Transport for the Olympics

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Transport for the Olympics
Working together to a common
goal to deliver major projects
Sue Kershaw
Director of Rail Europe
• An introduction to CH2M
• Transportation Infrastructure in Poland
• Leadership is key
• Central and local government play an important role
• The national infrastructure plan
• Lessons learned from successful projects
• The importance of diversity and innovation
• Collaboration is key
• Case Study: Transport for the Olympics
• Conclusion
• Q & A Session
2
CH2M HILL – Founded in 1946 in Oregon,
USA
3
CH2M Statistics
• Over 28,000 employees, operating in 120 countries and 210 area
offices worldwide
• Employee owned
• Working with over 4,900 unique clients
4
Nearly two decades of expertise in
Poland
• Present in Poland since 1996
• More than 330 employees
• Offices in Krakow (HQ), Warsaw, Gdańsk, Katowice and Wrocław
• Multidisciplinary teams
• ISO 9001:2008 Certified
• 3D / BIM across all disciplines
#
Ranked by
Book of
Lists
1
Architectura
l Company
In Poland
2014
Ranked by
Book of
Lists
#
5
Construction
Project
Management
Company
2014
In Poland
5
Ministry of
Economy
2015
Medal of
Merit for
contribution
to
development
of Polish
economy
Transportation Infrastructure in Poland
• Highways and Bridges
• Maritime ports
• Intelligent Transport Systems (ITS)
• Transport Planning
• Tunnels
• Rail
• Tramways
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Transportation Infrastructure in Poland
Selected Experience – Rail
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
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E65 South –railway line modernisation to high speed
standards (550km)
E65 „3 stations” Czechowice Dziedzice,
Zebrzydowice, Zwardoń – design
Supervision of works - modernisation of railway line
E59
Rail Baltica – Project Monitor for the bank modernization of the railway line E75
PKP SKM Trójmiasto
ERTMS (safety improvements, E30 level 2: Legnica –
Polish border
Long-term development plan for the tram network in
Warsaw
Feasibility Study on modernization of the railway line
104 – with option of PPP involvement in the project
Transportation Infrastructure in Poland
Ports
Transportation Infrastructure in Poland
Deepwater container terminal DCT 2
• The easternmost port which is now capable of handling the
largest container vessels in the ice-free zone of the Baltic Sea
• Value of the investment estimated at 250 mln EUR
• preparation of contract tender documentation,
• The new DCT 2 facility to be completed in 2016
• assisting in the tendering process
• The target annual capacity of DCT 2 terminal is estimated to
be 1.25 million TEU (Phase I of investment)
• supervising contractors (including designer Mott MacDonald)
• The new terminal will be able to handle the largest vessels in
the world with the length of 400 m and the height of 70 m of
the capacity of 18 000 TEU
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• Scope of works
• Communication with contractor: N.V. Besix s.a.
Transportation Infrastructure in Poland
Water Selected Experience
Odra River Basin, Flood
Protection Program
Flood Risk Management:
• Environment Agency (NEECA,
WEM framework projects) (UK)
• Scottish Boarders Council
(SCO)
Water Companies:
• United Utilities - CDP (UK)
• Northern Ireland Water (NI)
• Affinity Water (UK)
• Wessex Water (UK)
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Transportation Infrastructure in Poland
Water − Odra River Basin, Flood Protection
Programme
Odra floods
From its source in the Czech Republic’s mountain ranges, the river Odra
flows through Poland and north to the Baltic Sea. In 1997, flooding caused
extensive damage and loss of life. This sweeping devastation was the
catalyst for a major flood alleviation initiative funded in part by the World
Bank, European Union grants and local investment.
Modernizing the flood protection system
CH2M HILL, in consortium with URS and BRL Ingenierie, has been
appointed to deliver a key component of a scheme to modernise the historic
city’s flood-prevention system.
The project will improve the Odra river’s flow capacity through Wroclaw and
provide additional flood defence measures along the river. It forms an integral
part of a wider £468 million flood risk management scheme – Europe’s
largest.
