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PDF - University of New Hampshire
^0^
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e4^ullUixi
3^ecemLe^ 3i, 1996
TOWN HALL BEAUTIFICATION COMMITTEE
VOLUNTEERS
Eleanor Bassett
(Chairman)
Patty Jones (Treasurer)
Fred Soule
Barbara Lachance
Ken Sherwood
Bill Lueders
Kim Kaulbach
Fred Stafford
Debbie Brown
Neal Nelson
Rudy True
Pat Floyd
John Poehlman
Berthia Deveau
Ed Garvey
David Le ith
DONATIONS
A.T.
T
&
(Kevin Major
&
Mike Rainey
Penny Williams
Lee Danley
Britton's Landscapin;
True Green Chemlawn Service
Windham Nursery
Hall's Nursery
Mother's Club
Peter
&
Maureen Tenaglia
60+ Club
Roberta Cook
Bassett Family
Dillon Farm
Sandown Materials
Nancy Browall
Lex
John
&
Dorothy Viaes
&
Vera Kirk
HOP Steam Cleaning
^^^^^^^:^g^gg^^^|g^§S=^^gS=^Jc^|?g^^^g
DEDICATION
The 1996 annual town report is dedicated to a person very
She is a life-long resident of
deserving of this honor.
Sandown who was born in the family homestead that was
located on Fremont Road and, except for a brief period
of time when the home was being rebuilt after it was
destroyed by fire in 1945, she has lived there all of her
life.
This person is Eleanor Bassett who epitomizes the true
meaning of family tradition and values, community involvement,
friendship and caring for and about one's fellow man.
Eleanor
is also a valuable source of historic information since her
family first settled this area and continues to be a very
important part of the Sandown community.
She is one of 16
children born to Raymond K. and Priscilla Bassett and one
of many who still reside in town.
.
Some of the local organizations that have benefited from
Eleanor's volunteer efforts and/or membership are:
The
Lions Club;' the United Way, the Caregivers of Greater Derry,
St. Matthew's Church, United Methodist Women's Group, St.
Matthew's Food Pantry (Coordinator), St. Matthew's Sunday
School (Treasurer), 60+ Club, Sandown Grange (#181), Pomona
Grange (#10), Old Meeting House Historical Association
(Treasurer since 1958), Friends of the Sandown Library,
Sandown Town Hall Beaut if ication Committee, Sandown Public
Library (Librarian from 1942-1953, 1955-1956) and Sandown
Civic Association.
In recent years, Eleanor has been recognized as a local
Volunteer of the Year by the Governor's Council on
Volunteerism (1995) and as a Citizen of the Year (1990).
Anyone who attended the Old Home Days celebration held in
August of 1996 would have also seen Eleanor as an active
participant of the Bathtub Race that took place on Main Street.
Whether it is providing food for the town's emergency personnel
when they are in a crisis situation or helping the needy at the
St. Matthew's Food Pantry, going from house to house with holiday
food baskets or taking an elderly resident to a doctor, Eleanor
is always there when town residents need her.
No one is more
deserving of the dedication of the Sandown Annual Town Report
than Eleanor Bassett.
^^^^^mm^m^m^^^^smm9Mm?Mw^^m^
Digitized by the Internet Archive
in
2010 with funding from
Boston Library Consortium IVIember Libraries
http://www.archive.org/details/annualreportsfor1996sand
INDEX
ASSESSING REPORT
PLANNING BOARD
83
POLICE DEPT. REPORT
80
...
&
COMMENTS 78
BOARD OF SELECTMEN
77
BUDGET COMMITTEE
84
RECREATION COMMISSION
BUDGET DETAIL
59-76
RCCAP REPORT
SCHEDULE OF LONG-TERM
INDEBTEDNESS
23
AUDITORS' REPORT
BUDGET FOR 1997 (MS-7)
BUILDING INSPECTOR
.
.
79
RECEIPTS
.51-58
....
CABLE TV ADVISORY BOARD
&
.
82
&
100
96
&
97
94
&
95
&
14
99
20
.
.
SCHEDULE OF TOWN PROPERTY 24
85
86
STATEMENT OF APPROPRIATIONS
13
& TAXES ASSESSED
COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF
APPROPRIATION & EXPENDITURE
17
SUMMARY INVENTORY
OF VALUATION
CONSERVATION COMMISSION
92
SOURCES OF REVENUE.
25-33
TAX COLLECTOR
CEMETERY REPORT
......
.
.
DETAILED STATEMENT OF
PAYMENTS
ELECTRICAL INSPECTOR
EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT
...
...
FINANCIAL REPORT
FIRE/RESCUE
HEALTH DEPT. REPORT
&
18
TAX RATE COMPUTATION
82
TOWN CLERK'S REPORT
91
....
15
.
16
5-7
.
...
34-50
TOWN WARRANT
98
TREASURER'S REPORT.
90
HISTORICAL SOCIETY
93
LIBRARY REPORTS
87-89
PAYMENTS
21
&
22
4
1-3
TOWN OFFICERS
19
,
12
...
...
8-10
TRUST FUNDS
11
VITAL STATISTICS
101
ZONING BOARD
81
-
103
TOWN OFFICERS
1996
Selectmen
David Cheney
Paul Bertoncini
Chairman
1997
1999
William Crum, Jr.
1998
Town Clerk/Tax Collector
Edward C. Garvey
1997
Nancy Browall
Deputy
Selectmen's Aide
Pat Giaquinta
Treasurer
Marie Marsh
Bookkeeper
Donna Fusere
',
1997
Road Agent
Robert Johnson
Town Moderator
George Romaine
1997
1998
Supervisors of the Checklist
Elaine Garvey
Jean Eastman
2002
1998
Janet Romaine
2000
Trustees of Trust Funds
Kenneth McCormack
Cheryl Cronin
1998
David Drowne
1999
1997
Library Trustees
Barbara Lachance
Carol Stafford
Kris Mazalewski
1998
1999
1997
John Duffy
1998
Tina Owens
1997
Cemetery Trustees
Fred Stafford
1997
David Drowne
Carroll Bassett
1999
1998
Auditors
Angela Sherwood
Marianne Duffy
1998
1997
Conservation Commission
David Cheney
Heidi Chaput
Ralph Millard
Jane Neskey
-1-
Laura Stundze
d
)
t
Planning Board
Donald
P
Lee Wilmo
Cha irman
1998
icar
1998
Vicki Wilson
1997
Donna Fugere
Ed Mencis
1997
Bill Crui
1998
1999
Tim Robinson
Greg Eaton
1999
1999
(Alt.)
(Alt.)
Susan Rice
Administrative Assistant
Board of Adjustment
Mark Hamblett
Chairman
Jeff Morgan
1998
Ken Sherwood
1997
1998
Suzanne Cervenak
Ralph Millard
1999
W.
Steven Clifton
1997
1997
Pat Giaquinta
Zoning Board
Aide
Inspec tors
Building
Ken Sherwood
Electrical
Plumb ing
Ken Sherwood
Irving Bassett
Dr iveway
Bob Johnson
Dean Sotirakopoulos
Bill Cachion
(Asst )
(Asst
.
.
Oil Burner /Chimney
Septic Systems
Mary Ellen Tufts
Irving Bassett
Volunteer Fire Dept
Engineers
James Bassett
1997
Andrew Higham
1997
Irving Bassett
Carroll Bassett
1999
1998
Fred Stafford
1998
James Passanisi
1999
Forest Fire Warden
Irving Bassett
-2-
Dennis Giangregorio
1999
Police Department
Timothy Vincent
J
Dennis Mannion
.
Scott Currier
Chief
1997
Andrew Artimovich
Chris Johnson
Joseph Gordon
Brian Chevalier
Brad Apitz
James Elliott
Aurie Roy
Administrative Officer
Emergency Management Coordinator
Memorial Day Coordinator
Kevin M
.
Ma j or
Health Officer
Mary Ellen Tufts
Disposal Area Custodians
Robert Bragg
Joseph Berthiaume
Helen LoPresti
Mark Emmons
Henry Marrone
Budget Committee
Mark Hamblett
Cheryl Cronin
Chairman
George Romaine
1997
1998
1999
Peggy Crum
Paul Bertoncini
(ex officio)
Anthony Pace
1997
1998
Recreation Commission
Linda Meehan
Edward Mencis
Ron Dulong
Jeff Litchfield
Bob Desrochers
Debbie Brown
Dave Cheney
Janet Gustafson
(Alt.)
(ex officio)
Cable TV Advisory Board
Nancy Browall
Tom Gainan
Donna Fugere
Timberlane School Board Members
Richard Brayall
James Devine
1997
1998
Timberlane Budget Committee Members
Ralph Bruno
Terry Knuutunen
1998
1997
-3-
TOWN OF SANDOWN
OFFICE OF TOWN CLERK/TAX COLLECTOR
SANDOWN, NEW HAMPSHIRE 03873
Incorporated 1756
Tel: (603)
887-4870
1996 TOWN CLERK REPORT
6042 MOTOR VEHICLE PERMITS ISSUED
5299 PLATE DECALS @ 2.50
@ 2.00
1055 TITLE FEES
623 DOG LICENSES ISSUED
21 GROUP LICENSES ISSUED
LATE FEES
38.00
28
MARRIAGE FEES TO STATE
28
7.00
MARRIAGE FEES TO TOWN
VITAL STATISTIC FEES TO STATE
VITAL STATISTIC FEES TO TOWN
(?
(?
FILING fees: town ELECTION
STATE PRIMARY
UCC FEES
1.00
8
(?
1
@ 2.00
414,746.00
13,247.50
2,110.00
430,103.50
4,452.50
326.00
1,172.00
5,950.50
1,064.00
196.00
99.00
67.00
1,426.00
8.00
2.00
10.00
FOR THE MUNICIPALITY OF
TAX COLLECTOR'S REPORT
SAKDOWN
YEAR ENDING
MS-61
12-31-96
FOR THE MUNICIPALITY OF
CR.
TAX COLLECTOR'S REPORT
MS-61
SANDOWN
YEAR ENDING 12-31-96
TAX COLLECTOR'S REPORT
FOR THE MUNICIPALITY OF
DR.
SANDOWN
MS-61
TEAR ENDING
12-31-96
TREASURER'S REPORT
BEGINNING BALANCE JANUARY 1995
PLAISTOW BANK AND TRUST TEMPORARY LOAN
FROM LOCAL TAXES
311^.
3290.
3401.51
3401.52
3401.53
3401.54
3401.55
3401.57
3401.58
PLANNING
PLANNING BOARD
ZONING BOARD
SUBDIVISION BOOKS
ZONING ORDINANCE
SEPTIC DESIGN REV.
SITEPLAN REVIEW
DAYCARE
$10,175.00
$1,621.88
$84.50
$85.50
$590.00
$222.25
$40.00
$12,819.13
3501.00
3501.10
SALE OF MUNICIPAL PROPERTY
SALE OF TOWN PROPERTY
$43,758.12
3502.00
INTEREST ON INVESTMENTS
$45,581.77
3503.00 TOWN HALL RENTAL
3509.00
3509.10
$1,520.00
FINES AND FOREFEITS
RETURNED CHECKS
PENALTY
($4,483.50)
$570.00
3915.00 TRANSFERS FROM CAPITAL RESERVE
$7,433.68
$1,147.76
TOTAL RECEIPTS
$8,703,982.24
ORDERS DRAWN BY SELECTMEN
$6,586,285.38
BALANCE DECEMBER 31,1996
$2,117,696.86
RESPECTFULLY SUBMITTED, MARIE MARSH, TREASURER
SPECIAL FUNDS
CONSERVATION COMMISSION
12/31/95
$7,634.38
12/31/96
$7,560.39
x^
2:e^*^-^
-10-
t
fi
£ S
JL>
i
^
1
I
SUMMARY INVENTORY OF VALUATION
ASSESSED VALUATION
ACRES
1996
LAND
CURRENT USE
RESIDENTIAL
COMMERCIAL/INDUSTRIAL
TOTAL
TAX EXEMPT
$319,651
$103,697,034
$2,160,200
$106,176,885
$3,248,102
4279.28
7787.83
398.27
BUILDINGS
RESIDENTIAL
COMMERCIAL/ INDUSTRIAL
TOTAL
TAX EXEMPT
PUBLIC WATER UTILITY
ELECTRIC UTILITIES
TOTAL UTILITY
TOTAL VALUATION
;mptions:
BLIND:
$122,339,100
$1,991,600
$124,330,700
$2,299,600
$36,200
$3,017,118
$3,053,318
$233,560,903
STATEMENT OF APPROPRAITIONS AND TAXES ASSESSED
PURPOSES OF APPROPRIATIONS:
