CAB Training

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CAB Training
ITSSAR ACCREDITED
LIFT TRUCK TRAINING COURSES
Operator Course Manual
Notes
IMPORTANT PLEASE READ
Induction – CAB Training
1. Please ensure you sign the fire register, located in the canteen.
2. If in the event of a fire please leave at the nearest fire exit, go straight to the fire
muster point, at the end of the yard, near the path.
3. Smoking, taking drugs and drinking alcohol is not permitted at CAB Training.
Anyone found drinking alcohol or taking drugs at CAB Training will be asked to
leave the premises. Smoking is permitted only in the designated area, outside of
the units. Please ensure you put only cigarette ends in the bins provided, not
rubbish.
4. Please make sure when entering unit 3 and 5, you use the pedestrian walkway.
Do not run.
5. The first aid kit is located near the main office in unit 5, and your first aider on site
is Carol Brown, who is located in the main office in unit 5.
6. DANGER – This is a forklift training area, please be aware there are moving
vehicles at CAB Training.
7. During Training please switch off mobile phones.
8. Tea and coffee is available in the canteen.
9. CAB Training operates the following policies: Equal Opportunities – Equality &
Diversity – Health and Safety – Grievance, Complaints and Appeals Procedure,
for more information on any of these, please speak to Carol Brown.
10. One last thing, if you use the canteen facility please keep it nice and tidy and
clear your rubbish up!
Page 1
Lift Truck Driver Training.
Why do Fork Lift Operators need to be certified?
Under the Health and Safety at Work Act of 1974, and under The Provision and
Use of Work Equipment regulations 1998, no one should be permitted to operate a
lift truck until they have been selected, trained and authorised to do so.
The responsibility for the safe operation of lift trucks in the workplace lies with both the
employers and employees. Managers, supervisors and operators alike must play their
part to ensure the safety of those working on or in the vicinity of lift trucks.
The Law states that the employer has a duty as far as is reasonably practicable to
ensure your safety at work. They must give you the information, instruction and training
necessary to ensure that you can do your job safely and keep records of your training.
An Approved Code of Practice (ACOP L117) is published by the Health and safety
Executive to assist employers and trainers to do this.
They must also provide you with the necessary protective clothing free of charge.
You must take care of yourself and others. You must co-operate with your employer in
the interests of safety and not interfere with the equipment provided.
Page 2
Penalties for breaking the law:
1.
2.
Summary conviction at a Magistrates Court.
a.
For breaches of sub section 2 to 6 of the Health and Safety at Work Act
1974.
Maximum fine £20,000.
b.
Failing to comply with an Improvement or Prohibition Notice.
Maximum fine £20,000.
c.
For breaches of the remaining sections of the H&S at Work Act and
Subordinate regulations.
Maximum fine £20,000.
Indictment at a Crown Court.
a.
b.
c.
Certain offences involving required licences.
Certain offences involving explosives.
Contravention of an improvement or prohibition notice.
Maximum penalty 2 years imprisonment and an unlimited fine.
PLEADING IGNORANCE IS NO DEFENCE.
Page 3
Types of Training.
Once a candidate has been selected, he/she will undergo 3 types of training. These are
Basic, Specific Job and Familiarisation Training.
Basic Training consists of a comprehensive operator’s course, in this case carried out
at CAB Training, Training Centre. The course will include the theory of safe operating,
practical driving skills and ends with a practical assessment of the operator’s skills. The
course is designed and overseen by ITSSAR
Specific Job Training is additional information and practice required to operate safely
at a particular site. This may include training on a particular type of machine including
the use of its controls, the layout of premises (highlighting danger areas), various
attachments in use there and specific site rules.
Familiarisation Training is carried out on the job under normal working conditions.
Close supervision by a responsible person is essential to ensure that that the new
operator is fully competent and safe at that site.
Always remember that manufacturers are continually updating and designing new
equipment and it is the individual’s responsibility as well as their employers to ensure
that individuals receive additional specific and or familiarisation training before operating
any truck.
More importantly to the individual, ensure that you have your employer’s written
consent before operating any truck.
Page 4
COURSE CONTENT.
