Don’t
Impress Me” struggled with muscular tension that made singing
more difficult. And in 2008, she
was thrust into an unwelcome
spotlight by an alleged affair
between her then-husband and
producer, Robert “Mutt” Lange,
and one of her best friends.
Since then, she married that
friend’s ex-husband, Frederic
Thiebaud. They’ve found some
sense of normalcy; Thiebaud
coaches Twain’s son in soccer,
and she said the 11-year-old is a
happy child.
HUNTSVILLE, Ala. — An
Alabama pro hockey player and
his brother have claimed the $1
million prize of CBS’ “Amazing
Race.”
Huntsville Havoc player
Anthony Battaglia and his brother
Bates were shown winning
the event in a two-hour finale
that aired Sunday night, al.com
reported
Good note-taking skills turned
out to be a key part of their victory after all the running, swimming
and scrambling across the globe.
The finale took competitors
from Edinburgh to Belfast to London to Washington, D.C., where
they twice had to show a good
memory for details of their voyage. At one point, their finishing
positions in several past episodes
translated into the combination to
a briefcase containing a clue. At
another, they had to line up countries in the order in which they
had visited them.
At the finish line, members of
the teams which had earlier been
eliminated cheered the finalists
as they arrived. For fans of Team
Mullet, it was one last chance to
see Chuck and Wynona McCall
of Daphne. The couple had a
good run, making past the halfway point.
Hill gets
3 months
in tax case
The Associated Press
NEWARK, N.J. — Grammywinning singer Lauryn Hill has
been sentenced to three months
in prison for failing to pay about
$1 million in taxes.
She also was sentenced Monday in Newark to three additional
months of home confinement.
The 37-year-old South Orange
resident pleaded guilty last year
in the case.
During a forceful statement
to the judge, Hill explained she
had always meant to eventually
pay the taxes but was unable to
during a period of time when she
dropped out of the music business.
Before the sentencing, her
attorney had said Hill had paid
more than $970,000 to satisfy the
state and federal tax liabilities.
WALTER E. HUSSMAN JR.
Chairman and Publisher
JASON TAYLOR
President & General Manager
LESLIE KAHANA
Advertising Director
ALISON GERBER
Managing Editor
CARROLL DUCKWORTH
Circulation Director
MARK JONES
Target Publishing Director
ED BOURN
Digital and Technology Director
RUSSELL LIVELY
Controller
SHANNON YORK
Creative Services Director
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• • • Tuesday, May 7, 2013 • A3
timesfreepress.com
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When I came to the The Chattanooga Spine and
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• Why do I have pain in my legs, feet, toes?
• What causes the tingling sensation or numbness
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• Why do my feet feel like they’re on fire?
Here’s What Makes
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What About Your Future:
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Unfortunately, there are people who have been
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There May Be Hope For You With A New Technology For Treating Peripheral Neuropathy Called
Neuro-Analgesia
Neuro-Analgesia, sometimes referred to as Electronic Signal Treatment, is a patented, innovative
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can substantially reduce or even possibly eliminate
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So, How Does Neuro-Analgesia Work?
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Who Should Call For A
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The attenuated current or signal penetrates deeply
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NOTE: This technology is patented,
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My experience with The Chattanooga Spine
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I am a vigorously active 69 year-old- man. For
two years, I have pursued various medical specialists and solutions seeking relief from my agonizing affliction with Neuropathy in my feet. I had
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Spine and Nerve Institute.
-William J. Bunnell; ARRT, MS Radiological
Sciences, CRA, Executive Director of Medical
Imaging (Retired), Chattanooga, TN.
Since coming to The Chattanooga Spine and
Nerve Institute for treatment for neuropathy in
my feet and legs, I have experienced wonderful results with the hot burning pain in my right leg. It
was horrible pain, almost to the point of stopping
almost all of my activities that involved walking.
Now with the treatment most of the pain is gone
• If you’ve had severe peripheral neuropathy (diabetic or otherwise) for at least six months, and
nothing has helped
• If you’re over the age of 65
• If you have tried just about everything and anything and nothing seems to help
• If you’re practically at the end of your rope, and
out of other options
Who Should Not Call?
• Do not call us if you are under the age of 60 (we
have to reserve this technology for the “worst of
the worst”
• Please do not call if your problem is not very
bad – (again, we must reserve this for the worst
cases)
• Do not call if your problem is already improving, and please do not call if you have not tried
some other form of treatment!
Now, What’s the Next Step You Should Take?
We have decided to make it super-easy for you
to take action. This is the very first time that we
have released any information on our Peripheral
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date, we have only treated established, existing
patients with this new technology. We will only be
able to accept 15 new patients, so you must call as
soon as possible to schedule your complimentary
(free) Qualifying Assessment.
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No charge at all and you don’t need
to buy anything. But, you will find
out if you qualify for this revolutionary new therapy. You won’t leave
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get rid of your pain. During your
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& risk of fall assessment and a
complete quantitative &
qualitative examination.
Expires 5/13/13.
Call Today!
CALL OUR 24 HOUR
HELP LINE AT
423-296-2604
Chattanooga Spine
and Nerve Institute
1334 Mackey Branch Dr.,
Suite 104
Chattanooga, TN 37421
Dr. John Wall, D.C.
Dr. Jessica Taylor, D.C.
(Just off Gunbarrel and East Brainerd)
35685836
If any of these problems or concerns are creating
a situation where the quality of your life is being
compromised, then you need to pay close attention to what we’re telling you in this article.
Isn’t it sad to otherwise feel so alive and full of
vigor, but not be able to fully participate in life
because the pain, tingling, and numbness is so
pervasive, so intruding – and so unfair? Don’t
you sometimes feel downright angry that these
symptoms have appeared – and won’t go away?? If
you do, it’s only normal. After all, who wants to
be burdened with carrying a load of pain, and live
life through an all-encom-passing fog of discomfort? Pain that’s always there, always reminding
you of its presence. Always raising its ugly head,
no matter how hard you try to ignore it. It’s
always there – sitting in your recliner. Going to
the store. Playing golf with friends, or just trying
to get some much-needed sleep and rest at night.
Anything you do is accompanied by the sharp
pain, tingling, and the numbness.
A4 • Tuesday, May 7, 2013 • • •
..
timesfreepress.com ..
National
FDA wants cancer warnings on tanning beds
promote indoor tanning. And
regulators are also proposing
that manufacturers to meet
certain safety and design features, including timers and
limits on radiation emitted.
The government action
is aimed at curbing cases
of melanoma, the deadliest
form of skin cancer, which
have been on the rise for
about 30 years. An estimated 2.3 million U.S. teenagers tan indoors each year,
and melanoma is the second most common form of
cancer among young adults,
according to the American
Academy of Dermatology.
Recent studies have shown
that the risk of melanoma is
75 percent higher in people
who have been exposed to
ultraviolet radiation from
indoor tanning. While most
cases are diagnosed in people in their 40s and 50s, the
disease is linked to sun exposure at a young age.
Physician groups have been
urging the U.S. government to
take action on tanning beds
for years, citing increases in
the number of cases of skin
cancer among people in their
teens and 20s.
“As a dermatologist I see
the consequences of indoor
tanning. I have to diagnose
too many young people with
melanoma and see the grief
that it causes to these families,” said Dr. Mary Maloney
of the American Academy of
Dermatology, on a call with
FDA officials. Maloney said
the FDA action is an important first step, but that her
group would continue to
push for a ban on the sale
and use of tanning beds for
people under age 18.
Earlier this year, a study
of Missouri tanning salons
Obama golfs
with GOP
senators
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said. and design
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day afternoon were not
U.S. team stopped
from Benghazi flight
The Associated Press
A box of preserved cicadas, including emerging insects and molted exoskeletons, is
shown at the Smithsonian Institution’s Museum Support Center in Camp Springs, Md.
Cicadas invasion imminent
The Associated Press
WASHINGTON — Any
day now, billions of cicadas
with bulging red eyes will
crawl out of the earth after 17
years underground and overrun the East Coast. They will
arrive in such numbers that
people from North Carolina
to Connecticut will be outnumbered roughly 600-to-1.
Maybe more.
But ominous as that
sounds — along with scientists’ horror-movie name
for the infestation, Brood II
— they’re harmless. These
insects won’t hurt you or
other animals. At worst, they
might damage a few saplings
or young shrubs. Mostly they
will blanket certain pockets
of the region, though lots of
people won’t ever see them.
“It’s not like these hordes
of cicadas suck blood or
zombify people,” says May
Berenbaum, a University of
Illinois entomologist.
They’re looking for just
one thing: sex. And they’ve
been waiting quite a long
time.
Since 1996, this group
of 1-inch bugs, in wingless
nymph form, has been a few
feet underground, sucking on
tree roots and biding their
time. They will emerge only
when the ground temperature reaches precisely 64
degrees. After a few weeks
up in the trees, they will die
and their offspring will go
underground, not to return
until 2030.
“It’s just an amazing
accomplishment,” Berenbaum says. “How can anyone
not be impressed?”
And they will make a big
racket, too. The noise all the
male cicadas make when
they sing for sex can drown
out your own thoughts, and
maybe even rival a rock concert. In 2004, Gene Kritsky,
an entomologist at the College of Mount St. Joseph in
Cincinnati, measured cicadas at 94 decibels, saying it
was so loud “you don’t hear
planes flying overhead.”
There are ordinary cicadas that come out every year
around the world, but these
are different. They’re called
magicicadas — as in magic
— and are red-eyed. And
these magicicadas are seen
only in the eastern half of the
United States, nowhere else
in the world.
There are 15 U.S. broods
that emerge every 13 or 17
years, so that nearly every
year, some place is overrun. Last year it was a small
area, mostly around the Blue
Ridge Mountains of Virginia,
West Virginia and Tennessee. Next year, two places
get hit: Iowa into Illinois and
Missouri; and Louisiana and
Mississippi. And it’s possible
to live in these locations and
actually never see them.
This year’s invasion,
Brood II, is one of the bigger
ones. Several experts say that
they really don’t have a handle on how many cicadas are
lurking underground but that
30 billion seems like a good
estimate. At the Smithsonian
Institution, researcher Gary
Hevel thinks it may be more
like 1 trillion.
Even if it’s merely 30 billion, if they were lined up
head to tail, they’d reach the
moon and back.
WASHINGTON — A
team of U.S. special forces
ready to head to Benghazi,
Libya, after the assault on the
American diplomatic mission
had ended was told to stand
down, according to a former
top diplomat.
Gregory Hicks also told
Republicans on the House
Oversight and Government
Reform Committee that if the
U.S. military had flown aircraft
over the Benghazi facility after it
came under siege it might have
prevented the second attack on
the CIA annex that killed two
CIA security officers.
Excerpts of the interview
with the former deputy chief in
Libya were released Monday in
advance of Hicks’ testimony on
Wednesday before the panel.
The Sept. 11 assault killed
Ambassador Chris Stevens and
three other Americans. Nearly
eight months later, Republicans
insist that the Obama administration is guilty of a cover-up
of the events despite a scathing independent report that
faulted the State Department
for inadequate security at the
diplomatic mission.
Hicks’ comments and the
hearing are likely to revive the
politically charged debate in
which GOP lawmakers and
outside groups have faulted
former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, a possible
presidential candidate in 2016.
After the first word of the
attack in Benghazi, a sevenmember security team, including two military personnel,
flew from Tripoli to Benghazi.
Upon their arrival, they learned
that Stevens was missing and
the situation had calmed after
the first attack, according to
a Pentagon timeline released
last year.
Meanwhile, a second team
was preparing to leave on a
Libyan C-130 cargo plane from
Tripoli to Benghazi when Hicks
said he learned from the Libyan prime minister that Stevens
was dead. The Libyan military
agreed to transport additional
U.S. personnel to Benghazi on
its cargo plane, but Hicks complained the special forces were
told not to make the trip.
“They were told not to
board the flight, so they missed
it,” Hicks told GOP committee
staff.
That flight arrived well after
the second attack on the CIA
annex that killed two security
officers — Tyrone Woods and
Glen Doherty.
Hicks also contended that if
the U.S. military had scrambled
jet fighters after the first attack
that it would have prevented
the mortar attack on the CIA
annex around 5:15 a.m.
“I believe the Libyans
would have split. They would
have been scared to death that
we would have gotten a laser
on them and killed them,”
Hicks said, according to the
excerpts.
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Wire Services
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Limousine had extra passenger
The Associated Press
AP Photo/Roxana
and Carlos Guzman
A limo burns Saturday on
the San Mateo-Hayward
Bridge in San Francisco.
REDWOOD CITY, Calif.
— A stretch limousine that
burst into flames on a San
Francisco Bay bridge, killing
five women inside, was carrying one too many passengers,
investigators said Monday.
The state Public Utilities
Commission had authorized
the vehicle to carry eight or
fewer passengers, but it had
nine on the night of the deadly
fire, California Highway Patrol
Capt. Mike Maskarich said. He
did not comment on whether
the overcrowding may have
been a factor in the deaths.
The Lincoln Town Car was
packed with young women
celebrating a girls’ night out
with a newlywed bride when
it went up in flames Saturday night on the San MateoHayward Bridge. The driver
and four women were able to
escape.
The newlywed woman was
among the dead.
The driver, Orville Brown,
said, “There were just so
many flames. Within maybe
90 seconds, the car was fully
engulfed.”
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WASHINGTON — President Barack Obama took his
congressional outreach effort
to the green on Monday, playing a round of golf with a
bipartisan trio of senators.
On the first green, Obama
put his arm around Sen. Bob
Corker, the Tennessee Republican.
He shared his golf cart with
Sen. Saxby Chambliss, Republican from Georgia and joked
with Democrat Sen. Mark
Udall of Colorado.
Obama hasn’t had much
luck schmoozing GOP lawmakers in the past, but he gave
it another go Monday afternoon by inviting two of the
Senate’s best Republican golfers out for a round at Andrews
Air Force Base.
Under overcast skies, the
three chatted casually with
Obama, wearing a windbreaker and baseball cap. They putted on the first green before
leaving the view of reporters
on a pair of golf carts.
The afternoon outing added
a recreational twist to Obama’s
months-long effort to strengthen ties with lawmakers, hoping some quality face time
now can lay the groundwork
for compromise on pressing
issues down the road.
“He’s looking for partners
anywhere he can find them
— including on the 8th hole,”
said White House press secretary Jay Carney.
The White House and
Democrats are working to
secure support for an immigration overhaul — especially
from Republicans.
“With the major fiscal
issues our country is facing,
not to mention foreign relations issues around the world,
anytime you can get the president’s ear for a few hours,
I think that’s a good thing,”
Corker said in a statement
issued by his office.
Obama could have his hands
full on the golf course. All three
of the senators who golfed
Monday with Obama were
ranked among the top 40 on
Golf Digest’s 2011 list of “Washington’s Top 150 Golfers.”
Golf Digest ranked Corker
and Chambliss among the top
golfers in Congress in its 2011
review. Udall was ranked the
best golfer in Congress by the
magazine in that review.
Chambliss aced the 11th
hole and said, “We had a
delightful day of golf with
folks who enjoy playing the
game.”
found that 65 percent of 250
businesses surveyed would
accept children ages 10 to
12, often without parental
permission. The study was
conducted by dermatologists
at the Washington University School of Medicine in
St. Louis.
“They don’t have to provide any data in advance
before they go on the market, so we have no way of
providing assurance that the
tanning beds are performing
up to specifications,” said Dr.
Jeffrey Shuren, FDA’s director for medical devices.
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The Associated Press
WA S H I N G T O N —
Indoor tanning beds would
carry new warnings about
the risk of cancer and be subject to more stringent federal
oversight, under a proposal
unveiled Monday by the Food
and Drug Administration.
The FDA has regulated
tanning beds and sun lamps
for over 30 years, but for the
first time ever the agency
says those devices should
not be used by people under
age 18. The agency wants
that warning on pamphlets,
catalogs and websites that
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Abortion trial deliberations continue
The Associated Press
PHILADELPHIA — The
jury in the death-penalty
trial of a Philadelphia abortion provider has gone home
without a verdict after another day of deliberations.
Dr. Kermit Gosnell is
charged with five counts
of murder in the deaths of
a patient and four babies
allegedly born alive and then
killed with scissors.
Jurors are expected to
return today, a week after
they started deliberations.
They must also weigh racketeering, infanticide and
alleged abortion-law violations.
Jurors appear to be working on the murder charges,
based on questions they
asked Monday about the
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They have also been told
to avoid media reports about
the high-profile case.
Co-defendant Eileen
O’Neill, Gosnell’s former
employee, is also on trial,
charged with billing as a
doctor when she had no
license.
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• • • Tuesday, May 7, 2013 • A5
International
Pakistan
Islamist
rally bomb
kills 16
Syrian
rebels say
shot down
helicopter
The Associated Press
PARACHINAR, Pakistan — A
bomb blast tore through a political
rally held by an Islamist party in
northwest Pakistan Monday, in an
attack claimed by the Pakistani Taliban that killed 16 people and underscored an increase in violence ahead
of the May 11 vote.
The explosion, at a rally held in the
village of Sewak in the northwest Kurram tribal area, was the latest attack
on candidates, political offices and
election-related events as the vote
approaches. Much of the violence is
believed to have been carried out by
the Taliban against three liberal and
secular parties. But Monday’s blast
targeted a gathering of the Jamiat
Ulema-e-Islam party which generally has a more favorable relationship
with the militant group.
The bomb, which was apparently
planted near the main stage of the
rally, killed 16 and left 44 wounded,
said Umar Khan, a doctor at the nearby Sada hospital where many of the
wounded were initially taken.
Two party leaders who were speaking at the event escaped unharmed.
About 2,500 people had gathered
at a local religious school to hear the
candidates speak, said one man who
was in the crowd, Sabir Gul. The massive explosion came just as one of the
candidates ended his speech and was
leaving the stage, he said.
The Jamiat Ulema-e-Islam party is
considered supportive of the Afghan
Taliban’s fight against the United
States and its allies in neighboring
Afghanistan. It’s also sympathetic
to the Pakistani Taliban, which have
been fighting Pakistani troops and
would like to establish a hardline
Islamic government in Pakistan.
The group’s leaders have generally
opposed the Pakistani military’s operations against militants in the tribal
region and instead called for negotiating with the militants.
New York Times News Service
The Associated Press
Chinese Premier Li Keqiang, right, talks with Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas, left, during a
meeting at the Zhongnanhai compound in Beijing on Monday.
China hosting Mideast leaders
The Associated Press
BEIJING — China is hosting
both the Palestinian and Israeli leaders this week in a sign of its desire
for a larger role in the Middle East.
Palestinian President Mahmoud
Abbas was welcomed by his Chinese
counterpart Xi Jinping in Beijing on
Monday, as Israeli Prime Minister
Benjamin Netanyahu began a visit to
the eastern financial hub of Shanghai. Netanyahu is due in Beijing on
Wednesday following Abbas’ departure a day earlier.
China’s Foreign Ministry said last
week it would be willing to help set
up a meeting between Abbas and
Netanyahu if the two men wanted.
Talks between the Israeli and Palestinian sides have been deadlocked
for four years and there was no indication a meeting would take place.
China has traditionally maintained a low profile in Middle East
diplomacy, but in recent years has
tried to play a more active role in
the region as part of its quest for
markets, resources and diplomatic
influence. Beijing has sought stable
relations with both sides in the Israel-Palestinian conflict, but Israel’s
weekend airstrike on a Syrian military complex created a turbulent
start to China’s diplomatic foray.
Asked by reporters about play-
ing host to Netanyahu following
the airstrike, Chinese Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Hua Chunying
avoided criticizing Israel by name
but said, “We oppose the use of
force and believe any country’s sovereignty should be respected.”
Still, Hua reiterated that China’s
hosting the two leaders should be
positive for promoting regional
peace. “China thinks it is of great
significance to help facilitate the
Middle East peace process, and
would like to make positive and constructive efforts in helping resume
peace talks between Palestine and
Israel,” Hua said at a daily media
briefing in Beijing.
Meeting with Xi at the Great Hall
of the People, the seat of China’s legislature, Abbas reviewed the history
of their relations stretching back to
the 1960s and said the two sides
shared the “same views on many
world problems.”
“I appreciate China’s high
position in the world nowadays,”
Abbas said in opening remarks at
the meeting, which was followed
by the signing of agreements on
technical cooperation and cultural
exchanges.
China recognized the Palestinian
state in 1988, four years before establishing diplomatic ties with Israel.
In an interview with China’s official Xinhua News Agency last week,
Abbas said he wanted to involve
China more in the Middle East
peace process, and said the dual
visits would offer a “good opportunity for the Chinese to listen to
both of us.”
China is a major customer for
Israeli know-how, from high-technology to agriculture, engineering
and military hardware and services,
including the training of Chinese
security forces and purchase of
unmanned aerial vehicles.
After touring a high-tech industrial park, Netanyahu spoke to
Israeli and Chinese business leaders in Shanghai. He paid tribute to
Shanghai’s role as a haven for European Jews fleeing the Holocaust, and
then touted the potential for future
cooperation combining Israel’s
high-tech know-how with China’s
manufacturing heft.
“We have 8 million residents,
approximately one-third the population of Shanghai. But we manufacture
more intellectual property than any
other country in the world in relation
to its size. If we create a partnership
between Israel’s inventive capability
and China’s manufacturing capability, we will have a winning combination,” Netanyahu said.
BEIRUT — Syrian rebels said
Monday that they had shot down a
government helicopter in the east
of the country, killing eight security
troops, as new accusations emerged
that insurgents seeking to overthrow
President Bashar Assad may have used
an illegal nerve agent in the country’s
grinding civil war. The rebels denied
the assertion.
Before the weekend, a key question
defining outside attitudes about the
more than two-year-old conflict was
whether chemical weapons had been
used, which could draw Western powers more directly into the war. President
Barack Obama has said he would intervene only if Syria has used chemical
weapons or if such use is imminent.
But there have been separate claims
that chemical weapons have been used
by the insurgents, who are supported
by many Western and some Arab
nations.
In an interview over the weekend
with Swiss-Italian television, Carla Del
Ponte, one of the leading figures in
a Geneva-based U.N. commission of
inquiry, said there were strong suspicions that the rebels seeking Assad’s
overthrow had themselves used sarin,
a nerve agent, but there was no “incontrovertible proof” that they had.
But a statement that the commission of inquiry released later in Geneva qualified Del Ponte’s assertions,
emphasizing “that it has not reached
conclusive findings as to the use of
chemical weapons in Syria by any parties to the conflict.”
The United States also cast some
doubt on Del Ponte’s assertions.
George Little, a Pentagon spokesman,
declined to comment on them directly
but told reporters in Washington: “It’s
our very strong belief, based on what
we know, that at this stage, if chemical
weapons were used, the Syrian regime
would be responsible.”
Putin protesters drop in number, enthusiasm MOM RINGS
MOSCOW — About
20,000 protesters thronged
Bolotnaya Square across from
the Kremlin on Monday, a
year after a protest at the
same spot turned violent on
the eve of President Vladimir
Putin’s inauguration.
Monday’s turnout — far
less than the 100,000 or more
who marched through Moscow with giddy optimism
ahead of Putin’s election to a
third term — reflected a wariness that has sapped energy
from the protest movement.
As a result of last year’s
protest, 27 people face charges that could send them to
prison for up to 10 years.
In the biggest show of
opposition to Russian President Vladimir Putin since
last May, thousands of demonstrators gathered Monday
near the Kremlin to demand
an immediate release of all
political prisoners and new
presidential and parliamentary elections.
The Associated Press
Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny speaks during
a major protest rally in Bolotnaya Square in Moscow on
Monday as his wife listens.
“We have spent a year in
deep defense,” opposition
leader Alexei Yashin told the
crowd Monday. “It is high
time we shift to a counteroffensive, and we will win back
Moscow and then the entire
country!”
This time, the rally ended
peacefully, if ominously. With
police helicopters hovering low under leaden skies,
protesters scattered to find
thousands of riot police and
Interior Ministry troops lining every adjacent street and
surrounding Red Square and
the Kremlin.
In the year between the
two gatherings, the Kremlin has been steadily cracking down on the opposition.
Twenty-seven political activists, 12 of them in jail, are
under investigation for allegedly organizing riots funded
from abroad.
In addition, prosecutors
have brought embezzlement
charges against the most
popular and charismatic
of the opposition leaders,
Alexei Navalny, who nonetheless appeared at the rally,
arriving to massive cheers
and applause as he climbed
onstage with his wife, Yulia.
In a fiery speech, Navalny
gave the crowd a new rallying
cry by calling Putin “a thieving, corrupt hypocrite” — a
phrase that was immediately
taken up and chanted.
If found guilty on charges
of embezzling about $500,000
from an obscure regional
timber company, Navalny
could go to prison for up to
10 years.
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Libya militias standing firm despite new law
some still remained outside
the Justice and Foreign Ministry buildings, where several
raised signs demanding the
resignation of Prime Minister
Ali Zidan.
Days ahead of the vote
on the law, militias had also
banned government employees at both buildings from
work.
The prime minister, who
was a member of Libya’s first
freely elected parliament
before being chosen by fel-
low liberal lawmakers to lead
the government, has been in
a confrontation with militias
for months.
The continued siege of
government buildings highlights Zidan’s inability to
rein in the armed groups and
exposes the many obstacles
the North African nation faces
in rebuilding its weak central
government.
Zidan’s options, though,
are limited in dealing with
the militias.
35612075
The Associated Press
TRIPOLI, Libya — A
number of Libyan militias
refused to back down on Monday from their protests outside
government buildings, despite
passage of a sweeping law that
bans anyone who served as a
senior official under Moammar Gadhafi from working in
government.
The militiamen, some manning machine guns mounted
on trucks, had been pushing for the law’s passage. But
35677719
A6 • Tuesday, May 7, 2013 • • •
..
timesfreepress.com ..
Breaking News: 423-757-News
White House: Assad likely behind chemical arms use
By Jim Kuhnhenn
The Associated Press
WASHINGTON — The
White House asserted Monday that it’s highly likely
that Syrian President Bashar
Assad’s regime, not the rebel
opposition, was behind any
chemical weapons use in
Syria. Responding to weekend airstrikes in Syria, the
White House also reiterated
its view that Israel has the
right to protect itself against
weapons that could pose a
threat to Israelis.
White House spokesman
Jay Carney says there is certainly evidence that chemical weapons have been used
in Syria. And on Sunday, a
member of a U.N. panel
investigating events in Syria
said there were indications
that rebel forces had used the
nerve agent sarin.
But Carney questioned
that claim.
“We are highly skeptical of suggestions that the
opposition could have or did
use chemical weapons,” he
said. “We find it highly likely
that any chemical weapon
use that has taken place in
Syria was done by the Assad
regime. And that remains our
position.”
Carney’s comments came
as Syria remained one of the
most high-profile issues confronting the administration.
Air strikes over the weekend
on alleged Hezbollah-bound
weapons in Syria and the sta-
tus of chemical weapons use
kept the country’s civil war
at the forefront. Lebanon’s
Hezbollah militia is an ally of
Syria and foe of Israel.
The weekend airstrike on
a military complex near the
Syrian capital of Damascus
killed at least 42 Syrian soldiers, a group of anti-regime
activists said Monday, citing
information from military
hospitals.
The Israeli government
has not formally confirmed
cern and a threat to Israel,
and they have the right to act
in their own sovereign interest on ... in response to those
concerns.”
Asked whether the U.S.
had been forewarned about
the strikes, Carney said: “We
are in close coordination as
a matter of course with the
Israelis, and continue to
be.”
Administration officials
have noted that Israel aircraft
struck Syria in January.
‘3D-printed’ handgun test
successful, student says
Syria
• Continued from Page A1
Since the uprising in Syria
began in March 2011, Israel
has carefully avoided taking
sides.
At the same time, Prime
Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has repeatedly declared
a series of red lines that
could trigger Israeli military
intervention, including the
delivery of “game-changing”
weapons to Hezbollah.
The first test of this policy came in January when
an Israeli airstrike in Syria
destroyed a shipment of
advanced anti-aircraft missiles bound for Hezbollah,
according to U.S. officials.
Israel and Hezbollah
fought an inconclusive
monthlong war in 2006 and
are bitter enemies.
When Israeli intelligence determined last week
that sophisticated Iranianmade Fateh-110 missiles had
entered Syria, the military
prepared to strike again.
Although Israel has not
officially confirmed the operation, a senior official said a
first airstrike at a Damascus
airport early Friday destroyed
most of the shipment, while
a series of subsequent airstrikes on nearby locations
Sunday took out the remnants of the missiles. The
that it carried out the air
strikes Friday and Sunday,
and Carney referred specific
questions about the strikes
to Israel.
“Israel certainly has the
right to be concerned about
the transfer of sophisticated weapons to Hezbollah,”
Carney said. “And that has
been a concern of Israel’s
for a long time. The transfer
of sophisticated weapons to
terrorist organizations like
Hezbollah is certainly a con-
By Claudia Grisales
Austin American-Statesman
The Associated Press
In this photo released by the Syrian official news agency SANA, damaged buildings
wrecked by an Israeli airstrike are seen in Damascus, Syria.
official spoke on condition
of anonymity because he was
not authorized to discuss a
covert military mission.
Residents in Damascus
said they felt and heard several huge blasts before dawn
Sunday. Radwan Midani, a 25year-old office assistant, said
he “saw the sky light up.”
Midani and others in the
Syrian capital said they were
more concerned about random mortar attacks by the
rebels on their areas than
Israeli strikes.
The rebels’ weapons are
less accurate than Israeli missiles, said Fadi, a 29-year-old
businessman who would not
give his last name for fear of
repercussions for talking to
the foreign media.
While also less concerned
about the Israeli strikes, “it’s
very disgusting to have the
Israeli mess around with our
country’s sovereignty,” he
said in a phone interview.
Assad’s regime has tried
to portray the rebels as traitors engaged in a foreign-led
conspiracy. Syrian officials
stepped up those claims after
Sunday’s strikes, alleging the
opposition is cooperating
with Israel.
The Israeli attacks pose a
problem for those trying to
topple Assad because ordinary Syrians might be convinced that there is something to the regime claims,
said Elizabeth O’Bagy of the
Institute for the Study of War,
a Washington think tank.
“The idea of the conspiracy of Israel working with
the opposition becomes that
more real,” she said.
The Britain-based Syrian Observatory for Human
Rights, an anti-regime group,
said at least 42 Syrian soldiers were killed in Sunday’s
strike, citing information
from military hospitals.
AUSTIN, Texas — A University of Texas law school
student says a gun made with
3D-printed technology was
successfully fired this weekend in Central Texas.
There are claims the 3Dprinted handgun is the first
weapon of its kind, and this
past weekend marked the
first successful test of its
kind.
Cody Wilson, the 25-yearold director and co-founder
of Defense Distributed, the
online collective managing
the Wiki Weapon Project,
said the successful tests of
the guns, largely comprised
of plastic, were well documented.
“It behaved exactly as
we expected it would,” Wilson said of the 3D-printed
handgun. Wilson told the
American-Statesman he was
“positive and optimistic” following the tests. But “there’s
work to be done.” Wilson
said the weapon was fired
successfully from an aluminum frame on Friday and
by hand Saturday on private
property in Lockhart.
Wilson’s Defense Distributed website shows a video
of the tests, and he said two
members of the national and
international media were
present during the demonstrations. BBC News and
Forbes both reported the
successful tests.
BBC News said 3D printing has been hailed as the
future of manufacturing.
“The technology works by
building up layer upon layer
of material — typically plastic — to build complex solid
objects,” the outlet reported.
“The idea is that as the printers become cheaper, instead
of buying goods from shops,
consumers will instead be
able to download designs
and print out the items at
home.”
The second-year law
school student drew attention last year when he found
himself at the center of a
legal controversy after the
3-D printing company that
allowed him to borrow a
printer a day later sent a team
of contractors to reclaim its
property at Wilson’s central
Austin apartment.
At the time, Wilson said
the project was on hold.
For legal experts and law
enforcement officials, the
endeavor falls under a new
frontier of the law.
By Mark Landler
New York Times News Service
The main argument for
greater American involvement in Syria, why President Barack Obama has been
reluctant so far, and how
Israeli airstrikes may alter
the calculus.
Q: What is the main
argument of advocates for
greater American involvement in Syria?
A: Supporters of intervention argue that the United
States and its allies have an
obligation both to buttress
the fortunes of the rebels and
to protect innocent civilians
from the escalating bloodshed. Since fighting erupted
in March 2011, more than
70,000 Syrian civilians are
estimated to have died in the
conflict.
Two Republican senators,
John McCain of Arizona and
Lindsey Graham of South
Carolina, advocate providing the rebels with lethal
weaponry, enforcing no-fly
zones to create humanitarian corridors for refugees,
and carrying out offshore
airstrikes to degrade Syria’s
air force.
Q: Why has Obama been
reluctant so far?
A: Obama, who opened
his 2008 bid for the White
House with his opposition
to what he called a “dumb
war” in Iraq, is deeply skeptical that American military
involvement will resolve
a Syrian civil war that has
grown increasingly sectarian.
Though he is more open
to arming the rebels than
he was before reports that
President Bashar Assad
used chemical weapons, he
continues to doubt that this
would alter the equation
on the ground. The president is also wary of arming
rebel groups, given that an
increasing number of them
are tied to radical Islamist
groups, including al-Qaida.
And aside from hawks like
McCain, there is little appetite for another Middle East
war, either on Capitol Hill or
among the public.
Q: How will Israel’s
recent airstrikes on Syria
influence Obama?
A: It is not clear. The
Israelis were responding to
a different threat, in the form
of weapons being sent to the
Islamic militant group Hezbollah. But the Israeli attacks
also sent Assad a strong message of deterrence about
using his chemical weapons,
which Israelis say pose a particular threat to them.
The success of Israeli jets
in striking Syrian targets
could undermine a major
argument of those opposed
to American military action:
that Syria’s air defenses are
so robust that it would be
very difficult to mount an air
campaign like that in Libya.
Q: Will Israel’s airstrikes transform Syria’s
civil war into a regional
conflagration?
A: Syria has threatened
Israel with unspecif ied
retaliation for the attacks,
though Israeli and American
officials doubt that Assad,
consumed with his own
battle for survival, will do
more than issue public condemnations.
Still, the strikes underscore that the Syrian conflict is already international:
Israel’s military was targeting
weapons from Iran that were
being funneled through Syria
to Hezbollah.
35608503
Crucial questions on U.S. role in Syrian civil war
35645024
Couple accused of zip-tying child
hard her lower teeth broke
through her lower lip.
Arrest warrants say the
abuse occurred earlier this
year. The child was taken
into the custody of social
services March 31.
Swinehart is charged with
two counts of intentional
child abuse inflicting serious
physical injury and is being
held under $100,000 bond.
Coffey faces one count and
is being held under $50,000
bond. It’s not known if they
have attorneys.
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35688530
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35572487
The Associated Press
RALEIGH, N.C. — North
Carolina authorities are
accusing a couple of using
zip ties to bind their 4-yearold daughter’s wrists and
ankles to a baby gate.
Raleigh police say 26year-old Gerald Thomas
Swinehart and 28-year-old
Marlaine Victoria Coffey are
accused of tying the child to
a gate with plastic ties normally used by electricians.
They also say Swinehart
pushed or kicked the girl so
• Continued from Page A1
Some of those advocates
say imposing any age limit
is too restrictive.
But others are concerned
that making Plan B OneStep more widely available
encourages teens to become
sexually active at younger
and younger ages.
“What is the message we
are sending our kids?” said
Julie Baumgardner, president and CEO of Chattanooga-based family-advocacy organization First
Things First. “I have a hard
time seeing how this is in
the best interest of our children. They may be teenagers, but they are still in their
formative years. Why are
we putting big, life-changing, adult decisions in the
hands of children?”
Some local pharmacists
echo the concern, saying
they are reluctant to change
how they distribute the pill.
Roy Phipps, a pharmacist at Kingwood Pharmacy
in East Ridge, said the store
stocks Plan B One-Step, but
he does not plan to move it
out from behind the counter
anytime soon.
“To me, it’s not something
just anybody and everybody
should have access to,” he
said. “It is a contraceptive
pill.”
He said the store has been
following the debate closely,
saying “it concerns us, and it
concerns our patrons.”
Some local pharmacies
don’t carry the contraceptive.
An employee at Belvoir Pharmacy in Chattanooga said the
store has never carried the
pills, but didn’t say why. At
Signal Mountain Pharmacy,
owner Rick Gallaher says
there just isn’t a market for
it among the age group of his
clientele.
“It’s not strictly a moral
issue — I’ve just never had
demand for it,” he said. “I can
see both sides of the dilemma, though.”
National retailers have
not been precise about their
plans or timelines for bringing Plan B One-Step out from
behind pharmacy counters,
saying they are waiting on
the drug manufacturer to
Prison
• Continued from Page A1
Alexander, R-Tenn., said in a
statement over the weekend.
“I have yet to hear one good
reason why moving these
terrorists from off our shores
right into the heart of our
country makes us safer.”
Only U.S. Sen. Bob Corker, a Tennessean and the top
Republican on the Senate
Foreign Relations Committee, kept the door open to
Obama’s idea in a carefully
worded statement.
“While the administration has yet to submit a plan
for closing Guantanamo to
Congress, if an acceptable
alternative is presented that
allows us to lawfully detain
and question terrorist combatants without undermining U.S. security or putting
our criminal justice system
at risk, I would be open to
looking at that,” the former
Chattanooga mayor said.
That flexibility is new. On
at least two occasions, Alexander, Corker and Republican senators from Alabama
and Georgia have hindered
efforts to close Guantanamo.
In 2009, they voted to cut
from a war spending bill $80
million requested by Obama
to close the detention center and to bar the transfer
of detainees to the United
States and its territories. As
a whole, the Senate voted the
Southerners’ way 90-6.
More recently, in November of last year, the tri-state
sextet voted to bar the
transfer of Guantanamo
Bay detainees to the United
States. The Senate voted 5441 to prohibit such transfers
for another year.
Some House Republicans are just as adamantly
opposed as their Senate colleagues. In a recent newsletter to constituents, U.S. Rep.
Jimmy Duncan, a Knoxville
Republican, said Guantanamo detainees “are not U.S.
citizens and should not be
given the same rights and
privileges as if they were.”
“I do not support any plan
for these prisoners that puts
them on U.S. soil,” Duncan
wrote.
Meanwhile, U.S. Rep. Mar-
PILL POLITICS
The Food and Drug
Administration’s decision
in 2011 not to make Plan
B One-Step available to
girls younger than 17 was
hotly criticized as a political
move in the presidential
campaign season. In April,
a federal judge ordered
the FDA to label the drug
as available to all girls and
women of reproductive
ages. The drug is produced
by Teva Women’s Health
Inc. The FDA says its recent
decision to make Plan B
One-Step more widely
available is separate from
the April order. It is unclear
how the FDA’s decision
will affect the Justice
Department’s decision to
appeal the judge’s ruling
by the Monday deadline.
While it is often confused
with the “abortion pill,” the
FDA and other researchers
have long insisted the
morning-after pill will not
end an existing pregnancy
or harm a developing fetus.
It can prevent ovulation
or fertilization of an egg if
taken soon after sex. Some
critics say that using the
pill is a gray moral area if
it prevents a fertilized egg
from attaching to the uterus.
Sources: The Associated Press, U.S.
Food and Drug Administration
make changes to packaging.
Walgreens released a
statement last week about the
contraceptive, saying, “We are
working with the manufacturer of Plan B on packaging
and other issues related to the
FDA’s new guidance.”
Target also said it was
awaiting cues from government regulators and the drug
company.
“We’ll align our practices
to ensure we’re compliant
with federal and state laws
and regulations,” said Target
spokeswoman Jessica Deede.
“However, I don’t have anything to share about specific
plans.”
■■■
Tennessee is among 15
states with the highest teen
birth rates, according to the
National Center for Health
Statistics. The teen birth rate
in 2010 was 43.2 births per
1,000 teen girls. The highest
rate was in Mississippi, with
55 births per 1,000 teen girls.
“
I have yet to hear
one good reason why
moving these terrorists
from off our shores right
into the heart of our country makes us safer.
”
— U.S. Sen. Lamar
Alexander,
R-Tenn.
sha Blackburn drew parallels
to current events.
“The president needs to
realize that the Global War
on Terrorism did not end
with the killing of Osama
bin Laden,” the Brentwood
Republican said in a statement. “The Boston bombing is a sharp reminder that
there is still a clear and present threat to our American
way of life from those that
mean us harm.”
Political concerns have
discouraged even Obama’s
allies from endorsing his
plans to do away with Guantanamo, which houses a few
9/11 plotters. Tennessee’s pair
of congressional Democrats,
U.S. Reps. Jim Cooper, of
Nashville, and Steve Cohen,
of Memphis, did not respond
to requests for comment on
Obama’s proposals.
Experts say Republican
opposition likely will prevent Obama from getting
Congress to accede to his
Guantanamo proposals. But
at Thursday’s news conference, the president said he
would also do “everything
we can do administratively”
to shut down the prison.
“This is a lingering problem that is not going to get
better,” he said. “It’s going to
get worse. It’s going to fester.”
Contact staff writer Chris
Carroll at [email protected] or 423-2802025.
Share content with social
networks like facebook
and twitter.
Georgia’s rate was 41.4, data
show.
A 2011 Youth Risk Behavior Survey found the majority of Hamilton County high
schoolers are sexually experienced, with nearly half
of the students having had
sexual intercourse.
That survey also found
that 53 percent of female
high school students in the
county have had a sexual
experience.
That’s why Bea Lurie,
president and CEO of Girls
Inc. of Chattanooga., says
“it’s important to educate
girls on effective methods
of disease prevention and
contraception so that if they
do engage in sexual activity, they can protect themselves from pregnancy and
disease.”
Still, Girls Inc. — which
offers education and enrichment programs for girls
between 6 and 19 — has not
taken a position on emergency contraception, Lurie
said.
“Parents are the first and
most important educators of
their daughters,” Lurie said
in an email. “We believe that
girls have the right to comprehensive, age appropriate
resources and information
and know that if we equip
them with the facts and
knowledge, they will make
healthy choices in line with
their personal and career
goals.”
Both Girls Inc. and First
Things First say they encourage young people to choose
abstinence as the best means
for developing healthy relationships and achieving
long-term goals. And both
say parents need to be proactive about providing their
children with clear, accurate
information about sex.
Girls Inc.’s sex education
curriculum, Preventing Adolescent Pregnancy, not only
focuses on reproductive
anatomy, but also addresses
factors like media and peer
pressure, self-esteem issues,
personal values and boundaries, and assertiveness — all
which have bearing on girls’
views of sex, Lurie said.
Contact staff writer Kate
Harrison at [email protected]
timesfreepress.com or 423757-6673.
GOP SPLITS OVER
ONLINE SALES TAX
Tax
• Continued from Page A1
That argument helped
the bill pass despite opposition from Cruz, Sen. Marco
Rubio, R-Fla. and other young
conservatives who staunchly
opposed what they said constitutes a new tax.
Sen. Bob Corker, R-Tenn.,
and the Republican quartet
from Alabama and Georgia
joined Alexander in supporting the bill. In all, 21 Republicans voted in favor while 22
opposed.
Across the aisle, an unlikely Alexander ally — Senate Majority Whip Richard
Durbin, the chamber’s No.
2 Democrat — thanked the
former Tennessee governor,
adding that tabling the bill
would hurt brick-and-mortar
retailers that already must
collect sales tax at the cash
register.
Durbin said only one in 20
Illinois residents obey current
law and self-report sales taxes
on Internet purchases.
“It’s a tax that some people
are paying and other people
aren’t, even though they owe
it,” Alexander added.
Lawmakers from several
states that don’t have sales tax
— Alaska, Delaware, Montana,
New Hampshire and Oregon
— objected to the fact that businesses may be required to chase
down sales tax rates “thousands
and thousands of miles away,”
as Sen. Ron Wyden put it.
“This steers the Internet
toward a dangerous path,” the
Oregon Democrat said.
But again and again, supporters pointed to language
within the 11-page bill that
requires states to provide
free tax-calculation software
to online retailers. Alexander
compared the software’s userfriendliness to “looking up the
weather on the computer.”
As expected, trade groups
representing brick-and-mortar retailers praised Senate
passage.
“Retailers compete for
customers on many different levels, ... but they cannot compete on sales tax,”
National Retail Federation
Board Chairman Stephen I.
Sadove said. “Congress needs
to address this sales tax disparity and allow retailers to
Adults’ mouth
bacteria may
help babies
Area senators
overwhelmingly supported a
bill that would allow states
to compel many online
retailers to collect sales
tax. They found themselves
at odds with prominent
national Republicans.
Los Angeles Times
LOS ANGELES — Forget
boiling, or antiseptic wipes:
The best way to clean a
Binky may be putting it in
your own mouth.
It may sound gross, but
evidence suggests that those
bacteria may help reduce
instances of allergy development in babies.
In a new study published
in Pediatrics, researchers followed 184 infants recruited
from a Swedish hospital from
birth until most of them were 3
years old. The researchers were
specifically looking for allergyprone babies, and 80 percent of
the sample group had at least
one parent with allergies.
In the first six months of
the babies’ life, 74 percent of
them used a pacifier. Almost
all the parents of pacifiersucking babies said they used
tap water to clean the pacifier.
Half of the parents said they
also boiled them, and another
half said they popped dirty
pacifiers in their own mouth
before handing them back to
baby.
At an 18-month check-up,
the researchers found that the
babies whose parents sucked
their pacifiers to clean them
were 63 percent less likely to
have eczema and 88 percent
less likely to have asthma compared with those whose parents did not clean their pacifiers that way.
VOTING IN FAVOR
■ Sen. Lamar Alexander,
R-Tenn.
■ Sen. Bob Corker, R-Tenn.
■ Sen. Saxby Chambliss,
R-Ga.
■ Sen. Johnny Isakson,
R-Ga.
■ Sen. Jeff Sessions, R-Ala.
■ Sen. Richard Shelby, RAla.
VOTING AGAINST
■ Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas
■ Sen. Jeff Flake, R-Ariz.
■ Senate Minority Leader
Mitch McConnell, R-Ky.
■ Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky.
■ Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla.
Source: U.S. Senate records
compete freely and fairly.”
Internet giant and Chattanooga employer Amazon also
supports the legislation. But
its fellow online titan finds
itself on the other side.
“EBay will continue to
focus on bringing greater balance to the legislation by protecting small businesses with
less than $10 million in sales
or fewer than 50 employees,”
said Brian Bieron, the company’s senior director of global
public policy.
Contact staff writer Chris
Carroll at [email protected] or 423-280-2025.
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A8 • Tuesday, May 7, 2013 • • •
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boost their quality on service and devices for customers, said Cornell.
“We send several key
personnel to Wisconsin
35531646
the past, Reliable’s employees have installed
generators in assisted living facilities, crematories
and other businesses. The
installation process varies
according to what the client selects, but the average time frame takes three
to four days and the work
is done by master electricians.
“All work from beginning to end is performed
by factory-trained Reliable electricians, gas fitters and service technicians,” said Cornell. “We
provide 24-hour emergency service and can
keep your new generator
running smoothly with
a variety of maintenance
plans. To my knowledge,
no other area outfit can
match our comprehensive
services.”
He added that Reliable
serves clients as a onestop shop for generators,
handling sales, design,
installation and factoryauthorized service after a
sale. Cornell also said the
generator should be the
only one a homeowner
ever needs as long as they
stay in that home.
Reliable started selling standby generators
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35531674
ince the tornadoes
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people in Chattanooga and the surrounding
areas have found themselves putting together
emergency kits, building
storm shelters and coming up with family emergency plans to be ready
for whatever may happen.
With the idea in mind of
being ready for anything,
Reliable Heating and Air
Conditioning offers standby generators.
“People like the peace
of mind that having your
own ‘power plant’ provides,” said David Cornell, vice president of
the
second-generation
family-owned local business. “They can be used
to power the whole house
or selected circuits like
heating and air conditioning, lights and the kitchen
circuits.”
A standby generator is
a backup power supply
that turns on automatically within seconds of a
power loss, he explained.
With most standby generators there are no switches to throw, and they can
restore power automatically whether the owner
is home or not.
“They differ greatly
from the more popular portable type in that
they are a permanent fixture on the outside of the
home, much like a heating
and cooling unit,” Cornell
said. “Another benefit to
the standby generator is
that it is fueled by natural gas or propane, so the
fuel source is plentiful to
withstand long power outages and there is no need
to store gasoline, as is the
case with most portabletype generators.”
Reliable
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• • • Tuesday, May 7, 2013
timesfreepress.com/local
5301 Brainerd Rd.
nd In The
Your Frie
iness (423) 499.9162
us
B
ry
el
Jew
35649948 *5-6-13 market at 9:45 a.m.
FLOODWATERS RISE: Bradley skater rescued, B4
q
q
DUI ARREST: Woman of the Year charged, B5
B
RICK DAVIS
Mercy
and jail
Justin Tabor — the
Hamilton County deputy
sheriff who bought beer
for teenagers — still has a
job. Thousands of recession-hit people don’t, but
this guy does.
For the life of me, I
can’t understand why.
Every bartender or waitress for miles would have
been fired
before the
foam settled; buying booze
for kids is
a crime.
Literally.
“A
Class A
misdeDavid Cook
meanor,’’
Commentary
Tennessee Annotated Code law
states.
It’s double-wrong
because the guy had a
badge, which means he’s
supposed to act above the
law. Miles, miles above
the law.
It’s triple-wrong
because the four teenagers he drank Bud Light
with were in the Explorers, a well-intentioned
program that lets kids
ride along with cops on
patrol.
It’s quadruple-wrong
because, according to an
internal affairs investigation, Tabor shared a bed,
but did not have sex, with
one of the teenagers, the
report found. According
to this teenager, there was
no sexual contact between
her and Tabor until she
was 18, the report states.
So why did he get a
punishment that seems
lighter than the beer he
was handing out?
“I wouldn’t say it was
light,” Hamilton County
Sheriff Jim Hammond
said.
Hammond suspended
Tabor’s pay for 132 hours,
put him on probation for
a year, removed his duties
as a patrol officer and
reassigned him as a correctional officer, which
means he works in the jail
(most of the time without
See COOK, Page B5
Rainy day fishing
Staff Photo by Dan Henry
Shane Bellomy and Jeremy Harris launch their boat from the Rivermont boat ramp after finding most of the other ramps closed
because of high water on the Tennessee River on Monday morning. “Hunting and fishing: It’s what we do, and if it starts raining, there
are plenty of bridges to pull under,” Harris said speaking about the chance of rain in the Tennessee Valley.
City chicken ordinance
getting calls to slow down
WHAT’S NEXT
Hamilton County
Schools officials
will present their
budget to county
commissioners on
Thursday at 1 p.m.
Animal Control Board should hear plan first, Berz says Increases
By Cliff Hightower
Staff Writer
Two Chattanooga City Council
members said Monday an ordinance
to allow chickens within city limits
needs to be vetted by the Animal Control Board before the council takes up
the proposal.
“I’m going to ask that it be deferred
to the people it should go to first,”
Councilwoman Carol Berz said. “That’s
why we appointed them.”
The City Council is expected to
discuss and vote on an ordinance that
would allow up to 10 hens per household within Chattanooga city limits.
Nearby Signal Mountain is the only
other municipality in the area that
allows backyard chickens.
Councilman Chris Anderson, who
is sponsoring the proposed ordinance,
said he thinks there should be no problems. He said the Animal Control Board
has no legislative authority and that the
council is the ultimate decider.
“It would still come before the council,” he said.
A Facebook group called Chicken
Legal, made up of more than 400 members, has been pressing for an ordinance change for almost a year. The
council heard arguments for allowing
chickens in the city three years ago, but
the measure ultimately died because
of concerns about health and whether
the McKamey Animal Care & Adoption Center would be able to handle
chickens.
Karen Walsh, McKamey’s executive
director, noted Monday the proper
procedure is to go before the Animal
Control Board first, especially because
the board looks at permit issues for the
city, and the new ordinance would call
for a $50 permit fee.
“I think that’s the process the city
proposed
in county
budget
■ Requests from 40
officials or groups seeking
funds were $3.4 million
higher than for this fiscal
year.
See CHICKENS, Page B5
By Louie Brogdon
Staff Writer
Man on porch killed;
suspect in custody
By Beth Burger
Staff Writer
Blood splatter still stained
the porch where 20-yearold Wendell Washington
drew his last breaths after
shots were exchanged with
another gunman late Sunday
night, according to Chattanooga police.
Homicide detectives late
Monday said they have a
suspect in custody who is
at a local hospital being
treated for a gunshot wound
he received during the altercation.
The suspect is under 24
hour watch and faces charges of criminal homicide and
possession of a weapon during the commission of a dangerous felony, police said.
Because of security issues,
the suspect’s name and condition were not released and
he is not allowed any visitors, police said.
Washington was shot
about 11:15 p.m. at 3687
Northrop St. in Lupton City.
Homes dot the hill line, some
worn weary from the elements and in need of repair
while others were freshly
renovated.
The blue home marked
with a no-trespassing sign
See HOMICIDE, Page B5
tion’s evidence was scientific, the judge said.
Arthur Knight III, a Knoxville-based attorney defending McMinn County, argued
that any of the actions taken
by the county’s sheriff deputies didn’t result in any evidence that was used at trial,
therefore Vann’s rights were
not violated.
“I think this conversation
is going on right now with
the person arrested in Boston,” Collier said, referring
When it comes to budget proposals, Hamilton
County Commissioner
Fred Skillern has a simple
measure for success: Start
with last year’s figure —
and lower it if possible.
“Zero is good; lower
is better,” Skillern said of
budget increases Monday
as commissioners heard
from 40 government officials or nonprofit groups
seeking to gain pieces of
Hamilton County’s 2014
fiscal pie.
Despite Skillern’s sentiments, only 16 of those
petitioning for slices Monday met the veteran commissioner’s standard.
Overall, requests for
those who petitioned came
in $3.4 million higher than
the $63.1 million approved
for the same organizations
in this fiscal year.
The greatest requested
increase came from Sheriff
Jim Hammond. He’s asking
for a combined $31.2 million to cover operations
and capital improvements.
That figure is $2.5 million
higher than the current
budget year. Hammond said
the increase was needed to
replace aging patrol cars,
hire more school resource
officers, add clerk positions
and wrangle rising food
costs at the jail.
Commissioners had no
questions for Hammond
after his presentation.
Commission Chairman
See LAWSUIT, Page B5
See COUNTY, Page B5
Staff Photo by Dan Henry
Chattanooga police responded to 3687 Northrop St. about 11:15 p.m. Sunday to
find the body of Wendell Washington, 20, on the porch.
Judge dismisses $20 million lawsuit against McMinn
By Todd South
Staff Writer
Gussie Vann sued too
late.
On Monday a federal
judge dismissed a $20 million
civil rights lawsuit filed by
Vann against McMinn County, Tenn., for unlawful arrest,
detention and lack of access
to a lawyer that he believes
resulted in a death sentence,
which later was dismissed.
The first hurdle Vann’s
attorney Robin Flores had
to clear — did Vann file his
lawsuit within the one-year
■ Gussie Vann’s conviction
for the incest, rape and
murder of his 8-year-old
daughter was ruled invalid
in 2008.
limit?
U.S. District Judge Curtis
Collier decided Vann didn’t
get it done in time.
But not before the judge
and Flores bantered for
at least 30 minutes about
Reconstruction, extraordinary rendition and the recent
Boston Marathon bombing
as Flores tried to convince
Collier that he was right.
In an hour and a half
hearing on McMinn County’s request to dismiss the
lawsuit, Collier’s questions
centered on the civil rights
violations claimed by Vann.
Through those questions
Collier slow-walked Flores in
a civics lesson on how Vann
was arrested without probable cause, questioned without a lawyer and released
only to be arrested again and
held for 10 months without a
bond hearing or an attorney
to prepare for his 1994 death
penalty trial.
Flores argued that all of
those violations together
resulted in Vann’s conviction
and death penalty sentence
for the incest, rape and murder of his 8-year-old daughter in 1992.
On appeal a judge ruled
in 2008 that Vann’s conviction was invalid because his
lawyers should have called
a forensic expert in his
defense.
The bulk of the prosecu-
■ To contact Local News • Phone: 423-757-6317 • Fax: 423-668-5062 • Email: [email protected]
B2 • Tuesday, May 7, 2013 • • •
.
timesfreepress.com ...
Breaking News: 423-757-News
OBITUARIES
HAMILTON COUNTY
Arthur Burney
Arthur Lee Burney, 51, of
Chattanooga, passed away
Monday, May 6, 2013, in a local
hospital.
A r ra n ge m e n t s w i l l b e
announced by Taylor Funeral
Home of Chattanooga Inc.
Gary Byrd
Gary L. Byrd, 63, of East
Ridge, passed away Saturday,
May 4, 2013 at a local hospital.
Condolences may be sent
to www.lane-southcrestchapel.
com.
Graveside services will be at
11 a.m. today, May 7, at Lakewood
Memory Gardens, South, with
Dr. David Sampson officiating.
Arrangements are by the
South Crest Chapel of Lane
Funeral Home & Crematory,
located at the end of historic
Missionary Ridge, Rossville.
Travis Collins
Travis James “Junior/Slap
Rock” Collins, 48, of Chattanooga, was called to his heavenly
home on Monday, April 29, 2013,
in a local hospital.
Funeral: today at 1 p.m. in the
chapel of Taylor Funeral Home
with Minister Vincent Boozer as
the eulogist.
Burial: Highland Memorial
Gardens.
William Greiner
William Emerson Greiner, 58,
of Hixson, died Saturday, May 4,
2013, at his home.
A r ra n ge m e n t s w i l l b e
announced by Hamilton Funeral Home & Cremation Services,
4506 Hixson Pike, 423-531-3975.
Methodist Church (Bethlehem
Wiley UMC) throughout his
childhood. Jason graduated from
Brainerd High School, class of
1978, and earned his bachelor of
arts degree in political science at
Columbia College in 2003.
Jason enlisted in the United
States Navy in 1978, retiring in
2001 as chief petty officer after
23 years of service. He served as
manpower coordinator for U.S.
Naval Forces in the Middle East
and was awarded the Meritorious Service Medal at the end of
his naval career.
Jason held various civilian positions after retirement,
including community organizer
for the Central Florida Urban
League in Orlando, and public information officer for the
Orlando Police Department. He
was employed by the Orange
County government as neighborhood services coordinator
until the time of his passing.
He leaves to cherish his
memories his wife, Maria Mendoza-Johnson, Orlando; and two
sons, Joshua Johnson, West Palm
Beach, Fla., and Jared Johnson
(Orlando); parents, Jimmie and
Bettye Johnson, of Chattanooga;
sister, Jennifer (Bobby) Morrow,
Atlanta; aunts, Bennie Davis,
Chattanooga, Barbara (Leonard)
Johnson, Little Rock, Ark., Callie
(Clarence) Smith, Sacramento,
Calif.; and a host of other relatives and dear friends.
A graveside service with full
military honors will be held at
12:30 p.m. Wednesday, May 8,
2013, at Chattanooga National
Cemetery.
The body will lie in state after
noon today at John P. Franklin
Funeral Home, 1101 Dodds Ave.,
622-9995.
Cheryl Jungina
Cheryl Lynn Jungina, 60, of
Red Bank, died Monday, May 6,
2013, at her home.
Complete arrangements will
be announced by Chattanooga
Funeral Home, North Chapel.
Winfred Martin
Edwin Hindman
Edwin Hindman, 76, of
Soddy-Daisy, passed away Monday, May 6, 2013.
He was a member of Shady
Grove Baptist Church, and a former employee of the Hamilton
County Highway Department
and several
local contractors.
He was
preceded in
death by his
parents, Jess
and Sarah
Jane Hindman; and 10
brothers and
sisters.
Survivors include Mary Hindman, former wife of 33 years;
children, Nancy (Ricky) Shetter,
Karen (Eddie) Vincent; brother,
Louis Hindman; sister, Imogene
Youngblood; and special friend,
Lela Eubanks; grandchildren,
Jimmie and Steven Shetter, Matthew Vincent, Amy Lewis; and
six great-grandchildren. Special
thanks to Angie Qualls.
Services will be held at 1 p.m.
Wednesday, May 8, 2013, in the
funeral home chapel with Chaplain Ricky Vaughn officiating.
Interment will follow in
Hamilton County Memorial
Park.
Visitation is from 4 to 9 p.m.
today at the funeral home.
Condolences and memories
may be shared at www.williamsonandsons.com.
Arrangements are by Williamson & Sons Funeral Home,
8852 Dayton Pike, Soddy-Daisy,
TN 37379.
Erwin Hughes Jr.
Erwin “Tadon” Darrell
Hughes Jr., infant, passed away
Friday, May 3, 2013.
He is survived by his mother, Omanda Billingsley; father,
Erwin Darrell Hughes Sr; grandmother, Annette Brown; other
relatives and friends.
A private family gathering
will be held.
Arrangements by John P.
Franklin Funeral Home, 1101
Dodds Ave., 622-9995.
Jason Johnson
Jason Perry Johnson, 52,
formerly of
Chattanooga,
passed away
T h u r s d a y,
May 2, 2013,
in Orlando,
Fla.
He was
born June
26, 1960, to
his parents,
Jimmie and
Bettye Johnson. He was an
active member of Wiley United
Winfred Martin, 78, of Hixson, died Sunday, May 5, 2013.
Funeral service will be 11
a.m. Wednesday in the chapel
of Vaughn Funeral Home.
Interment in Harris Cemetery.
Visitation is from 6 to 8 p.m.
today at the funeral home.
Arrangements by Vaughn
Funeral Home, www.vaughnfuneral-home.com.
Edna Harris
Deborah Jones
Nellie Letner
Wayne Pendergrass
Eloise Singleton
Jane Smith
Barbara Swanger
Hamilton County
Arthur Burney
Gary Byrd
Travis Collins
William Greiner
Edwin Hindman
Erwin Hughes Jr.
Jason Johnson
Cheryl Jungina
Winfred Martin
Jack Rector
Thomas Sims
Mary Tigner
Holly Turner
Reed White
Georgia
Katherine Bryant
Kathy Joiner
Margaret Maddux
Sandra Motley
Alabama
Michael Brown
Lowell Horton
Ray McGill
Tennessee
Bill Ball
Richard Brackett
Debra Branham
EDITOR’S NOTE: Obituaries printed in today’s edition
are submitted by funeral homes. The newspaper prints
the notices as provided. The first 50 words are free. A
charge of 50 cents per word is made for each word after
that. The photo charge is $25. For information on an
individual obituary, contact the appropriate funeral home.
The deadline for obituaries is 3 p.m. daily.
■ For more information about obituaries or to order a
laminated memorial bookmark, call 423-757-6348 or go
to memorialbookmarks.netfirms.com/chattanooganew.
■ To place an In Memory ad, contact the classified
advertising department at 757-6200.
Road, Soddy-Daisy, TN 37379.
Services for Jack will be held
at 1 p.m. on Wednesday at Mile
Straight Baptist Church with Dr.
Al Goss and Pastor Ray Williams
officiating.
Burial will follow in Hamilton Memorial Gardens.
Please share your thoughts
and memories at www.chattanooganorthchapel.com.
Arrangements are by the
North Chapel of Chattanooga
Funeral Home, Crematory &
Florist, 5401 Highway 153, Hixson.
Funeral Home.
Interment in Spring City
Cemetery.
Visitation is from noon to 2
p.m. at the funeral home.
Arrangements by Vaughn
Funeral Home, www.vaughnfuneral-home.com.
Richard Brackett
JASPER — Richard Harold
Brackett, 68, passed away, Saturday, May 4, 2013.
Funeral services will be conducted from the funeral home
chapel at 1 p.m. CDT today, May
7, with Brother Gene Lewis and
Brother Roger Webb officiating.
Interment will follow in
Lakewood Memory Gardens,
West.
Arrangements by Tate Funeral Home LLC, Jasper, 423-9429500.
Debra Branham
DECATUR — Debra Sue
“Debbie” Branham, 55, died Sunday, May 5, 2013.
Funeral service 8 p.m.
Wednesday in the Bowers Funeral Home Chapel, Decatur.
Visitation 5-8 p.m. Wednesday.
Go to www.bowersfh.com
and sign the guest book.
Arrangements by Bowers
Funeral Home, of Decatur, 423334-3661.
Edna Harris
ETOWAH — Edna Jack Harris, 90, passed away Sunday, May
5, 2013, at an Etowah hospital.
Funeral services 2 p.m. today
from the funeral home chapel.
Visitation 11 a.m.-2 p.m. today
at the funeral home.
Please visit www.serenityfunerals.com.
Arrangements by Serenity
Funeral Home and Cremation
Center of Etowah.
See OBITUARIES, Page B3
TENNESSEE
Holly Turner
Thomas Sims
Thomas Sims, 87, of SoddyDaisy, passed away on Monday,
May 6, 2013.
Arrangements are incomplete and will be announced by
Legacy Funeral Home and Cremation Center.
Mary Tigner
Jack Rector
Jack Conley Rector, our precious husband, daddy, brother
and friend, took his heavenly
flight on Saturday, May 4, 2013.
He was 72.
Jack was born in Chattanooga on Nov. 13, 1940. His parents,
Jackson and
E t h e l Re c tor, lived in
Nashville,
but he was
born prematurely while
his mother
was in Chattanooga on a
trip. At that
time, he was
the smallest baby to ride in an
airplane. When he flew home to
Nashville, he weighed just above
2 pounds.
Jack had one brother, Frank
Rector and wife, Pauline; one
sister, Pat Gentry and husband,
Dan; and special sister-in-law,
Denise Fuston.
Jack served in the Navy from
1960-1961. After returning from
Australia, he met his “true love,”
who lived right next door. He
married Debbie Fuston in 1965.
Having a marriage only most
people dream of, their commitment, love and devotion for
each other was nothing short of
Heaven.
They were married 48 years
and had three children who
were raised in a loving, Christian
home: Fuston Rector and wife,
Sheila, Coy Rector and wife,
Tara, Amber Wasdin and husband, Will. His whole life was
devoted to his family, especially
his grandchildren whom he
adored — Shelby, Abby, Emma,
Brinkley and Adison Rector and
Jackson and Luke Wasdin.
The family home was open
to all. Family meals, trips, holidays, watching the Vols, and just
being together was his greatest
joy. He loved the Lord and loved
listening to the Gaithers, which
he found to be uplifting and
worshipping to his Lord. One
of his greatest gifts from God
was encouragement. Many times
he would make calls to people
he hardly knew with a word of
encouragement and care. He
retired from Chattem Inc. after
35 years of service. He was loved
by everyone who knew him and
his smile and sweetness will
always remain in our hearts. We
so miss you Doey (Do-Do).
The family will receive
friends from 4 to 8 p.m. today,
May 7, at the North Chapel and
again from noon to 1 p.m. on
Wednesday at Mile Straight Baptist Church at 8448 Springfield
Brenda Weaver; her dear sister,
Betty Lloyd; her niece, Beatrice
Starr; nephew, Reginald (Holly)
Jordan; aunts, Nell Cargile, Ruby
Jones; and her loving and caring
church family.
Funeral services will be held
at noon on Wednesday, May 8,
2013, at Pure Holiness COGIC.
Interment in National Cemetery.
The body will lie in state after
noon today at John P. Franklin
Funeral Home, 1101 Dodds Ave.,
622-9995.
been a member of South Seminole Baptist Church where he
taught Sunday school for several
years and was a deacon emeritus. He was
a member of
Chattanooga
Southeast
Gideon Camp
and past president of Chattanooga Lions
Club.
He retired
from the state
of Tennessee
after 42 years of service where
he was most recently the Southeast Tennessee regional director
for vocational rehabilitation.
Survivors include his wife,
Yvonne White; sons, Gary White
and wife, Gale White, of Chattanooga, David White and wife,
Janet White, of Ringgold, Ga.;
grandchildren, Katie Griswold
and husband, Andrew, of Mount
Juliet, Tenn., Jacob and Taylor
White, of Chattanooga, Hunter,
Conner and Lindsey White, of
Ringgold, Ga.; sister, Florence
Cable, of Smyrna, Ga.; brother,
Marion White, of Alcoa, Tenn.;
“nephews,” Calvin and Clayton
Farley; “niece,” Judy Moore.
Funeral services will be held
11 a.m. Wednesday, May 8, at
Heritage Funeral Home chapel
with the Rev. Ron Perry officiating.
The interment will follow in
Shady Grove Cemetery in Tellico Plains, Tenn. Pallbearers will
be his beloved grandsons.
Visit www.heritagefh.com to
share words of comfort to the
family.
In lieu of flowers, the family
requests contributions be made
to the Gideons or his church.
The family will receive
friends 4-8 p.m. today at Heritage Funeral Home, 7454 East
Brainerd Road.
Mary Lloyd Tigner, 80, went
to be with her first love, her
heavenly Father, and now is
resting peacefully with her second true love, her husband of 58
years, on Friday, May 3, 2013.
She was preceded in death
by the love of her life, husband,
Elder Wilbur Tigner, who passed
away on March 13, 2013; son,
Gregory Arnez; parents, William
and Lillian Lloyd; two brothers,
Mose and Ivory Lloyd; two sisters, Clara Kennedy and Louella
Lloyd; nephews, Gregory Lloyd
and Antonio Starr.
She received her B.S. degree
in elementary education from
Tennessee State University and
taught at Chattanooga Public
Schools for 31 years, ending her
career at Clifton Hills Elementary School in 1990. She loved
teaching and spoiled each student. She was a lifetime resident
of the Park City community and
will be missed by all.
She united as a youth at the
Greater Beulah Baptist Church
in Park City, later united with
her husband, they attended
Pure Holiness Church of God.
Through faith and much prayer,
her husband, Elder Wilbur
Tigner, was summoned by God
to move on and begin his own
church where he pastored, the
Church of Jesus Christ of the
Apolostic Faith. She served as
musician at each church. Playing
the piano was her given talent
by God.
Survivors include her son,
Leonard Maurice Tigner; daughters, Muriel Denise (Dewayne)
Brown, Kitty Arlene (James)
Favors; grandchildren, Minister Corey Dewaun (Tiffany)
Prather, Ashlyn Danielle Prather,
the love and joy of her life; her
great-grandbaby, Rilee Madiison
Young; her adopted daughter,
Holly Denise Turner, 53, of
Crossville, Tenn., passed away
on May 6, 2013, in Knoxville.
She was born in El Paso,
Texas. She spent part of her life
in Hixson,
and Crossville was
currently her
home with
her husband,
children and
animals.
Denise was
a teacher at
Hixson High
School for 16
years working with special education students.
Denise was preceded in death
by her father, Joe L. Currie.
Denise is survived by her
husband, Clint Turner; mother,
Joyce Currie; brother, Randy
Currie; mother-in-law, Bobbie
Turner; children, Brittany Dedmon, Brandon Walker, Tyler
Burt, Wally Turner, Toby Turner,
Andy Turner, Jennifer Turner;
six grandchildren; and several
nieces and nephews.
The family will receive
friends from 6 to 8 p.m. on
Thursday, May 9, at the North
Chapel Chattanooga Funeral
Home.
In lieu of flowers, memorial
gifts may be made to St. Jude
Children’s Research Hospital.
Please share your thoughts
and Memories at www.chattanooganorthchapel.com.
Arrangements are by Chattanooga Funeral Home Crematory & Florist, North Chapel,
5401 Highway 153, Hixson, TN
37343.
Reed White
Reed White, 81, a longtime
resident of Chattanooga, passed
away Saturday, May 4, 2013.
He was born Aug. 14, 1931, in
Tellico Plains, Tenn. Reed has
IN MEMORY
LARRY C. CHUBBS
FEB. 3, 1958 - MAY 7, 2012
Departed his life a year ago.
Sadly missed by his kids.
DAYTON — William E.
“Bill” Ball, 76, died Friday, May
3, 2013.
Funeral services are 2 p.m.
today in the chapel of Vaughn
IN MEMORY
REVEREND O’NEAL KYLE
JAN. 17, 1933 MAY 7, 2012
Sadly missed, but not
forgotten by his wife Betty
Kyle, children: Ida (Jacoby)
Leonard, Betty Talley,
Charles, Charlton, Clayton
Kyle and two grandsons,
Norman Freeman Jr.,
and Charlton Kyle Jr.
STACEY NICHOLE
BARROW
MAY 7, 2010
Before the world had started,
before our lives began,
God assigned us all our
challenges,
some hard things to
withstand.
So you were challenged
with a body that became
broken and quite ill,
but life could never take
from you
a solid, determined will.
You kept your face turned
toward the sunshine, trapped
in a body that only knew rain
and chose to see the joys in
life in spite of constant pain.
And though your body was
often connected to needles
machines and tubes.
you bravely faced each day
with them while expressing
gratitude.
For the chance of simply
being here, though to us it
didn’t seem fair,
to see someone as
special as you suffer in a
body beyond repair.
And though we’ll miss you
deeply,
so cherished and loved were
you. ...
From Father, Mother, Sister,
Grandmother, Aunts, Uncles,
and Cousins.
Happy 70th Birthday
Loved and missed by wife
Janie & Mary, Zach,
Anthony, Donald, Cheryl,
Amber, Jackie Addison, his
mother, siblings, family, &
friends.
IN MEMORY
Each of us were given
some difficult things to do,
but God gave his bravest
warriors an extra burden too
So when you’d honorably
completed every trial you
were assigned, God chose to
bring you back to Him,
freeing your bright spirit and
mind
JAMES D. PARTON
IN MEMORY
IN MEMORY
Bill Ball
BEVERLY (SHANG)
CALHOUN GRAHAM
MAY 26, 1959-MAY 7, 2006
The depths of sorrow we can
not tell of the loss of one we
love so well. And while she
sleeps a peaceful sleep the
memories we shall always
keep. Sadly missed by her
daughter, son,
grandchildren and brothers
mother and father
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• • • Tuesday, May 7, 2013 • B3
Breaking News: [email protected]
Crews
clear I-40
rockslide
Report studies
numbers of child
deaths in Georgia
The Associated Press
MACON, Ga. — A state
agency has issued its firstever yearly report on deaths
of children involved in the
child protection system. It
found unusually high numbers of deaths in some parts
of Georgia.