Set to run for six years, in its first phase the project comprises:
− A review of the feasibility study
− Outline design
− Detailed design
Phase two includes:
− Construction supervision
− Overseeing a one-year maintenance period
The project is scheduled for completion in 2015
Project co-financed by: Government, EU Cohesion Fund, Clean Energy Development Bank (CEDB) and the World Bank (IBRD)
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Transportation Infrastructure in Poland
Selected Experience: Industrial & Advanced
Technology
Procter & Gamble, Germany
Procter & Gamble, Ukraine
Procter & Gamble, Poland
Procter & Gamble, Hungary
Procter & Gamble, UK
Procter & Gamble, US
Avon, Poland, Italy, Spain, Egipt
Ashland, Germany
IBM, Poland
3M, Poland
3M, Russia
John Deere, Russia
Schering-Plough, Ireland
SCHOTT AG, Russia
Hamilton Sundstrand, Poland
Pratt & Whitney, Poland
Michelin, Russia
Michelin, Shanghai
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Leadership is key…
• Major Projects Authorities & Said Business School & Major
Projects Association
• Association for Project Management Standards – Chartership &
RPP
• Role of Sponsor
• Role of Project Manager
• Role of Delivery Partner
• UK Successes: Olympics/Crossrail/Thameslink….
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Central and local government play an
important role…
• The National Infrastructure
Commission
• The Local Enterprise Panels
• The London & Metropolitan Boroughs
• The London Infrastructure Plan
• The Interactive Map
• Sharing & learning
• The regeneration factor
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The National Infrastructure Plan
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The National Infrastructure Plan
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The National Infrastructure Plan
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That National Infrastructure Plan
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In Rail, over the next 5 years UK Government
is committed to:
overseeing £38 billion of expenditure by Network Rail in Control Period 5 (2014 – 2019) including the
following enhancement projects;
• the start of a major electrification programme including key routes such as the Great Western Line,
Trans-Pennine and Midland Main Line
• redevelopment of key stations in Birmingham, Bristol and Manchester
• capacity improvements at key routes such as the South West and through the Northern Hub
• beginning implementation of the European Rail Traffic Management System to improve line capacity
• further development of the Strategic Rail Freight Network
• ensuring Crossrail is completed on time and on budget
• completion of the Thameslink upgrade programme, including the redevelopment of London Bridge
station and a new direct interchange with Crossrail at Farringdon
• provision of 3,400 new rail vehicles; this includes around 2,500 for 3 major projects – new trains for the
Intercity Express Programme, Thameslink and Crossrail – which are being procured by the public sector
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Lessons learned from successful
projects…
• Delivery Partners
• Collaboration
• Single vision
• Programme appraisal
• Clear processes
• Strategy
• Believe in the outcomes
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The importance of diversity and
innovation…
• Use the 50% which is not being used
• Intake from more diverse backgrounds
• Innovate wisely & within a sense of time
• Map your agenda
• Think about the wider skills/conversion courses
• Apprentices/interns/work experience
• The Digital Railway
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Collaboration is key…
• BS11000 – evidence based collaboration
• The new way of thinking: it is better working together
• Effective Teaming
• Using our own teams wisely
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Case Study: Transport for the Olympics
How transport supported a great London
2012 Games
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Case Study: Transport for the Olympics
The challenges were so great, some
doubted London and its transport
system could cope
The challenges were so great, some doubted
London and its transport system could cope
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Case Study: Transport for the Olympics
•
Transport worked well and received widespread
praise
Transport commended by LOCOG
Chairman Lord Sebastian Coe, IOC
President Jacques Rogge and IPC
President Sir Philip Craven
•
83 per cent of spectators said getting
home was ‘extremely good’
•
82 per cent of travellers thought the
transport network as a whole operated well
and only 5 per cent did not
•
High profile athletes, such as the US
Olympic Basketball team, were seen using
public transport
•
Freight Transport Association and Road
Haulage Association praised the operation
of London’s roads during the Games
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Case Study: Transport for the Olympics
Transport helped shape London’s 2005 winning
bid
•
Transport was central to London 2012 right
from the start, including the design and
delivery of London’s winning bid in 2005
•
The promise made to the IOC was to deliver