Only fully qualified and accredited ITSSAR Forklift training Instructors/Examiners, who
after passing rigorous courses laid down by the relevant training board are able to offer
training and certification.
All lift truck courses are mainly practical in nature but do include an element of theory.
Trainees must be minimum school leaving age (16 ), reasonably fit and able to hear all
verbal instructions and audible warning signals.
No training can be undertaken by candidates who suffer from vertigo.
On completion of the course all operators will be able to use the lift truck safely and
efficiently in accordance with the manufactures handbook and to the standards laid
down by the Health & Safety Executive’s Approved Code of Practice (ACOP L117).
Operators will clearly understand the causes of instability of lift trucks and their loads, be
able to carry out routine pre-shift inspections and understand the importance of defect
reporting.
The operator will be able to replenish the machines energy source and operate it in a
variety of environments with varied loads.
On successful completion of the course and the ITSSAR Skills Test, trainees will receive
a certificate and photo ID card, confirming their competence to operate the relevant lift
truck for the course that they have attended.
It must be stressed however that the operator will need to gain experience whilst under
supervision in his given workplace and will be required to undergo a further period of
familiarisation training.
Page 5
Legislation
Health and Safety.
The Health and Safety at Work Act of 1974 etc. states that both employers and employees are
responsible for safety at work. Enforcement of this is carried out by the Health and Safety
Executive and the Local Authorities.
As part of this act, the employee is responsible for looking after the health and safety of
themselves as well as other people in the workplace. This means that lift truck drivers are
responsible for looking out for pedestrians.
They have to co-operate with the management on all aspects of safety and they must not
interfere, misuse, abuse, be reckless or modify anything provided for health, safety and welfare.
The lift truck operator’s code of practice is provided to advise duty holders on how to comply
with legislation.
The law
Employers have a duty under health and safety law to ensure, as far as is
reasonably practicable, the health, safety and welfare of their employees.
The main legislation applying to the use of lift trucks is:
(a) the Health and Safety at Work etc Act 1974 (HSW Act);
(b) the Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1999;
(c) the Provision and Use of Work Equipment Regulations 1998;
(d) the Lifting Operations and Lifting Equipment Regulations 1998;
(e) the Workplace (Health, Safety and Welfare) Regulations 1992;and
(f) the Construction (Design and Management) Regulations 2007.
Page 6
The Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations
1999
5 The Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1999
require a risk assessment to be carried out to identify the nature and level of risks associated
with a work activity.
Appropriate precautions need to be taken to eliminate or control these risks.
A proportionate response according to the risk is required.
The higher the level of risk identified through the assessment, the greater the measures that
will be needed to reduce it.
Risk assessment provides the basis for safe systems of work to eliminate or reduce risks as far
as possible.
Safe systems of work are formal procedures which should be followed to ensure that work is
carried out safely.
They are necessary where risks cannot be controlled adequately by other means.
Employers must ensure that the systems of work to be followed are properly
implemented and monitored, and that details have been given to those at risk.
Page 7
The Provision and Use of Work Equipment Regulations 1998
6 The Provision and Use of Work Equipment Regulations 1998 apply to all work equipment.
They require that:
(a) work equipment should be suitable for the purpose for which it is used or provided, and
should be properly maintained and inspected at suitable intervals;
(b) where the use of work equipment is likely to involve specific risks, the use, maintenance etc
of that equipment is restricted to people given the task of using and/or maintaining it
(c) users, supervisors and managers have received adequate training for purposes
of health and safety, including: training in the methods which may be adopted when using work
equipment; any risks which such use may entail; and precautions to be taken.
The Regulations also require that lift trucks which carry a seated ride-on operator
should be fitted with a restraining system, such as a seat belt, if risk assessment
indicates that there is a risk of the vehicle rolling over and the operator falling from
the operating position and being crushed between the truck and the ground.
Page 8
The Lifting Operations and Lifting Equipment Regulations
1998
7 The Lifting Operations and Lifting Equipment Regulations 1998 deal
with specific hazards/risks associated with lifting equipment and lifting operations.
