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View file - The Library - University of California, San Diego
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA SAN DIEGO
VOLUME 64, #2
THURSDAY, APRIL 7, 1988
Crabtree
hearing
closed
Elections
Bad ,timing,
say candidates
By MICHELE BIDWELL
FHtun. Edit",
With the elections being held
in just a few days, the consensus
of many of the Associated Students (A.S.) candidates is that
filing and campaign procedures
of the present and previous weeks
are, and have been very poorly
structured. According to most of
the candidates interviewed, the
timing for filing and campaigning
is bad and, to some candidates,
the one week of campaign time is
too short.
"I found the filing process
hectic," said Alex Wonl, candidate for Third Senior Senator. "I
would prefer to have it not on
tenth week but backed up a week
or so," he added.
One candidate, who chooses
to remain anonymous, said, "The
pressure of tryinl to do campaigning all at once the fint week
made me think that maybe it's
just too much to do. With getting
slates 'together and crashinl classes, I don't· think ifs enouah
time." 8ecJuse of the prenure,
this candidate may to choose to
drop out of the race.
As stated in the election bylaws
of the A.S. Constitution, annual
A.S. elections must be held on
the Tuesday and Wednesday of
the second week of the Spring
quarter. With this law in effect,
the normal procedure requires
all prospective candidates to file
their petitiions either during the
tenth week of Winter quarter or
on the fint day of Spring quarter,
the filing deadline. The required
number of signatures for each
petition must also be obtained
by the Monday deadline. No
filing or campaigning may be
done over spring break. The
candidates are then allowed one
week to campaign one week before the elections.
With the filing process being
held mainly during the tenth
week of winter quarter, Bob
DeCarli, a Services and Enterprises Commisioner candidate
argued, "I think getting signatures durinl tenth week, when
people are trying to study for
finals, is bad."
Mary Fisher, a Revelle Junior
Senator candidate agreed;"Finals
were a problem ... it was hard to
find people (and) let the members
of my slate together."
The fact that campaigning
must be done the week after
spring break also posed some
problems for many of the candidatel. "The first week of school
ia bed tim ..... " .aid Dana
KOltner, a candidate for Academic Affairs Commissioner.
"Everyone is standinl in lines,
trying to crash classes, and get a
head start on homework. They
should've given us one week grace
period," she added.
"But, " argued Dave Marchick,
the present A.S. President, "the
thinking behind that is that if we
See ELECTIONS, pale 3
By PETER MESSROBIAN
N.w.EdJtor
Kathleen Doaa"'/Guardian
Kristin Crabtlee, who is facing charges of assaulting an officer,
must wait until next week tor a decision from the Third Council
Judicial Board.
A.S. rejects Greek
campus housing
By CYNTHIA CHESY
s.u Wrlt.r
Endorsement for campus
Greek and co- op housing was
rejected by the Alternative
Housing (AH) Committee last
night at the AS Council meeting.
Other issues raised included an
allocation to the Asian Pacific
Student Union (APSU) and a
parking shuttle expansion.
I),
-._, fbtaII
I
dleIlellCU.C....." ... euIlRINI
' ...Mr . . . . . . . .
"y .. 1__. .
Oft UICI...
COD let ..... C
•
(lGCC).
San Dic,o was Taimov's
talt ItOP on a lectun circuit
tbat iacluded Santa Barbara
and Santa Cruz, amoDl other
California cities ",inDin,
with either 'San' or 'Santa,' as
Taimov noted. "When I
,0
IiIet
ore ,...... 01 ;oiIilltilitiill
- tie freedOM for people to
coatinue with tbe democratic
PI'OCIIII... Tairaov saicI.
Taimovadded tbat be UIII
the worela 'democratic' and
'demooratizatioa' "for lack of
a better word." He indicatecl
tbat better woreb an probably
Set SOVIET, . . . 3
Dave Marchick, AS presient, reported that while the A H
committee recommended an
international house and a cultural house on campus to
Chancellor Atkinson, they advised the administration to not
. support Greek campus housing.
Instead, they suggested that the
chancellor help Greek orlanizations get bank loans for various
activities.
The committee also found it
"virtually impossible" to have
co - op housing on campus,
according to Marchick . "If
anyone has any comments on
this [committee] draft, see me by
April 22," Marchick said.
In other council announcements, UCSD commuters will
soon be able to avoid campus
parking problems when the
parking shuttle expands to areas
in La Jolla, including Gilman
Drive, according to David
Manheim, Vice President of
Administration. The bad news is
that parking rates will go up $3
per month, according to
Manheim.
In other business, $450 from
General Unallocated AS funds
was alloted to the APSU for
members to attend a conference
in Hawaii; a reallocation of
$1,200 to the UCSD Triton
Yearbook organization for printing costs was postponed for
amending and voting until next
week's meeting and a request for
a council vote on a S60S allocation for 11,000 Guardian
newspaper inserts for External
Affairs was postponed.
The AS endorsement of a credit
union in the new Student Center
was passed with one amendment.
The statement submitted by
Marchick read that the University
and State Employees Credit
Union will manage and operate
the credit union with "appropriate" student involvement.
"There will be another bank on
campus ... and it will provide
check ina and loans for students,"
Marchick said.
Next week's voting includes a
proposal which will allow the
university to lease a space to
KSDO, a local news radio station,
on their transmitter, in exchange
for internships at KSDO, money,
and other benefits.
The council meetings which
are open to public input, are held
at 6:30 p.m., Wednesdays, in the
North Conference Room of the
Student Center.
~
Nearly fifty people attempted
in vain to attend a closed judicial
hearing held last night to determine whether or not UCSD student Kristen Crabtree is guilty of
assaulting a University police officer.
However, due to the late hour,
the meeting was adjourned after
midnight before a decision was.
Deliberations are scheduled to
continue on Wednesday, April
13 at 7 pm.
The decision to bar the public
and the press from last night's
hearing, opposed by Crabtree,
was nominally made by Judicial
Board Chair Eric Basil. However,
it was Third Dean Luis Ramirez
who actually made the choice.
"I made that decision" Ramirez
said. "He [Basil] was involved in
the rationale in making the
decision. "
Before the hearing, which
began ~t 7:30 pm, Crabtree complained about the fact it was
closed. Asked if she expected a
fair hearing, she said "they
already haven't [given me one];
by denying my rights they're
denied me any hope of having a
fair hearing."
According to Ramirez, virtually all Judicial Board hearings
are denied.
The charges against Crabtree
stem from an incident that occurred earlier this year at a lecture
given by a Contra spokesman.
After his presentation, he was
approached by one of Crabtree's
friends. The police restrained the
individual, and Crabtree claims
she attempted to help him. She is
accused of assaulting one of the
police officers, a charge she
denies.
Andy Howard,a Warren senior
and friend of Crabtree's, claimed
to have interviewed all the
witnesses to the incident. "Every
single person I interviewed was
emphatic that she [Kristen] did
not assault anybody," Howard
said.
Crabtree refused to discuss
what happened that night, but
she did brandish some 200 letters
she said were written by UCSD
expressing theie support
for her. Calling the charges
·against her "bogus", Crabtree
said she was being "blackballed"
bacause of an incident last year
that involved a tussle between
her and an FBI agent, and
resulted in her aHegedly biting
the agent. That case was thrown
out of court once, but has been
reintroduced by the government.
According to Dean Ramirez,
if Crabtree is found luilty, the
Judicial Board, composed entirely of students, may impost a
penalty as severe as expUlsion
from UCSD. Ramirez said it was
"very unlikely that it [the hearin~
will result in an expulsion." lliJ
1
"'''''y. April? 1911
'11IursdJIy. April 7. 1988
NEWS
NEWS
sponsoring two two-hour self-defense workshops.
One is designed for UCSD students with disabilities.
It will be held Wednesday, April 13,4-6 pm, in the
south conference room, Student Center building B.
SHORTS
AIDS memorial quilt comes to San
Diego
The "Names Project" national AIDS memorial
quilt will be displayed at Golden Hall in San Diego's
Civic Center April 12-13 as part of a 24-city national
tour.
The giant quilt, which covers over 100,000 square
fcct , is a national memorial to the tens of thousands
of Americans whose lives have been lost to AIDS.
The quilt is made up of 3' x 6' fabric panels created
by friends and families of those who have died . Each
panel bears the name of a single person lost to
AIDS. The quilt was first displayed in Washington,
D.C. in October, 1987 as part of the National March
on Washington for I...esbian and Gay rights.
A Host Committcc representing the San Diego
community has been formed to assist the National
Tour Committcc and to provide local support for
the quilt's visit. The San Diego Host Committee will
require more than 250 voluntccrs to fulfill all of the
logistical tasks necessary to make the showing in
San Diego a success . Fundraising efforts will be
undertaken to offset the expenses associated with the
quilt's stop in San Diego. Additionally, people in the
community who have lost a friend, family member,
or loved one to AIDS, are being sought to create a
3' x 6' panel for inclusion in the quilt during its
display at Golden Hall.
There will be no charge for admission to view the
quilt during its visit to San Diego. Viewing hours
will be 7 to 12 pm on Tuesday, April l2 and 9 am to
9 pm on Wednesday, April 13.
To voluntccr time, donate funds, or create and
submit a panel for the "Names Project" visit to San
Diego, contact the Host Committcc at (619) 6922077. Mail correspondence to Names Project Host
Committee, P.O. Box 881014, San Diego, CA
92108.
AIDS poster contest targets drug
abusers
The County of San Diego Drug Abuse Services, is
conducting an AIDS Poster Contest with the theme
"Drug Abuse and AIDS : You have a choice."
Posters should communicate the theme to one of
four high risk groups of citizens: drug users in the
Black Community, drug users in the Hispanic
Community, IV drug users, and sex partners of drug
users. Winning posters will be reproduced and
distributed throughout the country.
Full scale artists' renderings must be submitted in
a II" wide x IS" high, one color, vertical format. No
Soviet speaker assails 'Mafiatype' U.S.S.R. bureaucracy
There is no charge for the workshop but class size
is limited to 30. Sign up as soon as possible at
Student Safety Awareness, bldg B, or at Disabled
Student Services to reserve a place.
•
Liberal arts majors to be interviewed
April 25 - 29
Liberal Arts Interviewing Week, which gives
liberal arts majors the opportunity to be interviewed
by a variety of employers, will be conducted from
April 25-29. Students can sign up on April II, .12
and 13. Attendance at one of the On-Campus
Interview Orientations is mandatory. For more
information, contact the Career Services Center.
Holocaust memorial scheduled for
April 14.
An interfaith memorial service will be held at
noon in Revelle Plaza, April 14, to observe
Holocaust Memorial Day. Names of victims will be
read continually on the plaza from 7 am to 7 pm and
the film "The Wave" will be shown at 7:30 pm in the
PsychololY and Linguistics Building, room 1110.
For information, call ext. 42521.
s...raace! r.u~"d;',..
A view from underneath the DNA structure of the
Undergraduate Science Building taken by GuardjQn
photographer Cathlin Severance.
other size, format, or multiple colors will be
considered. Selected artists will receive cash awards.
The winning designs will be printed in one color for
quantity distribution and will be reproduced in a
fiscal year 1988-89 calendar.
Art work must be received by 5 pm on May 15,
1988 at Drug Abuse Services, 3851 Rosecrans Street,
San Diego, CA 92110. The four first place awards
will be 5750, four second place awards, 5500, and
honorable mentions receiving 5200.
All art work will become the property of the
County of San Diego and may be reproduced or
displayed in the community. For additional
information, contact Drug Abuse Services at
236-2200.
Self Defense workshop offered April
13 and 19
Touch dance party to be held on
Revelle Plaza
Those who loved the movie "Dirty Dancing," and
love to dance can bring their friends to the Touch
Dancing Party Saturday at 9 pm in Revelle Plaza.
Students can learn all the right moves from Miranda
Garrison, who played "Vivian", D.A. Pawley and
Dorian Sanchez-I...ead dancers from the hit movie,
"Dirty Dancing!"
These dancers are also starring in the upcoming
dance movie, "Salsa" - with a soundtrack that
includes original dance tunes from Gloria Estefan
and, the Miami Sound Machine and Michael
Sembello.
The Touch Dancing Party welcomes the entire
UCSD campus. A pre-party kick off will take place
Friday, April 18 from 12-1 pm in Revelle Plaza with
an informal dancing demonstration by the "Dirty
Dancing" dancers.
The actual Caress Touch Dancing Party begins at
9 pm and the dancers will be on hand for further
demonstration and instruction. Admission is free.
Cash prizes will be awarded in various categories
and movie posters, door prizes and giveaways will be
available.
Bicycles hanging on the racks behind the UCSD
3ikeshop await cyclists' use in the recent Spring weather.
Elections
Kei Sellers, this year's Election
Manager, aBrees that the filinl
period should be lon,er. "I think
that
it could be a lot more orContinued from pap 1
"she added. At the same
ganized,
do it [campaigning] later in the
PRinted out another
time,
Sellers
quarter, it runs into midterms." .
reason
for
tft
elections being
Even with this fact in mind,
held
early
in
the
quarter
- Open
most candidates agreed that the
House.
Scheduled
for
the
end of
beainnin, of the third week would
suuested
that
the
April,
Sellers
be a better time to hold the
Open
House
"are
.
elections
and
elections, either allowing two
weeks for the candidates to cam- probably the two biu~st events
paign, possibly extending the oncampus,"To hold the elections
filing deadline, or allowing one any later in the quarter would be
week ",race period" after spring to cut into the plannin, of the
Open House, SeHen added.
break.
Although the majority of the
"Given the fact that we have to candidates are displeased with
just ri,ht into classes," said Rick the filing and campaigning proMersereau, a candidate for Public cesses as they stand at present,
Relatrons Commissioner, "the the bottom-line rests on the electiming for campaigning is not tion bylaws in the A.S. Constivery good." Mersereau argued tution. Before any procedure can
that the second week of the be changed concerning the elecquarter would be better timing tion, the bylaws must be chanaed,
because "by then, both the candi- and accordinB to Sellen, that
dates and the people would be would be"a very lona and drawnready for the campaign."
~
out prooes~."
