george mason university`s - Coach Jackson`s Pages Basketball

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george mason university`s - Coach Jackson`s Pages Basketball
GEORGE MASON UNIVERSITY'S
BUILDING THE FULL COURT SCRAMBLE
By Eric Konkol
Assistant Basketball Coach
George Mason Univeristy
Applying effective full court pressure is an excellent way of taking your opponent out
of their comfort zone in two simple ways. Its immediate effect is placing duress on the
ball handlers, potentially forcing dribbling on passing errors, well before they get across
half court and into the scoring area. In the long term, the effects of persistent pressure,
constant guessing, and an increase in tempo can cause additional physical and mental
fatigue on your opponent and give you a great opportunity for success.
Nearly eight years ago, Jim Larranga inherited a George Mason University men’s
basketball program that suffered through seven losing seasons including four last place
finishes in the Colonial Athletic Association. After implementing an intense style of
pressure defense that includes the Full Court Scramble, George Mason now has the most
wins in the CAA as well as four postseason tournament appearances in the past six years.
At George Mason, we believe that being successful at the Full Court Scramble requires
three inner qualities before our players ever step onto the floor. Our three-part philosophy
includes: attitude, commitment, and class.
First, everyone must have a positive attitude. Each of us makes a decision each day on
what type of attitude we will have. We emphasize enthusiasm, passion, along with hard
work in our program. There is going to be adversity, and how we bounce back is vital.
Secondly, everyone must be totally and unconditionally committed. We must work hard
to improve every day, no matter the circumstances. It is easy to work hard when things
are going well, but those who are totally and unconditionally committed work hard even
during tough times.
Thirdly, everyone must act in a first-class manner. We must represent the program with
pride and respect. We understand that our actions impact not only ourselves, but also our
teammates, coaches, university and family.
Once we deliver this philosophy to our team, we are ready to get on the floor and build
the Full Court Scramble.
Full Court Scramble Drills
On the court, the Full Court Scramble requires three essential fundamentals before we
practice our 5-on-5 situations. They are:
1. Apply extreme pressure on the ball handler
2. Anticipate the pass
3. Effectively trap the dribbler
In order to excel at these three fundamentals, we spend time each day in our pre-season
individual workouts as well as our team practices on drills that incorporate these
fundamentals. In addition, although we are developing our defense, the offensive players
in each drill must work hard to make game-line plays to make each drill effective.
These drills are:
1. Nose on the Ball
2. Anticipation Drill
3. Herding Drill
Nose on the Ball
“Nose on the Ball” requires the defender to work
very hard to influence the ball handler to crossover
at least three times before half court. We call it
“Nose on the Ball” because we want our defenders
to do just that. Our defender isn’t looking to gamble
and steal the ball. His goal is to make the offense’s
Diagram 1.
job very difficult.
1. In Diagram 1, the defender passes the ball to the offense and closes him with hands
high and quick choppy steps.
2. The offense then quickly zig-zags up the court with the defense closing guarding and
making him crossover at least three times.
3. At half court, the offense picks up his dribble and the defender immediately pressures
the dead ball by closing the space between them and
“mirroring” the ball with both hands. After a count
of two, the offense passes the ball to a coach at half
court.
4. In Diagram 2, the defense immediately jumps to
the ball and denies the pass back to the offense.
5. The ball is passed to the offense and the zig-zag
dribble continues to the end line.
Anticipation Drill
Diagram 2.
The “Anticipation Drill” works the defender to
quickly anticipate the direction of a pass. The defender is concentrating on deflecting the
basketball three times to get out of the drill.
1. In Diagram 3, the defender begins in the middle of the free throw line facing half
court. Two offensive players stand with their inside foot on the elbow, also facing half
court. A coach stands on the circle at half court, with a ball, facing the players.
2. The coach passes the ball quickly to one of the
players at either elbow. The defender in the middle
Diagram 3.
Diagram 4.
tries to anticipate where the ball is
going and get a deflection. The
coach can utilize pass fakes and nolook passes to make it difficult.
3. The defender stays in the middle
until he gets three deflections.
Herding Drill
The “Herding Drill” focuses on two
defenders trapping a dribbler and
then running out of the trap once a
pass is made. The offensive player’s
goal is to dribble as quickly as he
can in straight lines to the left or
right. We do not want him to use a
variety of risky moves.
Diagram 5.
1. In Diagram 4, the offensive
player begins underneath the rim
with a ball. The two defenders begin where the lane line extended meets the three-point
line. A coach stands at half court facing the players.
2. As soon as the dribbler begins in one direction, the two defenders try to “herd” him
into a trap. It is important that they do not get beat! They must use the sidelines as
another defender and work together.
3. In Diagram 5, the dribbler crosses over, the defenders close up the space between
them and force a trap. The trap must wrap up the dribbler and now allow him to step
through the trap.
4. Once the trap is made and after a two-count, the passer throws the ball to the coach at
half court. The defenders then sprint out of the trap, run the coach down, and either tip
the ball out of his hands or block an attempted lay up.
Full Court Scramble Defenses
Now that we have built a strong foundation with our philosophy and drill work, we are
ready to work with our players 5-on-5 in our five full court scramble defense. Our five
full court defenses are:
1. Full Court Man
2. Quick trap
3. Slow trap
4. Twist
5. 55
George Mason University's
Building the Full Court Scramble
PART II
By Eric Konkol
Assistant Men's Basketball Coach
George Mason University
Applying effective full court pressure is an excellent way of taking your opponent out of
their comfort zone in two simple ways. Its immediate effect is placing duress on the ball
handlers, potentially forcing dribbling or passing errors, well before they get across half
court and into the scoring area. In the long term, the effects of persistent pressure,
constant guessing, and an increase in tempo can cause additional physical and mental
fatigue on your opponent and give you a great opportunity for success. (See Part I:
Building the Full Court Scramble in Vol. II/1st Quarter of ABQ)
Full Court Scramble Defenses
Now that we have built a strong foundation with our philosophy and drill work, we are
ready to work with our players 5-on-5 in our five full court scramble defense. Our five
full court defenses are:
1. Full Court Man
2. Quick trap
3. Slow trap
4. Twist
5. 55
Full Court Man
Our Full Court Man sets up the rest of our scramble defenses. There are no traps in this
defense, but extreme pressure is placed all over the floor.
