March/April 2007 - Mississippi Bend AEA

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March/April 2007 - Mississippi Bend AEA
March/April 2007
Feature Articles . . . . .1-11
Conferences &
Workshops . . . . . . . . . . 12
Staff
Development . . . . . .13-19
Media Center
Resources . . . . . . . . .20-25
Career
Opportunities. . . . . . . . 26
Learning Center
Calendar . . . . . . . . .27-28
The Mission of the
Mississippi Bend Area
Education Agency is to
improve teaching and
learning for all students
through active partnerships
and assertive leadership in
a climate of mutual respect.
Communicator
Serving the schools in Jackson, Clinton, Cedar, Scott, Muscatine, & Louisa Counties
A New Wave of Evidence:
School, Family, Community Connections,
and Student Achievements
~ By Barb Brunkan and Cindy Swanson, Research, Development and Evaluation Division
W
hen schools build partnerships with families that respond to their concerns and honor
their contributions, they are successful in sustaining connections aimed at improving
student achievement (Anne Henderson & Karen Mapp, Harvard University, National
Center for Family and Community Connections with Schools).
Side bar table/chart:
Type of Family
Involvement*
Elementary
Secondary
Parenting
• Expressing high expectations
• Limiting television & video
game use
• Supervising time use &
behavior
• Discussing interest issues &
studies
• Doing things together
• Supervising behavior
• Selecting student classes
• Supervising academic work
Communicating
• Initiating contacts with
educators
• Responding to requests from
educators
• Initiating contacts with
educators
• Responding to requests from
educators
• Collaborating with educators
on postsecondary planning
Supporting School
• Volunteering at school
• Volunteering at school
• Attending school activities
Learning at Home
• Providing academic support
• Providing music or dance
lessons
• Discussing future plans
• Encouraging high school
graduation
• Learning about postsecondary
education
• Assisting with educational
expenses
Decision Making
• Taking part in parent
organizations
• Taking part in school
improvement committees
• Taking part in parent
organizations
• Taking part in school
improvement committees
Community Collaboration
• Using community learning
resources
• Taking part in community
groups
• Communicating with other
parents
* Adapted from the National Center for Family and Community Connections with Schools
Continued
Working Together…Improving Teaching and Learning
Features
A Wave of New Evidence, continued from page 1
• Ask families about ways they encourage their children and ways
they share their cultural traditions.
• Invite families to tell their educational stories.
• At every conference, ask about expectations for their children’s
education
Create programs that support their children’s learning from
preschool to high school. Children of all ages do better when
they make a solid adjustment to school. Students feeling safe and
respected, feeling they belong at school, and feeling supported by
teachers are examples of adjustment.
Encouraging, convincing, and consistent evidence exists that
parents have a major influence on student academic and social
achievement. When schools, families, and community groups
work together to support learning, students do better in school,
stay in school longer, and like school more. Many studies found
that students with involved parents, no matter their income level
or background, were more likely to:
• Earn higher grades and test scores and enroll in higher level
coursework
• Be promoted, pass their classes and earn credits
• Attend school regularly
• Have better social skills, show improved behavior and
adapt well to school
• Graduate and go on to postsecondary training
• Schedule family and student tours of the school to visit and
observe in the classrooms.
• Create transitional programs at each educational level i.e.
preschool, elementary, intermediate, high school.
• Build relationships with each family before school starts.
But if parents have a central role in influencing their children’s
progress in school, schools in turn have an important part to play
in determining levels of parent involvement. Involving parents
is particularly important as students grow older. A report from
the U.S. Department of Education lists reasons for the decline
in parent involvement as children grow older. Parents of middle
school age children believe students should do homework alone.
In addition, parents believe they should not try to help if they
are not experts in the subject area. The structure of many middle
schools can also deter parents. Many schools are larger and more
impersonal than elementary schools, and students may receive
instruction from several teachers which means parents no longer
have contact with one person who knows their child well.
Work with families to build their social and political connections.
When parents feel they have power to change and control their
circumstances, children do better in school. When schools work
with families to develop partnerships, families become powerful
allies of the school and advocates for education.
Studies find that families of all educational levels, ethnic and
cultural groups, are engaged in supporting their children’s learning
at home. Encouraging involvement from all parents may be an
important strategy for addressing the achievement gap.
Develop the capacity of school staff to work with families and
community members. Increase opportunities for staff development
providing strategies to connect with diverse families and community
members.
Schools that succeed in engaging families from diverse backgrounds
and income levels share three key practices:
• Help staff recognize the advantages of school, family, and
community connections.
• Explore how trusting and respectful relationships with families
and community members are achieved.
• Enhance the school staff ’s ability to work with diverse families
• Explore the benefits of sharing power with families and
community members.
• Promote families’ connections with each other, with teachers
and other school staff, and with community groups.
• Make school a laboratory for democracy that includes family
involvement in decision making committees and school
improvement initiatives at the beginning and throughout
the planning process.
• Acknowledge the levels of parent involvement and offer
workshops to support parents.
1. Focus on building trusting collaborative relationships among
teachers, families, and community members.
2. Recognize, respect, and address families’ needs as well as class
and cultural differences.
3. Embrace a philosophy of partnership in which power and
responsibility are shared.
Link family and community engagement efforts to student
learning. To be effective, programs and practices that engage
families should be focused in some way on improving achievement.
Types of Family Involvement: Action Steps
Based on the Harvard study, recommendations hold important
implications for educational practice:
• Develop or adopt programs to engage parents in working with
their children to develop certain skills.
• Work with local after-school programs to link their content to
what children are learning in class.
• Link the school’s traditional staples of parent involvement to
learning with activities such as math and literacy family nights
or exhibitions of student work.
Recognize that all parents, regardless of income, education level,
or cultural background, are involved in their children’s learning
and want their children to do well in school. Families respond
well to information and support to improve their children’s
performance in school and influence other key outcomes that
affect achievement.
Continued
Continued
2
Features
A Wave of New Evidence, continued from page 2
Louisa Muscatine Community School District Develops
an Action Plan to Enhance Parent Involvement.
Focus efforts to engage families and community members in
developing trusting and respectful relationships. Attempts to
form genuine collaborations among school staff, parents, and
community members must start with building relationships of
respect.
Louisa Muscatine Community School District is an AEA9
Learning Support pilot site committed to increasing
student proficiency by actively engaging parents in the
education of their children. The district Building Leadership
team is currently examining research and best practices
aimed at improving parent/school partnerships. Based on
a gap analysis, the district developed an action plan that
includes meaningful parent participation in decision
making processes, building social connections for families,
linking family engagement efforts to student learning, and
creating supportive relationships preschool through high
school.
• Respect culture and class differences.
• Allocate resources to build relationships and support parent
and community involvement.
• Adopt simple but effective practices of educator outreach to
families
Embrace a philosophy of partnership and be willing to share
power with families. Make sure that parents, school staff, and
community members understand the responsibility for children’s
educational development is a collaborative enterprise. Partnership
means sharing power with parents and community members.
Both lose interest in partnering with schools when their participation
is a token.
Action Step: Meaningful parent participation in decision
making processes
• Work with community based programs, i.e., Big
Brothers Big Sisters
• Open school facilities to community groups
• Extend active and meaningful membership of district/
building leadership teams and committees to include
parents
• Adopt the philosophy that family and community engagement
is a key component in the whole school reform plan.
• Find workable ways to involve families and community
members in planning, establishing policy, and making
decisions.
Action Step: Build Social Connections for Families
• Develop or enhance volunteer opportunities
• Increase attendance at school activities
• Create novel opportunities for parents to connect with
other parents at school sponsored functions
• Provide information about community services during
conferences
Build strong connections between schools and community
organizations. Connections to community groups can expand
the resources available to schools for both staff and families.
Collaboration between school leaders and community groups
have resulted in improved facilities, more funding resources,
higher quality academic programs, improved social and health
services, and new after-school programs.
Action Step: Linking family engage efforts to student
learning
• Support family literacy through a parent/child book club
• Develop opportunities to increase math proficiency
through “Fantasy Football”
• Provide developmentally appropriate “Movie nights”
linked to student learning
• Display student artwork in Fine Arts Showcases
• Acknowledge student achievements through Falcon
Awards
• Increase participation in mentoring programs
• Work with community organizations that offer programs that
encourage reading, writing, and studying during evenings,
weekends, and summer.
• Open the school to community groups and agencies that can
offer services to families.
• Collaborate with community organizing groups that want to
improve the school.
• Coordinate efforts to reach families with community
organizations
Summing up:
Action Step: Creating supportive relationships preschool
through high school
• Provide developmentally appropriate parent education
and support programs
• Support student transitions through formal programs
and activities
• Create kindergarten and 7th grade videos to inform parents
of school programs and opportunities
• Provide opportunities for parents to learn about post
secondary options including financial aid
• Use district and building level communications to
provide information to families
When parents talk to their children about school, expect them to
do well, help them plan for college, and make sure that out-ofschool activities are constructive; children do better in school.
When schools engage families in ways that are linked to improving
learning, students make greater gains. When schools build
partnerships with families responding to their concerns and
honoring their contributions, they are successful in sustaining
connections aimed at improving student achievement. And when
families and communities organize to hold poorly performing
schools accountable, school districts make positive changes in
policy, practice, and resource allocation.
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3
Features
Every Student Counts
Shows Promising Results
~ By Sandra Campie, Elementary Math/Science Consultant
E
very Student Counts, Mississippi Bend Area Education
Agency’s math initiative, is now in its second year. This
professional development program for math leadership
teams K-12 will be offering Number and Operations (Year 1),
Geometry and Measurement (Year 2), and Data Analysis and
Probability (Year 3) of the initiative in 2007-08 to interested
districts. I’d like to share some of the highlights of the past two
years with you this month and offer you an invitation to participate
in Every Student Counts next year.
Those schools that implemented a new curriculum compatible
with teaching for understanding and engaged their teachers in
ESC professional development have averaged 14 point gains in
proficiency ratings over the past 5 years. Although gains may be
attributed to many other changes schools could have made as
well, we are encouraged by our local data that mirrors what has
been found in national studies.
This quote is from a recent study conducted for Title 1 schools
that examined the factors that led to successful achievement in
schools for students in math and reading.