-Compiled by Susie Reel
The Student Safety Awareness Program is
by Berke Breathed
.....-------, -----.......;;--,
BLOOM COUNTY
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change the "much-centralized nuclear conflict without the
Continued frOID pale J
'sovietize' and 'sovietization, 'be- system" in which someone who Soviet Union suffering similar
cause a country run by soviets, seeks to fight corrupt bureau- fate.
or "committees of workers, sol- crats must "eventually come to
Tairnov believes that this attidiers, and intellectuals," was the Moscow because you can't fight tude had changed . He believes
original intent of the leaders of them alone."
that there is a "new generation of
Tairnov also made it clear that military leaders" that sees negothe Bolshevik Revnlution.
Tairnov believes that the Gorbachev did not intend to tiation with the West as more
USSR was taken off the path to carry out reforms and changes beneficial to the Soviet Union
'sovietization' with the rise of only on the home front, but also than a new nuclear arms buildJosef Stalin to power. "Despite hoped to improve the Soviet up, which would take further toll
the fact that we lived in peace for
40 years, our system has been
predominantly Stalinist - total"Despite the fact that we lived in peace for 40
itarian, in some cases."
He added that most Soviets years, our system has been predominantly
"knew that one day thin,s would Stalinist - totalitarian,. in some cases."
change," but they also knew that,
-Tair Tairnov
'"unfortunately, "they would have
to wait, and that it might take
generations . "That's again an
indication that our constitution UnIon's relations with other on a weak national economy.
- our system - doesn't work," countries and make progress in
"I would say that this is a
he added. "We don't have the nuclear disarmament.
renaissance in Soviet society, "he
flexibility and the democratic
',(Perestroika] is also a process concluded. "There have been
institutions which would bring in which we want to involve our
remarkable changes so far . .. for
legitimate change . .. in the party friends," he said. "We think that
the first time the younger generaand in the state. The bureau- we can go ahead with the disar- tion in my country are watching
cracy is what still continues."
mament issues." He added that television and they are seeing the
And, Tairnovsees the bureau- signihcant progress had already leaders of the Bolshevik Revocracy as a product of the Stalin been made in his country ·with luation of whom they have n~v~r
era, when such a system made it regard to disarmament because, heard of before. In old days, in
possible for the dictator to con- during the 70s, the Soviet mil- textbOOks, including the history
trol every aspect of Soviet society. itary establishment would not of the Communist Party, [the
The fact that the bureaucracy even consider the possibility of content] was a 100 percent falsi"still continues" is one Tairnov "mutual destruction." They still fication that was begun in the 20s
attsibutes to "the lost dream of believe that Soviet military and 30s under Stalin. Now the
power of ·the Soviets," power superiority would allow them to history books are beginning to
taken by a bureaucracy that con- destroy the enemy during a tell the truth. ..
trols every level of government
in the Soviet Union.
1-- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - _
"There are ministers, party
leaders, and they are in the
Supreme Soviet, and they are
not responsible in the true sense
which the [Supreme Soviet]
should be responsible," he
explained . "So we face today -a
real crisis in terms of our political system, and, as a result, in
Call us today Jar a free
terms of our economic svstem."
personal
rate quotation.
Tairnov concluded that Perestroika involved decentralizing the
Soviet government in order to
combat the entrenched bureauJuS[ Jive minUlI!S from campus !
cracy that has "established itself
within the form of the Mafiatype gangster, in the case of[factory] plants around the Soviet
Union."
And Affiliate.
He emphasized the nccd to \
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Ken Morris (left) and Ben Fernandez bask in the sun in the
Sigma Pi golf cart at their fraternity 's booth Wednesday on
the Plaza . All ten fraternities have booths during this week for
Spring Rush .
1. Tumor cell heterogeneIty: Implications for therapy
2. GenetIc Instability: Impllcatl~ for tumor heterogeneity
3, Multiple drug resIstance
4. Metastatk spread of cancer and Its mechanisms:
Implication for therapy
~. Induced dIfferentiation of tumors to lower malignancy
6. Role of diet In cancer prevention and cause
7. BIological and Immunological treatment of cancer
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tumors
9. Growth enhancers and InhIbitors secreted by tumors
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Implication for prognosis and therapy
11. In vitro drug-sensItivIty testing of human tumor tissue
for IndivIdualized tratment
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Thursday. April 7. 1988
Thursday. April 7, 1988
5
OPINION
CommentarY.,
Hunter S. Thompson
Letters
WELCOME TO
Football
Surprise Dinner Guest Sexist
O
nly 45 percent of the precincts had reported last Saturday,
and Michael Dukakis was still running dead even, on paper,
with Jesse Jackson, who was said by the wizards and the
smart people to be a 2-to-1 underdog in Michigan ... Dukakis had a
lock on it, they said : He had the staff people, he had the money, he
was coming off that big win on Super Tuesday ... The hog had
emerged from the tunnel, they said . Dukakis was on a roll . The train
was leaving the station, and the party pros were scrambling to get
aboard . Yessir, it was the Wabash Cannonball all over again: Even
Bill Bradley fell for it.
Bradley, the senior senator from New Jersey and a genuine dark
horse in his own right, was persuaded by persons unknown, at the
last moment, to endorse Dukakis and "give him that one final boost
he needs to get over the hump."
Bradley believed it, along with a lot of other working professionals
and they were all staggering around like winos when the sun went
down on Saturday and took Dukakis with it . Jackson even won
Ann Arbor, where the white / black voter registration numbers run
about 99-1 . The whole southern tier of the state, with a IO percent
black vote, was effectively lost to Dukakis by the time cocktail hour
ended in Lansing.
Dukakis went belly up before the evening news came on in San
Francisco. With less than 50 percent of the precincts reporting, he
saw that he was doomed and crawled out of town like a snake.
This was, after all, his second consecutive loss -in a crucial northeastern "industrial state" to a greedy black preacher from either
Chicago or South Caroli na who never ran for sheriff an ywhere and
with no credentials at all as a presidential candidate, except that he
believes in the American political system and takes democracy
seriously . Jesse has no more business running for president than I do
but he is doing it, and he is doing it a lot better than some of the
smartest hot rods in the business ... And if he ever gets to the White
House, Richard Perryman might finall y be crowned as the true king
of rock and roll.
he party pros are not looking forward to a gang war at the
convention at Atlanta . Two or three crazed ballots in prime
time would give the Republicans a handle and a hammer and
a whipsaw all at once. "The last thing we need is another 'McGovern
convention,' "they say to each other in the back rooms and bistros of
Georgetown, as they plot this new campaign. "We have a lot offreaks
in our party, but that 's no reason they should all be on prime-time
TV, like they were in '72."
Indeed . It was horrible. I was there, and so were a lot of other
people who are no longer functional in big-time politics. George lost
by something like 24 points, the worst beating in American politics
since George Washington ran for a second term.
But what they forget about McGovern is that he put together a
national staff from Frank Mankiewicz and Gary Hart down to
12-year-old volunteers in places like Pittsburgh and Pismo Beach
that is still the only real nucleus of idealism and true believers in
Democratic politics today ... Jimmy Carter's "peanut brigade"
doesn't have any annual reunions, and most of the people who
worked for Fritz Mondale will claim they went to Bora Bora or
maybe even jail that year.
But McGovern's people, and I am one ofthem , still wear that brief
and brutal experience like a tattoo that looks better every year. I ran
into one of them the other day in the kitchen at the Woody Creek
Tavern, and he said that "working on the McGovern campaign was
still the best thing I ever did in my life."
I asked him who he was going to vote for this year, and he said,
"Nobody."
Once you've walked with the king man, it's hard to hang around
with punks.
"But I like Jesse," he said. "He walks tall and he's stone crazy and I
like him yeah, J could vote for Jesse; I might even stand in line to do
it, like they did in Detroit."
here is another theory floating around out there in what Fitzgerald called that "vast obscurity beyond the city, where the
dark fields of the republic rolled on under the night." It is a
kind of underground Democrat point of view that says the next four
years are going to be such an economic disaster, for sure, that it is a
far, far better thing in the long run to let Bush get elected and take the
whole load of blame for it - a ghastly depression, with millions gone
mad with despair and blind hatred for whoever caused it to happen.
No Democrat should have to bite that bullet, they say. Give the
"trickle-down" people a taste of what is really trickling down . Let
them wallow in their own greedy mess, and in 1992 we will take over
by default and the Greedheads will flee into the swamps, leaving their
songs to pay their debts and their daughters to remember them as fat
green snakes coiled tightly around their arms forever.
But that is a grim way to have to look at politics in a country where
Victory or Death has always been the only attitude to take when
things get serious. The idea of rolling over and laying low until the
next presidential race runs contrary to the American experience ... It
also ignores the long-term reality of the McGovern campaign, which
suffered a disastrous loss to Nixon, but not for long. He was a crook
and a thug and a gun-drunk, and twO years later we swarmed all over
the bastard and ran him out of town.
That too was politics. It ain't alljust a gameforfixers and lawyers
and thieves. Every once in awhile it can take you for a ride like one of
those big 12-cylinder Jaguars that will scare your passengers into a
coma.
T
T
Editor:
Students who are debating the
pros and cons of the proposed
fee increase to support a football
team should consider the following point: since college football
teams are made up of male students exclusively, any fee increase
to support such a team is an insidious form of monetary discrimination against women students and athletes.
A fee increase designated to
support a male-only sports program at UCSD must be balanced
by more funding for women's
sports programs. Otherwise,
UCSD will start down the road
taken by the nation's traditional
football colleges - these colleges often spend five to ten
times as much on men's sports as
they spend on women's sports.
In addition to considering this
argument against the fee increase,
I hope students will ask themselves which is more exciting: the
prospect of having a third-rate
football team (which costs $45
per year) , or the possibility that
UCSD will have another national
championship water polo team.
Yes , it 's true, UCSD has already
won a national championship in
women 's water polo-and that's
something to write home about!
Austin Gallaher
By DULCE AMOR T. LEDINA
I
treatment. Occasionally, I take
the risk of getting a citation and
fine in this world. I make Uturns, I park in loading zones, [
ride my bicycle through Revelle
Plaza . In the laUercase. by virtue
of what I witnessed on Friday, I
realized a potentially traumatic
and hostile incident could result
from my actions. Perhaps
someone can enlighten me
regarding the details of this
incident.
Carin Crawford
Cops and
Skateboards Marchick
Editor:
Insulting
I saw a guy cruising through
Revelle Plaza on a skateboard.
He was approached by an officer,
forcibly handcuffed and taken
away. The conduct of the officer
in the course of this incident was
frightening. He was aggressive
and hostile in his manner of carrying out this "procedure. n
1 do not know the details of
this incident other than what I
have described and I do not
intend (in this letter) to defend
the skateboarder or argue about
the no bike/ skateboard rule.
My reaction of shock and fear
is the issue here. I am too sensitive to dismiss the fact that a fellow student was subjected to
psychological and physical abuse
that seemed greater in proportion to the event which provoked
it.
I, too, could be subject to such
Soaps
Addictive
Editor:
On Tuesday, Feb. 23, A.S.
President David Marchick addressed the Warren Residence
Life Staff on various matters
concerning the ASUCSD. A
concern was raised by several
staff members about the problem of under representation of
the university's diverse (ethnically, economically, ideologically) student population on the
A.S. Council.
Marchick's response was that
the A.S. had done an out-reach
program. Yet one program is not
enough. Many of us felt that he
had tip-toed around the question. His attitude was: "We bad
tried, the [the under represented
students] did not respond, so it is
See MARCHICK, pale !!
Statistics
Misleading
I
Etltor:
Congratulationa! The
article entitled 'Black Retention: People and Numben'
[Gutl,dltlfl, Feb. 27] was
excellently written.
The issue of black retention at UCSD it a problem
that needs to be addressed
by the admiDiatration but
not in tbe form of mitleadin, facti. In the letter IUbmitted by JOICpb Wallon,
tb, Vice Cbaneellor of
Undcraraduate Affain
[Gu.,dl.", Mar. 7] it is
apparent tbat die adlDiDiatration chooIeI to ctimiDiab
the .rioua_ of &be problem rather tbaa ....... poslible 10hatiON. 1'bia is baaed
OD Jail referea&lll &0 "the
frcabman . . . 011912" and
Se• •
traub
TODD RAPPAIlPORT, ManGging Edi/or
P[T[R MESSROIIAN. N~ ....s Editor
J[FF I[R[SFORD·HOWE, Opinion Edi/or
MICH[L[ BIDW[LL, F,aturn Editor
JONATHAN SCHR[T[R, Spom Editor
SUSI[ B[[L, Am Editor
EVA WONG, Am Edi/or
IIRYAN IILY[U, Photo Editor
SEAN DUFFY. Grophirs Editor
JOHN SHA W, Trommg Oi"ctor
KATHRYN SHOM[TTE ALLEN, Cop)' £diwr
ANNAMARIE B[ZZ[RIO[S, Assor,a" N' ....s Editor
KATHL[[N DONAHUE, AlJiS/ont Photo Editor
MICHAEL FOULKS. Ad"mising MunoKn
SHENDL DIAMOND. Olfie, Mo"agn
MIK[ MARTINEZ, Ado'ulIsmJ( O",ig""
Marchick
Continued from pale 4
not our Lthe A.S.'s] problem
anymore." Yet is it obvious the
problem still exists, and we feel it
is the obligation of the A.S. to
search for a solution to the problem, and not just disregard it.
Marchick had not seriously
addressed the problem in the
meeting. Later in the evening, he
telephoned one of the resident
advisors involved. His tone was
condescending, and he proceeded
to utter slurs against the student
populations in question. Among
other thin., he stated that these
students had a "lack of courage."
We believe the problem of
under representation lies with an
A.S. that has not demonstrated
to the various ethnic groups / organizations on campus a concern for their issues nor a willingness to listen to their specific
needs and goals. In his telephone
conversation, Marchick illustrated his ignorance of the problem
as well as a lack of sensitivity
towards these students. Logically
it fOllows that if one is dealing
with an A.S. that has not displayed the sensitivity, the understanding, nor the support for
one's concerns, one would not
desire to be involved with tbat
A.S.
The A.S. is supposed to be the
voice for students, and therefore
sbould be representative of the
university'S diverse student population.
Theresa Marcbetta,
Ta,y Aherne
DanAel FitzSimmons
Wanen R.A ..
No Task Is Too Tough.
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v..... ,. Iu
r -________________-J~,'~~~uaA~J~~~~..~~__________________~
NIKI N[WLANDS, Edilor in Chi,/
t's a beautiful day; the tree nearby gently
caresses the window and you can see
neighbors outside talking.
All of a sudden, the clock strikes twelve
and t}iis placid picture is interrupted by the
slamming of the door and the sound of books
falling to the ground. Three college students
rush madly in front of the television set and
one quickly turns it on to the Days of Our
Lives. iQSisting on silence.