1. In Diagram 1, each defender is guarding their man while the ball is taken out. X3
attempts to deflect any pass that comes in. The rest of the defenders deny the inbound
pass but also try not to get beat with a long pass.
2. In the Full Court Scramble, we switch like size players. When O2 screens for O1, X2
switches and tries to deny O1.
3. In Diagram 2, the ball is inbounded to O1. X2 incorporates the “Nose on the Ball”
drill and applies pressure to O1 by turning him at least three times. The other defenders
are up the line, between the ball and their man, faking at the dribbler to make him think a
trap may be coming.
Diagram 1.
Diagram 2.
Quick Trap
Quick Trap begins just like our Full Court Man. The first pass is denied, however, if a
pass is entered, the man guarding the ball out of bounds quickly traps the receiver.
1. In Diagram 3, X3 pressures the inbounder, X2 and X1 switch the screen, and the ball
is passed to O1.
2. In Diagram 4, on the pass, X3 immediately traps the pass receiver with X2. X1 splits
the space between O3 and O2 and anticipates the next pass looking for an errant one. X4
splits O2 and O4, X5 falls back with O5 and is the goaltender.
Diagram 3.
Diagram 4.
3. In Diagram 5, the pass is made out of the trap to O3, X1 rotates to him. X3, who left
his man to trap, must now go to where his help came from and guard X2.
4. Now we are in our basic Full Court Man. X1 applies “Nose on the Ball” on O3. X2
denies O1 from getting the ball and the other defenders are up the line, between the ball
and their man, faking at the dribbler to make him think a trap may be coming.
Slow Trap
Slow trap is used to trap a dribbler the very moment he dribbles. This is the fundamental
developed in the “herding drill.”
1. In Diagram 6, X3 pressures the inbounder, X2 and X1 switch the screen, and the ball
is passed to O1.
Diagram 5.
Diagram 6.
2. In Diagram 7, X2 switched on to O1 and forces him to the middle. X3, drops back and
plays between the ball and O3 just like he would in our Full Court Man. Once O1
dribbles, X2 and X3 immediately “herds” him until a trap is formed. Once again, X1
splits the space between O3 and O2 and anticipates the next pass looking for an errant
one. X4 splits O2 and O4. X5 falls back with O5 and is the goaltender.
3. In Diagram 8, the pass is made out of the trap to O3, X1 rotates to him. X3, who left
his man to trap, must now go to where his help came from and guard X2.
Diagram 7.
Diagram 8.
4. Now we are at our basic Full Court Man. X1 applies “Nose on the Ball” on O3. X2
denies O1 from getting the ball and the other defenders are up the line, between the ball
and their man, faking at the dribbler to make him think a trap may be coming.
Twist
Twist is use to completely deny the opponent’s inbound pass from going to the point
guard. This forces one of the other players to make a move to receive the first pass and is
a terrific way to force a five-second violation.
1. In Diagram 9, just as the ball is taken out by O3, X3 “twists” and double teams by
face guarding O1 with X2 who switched the screen.
2. With O1 denied, O2 is forced to get open. In Diagram 10, O3 passes to O2 and X3
runs out of the trap to his own man, O3.
Diagram 9.
Diagram 10.
3. Now we are in our basic Full Court Man. X1 applies “Nose on the Ball” on O2. X2
denies O1 from getting the ball and the other defenders are up the line, between the ball
and their man, faking at the dribbler to make him think a trap may be coming.
“55” (1-2-1-1 Match-up Zone)
"55" is our only zone press. Unlike our man-to-man presses, this gives our players
specific spots to run to when converting from offense to the Full Court Scramble. We
look to deny the first pass, but if a pass is received, we trap it.
1. In Diagram 11, the defense is set in our "55". X4 is always on the ball, X3 is on the
left, X2 on the right, X1 in the middle, and X5 is back and the goaltender. X4 pressures
the inbounder, X2 and X1 switch the screen, attempt to deny the first pass, but the ball is
inbounded to O1.
2. In Diagram 12, on the pass, X4 immediately traps the pass receiver with X3. X2
aggressively splits the space between O3 and O2 and anticipates the next pass will be
back to X3. X1 splits Ox and O4. X5 falls back with O5 and is the goaltender.
Diagram 11.
Diagram 12.
3. In Diagram 13, the pass is made out of the trap to O3
and X2 rotates to him. X1 rotates to O2, and X4, who
left his man to trap, must now go to where his help
came from and guard O4.
4. Now we are in our basic Full Court Man. X2 applies
“Nose on the Ball”: on O3. X3 denies O1 from getting
the ball and the other defenders are up the line, between
the ball and their man, faking at the dribbler to make
him think a trap may be coming.
When playing defense, there are essentially three ways
of ending the possession and returning to offense. First,
the opponent misses and you get the rebound. Secondly,
the opponent turns it over. Lastly, the opponent scores.
At George Mason, creating turnovers is a top priority
because it completely takes away scoring opportunities
from the opponent. They do not attempt a shot or have
an opportunity to rebound offensively. Moreover, many
times the turnovers created by the Full Court Scramble
result in high percentage transition scores for our
Diagram 13.
offense.