The report by the Georgia Division of Family and
Children Services analyzed
the causes of the deaths and
identified ways the agency
could improve both its prevention and responses to
deaths.
Agency spokeswoman
Susan Boatwright called the
number of deaths in Central and Southwest Georgia
“unusually high” relative to
their populations.
Officials are looking at the
numbers in those parts of the
state and questioning what is
behind them, Boatwright told
The Telegraph.
“We are certainly looking
at those numbers and saying, ‘Hmm. I wonder what’s
going on,’” she said. “We’re
looking very carefully to see
if this is an anomaly or this is
a trend.”
The report covers the
death of every child who
received some kind of service from the Division of
Family and Children Services — even if only assis-
tance with food or day care
— during the previous five
years.
The agency identified
152 of these deaths in 2012,
although only 48 of those
children had open DFCS
cases at the time. Thirteen
were in foster care, and 84
had been the subject of a
prior investigation for abuse
or neglect.
The report analyzed
the causes of the deaths
— including many unrelated
to abuse or neglect — and
sought to identify ways that
DFCS could improve both its
prevention and responses to
deaths.
Children who died in foster care mostly died before
leaving the hospital, or they
died of medical problems
caused by maltreatment
before entering the foster system, according to the report.
Only one case involved suspected maltreatment at the
time of death.
Statewide, 33 percent of
the deaths were deemed
natural, mostly caused by a
pre-existing medical condition or disease. Accidents,
such as fires and drownings,
accounted for 23 percent of
the deaths. Murders caused
18 deaths, or 12 percent of
the total. Six deaths were
suicides.
Man sentenced 5 years for selling bomb
The Associated Press
ATLANTA — A Georgia
man who sold homemade
explosives to an undercover
officer has been sentenced
to more than five years in
federal prison.
Federal prosecutors say
Mark Young was sentenced
Monday on charges of possessing a destructive device.
He pleaded guilty in February.
An officer arranged a
meeting with Young in
January 2012 after receiving information that Young
Obituaries
• Continued from Page B2
Deborah Jones
ATHENS — Deborah Louise
Jones, 59, died Saturday, May
4, 2013.
Funeral will be 1 p.m. today
at Hill Top Baptist Church.
Burial will follow in the
church cemetery.
Ziegler Funeral Home,
Athens, in charge of arrangements.
Nellie Letner
TEN MILE — Nellie Mae
Letner, 80, died Saturday, May
4, 2013.
Visitation 6 to 8 p.m. today
at Ziegler Funeral Home.
Funeral service will follow
at 8 p.m.
Burial 10 a.m. Wednesday in
Roberts Cemetery.
Ziegler Funeral Home, Athens, Tenn., in charge of arrangements.
Wayne Pendergrass
PIKEVILLE —Wayne Sylvester Pendergrass, 73, of Pikeville,
passed away on Saturday May
4, 2013.
He was of the Church of God
faith. Wayne was self-employed
in construction.
He was preceded in death
by his wife, Mary Alice Pendergrass; daughter, Sherry Diane
Pendergrass; parents, Warney
and Mandy Pendergrass; brother, Cecil Pendergrass; and a sister, Anna Louise Green.
Left behind to cherish his
memory are his children: son,
Troy Pendergrass; daughters,
Glenda (Larry) Nichols and
Michelle (Danny) Pendergrass;
brother, Jerry (Emma) Pendergrass; sister, Georgia Bess Pendergrass; four grandchildren;
two great-grandchildren; several nieces and nephews and
many dear friends.
A celebration of Wayne’s
life will be held in the funeral
home chapel at 2 p.m. CDT on
Wednesday, May 8, 2013, with
the Rev. William Smith offici-
had manufactured a type of
plastic explosives. Young
said he would give the officer a free sample and came
to a meeting with a substance on a paper plate.
The next month, he told
the officer he had a new
batch and sold the officer
the bomb for $750. Authorities determined it was
an improvised explosive
device.
Young was sentenced
to five years, three months
in prison, followed by three
years supervised release.
ating.
The family will receive
friends from 4-9 p.m. CDT
today May 7, 2013.
Burial will be in Pendergrass
Cemetery.
Arrangements entrusted to
Pikeville Funeral Home.
Eloise Singleton
PIKEVILLE — Eloise E. Singleton, 89, died Sunday, May 5,
2013.
Services at 11 a.m. CDT today
in the funeral home chapel with
burial in Blackburn Cemetery.
Online condolences can be
made at www.reedfamilyfh.
com.
Arrangements by PutnamReed Funeral Home, U.S. Highway 127 South, Pikeville.
By Don Jacobs
Knoxville News Sentinel
The Associated Press
Michelle Clampit leafs through some of the many letters and notes about her Social
Security problems in Wetumpka, Ala.
29-year-old Social Security
debt stuns Alabama woman
By Scott Johnson
The Montgomery Advertiser
MONTGOMERY, Ala.
— Michelle Clampit expected
financial relief to arrive soon
in the form of an income tax
refund check. She was counting on it, in fact.
It had been a difficult time
recently, and the $5,414 she
was expecting to be deposited Feb. 27 is equal to more
than a quarter of her annual
salary, Clampit said.
But no deposit was made,
and when she checked the
IRS website to find out what
happened, she was referred
to the Social Security Administration.
The Wetumpka resident
said she had no idea she possibly could have owed money
to the SSA. After all, she had
never received a single Social
Security check in her life.
After a visit to a local SSA
office, Clampit began to suspect that her identity had
been stolen.
Eventually, however, the
actual reason for the debt
became clear: Social Security
payments made to her nowdeceased mother 29 years
ago.
The loss of income was
a difficult blow for Clampit,
who said she and her husband
Rebekah Swanger; great-grandchildren, Eli Swanger and Laine
Arp; several nieces and nephews.
Funeral services will be held
at 1 p.m. CDT Wednesday, May
8, 2013, in the funeral home
chapel with Pastor Dave Marcum and Pastor Glenn Morgan
officiating.
Burial will follow in Chapel
Hill Cemetery.
The family will receive
friends from 4-8 p.m. CDT
today.
She is loved and will be
greatly missed by her family
and friends.
Her children arise up, and
call her blessed; Proverbs
31:28.
Arrangements by Ewton
Funeral Home, 6936 Highway
28, Dunlap, TN 37327, www.
ewtonfuneralhome.com, 423949-2112.
live paycheck-to-paycheck
and count on tax refunds to
pay for such things as vacations and extra clothes for
their children.
“Income tax [season] is
kind of like poor people season. That’s when most poor
people do the things in life
that they normally don’t get
to do,” Clampit said.
The tax refund was diverted by way of the Treasury
Offset Program, which until
recently was not authorized
to collect on debts that were
more than 10 years old, SSA
spokesman BJ Jarrett said.
A law passed in 2008
eliminated the 10-year statute of limitations, and in June
2012, the SSA began to inform
people about its intention to
collect those older debts, Jarrett said.
So no matter how old the
overpayments might be, the
SSA can go after those debts
and will continue to have the
ability to collect old debts
without limits.
Clampit’s mother, Alma
Waugh Autery, began receiving Social Security payments
to compensate for her husband’s death in 1973, including payments in the names
of Clampit and her brother,
who was 5 at the time. It was
Autery’s primary method of
supporting them, Clampit
said.
In 1984, when Clampit
was 14 years old, she received
her mother’s permission to
marry her 17-year-old boyfriend, Doug Clampit. The
two remain married today,
29 years later.
Autery apparently continued to receive Social Security
payments in Clampit’s name
although Clampit’s marriage
made her no longer eligible
for the payments.
Clampit said she believes
her mother simply did not
know she was no longer eligible to receive those payments.
“My mom was an honest
person. She didn’t like dishonesty,” she said. Autery
died in 2004.
Clampit said it is “ridiculous” to expect her to pay a
29-year-old debt on an overpayment to her deceased
mother that Clampit previously knew nothing about.
“I’m not the one that
received these checks. I’m
not the one that cashed the
checks, and I am the one
that is being punished for
it, me and my family,” said
Clampit, who has a 19-yearold daughter and a 12-yearold son.
She was preceded in death
by her husband, Thomas Joiner;
parents, Carl and Bonnie Justus;
and sister, Sylvia West.
Survivors include her
daughter, Courtni Lomenick,
of Chickamauga; granddaughters, Gabriella Lomenick and
Zoe Cartwright; two brothers,
Randall and Roger Justus; three
sisters, Marie Hughes, Jessie
Faye Liner and Jo Ann Stewart;
and several nieces and nephews.
Condolences may be sent
to www.lane-southcrestchapel.
com.
A private celebration of life
will be held by the family.
Arrangements are by the
South Crest Chapel of Lane
Funeral Home & Crematory,
located at the end of historic
Missionary Ridge, Rossville.
Happy Valley Baptist Church
in Dalton, Ga.
She was preceded in death
by her father, Authur Lloyd
Sexton Sr.; son, James Lloyd
Motley; and two grandsons,
Simon Peter Motley and Eric
Farmer.
She is survived by her
husband of 51 years, Carlos
Motley, of Rossville; mother,
Sarah Templeton Sexton, of
Ringgold, Ga.; two children,
Carlissa Farmer, of Ringgold,
and Kendel Ray Motley, of Fort
Oglethorpe; sister, Juannel
Howell, of Dalton, Ga.; four
brothers, Junior Sexton, Carl
Sexton, Marshall Sexton and
Oscar Sexton, all of Ringgold;
five grandchildren, Celisse
Johnson, Tuesday Farmer,
Sandy Farmer, Samuel Motley and Alicia Motley; greatgrandchild, Westin Gauge
Ridley; and several nieces and
nephews.
A celebration of life service
will be held 10 a.m. until 2 p.m.
Wednesday at Happy Valley
Baptist Church with the Rev.
Mike Palmer officiating.
Interment will follow at
Happy Valley Baptist Church
Cemetery.
The family will receive
friends from 2-9 p.m. today at
the funeral home.
An online register book
may be signed at www.wilsonfuneralhome.com.
Arrangements are by Wilson Funeral Home, WallisStewart Chapel, Ringgold.
GEORGIA
Jane Smith
DAYTON — Jane Smith, 81,
died Saturday, May 4, 2013, died
in Hixson.
Funeral will be 4 p.m. today
in the funeral home chapel with
the Rev. Clyde Fitzgerald officiating.
Burial will be in Pleasantview Cemetery.
Arrangements are by Coulter-Garrison Funeral Home,
Dayton.
Barbara Swanger
DUNLAP — Barbara Jean
McDowell Swanger, 81, passed
away Sunday, May 5, 2013.
She was a member of Dunlap First Baptist Church.
Mrs. Swanger was preceded
in death by her husband, James
Swanger; parents, Harvey C.
and Ethel Bailey McDowell; sisters, Patsy Moody and Loretta
Blaylock; and brother, Clarence
McDowell.
Survivors include her
daughters, Janet (Larry) Arp,
Signal Mountain, and Pamela
(J.B.) Cox, Ringgold, Ga.; son,
Michael (Karen) Swanger, Dunlap; sister, LeFern Swanger,
Dunlap; grandchildren, Deidre
Arp, Matthew (Meredith) Arp,
Travas (Amber) Swanger and
Margaret Maddux
Katherine Bryant
LYERLY — Katherine Elizabeth Morrison Bryant, 92, died
Sunday, May 5, 2013.
Survivors: daughters, Marilyn Bryant, Terri (Andy) Pilgrim; four grandchildren; four
great-grandchildren.
Funeral is 4 p.m. today,
May 7, at Lyerly First Baptist
Church.
Visitation is 2 until 3:30 p.m.
today at Mason Funeral Home.
Kathy Joiner
CHICKAMAUGA — Kathy
Joiner, 62, passed away Saturday,
May 4, 2013,
at a local hospital.
She had
lived several years in
Atlanta, and
had lived
most of her
life in the
Rossville and
Chickamauga
where she was the owner and
operator of Kathy’s Iron Skillet.
Her passions in life were spending time with her granddaughters, gardening and yardsaling.
ROCK SPRING — Margaret Ann Cooper Maddux died
Friday, May 3, 2013, in a local
hospital.
Funeral services will be
2 p.m. today at Peavine Baptist Church with Dr. Stephen
Anthony officiating. The body
will lie in state at the church
from 1-2 p.m. today.
Interment in the Peavine
Cemetery.
Visit www.heritagefh.com
to share words of comfort with
the family.
Arrangements by Heritage
Funeral Home & Crematory,
Battlefield Parkway.
Sandra Motley
ROSSVILLE — Sandra Jeanette Sexton Motley, 69, went
home to be with her Lord on
Monday, May 6, 2013, at her
residence.
A lifelong resident of
Catoosa County, she was a
former employee of Bailey’s
Bar-B-Que and a member of
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ALABAMA
Michael Brown
BRYANT — Michael Lee
Brown, 48, died Saturday, May
4, 2013, at Erlanger hospital.
Survivors include wife, Lisa
Stone-Brown; daughter, April
Freeman; son, Brian Brown;
stepson, Joshua Stone; granddaughter, Bailey Freeman;
brothers, Rex Graham and E.J.
Brown; sisters, Glenda Siniard,
Gracie Sewell, Joann Adkins
and Margaret Thompson.
Michael was preceded in
death by parents, E.O. and
Lorene Bell Brown; sisters, Eva
Lacy and Louise Tike; broth-
Repair crews reopened both
lanes of westbound Interstate
40 in Roane County, Tenn.,
Monday night, about 12 hours
after a large boulder tumbled
into the far right lane.
Shortly after 9 a.m. Monday, emergency workers in
Roane County were alerted
to a slab of rock that had toppled alongside I-40 near the
343 mile marker. The slab of
rock sent debris onto the far
right westbound lane, forcing
closure of one lane.
Tennessee Department of
Transportation spokesman
Mark Nagi said state workers using a track hoe with
a rock hammer attachment
converged on the boulder.
Workers planned to smash
the large slab into pieces
small enough to haul away.
Nagi said the slab of fallen
rock was about 20 feet long,
5 feet wide and 5 feet thick.
No one was injured when the
slab fell.
“Concrete barricades will
be put up so that if any loose
materials were to fall from
the slope, they would be contained,” Nagi said.
Medicaid reform
bill up for debate
in Alabama House
The Associated Press
MONTGOMERY, Ala.
— The Alabama House will
consider a bill that would
reorganize the state’s Medicaid program.
The bill will be up for
final passage in the House
of Representatives today.
The bill was recommended by a Medicaid Advisory
committee created by Gov.
Robert Bentley.
The Medicaid bill will be
debated today with just three
days remaining in the 2013
legislative session. The bill
replaces the current payment
method with the regional
care organizations.
ers, Jimmy and Doyle Graham,
Douglas and Gary Brown.
Leave condolences online
at www.cornerstonefuneralchapel.com.
Funeral services are at 1
p.m. CDT Wednesday in the
chapel with the Rev. Darren
Rogers officiating and burial
in Payne Gap cemetery.
Family will receive friends
from 3 to 8 p.m. CDT today
and 10 a.m. CDT until service
time Wednesday.
Lowell Horton
BRYANT — Lowell Hanley
Horton, 70, died Saturday, May
4, 2013, at Erlanger hospital.
Survivors include, daughter, Carla (Jeff) Bethune; son,
Randy (Mitzi) Horton; sisters,
Irene West and Betty Donavan; grandchildren, Brandon
Horton, Randy Lee Horton,
Niki Sutton, Brandy Hawkins,
Zane Bethune and Haley Bethune; great-grandchildren,
Eddie and Jacob Hawkins, Levi
Horton, Kaylee Haggard, River
and Lake Bell, Creek Higdon,
Brinlee and Braden Sutton,
Brendon Horton.
Mr. Horton was preceded
in death by parents, Waymon
and Virtie Lee Gass Horton;
sister, Imogene Holland; brothers, Leon, Lois, Loran, Herbert,
Roy and Floren.
Leave condolences online
at www.cornerstonefuneralchapel.com.
Funeral services are at 5
p.m. CDT today in the chapel
with Pastor Carlis Clinton and
Brother Steve Wade officiating.
Burial to follow in Payne
Gap Cemetery.
Family will receive friends
from noon CDT until service
time today.
Ray McGill
SKYLINE — Ray Thomas
McGill, 56, died Sunday, May 5,
2013, in Huntsville Hospital.
Funeral services will be 2
p.m. CDT today from Skyline
Holiness Church.
Burial to follow in Skyline
Cemetery with W.T. Wilson
Funeral Chapel in charge.
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Breaking News: 423-757-News
REGION
REGION
DIGEST
FYFFE, ALA.
DNA evidence
leads to arrest
A 33-year-old Alabama
man has been arrested in
a Feb. 6 burglary at a Fyffe
pharmacy after police
matched his DNA.
Carson Weldon, of Flat
Rock, Ala., was arrested and
charged with probation violation and burglary, authorities said.
DeKalb County Sheriff
Jimmy Harris said the arrest
was the fourth drug store
burglary in which police
have made an arrest in the
last three months.
After the burglary in February, police found a piece
of flesh and blood stains at
the pharmacy, and a forensics analysis matched Weldon to the skin, Harris said
in a news release.
Investigators are interviewing at least two other
suspects, he said.
ONEIDA, TENN.
New population estimates of black bears in and
around the Big South Fork
National River and Recreation Area show the population is thriving.
The Knoxville News Sentinel reports the bears were
reintroduced to the area
almost 20 years ago after
they had been nearly wiped
out by habitat destruction
and unregulated hunting.
New DNA information
collected by biologists
shows the bear population
has grown dramatically
from the 14 females and
16 cubs brought from the
Smokies in the 1990s. Today
there are about 284 animals
in the park area in Tennessee and Kentucky.
Staff Photos by Angela Lewis
Water covers a grass field Monday near the Howard l. “Baba” Hill Sports Complex in Chickamauga, Ga.
High water across region
Bradley roller skater rescued from flooded road
Staff Report
ATLANTA
Cutting trees
for signs upheld
Georgia’s highest court
has upheld a Georgia statute that allows trees to
be chopped down under
certain circumstances so
billboard companies can
advertise along highways.
The Supreme Court of
Georgia’s ruling in a Columbus case was announced
Monday morning.
The case arose after CBS
Outdoor Inc., which owns
billboards across the state,
in 2006 submitted 10 permit
applications to the Georgia
Department of Transportation to remove trees along
Interstate 185 in Columbus.
Columbus, Gateways
Foundation and Trees
Columbus Inc., a nonprofit
group that donates and conserves trees, filed a lawsuit in
Muscogee County to stop the
trees from being removed.
Water covers Old Mill Road on
Monday in Fort Oglethorpe.
flooding as “approximately 150
yards of swift running water covering the roadway,” said he called
out to the boy to stop him from
entering the water.
The boy, 13, didn’t hear the
officer and continued skating
along the edge of the road into
deeper and swifter water.
“When he got into waist-deep
water, the current pushed him
off the roadway and into some
trees,” Rogers said in the release.
“I yelled for him to hang onto
the trees and not try to move
further.”
Rogers radioed for help.
Deputy Sam Long arrived on
the opposite side of the flooding
shortly thereafter, and a rescue
squad was on the way.
But the officers noticed the
boy was struggling to hang on
Palmer man
sentenced
for making
child porn
and that they needed to act
quickly. Long reached the boy
first and prevented him from
being swept away. Rogers then
helped them reach safety.
The boy’s family recently had
moved to Bradley County from
Pennsylvania and had lived in
the neighborhood for only a
short time. His mother told officers that she wasn’t aware of
how deep and swift the creek
was when she gave her son permission to go to the store, the
release states.
Rogers reported that Long’s
actions prevented the boy from
drowning.
But Bradley County wasn’t
the only part of the tri-state area
with high-water problems.
See FLOODING, Page B8
Lookout’s only
doctor to stay
Church to sell part of parking
lot for new physician office
By Todd South
Staff Writer
A 44-year-old Palmer,
Tenn., man was sentenced to
a quarter century in prison
Monday by a federal judge
for making child pornography.
Jimmy Rollins was arrested in February 2012 by WinSAVANNAH, GA.
chester, Tenn., police who
had found evidence Rollins
used the Internet to traffic in
child pornographic images.
A subsequent investigaA Republican state lawtion revealed that on nine
maker from the Savannah
occasions from July 19, 2011,
area plans to run for the
U.S. House seat being vacat- until Nov. 20, 2011, Rollins
had “engaged in sexual actived by longtime GOP Rep.
ity with a known minor,”
Jack Kingston.
according to a Justice DepartState Sen. Buddy Carter,
ment release.
a pharmacist from Pooler,
The victim was a teenage
on Monday announced his
boy.
campaign for Georgia’s 1st
Rollins pleaded guilty to
District congressional seat.
a single count of having sex
His announcement
with a minor for “the purcomes just a few days after
Kingston kicked off his 2014 pose of producing a visual
race for the U.S. Senate seat depiction.”
Prosecutor John MacCoon
held by Saxby Chambliss,
handled the case.
who is retiring next year.
U.S. District Judge Harry
The 1st District congresS. “Sandy” Mattice sentenced
sional seat covers parts
Rollins to the mandatory
of 17 Southeast Georgia
minimum of 25 years, per the
counties from Savannah to
Moody Air Force Base near plea agreement.
The maximum prison
Valdosta.
— Staff and Wire Reports sentence is 50 years. The
remaining eight counts were
dismissed with the agreement.
REGION CONTACT
In a previous statement,
■ Region editor:
U.S. Attorney Bill Killian said
Alex Chambliss
his office “will aggressively
423-757-6306
prosecute those who are
[email protected]
.com
See SENTENCE, Page B8
Lawmaker seeks
Kingston’s seat
A Bradley County, Tenn., boy
was nearly swept away by floodwaters Sunday while roller-skating in his neighborhood, according to a news release.
The steady downpour over
the weekend, which led to localized flooding across the tri-state
area, caused Candies Creek to
spill over its banks and onto
nearby roads.
Patrol Sgt. Jerry Rogers of
the Bradley County Sheriff ’s
Office was rechecking barricades
placed on both sides of flooding
near Tennessee Nursery Road
and Old Harrison Pike.
He saw a boy roller-skating
toward the water on the other
side of the flooding.
Rogers, who described the
By Tim Omarzu
Staff Writer
to write the rules during much of the
General Assembly’s 40-day session.
That political impasse prevented a
vote on the state budget. To break
the logjam, Deal threatened to call
a special session unless legislators
resolved the dispute. Lawmakers
then approved the state budget and
a compromise ethics package on the
final day of the legislative session.
House Speaker David Ralston,
R-Blue Ridge, described the bills as
“historic measures” for putting the
state’s first limits on lobbyist spending.
Still, there are big exceptions.
Once the law takes effect, lobbyists still can spend more than $75
on food, beverages and registration to host group events where all
members of the General Assembly
or entire political or other caucuses
are invited.
Once a year, lobbyists can invite
members of legislative committees,
which have significant sway over
The only physician practicing on Lookout Mountain plans to stay on the mountain
— despite a proposal that fell through for a
new “town center” that was due to house a
new doctor’s office.
Family practitioner Dr. Bill Moore Smith
plans to build a new office at the corner
of Lookout
Mountain
McFarland
United MethDoctor’s
Road
odist Church
current
office
at 1300 Lula
Lake Road.
“ T h e
Lookout
church ... they
Mountain
United
have voted to
Doctor’s
Methodist
sell a piece of
Church
future
that parking
office
lot to build
[Smith’s]
Rock City Trail
office there,”
said Michael
H u b b l e , IjW\\=hWf^_YXoBWkhWM$CYDkjj
superintendent for the Chattanooga District of the
Holston Conference of the United Methodist Church.
“I think it’s a win-win,” Hubble said.
The church could use money from the
land sale to pay for some needed maintenance, he said.
“Another reason why the church was willing to sell it, it was in the interest of keeping
the doctor up on the mountain,” Hubble
said.
Smith has said his current office next
to Fairyland Pharmacy is too small for his
needs. He couldn’t immediately be reached
for comment Monday afternoon.
Smith’s quest to find a location for a new
office caused controversy after Lookout
See LOBBYING, Page B8
See DOCTOR, Page B8
The Associated Press
Georgia Gov. Nathan Deal, center, holds up a legislative package in
Atlanta on Monday after signing into law new limits on lobbyists. At left
is state Sen. Jeff Mullis, R-Chickamauga, and at right is House Speaker David Ralston, R-Blue Ridge.
Deal signs lobbyist limits bill
By Ray Henry
The Associated Press
ATLANTA — Lobbyists cannot
spend more than $75 at a time while
seeking to influence Georgia officials
under legislation signed into law
Monday that still leaves some loopholes and unresolved questions.
The legislation signed by Gov.
Nathan Deal, a Republican, takes
effect Jan. 1 and sets the first state
limits on how much money lobbyists can spend. Right now, lobbyists
can spend as much as they want so
long as they publicly disclose their
expenditures.
“Our success as leaders of this
state depends heavily on the public’s
ability to trust us,” Deal said during
a bill signing ceremony at the Statehouse. “And we cannot expect them
to honor our laws or to elect us to
do further good for this state unless
we have put in place those measures
whereby with certainty they know
that we have their best interests in
mind.”
Republican lawmakers in the
House and Senate fought over how
Lula L
ake Ro
ad
Black bear
numbers rise
...
. timesfreepress.com
• • • Tuesday, May 7, 2013 • B5
Breaking News: [email protected]
Lawsuit
Woman of Year
charged with DUI
Private schools
don’t want state
involvement
The Associated Press
Cook
• Continued from Page B1
a gun) instead of the streets
and loses his patrol car, powers of arrest and a big chunk
of pay.
“There is a world of difference between the duties
of a correctional officer and
a patrolman,” the sheriff said.
“This guy is not a policeman.
He lost all of that.”
The 16-page IA report
includes interviews with
four juveniles and Tabor
himself. The teens — whom
Tabor met through the
Explorers program — say
the officer bought them
beer multiple times. (None
of it occurred while Tabor
was on duty.)
Tabor, whom Hammond
said is 25 years old, admitted
to sleeping in the same bed
with her two daughters
when she was pulled over
by Red Bank police.
quick search of the vehicle
revealed a metal water bottle and orange cup near the
driver’s seat, both full of red
wine, police said.
Jones’ failure to complete
several field sobriety tests
convinced officers she wasn’t
fit to operate a vehicle.
Officer Nathan Bruce
said in the arrest report that,
“based on her performance
of these tests, I feel that she
wasn’t able to drive.”
Jones was taken to the
Red Bank Police Department,
where she refused a blood alcohol test. She was charged with
driving under the influence,
evading arrest and two counts
of child endangerment.
“Ms. Jones’s actions of
evading from police placed
the children in grave danger,”
the report states.
She also was issued citations for refusing an alcohol
test, violating the open container law and traffic violations.
Jones could not be reached
for comment Monday night.
The children and vehicle were
released to a grandmother,
according to the report.
Chickens
• Continued from Page B1
should take,” she said. “But
it doesn’t have to.”
Walsh opposed the proposal to allow chickens in the
city three years ago and lobbied against it. But she said
this time she has no objections to it.
She said last time she
came into the discussion
late.
Walsh said she was guaranteed the City Council
would provide the necessary
money for a chicken coop
and any other associated
Homicide
The Associated Press
Signs warn against trespassing at the Y-12 National Security Complex in Oak Ridge, Tenn.
Nuclear protester trial this week
NASHVILLE — An octogenarian nun and two codefendants used bolt cutters to
cut through fences and spent
about two hours inside a Tennessee national security plant
that has had a hand in making,
maintaining or dismantling
parts of every nuclear weapon in the country’s arsenal,
federal authorities allege.
In July, the trio splashed
human blood on the walls
of the fortresslike Highly
Enriched Uranium Materials
Facility in the Y-12 National
Security Complex in Oak
Ridge and painted phrases
on its walls such as: “Woe to
the empire of blood.”
Jury selection began Monday for the trial of Sister
Megan Rice, 83; Michael Walli,
64; and Greg Boertje-Obed, 56.
Rice and Walli live in Washington, D.C., while BoertjeObed, 56, a house painter, is
from Duluth, Minn.
All three have long histories protesting U.S. military
policies. Walli, a Vietnam
veteran, was arrested two
years earlier for trespassing
at Y-12 and sentenced to eight
months in federal prison.
The activists arrested after
the July incursion say in court
filings that after they refused
to plead guilty to trespassing,
prosecutors substituted that
charge with a sabotage count
that increased the maximum
prison term from one year to
20 years.
A n d wh i l e o ff i c i a l s
claimed there was never
any danger of the protesters
reaching materials that could
be detonated on site or used
to assemble a dirty bomb,
the delayed response to the
intrusion raised serious questions about security.
expenses. She said Anderson
indicated money would not
be an issue.
“He indicated to me it
wasn’t a problem,” she said.
Anderson said he is pushing the ordinance because
constituents came to him
during his campaign asking
him to support it.
He said Walsh and the
McKamey Center would be
able to handle the additional
work.
“She’ll be able to handle it
just fine,” he said.
Animal Control Board
members are divided about
whether they should hear the
ordinance first.
Board Chairman Michael
Mallen said the board can
hear requests such as the
chicken ordinance, but it’s
not necessary. He said the
board probably will hear the
ordinance after any approval
and could choose to ask for
amendments.
But Vice Chairwoman
Lynn Ashton said the board
was created to hear these
types of cases.
“I’m confused on why
Mr. Anderson would ask
to circumvent the Animal
Control Board when it’s the
very thing we were tasked to
do,” she said. “I don’t understand why it has to be pushed
through so quickly without
being vetted.”
Councilman Larry Grohn
said the council should look
at the ordinance more carefully.
He has concerns about
putting an added burden on
the McKamey Center. He
also feels the $50 permit fee
could be too high.
He said he supports deferral to let the Animal Control
Board vet the issue.
“I think that’s what they
should be doing,” he said.
Contact staff writer Cliff
Hightower at [email protected]
timesfreepress.com or 423757-6480. Follow him at
twitter.com/cliffhightower
or facebook.com/cliff.high
tower.
County
A few months ago, police
had taken Washington into
custody after Stokes showed
up at Erlanger North Hospital in Red Bank with a split
gum and at least one tooth
broken, according to an arrest
report. She told police she
and Washington had argued.
He punched her in the mouth,
the report states. The wounds
to her face were described as
“serious bodily injury.” The
case was dismissed.
On Twitter, some expressed
condolences for Washington’s
death and posted pictures.
One woman tweeted, “Your
were my childhood friend,
my crush, the first guy I sang
for, n your were like fam. Now
you gone.”
Thus far in 2013, there
have been 11 homicides —
eight of those deaths were
because of shootings.
Contact staff writer Beth
Burger at [email protected]
freepress.com or 423-7576406. Follow her on Twitter
at twitter.com/abburger.
ethics for local law enforcement.
Shouldn’t the ethical lawman have quickly fired the
unethical deputy?
“There was a degree of
mercy in this,” he said. “I
very highly believe in people
being able to feed their families and retain their jobs. ... It
is very difficult to just take
somebody’s job away.”
Usually, I’m a sucker for
mercy. Aren’t you?
Mercy is sweeter than
wine when it’s applied
fairly, evenly, to all. Few
things have the power to
crack open the human spirit
like mercy can. Hammond
knows this, too.
But when it’s doled out
unevenly — when some draw
a good hand but others don’t
— mercy loses its flavor, and
starts tasting more like favoritism.
Hammond, a lawman with
a preacher’s heart, is still a
lawman. His job is to enforce
the law, not diminish it. If he
won’t let Jimmy around the
corner off the hook when
he gets caught buying beer
for kids, then he shouldn’t
have any less punishment for
Tabor.
“You might get another
sheriff that fires everybody.
I like to practice a little more
mercy,” he said.
In the end, it’s your call,
Hamilton County residents.
Was the sheriff merciful and
just, or just unfair?
Contact David Cook at
[email protected]
or 423-757-6329. Follow him
on Facebook and Twitter at
DavidCookTFP.
The Associated Press
d Terrace
Ashlan
• Continued from Page B1
where Washington was shot
in the chest had an oxygen
mask left on the rail of the
porch.
Neighbors said the gunfire
sounded like firecrackers. One
woman who lived next door to
where Washington lived with
his girlfriend, Kristen Stokes,
said she didn’t want to talk
about what happened.
Police believe Washington
was targeted.
Washington’s record consisted of a couple of driving
offenses and an aggravated
domestic assault charge.
with one teen during a twonight trip to a Gatlinburg,
Tenn., cabin. The girl’s mother
was with them on the trip.
“The parents of the juvenile victims do not wish to
pursue criminal charges
against Deputy Sheriff Tabor
concerning this matter,” the
investigation reads.
Why why why not? Are
they afraid of retaliation?
They don’t want to drag
their kids through a public
spectacle? But doesn’t that
mean ...
“You don’t have a case if
they don’t press charges,”
Hammond said.
Make no mistake: Tabor’s
the one who blew it in this
story. But since being elected, Hammond has portrayed
himself as the ethical lawman. He writes about ethics, speaks about ethics, has
created a foundation to raise
money to provide training in
Pike
Hixson
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MONTGOMERY, Ala.
— Private and parochial
schools want to make sure
Alabama’s new tax credits
and scholarships for private school attendance don’t
lead to the state government
having a role in their operations.
J. Robin Mears, executive director of the Alabama
Christian Education Association, said the concept of
the new law is sound, but
proposed changes raise concern about state involvement.
“What we are looking at is
what is in it that could eventually hurt us?” he said.
Randy Skipper, executive director of the Alabama
Independent School Association, said he expects many
of his 55 member schools to
decline to participate if the
tax credits and scholarships
come with state government
involvement. “The whole
point is they are independent
schools,” he said.
The Legislature passed
the Alabama Accountability
Act on Feb. 28. It provides
tax credits to parents who
choose to send their children
to a private school or nonfailing public school rather
than a public school rated as
failing.
■ Carrie Jones was driving
IjW\\=hWf^_YXoBWkhWM$CYDkjj
is Moth
Su
nd er’s
ay, Da
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2
It’s all about Mom!
Larry Henry said that’s probably because no one was surprised.
“I think some of them sort
of expected it. [Hammond]
gave an explanation of it that
was pretty forthright,” Henry
said.
Hammond and the commission butted heads several
times this year over budgeting issues at the sheriff ’s
office. Hammond exceeded
his allotted salary budget by
$220,000 this year, according
to a recently released audit.
And commissioners said last
week they expect all county
departments — including
Hammond’s — to expect no
change in budgets.
Commissioners did have
words for Circuit Court Clerk
Paula Thompson, though.
Thompson is seeking an
additional $336,000 to cover
declining revenues at her
office, and Commissioner
Joe Graham was not pleased
to hear it.
In March, the commission
returned $192,000 to Thompson, which she had paid to
the county in excess fees
over the last 11 years.
Graham wanted to know
Monday why Thompson had
not cut her staff and was still
having trouble making ends
meet.
Thompson said she had
cut positions and reduced
her budget by $140,000, but
it wasn’t enough.
Joe
Graham
Larry
Henry
“You’re still asking for
$300,000 on top of the
$140,000? It’s still not bringing a balanced budget,” Graham said Monday.
The largest requested
budget reduction came
from Assessor of Property
Bill Bennett’s office. He’s
requesting $3.6 million,
which is $647,000 less than
last year. Bennett said the
reduction came because 2013
was a reappraisal year, and
he needed all hands on deck.
Now that the reappraisal is
over, his budget can return
to normal operating levels,
he said.
Commissioners only heard
requests Monday. Mayor Jim
Coppinger ultimately will
pull the budget together and
present it to the commission
for final approval.
“This is the very early
infant stages of this. We’ve
got to assimilate all this
information. ... We’ll probably have it passed by June
30. I don’t think we’ll have
any problems with it,” Henry
said.
Contact staff writer Louie
Brogdon at [email protected]
freepress.com or 423-7576481. Follow him on Twitter
at @glbrogdoniv.
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to Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, one
of two suspects in the April
15 bombing of the Boston
Marathon.
Flores then turned the
talk to Reconstruction and
its relation to the 1983 Civil
Rights Act and what Congress intended the Act to
protect.
Flores also compared
McMinn County holding his
client for nearly 10 months
without a bond hearing or
an attorney to extraordinary rendition, an alleged
practice by U.S. intelligence
agencies against terrorism
suspects.
The practice involves taking suspects to undisclosed
locations and holding them
without formal charges or
legal representation, often
in other nations.
“Mr. Vann was taken by
police, your honor, and squirreled away,” Flores said.
But the judge was not
ruling on the merits of the
rights violations, only whether Vann had filed his lawsuit
within the statute of limitations.
Flores filed a lawsuit on
behalf of Vann after meeting with his family in mid2012.
Vann is being held in the
Morgan County Correctional
Complex on a separate incest
conviction.
After the judge’s ruling in
2009, prosecutors dropped
the case and dismissed the
charges in 2011.
Flores argued that the
“clock started ticking” for
statute of limitations in
2011.
But Knight disagreed and
said it started, at the latest,
in 2009.
Collier agreed with Knight
and said the filing was too
late.
After the hearing, Flores
said the chances for an appeal
are narrow, but he would talk
with his client before deciding.
He has 30 days to file an
appeal.
Contact staff writer Todd
South at [email protected]
press.com or 423-757-6347.
Follow him on Twitter @
tsouthCTFP.
CHATTANOOGA
Northshore- 345 Frazier
Next to Regions Bank
(423) 757-2900
HAMILTON PLACE
Hamilton Place Mall
Next to Women’s Belk
(423) 855-8686
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Features the premiere of a Magnificat by
local student composer Ethan McGrath,
commissioned by the three churches.
Other composers include: Ralph Vaughan
Williams, William Smith, and Richard
Proulx. Offerings benefit Metropolitan
Ministries. A reception follows.
35675308
Staff Report
Signal Mountain’s recently
honored Woman of the Year
was arrested Saturday night
and charged with driving
under the influence, evading arrest and two counts
of child endangerment, Red
Bank police said.
Carrie Jones, 41, was
selected to be the 2013 Signal
Mountain Community Guild’s
Woman of the Year on April
24 for her volunteer work.
Just 10 days after the
award, Red Bank Police
Department officers found
Jones driving south on Dayton Boulevard, slumped over
and appearing to be asleep
at the wheel with her two
young daughters in the car,
an incident report states.
The officers turned on
their emergency lights and
sirens, which woke up the
driver, who sped down Dayton
Boulevard in a silver Honda
Odyssey before turning right
onto Morrison Springs Road.
Police finally made contact with Jones when she
came to a stop at 314 Morrison Springs Road, the incident report states.
As Jones exited the
vehicle, with glazed eyes
and slurred speech, officers
noted the smell of alcohol on
her, police said.
Jones told police that she’d
had three glasses of wine. A
• Continued from Page B1
305 West Seventh at Pine • Chattanooga • 266-8195 • stpaulschatt.org
..
timesfreepress.com ..
Breaking News: 423-757-News
Facility up to standards. It
includes policy, training and
employment changes.
The report praises the
county for expeditiously
responding to complaints and
taking corrective actions.
The investigation of
the facility, released by
the Justice Department in
2011, came as the result of
a handwritten complaint
from inmate Tellis Williams
to U.S. District Judge Todd
Campbell.
In the 2009 letter, Wil-
liams said he lost 20 pounds
in his first few weeks as a
pretrial detainee awaiting a
federal court trial.
“I know that both the diet
and the way that they feed
the inmates here at Robertson County jail are not
healthy because I no longer
feel healthy,” Williams wrote.
“My ribs are visible and I am
constantly hungry!”
Campbell held hearings
on the complaints and then
requested the federal investigation, which found numer-
ous problems in addition to
inadequate nutritious food.
The problems included a
policy allowing inmates who
were supposed to be on suicide watch to simply sign a
form agreeing not to harm
themselves.
The jail changes affect
more than just people arrested locally. Seventy-three percent of RCDF inmates are
either state inmates serving
sentences or pretrial detainees waiting for state or federal trials on felonies.
Landscaper killed
outside church
The Associated Press
BIRMINGHAM, Ala.
— Police are investigating the shooting death of a
landscaper who was gunned
down during a grass-cutting
job outside a Birmingham
church.
Birmingham police say
59-year-old Birl Jackson
was found Monday morning, slumped over the wheel
of his pickup truck in the
parking lot of Zion Star
Missionary Baptist Church.
Witnesses reported hearing
three shots Monday morning
shortly before finding Jackson in the truck.
Police say the crime appears
to have been a robbery.
The Birmingham News
said Jackson had been cutting
The Associated Press
grass in the area surround- Rising water floods Woodrow Wilson Park in Lithia Springs, Ga., Monday.
ing the church and the King
Manor Apartments. Authoristorm, The Associated Press
While a chance of showties say it was unclear where
ers persists through this
reported.
he was shot, but apparently
WTVF-TV reported the weekend, meteorologists
he made his way to the truck
storm
hit areas around don’t expect more than an
afterward. He was taken away
Continued from Page B4 Decherd and downtown inch of rain.
in an ambulance and pro- •
“It’ll be nothing like the
The National Weather Winchester on Sunday evenounced dead at a hospital.
5
to
6 inches we’ve had over
ning,
leaving
behind
several
Service early Monday said
the past few days,” said TriNorth Georgia flood warn- inches of hail.
The Franklin County sha Palmer, National Weathings continued for several
Highway
Department was er Service meteorologist in
waterways, including the
Peachtree City, Ga.
Coosa River near Rome, called to assist in cleaning
“Looks like [today] it’s
up the roads around the
the Oostanaula River near
• Continued from Page B4 Calhoun, Armuchee Creek Winchester town square. going to start warming up
Mountain, Tenn., offered to near Armuchee, the Etowah There were no immediate a little bit,” she said.
Chattanooga-area highs
sell him a one-acre parcel of River near east Canton, the reports of any accidents.
In Hamilton County, will hover in the midtown-owned land at the cor- Conasauga River near Eton,
ner of Scenic Highway and Coahulla Creek in the Dal- South Chickamauga Creek to high 70s through the
South Watauga Lane known ton area, Lookout Creek crested at 21.64 feet around week, with the possibility
as Verlenden Park. About near New England, West 8 a.m. Monday. The water of showers and thunder150 people — most of whom Chickamauga Creek near level fell to 21.04 feet by storms. By Friday night,
opposed selling the park — Fort Oglethorpe and the 6:15 p.m. on Monday, still there’s a 40 to 50 percent
packed into Lookout Moun- Oconee River near Avant 3 feet above flood stage, chance of thunderstorms,
w h i c h i s 1 8 f e e t . T h e with that increasing to 50
tain Elementary School’s Mine.
creek, affecting Hamilton to 60 percent on Saturday
auditorium in September
In Tennessee, Franklin and Catoosa counties, is and Sunday.
2012 for a city meeting about County got its fair share
“It’s not moving out until
under a flood warning
the proposed land sale.
of water, but in hail form. until around 8 p.m. today. Monday,” Palmer said.
Smith also had considered
Schools were closed Mon- The Tennessee River did
The Associated Press conopening his office in a town
day after a Sunday hail- not reach flood stage.
tributed
to this story.
center proposed by develop-
Flooding
Doctor
er Jimmy Chapin on the site
of Lookout Mountain, Ga.’s
current City Hall at 1214 Lula
Lake Road. The town center
also was going to be home
to a grocery and new City
Hall, police and fire station
for Lookout Mountain, Ga.
But Chapin has pulled his
proposal.
“He has officially withdrawn,” City Clerk Cindy
Roberts said.
Chapin couldn’t immediately be reached for comment Monday.
He requested $5,000 from
the city to pay for the work
he put into the town center
plans. The City Council will
discuss the request at its next
meeting May 16.
Smith’s plan to build the
new office must be approved
by city officials.
Contact staff writer
Tim Omarzu at [email protected]
timesfreepress.com or 423757-6651.
Teen charged
in brother’s death
The Associated Press
MEMPHIS — Memphis
police have charged a Memphis teenager in the shooting
death of his brother.
Dewayne McKissack, 18,
was arrested Sunday in the
death of 15-year-old Cardarius Webb.
According to police, on
April 29 Webb began throwing
bricks at the home of people
who had been in an altercation
with the boys’ mother. McKissack showed up and began firing, intending to hit the people
in the home. Instead, he shot
his brother in the head.
McKissack is charged with
second-degree murder, two
counts of attempted seconddegree murder, three counts of
aggravated assault and using a
firearm to commit a felony.
Lobbying
• Continued from Page B4
bills, out for meals. Lobbyists
will be able to pay to send
lawmakers and their staff on
trips within the United States
that are related to their official duties.
There are questions about
how the rules will be enforced.
The new law limits what lobbyists can spend, not what lawmakers can accept. As a result,
some who supported tighter
restrictions on lobbyist spending fear it will be legal for lobbyists to split large expenses.
For example, two lobbyists
could jointly buy a $150 football
ticket for a lawmaker without
breaking the rules.
Critics also worry a provision of the bill will allow
attorneys to lobby without
having to register as lobbyists and obey the new rules
governing spending. The
state’s ethics commission,
which enforces the law, likely
will be asked to rule on those
issues next year.
“We are pleased that this
first step was taken, and
we will be back,” said Debbie Dooley, a co-founder of
the Atlanta Tea Party, which
pushed for tighter lobbying
rules. “There are things that
need to be done to adjust the
legislation.”
Ralston said lawmakers
need to see how the new
laws work before considering changes to them.
By Jim Tanner
Staff Writer
With the USA Cycling
Professional Championships
debut in Chattanooga quickly
approaching, local organizers
are making final adjustments
for the event.
“We have changed the
course a little bit and finalized some of the traffic plans
as it relates to the course,”
Outdoor Chattanooga Executive Director Philip Grymes
said Monday. “These changes
will make traffic easier for
some of the businesses on
the route.”
The May 25-27 races are
the national championships
for American pro cyclists in
the time-trial and road-race
disciplines, and they have
attracted some of the sport’s
top names. This begins a
scheduled three-year run in
Chattanooga and will include
men’s and women’s championships at the same event for
the first time.
The weekend also will
feature the United States
Handcycling Federation criterium championship downtown between the men’s and
women’s road-race competitions on Memorial Day.
The time-trial and roadrace courses were announced
in January, with the May 25
time trial set to begin and
end at the Chattanooga Volkswagen plant and the May 27
road race featuring multiple
loops through downtown
and up and down Lookout
Mountain.
Grymes said planning
for the event — which is
expected to draw nearly 200
competitors and thousands
of spectators — has been a
monumental undertaking.
“There’s an incredible
amount that goes into this
thing — details that the
general public would never
imagine,” he said. “It’s a
bulky event, but it’s finally
coming together.”
The road-race course was
changed slightly in the St.
Elmo area and on Lookout
Mountain. Riders coming
out of town on Broad Street
now will turn left from Cummings Highway onto St. Elmo
Avenue, rather than going
through St. Elmo on Tennessee Avenue. After climbing
Sentence
• Continued from Page B4
using interstate commerce to
victimize children for profit
and sexual gratification.”
The investigation was part
of Project Safe Childhood,
a federal initiative launched
in May 2006 by the justice
department to fight child sexual exploitation and abuse,
according to the release.
Contact staff writer Todd
South at [email protected]
press.com or 423-757-6347.
Follow him on Twitter @
tsouthCTFP.
CRIMINAL DEFENSE
Felony • Misdemeanor • DUI
Licensed in TN & GA
Daniel J. Ripper, Attorney
1110 Market St., Ste. 500 • Chattanooga, TN
423-756-5034
Ripperlaw.com
Lookout on Ochs Highway,
competitors will proceed all
the way up the mountain to
Ochs Extension, rather than
turning right on Sanders
Road, then to the descent on
Scenic Highway.
“The National Park Service was not comfortable
with the race coming through
Sanders Road because of the
road conditions and potential
impact along Sanders Road,”
Grymes said.
Grymes also said that
some of the traffic planning
has been set for the downtown area on Memorial Day.
Broad Street will be narrowed to two lanes from 20th
Street to the base of Lookout
Mountain to allow two-way
traffic along that corridor,
but there will be no traffic allowed at all along the
downtown and North Shore
portions of the route while
racing is in progress.
“The downtown loop is
going to be a hard closure,”
Grymes said. “No vehicle
traffic will be allowed on
those roads. Fourth Street
will allow emergency traffic
to cross, but all other traffic
will have to go around the
course on Riverfront Parkway or Main Street.”
Saturday’s fatal bicycle
crash during the 3 State, 3
Mountain Challenge happened on a portion of Ochs
Highway that is part of the
US Pro Championship roadrace course. Grymes said
that tragedy underscores
much of the planning that
Outdoor Chattanooga has
been engaged in for months.
He said emergency services
will be stationed along the
course to quickly assist competitors, spectators and area
residents.
“The staging of emergency services is a conversation we’ve been having for a
while,” he said. “And not just
as it relates to the race, but
also to life around the race.”
Contact staff writer Jim
Tanner at [email protected]
freepress.com or 423-7576478.
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The Associated Press
SPRINGFIELD, Tenn. —
Robertson County has agreed
to changes at the jail after a
U.S. Department of Justice
investigation found constitutional rights violations.
The City Paper in Nashville reported the federal
government filed the civil
rights complaint against Robertson County as well as a
joint settlement agreement
April 26. The agreement
lays out a plan to bring the
Robertson County Detention
USA Cycling Pro
race route shifts
35621425
Robertson agrees to jail changes after probe
35648076
B8 • Tuesday, May 7, 2013 • • •
256-845-1382
www.chadwickplumbing.com
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35615314
THERE’S A LOT YOU CAN DO!
..
timesfreepress.com ..
OPINION
B6 • Tuesday, May 7, 2013 • • •
Established 1869 Adolph S. Ochs,
Publisher 1878-1935
PAM SOHN
Times Page Editor
Contact:
757-6900,,
[email protected]
COMMENTARY
CHUTZPAH CAUCUS
Austerity fans
have been
proven wrong
At this point the economic case
for austerity — for slashing government spending even in the face of a
weak economy — has
collapsed. Claims
that spending cuts
would actually boost
employment by promoting confidence
have fallen apart.
Claims that there is
some kind of red line
of debt that countries
Paul
dare not cross have
Krugman
turned out to rest on
fuzzy and to some extent just plain
erroneous math. Predictions of fiscal
crisis keep not coming true; predictions
of disaster from harsh austerity policies
have proved all too accurate.
Yet calls for a reversal of the
destructive turn toward austerity are
still having a hard time getting through.
Partly that reflects vested interests, for
austerity policies serve the interests
of wealthy creditors; partly it reflects
the unwillingness of influential people
to admit being wrong. But there is, I
believe, a further obstacle to change:
widespread, deep-seated cynicism
about the ability of democratic governments, once engaged in stimulus, to
change course in the future.
This cynicism, which sounds realistic and worldly wise, is actually sheer
fantasy. Ending stimulus never has
been a problem — in fact, the historical record shows that it almost always
ends too soon. And in America we have
a good record for behaving in a fiscally
responsible fashion, with one exception — namely, the fiscal irresponsibility that prevails when, and only when,
hard-line conservatives are in power.
Let’s start with the common claim
that stimulus programs never go away.
In the U.S., government spending programs designed to boost the
economy are in fact rare. FDR cut back
sharply in 1937, plunging America back
into recession; Obama’s Recovery Act
had its peak effect in 2010, and has
since faded away, a fade that has been a
major reason for our slow recovery.
What about programs designed to
aid those hurt by a depressed economy?
Don’t they become permanent fixtures?
Again, no. Unemployment benefits
have fluctuated with the business cycle,
and as a percentage of GDP they are
barely half what they were at their
recent peak. Food stamp usage is still
rising, but historical experience suggests that it too will fall sharply if and
when the economy really recovers.
Incidentally, foreign experience follows the same pattern. You often hear
Japan described as a country that has
pursued never-ending fiscal stimulus.
In reality, it has engaged in stop-go
policies, increasing spending when the
economy is weak, then pulling back at
the first sign of recovery (and thereby
pushing itself back into recession).
So the whole notion of perma-stimulus is fantasy posing as hardheaded realism. Even if you don’t believe that stimulus is forever, Keynesian economics says
not just that you should run deficits in
bad times, but that you should pay down
debt in good times. It’s silly to imagine
that this will happen, right?
Wrong. The key measure you want
to look at is the ratio of debt to GDP,
which measures the government’s fiscal position better than a simple dollar
number. And if you look at U.S. history
since World War II, you find that of
the 10 presidents who preceded Barack
Obama, seven left office with a debt
ratio lower than when they came in.
Who were the three exceptions? Ronald
Reagan and the two George Bushes. So
debt increases that didn’t arise either
from war or from extraordinary financial crisis are entirely associated with
hard-line conservative governments.
And there’s a reason for that association: U.S. conservatives have long followed a strategy of “starving the beast,”
slashing taxes so as to deprive the government of the revenue it needs to pay
for popular programs.
The funny thing is that right now
these same hard-line conservatives
declare that we must not run deficits
in times of economic crisis. Why?
Because, they say, politicians won’t
do the right thing and pay down the
debt in good times. And who are these
irresponsible politicians they’re talking
about? Why, themselves.
New York Times
EDITORIAL
IS IT SAFE TO BIKE
THE MOUNTAINS?
M
ore than 2,000 bicyclists came to Chattanooga this past weekend to bike three
mountains.
It sounds like fun, but it wasn’t.
One bicyclist died, and the life of the person
whose car the cyclist struck on the rain-slicked Ochs
Highway is likely forever altered.
Bicycling is the new cool. It’s a sign of vigor and
enthusiasm for life. It has it own recent state law
that says drivers must give a bicyclist at least three
feet distance.
But then there’s this elephant in the living room
of Chattanooga — the city of mountains and valleys
seemingly perfect for that outdoorsy, healthy cyclistkind of happy picture. The elephant is safety, or the
lack of common-sense understanding of safety that
no one wants to talk about.
It’s just not safe to bicycle on steep mountain
roads. It’s not safe for the cyclists, and it’s not safe for
the people who have to drive those mountain roads
to get to home and work. These roads are barely
adequate for the traffic they bear, let alone for one
or more cyclists suddenly right in front of drivers
who’ve just rounded a curve and have nowhere else
to go but into a lane of oncoming traffic.
Something has to give.
Less than a year ago, this newspaper ran a story
stating “Biking is a bit safer in Tennessee and Georgia
as of this morning, assuming two new state laws keep
motorists away from cyclists.”
The story went on to say legislation in Tennessee strengthened penalties against drivers who hit
pedestrians or cyclists. Instead of facing 30 days in
jail and a $50 fine, drivers judged guilty of “failure
to exercise due care” face up to a $500 fine and 11
months and 29 days in jail and the loss of a driver’s
license for causing death.
Across the state line, Georgia drivers suddenly
faced the same mandate to keep least three feet
between themselves and cyclists.
Keeping good space — even more than three
feet — between a vehicle and a bicycle is a good
common-sense rule, but it doesn’t work on a curvy,
two-lane (or even three-lane) mountain road where
neither driver nor biker knows the other is there until
the three-feet buffer is merely inches.
If the lane is too narrow for the motorist to safely
pass the bicyclist — while still allowing the cyclist
a safe buffer-distance — the motorist has to wait
behind for a safe chance to pass. And the motorist has
to pray not to be rear-ended in the meantime.
This issue needs rethinking. A one-size-fits-all
bicycle safety law may not work on our mountain
roads.
Since 2003, at least five bicyclists have died in
bike/car collisions in the Chattanooga region, according to newspaper archives.
The cyclists lost their lives, but the drivers and
their families were not unscathed. Some were prosecuted, and whether they went to court or not, they
deal with the nightmares that all fatal accidents
bring.
Saturday’s unfortunate accident was not the vehicle
driver’s fault, according to police. The cyclist lost control riding downhill on Lookout Mountain’s Ochs Highway and went into the path of a car traveling uphill,
said Chattanooga police spokesman Nathan Hartwig.
The cyclist, a Florida man, died at the scene.
Yes, bicycling is fun and usually healthy, but it’s not
a God-given right on a highway. And especially not in
inclement weather on a curvy mountain road.
Was any thought given to canceling this event,
knowing that a deluge of rain was forecast days in
advance? Couldn’t the roads have been temporarily
closed or detoured for the event?
Perhaps mountain cycling enthusiasts need to
do what horseback riders and four-wheelers have
had to do: build their own routes away from car and
truck traffic.
There’s a reason bicycling is not legal on an Interstate highway, even though on Interstate highways
cyclists would have a wide shoulder available.
The reason is simple. Safety. On Interstate highways, speed makes cycling unsafe for everybody.
Well, on mountains, curves, switchbacks and narrow
lanes make cycling unsafe for everybody.
Yes, cyclists have a right to ride. But we all have
a right to safety.
Bicycles on roads that are dubiously safe even for
cars, stretch that right to the limit.
FACEBOOK
FEEDBACK
DO YOU THINK
GEORGIA SHOULD
ELIMINATE ITS
INCOME TAX?
No. High sales
taxes hit the poor
disproportionately, as
they have to spend a
larger percentage of their
income. A rebate system
will lead to bureaucratic
inefficiency, additional cost
and fraud.
— Charles McCullough
•••
Has anyone stopped to
consider that under the
Constitution of the United
States of America, a state
income tax is illegal?
— Ryan Tucker
•••
I moved to Tennessee to
get away from the income
tax.
— Robert Wilcox
•••
A fair tax in which you
eliminate all other taxes
and then institute a 20-25
percent tax on everything,
would be the fair way to
go. ... The tax would be
divided among the state,
federal and local levels.
It would simplify the tax
code, abolish the IRS and
save taxpayers in the long
run a substantial amount.
— Lonnie Henderson
•••
Direct taxation of a
person’s income is nothing
more than theft.
— Gary Patterson
•••
I left Georgia six years
ago and moved back
to Tennessee. Haven’t
looked back. Georgia was
eating my retirement up.
— Erbie Lyons
YOUR COMMUNITY | YOUR VOICE
TO SUBMIT
LETTERS
Keep them topical,
short (200 words or
fewer), legible and
not more often than
one every 30 days.
Letters chosen for
publication may be
edited and should
not previously have
been published
elsewhere.
Must be signed with
name, address and
telephone number.
Send to:
Editorial page
editor (either Times
or Free Press),
P.O. Box 1447,
Chattanooga,
TN 37401; fax:
423-757-6383; or
email: [email protected]
timesfreepress.com.
CLAY BENNETT CONVEYS
SEVERITY OF IRAQ WAR
This article is in response to
a letter to the editor, lambasting
Clay Bennett’s “vicious” attack
on Bush’s new library — Bennett
comparing it with the Holocaust
Museum.
I’m not as positive as the aforementioned writer that the comparison was not justified. Deliberate killing of over 6 million Jews,
plus several million other political prisoners by the Germans was
deplorable, but America’s role in
the killing of more than 100,000
Iraqis also is indefensible — considering many were civilians.
There’s not much difference in
dropping bombs from five miles
up and a crazy person with an
automatic gun spraying a crowd.
Many people will be victims along
with their targets.
Is it poor taste to compare the
Holocaust with our not-so-fast
“mission accomplished” in Iraq?
It really depends on what side of
the bomb you’re on, doesn’t it?
What would the families of the
100,000 Iraqis — if any still are
alive — say? Perhaps it would be
a different spin.
TOM BAKER
Hixson
REPUBLIC PARKING’S
BILLING IS RELENTLESS
Republic parking ... argh! I
received a ticket for parking
next to a Dumpster. I didn’t see
a number on pavement, and I
didn’t even know it was part of
Republic’s system.
I lost the ticket. Unfortunately,
this allowed the company to raise
the price from $9 to $39! Republic
sent me a bill, I explained the situation and included a check for $10.
I wrote “paid in full” on the memo
section. Republic crossed out my
memo, cashed my check and billed
me the remainder.
Despite my attempts to reason
with it, Republic is relentless. It is
unbelievable to me that this company pretty much rules downtown
parking. I guess I won’t be going
downtown anymore!
SUSAN PROCTOR
GOOD SAMARITANS HELP
SAVE DOG FROM TRAFFIC
With all the bad things happening in Red Bank the last few
weeks, I want to say there is goodness — true goodness — in these
neighborhoods, as well. That
goodness was shown to me in
the most tangible way by a good
Samaritan whose name is Linda
Clayton.
While we were sitting for a
good friend, their dog, a huge
German shepherd named Mata
escaped. Enter Linda and another
wonderful woman, whose name
we didn’t get.
Linda rescued him from rushhour traffic on Dayton Boulevard
and took him to a vet, who happened to be Mata’s vet. Now everything’s OK.
Linda went above and beyond
to help strangers. Not too many
people would even think to stop
and help a huge German shepherd,
much less be late for work to make
sure he was taken care of.
I thank Linda, but I give God the
glory for his protection not only
for Mata’s safety but from protecting us all from much grief.
Red Bank is truly a great place
to live.
JEANNA DAVIS
FORD TOOK CONTROL
OF WORKERS’ WAGES
Did you know Henry Ford willingly raised his workers’ wages
from their usual two to three bucks
a day to five?
You surely don’t believe producers of goods and services to
exclusive clients and/or customers — such as doctors, lawyers,
Indian chiefs, butchers, bakers,
candlestick makers and professionals, rather than our general
public‚ have anything to do with
slowing today’s economy; now do
you?
LES DEWALD
AMERICANS SHOULD NOT
BE FORCED TO JOIN UNION
Americans should always have
the right to join the labor union of
their choice.
However, Americans must
never be forced to join a union as
a condition of holding their job.
JOHN M. DAVIES
...
. timesfreepress.com
OPINION
• • • Tuesday, May 7, 2013 • B7
Established 1936
Roy McDonald
Founder & Publisher, 1936-1990
Frank McDonald
President & Chairman, 1969-2000
Lee Anderson
Editor, 1958-2012; Publisher, 1990-1999
Drew Johnson
Editor
COMMENTARY
NUCLEAR POWER
Energy source
provides for
power needs
By Ronald Eytchison
With the “war on terror” dominating the news, few Americans are
likely to recall that 60 years ago
President Dwight
Eisenhower laid
the foundation for
the peaceful use of
nuclear energy in an
historic address to the
UN General Assembly. His speech, delivered at the height
of the Cold War in
1953, helped change
the course of world
Ronald
events.
Eytchison
After all these
years, it is important to remember
that nearly six decades of experience with nuclear energy has not
lessened the wisdom of Eisenhower’s proposal to mount a program
of international pooling of nuclear
technology and fissionable materials
for “the benefit of mankind.”
His “Atoms for Peace” vision
clearly resounds today. Nuclear
medicine has become indispensable
to health care, playing a key role in
the diagnosis and treatment of diseases. A great achievement.
Radiation is widely used in
modern industry, as, for example,
in the inspection of metal parts
in jet engines. Nuclear generators
supply the power for virtually all
space missions. And nuclear energy has become a source of electricity for more than a billion people
globally.
Eisenhower’s address foreshadowed the production of nuclear-generated electricity with fuel derived
from nuclear weapons stockpiles in
the United States and Russia. Under
a disarmament agreement, nearly
500 metric tons of highly enriched
uranium from former Soviet warheads have been down-blended into
low-enriched uranium currently
used at U.S. nuclear plants to supply power for American homes and
businesses. The “megatons to megawatts” program has been a great
success.
Now, with the growing concern
for global climate change, the case
for expanding the use of nuclear
energy has never been greater.
Nuclear energy is among the cleanest sources of “base-load” electricity, a great help in protecting public
health and the environment.
James Hansen, a climatologist
who headed NASA’s Goddard Institute for many years and who was
the first atmospheric scientist to
warn Congress about the danger
of global warming in 1988, recently
completed a study on the importance of nuclear energy in protecting our planet. Hansen determined
that over the years global nuclear
energy has prevented more than 1.8
million deaths from air pollution
and 64 billion tons of greenhousegas emissions that would have
resulted from the burning of fossil
fuels. By 2050, nuclear energy could
prevent as many as 7 million deaths
and avoid 240 billion tons of greenhouse emissions, he said. His study,
which appears in the journal Environmental Science and Technology,
confirms nuclear energy’s benefits
globally.
Around the world, 71 nuclear
plants are being built, and 150 plants
are planned and another 340 are
proposed. That’s in addition to the
437 operating nuclear plants, including the U.S. fleet of 104 plants. Here
in the Southeast, five new reactors
are under construction — two in
Georgia, two in South Carolina and
the Watts Bar reactor in Tennessee.
If any one energy source will be
vital in the years ahead, it is nuclear
power. The fact that even OPEC
countries like Saudi Arabia, United
Arab Emirates and Indonesia plan to
build nuclear plants should tell us
something.
Retired Vice Adm. Ronald Eytchison, had 45 years’ experience in Navy
nuclear power and the commercial
nuclear power and nuclear fuels
industries.
Arrested
development
EDITORIAL
GEORGIA STATE PARKS
GET NEW LEASE ON LIFE
G
eorgia is outsourcing the management of five state parks with
upscale lodges and golf courses to a
private company — and it could be
the best news in decades for visitors and
supporters of Georgia’s parks.
Despite what a few confused nature-lovers believe, the parks aren’t being sold off
and turned into condos, cul-de-sacs and
Costcos. They are still protected property, preserved forever for all to use and
enjoy.
The outsourcing plan simply allows a
private company to manage the operations
of a few of the state’s less successful parks
in order to correct flaws and increase efficiency, which will result in more visitors
and a better guest experience.
Coral Hospitality, the Florida-based
hotel and resort management company
that state officials hired to manage the
parks, will largely focus on improving state
park functions and amenities that, frankly,
the government should have never been
providing in the first place.
Georgia bureaucrats have a history of
operating golf courses, restaurants and
lodging operations at state parks that
drown in red ink, losing mounds of tax
dollars every year. Coral Hospitality, on
the other hand, has a proven track record
of turning flagging hotels, resorts and golf
clubs into successful facilities. They also
have a strong incentive to improve the
services at the state parks they manage:
the company gets paid based on the money
the parks generate — a total of just 3.25
percent of gross revenues.
Coral took over management of the visitor lodges at Amicalola Falls State Park
in Dawsonville and Unicoi State Park in
White County last December. Already,
improvements are clear. Bill Donohue,
executive director of the North Georgia
Mountains Authority, the arm of state government responsible for contracting with
Coral to operate the parks, told Times Free
Press reporter Tim Omarzu that the dining
room at the lodge at Amicalola Falls State
Park was a longtime money pit. After Coral
took the facility over and made changes
such as replacing a nightly buffet with an
a la carte menu, the dining room began to
turn a profit.
The state’s agreement with Coral has
produced other benefits, as well. For example, the Georgia Department of Natural
Resources planned to close the Unicoi
State Park lodge for long-term renovations.
Coral, however, has devised a plan for
upgrading guest rooms while keeping the
lodges open, according to Leonard Gilroy
of the Reason Foundation.
When Coral assumed management
duties at Amicalola Falls and Unicoi, the
company retained 98 percent of the parks’
existing employees. That’s good news for
workers at Ocmulgee, Georgia Veterans
Memorial and George T. Bagby state parks,
the other three parks affected by the outsourcing plan.
Public-private partnerships like the one
between the state parks and Coral Hospitality are nothing new. The U.S. Forest Service has benefited from a similar
approach for more than 25 years. By contracting operations for services such as
campgrounds and entrance fee collections
to a private recreation management company, the Forest Service has retained full
ownership of land, while pocketing about
90 percent of the money collected by the
private operators and providing visitors
with clean, well-maintained recreation
areas at no cost to taxpayers, according to
Gilroy. The Tennessee Valley Authority
and a number of national and state parks
employ similar arrangements with great
success.
Lovers of Georgia’s state parks should
be thrilled that five previously failing state
parks are getting a new lease on life. Not
only are the parks now in the hands of
professionals who know how to operate
them successfully, the revenues the parks
will now generate will go toward improving state parks. That means the decision
to outsource the operations of a few parks
will benefit Georgia’s state parks and their
visitors for years to come.
By Paul Jacob
Former Atlanta schools superintendent Beverly Hall and 34 other
school employees, including highlevel administrators, principals and
teachers, were recently booked in
Atlanta’s Fulton County Jail after
being indicted on 65 criminal counts.
The charges included racketeering,
theft, conspiracy, making false statements and witness tampering.
Just four years ago, Hall was
the National Superintendent of the
Year. Now, she faces the possibility of 45 years in prison for having
allegedly snagged almost $600,000
in bonus income for higher test
scores achieved through fraudulently
changing students’ test answers.
And this, the nation’s largest-ever
cheating scandal, may prove only the
highest shard of a proverbial large
floating mass of frozen water.
But instead of condemnation,
some of the nation’s leading “education experts” seem bent on excusing
the cheaters.
“What we do know,” Washington
Post education writer Valerie Strauss
pointed out, “is that these cheating
scandals have been a result of testobsessed school reform.”
Dr. Christopher Emdin of Columbia University Teachers College
reminded readers at the end of a
recent Huffington Post column, “I
am not saying that educators and
school officials who cheat on tests or
conspire to cover up cheating should
not be reprimanded.”
Just “reprimanded”?
Award-winning teacher Steven Lin
explained that “environments such
as that alleged in Atlanta present the
classic sociological phenomenon of
‘diffusion of responsibility,’ along
with a host of other flaws regarding the compartmentalization of job
descriptions within bureaucracies.”
You mean they suffer from “peer
pressure”?
Nevertheless, I still think it’s more
than sorta bad to cheat.
Paul Jacob is president of the Liberty Initiative Fund. His “Common
Sense with Paul Jacob” column is
available at: www.ThisIsCommon
Sense.com.
The stakes of being too late
WASHINGTON — On Syria,
President Obama has sometimes
seemed isolated within his own
administration.
As the atrocities have escalated — from
the shelling of
neighborhoods,
to airstrikes on
bread lines, to
the use of Scud
missiles against
Michael
civilians, to the
Gerson
l i ke ly i n c re mental introduction of chemical
weapons — the Assad regime’s
strategy has become alarmingly
clear. Unable to retake rebel-held
areas, it seeks to depopulate them,
producing mass casualties, refugee
flows and sectarian conflict. During the last two years, it has been
reported that many of Obama’s top
foreign policy advisers, including
David Petraeus, Hillary Clinton,
Leon Panetta and Ben Rhodes,
have urged more robust action to
arrest Syria’s downward spiral.
But Obama has firmly resisted
such advice, preferring instead to
gradually (and, so far, ineffectively) increase training and nonlethal
support for the rebels. During his
recent news conference, he again
urged patience. Why has the president been so resolutely inactive
on Syria?
To start with the obvious:
Obama was re-elected on the
promise of winding down difficult
foreign commitments, not making
them. Both his presidential campaigns assumed and encouraged
American war weariness. And
any action in Syria, no matter how
limited, carries heavy historical
baggage: Another confrontation
with a Baathist dictator concerning
weapons of mass destruction?
All this can be chalked up to
Iraq War Syndrome. But Obama
seems to have a larger strategy in
staying on the sidelines. Insofar
as there is an Obama doctrine, it
is this: America has overinvested
resources and attention in thankless Middle Eastern conflicts and
underinvested in other places,
particularly Asia. Obama’s goal
is to rebalance the portfolio. And
Syria doesn’t fit. According to Vali
Nasr of the Brookings Institution,
“Syria challenges a central aim of
Obama’s foreign policy: shrinking
the U.S. footprint in the Middle
East and downplaying the region’s
importance to global politics.”
If true, Obama’s tactical timidity
is also the expression of a kind of
strategic boldness. He is challenging the post-World War II foreign
policy consensus on the geopolitical priority of the Middle East.
Presidents of both parties have
accepted a major U.S. role in ensuring regional stability, allowing the
flow of resources, defending Israel,
and, more recently, countering the
rise of extremism. Obama’s pivot
to other priorities may help explain
his generally passive reaction to
the Iranian Green Revolution in
2009, to the Arab Spring and to
events in Syria.
Syria has been a test of the
Obama Doctrine, and it hasn’t
fared well. It is difficult to remember now, but the initial stages of
the Syrian uprising were mostly
peaceful protests along the lines
of Tunisia or Egypt. A sharp diplomatic and economic shove might
have convinced elements of the
regime to give up on the Assad
family. Early military support for
responsible rebels might have preempted sectarian conflict and marginalized the jihadists.
But having missed the moment
— through indecision or ideology
or indecision reinforced by ideology — Obama is left to limit the
damage. His own foreign policy
goals — improving the image of
America in the Islamic world,
focusing on Israeli-Palestinian
peace, pivoting to Asia — have
been badly undermined. And the
moral and strategic consequences
are much broader. Obama’s inaction has helped create an outcome
with a familiar historical ring: a
civil war at the heart of the Middle East that destabilizes friendly
governments, empowers jihadists,
increases sectarian tensions across
the region and allows Iran broader
opportunities for mischief. Call it
the revenge of the postwar consensus.
America should not accept the
refounding of the Assad regime on
a vast pile of skulls. And America
should not accept the disintegration of Syria into enclaves, some of
them sheltering al-Qaeda affiliates.
So Obama has little choice but to
help the rebels to win, while helping the right rebels to win out in
a post-Assad power struggle. But
delay has made this task much
more difficult. Civil wars, over
time, tend to favor the ruthless
and radical. As options for arming
the rebels narrow — for fear of
weapons falling into the hands of
future enemies — the pressure for
direct American action increases.
Obama’s earlier passivity now
pushes him toward the very policies he wanted most to avoid.
Former British Prime Minister
Tony Blair recently said: “If you
intervene, it can be very tough.
If you don’t intervene, it can also
be very tough.” But if you are
compelled to intervene late, after
squandering some of your best
options, it may be toughest of all.
Washington Post Writers Group
BIBLE WISDOM
Matt 5:16: In the same way, let
your light shine before men, that
they may see your good deeds
and praise your Father in heaven.
...
.
FULL ROOF REPLACEMENT
C
BUSINESS
• • • Tuesday, May 7, 2013
(with coupon)
timesfreepress.com/business
DOW
14,968.89
NASDAQ
3,392.97
S&P 500
1,617.50
6-MO
T-BILLS
.08%
30-YR
T-BONDS
2.98%
CRUDE
OIL
$96.16
GOLD
$1,468.10
q
p
p
q
p
p
p
+14.34
+3.08
-.03
+.03
MORTGAGE SETTLEMENT: Banks accused of breaking deals, C4
Pfizer soon to offer the little blue pill online
By Linda A. Johnson
The Associated Press
-5.07
FREE Consultation • 423-321-8470
q
q
TVA SUNSHINE: Inspector General says TVA hiring didn’t violate Sunshine Law, C2
STOCK
WATCH
5% OR UP TO
$
500 OFF
TRENTON, N.J. — Men
who are bashful about needing help in the bedroom no
longer have to go to the drugstore to buy that little blue
pill.