They replaced most sector-specific legislation on lifting to create a single set of regulations that
apply to all sectors. Management should ensure that every lifting operation involving a lift truck
is:
(a) properly planned by a competent person;
(b) appropriately supervised; and
(c) carried out in a safe manner.
For most lift truck work, planning will usually be a matter for the operator, who should therefore
have the appropriate training, knowledge and expertise.
While experienced lift truck operators may not be under direct supervision every time they carry
out routine lifts, they may need to be supervised if required to lift an unusual load, or to lift in
potentially hazardous conditions.
Page 9
The Workplace (Health, Safety and Welfare) Regulations
8 The Workplace (Health, Safety and Welfare) Regulations
require that workplaces should be organised to ensure that vehicles and pedestrians can move
around safely. This includes:
(a) sufficient lighting to enable people to work and move around safely (including
not obscuring lights by stacking goods in front of them);
(b) construction of floors and traffic routes to ensure that they are suitable for the
purpose for which they will be used and do not expose users to health and
safety risks;
(c) organisation of traffic routes to enable pedestrians and vehicles to circulate
safely; and
(d) the need to ensure that doors or gates which can be pushed open from either
side give a clear view, when shut, of the space close to both sides.
More detailed advice on these and other legal requirements is available in the
Approved Codes of Practice (ACOPs) and Guidance
Page 10
The Industrial Lift Truck Drivers Guide.
Before starting work.
You must have ‘written authorisation’ from your employer to operate a lift truck in the working
environment. It is the drivers’ responsibility to ensure that the lift truck is in good working order
before using it. This involves carrying out a pre-shift check and an operational check. The preshift check involves examining items such as the forks, mast, chains, wheels, tyres, seat, horn
etc. the operational check should include the steering, brakes (both foot and parking), and the
hydraulics. If there is a serious fault with the truck, stop immediately and report it.
Driving the truck.
Ground surfaces can affect the truck considerably. Understand what effect they could have and
what you can do about it.
When preparing to move off, first select the direction you want to go, look around to ensure the
area is clear and then release the handbrake. Always travel with the forks as low as is practically
possible and tilted back.
Ensure that you can see where you’re going. In normal circumstances, if the load obscures your
view, drive the truck in reverse.
When approaching blind bends, doorways or when exiting narrow aisles, sound several short
blasts on the horn to attract attention.
Always leave at least three truck lengths clearance when following another truck around the
warehouse.
If driving across railway lines, drainage gullies etc. always cross slowly and if possible,
diagonally, this reduces the chance of tipping or loosing the load. Ensure that rubbish and
packaging is cleared away from areas where the truck is to be driven.
If a safety cage is to be used, ensure that it is up to the requirements laid down by the HSE. It
must be fixed securely to the forks and a safe method of use must be agreed before starting
work. Only authorised persons should be lifted in it.
Stability.
The load should always be against the heel of the forks to ensure the truck’s stability, the load
stability and also to keep the truck and load as short as possible in confined spaces.
Leaving a gap between the load and the heel of the forks is called undercutting the load and is
sometimes necessary if the forks are longer than the load and there is an obstruction behind it.
Undercutting can cause the truck to tip over forwards as will a load that is too heavy or if it’s
centre of gravity is too far forward.
Harsh braking, rough use of the hydraulics or handling a live load can also cause the truck to tip
over forwards. With the load high up, tilting the load forward will increase the load centre.
This, as well as harsh acceleration in reverse can also cause the truck to tip over forwards.
Trucks can also tip over sideways, usually because of driving round corners too fast, especially
when un-laden. Driving across a slope or having the load offset or uneven can cause a truck to
topple over sideways as can not having the forks evenly spaced or side shift centralised, turning
with the mast in the air or transporting a live load.
Page 11
Slopes.
Slopes will affect the stability of the lift truck. Driving a lift truck across a slope may cause it to tip
over sideways.
When on a slope, the load must always face up the slope so that it cannot slide forward off the
forks.
With an un-laden truck, the empty forks should face down the slope as this improves traction,
stability and adhesion. Normally, you would never park your truck on a slope. In an emergency,
if you have to park on a slope, always chock the wheels.
Calculating weights.
Before attempting to lift a load, you should know how much it weighs. It may have the weight
printed on it or on the accompanying paperwork.