The initiative at Mississippi Bend AEA9 was set into motion
earlier than some parts of the state because the need for K-12
buildings to build math proficiency quickly was indicated by
district data. We needed to reach all students, especially the
subgroups, in several of our districts. We knew using the powerful
strategies of teaching for understanding, problem-based
instructional tasks and meaningful distributed practice, would
bring about the changes needed. Problem-based instructional
tasks frame math lessons with an opening problem that students
do not yet know how to solve. As they access prior knowledge of
mathematics and use personal strategies of finding solutions, they
develop deeper understanding of the concepts in the problem.
Through classroom discourse students and teachers discuss
solutions and strategies that develop deep understanding.
Meaningful distributed practice allows students more time for
developing underlying prerequisite skills and concepts before a
problem-based task or provides additional practice following a
task on a math concept. Years of research has shown distributed
practice over time, in small segments, enhances retention and
application skills. These two practices form the foundation of the
study of the math content in each year. Each year provides
further refinement of the skills needed to conduct a problem-based
classroom successfully.
“The best combination of circumstances for mathematics
gains was the following:
• Relatively higher amounts of exploration in instruction,
• A teacher who believed he or she had more to learn
in mathematics instruction, and
• Higher teacher ratings of professional development.
Students who experienced this combination of
instructional variables, starting out 18 points behind
their counterparts in the LESCP sample and 20 points
below national norms, would close 40 percent of the
gap between themselves and the longitudinal sample
and about 50 percent of the gap between their scores
and national norms.11”
This report is from Longitudinal Evaluation of School Change in
Performance (LESCP) in Title I Schools, 2001. The report is available in Word and PDF formats online at ed.gov/offices/OUS/PES/
esed/lescp_highlights.html Print copies of this report are available
by contacting the U.S. Department of Education’s Publication
Center, by calling (800)
USA-LEARN (800-8725327) or by e-mailing
[email protected]
How do teachers best
learn new educational
practices? Research from
the Iowa Professional
Development Model tells
us it is through collaborative teams and the
opportunity to practice with support from
experts and each other.
Every Student Counts
provides these essential
components. Having appropriate resources also is
essential. The following
data has been collected
for the schools in Area 9.
Continued
Letters of invitation will
be sent during March
and April to superintendents and principals. If
your district is considering math adoption
in the near future or
if math proficiency of
your students is an area
of focus for you, please
contact Sandi Campie at
[email protected]
or call 563-344-6341 for
further information.
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4
Features
School Libraries Are Key To Student Achievement
~ By Cindy Blinkinsop, Media-Technology Consultant
F
School Library Media Programs Impact Academic
Achievement in Iowa” showed that school library
media programs promote academic achievement
through:
or the past several years, studies have been
conducted on the impact of school libraries
and librarians on academic achievement.
The research shows that the following factors are
key elements to student success:
• An emphasis on literacy and life-long learning
• Rich collections of resources which included
print, video, audio and computer formats to
meet the needs of diverse learners
• Collaboration with teachers to promote the
integration of information literacy with
classroom content connections
• Flexible access so students can use a variety of
resources when they need them
• Current technologies for accessing timely
information and the production of multi-media
projects
• Warm and inviting facilities where a variety of learning
opportunities abound
• Hours the library is open & flexible scheduling
• Staffed by teacher-librarians & aides
• School expenditures on school libraries and
resources
• Up-to-date print & periodical collections
• Licensed databases & the technology to utilize
them
• Activities associated with teaching and learning
• Access to information and the delivery of the
content
• Program administration by teacher-librarian
• Group & individual visits to the school library media center
• Visits to the media center for literacy instruction
You can view this information along with the actual State
studies on the Library Research Service web page at http://www.
lrs.org/index.asp Some of the States that have conducted the
impact studies include Iowa, Colorado, Ohio, California,
Massachusetts, Connecticut, Delaware, Nevada, South Carolina,
Alaska, Florida, Vermont and South Dakota. There are links to
all of the studies at the Library Research Service homepage.
The Iowa study further showed that Iowa schools with a higher
percentage of top reading scores tended to have a stronger library
media program than schools with the lowest percentage of acceptable
reading scores.
According to the National Commission on Libraries and Information
Science, school libraries are critical for student achievement, play
an important role in teaching, lead the way for technology use in
schools, inspire literacy, and don’t matter without highly qualified
school librarians (NCLIS: Why Care About School Libraries).
Keith Curry Lance, Director of Library Research Service, (http://
www.lrs.org/documents/lmcstudies/) looked at how school
libraries compare with school and community conditions and
found that:
A few interesting facts to close with from the American Library
Association:
1. The percent of students eligible for the National School Lunch
Program was the #1 predictor of test scores
2. A school library program was the 2nd most consistent
predictor
3. Other important predictors included teacher-to-student ratio,
over spending per pupil, race/ethnicity, and adult education
achievement.
• Americans go to school, public and academic libraries more
than twice as often as they go to the movies.
• Reference librarians in the nation’s public and academic
libraries answer more than 7 million questions weekly.
• Federal spending on libraries annually is only 54 cents
per person.
• A 2002 poll conducted by the American Library Association
showed that 91% of respondents expect libraries to be needed
in the future, despite the increased availability of information
on the Internet.
• Americans spend seven times the money on home video games
($7 billion) than they do on school library materials for their
children ($1 billion).
• Students visit school libraries almost 1.5 billion times
during the school year – about 1/2 times the visits to
state and national parks.
• There are more public libraries than McDonald’s Restaurants.
Keith Curry Lance also found that the teacher-librarian must be a
leader in his or her school community by meeting with the principal
and other administrators on a regular basis, by serving
on key committees such as technology team or curriculum
team, by participating in the school’s faculty meetings, and by
meeting with other teacher-librarians. Teacher-librarian’s who are
‘collaborators’ provide vital information to their principals and
teachers, plan and co-teach with classroom teachers, develop a
rich collection to meet the curricular needs of the school, and
create an environment that promotes reading (http://www.lrs.
org/documents/lmcstudies/).
The study done in Iowa entitled, “Making the Connection: Quality
Continued
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5
Features
Awesome Websites for Awesome Educators
ducators
~ By Cindy Blinkinsop, Media-Technology Consultant
ASTRONOMY:
The National Science Foundation (NSF) has organized links,
resources and lesson plans for educators. From the Astronomy
page, teachers and students can follow links to learn about planets,
amateur telescope making, black holes, and what astronomers
really do! Students in grades 2-6 have access to hands-on
astronomy activities.
http://www.nsf.gov/news/classroom/astronomy.jsp
U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). Teachers have access to lessons
and activities to conduct field trips right in their own backyards!
Some lessons and activities include mapping the schoolyard,
locating and identifying rocks, and learning geological concepts
such as striations, layers, and sinkholes. Student activities also
teach about fossils, dinosaur tracks and how old rocks are using
side-by-side comparisons.
http://education.usgs.gov/schoolyard/
BIOLOGY:
The National Science Foundation (NSF) has organized links,
resources and lesson plans for educators. From this page a class
can learn about cells, biotechnology, genomics, slugs, tigers,
paleontology, and much more! Students can play interactive games
on evolution and the animal kingdom, and link to a site called
Strange Science which leads you through myths and explanations
about scientists.
http://www.nsf.gov/news/classroom/biology.jsp
MATH SITES:
A Maths Dictionary for Kids is an interactive web site put together
by an educator in Australia. She has very clear, concise definitions
for many math terms as well as activities for most terms.
http://www.amathsdictionaryforkids.com/
Math Challenges are featured on this website for all K-12 grade
levels and ability levels. Correct responses are provided instantly
so the student has immediate feedback.
http://www.whitehouse.gov/kids/math/
GENERAL:
Results that Matter is a report available online that urges high
school reform. Improving high schools requires a district to look
at its curriculum to make sure it is rigorous and relevant. Today’s
graduates need to be critical thinkers, problem solvers, and
effective communicators who are proficient in core subjects as
well as information technology.
http://www.21stcenturyskills.org/documents/P21_report.pdf
Math Open Reference is a free web based high school geometry
textbook that incorporates student learning with interactive tools.
http://www.mathopenref.com/
TECHNOLOGY:
More than a Blog...Oracle Education Foundation sponsors a
free online web based learning community for Elementary and
Secondary Education.
GEOGRAPHY:
Google Inc. has enhanced its digital maps and videos of different
places on the earth. Google has partnered with Discovery
Communication to enhance its popular Google earth digital
mapping service with video clips of historic sites and other
locations around the globe.
http://earth.google.com/
The latest version makes it easier for teachers to create and
manage student accounts, flag and review content, and facilitate
online collaboration and learning. New features include new tabs:
My Site, People, and Groups.
http://www.think.com/en_us/
Webcasts from the Library of Congress can be played using
RealPlayer and offer six-plus years worth of recordings from
several hundred talks, discussions, and conferences. There are
webcasts available for students, parents, and teachers.
http://www.loc.gov/today/cyberlc/index.php
GEOGRAPHY: ONLINE QUIZ SITES:
National Geographic Web Site offers the Geobee Challenge
which has lower-level questions as well as higher-level questions
for students. Check it out at:
www.nationalgeographic.com/geobee/
Best Practices in Technology Integration is a website with a ton
of resources for all grade levels and all curricular areas. This site
is sponsored by the Michigan Association of Intermediate School
Administrators, the REMC Association of Michigan and the
Berrien County Intermediate School district. This site is a must
see!
http://www.remc11.k12.mi.us/bstpract/
Lizard Point has geography quizzes for older students and teachers
too!
http://www.lizardpoint.com/fun/geoquiz/
FunBrain’s basic quiz focuses on key locations. Students are
shown maps and have to identify the correct country. There are
higher-level quizzes available.
http://www.funbrain.com/where/
Technology Integration made easy! This web site is an invaluable
resource for educators who want to integrate technology seamlessly
across the curriculum. This site is another must see!
http://its.leesummit.k12.mo.us/
GEOLOGY:
Take a Geological Field Trip using this web site provided by the
Continued
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6
Features
Web-based Checkout for
Assistive Technology Items
Continues to Grow
Making Written
Documents Accessible
Persons with disabilities can’t always read your letters, emails or
other electronic documents. Some simple tips will allow them to
be as accessible as possible.
N
ew items are being added weekly
to the web-based checkout for
the Assistive Technology Loan
Library (ATLL). The checkout period for
most items has been expanded to four
weeks. Items have been categorized to
make it easier to search for specific types
of devices. Examples of new items in the
checkout include: The Writer, Neo and Dana (portable word
processing devices); Mess Be Gone (desk organizer); Singing
Snowman (switch-activated toy); Lap Genie Tray (strong,
adjustable work tray for bed or seated work); Elmo-Birds the
Word (switch-activated toy); Social Skills Stories (resource book);
and Dell PDA (for organization, assignment tracking, alarms,
etc.). Other categories include: Timers; Memory Aids; Literacy
Aids; “At my desk” items; Schedule Boards; Writing Aids; Math
items; Communication Devices and Supports; and Infrared
Devices.