At George Mason, The Full Court Scramble has been an integral force in lifting a
program that suffered seven straight losing seasons to achieving the best record in the
conference the last six years. We hope you find our philosophy, drills, and Full Court
Scramble defenses effective in achieving all of your goals.
About the author
Eric Konkol
Eric Konkol just completed his third season as a member of Jim Larranaga’s coaching
staff at George Mason. His responsibilities include recruiting, game preparation, scouting,
evaluation of players, and breaking down game tape. Konkol previously was an assistant
on Buzz Peterson’s staff at Tennessee and Tulsa. He is a graduate of the University of
Wisconsin at Eau Claire and earned a master’s degree in sport management at Tennessee.
Questions?
You can email the author at:
[email protected]
BAYLOR UNIVERISTY'S
PRESS OFFENSE
By Matt Driscoll
Assistant Coach,
Baylor University
Included are some basic sets of the Press Offense. This will be our basic set vs. man or
zone.
Most of the time we will go to our 14 Triangle set, but this gives us good early movement
and the potential for an easy basket on the other end. The inbounder must clear the lane
and basket. Never throw the ball to the offense below the block (trap area). Later in the
year, add cut and replace with your bigs coming to front court. (See Diagrams 1A-1-D)
Diagram 1A.
Diagram 1B.
Diagram 1C.
Diagram 1D.
Press Offense - l Man
A. 1 man will always work to get open off the 5 man...if the 3 man hits the 1 man we are
in our normal movement (Diagram 1-A)
B. 5 man will look for an opening in the middle... 4 man is diagonal... 2 man is up the
sideline... 1 man must pass fake first up the floor...normally we will eventually reverse to
3 man (Diagram 1-B)
C. 3 man will take a dribble then hit the 4 man flashing back up the sideline... 5 man will
bail out help side on pass back to 3 man...2 man will fill middle where 5 man vacates
then quickly get back to the ball side deep spot...1 man will become the middle relief
(Diagram 1-C)
D. If we haven’t been able to make a forwardadvancing pass, we will now ask our 1, 2, or
3 man to get the ball across half court in a triangle formation... the 2 man is looking for
an open area anywhere in the middle of the floor... 4 and 5 man are going to space to the
front court staying stretched (Diagram 1-D)
Diagram 2A.
Diagram 2B.
Diagram 2C.
Diagram 2D.
Press Offense - 14 (2 man)
This will be our basic set vs. man or zone. Most of the time we will go to our 14 Triangle
set, but this gives us good early movement and potential for an easy basket on the other
end. Inbounder must clear lane and basket. Never throw the ball to the offense below the
block area (trap area). Later in the year, add cut and replace with bigs coming to front
court.(See Diagrams 2A-2D)
A. If the 1 man is being dogged, the 2 man must always be ready to walk his man to the
middle of the floor then change direction quickly out to the wing (Diagram 2-A)
B. 5 man will look for an opening in the middle... 4 man is diagonal...1 man is up the
sideline...2 man must pass fake first up the floor...normally we will reverse to 3 man
(Diagram 2-B)
C. 3 man will take a dribble then hit the 4 man flashing back up the sideline... 5 man will
bail out help side on pass back to 3 man...1 man will fill middle where 5 man vacates
then quickly get to the ball side deep spot...2 man will become the middle relief
(Diagram 2-C)
D. If we haven't been able to make a forward advancing pass, we will now ask our 1, 2,
and 3 man to get the ball across half court in a triangle formation...1 man is looking for
an
open area anywhere in the middle of the floor... 4 and 5 man are going to space to front
court staying stretched (Diagram 2-D)
Press Offense - 14 (4 man)
This will be our basic set vs. man or zone. Most of the time we will go to our 14 Triangle
set, but this gives us good early movement and the potential for another basket on the
other end. Inbounder must clear the lane and basket. Never throw it to the offense below
the block area extended (See Diagrams 3A-3D).
Diagram 3A.
Diagram 3B.
Diagram 3C.
Diagram 3D.
A. If the 3 man can't hit the 1 or 2 man he must run the baseline and pass to the 4 man...4
man is walking his man into the middle then making a quick change of direction to the
outside open area...3 man will hit 4 man (Diagram 3-A)
B. 1 man is going ball side hard toward the sideline... 3 man is filling behind... 2 man is
going deep diagonal. If 4 man can hit 1 man, we're successful...normally, we reverse the
ball back to the 3 man (Diagram 3-B)
C. 3 man will take a dribble then hit the 2 man flashing back up the sideline...5 man will
bail out deep ball side...1 man will fill middle where 5 man vacates...4 man will become
the deep diagonal (Diagram 3-C)
D. If we haven't been able to make a forward advancing pass, we will now ask our 1, 2,
and 3 man to get the ball across half court in a triangle formation... the 1 man is looking
for an open area anywhere in the middle of the floor... 4 and 5 man are stretching deep to
create space (Diagram 3-D)
Diagram 4.
Diagram 5B.
Diagram 5A.
Diagram 5C.
Press Offense - 14 Double
This will be a nice option to go to at the end of a game to get the ball in the hands of our
best free throw shooter. 2 man has to make a quick change of direction to move deep... 4
and 5 man set a double staggered for the 1 man... 1 man has a choice reading his defender
– he can turn down the screen or go under the double or over the double (Diagram 4)
Press Offense - 14 Triangle
This is a common offense vs. presses. The 1, 2 and 3 man will form a triangle staying 15
– 18 feet apart at all times. The triangle will sometimes have 2 in the back court or 1.