Remember, the net weight is the weight of the product only; the gross weight is the weight of the
product, packaging, pallet, etc on the load.
In addition to the weight of the load, the load centre must be known.
The load centre is the measurement given forward from the front face of the fork arms to the
centre of gravity of the load. When the load centre is increased, the amount of weight the truck
can lift is reduced.
Remember, the weight of the loads left outside can be affected by rainwater or snow
Capacities.
Firstly, the truck must have a rated capacity plate attached to it.
This will tell you the maximum weight the truck can lift the load centre distance and the
maximum stacking height.
To calculate if a load can be lifted safely, you will need to find out how much the load weighs
and where its centre of gravity is.
Take the information on the trucks rated capacity plate and multiply the trucks weight capacity
by the trucks load centre capacity. Divide this by the load’s centre of gravity to find out the
maximum permitted weight of the load.
Handling loads.
Before attempting to move a load, find out what it is. Is it dangerous or hazardous? Find out how
much it weighs, where the load centre is and whether it is secure and stable.
Before operating the hydraulics, make sure that the parking brake is on and the truck is in
neutral. This ensures that the truck is stable and allows you to concentrate on operating the
controls.
You should stop the truck a short distance from the stack (150 – 200mm) so that pedestrians
cannot walk between the truck and the stack.
It also helps with accuracy and reduces possible damage to stacked loads. To comply with the
manufacturers stated lifted capacity and ensures the trucks stability, the mast must be vertical
and the truck be on level ground.
Before lifting a load, you should adjust the forks to suit. With a pallet, there should be equal
weight on each fork. However, with metal stillages or cages, the forks should be set as wide
apart as possible to prevent the stillage slipping sideways.
When transporting loads, ensure that they are as low as practically possible and that there is
sufficient back tilt to cater for the type of load and ground conditions.
The term Free lift is the distance that the forks can be raised before the mast begins to extend.
Lorry loading.
When loading or unloading a lorry, first ensure that the lorry / trailer cannot move. The parking
brake should be on, the keys removed and the wheels chocked. The unloading area should be
clear, level and free from uneven surfaces.
Page 12
Parking.
You should not park your truck blocking fire exits, fire fighting equipment, first aid points,
doorways or blind corners.
Also, avoid parking on slopes, near electrical boards or switches or on wet, muddy or soft
ground.
When parking, the forks should be tiled forwards and lowered to the ground to reduce the
chance of people tripping over them.
Page 13
Stability
THERE ARE TWO BASIC WAYS IN WHICH A TRUCK CAN OVERTURN.
LONGITUDINAL (Lengthways).
Caused by:
1.
Overturning.
2.
Undercutting.
3.
Tilting a raised load forward.
4.
Lifting or raising the load while facing downhill on a slope.
5.
Travelling forward down a slope with a load.
6.
Excessive braking when loaded.
7.
Erratic use of the speed control.
8.
Harsh use of the hydraulic controls.
9.
High winds (with a raised load).
Page 14
LATERAL (Sideways).
Caused by:
1.
Turning at excessive speed.
2.
Turning on a ramp or incline.
3.
Lifting or raising a load while sideways on a slope.
4.
Driving over obstacles, e.g. pieces of wood.
5.
Driving into potholes.
6.
Operating the truck with incorrect tyre pressures.
7.
Picking up a load off-centre to the forks.
8.
Incorrect use of the sideshift.
9.
High winds (with a raised load).
Page 15
They make fast work out of lifting, loading and unloading, stacking, and transferring
crates, drums, pallets, and other materials. But, forklifts can be dangerous if not
operated properly.
Drivers and colleagues can be hurt (or killed) by forklifts that tip over or fall off loading
bays,
or by collisions or falling loads.
In fact, more than 200 serious injuries a year are caused by improper forklift operations.
Nearly 1,000 other workers require time off due to injury.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Know how your forklift operates.
Understand the load characteristics: weight,
size, shape etc.
Drive safely (plan your route).
Load and unload safely.
Learn and follow the manufacturers and
company safety rules and procedures.
The HSE requires that only “Trained” and “Authorised” personnel operates forklifts.