•
Elsewhere, households appear to have been time of our soap. We would even turn on our
overtaken by aliens because the vacuum is
answering machine so that the phone would
turned off, dishes are piled high from lunch- not distract us'from our show.
time, the churning of the washing machine
It does sound pretty silly and I often wonceases to exist and the only noticeable sound dered why we do these things. Nothing could
is the TV.
ever interfere with watching our soap and
These are the soap opera addicts. It is an everything was required to be scheduled
addiction like drugs because one show is not around it so we could watch it. Gradually, it
enough to satisfy this compUlsion. The story- was becoming installed in our daily routines
lines have one motive - to entice the addicted and we joined the legions of soap opera
viewer to tunc in tomorrow and the next day, addicts with nothing better to do but feed our
and the next day. The characters on the soap uncontrollable addiction.
are entertaining and many find it exciting to
Being stuck on a soap or several soaps
substitute the lives of their favorite stars for meant daily watching, so it was not possible
their own lives as an escape from domestic to do any other activity during soap time. We
drudgery.
became lifeless and unable to contribute anyI am a full-fledged member of "Soap Opera thing positive to ourselves or to society. I
Anonymous" and I hate the feeling of being have been a faithful soap viewer since fifth
controlled by my soap. Many may feel that grade and I do not really want to sever my ties
this problem is not serious enough and may with my soap. After nearly nine years, one
not pertain to them. Big deal if someone is develops a sense of responsibility and loyalty
glued to a TV set for several hours everyday. to the show and daytime drama, but at the
Why should that be such a problem?
same time, like many soap addicts,l was tired
Sometimes, my friends and I find ourselves of being controlled by them. So what are the
discussing the characters and their storylines alternatives? Is there really a cure for this
onDays as if they really exist (in our minds addiction?
they do) and we have even vowed to never
If you need the escapism that soap operas
take a class between the hour of noon and I provide, read a good, juicy romantic novel.
pm because it would conflict with the show However, though some of us were born to
read, some of us just do not have the passion
and even the capacity to read a book and
visualize the context of the novel. We take the
easy way out. We would rather have someone
else analyze it for us and we watch the final
hypothesis, then we use our own imaginations and picture it in our minds.
Another idea to get over this addiction
could be the purchase of magazines. When I
was in high school, I use to purchase Soap
Opera Digesl, .a magazine which offered a
two-week sypnosis of every soap opera on
television and it was available at any local
supermarket. If! did not have enough money,
J would purchase a newspaper for a quarter
and turn to the entertainment section where
they offered supplements of the storyline.
However, this too posed a problem because
seeing it and reading it were two different
matters. After reading about what had happened on my soap, I tried everything to see it
first hand for myself on TV.
In drug addiction, addicts have a rehabilitation program in which they gradually ease
themselves from drugs. With soap opera
addiction, the same applies. You can begin
easing away from your favorite show by
watching only Monday and Friday because
you will get all the storyline information you
need during these two days. Any soap viewer
will agree that these are the best days to watch
soaps because the producers make the storylines more provocative to entice the viewer to
tune in after the weekend. But what happens
after Monday? Usually, Monday has a cliffhanger to be revealed on Tuesday and once
again you fjnd yourself trapped ill this endless cycle of tuning in day after day to satisfy
your curiosity.
The solution is quite simple: find something else to occupy your time. For example,
plan a scheduled activity while your soap
opera is on the air -like a hair appointment,
shopping with friends, early spring cleaning,
volunteer work, playing a tennis game, enrolling in a class, or running errands that have
been put off. This way, you are obligated to
go somewhere or to do something.
s,." WrII... : Koron Kumm. Roben Leo.... Larry Wein·
s,."
Writ ...: KUrl llell. Eri<
eynlhil ChClY. Kllhy
Garllnd. KllY Garvey. Jlmes Gilmore. Londl GII.e. Phil G......
C~""nkin.
GlYII" Gunl .. h .. n. Chris Hlmson. V.. HUlchinlOft. lri..
Ito ... Miles Kin . John Kearney. M.rk Kenney. Laur. Knapp.
Adam Le.y. L.... Li,hl. Ni,.. Linde.... n. Philip MacG ••crn.
Nlncy Muntncr. J ...... Pinpon. Lila Quin'.na. Ponche Shantz.
Elaine Smoler. Mourccn Spurr. llaloclle Tihanyi. Lelicia Viliarre.1
.........,IMn: Molly Aluandor. Slacy Lonpl'"'. Dawn Mami·
kunilln. MariO Munoz. Mike Oitzman. Ken IClnltein. T.i aiUo.
Ali S.di.hi.n. ealhlin Se .... nc• . Mich.ol Spauldin•. Floride
TlqUI. Lesley V.IOWIIl
IIt. .,.eors: Rick Ford. Ckmond Holmel-Henien. lriln Hlv. Orr..do SI.ce• . J.ff Quan. P... r Zell ... r
T"h Gr.mm... Lora Mihal • . Calherine Seidel
C.." . . . . . ., Julia Ila.k . Ch ..."nl Lopp
P.......do. Crt.: Sar.h Banel. Cynthia C.mpbell. Sen Duffy.
L.... L,.hl . Ke.in Muller. Jonnifer Pholl,p•. Todd RaptNlrpon .
ab"nl Youmans
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Bartok: Quartet No.6, Brahms: .Quartet in C minor
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6
Thursday. April 7. 1988
ThursdGY, April 7, /988
. ................ Los Alamos Laboratory to
.~ II , !{1~~~4~w !develop space reactor fuel
,..
NEWS
NEWS
' ~.:.)::.:
I
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200~_
OFF
By JOHN A. WEBSTER
I
hOI Jpil'Y e u" ie.1 and d,,/idellJ' Blf l"Unie.1
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Lunch - 11 :30-2:30 Dinner - 5:30-9:.10
Corner 01 lo"cr ","rd & Pr"'pcel
Opcn SClcn l)a~,
LOS ALAMOS- Fuel pellets
for ground-testing of small nuclear reactors designed for use in
space will be fabricated at Los
Alamos National Laboratory.
I
I
I
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I
Following an extensive evaluation , a technical review panel
recently approved the production ofthe uranium nitride pellets
for the SP-lOO program, a national effort to develop the technology for putting a reactor in
space.
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John Hanson, SP-1OO laboratory coordinator at Los Alamos,
said the approval marked the
successful culmination of the fuel
for a real reactor," said Hanson,
of the Lab's Nuclear Technology
and Engineering Division.
medium or large
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The SP-100 Ground Engineering System project is managed
by Los Alamos and the Jet PropUlsion Laboratory in Pasadena,
Calif. Los Alamos also is charged
with fuels development, while
other labs and companies around
the country are responsible for
other technical aspects of the
project.
The Department of Energy,
Strategic Defense Initiative Organizationand the National Aeronautics and Space Administration are sponsoring the ground
testing of SP-IOO space systems
and sub-systems, including the
D·
lo Jolla
PI.
Colo" ...
a
..~-
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--------------------
reactor.
The SP- I00 reactor is intended
for space-based defense and
scientific applications that require more energy than can be
obtained through solar cells, batteries or radioisotopes, or require
the long lifetime and solar independence of a nuclear reactor
power source.
The reactor, which could produce tens to hundreds of kilowatts of electricity, is being designed to operate at full power
for up to seven years, making it
suitable for projects ranging from
deep space probes to ferrying
supplies from one Earth orbiter
to another.
Commercial nuclear reactors
use uranium oxide as the primary
fuel. Uranium nitride has higher
density, meaning it can produce
more power per unit of volume,
and higher thermal conductivity,
allowing it to transfer heat more
·effici.. ntly than uranium oxide.
"Basically, it enables you to
build a smaller reactor core,
which is important in space,"
said Bruce Matthews, leader of
the fuels section of the Nuclear
Fuel and Isotope Separation
Group at Los Alamos.
Matthews , whose section developed the new fuel, said uranium nitride had been considered as a possible power source
for a space reactor years ago, but
research and development halted
when an earlier space reactor
program was dropped in the late
1960s.
The program was revived in
the early 19805 with a demand
for higher power-level sources in
space for defense and scientific
missions, and the Los Alamos
effort to reexamine the potential
of uranium nitride and develop a
method of fabricating it began in
1983,
The Lab team solved most of
the technical problems within a
year, then performed a series of
tests and analyses and escalated
the process from "bench-top"
fabrication to a pilot project,
Matthews said .
The uranium nitride fuel pellets are the key part of fuel pins
that will be assembled at Los
Alamos and shipped to the site
of the ground tests for use in a
reactor.
Other fuel pin components arc
being designed by General Elecsystems contractor for the prowhich also is building the reactor.
Following the ground tests,
fuel-fabrication technology deat Los Alamos will be turned
to private industry to produce
the fuel for future reactors that
will be launched into space.
Los Alamos National Laboratory is operated by the University of California for the Department of Energy.
~
Geologists discover landslide
If the C'a mpus moves,
it's Powers Fault
By ROBERT LEONE
Sellior St¥J Writtr
George Shor has been a Scripps Institute of
Oceanography (SIO) geologist for 35 years, but he
never knew that the shortwavt radio station he
manages as associate director of Ship Operations
and Marine Technical Support was perched on
top of an eons-old landslide.
He only found out be<:ause the hill was recently
placed under intense scrutiny by geologists who
drilled deep holes to see what was to be sccn. "I
used to take students out to do geophysical studies
[on campus] but nothing like this," Shor said.
SIO's geologist tend to look out to.sea more than
around campus for research projects, Shor added.
Mark Nelson, a UCSO architect and project
manager for the Stephen Birth AquariumMuseum, when questioned about the landslide,
"No, we had no idea [it was there]. Jt'sjust one of
those things you'd run across."
Another example of things that UCSD's build-
ATTENTION ALL UCSD STUDENTS:
:..
:..
*VOTE*VOTE*VOTE*
:..
:
AS A UCSD STUDENT YOUR VOTE COUNTS!!!
:
..
..
: BE SURE TO VOTE IN
....
..
According to Shor, Powers Fault runs from the
intersection of Genesee Avenue and 1-5 to the new
Warren Apartments, intersects Gilman Drive
south of the Student Center, and disappears in
Skeleton Canyon south of Azul Street and east of
the city-owned soccer field . It's almost entirely on
UCSD property.
"There's a lot of interesting geology on campus
-we usually only find out about it when we dig
foundations," Shor said.
UCSD is currently creating a general geolo,ical
survey of the campus. This will compile the results
of aerial surveys and studies for various buildings
into a geological map of the campus. Perhaps
UCSO's builders won' find as much "interesting
geology" in the future.
:
:
AT YOUR RESPECTIVE COLLEGE ONLY:
:
-Mark Kenney
Hillt.s Stllll Writer
" I learned a lui abaul u'rilinga neu's ar/icle: huU' 10 u'rilea lead, IlOu'
lu illlenJieN' /leo/lle, huu' lu galhlY in/urmaliun, and huu' lu />IIllogelher
lillii'll lire arlide. The besl />arl aboullhe /lrogram is allhelllld u'hen you
are gi,'e ll all ossignmelll. I el/juyed Ihe program ,'ery mu ch , .,
-Robert Sweeney
News Interr•
Julie Munro
Feot.ru Inttrn
" 1 /rad a/yoa)"s Ihuught a/Juul
lai/inK/or a n(,ll'ipGper, /JUI I'd
nl" 'f" /('arnl'd hu... IU " 'ril(,
journalis/icJlrl". The inlf'rn.lhip
pfOKrO/ll ...as a thofOUKh, pain'
/I'H ...ay IU K(,I s/art('t/. "
.. The IlIlenrs hip Program go,'e me I/Iore confidel/ce in my u'riling.
1 ','e lIIel (/ luI 0/ peuple alld gai lied i IIsiKh! inlu Ihe u nilJersily process, .,
-Elaine Smoler
News Stllll Writer
The Guardian is located southeast of the Humanities
Library, next to the Che Cafe.
:
MUIR-MOM
:
Advertising Club of San Diego
:
THIRD - PETERSON HALL
:
:
WARREN - COMMONS
:
SCHOLARSHIP
:
ON WEDNESDAY, APRIL 13TH, 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM :
AT THE GYM STEPS
:
YOUR VOTE CAN MAKE A BIG DIFFERENCE .. BE SURE TO VOTE IN THE
A.S. ELECTIONS!!!
..
..
....
.. •••• .............................
~
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4224 Balboa Ave.
San Diego, CA 92117
675-B N. Broadway
Escondida, CA 92025
corner of BalbOa & CioICernont Dr
Country Comer Shopping Centa<
- Next to Food Basket -
at Broadway & Washington
(619) 483-4853
(619) 745-5660
1987 DC ComtCS Inc.
accredited post secondary institution, college or university
offering majors in these subjects. Checks will be dispersed .
to the school's registration office to be used toward tuition
gr fees.
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• Fantasy & roia-playing games
• Fantasy miniatures
• Robotech and Japanese Animation
TO FIND OUT MORE.
Drop by the News Room Tuesday, April 11th at 7:30pm.
:
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IN
TOWN!
..
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ON TUESDAY, APRIL 12TH, 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
:
BOOI8
" The Guardian IlIlernship Prugram laughl meellerylhing I needed
lu knuu' a/xJII/ u·riling for a neu'spoper. ,.
1988 A.S. ELECTIONS!!! :..
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t·····················································•••,
:..
ers have run across is Powers Fault, Named after
Chuck Powers, UCSD's former assistant vice
chancellor of Design and Construction, this small
and "probably inactive" fault was discovered
during the building of the new Warren Apartments.
..
It is the aim of this scholarship program to provide
assistance to students sincerely seeking a career in
Marketing, Advertising or Communications. To this end,
the Advertising Club of San Diego is actively involved in
administering this scholarship fund to help local college
students prepare for a career in these fields.
Under the current program, a number of scholarships worth
up to $2,500 each will be available to the awardee(s) in any
Students must adhere to the following basic criteria: (I)
Student must be currently attending a college, university or
academy in San Diego County; (2) Student must have successfully completed at least two years of college by July 1st,
1988, with at least one more year of full-time academic
training remaining to be completed in San DielO County
prior to graduation; (3) Student must be career-oriented
and majoring in Marketing, Advertising or Communications; (4) Student must have at least an overall 3.0 college
grade point average (on a 4-point scale, A =4.0).