That is the beauty of this press offense; the fact that it is very flexible. Inbounder must
clear the lane and basket. Never inbound
to the offense below the block area
extended. (See Diagrams 5A-5D)
A. No matter what it takes we will get the
ball inbounded to the 1 man or 2 man
coming back to the ball... if we have to go
to the 4 man who will go right back to the
3 man when we are in Triangle (Diagram
5-A)
B. 5 man is bailing out to the ball side
deep and scraping the sidelines... 4 and 5
men arearound the 3-point line extended
waiting for a possible long pass (Diagram
5-B)
C. 1, 2 and 3 man will continually work
ball back and forth looking to get ball over
half court...middle person is always
Diagram 5D.
looking to move to an open area... staying
behind ball in back court is important to make an easy pass out of any trap... we can
throw it ahead to a post player as well... bigs can also communicate a cut to each other.
(Diagram 5-C)
D. We will drive the middle man hard to the basket then out the ball side (looking for a
trap)...the opposite big will fill the foul line area...3 man will fill behind... 1 Man is deep
diagonal...these are our normal spots when we are getting trapped...this is a good time for
teams to trap so we should be prepared (Diagram 5-D)
About the author
Matt Driscoll
Assistant Coach Matt Driscoll is in his second year on Coach Scott Drew’s Baylor staff.
Previously, Driscoll spent five years as an assistant to Clemson Coach Larry Shyatt from
1998-2003. Prior to his years at Clemson, Driscoll was an assistant coach for Shyatt at
Wyoming. A 1992 graduate of Slippery Rock, Driscoll can be reached at
[email protected]
SNAKE BITE
PHILOSOPHICAL APPROACHES TO IMPLEMENTING THE RUN & JUMP
"SNAKE" DEFENSE
By Dr. Gamal Smalley
Assistant Basketball Coach,
Pasadena City College
In naming our trapping style run & jump defense, “snake”, we had to look at the
significance of the code name itself and question if it fit the philosophical approach to
what we were trying to teach. Snakes are legless reptiles, some of which have a
venomous bite which they use to kill their prey before eating it. Other snakes kill their
prey by constriction, for example strangulation, which causes suffocation. At Pasadena
City College, we love to take advantage of our quickness and aggressive defensive style
of play. The run & jump defensive pressure is one of several defensive niches that we use
to take our opponents out of their rhythm, while causing indecision and disrupting their
offensive structure, thus causing an offense to suffer asphyxiation. This is a condition of
severe lack of oxygen, and in the absence of remedial action (such as effective dribbling
and passing) can very rapidly lead to unconsciousness and
even death, otherwise known as offensive confusion.
Ok, enough of the metaphoric articulation, I think you get the
picture. The run & jump man to man defensive pressure can
be extended full court from end to end if preferred but we
like to attack in the back court while allowing the poison to
continue all the way into areas that go a few feet beyond the
half-court line. Those are areas where we especially like to
bite because the offense can no longer throw the ball
backwards, for risk of a backcourt violation.
The run & jump defense epitomizes our team concept of
togetherness and unity through hard work and individual
commitments to the greater whole of our team goals for
success. If just one person does not carry out their
assignment, the defense can break down. Thus the run &
jump defensive pressure requires complete dedication from
Diagram 1. Deadly bites
for run and jomp trap
opportunities are in the
trapping zones.
every player on the floor. However the elements required to implement the run & jump
effectively are also elements that promote our overall team philosophy with regards to
everyone making a difference. The psychological impact of everyone being a piece to the
puzzle is greatly emphasized in the run & jump, as it requires a trapping pressure defense
that must be carried out with an aggressiveness that is intensified by having hands tracing
the ball and blocking the passing lanes.
Defensive teammates away from the ball must be aware of all the holes and quick enough
to make the necessary switches in the rotation. There are no lay-ups given because the
determined defenders away from the ball don’t allow anyone to get open. We get into our
run & jump by applying tough full court man -to -man pressure. You can influence the
dribbler toward the sideline by overplaying him to one side, but our defenders must
possess the ability to deny all passing lanes while being intelligent enough to turn the
dribbler to the jumper side to allow the double team to happen.
In our defensive sliding drills we emphasize turning the dribbler with a run and slide drill,
daily. We are always preparing our players for the mindset needed to bite in the run &
jump. Because we are playing straight man-to-man defense, teams generally do not
design a press break offense against us. We want the ball handler to be convinced that he
can beat us up the floor, one on one. We have to be cleaver enough to sell that concept to
our opponent by mixing up the run & jump on various trips down the floor, luring the
dribbler into a false sense of
security. Dribblers that try to push the ball up the floor at a high speed are even more
vulnerable to the run & jump, and that’s just the way we like it. We love those impatient,
"streetball-tape-watching" ball handlers whose egos won’t allow them to pass the ball up
the floor, with patience, control and deliberate ball fakes as well as precision (the way we
subsequently teach our offensive pressure releases). That’s not a knock on the producers
of those street-ball mix tapes and shows. I hope they keep
making them over and over. That’s more opportunities for the
snake defense to bite those non-fundamental ball handlers
where it hurts, but enough of that for now!
Just like a snake who waits for the most opportune time to
attack, we bite with a quick double team as our defender
either forces the dribbler to one side or we take advantage of
our opponent’s inability to space themselves properly on the
floor. In that instance our jump comes when offensive players
get too close to the man bringing the ball up the floor. When
one or more offensive players are close enough to each other,
our defender not guarding the ball can leave his man and
jump the offensive player with an aggressive double team. In
that scenario our defenders are taking what the offense gives
them.