Do not operate a FLT if you have not been trained or authorised.
You and your forklift make a powerful team.
Before using any forklift, be sure you:
•
•
•
•
Have been properly trained.
Read your operator’s manual and follow the
instructions.
Read the forklift data plate to see how heavy a
load it can carry – and stay within that range.
Follow all the manufacturers and your company’s
inspection procedures.
Page 16
Follow the rules of the “Road to Safety”.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
Never tilt a load while moving.
Stay at least three vehicle lengths behind the
vehicle ahead.
Keep out of pedestrian lanes and walk ways.
Always give the right-of-way to pedestrians.
Slow down, stop, and sound the horn at
intersections and blind spots.
Use the mirrors on your vehicle, plus those on the walls and ceilings to see
around
corners.
Follow your company policy on the use of a hard hat, protective gear, and seat
belt.
Do not use unapproved forklifts in areas that have flammable or explosive
materials.
Keep arms, hands, and legs inside the forklift.
Stay away from edges of ramps, platforms, and
elevated docks.
Avoid sharp turns.
Keep a clear view of where you’re going; drive in
reverse (except up slopes) if the load obstructs your
view – always look before reversing.
Don’t drive up to a person standing in front of a
bench, table, wall, or other fixed object.
Don’t let anyone stand or walk under the elevated part
of the forklift – full or empty.
Obey speed limits and other road signs, including floor
markings.
Remember, this is not a car, it’s a specialised machine.
Don’t let anyone ride on the forklift or use it to
lift people unless it is specifically designed for that
purpose or has an approved basket or lifting cage.
Don’t reach through the mast.
Don’t drive the forklift on to public roads unless you
hold the correct licence and the truck is also licensed.
Page 17
Rules of the road.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
Make sure you won’t hit overhead lights, wires, pipes, sprinklers, or opening
doors.
Don’t pass at intersections or blind spots.
Drive slowly over dock plates. Make sure they
are secured with bolts or pins.
Watch out for holes, grease, or uneven surfaces
on the floor.
Cross railroad tracks diagonally if possible.
Try not to run over loose objects.
Slow down for turns.
Stop before going into reverse.
Make wide turns to avoid tipping over.
On slopes.
•
•
•
•
Go up and down slopes slowly the correct way.
Point the load uphill if the slope grade is more
than 10%.
Note: As a general rule, it is wise to travel with
the load uphill.
Keep the load only as high as necessary to clear
the road surface so it doesn’t have far to fall.
Parking.
•
•
•
•
•
Park away from traffic, preferably on a flat surface, if you have to park on a
slope, chock the wheels.
Don’t block aisles, doors, exits, fire extinguishers, electrical panels, or access to
stairs.
Lower the forks to the floor and tilt them flat.
Put controls in neutral, turn off the machine, and set the brake.
Remove the key.
Loading.
•
Check the load. Make sure it’s
- within the trucks rated capacity.
- stable and centred – stack and / or tie
loose or uneven loads.
•
Use the proper lift fixture for specific loads, such as a carpet spike or drum
grappler.
Page 18
To pick up the load.
•
•
•
•
•
Set the forks wide and high enough to go under the load.
Drive into the loading position.
Put the load squarely on the forks.
Drive under the load until it touches the carriage slightly.
Lift the load. Tilt it back before travelling.
As you carry.
•
•
•
•
Keep the forks low – 150 – 200mm (4 – 6 inc) above the ground.
Carry loads low and tilted back.
Don’t carry anything on the overhead guard.
Do not raise or lower the load while moving.
Unloading.
•
•
•
Turn the forklift slowly into position.
Go straight into trailers or railcars.
If you’re unloading onto a truck:
Make sure the truck’s rear wheels are
chocked, with brakes on.
Make sure the dock plate is secure and
won’t move.
Position the load, tilt it forward, then
release it.
•
If your unloading onto a rack or stack:
Tilt the load forward.
Raise and position the load to the correct height. Be sure to check
overhead
clearance levels.
Move it slowly into position.
Lower it onto the rack or stack.
Pull the forks back slowly.
When stacking, know how high you can safely stack
materials.