APPROPRIATION
GENERAL GOVERNMENT
4130 EXECUTIVE
4140 ELECTION & REGISTRATION
4150 FINANCIAL ADMINISTRATION
4153 LEGAL
4155 PERSONNEL ADMINISTRATION
4191 PLANNING & ZONING
4194 GENERAL GOVERNMENT BUILDINGS
4195 CEMETERIES
4196 INSURANCE
4199 TRUSTEES/REBATES/REFUNDS
TOTAL
$43,731
$15,264
$58,488
$20,000
$58,720
$13,138
$27,709
$1,000
$50,662
$80
$288,792.00
PUBLIC SAFETY
4210 POLICE
4215 RESCUE-AMB
4220 FIRE
4241 INSPECTIONS
$173,334
$37,696
$26,015
$21,515
$258,560.00
TOTAL
HIGHWAYS, STREETS & BRIDGES
4311 HIGHWAY-ADMIN
4312 HIGHWAY MAINTENANCE
4316 STREET LIGHTING
$6,030
$214,796
$4,600
$225,426.00
TOTAL
SANITATION
4321 ADMINISTRATION
4324 SOLID WASTE DISPOSAL
4325 SITE MAINTENANCE
4326 RECYCLING
$3,650
$150,234
$4,000
$24,115
$181,999.00
TOTAL
HEALTH
4411 ADMINISTRATION
4414 ANIMAL CONTROL
4415 AGENCIES
$2,470
$8,678
$18,212
$29,360.00
TOTAL
4445 WELFARE
$14,250
CULTURE & RECREATION
4520 PARKS & RECREATION
4550 LIBRARY
4583 PATRIOTIC PURPOSES
$13,289
$48,367
$1,650
$63,306.00
TOTAL
-13-
4619 CONSERVATION COMMISSION
DEBT SERVICE
4711 PRIN. LONGTERM B.& N.
4721 INTEREST LONGTERM B. & N.
4723 INTEREST TAX ANTICIPATION NOTE
$90,000
$46,943
$0
$136,942.50
TOTAL
TOTAL OPERATING APPROPRIATIONS
CAPITAL OUTLAY:
WA #4 PD VEHICL
WA #6 PD PATROL
WA #7 FD RIEMB
WA #8 TANK TRUC
WA #9 RESCUE EQ
WA#10 1995
WA #10 LIBRARY
WA #11 ROADS
WA #12 IMPACT FEES
WA #13 VACATION
WA #14 FIELDS
WA #15 SUM REC
WA #16 T. HALL
WA #17 ELDERLY
WA #18 VIC GEAR
WA #26 PARKING LOT
$500
$1,199,135.50
$24,867.00
$1,403.40
$12,200.00
$6,000.00
$9,000.00
$81,989.57
$10,000.00
$70,000.00
$4,188.28
$490.00
$30,000.00
$14,000.00
$2,190.00
$1,200.00
$600.00
$0.00
"
TOTAL CAPITAL APPROPRIATIONS 1995:
TOTAL TOWN APPROPRIATIONS 1996
$268,128.25
$1,467,263.75
-14-
SOURCES OF REVENUE
TAXES:
3120
3185
3190
LAND USE CHANGE TAX
YIELD TAXES
INTEREST & PENALTIES ON TAXES
TOTAL
LICENSES
$7,000.00
$3,500.00
$80,000.00
$90,500.00
&
3210
3220
3290
PERMITS
BUSINESS LICENSES, PERMITS & FEES
MOTOR VEHICLE PERMIT FEES
OTHER LICENSES, PERMITS & FEES
$7,000.00
$325,000.00
$12,000.00
$344,000.00
FROM STATE
3351
3353
3359
SHARED REVENUE
HIGHWAY BLOCK GRANT
OTHER
TOTAL
$59,264.00
$71,537.00
$23,214.00
$154,015.00
FROM OTHER GOVERNMENT
3379 INTERGOVERNMENTAL REVENUE
$74,300.00
CHARGES FOR SERVICES
3401
INCOME FROM DEPARTMENTS
3409
OTHER CHARGES
$34,128.00
$0.00
TOTAL
$34,128.00
MISCELLANEOUS REVENUES
3501 SALE OF MUNICIPAL PROPERTY
3502 INTERESTS ON DEPOSITS
$28,832.00
TOTAL
$68,832.00
INTERFUND OPERATING TRANSFERS IN
3915 CAPITAL PROJECTS FUND
$11,370.00
FUND BALANCE USED TO REDUCE TAXES
$50,000.00
TOTAL REVENUES AND CREDITS
40 000. 00
,
$827,145.00
-15-
TAX RATE COMPUTATION
TOTAL TOWN APPROPRIATIONS
TOTAL REVENUES AND CREDITS
$1,397,332.00
$994,342.00
NET TOWN APPROPRIATIONS
NET SCHOOL TAX ASSESSMENT
COUNTY TAX ASSESSMENT
$402,990.00
$4,883,616.00
$247,675.00
TOTAL OF TOWN, SCHOOL
&
$5,534,281.00
COUNTY
SUBTRACT WAR SERVICE CREDITS
$5,510,081.00
TOTAL PROPERTY TAX COMMITTMENT
TAX RATE BREAKDOWN
PRIOR YEAR
TAX RATE
1995
TOWN
COUNTY
SCHOOL DISTRICT
$3.14
$1.01
$19.39
$23.54
VETERANS EXEMPTIONS
TOTALLY & PERMANENTLY
DISABLED VETERANS,
WIVES/WIDOWS OF VETERANS
ALL OTHER QUALIFIED PERSONS
TOTAL
($24,200.00)
LIMITS
$1,400.00
$100.00
COMPARATIVE STATEMENT
OF APPROPRIATIONS AND EXPENDITURES
PURPOSES OF APPROPRIATIONS:
APPROPRIATION RECEIPTS
AMOUNT
EXPENDITURE
AVAILABLE
UNEXPENDED
OVERDRAFT
BALANCE
REIMBURSE
GENERAL 60VERNHENT
4130 EXECUTIVE
1140 ELECTION
«
REGISTRATION
4150 FINANCIAL ADMINISTRATION
$43,731
$43,731
$46,072.03
$15,264
$15,264
$14,488.38
$775
$0.00
$58,488
$58,488
$59,418.54
$0
$930.54
$2,341.03
4153 LEGAL
$20,000
$20,000.00
$7,340.32
$12,659
$0.00
4155 PERSONNEL ADMINISTRATION
$58,720
$58,720.00
$52,882.66
$5,837
$0.00
$13,138
$13,138.00
$12,557.80
$580
$0.00
$27,709
$27,709
$31,166.54
$0
$3,457.54
4191 PLANNING
X
ZONING
4194 GENERAL GOVERNMENT BUILDINGS
4195 CEMETERIES
4196 INSURANCE
4199 TRUSTEES/REBATES/REFUNDS
TOTAL
$1,000
$1,000
$1,000.00
$0.00
$50,662
$50,662
$51,077.97
$415.97
$3,869.39
$3,789.39
COHPARATIVE SIATEHENT
OF
APPROPRIATIONS AND EXPENDITURES
APPROPRIATION RECEIPTS
PURPOSES OF APPROPRIATIONS:
AHOUNT
EXPENDITURE
AVAILABLE
UNEXPENDED
OVERDRAFT
BALANCE
REIHBURSE
4619 CONSERVATION COHMISSION
$500
$500.00
$379.00
$90,000
$90,000.00
$90,000.00
$0.00
$46,943
$46,942.50
$46,942.50
$0.00
$0.00
$0
$0.00
$0.00
$0.00
$0.00
$121.
DEBT SERVICE
4711 PRIN. LONGTERH B.X N.
4721 INTEREST LONGTERH B. «
N.
4723 INTEREST TAX ANTICIPATION NOTE
TOTAL
$0.00
1996 FINANCIAL REPORT
ASSETS
ACCOUNT
#
FUNDS IN CUSTODY OF TREASURER
$2,117,696.86
1010
CASH:
1030
CAPITAL RESERVE FUNDS
CEMETERIES
$2,233.93
TOTAL
$2,233.93
1110
UNREDEEMED TAXES
$222,134.69
1080
UNCOLLECTED TAXES
LEVY OF 1996
PREVIOUS YEARS
$344,738.96
$13,910.00
$358,648.96
$2,700,714.44
TOTAL ASSETS
FUND BALANCE
DECEMBER 31,1995
DECEMBER 31,1996
$435,480.51
$263,432.51
CHANGE IN FUND BALANCE
$172,048.00
LIABILITIES
2075
2080
2530
ACCOUNTS OWED TO THE TOWN
SCHOOL DISTRICT
CAPITAL RESERVE FUNDS
$2,435,048.00
$2,233.93
TOTAL CURRENT LIABILITIES
$2,437,281.93
FUND BALANCE-CURRENT SURPLUS
$263,432.51
TOTAL LIABILITIES
•19-
$2,700,714.44
RECEIPTS
CASH ON HAND JANUARY
1,
1996
$1,884,296.73
TEMPORARY LOAN
$0.00
TOTAL TAXES COLLECTED AND REMITTED
$6,001,279.85
INTERGOVERNMENTAL REVENUES
$226,997.26
LOCAL SOURCES EXCEPT TAXES
$438,825.00
INTEREST ON DEPOSITS
$45,581.77
BUSINESS LICENSES AND PERMITS
$15,387.78
INCOME FROM DEPARTMENTS
$42,815.55
RETURNED CHECKS
($3,913.50)
&
PENALTIES
TOWN HALL RENTAL
$1,520.00
SALE OF TOWN ASSETS
$43,758.12
TRANSFERS FROM CAPITAL RESERVES
$7,433.68
TOTAL CASH RECEIPTS
$8,703,982.24
-20-
PAYMENTS
GENERAL GOVERNMENT
4130 EXECUTIVE
4140 ELECTION & REGISTRATION
4150 FINANCIAL ADMINISTRATION
4153 LEGAL
4155 PERSONNEL ADMINISTRATION
4191 PLANNING BOARD
4194 GENERAL GOVERNMENT BUILDINGS
4195 CEMETERIES
4196 INSURANCE
4199 TRUSTEES/REBATES/REFUNDS
$46,072.03
$14,488,38
$59,418.54
$7,340.32
$52,882.66
$12,557.80
$31,166.54
$1,000.00
$51,077.97
$3,869.39
TOTAL GENERAL GOVERNMENT
$279,873,63
PUBLIC SAFETY
4210 POLICE
4215 RESCUE-AMB
4220 FIRE
4241 INSPECTIONS
$172,347.36
$36,591.04
$25,768.57
$15,393.00
TOTAL PUBLIC SAFETY
$250,099.97
HIGHWAYS, STREETS & BRIDGES
4311 HIGHWAY-ADMIN
4312 HIGHWAY MAINTENANCE
4316 STREET LIGHTING
$5,082.19
$199,140.30
$4,583.48
TOTAL HIGHWAYS, STREETS & BRIDGES
$208,805.97
SANITATION
4321 ADMINISTRATION
4324 SOLID WASTE DISPOSAL
4325 R&M SITE
4326 RECYCLING
$4,293.07
$148,021.25
$2,680.66
$24,563.12
TOTAL SANITATION
$179,558.10
HEALTH
$2,278.29
$8,415.18
$17,462.00
4411 ADMINISTRATION
4414 ANIMAL CONTROL
4415 AGENCIES
TOTAL HEALTH
$28,155.47
4445 WELFARE
$10,970.08
CULTURE & RECREATION
4520 PARKS & RECREATION
4550 LIBRARY
4583 PATRIOTIC PURPOSES
$11,745.83
$46,138.08
$1,599.00
TOTAL CULTURE
&
$59,482.91
RECREATION
$379.00
4619 CONSERVATION COMMISSION
21-
DEBT SERVICE
4711 PRIN. LONGTERM B.& N.
4721 INTEREST LONGTERM B. & N.
4723 INTEREST TAX ANTICIPATION NOTE
$136,942.50
TOTAL DEBT SERVICE
$1,154,267.63
TOTAL OPERATING EXPENSES
CAPITAL OUTLAY
WA #4 PD VEHICL
WA #6 PD PATROL
WA #7 FD RIEMB
WA #8 TANK TRUC
WA #9 RESCUE EQ
WA#10 1995
WA #10 LIBRARY
WA #11 ROADS
WA #12 IMPACT FEES
WA #13 VACATION
WA #14 FIELDS
WA #15 SUM REC
WA #16 T. HALL
WA #17 ELDERLY
WA #18 VIC GEAR
WA #26 PARKING LOT
$90,000.00
$46,942.50
$0.00
$23,698.72
$965.04
$11,000.00
$6,000.00
$7,505.17
$29,850.91
$10,000.00
$63,410.61
$0.00
$490.00
$30,155.00
$4,203.82
$2,190.00
$1,200.00
$600.00
$9,735.81
.-
TOTAL CAPITOL OUTLAY & TRANSFERS OUT
PAYMENTS TO OTHER GOVERNMENTS
4931 COUNTY TAX
4933 SCHOOL
4939 STATE
TOTAL PAYMENTS TO OTHER GOVERNMENTS
$252,166.00
$4,746,935.00
$2,654.00
$5,001,755.00
TAX ANTICIPATION NOTE PAYMENT
TAXES BOUGHT BY TOWN
RECOVERED FUNDS
TOTAL PAYMENT FOR ALL PURPOSES
$0.00
$230,575.68
($1,318.01)
$6,586,285.38
$201,005.08
22-
SCHEDULE OF LONG TERM INDEBTEDNESS
AS OF DECEMBER 31, 1996
BONDS OUTSTANDING
ROADS
PURPOSE
RECONSTRUCTION
TOTAL
AMOUNT
729,125
$729,125,
RECONCILIATION OF OUTSTANDING LONG TERM INDEBTEDNESS
OUTSTANDING LONG TERM DEBT
$729,125.01
DEBT RETIREMENT DURING FISCAL YEAR
LONG TERM NOTES PAID
ROAD RECONSTRUCTION
TOTAL DEBT RETIREMENT
$90,000.01
90,000.01
OUTSTANDING LONG TERM DEBT
$639,125.01
-23-
SCHEDULE OF TOWN PROPERTY
DESCRIPTION
TOWN HALL, LAND & BUILDINGS
FURNITURE AND EQUIPMENT
$279,900.00
$14^200! 00
LIBRARY, LAND & BUILDING
FURNITURE AND EQUIPMENT
$202,400.00
$41^500! 00
FIRE/POLICE, LAND AND BUILDING
FURNITURE AND EQUIPMENT
$237,000.00
$909 700.00
ANGLE POND FIRE STATION
!
$31,600.00
HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT, LAND AND BUILDINGS
EQUIPMENT
$162 500 00
$12 ',540. 00
TOWN BEACH AND SEELEY PARK
$119,700.00
DEPOT MUSEUM
$112,500.00
RECREATION FIELD
$72,400.00
MEETING HOUSE
$151,900.00
TOWN FOREST
$103,100.00
ALL LANDS & BUILDINGS ACQUIRED
THROUGH TAX COLLECTOR'S DEEDS
ALL OTHER PROPERTY & EQUIPMENT
RESCUE SQUAD
TOTAL
$2,342,290.00
$72,500.00
$4,865,730.00
-2A-
DETAILED STATEMENT OF PAYMENTS
GENERAL GOVERNMENT
4130.0 EXECUTI:
ADS
BOOKS
COMPUTER
COPIER
DUES
FLOWERS
MILEAGE
PAYROLL
POSTAGE
SEMINARS
SERVICES
SUPPLIES
SUPPORT
TAX MAPS
TEL
TOWN REP
TOTAL
4130.0 EXECUTI:
4140 ELECT & REGIST
4140.1 T. CLERK:
CASH DRAWER
DOG Lie
DUES
MA I NT
MILEAGE
PAYROLL
SEMINARS
SUPPLIES
TEL
TOTAL 4140.1 T. CLERK
4140.2 ELEScREG:
BALLOTS
PAYROLL
SUPPLIES
VOTE M.
TOTAL 4140.2 ELE&REG
TOTAL 4140 ELE&REG
BUDGET
4150 FIN ADMIN
4150.1 BOOKKEEP:
BOOKS
DUES
PAYROLL
SUPPLIES
TOTAL 4150.1 BOOKKEEP
$58,488
$39.00
$25.00
$16,664,44
$228.26
$16,956.
4150.2 AUDITOR:
PAYROLL
TOTAL 4150.2 AUDITOR
4150.3 ASSESSING
DUES
MILEAGE
PAYROLL
SEMINAR
SUPPLIES
SUPPORT
TOTAL 4150.3 ASSESSIN
4150.4 TX COLL:
DUES
EQUIP MT
MA I NT
MILEAGE
PAYROLL
SEMINARS
SUPPLIES
SUPPORT
TAX BILL PRINT
TAX LEIN EXP
TEL
TOTAL 415 0.4 TX COLL:
4150.5 TREASURER
MILEAGE
PAYROLL
SUPPLIES
TOTAL 4150.5 TREASURER
TOTAL 4150 FIN ADMIN
$1,500.00
$59,418.54
$20,000
4153.0 LEGAL:
COUNSEL
Other
$7,205.32
$135.00
$7,340.32
TOTAL 4153.0 LEGAL
PERSONNEL ADMINISTRATION
4155.0 BENEFITS:
BL. CROSS
PICA
MCARE
RET
RIEMBURS
TAXES
$58,720
$26,741.77
$17,703.37
$5,393.03
$2,309.74
$720.00
$14.75
$52,882.66
TOTAL 4155.0 BENEFITS
PLANNING & ZONING
4191.1 PLAN BD:
ADS
BOOKS
COPIES
DUES
MILEAGE
PAYROLL
SEMINAR
SUPPLIES
TEL
TOTAL 4191.1 PLAN BD
4191.3 ZBA:
ADS
BOOKS
PAYROLL
SEMINARS
SUPPLIES
TOTAL 4191.
TOTAL PLANNING
3
ZBA
&
ZONING
$13,13!
$357.56
$120.00
$25.75
$3,522.00
$66.22
$7,183.88
$45.00
$147.36
$126.06
$11,593,
$7,340.32
4195.0 CEMETERY
4196.0 INSURANCE
ANTIQUE
CLAIM
GROUP ACC
PLIT
UNEMPLOY
WRKS COMP
TOTAL 4196.0 INSURAN
OTHER GENERAL GOVERNMENT
4199.0 TRUSTEES
BOOKKEEPER
SAFETY BOX
Other
REFUNDS
REBATES
FUNDS
TOTAL
$1,000
$1,0(
$50,662
$43.75
$2,000.00
$950.00
$35,218.00
$2,141.92
$10,724.30
$51,077.97
4220.0 FIRE:
COMMUNICAT
DUES
EQUIP MAINT
FIRE PREVENT
GASOLINE
MILEAGE
NEW EQUIP
OFFICER EXP
SUPPLIES
TEL
TRAINING
VEHICLE MT
$26,015
$370.97
$202.00
$3,131.86
$179.55
$1,455.84
$24.20
$10,018.88
$1,286.48
$713.26
$1,996.98
$1,047.17
$5,341.38
$25,768.57
INSPECTIONS
4 241.1 DRIVEWAY
INSPECT
$21,515
$70.00
$70.
TOTAL 4241.1 DRIVEWAY
4241.2 BLD INS:
BOOKS
DUES
INSPECT
SUPPLIES
TEL
TOTAL 4241.2 BLD INS
4241.4 PLM INS:
INSPECTIONS
TOTAL
4
241.4 PLM INS
4241.5 ELEC INS
BOOKS
DUES
EQUIP PURCH
INSP
TOTAL 4241.5 ELEC IN
4241.6 GOC INSP:
INSPECTIONS
TOTAL 4241.6 GOC INSP
4242.1 SEPTIC:
INSPECTION
PERMIT
TOTAL 4242,1 SEPTIC
TOTAL PUBLIC SAFETY
$3,470.00
$250,099.97
-29-
STREETS
HIGHWAYS
4311.0 HIGHWAY:
BLDG MT
COMMUNICA
ELEC
HEAT OIL
PAYROLL
SUPPLIES
TEL
6v
TOTAL
4
$6,030
S876.31
SI 8. 88
$1,023.52
$1,531.85
$104.16
$1,233.24
$294.23
311.0 HIGHWAY
4312.0 HIGHWAY;
CHEMICALS
COLD MIX
EQPT MT
EQPT RENT
GASOLINE
GRAVEL
MATERIALS
NEW EQUIP
PAVING
PAYROLL
SALT
SAND
SIGNS
SUPPLIES
VEH MAI NT
$5,082.19
$214,796
$1,469,
$2,342,
$3,786,
$58,936,
$6,441,
$1,086,
$294,
$9,004.