Writing for Vision Disabilities:
• Eyes respond to contrast. Black on white is the best. Avoid light
blue text. Light blue is the first color that we loose the ability
to see as we age. Yellow backgrounds are also a problem for
those who have a reduced color spectrum.
• Persons who have vision impairments often use reading
software. Hyperlinks should have a short but sensible text
description.
• Don’t use “link” or “click here.”
• When using images, add a textual description of the image,
known as alternative text. Screen readers and Braille displays
recognize this.
Writing for Hearing Disabilities:
• Persons who are hearing disabled often use visual warning
devices as an alert for audio. If you utilize a sound file in your
document, include a text description.
Writing for Cognitive, Language Disabilities and Seizures
To check out a device, go to http://www.aea9.k12.ia.us/05/at_
device/at_search.php The search screen can be used to narrow
your search to specific categories. Pull down from the Type
and Sub-Type and then select Search. If you want to search for
switch-activated toys, you can use the sensory area search tools
to include and exclude specific sensory area.
• Use lots of white space. Put an empty line between paragraphs.
• Avoid “busy” screens. Minimize highly colored graphics, text,
different fonts and animations on any one page.
• Bulleted or numbered lists are easier to read and comprehend
than a dense paragraph.
• Use short sentences. Be precise and uncomplicated.
• Avoid moving text or images. Even slow movement can make
the text unreadable.
Assistive Technology Loan Library
More information or training may be obtained at:
Microsoft.com/training.
Reprinted with permission from: Iowa COMPASS Newsletter, January,
2007, p. 2, http://www.uiowa.edu/infotech/Publication.htm
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The Mississippi Bend
Area Education Agency
Ombudsperson
The Mississippi Bend Area Education Agency Ombudsperson is a
liaison who responds to internal and external customers who have
concerns, questions, issues, or problems that need to be resolved.
The Ombudsperson pledges commitment, integrity and professional
expertise to handle customer needs. Requests will be dealt with in
a confidential, independent, neutral and timely manner, making
the Mississippi Bend Area Education Agency even more responsive
to its customers. For more information about the Mississippi
Bend AEA Ombudsperson, please call 563-344-6403.
When you see an item that you would like to use, select the item
and follow the checkout procedures. If the item is available, the
“Checkout this item” button will be available. If the item is
currently checked out, the “Get on the waiting list” button will
be available.
Please contact Cindy Cavanagh ([email protected]) or
Teresa Wyant ([email protected]) with questions.
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7
Features
Whatʼs New in the
Staff Development Department
~ By Georgie Koenig, Head of Professional Development
T
o better serve the educators in our area the Staff Development Department has made several changes. The department has
received frequent requests from educators for coaching and physical education courses. In response to those requests, the
department has added new courses. Many educators have expressed interest in the online courses, but want to know more
about them before registering. A demonstration course is now available to educators.
The Staff Development Department has been working hard this past year to become more efficient in meeting customer needs. Educators
will find that these changes expedite registration and the grading process. The Staff Development Department works to ensure the
department offers quality courses at an economical price. Our prices will be increasing to meet rising costs, but educators will
continue to receive courses priced well below other educational institutions offering credit.
Video Coaching and Physical Education Courses
The Staff Development Department is partnering with Drake University to offer video courses for coaches and physical education
teachers. Educators registering through the AEA online registration site receive the early bird pricing. Interested educators can register
anytime for the video courses. Participants have one year from the date of registration to complete the course. The videotapes or DVD
and Study Guide are shipped to the participant’s home 10-15 days after registering for the course.
Completed coursework and videotapes or DVD are sent to Drake University’s Distance Learning Center for grading. Coursework is
graded continuously throughout the semester. Coursework is graded within 60 days of being received.
To find out more or to register go to http://www.solutionwhere.com/mbaea/cw/CourseByCateg.asp and look under the category of
Physical Education.
Address questions to Georgie Koenig, Head of
Professional Development at (563) 344-6487
or at [email protected] Call or email
Georgie Koenig to request a complete Video
Coaching & Physical Education course catalog.
Demo for Online Pearson Courses
Due to the many inquires from area educators
about how online courses work; the Staff
Development Department has added a link to
the staff development webpage to a Pearson
demonstration course. The direct link to the
demo is http://www.drake.edu/edex/distance/
Online_Courses.php.
While on the staff development webpage,
educators can view interviews with local
educators about their experiences taking online
courses through the AEA. Interested educators
should go to the staff development web page:
http://www.aea9.k12.ia.us/04/staffdevdirect.php
Once on the webpage scroll down to Other Staff Development Sites and click on Online Course Video.
Questions regarding the demonstration course or the link to the interviews can be addressed to Judy Bickle, Staff Development
Specialist, at (563) 344-6481 or at [email protected] and to Georgie Koenig, Head of Professional Development at (563) 344-6487
or at [email protected]
Drake Online Graduate Credit Form
In an effort to save time and money, the Staff Development Department has moved closer to a paperless environment. The changes
eliminate redundancy of tasks and generate more efficiency. One of the changes that directly affect course participants is the Drake
University graduate credit form. The form is now online and available to fill out during the registration process. Instructors will no longer
Continued
8
Features
What’s New in the Staff Development Department, continued from page 8
be handing out the paper Drake forms. In order to receive Drake Graduate credit, course participants will need to fill out the online
Drake form available on the home page of the online registration site, http://www.solutionwhere.com/mbaea/cw/main.asp. Once a
course participant logs on the home page the participant needs to click on the link that says, “To Access Drake University Graduate
Credit Form, Click Here.”
It is important for course participants to fill the form out completely, as Drake needs all of the information requested in order to register a
course participant for Drake graduate credit. The Drake form is sent electronically to Drake in a secure FPT. Course participants need
to remember to register for the course in addition to filling out the Drake graduate credit form. If the Drake graduate credit form is not
completed by a course participant, Drake graduate credit cannot be issued. If a course participant needs assistance with completing the
Drake graduate credit form, the participant can call Judy Bickle, Staff Development Specialist at (563) 344-6481.
Cost Increase for Courses
In order to cover operating costs, the Staff Development Department will be raising the cost of courses submitted for approval, beginning
May 1st. A course that has been posted online for registration or approved before May1, 2007, will not be affected. The cost for the
following courses will remain the same: Pearson online courses, Pearson video courses, and Drake video coaching and physical education
courses.
An explanation of how current course costs are determined compared to how the new course costs will be determined is as follows:
Drake University courses for one graduate credit
The current formula for determining Drake course cost is:
$62.00 Drake credit + $16.00 processing fee + $50.00
instructor fee = $128.00 per credit
The new formula for determining Drake course cost will be:
$90.00 Drake credit + $50.00 instructor fee = $140 per credit
The increase in cost is $12.00 per credit
Relicensure courses for one graduate credit
The current formula for determining relicensure course cost is:
$16.00 processing fee + $50.00 instructor cost = $66.00 per
credit
The new formula for determining relicensure course cost
will be: $20 relicensure fee + $50.00 instructor fee = $70.00
per credit
The increase in cost is $4.00 for one credit.
Instructor fees will be included in courses open to all participants. The instructor fee will not be included in district only courses offered
by district staff.
The new course costs, though slightly higher than our previous fees, still remain economical and are significantly lower than surrounding
institutions offering graduate credit.
The following chart provides the new cost for Drake graduate credit and relicensure credit beginning for all courses submitted after
May 1, 2007:
Drake Graduate Credit
District Only Courses
Offered By District Staff
Courses Open to All
Registrants
One Drake Graduate Credit
$90.00
$140.00
Two Drake Graduate Credits
$180.00
$280.00
Three Drake Graduate Credits
$270.00
$420.00
One Relicensure Credit
$20.00
$70.00
Two Relicensure Credits
$40.00
$140.00
Three Relicensure Credits
$60.00
$210.00
Relicensure Credit
For more information about the changes in the Staff Development Department, contact Georgie Koenig, Head of Professional
Development at (563) 344-6487 or at [email protected]
◆◆◆◆◆◆◆◆
9
Features
2007-2008 AEA 9
Reading Initiatives
Second Chance Reading
~ By Judith Boland, Early Childhood/
Quality Learning Consultant
T
~ By Judith Boland, Early Childhood/
Quality Learning Consultant
he goal of “Second Chance Reading” is the remediation
of reading deficits for secondary students who otherwise
would struggle with the demands of the secondary
curriculum.
M
ississippi Bend AEA invites districts to participate in
professional development focused on improving
student achievement in reading. An Elementary
Initiative and a Secondary Initiative are being offered, and both
initiatives will engage participants in the process of collecting,
organizing, and analyzing student performance data and
implementation data. Quality Learning Reading Consultants will
plan with Building Leadership Teams to deliver on site professional
development aligned with student achievement needs. The
Initiatives will utilize the Iowa Professional Development Model.
The content is research based and supported by the Iowa Department
of Education Reading Team.
“Second Chance” Reading focuses on comprehension skills but
also targets vocabulary development and fluency in both fiction
and non-fiction textual materials. The course is designed specifically for middle and high school students who are reading below
grade level.
Based on a comprehensive analysis of research on reading,
“Second Chance” combines multiple strategies and practices into
a structure for reading instruction and has proved successful in
both urban and rural settings.
The program incorporates several strands:
Several elementary, middle, and high school buildings participated
in the AEA 9 Reading Initiatives during the 2006-07 school year.
1. Extensive independent reading at students’ recreational level
2. Vocabulary development at both age-appropriate and
recreational reading levels
3. Comprehension instruction for both lower- and higher-order
comprehension tasks in fiction and non-fiction materials
4. Fluency instruction and monitoring
5. Writing as an assist to comprehension.
Elementary Reading Initiative
Buildings participating in the Elementary Initiative will have
the opportunity to select strategies in the area of comprehension,
vocabulary, and fluency. The comprehension strategies are:
Read-aloud, Talk-aloud, Think-aloud, and QAR (Question
Answer Relationships). Professional development in the area of
fluency includes these activities: Partner Reading, Structured
Repeated Readings, Choral Reading, and Reader’s Theatre.