PLEASE NOTE: If you feel you meet the above criteria,
stop by the UCSD Undergraduate Scholarship Office, 213
Matthews Administrative and Academic Complex for an
application.
DEADLINE: Ap,U 24, 1988.
7
8
1hurJday. April 7. 1988
Thursday, April 7, 1988
9
FEATURES
Helping kids help themselves
Youth program provides
alternatives to the streets
Editor's note: This article is the
second of a two-part series on
the Youthfor Progressprogram,
Part one appeared in last
Monday's edition.
By CHAD B. SKOPP
GIIMdiM imerlt
Logan Youth and Family
Services, a sub-agency of Youth
for Progress, is located in the
Barrio Logan area of San Diego,
a primarily low-income region.
The agency serves as a juvenile
diversion program, providing
alternatives to the limited activities available to the Barrio's
youth.
Its building, referred to as
'Logan,' was originally a twostory furniture warehouse, converted by the progra m '5 founder,
Simon Judge. Inside, there is a
colorful mural that captures
one's attention upon first entering the agency. The picture
depicts a native Californian
Indian looking away from a
serene San Diego countryside
that evolves, from left to right,
into a complex urban setting.
The mural metaphorically reflects the conditions for many of
Logan's clients: children that
have been progressively isolated
from either their families,
schools, or communities. Like
the Indian, according to Tony
Ramirez, the Logan Youth and
Family Service's director, the
children are trying to accept
"(transitions) in a harmonious
way."
Blaring top-40 music and colliding pool balls pervade the
building'S first level. Worn pool
tables stand on brown tile floors,
occupying the attention of variously-aged children who smoothly survey their games, cue sticks
in hand. Some are possibly from
rival gangs, but once inside
Logan they disregard their dif-
environments of their original
schools.
Once inside, a visitor to director Tony Ramirez's office is
aware of his busy routine, easily
noticing the room's sense of
activity. "Their eyes," he commented "take in the whole room,
until they settle down, and realize
that they came here to see me."
Ramirez, 43, is a gentle figure,
both adored and respected by
Logan's youth. Playfully referred
to as "Bear," the children have
adorned his office with objects
alluding to his nickname.
Formerly an aspiring commercial artist, Ramirez held up his
dreams, devoting the last 13 years
to working as a direct service
person in community-based organizations.
Raised in Logan Heights since
age three, Ramirez shared experiences similar to those of the
children he now instructs. "I
[have] got a lot of insight in
regards to what makes up Logan
"If our kids can't Heights," he explained . By age
he was given the opportunity
work, they can 't sur- to18, work
in a recreation center
vive; if they can't involved with the local gang,
which he also happened to be
survive, they're going "running
with" at the time.
to resort to all kinds Active with this gang since junior
high school, Ramirez, with the
of different activities." infl
uence of a concerned teacher,
-Pam Peterson eventually relinquished his ties
Executive director to it by age 21.
It was at tbe recreation cente)
Youth for Progress that his interest in social work
was sparked through activities
such as painting over graffiti to
tunity to earn credits and as- coordinating baseball games besimilate back into their regular tween the local gang and police
public schools. Instructed by officers. He knew that he could
Bernie Gately, the location at lend his own personai experLogan has a classroom size that iences to working and relating
fluctuates between approxi- with troubled youth, for like
mately IS to 18 students from many of them, he too had felt
grades nine through 12. Al- " ... the hurt, the pain [in] feeling
though it is not accredited, many like the outcast. to
"I decided that I could do
students stay on to graduate
because they feel more comfor- something better with my life, to
table there than in the hostile influence some of the young
ferences. Book cases, standing
out sharply from the tough
atmosphere, serve as a reminder
that there is always the opportunity for progress. Across the
room is a boxing ring, surrounded by onlookers and various
training devices, where the instructor, Vincente Hueso, 34, has
trained top amateur atheletes.
On the second level, there are
many school desks and chairs
positioned around the center of
the room. This instructional
setting is an "overflow" room for
the Summit School. One of 23
sites, the space is leased out by
Logan and operated by the San
Diego County Department of
Education.
The Summit program gives
students who have missed a substantial amount of their school's
semester, either from expUlsion
or legal problems, the oppor-
Tony Ramirez. the Logan Youth and Family Services director grew
up in the Logan Heights area and finds that he can relate to the
Logan youths more effectively because he has had experiences
similar to theirs.
people that were growing up
in that environment," said Ramirez. Obtaining a degree in
social welfare from San Diego
City College, Ramirez's experience took him to the Youth for
Progress agency.
"When I came to Youth for
Progress, they needed a troubleshooter to bring the Chicano
popUlation to the Lemon Grove
area," Ramirez explained. After
two-and-a-half years with that
agency, he transferred (in 1983)
to 'the Logan site as the assistant
coordinator; since 1985 he has
served as Logan's program coordinator.
Most of Ramirez's clients are
referred to him by police and
probation officers, juvenile
courts, schools, and family members. The target population of
the program is comprised of
adolescents between the aacs of
10 and 18 years. Ethnically, the
youth are 85 percent Hispanic,
10 percent Black and 5 percent
white or Asian, with a male
popUlation of 83 percent.
Most of the children at Logan
Youth and Family Services are
poor, under-educated, and lack.
English and Spanish language
skills. The majority of Logan's
clients read at a level of three
grades below standard, while
about half of the adolescents
drop out of hi,h school. Nearly
all of the clients are unemployed,
livin, below Federal Poverty
Guidelines, and have used drugs
at one time or anotber. About
half of the youths claim to be
involved with gangs.
CO!ltinued from .page 8
self-esteem through anti-social
behavior.
Seeing between 40 to 50 clients
a month, Logan's two staff
members provide an individualized treatment program for every
youngster. The agency offers
many different programs such as
individual and family counseling,
job referrals, and tutoring. In
their literacy training program
entitled "El Puente" (The
Bridge), the staff works with
clients, trying to improve their
attitudes about themselves and
what they are reading.
"We've found that just by
doing that, we can increase a
youngster's reading score, withOJt even providing remedial
training," explained Pam Peterson, executive director of Youth
for Progress. Logan also provides court assistance, defending
their clients in cases where their
right to a public education is in
jeopardy.
Maintaining ties with his artisitic friends, Ramirez allo manages to bring in local artists to
the Logan site where they conduct beginnina muralist classes;
these coune have served as an
alternative to graffiti. Some of
the painten have even arranged
community art projects for the future, one is that he can
upgrade the cliche of "saving one
Logan's clients.
The center docs not only offer life in I0" to a larger ratio. Also,
assistance to adolescents. If a Ramirez encourages that as
senior citizen is in need of emo- Logan's youth experience suctional support in overcoming the cess, they don't forget their
death of a spouse, assistance background, so that they will
with translating a document, or contribute back to the commuhelp with food stamps, they can nity.
find aid at Logan. "We don't
As for Peterson, self-sufficienlimit our services," Peterson cy among both children and the
added.
agency is what she is striving for.
The agency also works to dis- Currently, a work-experience
solve cultural barriers that in- program for youths, operating
hibit adolescents'actions. Direc- as a sub-program of ·Youth for
tor Ramirez tries to promote Progress, is under consideration.
activities such as scuba diving
"If our kids can't work, they
and sailing because his clients can't survive; if they can't survive,
sometimes feel uncomfortable at they're going to resort to all
many of the public water facil- kinds of different activities,"
ities. "They feel that if you go to Peterson added. With the help of
the beach, you've got to be Anglo caring and concerned people like
and wear [fancy] t-shirts ... they Peterson and Ramirez, the only
isolate themselves, to Ramirez ex- foreseeable activity that these
plained.
children will continue to engage
One of the many reasons that in, is progress.
motivate the adolescents to conYouth for Progress would
tinue attending Logan is to carry deeply'appreciate help from any
on the friendships that have volunteers. They also have the
developed in the program. "I had ability to supervise and provide
moved to some of the other structure to any intern interested
barrios and never liked them, in counseling, psychology, sociountil I moved out here and met logy, and juvenile justice. For
all my friends. We all live to- information, contact Pam Petergether," said Rene Huizar, 16.
son at (619) 236-1853 or Tony
Among Ramirez's hopes for RIImirez at (6/9) 232-1093.
See BEL", pale'
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CPR
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Lasting friendships are made at Logan Youth and Family Services, giving adolescents even more
encouragement to aHend the program.
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See The Canyon view listings for Aerobics, Tennis, & Kids' Classes.
For prices, locations, and more info. call 534-4037.
Sign-ups and details at Canyon view x44037
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TTh 5-6pm
Dance, Beg. Jazz
TTh 6-7pm
Dance, AdvBeg . Jazz
MW 7-8:3Opm
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MW 6-7pm
Dance, Beg. Ballroom
Th 6-7:3Opm
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Th 7:30·9pm
Weight Training, Womens' Beg.
Th 6-7:3OpmlSat 4-5:30pm
Weight Training, Womens' AdvBeg. Tues 7·8 :3Opm/Sun 4-5:30pm
Weight Training, Co-Ed Beg.
MW 6-7pm
Ice Skating, Beg.
Th 7:30-Spm
Fencing, Beg.
Fri 5:30-6:30pm
Womens' Self De1ense
Thurs 6-Spm
Womens" Self De1ense
Sat 10-12noon
Sand Volleyball, Beg .
Mon 5-7pm
Springboard Diving, Beg.
MW 9-10am
Swimming, Beg.
Sat 10·llam
Swimming, AdvSeg.
Sat 9-1Oam
Swimming, Stroke Analysis
Sat 1' -12noon
TTh 9-10:30am
Swimming, Pre-Masters
TTh 12-1pm
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MW 5·6:15pm
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The non-profit service provides counselin, and other organized activities to the adolescents because they are considered to be at a "high-risk" of
becoming involved in illegal activities, or have already been
labeled as "delinquent."
The program is designed to
intervene in the children's behavioral cycle, whereby preventing wayward behavior. Youth
for Progren believes that
through the positive activities
tbat they provide, their clients
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penonal acknowled.ment and
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10
Thursday, April 7, 1988
Thursday, April 7, 1988
NEWS
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•
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The big cities 01America are becoming Third
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Don't Leave School Without It~
Lower spring break use
averts water shortage crisis
By ROBERT LEONE
chancellor for business affairs,
confirmed Grigsby's statements.
GUlUdle,. WrUB
"We're at the end ofthe line , and
Recent Santa Ana conditions if everybody uses water, we come
nearly led to a repetition of the up short. It has to do with the
water shortage that resulted in way water is routed to us around
the closure ofthe UCSD campus that break," Himel said .
on Jan. 19, according to city
The water main that broke
water officials.
that has now been replaced is a
Since there were no students 51-inch pre-stressed concrete tube
living on campus during the which serves UCSD and the northspring break Santa Ana, there western part of the City of San
was a reduction in UCSD's usual Diego, according to Grigsby.
water consumption, averting a Even though only one pipe segment broke, others nearby
crisis.
City officials also said that the showed evidence of corrosion.
broken main which caused the Therefore the city is replacing 14
Jan. 19 incident was fixed on segments of pipe each of which
March 31.
weighs 16 tons. Grigsby said the
The January shortage led to replacement pipe was delivered
the closing of campus for safety starting in early March, at the
and health reasons, according to rate of one section a day.
G.rigsby said the burst water
the UCSD administration. The
shortage affected Third, Muir, main was returned to service on
and Revelle colleges, but not March 31. However, in an earlier
Warren which is on a different interview he cautioned that the
water-main system.
"original target date was midDarly Grigsby, assistant depu- April." Grigsby said one of the
ty director of the systems division water department's main conof the San Diego Department, struction crews had been at the
said, "You all probably had the site every day since the middle of
most trouble during the Santa February. "A 5 I-inch pipeline is
Anas." Grigsby stated that while a big pipeline to be without,"
the city's water supply is set up in Grigsby said.
The break occurred in a canyon
a circular loop so that service can
be provided even if a water line during a windy storm, but "our
breaks, UCSD is at the end of people don't think it was because
the line for the main that supplied of the storm." Grigsby siad. He
water on campus after the Jan. . added that mains often break
19 main rupture.
when rain and changing temperaGeorge Himel, associate vice tures causes ground-shifts, but
Isn't it nice that people who prefer Los Angeles to San francisco
live there?
-Herb caen
I don't have trouble
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-Oscar Wilde
CI9KtJ ARK f lCln
COpy
~phron
fashion is a form of
ugliness so intolerable
tut we have to alter It
evety six months.
"
that water department personnel
did not think that's what happened to this main .
However, the water department doesn't know why it broke.
"A lot of times it's not easy to tell
whya main broke," Grigsby said .
According to Himel, he had
advised UCSD residents not to
usc water from 7 to 9 am in the
morning and from 4 to 6 pm in
the afternoon. "In the meantime
[until the main was fixed] we
have to conserve water," Himel
said.
If there were another campus
water emergency, "I think that
we would probably do it the
same way," said Pat DanylyshynAdams, the Muir resident dean,
referring to emergency measures.
Tim Purpura, a Revelle assistant
resident dean, said, "I think that
we would end up doing a lot of
the things we ended up doing a
lot quicker," when asked what
would happen if the campus again
lost all water pressure while
school was in session.
Himel said that the administration's response to a water
crisis would be quicker. "It's
because we've already got the
contacts made," Himel explained.
Administration responses during the January water crisis include the rental of portable
latrines, the purchase of bottled
drinking water for dormitory residents, and informing the fire
department.
According to Himel, the fire
department was told about the
on-<:ampus water problems so
that their first response units to
an on-<:ampus fire would include
tanker trucks which carry a water
supply.
The tall buldings at Muir have
had continual low-pressure problems since the main broke, in
part because of their height , said
Danylyshyn-Adams. "We've been
experiencing water shortages the
past two months," she said,
mentioning that the water in her
II th floor Tioga apartment stops
flowing every morning at 7 am.
"We're probabl,.y carrying water
to her," Himel said .
"The folks in the rforms arc
being very good about it ," said
Himel about on-<:ampus student
reaction to the water problems.
"What makes it more bearable
for the students is that it's not a
university problem," DanylyshynAdams said .
lID
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MONDAY - FRJDAY 7:45AM - 5:15PM SAnJRDAY IO:ooAM - 4:00PM ClOSED SUNDAYS AND HOLIDAYS WITH EXTENDED HOURS AT 11IE BEGINNING OP EVERY QUARTER
-Gertrude Stein
.....
_-...