$14,000,
$43,440,
$42,328,
$5,684,
$909,
$3,649,
$5,100,
$198, 475.
431G.0 ST LGHTS:
ELEC
55
49
62
85
19
92
36
40
00
24
96
00
20
74
78
3(
$4,6(
$4,583.48
TOTAL 4 316.0 ST LGHTS
TOTAL HIGHWAYS
STREETS
$4,583.48
$208,140.97
6.
SANITATION
4321.0 SANITAT:
BEEPER
ELEC
TEL
$3,650
$105.65
$3,693.22
$494.20
TOTAL 4321.0 SANITAT
4324.0 SANITAT:
DUES
EQUIP MT
HAULING
PAYROLL
SUPPLIES
WASTE
TOTAL
4
4
$150,234
$1,426.66
$715.64
$44,542.26
$15,642.68
$879.15
$84,814.86
324.0 SAN I TAT
4325.0 SANITATION
R6>M SITE
TOTAL
$4,293.07
325.0 SANITATION
$148,021.25
$4,000
$2,680.66
$2,680.66
4326.0 SANITAT:
DUES
GASOLINE
HAULING
LITERAT
PAYROLL
R&M VEH
SUPPLIES
$24,115
S438.19
$139.40
$5,400.00
$42.00
$16,058.35
$2,043.43
$441.75
$24,563.12
TOTAL 4326.0 SANITAT
TOTAL SANITATION
HEALTH
4411.0 HEALTH:
PAYROLL
SEMINAR
SUPPLIES
TEL
WATER TEST
$179,558.10
$2,470
$1,956.96
$30.00
$94.52
$61.81
$135.00
$2,278.29
TOTAL 4411.0 HEALTH
4414.0 A.CONTRO:
BEEPERS
BOOKS
EQUIP MT
HEALTH
KENNEL
MILEAGE
NEW EQPT
PAYROLL
SEMINAR
SUPPLIES
VET
$8,678
$248.77
$10.00
$274.50
$101.75
$235.00
$494.89
$597.34
$5,996.44
$330.00
$61.14
$65.35
$8,415.18
TOTAL 4414.0 A. CONTROL
4415.0 HEALTH AGENCIES
A SAFE PLACE
COMM ACTION
LAMPREY
R. COUNSEL
RSVP
S. ASSAULT
VNA
$18,212
$150.00
$3,609.00
$2,000.00
$300.00
$100.00
$566.00
$10,737.00
$17,462.00
TOTAL 4415.0 HEALTH
TOTAL HEALTH
WELFARE
4445.0 WELFARE:
ELEC
FOOD
MORTGAGE
OIL
PROPANE
RENT
REPAIRS
TEL
TOTAL 4445,0 WELFARE
$28,155.47
$14,250
$5,147.61
$679.88
$2,535.25
$312.99
$292.36
$1,596.76
$77.53
$327.70
$10,970.08
RECREATION
CULTURE
4520.0 PRIvSlVREC:
ADS
BALL FIELD
BEACH
ELEC
MOWING
PAYROLL
SAND
SUPPLIES
TEL
TOILETS
6.
$13,289
$113.69
$335.00
$543.72
$105.25
$1,410.00
$6,712.72
$710.00
$24.99
$295.26
$1,495.20
•
TOTAL 4520.0 PRKS&REC
4550.0 LIBRARY
PAYMENTS
PAYROLL
$11,
$48,367
TOTAL 455 0.0 LIBRARY
458 3.0 PAT.PURP:
$1,650
FIREWORKS
FLAGS
$1,599.00
TOTAL 4583.0 PAT.PURP
RECREATION
TOTAL CULTURE
$59,482.91
6>
CONSERVATION
4619.0 CON COMM:
BOOKS
DUES
SEMINARS
TOILETS
$5
$29.00
$200.00
$100.00
$50.00
CAPITAL OUTLAY
WA #4 PD VEHICL
V\A #6 PD PATROL
WA #7 FD RIEMB
WA #8 TANK TRUC
WA #9 RESCUE EQ
WA#10 1995
BLUE CROSS
MCARE
PAYROLL
RETIREMENT
WA #10 LIBRARY
WA #11 ROADS
CRUSHER RUN
CUT AND CHIP
PAVING
PAYROLL
WA #13 VACATION
WA #14 FIELDS
WA #15 SUM REC
FIELD TRIP
PAYROLL
REIMBURSE
SUPPLIES
T SHIRTS
WA #16 T. HALL
WA #17 ELDERLY
WA #18 VIC GEAR
EXPENSES OTHER
$23,698.72
$965.04
$11,000.00
$6,000.00
$7,505.17
$5,732.43
$335.17
$23,108.00
$675.31
$10,000,00
$386.15
$2,800.00
$51,187.50
$9,036.96
$490.00
$30,155.00
$148.89
$2,800.00
$85.00
$756.93
$413.00
$2,190.00
$1, 200.00
$600.00
$665.00
$191,934.27
$1,355,272.71
TOTAL WA EXPENSES
TOTAL EXPENSES
-33-
The
State of
New
THE POLLS WILL BE OPEN FROM
To the Inhabitants
of the
in
Town
at
ARTICLE
YEAR,
TEN
AJ^.
8:00
to
(April 8,
P.M.
SANDOWN, NH
in the
in said State, qttalified to vote
Affairs:
You are hereby notified to meet at
on
SANDOWN
March, next
8:00
ROCKINGHAM
County of
[l. s.]
said
Town of
Hampshire
of die
SANDOWN TOWN HALL
SATURDAY, THE FIFTEENTH
dock
in the
in
day of
forenoon, to act upon the following subjects:
1.
TO CHOOSE ALL NECESSARY TOWN OFFICERS FOR THE ENSUING
(TO BE VOTED BY BALLOT APRIL 8, 1997)
SHALL THE TOWN RAISE AND APPROPRIATE AS AN OPERATING
ARTICLE 2.
BUDGET, NOT INCLUDING APPROPRIATIONS BY SPECIAL WARRANT ARTICLES,
THE AMOUNTS SET FORTH ON THE BUDGET POSTED WITH THE WARRANT, FOR
SHOULD THIS
THE PURPOSES SET FORTH THEREIN, TOTALING $1,195,759?
ARTICLE BE DEFEATED, THE OPERATING BUDGET SHALL BE $1,211,193,
WHICH IS THE SAME AS LAST YEAR, WITH CERTAIN ADJUSTMENTS REQUIRED
BY PREVIOUS ACTION OF THE TOWN OR BY LAW OR THE GOVERNING BODY
MAY HOLD ONE SPECIAL MEETING, IN ACCORDANCE WITH RSA 40:13, X AND
XVI, TO TAKE UP THE ISSUE OF A REVISED OPERATING BUDGET ONLY.
TO SEE IF THE TOWN WILL VOTE TO AUTHORIZE THE BOARD OF
ARTICLE 3.
SELECTMEN TO ACCEPT, ON BEHALF OF THE TOWN, GIFTS, LEGACIES AND
DEVISES MADE TO THE TOWN IN TRUST FOR ANY PUBLIC PURPOSE, AS
PERMITTED BY RSA 31:19.
"We hereby
certify chat
we
gave notice
to the inhabitants
within named,
and place and for the purpose within mentioned, by posting up an
Warrantactheplaceof meeting. within named, and alike
attested
attested
copy
& POST OFFICE
being: 1 public place in said Town, oa the
DAY Of FEBRUARY, "1997.
at
to
meet
at
time
copy of the widiin
SANDOWN TOWN HALL
TWENTY-FOURTH
Selectmen
of
SANDOWN, NH
-34-
1997)
4.
SHALL THE TOWN ACCEPT AND APPROPRIATE BLOCK GRANT REVENUES IN
THE SUM OF $80,050.99 AS SUPPLIED BY THE STATE OF NEW HAMPSHIRE
FOR ROAD IMPROVEMENT PROGRAMS TO BE RECOMMENDED BY THE SANDOWN
HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT AND APPROVED BY THE SANDOWN BOARD OF SELECTMEN.
(Recommended by Board of Selectmen)
(Recommended by Budget Committee)
5.
SHALL THE TOWN RAISE AND APPROPRIATE THE SUM OF $60,000 TO REBUILD
1/2 MILE OF WELLS VILLAGE ROAD CONTINUING APPROXIMATELY 1/2 MILE
FROM LIMIT OF 1996 WORK TO THE OLD CEMETERY ON WELLS VILLAGE ROAD.
(Recommended by Board of Selectmen)
(Recommended by Budget Committee)
6.
SHALL THE TOWN RAISE AND APPROPRIATE THE SUM OF $25,675.00 FOR
PURCHASING AND EQUIPPING A POLICE CRUISER FOR THE SANDOWN POLICE
THE COST TO BE PARTIALLY OFFSET BY THE SALE/TRADE-IN
DEPARTMENT.
(Recommended by Board of Selectmen)
OF THE 1993 FORD CROWN VICTORIA.
(Recommended by Budget Committee)
^
7.
SHALL THE TOWN RAISE AND APPROPRIATE THE SUM OF $5,228.00 FOR THE
PURPOSE OF REPAIRING THE ROOF AND WATER DAMAGE AT THE POLICE STATION.
(Recommended by Board of Selectmen)
(Recommended by Budget Committee)
8.
SHALL THE TOWN RAISE AND APPROPRIATE THE SUM OF $1,473.30 FOR THE
PURPOSE OF YOUTH ALCOHOL OVERTIME PATROLS CONTINGENT UPON RECEIVING
(Recommended by Board
100% FUNDING FROM THE HIGHWAY SAFETY AGENCY.
of Selectmen)
(Recommended by Budget Committee)
9.
SHALL THE TOWN OF SANDOWN RAISE AND APPROPRIATE THE SUM OF TWELVE
THOUSAND ($12,000.00) DOLLARS FOR THE PURPOSE OF REBUILDING AND
REFURBISHING THE FIRE DEPARTMENT'S ENGINE #2.
MOST OF THE WORK
TO BE DONE BY MEMBERS OF THE FIRE DEPARTMENT.
THIS WILL COMPLETE
(Recommended by
THE UPDATING OF FIRE APPARATUS FOR SEVERAL YEARS.
Board of Selectmen)
(Recommended by Budget Committee)
0.
SHALL THE TOWN OF SANDOWN RAISE AND APPROPRIATE THE SUM OF THREE
THOUSAND FIVE HUNDRED ($3,500.00) DOLLARS AS THE SANDOWN FIRE
DEPARTMENT'S SHARE TO UPDATE THE AIR COMPRESSOR AND EQUIPMENT TO
FILL AIR BOTTLES USED IN FIRE PROTECTION BY THE SANDOWN FIRE
(Recommended by
DEPARTMENT.
(Recommended by Board of Selectmen)
Budget Committee)
1.
SHALL THE TOWN APPROVE A CHANGE IN THE LIBRARY DIRECTOR'S POSITION
FROM PART-TIME TO FULL-TIME AND RAISE AND APPROPRIATE THE SUM OF
DIRECTOR'S SALARY (FOR ADDITIONAL HOURS)
$25,000 FOR THE FOLLOWING:
= $7,100, FICA (TOWN CONTRIBUTION) = $1,445, HEALTH INSURANCE
(FAMILY PLAN) = $5,265, STAFF SALARIES (FOR ADDITIONAL HOURS)
= $5,485, OPERATING EXPENSES (LIGHTS, PHONE, ETC.) = $5,705.
IN
(Recommended by
SUBSEQUENT YEARS, ALL SUCH COSTS WILL BE BUDGETED.
Board of Selectmen)
(Recommended by Budget Committee)
.2.
SHALL THE TOWN RAISE AND APPROPRIATE THE SUM OF $1,200 FOR THE
PURPOSE OF RECREATIONAL AND EDUCATIONAL ACTIVITIES FOR THE ELDERLY
CITIZENS OF SANDOWN.
(Recommended by Board of Selectmen)
(Recommended by Budget Committee)
.3.
SHALL THE TOWN RAISE AND APPROPRIATE THE SUM OF $600 FOR THE VIC
GEARY CENTER IN PLAISTOW TO PROVIDE SOCIAL SERVICES FOR SENIOR
(Recommended by
CITIZENS.
(Recommended by Board of Selectmen)
Budget Committee)
-35-
14.
SHALL THE TOWN VOTE TO RAISE AND APPROPRIATE THE SUM OF $10,000
TO PROVIDE A SUMMER RECREATION PROGRAM FOR THE CHILDREN OF
SANDOWN.
TO BE OFFSET BY REVENUE OF $10,000 (TAX IMPACT -0-)
(Recommended by Board of Selectmen)
(Recommended by Budget
Committee)
15.
SHALL THE TOWN ESTABLISH A "RECREATION COMMISSION REVOLVING FUND"
(PER RSA 35-B:2) TO PROVIDE FOR COLLECTION AND DISPERSAL OF
RECREATION FEES FOR RECREATION PURPOSES AND TO INITIATE THIS FUND
BY RAISING AND APPROPRIATING $100.00 FOR SAID PURPOSE.
THE TOWN
TREASURER SHALL BE THE CUSTODIAN OF SAID FUND WITH DISPERSAL
AUTHORIZED BY THE RECREATION COMMISSION.
(Recommended by Board
of Selectmen)
(Recommended by Budget Committee)
16.
SHALL THE TOWN RAISE AND APPROPRIATE $3,710 TO PURCHASE AN
ADDITIONAL MOTOR VEHICLE COMPUTER WORK STATION AND UPGRADE THE
EXISTING MOTOR VEHICLE COMPUTER WORK STATION IN THE TOWN CLERK/
TAX COLLECTOR'S OFFICE IN ORDER TO SERVE THE PUBLIC MORE
EFFECTIVELY.
(Recommended by Board of Selectmen)
(Recommended
by Budget Committee)
17.
SHALL THE TOWN RAISE AND APPROPRIATE
COMPUTER AND TO UPDATE THE SYSTEM IN
THUS INCREASING SPEED AND EFFICIENCY
Board of Selectmen)
(Recommended by
18.
SHALL WE MODIFY THE ELDERLY EXEMPTIONS FROM PROPERTY TAX IN THE
TOWN OF SANDOWN, BASED ON ASSESSED VALUE, FOR QUALIFIED TAXPAYERS,
TO BE AS FOLLOWS:
FOR A PERSON 65 YEARS OF AGE UP TO 75 YEARS,
$30,000; FOR A PERSON 75 YEARS OF AGE UP TO 80 YEARS, $45,000;
FOR A PERSON 80 YEARS OF AGE OR OLDER $60,000.
TO QUALIFY, THE
PERSON MUST HAVE BEEN A NEW HAMSPHIRE RESIDENT FOR AT LEAST 5
YEARS, OWN THE REAL ESTATE INDIVIDUALLY OR JOINTLY OR OF THE
REAL ESTATE IS OWNED BY SUCH PERSON'S SPOUSE, THEY MUST HAVE BEEN
MARRIED FOR AT LEAST 5 YEARS.
IN ADDITION, THE TAXPAYER MUST HAVE
A NET INCOME OF NOT MORE THAN $18,750 OR, IF MARRIED, A COMBINED
NET INCOME OF LESS THAN $26,750 AND OWN NET ASSETS NOT IN EXCESS
OF $35,000.
19.
SHALL THE TOWN DEPOSIT 25% OF THE REVENUES FROM LAND USE CHANGE
TAX (FROM PROPERTY TAKEN OUT OF CURRENT USE FOR DEVELOPMENT OR
OTHER NON-CONSERVATION PURPOSES) COLLECTED PURSUANT TO RSA 79-A
IN A CONSERVATION FUND FOR THE PURPOSE OF PURCHASING OPEN SPACE
LAND FOR CONSERVATION USE IN ACCORDANCE WITH RSA 36-A:5 III AS
AUTHORIZED BY RSA 79-A:25 II.
20.