transport upgrades across London to
provide the capacity needed for the Games
•
The development of transport connectivity
for Stratford and for the Olympic Park have
been intrinsically linked
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Case Study: Transport for the Olympics
Investment in infrastructure delivered a major
early legacy for London
•
Tube line upgrades and new trains
•
Complete refurbishment of Stratford,
King’s Cross and St Pancras rail and
Tube stations
•
Extension and transformation of London
Overground, with new trains, stations
and signalling
•
A new line and extra carriages on DLR,
delivering 50 per cent more capacity
•
New lifts at key Games stations such as
Green Park and Southfields
•
Javelin® service during the Games –
St Pancras to Stratford in 7 minutes
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Case Study: Transport for the Olympics
These and other public transport infrastructure
upgrades have benefited people across London
Jubilee line upgrade: 33% more capacity
Javelin: St Pancras to
Stratford in 7 minutes
Overground: North
London line works
Key station works
across London
Overground: New,
state-of-art trains
DLR: extension to
Stratford
International
Central line upgrade: 30 trains an hour in peak
DLR: extension to
Woolwich Arsenal
Victoria line upgrade: new, state-of-the-art trains and
signalling, running 30 trains an hour in peak
DLR: 3 car upgrade,
50% more capacity
Overground: East London line extension
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Case Study: Transport for the Olympics
Investments in roads was also crucial to the Games
• £40m invested in state-of-the-art
intelligent signal control technology
called SCOOT
• Installed at 500 extra junctions for the
Games, making nearly 2,500 in total
• Meant flow of Games traffic and
ordinary motorists could be balanced
• Hammersmith flyover and M4 elevated
section fixed and fully open well ahead
of the Games
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Case Study: Transport for the Olympics
An integrated transport system
•
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London’s transport system is uniquely integrated:
•
TfL manages Tube, DLR, London Overground,
Emirates Air Line, Tramlink, Barclays Cycle
Hire and all 8,000 London buses
•
Also operates 580km of London’s major roads,
plus all 6,000 traffic signals, regulates the taxi
and private hire trades, and delivers measures
to support walking and cycling
•
All London spectators were given a free travelcard
for the day of their event, giving them access to a
vast public transport network
•
National rail in London more joined up than ever,
with Oyster in use on vast majority of services
•
Transport operators across the UK combined
efforts to deliver an integrated Games service
Case Study: Transport for the Olympics
Collaborative planning and operations
•
An effective governance structure was
established early on to ensure London
2012, government and delivery agencies
could work together productively
•
Transport partners contributed to a joint
transport plan, produced by the ODA
•
A nationwide Games Transport Board,
chaired by the TfL Commissioner, was set
up to plan and deliver transport services
collaboratively
•
During the Games, the UK’s first ever
nationwide Transport Coordination
Centre (TCC) enabled transport operators
to share information and resolve incidents
quickly
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Governance: the “WHO”
Lessons learned: One Team, Communicating widely and freely
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Case Study: Transport for the Olympics
Case Study: Transport for the Olympics
Governance: the “WHO”
Lessons learned: Strong governance; collaborative working
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Assurance Roadmap to Success
Case Study: Transport for the Olympics
2011
2010
Commissioning & Integration
2012
Validation & Delivery
Testing & Training
Dec 2010
Olympic
Transport
Plan
May 2011
Operations
Plans
Operational
Readiness
Programme
Operations
Plans V2
Venue
Transport plans
(VOTPs) issue
speaking
Games
Readiness
ODA Ops
Readiness
Programmes
V2
V2 Ops Readiness
Programmes
integrated with DP’s
360o
Assurance
Games Readiness Strategy programme and
requirements established
Pulse
Check
Refresher
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Apr 2012
Olympic
Transport plan
(OTP) issue
speaking
OTP inputs Nov 2010
from ops
plans
Stakeholder
Consultation
360o Pulse Check start
Mini-Pulse
Checks by Ops
Units (Feeder
Reviews)
Operations
Plans V3
VTOPs V2
Ops Readiness
Programmes
V3
Functionality Ready
Pulse Check (Mar
2011)
Jan 2012
Final Plans,
VTOPs & Manuals
Sep 2011
V3 Ops
Readiness
Programmes
integrated
with DP’s
Draft Games
Time
Programme
Operationally Ready
Pulse Check
Refresher (Sep
2011)
Final Games
Time
Programme
Games Ready
Games Ready
validation check (Mar
2012)
Case Study: Transport for the Olympics
•
Every facet of operations was tested ahead of the
games
The transport system was tested at all
levels, from the most detailed technical
elements, to the coordination of the
system as a whole, and its interaction
with sports events, security, government,
etc.