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~
6,75
12
Thursday. April 7, /988
Thursday. April 7. /988
13
SPORTS
Triton Tidbits
Tritons use balk, steal
hom·e to beat Biola 8-7
Triton V-ball
falls to VCI
The UCSD men's baseball
team improved its record to
18-6 on a balk and Triton
Gary Fessia's successful steal
of home in the top of eleventh
inning to beat Biola University 8-7 in a nonconference
game in La Mirada, Tuesday.
Starter Mike Morgan went
ten innings to improve his
record t04-\. Rich Tomolonis
came on in relief in the eleventh to earn the save .
The Tritons struck quick
and early in the top of the
first, scoring first on a tworun homerun by Jim Martinez, driving home Thad
Ferre, who had singled and
reached second on a balk.
Biola made a run for the
game in the fourth, sending
nine batters to the plate,
scoring four runs on four hits
and two errors. Morgan and
Tomolonis managed to keep
Loss of second setter Lee leads
to 3-1 defeat
By BRIAN ITOW
G".,dMIt ",rUn
• I
The Triton men's volleyball
team's roller coaster season took
another dive Tuesday night as
they were handed two more losses. First, they lost setter John
Lee to a possible season-ending
ankle injury. Then they lost their
match with 20th ranked UC
Irvine, 15-7, 10-15, 15-3, 15-13.
Early in the first game, Lee
went up to block an Irvine spike
attempt and came down on the
leg of another Triton, turning his
ankle . Since Lee was the only
setter, coach Digger Graybill
suited up; the team was forced to
play without one. And, their
passing game clearly suffered
from the loss. Said Lee, "We
started out okay but we didn't
pass well and we weren't there
emotionally ...
Still, after giving the first game,
the Tritons regrouped and were
able to battle and scrap their way
to a second game victory before
their offensive disorganization
forced errors that caused them to
lose the final two games, and
subsequently, the match, 3-1.
With the injury to Lee, Graybill must now face the prospects
of a setter-less team as they approach the league tournament,
only three games away.
"We started the season with
four setters and now we have
none," Graybill said.
At the beginning of the year,
we lost Jeff Jamile who decided
to pursue other interests and we
red shirted freshman John Childers. Then,just before spring break
Marco Gentzbourger, our starting setter pulled ligaments in his
right ankle, leaving us with just
one player at that· position. We
decided to gamble by suiting up
only one setter. But now with
John (Lee) hurt, I guess we lost
that gamble.
"Without a setter, offensively,
it puts us in a real predicament
and you could see that tonight .
As a result, it made it difficult for
us to play together. We didn't
pass well, we didn't block well
and we let ourselves be affected
the Biola bats silent through
the next six innings, allowing
the Tritons to catch up and
eventually take the lead for
the win.
Golf team sets
course record
On Wednesday, March 30,
the UCSD men's golf team
participated in a dual match
against Pomona-Pitzer at
Mountain Meadows Golf
Course in La Verne. The
Tritons managed to shoot a
new l8-hole course record for
the lowest five-man total
against Pomona-Pitzer in the
history of the course, beating
Pomona 379-431.
Triton Bob Knee earned
medalist honors with a 72.
The other top UCSD scorers
were Dan Young (73), Mike
,
Usual Triton setter Marreo Gentzbourger (no. 8) has been out with a sprained ankle sinee spring break.
emotionally. Still, we battled and
scrapped, even after we lost John.
I was pleased to see the effort.
Our goal is still the same: to win
the league tournament. And, we
can still do it." Graybill said.
But, first, the Tritons must
find another setter. GraybiJI said
he was contemplating activating
John Childers or recruiting on
campus in order to find a replacement for their injured setters. If
they can do it, they may very well
rebound from their latest dive
continued from pale 12
whose team had just takcn an
easy victory from the Tritons,
felt they could do it. "The league
tournament comes down to whoever is playing the best at the
time. Any of the four teams in
our league can win it. Tonight,
UCSD's problems wcrc compounded by the loss of its sctter.
They are a much better team
than they showed and are capable of taking a makeshift lineup and turning it into a winning
team. Come tournament time
they have as good a chance of
wining as anyone else," Ashen
said.
In the tournament, the Tritons
(2-18, 19th in the nation) will be
playing without three key performers. Gentzbourger, Lee, and
Bob Benefield, who was injured
earlier in the scason. Graybill
should have his team ready for a
strong run at the title.
lID
V-ban, pal. 13
Major League Commentary
A S will astound while Twins topple
By J. BERESFORD-HOWE
The AL West is the kind of
division a general manager looks
at and says, " If I can get some
washed up National Leaguer to
DH who can hit 25 home runs,
we might win because everyone
else stinks ."
It's the best balanced division;
last place was o nly 12 games out
last year. Consequently, predicl-
ing the division is a fool's errand.
Hey, I qualify.
Oakland - Everybody, including the management, thinks the
A's have improved themselves
enormously through the acquisitions of Dave Parker (see above)
and Bob Welch . That's true, but
the main improvement will be
realized because they dumped
some major league head cases
like Mike Davis, J oaquin An-
dujar, Jose Rijo and Jay Howell.
The A's have a murderer's row
(albeit with no lead-off hitter)
and the deepest starting five anywhere (Dave Stewart, Welch,
Curt Young, Steve Ontiveros and
Storm Davis).
It should be noted that the A's
are one of the last few teams with
real bleachers . It's $3 to lie out in
the sun and watch the A's march
through the American League.
And they have Henry's on tap.
Seattle - Dick WiIliams is the
best manager in baseball except
Wh itey Herzog . With Mark
Langston ready to win the Cy
Young and Mike Moore expecting a decent year , and with the
power I speed offense Williams
totally inept, but's willing to act
quickly and viciously in the case
of health problems Iikc drug addiction. (George Steinbrenner is
ineligible; his name has been
permanently inscribed on the
trophy and he's scheduled to be
inducted to the Brown and Puckery Hall of Fame this August.)
Give it to Agyros, for cheapness
and extortion .
Kansas City - Kurt Stilwell is
the Royals ' key. If Stilwell can
hit like he did in Cincinnati and
play a decent shortstop, the
Royals will improve . If not, Bret
Saberhagen and Charlie Leibrandt, ground ball pitchers both,
will probably strike to get Stilwell out.
some major gaps that Cookie
Rojas will be at a loss to plug;
Mark McLemore won't make it
as a lead-off hitter, Jack Howell
can't hit lefties and Chili Davis,
for all the money their paying
him, can't hit righties.
Mike Witt will once again be
the main reason to watch the
Angels; he's as ovcrpoweringand
interesting to see as Dwight
Gooden.
Texas - Ruben Sierra is the
best young player in baseball.
Forget Mark McGwire and Jose
Canseco. Forget Wally Joyner
(please) and forget Will Clark
and Cory Snyder and Kevin
Elster and Charlie Hough (on
the verge of his prime as a
The Angels went from first to last in 1987; the Twins
will duplicate in '88,
..
has managed to install , the Mariners will surprise.
1M INTERNATIDNAL
CiDLF CLASSIC
FR. - SUN. APRIL 8-10
BGN-UPB &. DETAIL. AT CANVDNVIEW
UCBC RECREATIDN, )(44D37
Getting Glenn Wilson from
the Phillies for Phil Bradley
wasn't too swift for a long term
strategy, but Wilson will be awesome in right - at least this year.
Jim Presley, Al Davis, and Ken
Phelps will blast the ball around
the Kingdome, too.
Is George Agyros the Biggest
Ass among owners? Well, therc's
Auggie Busch in St. Louis and
Eddie Chiles in Texas, who think
unions are dangerously communistic, used car dealer Marge
Schott in Cincinnati, and Joan
Kroc, who took several years to
realize that Ballard Smith was
George Brett needs to improve
from the lame 25 home runs and
.290 batting average of the last
two years, and the Royals are
doomed if they don't get someone
to pitch in the bullpen.
Manager John Wathan's fourman rotation experiment
put
Saberhagen on the DL in June
and Wathan at the unemployment office in July. Bo Jackson
will strike out 180 limes and
retire in mid-September.
California - Gene Mauch may
not have the temperamcnt for
closc races and close playoff
games, but over the course of a
season, he's a genius aljuggling a
line-up to hide weaknesses. Without Mauch, the Angell will have
will
knuckleballer). Sierra can run,
hit for power, hit for average,
keep his on-base-percentage
high, throw and is intensely
competitive.
Hough will survive the balk
clampdown, and Bobby Witt is
on the verge of beinl a real
pitcher. What happened to Greg
Harris, anyway? He can't even
make the Cleveland staff now.
Chicago - It has been widely
noted that the Sox rotation won
a total of not quite thirty games
last year. The starters will surprise, however. Jack McDowell
will be Rookie of the Ycar,
Rickey Horton will blossom in
his new role and Jerry Ruess will
..........U,,.... 5
-By Jonatban Scbreter
V-ball
and ride the roller coaster back
to the top with a championship
at the league tournament which
takes place at UCSD on April 22
and 23.
UC Irvine coach Bill Ashen,
let
Reinhardt (77), Gary Bong
(78) and Sharm Newbold (79).
On Monday, April 4, the
Tritons participated in thc
annual UC Irvine Invitational
Tournament at Big Canyon
Country Club in Newport
Beach.
The Tritons finishcd 15th in
a field of 17 with a 671 team
total. Fritz Reber turned in
the top score for UCSD,
shooting a 165 over the 36
holes.
Tom Cheiffo of Cal Statc
University, Northridge was the
tournament's top golfer with
a 147. Mike Suckling from
UC Irvine finished second with
a 148 and Dan Mahoney won
a three-way playoff to take
third place with a 149. UC
Irvine finished first in the tournament, finishing with a team
total of 609.
A
T
T
E
N
T
I
o
and Sports Injuries
• Headaches
• Student Payment Plans
• Sports Massage. Neck Tension/Stress
• Back/Neck Pain • Complimentary Consultation
Dr, Keith Jeffers The Running Doctor
7770 Regents Rd.
In Von's Shopping Center
451-7770
FULL TIME STUDENTS
WE HAVE EXCELLENT
AUTO INSURANCE RATES
FOR QUALIFIED STUDENTS
call
279.. 5955
D'Agnessa Insurance Agency
7 84 1 Balboa Ave. Ste.
San Diego, CA 92 I
215
I I
IlelpblCdtt.
Association for Retarded Citizens
N
Muir Graduating Senlon
Spring Quarter 1988 and
Summer Session 1988
Students planning to graduate Spring, 1988 are
now being seen for Rnal Degree Check
.!\ppointments. D.lldlln. for filing to
,rlldu• • Spring Is April 1S. You must
schedule your appointment by this date.
Applicants tor Summer Session, 1988 graduation
who wish to have their name appear in the
commencement program lIIull complet.
I tqulrecl p."erwork by April ZI and
SCI ~ule a Final Degree Check appointment.
••
PI_., make your IIppolntment In the Muir
Ae&"emle Advising OtIIee. HaSS Z126.
..
WIllI If . . DOII'T GO
nno 1111l1li SCIOOL
. . . CIIOICI?
'elldllne for scheduling Summ...
IIppolntment Is June 3.
DON'T DELAY
Jeffers Chiropractic:
Experience with us the fun and excitement of
learning to Hang Glide on the sand dUnes of
Cantamar, Mexico. All equipment and
transportation from UCSD are provided. Class
size is limited and reservations are required.
NEXT CLASS BEGINS: April 24th.
4760 Clalremont Mesa Blvd.
Son Diego. CA 92117
(619)277-6744
GROUP
DISCOUNTS
AVAIlABLE
450-9008
..
...
71rurJdIlY. April 7. /988
71ruwlGy, AprIl 7, 1988
15
SPORTS
Baseball
Continued from pace 12
be the second coming of Tommy
John.
Kenny Williams is the only
decent young Sox player. and
Carlton Fisk will whine through
one last season.
The most interesting battle in
Comiskey will be over a possible
Sox move to St. Petersburg.
Attendance will be low because
of the ongoing terribleness of the
Sox combined with the main
freeway exit to Comisky being
closed for the next two years.
Good luck.
•
Minnesola - The Angels went
from first to last in 1981; the
Twins will duplicate in '88. They
have one decent staning pitcher
(Frank viola), no catchers. no
bullpen (Reardon is massively
over-rated) and Gagne / Lombardozzi is a weak, vinually immobile double play combination.
Kirby Puckett will decline after
a career year, Kent Hrbek will
enter a rehab program after he
passes 350 pounds and Gary
Gaetti will be dosed with 100 hits
of LS 0 after he is mistaken for a
laboratory rat. He will miss half
the season but catch the Grateful
Dead summer Midwest swing .
B.J. sf
Guardian
Sports Trivia
Quiz
This week's questions
I . What four teams were in
last year's Final Four tour- '
nament and who was the
winner?
2. Who is the new head coach
of the Los AnJteles Raiders?
3. What city is the site of the
1992 Olympics?
4. What USFL football team
did real estate millionaire,
Donald Trump, own?
5. On what day did baseball
spring training "unofficially"
open for the San Dieso
Padres?
UCSD
Student
Special
TO ALL UCSD STUDENTS
1$///1~
Have You Thought About Becom1n, A Teacher?
The Teacher Education Program
North Conference Room. Student Center
Learn what it takes to become an elementary or
secondary school teacher at UCSD.
If you are unable to attend. call 534-2957
ITwoWestern
for
: Bacon Cheeseburgers e
I
I
*1 14
:
I
I
Coapoa apba May 7. 1988. One offer per coupon.
I
•
One coupon per customer per visit.
•
I~~~~~~m
I
-
I
Pruentthts coupon and rec~lv~ two W~stem Bacon Ch~~Hburiers for S2.s9. I
• Offer vaUd at 6788 MIramar Id.
•
for more Infonnatlon.
52 59 .
•••••••••••••••••••••••••
invites all students to an information meetlng on
Tuesday. Aprtl12 at 3:00 p.m.
-
6. What country has earned
the most medals in the Winter
Olympic Games? (Bonus : How
many have they earned
through 1988?)
1. Who is Eddie Edwards?
8. Who managed the Milwaukee Brewers to their only
World Series appearance?
9. Who is the commissioner
to the Nat ional Football
League?
10. Who is the only pitcher in
majo~ league baseball history.
to pItch back-to-back nohitters?
•
discount. Price does not include tax.
~Carl Karcher Enterprises. Inc. 1988
• We still Believe in Old-Fashioned American Values.