SHALL THE TOWN CHANGE THE ROAD AGENT POSITION FROM AN ELECTED
THE
POSITION TO AN APPOINTED POSITION PURSUANT TO RSA 231:62.
ROAD AGENT WOULD BE APPOINTED BY THE SELECTMEN THROUGH A JOB
APPLICATION PROCESS OPEN TO NON-RESIDENTS AS WELL AS RESIDENTS
OF THE TOWN OF SANDOWN.
EFFECTIVE UPON COMPLETION OF 1997 TERM.
-36-
$3,350 TO REPLACE AN OUTDATED
THE TAX COLLECTOR'S OFFICE
OF SERVICE.
(Recommended by
Budget Committee)
21.
SHALL THE TOWN VOTE TO CHANGE FROM AN ELECTED PART-TIME POLICE
CHIEF TO AN APPOINTED FULL-TIME POLICE CHIEF.
CANDIDATES WILL
BE SELECTED BY A PANEL CONSISTING OF FIVE (5) SANDOWN RESIDENTS
TO INCLUDE A RESIDENT WITH LAW ENFORCEMENT EXPERIENCE.
ONE WITH
OTHER PUBLIC SAFETY EXPERIENCE AND THREE REGISTERED VOTERS
GUIDED BY THE FOLLOWING SCORING SYSTEM.
A.
EDUCATION TOTAL POINTS 20:
FOR A MASTERS DEGREE IN A RELATED FIELD
FOR A BACHELORS IN A RELATED FIELD
POINTS FOR AN ASSOCIATES IN A RELATED FIELD
POINTS FOR 1 YEAR OR MORE ABOVE HIGH SCHOOL IN A RELATED FIELD
20 POINTS
15 POINTS
10
5
B.
EXPERIENCE TOTAL POINTS 20:
20 POINTS FOR 15 TO 20 YEARS (10 OF WHICH ARE SUPERVISORY)
IN THE FIELD OF LAW ENFORCEMENT
15 POINTS FOR 10 TO 15 YEARS (5 OF WHICH ARE SUPERVISORY)
IN THE FIELD OF LAW ENFORCEMENT
10 POINTS FOR 5 TO 10 YEARS (5 OF WHICH ARE SUPERVISORY)
IN THE FIELD OF LAW ENFORCEMENT
5
C.
POINTS FOR 1 TO 5 YEARS (3 OF WHICH ARE SUPERVISORY)
IN THE FIELD OF LAW ENFORCEMENT
PANEL INTERVIEW
-
MAXIMUM POINTS ALLOWED
-
20
POINTS
AS A MINIMUM, THE TOP THREE APPLICANTS WILL BE SUBMITTED TO THE
SELECTMEN FOR INTERVIEWS AND APPOINTMENT.
22.
SHALL THE TOWN CHANGE THE ELECTED PART-TIME POLICE CHIEF'S
POSITION FROM A ONE (1) YEAR PART-TIME TERM TO A THREE (3)
YEAR FULL-TIME TERM PURSUANT TO RSA 41:47 TO TAKE EFFECT AT
IF WARRANT ARTICLE #21 PASSES,
THE END OF THE 1997 TERM.
THIS WARRANT ARTICLE BECOMES NULL & VOID.
23.
SHALL THE TOWN ADOPT THE PROVISIONS OF RSA 202-A:4-d AUTHORIZING
THE LIBRARY TRUSTEES TO ACCEPT GIFTS OF PERSONAL PROPERTY, OTHER
THAN MONEY, WHICH MAY BE OFFERED TO THE-LIBRARY FOR ANY PUBLIC
PURPOSE, PROVIDED, HOWEVER, THAT NO ACCEPTANCE OF PERSONAL PROPERTY
BY THE LIBRARY TRUSTEES SHALL BE DEEMED TO BIND THE TOWN OR THE
LIBRARY TRUSTEES TO RAISE, APPROPRIATE OR EXPEND ANY PUBLIC FUNDS
FOR THE OPERATION, MAINTENANCE, REPAIR OR REPLACEMENT OF SUCH
AND FURTHER TO REQUIRE THAT PRIOR TO THE
PERSONAL PROPERTY.
ACCEPTANCE OF ANY SUCH GIFT, VALUED AT OVER $5,000, THE PUBLIC
LIBRARY TRUSTEES SHALL HOLD A PUBLIC HEARING ON THE PROPOSED
ACCEPTANCE.
24.
TO SEE IF THE TOWN WILL VOTE TO ACCEPT EASTFIELD LOOP AS A TOWN
ROAD (By Petition).
25.
SHALL THE VOTERS OF SANDOWN MODIFY THE ELDERLY EXEMPTIONS FROM
PROPERTY TAX IN THE TOWN OF SANDOWN, BASED ON ASSESSED VALUE,
FOR A PERSON 65
FOR QUALIFIED TAXPAYERS, TO BE AS FOLLOWS:
YEARS OF AGE UP TO 70 YEARS, $45,000; FOR A PERSON 70 YEARS OF
AGE UP TO 80 YEARS, $65,000; FOR A PERSON 80 YEARS OF AGE AND
TO QUALIFY, THE PERSON MUST HAVE BEEN A NEW
OLDER, $85,000?
HAMPSHIRE RESIDENT FOR AT LEAST 5 YEARS; OWN THE REAL ESTATE
INDIVIDUALLY OR JOINTLY, OR IF THE REAL ESTATE IS OWNED BY A
SPOUSE, THEY MUST HAVE BEEN MARRIED FOR AT LEAST 5 YEARS.
IN ADDITION, THE TAXPAYER MUST HAVE A NET INCOME OF LESS THAN
$20,000, OR IF MARRIED, A COMBINED NET INCOME OF LESS THAN
$30,000, AND HAVE NET ASSETS, NOT INCLUDING THE VALUE OF THE
(By Petition)
PERSON'S RESIDENCE, NOT IN EXCESS OF $45,000.
-37-
Z-1.
Are you
To amend
Z-2.
favor of the adoption of the Zoning Ordinance as proposed by the Planning Board'^
in
Article
m
Are vou
B.
Secnon
3
B(2) to read as follows:
"Before the
class
V Town
final
Road; or"
PlannmgBoard?
Part B, Section 4 which currently reads:
II,
approval of newly created
Sandown Planning Board
Article n. Part C, Section 3,
shall
through the subdivision or resubdivision process,
lots
determine that an
all
season sight distance as defined
(Driveway Regulations All Zones),
the slope of the road at the driveway access location does not
And add
"A
favor of the adopnon of the Zoning Ordinance as proposed by the
Delete Article
the
Pan
II,
Article U, Part
C Secnon
exists for each
exceed 6%.
(
1
new
lot
in
and
that
985)"
3 the following:
"All proposed driveways shall be constructed so as to intersect with an existing or proposed
where
street at a loction
shall include a
Z-3.
the slope of said street
fi-om the
edge of pavement."
Are vou
m
Amend
"C.
is
not
more than 6
percent.
The dnveway apron
platform with-a negative slope of 2.0 percent running not less than 6.0 feet inward
favor of the adopnon of the Zoning Ordinance as proposed by the Planning Board"!*
.Article H. Part
The 4,000 square
B, Land Regulations-Zone A. Secnon
foot receiving layer shall
be
set
3C,2C
back 75
Conservation District" and 35 feet from any newly created
feet
lot line
to read as follows:
from land
in the
created after
"Wetlands
December
20,
1996."
Z-4.
Are you
Add
m
favor of the adopnon of the Zoning Ordinance as proposed by the
to .Article
II.
Pan
"N. .Abandonment:
than one
( 1 )
A non-conforming
use which has been discontinued for a period of less
year shall not be re-established for use other than the nonconforming use that
penod of more than one
A nonconfonning
use which has been discontinued for a
(1) year shall not be re-established
and fumre use
shall
conform with
bylaw."
"0. Expansion:
Z-5.
Board'!'
A. Secnon 15 the following defininons:
existed at the time of abandonment.
this
Plannmg
Are you
Amend
in
Any
volume of internal space of an existmg
structure."
favor of the adoption of the Zoning Ordinance as proposed by the Planning Board?
Article
11,
Part A,
"C. Structure: Shall
parts
increase in the
Secnon
1
5
C
to read:
mean any production or piece of work artificially built as composed of the
in some definite manner. This includes, but is not limited to garages,
and enjoined together
storage sheds, gazebos, carports or animal housing."
-38-
Z-6
Are you
Add
"3.
favor of the adoption of the Zoning Ordinance as proposed by the Planning Board?
in
to Article
Pan
1,
The following
B, Section
C and new
must be met
cnteria
in
sub-secnon 3
to read as follows:
order to grant a Special Exception;
A. Dredging, filling or crossings shall have minimal impact.
B.
There
is
no other logical placement.
C. Application or approval from the State Wetlands Board.
D. Report from the Conservanon Commission.
E.
Demonstration
F.
Complete
set
that this
proposal best utilizes the property
of engineered plans must be submitted along with drainage calculations and
wntten impact statement.
G. Report from the Planning Board Engineer.
Report from Rockingham County Conservanon Distnct.
The proposed use would not diminish surrounding property
Grannng the exception would be in the public interest.
J.
Grannng the exception would do substannal justice.
K..
H.
I
L.
Z-7.
The propsed use
Are you
Delete
in favor
not contrary to the spint of the ordinance."
of the adoption of the Zoning Ordinance as presented by the Planning Board''
.Article lU.
Section
is
values.
Part
.A,
Section
1
and replace with the following:
1
A. Each structure in
Zone
A
shall
be setback
at least thirty (30) feet
from the edge of right of
way. Distance shall be calculated from the numbered side of the house.
B.
I
.
Side setbacks shall be 15 feet
Permitted uses
Swimming
shall
C.
1.
be
1
in rear setbacks:
pools and accessory structures, swing sets, gazebos, animal houses or runs
No structure shall be
shall
Are you
8 feet to the property line.
feet.
be located no closer than
of any
Z-8.
shall
Permitted uses
Swimming
D.
pools and accessory structures, swing sets, gazebos or animal houses or runs
be located no closer than
Rear setback
shall
in side setbacks:
lake,
5 feet to the
property
line.
constructed to within forty (40) feet from the high water mark
stream or surface water system including wetlands.
No high
water mark
be moved or disturbed without Planning Board approval."
in favor
Amend Article
of the adoption of the Zoning Ordinance as presented by the Planning Board?
H, Part A, Section 17-
A Sewage Sludge and Residential Septage Application
Ordinance to read as follows:
"The storage and/or land application of any septage or sewage sludge
EPA shall
conform
to- the-latest-revision-ofihe-N:H.D7E:Sron
-39-
as defined
by the U.S.
septage- and-siudge-maiiageiiiem.
Z-9.
Are you
Amend
"An
in favor
of the adoption of the Zoning Ordinance as presented by the Planning
Article V, Section 6, Part A..
B
existing sanitary system that meets
Environmental Services
,a to
read as follows:
current State of New
tlie
Board'!'
Hampshire Department of
(WSPCD)
standards for an on-site septic disposal system or other
systems permitted by such standards, or"
Are you
Z- 1
favor of the adoption of the Zoning Ordinance as presented by the Planning Board'!'
in
Delete Article V, Section
"2.
1
1
Pan
b.
Someone
Someone
c.
Only
d.
The owner
Are you
Amend
already year round and has a holding tank.
is
already year round and no other viable altemanve exists
Article
Are you
Amend
shall maintain records
3
Are you
Article
Amend
in
which document when
the holding tank
was pumped.
11.
Part B.
Secnon
on:
3 to
lot shall
read as follows;
have a minimum frontage of 200 contiguous
feet,
(Amended 3/14/89)"
favor of die adoption of the Zoning Ordinance as presented by the Planning Board'!'
in
"...Chapter.
Z-1
Or
for seasonal dwellings. .And
favor of the adopnon of the Zoning Ordinance as presented by the Planning Board'!"
in
which must be
1
Or
is
"B. Frontage. Every building
Z- 2
and replace with the following:
A., B. 2
Holding tanks are allowed when:
a.
Z-
6.
II,
Pan
.A.
Secnon
16, c)
I
to
Exception to sepnc tank being
read as follows:
50'
from well or waterbody per Env -WS-1008
03-b.'
favor of the adoption of the Zoning Ordinance as presented by the Planning Board'!'
Article
II,
Part D, Cluster Residennal to read as follows:
40-
CLUSTER RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT:
Section
1
-Overview and Provisions
A- Cluster Permitted.
Single and two family structures in a cluster concept is permitted in any district within the Town
Sandown and may be exempt from the provisions of minimum required lot and yard regulations,
but subject to the conditions which follow.
1.
of
2.
Manufactured Housing. Manufactured Housing may be permitted in a duster development in any
all other requirements of the Sandown Zoning
residential district provided such housing meets
Ordinance
B.
(in particular Article IV).
Purpose.
The purpose of
cluster development,
and
to
which any such development must adhere,
are the following:
1.
2.
Permit greater flexibility in design and to discourage development sprawl.
To preserve the natural beauty of
including
setback
areas,
buffer
e-xisting rural roads, natural
zones,
agricultural
lands,
and scenic
tree
cover,
qualities of
recreation
open space
areas and
environmentally sensitive lands.
economical and efficient provision of public services.
3.
Facilitate the
4.
Provide a
5.
Provide for an efficient use of land, streets, and utility systems.
6.
more
efficient use of land in
To expand the opportunity
for the
harmony with
its
natural characteristics.
development of affordable housing without increasing the
development's overall density and provide a balance of community needs such as adequate recreation
and open space
areas, easy accessibility to those
and other community
facilities,
and pedestrian and
vehicular safety.
7.
To stimulate new approaches
to land
and community development.
C. Other.
1.
The proposed development
will
be consistent with the general purpose, goals, objectives and
standards of the town's master plan, zoning ordinance, subdivision regulations and site plan review
regulations.
2.
The proposed development shall comply with all applicable provisions of the zoning ordinance,
and site plan review regulations unless expressly superseded by this ordinance.
subdivision regulations
-41-
Section 2-Deftnitions for Cluster
definitions apply specifically to this Section of the Zoning Ordinance:
A,
The following
1.
Cluster Subdivision:
sites or lots
Development
A form of residential subdivision that permits housing units to be grouped on
with dimensions, frontages and setbacks reduced from conventional sizes, provided the
density allowed by the zoning district under existing regulations, in which the cluster development
located and the remaining land is devoted to common open space.
2.
Buffer:
An area
is
of land used to separate visibly one parcel from another or which acts as a separation
between two land uses of different
intensity.
Common Open Space: Land within or related to a cluster residential development, not individually
owned, which is designed and intended for the common use or enjoyment of the residents of the
development, or the public, which may contain such accessory structures and improvements as are
A condition of the cluster residential
necessary and appropriate for recreational purposes.
development approval shall be that common open space may not be further subdivided.
3.
4. Develop able Land: The Develop able land area is that portion of the tract remaining after deducting
the undevelopable land area (such as wetlands, steep slope and roadways) from the total tract area.
A private non-profit association which is organized by the developer of
development in which individual owners share common interests in open space
and/or facilities and are in charge of preserving, managing and maintaining the common property, and
enforces certain covenants and restrictions.
5.
Homeowners
Association:
a cluster residential
6.
Traa;
and
7.
An area,
parcel, site, piece of land, or property
which
is
the subject of a development proposal
application.
Town
Road:
A Town
road shall be defined as a Class
V
road.
Section 3-Density Change
which allows cluster residential development, the lot size for clustering may
be reduced below the minimum lot size required for that specific district. All reductions in lot size
shall be offset by an equivalent amount of land set aside in common open space, or as may be
determined by the planning board. All sections of the subdivision regulations or the zoning ordinance
which are not superseded by the duster residential development options shall be applicable.
A. In each zoning district
1.
The individual
lots,
buildings, streets
and parking areas
shall
be designed and situated to minimize
alteration of the natural site features.
The suitability of all cluster open space intended for recreation use or other specified uses shall be
determined by the size, shape, topography and location for the particular purpose proposed, and shall
be accessible to all residents of the cluster development
2.
3- The proposed cluster buildings- will not have an undue adverse effect upon adjacent property, the
character of the neighborhood, traffic conditions, utility facilities, and other areas related to public
health, safety
and general welfare.
-42-
Section 4-General Requirements
A.
Location.
the
Town
of
Single
Permitted Uses.