Vocabulary content includes vocabulary activities based on the
work of Isabel Beck and Steven Stahl, and three visual representations
(graphic organizers): Concept Map, Semantic Map, and Semantic
Feature Analysis. The Picture Word Inductive Model (PWIM)
utilizes multiple strategies and addresses comprehension,
vocabulary, phonemic awareness, phonics, and fluency. Professional
development is also available in the area of Explicit Instruction.
For more information, contact Janet Stos, Mississippi Bend Area
Education Agency (563) 344-6392 or [email protected]
◆◆◆◆◆◆◆◆
TEACHERS’ HELPER STORE
HOURS:
Monday – Friday
7:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.
For information regarding the Elementary Initiative, or to
request an application form, contact Judy Boland, [email protected]
k12.ia.us (563) 344-6432 or 800-947-2329 ext 6432.
Located in the Media Materials Distribution Center
of our Bettendorf Office
Applications for the Elementary Initiative are due by May 15, 2007.
Secondary Reading Initiative
Buildings participating in the Secondary Initiative (middle and
high schools) will have the opportunity to select strategies in the
area of comprehension and vocabulary. The comprehension
strategies are: Read-aloud, Talk-aloud, Think-aloud and QAR
(Question Answer Relationships). Vocabulary content includes
utilizing graphic organizers. Professional development is also
available in the areas of writing across the curriculum and “Second
Chance Reading.” For more information about “Second Chance
Reading,” see the accompanying article in the Communicator.
•
•
•
•
Classroom Supplies
Decorations
Books
Puzzles
We accept
purchase orders,
cash, checks,
Mastercard
or Visa
For information regarding the Secondary Initiative, or to request
an application form, contact Janet Stos, [email protected]
(563) 344-6392 or 800-947-2329 ext 6392.
Applications for the Secondary Initiative are due by May 15, 2007.
Phone: (563) 359-1371
◆◆◆◆◆◆◆◆
10
• Games
• Charts
• Bulletin Board
Sets . . .
Features
be used by the science teacher. The initiative’s time line does not
include immediate implementation, but rather a careful and
deliberate development stage over two years. Implementation
will begin after data and observations from the case study schools
throughout the state have been thoroughly evaluated and scaled
up for high implementation outcomes.
Every Learner Inquires (ELI)
~ By Sally Rigeman, Quality Learning Consultant
& Eldon Bird, Quality Learning Consultant
E
very Learner Inquires is Iowa’s statewide science initiative.
ELI is a four year K-12 science professional development
project that aligns with the Iowa Professional Development
Model.
AEA 9 Involvement
A team of K-12 science teachers and administrators from the
Calamus-Wheatland District, the Davenport Schools K-12 Science
Coordinator, and AEA 9 science consultants is assisting the local
development of the initiative. Cal-Wheat Elementary teachers,
Lisa Fox and Susan Kruse, join with secondary staff, Joel Schroeder
and Glenn Drowns, on the front lines:
• Learning and absorbing all they can about inquiry from the ELI
seminars and their work in their science classrooms.
• Practicing inquiry activities in their classroom and making
notes at every opportunity.
• Sharing their observations through ELI seminars, discussions,
and the web board, and opening their classrooms for observation.
Goals
• Student Learning Goal: Improve science learning for all K-12
students in the state of Iowa
• Teacher Learning Goal: Build teacher leadership and content
expertise within the system
• Teacher Practice Goal: Implement inquiry-based instruction
• Organizational Goal: Establish a structure that sustains the
implementation of Every Learner Inquires (ELI)
Vision
The vision of the Every Learner Inquires (ELI) project is one in
which all students engage in investigating significant scientific
questions in supportive, collegial learning communities. Students
will come to deeply understand important science ideas and
master complex skills and reasoning processes that are essential
to scientific literacy.
John Cain and Lonnie Luepker, Cal –Wheat Elementary and
Secondary Principals, Dawn Anderson-Rascher, Science
Curriculum and Instruction Specialist for Davenport Schools,
John Dunkhase from the Science Education Center at the University
of Iowa and MBAEA science consultants Sally Rigeman and Eldon
Bird are supporting members of the AEA 9 ELI team.
For further information contact: Sally Rigeman at (563) 344-6562,
email: [email protected] or Eldon Bird at (563) 344-6417,
email: [email protected]
Mission
The mission of the Every Learner Inquires project is to assist Iowa
AEAs, schools and districts in building the capacity to implement
an effective K-12 science education program using inquiry-based
instructional strategies as outlined in the National Science Education
Standards.
◆◆◆◆◆◆◆◆
Instructional Decision Making
(IDM) Pilot Program
Why Inquiry?
Inquiry has strong support in National Science Education
Standards and research literature. Inquiry learning occurs when
students have the opportunity to:
• investigate a question about natural phenomenon (preferably
by direct experience)
• gather and interpret evidence from the investigation
• make and share claims of understanding based on evidence
Implemented in Bettendorf and North Scott
Schools This Year
The Mississippi Bend Area Education Agency (AEA) is working
with local school districts to implement Instructional Decision
Making (IDM). IDM focuses on academic and social/behavioral
instruction by using data regarding the student’s responses to
instruction to guide future educational decisions. There are three
key guiding principles to IDM.
Research has shown inquiry to be effective in increasing student
understanding about science concepts as well as developing
abilities to investigate and understand the nature of science. It is
also an effective strategy when the learner is allowed to compare
personal prior experience and knowledge with understandings
derived from their inquiries. The teacher’s role in the inquiry
classroom is to facilitate the inquiry process and mediate science
concept development. This is a much different learning situation
than the traditional classroom – instead of the learning process
being teacher-centered it is student-centered. The teacher guides
students to use reason and comparison to resolve their problems
in the learning process.
1. All students receive curriculum that is guaranteed, viable,
rigorous and relevant. Such curriculum includes
academic, social, and behavioral learning.
2. All students receive core instruction, and some students,
both those who are high achievers and those who are
struggling, also require supplemental instruction and/or
intensive instruction.
3. Assessment data, screening, formative, diagnostic and
summative, is required to make good instructional
decisions.
Several pilot case study schools across the state will collect data
and observations over a two year period to discover how best to
initiate inquiry in the science classroom. Their work will provide
the foundation for implementation of the initiative across the state.
IDM is being piloted in the Bettendorf and North Scott districts
this school year, focusing on both academic and behavioral issues.
For more information, contact David Quinn, Director of Special
Education, (563) 344-6201 or 800-947-239, extension 201.
Not a Curriculum
ELI is not a curriculum, but rather a collection of strategies to
Continued
◆◆◆◆◆◆◆◆
11
Conferences & Workshops
Master’s Degree Programs . . .
Are you interested in earning a master’s degree? Then plan on
attending one the information sessions scheduled during the
months of March, April, or May in Clinton, Muscatine, or
Bettendorf. Check the AEA’s staff development online registration
at http://www.solutionwhere.com/mbaea/cw/main.asp for specific
dates, times, and location.
Mississippi Bend Reading Council
Get Into the Game of Reading
Members and interested teachers are invited to attend the
Mississippi Bend Reading Council meeting on May 17, 2007.
For more information contact Georgie Koenig, Head of Professional
Development, at (563) 344-6487 or [email protected]
The cost of joining the Mississippi Bend Reading Council is $25.
This membership automatically makes you a member of the
Iowa Reading Association. You will be provided publications to
enhance your professional growth, reduced rates for conferences,
and much more by being a member of the Reading Council.
◆◆◆◆◆◆◆◆
Mississippi Bend Area Education Agency
& Drake University present:
Mark your calendar & plan to attend the upcoming
Mississippi Bend Reading Council meeting
THE DIFFERENT LEARNER SERIES
May 17, 2007: Home Run to a Shining Season
Rivermont Collegiate – Bettendorf
6:00 - 8:00 p.m.
Speakers: Poetry and Writing Contest Winners
Festival of Young Writers
Instructors:
Frank Ogden and Candice Benjamin
June 4 – July 31, 2007
1. The Myth of Laziness by Dr. Mel Levine
2. Overcoming Dyslexia by Dr. Sally Shaywitz
3. How the Gifted Brain Learns by Dr. David A. Sousa
4. How the Special Needs Brain Learns by Dr. David A. Sousa
5. How the Differentiate in Mixed Ability Classrooms
by Carol Ann Tomlinson (NEW CLASS LISTING)
See you at the games!
For more information, contact Marilyn Eberle at Wilson
Elementary School. Phone (563) 391-0903.
◆◆◆◆◆◆◆◆
THE EMOTIONAL LIFE OF THE CHILD SERIES
8th Annual Teacher Job Fair
Instructors:
Frank Ogden and Candice Benjamin
Tuesday, March 6, 2007
2:00 – 5:30 p.m.
June 8 – August 4, 2007
1. Engaging Troubling Students: A Constructivist
Approach by Scot Danforth
2. Bullying From Both Sides by Walter B. Roberts, Jr.
3. Helping Students Overcome Depression and Anxiety
by Kenneth Merrell
All prospective and current teachers, counselors and administrators
are invited to attend the Teacher Job Fair. This event will be an
opportunity to talk to school district representatives from Illinois
and Iowa at no charge. Please bring copies of your resume. Licensure
information for Iowa/Illinois will be available.
The Emotional Life of
the Child Series and
The Different Learner
Series are made up of
online, self-paced
classes that may be
taken for credit or for
licensure renewal
Where: The Mark of the Quad Cities, 1201 River Drive, Moline,
Illinois 61265
If you have questions, please contact: Tom Wirtz, Mississippi Bend
Area Education Agency. Phone (563) 344-6410 or [email protected]
k12.ia.us or John Flaherty, Regional Office of Education. Phone
(309) 736-1111 or john.fl[email protected]
Classes are 3 credit hours each. Renewal cost $166 (does
not include book); Drake credit cost $355 (does not include
book).
Sponsored by:
Joseph Vermeire
Regional Superintendent
Regional Office of Education
Moline, Illinois
Register online through the Mississippi Bend Area Education
Agency website. Visit http://www.aea9.k12.ia.us
Questions: Judy Bickle 563-359-1371;
Frank Ogden [email protected]; or
Candice Benjamin [email protected]
Dr. Glenn Pelecky
Chief Administrator
Mississippi Bend AEA
Bettendorf, Iowa
To register, visit our website at www.aea9.k12.ia.us
The purpose of the Teacher Job Fair is to bring school districts
looking for teachers together with teachers looking for jobs.