•
®
I
carl's Jr. I
•••••••••••••••••••••••••
UNIVE~SIT'" 1j()()I\ST()~E '
The Moose Is Loose
When it comes to
better grades,
Schaumls makes the
difference.
at the TRITON
Friday 6:30-8:30 .
THE WILD CARDS
Schaum's Outline Series
Today's #1 choice in study aids,
offering BASIC THEORY plus hundreds of SOLVED PROBLEMS
ACCOUNTINO
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MicroetOnomic TI1eoIY. 21ed.
COMPUT....
Compuler GrlClhlCs
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Essenllll Compullf Mathema~cs
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Prooramming W1If1 BuIC. lilCl.
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EIec!ric Circuils. 2Jed.
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Thursday. April 7. /988
CI......... ~.,ntll.lOkIln ISWOI'dIncN ........ 'rile ..... per IS
words Is .1 for .......... " for
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Guercllen. UCSD. "016.... Jone.
CA 92091.
Attn: Rev. minorityundergradsl Rev. Third
World Alliance Alumni Dinner on Thurs.
April 14 from 6-9 pm at IntI. Crr. Please
RSVP by Fri 4/8. contact Marlene. 5437653 or leave msg./4/7/
The Physicians Committee for Responsible
Medicine is o~ring a Medical Student
Summer Fellowship Program for medical
and veterinary students to conduct supervised independent projects critically evaluating animal research and non-animal
methodologies. sa00-5900 per month for
each of the two months of the fellowship.
For more information: p.o . Box 6322,
waShington, D.e. 20015, /301/ 493-4652.
/4/28/
UCSD tundraising campaign is seeking
bright, articulate, dedicated students to
work on campaign. Make 55.50-SIO.00
per hour working flexible evening hours
in our on campus location. Call for more
information, 587-1589bet\llleen 2-5 pm.
/4/7/
Telemarket in Real Estate. No selling. S5
per hour S500 bonus. 3 blocks from
campus. Set own hours from 9 to 9. One
or two hours per day. 457-1 976 Carl.
/4/11/
Delivery drivers flexible hrs free meals S7-8
per hour. Shift supervisors 25-30 hours
per week 55 per hour call Pizza Hut
deliverty 481-8695. /4/11/
The 10th Annual Revelle Almost Anything
Goes Tournament will be held Sat, April 9
from II am to 4 pm on Revelle Field. Don't
miss our on all the funl Come and compete
for your res. halll/4/7/
Announcements
Friendship building through open, honest
and intentional communication. Supportive confrontation resolves inner conflict
and fosters personal growth. Priceless
free rap group seeks participants. 5811310. /6/9/
Tacotime 59¢ tacos and free drink refills at
time of purchase. Taste the real difference.
/6/9/
want to be on the Muir College Council7
Elector petitions available now in the
Muir Dean's office. Deadline is April II, by
9am. /4/7/
want to gain the competitive edge 7 Learn
to communicate at every level. Visit the
lXliversity Toastmaster meeting - Tuesdays at 5'30-7:00 pm. Rm 111A/Chancellor
complex/. /4/7/
Ufe Sciences Student Organization springs
ahead I First mtg: fabulous t-shirts available. Discuss interests, eat, and drink with
others interested in Ufe Sciences. International Center Conference Room 4 pm
April 8. /4/7/
us
Grants funds ideas I For more information come to our worteshops, Tues Apr.
5 at 1:00 and Thurs Apr. 7 at 1:001/4/7/
Deadline for UJS Reg. forms - Fri, 4/8
Don't miss outl For mor~ info, call 5342521./4/7/
Note: WS Oneg Shabbat on 4/8 will
include a potluck dinner. call John Cox~
to find out what to bring. /4/7/
Surf Club meeting tonltel 8 pm PH103 all
club team members must attend. /4/7/
San Diego Mortgage Bankers Assoc. are
looking for summer interns to study with
mortgage bankers. Interns will receive
S2oo/week. Deadline to apply is April
22nd. For more info contact ASIa in the
Student Center. /4/11/
Get involved for your last quarter. Volunteer for a fun staff at ASIa and gain
valuable resume and business skills. If
interested contact ASIa in the Student
Center above the game room. /4/1I/
A business publication needs spring interns for ad sales and magazine production. Contact ASIa if interested in the
Student Center. /4/11/
Andrews &Bloom Group need interns for
marteeting research project. Management
Science & Econ majors pref~rred . If interested, contact ASIa in the Student Center
or call 534-4689. /4/11/
Win a free trip to San Francisco, a truise to
catalina, a cruise to Ensenada, and much,
much more. Come to the Getaway Dance
at Revelle Commons on Friday, April 15
and see what it's all about I The fun starts
at 9 pm. /4/14/
For Sale
Books for sale I Math 2EA. Anton, S30.
Ames 11. Ven V1ack, 5th ed., 530. Both in
great condition and both aver 540 in
bookstore. Call Todd at 457-4335 or
534-6580.
I BR in ~ Jolla, will go FHA. Vaulted clngs
in a brght spacious unit w/fplce, Igs wk-in
closet, huge deck overlooking pool & spa
in gardent setting inciudes wash-d~r,
retrig . Only a7,500. Agt 488-9155. /4/7/
Wanted
Co-ed camp in northeastern Pennsytvania
has openings for: Waterfront staff, including WSls and Sailing; I..1nd sports
staff, including Soccer, Basketball, Softball,
and Tennis; instructors for Rocketry, Ceramics, Dance, and Archery; and Pioneering
staff, including Trip staff and Ropes
Challenge Course. Positions also available
for Nurses, Office staff, and Dining Room
staff. On campus i ntervi~ws to be held on
April 20. For information, write G. lustig,
60 W. 66th St., 15E, New York, N .Y.
10023. /4/7/
PART TIME : Dependable individual
needed to prepar~ breakfast and dinner
five days a weex tcv ·"riter. Ught housekeeping and shopPIng on open schedule.
Good pay. At the Villa 1..1 Jolla Apts at
Gilman and Villa 1..1 Jolla Drive. Interested 7
Please call George at 450-0444. /4/14/
Wanted immediately120 ambitious people
to share solid business opportunity. can
earn S2,000/mo. easyl Career potential
for right person. Excellent training program. Call Mr. Cohen 528-1181 or 5870392./4/7/
Attention students II Cleaning seNice
looking for honest and reliable workers.
Set own hourts, earn extra money. Must
have own car and insurance. 55/hr and
up. 435-5155. /4/7/
Restaurant at U shores hiring pit, no exp
necessary. Rex hrs, free meal, close to
UCSD. Kevin 454-8038. /4/7/
Summer CRUISESHIP J08S appiy nos
466-7151. /4/7/
SURFERSI Full D-Nelll wetsuit. men's
small. Used only onc~1 S90 obo. Call Bob
453-6622. /4/111
83 Mercury lynx 5-speed, Pioneer cassette
AM/FM, Ale. new tires, recent tune-up,
xlnt [email protected] 53,600 call 450-3172. /4/11/
1975 Toyota Corolla, run great. looks
awful 5400 must sell. Call Julia 455-0362.
/4/71
78 Toy Celica 5 sp, brand new battery,
xlnt condition I Runs great SI5OO/ best call
QJang 453-5044. /4/18/
Schwinn super sport 10 speed man's bicycle SI20.00. 457-0618. /4/7/
68 vw bug runs greatl Needs cosmetic
worte must selll S750 581-1830 call now.
/4/7/
Must sell 78 Datsun 810 wagon. Has a
280 zx engine and over S800 of work
done over last year. A steal at S650, or
best offer over 5600. 453-3373. PaUl.
/4/11/
Physiology lab dissecting kit, includes
fine-tipped scissors, still new condition.
S28.00, 534-2519 Robert. /4/7/
1985 Yamaha R2350 good condition with
extras SI500 obo. call 453-9771. /4/11/
Scooter: 1986 Yamaha Rilla 200- brand
new and red hot'" Only 1,000 miles. Call
452-3935. /4/18/
Surfboard for sale: 6' 3" moonlight thruster
excellent condition no dings must sell
S1500bo. Mark 259-6984. /4/11/
CSO Program NOW HIRINGI6 openings
CSO evening shift 5 pm-1 :3O am 4 openings - drivers of a shuttle van. Call Beth/Diane for more info x43644 M-F 8- 3 see
also career Center. /4/7/
looking for someone qualified but cheap
to french braid my hair. Please call 4536059. /4/11/
1iIdeo,,"
Housing
Have your own room in a clean, quiet
Woodlands condo I 5315 + 1/3 util. Pool.
jacuzzi, near bus, 15 min. by bike to UCSO.
Available nowl call 546-8322 eves. /4/7/
~ad, S~I
The Best Shows In Town are at
Subletting your apartment this summer7
Local law firm seeking summer housing
for law students. Call 699-2745 with
details. /4/7/
Retired professor recent U. Hawaii needs
house nr. UCSD. Care plants pets. Flex.
time. reas. 433-1191. /4/11/
Condo for rent - 1..1 Jolla Colony, 2 bdrms,
pool.jacuzzi, wid, micrC>-Ollm, 690-5147,
477-9709. /5/5/
Need 1-2 non-smoking fem rmmates to
share large UC condo-fully furnished,
balcony, pool. d/w, micro., \/Cr. avail. 4-1
5400 or S200 /for 2/ + share of util. 2778414 eve 7-10./4/7/
Speak Spanish. Cuernavaco I..1nguage
School. the place to learn it. five hours
each day. Cultural actMties, field trips and
excursions . Family living. Apdo 4-254
62430 Cuernavaca, Mexico. /73/15-4643. /6/9/
Mom's Mums is located right on campus
& supplies corsages & boutinieres for
semi-formals MWF 12-41 /4/18/
Battle of the Bandsl Sign up in Revelle
Provost's Office. 5250 first prizel/4/7/
Grab your skatesl RPB needs roller-skating
waitresses for April drive-in moviel Details
laterl/4/7/
1..1 Jolla Colony 2B Ixurious - new roommate needed 385 call 552-0151 includes
pool. washer d~r, microwave, etc. /4/1I/
Come out and see what an Honor fraternity is all about. A chance to build friendships that last a Hfetime. Drop by the
Sigma Nu booth to find out more. /4/7/
Female roommate wanted to share master
bedroom in fully furnished condo. 10 min
walk to UCSD; pool, jacuzzi, dishwasher
5300/ month +'.4 utilties. call April 5350329. /4/18/
What do James Dean, Harrison Ford, Bob
Barteer, and many others have in common 7
The Legion of Honorl Rush Sigma Nul
/4/7/
Short term housing in Mesa avail from 4/9
to 5/9 rent S202.5O near university call
Yuan 452- 7909. /4/7/
San Diego Intercollegiate Indoor Soccer
Tournament. UCSD takes on USD and
winner plays SDSU for the championship.
Info at soccer booth in quad.
Need a graduate student or undergraduate over 25 to share 2-bed apartment in Mesa avail 4/10 452-7909. /4/7/
Jeff /Snuggle Bunny/, Happy Passover. I
WlN u, I WlN u, I WIN ul JW /Snookums/
/4/7/
wanted: Roommate to share 3 bedroom
house in Del Mar. House is furnished :
washer/d~r, microwave, dishwasher,
garage, etc. S330 per month+' jl uti Is. Call
Allison 792-1132. /4/11/
You missed Malibu, but the Imported
Yeast and Barley Party is Friday and The
Turtle Races are Saturday. Rush Sigma
Alpha Mu fraternity... rush SAMI /4/7/
Two roommates wanted I 4 bedroom
condo, 10 minutes from campus. Own
room, fully furnished, cable, in-house
washer/dryer, the works. S285 +~ utilities. Call Steve P. at 271-6811. /4/28/
Share/Rent/Sublet 5/15-9/15 . Nonsmoker pfd. Dave/Sean /303/ 938-1823
eve. Mom /415/646-6511 eve. Collect OK.
/4/18/
Lost and Found
Earmarte microphone lost in HSS 2250
/3/4/. Iffound return to Disabled Student
Services 534-4382/reward./ 14/7/
Penonals
Pi Phis: we're really looking forward to our
"softball" game this Sat. See you there.
The Phi Delts. /4/7/
Hey runners and walkersl Come to Revelle
College's 5 K fun run on Sat. April 23. 8 am
on the Plaza. sa inlcudes Tee-shirt. refreshments, and raffle entry. /4/7/
Win a day cruise to Ensenadal Come to
the Getaway Dance Friday AprIl 15 at 9
pm in the ~IIe cafeteria. 51 admission.
/4/14/
\Xf1n a trip to San Francisco for twol The
Getaway Dance Friday April 15 at 9 pm in
~lIe Cafeteria. Admission 51- Come see
what It's all about. /4/141
\Xh1ich dorm is the best dorm at Revelle 7
Find out this Sat., April 9 from 11 am to 4
pm at Revelle FIeld. when the Revelle
Resi~nt lJran's offta sponsors the Tenth
Annual ~t Anything Goes competitionl Don't miss outl/4/7/
PIglet: 2 tlx to zoo in exchange for 7 - 117
/4/7/
Katrin Mack : Do you at least know when
your mom is leaving77/4/7/
Afraid to speak to groups7 Teach your
butter11ies to fly in formation. University
Toastmasters will show you how. Tuesdays-5:3O pm-7:00 pm RM 111A /Chancellor Complex/. /4/7/
P.K. - AFter many sun-drenched days
and fun-filled nights, bet you'r~ dying to
go home I Come back soon- your cuz,
Niki, and your other cuz.
Matt- you are such a stud - too bad I paid
M .I.T. to accept you. 0tI \/veIl- everyone
can't be like me. Love, Sis.
lrsli - Just wanted to let you know how
happy I am \/ve met. Here's hoping everything works out for the bestl (Besides. \/ve
had the extra spacel/ -J.
0tI I wish I was an Oscar ~ llveiner...
cuz then I could have big buns and my
butt wouldn't get sore in fJfterson Hall.
Maynard and Skinner; what's that on
your head7 A wig 71 I love youl -Jenlfer
Services
Word processing - reports. theses. ~
tIons. resumes etc. laser printer -Student
rates. 484-5996.