In a first for the drug
industry, Pfizer Inc. told The
Associated Press that the
drugmaker will begin selling
its popular erectile dysfunction pill Viagra directly to
patients on its website.
mond-shaped pill on viagra.
com, but they no longer have
to face a pharmacist to get it
filled. And for those who are
bothered by Viagra’s steep
$25-a-pill price, Pfizer is
offering three free pills with
the first order and 30 percent
The Associated Press
off the second one.
Pfizer Inc. announced
Pfizer’s bold move blows
Monday that it will sell
up the drug industry’s distriViagra on its website.
bution model. Drugmakers
don’t sell medicines directly
Men still will need a pre- to patients. Instead, they sell
scription to buy the blue, dia- in bulk to wholesalers, who
then distribute the drugs to
pharmacies, hospitals and
doctors’ offices.
But the world’s secondlargest drugmaker is trying
a new strategy to tackle a
problem that plagues the
industry. Unscrupulous
online pharmacies increasingly offer patients counterfeit versions of Viagra and
other brand-name drugs for
up to 95 percent off with no
prescription needed. Patients
don’t realize the drugs are
fake or that legitimate pharmacies require a prescription.
Other major drugmakers likely will watch Pfizer’s
move closely. If it works,
drugmakers could begin
selling other medicines that
are rampantly counterfeited
and sold online, particularly
treatments for non-urgent
conditions seen as embarrassing. Think: diet drugs,
medicines for baldness and
See VIAGRA, Page C3
+.55
+3.80
BUSINESS
BRIEFING
CBL adds stores
at Atlanta center
Chattanooga-based
CBL & Associates Properties Inc. has named 38
more stores for its new
outlet center outside
Atlanta that’s slated to
open this summer. The
list of stores for the Outlet Shoppes at Atlanta
now totals 89 with more
to be announced soon,
according to the developer.
Among the new stores
are American Eagle,
Chico’s, Coach, Fossil
and Johnston & Murphy.
Michael Lebovitz,
executive vice president
of development for CBL,
said the Woodstock, Ga.,
center will open July
18 at more than 95 percent leased. The Outlet
Shoppes at Atlanta is a
joint venture of CBL &
Associates Properties,
Inc. and Horizon Group
Properties, Inc.
Staff File Photo by Tim Barber
Solar panels, like these atop Chattanooga Bakery Co., could soon be limited to those that pay for them in full. The Tennessee Valley Authority may cut off subsidies for future power produced from such installation for the remaining days of 2013.
BOOM
BUST?
or
Hackers hit
Mapco cards
Mapco says some of
its customers’ credit card
information could be at
risk after hackers used
malware to access payment card processing systems over the past couple
of months.
Mapco is notifying
customers who might be
affected.
Customers with questions may call a help line
at 877-297-2081.
TVA cap on solar subsidies
could hurt growing industry
By Dave Flessner
Staff Writer
Chattanooga Bakery Co. may have
picked a lunar name for its signature
Moonpie, but the local bakery is turning to the sun this year to help make
its world famous snack.
Atop the roof of the company’s
Moccasin Bend bakery, 195 polycrystalline solar panels are turning the
energy of the sun into electricity to
help power the plant that produces
its marshmallow treats. Aided by federal and utility credits, Chattanooga
Bakery and more than a dozen other
Chattanooga plants and offices are
using rooftop solar panels to help cut
their energy bills.
“This installation will help us
hedge against rising energy rates, lowering our operating costs for the next
20 years,” Chattanooga Bakery Vice
President John Campbell said about
SOLAR SUBSIDIES
■ 30 percent federal tax credit on
investments
■ 9 cents per kilowatthour premium
price by TVA
the 50 kilowatt system installed at his
plant in January.
But renewable power enthusiasts
worry that a new cap by the Tennessee Valley Authority on subsidies for
such solar pholtaic power generation
might create a type of solar eclipse
and quickly turn the solar energy
boom across the region into a bust.
“The solar energy industry is
growing, getting more efficient and
becoming an important part of the
economy, but we’re going to cut it off
before we’re even half way through
See SOLAR, Page C3
Staff Reports
BIGFIVE
SMALLBUSINESS
JC’s Family BBQ owners set sights on Harrison restaurant’s future Best jobs
■ Name: JC’s Family BBQ
■ Owners: Jim and Jean
Johnson
■ Location: 9070 Highway
58, Harrison
■ Opened: October 2012
■ Service: From homemade
cobblers to country fried
steak and okra, JC’s Family
BBQ serves up a range of
lunch and dinner options. Jim
and Jean dish out about 250
meals on a Friday night and
have seating for just over
130 people. The restaurant
also does catering and to-go
orders. “In my opinion, my
ribs will make you want to
slap your mama,” Jim said.
■ Prices: $5 to $12 a meal
■ Staff: 15
■ How it got started: Jean
has been in the restaurant
business for decades and
spent nine years working at
Two Pigs Barbecue. After
Two Pigs closed, Jean and
Jim leased the building,
renovated it and reopened
as JC’s Family BBQ. Jean
handles the cooking and
kitchen staff, while Jim
deals with the vendors and
finances.
■ Initial investment:
$30,000
■ Two-year goal: Jim and
Jean have a two-year lease
on the building. The pair
hopes to buy it when that
lease runs out. To do that,
they need to increase their
customer base. “If our growth
continues to trend the way
it’s been in the first quarter
— I’ve seen consistent
growth every week — if we
can maintain our growth, I
think we’ll certainly be on
track,” Jim said.
■ Yankee transplants:
Jim and Jean moved to
Tennessee in 1988 from
New Jersey. “We may be
from the North,” Jim said,
“but I like to tell people that
we’re dug in like a couple
ticks on a coon hound. And
you’d never hear a Yankee
say that.”
■ Phone number: 423485-3481
— Compiled by Shelly Bradbury,
who may be reached at 757-6525
or at [email protected]
com.
Actuary — Median
1
salary of $87,650.
Projected job growth of 27
percent by 2020.
Biomedical engineer
— Median salary of
$81,540. Projected job
growth of 62 percent.
Software engineer
— Median salary of
$90,530. Projected job
growth of 30 percent.
Audiologist — Median
salary of $66,660.
Projected job growth of 37
percent.
Financial planner
— Median salary of
$64,750. Projected job
growth of 32 percent.
2
3
4
5
Staff Photo by Doug Strickland
Jim Johnson and his wife, Jean, are co-owners of JC’s
Family BBQ in Harrison.
Source: Careercast.com, data from
the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics
Commercial Space Available
in the Heart of Signal Mountain
• Ideal for Retail and O∞ce Space •
• Excellent Visibility •
Signal Plaza
Call (423) 886-1661 for more information.
■ To contact Business • Phone: 423-757-6340 • Fax: 423-668-5085 • Email: [email protected]
35645816
.
timesfreepress.com ...
C2 • Tuesday, May 7, 2013 • • •
THE MARKETS
NYSE
NASDAQ
AMEX
1,640
S&P 500
3,400
1,600
Close: 1,617.50
Change: 3.08 (0.2%)
3,320
1,560
MARKET DIARY
MARKET DIARY
MARKET DIARY
Name
Advanced
Declined
Unchanged
Total issues
New Highs
New Lows
Yest.
1818
1206
142
3166
308
10
Prev.
2223
835
114
3172
487
10
Name
Advanced
Declined
Unchanged
Total issues
New Highs
New Lows
Yest.
1463
984
111
2558
183
14
Prev.
1825
639
107
2571
280
21
Name
Advanced
Declined
Unchanged
Total issues
New Highs
New Lows
Prev.
245
158
37
440
21
4
2,047,966,242
927,473,117
31,857,123
3,007,296,482
Name
MBIA
BiP GCrb
Renren
USMetlIdx
Entravisn
HarmonyG
McClatchy
ActiveNet
Qihoo360
XinyuanRE
Last
14.29
4.96
3.10
25.70
4.43
4.73
2.42
6.05
37.30
5.05
Chg
+4.46
+.77
+.31
+2.38
+.39
+.41
+.21
+.50
+2.90
+.39
%Chg
+45.4
+18.4
+11.1
+10.2
+9.7
+9.5
+9.5
+9.0
+8.4
+8.4
LOSERS
Name
TowerIntl
PSBMetDS
Tredgar
OmegaP
InergyMid
Oi SA C
ProUltPSFn
Oi SA s
BoiseCas n
Lentuo
MOST
853,493,133
564,542,263
55,280,210
1,473,315,606
Advanced
Declined
Unchanged
Total issues
Last
17.80
14.51
25.97
8.78
22.78
2.50
15.50
2.14
29.39
2.27
Chg
-2.26
-1.14
-1.79
-.56
-1.37
-.15
-.88
-.12
-1.45
-.11
%Chg
-11.3
-7.3
-6.4
-6.0
-5.7
-5.7
-5.4
-5.3
-4.7
-4.6
Name
YRC Wwde
ArkBest
FstSecGrp
AmbacF wt
YY Inc n
Alco Strs
JamesRiv
ChHousLd
ICAD rs
PHI nv
Last
15.44
14.73
5.24
12.01
21.98
9.44
2.32
2.45
6.05
33.56
Chg
+4.49
+4.18
+1.18
+2.35
+3.68
+1.54
+.36
+.37
+.83
+4.44
%Chg
+41.0
+39.6
+29.1
+24.3
+20.1
+19.5
+18.4
+17.8
+15.9
+15.2
Name
ContMatls
GranTrra g
Univ Insur
RELM
AvalonHld
SparkNet
AdcareHlt
SL Ind
CPI Aero
CT Ptrs
Vol (00)
257,708,100
67,030,600
62,649,800
53,516,700
50,645,300
32,908,700
30,233,500
28,674,000
28,307,600
26,602,600
Last
12.88
14.29
161.78
14.09
3.61
28.72
43.58
47.48
22.58
3.40
Chg
+.64
+4.46
+.41
+.26
+.01
-.24
+.06
+.51
+.01
+.10
Last
18.00
6.15
6.77
2.74
3.60
7.07
5.60
20.50
9.55
3.30
Chg
+1.74
+.50
+.48
+.18
+.21
+.35
+.27
+1.00
+.43
+.15
%Chg
+10.7
+8.8
+7.6
+7.0
+6.2
+5.2
+5.1
+5.1
+4.7
+4.6
LOSERS
Name
ChinaHGS
Spherix rs
Cyclacel pf
HimaxTch
VisChina rs
GeospacT s
CmstkHldg
SCG FnAcq
USA Tc pf
NymoxPh
MOST
31,853,789
31,053,708
4,865,550
67,773,047
GAINERS
LOSERS
ACTIVE
Name
BkofAm
MBIA
S&P500ETF
FordM
AMD
Pfizer
iShEMkts
Citigroup
GenElec
NokiaCp
Advanced
Declined
Unchanged
Total issues
GAINERS
GAINERS
HIGH
3,400
Dow Industrials
14988.87
Dow Transportation 6314.00
Dow Utilities
529.30
NYSE Composite
9360.21
Amex Market Value 2439.71
Nasdaq Composite 3396.21
S&P 500
1619.77
S&P MidCap
1171.84
Wilshire 5000
17092.86
Russell 2000
960.22
3,200
1,520
1,440
3,000
1,360
N
D
J
F
M
2,800
A
N
D
J
F
M
A
VOLUME
VOLUME
Advanced
Declined
Unchanged
Total issues
10 DAYS
1,600
1,280
VOLUME
Stock market indexes
Close: 3,392.97
Change: 14.34 (0.4%)
3,240
10 DAYS
1,680
Yest.
211
183
50
444
16
7
Nasdaq composite
Last
10.56
8.10
6.80
6.00
2.58
83.92
2.26
15.43
19.12
4.96
Chg
-1.57
-1.17
-.90
-.61
-.26
-8.25
-.22
-1.42
-1.72
-.42
%Chg
-12.9
-12.6
-11.7
-9.2
-9.2
-9.0
-8.9
-8.4
-8.3
-7.8
Name
AskanoG g
SilvrCrst g
TanzRy g
Ever-Glory
Aurizon g
Alteva
Acquity
InvCapHld
PacGE pfB
Protalix
MOST
ACTIVE
Name
SiriusXM
Facebook n
Microsoft
BMC Sft
Cisco
Groupon
Intel
RschMotn
MicronT
PwShs QQQ
Vol (00)
49451300
42754000
40674800
33804800
31015500
30119200
30052600
23031000
20876700
18193000
Last
3.39
27.57
33.75
45.42
20.81
5.46
23.91
15.57
9.76
72.40
Chg
+.04
-.74
+.26
Chg
-.13
-.11
-.15
-.09
-.14
-.35
-.21
-.12
-.92
-.14
%Chg
-5.1
-5.0
-5.0
-4.1
-3.7
-3.4
-3.2
-3.2
-3.2
-2.5
ACTIVE
Name
NA Pall g
CheniereEn
GranTrra g
Rentech
NovaGld g
GoldStr g
NwGold g
AlldNevG
NthnO&G
SprottRL g
-.02
-.38
-.05
-.06
+.13
+.28
Last
2.40
2.07
2.83
2.11
3.62
10.05
6.26
3.61
27.80
5.38
Vol (00)
10369900
4041200
2644700
2519300
2332000
2236100
1771600
1193900
1146100
1061400
Last
1.16
29.54
6.15
2.33
2.40
1.03
7.59
9.77
13.11
1.46
Chg
-.20
+.99
+.50
+.01
-.05
-.05
+.03
-.21
+.08
+.06
Commodities
Commodity Exchange Unit
Oats
CBOT 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel
Cocoa
ICE 10 metric tons- $ per ton
Coffee
ICE 37,500 lbs.- cents per lb.
Sugar
ICE 112,000 lbs.- cents per lb.
Cotton
ICE 50,000 lbs.- cents per lb.
Wheat
CBOT 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel
Rough rice
CBOT 2,000 CWT- dollars per CWT
Heating oil
NYMX 42,000 gal, cents per gal
Light sweet crude
NYMX 1,000 bbl.- dollars per bbl.
Gas blend
NYMX 42,000 gallons- dollars per gallon
CATTLE
40,000 lbs.- cents per lb.
Jun 13
122.30 122.72
Aug 13
122.40 122.77
Oct 13
125.60 125.85
Frisales 70756
Friopen int 324609 up+908.00
CORN
5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel
May 13
689
689
Jul 13
650.50 652
Sep 13
567
567
Dec 13
537.75 542.75
Frisales 179883
Friopen int 1139837 off-2,920.00
FEEDER CATTLE
50,000 lbs.- cents per lb.
May 13
139.25 139.32
Aug 13
148.20 148.70
Sep 13
149.00 150.05
Frisales 7062
Friopen int 34563 off-678.00
HOGS-Lean
40,000 lbs.- cents per lb.
May 13
91.42
91.47
Jun 13
92.10
92.67
Jul 13
92.25
92.45
Aug 13
91.47
91.52
Frisales 34819
Friopen int 234287 off-2,187.00
121.00
121.05
124.25
121.30
121.40
124.52
-.52
-.57
-.78
675.50
633.25
555
532.25
678.75
636.50
559.75
538.25
-20.75
-24.75
-19.50
-15.25
138.15
146.92
148.97
90.90
91.15
91.02
90.05
138.40
147.45
149.00
91.05
91.32
91.25
90.05
-.37
-.05
-.35
-.35
-.85
-1.05
-1.45
Month Open Int. Vol. Settle Chg.
May 13
49
2 412.50
-9
May 13
24
2390
-14
May 13
155
141.35 +1.05
Jul 13
1592
19.63 +.38
May 13
89
15 85.31 +.59
May 13
1463 2245
693 -18.25
May 13
19
48 15.315 +.115
Jun 13
103647 41477 292.02 +3.58
Jun 13
276665 256848 96.16 +.55
Jun 13
93731 49006 2.8657 +.0403
SOYBEAN MEAL
100 tons- dollars per ton
May 13
417.50 421.40
Jul 13
405.00 409.20
Aug 13
385.60 388.30
Sep 13
363.00 364.40
Oct 13
344.60 344.80
Dec 13
342.50 343.00
Frisales 60323
Friopen int 254880 up+3,360.00
SOYBEAN OIL
60,000 lbs- cents per lb
May 13
49.37
49.37
Jul 13
49.16
49.73
Aug 13
48.81
49.45
Sep 13
48.61
49.10
Oct 13
48.42
48.81
Dec 13
48.01
48.58
Frisales 76348
Friopen int 341199 off-2,517.00
SOYBEANS
5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel
May 13
1450.25 1469
Jul 13
1382.75 1395
Aug 13
1329.25 1340.75
Sep 13
1260.50 1267.25
Nov 13
1215
1223
Jan 14
1221.25 1230.75
Frisales 120206
Friopen int 541640 up+4,727.00
412.60
400.20
380.40
358.30
340.30
338.20
413.10
401.20
381.40
359.00
340.50
338.60
-4.70
-5.30
-5.80
-5.40
-4.70
-4.70
48.69
48.61
48.38
48.16
47.75
47.50
48.69
48.76
48.54
48.31
47.99
47.76
-.47
-.51
-.47
-.46
-.43
-.42
1442
1366.25
1314
1247.75
1204
1212.50
NAME
TICKER
LAST
A-B-C
AAR
ABB Ltd
ADT Cp n
AES Corp
AFLAC
AGCO
AGL Res
AK Steel
AT&T Inc
AbtLab s
AbbVie n
Accenture
Actuant
AdamsEx
AdvAuto
AMD
Aegon
Aetna
Agilent
Agnico g
AirProd
AlcatelLuc
Alcoa
AlliBGlbHi
AlliBInco
AlliBern
AlliantEgy
Allstate
AlphaNRs
AlpGPPrp
Altria
AMCOL
Ameren
AMovilL
AmAxle
AEagleOut
AEP
AmExp
AmIntlGrp
Amerigas
Ametek s
Anadarko
Annaly
AquaAm
Arbitron
ArcelorMit
ArchCoal
ArchDan
ArlingAst
ArmourRsd
AssuredG
AstraZen
AtlPwr g
AtlasPpln
ATMOS
AutoZone
Avon
B&G Foods
BB&T Cp
BHP BillLt
BHPBil plc
BP PLC
BP Pru
BabCPtInv
BakrHu
BcoBrad pf
BcoSantSA
BcoSBrasil
BkofAm
BkNYMel
BariPVix rs
Bard
BarrickG
Baxter
Beam Inc
BectDck
BerkHa A
+2086.00
BerkH B
BestBuy
Blackstone
Boeing
Boise Inc
BostonSci
BoydGm
Braskem
Brinker
BrMySq
BrwnBrn
CBL Asc
CBRE GRE
CBS B
CGG Verit
CLECO
CMS Eng
CNOOC
CSX
CVS Care
CYS Invest
Calpine
CdnNRs gs
CapOne
CapitlSrce
CapsteadM
CardnlHlth
CareFusion
Caterpillar
CedarF
Cemex
CenterPnt
CntryLink
ChesEng
Chevron
ChicB&I
Chicos
Chimera
ChinaUni
Chubb
Cigna
Citigroup
AIR
18.56
ABB
22.70
ADT
44.36
AES
13.83
AFL
55.61
AGCO 54.48
GAS
43.75
AKS
3.43
T
37.09
ABT
35.85
ABBV
44.59
ACN
78.82
ATU
31.73
ADX
12.02
AAP
84.91
AMD
3.61
AEG
6.84
AET
58.69
A
42.00
AEM
31.22
APD
89.38
ALU
1.31
AA
8.69
AWF
16.57
ACG
8.32
AB
24.88
LNT
52.52
ALL
49.10
ANR
7.20
AWP
8.76
MO
36.08
ACO
31.00
AEE
36.05
AMX
21.62
AXL
15.42
AEO
19.17
AEP
50.46
AXP
70.06
AIG
45.48
APU
46.40
AME
40.85
APC
87.62
NLY
15.05
WTR
31.53
ARB
46.75
MT
12.79
ACI
5.21
ADM
33.88
AI
27.26
ARR
6.32
AGO
22.18
AZN
51.62
AT
4.65
APL
36.30
ATO
44.40
AZO
413.49
AVP
23.15
BGS
30.16
BBT
31.16
BHP
68.11
BBL
58.21
BP
43.97
BPT
81.60
MPV
14.53
BHI
46.92
BBD
16.24
SAN
7.28
BSBR
7.12
BAC
12.88
BK
28.20
VXX
18.38
BCR
101.17
ABX
20.35
BAX
70.31
BEAM
66.74
BDX
96.91
BRK/A 164990.00
BRK/B
BBY
BX
BA
BZ
BSX
BYD
BAK
EAT
BMY
BRO
CBL
IGR
CBS
CGG
CNL
CMS
CEO
CSX
CVS
CYS
CPN
CNQ
COF
CSE
CMO
CAH
CFN
CAT
FUN
CX
CNP
CTL
CHK
CVX
CBI
CHS
CIM
CHU
CB
CI
C
110.00
26.34
22.49
94.19
7.69
7.74
12.98
17.12
39.79
40.02
31.61
25.13
10.01
47.17
24.51
47.80
28.97
186.87
25.23
57.94
11.91
21.10
29.31
59.05
9.19
12.87
45.96
34.30
87.59
42.27
11.92
24.18
37.05
19.44
123.25
56.30
18.20
3.29
14.44
88.61
67.09
47.48
CHG NAME
ClearEnFd
CliffsNRs
-.01 Clorox
+.04 CloudPeak
+.86 Coach
+.01 CocaCola s
+.25
+.29 CocaCE
-.14 Coeur
-.05 ColgPal
-.25 CmtyBkSy
-.95 CompDivHd
-.09 ComstkRs
-.68 ConocoPhil
+.30 ConEd
+.06 ConstellA
+.35 Cnvrgys
+.01 Corning
+.05 CorrectnCp
-.31 CoventryH
+.45 Covidien
-.29 Crane
-.42 CSVelIVSt
-.02 CSVS2xVx rs
+.07 CrosTim
Cryolife
-.03 Culp Inc
+.47 Cummins
-.71 Cytec
+.41
+.07
+.02 DCT Indl
-.43 DR Horton
-.14 DTE
-.50 Darden
-.23 DeanFds
+.60 Deere
+.16 Delhaize
-.62 DelphiAuto
-.17 DeltaAir
+.96 DenburyR
+.79 DevonE
-.02 DiaOffs
+1.02 Dillards
-.07 DxFinBr rs
-.40 DxSCBr rs
DxGldBll rs
+.12 DxFnBull s
+.13 DxSCBull s
-.32 Discover
+.38 Disney
-.04 Div&Inc rs
+1.35 DoleFood
-.41 DollarGen
-.07 DomRescs
+.41 DmRsBW
-.09 Dover
+2.38 DowChm
-.09 DuPont
-.22 DukeEn rs
+.22 DukeRlty
+.52 DynexCap
+.61 E-CDang
+.01 EMC Cp
+.47 EOG Res
+.16 EastChem
+.34 Eaton
-.30 EdwLfSci
-.01 Elan
-.02 EldorGld g
+.64 EmersonEl
-.18 EnbrdgEPt
-.31 Energen
-.40 Energizer
+.35 EngyTsfr
+.06 Enerpls g
+.11 Enersis
-.52 Ennis Inc
Entergy
EntPrPt
+1.36 EnzoBio
-.18 EqualEn g
+.74 EscoTech
+.45 ExcelTrst
-.01 ExcoRes
+.05 Exelon
+.07 ExxonMbl
-.15 FBL Fn
+.46 FairchldS
-.18 FamilyDlr
+.16 FedExCp
+1.08 Ferrellgs
FidlNFin
-.23 FstHorizon
+.07 FirstEngy
-.70 Fluor
-.42 FordM
+.77 ForestOil
+.42 FBHmSec
-.70 FrkUnv
-.10 FMCG
-.11 FresenM s
-.02 Frontline
+.53 FullerHB
+.04
+.01
-.43 GabelliET
+.16 GabHlthW
+.61 GabUtil
+.29 Gap
+.06 GnCable
-.16 GenDynam
-.09 GenElec
+.19 GenMills
-.24 GenMotors
+1.08 Gensco
-.18 GenuPrt
+.01 Genworth
-.06 Gerdau
+.49 GlaxoSKln
-.04 GolLinhas
+.51 Goldcrp g
TICKER LAST CHG
CEM
27.74 +.04
CLF
21.01 +1.10
CLX
85.33 -.86
CLD
18.69 -.27
COH
57.33 -.92
KO
42.08 -.16
CCE
37.04 -.18
CDE
15.16 -.11
CL
120.20 -.95
CBU
28.74 +.22
CODI
16.94 +.19
CRK
16.00 +.45
COP
62.22 +.30
ED
62.72 -.94
STZ
50.23 +.02
CVG
17.49 -.08
GLW
14.88 +.01
CXW
37.06 -.01
CVH
49.99 -.23
COV
65.14 +.79
CR
55.78 +.18
XIV
23.53 +.37
TVIX
2.65 -.09
CRT
28.80 -.20
CRY
6.05 +.20
CFI
15.43 -.30
CMI
110.85 +.25
CYT
72.58 +.05
NAME
NextEraEn
NiSource
NikeB s
NokiaCp
Nomura
NordicAm
Nordstrm
NorflkSo
NthnTEn n
NorthropG
NStarRlt
Novartis
NovoNord
Nucor
NustarEn
OGE Engy
OcciPet
Och-Ziff
OfficeDpt
OfficeMax
Oi SA s
Olin
OshkoshCp
D-E-F
DCT
DHI
DTE
DRI
DF
DE
DEG
DLPH
DAL
DNR
DVN
DO
DDS
FAZ
TZA
NUGT
FAS
TNA
DFS
DIS
DNI
DOLE
DG
D
DOM
DOV
DOW
DD
DUK
DRE
DX
DANG
EMC
EOG
EMN
ETN
EW
ELN
EGO
EMR
EEP
EGN
ENR
ETP
ERF
ENI
EBF
ETR
EPD
ENZ
EQU
ESE
EXL
XCO
EXC
XOM
FFG
FCS
FDO
FDX
FGP
FNF
FHN
FE
FLR
F
FST
FBHS
FT
FCX
FMS
FRO
FUL
8.26
26.49
71.46
52.91
18.96
91.13
63.06
46.27
18.06
17.93
58.40
69.81
85.04
36.42
34.62
12.11
61.65
45.33
46.31
65.06
16.05
10.49
53.58
60.47
5.00
71.98
34.01
53.89
72.90
18.23
10.80
4.16
23.29
126.04
68.52
62.07
63.66
11.49
7.38
57.30
28.92
48.81
99.20
47.94
14.22
18.79
15.28
69.13
60.64
2.23
3.72
35.49
15.06
7.27
35.25
90.58
39.61
14.21
62.36
96.23
20.09
25.44
10.71
44.18
60.09
14.09
4.43
40.13
7.69
31.43
34.54
1.80
38.58
+.25
+.04
-1.14
+.09
-.42
+.59
+.04
+.53
+.10
+.05
+.25
-.24
+.70
-.98
-.72
+.17
+1.66
+.95
+.38
+.26
+.14
+.49
+1.09
-.44
-.01
+.82
+.05
-.05
-1.57
+.17
+.14
+.29
-.09
+2.06
+.63
+.42
+.45
-.09
-.13
+.48
+.09
+.29
-.02
+.11
+.11
+.04
+.12
-1.97
-.18
-.03
+.03
-.52
+.15
-.07
-.56
+.56
+.16
+.69
-.01
+1.71
+.14
+.39
+.20
-.81
+.29
+.26
-.03
+.41
-.02
+.30
+.88
-.01
+.24
G-H-I
GAB
GRX
GUT
GPS
BGC
GD
GE
GIS
GM
GCO
GPC
GNW
GGB
GSK
GOL
GG
6.68 +.05
10.32 -.06
7.00 -.04
38.45 -.36
32.46 +.13
75.25 +.01
22.58 +.01
49.59 -1.13
31.82 -.28
62.35 +.37
77.31 +.21
10.65 +.18
7.73 -.01
51.02 -.22
6.12 +.10
28.92 +.02
NAME
GoldmanS
GreenbCos
HCA Hldg
HalconRes
Hallibrtn
Hanesbrds
HarleyD
HarmonyG
HarrisTtr
HartfdFn
HatterasF
HawaiiEl
HltMgmt
HeclaM
Heinz
HelixEn
Herbalife
Hershey
Hertz
Hess
HewlettP
HollyEn s
HollyFront
HomeDp
Honda
HonwllIntl
HostHotls
HovnanE
HugotnR
Humana
Huntsmn
IAMGld g
IFM Invest
INGPrRTr
iShGold
iShBraz
iShJapn
iSMalas
iSTaiwn
iShSilver
iShChina25
iSCorSP500
iShEMkts
iShSPLatA
iShB20 T
iS Eafe
iShR2K
iSSPMatl
TICKER LAST CHG NAME
GS
148.45 +3.08 iShREst
GBX
22.70 +.43 iStar
HCA
41.40 +.40 Imation
HK
6.02 -.28 Inergy
HAL
43.06 +.51 IBM
HBI
49.51 +.42 IntPap
HOG
55.16 +.81 InvenSense
HMY
4.73 +.41 Invesco
HTSI
44.11 +.01 ItauUnibH
HIG
29.03 +.23
HTS
26.62 -.14
HE
27.99 -.08 JPMorgCh
HMA
10.73 -.03 Jabil
HL
3.40 -.04 JacobsEng
HNZ
72.43 -.01 JohnJn
HLX
23.95 +.07 JohnsnCtl
HLF
42.64 +1.64 JnprNtwk
HSY
88.66 -.90 KB Home
HTZ
24.96 +.66 KKR
HES
72.46 -.54 KC Southn
HPQ
20.64 +.01 KA MLP
HEP
36.48 -.55 Kellogg
HFC
51.73 +1.27 KeyEngy
HD
75.26 +1.30 Keycorp
HMC
40.08 -.16 Kimco
HON
76.08 +.84 KindME
HST
18.44 +.09 KindMorg
HOV
5.94 +.21 KindMM
HGT
8.93
Kinross g
HUM
75.49 +1.56 KodiakO g
HUN
18.85 +.20 KrispKrm
IAG
5.50 -.06 Kroger
CTC
2.50 +.10 LabCp
PPR
6.60 -.04 LVSands
IAU
14.28
LeggPlat
EWZ
54.74 -.07 Level3
EWJ
11.73 -.05 LillyEli
EWM
16.64 +.99 LincNat
EWT
14.08 -.03 LinkedIn
SLV
23.18 -.11 LockhdM
FXI
37.89 +.18 LaPac
IVV
162.56 +.43 Lowes
EEM
43.58 +.06 LyonBas A
ILF
43.32 -.23
TLT
120.63 -.30
EFA
62.47 -.08 MBIA
IWM
95.37 +.61 MEMC
MXI
59.33 +.17 MFA Fncl
TICKER LAST CHG NAME
IYR
73.59 +.29 MGF
SFI
12.00 +.18 MGIC
IMN
3.58 +.02 MGM Rsts
NRGY 23.75 +1.74 Macerich
IBM
202.78 -1.73 Macys
IP
45.89 +.27 MagelMPt s
INVN
11.87 +.73 MagHRes
IVZ
32.58 +.12 Manitowoc
ITUB
16.63 -.14 Manulife g
MarathnO
J-K-L
MarathPet
JPM
48.18 +.61 MktVGold
JBL
18.66 +.43 MV OilSvc
JEC
50.90 +.27 MktVRus
JNJ
84.68 -1.07 MarkWest
JCI
35.32 +.43 MStewrt
JNPR
16.93 +.45 Masco
KBH
24.61 +.59 MasterCrd
KKR
21.15 +.38 McDnlds
KSU
109.23 -.92 McMoRn
KYN
36.06 +.59 McEwenM
K
63.44 -.22 MeadJohn
KEG
6.20 -.04 MeadWvco
KEY
10.14 +.11 Medtrnic
KIM
24.69 +.13 Merck
KMP
87.45 +.28 MetLife
KMI
39.07 +.22 MKors
KMR
85.66 -.18 MidAApt
KGC
5.32 -.03 MitsuUFJ
KOG
8.14 +.22 Modine
KKD
13.00 +.37 Mohawk
KR
34.50 -.21 Molycorp
LH
93.55 +.74 Moodys
LVS
56.72 -.39 MorgStan
LEG
32.61 -.23 MurphO
LVLT
22.66 +1.15 NRG Egy
LLY
54.47 -.52 Nabors
LNC
33.89 +.93 NBGre pfA
LNKD 176.92 +1.33 NatFuGas
LMT
102.19 +.18 NtHlthInv
LPX
18.77 +.63 NOilVarco
LOW
40.81 +1.22 Nationstar
LYB
62.65 +1.70 NatResPtrs
NewOriEd
M-N-O
NY CmtyB
MBI
14.29 +4.46 Newcastle
WFR
5.50 +.08 NewellRub
NewmtM
MFA
9.24
TICKER LAST CHG
MGF
6.63
MTG
5.51 +.25
MGM
14.81 +.15
MAC
70.81 +.39
M
46.00 -.23
MMP
51.63 +.10
MHR
2.96 +.06
MTW
18.49 +.62
MFC
15.60 +.13
MRO
33.58 +.05
MPC
80.34 +2.24
GDX
29.73 +.04
OIH
43.94 +.36
RSX
27.13 -.15
MWE
63.13 +2.43
MSO
2.45
MAS
21.59 -.01
MA
547.73 -5.82
MCD
102.07 -.85
MMR
16.68 -.08
MUX
2.15
MJN
80.21 -.51
MWV
34.57 +.07
MDT
47.70 -.02
MRK
44.98 -.69
MET
40.75 +.27
KORS
57.09 -.95
MAA
70.79 +.96
MTU
6.83 -.06
MOD
9.25 -.05
MHK
115.00 -.50
MCP
5.84 +.05
MCO
63.50 +.75
MS
23.28 +.52
MUR
62.60 +1.16
NRG
27.64 +.03
NBR
15.73 +.41
NBGpA
8.94 +.02
NFG
61.95 -.07
NHI
68.58 +1.48
NOV
68.04 +1.16
NSM
37.74 +.89
NRP
22.44 +.19
EDU
18.94 +.28
NYCB
13.29
NCT
11.92 +.11
NWL
26.49 -.08
NEM
33.07 +.07
TICKER LAST CHG NAME
TICKER LAST
NEE
80.60 -1.15 Smucker
SJM
102.55
SNA
87.29
NI
30.18 -.35 SnapOn
SQM
49.38
NKE
63.96 -.59 SocQ&M
SAH
22.73
NOK
3.40 +.10 SonicAut
SO
46.76
NMR
8.16 -.12 SouthnCo
NAT
8.71 +.05 SthnCopper SCCO 33.84
LUV
14.25
JWN
58.09 -.12 SwstAirl
37.06
NSC
77.82 +.01 SwstnEngy SWN
17.25
NTI
25.73 +.30 SpecOpps SPE
30.94
NOC
77.06 +.22 SpectraEn SE
TRK
18.31
NRF
10.13 +.23 SpeedM
S
7.20
NVS
72.95 -.54 SprintNex
12.29
NVO
173.31 +1.13 SprottGold PHYS
XLB
39.93
NUE
44.65 -.27 SP Matls
XLV
47.36
NS
49.39 +.30 SP HlthC
XLP
40.93
OGE
71.99 -.34 SP CnSt
55.72
OXY
89.36 -1.40 SP Consum XLY
XLE
80.01
OZM
11.42 +.36 SP Engy
19.05
ODP
3.95 +.06 SPDR Fncl XLF
XLI
42.40
OMX
11.74 +.15 SP Inds
XLK
31.36
OIBR
2.14 -.12 SP Tech
XLU
40.32
OLN
24.04 +.19 SP Util
SPF
9.29
OSK
39.18 +.37 StdPac
StanBlkDk SWK
77.01
P-Q-R
StarGas
SGU
4.82
23.71
PG&E Cp
PCG
46.50 -.75 Statoil ASA STO
SLT
7.31
PNC
PNC
68.26 +.15 Sterlite
SYK
66.28
PPG
PPG
151.76 -.52 Stryker
SPH
48.82
PPL Corp
PPL
31.98 -.75 SubPpne
SU
30.59
PVR Ptrs
PVR
24.41 -.29 Suncor gs
STP
.61
PeabdyE
BTU
20.86 +.19 Suntech
STI
29.82
Pembina g PBA
32.35 +.04 SunTrst
SPN
27.80
Pengrth g
PGH
5.26 +.12 SupEnrgy
SVU
6.46
PennWst g PWE
9.92 +.48 Supvalu
SNV
2.74
Penney
JCP
16.92 -.34 Synovus
SYY
34.33
Penske
PAG
31.78 +.39 Sysco
17.64
PepcoHold POM
22.04 -.47 T-MoblUS n TMUS
6.07
PepsiCo
PEP
82.50 -.33 TCW Strat TSI
20.96
PetroArg s PZE
4.71 -.04 TD Ameritr AMTD
TE
18.80
PetrbrsA
PBR/A 20.19 +.29 TECO
TJX
49.29
Petrobras
PBR
19.18 +.19 TJX
TSM
19.55
PetRes
PEO
26.25 +.29 TaiwSemi
TLM
11.72
Pfizer
PFE
28.72 -.24 TalismE g
TGT
70.03
PhilipMor
PM
93.11 -1.15 Target
TOO
31.13
Phillips66
PSX
63.87 +1.69 TeekOffsh
TFX
77.76
PiedNG
PNY
33.99 -.21 Teleflex
TEN
40.49
PiedmOfc
PDM
20.81 +.22 Tenneco
TDC
51.96
PimcoStrat RCS
11.82 -.05 Teradata
TEX
31.25
PioNtrl
PXD
133.54 +3.90 Terex
TNH
205.11
PitnyBw
PBI
15.15 -.24 TerraNitro
TSO
57.74
PlainsEx
PXP
46.07 +.54 Tesoro
TEVA
38.31
PlumCrk
PCL
51.35 +.22 TevaPhrm
TXT
26.76
Polaris
PII
85.06 -.32 Textron
3.15
Polypore
PPO
41.21 +.77 ThomCrk g TC
DDD
43.17
Potash
POT
42.52 +.30 3D Sys s
MMM 107.84
PwshDB
DBC
26.45 +.03 3M Co
TWX
60.64
Primerica
PRI
34.73 +.18 TimeWarn
TOL
35.37
ProLogis
PLD
42.86 +.12 TollBros
63.00
PrUShQQQ QID
23.30 -.19 Torchmark TMK
TM
115.03
ProUltSP
SSO
77.78 +.53 Toyota
TRP
48.64
PrUVxST rs UVXY
5.87 -.21 TrCda g
TLP
46.37
ProctGam
PG
77.75 -.44 TrnsMont
RIG
54.32
ProgsvCp
PGR
25.28 +.23 Transocn
TY
18.23
PrUShSP rs SDS
40.95 -.22 TriContl
TrinaSolar
TSL
5.00
PrUShL20 rs TBT
61.64 +.29
TRN
41.83
PUSSP500 rs SPXU
24.74 -.20 Trinity
TurqHillRs
TRQ
7.26
Prudentl
PRU
65.80 +.60
11.53
PulseElec
PULS
.36 +.05 TwoHrbInv TWO
TYC
32.85
PulteGrp
PHM
22.64 +.32 TycoIntl s
Tyson
TSN
24.10
PMMI
PMM
7.92
LCC
17.00
PPrIT
PPT
5.53 -.02 US Airwy
USEC
USU
.44
Qihoo360
QIHU
37.30 +2.90
USG
26.52
QstDiag
DGX
57.94 +.73 USG
UltraPt
g
UPL
20.16
Quiksilvr
ZQK
6.98 +.27
57.65
RPM
RPM
32.99 +.13 UndArmr s UA
UMC
1.96
RadianGrp RDN
12.49 +.40 UtdMicro
UPS
87.04
RadioShk
RSH
3.51 +.20 UPS B
56.64
RJamesFn RJF
42.20 -.25 UtdRentals URI
32.89
Rayonier
RYN
59.45 +.49 US Bancrp USB
UNG
21.76
RedwdTr
RWT
22.12 +.31 US NGas
US
OilFd
USO
34.14
RegionsFn RF
8.71 +.13
X
18.11
RelStlAl
RS
66.01 -.39 USSteel
UNH
60.20
Renren
RENN
3.10 +.31 UtdhlthGp
UNM
27.58
ReynAmer RAI
47.25 -.44 UnumGrp
RiteAid
RAD
2.59 +.02
V-W-X-Y-Z
RockTen
RKT
103.75 +1.62
VALE
16.81
RockwlAut ROK
86.21 +1.12 Vale SA
RockwdH
ROC
65.25 +.92 Vale SA pf VALE/P 15.98
VLO
38.38
RoyalBk g
RY
60.94 +.32 ValeroE
VNQ
75.86
RylCarb
RCL
37.09 +.10 VangREIT
67.41
RoyDShllA RDS/A 68.75 -.32 VangDivAp VIG
VangEmg
VWO
44.05
VectorGp
VGR
15.77
S-T-U
VVC
36.70
SCANA
SCG
53.53 -.38 Vectren
VZ
52.05
SpdrDJIA
DIA
149.43 +.07 VerizonCm
V
178.89
SpdrGold
GLD
142.15 +.06 Visa
VMware
VMW
76.76
S&P500ETF SPY
161.78 +.41 VulcanM
VMC
53.72
SpdrHome XHB
31.17 +.31 WGL Hold
WGL
44.33
SpdrLehHY JNK
41.80 +.06 Wabtec
WAB
105.40
SpdrS&P RB KRE
31.56 +.41 WalMart
WMT
78.83
SpdrRetl
XRT
74.51 -.03 Walgrn
WAG
47.84
SpdrOGEx XOP
59.17 +.48 WalterEn
WLT
17.57
SpdrMetM
XME
37.55 +.14 WREIT
WRE
28.65
SPX Cp
SPW
73.99 +.63 WsteMInc
WM
41.09
SafegdSci
SFE
15.81 +.15 WeathfIntl
WFT
13.52
Safeway
SWY
23.74 -.21 WeinRlt
WRI
35.54
StJoe
JOE
20.10
WellsFargo WFC
37.90
StJude
STJ
41.66 +.85 WstAsWw
SBW
15.33
Saks
SKS
11.78 -.01 WstnUnion WU
15.73
Salesforc s CRM
42.44 +.20 Weyerhsr
WY
31.04
SandRdge SD
5.30 +.04 Whrlpl
WHR 119.00
Sasol
SSL
44.54 +.32 WhitingPet WLL
46.54
Schlmbrg
SLB
76.16 +.44 WmsCos
WMB
37.30
Schwab
SCHW 17.55 +.08 WiscEngy
WEC
43.79
SeadrillLtd SDRL
39.63 +.83 WTJpHedg DXJ
48.41
SempraEn SRE
82.75 -1.15 WldW Ent
WWE
9.16
ServiceCp SCI
16.67 -.07 XL Grp
XL
32.13
Sherwin
SHW 187.77 -.21 XcelEngy
XEL
30.68
ShipFin
SFL
16.97 +.11 Xerox
XRX
8.76
SiderurNac SID
3.84 -.05 Yamana g
AUY
12.05
SilvWhtn g SLW
24.33 -.23 YumBrnds
YUM
68.38
CLOSE
CHG.%CHG. WK MO QTR YTD
s
s
t
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
-5.07 -.03
+79.08 +1.27
-7.28 -1.38
+8.43 +.09
-.20 -.01
+14.34 +.42
+3.08 +.19
+5.80 +.50
+42.40 +.25
+5.38 +.56
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
Today
Today Previous 1Yr Ago
Argent
Australia
Brazil
Britain
Canada
China
Denmark
Egypt
Euro
Hong Kong
India
Indnsia
Israel
Japan
Kenya
Mexico
N. Zealand
Pakistan
Poland
Russia
Saudi Arab
Singapore
So. Africa
Sweden
Switzerlnd
Taiwan
Venzuel
+14.23
+18.68
+15.21
+10.72
+3.19
+12.37
+13.41
+14.74
+13.85
+13.00
Interest rates
Dollar
1444.50 -10.50
1369.25 -18
1317 -18.25
1249.75 -16
1207.25 -14
1214.75 -14
New York Stock Exchange
LOW
14941.09 14,968.89
6218.90 6,297.98
521.91
522.02
9330.19 9,348.90
2426.36 2,430.83
3381.44 3,392.97
1614.21 1,617.50
1165.07 1,170.87
17029.93 17,072.33
954.87
959.80
5.2085
.9761
2.0133
.6433
1.0069
6.1715
5.6987
6.9464
.7646
7.7598
54.146
9737.00
3.5654
99.40
83.85
12.1053
1.1743
98.36
3.17
31.0265
3.7502
1.2315
8.9964
6.5421
.9385
29.60
6.2877
5.1960
.9694
2.0113
.6425
1.0079
6.1583
5.6865
6.9465
.7628
7.7590
53.811
9737.00
3.5551
99.04
83.72
12.0618
1.1711
98.32
3.16
31.0279
3.7503
1.2333
8.9087
6.5051
.9359
29.55
6.3000
4.4290
.9816
1.9195
.6193
.9956
6.2983
5.6824
6.0489
.7640
7.7611
53.375
9218.00
3.7959
79.87
83.10
13.1634
1.2572
90.80
3.20
29.7915
3.7503
1.2443
7.8092
6.8182
.9177
29.26
4.2927
Prime Rate
Discount rate
Fed funds
3.25
0.75
.00-.25
Treasuries
3-month T-bill
6-month T-bill
1 year T-bill
1 year T-note
2 year T-note
5 year T-note
10 year T-note
30 year T-bond
0.04
0.075
0.11
0.13
0.22
0.74
1.76
2.98
London Inter-Bank Offered Rate
3-month Libor
6-month Libor
0.28
0.43
Housing
FHLB Cost of Funds
Fixed 30 yr. mortgage
0.967
2.97
Money Market and CDs
Money market avg yld
90 day CD
0.01
0.20
Let us know
your favorite stocks
CHG
-1.01
+.04
+.02
+.25
-.50
-.25
+.18
+.02
+.12
+.07
+.05
+.11
-.31
-.30
+.18
+.54
+.20
+.27
+.15
-.57
+.27
+.36
+.08
-.18
-.01
-.05
+.08
-.27
-.01
+.45
+.07
+.12
+.03
-.33
+.14
+.03
+.19
-.14
-.26
+.14
+.23
-.47
+.22
-.58
+.33
+1.31
+1.41
+1.11
+2.27
-.19
+1.04
+.11
+3.29
+.01
+.21
+.08
+.37
+.11
-.09
+.22
+1.08
+.13
+.05
+.59
+.10
-.02
+.82
-.83
-.02
+.09
+.18
-.88
-.06
+.08
+.95
+2.15
+.12
-.18
+.13
-.03
+1.28
+.15
If you don’t see your favorite stock or
mutual fund and want it listed
regularly, call us at 757-6340 or
e-mail us at df [email protected]
Please list the full name of the stock or mutual fund and provide the stock
symbol or five-letter mutual fund symbol.
NASDAQ - Over The Counter
NAME
TICKER
LAST CHG NAME
TICKER
LAST CHG NAME
Cree Inc
CREE 59.60 +1.47
CrosstxLP XTEX 18.64 -.14
ATMI 21.80 -.05
Ctrip.com CTRP 23.24 +.64
ATVI 14.88 -.30
CubistPh
CBST 47.61 +.44
ADBE 46.49 -.52
CypSemi
CY
10.37 +.24
ABCO 46.00 -2.11
AGYS 11.17 -.09
D-E-F
ALGN 34.42 +1.82 DeckrsOut DECK 53.69 -.31
ARLP 68.53 -4.15 Dell Inc
DELL 13.29 -.02
MDRX 13.71 +.01 Dndreon
DNDN 4.63 -.07
ALTR 33.09 +.36 DirecTV
DTV 57.96 +.07
AMRN 7.02 +.24 DiscComA DISCA 79.02 -.19
AMZN 255.72 -2.33 DixieGrp
DXYN 7.40 +.05
AMBC 21.44 +1.04 DollarTr s DLTR 48.70 +.04
AMOV 21.63 -.18 DynMatl
BOOM 15.84 -.02
AGNC 30.94 +.28 Dynatrn rs DYNT 2.85 +.04
ACAS 14.35 -.14 E-Trade
ETFC 10.86 +.01
MTGE 24.48 -.71 eBay
EBAY 54.09 -.12
ARCP 17.11 +.43 ErthLink
ELNK 5.95 +.08
AMSC 2.48 +.06 Ebix Inc
EBIX 19.50 -.02
AMGN 104.83 -1.65 EchelonC ELON 2.34
ADI 45.82 +.82 ElectArts
EA
18.29 +.34
ANDE 54.71 -.21 EngyXXI
EXXI 24.17 +.84
AINV 8.72 -.05 Ericsson
ERIC 12.31 +.12
AAPL 460.71 +10.73 Expedia
EXPE 58.29 -.71
AMAT 14.81 -.02 ExpdIntl
EXPD 37.90 +.79
ARNA 7.52 -.11 ExpScripts ESRX 60.40 -1.16
ARCC 18.14 +.02 EZchip
EZCH 23.29 +.32
ARIA 17.35 +.28 Facebook n FB
27.57 -.74
ABFS 14.73 +4.18 FifthThird FITB 17.30 +.20
AZPN 29.48 +1.93 Finisar
FNSR 13.82 +.53
ASTE 34.85 +.55 FstNiagara FNFG 9.50 +.09
ATML 6.50 +.04 FstSecGrp FSGI 5.24 +1.18
AMAP 12.99 +.96 FstSolar
FSLR 47.69 +1.69
ADSK 39.60 +.08 Flextrn
FLEX 7.14 +.20
ADP 68.69 -.55 FosterWhl FWLT 21.44 +.05
AVGO 32.80 +.92 FrankEl s FELE 32.59 +.33
AVEO 2.34 -.18 FrontierCm FTR
4.09 +.06
BEAV 63.75 +.11 FultonFncl FULT 11.28 +.13
BMC 45.42
G-H-I
BIDU 87.65 +3.14
BSET 13.96 +.14 GT AdvTc GTAT 3.79 -.05
BOBE 44.62 -.07 GalenaBio GALE 2.77 +.29
BOLT 16.56 -.03 Garmin
GRMN 35.28 +.47
BRCM 36.17 +.11 Gentex
GNTX 24.14 +.15
BRCD 5.30 +.05 Gibraltar
ROCK 16.74 +.10
CA
27.67 -.06 GileadSci s GILD 54.43 -.72
CDNS 13.84 -.05 Goodyear GT
12.85 +.48
CHY 13.01 +.02 Google
GOOG 861.55 +15.83
CELG 121.22 -.42 GreenMtC GMCR 58.78 +.70
CIEN 15.25 +.54 Groupon
GRPN 5.46 -.38
CRUS 20.90 +1.01 GulfportE GPOR 52.86 -.54
CSCO 20.81 -.02 Hasbro
HAS 47.15 -.07
CTXS 64.17 +.68 HercOffsh HERO 7.46 -.06
CLNE 13.74 +.55 HimaxTch HIMX 6.00 -.61
CLWR 3.40 +.02 Hologic
HOLX 20.66 +.64
COBR 3.11 -.01 HuntBncsh HBAN 7.33 +.06
COKE 61.11 -.12 Intel
INTC 23.91 -.05
CTSH 65.65 -.96 Inteliquent IQNT 5.37 +.60
CMCO 18.90 -.08 IntervestB IBCA 6.01 +.01
CMCSA 42.78 +.24 Intuit
INTU 60.75 +.49
CPWR 11.79
IntSurg
ISRG 501.58 -2.24
CPRT 35.40 +.01
J-K-L
CVTI 5.44 +.01
CBRL 84.25 +.60 JDS Uniph JDSU 13.74 +.42
A-B-C
ATMI Inc
ActivsBliz
AdobeSy
AdvisBd s
Agilysys
AlignTech
AllnceRes
AllscriptH
AlteraCp lf
Amarin
Amazon
AmbacFn n
AMovilA
ACapAgy
AmCapLtd
ACapMtg
ARltCapPr
AmSupr
Amgen
AnalogDev
Andrsons
ApolloInv
Apple Inc
ApldMatl
ArenaPhm
AresCap
AriadP
ArkBest
AspenTech
Astec
Atmel
AutoNavi
Autodesk
AutoData
AvagoTch
AVEO Ph
B/E Aero
BMC Sft
Baidu
BassettF
BobEvans
BoltTech
Broadcom
BrcdeCm
CA Inc
Cadence
CalaCvHi
Celgene
CienaCorp
Cirrus
Cisco
CitrixSys
CleanEngy
Clearwire
CobraEl
CocaBtl
CognizTech
Colmbus
Comcast
Compuwre
Copart
Covenant
CrackerB
-.04
-.05
+.79
+.39
-.12
+.05
-.06
-.10
-.63
-.65
+2.26
+.24
-.27
-.26
-.42
-.18
+.22
+.12
-.03
-.07
+.31
+.16
-.05
+.09
+.39
+.58
+1.16
-.24
-.74
+.20
-.14
-.10
-.51
+.22
-.53
JamesRiv
JetBlue
JoesJeans
KLA Tnc
KeryxBio
Kirklands
KraftFGp n
LSI Corp
LegacyRes
LifeTech
LimeEn hlf
LinearTch
LinnEngy
LinnCo n
lululemn gs
TICKER
LAST CHG NAME
TICKER
JRCC
JBLU
JOEZ
KLAC
KERX
KIRK
KRFT
LSI
LGCY
LIFE
LIME
LLTC
LINE
LNCO
LULU
2.32
6.92
1.80
54.06
8.25
12.82
53.39
6.65
26.07
73.54
.78
37.79
35.75
39.24
74.40
RVBD 15.69 +.16
ROSG 3.25 -.03
ROVI 22.94 +.13
+.36
+.05
+.02
-.24
+.19
+.35
+.28
-.07
-.04
-.11
+.04
+.48
-1.96
-2.59
-1.96
M-N-O
MannKd
Mannatech
MarvellT
MediCo
MelcoCrwn
Microchp
MicronT
Microsoft
MdsxWatr
Mondelez
MonstrBev
Mylan
NIC Inc
NII Hldg
NXP Semi
NetApp
Netflix
NewsCpA
NewsCpB
NuanceCm
Nvidia
OReillyAu
OnSmcnd
OptCable
Oracle
OtterTail
MNKD 3.94
MTEX 7.50
MRVL 10.80
MDCO 34.25
MPEL 24.74
MCHP 37.41
MU
9.76
MSFT 33.75
MSEX 19.40
MDLZ 31.15
MNST 56.18
MYL 29.45
EGOV 16.59
NIHD 7.18
NXPI 28.21
NTAP 35.49
NFLX 210.69
NWSA 32.01
NWS 32.08
NUAN 19.47
NVDA 13.83
ORLY 110.27
ONNN 8.10
OCC 4.20
ORCL 33.51
OTTR 30.91
P-Q-R
Paccar
PacSunwr
PanASlv
PaneraBrd
PattUTI
Paychex
PeopUtdF
Polycom
Power-One
PwShs QQQ
priceline
ProgrsSoft
ProspctCap
Qlogic
Qualcom
QualitySys
RF Inds
RF MicD
Rambus
RschMotn
PCAR 51.97
PSUN 2.82
PAAS 12.98
PNRA 182.98
PTEN 21.99
PAYX 37.11
PBCT 13.57
PLCM 11.00
PWER 6.35
QQQ 72.40
PCLN 726.71
PRGS 22.95
PSEC 11.11
QLGC 9.81
QCOM 63.86
QSII 18.11
RFIL 6.16
RFMD 5.64
RMBS 7.51
BBRY 15.57
+.01
-.04
+.09
RiverbedT
RosttaG rs
Rovi Corp
LAST CHG
S-T-U
SanDisk
SeagateT
SearsHldgs
Sequenom
SigaTech h
SigmaAld
SilvStd g
Sina
SiriusXM
SkywksSol
SmithWes
SnydLance
SodaStrm
SonicCorp
Staples
Starbucks
StlDynam
SteinMrt lf
Stericycle
SunHydrl
SunPwr h
Suprtex
SusqBnc
Symantec
tw telecom
TeslaMot
TexInst
Thoratec
TibcoSft
TractSupp
TripAdvis
TriQuint
Unilife
UtdCmBks
USecBc AL
SNDK 54.60
STX 41.97
SHLD 52.08
SQNM 3.45
SIGA 3.31
SIAL 78.88
SSRI 7.15
SINA 57.68
SIRI
3.39
SWKS 23.04
SWHC 8.85
LNCE 25.29
SODA 54.98
SONC 13.26
SPLS 13.87
SBUX 62.48
STLD 15.17
SMRT 9.72
SRCL 109.21
SNHY 33.61
SPWR 15.86
SUPX 21.40
SUSQ 11.68
SYMC 24.95
TWTC 26.34
TSLA 59.50
TXN 37.04
THOR 32.76
TIBX 20.23
TSCO 111.88
TRIP 55.17
TQNT 5.98
UNIS 1.94
UCBI 10.98
USBI 7.68
-.01
-.14
+.13
+.26
+.07
-.58
-1.26
+.55
-.42
-.01
+.19
+.59
-2.76
+.04
+.06
-.06
-.04
+.38
+.08
-.10
V-W-X-Y-Z
+.13
WOOF 23.94
-.08 VCA Ant
VertxPh
VRTX 77.25
ViacomB
VIAB 67.45
-.57 Vodafone VOD 30.16
+.01 Volcano
VOLC 18.43
VRNG 2.85
-.18 Vringo
+2.14 WarnerCh WCRX 14.91
+.42 Wendys Co WEN 6.14
-.26 WDigital
WDC 58.13
+.22 WholeFd
WFM 91.80
+.27 Windstrm WIN
8.36
WisdomTr WETF 12.47
+.28 Wynn
WYNN 138.68
+1.94 Xilinx
XLNX 38.01
+.17 YRC Wwde YRCW 15.44
+.06 Yahoo
YHOO 25.17
+.09 ZaZaEngy ZAZA 1.34
+.09 Zagg
ZAGG 4.86
+.29 ZebraT
ZBRA 46.07
+.11 Zix Corp
ZIXI
3.69
+.04 Zogenix
ZGNX 1.62
+.33 Zoltek
ZOLT 12.93
-.06 Zynga
ZNGA 3.21
+.72
+.74
+.63
-.08
-.04
-.01
+.17
+1.45
+.04
+.68
+.11
-.08
+.98
-.01
+.35
+.61
-.12
+1.13
+.18
+.18
+.99
+.16
+.24
+.11
-.14
+4.95
+.03
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+.41
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-.13
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+.06
+.06
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+1.26
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-.18
+.05
-.10
+.29
+.24
+.98
+.34
+.82
-.12
-.15
+4.49
+.10
+.02
-.14
-.04
-.05
+.15
-.01
Stocks of Local Interest
AGL Resources
AT&T Inc
Astec Inds
BB&T Corp
Bank of America
CBL & Associates
CBL & Assoc pfD
Cigna Corp
Cintas Corp
Coca Btl Cns
CocaCola Co
Coca-Cola Ent
Comcast Corp A
Comcl Metals
ConAgra Foods
Convergys Corp
Corrections Corp
Covenant Transp
Cracker Barrel
Darden Rest
Dean Foods Corp
Dillards Inc
Dixie Group Inc
DuPont
Fst Horizon Natl
First Security Grp
Intel Corp
Johnson & Johnson
La-Z-Boy Inc
Medtronic Inc
Microsoft Corp
Miller Inds
TICKER
GAS
T
ASTE
BBT
BAC
CBL
CBLpD
CI
CTAS
COKE
KO
CCE
CMCSA
CMC
CAG
CVG
CXW
CVTI
CBRL
DRI
DF
DDS
DXYN
DD
FHN
FSGI
INTC
JNJ
LZB
MDT
MSFT
MLR
52LO
RANGE
36.59
32.47
26.09
26.86
6.72
16.65
24.75
39.01
35.41
58.00
35.58
26.05
28.09
11.30
23.64
12.40
20.71
2.92
56.26
44.11
11.66
60.76
2.95
41.67
7.44
1.30
19.23
61.71
10.95
35.67
26.26
13.55
0
8
9
6
0
0
7
0
0
3
9
0
0
6
0
0
0
7
0
7
0
9
0
0
9
0
6
0
9
0
0
6
52HI CLOSE
CHG %CHG
44.32
39.00
36.99
34.37
12.94
24.41
26.00
68.87
45.94
70.93
42.96
37.64
42.75
17.47
36.31
17.82
37.35
6.55
84.41
57.93
19.57
89.98
7.71
54.73
11.34
4.29
27.98
85.99
19.43
47.98
33.52
17.23
-.14 -0.3%
-.25 -0.7%
+.55 +1.6%
+.22 +0.7%
+.64 +5.2%
+1.08 +4.5%
-.01
...%
-.04 -0.1%
-.14 -0.3%
-.12 -0.2%
-.16 -0.4%
-.18 -0.5%
+.24 +0.6%
-.10 -0.7%
-.23 -0.6%
-.08 -0.5%
-.01
...%
+.01 +0.2%
+.60 +0.7%
+.09 +0.2%
-.42 -2.2%
+.70 +0.8%
+.05 +0.7%
-.05 -0.1%
+.20 +1.9%
+1.18 +29.1%
-.05 -0.2%
-1.07 -1.2%
-.05 -0.3%
-.02
...%
+.26 +0.8%
-.52 -3.2%
43.75
37.09
34.85
31.16
12.88
25.13
25.60
67.09
45.11
61.11
42.08
37.04
42.78
14.99
35.43
17.49
37.06
5.44
84.25
52.91
18.96
85.04
7.40
53.89
10.71
5.24
23.91
84.68
18.24
47.70
33.75
15.50
WK MO QTR
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YTD
CHG
+9.5%
+10.0%
+4.5%
+7.8%
+10.9%
+18.5%
+2.2%
+25.5%
+10.3%
-8.1%
+16.1%
+16.7%
+14.5%
+0.9%
+20.1%
+6.6%
+24.8%
-1.6%
+31.1%
+17.4%
+14.8%
+1.5%
+125.6%
+19.8%
+8.1%
+135.0%
+16.0%
+20.8%
+28.9%
+16.3%
+26.4%
+1.6%
1YR
VOL
CHG (Thou) P/E
+18.7%
+18.2%
+17.8%
-0.8%
+53.5%
+31.7%
...%
+45.8%
+16.6%
+0.1%
+11.8%
+28.6%
+42.4%
+5.3%
+42.2%
+36.7%
+59.7%
+72.4%
+46.2%
+8.6%
+58.1%
+36.9%
+82.8%
+4.5%
+14.1%
+27.3%
-13.0%
+35.0%
+14.6%
+26.5%
+8.2%
+4.1%
370
11991
45
2623
257708
1316
11
1471
360
10
9326
1427
7132
566
2378
346
798
8
89
697
4183
530
120
3239
2120
66
30053
8527
229
2669
40675
26
17
28
22
13
30
43
15
19
20
22
18
18
14
24
19
23
16
18
16
22
12
11
dd
dd
12
23
20
13
17
19
DIV
1.88
1.80
0.40
0.92
0.04
0.92f
1.84
0.04
0.64f
1.00
1.12
0.80
0.78f
0.48
1.00
0.24f
2.12a
...
2.00
2.00
...
0.20a
...
1.80f
0.20
...
0.90
2.64f
0.16
1.04
0.92
0.56f
Relax. Enjoy a great cigar.
9
A Fresh Take
The symbol above illustrates a stock’s
price in relation to its low and high
closing prices during the past 52
NAME
Mohawk Inds
Mueller Water Pdts
Natl Hlth Inv
Ntl Hlthcare Cp
Norfolk Sthn
Panera Bread Co
Raymond James Fncl
Regions Fncl
Reliance Steel Alu
Rock Tenn
Ruby Tuesday
Sanofi
Sonic Corp
Suntrust Bks
Unum Group
Vodafone Group
Vulcan Matl
WalMart Strs
Whirlpool
On News
35635086
NAME
Downtown 723 Cherry St. • East 110 Jordan Dr. • CBCBurns.com
TICKER
52LO
RANGE
MHK
MWA
NHI
NHC
NSC
PNRA
RJF
RF
RS
RKT
RT
SNY
SONC
STI
UNM
VOD
VMC
WMT
WHR
62.22
3.12
47.20
40.75
56.05
135.40
30.99
5.46
44.81
49.24
4.98
33.03
6.88
20.96
18.28
24.42
32.31
58.27
54.08
0
0
0
7
0
0
7
0
8
0
0
9
0
0
0
9
8
0
0
52HI CLOSE
CHG %CHG
119.88
7.07
67.68
50.17
78.79
185.67
48.22
8.65
72.90
103.07
9.84
55.77
13.45
30.79
28.35
30.80
59.48
79.50
122.39
-.50
+.27
+1.48
+.05
+.01
+2.14
-.25
+.13
-.39
+1.62
+.08
-.74
-.01
+.45
+.15
-.18
+.24
-.42
+.58
115.00
7.24
68.58
46.82
77.82
182.98
42.20
8.71
66.01
103.75
9.69
53.04
13.26
29.82
27.58
30.16
53.72
78.83
119.00
-0.4%
+3.9%
+2.2%
+0.1%
...%
+1.2%
-0.6%
+1.5%
-0.6%
+1.6%
+0.8%
-1.4%
-0.1%
+1.5%
+0.5%
-0.6%
+0.4%
-0.5%
+0.5%
WK MO QTR
t
s
s
s
r
s
t
s
t
s
s
t
t
s
s
t
s
t
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
t
s
t
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
t
s
t
s
s
s
s
s
t
s
s
s
s
YTD
CHG
+27.1%
+29.1%
+21.3%
-0.4%
+25.8%
+15.2%
+9.5%
+22.2%
+6.3%
+48.4%
+23.3%
+11.9%
+27.4%
+5.2%
+32.5%
+19.7%
+3.2%
+15.5%
+17.0%
1YR
VOL
CHG (Thou) P/E
+68.6%
+82.9%
+43.4%
+9.3%
+9.4%
+14.2%
+17.9%
+23.5%
+22.8%
+69.9%
+34.6%
+48.9%
+84.0%
+21.7%
+24.4%
+13.5%
+25.3%
+37.2%
+91.8%
753
2401
112
6
1313
307
795
7933
366
794
195
1070
540
2568
2857
4841
813
4777
697
31
66
21
13
14
30
18
10
13
14
dd
20
8
9
dd
16
15
DIV
...
0.07
2.94f
1.20a
2.00
...
0.56
0.12f
1.20
1.20f
...
1.86e
...
0.40f
0.52
1.53e
0.04
1.88f
2.50f
... timesfreepress.com
.
• • • Tuesday, May 7, 2013 • C3
Mutual Funds
NAME
4-WK
NAV CHG %RTN NAME
AcadEm n 19.64 -.04
Alger Funds A:
SmCapGr 8.64 +.06
Alger Funds B:
SmCapGr 7.54 +.05
AllianceBern A:
DiscValA 19.78 +.15
AllianceBern B:
SMCpValB 18.92 +.14
Allianz Admin MMS:
MCapVal p 20.91 +.03
Allianz Funds B:
MCapValB 18.14 +.03
Amer Century A:
SCapVal p 9.47 +.05
Amer Century Adv:
EqIncA p
8.68 ...
HeritageA p 24.05 +.05
ValueA p
7.27 +.01
Amer Century Inv:
EmgMkI
8.95 ...
EqInc
8.68 ...
GlGold
11.68 -.03
GrowthI
29.91 +.07
InfAdjBd 13.11 ...
SelectI
47.90 +.11
SGov
9.71 ...
SmCpVal
9.52 +.05
SmallCo 10.13 +.08
Ultra
28.88 +.07
ValueInv
7.27 ...
Veedot
7.97 +.02
American Funds A:
AmcpA p 24.66 +.04
AMutlA p 32.20 -.02
BalA p
22.38 +.04
BondA p 12.95 ...
CapIBA p 57.21 -.15
CapWGA p 41.07 -.08
CapWA p 21.02 -.05
EupacA p 44.09 -.08
FdInvA p 45.96 +.11
GwthA p 38.58 +.09
HI TrA p
11.67 +.01
IncoA p
19.68 -.02
IntBdA p 13.73 ...
ICAA p
34.22 -.02
NEcoA p 32.80 +.11
N PerA p 34.55 +.03
NwWrldA 57.02 -.05
SmCpA p 44.76 +.07
TxExA p 13.22 -.02
WshA p
35.38 +.03
Ariel Investments:
Apprec
48.79 +.13
Ariel
59.76 +.09
Artisan Funds:
Intl
27.07 +.03
IntlVal r
33.49 +.02
MidCapVal 24.35 +.10
Ave Maria Funds:
Group p
25.99 -.08
RisingDiv 15.34 +.04
Baron Funds:
Asset
56.16 +.17
BlackRock A:
EqtyDiv
21.92 -.01
FlexEqA 13.00 +.08
GlAlA r
21.14 +.02
BlackRock B&C:
GlAlC t
19.63 +.01
HlScOpC 35.10 -.12
BlackRock Instl:
EquityDv 21.97 -.01
GlbAlloc r 21.25 +.01
HiYldBd
8.37 ...
Brandywine Fds:
BlueFd n27.76 +.04
Bridgeway Funds:
AggInv1
43.50 +.46
CGM Funds:
Focus
n34.36 +.33
Mutl n
31.99 +.14
Century Funds:
ShsTrInst 19.93 +.07
ChamplSC p 15.48 +.05
ClearBridge:
Apprec A 17.83 +.02
Equity O 15.29 +.02
Cohen & Steers:
RltyShrs 74.25 +.41
4-WK
NAV CHG %RTN
+2.8 Columbia Class A:
HiYldBd
3.08 +.01
14.31 -.02
+3.1 TxEA p
SelComm A 44.03 +.28
+3.0 Columbia Class C:
Acorn t
29.16 +.12
+3.7 AcornInt t 43.83 -.05
Columbia Class Z:
33.83 +.14
+3.7 Acorn Z
AcornIntZ 45.47 -.05
Copley
60.06
...
+3.0
DFA Funds:
IntlCorEq 11.61 -.01
+2.9 USCorEq1 14.11 +.05
USCorEq2 13.94 +.07
+2.7 DWS Invest A:
TechA
15.28 +.10
+2.5 DWS Invest C:
+3.4 DreHiRC 38.69 -.02
+2.7
DWS Invest S:
CoreEqtyS 21.03 +.11
+4.9 Gold&Prc 9.22 -.01
+2.5 LgCpFoGr 35.90 +.06
-14.2 LifeCmpRet 12.22 +.01
+3.6 SmCpVlS r 22.61 +.26
-0.9 Davis Funds A:
+4.2 NYVen A 39.97 +.08
-0.1 RlEstA
31.71 +.09
+2.7
+4.9 Davis Funds Y:
+4.5 NYVenY 40.42 +.07
+2.5 Delaware Invest A:
+4.0 Diver Inc p 9.39 -.01
Delaware Invest B:
+4.0 USGrB p 16.84 +.05
+3.4 Dimensional Fds:
+3.2 EmMCrEq 20.57 +.03
+0.2 EmMktV 29.87 ...
+3.4 IntSmVa 17.76 -.04
26.55 ...
+4.5 USLgVa
+0.7 US Small 25.68 +.16
US
SmVa
30.17
+.35
+4.7
+4.6 IntlSmCo 17.45 ...
Fixd
10.33
...
+4.4
17.86 ...
+2.1 IntVa
+3.0 Glb5FxInc 11.24 ...
+0.1 Dodge&Cox:
+4.5 Balanced 86.73 +.22
13.93 -.01
+5.5 Income
37.70 -.15
+4.9 IntlStk
140.15 +.46
+4.0 Stock
+4.4 DoubleLine Funds:
11.39 ...
+0.3 TRBd I
+3.8 TRBd N p 11.39 ...
Dreyfus:
+3.5 AMTMuBdZ 14.38 -.02
48.33 -.10
+2.8 Aprec
Discp
36.40 +.09
10.79 +.01
+4.9 Dreyf
17.75 +.04
+3.0 GrInc
+2.4 MunBd r 11.98 -.02
OppMCVal A 36.45 +.25
+2.4 Dupree Mutual:
11.77 -.02
+3.5 TNTF
Eaton Vance A:
TMG1.1
30.49 +.06
+2.2
Eaton Vance I:
FltgRt
9.23 ...
+2.4
+3.5 FAM Funds:
+2.3 EqtyInc n22.90 +.04
FMI Funds:
+2.3 LgCap p n19.80 +.03
+2.8 FPA Funds:
Capit
44.77 +.23
+2.4 FPACres 31.00 +.08
+2.4 Fairholme 37.65+1.04
+2.3 Federated Instl:
KaufmnR
5.71 +.01
+3.1 TotRetBd 11.42 -.01
Fidelity Advisor A:
+5.8 NwInsgh p 25.65 +.05
StrInA
12.81 -.01
+6.5 Fidelity Advisor I:
NwInsgtI
n25.98
+.05
+4.0
Fidelity Freedom:
+4.0 FF2010 n14.87 ...
FF2015 n 12.49 +.01
+2.2 FF2015K 13.70 ...
FF2020 n 15.21 +.01
+3.1 FF2020K 14.24 +.01
+3.5 FF2025 n 12.68 ...
FF2025K 14.60 ...