B.
and two family structures in a cluster concept is permitted in any district within
it meets all other requirements of the Sandown Zoning Ordinance.
Sandown provided
No
Section
5.
Minimum
Minimum
A.
development shall include any use other than
and incidental recreational uses.
cluster residential
family dwellings, accessory structures
single
and two
Tract Requirements.
The
Tract Size.
tract, lot
or parcel of single or consolidated ownership at the time of
application shall be:
At least 20 contiguous acres of upland soils as delineated by High Intensity Soils Mapping in Zone
1.
A.
2.
At least 300 feet in depth from an existing Class
the cluster development
In
3.
all
is
V or
State
Highway from which access/frontage
for
provided.
instances, the entire tract, lot or parcel of single or consolidated ownership proposed for
cluster development, inclusive of all setbacks, buffer zones,
Hampshire Wetland Board, shall be
the Sandown Zoning Ordinance.
and wetlands as defined by the New
with Article II. Part B.. Section 3 of
a build able lot in accordance
In accordance with Article 1. Part B of the Sandown Zoning Ordinance, only 25% of any poorly
drained soils and no portion of any ponds, lakes, fresh water marshes, alluvial soils, perennial streams
or very poorly drained soils may be used to fulfill the minimum tract size for any proposed cluster
4.
development.
5.
Subject to approval by the Planning Board under
RSA 674:35
as
amended.
maximum number of dwelling units permitted in any cluster development
determined by utilizing the soil type lot requirement contained in Article II. Part B. Section 3
e of the Sandown Zoning Ordinance. The maximum number of dwelling units or lots shall not exceed
Permitted Density. The
B.
shall be
the
number of single family
the
maximum number of dwelling
by
Article
II,
Part B. Section
units or lots possible in a conventional grid subdivision. In
3.
units or lots permitted include
Paragraph C.3.a)
no event
shall
wetland soils (except as permitted
as defined by the Wetlands Bureau and all lands with
all
slopes greater than 25%.
C. Lot Size.
1.
The minimum
lot
area per dwelling unit shall be no less than
conventional lot which
is
a
minimum of 40,000 square
feet (based
25% of the lot area required
on HISS mapping).
for a
Maximum Dwelling Units Per Acre. The residential density within the area being developed shall
not exceed two(2) dwellings^per acre, as-measured on one side^af a-road or-streefc
2.
D. Frontage Requirements
and Setbacks:
-43-
cluster
1.
V
Development Frontage. The minimum
cluster residential
development frontage on
a Class
road or state highway shall be a contiguous 250'.
Dwelling Unit Frontage. Cluster development shall not be required to conform to the minimum
and lot sizes required elsewhere in the Sandown Zoning Ordinance, but shall be designed with
a minimum frontage of 100 contiguous feet for each dwelling unit and shall be designed and
constructed as to achieve the purposes of cluster development set forth in these regulations.
2.
frontage
3.
Building Setback. Building setbacks shall be the
the
Sandown Zoning Ordinance.
same as those in
article
III.
Part A. Section
1
of
Building setback distances shall be measured from the buffer zone
distance and not the perimeter boundary.
E.
Buffer
Zone Requirements.
Frontage setback from the existing Town approved road or state highway in existence prior to
1.
submission of the application shall be a 300 linear foot measurement.
2.
Side
and
rear setbacks shall be 150 feet
A
from
all
abutting property lines.
development shall have a one hundred (100) foot landscaped buffer
an adequate division of transition from abutting land uses and
existing town roads. This landscaped buffer shall be required whether or not the abutting properties,
including those across the street, are developed or undeveloped. The Planning Board shall determine
whether the type of landscaping proposed is acceptable.
3.
Landscape buffer.
around
4.
its
cluster
entire perimeter to provide
Restrictions In Buffer Zone.
side,
and rear
In
no instance,
shall
any of the following be allowed within the
front,
setbacks: structures of any type, additions to existing structures within the cluster
including garages, decks, or porches; parking areas, walkways, driveways, or any privately
owned road
(Town roads or collector roads may not pass through any side or rear setback unless approved
by the Planning Board, and may only pass through a front setback for purposes of access to an existing
town or state road in existence at the time of submission of application), septic systems, leaching
fields, and back-up areas for the same: wells, or back up wells; any other improvements not specifically
listed above that would disturb the natural condition of the setback- In the development of the cluster,
or street
the setbacks shall be
left
in their natural state with the following exceptions:
Planning Board, cutting of vegetation and excavation
may be allowed
Upon approval
of the
to improve sight distance along
an access from
a town or state road in existence prior to submission of application; drainage and utility
easements; required landscaping; entrance sign; and any other improvements deemed necessary by the
Plaiming Board to ensure public health, safety and welfare.
5.
A
75' foot buffer
zone
shall
be provided on each side of the cluster access road as measured from
the centerline of said road.
F.
Utilities.
Water and Septic Systems. The development may be served by common water and septic systems,
must be approved by the state and local authorities prior to final
approval of any duster site plan or subphase thereof by the 5andown-Planning Board. All common
water systems shall require state approval under RSA 149:82, if applicable, and approval by the State
of New Hampshire Water Supply and Pollution Control Division. Additionally, NHWSPCD subdivision
1.
the design and construction of which
-44-
approval for cluster development, if applicable, and individual sewage system approvals must be
obtained prior to final approval of any cluster site plan or subphase thereof the board. All common
no instance have a protective radius of less than 125 feet,
requirements for a greater radius shall apply. In no instance, shall any
sewage system, road, driveway, parking area, walkway or dwelling unit be allowed vidthin the protective
well radius of any common well. Private wells shall not have any roads, walkways, parking, driveways
wells within the duster development, shall in
and when applicable
state
or septic systems within a 75 foot radius. Whenever possible, the well(s) shall be located on an upgradient from any sewage system, structure, roadway, driveway, parking area, or walkway, and any
potentially harmful run-off shall be directed away from the protective radius.
2.
All electrical, gas. cable
and phone
lines shall
be located underground.
G. Parking.
parking spaces per bedroom shall be provided.
1.
Two
2.
A parking space
shall
be defined as one which
is
9 foot
wide and 20 foot long exclusive of traffic and
maneuvering space.
3.
All
parking spaces shall be paved.
Parking areas and locations shall be subject to Planning Board approval. Access driveways shall be
paved and widths shall be subject to Planning Board approval.
4.
5.
Driveways shall meet
6.
Driveways shall access no more than three dwelling units.
all
other design criteria as set forth in the
Sandown Zoning Ordinance.
H. Roads.
1.
development plan shall show the lay out of all roads and shall differentiate
which move traffic through the development and service roads which provide
the development and individual structures. No service road shall access more than six
Layout.
between
The
cluster
collector roads
access to
dwelling units.
2.
All collector roads
and
service roads shall be built to the
town subdivision requirements
for
new
public roads.
3.
Sidewalks shall be provided on one side of the street
if
the development exceeds 12 or more
dwelling units.
4.
I.
1.
Traffic signalization. stop signs, street signs,
shall
be installed or bonded.
Emergency Items.
Emergency vehicle access
shall
2.
and development signs
shall
be provided to
all
structures vnthin the duster development
and
be subject to Planning Board and Fire Chief Approvals
A fire pond built to NFPA standards
shall
be provided along with the installation of
-45-
a
dry hydrant.?
J.
Common
Land.
1. Fifty percent (50%) of the total area, exclusive of public right-of-way and common parking areas shall
be set aside as common land through the preparation of legal instruments to ensure it will be
maintained as permanent "open space."
2.
Areas which are non-build able (wetlands and steep slopes) and are not included in determining the
under a conventional grid subdivision shall not be used in determining lot size and common
lot size
open space requirements under
3.
a cluster
development proposal.
The land so set aside shall be provided in such a manner that it is usable
and is reasonably accessible to all residents of the cluster development.
for recreation other
activities,
4.
Use of
as tot
lot.
Common
Land. Such
common land
shall
be
restricted to
open space recreational uses such
park, sviamming pool, tennis courts, playground, play field, golf courses or conservation.
front, rear.and side are considered part of the common land, none of the above
uses shall be allowed within these areas that would not be allowed under Section 5, Subsection E of
this ordinance, nor any other uses that would disturb the natural vegetation within these areas. These
While the setbacks,
restrictions of the use of the
common
shall be so stated in the covenants
5-
land within the setbacks (including the landscaped buffer area)
running with the land.
Those areas set aside for conservation or preservation shall remain unimproved unless for safety
Future development of any common open space
and welfare of the pubhc mandates improvement.
is
6.
forbidden.
Access to
Open
Land.
Such
common
land shall have suitable access to a road only within the
development
Current Use Limitation. The common land areas, open space areas and natural areas in an approved
development are considered to be part of the residential use of such development and shall not be
considered to be "open space": "farmland", "forest land"; "wetlands"; "recreation land"; "floodplain";
or "wild land"; within the meaning of RSA 79-A except where such consists of actively operated
7.
farmland. As a condition of approval of a duster residential development, all deeds to the common
open space and natural areas in the development acknowledge that such areas and space are part of the
residential use and do not qualify for "current use" under RSA 79-A.
B. Protection of Common Land. Open space, common areas, common facilities, and other features
within the duster development shall be protected by covenants running with the land and shall be
conveyed by the property owners to a homeowners association so as to guarantee the follovping;
1.
The continued use of land
2.
Continuity of proper maintenance for those portions of the development requiring maintenance.
3.
The
4.
Recovery for loss sustained as a result of casualty, condemnation or otherwise.
availability
for the intended purposes.
of funds required for such maintenance.
-46-
A homeowners association of tenancy-in-common or similar form of ownership, that the
membership and obligation of the residents of the duster development be automatic upon conveyance
of tide or lease to single dwelling units. Homeowners association, tenancy in common, or similar form
of ownership shall include lien provisions and shall be subject to review and approval by the Planning
5.
Board.
Section
5.
Site Plan
plan for the entire tract at a scale of 1"=100' and the developed portion to the scale of 1"=50'
be prepared by either a registered architect, registered professional engineer or registered land
surveyor in the State of N.H. The site plan shall be submitted in accordance with the site plan and
A.
A site
shall
subdivision regulations for the
Town
of Sandown.
be shown on the plan.
B.
The location of parks and open space
C.
Submission of two different design review plans for general discussion before approving the cluster
shall
subdivision concept.
1.
One
plan shall
show a conventional subdivision plat based on
number of developable lots possible;
existing regulations without cluster
design to establish the
2.
One plan
shall
show
a cluster subdivision
design would be appropriate for the specific
Section
6.
which would be reviewed
to
determine whether a cluster
site.
Plannine Board Review
A. Planning
Board Review.
The review of any
cluster
development conducted by the Planning Board under these regulations shall
made by the owner or his authorized agent for the
ascertain that adequate provisions have been
following, but not limited to the following:
1.
Traffic circulation
and access including adequacy of adjacent street, entrances and exits,
and existing or recommend traffic signalization.
traffic flow,
sight distances, curb cuts, turning lanes,
and access.
2.
Pedestrian safety
3.
Off street parking and loading,
4.
Emergency vehicle access and protection.
5.
Fire protection as
firefighting
6.
it
applies to the proximity of buildings to
Storm water drainage based upon
a
minimum
to the existence of
of a ten (10) year storm frequency, utilizing on-site
absorption and/or positive outfall.
7.
one another and
water sources.
Recreational
facilities.
-47-
8.
9.
Water supply and waste water disposal approved by
a civil or sanitary engineer registered in N.H.
Environmental factors such as protection against pollution, noise, odor, and the protection of
natural features,
10.
Signing and exterior lighting.
11.
Landscaping in keeping with the general character of the surrounding areas.
12. Submission of proposal along with abutting property owners' names and addresses shall be in
accordance with the Town of Sandown Subdivision Regulations in order to provide for timely
notification to abutters of public hearing to review said parcel.
13.
In addition, the Planning Board shall review the plan to insure compliance with the provisions of
town regulations and ordinances. The Planning
Board shall also ascertain that the plan minimizes the encroachment of the cluster development upon
neighboring land uses.
the standards set forth in these regulations and other
The Plarming Board may retain the services of a consultant and/or engineer qualified to review any
any engineering or professional studies submitted by the
developer as requested by the Board. The cost of said services shall be borne by the owner and/or
developer as outlined in the Site Plan Review Regulations and Subdivision Regulations.
14.
specific aspects of the plan or to review
15.
That the proposed building design and layout be compatible with the predominant architectural
styles of the
Section
7.
Town.
Performance Bond.
A performance bond or other acceptable surety and other legal data shall be submitted as required
by the Planning Board to ensure the completion of streets, buffers and amenities in accordance with
the accepted plans and subdivision regulations of the Town of Sandown as adopted or hereafter.
A.
Section
8.
Amendments
to
an Approved Plan.
The ovimer, his agent or his successors or assigns will make no alterations or additions or deletions
from the approved Cluster Development Plan except as provided in advance by the Planning Board.
All requests for changes to the approved plan shall be made in writing to the Board and shall be
accompanied by such documents as the Planning Board shall deem necessary to explain the requested
change. The Board shall determine if the requested change is minor or major in nature.
A.
Minor Changes.
A minor change
one which respects the approved plan's basic land
and variety of facilities and dwelling units being
approved, and/or the timing of providing these facilities, but shall not include any increase in the
overall density of the development The Board may hold a public hearing on the proposed change with
proper notification to all abutters, including those of the original proposed development as well as any
additional one which may have been created by development activity within the development itself.
The Board shall then act to approve or disapprove with written notification to the owner of its action.
Any approved changes involving changes- in any lot boundaries-shall be recorded as a subdivision
change in the Rockingham County Registry of Deeds.
1.
allocations in terms of use
and
shall be
density, the type
-48-
Major Changes. Any requested change which the Board determines does not qualify as a minor
change shall be required to be submitted a separate cluster development plan in accordance with these
regulations and procedures.
2.
Section
A.
Q.
Other Provisions.
Administration.
The Planning Board shall be responsible for the review and approval of all
development To minimize the period of time required for the review, the
applications for cluster
Board may conduct its Site Plan Review in concert with the cluster provisions contained in the
Sandown Zoning Ordinance.
shall adopt such procedures as part of the Site Plan and Subdivision Regulations
necessary in order to insure sufficient public review of any cluster proposal and to
B.
The Planning Board
as
it
may deem
insure compUance with these and other
C. All other
all
Town
land use requirements in the
ordinances and regulations.
Town
of
Sandown Zoning Ordinances
general requirements of the issuance of a special exception.
-49-
shall
be met including
Z-14
Are you
Amend
"'E.
in
favor of the adoption of the Zoning Ordinance as proposed by the Planning Board'!'
Article HI,
Pan
,\,
Secnon
3 to read as follows:
Buildings or structures shall not exceed thirty five (35) feet as averaged bv
all
sides of the
structure."
Given under our hands and
of our Lord nineteen hundred
seal, this
TWENTY- FOURTH
day of February,
in the
year
and NINETY-SEVEN..
Selectmen
of
SANDOWN, NH
David R. CHeney
—
A true copy of Warrant
Attest:
Selectmen
of
riiam
SANDOWN, NH
David'k.' dhen'ey
-50-
STATE OF NEW HAMPSHIRE
DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE ADMINISTRATION
MS-7
MUNICIPAL SERVICES DIVISION
81
SaSBnng
ConoorO.
St. P.O.Box 1122
NH
(903)
03302-1 122
271-3397
/0^^
BUDGET FORM FOR TOWNS WHICH HAVE ADOPTED
THE PROVISIONS OF RSA 32:14 THROUGH 24
BUDGET OF THE TOWN
OF
Appropriations
for Fiscal
N.H.
'^^ndnwn
and Estimates of Revenue
for the
Ensuing Year January
Year From
Use
this
form to
operating budget
2.
Hold
3.
When
derk,
at least
and
one
32:5 applicable to
list
all
all
997
J-
or
municipalities.
the entire budget in the appropriate
special
and
individual warrant articles
u,
recommended and
not
recommended
area.
This
m&ans
the
must be posted.
public hearing on this budget.
to the
t>e posted with the warrant. Another copy must be placed on
Department of Revenue Administration at the address above.
Date
in ink.)
•^.,,.^ .r?iA-//r;^f^
ISM)
December 31,
file
with the town
BUDGET SHALL BE POSTED WITH THE TOWN WARRANT
Budget Committee:(Please sign
jur^ji
to
completed, a copy of the budget must
and a copy sent
THIS
\
L997
to
important: Please read RSA
1.