After unloading, always back out slowly,
looking over your shoulder.
Page 19
DAILY INSPECTION or PRE-USE CHECK.
NOTE:::
ALL CHECKS SHOULD BE IN ACCORDANCE WITH
MANUFACTURES HANDBOOK AND INSTRUCTIONS.
FORKS:
CHECK FORK ARMS ARE NOT TWISTED AND ARE LEVEL - CHECK
FOR CRACKS, CHIPS, SPLINTERING or BITS MISSING.
CYLINDERS: CHECK FOR SIGNS OF HYDRAULIC LEAKS.
CHAINS:
CHECK FOR MISSING LINKS, RUST and ALL SECURING PINS ARE IN
PLACE AND THEY ARE ADEQUATELY GREASED.
BATTERIES:CHECK THEY ARE SECURELY STOWED AND FILLER CAPS FITTED
AND SECURE.
HYDRAULICS: LEAVE MAST FULLY EXTENDED FOR 30 SECONDS AND CHECK
THAT MAST DOES NOT START TO CREEP DOWNWARDS.
NOTE:::
ALWAYS CHECK HYDRAULIC OIL BEFORE USING ANY
CONTROLS.
BECAUSE HYDRAULIC OIL WILL THEN IN THE HYDRAULIC
SYSTEM.THEREFORE GIVING A FALSE READING IN THE
HYDRAULIC FLUIDTANK.
Page 20
Give your partner a daily check-up.
Good maintenance is important!!!
•
Check your machine daily to make sure it’s in
good operating condition. Follow all manufacturer’s
and company procedures carefully.
•
Be sure all dials, gauges, and equipment work roperly.
•
Check tyre condition and air pressure if appropriate.
•
Check for water and oil leaks, particularly in the hydraulic system.
•
Test brakes, steering, horn, warning lights, backup alarms, and other controls.
•
Make sure the fire extinguisher is in place and properly serviced.
•
Check for cracks at the heel of the forks.
•
Look for bent or damaged forks – this usually means a serious safety problem.
•
Never attempt to alter or repair the forks yourself. They either need to be
replaced, or repaired by the manufacturer.
•
Clean your truck at the start or end of each shift to
grease.
•
Use non-combustible cleaning agents on the forklift.
•
Don’t drive a forklift if anything is sparking, smoking, or if any temperature gauges
register above normal. Report the problem.
remove dust, dirt, and
And while you’re inspecting, always keep your hands away from parts
that can move.
Maintenance is very important.
Keep maintenance records neat and up-to-date. Report any problems to your supervisor
and let a trained mechanic fix them. Place a “Do Not Operate” tag or sign on the forklift
and remove the keys so that no one else can use it.
Page 21
Page 22
Page 23
Daily Inspection or
Pre-Use Checks
Item
Shift
Mon
Fork Arms
Carriage
Stop Bolts
Load Back Rest
Mast and Rollers
Chains/Securing Pins
Lift Cylinders
Wheels (nuts & rims)
Tyres (condition & pressures)
Overhead Guard
General Bodywork
Capacity Plate
Check Fuel/Battery/Oil & Water
Check Hydraulic Oil Tank (before using hydraulic controls)
Check Oil Hoses for Leaks
Check Seat for Security & Condition
Check Horn
Check Beacon Flashing
Check all Warning Lights
Start the Truck
Check ALL Brakes
Check Hydraulic Controls
Checked by - Initials
Park Truck and report any faults to supervisor
Faults to be logged in fault report book
Sign Inspection Log book if truck is serviceable
Page 24
Tue
Wed
Thu
Fri
Sat
Sun
Lift truck Fault reporting log.
Truck Fleet Number/Serial Number……………………….
Date
Fault Found
Operator
Signature
Page 25
Supervisor
Signature
Date Repaired
Engineer
Signature
FILLING INSTRUCTIONS AND SAFETY NOTES FOR LIFTING
CALOR REFILLABLE CYLINDERS USED ON FORK LIFT TRUCKS.
Electric Dispenser Pump and Hand Operated Pump Sitting, Installation and
Maintenance of Fuel Storage Tanks.