Minimum – 8 participants; maximum – 20 participants
◆◆◆◆◆◆◆◆
12
Staff Development
Staff Development Offerings
Date
Course Title
MARCH
Classes that begin with EDDL
are on line classes.
3/12/07 EDDL 206 Teaching
Strategies to Increase Math
Achievement in Elementary
School
March 2007 – July 2007
Online Category Cr.
Description
Mathematics
3 This is an online course and the instructor will contact you the first
week of class. The impact of state and federal standards, of state testing,
and research consistently challenges teachers to provide quality
instruction to help students meet or surpass achievement requirements.
In this course, you will review each strand of the elementary math
curriculum and discover how concept development and computational
strategies can be creatively enhanced.
Mathematics
3 This is an online course and the instructor will contact you the first week
of class. Any math curriculum needs to be coherent and consistent,
focusing on problem solving and engaging students as they try to
develop required skills to function in the real world as well as pass state
and federal exams. The four themes of middle school math curriculum
are explored in this course as are strategies to help students learn and
understand the math for the classroom and beyond.
3/12/07 EDDL 229 Brain-Compatible Mathematics
Strategies for the Mathematics
Classroom
3 This is an online course and the instructor will contact you the first week
of class. Brain-compatible learning is used in many content areas, so it
only makes sense to see how it can be applied in the mathematics
classroom. Explore the science behind brain-compatible learning so
you can identify ways for your students to develop the skills that best
suit them for mathematics instruction.
3/12/07 EDDL 233 Integrating Math Mathematics
Across the Curriculum
3 This is an online course and the instructor will contact your the first
week of class. Like reading, math is a discipline that is applied outside
its content boundaries. Learn how to integrate mathematics into other
areas of your teaching.
3/12/07 EDDL 202 Language,
Literacy, and Technology
Reading/
Language
3 This is an online course and the instructor will contact you the first
week of class. Literacy skills are necessary for every facet of life. Students
need to make sure they understand that literacy skills are integral to all
content areas, and that there are various ways to use and master them.
This course emphasizes strategies that will help your students develop
those valuable literacy skills useful in all content areas in the classroom,
and in their lives outside of the classroom. Also available as a video
course, EDEX 236 Teaching Strategies for Building Literacy. Students
cannot take both the online and video versions of the same course for
credit.
3/12/07 EDDL 210 Foundations of
Reading Assessment
Reading/
Language
3 This is an online course and the instructor will contact you the first
week of class. How does a teacher assess reading to inform instructionand identify appropriate intervention strategies? This course will
instruct in mechanisms for diagnosis, assessment, evaluation, and
intervention.
3/12/07 EDDL 214 Research-Based
Reading Practices and
Strategies
Reading/
Language
3 This is an online course and the instructor will contact you the first
week of class. Reading instruction should not stop at elementary
school, but too often teachers are concerned they lack skills, knowledge
and strategies. You will learn, or relearn, proven approaches to integrate
and instruct reading.
3/12/07 EDDL 207 Teaching
Strategies to Increase Math
Achievement in Middle
School
Continued
13
Staff Development
Date
Course Title
Online Category Cr.
Description
Reading/
Language
3 This is an online course and the instructor will contact you the first
week of class. This course emphasizes the fundamentals and foundations
of reading as the young reader moves from early literacy to emergent
literacy. You will study those reading fundamentals of phonics, phonemic
awareness, and print and alphabetic awareness as well as vocabulary
development and comprehension. More importantly, you will develop
increasing awareness and skill in how to use your knowledge to help the
young reader become a lifelong reader. Also available as a video course,
EDEX 228 Building Blocks of Reading Instruction. Students cannot take
both the online and video versions of the same course for credit.
3/12/07 EDDL 216 Reading Strategies Reading/
Language
for Struggling Readers
3 How often do teachers stay up late pondering why a student struggles
in a particular area, or pacing with frustration because they can’t figure
out how to help a student be successful in one or more areas? The
teacher who is able to diagnose reading difficulties and implement
interventions may sleep more and pace less, especially if that teacher
has also learned how to assess student progress to determine if further
problems are related to reading or to the subject matter. Also available
as a video course, EDEX 229 Teaching Solutions for Struggling Readers.
Students may not take both classes for credit.
Reading/
Language
3 This is an online course and the instructor will contact you the first
week of class. Struggling math students may be able to improve in math
only if he or she can read and comprehend the problem. The student
who skims a history book but cannot make sense of the information
probably has difficulty reading with comprehension, or a student who
reads and highlights a psychology book but cannot summarize what he
or she has just read struggles with literacy skills. This course introduces
content area teachers in critical reading strategies that can be applied
effectively in the teaching of their disciplines. Also available as a video
course, EDEX 225 Literacy and Learning Across the Curriculum.
Students cannot take both the online and video versions of the same
course for credit.
3/12/07 EDDL 234 Teaching English Reading/
Language
and Language Arts to
Second Language Learners
3 This is an online course and the instructor will contact you the first
week of class. Despite language and grammar peculiarities, learning
a first language seems commonplace. Acquiring a second language,
especially beyond the fundamental developmental ages of language
acquisition, complicates the process. This course examines theoretical
foundations of language acquisition and provides opportunities to learn
strategies to promote language development and acquisition as well as
improve reading achievement for the second language learner.
3/12/07 EDDL 215 The ABC’s of
Reading
3/12/07 EDDL 219 Reading Across
the Content Area
3/12/07 EDDL 240 Teaching the
Writing Process
Reading/
Language
3 This is an online course and the instructor will contact you the first
week of class. Reading and writing are inextricably linked. The student
who reads well can generally write well, and vice versa, but students often
fear writing because they understand it only as “grammar.” In this course,
you will learn how to design effective writing assignments that reduce
fear and increase mastery. You will also learn ways to assess student
writing that are effective for the writing purpose and in concert with
the student’s writing style.
3/12/07 EDDL 212 Hands-on/
Minds-on Science in the
Elementary Classroom
Science
3 This is an online course and the instructor will contact you the first
week of class. Teaching scientific fundamentals can be challenging and
fun. In this course, learn different ways to introduce and teach grade
appropriate science concepts, choosing the skills and activities most
beneficial for your students. Incorporates NSTA standards.
Continued
14
Staff Development
Date
Course Title
Online Category Cr.
Description
3/12/07 EDDL 213 Hands-on/
Minds-on Science in the
Middle School Classroom
Science
3 This is an online course and the instructor will contact you the first
week of class. This course offers active and problem-based learning
strategies to engage all students in learning science. The grade appropriate
activities, designed to enhance your specific teaching needs, provide
science education research and Internet resources to help you create
engaging middle school science lessons. Incorporates NSTA standards.
3/12/07 EDDL 235 Cultural
Diversity in the Classroom
Special Needs
3 This is an online course and the instructor will contact you the first
week of class. Even as the world seems to get smaller because of technology,
the variety of languages and ethnicities in many cities and towns in the
United States seems to grow. Multicultural education takes on different
nuances that require a firm understanding of historical, theoretical,
and practical perspectives of its application in the classroom, as well
as requiring different communication skills. This course will help you
navigate some of those perspectives.
3/12/07 EDDl 211 Using
Technology Across the
Curriculum
Technology
Integration
3 This is an online course and the instructor will contact you the first
week of class. The “digital divide” is a reality, but not only between
socio-economic groups of students. The fact is that today’s students
often know more about computers and technology than their teachers,
especially as they freely use attributes and capabilities many adults have
barely begun to explore. Get ready to go to the next level and learn how
to use technology, from basic applications to the Internet, to enhance
your teaching and engage their learning. Also available as a video
course, EDEX 230 Using Technology to Enhance Student Learning.
Students cannot take both the video and online for credit.
3/12/07 EDDL 225 Infusing the
Internet Into Your
Curriculum
Technology
Integration
3 This is an online course and the instructor will contact you the first
week of class. Build a body of technological essentials in your content
area by learning how to infuse the Internet’s unlimited resources into
any teaching area. Improve curriculum by making it as expansive as
necessary, or refining it within your specific discipline. Computer
expertise not required for this course.
3/12/07 EDDL 232 Computer
Technology
Applications and
Integration
Technology for Teaching Math
3/12/07 EDDL 203 Managing the
Interactive Classroom
Learning
Environment
3 This is an online course and the instructor will contact you the first
week of class. New technologies seem to be developed on a daily basis,
and the number of online resources seems to grow exponentially. But
how do you determine which resources are the most useful? This course
helps you identify ways to improve your teaching and your student’s
learning as you use technology to connect math to the real world and to
other content areas.
3 This is an online course and the instructor will contact you the first
week of class. Regardless of class size or student ages, daily routines
and procedures can make a huge difference in proceeding with the
instructional plan for the day. Students who learn and abide by daily
routines and procedures are well on their way to becoming effective
independent learners. Learn strategies and methods for developing and
implementing a classroom management plan that becomes part of your
instructional structure, and will help you and your students focus on
the learning tasks at hand. Also available as a video course, EDEX 237
Best Practices in Classroom Management. Students cannot take both
the online and video versions of the same course for credit.
Continued
15
Staff Development
Date
Course Title
Online Category Cr.
Description
3/12/07 EDDL 201 Best Practices
in Active Learning
Teaching
Strategies
3 This is an online course and the instructor will contact you the first
week of class. Engaging students is one part of motivating them to learn.
This course explores various strategies and techniques, including strategies
such as multiple intelligences and cooperative learning, which will help
you encourage your students to be active learners. But it will also help
you understand active learning strategies as they inform your instruction
and contribute to how you assess your students’ achievements. Also
available as a video course, EDEX 239 Active Learning in the Cooperative
Classroom. Students cannot take both the online and video versions of
the same course for credit.
3/12/07 EDDL 205 Teaching
Strategies for the Inclusive
Classroom
Teaching
Strategies
3 This is an online course and the instructor will contact you the first
week of class. Differentiated instruction, cooperative learning, active
learning, assessment and more, require some different skills in the
inclusive classroom. Legal requirements necessitate a familiarity with
the IEP and its role as well as a certain comfort with what might be
more complex requirements for adaptation, modification, and
accommodation. This course examines strategies and information to
help you build that skill set and make your tasks more manageable.
Also available as a video course, EDEX 235 Teaching Every Child in
the Inclusive Classroom. Students cannot take the online and video
versions of the same course for credit.