+4.4 FF2030 n 15.32 +.01
+2.7
+0.3
+3.6
+3.0
+4.7
+3.0
+4.8
NA
+5.4
+3.5
+3.4
+3.9
+2.7
+3.0
-13.3
+3.6
+1.5
+4.8
+3.9
+1.6
+3.9
+0.6
+2.6
+4.0
NA
+5.4
NA
+3.0
+3.3
NA
0.0
NA
NA
+3.0
+0.3 NAME
NAV
+5.6
+4.0 FF2030K 14.81
FF2035 n 12.88
NA FF2035K 14.77
NA FF2040 n 8.84
FF2040K 14.82
+0.3 Fidelity Invest:
+2.9 AllSectEq 13.16
+2.9 AMgr50 n 17.44
+2.7 AMg85 n 15.59
+3.6 Balanc n 21.73
+0.3 BalancedK 21.73
+2.9 BlueChGr n 55.37
Canada n 54.72
+0.2 CapAp n 33.63
CpInc r n
9.94
+3.6 Contra n 86.76
ContraK
86.73
DivIntl n
32.92
+0.5 DivrsIntK r 32.88
DivGth n 33.59
+2.4 EmergAs r n 30.79
EmrMk n 24.38
+4.2 Eq Inc n 53.36
ECapAp 20.63
22.96
+0.6 Fifty r n
+2.9 FltRateHi r n 10.03
+8.9 FrInOne n 32.44
GNMA n 11.72
+3.6 GroCo n 105.66
+0.3 GroInc n 24.33
GrowthCoK 105.59
GrStrat r n 23.74
+4.2 HighInc r n 9.65
+1.2 IntGov n 10.86
IntlDisc n 36.68
+4.2 IntlSCOp r n 12.70
InvGrBd n 11.60
+1.8 InvGB n
8.01
+2.0 LargCap n 23.50
+1.9 LatAm
45.34
+2.1 LevCoStk n 37.02
+2.1 LowP r n 45.45
+2.5 LowPriK r 45.43
+2.5 Magelln n 81.61
+2.7 MegaCpStk n13.53
Gold
Date
High
Low
100 troy oz.- dollars per troy oz.
May 13
1477.20 1466.80
Jun 13
1478.40 1463.80
Jul 13
1470.50 1465.00
Aug 13
1479.60 1465.90
Oct 13
1480.50 1468.20
Dec 13
1482.00 1469.90
Feb 14
1482.10 1473.10
Apr 14
Jun 14
1476.70 1475.50
Aug 14
Oct 14
Dec 14
1484.00 1479.50
Feb 15
Jun 15
Dec 15
1490.50 1486.30
Jun 16
Dec 16
Jun 17
Dec 17
Jun 18
Dec 18
Est. sales:Fri’s sales: 194184
Fri’s open int: 429322
Close
Change
1468.10
1468.00
1468.60
1469.50
1470.70
1471.90
1473.10
1474.30
1475.50
1476.90
1478.30
1479.80
1481.30
1484.60
1490.50
1497.10
1506.10
1517.10
1531.50
1545.40
1563.50
+3.80
+3.80
+3.80
+3.90
+3.90
+3.90
+3.90
+3.90
+3.90
+3.90
+3.90
+3.90
+3.90
+4.00
+4.20
+4.30
+4.40
+4.60
+4.80
+4.90
+4.90
Close
Change
2391.8
2393.6
2395.5
2400.4
2407.2
2408.8
2412.1
2415.2
2418.2
2421.2
2425.8
2427.1
2429.6
2434.4
2439.6
2446.9
2450.7
2458.1
2461.5
-5.7
-5.8
-5.9
-5.9
-5.9
-5.9
-5.9
-6.0
-6.1
-6.1
-6.1
-6.1
-6.1
-6.3
-6.6
-6.6
-6.6
-6.6
-6.6
Silver
Date
High
Low
5,000 troy oz.- cents per troy oz.
May 13
2437.5 2384.5
Jun 13
2436.5 2382.0
Jul 13
2442.0 2382.0
Sep 13
2429.0 2392.0
Dec 13
2452.0 2400.0
Jan 14
Mar 14
2444.5 2412.1
May 14
Jul 14
Sep 14
Dec 14
Jan 15
Mar 15
Jul 15
Dec 15
2460.0 2439.6
Jul 16
Dec 16
Jul 17
Dec 17
Est. sales:Fri’s sales: 63459
Fri’s open int: 145947
NAME
Georgia Poultry
The Georgia f.o.b. dock quoted price
on broilers and fryers for this week’s
trading is $1.0325 based on full truck
load lots of ice pack USDA grade “A”
sized 2½ to 3 pound birds. 100% (representing 1,000 loads) of the loads
offered have been confirmed within a
range of 96.91¢ to $1.0923 with a final
weighted average of $1.0320 f.o.b. dock
or equivalent.
The market is firm to steady and the
live supply is adequate to occasionally
short for a very good to normal demand.
Average weights are mostly desirable.
Estimated slaughter today is 4,722,500
head. This compares with 4,556,300
head last Monday.
The f.o.b. dock confirmed final weighted average prices on ice pack parts
based on truck load and pool truck
load lots for thisweek’s trading are: Line
Run Tenders: $2.06, Skinless Boneless
Breasts: $2.02, Whole Breasts: $1.1850,
Boneless Skinless Thigh Meat: $1.4350,
Thighs: 73¢, Drumsticks: 65¢, Leg
Quarters: 55.50¢, Wings: $1.40.
Demand on most parts is good to normal, mostly good with the exceptions of
line run tenders and skinless boneless
breasts which is good to normal, mostly
good, occasionally very good; and wings
which is normal to light, occasionally
good.
Georgia Department of Agriculture
Tennessee Livestock
Reported auctions on Saturday at Carthage, Crossville and Greeneville.
Cattle receipts: 1,762
Trends: Compared to same sale one
week ago: Slaughter cows 1.00 to 2.00
higher. Bulls steady to 1.00 higher. Feeder
steers/bulls mostly steady. Heifers 2.00 to
4.00 lower. Slaughter Cows Boners 80-85
pct lean 68.00-83.00; Slaughter Cows Lean
85-90 pct lean 64.50-73.50; Slaughter
Bulls 1100-2200 lbs 86.00-98.00.Feeder
Steers Medium and Large 1-2: 300-400 lbs
154.00-178.00; 400-500 lbs 145.00-162.00;
500-600 lbs 130.00-153.00; 600-700 lbs
116.00-137.50.Feeder Bulls Medium and
Large 1-2: 400-500 lbs 133.00-160.00;
500-600 lbs 118.00-144.00; 600-700 lbs
106.00-137.00; 700-800 lbs 88.00-113.75.
Feeder Heifers Medium and Large 1-2:
300-400 lbs 122.00-153.00; 400-500 lbs
112.00-141.50; 500-600 lbs 109.00-133.00;
600-700 lbs 109.00-121.00.
Tennessee Department of Agriculture
4-WK
CHG %RTN NAME
+.01
+.01
+.01
+.01
+.01
+2.7
+3.0
+3.1
+3.1
+3.2
+.04
+.02
+.02
+.05
+.05
+.23
+.06
...
+.02
+.19
+.19
-.06
-.06
+.13
+.05
-.02
+.04
-.05
+.12
...
+.02
-.01
+.30
+.06
+.30
+.09
+.01
...
-.11
-.04
-.01
...
+.11
-.17
+.24
+.10
+.10
+.30
+.05
+3.2
+2.3
+3.9
+2.3
+2.4
+4.6
+3.0
+4.2
+2.8
+4.1
+4.1
+5.4
+5.4
+3.6
+6.5
+4.7
+2.8
+5.4
+4.1
+0.6
+3.5
-0.1
+5.9
+4.1
+5.9
+3.9
+2.2
+0.1
+4.8
+5.8
+0.1
+0.3
+4.1
+1.1
+4.7
+4.9
+4.9
+3.4
+4.2
4-WK
NAV CHG %RTN NAME
MtgSec n 11.33 -.01
MuniInc n 13.61 -.02
NwMkt r n 17.56 -.01
NwMill n 34.67 +.17
OTC n
68.41 +.30
Puritn n
20.87 +.04
RealEInc r 12.28 +.03
SCmdtyStrt n 8.38 -.03
SCmdtyStrF n 8.42 -.03
SrsIntGrw 13.11 -.01
SrsIntVal 10.47 -.04
SrInvGrdF 11.60 -.01
StIntMu n 10.86 -.01
STBF n
8.61 ...
SmCapDisc n27.70 +.09
StkSlcACap n32.07 +.11
StratInc n 11.48 ...
TotalBd n 10.99 -.01
Value n
88.28 +.35
Fidelity Selects:
Air
n48.19 +.65
Biotch n 141.66 -.81
Brokr n
60.49 +.49
DfAer n
97.84 +.61
Electr n
51.57 +.47
Enrgy n
56.68 +.37
EngSv n 76.58 +.46
Gold r n
24.16 -.07
MedDl n 62.44 +.10
MdEqSys n 31.30 +.04
Fidelity Spartan:
500Idx I
57.36 +.11
IntlInxInv n 37.71 -.12
Fidelity Spart Adv:
ExMktAd r n45.68 +.26
500IdxAdv n 57.36 +.11
IntAd r n 37.72 -.12
TotMktAd r n 47.01 +.12
USBond I 11.86 -.01
First Eagle:
GlblA
51.99 -.02
OverseasA 23.28 -.01
Frank/Temp Frnk A:
DynTchA 36.93 +.06
0.0
+0.4
+0.7
+3.7
+6.7
+2.4
+1.7
-1.4
-1.4
+4.0
+6.0
+0.1
0.0
+0.1
+1.6
+4.1
+1.2
+0.3
+3.1
+5.5
+7.7
+9.1
+2.8
+4.2
+2.7
+5.1
-14.3
+1.7
+0.6
+3.6
+5.6
+3.6
+3.6
+5.6
+3.6
0.0
+1.7
+1.4
+3.9
4-WK
NAV CHG %RTN
FedTFA p 12.74 -.02
GrwthA p 55.81 +.16
HYTFA p 10.97 -.02
IncomA p
2.36 -.01
RisDvA p 42.76 -.11
SmCpGrA p 14.47 +.05
SmCpVl p 51.21 +.23
USGovA p 6.73 ...
UtilsA p
15.60 -.19
Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv:
GlbBdAdv n13.74 +.03
IncmeAd
2.34 -.01
Frank/Temp Frnk C:
HiIncC t
2.16 ...
IncomC t
2.38 -.01
Frank/Temp Temp A:
GlBd A p 13.79 +.03
GlbOpA p 20.33 ...
GrwthA p 21.64 +.02
Frank/Temp Tmp B&C:
GlBdC p 13.82 +.04
GAMCO Funds:
GlTelAAA 21.99 -.05
GE Instl Funds:
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14.52 +.06
GMO Trust III:
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25.47 -.08
GMO Trust IV:
IntlIntrVl
22.90 -.08
GMO Trust VI:
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Gabelli Funds:
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59.04 +.03
EqInc p
26.07 -.01
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Goldman Sachs B:
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22.31 +.06
MidCVB p 43.20 +.18
SCapB p 41.31 +.26
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4-WK
NAV CHG %RTN NAME
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CapApInst 47.12 +.05
CmdtRRtn I 6.84 ...
Intl r
65.99 +.02
Hartford Fds A:
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Hlthcare p 24.47 -.05
Hartford Fds B:
GlbGrB p n16.23 +.02
MidCpB t n 18.66 +.07
Hartford Fds C:
Hlthcare t 21.91 -.05
HiYieldC tx 7.82 ...
Hartford HLS IA :
CapApp
50.18 +.35
Heartland Fds:
ValPlusInv p 31.67 +.08
IVA Funds:
Wldwide I r 17.27 +.06
Invesco Funds A:
CmstkA
20.44 +.04
EqIncA
10.28 +.01
SmCpEq p 15.01 +.08
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39.13 +.08
PacGrB
22.23 -.02
Invesco Funds Y:
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AssetSC t 26.93 +.14
AssetStA p 27.68 +.14
AssetStrI r 27.90 +.14
EurOpB p 23.74 -.02
JPMorgan A Class:
CoreBd A 12.04 -.01
JP Morgan Instl:
MdCpVal n32.04 +.08
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HighYld n 8.42 ...
ShtDurBd n 10.98 ...
USLCCrPls n25.46 +.10
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EnterprT 72.46 ...
GlLifeSciT r 35.76 ...
GlbSel T 11.06 ...
GlTechT r 20.52 ...
Grw&IncT 39.32 ...
Janus T
35.08 ...
OvrseasT r 35.70 ...
PrkMCVal T 23.90 ...
Twenty T 67.96 ...
John Hancock A:
FnIndA p 14.12 +.15
TFBd A
10.47 -.02
John Hancock B:
FnIndB p 13.09 +.14
John Hancock Cl 1:
LSBalanc 14.50 +.02
LSGrwth 14.72 +.03
Kinetics Funds:
Medical n22.28 -.08
Lazard Instl:
EmgMktEq 19.69 -.01
Longleaf Partners:
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Loomis Sayles:
LSBondI 15.67 ...
StrInc C
16.47 ...
LSBondR 15.61 ...
StrIncA
16.37 ...
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Lord Abbett A:
AffilA p
13.66 +.05
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UtilA
21.02 -.09
ValueA
29.22 ...
MFS Funds B:
MCapB n10.07 +.03
NewDB
21.14 +.14
RschB n 30.14 +.07
GlGrB n
28.87 -.03
NA
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NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
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4-WK
NAV CHG %RTN NAME
MFS Funds C:
TotRC
n16.61 ...
UtilC n
20.94 -.09
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ValueI
29.36 ...
MFS Funds Instl:
IntlEq
n20.40 -.03
Managers Funds:
Yacktman p 22.02 -.02
YacktFoc 23.64 -.03
Manning&Napier Fds:
WldOppA 8.31 ...
Marsico Funds:
Grow p
23.42 +.02
Matthews Asian:
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Meridian Funds:
Growth
43.76 +.19
Value
36.53 +.14
Metro West Fds:
TotRetBd 11.01 ...
TotRtBdI 11.00 -.01
MorganStanley Inst:
EmMktI
26.94 +.05
Muhlenk n 60.64 +.34
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15.05 +.04
EuropZ
22.91 +.05
GblDiscA 31.52 +.06
GlbDiscZ 31.97 +.06
SharesZ 25.37 +.06
Needham Funds:
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Neuberger&Berm Fds:
GenesInst 54.10 +.09
Nicholas Group:
Nicholas n55.86 +.06
Nch II I n 23.91 +.06
Northern Funds:
HiYFxInc
7.83 +.01
IncEq
14.89 -.01
LCGr
26.89 +.05
SmCapVl 18.58 +.09
Technly
17.01 +.11
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TNMBA p 12.21 -.02
Nuveen Cl C:
HYMuBd t 17.39 -.02
TNMuBd t 12.19 -.02
Oak Assoc Fds:
BlkOkEm
3.08 +.03
LivOakHlt 16.33 -.04
RedOakT 12.07 +.03
Oakmark Funds I:
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GlobalI
26.75 +.02
Intl I r
23.37 -.04
Oakmark 55.26 +.37
Select
34.56 +.30
Old Westbury Fds:
GlobOpp
8.11 +.02
GlbSMdCap 16.15 +.03
LgCapStrat 10.98 -.01
Oppenheimer A:
DvMktA p 36.19 +.13
Disc p
66.22 +.52
GlobA p
72.28 -.05
GblStrIncA 4.42 ...
IntBdA p
6.64 ...
Oppenheimer B:
DiscB t
53.95 +.43
Oppenheimer C&M:
DevMktC t 34.62 +.12
GlOppC
29.83 +.10
Oppenheimer Y:
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IntlBdY
6.64 ...
IntGrowY 33.49 -.03
PIMCO Admin PIMS:
TotRtAd
11.30 -.01
PIMCO Instl PIMS:
AlAsetAut r 11.12 -.01
AllAsset
12.86 ...
ComodRR 6.34 -.02
DivInc
12.41 ...
EmgMkCur 10.72 ...
EmMkBd 12.45 ...
4-WK
NAV CHG %RTN
HiYld
9.87 -.01
+1.9 InvGrCp
11.33 ...
+2.8 LowDu
10.52 ...
RealRtnI 12.24 -.01
9.91 ...
+3.5 ShortT
TotRt
11.30 -.01
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AllAstAut t 11.12 -.01
11.30 -.01
+2.5 TotRtA
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RealRtB t 12.24 -.01
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AllAsset t 12.82 ...
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TotRtC t
11.30 -.01
+5.8 PIMCO Funds D:
TRtn p
11.30 -.01
+2.1 PIMCO Funds P:
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TotRtnP
11.30 -.01
+0.7 Parnassus Funds:
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Perm Port Funds:
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+4.9 Pioneer Funds A:
AMTFrMu p 14.65 -.03
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HiYldC t
11.18 +.02
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R2030A n20.56 +.03
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7.29 +.01
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InstlCpG 21.08 +.08
IntDis
n
50.88
+.01
NA
14.19 -.04
NA Intl G&I
15.22 ...
NA IntlStk n
NA LatAm n 37.67 -.18
NA MidCap n 64.00 +.28
MCapVal n 27.28 +.07
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9.86 ...
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RealEst n 23.69 +.14
R2015 n 13.81 +.01
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4.84 ...
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Value n
30.63 +.11
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+5.3
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+1.2 LgCGI In 10.99 +.02
Prudential Fds A:
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Putnam Funds A:
+3.7 AmGvA p 9.14 -.01
+5.3 AABalA p 13.04 +.03
DvrInA p
7.99 ...
IntlGrth p 17.35 -.02
+3.8
Putnam
Funds
B:
+1.2
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GlblUtilB 11.66 -.10
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MultiCpGr 56.74 +.27
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-1.9 TotRetI r 15.27 +.04
15.21 +.07
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+0.2
Directors of the Tennessee Valley Authority didn’t
violate the federal Sunshine
law when they hired Bill
Johnson as chief executive
last November without a
public meeting, the utility’s
internal watchdog said Monday.
The TVA inspector general said the TVA board
was within its rights to hire
Johnson using a notational
approval from each of the
members of the then sixmember board. In a 10-page
report released Monday, TVA
Assistant Inspector General
John Brennan said the board
didn’t deliberate among members over the hiring selection
and therefore didn’t violate
the requirements of the Sunshine Act to conduct board
deliberations in public.
“Notational procedure
[with each board member
casting votes without board
deliberation] is not prohibited by the Sunshine Act, and
the board followed that process,” Brennan concluded.
Garry Morgan, a member
of the Bellefonte Efficiency
and Sustainability Team
who asked for the inspector general investigation of
Johnson’s hiring, said he was
disappointed in the secret
process used by the board
in making one of its most
important decisions.
“The TVA has taken the
route of ignoring openness
-1.0
+0.4
+2.8
+3.3
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+4.8
+3.5
0.0
NA
NA
NA
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+2.2
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+2.3
+2.6
+3.5
-6.2
and instead supports secrecy
and reneges in its responsibility to display openness in
a major federal action which
involved the final selection of
its CEO,” Morgan said Monday. “Increasingly, the TVA
is turning its head and ignoring openness in its meeting
process.”
The inspector general
report said the board didn’t
want to reveal the names of
any of the candidates for the
TVA CEO post, which was
created last year with the
retirement of Tom Kilgore
as head of TVA.
“Making the candidates’
identities known might jeopardize their current jobs or
jobs to which they may have
applied,” the inspector general report said.
The TVA board interviewed candidates for CEO
in September and October of
2012, but TVA’s general counsel advised the board not to
discuss any views or impresprivate.
Few realize that the vast
majority of online pharmacies don’t follow the rules.
The Internet is filled
with illegitimate websites
that lure customers with
spam emails and professional-looking websites
that run 24-hour call centers. A January study by
the National Association of
Boards of Pharmacy, which
accredits online pharmacies, found that only 257
of 10,275 online pharmacy
sites it examined appeared
legitimate.
Experts say the fake drugs
such websites sell can be
dangerous. That’s because
they don’t include the right
amount of the active ingredient, if any, or contain toxic
substances such as heavy
metals, lead paint and printer ink. They’re generally
made in filthy warehouses
and garages in Asia, Eastern
Europe and Latin America.
Online buyers are “playing Russian roulette,” says
Matthew Bassiur, vice president of global security at
New York-based Pfizer.
“The factories are deplorable. I’ve seen photographs
of these places,” he says.
“You wouldn’t even want to
walk in them, let alone ingest
anything made in them.”
Pfizer, which invented
the term “erectile dysfunction,” has long been aggressive in fighting counterfeiters. It conducts undercover
investigations and works
with authorities around the
globe, with good reason.
Counterfeit versions
of Viagra and dozens of
other Pfizer medicines rob
the company of billions in
annual sales.
Viagra is one of its top
drugs, with $2 billion in
worldwide revenue last year.
And it’s the most counterfeited drug in the U.S.,
according to the company.
Viagra
• Continued from Page C1
birth control pills.
“If it works, everybody
will hop on the train,” says
Les Funtleyder, a health
care strategist at private
equity fund Poliwogg who
believes Pfizer’s site will
attract “fence-sitters” who
are nervous about buying
online.
The online Viagra sales
are Pfizer’s latest effort to
combat a problem that has
grown with the popularity
of the Internet.
In recent years, Americans have become more
comfortable with online
shopping, with many even
buying prescription drugs
online. That’s particularly
true for those who don’t
have insurance, are bargain
hunters or want to keep
their medicine purchases
Staff File Photo by John Rawlston
Bill Johnson
is more than just one story.
+3.2
sions about the candidates.
The individual impressions
about the board members
were compiled and a consultant hired by the board to
help in the CEO selection,
Albert McAuley, then talked
one on one with board members to determine who they
wanted to hire.
TVA spokesman Duncan
Mansfield said the board “is
committed to working in an
open and transparent manner” and has met in open session for board meetings since
1975. Once the board picked
Johnson and Chairman Bill
Sansom negotiated his pay,
the hiring was announced on
Nov. 5, 2012.
Morgan said if TVA wants
to act in private like a private
company “then it should go
ahead and accept the Obama
administration’s proposal to
become an investor-owned
utility answerable to its
shareholders.”
“But if TVA wants to be
a public utility and get the
advantages of being a government agency, it needs to
operate in the open and let
the public which owns TVA
see what the board is doing,”
Morgan said.
Morgan said he still
believes that TVA violated
the Sunshine Act, but he said
he doesn’t have the financial
resources to mount a lawsuit
against TVA.
Contact Dave Flessner at
[email protected]
com or at 757-6340
Staff Writer
Breaking news
+0.2
TVA hiring of CEO didn’t
break the Sunshine law
By Dave Flessner
GET MORE
+1.1
+0.2
k`d\j]i\\gi\jj%Zfd
NAME
4-WK
NAV CHG %RTN NAME
SEI Asset Alloc:
DvrAgStkA
... ...
ModGroA
... ...
SEI Portfolios:
DvrAggGrA
... ...
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S&P Sel 25.32 +.04
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CathVal p 19.77 +.09
Scout Funds:
Intl
35.51 -.02
Sequoia 187.89 +.30
St FarmAssoc:
Balan
60.14 -.08
TCW Funds:
EmMktIn
9.40 ...
TotRetBdI 10.38 ...
TIAA-CREF Funds:
EqIdxInst 12.34 +.03
Templeton Instit:
ForEqS
20.75 -.04
Thornburg Fds:
IntValA p 29.11 -.01
IntValue I 29.74 ...
Thrivent Fds A:
SmCpStk 16.41 +.12
Tocqueville Fds:
Delafield n33.03 +.23
Gold t n
42.72 -.21
Tweedy Browne:
GblValue 25.68 -.02
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GlobAllo t 10.21 ...
UBS Funds Cl C:
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17.91 +.13
GrTxStr
15.60 +.01
Grwth
19.09 +.03
Intl
27.63 ...
PrecMM 17.28 -.09
4-WK
NAV CHG %RTN NAME
SmCpStk 16.73 +.06
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13.82 -.02
0.0 TxELT
14.02 -.02
TxESh
10.84 ...
0.0 Value Line Fd:
PremGro n31.77 +.01
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CAITAdm n 11.78 -.02
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ExtdAdm n 52.74 +.30
500Adml n 149.26 +.28
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GrwAdm n 41.23 +.09
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69.77 -.20
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InfProAd n 28.33 -.01
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IntGrAdm n 65.45 -.05
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ITGrAdm n 10.25 -.01
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LT Adml n 11.83 -.02
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MuHYAdm n 11.33 -.02
PrmCap r n 85.39 -.01
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STIGrAd n 10.82 ...
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TtlBAdml n 11.05 ...
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WellslAdm n 61.44 -.05
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Windsor n 58.62 +.33
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n26.24 +.10
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Solar
• Continued from Page C1
the year,” said Stephen Smith,
executive director for the
Southern Alliance for Clean
Energy. “TVA has set an
arbitrary cap and mismanaged the application process
in a way that suggests that
TVA is just not serious about
growing this technology.”
Smith and other solar
backers object to the limit
TVA imposed last fall on
the volume of solar generated power the federal utility
would buy at premium prices to help spur more solar
generation. Effective in 2013,
TVA will buy only 7.5 megawatts of solar generation at
its premium price of 9 cents
per kilowatt-hour above the
average retail rate in the valley. As of this week, about 250
solar energy proposals had
already used up this year’s
subsidy allocation, although
some of the allocation may
be recaptured later this year
if the reserved projects aren’t
actually built.
TVA spokesman Mike
Bradley said solar power
generation is growing for
TVA and other power producers, but utilities can’t pay
unlimited subsidies for solar
power.
“Our goal is to encourage
solar power growth as part
of our clean energy vision
and solar has certainly grown
tremendously in our region,”
Bradley said. “The cost of
solar generation has gone
down tremendously and
we’ve adjusted our program
to the market.”
Bradley said the fact that
TVA’s allocation is already
met “indicates the program
is working and there is more
interest in solar power.”
Ultimately, solar and other
energy generation must be
sustainable and competitive
and not rely upon market
subsidies, he said.
TVA cut its previous 12cents-per-kilowatt-hour subsidy for solar to 9 cents per
kwh this year and limited
the number of projects it
would support beyond small
residential solar generation
below 10 kilowatts.
But having reached the
annual limit for solar subsidies from TVA, some solar
energy developers worry
that their businesses could
wither while customers wait
4-WK
NAV CHG %RTN NAME
Convrt n 13.77 +.06
DivdGro n 19.24 -.02
Energy n 63.36 +.27
EqInc n
27.54 -.02
Explr n
91.40 +.53
GNMA n 10.86 -.01
GroInc n 34.55 +.10
HYCorp n 6.23 ...
HlthCre n 165.37 -.48
InflaPro n 14.42 ...
IntlExplr n 16.30 ...
IntlGr n
20.57 -.02
IntlVal n
33.61 -.04
LifeCon n 17.76 +.01
LifeGro n 25.56 +.03
LifeInc n 14.55 ...
LifeMod n 22.08 +.02
LTTsry n 12.93 -.03
Morg n
22.35 +.07
MuInt n
14.41 -.02
PrecMtls r n 12.28 +.04
PrmcpCor n 17.46 ...
Prmcp r n 82.30 -.01
SelValu r n 24.29 +.08
STAR n
22.44 +.01
STIGrade n 10.82 ...
StratEq n 25.06 +.15
TgtRetInc n 12.61 ...
TgRe2010 n 25.38 +.01
TgtRe2015 n 14.28 +.01
TgRe2020 n 25.68 +.02
TgtRe2025 n 14.76 +.01
TgRe2030 n 25.60 +.02
TgtRe2035 n 15.55 +.02
TgtRe2040 n 25.70 +.03
TgtRe2045 n 16.13 +.02
USGro n 23.82 +.09
Wellsly n 25.36 -.02
Welltn n
37.00 +.01
Wndsr n 17.37 +.10
WndsII n 33.43 +.05
Vanguard Idx Fds:
ExtMkt I n130.16 +.74
MidCpIstPl n129.22 +.47
TotIntAdm r n26.75 -.04
4-WK
NAV CHG %RTN
+3.3
+3.7
+3.2
+3.1
+4.5
0.0
+3.4
+2.1
+2.3
-0.8
+5.6
+4.7
+6.0
+1.6
+3.1
+0.8
+2.4
-0.7
+4.0
+0.2
-5.4
+3.9
+4.3
+4.0
+2.7
+0.2
+4.3
+1.0
+1.5
+2.1
+2.5
+2.8
+3.1
+3.3
+3.5
+3.5
+3.3
+1.4
+2.5
+4.1
+3.5
TotIntlInst r n106.96 -.16
TotIntlIP r n 106.98 -.16
500 n
149.24 +.28
Balanced n 25.71 +.03
DevMkt n 10.74 -.03
EMkt n
27.82 +.05
Europe n 27.76 -.08
Extend n 52.71 +.29
REIT r n 25.21 +.13
STBnd n 10.62 ...
TotBnd n 11.05 ...
TotlIntl n 15.99 -.02
TotStk n
40.55 +.10
Vanguard Instl Fds:
BalInst
n25.72 +.04
DevMkInst n 10.65 -.04
ExtIn n
52.74 +.30
GrwthIst n 41.23 +.10
InfProInst n 11.54 ...
InstIdx n 148.31 +.28
InsPl n
148.32 +.28
InsTStPlus n 36.75 +.09
MidCpIst n 26.20 +.10
STIGrInst n 10.82 ...
SCInst n 44.40 +.26
TBIst n
11.05 ...
TSInst n 40.57 +.10
ValueIst n 26.36 +.05
Vanguard Signal:
500Sgl n123.29 +.23
MidCpIdx n 37.43 +.14
STBdIdx n 10.62 ...
SmCpSig n 40.00 +.24
TotBdSgl n 11.05 ...
TotStkSgl n 39.15 +.10
Virtus Funds I:
EmMktI
10.82 -.02
Wasatch:
16.08 +.03
+3.7 IncEqty
4.48 +.01
+4.3 SmCapV
21.53 +.05
+4.9 UltraGr
+4.9
+4.9
+3.5
+2.1
+5.4
+4.2
+5.6
+3.6
+4.1
+0.1
+0.1
+4.9
+3.5
+2.2
+5.3
+3.7
+3.9
-0.9
+3.6
+3.6
+3.6
+4.3
+0.2
+3.3
+0.1
+3.5
+3.3
+3.6
+4.3
+0.1
+3.3
+0.1
+3.5
+4.7
+2.8
+3.7
+3.6
SOLAR CAP
Under its Green Power
Providers program, TVA:
■ Buys solar powergenerated electricity in
the Valley for 9 cents
per kilowatt-hour above
the retail rate. But the
utility caps the volume
of such subsidized
power in 2013 to 7.5
megawatts.
■ Signed agreements
with about 250 solar
projects to be added
in the Valley this
year. TVA has met its
annual cap already for
all of 2013, although
some of the unused
reservations may be
recaptured for other
developers this fall.
for next year’s allocation of
more solar subsidies.
“I won’t be able to sign
up any more customers until
next January, and I can’t go
that long without any work,”
Gary Wolf, co-owner and
lead installer at Sundog Solar
Energy LLC in Nashville, told
the Tennessean.
Solar installers in the
South complain that many
states don’t allow solar energy producers to sell directly
to homes or businesses and
must go through utilities.
“The states that are most
successful are the ones that
have the most predictable
and dependable markets and
allow free market competition [for end users],” said
Bill Silva, president of United Renewable Energy LLC.
Silva and others expect
solar energy to keep growing.
“I think it could supply
20 to 25 percent of our electricity,” Silva said. TVA now
gets less than 1 percent of
its power from solar.
“Solar has always been
competitive over the long
term, even before we had
any subsidies,” said Thomas Tripp, owner of Big Frog
Mountain in Chattanooga.
“TVA has been supportive
of solar power through the
years, and TVA can’t just
pay a premium price for
all renewable power and
remain competitive in the
market. Ultimately, we have
to prove that solar is cost
competitive and I know that
it is.”
Contact Dave Flessner at
[email protected]
com or at 757-6340
News From Across 12 Counties
Every day, every week in the...
C4 • Tuesday, May 7, 2013 • • •
..
timesfreepress.com ..
Breaking News: 423-757-News
CHANNEL 3
7-DAY
FORECAST
WEDNESDAY
8
THURSDAY
9
FRIDAY
Few Clouds
Few Showers
Few Showers
Few Showers
Few Showers
Showers End
Few Clouds
High: 71; Low: 52
High: 78; Low: 54
High: 83; Low: 60
High: 80; Low: 59
High: 79; Low: 57
High: 74; Low: 51
High: 71; Low: 51
TODAY
7
SATURDAY
11
10
SUNDAY
12
MONDAY
13
This forecast
prepared by
Chief Meteorologist
Paul Barys
Regional
Local
Cookeville
69/51
Nashville
72/52
40
Murfreesboro
72/52
Shelbyville
72/51
24
TN
Monteagle
67/49
65
Bridgeport
73/48
Huntsville
73/50
Scottsboro
72/47
59
at Chattanooga through 4 p.m. Yesterday.
High Temperature. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
Low Temperature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
Normal High . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
Normal Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
Record High . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94 in 1952
Record Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 in 1968
Knoxville
70/53
Dayton
72/50
75
Athens
69/51
Chattanooga
Cleveland
71/52
73/51
Dalton
68/50
LaFayette
69/49
Fort
Payne
62/51
Guntersville
69/46
TEMPERATURE
75
Crossville
67/49
PRECIPITATION
Precipitation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.03"
Month to Date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.41"
Normal Month to Date . . . . . . . . . . 0.85"
Year to Date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31.89"
Normal Year to Date. . . . . . . . . . . 19.57"
NC
Murphy
68/51
Blue
Ridge
66/49
SUN
Today
MOON
GA
75
Today
AL
Atlanta
68/52
New
5/9
Today Tomorrow
Hi/Lo/F
Hi/Lo/F
63/47/t
71/49/t
69/51/t
78/55/s
70/52/t
79/55/pc
73/52/s
79/55/s
68/50/t
68/52/t
74/55/t
78/59/s
68/53/t
78/55/t
73/53/pc 82/56/s
79/59/s
81/61/s
73/60/s
75/65/s
68/51/t
75/52/t
73/50/s
77/56/s
77/60/pc 81/62/s
City
Key West
Knoxville
Memphis
Miami
Mobile
Montgomery
Myrtle Beach
Nashville
Orlando
Panama City
Pensacola
Savannah
Tallahassee
Today Tomorrow
Hi/Lo/F
Hi/Lo/F
82/71/s
83/72/s
70/53/t
73/52/pc
74/56/s
81/63/s
81/68/s
85/70/s
77/57/s
79/62/s
74/53/s
82/57/s
70/54/t
72/60/s
72/52/pc 78/58/pc
81/61/s
85/63/s
77/60/s
81/65/s
75/60/s
77/65/s
74/56/t
80/60/s
78/53/sh 82/59/s
Today
Hi/Lo
City
Today
Hi/Lo
Tomorrow
Hi/Lo/F
75/57
78/63/pc
66/56
68/58/s
74/56
81/63/s
Atlanta
73/50
Tomorrow
Hi/Lo/F
77/56/s
Sunny
Las Vegas
Lake
Apalachia
Blue Ridge
Center Hill
Chatuge
Cherokee
Chickamauga
Douglas
Fontana
Fort Loudoun
Guntersville
Hiwassee
Melton Hill
Nickajack
Normandy
Norris
Nottely Lake
Ocoee No. 1
Tellico
Tims Ford
Watts Bar
Weiss
Wheeler
Showers
Charlotte
68/51
73/52/t
Los Angeles
Thunderstorms
Thunderstorms
Chicago
68/49
73/53/s
Sunny
Memphis
Cincinnati
72/54
75/53/t
Nashville
85/61
86/64/pc
Sunny
New York
67/42
61/42/ra
73/51
72/53/pc
83/66
86/68/s
Thunderstorms
Orlando
Partly cloudy
Pittsburgh
Tampa
Today . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Med-High
Tomorrow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Med-High
Thursday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Med-High
81/61
85/63/s
72/55
71/52/sh
80/63
82/64/s
67/57
71/55/sh
WEATHER UPDATES
24/7
FREE
HOME
k`d\j]i\\gi\jj%Zfd
ASSESSMENT!
SPONSORED BY:
LINDA BROCK
MARK HITE
Sunny
Houston
83/63
83/65/pc
Sunny
Washington
Chng
+0.9’
+0.5’
+5.8
+0.8’
+0.4’
+1.1’
+1.5’
+2.9’
+0.2’
+0.6’
+1.4’
+1.0’
-0.7’
+0.6’
+0.6’
+1.1’
-0.9’
+0.2’
-0.7’
+1.3’
-0.1’
-0.2’
62/55/t
35493291
Sunny
Curr
1278.6’
1688.4’
649.2’
1926.3’
1067.2’
682.8’
993.0’
1703.4’
811.3’
594.9’
1521.6’
794.8’
632.8’
876.5’
1021.8’
1778.0’
830.1’
811.3’
890.3'
742.8’
563.8’
555.4’
70/57
Showers
Ft. Lauderdale
Norm
1280’
1691’
692.2’
1928’
1075’
682.5’
1002’
1710’
813’
595’
1526’
795’
634’
880’
1020’
1775’
830.76’
815’
886.8’
741’
564’
556’
78/58/pc
Sunny
Detroit
110s
100s
90s
80s
70s
60s
50s
40s
30s
20s
10s
0s
L
L
L
H
National Extremes
72/52
Partly cloudy
Denver
Last
5/31
PREDOMINANT POLLEN. . . . Maple
FORECAST
Partly cloudy
Dallas
Full
5/24
Pollen
Sunny
Thunderstorms
First
5/17
The Northeast will see mostly clear to partly cloudy skies and isolated thunderstorms, with the highest
temperature of 81º in Lebanon, N.H. The Southeast will experience mostly clear to partly cloudy skies,
with the highest temperature of 86º in Marathon Key, Fla. The central United States will see mostly
clear to partly cloudy skies and a few thunderstorms, with the highest temperature of 92º in Laredo,
Texas. In the Northwest, there will be mostly clear to partly cloudy skies, with the highest temperature
of 89º in Hanford, Wash. The Southwest will see scattered thunderstorms, with the highest temperature
of 91º in Artesia, N.M.
LAKE LEVELS
Airports
City
Tomorrow
Moonrise. . . . . 5:13 a.m. . . . . . 5:48 a.m.
Moonset . . . . . 6:35 p.m. . . . . . 7:32 p.m.
Southeast
City
Asheville
Athens, GA
Augusta, GA
Birmingham
Bristol
Charleston, SC
Columbia, SC
Columbus, GA
Daytona Bch.
Destin
Greenville, SC
Huntsville
Jacksonville
Tomorrow
Sunrise . . . . . . 6:43 a.m. . . . . . 6:42 a.m.
Sunset . . . . . . 8:32 p.m. . . . . . 8:33 p.m.
Calhoun
68/50
Rome
70/49
National
Showers
667-2459 • 664-1900
t
MarkHite.com
LindaBrockHomes.com
High: 93° in Phoenix, Ariz.
Low: 20° in Chadron, Neb.
City
Albany
Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlantic City
Austin
Baltimore
Baton Rouge
Billings
Boston
Buffalo
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Dallas
Dayton
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Fairbanks
Fargo
Today
Tomorrow
Hi/Lo/F
Hi/Lo/F
77/51/s
73/55/sh
79/48/s
74/47/s
48/34/mc 53/36/pc
66/54/sh 66/56/sh
85/61/s
85/68/mc
72/59/sh 71/57/sh
80/58/s
84/62/s
76/47/s
72/48/t
73/53/pc 64/52/sh
77/53/s
70/56/s
67/57/sh 71/55/sh
68/51/t
73/52/t
68/49/s
73/53/s
71/54/t
75/53/t
71/54/s
71/56/s
85/61/s
86/64/s
71/53/t
74/54/t
65/41/t
61/42/ra
76/54/s
71/56/t
73/51/pc 72/53/pc
81/62/s
81/63/s
45/20/pc 49/27/pc
73/49/s
69/43/pc
City
Grand Rapids
Greensboro, NC
Helena
Honolulu
Houston
Indianapolis
Kansas City
Las Vegas
Lincoln
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Macon
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
New Orleans
New York City
Norfolk
Oklahoma City
Omaha
Peoria
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Today
Tomorrow
Hi/Lo/F
Hi/Lo/F
74/51/pc 74/55/mc
68/54/t
68/53/t
73/48/s
73/47/t
85/69/s
83/69/s
83/63/s
83/65/pc
73/56/t
76/58/mc
73/56/s
71/60/t
75/61/pc 78/67/s
73/52/t
71/55/t
79/56/pc 82/60/s
66/56/t
68/60/pc
73/56/t
76/59/pc
72/50/sh 80/55/s
69/49/s
68/51/s
73/53/s
71/54/t
77/64/s
81/65/s
70/57/pc 62/55/t
68/56/t
73/57/t
77/57/s
82/60/mc
72/52/t
70/55/t
77/53/s
77/58/s
74/57/sh 68/57/sh
83/61/s
83/62/s
City
Pittsburgh
Portland, ME
Portland, OR
Providence
Raleigh
Rapid City
Reno
Richmond
Sacramento
St. Louis
Santa Fe
Salt Lake City
San Antonio
San Diego
San Francisco
San Jose
Seattle
Topeka
Tucson
Tulsa
Washington
Wichita
Wilmington, DE
Today
Tomorrow
Hi/Lo/F
Hi/Lo/F
72/55/sh 71/52/sh
67/47/s
62/48/pc
72/51/s
73/49/s
73/51/s
66/52/sh
71/55/t
72/54/t
71/46/t
69/47/t
61/45/t
67/47/mc
68/55/t
72/55/t
74/55/mc 78/53/s
75/57/s
78/59/s
68/42/s
63/41/mc
67/50/t
67/51/t
83/64/s
83/70/mc
70/60/mc 66/60/mc
70/51/mc 66/51/pc
73/53/mc 72/53/s
69/50/s
69/48/pc
74/55/pc 74/58/t
83/58/s
81/59/s
76/56/pc 79/62/pc
67/57/sh 71/55/sh
72/56/pc 76/58/t
73/56/sh 68/54/sh
City
Jerusalem
London
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
New Delhi
Paris
Today
Tomorrow
Hi/Lo/F
Hi/Lo/F
81/59/s
82/61/pc
64/53/sh 59/46/sh
84/56/s
85/58/pc
82/52/s
83/57/pc
66/46/s
71/51/pc
108/80/s 108/83/s
72/59/pc 66/49/sh
City
Port-au-Prince
Rio de Janeiro
Rome
Seoul
Sydney
Tokyo
Toronto
Today
Tomorrow
Hi/Lo/F
Hi/Lo/F
96/73/t
92/76/t
79/67/pc 78/63/pc
67/56/ra
69/58/s
77/51/s
74/51/pc
71/56/s
72/57/s
65/49/s
70/54/s
74/53/s
72/54/pc
International
City
Athens
Beijing
Berlin
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Frankfurt
Hong Kong
Today
Tomorrow
Hi/Lo/F
Hi/Lo/F
81/60/pc 77/58/pc
87/61/pc 82/62/s
70/57/pc 76/59/pc
65/47/s
72/52/s
93/67/s
91/69/pc
73/56/t
77/58/pc
81/74/t
79/74/t
Weather (Wx)FOFORXG\ÁÁXUULHVSFSDUWO\FORXG\PFPRVWO\FORXG\UDUDLQ
UVUDLQVQRZVVXQQ\VKVKRZHUVVQVQRZWWKXQGHUVWRUPVZZLQG\
House Republicans seek alternative to overtime pay
even months later to attend a
parent-teacher conference or
deal with home repairs.
Republicans in Congress
are pushing legislation that
would extend that option to
the private sector. They say
that would bring more flexibility to the workplace and
help workers better balance
family and career.
The push is part of a
broader Republican agenda
undertaken by House Majority Leader Eric Cantor, R-Va.,
to expand the party’s political
appeal to working families. The
House is expected to vote on
the measure this week, but the
Democratic-controlled Senate
isn’t likely to take it up.
“For some people, time
Buffett:
Wells Fargo, Bank of America
Stocks good;
accused
of
violating
mortgage
accord
bonds awful
The Associated Press
action, Schneiderman said he
will sue for compliance.
Under the settlement, the
banks are required to respond
to mortgage modification
requests within 30 days.
Schneiderman said delays
put homeowners further into
debt from missed payments
and penalties, pushing them
closer to foreclosure.
“The five mortgage services that signed the national mortgage settlement are
legally required to take specific, rigorous and enforceable steps to protect homeowners,” Schneiderman said.
“Wells Fargo and Bank of
America have flagrantly vio-
lated those obligations.”
Bank of America spokesman Richard Simon said
through March it provided
mortgage relief for more than
10,000 New York homeowners totaling more than $1 billion and the bank will work
to address quickly the 129
customer servicing problems
Schneiderman cited.
Wells Fargo said it was
committed to full compliance with the settlement.
er advocacy groups, labor
unions and most Democrats,
who claim it’s really a backdoor way for businesses to
skimp on overtime pay.
“This is nothing more than
an effort to turn a sow’s ear
into a silk purse,” said Judith
Lichtman, senior adviser to
the National Partnership for
Women and Families.
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35612205
OMAHA, Neb. — Investor Warren Buffett said even
though the stock market is
soaring, prices appear reasonable, and stocks would
be a better investment than
bonds for most people.
Buffett conducted interviews Monday on CNBC
and the Fox Business Network cable channels after
a weekend full of events in
Omaha for Berkshire Hathaway shareholders.
“Bonds are a terrible investment right now,” Buffett said.
Buffett said bond prices are artificially inflated
because the Federal Reserve
continues to buy $85 billion
of bonds a month, and owners of long-term bonds may
see big losses when interest
rates eventually rise. He said
inflation is also likely when
the Fed stops buying bonds.
He said the average investor should keep enough cash
to be comfortable and invest
the rest in equities.
“Stocks are reasonably
priced now,” Buffett said on
CNBC.
The Federal Reserve’s
efforts to keep interest rates
low have helped the stock
market soar, Buffett said, but
the improving economy has
also played a role.
ALBANY, N.Y. — New
York’s attorney general on
Monday accused Wells Fargo
and Bank of America of violating the terms of last year’s
national mortgage settlement
by failing to process hundreds of refinancing requests
promptly.
Attorney General Eric
Schneiderman has notified
the national monitoring
committee established to
enforce the five-bank agreement, citing complaints of
210 prompt-processing violations by Wells Fargo and
129 by Bank of America. If
the committee defers taking
Start With Trust
SM
bbb.org
Better Business Bureau®
35584844
The Associated Press
is more valuable than the
cash that would be accrued
in overtime,” said Rep. Martha Roby, R-Ala., the bill’s
chief sponsor. “Why should
public-sector employees be
given a benefit and the private sector be left out?”
But the idea Republicans
promote as “pro-worker” is
vigorously opposed by work-
35677142
The Associated Press
Warren Buffett
WASHINGTON — It
seems like a simple proposition: give employees who work
more than 40 hours a week the
option of taking paid time off
instead of overtime pay.
The choice already exists in
the public sector. Federal and
state workers can save earned
time off and use it weeks or
34222361
The Associated Press
...
.
D
SPORTS
Blackburn
gives QB Club
a good first
impression
timesfreepress.com/sports
GEORGIA PREP GOLF: Six area girls’ teams set for state, D5
q
q
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL: A-Rod back on the field, D4
• • • Tuesday, May 7, 2013
NEW ATHLETIC DIRECTOR GIVES QUARTERBACK CLUB UPDATE ON MOCS
David Blackburn got to
preach to the choir Monday.
The University of Tennessee
at Chattanooga’s new athletic
director addressed the Quarterback Club before being softly
questioned by a lot of folks
whose primary colors have been
blue and gold for most of their
lives.
Yet even with a house full of
Mocs Maniacs ready to embrace
his every word at Finley Stadium’s Stadium Club, Blackburn
asked for no blind loyalty.
“I don’t expect you guys to
trust and believe me right now,”
he said. “I know I have to earn
that.”
Earning anything takes time,
of course. And with Blackburn
hoping to hire
both men’s and
women’s basketball coaches
over the next
week to 10 days,
he knows time is
not on his side
at the moment.
“I never
Mark
thought it would
Wiedmer
be as hectic as
Commentary
it is,” he said.
“But I love every
minute of it.”
But it was what he told the
crowd of 100 or more about
his vision beyond the coaching
search that may make this community grow to love the former
University of Tennessee associate AD.
“Even in ugly situations, we
are going to treat people with
respect,” he said.
Regarding fundraising, long a
UTC athletic department problem, he noted, “We need to be
more visible in the community.
We need a little more heavy
prospecting.”
Discussing nonconference
basketball scheduling he said,
“You want to see exciting teams.
That’s what grows revenue.”
Asked about his views on
remaining in the Southern
Conference, he made no promises, saying only, “I think UTC
should be the school with the
greatest stature in the league.”
Questioned about the possibility of pushing for more football games to be played on
Staff Photo by Dan Henry
UTC athletic director David Blackburn speaks during a luncheon Monday to the Chattanooga Quarterback Club at Finley Stadium.
UTC MOVES CLOSER
TO BASKETBALL HIRES
By John Frierson
Staff Writer
T
he concurrent searches for
new University of Tennessee at Chattanooga men’s and
women’s basketball coaches are progressing and should be wrapped up
within the next week or so, new athletic director David Blackburn said
Monday.
Speaking to an attentive audience
of more than 100 Chattanooga Quarterback Club members and guests,
Blackburn talked about his past, his
goals for UTC and more during a
40-minute talk in the Stadium Club
at Finley Stadium.
Before anyone could ask a question about the searches, Blackburn
gave a brief and nameless progress
report. He declined to mention
names to protect “the integrity of
the search and I wanted to protect
the candidates’ names also,” he said
afterward.
In his first public address since his
introductory reception on April 24,
Blackburn said of the searches, “It’s
all I’ve done” since starting work on
April 25.
After the lunchtime address, Blackburn spoke with the media for several
minutes. He said he still is interviewing
candidates for the men’s and women’s
jobs. He also said no candidates have
been brought onto UTC’s campus, and
they may not before the hirings.
“That’s not atypical in the athletic
world,” he said.
Blackburn, who is working with
the Charlotte-based search firm Collegiate Sports Associates, said he
hopes to have the searches down to
the final two for each job in the next
day or so.
“We want to get it down on both
sides really tight here in the next
48 hours, and we hope to finalize it
sometime this week,” he said, adding
that he’s reluctant to put a specific
timeline on it.
Of the quality and quantity of the
coaches interested in both vacancies,
Blackburn told the audience, “I’ve
been very surprised — overwhelmed,
to be honest with you — on both the
men and the women’s sides.”
Blackburn said his first few weeks
on the job have been “a bit of a whirl-
INSIDE
■ Blackburn
says UTC
softball issue
settled, D6
■ UTC men’s
golf team
headed to
Ohio State
regional, D6
See UTC, Page D6
See WIEDMER, Page D6
SEC FOOTBALL
BRAVES 7, REDS 4
Simmons’ homers
pace Braves victory
QB Frazier, Auburn
see signs of hope in ’13
SEC INVASION
Head football coaches
from Tennessee and
Georgia will be in the
Chattanooga area
today, and it’s not
because of a premier
high-school prospect.
First-year Volunteers
coach Butch Jones
will be the guest
speaker at “A Lunch
for Champions” at the
Orange Grove Center.
Mark Richt, who is in
his 13th season with the
Bulldogs, will be joined
by basketball coach
Mark Fox and university
president Michael
Adams tonight as the
“UGA Days” tour makes
a stop at the Catoosa
County Colonnade.
The Associated Press
By David Paschall
Staff Writer
A month after Auburn won college
football’s 2010 national championship,
quarterback Kiehl Frazier signed with the
Tigers.
Frazier, tabbed by USA Today as its high
school national offensive player of the year,
tallied more than 4,000 total yards as a
senior in leading Shiloh Christian to its
third straight Arkansas Class 4A title. The
dual-threat talent was drawing comparisons to 2010 Auburn star Cam Newton.
Now halfway through his college career,
Frazier has faltered frequently but is not
without hope of joining Stan White, Ben
Leard and Jason Campbell as quarterbacks
who impressively salvaged their time on
the Plains. Gus Malzahn, who recruited
Frazier to Auburn when he was offensive
coordinator under Gene Chizik, is back
as head coach following a year guiding
See FRAZIER, Page D5
The Associated Press
Auburn junior quarterback Kiehl Frazier has struggled with the Tigers, throwing two touchdowns and
10 interceptions during his first two seasons.
CINCINNATI — Andrelton Simmons homered
twice and drove in a career-high four runs Monday
night, leading the Atlanta Braves to a 7-4 victory
that ended the Cincinnati Reds’ winning streak at
three games.
The Braves won at a place where they’ve had
little success. They were 0-4 at Great American Ball
Park last year and 14-25 overall since it opened for
the 2003 season.
Paul Maholm (4-3) held down an offense that’s
been all-or-nothing. The left-hander allowed four
2
hits and two runs in 5 ⁄3 innings. Cincinnati stranded
five runners in scoring position overall.
Craig Kimbrel gave up two singles in the ninth
before striking out Joey Votto for his 10th save in 12
opportunities.
Atlanta scored in four of five innings against
Bronson Arroyo (2-4), who gave up eight hits, walked
two and allowed four runs in his shortest outing of
the season.
Simmons had a solo homer and an RBI single off
Arroyo. He added a two-run homer in the eighth off
Logan Ondrusek, matching his career high for hits.
Freddie Freeman also singled and doubled and
See BRAVES, Page D4
Thomas wants out of FSU signing; to go to UGA or USC
By David Paschall
Staff Writer
Matthew Thomas, one of
the nation’s top football prospects in the 2013 signing class,
told the Miami Herald that he
wants out of his scholarship to
Florida State and would like to
play at Georgia or Southern
California.
The 6-foot-3, 205-pounder from Miami’s Booker T.
Washington High School was
rated by Rivals.com as the No.
2 outside linebacker in the
country and the No. 15 overall prospect. His last three
visits were to USC, Florida
State and Georgia, and he was
considered a toss-up leading
up to signing day between
FSU’s Seminoles and USC’s
Trojans.
“Georgia needs linebackers,” Thomas told the paper
in an article that ran Monday.
“It’s a big program. I have
family in Georgia.
“USC — growing up I
never thought I would have
an opportunity that big. I just
want to go have fun and play
football.”
The Herald reported that
FSU coaches do not want to
release Thomas and they plan
to visit him soon.
Contact David Paschall
at [email protected]
com or 423-757-6524.
Atlanta
activated
catcher
Brian
McCann
off the
disabled
list on
Monday.
McCann
went
0-for-4 at
the plate.
■ To contact Sports • Phone: 423-757-6273 • Fax: 423-668-5049 • Email: [email protected]
The Associated Press
Tuesday, May 7, 2013 • • •
..
timesfreepress.com ..
Breaking News: 423-757-News
PAGE2BITS
SCHEDULES
Area Colleges
COLLEGE BASEBALL
Monday’s Scores
HIGH SCHOOLS
Baseball
2013 ALL-DISTRICT TEAMS
District 5-AAA
Bradley Central: Charles Chavis, Jacob
Maynard, Nate Mills, Caleb Pippenger.
Cleveland: Kimsey Bell, Taylor Thompson,
Jake Wyrick. McMinn County: Jay Odum,
Corbin Powers. Ooltewah: Brody Binder,
Kevin Dupree, Logan Fugate, Jackson
McClain, Zach Thompson, Drew Williams. Rhea County: Hunter Scoons, Jalen
Smith.
Soddy-Daisy: Chris Amos, Caden Ricketts. Walker Valley: Kamren Barnes, Caleb
Longley, Josh Poole, Chase Prince, John
Simmons.
High Schools
NASCAR
Sprint Cup Leaders
Through May 5
Points
1, Jimmie Johnson, 383. 2, Carl Edwards, 342.
3, Dale Earnhardt Jr., 324. 4, Clint Bowyer, 316.
5, Brad Keselowski, 314. 6, Kasey Kahne, 299.
7, Aric Almirola, 293. 8, Paul Menard, 290. 9,
Kyle Busch, 285. 10, Greg Biffle, 280.
11, Matt Kenseth, 279. 12, Kevin Harvick, 276.
13, Martin Truex Jr., 269. 14, Jeff Gordon, 269.
15, Jamie McMurray, 267. 16, Ricky Stenhouse
Jr., 256. 17, Ryan Newman, 242. 18, Joey
Logano, 237. 19, Jeff Burton, 235. 20, Kurt
Busch, 231.
Money
1, Jimmie Johnson, $3,149,954. 2, Kyle Busch,
$2,337,412. 3, Dale Earnhardt Jr., $2,279,564.
4, Matt Kenseth, $2,258,640. 5, Brad Keselowski, $2,206,389. 6, Carl Edwards, $2,033,574.
7, Kevin Harvick, $1,921,982. 8, Martin Truex
Jr., $1,767,104. 9, Clint Bowyer, $1,742,263. 10,
Ryan Newman, $1,714,408.
11, Kasey Kahne, $1,679,243. 12, Joey Logano,
$1,657,969. 13, Aric Almirola, $1,640,276.
14, Jeff Gordon, $1,638,863. 15, Greg Biffle,
$1,634,789. 16, Tony Stewart, $1,610,459. 17,
Ricky Stenhouse Jr., $1,604,328. 18, Mark Martin, $1,572,497. 19, David Ragan, $1,496,728.
20, Paul Menard, $1,495,148.
Sports Editor Jay Greeson provides
a morning look at sports developments Monday
through Friday at www.timesfreepress.com.
INTHEBLEACHERS
All Times Eastern
Wednesday, May 8
SOFTBALL
SoCon tournament, Greensboro, N.C.:
Elon vs Samford, 9 a.m.
Col. of Charleston vs Western Carolina, 12
Georgia Southern vs UTC, 2:30
Appalachian State vs Elon/Samford, 5
UNC Greensboro vs Furman, 7:30
BASEBALL
NCCAA Mid-East Regional at Nashville:
Covenant vs Victory, 5
Tennessee Temple at Union, Tenn., 8
Tuesday, May 7
BASEBALL
District 5-A at higher seed
Winners-bracket final
Boyd-Buchanan at Silverdale Baptist, 5
losers-bracket semifinal
Copper Basin at Arts & Sciences, 5
District 6-A at South Pittsburg
Marion County vs. South Pittsburg, 5
Lookout Valley vs. Whitwell, 8
District 5-AA at higher seed
Meigs County at Polk County, 5
McMinn Central at Sequoyah, 5
District 6-AA at Hixson
Hixson vs. Central, 4:30
Red Bank vs. East Hamilton, 7
District 7-AA
Sequatchie County at Chattanooga Christian, 5
Signal Mountain at Bledsoe County, 6
District 5-AAA at Soddy-Daisy
Losers-bracket quarterfinals
Rhea County vs. Bradley Central, 5
Cleveland vs. Walker Valley, 8
GHSA State First Round Playoff if-necessary
game
Class AAAA
Grady at Northwest Whitfield, 5:30
SOCCER
Brentwood High at Baylor, 6
Marion County at Sequatchie County, 6
District 5-AAA Semifinals
Rhea/Cleveland winner at Ooltewah, 7
District semifinal
District 5-A/AA Semifinals
District 6-A/AA Semifinals
District 7-A/AA Semifinals
Notre Dame at Signal Mountain
GHSA Girls State Playoffs Second Round
Class AAAA
Carrollton at Heritage, 5:30
Class AAA
Blessed Trinity at Lakeview-Fort Oglethorpe
SOFTBALL
District 5-A at higher seed
Boyd-Buchanan at Grace Academy, 5
Silverdale Baptist vs. Arts & Sciences at
Warner Park, 5:30
District 6-A at Sale Creek
Van Buren vs. South Pittsburg, 5
Richard Hardy vs. Sale Creek, 7
District 5-AA at higher seed
Sequoyah at Polk County, 5:30
Sweetwater at Meigs County, 6
District 6-AA at Warner Park
Brainerd vs. Central; Red Bank vs. Hixson, 4:30
Tyner vs. East Ridge; Red Bank-Hixson winner
vs. East Hamilton, 6
Brainerd-Central winner vs. Tyner-East Ridge
winner, 7:30
Brainerd-Central loser vs. Tyner-East Ridge
loser, 7:30
District 7-AA at Sequatchie County
Signal Mountain vs. Grundy County, 6
Sequatchie County vs. Bledsoe County, 8
District 5-AAA at Rhea County
Rhea County vs. Soddy-Daisy, 4
Cleveland vs. Bradley Central, 6
Ooltewah vs. Walker Valley, 8
TENNIS
District 5-A/AA Individual Tournament at Lee
University
District 5-AAA Individual Tournament at
Ingleside Courts
District 7-A/AA Individual Tournament at
Champions Club
TRACK
Division II East Region decathlon/pentathlon
at McCallie
Class AAA boys’ sub-sectional at Rhea County, 4
Wednesday, May 8
BASEBALL
District 7-AA at Sequatchie County
Championship, 6
District 5-AAA at Soddy-Daisy
Winners-bracket final
Soddy-Daisy vs. Ooltewah, 5
Losers-bracket semifinal, 8
GHSA second round
Class AAA
Ringgold at Blessed Trinity (DH), 4:30
Class A
Jenkins County at Trion (DH), TBA
Gordon Lee vs. TBA
SOCCER
GHSA Boys State Playoffs Second Round
Class AAAA
Southeast Whitfield at Carrollton
Johnson at Dalton, 6:30
Northwest Whitfield at Chestatee, 6:30
Class AAA
East Hall at North Murray
Class AA
Rabun County at Calhoun, 6
SOFTBALL
Ensworth at GPS, 4
Ensworth at Baylor, 5:30
District 6-A at Sale Creek
Richard Hardy-Sale Creek winner vs. Whitwell, 5
Van Buren-South Pittsburg winner vs. Marion
County, 7
TENNIS
District 5-A/AA Individual Tournament at Lee
University, 9 a.m.
District 7-A/AA Individual Tournament at Middle
Valley, noon
District 6-A/AA Individual Tournament at Warner
Park, 1:30
TRACK
Division II East Region decathlon/pentathlon
at McCallie
Class A/AA sub-sectional field events, 3200 at
Red Bank, 4
LOOK DAILY FOR ‘5 AT 10’
District 7-AA
Bledsoe County: Nathan Turner, Ben Dean.
Chattanooga Christian: Levi Corbett, Zack
Mercer, Jay Simms.
Grundy County: Hunter Brown. Notre
Dame: Nick Chambers. Sequatchie County: Jake Pickett, Logan Wells, Thomas Willoughby, co-player of year Dakota Hudson.
Signal Mountain: Madison Byrd, Grant
Hensley, Chris Feemster, co-POY Braxton
Reese,; coach of year Bumper Reese.
SPORTSONAIR
TUESDAY TELEVISION
■ Baseball
MLB: Atlanta at Cincinnati, SSouth, 7 p.m.
MLB: Detroit at Washington, MLB Net, 7 p.m.
or Atlanta at Cincinnati
MLB: St. Louis at Chicago Cubs, WGN, 8 p.m.
■ Basketball
NBA: Indiana at New York, TNT, 7 p.m.
NBA: Memphis at Oklahoma City, TNT, 9:30 p.m.
■ Hockey
IIHF: United States vs Russia, prelim, NBCSN, 1 p.m.
NHL: Montreal at Ottawa, CNBC, 7 p.m.
NHL: Pittsburgh at New York Islanders, NBCSN, 7 p.m.
NHL: Chicago at Minnesota, NBCSN, 9:30 p.m.
NHL: Vancouver at San Jose, CNBC, 10 p.m.
■ Soccer
Premier: West Bromwich at Manchester City, ESPN2, 2:30 p.m.
Southern League
Monday
At Caja Magica
Madrid, Spain
Purse: Men, $5.6 million, (WT1000); Women,
$5.3 million (Premier)
Surface: Clay-Outdoor
Singles
Men
First Round
Kei Nishikori (14), Japan, def. Jurgen Melzer,
Austria, 6-3, 6-2.
Kevin Anderson, South Africa, def. Jesse Levine,
Canada, 6-2, 6-2.
Denis Istomin, Uzbekistan, def. Xavier Malisse,
Belgium, 6-3, 6-2.
Florian Mayer, Germany, def. Marinko Matosevic, Australia, 6-2, 6-7 (3), 6-4.
Milos Raonic (12), Canada, def. Nikolay
Davydenko, Russia, 7-5, 7-6 (5).
Daniel Gimeno-Traver, Spain, def. Feliciano
Lopez, Spain, 2-6, 6-4, 6-2.
Nicolas Almagro (11), Spain, def. Tobias Kamke,
Germany, 6-4, retired.
John Isner, United States, def. Guillermo GarciaLopez, Spain, 7-5, 7-6 (8).
Jerzy Janowicz, Poland, def. Sam Querrey,
United States, 6-3, 6-4.
Robin Haase, Netherlands, def. Alexandr Dolgopolov, Ukraine, 6-3, 6-7 (6), 6-2.
Grigor Dimitrov, Bulgaria, def. Javier Marti,
Spain, 6-2, 6-4.
Women
First Round
Christina McHale, United States, def. Peng
Shuai, China, 7-5, 5-7, 6-1.
Carla Suarez Navarro, Spain, def. Sam Stosur
(9), Australia, 7-6 (7), 6-2.
Kristina Mladenovic, France, def. Silvia SolerEspinosa, Spain, 6-1, 6-1.
Maria Sharapova (2), Russia, def. Alexandra
Dulgheru, Romania, 7-5, 6-2.
Victoria Azarenka (3), Belarus, def. Anastasia
Pavlyuchenkova, Russia, 7-6 (8), 7-6 (3).
Second Round
Angelique Kerber (6), Germany, def. Alize Cornet, France, 6-4, 6-2.
Sara Errani (7), Italy, def. Sorana Cirstea, Romania, 7-5, 2-6, 6-4.
Laura Robson, Britain, def. Agnieszka Radwanska (4), Poland, 6-3, 6-1.
Doubles
Men
First Round
Jeremy Chardy, France, and Lukasz Kubot,
Poland, def. Marcelo Melo, Brazil, vs. Mikhail
Youzhny, Russia, 7-6 (6), 6-4.
Julian Knowle, Austria, and Filip Polasek, Slovakia, def. Daniele Braccali and Fabio Fognini,
Italy, 6-3, 7-6 (5).
David Marrero and Fernando Verdasco, Spain,
def. Florian Mayer, Germany, vs. Andreas Seppi,
Italy, 6-1, 6-4.
Women
First Round
Chan Hao-ching, Taiwan, and Olga Govortsova,
Belarus, def. Sofia Arvidsson and Johanna Larsson, Sweden, 6-7 (2), 7-5, 10-8.
Cara Black, Zimbabwe, and Marina Erakovic,
New Zealand, def. Alize Cornet, France, and
Francesca Schiavone, Italy, 7-6 (3), 6-1.
Kristina Mladenovic, France, and Galina Voskoboeva, Kazakhstan, def. Zhang Shuai and
Zheng Jie (7), China, 6-4, 6-1.
Svetlana Kuznetsova, Russia, and Flavia Pennetta, Italy, def. Dominika Cibulkova, Slovakia,
and Liezel Huber, United States, 6-3, 5-7,
10-6.
Varvara Lepchenko, United States, and Anastasia Rodionova, Australia, def. Darija Jurak,
Croatia, and Katalin Marosi, Hungary, 6-4,
6-3.
Bethanie Mattek-Sands, United States, and
Sania Mirza (5), India, def. Daniela Hantuchova,
Slovakia, and Anabel Medina Garrigues, Spain,
7-6 (3), 4-6, 10-4.
Monday’s winning numbers:
Cash 3 Midday: 8-1-9
Lucky Sum: 18
Cash 4 Midday: 2-1-4-5
Lucky Sum: 12
Cash 3 Evening: 8-1-1
Lucky Sum: 10
Cash 4 Evening: 4-9-4-2
Lucky Sum: 19
Tennessee Cash: Not available
Cash Ball: Not available
Sunday’s winning numbers:
Cash 3: 0-6-1
Lucky Sum: 7
Cash 4: 3-0-1-9
Lucky Sum: 13
CONTACT
SPORTS
District 6-A
Lookout Valley: Tony Summerow, Levi Wallace. Marion County: Brandon Hutchins,
Austin Layne, Clay O’Shields, Austin
Pedigo, Jacob Vinson. Sale Creek: Cody
Beattie, Dakota Hooker, Zack Pugh. South
Pittsburg: Logan Alder, Jesse Elledge,
Lane Morrison, Tyler Reed, player of Year
Jake Stone, coach of year Wesley Stone.
Van Buren County: Tanner Hillis. Whitwell:
Bailey Kilgore, Logan McDaniel, Austin
Nesselt, Jesse Owens, Chase White.
North Division
W L
Birmingham (White Sox) 20 10
Tennessee (Cubs)
15 14
Jackson (Mariners)
12 16
Chattanooga (Dodgers) 11 19
Huntsville (Brewers)
11 19
South Division
W L
Mississippi (Braves)
19 11
Jacksonville (Marlins)
16 11
Montgomery (Rays)
17 13
Mobile (Diamondbacks) 14 16
Pensacola (Reds)
11 17
———
Tuesday’s Games
Pensacola at Jacksonville, 7:05 p.m.
Mobile at Chattanooga, 7:15 p.m.
Birmingham at Tennessee, 7:15 p.m.
Jackson at Huntsville, 7:43 p.m.
Mississippi at Montgomery, 8:05 p.m.
Wednesday’s Games
Mobile at Chattanooga, 11:15 a.m.
Birmingham at Tennessee, 11:30 a.m.
Pensacola at Jacksonville, 1:05 p.m.
Jackson at Huntsville, 7:43 p.m.
Mississippi at Montgomery, 8:05 p.m.
Pct. GB
.667 —
1
.517 4 ⁄2
.429
7
.367
9
.367
9
Pct. GB
.633 —
1
.593 1 ⁄2
.567
2
.467
5
.393
7
THE ODDS
Glantz-Culver Line
Major League Baseball
LINE UNDERDOG
LINE
National League
at Cincinnati
-115 Atlanta
+105
St. Louis
-130 at Chicago
+120
at San Diego
-150 Miami
+140
at Los Angeles -140 Arizona
+130
at San Francisco -140 Philadelphia
+130
American League
at Cleveland
-115 Oakland
+105
at Baltimore
-120 Kansas City
+110
at Boston
-185 Minnesota
+175
at Tampa Bay
-130 Toronto
+120
Los Angeles
-190 at Houston
+180
Interleague
at Pittsburgh
-140 Seattle
+130
at Washington -125 Detroit
+115
at New York (NL) -170 Chicago (AL)
+160
Texas-110
at Milwaukee
+100
New York (AL)
-110 at Colorado
+100
NBA PLAYOFFS
FAVORITE
LINE O/U UNDERDOG
at New York
6 (183)
Indiana
1
at Oklahoma City 2 ⁄2 (186)
Memphis
NHL
FAVORITE
LINE UNDERDOG
LINE
at Ottawa
-145 Montreal
+125
Pittsburgh
-160 at N.Y. Islanders +140
Chicago
-175 at Minnesota
+155
at San Jose
-170 Vancouver
+150
BOWLING
League Scores
HOLIDAY BOWL BRAINERD
Classics Mixed
Men: Brian Williams 685, W.C. Sherrill 630, Ron
Coyne 582, Don Grimes 572, Robby McKinney
566, Ray Bramlett 548, Joe Hall 541, Jay Shipp 520,
Gilbert Aikens 500. Women: Cecilia Loscalzo 541,
Donna Williams 521, Lois Eskew 492, Dawn Brown
469, Catherine McNalley 448, Tina Hall 444.
Monday Night Trio (Division A)
Men: John Allen 795 (299), Russell Gilbert
725, Brandon Grimes 706, Randy Sherrill 698,
Vincent Crum 683. Women: Brittany Williams
600, Betty Norman 589, Rita Hughes 553, Mary
Robinson 550, Donna Jones 529.
Monday Night Trio (Division B)
Men: Rico Gordon 769, Byron Sanders 697,
Matt Giuliani 677, David McGowan 676, James
Langston Jr. 649. Women: Cindy Buckner 610,
Schyler Burns 584.
Monday Night Trio (Division C)
Men: Robert Jolley 702, Ralph Richardson
659, Mike Smith 652, Johnny Doyle 651, David
Robinson 626. Women: Cecilia Loscalzo 530,
Pam Wood 491, Phyllis Zcrauge 457, Peggy
Hays 438.
HOLIDAY BOWL HIXSON
Summer Fever
Men: J.D. Putnam 672 (266), Glenn Lyon 667,
Don Hawkins 548, Phillip McClain 529, Mike
Lixey 519, Scott Howard 475, Kirk Schermerhorn 450. Women: Kim Howard 483, Etta Putnam 481, Rhonda Smith 452, Marilyn Liechly
428, Amanda Leslie 320.
FAVORITE
GOLF
Chattanooga Chapter
Tenn. PGA Pro-Am
Monday at Moccasin Bend GC
Low professional: 72—Trey Stansell. 76—
Gregg Juster.
Pro skins: Devere Keller No. 2; Juster No. 3;
Stansell Nos. 5, 8, 11 & 17. Amateur skins:
Brandon Cissom No. 1; Matt Crowder Nos. 7
& 15; Robby Hammond Nos. 11 & 17; Guy
Carpenter No. 18.
Top teams: 60—Stansell, Crowder, Brad
Love, Lynn Mynatt. 61—Juster, Wayne Woolfall, Tommy Lindsey, Tim Massey. 63—Stansell,
Hammond, Ted Ballew, Randy Fox.
GEORGIA LOTTERY
Monday’s winning numbers:
Cash 3 Midday: 6-8-3
Cash 4 Midday: 6-2-2-7
Georgia FIVE Midday: 7-9-3-5-0
Cash 3 Evening: 5-3-9
Cash 4 Evening: Not available
Georgia FIVE Evening: 8-8-3-9-9
Fantasy 5: Not available
Decades of Dollars: 9-12-24-30-33-46
BASKETBALL
NBA Playoffs
All Times EDT
(x-if necessary)
(Best-of-7)
CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Chicago 1, Miami 0
Monday, May 6: Chicago 93, Miami 86
Wednesday, May 8: Chicago at Miami, 7 p.m.
Friday, May 10: Miami at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Monday, May 13: Miami at Chicago, 7 p.m.
x-Wednesday, May 15: Chicago at Miami, TBA
x-Friday, May 17: Miami at Chicago, TBA
x-Sunday, May 19: Chicago at Miami, TBA
Indiana 1, New York 0
Sunday, May 5: Indiana 102, New York 95
Tuesday, May 7: Indiana at New York, 7 p.m.