The run & jump is an exciting means of applying defensive
Diagram 2. Special bites
are at the mid-court
area because the offense
can not throw in the
backcourt.
pressure and is particularly effective against teams with poor dribblers. However a key
element to the success of the run & jump is our ability to help and recover. We realize
that we are leaving one man open for a moment but we are ready to give help when
needed and recover back in our rotations. When the opportunity presents itself, we run &
jump but we never gamble. We like to think our opponents are the one’s gambling by not
spacing themselves properly. Though we use the code name, “snake”, and symbolically
referring to our run & jump traps as bites, we are also like piranhas on the kill for the
ball. We often change our code names but the symbolism is the same: we are antagonistic
predators seeking to provoke an attack on our opponents. (See Diagrams 1-4)
Though the run & jump can often
produce steals, steals are not our
main objective. What we really
want to do is disrupt the flow of
our opponent’s offense and force
them to play a hurried style of
play with quick shots outside of
the context of their offensive
design. Thus we control the tempo
of the game.
Another important aspect of
implementing the run & jump
defense centers on quick
transitions from offense to
defense. After a score we have no
time for artistic celebrations,
Diagram 3. Players must Diagram 4. When a
crowd acknowledgements, or
rotate to cover gaps and ballhandler dribbles in
finger pointing to one’s
holes once the bites are your area you can leave
grandmother.
on! These trapping bites your man at any time to
are not risks when
jump him but the
We must be totally committed to
everyone is hustling in
primary areas to bite are
the attack, for any wasted gestures
the defensive rotation.
in the trapping zones.
or temporary distractions caused
by a lack of concentration could result in a lost opportunity to hurt our opponents ability
to function properly. The run & jump style of play relies on a lot of defensive
communication which coincides with our overall expectations as a team. It takes hard
work to play the run & jump defense but it’s a lot of fun and serves as a great teaching
tool with regards to applying defensive pressure.
About the author
Dr. Gamal Smalley
Dr. Gamal Smalley is in his third year as an assistant coach at Pasadena City College.
Considered a defensive specialist, Dr. Smalley works primarily with the Lancers on
defensive philosophy, drills, and footwork. He can be reached at:
[email protected]
Screening Drills
at Kansas State
By Deb Patterson
Head Women's Coach
Kansas State University
At Kansas State University we prefer to be very diverse in both our offensive and
defensive systems. I believe one of the greatest elements of basketball is the extent to
which coaches and players can be creative in their approach to the game. There are a
wide variety of highly effective offensive systems and styles of play utilized by programs
in the Big 12 Conference. We see
systems that are predicated on the
three-point shot, some committed to a
power game, some who run various
motion offenses, pro sets, the triangle,
4 around 1, 1-4 high, basic high-low
offense, just to name a few. Whether
offenses are designed for playmakers,
great athletes, utilization of the full 30 Diagram 1A.
Diagram 1B.
seconds, quick hits, or to hide and
minimize weaknesses the reality is
there are a variety of ways to play.
The Kansas State offensive system is
predicated on solid fundamental
execution, diversity of options, and
scoring balance. We are challenged
each year in our league by great
Diagram 2A.
Diagram 2B.
defensive teams with superior
athleticism and depth. My belief is that the more playmakers and athleticism you bring to
the floor the more simple the system can become. There is nothing in the world like
watching great players make plays.
Last season in Big 12 games, Kansas State ranked first in scoring offense, FG%, 3 pt. FG
%, assists, 3 pt. FG’s made, scoring margin, assist/turnover ratio, FG% defense and 3pt.
FG% defense. We finished 11th however in offensive rebounds and 5th in steals. In other
words, our system and personnel led to a high level of efficiency each possession.
Offensive rebounding and steals are two great offensive weapons. As we all know,
offensive rebounding can turn the worst possession or the ugliest shot into gold. The
fewer offensive rebounds, the greater the pressure on each possession to be perfect.
As our rebounding numbers from 2003-04 illustrate, it’s important to consistently analyze
and measure all factors that potentially contribute to offense. Needless to say, we all want
our players rebounding the ball at a high level. The obvious starting point is by making it
a priority of thought and action every day at practice.
However, as a coach you must also
analyze numbers relative to your
personnel and the system. What are the
physical and mental characteristics of
your personnel? Do you have athletic,
quick and explosive players? Do you
have any leapers, strength or power in
your front line? Do you have any
mentally fierce and aggressive ‘nose
Diagram 3A.
for the ball’ competitors with the
intrinsic knack for asserting
themselves on the boards? Secondly,
what kind of impact is your system
having on your players’ ability to beat
people to the ball? What are you
getting and what are you giving up to
your system?
Diagram 3B.
Diagram 4A.
Diagram 4B.
In 2003-04 one of the priorities in our
offense was to maximize post touches and to compensate for double teams on our All
America post player, Nicole Ohlde. We achieved that objective as she was the Big 12’s
leading scorer and also finished 6th in the league in assists. We spread the floor a great
deal to maximize Ohlde touches, but our perimeters were not effective driving and
putting pressure on the rim. They were better 3 point shooters than penetrators;
consequently we were sixth in the
league in free throws attempted. Our
inability to penetrate was a factor that
contributed to our poor rebounding
numbers. Penetration draws defenders
and improves opportunities for
offensive post rebounding. We
consistently evaluate statistical
elements relative to both the strengths
Diagram 6A.
and weaknesses of our personnel, our Diagram 5.
overall offensive production and our
system. Is the system working?
The objective of every coach is to
teach players how to play offense and
then to let them play. My belief is that
an offensive system should take into
Diagram 6B.
Diagram 7A.
account each player’s strengths and put them in a position to play to those strengths while
minimizing weaknesses. We put a high priority on repetition as a means to mastering
fundamental skills and basic offensive concepts. The success of our offensive system
depends in large part on our individual players’ ability to read, react and make
appropriate decisions. Following are some of the fundamental offensive screening
concepts that we teach to build upon player skills, reads and overall understanding and
knowledge.