Tutoring - a proven method towards
better grades-specializing in BicH:hemPtTysics-MathGenerai StudIes. Reasonable
rates - flexible m . We can help you cram
for exams - for appt or Info call Leland •
259-2028. (4/71
mINerTheses, Ph. Os, MAs, Term. All
forrnaU. Rush~~IE 931-9596./6/9)
FreeUl Haircuts for people willing to
change their styte. For more infocall Aurel
Salon 459-0200. 14/7/
Word processing - Resumes are my ~
cialty. Papers, equatJons, too. Laser printer. 484-5996. '/5/31/
IDEO GALLERY
NEW RELEASES: PRINCESS BRIDE
• FLOWERS IN THE ATTIC. INNER SPACE
• WISH YOU WERE HERE. DANCERS
• Huge selection of Movies. No Deposit Required to r qualified
renters • No Credit Card Necessary • Movies. Video
Recorders/TVS and Cameras for sale or rent
Bring This Ad Mond.-y thru Thund.-y to Rent
One Movie and Get a Second Rental for FREEl
Coupon Good Mon -Thurs Only E)(j.Jlfes 4/14/t:l8
- - - - - 8 8 4 3 VILLA LA JOLLA
Ralph's Center between Crown Books and Osco Drugs
Hours Sun - Thurs II am-8 pm/Fn -Sat II am- IO pm
_l
DR.-----
45---1554
V"'"
/6/30/
HAIRCUTS
by Susanne & Charmaine
Wome n 517 (reg. $25)
Men 514 (reg. 19)
Haircut & Highlight 550 (reg. $70)
Haircut & Perm 550 (reg. $70)
r O,. Ul'IJ(1I11 11111'111 , {l1t'ull' I all 457·2930.
8950 "ilia I.a Jolla Dr., S It . 2120, I.a Jolla
(hl'llI lId f-.1 { (/f"(1 rill ('I If, C/( /'(/\ \ rall/{I )
ZETA BETA TAU
REVELLE STUDENTS:
PRESENTS
~SENSATIO
ALLY ENTERTAINING...THEMOST
ENJOYABLE MOVIE OF THE YEAR! " "F" 'URk ~(~..~~~
GET
i
a
is
i
::
::
INVOLVED I
I
=
~
!
i
I
I
Join one of Revelle 's committees! Some
committees review Revelle's general
i
i
II
i
education requirements, are involved in
judiciary matters, do programming, and
more!
=
::
5
=
=
::
::
Revelle also needs campus-wide
i
::
~==___
Stunnongl
s~ _
Sheen wtn IItonl,h you
. MIONe! Douglas and Chari.e
-Jeffrey Lyons
S"..1r Pre,,,.ws
II
I
Tremendous' E.cltlng ~ Oliver Slone surpasses hiS work In
PMtOOf'l whh
W."
Street •
PLACE: USB 2722
PRICE: $2.50
- Pia Lindstrom
N8C· TV. New York
FMl1*'ed _
TWO SHOWS
. very , _ ond a/W8ysenleft..ning'
- Steve Kmetko
CBS· TV los Angeles
WHEN: Tues. April 19th
TIMES: 7:30 pm &9:30 pm
TICKETS AVAILABLE AT THE
BOX OFFICE AT THE STUDENT CENTER
::
representatives for parking, housing,
alcoholic and substance abuse
::
i
i
committees and many more!
i::
Pick up an application and a list of
available positions from the Revelle
I
::
::
=
::
Provost' Office today. Applications due
in Provost's Office on April 18.
i
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55
5
i
•
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO SCHOOL OF MEDICINE
NOAH'S
ARK-
A Gathering for
Hea'th Preprofessiona'
and Professiona' Students
SlTURDlY, APRIL 23, 19888:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
GIntn AudItorIum, Room 1105, BIlle ScIence Bldg., ucso School of MIdIcInt
Topics to be covered:
• Public He., EducaIionIConvnunity and Famiy Medicine/Nursing
• Allied Health Careers • Presentations by Undergraduate Student Organizations
• MecIcaI Student Issues • Cross-ClMurai Pathways: AMedical Education Program
• Pharmacy, Osteopathy, • Medical $parish TenninoIogy Class
Dentistry
• Health Professions Mnission Revue
Regl.tratlon Fee:
$I (IorUlch)
Mall regI.tration ffHI to:
FREE SNEAK PREVIEW
APRIL 18, MONDAY, 8:00 P.M.
MANDEVILLE AUDITORIUM
FREE PASSES AT NOON TODAY!
UCSD BOX OFFICE
FIRST COME. FIRST SERVED
FREE SAMPLES
PRESENTED BY UNIVERSITY EVENTS l STUDENT ACTIVITIES
Such WIiIrns
AssisIInI DiI!cIor,
u.s.Propn
M~l , UCSO School 01 MediciIt
LJJoIa,CAI2III3
For
more Information
conlM:t:
Mary Bush
Dnclor,
u.s.Propn
(619)~170
~~~~~~~~~~~J
The Arts and Entertainment Section
Volume 18
April 7, 1988
Number 1
Foxlights ''BrightLights''
by eva
WODg
art. editor
You read the book, "Bright Lights, Big City," a week ago . You didn't like it much
because it was written in the second person, and since the nameless protagonist is a male, it
was hard for you, a female, to see yourself as a "him." Also, when you read the book, you
didn't relate to the way the protagonist lived his life.
It is now just past 10 am, Monday, March 21. You are heading north on the 405
towards Beverly Hills. You begin to wonder if you will make it to the preview screening of
"Bright Lights, Big City" that is scheduled to begin in half an hour. You wonder if you will
like the movie more than the book. While you liked the ending, you found the rest of the
book depressing. You seriously hope you will like the movie more than the book .
You are also a little bit nervous because you are drawing a blank on questions to ask Jay
Mcinerney, who wrote both the book and the movie's screenplay. A question that is
gnawing at you is whether or not Michael J. Fox can transcend his usual role as a perennial
high school student.
Can Fox portray a believable Jamie Conway (the name the protagonist is given in the
movie version of "Bright Lights, Big City"), a man who is addicted to cocaine and on the
edge of destruction due to living his life in the fast lane?
It is surprising how closely this movie follows the book, since movie adaptations
usually prostitute what is presented in novels. During the press conference McInerney
stated that "Bright Lights, Big City" went through 17 different screenplays (not all written
by McInerney). The reason that the movie resembles the book is that the original
screenplay, which Mcinerney wrote, was finally the version decided upon.
In one of the other screenplays which wasn't written by Mcinerney, Fox's character was
to be a chocoholic rather than addicted to cocaine. Mcinerney stated, "it was chocolate
down to the last week" before snoqting since there was no script the first week "Bright
Lights, Big City" was in production.
Mcinerney stated that one of the reasons he was fired from writing the screenplay three
and a half years ago was due to the heavy usage of cocaine in the storyline, which he saw as
an important element of the movie. He stated, "Cocaine was a metaphor implying false ·
values . . . it is a mindless consumer good, which is only perceived to have value."
Though the movie adapt ion resembles the book, the movie leads to a better
appreciation of the book. It is kind of ironic, but it is Fox's believable portrayal of the
unhappy Jamie that makes " Bright Lights, Big City" work.
Fox's portrayal of Jamie , a man who has yet to come to terms with his wife (Phoebe
Cates) leaving him and the death of his mother, (Diane Wiest), shows how someone could
easily fall prey to living a certain type of lifestyle as a way to escape from misfortunes of
one's past. Almost anyone could be lured into the "bright lights" of living in the fast lane
of a "big city."
Through Fox, the viewer can relate to the way Jamie lives his life. In watching Fox's
actions, Jamie's anguish is felt. He mechanically works as a fact checker at an established
New York magazine, while his real goal is to be a fiction writer. There are quite a few tense
scenes which take place between Jamie and higher ups.
His best friend, Tad Allagash (Kiefer Sutherland), believes the swinging night life is the
cure for Jamie's unhappiness. The lifestyle Tad has introduced Jamie into is filled with
women, drinking and drugs. After losing his job, due to the fast lifestyle he has become
accustomed to, Jamie realizes that living his life in this way leads to more anguish than
relief from the pain he is already feeling.
See BIG CITY, pale I
-~-
... ... ..
=~~=~
goings-on __~ with special guest Hugh
Masekela in concert on Tuesday, April 12 at the Bacchanal.
To the world, Makeba is a
symbol of the struggle of her
people: the oppressed of South
Africa. Maeskela is a South
African-born trumpeter and
vocalist. His recent Warner
Bros. LP, entitled Tomorrow
demonstrates a socio-political
consciousness which has
informed Masekela's artistry
from the beginning. For more
information, call 560-8022.
Prudence Carlson, a former
contributing editor at Art in
America and currently a New
York-based free-lance writer
and art critic, will lecture at
the La Jolla Museum of Contemporary Art's Cost Room
on Tuesday, April 12 at 7:30
pm. Her topic is "The ' Post
Modern' Chimera, The
Weight of History, and a New
Symbolism." Carlson is the
author of catalogue essays on
John Mclaughlin and Sigmar
Polke and her writings have
Nationall y-acclaimed guitar
also appeared in Artforum.
flatpicker,
Doc Watson, will
Admission is free to museum
perform
in
concert on Sunmembers, UCSD students and
day,
April10atthe
La Paloma
faculty; $2 . 50 for stuTheater,
located
at
the
corner
dents/ seniors; and $3 for
of
Highway
101
and
0
Street
non-members.
in Encinitas. The show will
begin at 8 pm. Connoisseurs
of acoustic music rank Watson among the world's best
Direct from Paul Sitnon's flat-pickers. Tickets may be
" Graceland Tour," Miriam obtained by calling 436-4030,
Makeka, "The Empress of or any Teleseat outlet,
African Song," will appear 283-SEAT.
• • •
The prize-winning Takacs
String Quartet of Budapest
will perform at 8 pm Saturday, April 9, in UCSD's
Mandeville Center Auditorium. The program will be
Haydn, Quartet in 0 Major,
Op. 76, No.5; Bartok, Quartet
No.6 and Brahms, Quartet in
C minor. Tickets for the concert are $15 for general admis.sion, and are available from
the UCSD Box Office and
TicketMaster outlets. For
complete ticket information
call 534-4559.
• • •
Discounting AIt'f
by eabrina youman.
hiatu. writer
It is a given that students are
broke. It is also given that students need to be entertained.
This is because affordable
entertainment reduces the
stress induced by the highly
structured and demanding
routine of the quarter system,
with its constant flux of midterms and finals. The San
Diego Theatre League is
attempting to alleviate both
problems through the ARTS
TlX box office, which offers
half-price tickets the day of
the event. The discount tickets
offer starving students a rare
night out on the town.
Circle, near the main entrance
to Robinson's department
store.
The new Horton Plaza location will increase public
awareness of the theatre
industry by making tickets and
information more obtainable.
The Times ARTS TIX Ticket
Center is expected to become
a major beacon for the arts
downtown by offering affordable tickets.
To date, ARTS TIX has
sold over 33,000 tickets for
over 70 performing arts and
entertainment groups in San
Diego and Los Angeles. The
new discount ticket location
will increase these numbers at
a minimum cost to the San
Diego League of Theatres. The
overall buildling cost of the
new center is over $96,000
and will be covered by a
$25,000 challenge grant from
the Centre City Development
Corporation and a $75,000
donation from the Los Angeles
Times. The site for the booth
was donated by the Hahn
Company, the developer of
Horton Plaza, and many other
major retail centers.
Until the projected opening
of the Horton Plaza location in
July 1988, the tickets will be
available Tuesday through
The ARTS TIX booth also
doubles as a TicketMaster
location with full-price
advance sale tickets to all
LA. '1 Wall o{Voodoo, who scored TicketMaster events. The
bi~ with " Mexican Radio" and
booth has been operating since
just finished up their second world June 1986 in the lobby of the
tour and recOf'ded a live album, Spreckles Theatre, which is
" The Ugly Americans Live in located downtown on BroadAustralia" will appear on Fri· way, between Firstand Second
day, April 8 at Rio's located at Avenues. The San Diego
4258 W. Point -l.oma BlOO. FOf'
- - -- - - - - - - - - - - -- - - - - - - - - - - , more information; call 225-9559. Theatre League is increasing
its efforts to make the performing arts accessible by relocating the Times ARTS TlX
Ticket Center to Horton Plaza.
Haircut - Plen
Every four years the Man- The new site will be on the
•
Women - $14.50
deville Gallery at UCSD pres- ground level of the Broadway
lTlX.pqe5
•
(Styling extra)
ents an exhibition featuring
faculty members of the visual
•
Perm - lst Time Only
arts department. This quadReg. $75 (inc. Cut If Style)
:
rennial show will feature the
•
~
(Long hair slightly extra)
•
works of approximately 20
UCSD artists, from April 6
•
txpIres ' / 1/88
•
through May 15. A reception
will be open to the general
public from 6-8 pm, Friday,
April 8. The Mandeville
W~come back to schooll w~ at Assorted Vlnyf are back too,
•
orl:": M-r !(}.gap: .,
Gallery is open from noon to
with
mor~ music trivia to keep you from paying attention in that
•
SAT ~6 Pm· SUI'I.11-5 PM
5 pm Tuesday through Sun~arly morning dass that you always rail asleep In. w~ alreacty
•
La Jolla Village Square - JIIay Co. Jllall
day.
announced the winners and answers In the last Issue of hi. .
•
• • •
• • • • (With this Ad only) . . . . . . . . .
of wlnt~ quan~, so we don't have any vital Information to pass
your way. The possible exception Is a quick reminder to you to
bring those answers by AssotIed Vinyl before noon on Monday
SUMMER EMPLOYMENT
The "No Booze Cruise"
so that you, too, can have a chance a pick out an album of your
aboard the Bahia Belle will sail
OPPORTUNITIES
choice (58.98 list price or less). Good lucid
during Alcohol Awareness
Environmental consulting firm is seeking students with expererience
Week from 9:45 am until 1
I. In t~ original Echo and the Bunnymen lineup, who was
in architecture, mechanical engineering, civil engineering, environpm, Sunday, April 10. The
"Echo7'
mental engineering or construction for summer employment. Employship boards at the Bahia Resort
2. Who are The Dukes of Stratospher~7
ment will include training and accreditation by EPA. Projects
3. Who are the Bubblemen7
Hotel, 998 W. Mission Bay
throughout California.