The above should be carried out in accordance with the following publications:
Code of Practice No 1 – Installation and Maintenance of Fixed Bulk LPG Storage at
Consumers Premises – Published by LPGITA.
Code of Practice No 20 – Automotive LPG Refuelling Facilities Published by LPGITA.
HS/G34 – The Storage of LPG at Fixed Installations – Published by HMSO.
Guidance Note CS4 – Keeping of LPG in Cylinders and similar Containers –
Published by HMSO.
Safety Rules:
No smoking, naked lights or other sources of ignition should be permitted in the
vicinity of the refuelling site and signs to this effect must be displayed.
The area must be kept free from grass, weeds, rubbish and other readily ignitable
materials.
Suitable Fire extinguishers (Dry Powder) should be sited adjacent to the installation.
Protective rubber gloves should be provided and worn at all times when refuelling is
taking place.
Page 26
VEHICLE CYLINDER REFUELLING INSTRUCTIONS.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
Park truck, set brake and switch off engine. Close Service Valve ‘F’ on
cylinder.
Check by Contents Gauge that cylinder is not already full.
Remove Filler Valve Dust Cap.
Connect the Filling Nozzle to the Filler Valve on the cylinder by means of the
union connection (normal right – hand thread). Ensure that the Vent Valve (if
fitted) is closed.
Open Valve ‘K’ underneath storage tank (electric pump) or Valve ‘D’ on top of
storage tank (hand pump) as appropriate.
Open Valve ‘J’ on end of Filling Hose and note reading of Contents Gauge on
cylinder. If this indicates ¾ (70%) or above, open Fixed Level Gauge Valve ‘E’
on cylinder, switch on electric pump, or operate hand pump, and commence
filling. When a visible spray of LPG issues from the Fixed Level Gauge Valve
‘E’ immediately close Filler Valve ‘J’ on end of hose and cease filling.
With Valve ‘J’ closed, open Vent Valve (if fitted) and allow the small amount of
gas trapped in the Filling Connection to escape. Do not attempt to break this
connection until all gas flow has ceased from the vent valve.
Disconnect Filler Hose from cylinder and stow correctly. Finally replace dust
cap on cylinder.
Keep Valve ‘K’ underneath storage tank (or Valve ‘D’ on top of tank) closed at
all times when the installation is not in use.
If the Fork Lift Truck cylinder is removed for filling, this should be done with the
cylinder in the horizontal position, with the locating hole in the shroud
positioned at the lowest point.
NOTES:
(i)
When refuelling, truck must be at least 3m (10ft) from storage tank.
(ii)
It is important that the filling hose should be inspected prior to use on every
occasion, as damaged hoses can result in serious incidents. If any damage is
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detected, do not use the hose, and immediately contact your nearest Service
Office for assistance.
(iii)
Do not drop the Filling Connection or drag the hose along the ground. This will
result in damage to the union and subsequent leakage.
(iv)
Never fill beyond the Max Level ‘F’ (or 80 %) on the Contents Gauge, or after
liquid spray emerges from the Fixed Level Gauge when the valve is opened.
If, for any reason, the cylinder has been inadvertently overfilled, it is essential that the
truck engine should be run to reduce the quantity of gas in the cylinder to the correct
amount before the truck is left unattended.
Safety Data Information Sheet
PROPANE.
Substance Identification Number :
1978
HAZCHEM Code 2WE
General:
Commercial propane is supplied as a liquid under pressure in various sizes of steel
cylinders, or in bulk for storage in steel pressure vessels on site. Containers are
equipped with a handwheel valve and the outlet is fitted with a gas-tight plastic plug
for transportation. The gas is stenched to provide a characteristic odour.
Physical Data:
Boiling Point -40° C (approx).
Vapour pressure at 15° C 7.5 bar (g).
Vapour Density (air = 1) 1.56 at 0° C.
Specific Gravity (water = 1) 0.51 at 15.6° C.
Flammable Limits in air 2.2 – 9.5% by volume.
Auto-ignition Temperature 460° C (approx).
Volume of gas per unit volume of liquid = 274.
SAFETY INFORMATION.
Warning:
Flammable gas – No smoking or naked lights – Keep container in well ventilated
place – Liquid may cause frostbite.