1,
<I^^eyyYi^€Li'^^._p^
[y
51-
'ro^Jj-
/
8
I
'i
9
7
s
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7
I.
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e
a
WM
ti
a
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o
o
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»T
*1
s
V)
<
m
is
s
*2
as
3^2
«
S
«
Year
Aeet.
No.
1997
Budget of the Town of
Sandown
MS-T
Year
1997
3912 Special Revenue Funds
Budget of the Town of
Sandown
MS-7
1997
3912
Soec-ial
Revenue Funds
Budget, of the Town of
Sandown
MS-7
Sandown Budget Proposals
1997
Dept:
EXECUTIVE - Acct# 4130.0
Sandown Budget Proposals
1997
Dept:
TOWN CLERK
-
Acct# 4140.1
Sandown Budget Proposals
1997
Dept:
BOOKKEEPER
-
Acct# 4150.1
Sandown Budget Proposals
1997
Dept:
ASSESSING - Acct#
4150.3
Sandown Budget Proposals
1997
Dept:
TREASURER
Acct# 4150.5
Sandown Budget Proposals
1997
Dept:
PLAN.BRD - Acct#
4191.1
Sandown Budget Proposals
1997
Dept:
GOVT. BLDGS. - Acct# 4194.0
Sandown Budget Proposals
1997
Dept:
TRUSTEES - Acct# 4199.0
Sandown Budget Proposals
1997
Dept:
RESCUE
-4215.0
Sandown Budget Proposals
1997
Dept:
BUILDING INSP.
-
Acct# 4241.2
Sandown Budget Proposals
1997
Dept:
SEPTIC - Acct# 4242.1
Sandown Budget Proposals
1997
Dept:
HIGHWAY
-
Acct# 4312.0
Sandown Budget Proposals
1997
Dept:
SANITATION - Acct# 4324.0
Sandown Budget Proposals
1997
Dept:
RECYCLING - Acct# 4326.0
Sandown Budget Proposals
1997
Dept:
ANIMAL CONTR. - Acct# 4414.0
Sandown Budget Proposals
1997
Dept:
WELFARE
-
Acct# 4445.0
Sandown Budget Proposals
1997
Dept:
LIBRARY - Acct# 4550.0
Sandown Budget Proposals
1997
Dept:
PRINCIPAL - Acct# 4711.0
TOWN OF SANDOWN
OFFICE
P.O.
of
SELECTMEN
Box 1756 • Sandown, NH 03873
Telephone (603) 887-3646
We all
Another busy and successful year has passed for our town.
witnessed a number of different events during 1996 and these happenings
The new year found Sandown
made us proud to call Sandown our home.
under a blanket of snow and the Highway Department worked hard and long
to ensure that our streets were safe.
Throughout the year, we all watched the face of the Town Hall change as
the "Town Hall Beaut i ficat ion Committee" members worked their magic.
Thank you to everyone that worked with this group!
In May, the Conservation Commission held its first fishing derby that
This event
brought out anglers of all ages on a damp and rainy day.
was a great success with the support of local businesses helping to
raise funds to support conservation.
August brought Old Home Days and some strange sights - Selectmen in
Thankfully, none
shower caps navigating a bathtub down Main Street.
In observance of Old Home Days, the
of us slipped on the soap!
Selectmen held their August 12th meeting at the Old Meeting House with
the help of Mrs. Arlene Bassett and Ms. Eleanor Bassett who hold
The meeting was the first public
Sandown's history in their hearts.
meeting held in the historic building since 1929.
The Sandown Recreation Commission held a summer recreation program for
It was a great success offering activities
the town's young people.
that kept many children from having a boring summer.
The members of the
October brought the worst flooding in many years.
Sandown Fire Department, Rescue Squad and Police Department worked day
and night pumping flooded basements and comforting those who lost many
These three departments worked as a team to save
of their belongings.
Their efforts were recognized by the
the life of a young resident.
State on a plaque presented to the town and on display at the town hall
October also saw the Selectmen scrambling eggs, cooking sausages and
The Selectmen's Breakfast that
serving the public in a different way.
was held at the town hall was a fundraiser for the Bishop family and
many local residents as well as town employees joined in the fun.
As you can see, 1996 proved once again that the most valuable natural
We must
resource that we have in Sandown is the people of our town.
continue to use this resource wisely to ensure that our community
The Selectmen wish to thank each and every one
continues to thrive.
of you that helped to make 1996 memorable and we look forward to
working witJi/y^Tl to keep Sandown a place that we can all call home.
u<.z
Paul Bertoncini
Chairman
•77-
"'j'.^e.
Dave Cheney
AUDITOR'S REPORT
TOWN OF SANDOWN, NEW HAMPSHIRE
We have examined the financial
statements of the fijnds and accounts of the
New Hampshire at December 31,
in
1996, and for the year then ended.
Town
of Sandown,
Our examination was made
accordance with generally accepted auditing standards and, accordingly, included such tests of
the accounting records and other such auditing procedures as
we
considered necessary in the
circumstances.
The Town prepares
its
financial statements using accounting principles
with the Uniform Municipal Accounting System promulgated by the
of Revenue. The accounting principles
which are
in
conformity
New Hampshire Department
differ in certain respects fi"om generally
accepted
accounting principles, the effects of which on the accompanying financial statements have not
been
quantified.
In our opinion, except for the effects on the financial statements of the differences in accounting
practices referred in the preceding paragraph, the financial statements mentioned above present
fairly the financial position
at
December
of the funds and accounts of the
Town
of Sandown,
New Hampshire
31, 1996, and the results of operations for the year then ended, in conformity with
generally accepted accounting principles applied on a basis consistent with that of the previous
year.
Our examination has been made
primarily for the purpose of expressing an opinion
on the
financial statements, taken as a whole.
The supplementary information
purposes and
presentation of the financial information referred to in the
is
not necessary for a
fair
is
presented for analysis
preceding paragraph.
Respectfully submitted,
Angela Sherwood
Marianne Dufly
February 26, 1996
-78-
AUDITOR'S
COMMENTS AND RECOMMENDATIONS
We have completed our review of the books for the Town of Sandown for the year
ending December 31, 1996 and are pleased to report improvements since
last year's
audit.
The
library's
Accounts Payable procedures have been standardized and consistently
followed. Packing slips have been attached to invoices along with payment
information and relevant signatures.
deposit
book
One recommendation would be
the use of a
in order to organize their cash receipts.
In our review of the selectmen's office,
we were
pleased to note that the requested
format for the monthly cash reconciliation was implemented and consistently
followed. In order to facilitate the completion of the State
requesting that
all
Form MS-60, we
are
outstanding checks as of the end of the year be detailed separately
by check number and amount
While reviewing the Accounts Payables,
we
noted that
the payroll paperwork submitted by the Police Department were not originals. Only
originals should
be submitted to the Selectmen's
designate should sign
all
Angela Sherwood and Marianne Duffy
Auditors,
Town
office.
submitted payment requests.
of Sandown
-79-
The department head or
)
.
,
1996 Planning Board Report
Your Planning Board had a very active year in 1996.
We met 19 times,
including two special meetings, three workshops and two separate joint
meetings with the Fremont Planning Board. We met with the Fremont
Board four times as two of our regular meetings included joint meeting:
Eight subdivision plans were reviewed and approved which created 31
Three lot line adjustments were also approved.
new building lots.
At year's end, one major cluster subdivision proposing 42 dwelling
units remains under review.
One of the year's highlights after voters approved the growth ma nagement
zoning ordinance amendment in March, was the adoption of growth management subdivision regulations allowing the Planning Board to requ ire
phasing of subdivisions larger than four lots over a five year p er iod
This action followed findings of
with a minimum of three per year.
fact of positive growth relative to our abutting towns in the ar ea s
of dwelling unit growth, population growth and equalized tax rat e
As a result of your enabling the Board to require phasing, only 23 of
Should the 42 unit cl us t e r
the approved lots were buildable in 1996.
be approved in 1997, only eight units can be built each year.
.
The effect of these growth control measures and the interim growth
management ordinance adopted in 1995 has been a dramatic reduction
1993
in the number of dwelling units built in the past two years.
and 1994 construction was 56 and 65 units, respectively, but 1995
and 1996 were 33 and 23, respectively.
Comparsion of Sandown's tax rate to the average of our five abutting
towns (Chester, Danville, Derry, Fremont and Hampstead) for 1995
shows Sandown's rate $1.17 higher based on a three year average and
A
(All rates are equalized.)
$1.71 higher on a two year average.
similar comparison of both dwelling unit growth and population growth
for 1995 (latest year available) is in progress.
1997 warrant, your Planning Bo ard is proposing 14 zoning
Most of these a re clarification s and update
ordinance amendments.
corrections resulting from recommendat ions and request s f r om both
Signi ficant amendthe Board of Adjustment and our Health Officer
ments are the replacement of our septa ge/sewage sludge disposal
ordinance with one requiring complianc e with New Hamps hire Department
of Environmental Services rules on the se materials, no w that they
(In late 1995, they did not hav e these
have permanent rules.
Secondly, we are proposing revisions t o Sandown's 10 y ear old cluster
subdivision ordinance.
The main chang e involved is th e requirement
that the number of dwelling units in a cluster cannot exceed the
We urg e you to
number achievable with a standard subd ivision.
approve all proposed zoning ordinance amendment s
For the
.
.
We will miss the contributions of Pat Giaquinta on the Board.
Lee Wilmot, Don Picard, Vicki Wilson, Ed Mencis, Donna Fugere, Bill
Crum and alternates Greg Eaton and Tim Robinson.
-80-
.,
ZONING BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT
TOWN OF SANDOWN
The Zoning Board of Adjustment (ZBA) is a quasi- j ud ic ial
board made up of five voting members and three alternates.
It is the ZBA's responsibility to hear appeals and hand
down decisions on exceptions to the Town's land use
There are three categories of cases that
ordinances.
the ZBA is authorized to hear:
1.
Appeals of administrative decision
2.
Requests for apecial exceptions
Requests for variances to existing
or d inance s
3.
During 1996, the ZBA dealt with a wide ranging list of
Once again, many of
variances and special exceptions.
the the variances granted were to replace septic systems
that did not meet setback requirements and the special
exceptions were either home businesses or seasonal to
The Board also presented a list
year round conversions.
of ordinances to the Planning Board that were in need of
up da t ing
The makeup of the Board changed slightly during the year
I would like to thank
as two alternates left the Board.
Brad Lake and Ed Mencis for the time they spent serving
These positions remain open and we encourage
on the Board.
anyone in town who may be interested in volunteering to
submit a letter indicating their interest to the Selectmen's
office.
Respectfully submitted
Mark Hamblett
Chairman
Sandown ZBA
l-
.
BUILDING AND ELECTRICAL
INSPECTORS REPORTS
1996, the Interim Growth Control Management Regulations
Since then, 17 permits for new single family
Sandown expired.
There were 29 permits issued
dwellings (S.F.D.) have been issued.
for S.F.D. under the Interim Growth Control period.
On March 14,
of
The total number of building permits issued during 1996 was up to
The biggest increase being in
178 from the 145 issued during 1995.
Again, last year saw no
permits for additions to existing homes.
multi-family or commercial buildings.
We all need protection from tragedy due to fire, structural collapse
Buildinj
and general deterioration of the structures that surround us.
permits are issued and inspections made during construction to verify
that code compliance has been achieved helping to ensure electrical,
The end purpose being
sanitation, structural, fire and life safety.
to protect the public health, safety and welfare by requiring safe
cons true t ion
The various codes establish predictable and consistent minimum
standards which are applied to the installation, quality and
durab ility' 'of construction materials.
Permit s
Single Family Dwellings
23
Renewals
21
Remodel
49
Additions
85
Sincerely,
Ken Sherwood
Building Inspector/
Electrical Inspector/
Code Enforcement Officer
-82-
ASSESSING REPORT
Abatements
In 1996 the number of requests for abatement of taxes was
Of these, 6 were granted abatements (either from significant
deterioration of the property (fire, for exanple) or due to an incorrect
listing on the record card). A few have applied to the state appeals
board. There was 1 state appeal settled in 1996.
20.
New Valuations
Reference to the building inspector's report will indicate
that a fair number of properties will have to be assessed in 1997. These
involve new structures, additions, alterations, outbuildings and similar
items. In addition to those, it is a practice to physically review all
properties transferred during 1996. The total nurrfcer is 376 to date.
Equalization Ratio
The town's equalization ratio is 1.26 (vs 1.29 in 1995),
indicating a continuing recovery in the market. This is the ratio of
property valuation to market value. Half of the properties are greater
than this and half less than this, with the majority within +/- 117. of
this nuntier (the coefficient of dispersion, or spread = 11.1, a value of
less than 15 is considered to be a good measure of a fair assessment in a
municipal ity).
The equalization ratio is the figure which is used to
adjust town valuations to comparable values for fair sharing of the
regional school district expenses. It also indicates that property market
values have decreased 26'/. since the revaluation in 1989.
Note, however, that if property assessments were
readjusted to make the equalization ratio =1.0 that a property's tax would
not change since the tax rate would be increased by the same 267.. The
taxes are primarily determined by the amount of money to be raised for
school, county and town services and debt, while the amount for a given
property's share is determined by the assessed valuation.
Some Statistics
192 property transactions were recorded in 1996. Of these
107 were "arms length" (willing buyer /will ing seller), 13 were
foreclosures, B sales by banks, and the rest were of other types
(inter-family, interHDusiness court settlements). A listing of the
property types and quantities may be of interest and is here presented:
Type
«
Type
#
Type
#
Ranch
224
Split
41
Colonial
226
•-^^
259
Bungalow
13
Conventional
125
^"^ern
100
Raises Ranch
176
Family Convert 18
Apartments
20
Mobile Home
102
Funeral Home
1
Restaurant
Camp
1
222
Light Industry 1
Condominium
64
Antique
55
Vacant land
375
Others
36
,
Comment
As has been stated in previous reports, it is recommended
that property owners check the property records at the town
hall to ensure
the listings are correct.
Respectfully sijbmitted,
George E. Romaine
Assessing Clerk
1996 Budget Committee Report
would
I
like to
thank the members of the Budget committee for their hard work and long
hours reviewing the 1997 budget requests. After a detailed review, the Budget
recommending an operational budget of $1,195,259. This figure is
.3% lower than the 1996 approved operating budget of $1,2 11, 193.
Committee
is
$15,934 or
1
A review of the salary
line items
and non-salary
line items
shows
that the salary line
items (including salary, unemployment insurance, worker's compensation, and benefits)
have increased $43,468 or 1 1 .3%. A similar review of non-salary line items shows an
decrease of $64,760 or 7.78%. The primary reason for the increase in the salary line
items
is
the Selectmen's
recommendation
to
make
the salaries of town employees
comparable with neighboring towns.
Budget Committee also reviewed Warrant
The amount of $231,887 was requested and recommended by the
Budget Committee. The recommended amount for 1997 is $45,748 (0.2458%) more than
the 1995 approved amount of $186,139.
In addition to the operating expenses, the
Articles for 1997.
I
would
like to
thank the department heads for their time and effort in gathering the
information for the budget request forms and their time in appearing before the budget
committee and when necessary, the selectmen.
the process that
We
is
We are working to
improve the forms and
used.
have included scaled down copies of the request forms that the department heads
submitted.
We hope the people
of the town find this information useful when voting on
the entire budget.
I would like to thank the people of Sandown
them on this committee.
Last, but definitely not least,
the opportunity to serve
Respectfully submitted,
Cheryl Cronin, Chair
Committee Members: George Romaine, Vice-Chair
Brian Butler, Secretary
Paul Bertoncini, Selectman
Peggy Crum
Mark Hamblett
Tony Pace
-84-
in allowing
me
SANDOWN CABLE TELEVISION ADVISORY BOARD
1996 ANNUAL REPORT
The Cable Television Advisory Board serves
television customers
as a liaison
between Sandown cable
and Continental Cablevision.
issues. The Town protested the large rate
Sandown receives fewer channels than other area towns.
When the Boston Red Sox moved to a different channel, the Board worked with
Continental to obtain Red Sox games, which can now be seen on Channel 8 on your dial.
This is WNBU-TV, Channel 21 in Concord, NH.
During 1996, the Board addressed several
increase in 1996 and the fact that
The Board monitors
the quality of cable service and records customer complaints so that
we may
better represent the subscribers
the next
two
when
contract renewal procedures begin within
years.