Basic screening teaching cues (Drills 1A through 10B)
1. Passer takes 1 or 2 steps in direction of the pass prior to setting the screen
2. Head hunt for defender early in the cut
3. To maximize angles:
a. on down screens - set with back to
the ball
b. on flare screens - back to the corner
of
the floor
c. on back screens - back to the
basketd. on cross, flex or pin screens back to
the sideline
Diagram 7B.
Diagram 8A.
Natural exceptions to these angles may
occur in play but these allow for
maximum ability to exploit a
defender’s response to the screen.
4. Player receiving the screen should
set the screen up by stepping 2 or 3
steps hard (v-cut action) in the
Diagram 8B.
Diagram 9A.
horizontal direction of the ball
5. Require both verbal and physical cues for the screener
6. Player receiving the screen must wait. Tendency is to run to the screener too soon
The following screening drills are geared toward improving 5 areas:
1. verbal communication - talking
2. use non-verbal cues
3. reading defense and teammates
4. reacting to defense and our teammate
5. spacing
These drills should enhance any offense you run. Players learn to talk, watch, read and
react to both the defense and their teammates.
Progression:
1. No defense
2. Add one defender on the cutter (not the screener).
Offense makes the correct read and then screener reacts to a second ball
3. Add a second defender
4. Work live 2 on 2 (no switching) with one ball. Scores will not come on every screen.
Space the floor and try again and again.
Key to K-State Screening Drills
Drill 1: Basket Cut and Fill
1A. 1: Step in direction of pass – then head hunt
2: Step down and then in direction of the ball
1B. 1: Basket Cut
2: V-cut, Rub off hard cut and fill
Drill 2: Curl and Pop (fill)
2A. Curl and Pop (fill)
2B. 1: Screen, pop, and fill
2: Curl
Drill 3: Screen and Re-screen
3A. Screen and re-screen
3B. 1: Screen, re-screen, flair, basket cut
2: Pop off flair
Diagram 9B.
Drill 4: Basket Cut and Fill
4A. Basket cut and fill
4B. 1: Screen, pop, and fill
2: Basket cut
Drill 5: Flex with Basket Cut and Pop (fill)
5. 1: Basket cut
2: Pop and Fill
Diagram 10A.
Drill 6: Flex with Screen/Re-screen Flair
6A. 1’s Defense cheats inside screen rather than over the top
6B. 2: Screens and re-screens
Drill 7: Backscreen with Fill
7A. 1: Cut hard under the net
7B. 1: Basket cut to shot (post if size)
2: Fill for shot
Diagram 10B.
Drill 8: Flair Screen with Basket Cut
8A. 1: Walk defense into lane
2: In charge (verbal and visual) Get into lane to set flare
8B. Variation of flair screen with basket cut
Drill 9: Flair with Screen/Re-screen and Basket Cut
9A. If defense goes under the screen – 1 stops behind screen
9B. 1: Stop behind screen, shorten pass and
fill
About the author
2: Screen and re-screen, then basket cut
Deb Patterson
Drill 10: Flair with Chaser/Drag
Backdoor
10A. If defense locks on and goes with
player....
The Closeout
In her eighth season as head coach at
Kansas State, Deb Patterson has catapulted
K-State into the national spotlight by
making back-to-back NCAA Tournament
appearances. She has also helped produce a
top six program nationally in home
attendance and lead several players to AllAmerica honors. You can reach her at
[email protected]
Cincinnati's On Ball Defense
By Laurie Pirtle
Head Women's Basketball Coach
Univeristy of Cincinnati
At the University of Cincinnati we spend a great deal of time developing the basketball
skills of our players. We teach
offensive, defensive and rebounding
techniques that develop our players
into the best they can be. However, for
the purpose of this article the focus
will be on drills that enhance on ball
defense.
The closeout requires a hard nosed
mentality. The hard nosed mentality is Diagram 1.
enhanced by a player’s desire to
control the offensive player. That
desire is a reflection of the player’s
competitive nature and sets the stage
for skill development.
Diagram 3.
Diagram 2.
Diagram 4.
The skill development requires technique, work ethic and repetition. The closeout
technique involves breaking down or chopping your feet towards the offensive player
while being disciplined not to jump or lunge at them. Developing an instinctive closeout
requires work ethic during proper repetition.
Utilizing repetitive breakdown drills to simulate game situations will prepare your
players for the many aspects of defending the ball. Our breakdown drills include, but are
not limited to: rolls, skips, skips with a bump screen, screen the screener and half court
closeouts. Additionally, during our closeout drills we incorporate a variety of offensive
skills for the player to defend. For example, during the closeout drill a coach will
designate or remind the defender whether the offensive player is a shooter, driver or
driver/shooter. This enables the defender to adjust their closeout according to thestrengths
of the offensive player.
As a rule, we keep score during our closeout drills.
Sometimes we keep track of baskets
made, but generally we keep track of
the number of stops. It depends upon
what we’re emphasizing during
practice. We always have a winner or
loser. This keeps the drill game-like
while developing the competitive
nature of our players.
Cincinnati Closeout Drills
Diagram 5.
Diagram 6.
Roll Closeouts: The roll closeout drill
consists of three players on the
perimeter on offense and one defensive
player under the basket. A coach is
under the basket with a ball. The coach
rolls the ball to a player and the
defender closes out on the ball (see
Diagram 7.
Diagram 8.
Diagram 1). The defender attempts to
stop the offensive player from scoring (see Diagram 2). The players rotate clockwise
after every possession. We play for five minutes. If you want to emphasis baseline
closeouts drop the wings down. We also modify this drill to include high post closeouts
(see Diagram 3).