Saturday, May 11: New York at Indiana, 8 p.m.
Tuesday, May 14: New York at Indiana, TBA
x-Thursday, May 16: Indiana at New York, 8 p.m.
x-Saturday, May 18: New York at Indiana, TBA
x-Monday, May 20 Indiana at New York, 8 p.m.
WESTERN CONFERENCE
San Antonio vs. Golden State
Monday, May 6: Golden State at San Antonio,
late
Wednesday, May 8: Golden St. at San Antonio,
9:30 p.m.
Friday, May 10: San Antonio at Golden State,
10:30 p.m.
Sunday, May 12 San Antonio at Golden State,
3:30 p.m.
x-Tuesday, May 14: Golden State at San Antonio,
9:30 p.m.
x-Thursday, May 16: San Antonio at Golden
State, TBA
x-Sunday, May 19: Golden State at San Antonio,
TBA
Oklahoma City 1, Memphis 0
Sunday, May 5: Oklahoma City 93, Memphis 91
Tuesday, May 7: Memphis at Oklahoma City,
9:30 p.m.
Saturday, May 11: Oklahoma City at Memphis,
5 p.m.
Monday, May 13: Oklahoma City at Memphis,
9:30 p.m.
x-Wednesday, May 15: Memphis at Oklahoma
City, TBA
x-Friday, May 17: Oklahoma City at Memphis,
TBA
x-Sunday, May 19: Memphis at Oklahoma City,
TBA
By Patrick Brown
Staff Writer
Collegiate Baseball Poll
TUCSON, Ariz. — The Collegiate Baseball poll
with records through May 5, points and previous
rank. Voting is done by coaches, sports writers
and sports information directors:
Record
Pts Pvs
1. Vanderbilt
41-6
497
1
2. North Carolina
42-4
496
2
3. LSU
43-6
494
3
4. Cal State Fullerton
39-7
492
4
5. Oregon State
37-8
489
5
6. Oregon
37-11
488
6
7. N.C. State
37-11
485
7
8. Virginia
39-8
484
8
9. Florida State
38-9
482
9
10. Louisville
37-10
476 11
11. UCLA
31-13
473 12
12. Arkansas
32-16
469 16
13. Oklahoma
34-14
467 10
14. Arizona State
30-14-1
464 13
15. Clemson
30-15
462 14
16. South Carolina
33-14
459 15
17. Pittsburgh
36-11
458 17
18. New Mexico
30-17
456 18
19. Stanford
26-16
452 22
20. South Florida
31-16
448 20
21. Indiana
35-9
444 21
22. Cal Poly
31-14
440 24
23. South Alabama
36-13
438 25
24. Mississippi State
36-13
435 28
25. Troy
35-12
432 —
26. Rice
31-15
429 27
27. Mississippi
33-16
427 26
28. Sam Houston State 31-17
424 —
29. Kansas State
34-15
421 —
30. Campbell
39-9
419 29
Baseball America Top 25
DURHAM, N.C. — The top 25 teams in the
Baseball America poll with records through May
5 and previous ranking (voting by the staff of
Baseball America):
Record
Pvs
1. North Carolina
42-4
1
2. Vanderbilt
41-6
2
3. LSU
43-6
3
4. Cal State Fullerton
39-7
4
5. N.C. State
37-11
5
6. Oregon State
37-8
6
7. Virginia
39-8
7
8. UCLA
31-13
9
9. Florida State
38-9
10
10. Oregon
37-11
11
11. Arkansas
32-16
14
12. Louisville
37-10
13
13. Arizona State
30-14
8
14. Indiana
35-9
16
15. South Carolina
33-14
15
16. New Mexico
30-17
17
17. Rice
31-15
19
18. Oklahoma
34-14
12
19. Clemson
30-15
18
20. South Alabama
36-13
20
21. Mississippi State
36-13
22
22. Virginia Tech
30-19
25
23. South Florida
31-16
—
24. Pittsburgh
36-11
—
25. Stanford
26-16
—
TRANSACTIONS
Monday’s Moves
BASEBALL
Mutua Madrid Open
TENNESSEE LOTTERY
District 5-AA
McMinn Central: Eric Hart, Hunter Shaw.
Meigs County: Kyle Carden, Jake Moon,
Christian Thompson. Polk County: Duncan
Coffey, Carter Flowers, Matt Hammons,
co-offensive player of year Justin Brown.
Sequoyah: Garrett Dalton, Mika McCreary,
Dustin Moser, Josh Watson, co-offensive
POY Jake Johnson. Sweetwater: Connor
Bryant, Andrew Coppinger.
District 5-A
Arts & Sciences: Chad Butler, Chaison
Gordon, Kenny Struthers. Boyd-Buchanan:
Austin Bailey, Jim Cardwell, John Hale,
Nathan Murrell. Copper Basin: Phil Spargo, Stephen Spargo. Grace Academy:
Wyatt Morrison. Silverdale Baptist: Josh
Bankston, Reid Clements, Matt Millard,
Colton Rogers, Joey Szollos, MVP Spencer Mossburg.
TUESDAY RADIO
■ Baseball
MLB: Atlanta at Cincinnati, 1370 AM & 104.1 FM, 7 p.m.
SL: Mobile at Chattanooga, 105.1 FM, 7:15 p.m.
TENNIS
District 6-AA
Brainerd: Cordaro Cummings. Central:
Gabe Fomby, Tyler Lowe, Colton Morgan,
Ryan Poole, co-player of year Dominique
Dawson, coach of year Glen Carter. East
Hamilton: Austin Gatewood, Matty Henshaw, Hunter Parker. East Ridge: Eric
McCurdy. Hixson: Nic Auger, Austin Gilkey,
Alex Pruitt. Howard: Rashad Brummitt.
Red Bank: Tyler Phillips, Gage Winton,
Ryder Pierce, co-POY Hagen Wilkey.
Tyner: Chae Butler, Mike Haywood.
SOUTH
Clemson 3, Maryland 2
Florida 22, Florida A&M 1
TOURNAMENTS
North Atlantic Conference
Championship
Husson 4, Castleton 2
New Orleans star
commits to Vols
BASEBALL
American League
BALTIMORE ORIOLES — Assigned RHP Zach
Clark to Bowie (EL).
BOSTON RED SOX — Placed RHP Andrew
Bailey on the 15-day DL. Reinstated LHP Craig
Breslow from the 15-day DL.
CLEVELAND INDIANS — Sent OF Michael
Bourn to Columbus (IL) for a rehab assignment.
HOUSTON ASTROS — Designated OFs Rick
Ankiel and Fernando Martinez for assignment.
Reinstated OF J.D. Martinez from the 15-day
DL. Selected the contract of OF Trevor Crowe
from Oklahoma City (PCL). Recalled INF/OF
Jimmy Paredes from Oklahoma City. Optioned
INF Brandon Laird to Oklahoma City.
NEW YORK YANKEES — Assigned RHP Cody
Eppley outright to Scranton/Wilkes-Barre (IL).
National League
ATLANTA BRAVES — Reinstated C Brian
McCann from the 15-day DL. Optioned SS Tyler
Pastornicky to Gwinnett (IL).
CHICAGO CUBS — Designated RHP Kameron
Loe for assignment. Optioned OF Dave Sappelt
to Iowa (PCL). Selected the contract of OF
Ryan Sweeney from Iowa. Recalled RHP Rafael
Dolis from Iowa.
PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES — Agreed to terms
with LHP Greg Smith on a minor league contract.
ST. LOUIS CARDINALS — Optioned OF Jermaine Curtis to Memphis (PCL).
SAN DIEGO PADRES — Placed LHP Clayton
Richard on the 15-day DL. Reinstated RHP
Tyson Ross from the 15-day DL.
WASHINGTON NATIONALS — Retained physical therapist Angela Gordon.
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
NBA — Fined Chicago G Marco Belinelli
$15,000 for making an obscene gesture during
Saturday’s game.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
JACKSONVILLE JAGUARS — Signed RB
De’Leon Eskridge and DE J.D. Griggs. Waived
LB Greg Jones and RB Richard Murphy.
MINNESOTA VIKINGS — Released P Chris
Kluwe and WR Nicholas Edwards. Signed OT
Brandon Keith and WR Adam Thielen.
NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS — Released RB
Quentin Hines and LB Ian Sluss.
PITTSBURGH STEELERS — Announced the
retirement of special assistant Joe Greene.
Signed OT Guy Whimper and LB Terence
Garvin. Released C Ivory Wade and DT Anthony
Rashad White.
SAN DIEGO CHARGERS — Named JoJo
Wooden director of player personnel and Kevin
Kelly director of college scouting.
SAN FRANCISCO 49ERS — Signed G Adam
Snyder to a two-year contract. Named Ronald
Curry assistant offensive coach.
TAMPA BAY BUCCANEERS — Signed DT
Andre Neblett, WRs Jheranie Boyd and Chris
Denton, OT Jace Daniels and LB Ka’lial Glaud.
Waived DT Richard Clebert, WR D.J. Monroe and RB Akeem Shavers. Terminated the
contractws of G Roger Allen and DE George
Selvie.
HOCKEY
National Hockey League
EDMONTON OILERS — Reassigned D Nathan
Deck from Oklahoma City (AHL) to Stockton
(ECHL).
LOS ANGELES KINGS — Recalled G Martin Jones and G Jean-Francois Berube from
Ontario (ECHL)
MINNESOTA WILD — Recalled D Matt Dumba
and F Carson McMillan from Houston (AHL).
TAMPA BAY LIGHTNING — Signed D Radko
Gudas to a three-year contract.
TENNIS
WORLD TEAMTENNIS — Announced Venus
Williams and Andy Roddick are part owners
of the league.
COLLEGE
ARKANSAS — Announced QB Brandon Mitchell, DE Austin Flynn, S Defonta Lowe and RB
Keante Minor will transfer.
FLORIDA — Announced men’s basketball G-F
DeVon Walker will transfer.
MILWAUKEE — Announced the resignation of
women’s tennis coach Sean McInerney to take
same position at Utah State.
KNOXVILLE — Jordan Cornish delivered
the good news to Tennessee basketball coach
Cuonzo Martin on Monday night.
The 6-foot-6 swingman from Brother Martin
High School in New Orleans gave the Volunteers their first commitment for the 2014
recruiting class.
“He actually did [get excited],” Cornish said
by phone, “because he really loves my game,
and like he told me, ‘I resemble him,’ and he
really, really likes me.”
A consensus three-star prospect, Cornish
is ranked in the top 150 players by both Rivals.
com (131) and 247sports.com (128). He said he
had scholarship offers from Oklahoma, Purdue,
VCU, Houston, Texas A&M and Wake Forest.
Martin and Tennessee have been recruiting Cornish since the summer following his freshman
season, and he’s made two visits to Knoxville.
“They’ve been on me the whole way, and
they’ve been straightforward with me,” Cornish
said. “I just felt at home with those guys — with
Coach Martin, Coach [Jon] Harris and the players — and the storied tradition the basketball
program has, it was an easy decision for me.
“I just wanted to get that weight off my
shoulders and be stress free. I already knew,
and I told my parents I knew where I wanted
to go. I just wanted to get it done with.”
Cornish was named to the the Times-Picayune’s all-city team following a strong junior season when he averaged 15.2 points per game. He’s
currently averaging 10.7 points per game with Nike
Team Louisiana on the Nike Elite Youth Basketball League circuit and poured in 27 points in the
Louisiana Rising Stars Showcase in Baton Rouge
in March, according to the Times-Picayune.
“I’m a big guard that can attack the rim with
vengeance, get other people involved and also
knock down the 3-point shot consistently,” he
said. “On the other end, I play tough. I’m a knockdown defender and I’ll guard your best player.
“I’m just a tough guy all the way around.”
AROUNDTHEREGION
Howard ceremony
for NFL star White
University of Tennessee All-American and NFL
superstar Reggie White of Chattanooga will be
honored by the Pro Football of Fame and Allstate
Insurance Company next Monday morning at his
high school alma mater, Howard, as part of the
“Hometown Hall of Famers” national program.
White, who died in December 2004 at the age of 43,
was inducted into the pro hall in 2006. He retired
for good in 2000 as the NFL’s all-time sack leader
with 198 and was a three-time NFL defensive player
of the year and 10-time first-team All-Pro. Also an
ordained minister, he was dubbed “The Minister of
Defense.” At the 10 a.m. ceremony at Howard, his
father, Charles White, will make a presentation of
a “Hometown Hall of Famer” plaque that will be
accepted by Reggie’s widow, Sara White, on behalf
of the family, according to a release from the PFHF
and Allstate. Dr. Paul Smith, Howard’s principal,
will emcee the event attended by school students,
faculty, staff and alumni.
LACROSSE
■ The Sewanee lacrosse teams both are
making historic appearance in the NCAA Division III tournaments this year after winning
the Southern Athletic Association regularseason and tournament titles. The Sewanee
women (13-6) will face Christopher Newport
at 3 p.m. Wednesday in Newport News, Va.,
and that winner will advance to a regional
against Salisbury or Cabrini. The Sewanee men
(14-3), riding a six-match win streak, also play
Wednesday in Virginia — at Washington and
Lee (15-4) in Lexington.
GOLF
■ Sewanee freshman Emily Javadi from
Chattanooga and Baylor School is capping her
first college golf season by going to the NCAA
Division III women’s tournament May 14-17 at
Sandestin Golf and Beach Resort in Destin, Fla.
The SAA tournament medalist received her individual invitation Monday to the 72-hole event.
■ Former Notre Dame High School standout
Richard Powell of Hixson made history Monday as the first King University men’s golfer to
compete in an NCAA postseason tournament,
and he opened with a 6-over-par 78 in the
NCAA Division II South/Southeast Regional
at Mission Inn Resort & Club at Howey-inthe-Hills, Fla. He is tied for 71st in the 54-hole
event, nine shots behind leader Ricardo Celia
of Nova Southeastern.
Staff Reports
MARKTRAIL
Sunday’s winning numbers:
Cash 3 Midday: 6-9-3
Cash 4 Midday: 5-2-7-2
Georgia FIVE Midday: 2-3-9-5-8
Cash 3 Evening: 9-0-0
Cash 4 Evening: 6-9-9-3
Georgia FIVE Evening: 6-3-9-7-2
Fantasy 5: 18-23-26-35-38
■ SPORTS EDITOR
Jay Greeson (423) 757-6273
[email protected]
■ DEPUTY SPORTS EDITOR
Ron Bush (423) 757-6291
[email protected]
■ ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITOR
Jim Tanner (423) 757-6478
[email protected]
■ ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITOR
Ward Gossett (423) 757-6288
[email protected]
by phone: (423) 757-6364 or 1-800-733-2637 • by fax: (423) 668-5049 • by e-mail: [email protected]
■ ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITOR
Stephen Hargis (423) 757-6293
[email protected]
...
. timesfreepress.com
• • • Tuesday, May 7, 2013 • D3
Breaking News: [email protected]
Bulls pull upset
against Miami
“
”
MONDAY
NBA PLAYOFFS
■ Golden State at San
Antonio, late
By Tim Reynolds
I’ve played on some
tough teams. But this one,
there’s something a little different, something special about
this group.
The Associated Press
MIAMI — Nate Robinson was
spitting blood in the first half, then
delivered the deepest cuts of the
night in the final moments. And the
Chicago Bulls reminded the Miami
Heat that no one in the NBA plays
them any tougher.
Yes, the streakbusters struck
again.
Robinson scored 27 points,
Jimmy Butler added 21 points and
a career-high-tying 14 rebounds,
and the Bulls beat Miami 93-86 on
Monday night in Game 1 of their
NBA Eastern Conference semifinal series. The team that snapped
Miami’s 27-game winning streak in
the regular season — the secondlongest in NBA history — found
a way to topple the champs again,
this time ending a run of 12 straight
Heat victories overall.
“I’ve played on some tough
teams,” Robinson said. “But this
one, there’s something a little different, something special about this
group.”
A seven-point deficit midway
through the fourth wasn’t enough
to doom the Bulls, who finished the
game on a 10-0 run in the final 1:59.
And the Bulls weren’t anywhere
near full strength. Kirk Hinrich
was out again with a calf injury.
Luol Deng isn’t even expected to
rejoin the team until today, after
dealing with an illness apparently
so severe that a spinal tap — and
other tests since — were needed
to rule out things such as meningitis.
“So proud of my team, man,
this bed might be good luck after
all,” Deng wrote on Twitter after
the game, with a photo of him in a
hospital bed.
— Chicago’s Nate Robinson
Oh, and Derrick Rose remains
sidelined, as he’s been since April
2012.
No problem. The Heat are 413 in their last 44 games — with
two of those losses to the Bulls,
who are now 3-2 against Miami
this season.
“I think when you’re facing
adversity, you have to be mentally tough,” Bulls coach Tom
Thibodeau said. “But this is just
one game. We have to play a lot
better in our next one.”
LeBron James got his MVP
trophy from commissioner David
Stern before the game, then
struggled to a two-point first half
before finishing with 24 points,
eight rebounds and seven assists
for Miami. Dwyane Wade added
14 points for the Heat, who had no
one else in double figures, finished
shooting 40 percent from the floor
and were outrebounded 46-32.
“I’m not stunned,” James said.
“This is what the playoffs is all
about. We’re going against a really
good team.”
Joakim Noah had 13 points and
11 rebounds for the Bulls, who
got 12 from Taj Gibson and 10
from Marco Belinelli. Game 2 is
Wednesday night in Miami.
“We’re not really a flashy team,”
The Associate Press
Chicago forward Carlos Boozer dunks during the second half of
Game 1 of the Bulls’ playoff series in the Eastern Conference semifinals against the Heat on Monday in Miami. The Bulls won 93-86.
Gibson said. “We like to go out and
do our job.”
Miami was outscored 35-24 in
the fourth quarter, something that
drew the ire of Heat coach Erik
Spoelstra afterward.
“There’s no excuses,” said Spoelstra, whose team had not played
in more than a week. “We’re not
making any excuses for time off
or anything else.”
If anyone could have made
excuses, it was Robinson. He
needed 10 stitches, five in his lip
SPORTSBRIEFS
MONDAY NHL PLAYOFFS
■ N.Y. Rangers 4, Washington 3:
Derek Stepan and Arron Asham both
scored tiebreaking goals in the third
period for the New York Rangers in a
victory over the Capitals in Game 3
on Monday night. The Rangers finally
found their offense and got back into
their first-round playoff series. New
York still trails 2-1 in the Eastern
Conference series, with Game 4 here
Wednesday night. Stepan gave the
Rangers the lead for good with 6:25
remaining when he deftly tipped in a
pass in front from Rick Nash. Asham
had put New York in front 3-2 at 2:53,
but Jay Beagle got the Capitals even
again 4:26 later.
■ Boston 5, Toronto 2: Boston
spoiled the return of playoff hockey
to Toronto, scoring two quick goals in
the second period in a victory over
the Maple Leafs. Adam McQuaid,
Rich Peverley, Nathan Horton, Daniel Paille and David Krejci, with an
empty-net goal with 1:17 remaining,
scored for Boston. After being beaten
4-2 in Boston on Saturday night, the
Bruins upped their game. The Leafs,
meanwhile, made mistakes and were
punished, although they tried to close
the gap with a busy third period in
which they outshot the visitors 18-6.
The Leafs finished with a 47-38 edge
in shots. Game 4 is Wednesday in
Toronto, with Boston leading 2-1 in
the best-of-seven series.
■ Detroit 3, Anaheim 2, OT: Damien
Brunner scored with 4:50 left in overtime, lifting the Red Wings to a win
over the Ducks. Pavel Datsyuk scored
a second game-tying goal for the
Red Wings with 6:33 left in regulation.
Brendan Smith made it 1-1 early in the
third. Matt Beleskey gave the Ducks
their first lead 5:07 into the game and
David Steckel put them ahead midway through the third period. Jonas
Hiller, who shut out Detroit in Game 3,
stopped the first 32 shots and finished
with 46 saves. Jimmy Howard had 31
saves for the Red Wings. Game 5 is
Wednesday night in Anaheim.
■ St. Louis at Los Angeles, late
Testaverde among 12
chosen for college hall
NEW YORK — Heisman
Trophy winner Vinny Testaverde of Miami has been
selected for induction into
the College Football Hall of
Fame. Testaverde is one of 12
former players to be picked by
the National Football Foundation as part of the latest Hall
of Fame class. The rest of the
class, which also will include
two coaches, will be announced
this morning during a news
conference at the Nasdaq Stock
Exchange. Testaverde played
four seasons for the Hurricanes and won the Heisman as
a senior in 1986. He finished
his career with 48 touchdown
passes and Miami went 23-3
in Testaverde’s starts. He went
on to become the No. 1 overall
pick in the 1987 NFL draft and
played 21 seasons in the NFL.
■ FAYETTEVILLE, Ark.
— Brandon Mitchell was
caught off guard by new coach
Bret Bielema’s suggestion
after spring practice at Arkansas that he might get playing
time somewhere other than
quarterback. Mitchell won’t
have to worry about that possibility anymore: He is one
of four Razorbacks who have
been granted their release with
the intention of transferring,
Bielema said Monday. The
others leaving the school are
defensive end Austin Flynn,
safety Defonta Lowe and running back Keante Minor.
tions that the former AAU basketball coach of Ben McLemore
received cash payments aimed
at steering the star freshman
to a sports agent. AAU coach
Darius Cobb told USA Today
he received $10,000 in two payments from Rodney Blackstock, the founder and CEO of
Hooplife Academy in Greensboro, N.C. Kansas athletic director Sheahon Zenger issued a
statement Saturday saying that
the university had received an
inquiry about the relationship
between the McLemore family
and Blackstock. The information was being reviewed and
officials would “process it” with
the NCAA and the Big 12 Conference if necessary.
TENNIS
■ NEW YORK — Venus
Williams and Andy Roddick
are now part owners of Billie
Jean King’s summer league
that began in the 1970s and
features male and female professional players in eight cities. WTT announced Monday
that Williams and Roddick will
join majority owner King and a
group of four other part owners that includes the U.S. Tennis Association. Roddick, who
retired from tennis after the U.S.
Open, is looking to start a team
in 2014 near his home of Austin,
Texas. He and Williams will still
play for their WTT teams during
the July 7-28 season. Williams
leads the two-time defending
COLLEGE BASKETBALL champion Washington Kastles;
■ LAWRENCE, Kan. — Roddick will play for the Lasers
University of Kansas athletic of Springfield, Mo.
Wire reports
officials are reviewing allega-
D.A. weighing charges in ref death
By Brady McCombs
The Associated Press
SALT LAKE CITY — A Utah
prosecutor said Monday he plans
to decide soon what charges to
file against a teenager accused of
punching a soccer referee who
later died after slipping into a
weeklong coma.
Authorities say the 17-year-old
struck Ricardo Portillo in the head
last month during a recreational
league match after the referee
called a penalty against him.
Hours later, the 46-year-old
went into a coma. He never
regained consciousness and died
Saturday. An autopsy was performed the next day, authorities
said, but the results have not been
made public.
Salt Lake County District Attorney Sim Gill said he and other
officials are reviewing evidence
and state statutes to determine
the appropriate charges, which he
expects to announce by midweek.
The teen, whose name is being
withheld because he is a minor, is
in juvenile detention on suspicion
of aggravated assault. Authorities
are considering additional charges
since Portillo’s death.
Legal analysts say the key factor
for Gill to determine is intent.
Paul Cassell, a criminal law
professor at the University of
Utah, who is not involved in the
case, said that from what he has
seen it doesn’t appear the teenager intended to kill Portillo, which
means a murder charge is highly
unlikely.
More probable is the lesser
charge of “homicide by assault,”
which comes when an attack
unintentionally causes death. The
charge brings up to five years in
prison for adults. Penalties can be
less for juveniles.
“This appears to be a freak and
tragic result of striking a referee,”
said Cassell, a former federal prosecutor and judge. “Clearly that is
a crime, but that is not going to
be murder.”
Tanya Lewis, a private attorney
in Salt Lake City and legal analyst,
who also is not involved in the case,
said the charges should fall between
homicide by assault and manslaughter, which is more serious.
For a manslaughter charge,
prosecutors would have to show
the teen acted with reckless regard
for the risk of death.
Cassell said that could be difficult, essentially requiring prosecutors to prove the defendant
thought, “This might kill the ref,
but I don’t care. I’m mad at him.
I’m moving forward.”
and five more inside his mouth, to
close a nasty cut that came when
he dove for a loose ball with James
and struck his head on the court
late in the first half.
And then not only did he
play the whole second half, but
he scored 24 points in those 24
minutes, including the last seven
points that finished the job for
Chicago.
“He was born a scorer,” Miami
guard Mario Chalmers said.
A pair of three-point plays
by James — one of them coming when he just broke through a
tackle attempt by Butler and muscled the ball to the rim anyway
— gave Miami a 76-69 lead midway through the fourth quarter,
the biggest deficit Chicago faced
all night.
The Bulls were undeterred.
Coming off a Game 7 road win
in Brooklyn two nights earlier just
to get into a series with Miami,
the Bulls just kept grinding. When
Ray Allen made a 3-pointer to give
Miami an 80-78 lead, Butler came
back with one of his own to put
the Bulls back on top. When the
Heat went up by three after James
made a free throw with 2:22 left,
Belinelli connected for 3 — on
a second-effort possession — to
knot the game.
Then when Robinson connected on a 20-footer with 1:18 left, the
Bulls had the lead and plenty of
swagger.
Wade missed a 3-pointer on
the next possession, Robinson
drove the lane and scored with
45.5 seconds left, and suddenly
the Bulls were up 90-86. James
drove against Butler and tried a
12-footer that missed everything,
the Bulls got the rebound, Robinson made a free throw to stretch
the lead to five and the stunner
was complete.
Game 1 to the Bulls.
“It’s all about being tough,” said
Butler, who played all 48 minutes
for the third straight game. “We’re
always going to be the underdogs
and we take pride in that. Everybody can overlook us, but we feel
like we’re good enough to hang
with a lot of these teams.”
It was a night that started with a
celebration, James getting his MVP
award from the commissioner.
“Thank you so much,” James
said. “And let’s get ready to go.”
Golf Hall of Fame
inducts Couples
By Doug Ferguson
The Associated Press
ST. AUGUSTINE, Fla. — About
the only thing Fred Couples and
Colin Montgomerie had in common
was a golf swing good enough to
trust for a lifetime.
Couples became the first American to reach No. 1 in
the world and won
the Masters by a
blade of grass that
kept his ball from
trickling into Rae’s
Creek. Montgomerie found fame on
the European Tour,
where he won the
Fred
Order of Merit a
Couples
record seven times
in a row, though he never won a
major, a glaring hole in his credentials.
Couples sauntered down the fairways, the essence of cool. Montgomerie walked with his head down, so
intense he never looked like he was
having much fun.
They shared the stage Monday
night when both were inducted into
the World Golf Hall of Fame, along
with three others in the Class of
2013. The others were former U.S.
Open champion and broadcaster
Ken Venturi, former European Tour
executive director Ken Schofield
and two-time British Open champion and architect Willie Park Jr.
That brings the Hall of Fame to
146 members.
Couples talked about his childhood in Seattle, when his mother
gave him $5 a day in the summer to
play at Jefferson Park. He couldn’t
afford to buy a glove, and Couples
still plays without one. He got choked
up when he mentioned watching a
PGA Tour player put on a clinic in
town when Couples was 14.
“I wasn’t really the person who
said, ‘That’s what I want to do. I’m
going to be a PGA Tour player.’ But
I knew I wanted to really, really get
involved in golf,” Couples said. “And
the gentleman’s name was Lee Trevino, who has been a mentor and
someone I love.”
Couples didn’t look at his notes
or use the teleprompter in the back
of the room. He rambled at times,
as he always does, talking about his
journey from Seattle to the University of Houston, where he first met
CBS announcer Jim Nantz, turned
pro and won 15 times, including that
1992 Masters and the green jacket
ceremony in Butler Cabin with
Nantz. They had rehearsed that
moment in college.
He was overcome with emotion
at the end of the night, reading two
sentences from a piece of paper.
“Thanks for taking a kid from
Seattle and putting him in the Hall
of Fame,” Couples said as his chin
buckled. “This is the coolest night
of my life.”
He walked off the stage in tears,
thrusting both arms in the air.
The election of this year’s class
was not without some debate.
Couples was elected on the PGA
Tour ballot ahead of Mark O’Meara
and Davis Love III, each of whom
either won more tournaments or
more majors. Couples received only
51 percent of the vote, a record low
for the PGA Tour ballot. It takes
65 percent to get elected, though
there is a loophole that if no one
gets 65 percent, one player is elected provided he receives at least 50
percent.
Montgomerie won 31 times on
the European Tour, the most of any
British player, and he was a stalwart
in the Ryder Cup.
The Scot played in
eight of them and
never lost in singles
(6-0-2) while competing on six winning teams. He also
was the winning
captain in Wales in
2010.
He never won on Colin
the biggest stage, Montgomerie
however. Montgomerie lost the
1994 U.S. Open and the 1995 PGA
Championship in a playoff. He was
second to Ernie Els again in the 1997
U.S. Open at Congressional. And the
most painful of all came in 2006 at
Winged Foot, when he made double bogey from the middle of the
18th fairway and finished one shot
behind Geoff Ogilvy.
“That’s the one that hurts,” Montgomerie said of Winged Foot, noting
another Hall of Fame member, Phil
Mickelson, also made double bogey
on the 18th. “The four or five others,
really, somebody happened to beat
me. The 2006 Winged Foot, I beat
myself. And that’s where it hurts
most. So that has taken the most to
recover from.”
Montgomerie is the fourth player
in the last four years to be inducted
into the Hall of Fame without having won a major. The others were
Jumbo Ozaki, Jock Hutchison and
Christy O’Connor Sr. A fifth would
be Peter Alliss, who won 23 times
on the European Tour, though he
was recognized more for his work
with the BBC.
Venturi was a premier amateur
out of San Francisco, leading the
1956 Masters until an 80 in the final
round. Venturi captured the 1964
U.S. Open at Congressional, in such
stifling heat that he suffered from
severe dehydration and nearly collapsed before he finished. When
carpal tunnel syndrome ended his
career, he moved to the broadcast
booth and enjoyed 35 years of distinguished service to CBS Sports.
Venturi became Presidents Cup
captain in 2000.
D4 • Tuesday, May 7, 2013 • •
NATIONAL LEAGUE STANDINGS
EAST
Atlanta
Washington
Philadelphia
New York
Miami
CENTRAL
St. Louis
Pittsburgh
Cincinnati
Milwaukee
Chicago
WEST
San Francisco
Colorado
Arizona
Los Angeles
San Diego
W
19
17
14
12
10
W
20
17
18
14
12
W
19
18
16
13
13
L
12
15
18
16
22
L
11
14
15
16
20
L
12
13
15
17
18
MAJOR LEAGUE
SCOREBOARD
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Sunday Games
Atlanta 9, N.Y. Mets 4
Washington 6, Pittsburgh 2
St. Louis 10, Milwaukee 1
Cincinnati 7, Chicago Cubs 4
Miami 14, Philadelphia 2
San Diego 5, Arizona 1
Tampa Bay 8, Colorado 3
San Francisco 4, L.A. Dodgers 3
Monday Games
Atlanta 7, Cincinnati 4
Texas at Chicago Cubs, 8:05
Arizona at L.A. Dodgers, late
Miami at San Diego, late
Philadelphia at San Francisco,
late
Tuesday Games
Detroit (Ani.Sanchez 3-2) at
Washington (Zimmermann
5-1), 7:05
Seattle (Harang 1-3) at Pittsburgh (Ja.McDonald 2-2),
7:05
Atlanta (Medlen 1-4) at Cincinnati (H.Bailey 1-3), 7:10
Chicago White Sox (H.Santiago
1-1) at N.Y. Mets (Harvey
4-0), 7:10
St. Louis (Lynn 5-0) at Chicago
Cubs (Wood 2-2), 8:05
Texas (Grimm 2-1) at Milwaukee
(W.Peralta 2-2), 8:10
N.Y. Yankees (Kuroda 4-1) at
Colorado (J.De La Rosa 23), 8:40
Arizona (McCarthy 0-3) at L.A.
Dodgers (Beckett 0-4), 10:10
Miami (Sanabia 2-4) at San
Diego (Stults 2-2), 10:10
Philadelphia (K.Kendrick 3-1)
at San Francisco (Lincecum
2-1), 10:15
Wednesday Games
Atlanta at Cincinnati, 12:35
Seattle at Pittsburgh, 12:35
St. Louis at Chicago Cubs, 2:20
Miami at San Diego, 3:40
Philadelphia at San Francisco,
3:45
Detroit at Washington, 7:05
Chicago White Sox at N.Y. Mets,
7:10
Texas at Milwaukee, 8:10
N.Y. Yankees at Colorado, 8:40
Arizona at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Sunday Games
Minnesota 4, Cleveland 2
Oakland 5, N.Y. Yankees 4
Toronto 10, Seattle 2
Kansas City 6, Chicago White
Sox 5, 10 innings
Texas 4, Boston 3
Baltimore 8, L.A. Angels 4
Detroit 9, Houston 0
Tampa Bay 8, Colorado 3
Monday Games
Chicago White Sox 2, Kansas
City 1, 11 innings
Cleveland 7, Oakland 3
Toronto 8, Tampa Bay 7
Boston 6, Minnesota 5, 11
innings
Chicago Cubs 9, Texas 2
Tuesday Games
Detroit (Ani.Sanchez 3-2) at
Washington (Zimmermann
5-1), 7:05
Kansas City (E.Santana 3-1) at
Baltimore (W.Chen 2-3), 7:05
Oakland (Milone 3-3) at Cleveland (McAllister 2-3), 7:05
Seattle (Harang 1-3) at Pittsburgh (Ja.McDonald 2-2),
7:05
Chicago White Sox (H.Santiago
1-1) at N.Y. Mets (Harvey
4-0), 7:10
Minnesota (Diamond 2-2) at
Boston (Dempster 2-2), 7:10
Toronto (Happ 2-2) at Tampa
Bay (Ro.Hernandez 1-4),
7:10
L.A. Angels (C.Wilson 3-0) at
Houston (Lyles 0-0), 8:10
Texas (Grimm 2-1) at Milwaukee
(W.Peralta 2-2), 8:10
N.Y. Yankees (Kuroda 4-1) at
Colorado (J.De La Rosa 23), 8:40
Wednesday Games
Seattle at Pittsburgh, 12:35
Detroit at Washington, 7:05
Kansas City at Baltimore, 7:05
Oakland at Cleveland, 7:05
Chicago White Sox at N.Y. Mets,
7:10
Minnesota at Boston, 7:10
Toronto at Tampa Bay, 7:10
L.A. Angels at Houston, 8:10
Texas at Milwaukee, 8:10
N.Y. Yankees at Colorado, 8:40
Pct
.613
.531
.438
.429
.313
Pct
.645
.548
.545
.467
.375
Pct
.613
.581
.516
.433
.419
GB
—
21⁄2
51⁄2
51⁄2
91⁄2
GB
—
3
3
51⁄2
81⁄2
GB
—
1
3
51⁄2
6
AMERICAN LEAGUE STANDINGS
WCGB
—
1
⁄2
31⁄2
31⁄2
71⁄2
WCGB
—
—
—
21⁄2
51⁄2
WCGB
—
—
1
31⁄2
4
L10
4-6
6-4
5-5
3-7
5-5
L10
7-3
5-5
5-5
3-7
4-6
L10
6-4
4-6
4-6
4-6
7-3
Streak
W-2
W-2
L-2
L-1
W-2
Streak
W-6
L-2
L-1
L-5
W-1
Streak
W-6
L-1
L-1
L-4
W-1
Home
9-5
9-7
8-10
7-8
5-11
Home
7-5
9-6
12-5
9-10
6-10
Home
11-4
10-5
8-8
7-8
7-8
Away
10-7
8-8
6-8
5-8
5-11
Away
13-6
8-8
6-10
5-6
6-10
Away
8-8
8-8
8-7
6-9
6-10
White Sox 2, Royals 1 (11)
Braves 7, Reds 4
Chicago
AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
De Aza lf
5 0 0 0 0 1 .239
Keppinger 2b
4 0 1 0 0 0 .198
1-Greene pr-2b
1 0 0 0 0 0 .280
Rios rf
5 1 2 0 0 1 .261
A.Dunn dh
3 0 1 0 1 1 .151
2-Jor.Danks pr-dh
1 1 1 1 0 0 .231
Konerko 1b
5 0 0 0 0 2 .225
Gillaspie 3b
3 0 1 0 1 1 .291
Al.Ramirez ss
4 0 1 1 0 2 .271
Flowers c
3 0 0 0 0 0 .184
Wise cf
3 0 2 0 1 1 .282
Totals
37 2 9 2 3 9
Kansas City
AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
A.Gordon lf
5 1 2 0 0 1 .306
A.Escobar ss
5 0 0 0 0 1 .282
Butler dh
5 0 1 1 0 1 .264
Hosmer 1b
4 0 1 0 0 2 .258
L.Cain cf
4 0 1 0 0 0 .337
Moustakas 3b
4 0 0 0 0 1 .198
Francoeur rf
4 0 0 0 0 1 .243
S.Perez c
4 0 2 0 0 0 .290
Getz 2b
4 0 0 0 0 1 .216
Totals
39 1 7 1 0 8
Chicago
000 000 001 01 — 2 9 0
Kansas City 100 000 000 00 — 1 7 1
1-ran for Keppinger in the 9th. 2-ran for A.Dunn in the
9th. E—Francoeur (1). LOB—Chicago 6, Kansas City
5. 2B—Butler (5), S.Perez (5). HR—Jor.Danks (1), off
K.Herrera. RBIs—Jor.Danks (2), Al.Ramirez (5), Butler (19). CS—Rios (3). Runners left in scoring position—Chicago 1 (Rios); Kansas City 3 (Moustakas,
A.Escobar, Getz). RISP—Chicago 2 for 5; Kansas
City 1 for 5. GIDP—Konerko, Flowers, Moustakas.
DP—Chicago 1 (Al.Ramirez, Greene, Konerko); Kansas City 2 (A.Escobar, Getz, Hosmer), (G.Holland,
S.Perez, Hosmer).
Chicago
IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Sale
7.1 6 1 1 0 5 119 3.42
Lindstrom
.2 0 0 0 0 1 4 4.15
Thornton
1 1 0 0 0 0 12 2.70
Crain W, 1-1
1 0 0 0 0 1 18 1.29
A.Reed S, 11-12 1 0 0 0 0 1 9 2.40
Kansas City
IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Shields
8 2 0 0 2 9 102 2.52
G.Holland BS, 2-9 1 4 1 1 1 0 27 3.75
K.Herrera L, 2-3 2 3 1 1 0 0 22 5.02
IBB—off G.Holland (Gillaspie). HBP—by Shields (Flowers). WP—Shields. Umpires—Home, Vic Carapazza;
First, Gary Cederstrom; Second, Kerwin Danley; Third,
Mike Muchlinski. T—3:14. A—15,576 (37,903).
Atlanta
AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
B.Upton cf
4 0 0 0 1 4 .148
C.Johnson 3b
4 1 0 0 1 2 .323
Kimbrel p
0 0 0 0 0 0
--J.Upton rf
4 1 2 0 1 1 .286
F.Freeman 1b
5 0 2 1 0 1 .319
Gattis lf
4 0 1 1 0 1 .260
Walden p
0 0 0 0 0 0
--O’Flaherty p
0 0 0 0 0 0
--d-R.Pena ph-3b
1 0 0 0 0 1 .293
McCann c
4 0 0 0 1 1 .000
Uggla 2b
4 2 2 0 0 2 .196
Simmons ss
4 2 3 4 0 1 .252
Maholm p
3 0 0 0 0 1 .125
Gearrin p
0 0 0 0 0 0
--Avilan p
0 0 0 0 0 0
--c-J.Schafer ph-lf
1 1 1 1 0 0 .278
Totals
38 7 11 7 4 15
Cincinnati
AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Choo cf
3 0 1 0 1 1 .331
Cozart ss
5 2 2 0 0 2 .207
Votto 1b
4 2 1 1 1 1 .320
Phillips 2b
4 0 2 1 0 0 .288
Bruce rf
4 0 0 1 0 2 .246
Frazier 3b
4 0 1 1 0 1 .239
Mesoraco c
4 0 0 0 0 1 .224
D.Robinson lf
1 0 1 0 1 0 .286
a-C.Izturis ph
1 0 0 0 0 0 .161
Ondrusek p
0 0 0 0 0 0
--Hoover p
0 0 0 0 0 0
--e-Paul ph
1 0 0 0 0 0 .265
Arroyo p
0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Simon p
0 0 0 0 0 0 .500
b-Lutz ph-lf
2 0 1 0 0 1 .200
Totals
33 4 9 4 3 9
Atlanta
110 110 030 — 7 11 1
Cincinnati
000 200 020 — 4 9 1
a-grounded out for D.Robinson in the 7th. b-struck out for
Simon in the 7th. c-homered for Avilan in the 8th. d-struck
out for O’Flaherty in the 9th. e-lined out for Hoover in the
9th. E—Gattis (3), Mesoraco (3). LOB—Atlanta 8, Cincinnati 8. 2B—F.Freeman (4), Gattis (8), Cozart (4), Votto (7),
Phillips (8). 3B—Uggla (2). HR—Simmons (3), off Arroyo;
Simmons (4), off Ondrusek; J.Schafer (1), off Ondrusek.
RBIs—F.Freeman (16), Gattis (19), Simmons 4 (15),
J.Schafer (3), Votto (13), Phillips (28), Bruce (16), Frazier
(24). CS—Choo (1). S—Arroyo 2. Runners left in scoring position—Atlanta 5 (Uggla 3, McCann, C.Johnson);
Cincinnati 6 (Choo, Mesoraco 3, Votto 2). RISP—Atlanta
2 for 10; Cincinnati 3 for 15. Runners moved up—Gattis,
McCann, Bruce, Frazier. GIDP—C.Johnson. DP—Cincinnati 1 (Cozart, Phillips, Votto).
Atlanta
IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Maholm W, 4-3 5.2 4 2 2 2 6 105 3.09
Gearrin H, 1
.2 0 0 0 0 1 10 1.26
Avilan H, 4
.2 0 0 0 1 1 11 3.27
Walden
0 3 2 2 0 0 11 4.38
O’Flaherty H, 10 1 0 0 0 0 0 11 1.93
Kimbrel S, 10-12 1 2 0 0 0 1 17 2.13
Cincinnati
IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Arroyo L, 2-4
5 8 4 4 2 7 97 4.30
Simon
2 0 0 0 0 6 26 4.32
Ondrusek
1 3 3 3 1 1 31 5.25
Hoover
1 0 0 0 1 1 17 2.87
Walden pitched to 3 batters in the 8th. Inherited runners-scored—Gearrin 1-0, O’Flaherty 2-1. HBP—by
Maholm (Choo). WP—Gearrin. Umpires—Home,
Mark Wegner; First, Laz Diaz; Second, Tim Timmons;
Third, Mike Winters. T—3:21. A—19,308 (42,319).
Indians 7, Athletics 3
Oakland
AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Jaso dh
1 1 0 0 2 0 .271
b-Montz ph-dh
2 0 0 0 0 1 .231
S.Smith lf
5 0 1 0 0 2 .279
Lowrie ss
4 0 0 0 0 0 .311
Cespedes cf
3 1 1 2 0 0 .243
Moss 1b
4 1 2 0 0 1 .299
Donaldson 3b
3 0 1 1 1 2 .303
Reddick rf
4 0 1 0 0 2 .152
D.Norris c
4 0 1 0 0 2 .246
Sogard 2b
2 0 0 0 0 1 .227
a-Rosales ph-2b
2 0 1 0 0 0 .289
Totals
34 3 8 3 3 11
Cleveland
AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Brantley lf
5 0 2 0 0 1 .289
Kipnis 2b
5 1 1 1 0 1 .217
A.Cabrera ss
4 3 2 2 1 2 .233
Swisher 1b
4 1 1 0 1 1 .253
Mar.Reynolds 3b
2 1 1 1 1 0 .300
C.Santana c
3 1 0 0 1 2 .367
Giambi dh
4 0 2 2 0 2 .242
Raburn rf
3 0 1 1 1 0 .343
Stubbs cf
4 0 0 0 0 2 .263
Totals
34 7 10 7 5 11
Oakland
000 101 010 — 3 8 0
Cleveland
200 020 30x — 7 10 0
a-flied out for Sogard in the 7th. LOB—Oakland 8,
Cleveland 9. 2B—Moss (3), D.Norris (5), Rosales
(3), Giambi (3), Raburn (5). HR—Cespedes (6), off
U.Jimenez; Kipnis (3), off Parker; A.Cabrera 2 (4), off
Parker 2; Mar.Reynolds (10), off Parker. RBIs—Cespedes 2 (18), Donaldson (23), Kipnis (11), A.Cabrera
2 (15), Mar.Reynolds (27), Giambi 2 (8), Raburn (11).
SB—Brantley (1). SF—Cespedes. Runners left in
scoring position—Oakland 5 (S.Smith 3, Reddick 2);
Cleveland 6 (Brantley, C.Santana, Kipnis, Stubbs 2,
Swisher). RISP—Oakland 1 for 9; Cleveland 2 for 11.
Runners moved up—Mar.Reynolds.
Oakland
IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Parker L, 1-5
5 7 4 4 2 7 93 7.34
Resop
1.2 1 3 3 3 3 46 6.00
Scribner
1.1 2 0 0 0 1 26 4.60
Cleveland
IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
U.Jimenez W, 2-2 5.2 4 2 2 3 8 101 6.37
Hagadone H, 1 .2 1 0 0 0 1 9 2.25
Shaw H, 2
1.2 2 1 1 0 1 29 1.23
J.Smith
1 1 0 0 0 1 11 0.84
Inherited runners-scored—Scribner 2-1, Hagadone
3-0, Shaw 1-0. IBB—off Resop (C.Santana). HBP—
by Parker (Mar.Reynolds). WP—Parker, Scribner.
Umpires—Home, Angel Hernandez; First, Doug
Eddings; Second, John Tumpane; Third, Paul Nauert.
T—3:05. A—9,514 (42,241).
Blue Jays 8, Rays 7
Toronto
AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Lawrie 3b
4 0 0 0 2 3 .186
Me.Cabrera lf
5 0 2 1 0 0 .258
1-R.Davis pr-lf
0 0 0 0 0 0 .271
Bautista rf
3 0 2 1 1 1 .228
Encarnacion 1b
5 0 1 0 0 0 .222
Lind dh
4 1 1 0 1 1 .228
2-Bonifacio pr-dh
0 1 0 0 0 0 .162
Rasmus cf
4 1 1 2 1 2 .248
M.Izturis 2b-ss
5 1 1 0 0 0 .210
H.Blanco c
2 0 0 0 0 0 .136
a-Arencibia ph-c
3 2 2 2 0 0 .254
Kawasaki ss
1 1 1 0 1 0 .255
b-DeRosa ph-2b
2 1 1 2 1 1 .225
Totals
38 8 12 8 7 8
Tampa Bay
AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Jennings cf
4 1 1 0 1 1 .237
K.Johnson lf
5 1 3 1 0 1 .264
R.Roberts 2b
4 1 1 0 1 1 .237
Longoria 3b
5 1 2 4 0 0 .305
Loney 1b
4 1 1 0 0 0 .391
S.Rodriguez ss
3 0 0 0 0 2 .233
Y.Escobar ss
1 0 0 0 0 0 .172
Scott dh
4 1 2 2 0 0 .462
J.Molina c
4 0 0 0 0 0 .183
Fuld rf
3 1 1 0 1 2 .200
Totals
37 7 11 7 3 7
Toronto
000 302 012 — 8 12 0
Tampa Bay
007 000 000 — 7 11 2
a-popped out for H.Blanco in the 6th. b-homered for
Kawasaki in the 6th. 1-ran for Me.Cabrera in the 8th.
2-ran for Lind in the 9th. E—J.Molina (3), Y.Escobar
(3). LOB—Toronto 11, Tampa Bay 6. 2B—Loney (10).
HR—Rasmus (5), off Hellickson; DeRosa (3), off
McGee; Arencibia (9), off Rodney; Longoria (7), off
Buehrle; Scott (2), off Buehrle. RBIs—Me.Cabrera
(9), Bautista (14), Rasmus 2 (12), Arencibia 2 (18),
DeRosa 2 (11), K.Johnson (16), Longoria 4 (19),
Scott 2 (4). SB—Encarnacion (2), Bonifacio (3). SF—
Bautista. Runners left in scoring position—Toronto 5
(Encarnacion 2, Bautista, M.Izturis, Lawrie); Tampa
Bay 2 (Loney, Jennings). RISP—Toronto 2 for 12;
Tampa Bay 4 for 8. GIDP—Lawrie. DP—Tampa Bay 1
(Longoria, R.Roberts, Loney).
Toronto
IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Buehrle
6 9 7 7 2 5 107 7.02
E.Rogers
1 1 0 0 0 1 21 4.96
Oliver W, 1-1
1 1 0 0 1 0 16 2.77
Janssen S, 8-8
1 0 0 0 0 1 10 0.82
Tampa Bay
IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Hellickson
5 6 3 3 4 3 101 4.79
McGee
1 2 2 2 0 1 17 10.64
Farnsworth H, 1 .1 2 0 0 0 0 12 6.43
Jo.Peralta H, 6
1 1 1 0 1 2 22 1.32
Rodney L, 1-1
1.1 1 2 2 2 1 37 5.06
J.Wright
.1 0 0 0 0 1 5 1.29
Inherited runners-scored—Jo.Peralta 2-0, Rodney 21, J.Wright 1-0. WP—Hellickson, J.Wright. Balk—Oliver. Umpires—Home, Mike Everitt; First, Marty Foster;
Second, Scott Barry; Third, Tim Welke. T—3:31.
A—9,952 (34,078).
This Date in Baseball
May 7
1917 — Babe Ruth of the Red Sox allowed two hits
as he outdueled Walter Johnson of the Washington
Senators 1-0. Ruth knocked in the winning run with
a sacrifice fly.
1922 — Jesse Barnes of the New York Giants pitched
the only no-hitter of the year, beating the Philadelphia
Phillies 6-0.
1925 — Pittsburgh shortstop Glenn Wright made an
unassisted triple play in the ninth inning against the St.
Louis Cardinals when he caught Jim Bottomley’s line
drive, stepped on second to double Jimmy Cooney,
and tagged Rogers Hornsby coming from first.
1957 — Cleveland pitcher Herb Score was hit on the
right eye by a line drive off the bat of Gil McDougald in
the first inning. The ball broke Score’s nose and damaged his eye; he missed the rest of the season.
1959 — A crowd of 93,103 came to the Los Angeles
Coliseum on “Roy Campanella Night” to show its affection for the paralyzed Dodger catcher. The Dodgers
were beaten by the New York Yankees 6-2 in an exhibition game that followed the ceremonies.
1960 — Norm Sherry, a replacement catcher for the
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Los Angeles Dodgers, hit a home run in the 11th inning
to give his brother, relief pitcher Larry Sherry, a 3-2
triumph over the Philadelphia Phillies in Los Angeles.
1997 — The Montreal Expos scored 13 runs to set an
NL record for runs in a sixth inning during their 19-3
win over the San Francisco Giants. Montreal added five
runs in the fifth to set a National League record for runs
in consecutive innings with 18.
2008 — Carlos Gomez became the first Minnesota
player to hit for the cycle in 22 years in a 13-1 victory
over the Chicago White Sox. Gomez homered off Mark
Buehrle on the game’s third pitch. He added an RBI
triple in the fifth, doubled in a run in the sixth and
completed the cycle with an infield single to lead off
a six-run ninth.
2008 — Joey Votto hit three homers as Cincinnati
beat Chicago 9-0. Jon Lieber became only the second
pitcher in Cubs history to give up four homers in an
inning. Votto started a four-homer second inning off
Lieber, who was making his first start of the season.
Adam Dunn and Paul Bako also had solo shots, and
Jerry Hairston Jr.’s two-run homer completed the history-matching rally.
Cubs 9, Rangers 2
Texas
AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Kinsler 2b
4 0 0 0 0 0 .323
D.Lowe p
0 0 0 0 0 0
--Andrus ss
4 1 1 0 0 0 .246
Beltre 3b
4 1 0 0 0 1 .242
N.Cruz rf
4 0 1 0 0 0 .288
Moreland 1b
4 0 0 0 0 0 .271
Soto c
4 0 2 1 0 1 .231
Dav.Murphy lf
4 0 1 0 0 1 .180
L.Martin cf
2 0 0 0 1 0 .259
Tepesch p
1 0 0 0 0 0 .000
a-Je.Baker ph
1 0 0 0 0 0 .313
Kirkman p
0 0 0 0 0 0
--J.Ortiz p
0 0 0 0 0 0
--b-L.Garcia ph-2b
1 0 0 0 0 0 .200
Totals
33 2 5 1 1 3
Chicago
AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
DeJesus cf
3 2 1 0 2 1 .286
S.Castro ss
4 3 2 2 1 0 .277
Rizzo 1b
4 1 3 4 1 1 .262
A.Soriano lf
4 0 0 1 1 2 .267
Sweeney lf
0 0 0 0 0 0
--Schierholtz rf
4 0 0 1 0 2 .289
Castillo c
5 0 1 0 0 2 .301
Valbuena 3b
4 1 3 0 0 0 .271
Barney 2b
2 1 0 0 2 0 .154
Feldman p
4 1 1 1 0 1 .133
Russell p
0 0 0 0 0 0
--Dolis p
0 0 0 0 0 0
--Totals
34 9 11 9 7 9
Texas
000 000 002 — 2 5 2
Chicago
100 501 02x — 9 11 2
a-grounded into a fielder’s choice for Tepesch in the
5th. b-fouled out for J.Ortiz in the 8th. E—Soto (2),
Kinsler (5), Valbuena (4), Castillo (5). LOB—Texas 5,
Chicago 9. 2B—Andrus (4), Rizzo (9), Valbuena (4).
HR—Rizzo (9), off D.Lowe. RBIs—Soto (1), S.Castro
2 (15), Rizzo 4 (25), A.Soriano (10), Schierholtz (13),
Feldman (2). SB—N.Cruz (2), DeJesus (2), A.Soriano
(4). SF—Schierholtz. Runners left in scoring position—
Texas 1 (Moreland); Chicago 4 (Schierholtz, A.Soriano,
Feldman, Castillo). RISP—Texas 1 for 5; Chicago 3
for 9. Runners moved up—Moreland. GIDP—Barney.
DP—Texas 1 (Andrus, Kinsler, Moreland).
Texas
IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Tepesch L, 2-3
4 6 6 5 4 4 89 4.50
Kirkman
1.1 2 1 1 3 3 37 6.59
J.Ortiz
1.2 1 0 0 0 1 30 3.38
D.Lowe
1 2 2 2 0 1 19 5.56
Chicago
IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Feldman W, 3-3 7 2 0 0 1 3 104 2.70
Russell
.2 1 0 0 0 0 7 0.00
Dolis
1.1 2 2 0 0 0 22 0.00
Inherited runners-scored—J.Ortiz 3-1, Dolis 1-0.
IBB—off Kirkman (Barney, A.Soriano), off Tepesch
(Barney). WP—Kirkman. Umpires—Home, Todd
Tichenor; First, Dale Scott; Second, Bill Miller; Third,
CB Bucknor. T—3:08. A—32,618 (41,019).
Red Sox 6, Twins 5 (11)
Minnesota
AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Dozier 2b
6 1 2 1 0 2 .247
Mauer c
5 2 2 0 1 1 .291
Willingham lf
4 1 2 1 1 1 .244
2-E.Escobar pr-ss
1 0 1 0 0 0 .349
Morneau 1b
5 0 1 2 0 2 .250
Parmelee rf
4 0 0 0 1 2 .209
Plouffe 3b
3 0 0 0 2 1 .229
Arcia dh
4 1 1 0 1 3 .255
Hicks cf
4 0 1 1 0 1 .124
b-W.Ramirez ph-cf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .348
Florimon ss
3 0 0 0 0 2 .232
a-Doumit ph-lf
2 0 0 0 0 0 .198
Totals
42 5 10 5 6 15
Boston
AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Ellsbury cf
5 0 1 0 0 0 .277
Victorino rf
5 2 3 1 0 0 .298
Pedroia 2b
5 1 3 1 0 1 .306
D.Ortiz dh
4 0 1 0 0 0 .426
1-Ciriaco pr-dh
0 0 0 0 0 0 .250
c-Carp ph-dh
1 0 0 0 0 1 .394
Napoli 1b
5 0 1 1 0 0 .266
Nava lf
4 1 1 0 1 1 .284
Saltalamacchia c
4 1 2 0 1 2 .235
Middlebrooks 3b
5 0 1 0 0 2 .195
Drew ss
5 1 4 3 0 1 .225
Totals
43 6 17 6 2 8
Minnesota 200 110 001 00 — 5 10 0
Boston
000 111 110 01 — 6 17 1
Two outs when winning run scored. a-flied out for
Florimon in the 9th. b-popped out for Hicks in the 10th.
1-ran for D.Ortiz in the 8th. 2-ran for Willingham in the
9th. E—Napoli (2). LOB—Minnesota 11, Boston 7.
2B—Mauer 2 (8), Willingham (7), Arcia (3), Hicks (2),
Ellsbury (7), D.Ortiz (9), Nava (6), Saltalamacchia (7),
Drew (2). HR—Dozier (1), off Hanrahan; Victorino (1),
off Worley; Drew (2), off Fien; Pedroia (1), off Fien.
RBIs—Dozier (9), Willingham (14), Morneau 2 (17),
Hicks (10), Victorino (9), Pedroia (13), Napoli (32), Drew
3 (12). CS—Ciriaco (1). SF—Morneau. Runners left in
scoring position—Minnesota 6 (Hicks 2, Dozier, Plouffe,
Parmelee, Doumit); Boston 2 (Ellsbury, Saltalamacchia).
RISP—Minnesota 4 for 14; Boston 3 for 12. Runners
moved up—Parmelee, Middlebrooks. GIDP—Ellsbury,
Pedroia, D.Ortiz 2. DP—Minnesota 4 (Dozier, Florimon,
Morneau), (Worley, Florimon, Morneau), (Morneau, Florimon, Duensing), (Dozier, E.Escobar, Morneau).
Minnesota
IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Worley
5 9 3 3 0 3 89 6.95
Duensing H, 5
1 1 0 0 1 1 19 1.80
Fien BS, 2-2
1 2 2 2 0 0 30 5.11
Swarzak
3 2 0 0 1 4 54 2.37
Burton L, 0-1
.2 3 1 1 0 0 13 2.08
Boston
IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Buchholz
6 7 4 4 2 9 116 1.60
A.Wilson
.1 1 0 0 1 1 18 1.86
A.Miller
.2 0 0 0 0 2 10 3.12
Breslow
1 0 0 0 0 1 12 0.00
Hanrahan BS, 2-6 .2 1 1 1 1 1 20 9.82
Mortensen W, 1-2 2.1 1 0 0 2 1 42 3.78
Worley pitched to 2 batters in the 6th. Fien pitched to
1 batter in the 8th. Inherited runners-scored—Duensing 2-1, A.Miller 2-0, Mortensen 1-0. WP—Duensing.
Umpires—Home, Cory Blaser; First, Jeff Nelson;
Second, Ed Hickox; Third, Lance Barksdale. T—4:44.
A—31,088 (37,071).
EAST
Boston
New York
Baltimore
Tampa Bay
Toronto
CENTRAL
Detroit
Kansas City
Cleveland
Minnesota
Chicago
WEST
Texas
Oakland
Seattle
Los Angeles
Houston
W
21
18
19
14
12
W
19
17
15
13
13
W
20
18
15
11
8
L
11
12
13
17
21
L
11
11
14
15
17
L
12
15
18
20
24
Pct
.656
.600
.594
.452
.364
Pct
.633
.607
.517
.464
.433
Pct
.625
.545
.455
.355
.250
GB
—
2
2
61⁄2
91⁄2
GB
—
1
31⁄2
5
6
GB
—
21⁄2
51⁄2
81⁄2
12
WCGB
—
—
—
41⁄2
71⁄2
WCGB
—
—
21⁄2
4
5
WCGB
—
11⁄2
41⁄2
71⁄2
11
L10
6-4
7-3
6-4
4-6
3-7
L10
9-1
7-3
7-3
4-6
5-5
L10
5-5
5-5
7-3
3-7
1-9
Streak
W-1
L-1
W-2
L-1
W-2
Streak
W-4
L-1
W-1
L-1
W-1
Streak
L-1
L-1
L-1
L-2
L-6
Home
12-5
12-7
7-5
8-5
7-12
Home
10-4
10-5
7-7
7-6
7-7
Home
11-4
9-8
9-8
7-9
4-12
Away
9-6
6-5
12-8
6-12
5-9
Away
9-7
7-6
8-7
6-9
6-10
Away
9-8
9-7
6-10
4-11
4-12
The Associated Press
Cincinnati’s Derrick Robinson returns safely to first as Atlanta first baseman Freddie
Freeman catches a pickoff throw in the fifth inning Monday.
Braves
• Continued from Page D1
drove in a run off Arroyo,
who needed 98 pitches to
get through five innings. Jordan Schafer added his first
career pinch-hit homer as
the Braves pulled away.
The injury-sapped Braves
got a little closer to full strength
when catcher Brian McCann
was activated off the disabled
list, completing a comeback
from surgery on his throwing
shoulder last October. The six-
time All-Star started and went
0-for-4 with a walk.
Right fielder Jason Heyward also increased his workout activities while recovering from surgery to remove
his appendix on April 22.
The Braves will decide by
the end of the week whether
he’s ready to start a rehab
assignment in the minors.
The Braves made it tough
on Arroyo from the outset.
Freeman singled home a run
in the first inning, but Atlanta left the bases loaded when
Dan Uggla struck out.
Simmons led off the second
inning with a homer down the
third-base line. Uggla opened
the fourth with his second triple of the season — a ball into
the gap in right-center field
— and scored on Simmons’
single off the glove of Zack
Cozart in the hole at shortstop
for a 3-0 lead.
Evan Gattis doubled home
a run in the fifth off Arroyo.
The Braves pulled away with
three runs in the eighth off
Ondrusek.
Votto doubled home a run
in the eighth inning, extending his hitting streak to nine
games.
A-Rod back on a field
The Associated Press
TAMPA, Fla. — Alex
Rodriguez got back on a
New York Yankees ballfield
for the first time since surgery on his left hip almost
four months ago.
He joined a group of
injured Yankees starters
Monday at the team’s minor
league complex. The 37-yearold third baseman ran, played
catch and hit off a tee.
Rodriguez said it was
“like being 8 years old again
when I first grabbed a bat.”
He added that it was “pretty
exciting” and he’s “really
looking forward to getting
back.”
He could return to the
Yankees after the All-Star
break. A surgeon repaired
a torn labrum and impingement in the Jan. 16 operation
in New York.
“It feels good to be back
out in uniform,” Rodriguez
said. “It’s been a rough stretch
with the rehab, obviously. It’s
small bites at a time.”
Rodriguez is in a 30-day
rehab schedule setup by his
doctors and team officials.
“We’re taking it four
weeks at a time,” Rodriguez
said. “Today is one of 30.”
The upbeat A-Rod signed
autographs and took photos
with about 40 fans waiting
for him outside the players’
parking lot. Fans driving
by stopped their car near
the complex driveway and
jumped out to have photos
taken.
“I have a lot of unfinished
business,” said Rodriguez,
who struggled offensively
late last season. “I’m really
looking forward to getting
back on the field close to
100 percent and being who
I am.”
Outfielder Curtis Granderson (broken right forearm),
first baseman Mark Teixeira
(right wrist), corner infielder
Kevin Youkilis (lumbar spine
sprain) and catcher Francisco Cervelli (broken hand)
also are rehabbing injuries
in Florida.
“It’s great seeing him,”
Teixeira said. “He’s just
happy to be back, doing some
baseball activities. He’s got a
big smile on his face right
now, which is great.”
Shortstop Derek Jeter
The Associated Press
New York Yankees third baseman Alex Rodriguez signs
autographs for fans at the Yankees Minor League complex Monday in Tampa, Fla.
also is on the disabled list
with a broken ankle and is
not expected back until after
the All-Star break.
“We always talk about
injuries are a part of the
game, but this is crazy,”
Rodriguez said. “I’ve never
seen anything like it. But I’ve
got to tell you, the way those
guys are playing up there, the
job the front office has done
putting these guys together
at the last minute, hats off to
everyone.”
The Miami New Times
reported this year that
Rodriguez bought human
growth hormone and other
performance-enhancing substances in recent years from
Biogenesis of America LLC,
a now-closed clinic in Coral
Cables, near the three-time
AL MVP’s offseason home.
Rodriguez has denied the
allegations.
“I can only control what
I can control,” Rodriguez
said. “I’m really focusing
on all the great things that
have happened in the game.
I’m really focused on getting
healthy and just getting back
and helping the Yankees win
a championship.”
A 14-time All-Star, Rodriguez had right hip surgery on
March 9, 2009, and returned
that May 8. He is due $114
million over the next five
years as part of his $275 million, 10-year contract.
Jeter found out he fractured his left ankle for a
second time in six months
on April 18. At that time the
Yankees said the team captain should be able to resume
his rehabilitation when the
new crack heals in about
four to eight weeks.
Out since injuring his
wrist with the U.S. on March
5 before the World Baseball
Classic, Teixeira took batting
practice in an indoor cage
and hopes to start on-field
BP in the next few days.
“I’m very, very happy
with where I am right now,”
Teixeira said.
Granderson, who broke
the arm Feb. 24 in his first atbat of spring training when
he was hit by a pitch from
Toronto’s J.A. Happ, is playing in extended-spring-training games and expected to
rejoin the team this month.
Youkilis is eligible to
come off the 15-day disabled
list next Monday. Cervelli
broken his hand April 26 and
is expected to miss at least
six weeks.
...
. timesfreepress.com
• • Tuesday, May 7, 2013 • D5
Breaking News: [email protected]
Six area
teams set
for state
Frazier
• Continued from Page D1
By David Uchiyama
Staff Writer
The Dalton High School
girls’ golf team already qualified for the Georgia Class
AAAA state tournament to be
held May 20 at the nearby Nob
North course.
Heritage, Northwest Whitfield and Southeast Whitfield
will be there with the Lady
Catamounts by virtue of their
finishes Monday in a GHSA
sectional at Blueberry Plantation, which is about 20 minutes
south of Augusta.
“It’s most definitely worth the
trip,” Northwest girls’ coach John
Linder said. “We knew there were
13 teams for 11 spots, and we felt
pretty confident going in. We felt
this was a time to sharpen things.
We advanced and yet we found
out that we have work to do.”
His Lady Bruins shot a
three-player score of 302 with
Dallas Coker and Alicia Cole
each shooting 100.
Southeast advanced with
senior Megan Collins leading
the way with a 7-over-par 79.
“At the beginning of the year,
we were thinking we couldn’t
reach state,” Southeast coach
Todd Murray said. “Then as it
got closer to region, we were
on the bubble. And we took six
strokes off our score today from
what we shot at regionals. Playing at state is a big positive for
our program and our school.”
Heritage will be joining
the three schools from within
Whitfield County at the public
course just north of Dalton. The
Ringgold-based Lady Generals
shot a 278 with senior Rachel
Rebne shooting a 77 and earning unofficial medalist honors.
Only Carrollton’s 251 beat the
Lady Generals.
“Our goal was to make state,
and that’s done,” Heritage
coach Kevin Terry said. “Anything else is icing on the cake.
Our three seniors are going to
go out in style.”
All four area Class AAAA
girls’ teams that qualified have
plans to play as much golf at
Nob North as possible in the
next 13 days.
“We’re going to wear that
course out as much as we can,”
Linder said. “We’d like to get
about five full 18-hole rounds in
and shore up our short game on
the days in between.”
The Trion and Gordon Lee
girls qualified Monday for the
Class A state tournament. Trion
won the sectional with two girls
counting a total of 195, and Gordon Lee was runner-up with a
196. The Trion boys’ team finished fifth and six shots out of
qualifying for the state.
“We’ll go to state with Gordon Lee and battle them again,”
Trion coach Doug Wilson said.
Contact David Uchiyama at
[email protected]
or 423-757-6484.
The Associated Press
Atlanta cornerbacks Robert Alford, left, and Desmond Trufant run a drill at the Falcons’ rookie minicamp.
New Falcons ‘very nice’
By Charles Odum
The Associated Press
FLOWERY BRANCH, Ga. —
Mike Smith tested Atlanta Falcons
rookies with an overload of information in a short period of time.
The coach said the first-year players survived the test during three
practices at the rookie camp. Topped
by Atlanta’s first two draft picks, cornerbacks Desmond Trufant and Robert Alford, the class also showed skills
to impress Smith and his staff.
“We gave them a whole bunch
the last three days, and I think they
handled it extremely well,” Smith said
after the final session Sunday. “We
wanted to see how they could handle
the things mentally, and they did a
very nice job.”
The draft picks were joined by
undrafted rookie free agents signed
by the team and first-year players
invited for tryouts. It was the start of
what Smith said is the “recalibration”
of the Falcons roster.
Highlights included the speed
of Trufant and Alford, the strength
and pass-rush promise of defensive
end Malliciah Goodman and the size
and good hands of 6-foot-8 tight end
Levine Toilolo.
Trufant, the first-round pick from
Washington, and Alford, the secondround pick from Southeastern Louisiana, needed no introduction. Alford
had an 88-yard kickoff return to open
the Senior Bowl, and he was denied a
touchdown when caught by Trufant.
“I haven’t even said anything yet,”
Trufant said with a smile as he looked
over at Alford. “I’m about to say
something though. It’s all good. He’s
a great player and we’re just going to
get better together.”
Alford said the two developed
“camaraderie” at the Senior Bowl that
will be strengthened as they continue
to be linked at cornerback and as the
Falcons’ top 2013 draft picks.
“We’re always talking football,”
Alford said. “Anything we have questions about, we can ask each other
and help each other get better.”
Alford’s long return was part of
his strong Senior
Bowl performance
that impressed Falcons general manager Thomas Dimitroff.
Alford, who returned
a punt 75 yards for
a touchdown in his
senior season, said
he had to give TruMike Smith fant credit for keeping him out of the end
zone on the long kickoff return.
“It was just a play that happened,”
Alford said. “He got me. I got a little tired on the long run and he got
me.”
By drafting the two cornerbacks,
the Falcons established a determination to fill needs in the draft.
Dimitroff picked two defensive ends
— Goodman and Stansly Maponga
— and added more help at defensive
back with safeties Zeke Motta and
Ishmael Kemal.
Toilolo, meanwhile, towered over
the class. He showed good hands
in the rookie camp, disproving any
thought he is just a big blocking tight
end.
Toilolo had 50 catches, including
10 for touchdowns, at Stanford. He
will have a year to take notes while
playing behind Tony Gonzalez, who
plans to retire after the 2013 season.
Owls, Lady Trojans
lead 5-AAA tennis
By Gene Henley
Staff Writer
ATHENS, Tenn. — The
Soddy-Daisy girls’ tennis
team has been on the cusp of
winning an outright district
championship before, as last
season the Lady Trojans fell
just short.
Through the first day of
the 2013 District 5-AAA individual tournament, they’ve
given themselves a chance
to break through.
The Lady Trojans lead
the way after the first day
of competition at Ingleside
Park with six points. They’ll
have to hold off charges from
Walker Valley, Cleveland and
Rhea County — all of whom
are within two points.
The Ooltewah boys lost
only one match Monday
and lead with seven points
— one ahead of Walker Valley, which has six.
Soddy-Daisy’s girls and
Ooltewah’s boys won the
regular-season titles, but
should another team win
more matches in the individual tournament, the Lady
Trojans or Owls would have
to defend its title in a onematch playoff Wednesday.
The Lady Trojans were in
a similar situation last season and fell in the playoff to
Walker Valley.
“I think it still eats at the
girls,” Soddy-Daisy coach
Lorri Johnson said. “They
remember what it felt like
and are wanting to do whatever to fight and win.
“They don’t want to hand
the plaque to somebody else.”
The team region tournament begins Thursday with
the girls. The boys will play
Friday.
Soddy-Daisy and Walker
Valley each has two entries
still playing for individual
titles, and the two face off
in a doubles match this afternoon at 1.
Ooltewah’s boys have
both doubles teams playing,
as well as Bryson Lype in
singles.
“I thought we took care of
business today, but tomorrow
is a different day,” Ooltewah
coach Ken Buchanan said.
“We’re not looking too far
ahead. We’re just taking it
one match at a time.”
Plott signs with Tigers
Coahulla Creek senior
catcher Scout Plott signed
to play baseball for Chattanooga State last week.
The 6-foot-1, 190-pound
Plott hit .350 this season and
threw out 10 of 18 runners
trying to steal.
“He’s an outstanding
defensive catcher with an
unbelievably strong arm,”
Colts coach Michael Bolen
said. “He’s got great feet and
he blocks the ball extremely
well. Offensively, he’s only
going to improve.”
Toilolo looks like a basketball
power forward in football pads.
“He’s hard to miss out there,”
Smith said. “He did a nice job improving in his understanding and his route
running. I thought he caught the ball
well. It’s going to be fun to watch him
be mentored by Tony Gonzalez.”
Toilolo, listed at 265 pounds, got
much of his action as a receiver in
red-zone situations at Stanford. He
said he also spent time as a blocker.
“I think when you’re that size
everyone wants to categorize you as
a good blocker,” Smith said. “Obviously his efficiency in the red zone
is well-documented. When you throw
the ball to a guy in the red zone, you
want to make sure he’s going to catch
the ball. So I think that kind of says
what kind of hands he has.”
The Falcons released defensive
end John Abraham after the season
and signed free agent Osi Umenyiora from the Giants. Goodman has a
chance to start with Umenyiora.
Maponga, recovering from a left
foot injury, was only an observer during the rookie camp.
Quarterback Sean Renfree, a
seventh-round pick from Duke, is
recovering from a shoulder injury
and couldn’t throw during the camp.
Renfree took snaps and made handoffs.