In the realm of local television
programming, a number of locally produced programs are
on Channel 48 and on Educational Channel 30. These include the Annual School
District meeting, school board meetings, the Timberlane High School graduation, school
aired
sports and musical events, and such feature
"Fitness First," and
Due
to the fact that local
joint venture
"CMUR,"
producers
local
Sunday, and
Monday evenings
in local
Local shows are
now
at
7:30
PM on Channel 48.
made by many
volunteers, and to get
in television
Community programming
staff at
may
espectfully Submitted,
Tom Gainan,
Currently,
Specific programs will be
Chairman
Nancy Browall
Donna Fugere
programming,
call
residents involved Continental
at
no
cost.
Interested
enroll in classes
by
calling
668-3123 or 382-9254.
you have a problem which with cable service which
local television
more
production offered
question about service or programming, or
making
Continental-WMUR
slots.
telecasts are seen regularly Friday, Saturday,
whether or not they are cable subscribers,
Continental's
If
share Channel 48 with the
newspapers.
conducts hands-on training
residents,
as "Joan's Jazz Jam," "Bonjour,"
programs are assigned specific time
"Sandown Today" and other Sandown
announced
shows
"Sandown Today."
is not resolved by Continental, a
you are interested in getting involved in
Tom Gainan at 887-2897.
if
1996
CEMETERY REPORT
1996 Appropriation
$1 ,000 .00
Detailed Statement of disbursements
Supp lies
Blue Seal Feeds
Equipment Repair
241
&
&
73
Maintenance
Strandell Power Equipment
Site Repair
.
249 .90
Maintenance
Irving Bassett
508 .37
Total disbursements
$1 ,000 .00
Anyone interested in purchasing a cemetery lot, please get in touch
The sale price for a single grave site
with one of the Trustees.
is $200 which includes perpetual care.
David Drowne
Carroll Bassett
Frederick Stafford
-86-
Library Report
It's
been a very busy and entertaining year
Sandown
at the
-
1996
Public Library.
As
usual, the Children's Story
Hours were well attended in the Spring and the Fall, and the Summer Story Hour, in conjunction with the
Summer Reading Program, was also very popular with 50 children reading over 1,000 books. The
Brownies of Sandown put on a Puppet Show in April (puppets and play created by the Brownies!) and
1
Wayne from Maine was also here that month for a fun afternoon of singing and dancing. During the
Summer Reading Program, which had an international theme in keeping with the Summer Olympic
Games in Atlanta, townspeople did programs on various countries including Japan, Belgium, Sweden,
Germany and Korea. In August, T.J. Smield, a prestidigitator, gave a workshop on magic tricks and then
did a magic show. Pam and Don Gaudreau donated our summer fiddle concert "The Works". We also
hosted a two part workshop put on by Parkland Medical Center for prospective babysitters that was so
November (Food for Fines month) there was a
Book Week. In December Susanna McHowell did a program
popular we've already had a second program. In
bookmark making
contest for Children's
explaining what Christmas in
Denmark was
like,
which was well attended by the younger
set, as
was
the
Polar Express.
Programs
for older patrons included a presentation
and "Sandown Recollections and Stories". The
by Mark Traeger on traveling
in
Portugal and Spain,
Sandown Home
World Wide Web!
find us at http://www.gsinet.net/~sandownlibrary/sandown.htm), which includes memories and stories
written by the people of Sandown. A printed copy of these memories has been flying out the door as
quickly as we can copy it. And the Internet came to the library this year. The weekly Internet Drop-In
sessions (a tutorial for Web neophytes) were popular, and we are pleased to announce that we finally
Page (we were one of the
first libraries in
program was
latter
the state with their
have public access to the Internet (instead of accessing
it
a kick off for the
own home page on
from the
the
library office).
The library also hosted or cosponsored programs with the Sandown Public Library Friends and the
Sandown Historical Society such as "Telephone Comes to New Hampshire", a three part series on the
History of New Hampshire Railroads and a Musical Program at the Town Hall. There were also several
book discussions of titles ranging from "My Name is Asher Lev" to "You Just Don't Understand" and
"Wind in the Willows".
Visits appear to
have decreased
slightly in 1996, but circulation has increased to the highest level in the
this year totalled $5,330 and included museum passes to the New
England Aquarium, the Children's Metamorphosis, the Children's Museum of Portsmouth and the
McAuliffe Planetarium as well as books, audio tapes, magazine subscriptions and the sign for the library's
hours. A big thank you to the Sandown Public Library Friends, the Sandown Mother's Club, the
history of the library.
Sandown
Donations
Rockingham Herb
Mariow, Dot Drowne, the Murrays, the
anonymous donors, Amelia Liesse and the many
residents of Sandown who volunteered time and/or made donations to make our library a fun place to be.
On behalf of the trustees and staff, I'd also like to thank the people of Sandown for their continued
Lion's Club, the
Society, Hazel
Traegers, the Gaudreaus, the True-Rogan Family, our
support of the
library.
Justine Shaffner
Director,
Sandown
Public Library
i7-
LIBRARY CIRCULATION STATISTICS
1996
1996
Adult Fiction/Non-Fiction
8,091
Children's Fiction/Non-Fiction
14,885
Non-Book
5,446
Materials
(Audios, Videos, Magazines ...)
InterlibraPy-
Loan Requests
Filled
28,686
Total Circulation
Materials
Added
Total Materials
/
in
,864
Discarded
1
Library
16,606
/
14,857
Visits
Respectfully submitted,
Justine Shaffner
Director,
264
Sandown
Public Library
46
SANDOWN PUBLIC LIBRARY
Treasurer's Report
For the Year Ended December 31,
1996
APPROPRIATIONS
Operating Budget
Supplemental arrant (Article 10)
\^J
TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS
46 ,496 .00
10,000.00
56 ,496 .00
REVENUES
Interest
8,131.77
Dona t ions
5,329 53
Fine s
.
1
Other Income
TOTAL REVENUES
,
770.80
446 .70
15,678. 80
EXPENDITURES
Salaries and Wages
28, 138.08
Books
18,654.26
Shelving
2,729.24
Electricity
2,657.72
Programs
1
,371 .42
Repairs and Maintenance
1
,299
Office Expenses
1
,291 .91
Technolo gy
1
,200.45
.
85
Heat
767.93
Telephone
733 .56
Equipment
400.00
NHCF Management and Investment Fees
389 .27
Due s
285 .00
Mileage
261 .44
Material s
244.35
Training and Education
Shipping and Postage
184.03
Adver t
148.46
i s
ing
TOTAL EXPENDITURES
171.49
60,928 .46
,
TOWN OF SANDOWN
HEALTH DEPARTINIENT
320 Main
Sanddwn.
Street
New Hampshire 03873
Incorporalod 1756
Tel: 16031
SS7-3646
The Health Officer and the Selectmen constitute the Board of Health.
The Board of Health and Animal Control together make up the Rabies
Control Authority.
As the Health Officer, I am responsible for a
number of duties.
As a licensed installer, I am able to inspect
septic systems.
I review new plan designs,
test pits, perc tests,
failed systems and the various levels of septic system construction.
Sandown enjoys concurrent jurisdiction with the State Department of
Environmental Services.
This allows the Health Officer to have more
enforcement powers in evaluating septic system situations.
The
State relies on the town to inspect bed bottoms.
The State and
town both conduct final inspections on the completed systems.
also assist the State by inspecting Day Cares and Foster Cares.
collect water samples for residents who may have well problems
(kits are available at the Town Hall for residents desiring to do
their own testing).
investigate odor complaints, rodent problems,
I
housing standards on rental units, refuse removal and I collect
beach water for testing at Seeley Park during the summer.
I
I
rlier this year, the Board or Selectmen adopted the State s Food
Codde (He-P2300).
These are the rules governing inspections of food
es
establishments.
This allows the Health Officer to enforce these
rules in instances where the public health may be threatened
(contaminated water, fly/rodent infestations, temperature abuses of
prepared foods).
As the State Food Inspectors are so overloaded
with work, this allows local authorities to assist on the first line
def pnsp against
ap-ainst food-borne
fnnd — borne illnesses
I'llnessps.
of defense
Toward the end of the year, indoor air quality issues in the modular
classrooms at our elementary school were exposed.
High mold and
bacterial counts and high CO2 levels are being reduced and corrected
by correcting the standing water under these units, adjusting the
fans to cycle constantly and by disinfecting all classrooms and
ventilation systems.
Indoor air quality in schools is a newlyexplored topic.
Some researches show that poor indoor air quality
contributes to learning disabilities.
This is an area that I am
getting quite an education in.
Thanking all of those town personnel and residents for working with
me to achieve a closer step to the public health and safety of our
town
I
remain,
Mary Ellen Tufts
Health Officer
-90-
SANDOWN,
N.H.
EMERGENCY ^L4]\AGE^IE^T ORGANIZATION
This has been one of the most exciting years, in terms of weather, that
snows of Januar)'-March, the
The
flood,
Fall Flood,
and the December
many
one of the areas worst on record produced
Sandown has seen
Snow Storm
in a while.
The heavy
& Blackout have taken their toll on us
flooded basements and closed roads.
Many
all.
families
of the Sandown Volunteer Fire Dept & Rescue Squad who pumped basements
and back yards for three days. Many of these emergency personnel missed work to take care of the town. They
should be commended for their efforts. In addition, many of the wives of the Fire Fighters came down and made
were brought
a
huge meal
relief by the efforts
for the guys.
They
too, should be
commended.
December Snow Storm & Blackout resulted in a power outage that lasted from Saturday evening to
Wednesday for a large portion of the town. This extensive outage resulted in the first opening of a Sandown
Emergency Evacuation Shelter in recent history. The shelter was at the Fire Station. The Red Cross was notified,
cots & blankets were sent down from Manchester, and information was posted on TV & radio. In addition, FOX
DEN Retirement Home, a town alternate shelter, opened its' doors to any elderly that might want a place to stay.
Volunteers called in to help man the shelter.. .a few names come to mind: Eleanor Bassett, Mrs. Fardella, Paul
Bertoncini,... In the end though, no one came to a shelter for help. I was told that Danville had the same result.
Tlie hearty New England stock we raise around here tends to take care of itself when a crisis arises. Imagine how
our country would be if everyone was so self reliant.
Tlie
1996 has been anotlier busy year for me. Below
is
a Hst
of accomplishments.
The town computer (Warrant Article 25: 1995 Town Meeting) has been set up at the Fire Station and has
become a tool for Fire, Rescue, Emergency Management, and Memorial & Old Home Day Parade planning.. It is
•
still
being used to develop the
Sandown Emergency
Operations- Plan.
Gerry Lachance have remodeled the dispatch office and
•
The Sandown Emergencj' Operations Plan
be put together. This document
•
I
is
is still
Fire
being developed.
& Fire
& printer.
Chief Irving Bassett
biult in a beautifiil spot for the
Many
computer
Fighter
department sections have yet to
being developed to provide response to various emergency scenarios.
had the Greater Manchester American Red Cross perform their annual survey of the SandowTi Centtal
The facilit>' was once again approved as a Red Cross evacuation shelter.
School.
•
The new owners of Fox Den Retirement community, in keeping with the fradition of the previous owners,
have graciously offered the services of their facility in the event of an emergency. I again performed a shelter
survey this year and found that this facility is equipped with emergency power, water and heat. Having Fox Den
as an altemate shelter
is
Sandown.
a great benefit for
I
thank the
FOX DEN for their continued community spirit.
had the tovms Radiological Monitoring Kits upgraded to the current standard at no cost. Then arranged for
the Office of Emergency Management to teach an Infroductory Radiological Monitoring course to 25 Police
•
I
Officers, Police
Cadets and Fire Fighters.
Emergency Planning Committee, consisting of the heads of town departments met a few times this
year to discuss emergency management needs for Sandown in the future. It was agreed that the biggest challenge
facing Sandown, is tiie ability to shelter people during a cold weather emergency when the power will be out for an
•
Tlie Local
extended time.
•
Building Inspector,
system to
Ken Sherwood
thinking about how(or
&
myself surveyed the Sandown Central Schools power distribution
We were not impressed
backup emergency power could ever be applied.
with the poorly marked, somewhat randomly distributed electrical system in the school.
start
if)
At the end of this
fiscal year, I will be unable to continue the duties as Emergency Management Coordinator.
In
have greatiy increased my responsibilities in the N.H. Army National Guard and have become an
officer on the Rescue Squad. These things require great amounts of time. I encourage any of you who are retired,
to approach the Selectmen about performing this duty. Many of the responsibilities require someone who can be
the past year
I
available during the
weekdays. Thank you
for letting
me serve you.
Kevin M. Major
-91-
.-xoN
Sandown Conservation Commission
Report 1996
vv
N
Dave Cheney, Jane
Neskey and Ralph Millard.
The Sandown Conser/ation Commission was assigned a new liaison in March,
Dave Cheney and Jane Neskey joined the SCC in May.
The SCC held their first fishing derby May 4, 1 996 at Seeley Park. We had a
great turn out and a good time was had by all. We are in the process of planning our
second one and if you are interested in helping just call.
The SCC was awarded a match grant from the Rockingham Planning
Commission to have some new maps of Sandown made. These maps include town
wide base map' wetland map, aquifers map, soil types and watersheds map. When
these maps are done they will be in the town hall for everyone to use. We know they
IVIembers: Chairman: Heidi Chaput, Secretary: Laura Stundze,
will
be
helpful.
The SCC
held a DES wetlands Bureau rule change workshop on Sept 12,1996
town hall. Kathleen Merriam, Resources and training officer for NH Department of
Environmental Services, was our guest speaker.
On Oct 12,1996 The SCC participated in the Exeter River clean up.
The SCC wrote a warrant article for 1997 which is to see if the town will vote to
deposit 25% of the revenues collected pursuant to
RSA 79-A in a conservation fund for the strict purpose of purchasing open space
land for conservation use only in accordance with RSA-A:5III as authorized by RSA
79-A:2511. There are 60 towns in NH that have already agreed to deposit all or a
at
portion of this tax
in
the conservation fund.
The SCC is trying to make Sandown residents more aware of their enviroment
and what the new rules mean for them. Anyone that lives within 50 feet of water or
wetland
to
see
if
contact the SCC before doing any projects to their land or home
other applications are needed.
are also always looking for new members. If you are interested or have any
may want to
We
questions feel free to
call
the
Town
Hall.
-92-
.
REPORT OF THE SANDOWN HISTORICAL SOCIETY
1996
Founded in 1977 as the Sandown Historical Society and Museum, the
Society is one of Sandown's cultural attractions.
Housed in the old Boston and Maine Railroad Depot, the Society
Its collection of railroad memorabilia
serves several functions.
and artifacts about early town life serve to remind townspeople
and visitors alike of the factors contributing to Sandown life as
It also serves an educational function each year
it is today.
when 3rd, 4th and 5th grade schoolchildren visit the Museum and
receive a guided tour through the exhibits by Bertha Deveau, devoted
The Museum is a great place for children at
Curator of the Museum.
any
t
ime
a tourist attraction, the Museum is visited by people from all
Tourists
over the United States and from foreign countries as well.
help to contribute to the upkeep of the Museum and may often spend
In this respect, the Society and
money elsewhere in the Town.
Museum represent an economic asset to the Town.
As
The Society also often is called upon to aid in tracing ancestors
In this regard, Bertha Deveau's
for both townspeople and visitors.
intimate knowledge of the town together with historical materials
housed at the Depot have often furnished the desired information.
With the aim of continuing to serve the Town and making the Museum
an attractive place to visit the Society during the past year
The exterior
embarked upon a physical rehabilitation program.
of the Depot has been completely repainted and a new walkway installed
Work has begun on refurbishing the two flanger cars donated to the
New roofs have been put on both cars and
Society several years ago.
new siding will be added during the coming year, the whole finished
No tax funds were expended on this
with an attractive coat of paint.
work, funding coming from the Society's own resources developed over
the years from contributions to the Society and from the sale of
materials about Sandown at the Depot.
You can
The strength of the Society lies in its membership.
contribute to the quality of life in Sandown by becoming a member
Inquiries may be sent to the undersigned at PO Box 405, Sandown.