Skip Closeout: The skip closeout involves two offensive players on the wings, one
defensive player under the basket and a coach under the basket with a ball. The coach
rolls the ball to either wing while the defensive player closes out on the ball (see
Diagram 4). O1 can look to score but preferably skips to O2 (see Diagram 5).
O2 can drive forcing the X1 to help
and recover (see Diagram 6)
Ultimately O2 skips the ball to O1.
The wings continue to repeat this skip
action a few times with the drill ending
when O1 attempts to score while the
X1 tries to stop her (see Diagram 7).
The players rotate after every
Diagram 9.
possession.
Diagram 10.
Skip Closeout with a Bump Screen:
This is the same drill as the Skip
Closeout but we add O3 setting a bump
screen on O1’s side while O2 has the
ball. As O2 skips the ball to O1, O3
sets a bump screen on X1. We instruct
the defender to go over the top of the
Diagram 12.
bump unless the screen is set too high Diagram 11.
(see Diagram 8). This allows the X1
to forceO1to the baseline while O3 is clearing out of the way (see Diagram 9).
Screen the Screener Closeout: This drill requires six players and a passer. It begins as a
3 on 3 drill with an offense and defense on the ball side box, offense and defense on the
weak side box and offense and defense
at the free throw line. The coach is on
the wing with the ball (see Diagram
10) .O1 sets a cross screen on X2 for
O2 (see Diagram11). O3 sets a down
screen on X2 for O2 to curl to the free
throw line and the coach looks at
O1who used the cross screen but
preferably passes to O2 who has curled
to the free throw line (see Diagram
12).
X2 closes out on O2 while everyone
Diagram 13.
else steps out of the play (see Diagram
13).
Half Court Closeout: All players are
Diagram 14.
in lines at half court with one player on
offense and another on defense while a coach has a ball. The coach passes to O1 who is
on the run and X 1 attempts to get a stop as O1 attacks the basket (see Diagram 14). O1
and X1 go to end of the lines while the next two players prepare to play.
About the author
Laurie Pirtle
The most successful women's basketball coach in Cincinnati history, Laurie Pirtle is now
into her 19th year as head coach for the Bearcats. In the past seven seasons, Pirtle has
guided UC to six winning seasons, six 20-plus win campaigns and seven straight post
season appearances. A three year starter for Ohio State, Pirtle graduated in 1980. She can
be reached at laurie.pirtle@ uc.edu.
Harvard University's
Combination Drills
By Kathy Delaney-Smith
Head Women's Basketball Coach
Harvard University
COMBINATION DRILLS
I am always interested in finding new combination drills. I look for drills that will
accomplish a lot in a short period of time. The drills described below are among my
favorites. You will be able to practice multiple parts of the game, adjust the drills to meet
your team’s needs and keep the intensity level high. Players love these drills.
CONTINUOUS 3 ON 3
Needed: 4 teams of 3
This is a drill that you may already use, but we’ve added a few variations. It’s a great
conditioner that simulates offensive and defensive transition better than most. By keeping
the teams the same throughout the entire drill, you can keep score and maintain a high
level of competition. You can adjust this drill to fit your particular needs. We saw great
improvement in our transition decision-making and shot selection. This drill practices 3
on 2’s, 2 on 1’s, and most fast break situations.
There are four teams of three. Team 1 starts by playing offense against Team 2. Team 3
positions two outlets on the sideline at the three-point arc extended and another outlet at
the hash mark. Team 4 is positioned at the opposite 3-point arc extended and hash mark.
Team 1 attacks Team 2 until there is a change of possession (basket, rebound or turnover)
(See Diagram 1)
Team 2 (defensive team) takes the ball
out of bounds and outlets the ball
quickly and accurately to a member of
Team 3 at the 3-point arc on the same
side of the floor. The two other
members of Team 3 may not move or
head down court until the outlet pass is
caught. A designated coach is in
charge of making sure that these two
Diagram 1.
do not leak out, as it results in
uncontested lay-ups, which defeats the
purpose of the drill. Team 3 tries to
fast break against Team 1, who has
sprinted back and is defending the
break. (See Diagram 2)
Team 3 offenses Team 1. Team 2 fills
the three outlet positions that have
been vacated by Team 3. (See
Diagram 3)
After a change of possession, Team 1
outlets to Team 4 on the same side of
the floor. Team 3 sprints back to
defend the fast break, and Team 1 fills
the outlet positions. (See Diagram 4) Diagram 3.
Diagram 2.
Diagram 4.
CONTINUOUS 3 ON 3
Needed: 3 teams of 3
In order to make this drill more of a conditioner, play with only three teams of 3. This
time, the team throwing the outlet pass sprints to the other end to fill the outlet positions.
(See Diagram 5)
Important points and other considerations:
• No one may head down the floor until the outlet is received - there will be a natural
tendency to leak out, so we put a coach in charge of that. We use this drill to practice 3 on
2’s and 2 on 1’s and setting up - not the uncontested fast break lay up!
• The team throwing the outlet pass after a score, turnover, or rebound must do so quickly
and accurately. Since they are not throwing to their own team, it is a little awkward in the
beginning. If they are quick enough and accurate enough to help create a lay-up at the
other end, we award those points to both teams. This really helps!
• If you want to work on offensive rebounding in transition, award 2 points for an
offensive rebound.
This gets very interesting!
• If you want to practice defending the
3 in transition, award extra points for a
3-point field goal.
• If you want to minimize the number
of 3 on 2’s/2 on 1’s and focus on
decision-making and shot selection,
then play with teams of 4 instead of 3.
CONTINUOUS 4 ON 2 (or 3) INTO
4 ON 4
Needed: 3 teams of 4
Diagram 5.
Diagram 6.
This is a variation of the same drill.