3/12/07 EDDL 209 Interactive
Strategies for the BrainFriendly Classroom
Teaching
Strategies
3 This is an online course and the instructor will contact you the first
week of class. This course helps you explore and understand the
impact of brain research and discover how the brain processes
information for meaning and contribution to learning. Explore
strategies to implement brain-compatible learning enabling students
to reflect, apply, and transfer skills from the classroom to real-life
situations. Also available as a video course, EDEX 232 Creating Brain
Compatible Classrooms. Students cannot take the online and video
versions for the course for credit.
3/12/07 EDDL 242 Problem-Based
Learning
Teaching
Strategies
3 Problem-Based Learning (PBL) is an educational approach that will
provide your students with authentic opportunities to think, investigate,
problem solve, and reflect while collaboratively considering topics that
naturally cross the curriculum. They will be engaged and motivated to
solve an authentic real-world problem and present their findings and
solutions. You will explore and practice PBL and then produce a PBL
unit in a “learn today, apply tomorrow” model. Also available as a video
course, EDEX 224 Problem Based Learning. Students may not take both
the video and online classes for credit.
3/7/07
Technology
1 This class is for Pleasant Valley Teachers only. This class will develop
skills for documenting teaching strategies to help make decisions related
to meeting individual, small and large group decisions for enhancing
student learning. Using multi-media formats, artifacts will be selected
to be reflective of your teacher expertise. Time will be spent learning to
use Microsoft FrontPage as the e-Portfolio template.
Arts
1 Figge Studio Fee: $25 for Figge members, $39 for non-members.
Checks will be collected at the first class period - make check payable
to Figge Art Museum. Participants provide their own sack lunch.
Using an e-Portfolio to
Improve Teaching and
Learning
3/10/07 Horses in the Classroom:
The Art of Deborah
Butterfield
This course is designed for elementary arts specialists and classroom
Continued
16
Staff Development
Date
Course Title
Online Category Cr.
Description
teachers who wish to incorporate a horse theme and the contemporary
work of sculptor Deborah Butterfield into their classroom curriculum.
Participants will be introduced to Butterfield’s ideas and creative process
as they develop a portfolio of lesson plans and projects. Historical and
literary horse references will also be discussed and analyzed. This course
is offered in conjunction with the Figge Art Museum exhibition Deborah
Butterfield (March 3 - May 27, 2007),
Registration closes on March 2.
APRIL
4/12/06 Curriculum Resources
Online
Technology
Integration
1 Registration closes March 29, 2007. Explore an abundance of online
resources that can be utilized in classroom teaching. Learn how to
critically evaluate these web sites for use in your classroom. Create a
web-based learning activity and a hot list of web sites of related
resources for your students to use.
MAY
No classes scheduled
JUNE
6/12/06 Challenges & Expectations
in Education Part II
Learning
Environment
3 In part one of the Challenges & Expectations class, the participants
developed a better understanding of many serious challenges to learning.
Each participant became more effective in working with children by
assessing the needs of each child. Each participant was able to evaluate his/
her teaching skills and changing/modifying them to lessen the affects of
some societal ills. In part II of this class we will focus on some specific
societal problems and how we as nation are developing strategies to
lessen their impact. We will learn how Federal, State, & Community
initiatives are meeting the needs of our children.
6/13/07 Meaning in Art
Arts
1 Registration closes June 6, 2007. This art class will use art work at the
Figge for inspiration and study. Sketches will be done on site in the
Museum. Participants can choose to work in drawing, watercolor,
or acrylic painting for a finished work. Art works selected by the
participants will be analyzed for meaning. Individuals will then create
their own art works using influences from the selected works.
Figge Art Library, and all art works on display may be used for
choices by students to pick from and do research on. The art library
at the Figge has many resources that will aid in the discovery of facts
needed. Since the students will not be choosing the same artists or
the same styles they will each be responsible for finding information
needed. Davenport City Library is only a few blocks from the Figge
and the internet can also be accessed from there.
JULY
7/18/06 Differentiated Instruction
for Today’s Classroom
Learning
Environment
3 Acquire key knowledge and skills to implement differentiated instruction
(DI) successfully in your own classroom. Gain expertise making
practical and flexible instructional decisions based on your own students’
learning needs. Create a standards-based learning environment where
all students can thrive and achieve. Discover practical responses to
diverse learning needs in today’s mixed ability classrooms. Gain insights
into the DI teacher’s role as facilitator and guide. Create a flexible DI
classroom learning environment. Support and develop self-directed
learners. Increase student achievement in a standards-driven learning
environment.
Continued
17
Staff Development
Date
Course Title
Online Category Cr.
Description
Learning
Environment
3 Acquire key knowledge and skills to implement differentiated instruction
(DI) successfully in your own classroom. Gain expertise making practical and
flexible instructional decisions based on your own students’ learning needs.
Create a standards-based learning environment where all students can
thrive and achieve. Discover practical responses to diverse learning
needs in today’s mixed ability classrooms. Gain insights into the DI
teacher’s role as facilitator and guide. Create a flexible DI classroom
learning environment. Support and develop self-directed learners.
Increase student achievement in a standards-driven learning environment.
Visual Phonics I
Reading/
Language
1 Visual Phonics is a multisensory system for teaching phonetic skills.
It has proven to be an exciting, effective method of teaching reading,
speech, and spelling skills in General Education classrooms, Special
Education, remedial reading, ESL and adult literacy programs.
Participants will learn the VP system and the appropriate use of VP with
different groups of students. Participants need to brings a letter/sound
or phonics activity to class on the first day. This activity will be used for
the required course project.
7/19/07 Visual Phonics I
Reading/
Language
1 Visual Phonics is a multisensory system for teaching phonetic skills.
It has proven to be an exciting, effective method of teaching reading,
speech, and spelling skills in General Education classrooms,
Special Education, remedial reading, ESL and adult literacy programs.
Participants will learn the VP system and the appropriate use of VP
with different groups of students. Participants need to brings a letter/
sound or phonics activity to class on the first day. This activity will be
used for the required course project.
7/18/07 Differentiated Instruction
for Today’s Classroom
Learning
Environment
3 Acquire key knowledge and skills to implement differentiated instruction
(DI) successfully in your own classroom. Gain expertise making
practical and flexible instructional decisions based on your own
students’ learning needs. Create a standards-based learning environment
where all students can thrive and achieve. Discover practical responses
to diverse learning needs in today’s mixed ability classrooms. Gain
insights into the DI teacher’s role as facilitator and guide. Create a
flexible DI classroom learning environment. Support and develop
self-directed learners. Increase student achievement in a standardsdriven learning environment.
7/30/07 Differentiated Instruction
for Today’s Classroom
Learning
Environment
3 Acquire key knowledge and skills to implement differentiated instruction
(DI) successfully in your own classroom. Gain expertise making
practical and flexible instructional decisions based on your own
students’ learning needs. Create a standards-based learning environment
where all students can thrive and achieve. Discover practical responses
to diverse learning needs in today’s mixed ability classrooms. Gain
insights into the DI teacher’s role as facilitator and guide. Create a
flexible DI classroom learning environment. Support and develop
self-directed learners. Increase student achievement in a standardsdriven learning environment.
7/30/07 Differentiated Instruction
for Today’s Classroom
7/9/07
◆◆◆◆◆◆◆◆
18
Staff Development
Staff Development Registration Directions
Visit our home page at www.aea9.k12.ia.us
Look under Staff Development, then click Staff Development On-Line Registration.
You are now on your way. You may want to bookmark this address for future use. The following are step-by-step directions to
help you navigate the program.
• Click on the large blue words “Logon Here.”
• To create your User ID and Password:
User ID: This has to be the first initial of your first name and your complete last name in lower case. For example:
If you are Jane Smith, your User ID will be jsmith.
Password: Your password has to contain six characters. For security reasons, please ensure your password contains
both alpha and numerical characters. Passwords are encrypted, so it is not possible for the System Administrators
to view your password in case you forget them, so please make a note of your ID and passwords as soon as you
create it.
• Click the Logon button, which will return you to the first screen.
• Click on an icon – View by Alpha, View by Month, or View by Category.
• Once you have selected the course for which you would like to register, click on the course title link.
• Click on the start date for the course you have chosen (some classes are offered more than once). Make sure you
check the status button to be certain the session is still open.
• On the next screen you can review the dates, instructor information, credit options and get a map to the
location. If the course is a credit course, you will need to select your credit option. Scroll down the rest of the
screen and click on the “Credit Classes” button once you are ready to register. If you are taking a workshop, select the
“Workshop Only” button.
• The next screen is for personal data. Once you have verified and added the necessary information, you will
go down to the payment portion of the form and select the payment option that works best for you. Options
include credit card, personal check, or purchase order. If you select credit card, your account is charged
immediately. If you select personal check or purchase order, they must be mailed to the Mississippi Bend
Area Education Agency, Staff Development Program, 729-21st Street, Bettendorf, Iowa 52722, within seven days
or your name will be taken off the class list.
• Finally, click on the “Submit Registration” button.
Congratulations! You have just successfully registered for a course online. You will receive an email confirmation within
minutes. Please remember to log off the system when you are finished. If you need help, please call the Staff Development
Department at 563-344-6481. We will be happy to walk you through the process.
SUBSCRIBE NOW!
Subscribe to the
Staff Development
Update Listserv and you
will receive bi-monthly
news on Staff Development
courses, workshops and classes
by pulling up your own email.
It’s simple, just go to
http://www.aea9.k12.ia.us/maillistingo.html
Staff Development Workshops
March
3/28/07
Level One Junior Great Books Training
3/2/07
Non – Crisis Intervention Refresher Course
April
4/1/07
Inspiration & Kidspiration Software
May
No workshops scheduled
June
No workshops scheduled
July
No workshops scheduled
19
Media Center Resources
New Materials
NUMBER
TITLE
LEVEL
SERIES
Videos
1044
1045
1046
1047
1048
1049
1050
1051
1052
1053
Share The Road
Picasso Makes Faces
Henri Matisse In Paper and Paint
Henri Matisse Patterns and Paper
Janet Fish Paints
The Art of Mexico
Jacob Lawrence The Glory of Expression
Dropping in on Picasso
Dropping in on Rousseau
Childhood Nutrition: Preventing Obesity
S
PIJS
PIJS
PIJS
PIJS
IJ
IJ
PI
PI
JS
Dropping in on Picasso
Dropping in on Rousseau
Put The Brakes on Bullying
Power Play Choking in the Fast Lane Part 1
Power Play Energy Part 2
Power Play Fossil Fuel Part 3
Engineers Can Do Anything!