Paul M. Densen
President
REPORT OF ROCKINGHAM COMMUNITY ACTION
Rockingham Community Action (RCA) is a private, non-profit corporation. Our mission is to serve the multitude of needs of
Rockingham County's low/-income residents by assisting them in coping with the hardships of poverty, giving them the tools to
seeking to eradicate the root causes of poverty. RCA has been addressing these needs for
lift themselves out of poverty and
over
thirty
years.
Greater Salem Community Action Center is an outreach office of RCA that serves residents of Sandown and 1 1 other
communities, and as such acts as Sandown's central resource for information regarding all available human services. RCA
also offers intake, clinic and distribution sites in over half of the county's thirty-seven communities for the application and
provision of various
Community Action
services.
Community Action provides a wide range of services that are unduplicated elsewhere in the county. Most of these seni/ices
meet immediate, critical needs and all have a direct and positive impact on people's lives. The following services were
provided by Community Action to eligible residents of Sandown from July 1, 1995 through June 30, 1996:
27 households received one of a group of Fuel Assistance Programs, services that provide financial grants of up to $585 to
income eligible households to assist with energy-related expenses through the Fuel Assistance Program (some households
also receive furnace cleaning and budget and energy counseling services), or grants of up to $250 for fuel and utility
emergencies for households not eligible for the Fuel Assistance Program through the Neighbor Helping Neighbor and the
Senior Energy Assistance Service.
6 homes were weatherized through the Weatherization or Energy Management Services Programs, which provide high quality
energy conservation materials and skilled labor to weatherize homes of income-eligible and high energy-using households in
order to reduce heating costs and conserve energy, and provides major repairs or replacement of heating systems for lowincome homeowners.
36 children and day care providers participated in the Family Day Care Program, which provides training and technical
assistance to day care providers and sponsorship of the USDA Child and Adult Care Food Program.
care referrals were arranged through the Child Care Resource and Referral Program, which compiles current data on
employees of participating companies as well as to the general
25
child
all
available child care options, provides child care referrals to
public,
and expands the supply of
quality child care by recruiting, training
and assisting new
child
care providers.
6 individuals received services through Family Support Programs, which provide support services, transportation and
protective child care to support and stabilize families at risk of child abuse through the Accompanied Transportation and
Family Resource & Support Programs.
1 individual participated in Seacoast HealthNet, which provides access to health care for medically indigent individuals
through age 64 through the provision of physician-based medical care, family support services and health education.
infants and children received help through the WIC or Commodity Supplemental Food Programs: WIC offers
supplemental nutritious foods, nutrition education, breast-feeding support and health care screening/referrals to pregnant
women, nursing mothers, infants and children up to the age of five; the Commodity Supplemental Food Program provides
monthly allotments of commodity foods and nutrition education materials to senior citizens, postpartum women and 5 year old
69 women,
children.
1
child
enrolled in Head Start, a comprehensive early childhood development program that provides education,
and family support services to income eligible pre-school children and their families.
was
nutrition
219 individuals received food through the Emergency Food Assistance Program, which
emergency food pantries, soup kitchens and shelters throughout Rockingham County.
health,
USDA surplus food
distributes
to
10 food allotments were provided through the Emergency Food Pantry, which provides temporary emergency supplies of nonperishable food to households facing severe economic hardship.
1
household received Crisis Services, programs that provide emergency grants to income
eligible
households
of rent, mortgage, electricity, fuel or other basic necessities for those facing evictions, foreclosures,
fuel or other
emergencies.
-94-
utility
for the
payment
terminations, lack of
were enrolled in the Emergency Response System, a program that provides immediate twenty-four hour access
community medical responders for disabled individuals in order to ensure their safety and maintain their independence and
2 households
to
quality of
1
life.
individual received help through the Health
Insurance Counseling, Education and Assistance Service (HICEAS), which
provides the services of trained volunteers to assist Medicare recipients with a wide range of health insurance needs,
including supplemental health insurance options and Medicare and Medicaid benefits and claims.
much of our staff time is devoted to working with people who come to us seeking help
logged 120 calls or visits from Sandown residents, many of which were crisis calls involving fuel or
utility problems, the lack of food or clothing, or general financial needs. By working closely together with local and state
welfare administrators, fuel and utility companies, other human service agencies and interested clergy and civic groups, we
In
addition to these major programs,
During the past year,
are able to
link
those
we
in
need with the services available
to
them.
The services provided by our staff, together with the programs provided by our agency, have a direct and significant effect on
Sandown's welfare budget. If our services were decreased due to lack of funding, the town would experience a resulting
increase
in
requests for local welfare assistance.
we provide greatly relieve the towns we serve of the full financial burden of providing for the needs of their
low-income residents, we ask every community we serve to make a financial contribution to our agency based upon the level
of service we have provided to its residents. The amount we request equals 5% of the total dollar value of services we
Since the services
provided during the previous fiscal year, which
means
that
we
request $5.00 for every $100.00
provided
in
direct services.
1995 through June 30, 1996, Community Action provided $89,204 in services to Sandown residents. We are
Sandown to contribute 5% of this amount, or $4,460. The town of Sandown has contnbuted
our agency for many years, and we extend our appreciation to you for your continued support.
From
July
1,
therefore requesting the town of
to
we
Cordially,
Connie Young, Outreach Center Director
Greater Salem Community Action Center
Rockingham Community Action
95-
.
SANDOWN RECREATION COMMISSION
1996 ANNUAL REPORT
With the support of town residents the Recreation Commission
was able to achieve many goals during 1996.
Major accomplishments included the addition of a third ballfield,
and a basketball court, at the Roy L. Miller Recreation Field.
Continued improvements were made to Seeley Park, the Summer
Swim Program was reinstituted, and a new Summer Recreation
Program for children of the town was begun.
Following the approval of the warrant article for the ballfield,
specifications were drawn up and sent out for bid. Local
resident Dave White, owner of David W. White and Son,
Incorporated was the sole bidder on the project. He was awarded
the bid by the Board of Selectmen.
The Commission would like to commend Mr. White for the fine
Also, we would be sorely
job he did installing the new field.
remiss if a huge thank-you was not extended to the Volunteer
These outstanding volunteers kept the field
Fire Department.
watered throughout the summer, ensuring that the grass would
take hold.
A debt of gratitude is owed to them by all. Please
stop and see the beautiful new field in your travels.
The new basketball court came about as an agreement between
the Planning Board and a developer responsible for providing
recrea'tional facilities.
Four hoops are available for play
We anticipate installing timed lighting,
at the paved court.
waste receptacle, and a bench as well.
The Commission was fortunate to have two members on board who
handled planning and programming of the Summer Program for
children. Both Linda Meehan and Janet Gustavson have extensive
training in teaching, childcare, and recreational planning.
Mrs. Gustavson also has a background in waterfront safety and
directing, and handled many of the details concerning the
waterfront at Seeley Park. Thank-you to both of them.
Although the number of participants was lower than expected
for the Summer Rec Program, the Commission feels the numbers
were appropriate for a "start up" program. There is a warrant
article this year asking for the appropriation of funds for
this program. Again, the appropriation will be offset by fees
charged for the program and will have a -0- impact for the
taxpayers
The Commission has also submitted a warrant article seeking
permission from the voters to establish a "Recreation Commission
Revolving Fund". The establishment of the fund will enable the
Commission to plan more programs and pay for them with fees
collected to cover their cost. Currently, when residents
approach us with an idea for recreation our hands
-96-
.
.
Programs must be planned for, prior
are pretty much tied.
to the annual town meeting. When an idea is submitted mid-year,
no matter how wonderful, if money has not been appropriated
for it at town meeting, it can't take place. Not even when the
cost is offset by fees. Those fees are required to go into the
General Fund.
The establishment of a Revolving Fund (see RSA 35-B:3) would
enable the Commission to have more flexability in program
It would also enable donations to be taken in for
planning.
recreational use and/or recreational equipment. Recreational
fund raisers, such as dances, could take place and the money
raised used for recreational purposes. The town treasurer acts
as custodian for the fund and it is dispersed through
authorization of the Recreation Commission.
The Commission is happy to report that attendance at Seeley
Beach has risen dramatically as more and more residents discover
We will continue
this "hidden jewel" that belongs to all of us.
to work with residents on providing a safe and clean environment
We are hopeful that plans to enlarge and
at the waterfront.
improve the beach and swimming area will continue.
Unfortunately much of the work that went into improvements last
year was, quite literally, washed away during the huge rainstorm
Sand, recently spread, will need to be replaced.
in October.
Broken trees and limbs need to be removed, as do broken docks
and other debris washed up in the storm. We will be looking
Your help would
for volunteers to lend a hand come spring.
be appreciated!
At the lower ballfield at Miller Field, drainage work was done
last summer to keep the field from washing out due to water
run off. The drainage has worked out well but nothing short
maybe 1) would have held the water back during that
of a dam
storm. Work again needs to be done to keep the field in playing
shape
(
Anticipated lighting at the new basketball court, increases
for rental of portable toilets, and maintenance of the fields
(mowing, poison ivy control etc.) have contributed to a rise
in the budget.
The Commission will continue to work hard to provide recreational
activities and facilities to townspeople. We appreciated the
efforts of everyone who has contributed time and effort to the
programs. We look foward to serving the town in the upcoming
year and invite you to attend our meetings with your thoughts,
ideas and concerns
Respectfully submitted,
,
Edward L. Mencis, Chairman
-97-
,
.
SANDOWN FIRE DEPARTMENT
I am glad to report that the year 1996 is over for the Sandown Fire
Department!
Although actual fire calls were down, everything else
kept us busy.
We continually found out that Mother Nature can cause
many problems for emergency personnel.
Many major snow storms started the year causing power outages with
limbs and trees down and lots of calls to the Fire Department.
The spring and summer months were very busy with training programs.
Most of the members took part in an intense propane gas fire training
weekend at a training center in Brentwood.
The way that the men
handled leaking propane tanks, which at times were fully involved
in flames and tremendous heat was an awesome sight.
We also had five of our newer fire fighters taking a 120 hour fire
fighter certification program.
They all put in many extra hours
and passed all of the courses and are now certified fire fighters.
Later in the year, the great floods of '96 came along and created
problems that were new to us.
We spent four days at the fire station
dealing with flooded cellars, closed roads, etc.
Several of our firemen and I took part in a dramatic rescue of a
teenager from a culvert that was flooded from all the rain.
A combined
effort by everyone from passers-by, police and fire-rescue personnel
made a real scary scene turn out okay and a young man's life was saved!
finish out the year, we had to deal with one more storm that left
some residents without electricity for several days.
We spent one
night during the storm cutting trees and trying to keep the roads
open for emergency services.
This was the most dangerous and scary
night ever for the fire and rescue personnel.
To
Many of the members of the Sandown Fire and Rescue gave lots of hours
of service to the residents of Sandown in 1996.
This means lots of
time away from home and family.
This is a great and dedicated group
of Fire and Rescue officers and members and I am proud to be Chief
of such an organization.
Thanks to all for the support given to the Sandown Fire and Rescue
Department
S
incerely
Irving Bassett
Fire Chief
98-
SANDOW^ POLICE DEPARTMENT
TOWN REPORT FOR 1996
The Sandown Police Department has had another busy and
again. This year our "Calls for Service" are close to the
effective year.
Our
statistics
have increased once
5000 mark. As the town grows and
society's negative
everywhere which includes Sandown, police department's automatically have
effects spread
much more
to deal
with.
All of us strive regularly to better ourselves through training at Police Standards and Training, through
different
programs offered by Federal Agencies, State Agencies throughout
organizations.
New England and local military
Some Officers have traveled to Connecticut on their own time to receive
extensive training.
We are connecting with police agencies all over the country for different ideas, programs and procedures to fight
We have made much progress in "the war against drugs", several arrests were made during 1996 for drug
offenses. We are also taking advantage of the training, seminars and lectures offered by agencies in Rockingham
crime.
County,
many being generated by the County Attorney's
Our Explorer Program
is
Office.
going strong, five more Explorers have joined. Officer Brad Apitz
is
The Explorers held a Child and Elderly Registry. Those who attended were fmgerprinted and
information
Old
was
recorded.
They performed
Cadets went on to become
career choice
Our plans
is
donated $200.00 to the Hampstead PoHce K-9
Academy in Nashua
this
for the future include
is
unit.
Two of our
summer. Since the application of the Program, four of our
Law Enforcement Personnel. Most recently Adam Dyer has
law enforcement, and
emergency
Bishop Benefit, the Fireworks Display on
traffic control at the Scott
Home Day and the Parade. The Explorer's
Explorers attended the Cadet
Head Advisor.
their
left to
join the military, his
presently a Militaiy Police Officer.
more innovative procedures,
policies,
community
services,
and
implementation of modem and effective techniques. To expand on our professionalism in serving our community.
We are also fortunate to have willing, eager, and professional personnel in this department which yield strong
team work,
efforts
and resuUs.
On behalf of myself and the Sandown PoUce Department, I would like to extend a
support, encouragement and cooperation throughout the year.
Sincerely,
J.Scott Currier
Chief of Police
99-
Sincere
Thank you
for all your
SANDOWN POLICE DEPARTMENT
STATISTICS FOR 1996
Motor Vehicle (Summons)
194
956
Abandoned Vehicle
26
Motor Veliicle (\\'amings)
Motor Vehicle (Cond.Summons)
Accident
66
Neighbor Disputes
12
Aided Motorists
98
Noise Complaints
37
Aided Person
186
O.H.R.V. Complaints
32
102
Parking Complaints
23
Alarms
Animal Complaints
445
Arrests
146
Assaults
11
Assist Other Police
321
Att. Stolen Vehicle
03
Bad Check
Burglary
17
08
56
Police Information
123
Possible D.W.I.
15
Protective Custody
03
Prowler
06
Public Hazard
48
Reckless Operation
45
Recovered Property
27
04
Released Property
17
Standby
47
Restraining Order Viol.
03
Criminal Mischief
62
Schoolbus Complaints
06
Security Checks
94
Child Abuse
Civil
Disorderly Conduct
08
Domestic
54
Domestic Assault
12
Domestic Juvenile
09
Drug Offense
D.W.I.
34
13
Fire Assists
61
Fireworks
05
Follow-up
Sei-ve
92
papers
163
Sexual Assaults
03
Stalking
01
Stolen Vehicle
03
Suspicious Activity
166
Suspicious Vehicle
79
Suspicious Person
27
Theft
50
03
Harassment
25
Theft of Services
Run
Illegal Dumping
04
Threatening
09
01
Traffic Control
40
Investigations
51
Trespassing
07
176
Unsecure Building
11
Lost Property
24
Untimely Death
01
Medical Assists
116
Vandalism
16
Mental Person
01
WeU Being Check
23
Miscellaneous
62
Weldy Arrests
62
Missing Person
05
(mmors
Hit and
Juvenile Complaints
in poss.of alcohol)
Weapons Viol.
100-
06
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NOTES
NOTES
TELEPHONE NUMBERS
&
BUSINESS HOURS
EMERGENCY- NUMBERS
AMBULANCE
911
FIRE
911
POLICE
911
RESCUE SQUAD
911
OTHER IMPORTANT NUMBERS
POISON CONTROL CENTER
1-800-6 43-4000
SHERIFF'S DEPARTMENT
1-800-582-717 7
STATE POLICE
1-800-8 52-3 411
SCHOOL NUMBERS
SANDOWN CENTRAL SCHOOL (MAIN ST.)
887-3648
TIMBERLANE JUNIOR HIGH
382-7131
TIMBERLANE HIGH SCHOOL
382-6541
SUPERINTENDENT'S OFFICE
382-6119
TOWN ADMINISTRATION
SELECTMEN'S OFFICE
(Hours:
8:30 AM - 12:00,
887-3646
12:30 PM
-
3:00 PM)
TOWN CLERK/TAX COLLECTOR
(Hours: 8:00 AM - 12:00, 1:00 PM - 3:00)
(Add. hrs. 4:30 PM - 7:30 PM (Mon. eves.)
887-4870
FIRE CHIEF
887-4806
POLICE ADMINISTRATION
887-3887
ANIMAL CONTROL OFFICER
887-3887
HEALTH OFFICER
887-3646
HIGHWAY DEPT./ROAD AGENT
887-3484
887-6100
HISTORICAL SOCIETY
LIBRARY
.
887-4655
SANDOWN POST OFFICE
887-5498
TRANSFER STATION
BURNING PERMITS
887-3428
Carroll Bassett
887-3453
Irving Bassett
887-4659
Jim Bassett
887-3496
Lloyd Lessard
887-3967