All the passing was handled by
undrafted rookie Seth Doege of Texas
Tech, and Graham Wilbert, in camp
on a tryout from Florida Atlantic.
The Falcons will begin offseason
team activities May 28-30, followed
by more work June 4-6 and June 1114. The team’s mandatory minicamp
is June 18-20.
MONDAY’S PREP RESULTS
BOYS’ TENNIS
District 5-AAA at Ingleside Park
Team points: 1. Ooltewah 7. 2; Walker Valley 6; 3.
Rhea County 5; 4 (tie). Cleveland 3; McMinn County
3; 6 (tie). Bradley Central 0; Soddy-Daisy 0.
Quarterfinals
Singles: Bryson Lype (Ool) def. Andrew McAlister
(WV), 6-1, 6-2; Nick McWherter (RC) def. Kevin Harrichannan (Cle), 6-2, 6-3; Joseph Sanger (WV) def.
Patrick Gleeson (Ool), 6-4, 2-6, 6-1; Cody Esparza
(MC) def. Hunter Byrd (RC), 6-1, 6-2.
Doubles: Jake Gibson/Vareen Patel (Cle) def. Danny
Lumpkin/Joel Childers (WV), 6-0, 6-2; Kyle Molhusen/Braden Lype (Ool) def. Chase Sholl/Gavin
Jones (RC); Cade Thacker/Logan Rader (WV) def.
Kyle Runyan/Andrew Travis (RC), 4-6, 6-3, 6-3;
Brady Matthews/Richard Huynh (Ool) def. Lofton
Carter/Richard Harrill (MC), 6-0, 7-5.
First Round
Singles: Andrew McAlister (WV) def. Jared Bowman (SD), 6-3, 6-1; Kevin Harrichannan (Cle) def.
Curtis Redman (MC), 6-3, 6-2; Nick McWherter
(RC) def. Brandon Beavers (BC), 6-0, 6-0; Joseph
Sanger (WV) def. Andrew Holladay (SD), 6-0, 6-1;
Patrick Gleeson (Ool) def. Jake Miggett (BC), 6-7
(7-4), 6-1, 6-2; Hunter Byrd (RC) def. Matthew Harris
(Cle), 6-2, 7-5.
Doubles: Danny Lumpkin/Joel Childers (WV) def.
Riley Shull/Paul Cannon (BC), 6-1, 6-0; Chase Sholl/
Gavin Jones (RC) def. Walker Moats/Luke Langley
(MC), 3-6, 6-1, 6-4; Kyle Molhusen/Braden Lype
(Ool) def. Seth Stewart/Justin Bennett (SD), 6-0, 63; Kyle Runyan/Andrew Travis (RC) def. Ward/Hertz
(BC), 6-0, 6-0; Cade Thacker/Logan Rader (WV) def.
Roman/Bracero (Cle), 6-3, 6-0; Lofton Carter/Richard Harrill (MC) def. Logan Bailey/Brandon Pippin
(SD), 6-4, 7-6 (7-2).
GIRLS’ TENNIS
GHSA Class A state semifinal
IRWIN COUNTY 3, GORDON LEE 1
Singles: Madison Hilley (GL) def. Maddie Carlton,
6-2, 6-2; Summer Pridgen (IC) def. Bonnie Hankins,
6-0, 6-0.
Doubles: Jordyn Jankiewicz/Jayden Jankiewicz (IC)
def. Sara Clayton/Tori McElhaney, 6-1, 6-0; Kalie
Youghn/Maggie Martin (IC) def. Katherine Chambers/Sara Holcomb, 6-4, 6-3.
Record: Gordon Lee 11-7.
District 5-AAA at Ingleside Park
Team points: 1. Soddy-Daisy 6; 2. Walker Valley 5; 3
(tie). Cleveland 4; Rhea County 4; 5. Ooltewah 3; 6.
McMinn County 2; 7. Bradley Central 0.
Quarterfinals
Singles: Lexi Bowman (RC) def. Taryn Wilson
(WV), 6-3, 6-3; Abigail Ellis (SD) def. Mallori Terry
(Cle), 6-3, 6-4; Holly Humberger (Ool) def. Mallory
McWherter (RC), 6-3, 6-0; Alyssa McAlister (WV)
def. Chloe Mitchell (SD), 2-6, 6-3, 6-2.
Doubles: Wendi Watson/Rachel Tarver (WV) def.
Moore/Louderback (Cle), 6-3, 6-4; Schafer/Casey
(SD) def. Faulkner/Collins (Ool), 6-1, 6-1; Kaitlyn
Barlok/Shelby Monroe (MC) def. Shayla Bradley/
Lindsay Smith (RC), 6-3, 6-1; Maddie Ohlsson/Katherine Cantrell (Cle) def. Adriana Peckinpaugh/Kasey
Stephens (SD), 6-3, 6-2.
Staff photo by Tim Barber
Arts & Sciences center fielder Kenny Struthers (1)
loses his footing on the soggy field at McCallie,
where the District 5-A tournament was moved for
Monday’s games. Boyd-Buchanan beat the Patriots
13-3 in five innings.
First Round
Singles: Abigail Ellis (SD) def. Racheal Garrett (BC),
6-1, 6-1; Mallori Terry (Cle) def. Doreen Flaherty
(Ool), 6-4, 6-2; Holly Humberger (Ool) def. Sarah
Parkinson (MC), 6-2, 6-0; Mallory McWherter (RC)
def. Heidi Barringer (Cle), 6-2, 6-4; Alyssa McAlister
(WV) def. Tori Roderick (BC), 6-1, 6-1.
Doubles: Briley Moore/Abigail Louderback (Cle) def.
Elle Brewer/Kaitlyn Grider (BC), 6-0, 6-0; Rachel
Faulkner/Rachel Collins (Ool) def. Madison Wright/
Abby Newberry (MC), 6-1, 6-2; Alex Schafer/Casey
(SD) def. Katelyn Travis/Madeline Klee (RC), 6-2, 6-0;
Kaitlyn Barlok/Shelby Monroe (MC) def. Caitlyn Moro/
Samantha Whitson (Ool), 6-1, 6-1; Shayla Bradley/
Lindsay Smith (RC) def. Reed Jones/Kayla Beckler
(WV), 5-7, 6-4, 6-2; Peckinpaugh/Stevens (SD) def.
Emily Beavers/Megan Beavers (BC), 6-2, 6-2.
BASEBALL
District 5-A tournament at McCallie
BOYD-BUCHANAN 13, ARTS & SCIENCES 3
CSAS
000
03 — 3 7 3
Boyd-Buchanan
354
01 — 13 10 1
WP: Nathan Murrell (5-3). LP: Jay Brown. HR:
Austin Bailey (BB). 3B: Jim Cardwell (BB). 2B:
Chad Butler (CSAS); Murrell 2, Skyler Anderson
(BB). Highlights: Bailey 2-3, 4 RBIs, 2 runs; Murrell
2-3, 2 RBIs, 3 runs; Anderson 2-3, 2 RBIs, 2 runs;
Cardwell 2-3, 2 runs (BB); Gordon 3-3 (CSAS).
Record: Boyd-Buchanan 18-7. Up next: Today at 5
p.m. at Silverdale.
SILVERDALE BAPTIST 11, COPPER BASIN 0
Copper Basin
000
00 — 0 1 1
Silverdale
416
0x — 11 12 0
WP: Colton Rogers (6-1), 1-hitter, 8 Ks. LP: Dylan
Boggs. HR: Spencer Mossburg (SBA). 3B: Rogers (SBA). 2B: Josh Bankston (SBA). Highlights:
Jordan Delashmitt 2-2, 2 runs, RBI; Bankston 2-3,
2 RBIs, run; Josiah Green 2-3, run (SBA). Record:
Silverdale 21-2.
District 6-A tournament at South Pittsburg
MARION COUNTY 6, WHITWELL 0
Marion County 012 002
1 — 6 4 1
Whitwell
000 000
0 — 0 1 1
WP: Austin Layne (4-3), 1-hitter, 15 Ks. LP: Jesse
Owens, 7 Ks, 6 IP. Highlights: Patton Grooms 1-2,
2 runs (MC). Record: Marion County 17-12, plays
South Pittsburg at 8 EDT; Whitwell plays Lookout
Valley at 5:30 EDT.
SOUTH PITTSBURG 11, LOOKOUT VALLEY 2
Lookout Valley 000 200
0 — 2 5 4
South Pittsburg 103 322
x — 11 7 3
WP: Brady Petty, 4 IP, 6 Ks. LP: Stansifer. 2B:
Summerow (LV); Jake Stone (SP). Highlights:
McKenna Blevins 2-3, 2 RBIs; Lane Morrison
1-1, 2 RBIs; Stone 1-2, 2 RBIs, 2 runs; Petty 2
RBIs (SP). Record: South Pittsburg 26-8; Lookout
Valley 10-19.
Arkansas State.
“Kiehl was in this offense
as a true freshman, but we
weren’t able to put the whole
package in with him because
he wasn’t here in the spring,”
Malzahn said. “He learned a
new offense last year, and it
was a little bit of a learning
curve for him this spring in
those first couple of practices. About halfway through, it
started to click, and you could
see that a lot of the stuff was
coming back to him.
“I feel like he ended spring
on a strong note, and what I
mean by that was he had a
good understanding of our
base offense and the communication that goes along
with the no-huddle aspect of
it and the base reads in our
passing game.”
Malzahn has bracketed
Frazier as a co-No. 1 with
sophomore Jonathan Wallace, who was the starter
throughout November as
the Tigers concluded a dismal 3-9 season. Wallace completed 18 of 26 passes for 191
yards and two touchdowns
during the A-Day game on
April 20, while Frazier was
10-of-16 for 125 yards with one
touchdown as well as a rushing score.
“I feel I did all right this
spring,” said Frazier, who
also fumbled a snap and suffered three sacks at A-Day. “I
was able to get most of the
procedure down, and I felt
pretty comfortable.”
Frazier rushed 76 times for
327 yards and three touchdowns as a freshman changeof-pace option for Malzahn,
and he threw
12 passes with
five completions and
two i n te r ceptions.
The 6-foot-2,
228-pounder
earned the
starting job
Gus
at the start
Malzahn
of last season under coordinator Scot
Loeffler and completed 62 of
116 passes for 753 yards with
two touchdowns and eight
interceptions.
C h i z i k a n d L o e ff l e r
benched Frazier during the
fifth game against Arkansas and replaced him with
senior Clint Moseley, who
was replaced in the ninth
game by Wallace. The 6-2,
205-pound Wallace is from
Phenix City, Ala., and joining
the mix this summer will be
Jeremy Johnson from Montgomery, a 6-6, 215-pounder
who was a Rivals.com top100 prospect.
Of course, upgrading an
offense that ranked 115th
out of 120 Bowl Subdivision
teams will take more than a
new staff and improved play
at quarterback. Tailback Tre
Mason is back after rushing for 1,002 yards and 5.86
yards a carry last year as a
sophomore, but the Tigers
are having to replace tailback
Onterio McCalebb, receiver
Emory Blake and tight end
Philip Lutzenkirchen.
“We do have a young
offensive line that we think
is extremely talented, and
that group up front is starting to jell more and more,”
Malzahn said. “I think the
future is going to be very
bright up front. I think the
running back position was a
concern depth-wise coming
in, but Cameron Artis-Payne
and Corey Grant both had
very solid springs. We know
what we have with Tre.
“With our receivers, we
have a lot of guys who are
very young, but we feel like
we’ll have the chance to
improve. The pieces around
the quarterback position have
a lot of potential.”
Contact David Paschall
at [email protected]
com or 423-757-6524.
A
Fresh
Take
On
News
D6 • Tuesday, May 7, 2013 • • •
..
timesfreepress.com ..
Breaking News: 423-757-News
Blackburn thinks UTC softball issue settled
By Jim Tanner
Staff Writer
University of Tennessee at
Chattanooga athletic director
David Blackburn said Monday
that he believes the incident
involving the Lady Mocs softball team forfeiting a game is
in the past.
Last Tuesday, UTC forfeited the second game of a
scheduled doubleheader at
Alabama-Birmingham when,
reportedly, the players refused
to take the field. The forfeit
resulted in an automatic suspension of coach Frank Reed
for two games, per NCAA
rules, and the team’s two fouryear seniors, Sara Poteat and
Kasey Tydingco subsequently
left the team.
“It turned out to be a discipline issue within the team.
There was the forfeiture of the
game, and we’ve dealt with
that internally with
the coach and with the
team,” Blackburn said
Monday after speaking to the Quarterback
Club. “Obviously the
[Southern Conference] tournament is
starting Wednesday,
so everything has Frank
been handled. We look forward to them lining up and
moving forward.”
UTC is the No. 6
seed in the tournament in Greensboro,
N.C., and will take on
No. 3 seed Georgia
Southern on the first
day of the doubleelimination tournament.
Reed
“Hopefully everything’s been finalized and they
can regroup and have a good
showing in the tournament,”
Blackburn said.
The SoCon announced its
regular-season all-conference
teams Monday, and second
baseman Poteat joined sophomore third baseman Sarah
Beth Roberts and freshman
outfielder Sam Taylor on the
second team. Taylor, from
Gordon Lee High School, and
catcher Anyssa Robles were
named to the all-freshman
squad.
Appalachian State’s Allie
Cashion was named player of
the year, and Mountaineers
coach Shae Wesley is coach
of the year. Georgia Southern’s
Sarah Purvis was selected as
the league’s top pitcher, and
UNC Greensboro’s Lindsay
Thomas is freshman of the
year.
Contact Jim Tanner at
[email protected]
or 423-757-6478.
Golf Mocs headed
to Ohio State regional
By David Uchiyama
Staff Writer
The University of Tennessee at Chattanooga men’s golf
team is heading to an NCAA
regional for the seventh
straight year.
The Mocs knew they were
going to the NCAA postseason even before they played
in the Southern Conference
tournament, based on their
ranking. But winning the
SoCon title gave them the
league’s automatic bid as they
try for a second consecutive
regional championship.
Monday night, the Mocs
learned they were seeded
eighth for the Midwest
Regional, which will be played
May 16-18 in Columbus, Ohio,
on the Scarlet Course of the
Ohio State Golf Club. The
original course was designed
by Alister McKenzie, and
OSU alumnus Jack Nicklaus
tweaked it in 2005-06, making it a staple for USGA and
NCAA competitions.
“I like the draw for us
because a lot of Southern
teams have to go north and
a lot of Western teams have
to come east and Ohio State
is not in our field,” said UTC
coach Mark Guhne, whose
team is ranked No. 48 by
Golfweek. “I feel that it sets
up pretty well and it gives us
a good shot.”
The top five teams (and
selected individuals not on
those teams) from each of
six regionals will advance
to the NCAA championship
tournament May 28-June 2 at
Atlanta’s Capital City Club—
Crabapple Course.
Staff Photos by Dan Henry
UTC athletic director David Blackburn speaks during the Chattanooga Quarterback Club luncheon Monday at
Finley Stadium. This was Blackburn’s first public appearance since being introduced nearly two weeks ago as the
new AD.
wind.” During the Q&A portion of the talk, the Loudon
native, who spent more than
two decades at the University
of Tennessee, didn’t hesitate
to say, “I don’t know,” when
asked about something he
hasn’t yet had time to study.
That happened on several
occasions.
“It’s a bit embarrassing,
actually, but I’m not afraid
to say, ‘I don’t know,’ if I don’t
Wiedmer
• Continued from Page D1
days other than Saturday,
Blackburn said, “I’m a little
more on the creative side of
scheduling. I’m personally all
for [Thursday night games].
But as the son of high school
football coach, I’m certainly
not for butting up against high
school football. I hope I’m a
little smarter than that.”
Much of that is surely
what the faithful wanted to
hear and needed to hear. But
Blackburn also told of his personal struggles, of losing both
his father and sister to cancer
during his early adulthood;
of his years as both a student
manager and student assistant to Johnny Majors; even
of his days as a tennis player
at Tennessee Tech.
“I can’t tell you how many
cups of coffee I brought
coaches,” he said of those
early days inside the UT football program in the late 1980s.
“But it allowed me to build
a network; it allowed me to
learn about recruiting.”
It allowed him to impress
Phillip Fulmer enough that
when Fulmer became the
head coach of the football
Volunteers, he soon called
Blackburn to ask him to be
his assistant recruiting coordinator, a post that quickly led
to a different position in the
athletic department involving
fundraising.
“Before that, I had no idea
what fed the engine,” he said as
he pointed toward the crowd.
“You guys are what allows us
to do what we do. That helped
me as much as anything to
learn how to become a director of athletics.”
Blackburn will learn a lot
this first year. If his basketball hirings don’t immediately
impress, the fans will attempt
to teach him how much he
doesn’t know.
Keenly aware of that
dynamic, he said, “I may not
be here if I get it wrong.”
But he seemed to get all of
it right Monday.
Said lifelong Mocs fan
Marshall Harvey: “I liked him
talking about his background
and family values. He seems
like a first-class kind of guy.”
Added Rusty Scott, a season-ticket holder for 30 years:
“I like his energy, that he’s
sincerely glad to be here. I
liked his frankness, that he
chances of playing against
Tennessee more often — in
all sports, but especially football and basketball — Blackburn said he hopes his UT
connections can help facilitate matchups with numerous
major-conference schools.
“I’d love nothing more
than to get them in the arena
and beat them,” he said,
drawing many murmurs of
approval from the crowd.
Contact John Frierson at
[email protected]
com or 423-757-6268. Follow
him on Twitter at twitter.
com/MocsBeat.
honorable leader willing to
tell it like it is while tirelessly
working every day to make
it the way the Mocs Nation
wants it to be.
Or as Blackburn ended his
talk: “I want to do everything
I can to make Chattanooga
better today than it was yesterday and better tomorrow
than it is today.”
If he succeeds in that goal,
if he can convince the UTC
faithful to feed their blue and
gold engine with more dollars than cents, if he can find
UTC athletic director David Blackburn talks with UTC
a men’s basketball coach to
women’s basketball player Alicia Payne before speaking return that program to past
during a luncheon Monday to the Chattanooga Quarter- glory, he just might become
back Club at Finley Stadium.
the most trusted and respected AD in Mocs history, both
to the choir and the masses
yet to be mined.
knew he needed to earn our politician.”
Contact Mark Wiedmer
The Mocs and their suprespect. He’s not trying to sell
us a bill of goods. He probably porters don’t need a politi- at [email protected]
wouldn’t make a very good cian. They need an honest, press.com
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handed Blackburn a donation to the athletic department from the Chattanooga
Quarterback Club.
Like many other areas,
Blackburn said he wanted
to study UTC’s fundraising
before saying much publicly about what needs to be
done in the future. He did
say UTC needs to be a little
more aggressive.
“It’s not offensive to ask
someone to give,” he said. “In
fact, I find that most people
find that flattering if they
care about the product.”
When asked about the
35596223
UTC
know,” he said. “I don’t want
to fake it, and there’s so many
things that I haven’t had the
chance to know yet.”
Among the topics covered
either in his address or during the Q&A were scheduling and fundraising. Blackburn did a lot of fundraising
during his time at Tennessee,
and he said that’s a high-priority area at UTC.
Speaking to a group that
gives to UTC and is interested
in the Mocs, Blackburn said
“you guys are what allows us
to do what we do.” At the end,
club president Doug Dyer
New Mexico, Stanford,
Auburn, Southern California
and Missouri are the top five
seeded teams in the OSU
regional, followed by UNLV,
Texas Tech and then UTC.
Fellow SoCon competitor
Georgia Southern is the No.
9 seed and will be paired
with the Mocs for the opening round.
“All the regions are tough,
but I like what I’m seeing,”
Guhne said. “The goal is
always to win, any coach will
tell you that. Another goal
is to put three good rounds
on the board that will get us
through to the next level.”
Last year, UTC did just
that. It won the South Central
Regional by one stroke over
Texas A&M at Olde Stone
Fort in Bowling Green, Ky.
Then-senior Stephan Jaeger
earned medalist honors with
a 13-under 203. Current senior
Steven Fox, the reigning U.S.
Amateur champion, tied for
third with a 211.
From there, the Mocs
advanced to the NCAA
championship event, where
they placed 18th at the Riviera Country Club near Los
Angeles. UTC also reached
the 2009 title competition at
Inverness Country Club.
“Both times that we got
through, we got off to good
starts,” Guhne said. “You don’t
want to be playing catch-up.
We were around the lead in
’09 at Karsten Creek, and we
were around the lead all of
last year.”
Contact David Uchiyama
at [email protected]
press.com or 423-757-6484.
...
.
E
LIFE
• • • Tuesday, May 7, 2013
timesfreepress.com/life
‘HANDS OF STONE’: Usher gets ready for role as Sugar Ray Leonard, E6
q
q
AUTO ADVICE: Heed warnings for brake maintenance, E4
Damon Johnson in solo show at Raw
■ Guitarist for reincarnated
Thin Lizzy relishes chance
to tell stories in solo shows.
By Barry Courter
Staff Writer
Contributed Photo
Damon Johnson is coming to play in Chattanooga.
Damon Johnson is pretty
sure he is the most famous
guitarist to come out of
Geraldine, Ala.
“Ha! That’s probably
true,” he says during a
telephone interview, “but
I’m probably not the most
famous musician.”
That honor may go to
Pat Upton, lead singer for
the Spiral Starecase on the
hit song “More Today Than
Yesterday.”
“He graduated with my
mother in 1957 from Gerladine High School,” Johnson
says.
But Johnson’s resume is
pretty strong also. He has
toured with or been a member of Brother Cane, Alice
Cooper, Whiskey Falls,
Slave to the System and he
is currently a member of
the reincarnated Thin Lizzy,
which recently changed its
name to Black Star Riders.
He also has performed with
or written for John Waite,
Stevie Nicks, Carlos Santana, Sammy Hagar, Queen-
The Black Star Riders
is a new band and a new
■ What: Damon Johnson
name for what is essentially
■ When: 8 p.m.
Thin Lizzy. Band members,
Wednesday
which includes longtime
■ Where: Raw Night Club & guitarist Scott Gorham and
Restaurant, 409 Market St.
drummer Brian Downey,
■ Admission: Free
wanted to record some
■ Phone: 756-1919
new material, but the current lineup didn’t feel right
sryche, Faith Hill, Skid Row about putting out the first
and the Temptations.
Lizzy record since 1983. Phil
He will be doing a solo
Lynott, the group’s original
show Wednesday at Raw
lead singer and the writer
downtown.
or co-composer of most of
“Damon is a great guy
their songs, including the
and great guitar player and hit “The Boys Are Back in
this is like having him in
Town,” died in 1986. Black
your living room,” says Raw
owner Jim Striker.
See JOHNSON, Page E6
IF YOU GO
MEMORIES
OF MOMS
What’s your favorite
memory of your mom?
The way she made
breakfast? Helped you
learn to tie your shoes?
Something she did that
utterly surprised you?
We’d like to share those
memories with the rest
of the Times Free Press
readers. Send in your
memory — 125 words
or less — and a photo
of your mom (or you and
your mom) to [email protected]
timesfreepress.com. We
will run the stories on
Sunday — Mother’s Day,
of course.
A little
honesty
would be
refreshing
I never knew the guy
who did the Rossville Furniture Co. ads a few years
ago. I wish I had gone by
and met him and thanked
him for his interesting
and unusual ad.
He would tag every one
with, “Come on down to
Rossville
Furniture
Co. It’s just
as good a
place as
any to buy
furniture.”
He didn’t
say, “It’s
Dalton
the cheapRoberts
est place
Commentary
to buy furniture” or “It’s the finest
furniture in town” or “We
have the friendliest staff.”
All he claimed was, “It’s as
good a place as any to buy
your furniture.”
If I had been buying a
house full of furniture, I
think I would have bought
it from him. Most advertising is nothing but exaggerated claims, half truths
and half lies. It plays up
the very best in the product and plays down the
very worst.
I remember buying
some furniture from a
fancy dealer, and most of
it came apart. I’m hunting
a powerful glue right now
to keep it alive a few more
days. In other words, that
place was not just as good
a place as any to buy my
furniture.
What I liked about the
old Rossville Furniture
Co. salesman was the
matter-of-fact way he
presented himself and his
company. He wasn’t bragging or boasting. He was
just saying, “This is the
way it seems to me.”
In almost all fields,
we have gotten ourselves
into the habit of making
See ROBERTS, Page E6
Staff Photo by Connor Choate
Nakelci Eppinger screams during a speaking exercise in the Orchard Knob Elementary School gymnasium during the Creative
Writing Outreach Program. Students from the McCallie School, led by program president Dan Meagher, left, work with fourthand fifth-grade students to help them improve their writing and speaking skills.
Loud and clear
Program boosts students’ writing, speaking skills
By Karen Nazor Hill
Staff Writer
R
eading, writing, and arithmetic —
the basics of an education, right?
But for some youngsters, writing is the hardest to conquer.
That’s why McCallie School
freshman English teacher Erin Tocknell
started the Creative Writing Outreach
Program in the spring of 2012, a volunteer-led effort that pairs McCallie students with fourth- and fifth-graders from
Orchard Knob Elementary and Calvin
Donaldson Elementary schools.
The McCallie students meet with the
youngsters every Saturday throughout
the school year, teaching them to improve
their writing and speaking skills. Tocknell
says the McCallie students plan and execute every detail of the program.
The students’ stories, along with some
photographs they took, will be featured
in a published journal, “Tales from Donaldson and Orchard,” to be unveiled at a
private reception on May 14 at McCallie
School. Among those in attendance will be
families of the students, representatives of
area businesses and teachers.
“The students will read selected works,
and the event will act as a launch party for
the collaborative journal,” says McCallie
senior Dan Meagher, the program’s president.
Imani Rowe, 10, a fifth-grader at Orchard
Knob, says he enjoys spending his Saturday
mornings with the McCallie students.
“When I first started, I used to put my
face behind my paper,” he says. “I was
reading slow, and I was quiet. When I
go to the writing academy now, I put my
paper down, and I’m not shy.”
Imani says he also enjoys activities that
teach them to speak loudly and clearly.
“When we’re in the gym, sometimes
they’ll tell us to scream out our name, and
we do different activities that involve our
voice,” he says.
Meagher says the program has been
equally fulfilling for the older students/
teachers.
See PROGRAM, Page E6
Gorilla Hilton
Gorillas living the high life at
state-of-the-art Georgia facility
looking like the Incredible
Hulk in a black fur coat.
Squatting next to Kidogo
In the green woods of
is Jasiri, who tickles his
the North Georgia mounfriend, then borrows the
tains, behind a computerstick, which they share for
controlled electrified fence,
a moment, both chewing
an idiosyncratic millionaire
quietly.
keeps a menagerie of huge,
Though we know that
powerful creatures.
these Western lowland
It’s not exactly Jurassic
gorillas could snap us in
Park. But it’s close.
Certainly the giants here half like a twig, they appear,
in this scene, as harmless
are awe-inspiring. They
and playful as puppies.
include Kidogo, who, on a
They are at ease, sugrecent Tuesday, is reclining
gests
their keeper Charles
in the sunshine, chewing
on a stick, his powerfully
See GORILLAS, Page E6
muscled 386-pound frame
By Bo Emerson
The Atlanta Journal
Constitution
McClatchy Newspapers
Jasiri, left, chews on wood as Kidogo relaxes at The Dewar Wildlife Trust in
Morganton, Ga. When the two teenage gorillas started beating up on a younger
gorilla in one of Zoo Atlanta’s bachelor groups, the pair were moved to the private refuge.
■ To contact Life phone: 423-757-6327 • Fax: 423-668-5051 • Email: [email protected]
E2 • Tuesday, May 7, 2013 • • •
.
timesfreepress.com ...
Breaking News: 423-757-News
Puzzles&Funnies
Horoscope
By Bernice Bede Osol
Universal Uclick
In the year ahead, you
are likely to get an opportunity to take over two
endeavors that have been
started by others. You could
turn them both into winners.
TAURUS (April
20- May 20):
You may be
holding all the trump cards,
but you’re not likely to use
this power unjustly. The
opposition will admire and
appreciate your restraint.
GEMINI (May
21- June 20):
Because someone
has helped you when
you needed it in the past,
your compassion is easily
aroused. Admirably, you’ll
be the first to respond to
someone in need.
CANCER (June
21- July 22): An
issue of personal
interest might also appeal to
your friends. Although they
may not know how to turn
it into a group endeavor,
you do.
Crossword
ACROSS
1 Help for
the poor
5 Buffalo bunches
10 Florida resort,
familiarly
14 Quick look
15 German sub
16 Cowardly Lion
actor
17 Old Sinclair
Oil rival
18 “Throw __ From
the Train”
19 Soap Box Derby
state
20 Defend a
position
23 Bind with a band
24 Pinup’s leg
25 Water under the
bridge
28 One in a church
chorus?
30 Brit. fliers
33 Walk-off home
run, often
35 Horne of jazz
36 Metallic mixture
37 Homie
38 Honda compact
39 Fast-talking
40 Explodes
with rage
42 PC panic button
43 Rounded
hammer end
44 Filled
flapjack-like food
45 Assist
46 Bow-toting deity
47 With “The,” PBS
show for kids,
and a hint to the
ends of 20-, 33and 40-Across
55 Put in cargo
56 Swashbuckler
Flynn
57 Space
58 Prepare, as rice
59 Petty
60 Swed. neighbor
61 “The Thin Man”
terrier
62 Tones down
63 Before long
DOWN
1 “Tarzan”
characters
2 “__ we forget”
3 Colorado’s __
Verde National
Park
4 Toon fry cook in
The Krusty Krab
restaurant
5 “Just go along
with what I said”
6 WWII
investment
7 “When in __ ...”
8 River projects
9 Walk drunkenly
10 Come into
one’s own
11 Hawaii’s most
populous island
12 Stubble spot
13 Yankee slugger,
familiarly
21 Bridget Jones’s
book
22 Was on the
ballot
25 __ fright
26 Cultivates
27 Thing of the
past
28 Soap Box
Derby city
29 Ask for Friskies,
maybe
30 Accelerate, as
an engine
31 Licorice-flavored
seed
32 Stands up to
34 Competent
35 Cradle-to-grave
stretches
38 Billiards bounce
40 Doctor’s advice
41 Uses a mouse
wheel
43 Poe’s
“The __ and the
Pendulum”
45 Amtrak
speedster
46 Pierre’s school
47 Isle off Tuscany
48 Cambodia
neighbor
49 Revise copy
50 “Joy of Cooking”
writer Rombauer
51 Study all night
52 Suffix with buck
53 Emperor after
Claudius I
54 Show fatigue
LEO (July 23-Aug.
22): Focusing on
the virtues rather
than the shortcomings of
friends will not only boost
their egos, but also make
you very popular.
VIRGO (Aug. 23Sept. 22): You’re
basically a very
imaginative person to begin
with, but today that will
be even more so. To your
credit, you’ll put your ideas
to work.
LIBRA (Sept. 23Oct. 23): Because
you’ll strive to treat
others as fairly as possible,
things will work out quite
well. Friends and colleagues
will respond in kind.
By Jack McInturff
c.Tribune Media Services
Stumped? Call
May 7, 2013
1-900-226-4413 99 cents a minute
SCORPIO (Oct.
24- Nov. 22): An
enterprising friend
is likely to provide you with
some helpful tips. Use them
to extract even more juice
from an already profitable
situation.
Today In History
The Associated Press
Today is Tuesday, May 7,
the 127th day of 2013. There
are 238 days left in the year.
at Allied headquarters in
Rheims, France, ending its
role in World War II.
■ 1954: The 55-day
Battle of Dien Bien Phu in
Vietnam ended with Vietnamese insurgents overrunning French forces.
■ 1963: The United
States launched the Telstar
2 communications satellite.
■ 1975: President Gerald
R. Ford formally declared
an end to the “Vietnam
era.” In Ho Chi Minh City
— formerly Saigon — the
Viet Cong celebrated its
takeover.
■ 1992: The latest addition to America’s space
shuttle fleet, Endeavour,
went on its first flight.
Bridge
By Phillip Alder
Universal Uclick
How should West hope
to defeat four spades after
he leads the club ace?
TODAY’S HIGHLIGHT
North’s sequence guar■ 1763: Pontiac, chief
anteed four spades. So
of the Ottawa Indians,
South corrected to four
attempted to lead a sneak
spades. Note that the
attack on British-held Fort
defenders could have taken
Detroit, but was foiled
five immediate club tricks
because the British had
against three no-trump.
been tipped off in advance.
Many inexperienced
(The Ottawa Indians and
defenders cannot wait to
other tribes then launched
cash winners. They would
an all-out war with the Brittake the club king about
ish that came to be known
one nanosecond after winas Pontiac’s War.)
ning the first trick with the
ace. Then they would look
ON THIS DATE
around to decide what to do
next — too late.
■ 1789: The first inauWhen dummy comes
gural ball was held in New
down with three hearts,
York in honor of President
TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS
West should realize that
George Washington and his
wife, Martha.
Former Sen. Pete Domeni- his partner has a singleton.
So, there are two ways to
■ 1824: Beethoven’s
ci, R-N.M., is 81. Singer
win by shifting to a heart
Symphony No. 9 in D
Jimmy Ruffin is 74. Actress
at trick two: Partner might
minor, Op. 125, had its
Robin Strasser is 68. Rock
have either the singleton
premiere in Vienna.
musician Bill Kreutzmann
heart ace or the spade ace.
■ 1915: Nearly 1,200
is 67. Rock musician Prairie
As you can see, this
people died when a German Prince is 63. Movie writerdefense defeats the contorpedo sank the British
director Amy Heckerling is
tract. East wins the first (or
liner RMS Lusitania off the 61. Actor Michael E. Knight
second) round of trumps,
Irish coast.
is 54. Rock musician Phil
puts West on lead with his
■ 1942: U.S. Army Gen.
Campbell is 52. Country
carefully preserved club
Jonathan Wainwright went
musician Rick Schell is 50.
king, and receives the conon a Manila radio station
Rock singer-musician Chris
to announce the Allied sur- O’Connor is 48. Actress Traci tract-killing heart ruff.
As the bidding progressrender of the Philippines
Lords is 45. Singer Eagle-Eye
es, mentally log what inforto Japanese forces during
Cherry is 42. Actor Breckin
mation it imparts. And slow
World War II.
Meyer is 39. Rock musician
down your play: there are
■ 1945: Germany signed Matt Helders is 27. Actor
no prizes — except booby
an unconditional surrender Taylor Abrahamse is 22.
— for speed.
Cryptoquote
SAGITTARIUS
(Nov. 23-Dec. 21):
Don’t be surprised
if you derive an unexpected
bonus from help that you
render to another. You’ll set
a wonderful example, and
the right people will notice.
CAPRICORN
(Dec. 22-Jan.
19): Even though
your needs are important,
they won’t be more so than
those of your loved ones.
You’ll figure out a way to
help both your family and
yourself.
AQUARIUS
(Jan. 20- Feb.
19): Outward
appearances might affect
how your associates view
things, but not you. You’ll
know how to dig deep
beneath the surface and
deal with root causes.
PISCES (Feb. 19March 20): One
of your greatest
assets is your ability to
adjust quickly to changing
conditions. You might have
to use it in several instances
today.
Jumble:
Monday’s Answer:
ICING
IGLOO
BEWARE
SWITCH
He practiced the trumpet for weeks before his band tryout, but on the big day he — BLEW IT
Puzzle answers on page E4
For more information about Jumble, visit www.jumble.com on the Web.
Don’t Keep
Your Final
Wishes
a Secret.
Sudoku
Complete the grid so every row, column and 3x3 box
contains every digit from 1 to 9.
ARIES (March
21- April 19):
You might be in a
moneymaking mood, but try
to profit for the benefit of
others, not yourself. You’ll
get the most satisfaction
from indulging your
charitable instincts.
Preplanning takes care of
all the decisions so your
family doesn’t have to.
Call 757-6200
for professional help
or do it Yourself
timesfreepress.com
www.hamiltonfuneraloptions.com
4506 Hixson Pike, Chattanooga, TN 37343
423.531.3975
35650239
... timesfreepress.com
.
Breaking News: [email protected]
• • • Tuesday, May 7, 2013 • E3
E4 • Tuesday, May 7, 2013 • • •
.
timesfreepress.com ...
Breaking News: 423-757-News
EXPERTADVICE
LIFE
Hopeful lottery winners
want to share with spouse
DEAR ABBY: I’m responding to the letter from
“Happily Single” (Feb. 13) on whether a divorce
would be the first action upon winning the lottery.
In a community-property state, a divorce AFTER
winning wouldn’t legally protect
you from having to share the spoils
with your soon-to-be (and probably
bitter) ex-spouse. My husband and
I would start by consulting a lawyer/financial planner to protect our
privacy before claiming the money. I
suspect comments from “Happily’s”
co-workers are evidence that unhapDear Abby
pily marrieds group together. StudWritten by
Jeanne Phillips ies show that complaining about a
spouse significantly decreases one’s
satisfaction in a relationship. While we all “vent”
from time to time, if divorce is your first response
to a jackpot win, then you’re in the wrong relationship. — IN IT FOR THE LONG HAUL
DEAR IN IT: I hit the jackpot with the huge response
I received about that letter. And the majority of readers
said they would NOT divorce:
DEAR ABBY: I am a lottery winner. I feel blessed
and proud that I can take care of my wife the way she
deserves. Within two minutes of my win I was on the
phone with her, telling her to quit her stressful job. We
now have a wonderful life, with more than we ever
hoped for. — SUNSHINE STATE
DEAR ABBY: I’m single, but that letter didn’t surprise me. I think a lot of people feel they must be married by a certain age, so they end up “settling.” Read
some of the crazy lottery winner stories posted online,
and you’ll see people trade in their spouses because
they feel they can do better or “move up,” kind of like
buying a bigger, better house. I’m not saying it’s right,
but it happens. — CINDY IN ARLINGTON, VA.
HEALTH
Gluten-free diet relieves
gas, bloating, diarrhea
DEAR DOCTOR K: I’m a healthy young person,
but I tend to have a lot of gas, bloating and diarrhea.
Could a gluten-free diet help me?
DEAR READER: Glutenfree eating is essential for
people with celiac disease,
which is an intolerance to
the protein gluten.
Gluten gives structure
and texture to breads,
pastas, cereals and baked
goods. It is also used as a
flavoring, thickener and
stabilizer in foods such
as ice cream, sauces and
condiments.
So gluten is
in a lot of
foods. About
300,000
Americans
are diagnosed
with celiac
Dr. K
disease. In
Dr. Anthony
people with
Komaroff
this disease, gluten provokes the
immune system to attack
the lining of the small
intestine. It causes gas,
bloating, diarrhea, constipation, headache, trouble
concentrating and fatigue.
It also leads to weight loss
and malnutrition.
For people with celiac
disease, following a strict
gluten-free diet is essential.
In its most severe form,
celiac disease can cause
life-threatening diarrhea
and dehydration.
Given your symptoms,
you should talk to your doctor about getting tested for
celiac disease. If you have
it, you definitely should be
on a gluten-free diet.
Even five years ago,
I would have said there’s
no point in your following a gluten-free diet if
you don’t test positive for
celiac disease. Two million
Americans follow a glutenfree diet — and that’s a lot
more than have celiac disease. Many really believe
it helps them, and recent
studies have found that
they may be right.
There now is good evidence for a condition called
non-celiac gluten sensitivity.
It causes gas, bloating and
indigestion, but no intestinal damage. The evidence
for non-celiac gluten sensitivity comes from studies of people who believe
they have gluten sensitivity.
The people have been chosen at random to eat foods
containing gluten or not
containing gluten — with
neither the doctors nor the
subjects in the study knowing what they were eating.
Those who thought they
had symptoms from gluten
really did.
If you don’t have celiac
disease but you have symptoms after consuming gluten, try a gluten-free diet to
see if you feel better. Many
foods now are labeled as
being gluten-free. By cutting out gluten-containing
foods, you may reduce your
fiber intake from whole
grains. You may also miss
out on vitamins and minerals that you’d normally get
from fortified foods. Contact a registered dietitian.
He or she can help.
FAITH
Revelation was written
for early Christians
Q: I’ve always been fascinated with how the
world will end, so I’ve been trying to read Revelation. But to be honest, I can’t make much sense of
it. Can you give me some suggestions? — J.V.R.
A: When Revelation forever as king of kings
was written, Christians and lord of lords.
were facing intense perseDon’t try to figure out
cution. The Roman emper- every symbol in Revelaor demand- tion (particularly if you’re
e d t h a t reading it for the first
Christians time). Focus on its cenw o r s h i p tral message: Someday
him as god, God will defeat all evil,
b u t t h e y and Jesus Christ will rule
w o u l d n ’ t forever. No matter what
Billy Graham g i v e u p you’re facing right now, is
their faith your hope in him?
in Jesus as their only savMake the Bible part of
ior. This book was meant your life every day, asking
to encourage Christians God to draw you closer to
in the midst of their tri- Christ through its pages.
als — and it should do the Remember: “All Scripture
same for us. The future is is God-breathed ... so that
in God’s hands, it reminds the man of God may be
us that someday all God’s thoroughly equipped for
enemies will be defeated, every good work” (2 Timand Jesus Christ will rule othy 3:16-17).
McClatchy Newspapers
Owner Steuart Dewar and his wife, JoBeth, right, feed Willie B. Jr. a treat through a slot in the window at The
Dewar Wildlife Refuge in Morganton, Ga.
Gorilla
• Continued from Page E1
Horton, because they are living the life of Riley.
“It’s the Gorilla Hilton up
here,” Horton says.
That is exactly as it was
planned. Ten years ago, software entrepreneur and British expatriate Steuart Dewar
and his then-wife, Jane Dewar,
opened Gorilla Haven as a
retirement village for male
gorillas on 300-plus acres of
Fannin County forest, near
Morganton, Ga., about two
hours north of Atlanta. They
built a 14-foot concrete wall
that enclosed 8 acres of green
space, and high-tech “dorms”
to house the gorillas at night.
With state of the art veterinary facilities and trained
professionals overseeing the
animals, the refuge earned
approval from the Association of Zoos and Aquariums.
The cost: about $6 million.
Steuart Dewar, an old-school
polymath who had made his
fortune in newspaper publishing software, helped cover the
cost of construction with the
proceeds of a calendar application he tinkered together
for Palm and Handspring
devices.
Then the economy tanked,
which hurt potential support
from zoos, as well as Dewar’s
revenues. One of their gorillas, Oliver, was transferred
to the Columbus, Ohio, zoo
in 2009, leaving them with a
single resident, the aging and
ailing Joe. And the Dewars
went through a contentious
divorce.
Hopes for the refuge
dimmed. Steel panels for a
planned expansion remained
stacked in an unfinished
group facility. Then Zoo
Atlanta began to take an interest in the refuge as a possible
solution for the ongoing challenge of the male gorilla.
Western lowland gorillas
live in social units comprised
of one adult male (a silverback), several females and
their offspring. When young
males grow up, they are forced
out of their clan by the dominant male, with the hope that
they will start their own social
units. But since captive breeding programs have produced
as many males as females (or
even, during recent years,
slightly more males than
females, for no apparent reason), that means many males
will not get lucky.
Zoos have tried to create bachelor groups so that
adult males aren’t forced to
live in solitary confinement.
But for a facility such as Zoo
Atlanta with a collection of 21
gorillas, assembling compatible groups in the smallish 3
acres available is as tricky as
planning an anarchists convention.
When the teenaged Jasiri
and Kidogo started beating
up on the younger Mbeli in
one of Zoo Atlanta’s bachelor
groups, the newly renamed
Dewar Wildlife Trust offered
a safety valve. The two older
apes were moved to the trust
from Atlanta in January of
2012. “It was great having this
opportunity,” Horton says.
Zoo Atlanta pays for two
full-time curators, Horton and
Bobby Fellows, to care for the
14-year-old gorillas, both of
which remain property of
the zoo. The zoo also supplies other in-kind support,
including gorilla chow.
Now the Dewar Wildlife
Trust is opening the facility for tours, creating some
revenue to offset operation
expenses. (They play on the
Jurassic look of the place
by calling the enterprise
“Dewarassic Tours.”) A youth
group recently enjoyed an
overnight at the facility, hanging their hammocks in one
of the unused gorilla dormitories.
The gorillas enjoy the
tours, says Dewar, as he and
his wife, JoBeth Dewar, watch
Fellows work on training with
Kidogo (also called Willie B.
Jr.). “They like being interactive.”
Zoo Atlanta Deputy Director Dwight Lawson says if
his zoo acquired the refuge it
could create a satellite facility that would appeal to a
different geographical area,
and could also provide elbow
room allowing breeding programs for other animals, such
as the Sumatran tigers. He
points out that Atlanta’s zoo,
Auto advice from Angie’s
List: Brake maintenance
By Angie Hicks
www.angieslist.com
Driving around with
brakes that are screeching or
grinding can be more than
just irritating — it’s a big
red flag to get your brakes
checked out immediately.
The good news is the
screeching is actually part
of a built-in system with the
brake pads — called a wear
indicator — that is designed
to alert people their brake
pads are running thin and
may need to be replaced. So
by taking quick action when
the screeching starts, you
may avoid a costly fix.
“It’s hard to say what the
most important thing on your
car is, but safety wise, brakes
are definitely one of the most
important things,” said Duke
Cardwell, an auto technician
with the Car Care Center of
Sacramento, Calif. “You need
to take your car in if you hear
a sound.”
Having your vehicle’s
brakes looked at by a professional at the first sign of
trouble will not only bring
safety to you and your family, it could save you hundreds of dollars in the long
run. Brakes get progressively
worse the longer you wait to
repair them, so contact an
auto technician when you
first hear the noise.
Rod Tate, with Colony
One Auto Center in Stafford,
Texas, said brakes should be
checked about every 10,000
miles to see if they’re working properly.
“By ignoring the squealing brakes or the brake light,
you can destroy the brake
rotors and possibly the calipers, easily adding hundreds
of dollars to a brake job,” Tate
said. “Keep in mind that just
■ By ignoring the
squealing brakes or the
brake light, you can
destroy the brake rotors
and possibly the calipers,
easily adding hundreds of
dollars to a brake job.
because your car stops when
you’re pushing the brake
pedal doesn’t mean everything is OK. You have to pay
attention to the sound and
feel of your brakes. A little
common sense will go a long
way.”
Often times, your brakes
only need new pads, which
can cost between $100 and
$300 to replace. If the brake
pads go out, damage can be
caused to your rotors or calipers, leading to an expensive
replacement of up to $1,000
or more. The pads are connected to the calipers, which
clamp down on the rotor to
make the tires stop.
Cardwell said, while the
squealing sound often comes
from your brake pads, a grinding noise means something
is rubbing against the rotors.
Pulsations or vibrations when
you apply the brake pedal
also indicate there is a problem with your rotors.
“Generally, the f irst
thing people will need are
their brake pads replaced,”
Cardwell said. “You’ll hear
that high-pitch squeal noise
warning you the brake pads
are about 2 or 3 percent from
metal to metal contact with
the rotors,” Cardwell said.
“It’s a great reminder not to
ignore it when you hear that
high-pitch squeal.”
Tate said a lack of brake
fluid maintenance can also
be an issue.
“Brake fluid should be
flushed out of the system and
replaced about every 30,000
miles because it accumulates
moisture and can boil at a
lower temperature and also
damage the internal parts of
your brakes’ hydraulic system,” Tate said.
Brake fluid should be
checked frequently for condensation, which can be
harmful to the braking system.
Pads, meanwhile, should be
replaced every 25,000 miles,
but that varies depending on
whether you do the bulk of
your driving on city roads
or on the highway. Stop-andgo driving likely will mean
quicker replacement
People can also increase
the longevity of their brakes
by not putting so much pressure on the petal when they
brake. Two-footed drivers
can also wear down brakes.
“The number-one thing I
see all the time in automatic
transmission cars is people driving with two feet,”
Cardwell said. “Two-foot
drivers rest their foot on the
brake pedal. Sometimes they
don’t think they’re touching
it, but just applying one percent of pressure can cause
significant damage to your
brakes and brake pads.”
It’s important to have your
brakes looked at by a trusted
auto technician. Tate said one
of the biggest gimmicks he’s
seen is advertisements for
low-cost brake pads, only to
be told by the technician you
also need new rotors, calipers
and cylinders.
Angie Hicks is the founder
of Angie’s List, a resource for
consumer reviews on everything from home improvement
to automotive repair.
at 36 acres, is smaller than
most in a city of Atlanta’s size.
(Riverbanks Zoo in Columbia,
S.C., and the North Carolina
Zoo in Asheboro, N.C., both
exceed 100 acres.) “It could
be developed to appeal to an
entirely different audience,”
he says. The only challenge:
cash.
What the zoo would get
would be a superb facility,
says Kristen Lukas, curator
of conservation and science
at Cleveland’s Metro Park
Zoo, and chair of the Species
Survival Plan for gorillas. Her
group coordinates nationwide
efforts to promote the health
and genetic diversity of gorillas. The Dewars “really did
a fantastic job in creating a
facility that met the highest
of industry standards,” she
says.
For Kidogo and Jasiri, it’s
just getting nicer. Workers are
putting in a pond for the hot
summer months. “It’s like the
people who go up to Hiawassee for that spa treatment,”
says Horton.
And the “boys,” as Dewar
calls them, seem to enjoy
each other’s company. “This
is a real success story,” says
Horton, “Two totally adult
males being about as bonded as I’ve ever seen males
bonded.”
Correction
A Chattanooga Now
story on Friday should
have stated that the
Big Boi and Killer Mike
show at Track 29 will
take place on May 31
and that tickets are $25
in advance or $28 at the
door. The Times Free
Press wants its news
report to be fair and
accurate. If you know of
an error, write:
Alison Gerber
Managing Editor
400 E. 11th St.
Chattanooga, TN 37403
e-mail: [email protected]
timesfreepress.com
Puzzle answers
Answer to previous Sudoku
Answer to previous Crossword
Answer to previous Word Sleuth
... timesfreepress.com
.
• • • Tuesday, May 7, 2013 • E5
Breaking News: [email protected]
PBS goes in search of more perfect union ‘Buffy the Vampire Slayer’
But without any of the “wit”
or satire that contemporary
critics felt was lacking in the
original.
“Duck Dynasty” has climbed
By Kevin McDonough
to the top of the cable reality/
comedy heap as a pale photocopy of “The Beverly Hillbillies,” albeit one that never
loads up the truck and moves
to Beverly.
The new series “Backyard
Oil: Kentucky Boom” (10:30
p.m., Discovery) seems similarly stuck. This one follows a
Kentucky family besotted by
rising oil prices, trying to revive
old wells. It’s just too bad they’ll
never get to rub shoulders with
Miss Hathaway.
■ “Polygamy USA” (9 p.m.,
National Geographic) visits
ABC Photo residents of Centennial Park,
Ariz. Their community was
Three finalists take the
founded by members of the
plunge on the season
finale of “Splash” at 8 p.m. Mormon Church who felt that
the official religion’s renunciaon ABC. Joey Lawrence
tion of polygamy was a spirihosts.
tual wrong turn.
■ TV-themed DVDs availJ.R.” episode of “Dallas.” And it
also includes a handful of regu- able today include “Space 1999:
lar episodes of “The Beverly 30th Anniversary Edition.”
Hillbillies.”
TONIGHT’S
The “Hillbillies” exploited
HIGHLIGHTS
stereotypes well honed by Al
■ “Weight of the Nation for
Capp’s comic strip “Li’l Abner”
Kids”
(6:00 p.m., HBO) looks at
(and resulting Broadway musical and movie adaptations) as childhood obesity and attempts
to change school cafeterias.
well as country vs. city com■ Contestants prepare for
edy conventions dating as far
a quinceanera party on “Hell’s
back as ancient Roman theater.
Kitchen” (8 p.m., Fox, TV-14).
Although Jethro and Granny
■ Zoe returns to New York
were often cartoon characters,
to recharge her batteries on the
most of the jokes on the show
season finale of “Hart of Dixie”
were at the expense of the city
(8 p.m., CW, TV-PG).
sophisticates who were in the
■ Mary Lynn Rajskub (“24”)
thrall of Jed Clampett’s money.
guest-stars on “New Girl” (9
(Or Elly May’s pneumatic p.m., Fox, TV-14).
naivete).
Contact Kevin McDonough
A half-century after the
at
[email protected]
debut of “Hillbillies,” cable
c. United Feature Syndicate
reality series still steal from it.
EPB
Tune In
Tonight
BATTL
LAFAY
CLEVE
RINGD
DALTN
CHATT
Apparently, we the people
don’t understand our own Constitution. According to a recent
survey, fewer than four in 10
could name the three branches
of the federal government.
To help remedy this sad
fact, or at least
TO SEE IT entertain the
rest of us who
“Constitution
actually paid
USA with
Peter Sagal,” attention in
f ifth grade,
9 p.m., PBS,
Peter Sagal
Comcast
(NPR’s “Wait
channel 5,
EPBFI chan- Wait... Don’t
nel 5 in Chat- Te l l M e ” )
hosts “Contanooga.
stitution USA
with Peter Sagal” (9 p.m., PBS),
a road- trip celebration of the
nation’s founding document,
coinciding with the 225th anniversary of its ratification by the
states.
Sagal will travel from Rhode
Island to California by way of
Texas and Missouri to discuss
this essential 4,418-word document and the history, myths
and misconceptions surrounding it. He’ll also rely on charts,
animation and clips from popular films to illustrate key ideas
and principles.
■ The disparity between
critical acclaim and TV ratings is hardly new. Few shows
earned more brickbats from
writers than “The Beverly Hillbillies,” a CBS comedy about
poor backwoods folks who
became the peculiar neighbors
of Hollywood millionaires after
striking oil in their back yard.
But viewers couldn’t get
enough. A list of the mostwatched television events of all
time includes plenty of Super
Bowls, the Beatles’ appearance
on “Ed Sullivan,” the finales of
“MASH” and the “Who Shot
6
PM
6:30
7
PM
star in‘Crazy Ones’ pilot
LATE NIGHT
■ Mindy Kaling is
scheduled on “The
Daily Show With Jon
Stewart” (11 p.m.,
Comedy Central)
■ Edie Falco, Marc
Maron and Iron & Wine
appear on “Conan” (11
p.m., TBS)
■ Michael Buble, John
Caparulo, Jen Kirkman
and Brody Stevens are
booked on “Chelsea
Lately” (11 p.m., E!)
■ Douglas Rushkoff sits
down on “The Colbert
Report” (11:30 p.m.,
Comedy Central).
■ Zooey Deschanel, Jim
Gaffigan, Pistol Annies
and Todd Rundgren
appear on “Late Show
With David Letterman”
(11:35 p.m., CBS)
■ Jay Leno welcomes
Zach Braff, Connie
Sawyer and Patty Griffin
on “The Tonight Show”
(11:35 p.m., NBC)
■ Mel Brooks, Simon
Pegg and Goo Goo
Dolls appear on “Jimmy
Kimmel Live” (11:35
p.m., ABC).
■ Craig Ferguson hosts
Ryan Seacrest on “The
Late Late Show” (12:35
a.m., CBS).
CULT CHOICE
A charming race car
driver (Elvis Presley)
battles tax problems
in the 1968 musical
“Speedway” (8 p.m.,
Encore), co-starring
Nancy Sinatra and
Bill Bixby. Not to
be confused with
“Spinout.”
TUESDAY EVENING
7:30
8 PM
8:30
9 PM
DEAR STACY: What Sketch Show” for cable’s
has Sarah Michelle Gellar Logo gay channel. Bearse,
been doing? — Kristin N., who came out in 1993 and
married Carrie Schenken
Cedar Rapids, Iowa
DEAR KRISTIN: The in 2010, has a 20-year-old
former “Buffy The Vampire adopted daughter, Zoe, and
Slayer” title star is in a CBS lives in Atlanta.
DEAR STACY: I was
comedy pilot called “Crazy
Ones” opposite Robin Wil- saddened to learn that
the lovely Deboliams, playing daughrah Raffin passed
ter and father adveraway from cancer
tising agency execs.
recently. How old
The David E. Kelley
was she and what
comedy is expected to
was her final role?
debut this fall. Mean— Lester B., Warwhile, she and husren, Ohio
band Freddie Prinze,
DEAR LESTER:
Jr. have three-year-old
Raffin, who died
daughter Charlotte Stacy
and seven-month-old Jenel Smith of leukemia last
son Rocky to keep Entertainment November, was 59
years old. Her work on “The
them busy.
DEAR STACY: I used Secret Life of The Amerito laugh at the antics of can Teenager” (2008-2010)
Marcy D’Arcy on “Mar- stands as her final acting
ried, With Children.” Can appearance.
DEAR STACY: Please
you give an update on
Amanda Bearse? Haven’t settle a trivia disagreeseen her in years. — Patty ment. Did Jennifer Aniston’s father play a detecL., Chesterfield, Mo.
DEAR PATTY: You must tive on “Kojak”? — Ginger
have missed her episodes of M., West Haven, Conn.
DEAR GINGER: No,
‘Drop Dead Diva” in 2011 and
“Anger Management” earlier Aniston’s father, John Anisthis year. Although she still ton (he was born in Greece
acts, Bearse focuses more and his original name was
on her directing career. She Anastasakis), played the part
honed her skills while on of mobster Albert Dansek on
“MWC” — serving as direc- a couple of episodes of the
tor for more than 30 epi- vintage show that starred his
sodes. She went on to direct best friend, Savalas, who was
shows including “Jesse” also Jennifer’s godfather.
(a reunion with former
To find out more about
“MWC” cast mate Christina
Applegate), “Reba,” “Dhar- Marilyn Beck and Stacy
ma & Greg” and “Veronica’s Jenel Smith and read their
Closet.” Also, she and Rosie past columns, visit the CreO’Donnell teamed behind ators Syndicate web page at
the scenes producing and www.creators.com.
c. Marilyn Beck, Stacy Jenel Smith
directing “The Big Gay
9:30
3.1 NBC
Eyewitness
NBC Nightly
Entertainment Inside Edition The Voice The top 16 artists perform live. 'TVPG' (N)
4
3
3
3
4
4
3
WRCB
News
News
Tonight 'TVPG' 'TVPG'
3.2 Antenna 216 148 148 148 216 216 163 Sanford
Sanford
Eyewitness
Maude
The Nanny
The Nanny
WKRP
WKRP
6.1 TNN
165 (5:00)Nash.Now Fitness
Best of Rick & Bubba 'TVPG' Larry's Country Diner 'TVG'
Music City Tonight
6.2 RTV
H.Cassidy
Real McCoys Bev. Hillbillies Ozzie/Harriet Highway to Heaven
The Saint "Iris" 'TVPG'
6.3 PBJ
Tom Foolery Theo. Tugboat Sgt. Preston Kangaroo
He-Man
She-Ra: Power BraveStarr
Secrets of Isis
6.4 FGO
Fishful Think. Ride Guide
Outdoorsman Outdoorsman Natural Angler Fishful Think. Inside Angling Ride Guide
6.5 TUFF
Rev It Up!
3 Wide Life
Bounty Hntrs Cold Squad 'TV14'
Bounty Hunter Lumberjack
High Octane
6.6 MyFam
Animal Court Talk.Picture
MovieStar
Little Miracles The New Zorro Bill Cosby
Crook and Chase 'TVPG'
9.1 ABC
NewsChannel ABC World
Wheel of
Jeopardy!
Splash (SF) 'TVPG' (N)
Dancing With the Stars: The
10 9
9
9 10 10 9
WTVC
9 at 6
News
Fortune 'TVG' 'TVG'
Results 'TVPG' (N)
Masquerade (1965,Comedy) A colonel is assigned to
I Spy (2002,Spy) An athlete and an agent recover a missing
9.2 ThisTV 208 174 174 174 208 208 169
12.1 CBS
WDEF
12.2 Bounce
WDEF
18.1 PBS
23.1 TBN
23.2 Church
23.3 JCTV
23.4 Enlace
23.5 Smile
39.1 WYHB
45.1 PBS
WTCI
45.2 Create
53.1 CW
WFLI
53.2 MeTV
WFLI
61.1 FOX
WDSI
61.2 MNT
A&E
AMC
ANPL
BET
BRAVO
CMT
CNBC
CNN
COM
CSPAN
CSPAN2
CSSE
DISC
E!
ESPN
ESPN2
FAM
FNC
FOOD
FOXSS
FX
GAME
GOLF
HALL
HGTV
HIST
ION
INSP
LIFE
MTV
NBCSN
NGEO
NICK
OWN
SPEED
SPIKE
SPSO
STYLE
SYFY
TBS
TCM
TLC
TNT
TOON
TRAV
TRUTV
TVLAND
UCTV
USA
VH1
WGN
13
12
12
8
4
8
4
12
13
13
4
204 204 10
9
9 13
208
204
9
12
162
156
158
159
18
5
10
10
10
5
201
6
5
164
6
6
6
6
435
225
6
166
11
11
226
26
19
21
48
17
81
61
14
39
95
104
27
20
35
28
29
31
59
58
33
42
179
36
43
22
126
178
244
37
25
70
109
16
103
74
44
53
118
52
7
69
41
15
124
47
83
40
96
24
30
2
2
49
58
52
69
62
68
39
41
65
14
85
34
47
23
31
32
53
43
50
33
30
144
35
60
51
44
107
120
25
66
311
48
55
127
36
64
37
24
63
27
59
26
28
56
49
45
57
11
11
11
11
7
2
49
58
52
69
62
68
39
41
65
14
85
34
47
23
31
32
53
43
50
33
30
144
35
60
51
44
107
101
25
66
311
48
55
127
36
64
37
24
63
27
59
26
28
56
49
45
57
5
29 29
67 67
15 15
2
46
58
52
69
62
68
39
41
65
14
85
34
47
23
31
32
53
43
50
33
30
144
35
60
51
44
107
101
25
66
311
48
55
127
36
64
37
24
63
27
59
26
28
56
49
45
57
226
26
19
21
48
17
45
61
14
39
95
104
27
20
35
28
29
31
59
58
33
42
179
36
43
22
126
178
244
37
25
70
226
26
19
21
48
17
81
61
30
39
95
104
27
20
35
28
29
31
59
58
33
42
179
36
43
22
86
178
244
37
25
70
16
103
78
44
75
118
8
44
47
62
49
71
77
43
40
73
17
18
32
26
55
27
31
25
39
65
34
48
113
36
54
64
68
22
21
52
75
35
67
59
103
37
72
33
121
70
45
50
63
24
60
66
46
74
16
103
78
44
56
85
52
7
69
41
15
34
47
83
40
265
24 23
53 78
2
2
7
69
41
15
34
47
252
40
265
29 24
67 30
15 2
CINEMAX 320 515 520 515 320 15 520
DISN
136 43 43 54
64 57
HBO
302 500 500 500 302 302 500
HBO2
HBO FAM
303 501 502 501 303 303 502
305 503 504 503 305 305 503
SHOWTIME 340 400 400 600 340 14 540
TMC
350 408 406 408 350 62 560
10 PM 10:30 11
PM
11:30
Grimm "Kiss of the Muse"
Eyewitness
(:35)Tonight
'TV14' (N)
News
Show (N)
WKRP
WKRP
Married, Child Married, Child
Texas Music Country Music Rewind
Route 66 "Burning for Burning" Da Vinci's Inquest
Good Dog
GRR TV
Real Life 101 Harveytoons
Ride Guide
Comp.Angler Wildfly Fishing Wildfly Fishing
Car Garage
S. Compact
Fusion TV 'TVG'
Cold Squad 'TV14'
Eye for an Eye FamTeam
Body of Proof "Dark City"
Newschannel (:35)Jimmy
'TVPG' (N)
9 at 11 p.m. Kimmel (N)
Diggstown (1992,Action) Con men make a large bet with
kidnap a prince. Cliff Robertson 'TV14'
fighter jet. Eddie Murphy 'TV14'
some small-town locals. James Woods 'TV14'
News 12 at
CBS Evening Prime News
The Andy
NCIS "Double Blind" 'TV14' (N) NCIS: Los Angeles "Parley"
Golden Boy "Beast of Burden" News 12
(:35)David
6:00 p.m.
News
Griffith Show
'TV14' (N)
'TV14' (N)
Nightside
Letterman (N)
The Confidant (2010,Thriller) Childhood best friends and strong Forgive or Forget
Off the Chain Uptown Comic Mo' Money (1992,Comedy) A former con artist goes back
'TV14'
bond and secret. Boris Kodjoe 'TVMA'
to his old ways. Damon Wayans 'TVMA'
PBS NewsHour
Nature
American Experience
Constitution USA (N)
TED Talks Educat 'TVPG' (N) Jewish Americans "Home"
(5:00)Praise-A-Thon
BehindScenes Enjoying Life Joseph Prince Rod Parsley
Praise the Lord 'TVG'
From His Heart Signs.
Supernatural Faith Now!
Behind Scenes Food for Soul World Impact Dr. Tony Evans Jewish Jesus Benny Hinn
Jerry Dirmann Dr. Goudeaux
40/40
Music Videos 'TVG'
Top 3
Amplify
Reflections
Music Videos 'TVG'
Music Village Yng Believer
Club 700 Hoy Casa de Dios Dios TV
Tiempo
Joyce Meyer Vida de Fe
La Vision
Tiempo
Hacerlo
Casa de Dios Tiempo
B. Adventures Upstairs Bears Charlie Church Colby's Club... iShine KNECT The Pond
Sarah
Hermie
Swiss Family Auto B. Good Gerbert
BB's Bed Time
Ron Hazelton INN News
Cold Case Files 'TV14'
The FBI Files 'TV14'
Storm Stories Storm Stories Poker Heartland Tour 'TVPG'
The Grid
Amer. Thinks
BBC World
Nightly
PBS NewsHour
American Experience "Jesse
Constitution USA "A More
TED Talks Education 'TVPG'
The A List
BBC World
News
Business 'TVG'
James" 'TVPG'
Perfect Union" 'TVPG' (N)
(N)
'TVPG'
News
Hometime
J. Weir's Cook Caprial
Julia & Jac.
Pepin
Test Kitchen Chef Besh
J. Weir's Cook Hometime
Steves' Europe Burt Wolf
Pepin
Extra 'TVPG' Access
Seinfeld "The The Simpsons Hart of Dixie "On the Road
Next Top Model "The Girl Who How I Met
The Office
Loves Ray "The Rick Davis
Hollywood
Limo" 'TVPG'
Again" (SF) 'TVPG' (N)
Sings for Alicia Keys" 'TVPG'
Your Mother "Initiation"
Breakup Tape" Gold 'TVG'
The Rifleman The Rifleman M*A*S*H
M*A*S*H
Bewitched
I Dream of
The Mary Tyler The Bob
The Odd
The Dick Van The Twilight Perry Mason
"Sheer Terror" "The Stand In"
Jeannie
Moore Show Newhart Show Couple
Dyke Show
Zone 'TV14'
'TVPG'
Rules of
Two and a Half The Big Bang The Big Bang Hell's Kitchen "12 Chefs
New Girl (N) Mindy Project Fox 61 First at Seinfeld "The Two and a Half How I Met
Engagement Men
Theory
Theory
Compete" 'TV14' (N)
"Frat Party" (N) 10 p.m.
Slicer" 'TVPG' Men
Your Mother
We the People We the People The People's Court 'TVPG'
House "All In" 'TV14'
House "Sleeping Dogs Lie"
Law & Order: C.I. "Revolution" American Dad Dish Nation
Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage (N)
Storage (N)
Hoggers (N)
Amer. Hogger Amer. Hogger Amer. Hogger
(5:00) A Knight's Tale (2001,Adventure) Heath Ledger 'TV14' The Italian Job (2003,Action) Mark Wahlberg 'TV14'
The Italian Job Mark Wahlberg 'TV14'
(4:00)Tanked!
River Monsters: Unhooked
Polar Bears: Edge of Existence
Blue Planet "Frozen Seas" 'TVG' Polar Bears: Edge of Existence
106 & Park: BET's Top 10 Live 'TVPG'
Stay Together Stay Together The Game
The Game
The Game (N) Together (N) The Game
Stay Together
The Real Housewives
The Real Housewives
Watch What Happens Live
Don't Be Tardy Don't Be Tardy Tardy... (N)
Don't Be Tardy Watch (N)
Don't Be Tardy
Reba
Reba
Reba
Reba
Ace Ventura: Pet Detective ('94,Com) Jim Carrey 'TV14'
On the Hunt 'TVPG'
Cops
Cops
Mad Money 'TVPG'
Hockey NHL Stanley Cup Playoffs Mtl./Ott. Eastern Conference Quarter-final Game 4 'TVG'
Hockey NHL Stanley Cup Playoffs Van./S.J. 'TVG'
Anderson Cooper 360
Piers Morgan Live 'TVG'
Anderson Cooper 360
OutFront
(5:00)The Situation Room 'TVG' OutFront
South Park
Tosh.O
Colbert Report Daily Show
A.Schumer
Tosh.O
Tosh.O
Tosh.O
Tosh.O (N)
A.Schumer (N) Daily Show
Colbert Report
(5:00)U.S. House of Representatives 'TVG'
Key Capitol Hill Hearings
Tonight From Washington 'TVG'
Capital News Today
(5:00)U.S. Senate 'TVG'
SEC Football "Spring Edition" SEC Tonight
Lacrosse H.S. Championship 'TVG'
Alabama Tide Dawg Report Georgia Tech Dantanna's
SEC Tonight
Deadliest Catch
Deadliest Catch
Deadliest Catch: On Deck (N) Deadliest Catch (N)
Back Oil (N)
Backyard Oil Deadliest Catch
WWRyanDo
WWRyanDo
E! News 'TVG'
MarriedJonas Kourtney & Kim Take Miami Kourtney & Kim Take Miami Chelsea Lately E! News
SportsCenter 'TVG'
E:60 'TVG'
30 for 30 "You Don't Know Bo" 'TVG'
Baseball Tonight 'TVG' (L)
SportsCenter 'TVG'
Horn (N)
Interrupt (N) NFL Live 'TVG' (N)
ESPN Films "The Real Rocky" 30 for 30 "One Night in Vegas" 30 for 30
E:60 'TVG'
Baby Daddy
Paul Blart: Mall Cop (2009,Comedy) Kevin James 'TV14'
Shallow Hal (2001,Comedy) Gwyneth Paltrow 'TVPG'
The 700 Club 'TVPG'
Special Report With Bret Baier FOX Report
The O'Reilly Factor 'TVG'
Hannity
On the Record
The O'Reilly Factor 'TVG'
Chopped
Chopped "Go for It!" 'TVG'
Chopped "Have a Heart" 'TVG' Chopped "Pigging Out" 'TVG'
Chopped "Momumental" (N)
Chopped
Game Time
Courtside
Boxing Golden Boy Orozco vs. Reynoso 'TVMA'
Stuntbusters Insider
Poker WPT Borgata Open
Met Mother
Met Mother
Two and Half Two and Half Soul Surfer (2011,Action) AnnaSophia Robb 'TVPG'
Soul Surfer ('11,Act) AnnaSophia Robb 'TVPG'
Family Feud Family Feud Minute to Win It 'TVG'
Family Trade Family Trade Minute to Win It 'TVG'
Minute to Win It 'TVG'
Family Trade Family Trade
Learning C.
PGA Tour (N) Live from the Players Championships 'TVG' (L)
Live from the Players Championships 'TVG'
Players Championship 'TVG'
Brady Bunch Brady Bunch Brady Bunch Brady Bunch Frasier
Frasier
Frasier
Frasier
Frasier
Frasier 1/2
Frasier 2/2
Frasier
HGTV Smart Home 'TVPG'
House Hunters House Hunters Flip or Flop
Flip or Flop
Income Property
House Hunters House Hunters Flip or Flop
Flip or Flop
Pawn Stars
Pawn Stars
Pawn Stars
Pawn Stars
Counting Cars Counting Cars Counting Cars Counting Cars Restoration
Restoration
Restoration
Restoration
Criminal Minds "Cold Comfort" Criminal Minds "Zoe's Reprise" Criminal Minds
Criminal Minds "Demonology" Crim. Minds "Omnivore" 'TV14' Flashpoint "No Kind of Life"
Happy Days
Happy Days
Dr. Quinn Medicine Woman
Little House "Blizzard" 'TVG'
The Waltons "Day of Infamy"
Matlock "The Heiress" 'TVG'
Matlock "The Lemon" 'TVPG'
Dance Moms
Dance Moms
Dance Moms (N)
Dance Moms "Tell All" 'TVPG' Preacher "Hallelujah" 'TV14' (N) Dance Moms "Tell All" 'TVPG'
Girl Code
Girl Code
My Crazy
My Crazy
Teen Mom 2 'TVPG'
Awkward
Awkward
Awkward
Girl Code
My Crazy
Awkward
The Crossover NHL Live!
Hockey NHL Stanley Cup Playoffs Pittsburgh vs N.Y. Islanders 'TVG'
Hockey NHL Stanley Cup Playoffs Chicago vs Minnesota 'TVG'
Doomsday Bugged
The '80s "Lift Off" 'TV14'
The '80s "The Revolutionaries" Polygamy, U.S.A. (N)
Taboo "Strange Behavior"
Polygamy, U.S.A.
SpongeBob
SpongeBob
SpongeBob
Drake & Josh Full House 1/2 Full House 2/2 Full House
Full House
The Nanny
The Nanny
Friends
(:35)Friends
Shocking Family Secrets
Shocking Family Secrets
Oprah: Where Are They Now? Oprah: Where Are They Now? Oprah: Where Are They Now? Oprah: Where Are They Now?
NASCAR Race Hub (N)
Pass Time
Pass Time
GearZ
GearZ
Dreams To
Dreams To
Translogic
The List
GearZ
GearZ
Worst Tenants Worst Tenants Worst Tenants Worst Tenants Worst Tenants Worst Tenants Worst Tenants Worst Tenants Tenants (N)
Worst Tenants Urban Tarzan Worst Tenants
Golf America Pre-game
Baseball MLB Atlanta Braves vs. Cincinnati Reds Site: Great American Ball Park 'TVG' (L)
Post-game
Post-game
Baseball MLB Atl./Cin.