Characteristics of Animals
Characteristics of Plants
Ecosystems and Habitats
Electricity
Forces
Health and Growth
Light and Darkness
Motion and Sound
Properties of Materials
Temperature, Solids and Liquids
Using Natural Resources
The Art of Listening
Food Safety
From Farm To Table
Help! They Stole My Name
How Consumers Decide
How Much Should I Eat?
The Metric System Series
Tools In Science
Classification of Life
Earth’s Rotation and Revolution
Exploring Earth, Sun, and Moon
Nutrition
Ecology Fundamentals
Measuring
Traits and Heredity
Mary Sillman’s War
Ordinary People Doing Extraordinary Things
PI
PI
JS
S
S
S
JS
PI
PI
PI
PI
PI
PI
PI
PI
PI
PI
PI
IJS
S
PI
JS
JS
JS
J
J
IJ
PI
PI
PI
PI
PI
PI
S
PIJS
Putnam Museum and Imax Theatre
IJS
Great Artist
Great Artist
Great Artist
Great Artist
DVDs
47494
47506
47507
47508
47509
47510
47511
47512
47513
47514
47515
47516
47517
47518
47519
47520
47521
47522
47523
47524
47525
47526
47527
47528
47529
47530
47531
47532
47533
47534
47535
47536
47537
47538
47539
Science Clips For Children
Science Clips For Children
Science Clips For Children
Science Clips For Children
Science Clips For Children
Science Clips For Children
Science Clips For Children
Science Clips For Children
Science Clips For Children
Science Clips For Children
Science Clips For Children
Integrated Science
Integrated Science
Life Science
CD ROMS
82228
Continued
20
Media Center Resources
New Materials
NUMBER
TITLE
LEVEL
SERIES
Set Books
45585
45586
45587
45588
45589
45590
45591
45592
45593
45594
45595
45596
45597
45598
45599
45600
45601
45602
45603
45604
45605
45606
45607
45608
45609
Twilight
West Side Story
A Certain Slant of Light
Poison
Cambridge Alphabet Books
Pacific Literacy Emergent Early Fluency
Sunshine Alphabet Books
Beginning Reader- Level 1
Beginning Reader- Level 2
Beginning Reader-Level 3
Beginning Reader-Level 4
Beginning Reader- Level 5
Beginning Reader- Level 6
Beginning Reader- Level 7
Beginning Reader- Level 8
Beginning Reader- Level 9
Beginning Reader- Level 10
Beginning Reader-Level 11
Beginning Reader- Level 12
Beginning Readers- Level 13 and 14
Beginning Readers- Level 15-17
Beginning Readers- Level 17-21
PM Story Book Readers
Beginning Readers
Teacher’s Choice Series
JS
IJS
IJS
IJS
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
Model Core Curriculum Project
Powerful and Authentic Social Studies,
Elementary School
Powerful and Authentic Social Studies, Middle School
The Gap Analysis, and Model Core Curriculum
Parallel Curriculum
Harassment Bullying- The Legal Issues
Graduating Peter
6 and 1 Traits of Writing- A Professional
Development Video Series
Legal Issues For Teacher Librarians
Leadership Sustainability
Model Core Curriculum Quadarant D
A
A
Professional Videos
90623
90624
90625
90627
90628
90629
90630
90631
90632
90633
90634
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
Professional DVDs
43072
43073
43074
43075
43076
43077
43078
43079
43080
Instruments in the Classroom
Music and Early Learning
Music and Movement
Singing and Songs
Communication and Professional Growth
Instruction For All Students
Phonemic Awareness And Introduction To Print
Sound Awareness
Phonemes and Phonics
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
Music in the Classroom
Music in the Classroom
Music in the Classroom
Succeeding As A Teacher
Succeeding As A Teacher
Phonemic Awareness
Phonemic Awareness
Phonemic Awareness
Continued
21
Media Center Resources
New Materials
NUMBER
TITLE
LEVEL
SERIES
Professional DVD’s, continued from page 25
43081
43082
43083
43084
43085
43086
43087
43088
43089
43090
43091
43092
43093
43094
Sound Manipulation
Setting The Stage
Observation I: The Eyes Have It!
Observation II: Making The Connection
Parents: Our Most Important Resource
Training And Support Is The Key
Heredity And Environment
Development and Discovery
What is Childhood Trauma?
Identifying And Responding To Trauma II
The Brain: Effects of Childhood Trauma
Domestic Violence and Childhood Trauma
Launching Literacy Stations
Best Practices in Action
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
Singapore Math: Problem-Solving Secrets From
The World’s Math Leader
Hiring and Retaining Great Teachers and Leaders
Winning Over Challenging Students
Dealing With NCLB
Succeeding With ELL/ESL/LEP Students
Top 10 Audios From The 2006 ASCD
Annual Conference
Closing Achievement Gap
Reforming Middle And Secondary Education
Sharpening Leadership Practice
Improving Literacy
Getting Leadership Basics Down
Using Brain Reasearch To Improve Learning
and Teaching
Creating A Positive School Climate
A
Phonemic Awareness
Authentic Assessment
Authentic Assessment
Authentic Assessment
Authentic Assessment
Authentic Assessment
Beginnings of Life
Beginnings of Life
Understanding Childhood Trauma
Understanding Childhood Trauma
Understanding Childhood Trauma
Understanding Childhood Trauma
Professional CDs
46168
46169
46170
46171
46172
46173
46174
46175
46176
46177
46178
46179
46180
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
◆◆◆◆◆◆◆◆
FIND WHAT YOU’RE LOOKING FOR ON THE MISSISSIPPI BEND AREA EDUCATION AGENCY
WEBSITE! VISIT: http://www.aea9.k12.ia.us
•
•
•
•
A complete listing of all Agency services and staff
Communicator
Integrating Standards
Information on workshops
• Staff Development...search for classes or
register online
• Media materials/resources
• Links, listservs, bulletin boards and much more!
22
Media Center Resources
Professional Library
The following are new materials available from the Professional Library. If you wish to check out any of the materials listed below, please
send your request to the Professional Library, use D/Max or Web/Max systems, or call 1-800-947-2329 or dial direct 563-344-6451.
NUMBER
ADMINISTRATION
AD91852
AD91863
COMPUTERS
CO91843
CO91844
CO91847
CO91851
CO91867
CO91871
CO91874
CURRICULUM
CU91756
CU91757
CU91758
CU91768
CU91772
CU91836
CU91840
CU91865
TITLES
AUTHOR
Leadership Coaching for Educators
Ethical Leadership in School
Reiss, K
Strike, K
Evaluating Educational Technology
Meaningful Learning Using Technology
Using Technology Wisely
Teaching With Technology
1-To-1 Learning
Teachers as Technology Leaders
101 Best Web Sites for Teachers Tools and
Professional Development
Haertel, G
Ashburn, E
Wenglinsky, H
Haymore, S
Livingston, P
Twomey, C
Lerman, J
The Kids Left Behind
How the Brain Learns, 3rd Edition
Laughing Matters
Student’s Brain
Quality Teaching in a Culture of Coaching
Big Book of Holiday Activities
Big Book of Projects
How Students Learn
Barr, R
Sousa, D
Stephensen, S
Nunley, K
Barkley, S
Zike, D
Zike, D
N/A
EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY
EP91783
How to Explain a Brain
EP91783
School of Fish
Sylevester, R
Strand, P
EXCEPTIONAL CHILDREN
EX91709
Improving Performance for Special Education Students
GUIDANCE
GU91790
GU91842
School of Belonging Hand book
Bullying From Both Sides
Levine, D
Robert, W
LANGUAGE ARTS
LA91755
Literacy Work Stations
Diller, D
LITERATURE
LI91838
LI91857
LI91859
LI91866
Multicultural Picture Books
Multiracial America
Aesthetic Approaches to Children’s Literature
Around the World With Historical Fiction and Folktales
Marantz, K
Downing, K
Nikolajera, M
Bartleson, B
MATHEMATICS
MA90781
MA91763
MA91803
MA91804
MA91828
MA91829
MA91830
MA91831
MA91834
MA91835
Navigating Through Problem Solving and Reasoning Grade 4
Mathematics Assessment
Navigating Through Probability in Grades 6-8
Navigating Through Probability in Grades 9-12
Navigating Through Measurement in Grades 6-8
Navigating Through Measurement in Grades 9-12
Navigating Through Mathematical Connections in Grades 9-12
Navigating Through Number and Operation in Grades 6-8
Big Book of Math Elementary k-6
Big Book of Math for Middle School and High School
Yeatts, K
Glanfield, F
Bright, G
Shaughnessy, M
Bright, G
Albrecht, M
Burke, M
Rachlin, S
Zikes, D
Zikes, D
Continued
23
Media Center Resources
Professional Library
NUMBER
TITLES
AUTHOR
Mathematics, continued from page 27
MA91862
MA91875
Great Tables Graphs Charts Diagrams and Timelines
Bridges to Classroom Mathematics
Zikes, D
N/A
MEDIA
ME91771
ME91854
ME91864
Family Values Through Children’s Literature and Activities Grades 4-6
Teen Volunteer Service in Librarians
Library Teen Advisory Groups
Roberts, P
Gillespie, K
Tuccillo, D
READING
RE91872
Content Area Reading
Vacca, R
SCIENCE
SC91832
SC91833
Big Book of Science for Elementary K-6
Big Book of Science for Middle School and High School
Zikes, D
Zikes, D
SOCIAL STUDIES
SS91699
SS91770
Hands-On Rocky Mountains
5-Minute Daily Practice Geography
Merrill, Y
Ashcraft, M
◆◆◆◆◆◆◆◆
New Materials K-12
The following are new materials available from the Book Library. If you wish to check out any of the materials listed below, please send your
request to the Video Department, use the D/Max or Web/Max systems, or call 1-800-947-2329, ext. 6574 or dial direct, (563) 344-6574.
NUMBER
38293
38294
38295
38296
38297
38298
38299
38300
38301
38302
38303
38304
38305
38306
38307
38308
38309
38310
38311
38312
38313
38314
38315
38316
38317
38318
38319
TITLES
LEVEL
North Korea
Fish
Salt
Elephants at Work
Caves
Dung Beetles
Great Depression, The
Using Math to Design a Roller Coaster
Inside Hurricanes and Tornadoes
Leaves
Abraham Lincoln: The Life of Americans
Sixteenth President
Serving on a Jury
Making a Law
Paying Taxes
Voting
Serving Your Community
Dropping in on Rousseau
Dropping in on Picasso
Marine Life For Young Readers Collection
Supa Doopers Collection
Fables From Aesop 7-12 Collection
Look
What Do You Like?