There are two major changes. The first
is that you outlet the ball to your own
team. The second is that the third team
sets up with two players at half court
(ready to come in) and two in the
opposite key ready to play defense.
You can adjust the rules to create a 4
on 2 into a 4 on 4, a 4 on 3 into a 4 on
4, etc. This is a good transition drill
and a GREAT drill to work against
breaking backcourt pressure. The
backcourt gets crowded so it is that
much more difficult to get the ball
across half court. We will use different Diagram 7.
Diagram 8.
pressing strategies (ie. trap
immediately, trap the dribble) to practice against. Again, the teams stay the same and the
drill is competitive.
Team 1 offenses Team 2. Team 3 has two players at half court, and two players at the
opposite end. (See Diagram 6)
Once there is a turnover, rebound, or basket made, Team 2 takes the ball out of bounds on
the endline (except on the rebound when the play stays live) and passes to a teammate in
the backcourt. Team 1 may press in the backcourt. If they get a steal, they go for the
score and press again. Once the ball crosses half court, the Team 3 players at half court
must touch the jump circle and play defense. Team 1 fills two defensive spots in the key
and the other two go to half court. (See Diagram 7)
CONTINUOUS 5 ON 5 ON 5
Needed: 3 teams of 5
This is a good drill if you have a large team and you want to include everyone. We will
use coaches to fill in if there are not enough players. We like to practice our zone
offenses this way. You can accomplish a lot in a short period of time and there are no
players standing around.
We do not press in the back court with 5 players and we do not set up a transition
situation (although you could). We just work on our zones (offensive and defensive).
(See Diagram 8)
We will do some form of these drills almost every day all year. I am a big believer in
goals and /or consequences. We try to make everything we do competitive and the
players respond well to this. Any particular offensive situation you are trying to work on
can be included in these drills by awarding more points to them (i.e. double points for
executing a pick and roll, post move etc.) You will be surprised how hard your players
will work to get those points! The other benefit is you are also practicing defending those
situations.
About the author
Kathy Delaney-Smith
Now in her 23rd season as the head coach of Harvard women’s basketball, Kathy
Delaney-Smith is the winningest women’s basketball in school’s history. Entering this
season, Delaney-Smith’s coaching record at Harvard is 335-240 with a 203-97 record in
the Ivy League. She is a graduate of Bridgewater State College and a member of its
Athletic Hall of Fame. She can be reached at [email protected]
The New Zone Offense
By Ron Reed
Men's Head Coach
Ohio University-Southern
With the success that teams have had playing zones against the 2004 Olympic team,
coaches will see more zones this year. Since 1974, my teams have run the motion
offense. I have been blessed/cursed by taking over programs in poor shape; in every
situation we started out with one and sometimes no scorer. We were patient in our motion
offense and teams recognized that the way to beat us was to use the zone.
An assistant of mine, Steve Barriger, suggested the use of the “New Zone Offense.” Over
the years, it has become effective against the zone with only one scorer. The “New Zone”
offense will work against all zones since after the first pass most zones are the same.
Here are some set plays for the “New Zone Offense” that may be helpful to you and your
team (See Diagrams 1-8).
Diagram 1.
#1 Best ball handling guard
#2 Best scoring guard
#3 Best perimeter scorer
#4 Forward
#5 Post
Diagram 2.
#4 breaks up and out to foul line
extended
#2 passes to #4 and runs the circle to
opposite elbow
#5 rolls to the ball side block
#1 replaces #2
#3 holds on the block
Diagram 3.
#4 pass fakes to #5, shot fakes (Zones must
respect shot fakes and pass fakes)
Diagram 4.
#4 reverses the ball to #1 and cuts
through to the corner (#4 must cut
under #3 and then to the deep corner)
#1 receives the ball, if #2 is open at
the elbow
then take the shot... if #2 is not open at
elbow he steps out on the perimeter to
receive the pass from #1
Diagram 5.
After receiving the pass #2 will make a pass fake
to #4 (#2 will not pass the ball to #4 even if he is
open can not score)
Diagram 6.
#2 will reverse the ball to #1 as #1
receives the #5 sets a screen on
defensive man “D”
#3 times the ball reversal to #1
#3 comes off #5’s screen to the corner
for a
wide-open shot
#5 after he screens “D” will post-up
and
seal “D” out looking for the ball
Diagram 8.
Diagram 7.
The offense is run to the opposite side.
If #3 does have a wide-open shot, he takes it. If
not, he looks inside for #5, if he can’t get it inside
(don’t force it) #3 will reverse the ball to #1, #1
will (can) drive the ball in the gap in the zone and
reverse the ball to #1 and the offense is reset.
I have found over the years you can incorporate the motion offense principles using the
“New Zone” but coaches will find if they run the pattern, the elbow shot will be there.
The post will open up and the scorer, #3, will get great looks. Even though this offense is
designed for only one scorer, if both #4 and #3 are
scorers, it enables the offense to be run to either side.
The “New Zone” offense is an effective offense if the
opposition is running a box and one; put the player
being “chased” in the #3 position. #3 must be patient.
This offense has been good to our teams over the years,
even in college, with the 35-second clock. Coaches need
to emphasize the basic fundamentals against zone such
as pass fakes, shot fakes, and driving the gaps to make
two defensive players play one man. As coaches look at
different zones they will find the “New Zone” offense
Diagram 9.
will be effective against all of them.
About the author
Ron Reed
Head Coach at Ohio University-Southern, Ron Reed has coached for 39 years, He has 20
years of high school coaching experience in Kentucky, was head coach at Milligan
College and an assistant at both Morehead State and Mississippi. This fall he starts his
sixth year at Ohio University-Southern.
Questions?
You can email the author at:
[email protected]

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