Giuliana and Bill
Giuliana, Bill "Roadtrip" 'TVPG' Giuliana and Bill
August Rush (2007,Drama) Freddie Highmore 'TVPG'
Supernanny "Demott Family"
Deep South Paranormal
Deep South Paranormal
Deep South Paranormal
Weird or What? "Monster" (N) Weird or What? (N)
Weird or What? "Monster"
King of Queens Seinfeld
Seinfeld
Seinfeld
The Big Bang The Big Bang The Big Bang The Big Bang WhoLast (N) The Big Bang Conan 'TV14' (N)
Movie
Little Men (1940,Drama) Kay Francis 'TVG' The Asphalt Jungle ('50,Rom) Sterling Hayden 'TVPG'
Crossfire ('47) Robert Young 'TVPG'
Out of the Past
Long Island
Long Island
American Gypsy Wedd
19 Kids and Counting
19 Kids (N)
19 Kids (N)
Little C. (N)
Little C. (N)
19 Kids
19 Kids
Castle "Anatomy of a Murder" Castle "3XK" 'TVPG'
Basketball NBA Playoffs 'TVG' (L)
Basketball NBA Playoffs 'TVG' (L)
Regular Show Regular Show Johnny (N)
TeenTita (N) Looney (N)
Finn and Jake King of the Hill King of the Hill American Dad Amer. Dad 1/2 Family Guy
Family Guy
Bizarre Foods "Ecuador" 'TVPG' Man v. Food Man v. Food Airport 24/7
Airport 24/7
Airport (N)
Airport 24/7
The Layover "Miami" 'TVG'
Anthony Bourdain
Cops
Cops
Pawn
Pawn
Pawn
Pawn
Pawn (N)
Pawn
Pawn
Pawn
Op Repo
Op Repo
(:25)Golden Girls 'TVPG'
Golden Girls Golden Girls Golden Girls Golden Girls Loves Ray
Loves Ray
Loves Ray
Loves Ray
King of Queens (:35)Queens
Deliverance Outreach 'TVG'
Know Your Bible 'TVG'
Our Town 'TVG'
Night Talk 'TVG'
Rick Davis Talking Gold 'TVG'
Law & Order: S.V.U.
Law & Order: S.V.U. "Fallacy" Law & Order: S.V.U. "Grief"
Law & Order: S.V.U. "Ritual"
Law & Order: S.V.U. "Risk"
CSI: Crime "Brain Doe" 'TV14'
(5:45)40 Greatest R&B "Hour 2" The Gossip Game
T.I. and Tiny T.I. and Tiny Love and Hip-Hop "Dinner Beef" I'm Married to a...
(:15)Behind the Music "Usher"
Old Christine Old Christine Funniest Home Videos 'TVPG' Baseball MLB St. Louis Cardinals vs. Chicago Cubs Site: Wrigley Field Chicago, Ill. 'TVG' (L)
WGN News
Home Videos
PREMIUM CHANNELS
(5:20) Cowboys and Aliens 'TV14'
(:35) Forrest Gump (1994,Comedy/Drama) Tom Hanks 'TV14'
A Very Harold and Kumar Christmas 'TVMA' Zane's Jump
Good Luck ... Jessie
Gravity Falls A.N.T. Farm Tinker Bell and the Great Fairy Rescue 'TVG' Jessie
Jessie
Good Luck ... Austin and Ally A.N.T. Farm
(:45)The
Game of Thrones "The Climb"
(5:30)The Weight of the Nation Rise of the Planet of the Apes (2011,Sci-Fi) Genetically Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter Abraham
"Consequences" 'TVPG'
modified apes fight for global domination. James Franco 'TVPG' Lincoln is on a mission to eliminate vampires. Making of
'TVMA'
(:15) Trust the Man (2006,Comedy) David Duchovny 'TVMA' Crazy, Stupid, Love. ('11,Com/Dra) Steve Carell 'TV14' Bill Maher 'TVM'
Veep
The Campaign
(5:30) George of the Jungle
Antz ('98) Voices of Woody Allen 'TVPG' Anastasia Voices of Meg Ryan 'TVPG'
(:15) Drive Me Crazy 'TVPG'
Movie
The Company Men Three men struggle
(:45) That's What She Said Best friends visit
(:15) Mean Girls (2004,Comedy/Drama) A new student
The Big C "Hereafter You Can't
with life after being laid off. Ben Affleck 'TVMA' New York City with a new friend. 'TVMA'
falls for the wrong guy. Lindsay Lohan 'TV14'
Take It With You" 'TVMA'
(5:45) Road to Nowhere ('10,Thril) Shannyn Sossamon 'TVMA' Liberal Arts ('12,Comedy) Josh Radnor 'TV14' (:40) The King of California 'TV14'
(:15) House of D 'TV14'
E6 • Tuesday, May 7, 2013 • • •
..
timesfreepress.com ..
Breaking News: 423-757-News
‘Hands of Stone’
Usher gets ready for role as Sugar Ray Leonard
The Associated Press
N EW O R L E A N S —
Grammy-winning singer
Usher believes his dancing
skills will help him in his
upcoming role as Sugar Ray
Leonard in “Hands of Stone,”
a new boxing film about
the great brawler Roberto
Duran.
Usher said he has been
preparing to play Leonard
— a fighter with fast hands,
smooth feet and a wide smile
— for more than a year and
still needs to lose nearly
25 pounds before shooting
begins in October.
The movie is based on
Duran, a world champion in
four weight divisions over
a career that spanned five
decades. Duran, whose nickname was “Hands of Stone,”
rose from the slums of Panama to defeat an unbeaten
Leonard in 1980 and claim
the WBC welterweight title,
only to lose the rematch several months later in the infamous “no mas” fight.
Usher said he was honored
to play Leonard in the film.
“You couldn’t find a more
stylized boxer than Sugar Ray
Leonard,” Usher said by telephone. “He was an incredible motion guy, the way he
moved around the ring, and
I think my dancing will make
it easier for me to pick up
his moves. I’ve been working on familiarizing myself
with the ring, sparring and
just understanding how to
move in the ring.”
The role will mean dropping some weight. Usher
said he’s currently about 172
pounds but will need to get
down to about 150.
The cast also includes
Robert De Niro as Duran’s
Hall of Fame trainer, Ray
Arcel. Edgar Ramirez, who
was recently in “Zero Dark
Thirty,” will play Duran.
The biopic, written and
directed by Jonathan Jakubowicz, is a love story and
sports drama that includes
the “Brawl in Montreal,” the
first fight between Duran
and Leonard and the “no
mas” fight, which took place
in New Orleans. In the eighth
round of that fight, Duran
inexplicably quit, saying in
Spanish “no mas,” which
means “no more.” They
fought one more time, and
Leonard won again.
Usher said the rivalry
between Leonard and Duran
was one of the most exciting
and unforgettable in sports.
“It’s an incredible story to
be told,” he said. “The metaphor of determination and
struggle is one we can all
relate to.”
Usher said he has had long
conversations with Leonard
and will meet him in person
in coming weeks.
“He had such incredible
discipline, and he was flashy
and classy at the same time,”
said Usher, who’s been studying videos from Leonard’s
boxing days. “I want to be as
passionate and dedicated in
preparing for this role as he
was every time he stepped
into the ring.”
Usher is an eight-time
Grammy-winner with more
than 50 million records sold
worldwide. He serves as a
celebrity mentor on the reality TV show “The Voice.” He
made his Broadway debut in
2006 in “Chicago” as lawyer Billy Flynn and recently
appeared in the off-Broadway
play “Feurza Bruta.”
This will be his first leading role in a feature film.
“I’m up for the challenge,
and I’m looking forward to it,”
he said. “I think my overall
feeling is one of anticipation.
It seems like this is a real passion project. It’s a film that
everybody is so invested in,
and I have the good fortune
of having the character I’m
playing still around.”
Usher said he was thrilled
to collaborate with De Niro,
who will play Arcel, the first
trainer to be elected to Hall
of Fame. Arcel handled more
than 2,000 fighters during his
70-year career.
It will be De Niro’s third
boxing film. He played Jake
LaMotta in “Raging Bull” and
stars in “Grudge Match” opposite Sylvester Stallone. That
film, an action-comedy, is
about two aging boxers and is
due for release in early 2014.
“Hands of Stone” will be
shot entirely in Panama.
Usher
Roberts
• Continued from Page E1
absurd claims. That’s why we
tune out politicians and most
commercial ads. Not only are
they going to send you something for $19.95 if you call and
use your credit card, they’ll
double your order.
Not only will politicians
educate your children,
they’ll fix the potholes in
the road that have jarred
your children’s heads for
so long it has substantially
lowered their IQ.
Politicians who run on a
pledge to never raise taxes are
the most dangerous jackasses
in the pasture. What they’re
really saying is, “If the
schools fall in and the potholes are breaking axles — or
any catastrophe befalls the
community — I’ll be snug and
secure in my little position
that I’ve sold my soul for.”
Just one time I’d like to
hear a politician say, “I’m
just as good a man as any to
vote for.” And what would
make it grand and glorious
Johnson
• Continued from Page E1
Star Riders’ new CD, “All
Hell Breaks Loose,” is set
for release on May 28.
Johnson, 47, grew up a
Thin Lizzy fan — “Scott Gorham was my hero” — and
says the band, which includes
Downey, Gorham and newer
members Darren Wharten,
Marco Mendoza and singer
Ricky Warwick, is very proud
of the new record. He believes
it was the correct choice to
release it under a new name.
“We wanted to consider
Thin Lizzy and it felt better
to us and it took the pressure
off of Ricky,” Johnson says.
When the band tours
as Black Star Riders, they
will play the bulk of the
new record, but they’ll also
423.757.NEWS (6397)
[email protected]
•••
*All submissions are confidential.
The Associated Press
Program
Graduates
• Continued from Page E1
“The idea of helping these
kids was really appealing to
me,” Meagher says. “They’re
little kids and, though they
might have had a little trouble
getting into it at first, the fact
that they get up every Saturday morning and spend four
hours with us is amazing.”
McCallie senior Sam
Devaney says he can identify with the youngsters and
their writing issues.
“It’s fun to see the elements that make a story for
them are the same elements
as I have writing a story,”
Devaney says. “In English
class, I would make an A on
content and a C on grammar.
A lot of these kids always
have good content but not
the correct grammar. I can
relate to that.”
McCallie senior Shawn
Paik is helping the students
learn the basics of photography.
“I took eight point-andshoot cameras to the class
and talked to the kids about
taking photos,” says the amateur photographer. “Dan told
me the whole point of the
writing class was to focus on
self-expression. Photography
is part of that, too.”
Orchard Knob fourth-grader Amari Culotta, 9, says the
McCallie students have taught
her how to express herself.
“They help with reading,
and you get to write about
lots of things like about how
you feel, what happens in
your life and your imagination,” she says. “They help
us speak louder and make us
not feel like we’re left out.
We can speak loud and tell
how we feel.”
She and Imani are excited
about the debut of the journal.
“A lot of people will see
our writing and know how
we express our feelings,”
Amari says.
“There will be strangers
reading it, and it makes me
include some Thin Lizzy
songs.
“We are so proud of
these songs and proud of
the band’s history.”
Johnson says he loves
doing solo shows like the
one at Raw because it lets
him play almost anything
and allows him to tell stories about his career.
“I did the first one four
years ago and it is so fulfilling to go out and play a solo
acoustic show,” he says. “I’m
so humbled to have this 20year career as a songwriter.
“I’ll do some new songs
and some old Alice Cooper
stuff.
“I played with Coop for
six years. I don’t think the
guy has done a bad show in
his life.”
Contact staff writer
Barry Courter at [email protected]
timesfreepress.com or at
423-757-6354.
2013
Place a Graduates 2013 message
for as little as $25
Staff Photo by Connor Choate
McCallie senior Dan Meagher listens as Dekela Barnes
practices her poem in an empty gymnasium to lessen
her nervousness.
“
There will be
strangers reading it, and
it makes me proud of my
work.
”
— Imani Rowe, 10
proud of my work,” Imani
says.
Proceeds from fundraisers
helped pay for the program’s
materials and publication of
the journal.
“Over the past couple
months, we put a lot of effort
into fundraising,” Meagher
says, noting that the goal was
$2,600 and they raised $3,000.
“We surpassed our goal,
and that’s due to the generosity of local businesses in
Chattanooga.”
The journals will be professionally produced by Starkey Printing.
“From the start, I wanted
this to be a high-level production,” Meagher says. “I
want these kids to be proud
of what they’ve done.”
Meagher also praises
writing coach Kim Honeycutt of Calvin Donaldson, and
Jashari White of Orchard
Knob for their dedication to
the program.
White, the family partnership specialist at Orchard
Knob, says the relationship
with the community, the
schools and McCallie has
been amazing.
“The partnership has
afforded two worlds to come
together that would not happen ordinarily. Without the
assistance of the students at
McCallie, some of our students, such as Imani, would
not have the confidence
that they currently have to
express themselves through
speaking and writing.
“I couldn’t be more proud
of our students,” White says,
“and I expect great things out
of all of them.”
Meagher is pleased that
younger McCallie students
plan to keep the program
active.
“When you see the results,
you know it’s worth the
effort,” he says. “When you
look at their first stories and
their last, you can see the elements we helped teach. It’s
very rewarding. Some of the
students identify themselves
as writers, which is great.”
No one is more proud of
the students than Tocknell.
“I’m an emotional person
anyway. But there are times
that I’ll get choked up just
watching them,” she says.
Contact staff writer
Karen Nazor Hill at [email protected]
timesfreepress.com or
423-757-6396. Follow her
on Twitter at twitter.com/
karennazorhill. Subscribe
to her posts on Facebook at
www.facebook.com/karen
nazorhill.
Honor your graduate on this special day.
Choose your desired size* and simply call, email, or mail
us your photo and text of what you would like to say.
Call us at 757-6200 for assistance in determining the size
and cost of your Graduates 2013 ad.
SINGLE BLOCK
1 column x 2.5”
$25
Megan Johnson
We’re so proud of you and all your
accomplishments. The best is yet to come.
Reach for the stars Princess!
Love you, Mom, Dad,
and Tommy
MAIL
Graduates 2013
400 E. 11th St.
Chattanooga, TN 37403
Soddy-Daisy High School
DOUBLE BLOCK
2 column x 2.5” - $40
EMAIL
[email protected]
with subject: GRADUATES 2013, include
your information and ad size request
with photo and copy
VISIT
During regular business hours
Monday-Friday 8 am to 5 pm
400 E. 11th St.
We’re so proud of you and all
your accomplishments. The best
is yet to come. Reach for the stars
Princess!
Love you, Mom, Dad,
and Tommy
Megan Johnson
Soddy-Daisy High School
Class of 2013
*Ads displayed have been reduced - not actual size
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All Graduate 2013 messages must be received no later than 3 p.m., Friday, May 17 Publishes Sunday, May 19.
35603838
By Stacey Plaisance
would be if he was.
I remember a man taking a strong stand for family
values while he was in the
midst of an ongoing 14-year
affair with a much younger
woman. Another ran as “a
successful businessman”
when he had bankrupted
three businesses.
None of these people
could make the simple, honest statement, “Just as good
a man as any.” That statement claims adherence to
a basic level of honesty and
performance.
I’m not encouraging lowering the expectations of
politicians or products. I’m
encouraging fundamental
honesty in the presentation
of ourselves and our products.
I say: Let’s say who we
are and be who we are and,
in most cases, we will be
worthy of confidence.
I never remember my
father bragging in his life,
but he was just as good a
man as any to be trusted to
get anything done.
Contact Dalton Roberts
at [email protected]
SECTION
F
Tuesday, May 7, 2013
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No phone calls or agencies.
Slant Front
Desk
$
Single Door
Robe
$
150
Locally owned in this area for
over 30 yrs. Lic. & Ins. Free Est.
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110
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shipment and sales notifications
FEATURED RETAILER
THE INSYDE
OUTSYDE SHOP
5006 Dayton Blvd. • Red Bank, TN
SPRING/ SUMMER HOURS
Thursday 10-5, Friday & Saturday 10-6
Sun Noon-6
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Air Conditioning
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Fish Ponds
All Carpentry/ Masonry
LOOKOUT AIR SOLUTIONS
$49.99 Seasonal Cleaning
Call for Duct Cleaning Specials.
Free Est. 100% financing avail.
423-710-1328
Additions a Sundecks aAll Repairs, expert work 423-381-5496
GOT A DIRTY FISH POND?
Clean & Service GoldFish
Ponds. Alan 423-802-5729
CARPET RESTRETCH
Flooring
PHILLIPS HEATING & AIR
Used Systems Heat Pumps &
Air At 2 Ton Thru 10 Ton New
Systems Factory Cost.
423-344-7571
Appliance Repairs
A-1 SERVICE - Air Cond.,
Refrigerators, Washers, Dryers,
Stoves. 822-6003/322-2790
REPAIR HOME icemakers,
customflooringusa.com
Clock Repairs
CLOCK REPAIR
All makes & models. House calls.
Call Joe (423) 855-8890
Computer Repair
Trojans, Viruses, Worms
Holding Your PC Hostage???
Can Fix call 423-463-0872
Concrete Work
refrigerators, freezers & stoves.
7 days. 596-4083/899-9448
WOOD FLOORS -Refinishing
& Repairs. All work guaranteed.
Best Prices. 423-227-9328
HARDWOOD FLOORING
Installation, Finish & Refinish.
423-240-9712
Gutter Work
Quality Seamless Gutters
Gutter Replacement,
Repairs, and Cleaning Services.
Call Rick @ 423-488-5942
PRECISION SEAMLESS
GUTTERING Free Estimates
(706) 965-4999
SANDERS GUTTERING
Automotive
Custom Concrete & Masonry
www.alguireconstruction.com
423-421-4895 or 888-615-0705
5’’ or 6’’ Seamless Aluminum
423-316-7691, 706-861-3591
Handyman Services
ALL Concrete - Including
pea gravel / decorative concrete.
Concrete removal. 34 yrs. 825-0017
WE PAY TOP
DOLLAR
for Junk Cars, Trucks,
Vans & SUVS.
423-394-5878
COMPLETE CONCRETE
423.421.8785 or 423.421.9466
SPECIAL 10X40X4’’ $1299
M & M CONSTRUCTION
Concrete/Paving. Spring Discounts!
30 yrs. exp. 423-987-4404
Counter Tops
FAST CASH
Cars Running or Not
423-645-7402
STONE SOURCE
Natural Stone, Countertops,
Tile, Flooring 423-702-4856
Decks
Buying Junk Cars & Trucks
Pay Top Dollar - Running or not
423-580-1611 Ken
JUNK CARS, TRUCKS
BUSES, MOTOR HOMES
Will pay cash in 30 minutes.
423-521-7777
WE BUY RUNNING / OR NON
VEHICLES/ TOP $$ WE BUY IT
ALL!! Call Jeff 423-255-0185
Electrical
GroundWerx Unlimited
demolition/french drains/dump
truck/retaining walls/driveways/
land clearing. 423-593-7810
COX Excavating - Bobcat,
backhoe, topsoil - All kinds of
excavating. Free est. 322-3010
DRIVEWAYS, DEMOLITION ,
Drainage Work, Land Clearing.
Lic./Ins. 25 yrs. 423-421-0664
REPAIRS TODAY
Will Beat All Prices
Excavators/Dozers/DumpTrucks
Free Estimates 423-595-9554
Lot Clearing, footings, road
building, septic systems, topsoil,
and fill dirt. 605-5374.
Bush Hogging
WEEDS, BRUSH & TREES
6’, 8’ & 15’ machines
Jim Swafford 423-593-0907
Simply Beautiful Fence &
Handyman Service. We do
it all. Prof. results. 423-584-4177
Dump Truck
Service
Home Improvement
Remodeling
Fencing
QUALITY FENCE COMPANY
Specializing in all types of fence.
Commercial/Residential/Sports.
Gates & gate operators. Over 30
yrs. exp. Fully licensed/insured.
423-825-0513 www.fence.net
FENCE OR DECK by STAN
40 yrs. Exp. Free Est.
423-298-1225
Hicks Fence
AFFORDABLE CLEANING
Fully insured.
All types brick, block, stone &
stucco. Concrete & remove old
concrete & repair chimney top.
Garner Masonry
698-6080 / 645-1846
423-505-8071
Moving & Hauling
Res. & Comm. Bonded &
Insured. 423-635-1235
HAULING brush, trash, furniture, etc. Cleaning of attics,
garages, etc. 423-899-4850
House Leveling
Painting
Call: (423) 954-3002
DELTA CONSTRUCTION
Level floors & foundations
423-994-9830 Licensed/Insured.
Abbott Painting&Press/Wash
Lowest Prices All Work Guaranteed
Int/Ext paint, restorations. Press
wash, exc. prep, paint/wash,
carpentry. Ins. 423-314-6970
Lawn Aeration,
Overseeding
Mike Delashmitt Const. We do it
all. Roofing, siding, windows & additions
Lic/Bonded/Ins 423-875-3024
Jerry’s Home Repair
Carpentry, Elec., Plumbing
Wood & Tile Floors, Kit. & Bath
repairs. No job too small. 39+ yes
exp. Call Jerry @ 423-883-4351
Handymen On Call - Can do it
all! Home Improvement & Repair.
handymenoncall.net Lic. #
00007292. 423-240-4227
BETTER HOMES
Kitchen & Bath
Design & Remodel
Lic. Contractor 320-4897
J. R.’S HOME REPAIR
Remodeling, additions, decks,
plumbing. Free est. 870-2391
THE FENCEMAN
TONEY MASONRY-Chimneys,
Repair, Retainer Walls, Block
Brick & Carpentry. 423-580-3611
423-499-9301
423-505-8071
Pressure Washing
Lawn Care
423-903-4701
Abbott Press-Wash/Painting
3Chem Low Press 3Low Spring Rates
3Fences 3Decks 423-314-6970
Commercial & Res. Scheduled Service
“Tried the rest, now try the best”
423-344-7446/423-635-0057
www.5starlawn.net
Call David 423-227-0176
Addisen Power Washing
Licensed, insured &
experienced. Call today for our
Spring Specials and free
estimate. 423-400-3537
TNT LAWNCARE
Cleanup Specialist, Overgrowth
/Underbrush Removal, Fence
Lines, Flower Beds, etc cleaned.
423-834-1103
QUALITY $15
Cut, Trim, Edge, Blow
NETHERY PAINTING
SCENIC CITY
“Metal Specialist’’
l All Shingle Roofs & Repairs
l Senior & Church Discounts
Call 886-2569, 320-9491
Quality Int./Ext. Services
Lic./Ins. 423-702-6032
Excellent Painter & Wallpaper
Hanger. Great work & Great
Rates. Call Cathie 423-304-3355
Asphalt, Sealcoating,
Concrete, Light excavation &
Demolition. Ins. Free Est
423-593-4800/423-463-5569
Pest Control
Plumbing
ABSOLUTE PLUMBING
Master Plumber. Sewer Jetting.
Great Rates. Bonded,
Lic & Ins. Matthew 423-509-4523
499-4468
Professional Lawn Care
Mow-Trim-Haul, Commercial/
Residential. Insured. 894-4233
THURS - FRI SLOTS OPEN
East Chatt., 423-987-4707
Full Service Lawn Care
Green Lawn Service- landscape
design, & mowing. 423-716-5259
or greenlawnservicetn.com
Low Cost. Warranty.
Free Estimates. 991-7702
TIM-BERS Tree Service
& Stump Grinding. Ins. Free est.
70’ bucket truck. 423-605-4158
Toppers Roofing & Repairs
Licensed & Insured. 25 yrs.
experience. 423-605-4485
ROOF MASTERS
Leak repairs, Metal, rubber
shingles & remodeling. All work
guaranteed in writing
423-355-6491/ 260-6523
16 yrs. complaint free BBB.
Commercial, Residential &
Repairs. All work guaranteed.
Free estimates. 423-867-9294
TENNESSEE ROOFING
GAF Master Ellite Applicators
Full Insured/ Warrantied
All types roofs
Metal, Shingle & Flat
Residential & Commercial
FREE Estimates! 842-8826
Pay by the job. Not the hour.
24hr. Call 314-4789
Textured, Finishing, 30 yrs.
Clay Simmons. 842-7786
TENN TREE SERVICE
Removal, Trimming, Stump
Grinding. We specialize in
dangerous trees. Free est.
Lic/Ins. 423-244-3487
L H Lewis Tree Service
42 yrs in business. Free Est.
Lic/Ins. W-Comp. 423-843-3593
Signal Pools & Electric
Pumps, motors, plumbing,
filters, lights. 423-667-1999
Top Soil
Finest of all Topsoil
706-861-6404, 423-593-2191
Tree Service
ROLLINS TREE SERVICE
Trimming, Topping Removal.
Insured. Free Estimates.
423-834-6297
Chris Rollins, Owner
Full Service - Tree removal,
stump grinding, pruning, land
clearing, 24 hr. ER service,
Mtn. Crest, 423-414-5280
WATKINS TREE SERVICE
Multiple trees. Trimming.
Fully equipped. Ins.
423-260-0770
Lumber Jacks Tree Srv.
Trimming, Topping, Full Removal
Land Clearing, Multi Tree Discount,
Lic & Ins Free Est.423-834-6096
ABSOLUTELY
AFFORDABLE
Trees Cut & Limbs Trimmed
Cheap! Fully Ins. Stump grinding
root ball removal. 423 320-1513
A CHRISTIAN CO - Kelley
Tree Service-Ins. Free
Estimates. 423-544-2602
Northside Tree Service
Top trim removed. Insured.
Since 1978. 877-0717/843-9020
NORRIS TREE SERVICE,
Inc. Tree work, stump removal
Licensed, insured. 892-7950
Wilson Tree Co. Oolt., TN.
Quality Work at a Fair Price.
Work Comp./Liab. 423-284-9872
KEITH’S TREE
SERVICE
Trimming, Topping & Removal.
Free Estimates. Fully insured.
Senior Citizen & Military Discount
ECONOMY TREE SERVICE
Full Service. All areas. Free est.
Lic/Ins. 423-902-8382/531-6775.
Vinyl Siding
423-499-0134
AJ’S PLUMBING & SERVICE
All types of Service & Repair.
Lic/Bonded/Ins. 423-510-0676
All Plumbing & Gas
CEILINGS REPAIRED
Jason Helton Roofing
EXPERT ROOFING
H All Star Plumbing H
423-790-0935
For all your plumbing needs.
Free Est. 423-876-4445
423-605-5374
Roofs & leak repairs. 40 yrs exp.
Low rates. 423-355-6214
$99 Drain Cleaning
HANGING, FINISHING
& REPAIRS up to 60 miles.
MACHINE CLEANED
TOPSOIL
Quality home repairs low rates.
Master Plumber. 423-785-7430
Mowing, Trimming, etc. Serving
all areas. 423-432-7152
20 yrs exp. Free estimates.
Weed eat/blow. 423-488-3974
423-593-7124
KEN’S ROOF REPAIR
Swimming Pools
AFFORDABLE ROOFING &
LEAK REPAIRS. Over 41 yrs.
Senior, Church & Vet Discounts.
Don Grant Co., Old Graysville
Mill. Free Estimates.
423-894-3781/ 706-937-6187
Marvin Jenkins & Son Plumbing
DANIELS’ LAWN CARE
A-1 HAROLD’S LAWN CARE
Mid-South Roofing & Repairs
30 yrs. experience.
Licensed, Bonded, Insured.
Best Price - Just Call
423-825-CALL / 825-2255
Paving
& Trimming -Soddy, Hixson, N.
Hamilton Co. Bush Hogging - all
areas. 423-280-0970
Cut, Trim & Blow
423-599-1108
AAA STUMP GRINDING
Room To Room
Painting
Call Jimmy 423-902-6782
PestMaster Termite &
Pest Control-Discount rates
for seniors. 423-313-6399
Most Yards $35
ABC-12TREE
Trimming, Topping, Removals,
Stump Grinding, Debris Cleanup.
Lic/Ins. Discount Prices Guar.
Serving all surrounding areas
Call Today! Cut Today!
Stump Removal
WATLINGTON PAINTING
Top Quality/Christian. Int/ext.
Remodeling avail. Free est.
LAWN MASTER - Mowing
Mowing & More - We Do It All!!
Planting, Mulching, Trimming &
Retaining Walls/Irrigation. Lic &
Ins. Reliable. 423-364-1798
Free Est. 423-598-0294
www.davidloweroofers.com
Sheetrock
JOLLY PAINTING
706-965-7106, 706-280-8661
E. BRAINERD AREA - PRO
MOWER . Experienced, Honest
Ag. Degree UTK, Allen 802-5729
DAVID LOWE ROOFING
Pressure Wash -specialize in
Vinyl siding. Driveways from
$99. Repair, Painting, Deck Stain.
Roofing
Int/Ext. Decks, Fences, Comm.
Lic/Ins. Free Est. 423-698-1831
5 Star Lawn Services
Chattanooga’s Premier Lawncare Service
D & L ROOFING
Replacements or repairs.
Free Estimates. 20 yrs. exp.
423-994-3111, 706-694-3751
Honest, Quality & Professional
Tree Care for over 30 years.
Free Estimates/Fully Insured
ISA-Certified Arborist SO-6099-A
423/421-0479 - 706/965-9945
LEAK REPAIR &
SMALL ROOF JOBS
Magiclean Pressure Washing
is back! $88 any house up to
2500 sq. ft. 423-255-7943
Lawn Aerating,Overseeding,
Seeding, Fertilizing, Reasonable
Rates. Free Est. 322-3010
Ron: 316-7904
TL Hood Construction - Lic/Ins.
25 yrs exp. Remodeling & new
home. Work guar. 423-619-1339
Affordable Roofing
HRepairs & RoofingH
RON RABY’S TREE SERVICE
DALE’S PLUMBING
H No Job Too Big or Small H
Roofing Repairs
Jack up & Replace floor joists
Free Estimates! Ron 304-7765
Licensed and Insured
Professional Improvements
HANDYMAN CONNECTION
Licensed H Bonded H Insured
All work guaranteed.
Tree Service
Call J&R Construction
Most E. Ridge/Brainerd lawns
$25. Free estimates, license &
Insured 309-0446, 697-1870
Custom tile/drywall/carpentry.
Free est. Robert 423-227-8998
Roofing
MASTER PLUMBER
CLEANER CORNERS
The Green Guys Lawn Care
23 years experience.
Call: 423-800-2968
Comm. or res. fence & repairs.
Free Est. Call Ron 423-505-6339
House Cleaning
Plumbing
Lic. & bonded. $25 service call
applied to repairs. 421-5380
Painting/Wallpaper
GRAVEL, FILL DIRT,
Bulldozer, Top Soil, Sitework,
Driveways, clearing, 20 yrs.
Lic. & Ins. 423-280-6347
Free Estimates, 40 yrs. exp. Call
423-596-1796, 706-956-8337
Bedwell Handyman Services
All home repair - Painting, Press
Wash, Carpentry. 423-432-2405
Electrical. Free Estimates
Lic & Ins. 423-667-1999
Bulldozing
Dozer, Excavator, Bobcat,
Backhoe, Dump Truck, Top Soil,
Fill Dirt & Gravel. Prompt &
Reasonable. 423-504-7857
Est. 1993 Small/large jobs,
Home repairs & Remodeling
PLicensed & Fully InsuredP
Free Est.! 423-624-9800
Acoustical Ceilings & Drywall,
carpentry, basement remodeling,
34 yrs. Exp. 423-432-8295
Bobcat Service
% ANDY OnCall %
DECK BUILDERS pool/spa
decks, Screened porches,
fences, 30 yrs. professional exp.
Lic./ Ins. Free Est. 629-8055
Drywall
Masonry
ONE CALL DOES IT ALL!
Carpet Sales/
Installation
No Job too small. 423-240-9881
Baileys Heating & Air Svc
& Sales. All makes/models,
senior discounts 423-413-5312
Home Improvement
Remodeling
Place your ad today 423.757.6679
Quality work + quality material
= Coffey Construction Co. 20
yrs. experience. 877-7147.
A-1 ROOFING
H & H Inc. Lic., Bonded & Ins.
24 yrs. exp. BBB Rating A+
423-355-3777
Patriot Tree & Landscape
Waterproofing
MASTERS ROOFING
& HOME IMPROVEMENT
Licensed & Insured.
Free Estimates. 423-240-1166
Veterans, Seniors & Fixed
Income Discounts.
No job too small.
423-309-0469, 423-718-2310
Wet basements/drainage/crawl
spaces. Lic./Ins. 423-421-0664
We Fix Water Problems
F2 • Tuesday, May 7, 2013 • • •
timesfreepress.com
Beginning Fall 2013
Chattanooga State Community College introduces
RESTAURANT/
FOOD SERVICE
College Within a College
BAKER - Bakery exp req, cake
decorating skills preferred. FT.
Be able to multi-task. Bring
resume in person to Piece-ACake Bakery in Collegedale, TN.
Career Fair Career Fair Career Fair
Chattanooga Area Chamber of Commerce in partnership
with the Southeast TN. Development District & SHRM
For more details and an application see:
http://www.chattanoogastate.edu/academics/
honors/pdf/cwc-newsletterfeb2013.pdf
Spring Job Fair
AIR
OB F
Pub. No. 11-70-302001-435-4/13/bap – Chattanooga State is an AA/EEO employer.
CHATTANOOGA’S
LARGEST JOB FAIR!
Thursday, May 9, 2013
9AM to 3PM
Stop by our booth and meet Answer Financial’s
management team for an onsite interview.
Excellent opportunity to advance your career
and join a growing company!
(423) 476-7905
Gibco Construction is an Equal Opportunity Employer
NGK Metals Corporation, an
established manufacturer of
copper beryllium alloys
castings, strip, rod, bar and
plate products has an
opening at the Sweetwater
facility for a Staff Accountant.
SPR I
This position will have
ability to:
l
l
35672390
4011 Austin Street
Chattanooga, TN 37411
Career Fair Career Fair Career Fair
ADOPTION
ADOPT: We will care about you
as you get to know us. Loving,
encouraging, active, ready to
give 24/7 as adoptive parents
thru child's joys and challenges.
Legal Expenses Paid. Sheila &
Ken 1-845-500-1960
[email protected]
CEMETERY LOTS
HAMILTON Memorial Gardens,
2 lots. In The Garden of Nativity w/Companian marker.
$6000. Call 615-895-3147.
LAKEWOOD Memory Gardens,
4 lots, side by side, Garden Of
Good Shepherd. $5000 obo.
Call 423-582-6383.
LOST & FOUND
Found: Golden Retriever Type
On Haven Crest Drive,
E. Brainerd Call 423-490-9701
Found-Hixson/Rivermont Area
Sm. Female Dog Black & Brown,
pink collar 423-443-2422
F O U N D : Item on Dietz Rd.
Owner can have by identifying.
Call 706-931-2381.
LICENSED
ESCORT SERVICES
COUNTRY GIRLS
ESCORTS
423-994-7488
BUSINESS
OPPORTUNITY
Newspaper Carriers Wanted
Ooltewah, Harrison,
Birchwood areas
Great way to earn extra
income in 2013
Home delivery routes
available.
Earn $600 to $800/month
Earning potential varies by
route size and area
Be your own boss! Grow your
own business through sales
contests and satisfied
customers
Perfect opportunity for
everyone! Seniors, homemakers, students and people
with "regular" jobs
Qualifications:
Must be able to work 7 days
a week, approximately
3 a.m. to 6 a.m.
Must be at least 18 years old
Must have a valid driver's
license and proof of vehicle
liability insurance
Must have reliable
transportation
Must provide a trained
substitute if you're unable to
report to work
Find out why more and more
families and adults agree that
delivering the Chattanooga
Times Free Press is a great
way to supplement your
income.
Call or email today!
Bob Hendrix 227-7205
BANKING/FINANCE
CONTROLLER - Local manufacturer seeking controller w/
strong financial and accounting skills to become key member of management team. A
strong candidate would have
significant growth potential for
advancement to a CFO position. BS in Accounting w/experience in manufacturing, job
cost accounting, inventory,
and ERP systems. Strong
computer, organizational, &
communications skills. Responsibilities will include all financial aspects, including
monthly financial reporting,
general ledger maintenance,
budgeting, forecasting, internal controls & other accountin
duties. Please send resume
and salary requirements to:
Dean Krech JHM Certified
Public Accountants 651 E. 4th
Street, Ste 200 Chatt,TN,
37403 or Fax 423-267-5945
[email protected]
TELLER POSITIONS available. Previous teller or cash
handling experience required.
Some Saturday work. Send
resume, with salary history
and references, or apply in
person: Dupont Community
Credit Union, 4503 Hixson
Pike, Hixson, TN 37343. No
phone calls or agencies.
EMPLOYMENT
WANTED
I will pet sit your animals and
give them lots of love. Call
Julie at 423-305-2094 / 867-9794
MONEY TO LOAN
FIRST LOAN FREE!
$100 - $800
Call for details - 622-3776
BEAUTY
RECEPTIONIST - Part Time
leading to Full Time. Some
evenings & Saturdays a must.
We need long term, happy,
enthusiastic, multi-tasker with
a strong work ethic. Benefits
with FT. Fill out application at
Hair Benders, 423-894-2973.
Cosmetology students please
apply for a position as a Stylist
CONSTRUCTION
CONSTRUCTION
Job Forman for commercial
Drywall Company. Travel a
must in Southeast US. Hourly
pay plus benefits. Must
have field experience in
reading blueprints, layout,
framing, acoustical and
drywall. Working Formans
only.No residential
applicants. Email
[email protected] or
call 770-382-1119 Ext 1009
NOW HIRING
CRANE OPERATORS
FT. NCCCO Certification
required. Pay depends on exp.
Call 706-529-3845.
Residential
Construction Supervisor
Must be experienced in all
aspects of residential construction and able to effectively
schedule and multi-task. This
is a highly detailed position
and requires exceptional organization and communication
skills.
Reply to:
Chattanooga Publishing
P.O. Box 1447
Advertiser 35616105
Chattanooga, TN 37401-1447
Business System Support
Specialist
We're looking for a bright,
creative problem-solver for
an entry-level mission critical
data-centric role with a very
visible Chattanooga-area
business.
The ideal candidate has fast
data-entry skills, a critical eye
to analyze large datasets for
proper format on-the-fly, a
high level of comfort working
in Microsoft Excel and is a
fast learner on new business
applications. You will be the
go-to person for one of our
major business unit's data
processing and setup procedures, and a keen attention
to detail and a perfectionist
personality will go a long way
to making you a success in
this position.
This is a salaried position,
with a competitive benefits
and vacation package available. Applicants should be
aware that there are times
where the processes the position controls will require
working later than normal,
and the position requires
someone with the ability to
be flexible to make sure our
tasks are completed.
Applicant should be organized, a good time manager
and able to carry out assigned tasks without intensive supervision. A pleasant
demeanor, a positive attitude
and a keen interest in helping our organization succeed
are absolutely critical.
Desired skills - Applicant must
have at least an intermediate
skill set working in Microsoft
Excel and a firm grasp of the
use of basic office machines
and computers. Communication will be critical in this role,
so the ability to effectively
use email to communicate is
a must. There will be recurring tasks that require data
entry, so experience on
10-key or other fast data entry methodology is highly desired. Prior experience running Crystal Reports is not
necessary, but can help set
an applicant apart. Experience managing dependent
processes is a major part of
this job, and the ability to
demonstrate an understanding of the same will be necessary for the applicant to
move forward through the
hiring process.
Qualified applicants should
send their resume with cover
letter to:
Micah Young
Chattanooga Times Free
Press
PO Box 1447
Chattanooga, TN 37401
E-mail: [email protected]
timesfreepress.com
DENTAL
PERSONNEL
An Equal Opportunity
Employer
Dental Assistant. We need the
absolute best in the Harrison
/Chattanoga. Apply only if
your clinical skills, communication skills & team building
skills are excellent. Compensation will be based on talent
& experience. This is a fulltime position with benefits.
Apply at timesfreepress.com.
CLASS B CDL
READY MIX DRIVERS:
Basic Ready Mix is now hiring
full time CDL Ready Mix drivers
at our Chickamauga (Walker)
Plant. Pay is based on
experience. Excellent
benefits…ie…Medical, Dental,
Vision, 401K, etc. Call
706-375-7140 for more
information. Application
deadline is May 17, 2013.
EMPLOYMENT INFO
GOVERNMENT
WILDLIFE JOBS!!
HIGH PAYING POSTAL JOBS!
Don’t pay for information about
jobs with the Postal Service or
federal government. Call the
Federal Trade Commission
toll-free, 1-877-FTC-HELP, or
visit www.ftc.gov to learn
more. A public service announcement from the Chattanooga Times/Free Press and
the FTC.
Cleaning Concepts hiring F/T
and P/T Maids cleaning
clients homes. Experienced
only apply at: 875 Intermont
Rd., Chatt. 423-521-7852
Driver Position Open
Aaa Taxi Service
Call: 423-593-1255
HVAC SERVICE TECHS. /
HOOK UP / INSTALLERS
Tools & exp. required. Fax
resume: 706-820-1109 or
call: 423-265-8144
GENERAL HELP
WANTED
Blast Hole surface blast drillers
(day & night shift) near the
Fort Payne area. Fringe benefit pkg inc health ins, 401(K),
life ins, & paid vac. For app
contact: Alicia O’Quin, Virginia
Drilling Co., LLC,P.O. Box
1198, Vansant,VA 24656.
Phone: (276) 597-4449, ext.
5010.
EOE.
DRIVERS - FT/PT-Frosty
Treats is seeking hard working individuals to operate ice cream
trucks. 19 & older NO EXPERIENCE. $200 - $600/wkly. avg.
(CASH PROFITS PAID DAILY!!!)
Apply at 1400 E. 34th St M - F
10am - 2pm or call 423-867-5005
l
l
Communicate effectively
with Customers,
Management & production.
Use Word, Excel, and other
computer based systems.
Effectively communicate
within a team environment.
Cross train and effectively
perform multiple functions.
Education/Experience:
l
l
l
BS Degree, with five plus
years of manufacturing
accounting experience.
Experience in cost
accounting, AR, AP, and
General Ledger.
Selected candidate will be
involved in all accounting
aspects.
OB
NG J
No cold calls, all calls are inbound warm or referred
leads. Professional environment where you control
your income! We offer you paid training, hourly
wage+bonus compensation, and full benefit package.
Visit our website at answerfinancial.com to learn
about our company! EOE
MAINTENANCE TECH Part time
could lead into full time. HVAC
& Market Ready exp. Email
[email protected]
or apply: 900 Mtn. Creek Rd.
Maintenance Person NeededApts. & Homes. Must have
experience, truck & tools.
Starts at $10/hr. Apply in
person 2225 Dayton Blvd.,
Red Bank (423) 875-0445.
SERVICE TECHNICIAN
HVAC & Refrigeration Exp
& EPA cert required. Fax
resume to: (423) 698-3353
All interested candidates
should send resume that
includes salary history to:
NGK Metals Corporation
Manager,
Human Resources/Benefits
917 US Highway 11 South
Sweetwater, TN. 37874
e-mail: [email protected]
An Equal Opportunity
Employer
STORAGE FACILITY CLERK
Self directed, organized,
problem solver, comfortable w/
learning business related software. Light maintenance
cleaning, walking of property &
truck rental req. Some customer service exp. preferred.
Reply w/ resume before
5/12/13 to PO Box 8006
Chatt., TN 37414 or email :
[email protected]
TIRE CHANGERExperience in large truck tires.
Call 423-622-1783 8am-5pm
UCTV is looking for
EXPERIENCED CONTROL
ROOM TECH.
Call Rick Mon. - Fri. between
8am - 2pm at 706-866-1518
35675285
241 Industrial Way SW • Cleveland, TN 37311
HIRING SALES AGENTS
BX Brainerd Crossroads
You Can Too!
GIBCO TRUCKING AND CONSTRUCTION
STAFF ACCOUNTANT
GENERAL HELP
WANTED
UPHOLSTERER & SEAMSTRESS - Immediate opening
for experienced upholsterer to
work in our shop, must be able
to cut, sew & tack on. Experienced seamstress needed in
the drapery work room. Call:
706-965-6610
WANTED
Person with equine
experience. CDL license and
good driving record. Willing
to travel several weeks a
year. Some heavy lifting
involved. Must be able to
positively interact with the
general public. Please
send resume to:
marketingmailbox
@checkintocash.com
WANTED: GROOMER
Must be experienced.
Pet Inn Kennels
423-892-6725
CLERICAL/
SECRETARIAL
RECEPTIONIST - Part Time
leading to Full Time. Some
evenings & Saturdays a must.
We need long term, happy,
enthusiastic, multi-tasker with
a strong work ethic. Benefits
with FT. Fill out application at
Hair Benders, 423-894-2973.
ENGINEERINGCHEMISTS
VALIDATION
CHEMIST
for Quality Assurance
department needed. Must
have a degree in chemistry,
biology or related field with
experience in analytical
chemistry, FDA and cGMP
manufacturing desired.
Equal Opportunity
Employer. Send resume
w/ salary history to:
Chattem Chemicals, Inc.,
3708 St. Elmo Ave.,
Chattanooga, TN 37409;
Fax to: 423-825-0507;
or email to: [email protected]
chattemchemicals.com
MEDICAL
A.C.L.S. & P.A.L.S.
Certification or Recert
WERCPR.com
423-553-0400
Chattanooga Times Free
Press' Software Engineering
Division is searching for a
Full-Time UI/UX/Web Designer with a solid design
eye and the technical skills to
bridge the gap from design to
development. The ideal candidate will have experience
with front-end Web Design.
They will play a role in web
site ideation, architecture, visual design and will then
work with the development
team bring it all to life. If you
thrive in a fast-paced,
energetic environment, we
want to talk to you!
Job Overview:
The UI/UX/Web Designer will
be responsible for developing a working knowledge of
our user base and leveraging that to design meaningful
and valued product interactions. As the Designer you
will work closely with
Management to translate
requirements into designs that
facilitate rapid prototyping.
Along with developing
wireframes, navigation, etc,
you will help define the look
and feel of the products.
Responsibilities will also
include validation and
iteration of your design with
target users, and close
partnership with developers to
ensure product feasibility.
Desired Skills & Experience
Proficiency is Adobe
Creative suite
Expert in designing and
developing process, interaction, and navigational flows,
mock-ups, and prototypes
Design for a variety of
platforms including but not
limited to smartphones,
tablets, and web browsers
Front-end development
experience a PLUS!
Familiarity with iOS UI and
Apple's Human Interface
Guidelines.
Familiarity with Android UI.
Ability to work with as part of
a team across multiple
projects
Solid understanding responsive design and web
technologies
Excellent communication
skills and a positive,
solution-oriented attitude
Good team player, but able
to work on own initiative
What you'll be doing
Work with a team of developers to create cutting edge
websites and applications
Work with the latest technologies and development
standards
Help to ensure that the team
is keeping up to date with
evolving web design trends
and practices
Produce designs to help the
entire team understand the
desired customer experience:
storyboards, flows, wireframes & prototypes.
Quickly collect and decipher
feedback for rapid iteration of
the product design.
Work in partnership with
management, visual design,
and developers to deliver the
desired experience on time
and within budget.
Responsible for the design of
web pages, graphics, multimedia, GUIs.
We offer a fun team atmosphere, professional office
environment and a benefits
package which includes
health, dental vision, and life
insurance, profit sharing and
401 (K) plan.
Qualified applicants should
send their resume and cover
letter to: [email protected]
timesfreepress.com
Be a part of our
Kiosk Sales
Team
Outside Sales
Our Top Sales Representatives average over $450.00
per week!!
Apply in person at:
Certified Pharmacy
Technician
Immediate opening for F/T
Certified Pharmacy Tech.
Mon. - Fri. No weekends or
holidays. Please apply
in person at:
Solutions Pharmacy
5517 Little Debbie Pkwy.,
Collegedale, TN 37315
No phone calls please.
C.N.A Positions
Mon. - Fri. 3pm - 11pm
Sat. & Sun. 7am - 7pm
Please apply in person
at Heritage Healthcare
1067 Battlefield Pkwy
Ft. Oglethorpe, GA
CNA's LPN's & RN's Needed
Contact Aging Gracefully
Staffing M-F 9 am – 5 pm
EST. (423) 285-5888
ULTRASOUND TECH & MRI
TECHNOLOGIST
NEEDED for busy outpatient
imaging center. PRN. Must be
ARDMS registered.
Fax resumes to: 423-553-1251
Are you
interested
in pursuing a
career in the
medical field?
See the Educational
classification for
more information.
MOTEL/HOTEL
MAID
Now hiring experienced Maid.
Apply: Kings Lodge,
2400 Westside Dr.
AIR CONDITIONERS for sale!
Dryer/Washer $199. & up will
separ.Also avail. Stoves & Refrigerators. Guaranteed! 706-866-3347
ALL APPLIANCES FOR SALE
Washers, dryers, refrigerators.
$99 & up. w/warr. 598-0717.
SALES AGENTS
Minimum 1 yr. experience
in tri-axle dump truck.
Asphalt hauling experience
a plus.
Holiday Barbie
Special 2000 Edition, in box $40
423-332-4403
RIB & LOIN (Hixson)
NOW HIRING
Apply in person at the
Brainerd Rd. location Mon.
- Fri. between 2-4 pm only.
Absolutely No Phone Calls!
• Immediate placement
• Home every night
• Top wages paid
• Overtime opportunities
• Class A or B CDL req.
A C Dryers, Washers, Stoves,
Fridges, $75/up. Can deliver.
Guaranteed. Also we buy non
working applcs. 423-760-0123
ALL APPLIANCES Repair and
Service. Svc. call $10. All
Work Guar. 423- 598-0717.
KITCHEN HELP
CDL DRIVERS WANTED!!!!
COLLECTIBLES
NOW HIRING LINE COOK Must have 2 years exp. & (2)
SERVERS- Must have ABC
permit. Apply in person 2-6pm
Mon. - Fri. Chattanooga Billiard Club 725 Cherry St.,
35666265
ING J
• A high-intensity curriculum for high-achieving
students who wish to transfer to elite colleges
and universities
• A cohort of exceptional
students each with
special support from a
librarian, a writing mentor,
and an academic advisor
• Scholarships available for
12 students
APPLIANCES
Evening part time hours are
available; up to 25 hours per
week. Applicants must:
Have excellent
communication skills.
A dependable vehicle
with a good driving
record and insurance.
Be willing to learn a
proven sales method.
Apply in person Monday Thursday between 9:00 a.m.
and 3:00 p.m. at:
400 E 11th Street
Chattanooga TN. 37403
Or call Noah Cusick at:
423-757-6650 for more
information
An Equal Opportunity
Employer
Mueller Company seeking
applicants for BILINGUAL
(ENGLISH/SPANISH)
INTERNATIONAL INSIDE
SALES REPRESENTATIVE.
More details and application
instructions can be found on
www.jobs.timesfreepress.com
Salary: $45,000 - $47,000
Clothes dryer, Crosley.
Gas model. Almond. Good
shape. $85. 423-875-5295.
COOK TOP, 4 burner, Jen-Air
with down draft, white,
$250. Call 423-667-5443.
Dishwasher-GE
$65
423-364-4077
An Equal Opportunity
Employer
SALES Exp. furniture
salesperson. Apply in person:
Scotts Furniture Company
1650 S. Lee Hwy., Cleveland.
DELL LAPTOP,
with Windows XP, $75
Cash Only. 423-855-0889.
FREEZER, Upright, Kenmore, 21
cu. ft. works perfect, will guarantee. $175. 423-326-5937.
DELL P-4 Desk Top. Complete,
XP Pro, Internet Ready. 30 day
Warranty! $100. 423-473-2767
Frigidaire Freezer-Frost-free,
free standing, great condition
$280 423-332-0718
Used Macbook laptop asking
$300, new battery. Works
great. call 423-255-9596.
Gas Cook Stove
$150
423-883-5009
GE White with Ice Maker works
perfect 19 cu. ft will guarantee
$250 423-987-8494
KITCHEN/ BATH CABINETS
New. Solid wood. 10 for $1500.
cash, will separate 266-8257
DRIVERS OTR
w/ min. 2 yrs. exp. Apply in
person: Ash Transport, LLC
86 E. 28th St. Chattanooga,
TN or call: 423-870-9681
Owner Operators Welcome!
NOW HIRING Experienced 18
wheel & roll-off truck driver.
Min. 5 yrs. exp. Must have
clean MVR. Local hauls only.
Sleep at home every night.
Full time position for good
driver. Contact Brian
at: 423-837-3691
STRAIGHT TRUCK /
OTR DRIVERS
CLASS A OR B
Teams/Drivers willing to
team. Split .38-.45 per loaded
mi. Avg. 3k weekly. Bring
your truck, we hire O/O,
Contact Gene
865-938-5888 ext 2
[email protected]
Refrigerator, GE, 20.6 cu ft,
White, Top Freezer, $100
423-899-6092
REPAIRS. Refrigerators, Freezers, Washer, Dryers, Stoves
Service calls $20. 635-4237.
Side by Side Fridge, Whirlpool
Can Deliver $190
423-362-0895
STOVE, Whirlpool, white,
good cond. $50. Call
540-550-8951 after 5pm.
WANTED DEAD OR ALIVE
Washer, Dryer, Fridge, Stoves
Cash Reward! 423-580-2031
Washer Like New Super heavy
duty, 3 yrs old, will guarantee
$275 706-866-9117
Will pick up unwanted
appliances, free.
423-424-9624 / 698-9326.
Wood BurningCook Stove- 6
eyes, $125
423-506-2187
BABY ITEMS
BICYCLE for 2, 26”, new tires,
good cond. $150. Call
423-653-5097.
BICYCLE - Giant Boulder Mtn.
Bike, men’s, 26’’, like new,
$100. Call 706-861-0979
Ladies Bike 26 “ new, single
speed, $70
423-238-9398
Mans Bike- Only rode 3 times,
little rust on handle bars, good
cond, $50, 706-931-2333
Mongoose Bicycles- 2, new, 1
men’s 1 women’s 10-speeds,
$250 will sep. 423-876-0035
Women’s Huffy Mtn. Bike
26” Brand New $65
423-580-4080 Leave Message
BUILDING
MATERIAL
1 Quart of Kilz Primer Sealer
Stain Blocker Cash Only.
$5. 706-937-3085
Delta Contractor Saw- w/
molding heads, $250
423-867-9911
GRANITE SLABS- Polished,
Suitable steps, yard benches,
monuments etc. Various
sizes /colors $65. 266-8257
2 Jetton couches.Rattan with red
cushions/pillows.$500 FIRM.
423.842.8310
5 Pieces Entertainment Center
w/ Lights, Doors Glass &
Wood, $400obo, 485-3103
Antique Armoire- Value at
$1800, first $750, Dunlap
Dont Snooze! 772-913-1404
ARMOIRE, Holds 32”
TV, $500. Call
423-510-9687.
BED, Brass, tall head and foot
boards real nice, complete.
$275. No Checks, 698-0542.
CHAIR- Wingback,
Floral print, Like new,
$100. Call 423-344-8794.
Chest of drawers, 36x32x18,
matching antique dresser,
36x27x18. $100 706-375-6565
Contemporary Conference
Table- w/ 5 chairs chrome with
arms $400 423-667-5443
Custom-built solid wood Ushaped desk $800
423-285-7123
Desk- Newly Painted, Aqua
Marine, Small, $45
706-937-7249
Desk
Pine, Dark Wood $50
423-892-7323
DESK- Solid Mahogany,
8’ long, 28” Wide,
$125. 423-693-8551
DINETTE SET, Round wrought
iron table and 4 chairs, $250.
Call 423-510-9687.
DINING ROOM, Broyhill, table, 6
chairs, china cabinet & Server
$1200 o.b.o. 423-336-9682
Dining Room Table &
(2) Chairs, Sturdy, good cond.
$25, 423-362-0895
DINING ROOM SET,
12 pcs. $1200 firm. No checks.
Call 423-698-0542.
Dresser, with mirror &
Chest , good shape $100
Call 423-580-9483
FILE CABINET Large tan, w/ 2
drawers 30x18. $38 cash
only. 423-903-5638
HEADBOARD, queen size
antique iron replica, still in box,
$49. 423-356-8806.
King-Size Leather
Bed-Spread/Comforter, $400,
Call 423.802.9130
POLE BARN - 24x36, 10’ ceiling,
6x6 treated posts,Wood trusses.
Metal roof. Installed. $4000.
Other sizes avail. 423-595-2079
Lazy Boy Recliner w/ Swivel
Rocker, $395
423-987-6617 call before 2pm
WINDOWS,
Tinted Glass
Thermo Pane, several sizes,
3/4” thick. $750. 423-822-8283
Maple China Cabinet- $225
423-506-2187
CAMPING
EQUIPMENT
Tents, mattresses, stove, and
accessories $100 call for
details 423-875-9911
CLOTHING
CLOTHES, Womens Plus size,
Like new, $3-$5 Call
423-332-9333.
JEANS, Levi 550, 3 pr, sz 40/32,
$20/all. Will sep.
423-875-3099.
Ladies Spring and Summer items
Size 6 and medium $30/offer
423-304-3094
Ladies Spring and Summer items
Size 4 and small $30/offer
423-304-3094
Mens Boots- 6’’ Die Hard 10med
in box $30
423-332-4403
Mens Suite & 2 Sport Jackets,
Good Shape, Size 40 Reg.
$30, 423-842-7837
Mens X-Large Sports ShirtsPlaid Button-up Short Sleeved
10, $2 apiece 423-877-7724
BANK, Antique Mechanical,
(Uncle Sam), $875. Call
423-240-2068.
TUXEDO- 40 regular,
36 waist, $25. Call
423-866-1433.
BANK, Antique Mechanical,
(Trick Dog), $875. Call
423-240-2068.
UGG Sundance Boots, Sandcolored size 8 like new $95
call Rita 706-965-8469
MICHELOB CLOCK
Antique, Rotate 2ft tall,
$250 423-653-1531
WEDDING DRESS, Pearl white,
Brand new in bag. Petite 4/6
Beaded $150. 883-3506
Please apply in person at
the location the position
is available. EOE
FURNITURE
Gorgeous one-of-a-kind wicker
couch Benchcraft, $2000 value
$475 423-598-9349
Days Inn Rivergate
901 Carter Street:
* Experienced Maintenance
* Housekeepers
Residence Inn
2340 Center Street:
* House person
* Room Attendant
FIREWOOD- Split Hardwood.
WHILE IT LASTS!
$45.00/rick. 423-313-2323
Computer Desk, New Wood stain
L-shape w/ file drawers Cost
$1200. sell $500.423-892-8228
SHOES, Mens, size 10 By Bass
& Nunn Bush, 2 pair $30. cash
only. Call 706-937-3085.
Fairfield Inn Chattanooga:
2350 Shallowford Village Dr:
* Front Desk P/T 2nd Shift
[email protected]<NFF;&=L<C
BICYCLES
3 tine wood pitch fork
$35
423-605-0468
Wingate Chattanooga
7312 Shallowford Road:
* Front Desk P/T
* Van Drive P/T
Massey Ferguson 135
Gas Tractor- $3500
423-432-0120
Chest of Drawers Like New
From Bombay Paid $1200
asking $229. 423-356-8806
Now hiring for the
following positions:
PUSH MOWER , Wizard, 18”, 2
cycle Clinton engine, not running. $20. 423-653-5097.
Hay Bind- New Holland
Like new, 7 ft. Blade used only 2
seasons $2000 423-298-6620
BABY BED WITH MATTRESS,
Jenny Lynn, Nice $75.
423-698-0542
Mens X-Large Sports ShirtsPlaid Button-up Long Sleeved
10, $2 apiece 423-877-7724
SpringHill Suites
495 Riverfront Parkway:
* Night Audit
* Front Desk
Natural Sheep Milk Soap
Hand crafted in small batches
$6.95 a bar 423-290-3865
Stove-Double Oven, Tappen
Manufacturer, White $200
423-886-6583
ANTIQUES
TownePlace Suites
Chattanooga
7010 McCutcheon Road:
* Housekeepers
* Front Desk
* Night Audit
CRAFTS
Refrigerator-Amana
$75
423-364-4077
TRUCKING
OPPORTUNITIES
DRIVERS - Now accepting
applications for local ROUTE
DELIVERY DRIVERS. Class
A CDL preferred. Must pass
drug screen test and have
acceptable driving record.
This type work is physical.
Please apply in person
at: 1307 Broad St.,
from 9am-4pm Mon.-Fri.
Topps 2012 Baseball Complete
Set w/Babe Ruth Watch $45
423-486-7397
DRYER, Whirlpool,
4 years old, $50. Call
423-710-3974.
Washer & Dryer, GE, matched
set, king size capacity, works
great! $350 firm 875-4100
Attention: Tami Porter
Chattanooga Times Free
Press
400 E. 11th Street
Chattanooga, TN 37403
(E-mail: [email protected]
timesfreepress.com)
SNOW VILLAGE “Motel”
$35. Cash Only. Call
706-937-3085.
DELL Computer monitor,
15” LCD, $40 cash only.
Call 423-903-5638.
The Chattanooga Times Free
Press, the areas number one
source for news and
information has an immediate
opening for a business-tobusiness sales professional
in the Retail Advertising
Department.
Qualified candidates are
encouraged to send their
resume with cover letter to:
Riverbend Pins 1993-2007
15 pins $50
423-892-7323
DROP IN RANGE, GE, almond
color, good cond. $60 or offer.
Call 423-894-6686.
Washer & Dryer,
Stackable, Kenmore $200 obo
706-375-3711
Retail Account Executives
entirely commission-based
with a bi-weekly draw, and
expected earnings of $50k+.
In addition, we offer a comprehensive benefits package
which includes hospitalization, prescription drug, vision
and dental coverage, 401(k)
with company match, profits
sharing plan and tuition reimbursement.
PRINT Charles Frace’ Jaguar
26X31 Signed Triple matted museum framed$150.706-820-2200
COMPUTERS
Outside Sales Retail
Account Executive
Opportunity
This position requires you to
be responsible for conducting sales presentations to
decision makers utilizing
specific product and market
knowledge. Successful
candidates will be verbally articulate and personable with
good marketing and
organizational skills. A
minimum of three years
experience in media sales is
required.
Precious Moments
Figurines, $10
423-315-2065
D O U B L E O V E N , Jenn-Air, in
cabinets, white, like new,
$600. Call 423-667-5443.
WASHER / DRYER - Kenmore, Heavy Duty, like new
with warranty. Will sacrifice
$325. 423-421-1615
Our sales executives are
enthusiastic, experienced in
media sales, self-directed,
savvy and effective
communicators who provide
advertising solutions to
clients, with a proven ability
to develop new business
while nurturing existing
clients. Selected candidate
will be polished, confident,
quick thinking and persistent.
Oak Curio Cabinet w/over
125 Snow Babies w/original
boxes. Must sell together.
$1200 615-319-8390
Women’s Plus Size Scrubs-3x
and 4x, Shirts and bottoms,
$5 each 423-779-8264
MATTRESS A + Mattress Sets
all sizes. Can deliver $100 &
Up!!. Nice sets. 304-5807
MATTRESS and Box Springs,
new, queen size. Quilt top,
clean. $75. 423-521-8343.
MATTRESS & BOX SPRINGS
King. Very nice! $150.
Call 423-580-9483
MATTRESS K i n g s i z e , b o x
springs, still in box , paid
$1000 asking $750. 485-9853.
Mattress Set
Firm, Some Bedding $150
821-6339 827-4041
Oak and White Farm House 2
Psc Dinette Set, $100
423-580-4080 Leave Message
OFFICES CUBICLES, Turn
space into rental offices.
9 Lockable Fully Fitted Units
Cost $75k. $12k. 423-266-8257
Outdoor Glass Table Metal
Frame. Oblong, $45
423-875-3099
PLATFORM ROCKER,
40’s, good cond. $50.
Call 423-698-0514.
Recliner- Blue Brushed Fabric
Almost new, $100
706-937-7249
Rocker/Glider, natural color,
very good cond. $99
706-375-6565
Small Barrel Swivel Chairgreat cond, $350
423-987-6617 call before 2pm
S O F A B E D , Queen size, 3
cushion, like new, Scotch
Guarded, $195. 423-867-7079.
Sofa & Love Seat- Soft Pastel
Stripes, 4 throw pillows & 4
arm cover $195, 827-6129
Sofa Sleeper &
Matching Loveseat. Really nice.
$300. 423-580-9483.
STUDENT Roll Top Desk, Geniune Aspin wood, $225 Cash
only. Call 423-903-5638.
TABLE TOP CHEST,
19” tall, 30”x50” $60.
423-693-8551
SOFA Early American 1930’s
Camel back , Pretty Carvings
$550. 423-266-8257
COINS-JEWELRY
TV Cabinet 4 shelf-glass door, 2
doors at bottom $50
423-894-3751
Vintage Precision Vacuum
Tube Tester, Excellent working cond. $140 423-285-7123
RING- Ladies’, Wedding, sz 6
1/4 Ct Diamond, w/ 6 small
Diamonds $500 423-693-8551
Wicker Bedroom Set
Queen plus decor $750
821-6339 827-4041
COLLECTIBLES
Wood Desk- 7 drawers
$35
423-877-7724
Wardrobe- with two top drawers,
Small, $140
706-937-7249
ART & DECORATIVE
45 Records- Over 300, 50’s &
60’s Beatles & All The Greats,
$400, 772-913-1404 Dunlap
GIVEAWAYS
Larry Dotson signed #ed matted
& framed “Winter at Chimney
Tops” $75-Rita 706-965-8469
Beautiful Hand Blown Glass (2)
$75
423-486-1682
Free Piano
You Pick Up
423-855-0988
• • • Tuesday, May 7, 2013 • F3
timesfreepress.com
Monty Jim Meddick
35661293
CROSSWORD PUZZLE
GIVEAWAYS
MACHINERY &
TOOLS
MISCELLANEOUS
WANTED TO BUY
FEED/SEED/
PLANTS
HITACHI Ultravision 50” Color
Console TV. Ringgold.
Bill, 706-375-2807.
AMISH TOOLS-Shaves, draw
knives, augers, mortise, tenon
tools. $2 & up. 706-398-0611
OFFICE DESK, Full size
3 Drawers, Great condition.
$98. cash 423-266-8257
26” BICYCLES! No gears!
Rideable or non-rideable.
Best Bicycle Store 423.899.5767
IRIS, Lavender, 2 for $3.00.
Come back each year. Call
423-488-5565.
Otterbox "Defender" Cellphone
Case For Galaxy S-3; Super
Rugged, Dependable. Like
New. Paid $80.00; Will Accept
First $50.00 423-842-2061
CASH 4 Diabetic Test Strips
$10 for 50ct, $20 for 100ct
Call Daniel: 423-401-8118
GOOD THINGS
TO EAT
Farm Fresh Eggs
$4.00 a dozen The Milk & Honey
Farm 423-290-3865
Farm Fresh Pastured Lamb
Cuts From $6.99 per pound
423-290-3865
FREEZER BEEF Natural local,
raised on grass, finished on
grain 423-309-3490
www.colmorefarms.com
Mac D. Evans Produce Stand
“Best Vineripe Tomatoes In Town”
8022 Old Lee Hwy
Belt & Disc Sander,
2/3 HP, $100
423-899-3145
Chainsaw Huska Varna.
Runs well. $150.
423-653-7415
GENERATOR , Mounted on a
push mower frame,. $100.
423-605-2716.
HOIST, 1-1/2 Ton Chain
Camalong, $55. Call
423-779-4682.
Ladder 6’ Aluminum Step
Like new. $25 cash, & other
items. 423-414-6800.
Lincoln Electric Mig Welder.
Handy Core. $200.
423-653-7415
GUNS
MIG WELDER- Lincoln, small,
like new on rolling cart, $500,
706-638-1103
AK type assault rifle 7.62/39
Case, 20 round clip, ammo
$480 obo David 423-298-1131
SAWS. All kinds: hand, crosscuts, meat, & bow. $2 & up.
706-398-0611.
AR-15- New In Box, BPMS
Panther Arms, w/2 30 rd clips
$1000, 706-375-8513
Scroll Saw, 16in.
Direct Drive, $110
423-899-3145
Bushmaster AR-15 8 30 round
clips, 200 rounds ammo, never
fired, 706-965-6987 or
423-829-0280 have other guns
WOOD PLANES- All kinds.
Wood bodied and steel frame.
$2 & up. 706-398-0611.
Colt Snub nose .38
Pearl handles like new
$500 cash 423-886-7229
MEDICAL
EQUIPMENT
Colt Trooper, $575, Smith &
Wesson 45, $550, Sig Sauer
P-220, $525, 423-802-3276
Porcelain Doll Molds. Eyes &
wigs. Large collection of both.
Plus a kiln. 423-315-9350.
Quilt scraps & material,
bundles are $5.00
423-485-3103
Q U I L T S T A N D /R a c k , e x t r a
large, decorative wrought iron,
$60. Call 423-892-4261.
Sound Phone
used to help sleep
$10.00423-877-3313
Table Arrangements. Red/white
roses, used in wedding 8/$240
can sep. 423-506-2187.
TN State Flower: Iris
$2 per plant
423-238-7467, Ooltewah.
Glenfield Model 60
like new, nice stock, 90% bluing,
$200 423-596-8125
NEW incontinence bed pads,
30x34, washable. $10 each.
208-1344. Cash only.
Twin Bed Comforter-colored
rose, excellent condition $20
423-894-3751
POWER Wheelchair,
$350/obo
423-875-4342
VCR- Sharp,
with remote, $10. Call
423-344-8794.
Walker , Welby Rollator (rolling)
collapsible w/seat, storage,
New, $50. 629-5525 aft 6pm.
Verizon Flip Phone
$8.00
423-877-3313
MISCELLANEOUS
Washer & Dryer, GE, matched
set, king size capacity, works
great! $350 firm 875-4100
Ruger 1022 30rd clip
like new $300/trade
423-949-4280
Ruger single 6 SS
5 &1/2” mint, $450 firm,
423-838-3805 6pm-9pm
SHOTGUN Stevens Model 311
.410 SXS Great Condition
423-314-7400 $550 OBO
SIG SAUER AR-15 with Scope
Sling, (2) Mags & Lock BNIB
$1375 OBO. (423) 322-1767
Stevens/Savage Arms 20
gauge pump 2.75 or 3” great
shape/trade $300 949-4280
TAURUS, 689 SS 6”
Mint! $425 Firm.
423-838-3805 b/w 6pm-9pm.
WWII P38, CYQ, 9 mm,
nice cond. $800. Call
423-344-7079.
SHOOTING
SUPPLIES
Compact Iver Johnson revolver,
.32 cal, 5 shot, 4" barrel,
nickle, Good shooter. $250
490-5693
Full ammo can ! 7.62x39 FMJ
reloads >530 rounds.
$175 firm. 423-910-1367
Adult DVDS
11 for $20
423-486-7397
White Uniden Cordless Phone
Used 2 months $10.00
423-877-3313
WOOD SWING, A-frame,
for the yard. $100. Call
423-710-3974.
CALCULATOR, Texas Instrument, Business II Plus, $10.
Cash only. 706-937-3085.
CardScan Personal Business
Card Scanner, Model 60,
brand new, $60, 423.802.9130
China-43 piece fine, Joanne
7006, $200 call Rita at
706-965-8469
COCA COLA COLLECTIBLES
23pcs for $35
423-332-5199
Cold Spot Air Condition
For a 1 BR $100 obo
423-486-1682
COOLER, Coleman, 22” long,
13” wide, $12. Cash Only.
Call 706-937-3085.
Want a new bathroom? Call Bath
Fitter for your free estimate!
We can cover your current tub or
shower, or remove and
put in new! Tub to Shower Conversions! Lifetime Warranty!
423-771-4483
Must sell-Black baby grand piano, excellent condition, price
reduced to $3000. 510-9687
ORGAN, Baldwin,
like new, $400 obo.
Call 423-875-5302.
PIANO- Gulbransen, studio mod.
mahogany w/bench, good
cond. $400obo. 332-3718.
HOBBIES/TOYS
Brother Embroidery Machine.
Call for information.
423-315-9350.
D O C K S F O R S A L E
$850ea.-Tony Smith
(678)849-2521-Chatta., TN
QC1000 like new
$950
423-315-9350
Dog kennel for sale.
$75.00
423855-1997
Sewing Machine and Surger
Quilting Supplies & New Cloth
$400 obo 706-861-2012
Drapes- Light green, lined custom made with valance, 125’’
w 84’’ long, $50 706-931-2333
SPORTS
EQUIPMENT
2 Garden Tillers, 1 Husqvarna,
1 Yard Machine, 1 new, 1
slightly used 706-965-6987 or
423-829-0280
Dresses/Skirts Girls 8-12
Shoes all types $45
827-4041 821-6339
2 push mowers, 22”& 20”
$65 each
423-883-5009
DVD and VHS Videos $1
each , 423-332-4403
Bad Boy 0 turn Lawnmower Pro
Series, 60” cut, commercial
grade 27 HP $2800 421-8986
Electric Sprayer, Wagner, 1spd.
wide shot, 2000PSI, like new!
$60 OBO 423-987-2482
CHIPPER SHREDDER, Troybilt
Super Tomahawk, 8 hp, runs
good, $425. 423-653-5097.
End Table- Dark Finished,
Purchased at Bombay, exc cond
$30, 423-344-8794
Choo Choo Customs Trailer. Like
new. $800 423-285-4165
Trailer 800 423-285-4165
EXTENSION LADDER
32’, Werner. $200 obo.
706-375-3711.
Craftsmen ride mower. 19.5 hp.
42” cut. new, new grasscatcher. $1300. 423-875-9911.
FILE CABINETS, 4 drawers,
Excellent cond. $45 ea.
Call 423-332-3718.
Cub Cadet1046i Zero Turn
Tractor 20 HP Kohler, 46” cut
40hrs $1900 423-847-0901
FLORAL ARRANGEMENT Lg
Use for dining, Banquet table
Cemetery,New, $65. 883-3506
David Bradley 2 Wheel Tractor
w/ Equipment, $1500
423-447-3165 or 423-285-0538
GREEN DEPRESSION GLASS.
$20
423-332-5199
IRIS- Many mixed varieties
10 for $10
423-238-7467, Ooltewah.