• Test events such as the London Surrey
Cycle Classic demonstrated how the
Games would work
• A series of nationwide ‘command post’
exercises – such as a counter terrorism
exercise at Aldwych station – tested
systems and coordination
• Games time signage and ‘Last Mile’
arrangements were tested for real in
Stratford months before the Games
begun
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Case Study: Transport for the Olympics
Extra public transport services and staff
•
Later and more frequent Tube, DLR, London
Overground and rail services on Games lines
•
200 extra buses, plus some single deck
buses replaced with double-deckers
•
More and longer trains put on by train
operating companies
•
Javelin service with 8-10 trains per hour
•
Coach and park & ride services to venues
•
4,000 TfL office staff in customer-facing
roles, plus 700 Network Rail Travel
Champions and 8,000 London Ambassadors
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Case Study: Transport for the Olympics
Transport operators put in place measures to create
an exceptional customer experience
Integrated last mile
signage
Flexible station
management
Visible, friendly and
informed staff and
volunteers
Web and social
media tools
Printed maps and
information
Real time travel
information
Extra accessibility
information
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Free Games
Travelcard
Case Study: Transport for the Olympics
A focus on reliability and
• resilience
Reliability has been improving over recent
years, with Tube typically running 96-97 per
cent of scheduled kms, and rail public
performance measurement (PPM) up from
75 per cent ten years ago to over 90 per
cent today
•
Games built on this, with extra preventative
maintenance, rapid response teams, extra
spare parts and suspended upgrade works
•
Result was over 98 per cent reliability on
Tube, DLR, Overground and buses, and
rail PPM consistently high, at 92-94 per
cent over the period
•
With a dense network of lines, London’s
transport was also resilient when incidents
did occur
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Case Study: Transport for the Olympics
A more accessible transport system
•
London set out to be the most
accessible Games ever
•
Almost 40,000 wheelchair users
attended the Games, with over
2,000 on the busiest days, plus
people with hearing and sight
impairments, elderly people,
pregnant women and those with
other accessibility requirements
•
With extra provisions – new lifts,
manual boarding ramps,
accessibility information and
more – many spectators could
use public transport
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Case Study: Transport for the Olympics
Keeping the UK moving and working
during the Games
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•
Despite investments, it was
recognised that demand could exceed
capacity at certain times and places
•
£22m UK-wide Travel Demand
Management (TDM) programme
enabled spectators, businesses and
regular travellers to plan ahead
•
Programme was a great success –
one third of Londoners reported a
change to their weekday daily travel
during the Games
•
On the roads, motorists followed
advice to avoid areas affected by the
Games, with morning peak traffic in
central London down by 16 per cent
during the Olympics
Case Study: Transport for the Olympics
Keeping businesses stocked and serviced
•
£4m freight engagement and marketing
campaign included workshops, adverts and a
freight forum chaired by an industry leader
•
Range of tools developed, such as a dedicated
Games freight website and online Freight
Journey Planner
•
Government, Traffic Commissioners, TfL
Boroughs and others worked to ensure
appropriate regulation and enable innovative
practices like out of hours deliveries
•
All this meant that during the Games, London
was kept stocked and serviced, with almost 90
per cent of operators and businesses saying
they were prepared
41
Case Study: Transport for the Olympics
Much of London’s growth over coming years will
be focussed around the Olympic Park
• Area around the Olympic Park will
benefit for years to come
• Expected to see 50 per cent of
London’s population increase and 25
per cent of new jobs over the coming
years
• Transport improvements will help to
maximise the benefits brought by
these new sports facilities, parkland,
homes and business space
42
Case Study: Transport for the Olympics
However, the benefits of transport investment
reach well beyond East London
• £6.5bn invested to provide:
– Extra capacity
– Greater reliability
– Improved accessibility
– More connectivity
• ODA funded £429m of
transport improvements
specially for the Games
43
Case Study: Transport for the Olympics
TDM has shown it is possible to change travel beha
• TDM could be used in future to
maximise use of transport
capacity, for example to:
– Provide a better customer
experience
– Support major events, such as
Rugby World Cup 2015
– Manage transport incidents
– Delay investment in extra
capacity
– Facilitate blockades for
upgrade work
44
Case Study: Transport for the Olympics
Volunteers can be deployed at future events and to help
during upgrade work
• Assist both visitors and
Londoners better navigate
the network
• Used alongside travel
demand management and
customer communications
• Valuable front-line
experience for office staff
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London delivered
46
Case Study: Transport for the Olympics
•
The UK transport industry proved it can plan, build and
operate a network able to support the most challenging
logistical exercise
•
All this gives more evidence, if any were needed, that London
and the UK are great places to live, work and invest in
Conclusion
•Have a vision
•Have an Execution Plan
•Consult widely
•Have strong leaders with collaborative
teams
•Celebrate success and share best practice
47
Q&A
THANK YOU

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