Good Morning, Good Night
Jack and the Beanstalk
Time For Bed, Little Bear
Jump the Broom
◆◆◆◆◆◆◆◆
24
I
I
I
I
P
I
S
IJ
I
I
IJ
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
PI
P
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P
P
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P
Media Center Resources
25
Career Opportunities
POSITION OPENINGS
Davenport
Community School District
Pleasant Valley
Community School District
Applications are being accepted for the
following positions:
Applications are being accepted for the
following positions:
2007-2008
• Math Grades (7-12)
• Industrial Technology Grades (7-12)
• Family and Consumer Science (Grades
7-12)
• Special Education BD
2006-2007
• Educational Aide-Riverdale Heights
• Interpreter Aide-Riverdale Heights
Send letter of application, resume,
credentials, and forward transcripts to:
Davenport Community School District,
1606 Brady Street, Davenport, IA 52803.
◆◆◆◆◆◆◆◆
Louisa-Muscatine
Community School District
Applications are being accepted for the
following position:
2007-2008
• Preschool Teacher/Elementary Classroom
• Elementary Reading
• Elementary Vocal Music
• Elementary Talented and Gifted
• Secondary Social Studies
• Secondary Physical Education
• Secondary Art
• Secondary Guidance Counselor
• Secondary At Risk Instructor
Send letter of application, resume,
credentials, and forward transcripts
to: Pleasant Valley Community School
District, P. O. Box 332, Pleasant Valley, IA
52767.
◆◆◆◆◆◆◆◆
• School-based Juvenile Court Liaison
Send letter of application, resume,
credentials, and forward transcripts to:
Louisa-Muscatine Community School
District, 14478-170th Street, Letts, IA
52754.
◆◆◆◆◆◆◆◆
Maquoketa
Community School District
Applications are being accepted for the
following positions:
•
•
•
•
•
Visit the
Mississippi Bend
Area Education
Agency
Website!
Assistant Varsity Football Coach
Assistant Varsity Boys Track Coach
Sophomore Girls Softball Coach
Varsity Girls Volleyball Coach
Freshman Boys Baseball Coach
Send letter of application, resume,
credentials, and forward transcripts to:
Maquoketa Community School District,
612 South Vermont Street, Maquoketa, IA
52060.
http://www.aea9.k12.ia.us
Herbert Hoover
Uncommon Student Award
$5,000 Scholarship Program for
Iowa High School Juniors
The Herbert
Hoover
Uncommon
Student Award
program seeks to
identify uncommon students
during their
junior year in high
school. Students
are NOT evaluated on the basis of
grades, test scores, essays, or financial
need.
Applicants are selected as finalists in
the spring of their junior year based
on a project proposal which includes
a goal they want to accomplish, and
two letters of recommendation. The
postmarked deadline is March 31,
2007. Approximately 15 students are
selected in April on the basis of their
stated project goal and detailed plans
to reach that goal.Between their
junior and senior years of high school,
finalists spend a required expense-paid
June weekend in West Branch, just
east of Iowa City.
In October of their senior year, finalists
make presentations about their
completed projects at the Herbert
Hoover Presidential LibraryMuseum in West Branch. Each
student receives a $750 award at that
time. Three students are chosen to
receive a $5,000 scholarship to be
used at a two or four year college or
university anywhere in the nation.
The award, sponsored by the Hoover
Presidential Library Association,
honors Herbert Hoover, our nation’s
31st president and the only Iowan
elected to the presidency. The
Association is a nonprofit support
group for the Hoover Presidential
Library-Museum and National
Historic Site in West Branch.
To request an application/brochure,
contact: Patricia Hand, 800-828-0475
or [email protected]
Online applications are also available
at: www.hooverassociation.org.
◆◆◆◆◆◆◆◆
26
Learning Center
March 2007
Learning Center Calendar
1
Superintendents Meeting
1
CSIN
9
Innovative Teaching Practices
in the Classroom Grades 6-12
19
Davenport Radio Group
20
School to Work Conference
9
Bettendorf CSD-Business
Ent. Class
20
Education News
Parents Can Use
10
Davenport Evaluator Training
20
Enhancing Communication
10
IAPITC
20
10
Innovative Teaching Practices
in the Classroom Grades 6-12
Bettendorf CSD-Administrative
Cabinet
20
Bettendorf CSD-Administrators
12
Bettendorf CSD-District
School Improvement Council
21
Pleasant Valley Students
22
Medication Administration
22
Home School Assistance
Program
22
Bettendorf CSD-Videotraining
22
Bettendorf CSD-Food Service
23
Scott County Kids
23
Technology Coordinators
23
Drake Class EDU 219
24
Innovative Teaching Practices
in the Classroom Grades 6-12
1
Every Student Counts
1
Area 9 Business Managers
1
Bettendorf CSD-Business
Ent. Class
2
Scott County Kids
2
CPI Refresher
2
Bettendorf CSD-Staff Meeting
2
Bettendorf CSD- Elementary
Principals
13
Bettendorf CSD-Elementary
Staff Professional Development
3
QCDH
13
Davenport Mentoring
3
IAPITC
13
Enhancing Communication
5
Read-n-Rap
13
5
Davenport Mentoring
Bettendorf CSD-Administrative
Cabinet
5
Bettendorf CSD-Business
Ent. Class
14
AEA Board Meeting
14
Bus Driver Inservice
6
Bettendorf CSD-Business
Ent. Class
14
Bettendorf CSDProfessional Development
24
IAPITC
24
Drake Class EDL 278
6
Bettendorf CSD-Videotraining
15
Davenport CSD
24
Drake Class EDU 219
6
Bettendorf CSD-Administrative
Cabinet
15
Home School Assistance
Program
25
Drake Class EDL 278
27
6
Bettendorf CSD-Administrators
15
Parents as Teachers
Parent Meeting
6
Enhancing Communication
Bettendorf CSD-Parent
Executive Council
27
7
6th Grade Math Bee
15
Bettendorf CSD-Reading
Teachers
Satellite Downlink-Bettendorf
Middle School
27
7
Meet & Eat Meeting
16
Scott County Kids
Bettendorf CSD-Administrative
Cabinet
7
Bettendorf CSD-Business
Ent. Class
16
Chamber Education Forum
7
Pleasant Valley Students
16
8
Using Kits to Teach
Inquiry-based Science
8
8
28
Junior Great Books
28
Assistive Technology Workshop
Innovative Teaching Practices
in the Classroom Grades 6-12
28
QC Symphony
16
Bettendorf CSD-Elementary
Principals
29
Junior Great Books
29
6+1 Extensive Training
Home School Assistance
Program
16
Bettendorf CSD-Foundation
Board
30
Child Abuse Council
Bettendorf CSD-Business
Ent. Class
17
30
Scott County Kids
9
Using Kits to Teach
Inquiry-based Science
Innovative Teaching Practices
in the Classroom Grades 6-12
19
Differentiated Instruction
9
Scott County Kids
19
Bettendorf CSD-Board Meeting
27
Learning Center
April 2007
Learning Center Calendar
3
PLA Implementation
14
Drake Class EDU 219
3
Enhancing Communication
15
Drake Class EDU 219
3
Bettendorf CSD- Administrative
Cabinet
16
Drug Impairment Training
17
Wilson/Hayes Schools
Enhancing Communication
4
High School Redesign
23
23
First Student Safety Lighthouse
Project Training
AEA Board Meeting
24
School to Work Conference
24
Enhancing Communication
4
BiState
17
24
First Student Safety
5
Media Specialists’ Academy V
17
Drug Impairment Training
24
Davenport Radio Group
5
CSIN
17
Education News Parents Can Use
24
STOP Program
6
AGENCY CLOSED
17
Every Student Counts
24
9
Bettendorf CSD-Administrative
Cabinet
24
Bettendorf CSD-Administrators
25
Model Core Curriculum
Bettendorf CSD-Board Meeting
17
STOP Program
10
High School Reform
17
10
ITBS Testing
Bettendorf CSD-Administrative
Cabinet
10
Enhancing Communication
18
Low Vision Clinic
25
MAT Meeting
10
Every Student Counts
18
Pleasant Valley Students
10
Bettendorf CSD-Administrative
Cabinet
Bettendorf CSD-Professional
Development
25
26
Parents as Teachers Family Night
19
Every Student Counts
10
Bettendorf CSD-Administrators
11
Reading Recovery
19
STOP Program
11
ITBS Testing
19
11
Pleasant Valley Students
Bettendorf CSD-Parent
Executive Council
11
Bettendorf CSD-Videotraining
19
11 Inspiration & Kidspiration Software
20
12
Superintendents Meeting
12
ITBS Testing
13
High School Reform Training
13
Scott County Kids
13
Olweus Bullying Prevention
Conference
19 Bettendorf CSD-Reading Teachers
26 AEA 9 Elementary Reading Initiative
26
Bettendorf CSD-School
Improvement Council
Parents as Teachers
26
STOP Program
Bettendorf CSD-Food Service
26
Bettendorf CSD- Advisory Group
Chamber Education Forum
27
Lighthouse
20 Bettendorf CSD-Foundation Board
27
Scott County Kids
Bettendorf CSD-Elementary
Principals
27
Technology Coordinators
27
Bettendorf CSD-Videotraining
21
WQPT
28
Middle Level Association
23
Drug Free Youth QC DFYIT
28
Bettendorf CSD-Board Retreat
23
Bettendorf CSD-Board Meeting
30
Goal Setting Math/Science
20
26
The Communicator is published by the Mississippi Bend Area Education Agency Communications Office,
and is distributed to all schools in Area Nine, administrators, board members, legislators, Area Education
Agency Staff, individual teachers, interested groups or other persons upon request.
Administrator – Dr. Glenn M. Pelecky
Head of Information & Support Services – Pat Kirkland
Print Services – Becky Holling
The Mississippi Bend Area Education Agency does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, creed,
gender marital status, sexual orientation, national origin, religion, age, or disability in its educational
programs, services or employment practices. Inquires concerning application of this statement should be
addressed to: Tom Wirtz, Equity Coordinator, 729 – 21st Street. Bettendorf, Iowa 52722. Telephone:
(563) 344-6410.
28