Hand Emroidered Rug, 6X4
Rose pattern, $150
423-893-6817
LAWN MOWER, Snapper,
30” 11 hp, $265. Call
706-483-2639.
HAND VAC, Sharp Bagless
Great for steps. Like new in box
$15 706-820-2200
MTD Husky Riding Mowert
B & S 2 cyl, 20 hp, 42” cut, Runs
Good, $400 obo 706-861-5272
MTD Riding Mower 42” Cut B &
S 2 cyl, 18.5 hp, Runs Good
$350 obo 706-861-5272
Poulan PP4018 Chain Saw
$75
423-432-0120
Top Soil for sale - Taken off
Farm - Very good soil. Call for
price (according to size of
truck). We have plenty of it.
Call Bobby 423-595-7555.
Heavy Duty Floor Safe16.5”x13”x10” fireproof $70
423-870-4041
DACHSHUNDS-Mini. 3 red
short haired F, 2 long haired
males, 1 blk & cream 1 long
haired brown & red dapple
P.O.P, 1st shots & wormed,
Kid & Pet Friendly, $250.
614-425-0615. Big Ridge
ENGLISH BULLDOG Puppies
(Olde) 1 Male & 1 Female left
Triple registered. parents on site
$650.Call or text 423-316-4470
FREE- 2 Red Boy Jacko Pit Bull
Puppies. Male & female. With
papers. 423-321-2260.
FREE-3 Kittens. 8 weeks old.
orange tabbys, 1 boy & 2 girls.
Call 423-413-5610. Lv. msg.
FREE-Chihuahua-Rat Terrier
Puppies. Toy size. Need good
homes. 423-277-6788.
FREE kittens
Only to Good Homes
Call 423-842-1067
CUSHIONS for loung chairs, 3
florals & 1 green, pretty, good
cond. $40. 423-698-0514.
Dresser and Chest of Drawers
Sears Harmony House 1950
$600 423-892-7323
Cocker Spaniel Pups, CKC,
tri colored, $350/$375.
931-445-3939 /931-644-5333
ELECTRIC/ACOUSTIC GUITAR
$75
423-653-7415
SEWING
MACHINES
25 HP Kohler Motor
$500
423-991-4012
Chihuahua, boy, 15 wks old, up
to date on shots/worm, small,
$400, 881-4053 or 762-0325
FREE -Jack Russell/Rat Terrier
Puppies. Make good inside or
outside pets. 423-227-6788.
CREDIT CARD Machine, Veriphone 570, pack of paper,
$100. Call 706-820-0167.
LAWN/GARDEN
EQUIPMENT
Bulldog pups, 100% Johnson
American. sire 120lbs dam
95lbs. $800. 706-847-1031.
MUSICAL
MERCHANDISE
HANDGUN CARRY PERMITCLASSES $50.
Immediate opening, over 300
guns in stock. Fugate’s
Firearms. 423-336-2675.
Wooden playground
$150.00
423-855-1997
Blue Tic & Coon Walker Pups
1 yr old. Starting to tree. $50 ea.
706-866-9682
English Bulldog pup. NKC
Reg., shots utd, vet checked,
$1500 423-785-7965 or
706-657-6866
Bedside Commode,
Nice $15
423-894-3751
Burgess outdoor bug fogger
never used in box $15
423-605-0468
Australian Shepherd Puppies
AKC, all colors w/ blue eyes.
Great family pets, Great w/kids
931-433-8578 / 931-205-5702
Wolf Tanning Bed- Used
$800 Customer Pickup
423-322-6226
Backgammon Table, Custom
Made, 24X36, Asking $400,
Call 423-802-9130
Bedspread Queen Size, 2
pillow shams, 3 pillows and
bedskirt $50 423-870-4041
B A S E B A L L S - Rawlings,
Southern League, 1 dozen
new in box, $60. 240-2068.
Eliptical
$100
706-375-4705
Everlast, heavy bag stand,
w/heavy punching bag, set of
gloves, $75, 706-965-8356
GOLD’S GYM SPINNER BIKE
Like new. $125.
423-490-9749
HEALTH RIDERPerfect Cond. Full body
workout. $100. 423-596-2889
Lifetime Basketball GoalIn ground, 44”, $50
423-332-0718
Men’s Golf Clubs Graphite,
Tommy Armor $350 obo
423-322-6226
TENNIS BALLS, 150, name
brand, great shape, $50.
Call 423-314-4056.
FREE- KITTENS
9 wks. old, 5 gray & 1 calico,
423-503-3503.
Free Kittens (5)Good Outside Cats
423-332-9023
Free Pups Beagle mix, 8 wks,
mostly white, playful, free to
good home, 423-394-2400.
FREE! Two mixed breeds need a
new loving home. Fem. 12 yrs.
Male, 2-1/2 yrs. 423-903-1647.
German Shepherd AKC Blk/Tan
Pups, Shots/Wormed $600
Exc Protection! 423-702-5821
GOLDEN RETRIEVERS AKC,
Champion sired pups. $850.
Call 706-935-8802.
www.showringgoldens.com
Labs Puppies Blk & Blond
5wks w/ shots, wormed
Both Parents AKC Reg,
$500, 423-881-3347
MALT-POOS $300. & up
chickamaugakennels.com
706-866-7782 / 423-802-2813
Pomeranian puppies for sale,
shots,
706-676-8301
Pomeranians & Yorkies
9 weeks shots and wormed CKC
$300 & $350, 931-319-0000
PUGGLES - $250.+
chickamaugakennels.com
423-802-2813 / 706-866-7782
YORKIE/ HAVANESE $300.
chickamaugakennels.com
706-866-7782 / 423-802-2813
TELEPHONE
SYSTEMS
YORKIES. Tiny Micro Tea Cups,
Male & Female, blue/gold. $595.
1.5-2 lbs. grown 256-878-1532.
Hitachi- 60” Console
$250
423-364-4077
PET SUPPLIES
TV/RADIO/STEREO
EQUIPMENT
Birdcage, Large, Heavy, $95
Firm 423-867-4872
b/w 6pm-9pm.
20’’ TV
with 2 Remote $25
Call 423-624-3063.
Cyclone Fence Dog Lot,
10X10, $125,
706-375-9300
Brand New Roku 3 with
expansion disk, $70
Call 423-877-7539
Heart-shaped birdcage, came
from decorator in Atlanta, $125
423-598-9349
PRESSURE WASHER,
11 hp, Honda, 3500 psi, $300.
Call 423-899-3820.
Industrial Lights, (8) High-Bay,
w/transformers/protected bulbs
$575/will sep. 423-332-6444.
C o m p a c t C a m c o r d e r, JVC,
GR-AX200, VHS-C, with case,
$120 OBO 423-987-2482
PUSH MOWER, Craftsman, self
propelled , great shape.
$200. Call 423-899-3820.
Landscape Plants. Monkey
grass, lilies, iris, vinca. 10
sections, $30. 423-892-4261.
Large Parrot Cage- New
w/accessories and plenty of toys
$150 423-875-9911
DVD Player. Very good cond.
Almost new. $30 cash only.
423-855-0889.
Lantern 2 mantle Coleman
w/funnel & extra fuel. $25 cash
Other items. 423-414-6800.
Pet Cage by Petmate large size
exc. cond. $55
423-877-4179
Galaxy Radio- Excellent shape,
10 &11 m., $175; firm, cash.
309-6476 no calls after 6pm.
RIDING MOWER, Craftmsan, 17
hp, used very little, like new,
42” cut, $450. 423-899-3820.
LAZY SUSAN, Peach/Green on
wooden turntable. 4 servingsections $35. 883-3506
PET CARRIER: Bargain Hound.
XL. 36”L x 24”W x 30”H.
Like new. $50. 423-322-5199.
PIONEER SYSTEM, amp 250
watt, speaker 11 watt, complete set, $65 obo. 779-4682.
Riding Mower Hoist,
new, $75. Call
423-332-9333.
M48 Tomahawk
$25
423-486-7397
RECEIVER, amp, subwoofer,
surround sound, $550
obo. Call 423-876-0035.
RIDING MOWER, 12.5 Murray
40" 6 speed w/steel dump cart
$300. obo. 423-842-1436.
Many Lifejackets. $5 each.
And many other items.
Call 423-414-6800 for info.
SANYO TV, Large, Exc Picture,
$50
423-320-6800
RIDING MOWER, Craftsman,
42” cut, 17 hp, $300.
Call 423-238-6713.
METAL DESK, Heavy would
make good work bench, $50.
Call 423-605-6035.
TV- 20” Magnavox, w/remote,
very good cond. $60. Cash
only. Call 423-855-0889.
RIDING MOWER,
Needs work, $125. Call
706-638-1103.
Military Relics. German, Japanese & American World War
I&II Pay top prices. 842-6020
T.V. 32 in Tube Sansui Like New
$59
423-356-8806
Variety of Push MOWER Parts
$160 for all or will sep
Call 706-638-1103.
NEW incontinence bed pads,
30x34,washable. $10 each.
208-1344. Cash only.
TV Controls
$100 obo
423-486-1682
Remington Electric
Chainsaw-16”, 3.25 hp, $35
423-332-0718
Visit us
online at
LEGAL NOTICES
Docket No. 13A114
DIVISION
Truck Load of Flea Market Stuff
Incl. weed eaters, etc, new/used
$300obo 423-883-5009
40 TON SHOP/BEARING
PRESS, asking $400.00 or
M.A.O.,PH 931-505-1003
3lb male crate-trained, sweet
Yorkie pup. $300 includes supplies. 423-637-9423.
SALON CHIAR, Bowl, Parafin
system & sterilizer, all for $250
obo. Call/text 423-313-8657.
HONEYWELL Air Purifier
with Hepa Filter, like new, $50.
Call 423-344-7079.
Remington 700, unfired .223
w/scope $475
423-298-1571
WILD FLOWERS, Jack In
The Pulpit. $5.00. Call
423-421-3498.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
HAMILTON COUNTY,
TENNESSEE
Compact Iver Johnson revolver,
.32 cal, 5 shot, 4" barrel,
nickle, Good shooter. $250
490-5693
2 outdoor chair cushions
tropical design $10
423-605-0468
Rose Campion Dark purple, lilac & white. $5.00 each. Call
706-935-2218.
Reel to Reel - 7’’tapes, 25 total
$100 for all will sep
423-822-8283
TOOL & SOCKET SET
w/ ratchet 75 Pc, $32 New!,
423-842-7837
John Wayne coach gun, 12 ga.
collector’s, 1632 of 2500,
$1900 423-899-3145
RED HOT Pockers, $5 each.
Get now to enjoy the blooms.
Call 423-488-5565.
Rose Of Sharon, Purple or pink
can become a tree or kept as
a bush. $3-$5. 423-488-5565.
Pressure Cooker- Mirro-Matic.
6 qrt capacity. Good Cond $12
Call 423-698-0514
BEDSIDE TOILET -by Carex,
NEW, perfect condition.
$30 cash only 706-937-3085
Gunworks LLC-Assault rifles,
shotguns, pistols, ammo, & clips
in stock. 4691 N. Lee Hwy,
Cleveland,TN, Tues.-Sat.
10am-5:30pm 423-458-1539
PETS
PORCH Rocking Chairs, (2)
with pads, natural finish, $20.
Call 706-820-2200.
Landscape Plants. Monkey
grass, lilies, iris, vinca. 10
sections, $30. 423-892-4261.
White Birdcage-24” long 16” tall
16” wide $25
423-870-4041
LIVESTOCK
EQUIPMENT
4-6 HORSE Gooseneck Trailer,
16 ft. new cond. red w/white top
$2995. Call 423-260-7336.
FEED/SEED/
PLANTS
IRIS- Biannual Everblooming
$5/plant. White, lavender, yellow & more. 423-238-7467.
IN THE MATTER OF:
BABY BOY MIREE
VS
“BOBBY” OR ANY UNKNOWN BIOLOGICAL FATHER OF BABY BOY MIREE
BORN TO CHERIE NICOLE
MIREE
It appears from the allegation in Complaint’s Bill, that the
defendant is a non-resident of
the State of Tennessee, so that
the ordinary process of law
cannot be served upon OR
ANY UNKNOWN BIOLOGICAL FATHER OF BABY BOY
MIREE BORN TO CHERIE
NICOLE MIREE “BOBBY”.
It is, ORDERED that unless
you appear and defend said
complaint within 30 days after
5/14/2013, a default judgement may be taken against you
for the relief demanded in said
complaint.
This 17th day of April, 2013.
35661291
PAULA T. THOMPSON
CIRCUIT COURT CLERK
By J. Wheeler, D.C.
Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Complaint:
MICHAEL SCOTT JENNINGS
130 JORDAN DRIVE
CHATTANOOGA, TN 37421
PUBLIC NOTICE
In accordance with the provisions of law, there being due
and unpaid charges for which
the undersigned is entitled to
satisfy an owners lien of the
goods herein described and
stored at Hide-Away Storage,
LLC, 1523 Keeble Street,
East Ridge Tn. 37412. And,
due notice having been given
to the owner of said property
and the time specified in such
notice for payment of such
having expired, the goods will
be sold at public auction to the
highest bidder or otherwise
disposed of May 23, 2013 at
3:00 p.m.
PK-53 Ogletree, Jason
B-34 35 Thompson, Linda
C-69 Dewees, Marianna
E-101 Lange, Natalie
I-195 Brown, Yolanda
I-196 Brundidge, Wayne
1-196 Kilgore, Sandy
M-299 Dobbs, Wiley
N-315 Birdford, Wyman
N-319 221 Hughes, LeRoy
N-336 Peoples, Blake
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE’S
SALE
WHEREAS, default having
been made in the payment of
the debts and obligations secured by a Deed of Trust executed on December 16, 2005,
b y J e n n i C r a n e a n d Larry
Crane t o J . P h i l l i p J o n e s ,
Trustee, for the benefit of
Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as sole
nominee for NovaStar Mortgage, Inc. and appearing of
record in Register’s Office of
Hamilton County, Tennessee,
in Book GI 7788, Page 349;
and
WHEREAS, the beneficial
interest of said Deed of Trust
was last transferred and assigned to Consumer Solutions,
LLC and
WHEREAS, Consumer Solutions, LLC, as the holder of
the Note for which debt is
owed, (“Note Holder”), appointed the undersigned, Nationwide Trustee Services, Inc.,
as Substitute Trustee by instrument filed or to be filed for
record in the Register’s Office
of Hamilton County, Tennessee, with all the rights, powers
and privileges of the original
Trustee named in said Deed of
Trust; and
WHEREAS, pursuant to
Tenn. Code Ann. § 35-5-117,
not less than sixty (60) days
prior to the first publication required by § 35-5-101, the notice of the right to foreclose
was properly sent, if so required; and
NOW, THEREFORE, notice is hereby given that the
entire indebtedness has been
declared due and payable as
provided in said Deed of Trust
by the Note Holder, and that
the undersigned, Nationwide
Trustee Services, Inc., Substitute Trustee, or its duly appointed attorneys or agents, by
virtue of the power and authority vested in it, will on Thursday, May 16, 2013, commencing at 11:00 am at the
Main Door (Walnut Street side)
of the Hamilton County Courthouse location in Tennessee,
proceed to sell at public outcry
to the highest and best bidder
for cash, the following described property situated in
Hamilton County, Tennessee,
to wit:
Located in the Third Civil
District of Hamilton County,
Tennessee: Lot Forty-Eight
48), Shore Acres
Subdivision, as shown by
plat of record in Plat Book
22, Page 69, in the
Register's Office of Hamilton
County, Tennessee. Being
the same property conveyed
to Larry Crane and wife,
Jenni Crane by Deed from
Joy Ann Waycaster, widow,
dated 11/20/02 and recorded
in Book 6450, Page 391 in
the Register's Office of
Hamilton County, Tennessee. Subject to Easements,
Conditions and Stipulations
as shown and /or noted on
subdivision plat. Subject to
Restrictions of record in
Book 1508, Page 672, in the
Register's Office Hamilton
35661292
LEGAL NOTICES
g
County, Tennessee, but
omitting any covenant or
restriction based on race,
color, religion, sex, handicap,
familial status or national
origin unless and only to the
extent that said covenant (a)
is exempt under Chapter 42,
Section 3607 of the United
States Code of (b) relates to
handicap but does not
discriminate against
handicapped person. Subject
to Restrictions, Conditions,
Stipulations, etc. of record in
Book 975, Page 555, as
amended in Book 1254,
Page 20, all in the Register's
Office Hamilton County,
Tennessee, but omitting any
covenant or restriction based
on race, color, religion, sex,
handicap, familial status or
national origin unless and
only to the extent that said
covenant (a) is exempt under
Chapter 42, Section 3607 of
the United States Code or
(b) relates to handicap but
does not discriminate against
handicapped person. Subject
to Governmental zoning and
subdivision ordinances or
regulations in effect thereon.
Legal description taken from
prior Deed. Commonly
k n o w n a s: 2 1 2 7 H i l l T o p
Crest, Soddy Daisy, TN
37379
PROPERTY ADDRESS:
2127 Hill Top Crest, Soddy
Daisy, TN 37379 CURRENT
OWNER(S): Jenni Crane and
Larry Crane
The sale of the above-described property shall be subject
to all matters shown on any
recorded plan; any unpaid
taxes; any restrictive
covenants, easements or
set-back lines that may be
applicable; any prior liens or
encumbrances as well as any
priority created by a fixture
filing; and any matter that an
accurate survey of the
premises might disclose.
Substitute Trustee will only
convey any interest he/she
may have in the property at the
time of sale. Property is sold
“as is, where is.” For every lien
or claim of lien of the state
identified above, please be
advised notice required by §
67-1-1433 (b)(1) was timely
given and that any sale of the
property herein referenced will
be subject to the right of the
state to redeem the land as
p r o v i d e d f o r i n §
67-1-1433(c)(1).
All right and equity of
redemption, statutory or
otherwise, homestead, and
dower are expressly waived in
said Deed of Trust, and the title
is believed to be good, but the
undersigned will sell and
convey only as Substitute
Trustee.
The right is reserved to
adjourn the day of the sale to
another day, time, and place
certain without further
p u b l i c a t i o n , u p o n
announcement at the time and
place for the sale set forth
above.
NATIONWIDE TRUSTEE
SERVICES, INC. 400
Northridge Road Suite 700MC- 7 Sandy Springs, Georgia
30350 404-417-4040
File No.: 1358113
Web Site: www.JFLegal.com
Publication Dates: April 23,
April 30, May 7, 2013
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE’S
SALE
LEGAL NOTICES
WHEREAS, default having
been made in the payment of
the debts and obligations secured by a Deed of Trust executed on December 8, 2006,
by William E. Durham to Larry
A. Weissman, Trustee, for the
benefit of Mortgage Electronic
Registration Systems, Inc. as
sole nominee for SunTrust
Mortgage, Inc. and appearing
of record in Register’s Office of
Hamilton County, Tennessee,
in Book GI8181, Page 178; and
WHEREAS, the beneficial
interest of said Deed of Trust
was last transferred and assigned to US Bank National
Association as trustee for
BAFC 2007-2 and
WHEREAS, US Bank National Association as trustee for
BAFC 2007-2, as the holder of
the Note for which debt is
owed, (“Note Holder”), appointed the undersigned, Nationwide Trustee Services, Inc.,
as Substitute Trustee by instrument filed or to be filed for
record in the Register’s Office
of Hamilton County, Tennessee, with all the rights, powers
and privileges of the original
Trustee named in said Deed of
Trust; and
WHEREAS, pursuant to
Tenn. Code Ann. § 35-5-117,
not less than sixty (60) days
prior to the first publication required by § 35-5-101, the notice of the right to foreclose
was properly sent, if so required; and
NOW, THEREFORE, notice is hereby given that the
entire indebtedness has been
declared due and payable as
provided in said Deed of Trust
by the Note Holder, and that
the undersigned, Nationwide
Trustee Services, Inc., Substitute Trustee, or its duly appointed attorneys or agents, by
virtue of the power and authority vested in it, will on Thursday, M a y 1 6 , 2 0 1 3 , c o m mencing at 11:00 am at the
Main Door (Walnut Street side)
of the Hamilton County Courthouse location in Tennessee,
proceed to sell at public outcry
to the highest and best bidder
for cash, the following described property situated in
Hamilton County, Tennessee,
to wit:
In the City of Chattanooga,
Hamilton County, Tennessee: Lot (18), Block E, W.S.
Beck's Subdivison of the
Sivley Tract at Glendale, as
shown by plat of record in
Plat Book 7, Page 18, in the
Register's Office of Hamilton
County, Tennessee.
PROPERTY ADDRESS:
223 Glendale Road, Chattanooga, TN 37405-1603 CURRENT OWNER(S): William E.
Durham and Dorothy Jean
Durham (deceased)
The sale of the abovedescribed property shall be
subject to all matters shown on
any recorded plan; any unpaid
taxes; any restrictive covenants, easements or set-back
lines that may be applicable;
any prior liens or encumbrances as well as any priority
created by a fixture filing; and
any matter that an accurate
survey of the premises might
disclose. Substitute Trustee will
only convey any interest
he/she may have in the property at the time of sale. Property is sold “as is, where is.”
SUBORDINATE LIENHOLDERS: SunTrust Bank For every lien or claim of lien of the
state identified above, please
be advised notice required by §
LEGAL NOTICES
y
67-1-1433 (b)(1) was timely
given and that any sale of the
property herein referenced will
be subject to the right of the
state to redeem the land as
p r o v i d e d f o r i n §
67-1-1433(c)(1).
All right and equity of redemption, statutory or otherwise, homestead, and dower
are expressly waived in said
Deed of Trust, and the title is
believed to be good, but the
undersigned will sell and convey only as Substitute Trustee.
The right is reserved to adjourn the day of the sale to another day, time, and place
certain without further publication, upon announcement at
the time and place for the sale
set forth above.
NATIONWIDE TRUSTEE
SERVICES, INC. 400
Northridge Road Suite 700MC- 7 Sandy Springs, Georgia
30350 404-417-4040
File No.: 1361813
Web Site: www.JFLegal.com
Publication Dates: April 23,
April 30, May 7, 2013
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S
SALE
Sale at public auction will be
on June 4, 2013 at 12:00 PM
local time, at the west door,
Hamilton County Courthouse,
Chattanooga, Tennessee, conducted by Shapiro & Kirsch,
LLP Substitute Trustee, pursuant to Deed of Trust executed
by Leonard P. Raulston, Jr.,
and wife, Tracy C. Raulston,
to First Choice Title, Inc.,
Trustee, on March 26, 1999 at
Book GI 5319, Page 621, Instrument No. 1999033000148;
all of record in the Hamilton
County Register's Office.
Owner of Debt: JPMorgan
Chase Bank, National Association
The following real estate located in Hamilton County,
Tennessee, will be sold to the
highest call bidder subject to all
unpaid taxes, prior liens and
encumbrances of record:
All that tract or parcel of land
lying and being in the Seconds Civil District of Hamilton County, Tennessee, being Lot 1, T & K Leamon
Subdivision, as shown by
plat of record in Plat Book
45, Page 357, in the
Register's Office of Hamilton
County, Tennessee.
This conveyance is made
subject to the following:
Any governmental zoning
and subdivision ordinances
or regulations in effect
thereon.
Street Address: 10000
Birchwood Pike, Harrison,
Tennessee 37341
Parcel Number: 077-010.04
Current Owner(s) of Property: Leonard P. Raulston, Jr.,
and wife, Tracy C. Raulston
Other interested parties:
Regions Financial Corporation
Successor by Merger to AmSouth Banc C/O Christopher
W. Conner, ESQ
The street address of the
above described property is
believed to be 10000 Birchwood Pike, Harrison, Tennessee 37341, but such address is
not part of the legal description
of the property sold herein and
in the event of any discrepancy, the legal description referenced herein shall control.
SALE IS SUBJECT TO
TENANT(S) RIGHTS IN POSSESSION.
If applicable, the notice re-
timesfreepress.com
time
F4 • Tuesday, May 7, 2013 • • •
quirements of T.C.A. 35-5-117
have been met.
All right of equity of redemption, statutory and otherwise, and homestead are expressly waived in said Deed of
Trust, and the title is believed
to be good, but the undersigned will sell and convey only
as Substitute Trustee.
If the highest bidder cannot
pay the bid within twenty-four
(24) hours of the sale, the next
highest bidder, at their highest
bid, will be deemed the successful bidder.
This property is being sold
with the express reservation
that the sale is subject to confirmation by the lender or
trustee. This sale may be rescinded at any time.
sions, default having been
made in payment of installments maturing on the note,
and in performance of covenants contained in the Deed
of Trust, the entire balance
owing on the note having been
declared due and payable, and
default being made in payment
thereof, at the request of the
owners of said note, and for
the purpose of effecting payment and satisfaction thereof,
principal and interest, and
costs of sale, George C Gwaltney, will, as Trustee, on May
28, 2013 at 1:30 o'clock P.M.,
offer for sale at public outcry to
the highest and best bidder for
cash, at the West Door of the
Courthouse, in the City of
Chattanooga, Hamilton County,
Tennessee, in bar of the equities of redemption, statutory
right of redemption, dower,
homestead, and all other exemptions, the following described real estate, to-wit:
LOCATED IN THE CITY OF
CHATTANOOGA, HAMILTON COUNTY, TENNESSEE:
BEGINNING at a point in the
East line of Harrison Street
at the Southwest corner of
the property conveyed by
American Trust and Banking Company, Trustee, to
Lovie Colbaugh July 10,
1925; thence South 73 degrees 15 minutes East, along
the South line of the Colbaugh Tract, a distance of
250 feet, more or less, to the
center of a ditch; thence
South, along the center of
said ditch to a point in the
North line of the property
conveyed by American Trust
and Banking Company,
Trustee, to Andrew W. Roden on July 10, 1925; thence
North 73 degrees 15 minutes West, along the North
line of the Roden property, a
distance of 245 feet, more or
less, to the East line of Harrison Street; thence North 18
degrees 20 minutes West,
along said Street, a distance
of 61.4 feet, to the Beginning.
For prior title and last instrument of record affecting
title to the above described
property, see deed recorded in
Book 8787, page 495, in the
Register’s Office of Hamilton
County, Tennessee.
SUBJECT TO Any Governmental zoning and subdivision ordinances or regulations
in effect thereon.
SUBJECT TO Restrictions
of record in Book V, Volume
28, page 543, said Register’s
Office.
SUBJECT TO Easement
recorded in Book 2283, Page
269, said Register’s Office.
Description taken from prior
deed.
This is improved property at
4046 Denham Road, Chattanooga, Tennessee 37406.
The sale will be made as
Trustee only, without covenants or warranties of title and
subject to any unpaid taxes or
assessments owing on the
property or valid prior encumbrances of record.
The trustee reserves the
right to adjourn the sale date
to another day, time and place
certain without further publication, upon announcement at
the time and place for the sale
set forth above.
A N T H O N Y R . S T E E L E,
Successor Trustee of a Deed
of Trust executed on December 13, 2002, by CLIFFORD
PRESTWOOD, being one and
the same as CLIFFORD
PRESSWOOD, in Deed of Acquisition, unmarried, which appears of record in the
Register’s Office of Hamilton
County, Tennessee, at Book
GI6486, Page 206 (“Deed of
Trust”) will sell for cash at a
foreclosure sale requested by
the current holder of the Deed
of Trust and underlying indebtedness, Vanderbilt Mortgage
and Finance, Inc., the property
described below. Pursuant to
T.C.A. §47-9-604 this sale shall
also include the affixed manufactured home described as
one (1) 2002 CMH HON
Manufactured Home bearing
S e r i a l
N u m b e r
H0NC05535047AB.
Sale Date and Location: May
15, 2013, at 11:30 a.m. at the
front door of the Courthouse in
Chattanooga, Hamilton County,
Tennessee.
Property Description: Abbreviated description per TCA
35-5-104(a)(2) is the property referenced and described fully at Book GI9853,
Page 375 and commonly
known as Lot No. 63 of
Montlake Mobile Home Estates.
Property Address: 1317
Bonnelia Circle, Soddy
Daisy, Hamilton County,
Tennessee
Tax Map Identification No.:
047K-B-011 (However, the
property description shall control in the event of any inconsistencies between the description and address or tax
identification number).
Parties Interested: None
known.
All sales of Property, both
real and personal, are "AS IS"
and "WHERE IS" without representation or warranty as to
merchantability or fitness for a
particular purpose or of any
kind, except as to title and authority to convey.
The sale of the described
property is subject to all matters shown on any recorded
plan; any unpaid taxes, any restrictive covenants, easements,
set-back lines, prior liens, encumbrances, if any, and any
other priority as may appear in
the public records. Title to the
manufactured home may be
transferred by Bill of Sale or
Certificate of Title, as the case
may require.
The right is preserved to
adjourn the day of the sale to
another day, time and place
certain without further publication, upon announcement at
the time and place for the sale
set forth above.
THE PURPOSE OF THIS
COMMUNICATION IS TO
COLLECT THE DEBT AND
ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED AS A RESULT WILL
BE USED FOR THAT EXPRESS PURPOSE ONLY.
THIS COMMUNICATION IS
FROM A DEBT COLLECTOR.
This the 18th day of April,
2013.
Anthony R. Steele,
Successor Trustee
Winchester, Sellers, Foster &
Steele, P.C.
P. O. Box 2428
Knoxville, TN 37901
(865) 637-1980
Publication Dates: April 23, 30
and May 7, 2013.
This April 24, 2013.
By George C Gwaltney,
Trustee
AREA
1 2
AREA
SUCCESSOR TRUSTEE'S
NOTICE OF SALE OF REAL
ESTATE AND AFFIXED
MANUFACTURED HOME
By virtue of the power and authority vested under a Deed of
Trust executed by Shayne R
Nichols and wife, Barbara R
Nichols , to George C Gwaltney, Trustee, dated July 27,
2009, filed for record July 28,
2009, and recorded in Book
8984, Page 755, in the
Register's Office of Hamilton
County, Tennessee, to secure
payment of one promissory
note therein set forth, payable
to the order of Citizens Savings & Loan Corporation, reference being made to the record
of the Deed of Trust for a full
recital of its terms and provi-
AREA 6
OOLTEWAH Lg. corner lots
MILL RUN $65,000 ROYAL
HARBOR. $67,000. 322-1963
AREA 8
HIXSON- 7807 Cove Ridge
This is a move-in ready Spanish
Colonial home in a great neighborhood with a large in-ground
pool. It has 4 bedrooms and 4
bathrooms with many updates.
Features include a large living
room, rec room, 3 fireplaces, and
great storage. The house has
been updated for energy efficiency with new windows, heat
and air conditioner unit, insulation, and energy star appliances.
Zoned for McConnell Elementary and Loftis Middle School
3500 sq.ft $214,900
E. LAKE Rent to own! 3 br.
1bath.C/H/A Hookups. Fenced back yard. $175./wk $500/
Dep.423-344-4614 / 394-1715
REAL ESTATE
WANTED
H. ANY HOUSE! H
Any Condition!
I BUY
HOUSES
CA$H!
316-3800
BUSINESS
PROPERTY
Morris Estates. 2 large Br., nice!
priv. backyard, patio, pool,
garage, basement, $115,000
43 Stanley Pkwy 423-280-0584
N. Hamilton Cty., Soddy-Daisy,
Bakewell, Sale Creek, Middle Valley
SODDY DAISY- 4 BR/2.5 Bath
2,000 plus sq. ft.
Fenced In backyard, Lake View,
Lake Access, Out Building,
Completely Updated!
$185K, 423-702-0057
SODDY DAISY (MLS#1057809)
13823 MOUNT TABOR RD.
$72,000 SELL-LEASE-LEASE
PURCHASE. Nice clean
remodeled home on large
level country lot. 2 bedrooms,
appliances & utility room. Lease
for $650. per month. Bill Hixson
Owner/ Agent 332-9999 Hixson
& Company Real Estate, LLC.
HOUSES FOR SALE
Ooltewah
E.DALE Shallowford Rd. 2 story
brick. 5000 sq. ft. paved. $45,000
Call: 423-304-4041
Webb Ave. Mini Storage
Crossville, TN (931)707-8380
149 units, 8.25 acres, fenced
w/ security system, $950,000
www.webbavemini
storage.com
OFFICE FOR LEASE
Bonny Oaks Industrial Park.
3200 SF Class A office space w/
warehouse. Front door parking
899-7024
Lookout Valley:
Office Space for lease.
Various sizes. 423-894-0324
APTS-RENTFURNISHED
BRAINERD-Beautiful Furnished
2 BR, All needed is bed clothes
& bath accessories. Perfect
for older person. $500/ $500.
Credit check 423-624-3449
APTS-RENTUNFURNISHED
BRAINERD
RUSTIC VILLAGE
APARTMENTS
OOLTEWAH 9227 Snow Hill
Rd. 3br, 2baths, F/P, Fenced
yard. $125,900. 423-400-6620
HOUSES FOR SALE
Walker County
1, 2, Bedrooms & Efficiencies
Near Hamilton Place
Eastgate
Newly Redecorated Available
Call
DOWNTOWN- located along the
river. 2br/2ba open floor plan
with hardwood flooring and
a deck facing the river.
$1,200/month, sec deposit
and 12 month lease required.
Please call 423-702-8865 for
more information.
E.CHATT./ CHATT. Ridgecrest
Apts. MOVE-IN SPECIAL!
Only $435 for a 1 BR/1 Bath,
Central A/H, Water Incl.,
No Pets! (423) 875-0445
ROSSVILLE foreclosure. Like
new. 2 BR 2 ba, fenced. AC.
$39,900 Call: 423-304-4041
Ft. Oglethorpe- Now accepting small pets. 1Apts. Ground
Level. Water and Garbage
paid. No Smoking. Quiet
Community. 706-861-0455.
Lakeshore II Apartments.
FT. OGLETHORPE
Efficiencies $325/355 Washer/
Dryer Great for Seniors.
706-861-1666 or 706-956-8864
-HIXSON/ RIDGESIDE APTSLarge 1 BR Available!
Call today for your custom
quote 423-842-8280
ROSSVILLE - Like new! 3 BR, 2
bath. Nice lot. New carpet &
paint. $39,900 423-304-4041
HOUSES FOR SALE
Chattooga County
MISSIONARY RIDGE- Newly
remodeled 1br/1ba apts
w/ hrdwd floors. Quiet area
convenient to downtown,
starting at $600/mo. Contact
Battery Place Properties
(423)702-8865 or
[email protected]
N. Chatt - River Hills Manor
Free Utilities!
1 Bedroom and Studio
Furnished or Unfurnished
$100 Off First Months Rent
2627 Hixson Pike
423-756-3797
Chattanooga - 4 bedroom, 2.5
baths, 2000 sqft. Beautiful home
built in 2009 has all the upgrades and features anyone
would be looking for in a new
build. $225,000 423-991-1323
RED BANK Affordable Living,
1, 2 & 3 BR Apts, Water incl.
3 locations to choose from,
Absolutely No Pets!(423)875-0445
River Cannon Apartments 10
minutes from Downtown, has 1
BR apt available on river front
property. $750 mth. 488-1345
CONDO-TOWNHOUSE-RENT
ROSSVILLE- 2 BR, 1.5 Bath.
$600/mo. $500/Dep.
Call 423-255-5385
Condo in Hixson - 3BR/2BA
Beautiful view of lake. Quality
upgrades include hardwood
floors, fireplace, wet bar, walk-in
tile shower. Owner will pay one
year HOA dues to buyer under
contract before end of May.
$265,000
Call 423-503-3301
WATERFRONT
HOMES
Ooltewah- Open floorplan.
Master on main split from jack/jill.
Sunroom, bonus w/ full bath,
screened porch, fenced yard,
corner lot, 2 car attached garage.
$2,000 deposit/ $2100 month
(843)810-0316
RENT or BUY 3 - 4 BR
Homes [email protected] $900. / month.
Call Today 800-624-0661
Stevens Realty Owner/Agent
www.stevensrentals.com
SODDY DAISY (MLS#1057809)
13823 MOUNT TABOR RD.
$72,000 SELL-LEASE-LEASE
PURCHASE. Nice clean
remodeled home on large
level country lot. 2 bedrooms,
appliances & utility room. Lease
for $650. per month. Bill Hixson
Owner/ Agent 332-9999 Hixson
& Company Real Estate, LLC.
MOBILE HOMESRENT
E. RIDGE/N.GA - $99 move-in
2 & 3 BR’s for $75.00 per week
& up! 894-0039 or 355-1104
SIGNAL MTN. Rd. 1 & 2 bedroom, utilities paid, Call
267-3783, 1-4, Mon.-Fri.
ROOMS FOR RENT
SIGNAL MTN. RD. $120 week,
$20 Dep. Free HBO & cable,
267-3783
POWER BOATS
1994 BAYLINER Ciera 2655
Cabin Cruiser, equipped,
w/gen. $12,500. 892-1111.
Aluminum Flatbottom Boat
& Trailer 16’ $650
423-468-3709
Bass Boat, 16 ft. 2001, 25 hp,
Evinrude motor, Galvanized
trailer, $1500. 423-468-3709.
Bayliner 19’ Center Console
120HP Mercury, nice trailer, fish
finder & radio $7500 598-5349
Pro Craft Fish & Ski 16’ 115hp
Mercury, trolling motor, depth
finder. $2500 423-468-3709
V-bottom Fishing Boat w/trailer
4 hp Johnson motor $1425.
Call 423-653-3007.
WELLCRAFT SCARAB NOVA 2
+trailer 26-ft. twin 350’s.Blue
book $14,500, $9995. 332-6444
SAIL BOATS
423-894-0324
DOWNTOWN 1br/1ba starting
at $625/month including water
& parking pass. Hrdwd floors
& central heat/air. Security
deposit & lease required.
Contact (423)702-8865 or
[email protected]
Rossville- FOR SALE ONLY - 3
bed/2 bath, wood flooring/ceramic tile, fenced backyard. Visit
www.forsalebyowner.com listing
# 23937794 or call 423-718-1788
A MUST SEE! $99,900
TRUCKS
Chevy Express Van 2500 Passenger ‘08, THIRD SEAT REAR
AIR V8 $12,900 - $284.84 MO.
W.A.C. C&C MOTORS
423-499-9799
GMC Sierra 1500 2WD Reg Cab
‘08, 24K MILES AUTO 6 CYL
$15,900 - $350.03 MO. W.A.C.
C&C MOTORS 423-499-9799
Kawasaki Ninja 250R ‘10 like
new 95 miles garage-kept
$3300 423-333-6758
Triumph Tiger 955i ‘05- 8K
miles, New rear tire & battery.
Ex Cond $6,500.423-847-0901
YAMAHA ‘00 Venture Millennia,
exc. cond. 27K mi. $6700 Call:
423-421-1345
MOTORCYCLE
ACCESSORIES
Motorcycle/ATV Trailer, Just
like new, heavy steel bottom
and front $950 333-6758.
Dodge Grand Caravan SE ‘06,
THIRD SEAT REAR AIR 6 CYL
AUTO $8,900 - $184.73
MO.W.A.C. C&C MOTORS
423-499-9799
Dodge Ram ‘99, 15 passenger,
school or church, new engine
at Maxie, $5000,309-9930
DUPLEXES
FOR RENT
E. Ridge: 4 BR, 3 BA, garage,
1700-2200 s.f. garbage pd,
no pets $1095. mo/dep 622-7019
E. Ridge: LG 2 BR, 1.5 BA, attic,
dining room, garbage pd, no
pets. $750 mo/dep 622-7019
LOOKOUT VALLEY: 2BR/1BA.
W/D connections. Starting at
$500. Call 423-894-0324.
RINGGOLD GA. -2 BR, C/H/A,
No Pets, Ground Floor.
$395/mo. 423-309-4842
Catalina Sailboat ‘82- 27 ft. Excellent condition, new bottom
paint. $11,500obo. 320-3008
FLEETWOOD TIOGA, ‘07.
31 ft. V-10 Ford, 2 slides,
levelers, 12,000 mi. Must
see! $40,000 firm.
Call 423-899-0701.
National RV class A ‘90 31ft. 12K
miles. great cond. Gen. dual
AC, $12,995 423-802-3520
Crossville Lakefront Home
2 BR/1B quality upgrades
New electric/plumbing
$125K 931-456-1332 visit
www.lingerlady.wix.com/cabin
Mazda B2300 ‘09- 5 Spd,
Like New, A/C, 26k mi, $10,000
Call 571-215-5128
CAMPER TOP Off Ford F-150
Black Aluminum side windows w/ screen$75.876-0035
DODGE Camper Van ‘87, 360
V-8, 57k, must see to appreciate. $5000. 706-996-0888.
REPAIRS/PARTS/
ACCESSORIES
AC Condenser, new in box fits
‘94-’97 Dodge Pick up
$75obo 423-304-5927
4 X 4 TRUCKS
Honda Odyssey EX-L ‘05
w/Rear Entertainment, Leather, 8
Passenger, 147K Miles, Like
New, $9950. Call River City Auto
@ 987-9277
Honda Odyssey Touring ‘05,
REAR AIR THIRD SEAT
LEATHER SUNROOF
$10,800 - $239.89 MO. W.A.C.
C&C MOTORS 423-499-9799
Chevy Silverado 1500 4x4 Reg
Cab ‘04, AUTO 6 CYL 93K
MILES $9,900 - $220.62 MO.
W.A.C. C&C MOTORS
423-499-9799
Aluminum Silver Truck Toolbox
Fullsize $85
706-375-3711
BEAUTY RINGS,
and center caps, 15”, $50.
Call 423-622-4441.
BENCH SEATS, (2) Dodge
Caravan - Like new, blue/gray
cloth. $150 423-842-8870
CAMPER TOP
for Chevy S-10, $350.
Call 423-308-9085.
CAMPER TOP off Chevy
Silverado, fiberglass, $400.
Call 423-421-3498.
CAR BATTERY, NAPA, like
new, top & side post, 450
cranking amp, $50. 653-1531.
Ford F250 SD 4WD ‘06,
#A59308 $20,800 NU 2 U Cars
643-0003 www.nu2ucars.biz
Saturn Relay Level 3 ‘05,
70K MILES TV/DVD THIRD
SEAT REAR AIR LEATHER
$11,900 - $264.16 MO. W.A.C.
C&C MOTORS 423-499-9799
Ford Ranger 4x4 SuperCab
XLT ‘04, AUTO 6 CYL
$10,900 - $242.03 MO. W.A.C.
C&C MOTORS 423-499-9799
Ford Taurus Hood New Still in
Box, Fits ‘96-09 $75 obo
423-304-5927
HOOD off 1973
Chevy truck, $100.
Call 423-421-3498.
FORD F150 1999. 4WD,
like new, $6000. Call
423-505-1377/876-7146.
TRUCKS
Chevy Aluminum Wheels and
Tires, 255/70/r15, set of 4
$185 423-877-4179
Chevy Silverado 1500 2WD ‘05,
#132526 $9,800 NU 2 U Cars
643-0003 www.nu2ucars.biz
JUMP SEATSFor Land Rover, $200.
Call 423-822-8283.
LEER CAMPER TOP- For ‘04
Tundra. Ext. cab. White. Great
cond. $1650. 423-667-1234.
Nissan 300ZX Left Door Shell
New OEM, Fits ‘90-97 $100
423-304-5927
Rally Wheels Chrome w/disc
brake centers 8”x16” nice
$395 423-877-4179
Chevy Colorado 2WD Regular
Cab ‘05, 4 CYL MANUAL $7,900
- $177.81 MO. W.A.C. C&C MOTORS 423-499-9799
Running Boards For Dodge
Dakota Short Wheel Base
$200 423-842-8870
D O D G E 1 9 8 6 Shortbed, can
hear run. Sell for parts. No
title. $750. 423-653-3007.
SPINDLES- Stock Fit ‘88-’98
Chevy truck. New.
$50 OBO Call 423-336-9682
Tires 245/65/17, Set of 4
$150 will sep
423-650-6450
Trailer Hitch For a Pathfinder
2’’ reciever $65
423-842-8870
PERSONAL
WATERCRAFT
AUTOS/TRUCKS
WANTED
We Pay Top Dollar
for Junk Cars,
Trucks, Vans
& SUVS.
GMC Sierra 1500 AWD Crew
Cab Denali ‘08, Nav Sunroof 20”
Wheels Leather Heated Seats
Back Up Cam Remote Start
$25,900 C&C MOTORS
423-499-9799
Ranger XLT 4X4 ‘99, Great
Truck, All Power, Cold Air, 157K
Miles, Drives Perfectly. $6950
Call River City Auto @ 987-9277
Tires (2) 35/70/16, Set of 4
$100 will sep
423-650-6450
CANOE, Alum.
17 ft. Exc. cond. $450.
Call 423-344-7079.
BOAT TRAILER, 22 ft. tandem
axles, red with deck plate.
$900. 423-485-3103.
NISSAN ‘95. Extra cab, 4x4,
moon roof, 102k, $6300obo.
Clean. Call 706-375-4705.
R-Vision Light Weight Travel
Trailer 2008, 26’ QB, 1 slide,
exc. cond., used 2 times per yr.,
$9800 Call 423-618-0328
Tires- Mudders 265/75/17,
Only 2, Good Condition, $130
obo, 423-987-2482
MARINE PARTS &
ACCESSORIES
Nissan Frontier 2WD ‘98,
#391198 $5,800 NU 2 U Cars
643-0003 www.nu2ucars.biz
Nissan ‘96- 2.4 L, 86k, Auto,
A/C, Camper Top, Good
Cond. $3950, 423-503-2366
RECREATIONAL
VEHICLES
CANOES & KAYAKS
YAMAHA’02 - 4 Seater Jet Ski.
New computer, wires, carburetors, starter & battery. Great for a
family. Very stable on the water.
$3,300 or best offer
Call 423-402-1551
Honda Odyssey EX-L ‘05,
#033118 $9,800 NU 2 U Cars
643-0003 www.nu2ucars.biz
Dodge Dakota ‘01 127k 5-spd
good cond., tow package. new
tires $5,200 423-521-8343
DODGE RAM ‘05, 53K, 1 owner
dual exhaust & headers ,looks
drives great. $9,500 619-3068
Dodge Ram 1500 2WD Quad
Cab Laramie ‘09, 20” Wheels
Nav Leather Sunroof Heated &
A/C Seats Remote Start BackUp Camera $28,900 C&C
MOTORS 423-499-9799
Toyota Tundra 01 TRD 4x4 new
tires, tow package, no problems, $5950 423-315-1778
SPORT UTILITY
Cadillac Escalade 2WD ‘05,
#195095 $9,800 NU 2 U Cars
643-0003 www.nu2ucars.biz
423-394-5878
ABSOLUTE
$ TOP DOLLAR $
CALL US FIRST!
Ford F-100 Dually ‘73
360 V8 4 spd w/ Bulldog NADA
$8500, only $6995 423-716-0242
Ford Explorer XLT ‘03, Local
Trade, All Power, Very Nice
SUV, 153K Miles, $5950. Call
River City Auto @ 987-9277
Ford F150 2WD Regular Cab
XL ‘03, AUTO 6 CYL SPORT
PKG $7,900 - $177.81 MO.
W.A.C. C&C MOTORS
423-499-9799
GMC Yukon 2WD SLT ‘07,
TV/DVD THIRD SEAT REAR
AIR LEATHER HEATED SEATS
20" WHEELS $19,800 C&C MOTORS 423-499-9799
Ford F150 2WD Reg Cab XL
‘08, AUTO 6 CYL $9,800 $218.48 MO. W.A.C.C&C MOTORS 423-499-9799
GMC Yukon Denali ‘08, AWD,
white/tan, 1 owner,6-speed, auto,
69K, $9,200, 865-986-4279
WE PAY CASH FOR JUNK
CARS, TRUCKS, VANS & SUV’s
423-362-2991
Custom-built Honda side-by-side,
loaded, $3200
423-285-7123
KAWASAKI TERYX, 2010, 4x4,
red, with hard top & console,
looks new..is new, never been
dirty. $8200. 423-667-9145.
DFKFI:P:C<J
J:FFK<IJ
2008 Yamaha Stratoliner (S)3500 mi, exc cond, blk cherry
grey met., $9,600, 931-692-8295
Big Dog Mastiff Custom ‘04
Great Cond., Serviced Regularly
$12.300 423-595-3295
Harley Davidson ‘04 883
Custom,7k like new many extras
$4000 423-488-7916
Harley Davidson Road King, ‘02
excellent condition, $7950,
423-240-7923
HARLEY-DAVIDSON Road King
Classic, 2002, 1 owner, 11,000
mls. $11,500. 423-827-4455.
Harley Davidson ‘07
Sportster 1200 Low $5000
423-314-1156
Harley Road King Classic ‘03.
Anniversary paint. Extra seat &
more. $9,500. 423-593-1143
Harley softail nostalgia,
15K miles, like new! w/extras,
$9000, 423-488-9721
AARON’S JUNK CARS,
TRUCKS, BUSES &
MOTOR HOMES. Will pay
cash in 30 min 423-521-7777
Buying Junk Cars & Trucks
Pay Top Dollar - Running or not
423-580-1611 Ken
AUTOS WANTED
Dead or AliveTop pay!!
Quick Removal!!
Starting @ $300.
Cash on the Spot
Jimmy 423-260-3821
Jeep Cherokee ‘95 Limited Edt
V8, Ext. Red. AC, Runs Great!
$1950 obo. 423-779-7230
I BUY JUNK CARS - running
or not. I pay top dollar.
Start at $300 & up.
Dennis 595-1132/ 843-4972.
CLASSIC
SPECIALTY AUTOS
Ford F350 2WD Reg Cab XL
DRW ‘99, 46K MILES 11FT
FLAT BED $12,800 - $283.48
MO. W.A.C. C&C MOTORS
423-499-9799
Buick Riviera ‘73,
455 H.O. V8, PWR., Auto., Air,
44k original, metallic maroon,
$11,000 706-965-4393
E. Brainerd: 3 bd, 2 1/2 ba,
Custom Home! with bonus
room! Must see! has a great
view, appl, f/p, double garage.
$1495/500 624.6746 #737
HD Dyna Street Bob ‘09, Rush
Slipon Pipes, Screaming Eagle
Air Intake, $6000 256-599-7597
HIXSON Stuart Heights 3br 1.5
bath C/H/A Applis Hook ups
Full bsmet $900.mo. 645-9484
H-D HERITAGE 2011,
400 miles, extras, $15,500 obo.
Call 423-847-2357.
Jeep Grand Cherokee Limited
‘05, 5.7L Hemi, Leather, Loaded,
New Tires, 106K Miles, $11950.
Call River City Auto @ 987-9277
CHEVY IMPALA SS '96, 59k
adult driven mi., Exc. Extras.
$16k/trade for Jeep. 847-0901
CORVETTE Convertible , 1963.
327 4 speed, showroom.
$80,000 obo. 423-365-5808.
Ford Ranger Edge 2WD ‘04,
Regular Cab 77K MILES 6 CYL
$10,900 - $242.03 MO. W.A.C.
C&C MOTORS 423-499-9799
HOUSES-RENT
-UNFURNISHED
E Ridge- Great Investment Duplex, convienient location in nice
neighborhood, w/ list of prospective renters. Each side w/ 2 bd, 1
ba, eat in kitchen & appliances.
$82,500 423-838-8184
GMC Sierra Ext Cab ‘97$4900
423-667-5464
YAMAHA ‘01 V-Star 1100cc
maroon & tan. Exc. cond. Low
mi. $3800 423-421-1345
Full Face Helmet HJC Graphics
Extra Large $75
333-6758
Walden, S i g n a l M t n . N e w l y
Renovated, new appliances,
hardwood & tile flooring, plantation shutters, granite counter
tops,gas logs, bonus office,2
car garage. $1900 month Call
423-517-8568
Catoosa County
HOUSES FOR SALE
VANS
MOTOR HOMES
HOUSES FOR SALE
St. Elmo Central Ave. Great
fixer-upper. $8500 Cash talks!
Call: 423-304-4041
City of East Ridge
CHATT./ BONNY OAKS - 3 BR,
2 BA, 1200 sq. ft., $825 mo.
$800 dep. Excellent Credit
Req. Call 423-485-9853.
HIXSON 2033 Marina Cove Dr.
4BR, 3 Bath, + Bonus Room. 3 Car
Garage. $2,250/mo. 931-261-7401
2 bed / 1 bath. Needs a little
work but with great terms. $5k
cash or $6k with $750 down and
$247/m. Lot rent only $165/m.
Call 423-463-9512.
CONDOS TOWNHOUSES
TRUSTEE'S SALE
Honda VT-1100 ‘00, loaded,
black, 2800 miles, $4500
423-653-4241 or 706-866-6611
Hixson, Chattanooga
City Limits
Dtwn, St. Elmo, Highland Park,
Avondale, Missionary Ridge
HOUSES FOR SALE
Alton Park- Remodeled &
CLEAN 3 bd, 1 ba New interior paint, carpet & vinyl floors
in the ba, kit & laundry. $725
per mo w/ $725 deposit. No
smokers or pets please. 4028
Highland Dr. Call 593-7788.
HOUSES FOR SALE
HOUSES FOR SALE
GREAT Rental Property! 3/1,
ready to rent. Sec. 8 approved. $59,000. 499-5165.
DFKFI:P:C<J
J:FFK<IJ
Brainerd- Newer, 4Br,
2Ba Home, C/H/A, Porch.
$995/mo. 423-364-1372
Any Day After 1pm
HOUSES FOR SALE
N. Chatt., Mtn. Creek,
Riverview, Rivermont
HOUSES-RENT
-UNFURNISHED
SUZUKI BLVD. ‘06 C50T, 800cc
Fully dressed, Chrome, 8000 mi.
Mint cond. $5300obo 653-1531
RIVERHILLSMANOR-CHA.com
AREA 3
Shapiro & Kirsch, LLP
Substitute Trustee
www.kirschattorneys.com
Law Office of Shapiro &
Kirsch, LLP
555 Perkins Road Extended,
Second Floor
Memphis, TN 38117
Phone (901)767-5566
Fax (901)761-5690
File No. 12-043946
BIRCHWOOD 1 Acre
200’ X 230’ $11,900. or $200.
down $180.mo. 423-344-9615
CHATT. Investor Special. 2+1.
Fenced lot. Cash talks! $11,900
Call: 423-304-4041
AREA 11
LEGAL NOTICES
LOTS & ACREAGE
MOBILE HOMES
AREA 13
LEGAL NOTICES
Brainerd, East Brainerd
ROCK SPRINGS, GA. 2+ acres,
whole or part, 12x24 storage
bldg. $45,000. 706-764-1725.
AREA 16
33412315
This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for
real estate which is in violation
of the law. All persons are hereby
informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal
opportunity basis.
HOUSES FOR SALE
HOME FOR AUCTION IN
MOUNTAIN SHADOWS
Large Exec. Home. 5BR, 5.5 Ba,
3 car garage. Huge deck & Pool.
3 story incl. Finished Basement
w/mother-in-law poss. Valued @
$725k. Bids start @ $575k.
Best Reasonable Offer.
Inspection Sat. 5/11 & Sun. 5/12
12pm-5pm. Home will be sold
Sunday night 5/12 to Highest
and Best Bidder. Free 24 hr rec.
info: 423-299-3040
AREA 19
All real estate advertised herein is
subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to
advertise “any preference, limitation, or discrimination because of
race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national
origin, or intention to make any
such preference, limitation or discrimination.”
AREA 27
PUBLISHER’S NOTICE:
AREA
1 4
AREA
timesfreepress.com
Corvette Stingray ‘69, T-Tops,
overall good condition. Numbers
matching. $20,000 423-637-9968
K5 Blazer Cheyenne, ‘78
350 V8, 4 Spd, $5,500,
706-398-2893 423-413-9847
GMC Sierra 1500 2WD Crew
Cab SLT ‘05, LEATHER AUTO
V8 CAMPERSHELL $13,900 $307.09 MO. W.A.C. C&C MOTORS 423-499-9799
Saturn Outlook AWD XR ‘08,
#145244 $11,800 NU 2 U Cars
643-0003 www.nu2ucars.biz
Nissan Pathfinder 2WD ‘07,
#615300 $11,800 NU 2 U Cars
643-0003 www.nu2ucars.biz
Sell Your stuff for Free! 3 Classified Lines FREE 423.757.6200
timesfreepress.com
subject to availability
Three Lines Three Days No Charge
timesfreepress.com
• • • Tuesday, May 7, 2013 • F5
F6 • Tuesday, May 7, 2013 • • •
timesfreepress.com
In memory of our
Sunday, May 12
SP2936
Mothers
PLACE AN IN MEMORY MESSAGE
for as little as
45
$
cars.timesfreepress.com
Honor your mother, grandmother, auntie or
anyone you may have felt connected to on this
special day. Choose your desired size* and
simply call, email, or mail us your photo and text
of what you would like to say. Call us at 7576200 for assistance in determining the size and
cost of your In Memory ad.
@eD\dfipf]FliDfd#
Al[pJd`k_
@kËjY\\e)/p\Xijj`eZ\
>f[ZXcc\[pfl?fd\%
N\d`jjpfl\m\ip[Xp#
Xe[n\cfm\pfl
m\ipdlZ_%
A\]]#>X`c#:_\ipc#DXip
<cc\eXe[>iXe[Z_`c[i\e
SINGLE BLOCK
SINGLE BLOCK
1 column x 2.5”
$45
DOUBLE BLOCK
2 column x 2.5” - $85
TRIPLE BLOCK
HORIZONTAL
3 column x 2.5” - $120
QUAD BLOCK
2 column x 5”
$135
Capital
Toyota
Pre-Owned
Outlet
Economy
Honda
$15,950
$5,591
Acura Legend ‘95, Leather, Moon Roof
#TSC005366 +TTL & Doc Fee 800-256-5286
www.economyhonda.com
Dodge Ram 1500 SLT Crew Cab ‘06, 6 Passenger, Bed Liner, Alloys, Tow Pkg #J174770
+TTL & $449 Doc Fee 423-648-4314
Capital
Toyota
Pre-Owned
Outlet
Capital
Toyota
Pre-Owned
Outlet
EMAIL
VISIT
In Memory of our Mother
400 E. 11th St.
Chattanooga, TN 37403
[email protected]
with subject: In Memory of our Mothers
include your information and ad size
request with photo and copy
During regular business hours
Monday-Friday 8am to 5 pm
400 E. 11th St.
Nissan Sentra CVT ‘07, 58K Miles, Auto,
Power Windows, Power Locks #L661575
+TTL & $449 Doc Fee 423-648-4314
Capital
Toyota
Pre-Owned
Outlet
Economy
Honda
$12,950
Honda Accord EX ‘04, Sunroof, Leather, Alloys #A101976 +TTL & $449 Doc Fee
423-648-4314
❑
Charge It (check one)
❑
❑
❑
Card No. ______________
Honda Civic LX ‘06, 5 Speed
#121574 +TTL & $449 Doc Fee
423-648-4314
_____________________________________ Exp. Date ________________
$9,923
❑ Single Block $45
Please indicate which size:
❑ Double Block $85
❑ Triple Block $120
Cadillac DeVille ‘05, 93,086 Miles
#F2110B incl. $383 Doc Fee + TTL
423-490-0181
_
❑ Quad Block $135 Remember to include your photo.
35635397
All In Memory messages must be received no later than 3 p.m., Thursday, May 9, 2013.
2013
Honor your graduate on this special day.
Choose your desired size* and simply call, email, or mail
us your photo and text of what you would like to say.
Call us at 757-6200 for assistance in determining the size
and cost of your Graduates 2013 ad.
SINGLE BLOCK
$12,999
Mercury Mariner AWD ‘06, Leather, Sunroof,
Nice Local Trade #UC7545A incl. $383 Doc
Fee + TTL 423-490-0181
Got something to sell?
1 column x 2.5”
$25
Megan Johnson
3 Lines · 3 Days · Free
We’re so proud of you and all your
accomplishments. The best is yet to come.
Reach for the stars Princess!
Love you, Mom, Dad,
and Tommy
Graduates 2013
400 E. 11th St.
Chattanooga, TN 37403
Soddy-Daisy High School
DOUBLE BLOCK
2 column x 2.5” - $40
The first three lines of
your classified ad cost you
[email protected]
with subject: GRADUATES 2013, include
your information and ad size request
with photo and copy
VISIT
During regular business hours
Monday-Friday 8 am to 5 pm
400 E. 11th St.
423-757-6200
We’re so proud of you and all
your accomplishments. The best
is yet to come. Reach for the stars
Princess!
Chevy Corvette ‘02
Auto Trans Silver Ext, $23,000
423-290-5110
Chevy Malibu LS ‘01, 121k, fully
loaded, Michelin tires, 2nd
owner, $3950 423-825-0390
CHRYSLER SEBRING Conv.
‘02. 68k, like new, $4900.
423-505-1377/876-7146.
Phone ___________________________________________________________
❑
Mitsubishi Montero 4x4 ‘03,
#049396 $8,800 NU 2 U Cars
643-0003 www.nu2ucars.biz
❑
❑ Double Block $40
_________________________________________________________________
Acura TL ‘01, Loaded, Leather,
Perfect Service History, 174K
Miles, $5950. Call River City
Auto @ 987-9277
35603175
_________________________________________________________________
4 X 4 SPORT
UTILITY
ACURA TL ‘02. Pearl white, like
n e w , $ 5 4 0 0 . C a l l
423-505-1377/876-7146.
Nissan Pathfinder SE 4x4 ‘05,
REAR AIR THIRD SEAT SUNROOF $10,900 - $242.70 MO.
W.A.C. C&C MOTORS
423-499-9799
BMW 328i ‘07, All Power,
Leather, Very Nice Car, 143K
Miles. $11950 Won’t Last! Call
River City Auto @ 987-9277
Ford Expedition EL 4WD ‘07,
#A12766 $14,800 NU 2 U Cars
643-0003 www.nu2ucars.biz
Toyota FJ Cruiser 4x4 ‘07,
#002174 $17,800 NU 2 U Cars
643-0003 www.nu2ucars.biz
Chevy Astro Ls ‘01
4.3 V6, Auto, 7 pass. burgundy,
174k, nice $3995 423-716-0242
Subaru Forester 2003, 108k mi.
new tires, muffler & exhaust
system. $5,000. 505-7195
Toyota Camry ‘00 4 door LE
V6 183k $4950
423-877-2888 Contact Tasha
TOYOTA SCION TC 2006, 75K
perfect inside & out, adult owned,
$11,000/obo. 706-375-4705
Ford Focus 01, loaded 128k,
runs, engine doesn’t smoke.
$1750 760-9720 call b4 7pm
Honda Pilot EXL ‘10 Leather,
DVD, 50k mi, exc cond,
$20,500 423-295-5393
MERCURY Grand Marquis ‘01
73K, silver, 1 owner, Never hit or
wrinkled, new tires. Super
clean! $6999, 706-965-4393.
Lexus ES 350 ‘07, ONLY 59K
MILES, Loaded with all options
including Navigation and New
Michelins, $21950. Call River
City Auto @ 987-9277
VW Beetle Convertible ‘05
GLS turbo, 59k mi., excellent
cond. $9,300 423-544-6354
VW CONVERTIBLE 2007. Black
w/black top, ivory leather interior,
auto, AM-FM Satellite radio, garage kept, 1 owner. 8,850 orig.
miles. $16,750. 423-667-3991.
TRAILERS
Jeep, 77 Levi CJ5, 3 Spd., 6cyl.,
updated, Warren, 8K wench,
$3800 firm, 423-488-2727
Nissan Xterra 2WD ‘05,
AUTO 6 CYL $9,800 - $218.48
MO. W.A.C. C&C MOTORS
423-499-9799
Ford Mustang Deluxe ‘07,
#327974 $12,800 NU 2 U Cars
643-0003 www.nu2ucars.biz
FORD ESCORT 2 door, needs
transmission, good radio, cold
air, $1500, 309-9930.
Nissan Pathfinder 4WD S ‘08,
#626904 $14,800 NU 2 U Cars
643-0003 www.nu2ucars.biz
Print your message here _____________________________________________
Suzuki Grand Vitara ‘99
V6, 5-speed, A/C & heat work
good, $2450 423-315-1778
Toyota Camry XLE ‘03, Leather,
All Power, Sunroof, VERY NICE,
163K miles, $7950. Call River
City Auto @ 987-9277
FORD CROWN VIC. ‘98.
1 owner, Carfax, very clean, gold
metallic, never hit or wrinkled,
106K $5999 706-965-4393.
Name On Credit Card _________________________________________________
All Graduate 2013 messages must be received no later than 3 p.m., Friday, May 17 Publishes Sunday, May 19.
Nissan Sentra, ‘96, 4 dr, 95K,
Auto, exc. on gas, 38 mpg,
new paint, $3200. 650-6450
Dodge Magnum RWD ‘06,
#363914 $8,800 NU 2 U Cars
643-0003 www.nu2ucars.biz
1997 BMW 740I. 4-dr, loaded,
senior owned, 200k hwy.
$2950. 423-260-2659.
‘96 Lincoln Continental, garage
kept, new michelin tires, 90K,
$3700, 706-861-3516
Card No. __________________________________Exp. Date _________________
Please indicate which size: ❑ Single Block $25
Chrysler PT Cruiser ‘05,
#283694 $8,800 NU 2 U Cars
643-0003 www.nu2ucars.biz
1996 HONDA ACCORD- 4-dr,
auto, 130k! Senior lady owned.
$2850. 423-260-2659.
_________________________________________________________
SPORT UTILITY
Nissan Altima 2.5 SL ‘07, One
Owner, Loaded, Leather, Sunroof, Michelins, 70K Miles,
$12950. Call River City Auto @
987-9277
Firebird Formula ‘01, 5.7 V8,
T-Tops Sharp $9500, New
Engine 423.298.6787
Address _________________________________________________________
❑
Mazda Protege, ‘99, auto, air,
cd, good shape, 35mpg,
$2350 OBO 423-605-5491
Porsche Cayman/S ‘07- Auto
Trans, Silver Ext., Clear
Carfax, $38,000 423-290-5110
Name____________________________________________________________
❑
MAZDA MIATA MX5 ‘06- 37k
miles, Auto, Leather, Maroon
Convertible$15,300 842-2610
CHEVY MONTE CARLO ‘84,
new engine & trans. 350 Vortex, $3500. 706-996-0888.
Megan Johnson
Soddy-Daisy High School
Class of 2013
Love you, Mom, Dad,
and Tommy
Jeep Cherokee, ‘97, new tires,
alloys, auto, cd, air, 4.0, 157K,
$3000 423-605-5491
Pathfinder, ‘95, 4X4, auto, air,
white, very nice! everything
works! $2850 423-605-5491
Subject to availability
Nissan Pathfinder 2WD ‘06,
THIRD ROW SEAT 88K MILES
V6 AUTO $11,800 - $262.02
MO. W.A.C. C&C MOTORS
423-499-9799
Chevy Caprice ‘88
needs work, $2200
423-402-1818.
CALL
*Ads displayed have been reduced - not actual size
Jeep Grand Cherokee ‘98
Recent motor, great shape
$3500 obo 423-961-4017
$16,999
VW Jetta SE ‘12, Automatic, All Power
#P6909 incl. $383 Doc Fee + TTL
423-490-0181
NOTHING!
EMAIL
SPORT UTILITY
Kelly
Downtown
Cadillac EL Dorado ‘88- 2 dr,
senior 1 owner, extremely low
miles, $2100, 423-260-2659.
MAIL
Charge It (Check One)
$6,482
Volvo XC ‘02, Leather, Sunroof, Heated
Seats #P21061792 +TTL & Doc Fee
800-256-5286 www.economyhonda.com
Kelly
Downtown
$8,995
Dodge Durango RT ‘02, V8, 4x4, Leather
#ZF108734+TTL, $199 Doc Fee & 3 Mo/4500
Mi Warr. on Engine, Drive Train 423-790-7100
Economy
Honda
$7,582
Jeep LIberty ‘04, Luggage Rack, Cruise
Control #P4W289864 +TTL & Doc Fee
800-256-5286 www.economyhonda.com
Kile
Motors
for as little as $25
$10,950
Volvo V50 Wagon ‘05, 83K Miles, Sunroof,
Alloys #082440 +TTL & $449 Doc Fee
423-648-4314
Economy
Honda
$8,581
Place a Graduates 2013 message
Capital
Toyota
Pre-Owned
Outlet
$10,950
Jeep Grand Cherokee Laredo ‘05, 1 Owner,
97K Miles, Sunroof, Leather #656054 +TTL &
$449 Doc Fee 423-648-4314
Economy
Honda
Chrysler Pacifica ‘06, Leather, Local Trade
#T6R68984 +TTL & Doc Fee 800-256-5286
www.economyhonda.com
$7,995
Toyota Camry ‘03, 5 Speed, #30195823
+TTL, $199 Doc Fee & 3 Mo/4500 Mi Warr.
on Engine, Drive Train 423-790-7100
Capital
Toyota
Pre-Owned
Outlet
$10,950
Chevy Uplander LT ‘07, 1 Owner, 99K Miles,
7 Passnger, Alloys #D107470 +TTL & $449
Doc Fee 423-648-4314
Kile
Motors
$6,581
Honda Odyssey ‘04, 1 Owner, Leather,
Navigation #T4B134539 +TTL & Doc Fee
800-256-5286 www.economyhonda.com
Capital
Toyota
Pre-Owned
Outlet
Graduates
$7,495
Toyota Avalon ‘00, Sunroof #YU012983
+TTL, $199 Doc Fee & 3 Mo/4500 Mi Warr.
on Engine, Drive Train 423-790-7100
Economy
Honda
$11,999
Chevy Impala LT ‘06, All Power, Alloys, Remote Start #P6894A incl. $383 Doc Fee +
TTL 423-490-0181
Kile
Motors
$14,999
Honda Element AWD ‘08, Automatic, All
Power, Local Trade, AWD #UC3603 incl.
$383 Doc Fee + TTL 423-490-0181
Kelly
Downtown
___________________________________________________________________________
$17,927
Subaru Outback ‘10, All Power, Heated
Seats, AWD #P6903 incl. $383 Doc Fee +
TTL 423-490-0181
Kelly
Downtown
$16,982
Cadillac DTS Level II ‘08, Leather, Sunroof
#P6892 incl. $383 Doc Fee + TTL
423-490-0181
___________________________________________________________________________
Kelly
Downtown
$10,950
Honda CRV 4WD EX ‘03, Sunroof, Alloys
#C028103 +TTL & $449 Doc Fee
423-648-4314
Kelly
Downtown
Print your In Memory message here: _____________________________________________
$19,999
Subaru Impreza Premium ‘12, Auto, Alloys,
All Power, Subaru Program Car #P6900 incl.
$383 Doc Fee + TTL 423-490-0181
Capital
Toyota
Pre-Owned
Outlet
Kelly
Downtown
Name on credit card ______________________________________________________________
Kelly
Downtown
$10,950
$11,950
Cadillac Deville ‘03, 39K Miles, Sunroof,
Leather #159315 +TTL & $449 Doc Fee
423-648-4314
$9,581
Saturn Vue ‘06, Auto, Keyless Entry
#T6S829494 +TTL & Doc Fee 800-256-5286
www.economyhonda.com
Capital
Toyota
Pre-Owned
Outlet
Capital
Toyota
Pre-Owned
Outlet
City/State/Zip ______________________________________________ Phone ___________________
$11,950
$9,581
$15,950
Address _____________________________________________________________________
Capital
Toyota
Pre-Owned
Outlet
Ford Mustang ‘07, 4x4, Sunroof, All Power
Accessories #T75266916 +TTL & Doc Fee
800-256-5286 www.economyhonda.com
Kelly
Downtown
Name __________________________________________________________________
$7,092
Nissan Quest ‘04, DVD Entertainment System #T4N342508 +TTL & Doc Fee
800-256-5286 www.economyhonda.com
Economy
Honda
$14,999
Cadillac CTS ‘09, 116,626 Miles
#F1308A incl. $383 Doc Fee + TTL
423-490-0181
Economy
Honda
$7,995
Ford Focus Wagon ‘07, 4 Cyl, #TW152854
+TTL, $199 Doc Fee & 3 Mo/4500 Mi Warr.
on Engine, Drive Train 423-790-7100
Kelly
Downtown
Buick Lucerne ‘07, Leather, Sunroof, All
Power, 1 Owner #P6910 incl. $383 Doc Fee +
TTL 423-490-0181
$11,950
Nissan Maxima V6 SL ‘05, Sunroof, Leather,
Alloys #866634 +TTL & $449 Doc Fee
423-648-4314
Kile
Motors
$11,950
MAIL
Capital
Toyota
Pre-Owned
Outlet
$4,581
Ford Escape ‘02, 4x4, Sunroof, All Power
Accessories #T2KC08465 +TTL & Doc Fee
800-256-5286 www.economyhonda.com
Buick LaCrosse CXL ‘08, 75K Miles,
Leather, Alloys #253547 +TTL & $449 Doc
Fee 423-648-4314
$10,581
Nissan Altima ‘05, Luggage Rack, Cruise
Control #T5C177391 +TTL & Doc Fee
800-256-5286 www.economyhonda.com
Economy
Honda
$12,950
Acura TL ‘05, Sunroof, Leather, Alloys
#A024723 +TTL & $449 Doc Fee
423-648-4314
Economy
Honda
Jeep Grand Cherokee 4x4
Overland ‘04, LEATHER SUNROOF V8 HEATED SEATS
$10,900 - $242.03 MO. W.A.C.
C&C MOTORS 423-499-9799
‘06 Toyota Scion XA, Burgundy,
loaded, 69K mi. garage kept,
$8500, exc. cond. 423-255-0100
‘09 BMW 528, Black on black,
sunroof, navigation, $26,500
423-892-1111
Trailer , Factory Built, w/large
toolbox, excellent cond. $700,
423-238-6713
Buick LaCrosse ‘05, #246362
$6,800 NU 2 U Cars 643-0003
www.nu2ucars.biz
Cadillac ‘04, Deville, white,
116K mi. looks new, excellent
service record, good cond.,
$8500, 877-9377 or 280-4702
Lexus LS 430 ‘04, Luxury,
Loaded including Navigation,
Michelins, Black on Black,
$15950. Call River City Auto @
987-9277
UTILITY TRAILER, 5x8,
good cond. $325. Call
706-483-2639.

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