Health Hazards:
Eye: Contact by liquid can cause burns similar to frostbite. If affected, immediately
flush eyes with plenty of water for at least 15 minutes. Get immediate medical
attention.
For protection, wear chemical goggles.
Skin: Contact by liquid can cause burns similar to frostbite. If affected, immediately
wash area with cold water for at least 15 minutes. Get immediate medical attention.
For protection, wear gloves and impervious clothing.
Inhalation: Asphyxiant in high concentrations. At lower concentrations, lack of
oxygen will cause dizziness, nausea, increased depth and frequency of breathing,
and ultimately unconsciousness. If affected, immediately remove patient to
uncontaminated area. If patient has stopped breathing, commence artificial
respiration. Summon immediate medical attention. For protection, if ventilation is
inadequate, the use of positive pressure air line respirator is required.
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ACTION IN CASE OF FIRE:
Vacate the area and call the Fire Brigade. Small fires can be attacked with dry
powder fire extinguishers. If it is safe to do so, close the container valve. Cool
neighbouring cylinder(s) or tank(s) with water. Do not use water to extinguish LPG
fires
BATTERY LOG
TRUCK DETAILS: Toyota 7FBEF-18
DATE:
6
7
18
19
5
8
17
20
4
9
16
21
3
10
15
22
2
11
14
23
1
12
13
24
Use the box beside the number to record the SG readings before charge.
Use the box under the numbers to record the SG readings after charge.
Typical values :
Low charge
Medium
High
1140
1225
1280
Unusual readings were recorded for the following cells :
........................................................................................................................................
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REMOVING FROM CHARGE.
1.
SWITCH OFF CIRCUIT BREAKER.
2.
SWITCH OFF MAIN ISOLATOR.
3.
REMOVE CHARGING LEAD FROM BATTERY CONNECTOR ON
FORKLIFT
TRUCK.
4.
REPLACE CHARGING LEAD ONTO CHARGER STOWAGE POINT,
ENSURE
THAT CABLE IS NOT TRAILING ON THE FLOOR.
5.
CARRY OUT HYDROMETER READING AND ENTER INTO BATTERY LOG
BOOK.
6.
YOU MAY NEED TO TOP UP INDIVIDUAL CELLS IF SO YOU WILL BE
UNABLE TO TAKE ANY READINGS.
7.
ALLWAYS USE THE CORRECT PPE & EQUIPMENT PROVIDED FOR
TOPPING UP THE CELLS AND FOLLOW MANUFACTURERS
RECOMMENDATIONS.
8.
ENSURE ANY SPILLS ARE CLEANED UP.
9.
ENSURE ALL BATTERY TOPS ARE SECURE AND ANY FURRING IS
REMOVED FROM BATTERY TERMINALS.
10.
REPLACE SEAT AND ENSURE IT IS SECURE.
11.
REPLACE FORKLIFT POWER PLUG TO BATTERY SOCKET ON THE
FORKLIFT TRUCK.
12.
CONTINUE PRE-USE CHECKS AS PER INSPECTION SHEET.
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PLACING ON CHARGE.
1.
PARK TRUCK NEXT TO BATTERY CHARGER.
2.
SWITCH OFF AND REMOVE KEY.
3.
DISCONNECT PLUG FROM BATTERY CONNECTION ON THE FORK LIFT
TRUCK.
4.
CHECK THAT MAIN ISOLATOR IS IN THE OFF POSITION.
5.
CHECK THE LEADS OF THE CHARGER AND MAKE SURE THERE ARE
NO SPLITS IN THE CABLE BEFORE TURNING ON THE CHARGER!
6.
CONNECT BATTERY CHARGER LEAD TO BATTERY CONNECTOR ON
THE FORKLIFT.
7.
SWITCH THE MAIN ISOLATOR TO ON.
8.
SWITCH CIRCUIT BREAKER TO THE ON POSITION.
9.
THE CHARGER WILL START AUTOMATICALLY.
ALWAYS FOLLOW THE MANUFACTURERS INSTRUCTIONS
WHICH CAN DIFFER ON DIFFERENT MACHINES.
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