4. Who beatEMsCost~1o to the 197BBest NewArtlstGrammy7
Drive. Live pop and jazz, per5. By what ~ did U2 open up their own stadium shows
formed by Mitch Manker and
• Tralnlnl provided
wlth7
George Emerson, both recov• Euellent compensation
ering alcoholics, will perform
• EP A accreclltatlon
during the cruise. For infor• Potential for permanent employment
following hIMUI l~.
mation and reservations,
• Useful experience
·ant). UCSD studrnts. faculty and stair
'All ~ul~ must be in ~ Guard...
may ~to!r. WI~s will be asIc..:! to show
ollice by 4 pm Monday. four days after ~
which
are
$15
per
person
If interested in this summer work, telephone Marcia N. Levin, R.N.,
~r UCSD /.0. cards to claim a pri~.
i~ dato! lerttri~ may tle malted to ~
including brunch. phone Vista
CiuMdIM. B-Oib. LA .kJlta. CA 920931.
with resume or informal notes on your background and work
'Entrl~ should inclUd!! namI!. addr~.
to!iephOne nulT'lber. major and ~wn .
'WI~ and prill! willtle printed in ~
Hill Foundation at 563-1770.
experience at CTL Environmental Services, 24404 S. Vermont Ave.,
~IUDEIYT
•• $10
: $ 'Z 7 50
:
SPECIAL.
:
'~5'~ ~~
4 1700:
55-
•
• • •
--
#307, Harbor City, CA 90710, tel. (213) !!30-S006.
You dOD't have to clip mto
your colleJe fund to e~oy
Jreat frozen YOJurl
Jlia fJIogurf J1lfair
has the lowest
prices in town!!!
1030 Torrey PInes Rd . at HerschellaJ'"
1774 Gamet Ave.. PadIc IuQ
w. .. ~.., ....... ,.....
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2
hiatus April 7 198B
•••
'~I
--compiled by eva
WOR.
S50 Mono S50
Have you had
EARlY $200-$600
~~============================================================~r.~.~I~to~r~~
Stand and Deliver stands strong
by robert leone
hiatw writer
What kind of film gets
funded by ARCO, the National Science Foundation, the
Ford Foundation, and the
Corporation for Public
Broadcasting?
No, it's not an instructional
film about atomic structure or
a documentary about giant
sqUid. It's "Stand and
Deliver," and extremely unhyped docu-drama about a
high school math teacher who
took an L.A. barrio high
school class from knowing
how to make "exact change,"
to the Advanced Placement
Calculus test.
It's tough to write a dramatic screenplay in which the
climax is taking a test, but writers Ramon Menendez and
Tom Musca (also director and
producer respectively) have
done a competent job of
molding the true story of Jaime
Escalante and his calculus class
into a filmable script.
The actors are also effective
in their roles. Edward James
Olmos, who portrays Lt. Castillo on "Miami Vice," is brilliant as Escalante, a man who
took a job teaching computers
to high school students only
Edward James Olmol and Lou Phillips appear in "Scand and Deli...er."
to find out the school didn 't
have any computers.
earn you $50 at the same
time. For additional
details call Ms. Vawter at
at UCSD Medica' Center
participating In
Asthma Research
(asthmatics only)
ZZ~17JJ.
CALL: 54J-5414 or 562-9155
_ __
_ _ _ ..52-1766 _ _ _•
.auJUICI
- . r ueHI'I, _
Edward James Olmos.
UNIVE~SIT'" (j()()I\ST()~E .
aT'I
...om ..... MOOMI1'IUCIC
Olmos' acting is charming
and believable, as is his preparation for the role, which
included a weight gain and
excluded the toupee he wears
on "Miami Vice."
Also believable is Lou
Diamond Phillips, who portrayed Richie Valens in "La
Bamba." His characterization
of gang member and calculus
student Angel Guzman is
complex and stirring. His acting, along with the script, goes
beyond the usual cliches.
The brilliance of this movie
is not that it l>0rtrays high
school, or a teacher, or a class.
AMlWLR
BTUIUICI
1111 LAST IIMI'DD4l
-.rr U8HT1, _ CII'Y
. ._ _ _ 27+0901 _ _ __
ntI FOX lIND 1111 HOUMD
"1GiiD~mN5"I""
UCSD University Events & Student Activities presents
Quality Film Developing
2nd set of color prints
FREE
EVERYDAY!
,
3Xstandard
12 expo (24 p~nts)
15 expo (30 pnnts)
24 expo (48 prints)
36 expo (72 prints)
,
4X6
2.99
3.79
4.99
6.99
3.47
4.39
5.95
8.43
Spring Reprint Special!
(April 4 to 15)
3 X standard size ,15 ea.
4 X 6 extra large .19 ea.
(from color negatives only.)
Essential Blolot'a.
"
AlOft 1111 LAW
ITIIND lIND DIU¥IIl
mononucleosis within
the last month? If so your
plasma could make a
valuable contribution to
the medical industry, and
The good point of "Stand and
Deliver," the thing that makes
it different, is that it's a movie
about people; different peo-
pie, facing different pressures.
When the film reaches the
climax, the viewer has the same
butterflies as the characters
taking the test.
" Stand and Deliver" is a
competent and interesting film
which should be seen.
OPEN MONDAY-FRIDAY 1:4SAM-S:lSPMJSAT.
1O:00AM·4:00PMlQ.OSED SUNDAYS & HOLIDAYS.
Minneapolis's great Guthrie Theater presents a psychologically rich and very human revision of the story
of the young scientist who creates a creature capable
of thought and emotion; the creature without parent,
without peer who crys, "Make me happy and I shall again
be virtuous!" More faithful to Mary Shelley's masterpiece. than to Karloff's classic film. Barbara Field's
stirring New adaptation is a San Diego premiere.
April 20, Wednesday, 8:00 p.m.
Mandeville Auditorium
G.A. $15.00, Students $10.00
UCSD Fac/Staff & Sr.Cit. $12.00
UCSD Box Office: 534~4559
e".,..,. _ _·s.,._
AT _
RICOMI. PUll ... _ _ • U" TIl
ncan ... TlR CIIAIIal ."., 211-l'1I
will most likely be·released as
the band's next single. Much
LWlN;;.at and lively than
Milky Way ....
be the song that
Church 'h the
mer~q~,es
they've
U J
The Church sees stars
of
latest and most provocative
offering to date. "Starfish."
that The Church
the quartet from Down Under
a sound that is like no
may finally become a welcome
addition to American rpr ..... rn
collections.
ing the album is a
Not much has changed in ·
soothing melody
the way of
Ie since The- ...;"d rne;ta "Destination." AIChurch pia
r first live.
betwee.n. Steve 'Kilshow in
couple
early on.
consists of
nallineup: Steve
lead vocals}. Peter
uitar. vocals}.
lIIn:nlS tempo is
per (guitar ...,....,."..~
single. the
"u:naru Ploog (
u""'I." _"'I~_....." .. ha n ti ng
Churning out a
Way."
psychedelic-in Il1pn,..'" ~
Already
cult
and contemporary
favorite. the
a
blues. The
psychedelic
with a
compared to the Ii
Floyd and R .E.M. Though the steady strumming of guitars.
comparisons exist. with one overlaid with Steve Kilbey's
See CHURCH, pale 5
listen of "Starfish." you will
sings • ."
pice • ,
Mil ': ay t~ ....,.......
11le remain "".~ rac
both melodically and mUlslcllllJ:!3~~~i1~!~~~r~~~e
consistent. Several of the
prominent tunes include the
story.like "Lost" and the
catchy "Spark" which features ~Rlfja;
guitarist Marty Wilson.Piper.
doing the honors on lea{f.
vocals.
It is the latter song which
ARTS
TIX
booth
Continued from page 2
"Starfish" is The Church's debut album on Arista Records.
Saturday from 10 am to 6 pm
at the Spreckles Theatre
lobby. There is also recorded
ticket information available 24
hours at 238·3810. The tape
is pre·recorded and does not
indicate if the event has been
sold out.
The home of the
39¢ hatnburger.
The Church includes Stew Kilbe" PeleT Koppel , Marty Wilson-Piper and
Richard Ploog.
AWomans
Choice••.
• Free Pregnancy '/esting
• Early Pregnancy Testing
• Pregnancy '/ermination
• General or local Anestbesia
• Affordable Blrtb Control
• Diagnosis & Treatment 0/ Sexually
'Transmitted Diseases (STDs)
U
D
SUMMER
SESSION
1
9
The UCSD Summer Session Ilrst fiveI' • week seSSion begins June 27 and the
second H¥e-week slSslon begins Augull 1. An exciting range of courses from
virtually every campus department Is
fered. Catalogs are available now. For your
free copy, drop by the Summer Session
OffIce, UCSD Extension Registration BuildIng, Mon. through FrI., 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m.,
or phone 534-4364 x22.
0'-
8
8
•
!
j,
d
tA\,~
7140 Miramar Rd. San Diego
IJ..~...~~~~~~~~-------------_.......JI
ALLAMERICAN-MEAL--- ~
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Quarter Pounder (o) with Cheese, Medium Fry,
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Limit one coupon per
customer, per visit. Please
present coupon when
ordering. Not volid with
any other otter.
bg\.)_::;:~_ii.iiiiiiiii
Phi Kappa Theta
1'!!::m
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II
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(plus tax)
Only at:
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~
INTERNATIONAL STYLE FILM SERIES
Comes to U.C. San Diego ....
Family Planning Associates
Medical Group
Call tbe College Line
619·535·1379
Organizational Meeting Tonight USB 4020A
6:30 pm
for Stude,,' Dlscou"t
Educaid offers savings
on deferred SLS and
PLUS loans
Just the Best...
Expect it
Be A Port Of It.
Phi Kappa Theta
NOSTALGHIA
CAPPED AT GRAD SAVES YOU MONEY! If you choose to defer
your payments , the Interest will accrue and be added to the
prinCipal (capitalized) EDUCAID capitalizes only ONCE when you
graduate or drop below half-time YOU DON 'T PAY INTEREST ON
INTEREST while you are In school-a substantial savings to you
Directed by Andrei Tarkovsky
121 min. Russian/ltalian 1984
See the Financial Aid administrator at your college for eligibility
Information And then call EDUCAID
Nostalghia was the late Andrei Tarkovsky's first film after
his exile from Russia, and deals with what he called "an
agonizing longing for an inner home." It is a visually
stunning, thinly veiled fiction about a mystical Soviet
exile tom by an unrequitable passion for his
abandoned homeland.
Sacramento · (916) 446-1626
Toll free in Calif (800) 443-766 7
OutSide of Calif (800) 642-9955
-.-...... Educaid'·
T~r
~'u
I'IIr lOl\N
SP~CIAll~TS
3301 C Street , Suite lOa-A. Sacramento. CA 95816
Phi Kappa Theta is looking for exceptional, highly motivated
individuals to be Founding Fathers here at UCSD, Stop by our
information booth today and tomorrow in front of the gym
and pick up a schedule of events. All are Welcome.
Just the Best
4
hiatus April 7, 1988
April 11, Monday, 8:00 p.m.
Mandeville Auditorium
,
Series Passes $12.00, Singles $2.50
UCSD Box Office: 534.. 4559
presented by University Events & Student Activities
April 7 1988 hiatus
5
.,
Annex
Art
8m~r1de
In the 1960's an actor/d.iJ:ector went looking tor America and c reated a n_ klnd ot film. The man waI Dennis Hopper.
Easy Rider was the IUm that dellned an era.
At. an actor and d.iJ:ector. he haa a\wayJ gone to the edge.
taJclng us places we'd never seen belore. Easy Rider. Blue Velvet. Rivers Edge.
Fire! Fire! Fire!
by robert leone
Manu writer
At the southwest corner of
Columbia and Cedar there's a
beige building with red trim
and red doors. As soon as you
clear the threshold you're
confronted by the gleaming
grill of a Seagrave Heavy
Pumper, a crimson, chrome,
and brass veteran of the San
Diego Fire Department.
In fact, you have to be care------------------------------------------------,
Annex
Art
(QYle.11 ~. r .T~e~t~~J
THE
KINKS
~Il
MIDNIGHT OIL
WITH SPECIAL GUESTS
~~~~ ~rf·
THE HARDlINE INTRODUCTION TOUR '88
TERENCE
TRENT
D'ARBY
WITH SPECIAL GUEST
THE NEW
CALIFORNIA THEATER
1122 4TH AVE DOWNTOWN
6
hlotui April 7 1988
I
LOVE AND
---------- ....
u.~
..........
ROCKETS
WITH SPECIAL GUESTS
THE MleHTY
7
LEMON DROPS and
THE IUllLEMAN9:00
SAT
MAY
ful where you walle, for the
Firehouse Museum is
crammed with memorabilia
celebrating the conflict
between civilization and
combustion.
Firefighters throughout history have captured our imagination, stirred our souls and
saved our lives.
There are all sorts of items
at the Firehouse Museum.
Presented is an extensive collection of firemarles, used by
property owners to designate
their insurance company for
the benefit of insurancecompany-hired fire crews. The
oldest firemark is from 1714.
There are display cases full of
uniform patches, badges,
helmets, trumpets, hose nozzles, and iron foundry molds
for fire hydrants mounted on
the walls.
There are three original
Currier and lves lithographs
depicting firefighting. Also
there are fire alarms, fire
extinguishers, and the list goes
on.
As far as history goes, the
museum in large part concentrates on the San Diego Fire
Department. Among the photos chronicling the S.D.F.D. '5
history are the 1917 gag picture of" Aerial Truck No. 1,"
and a large 1927 soft focus
portraitoffour blacle S.D.F.D.
members. There also are
printed cards with the history
of the department mounted
on the walls, and a number of
former S.D.F.D. engines.
And there are curiosities,
including the hand-hauled fire
engine that was La Jolla's only
fire protection from 1905 to
1913, an engine that was retired
"during the Civil War era,"
and a fire engine built in a
Model T chassis.
The building's P.A. system
constantly broadcasts the
emotionless voices of the fire
department's dispatchers.
The museum building used
to be the base for Engine
Company 6 and the location
of the S.D.F.D. machine shops,
where among other things the
S.D.F.D. built their own hose
nozzles . The city still owns the
building, but lets the museum
use the space.
The museum is operated by
the San Diego Hoole and
Ladder Company, which
organized the museum in 1962.
It's staff is entirely volunteer
(most of them are retired firefighters). Entrance is free, but
a $1 donation is suggested.
The museum is open from 10
am to 4 pm on Saturdays and
Sundays only . It's phone
number is 232-FIRE.
.
Now. In 1988. we tlnd d.iJ:ector Dennis Hopper In the streets ot Los Angeles.
In a war zone where gang members and Innocent people aUke are killed
over territorial emblems ot red and blue. Over COLORS. And again.
he takes us places we've never seen betore wi th the first realistic
motion picture about the war against street gangs.
To do It he has brought together an eztraordinary cast and crew. All 01 them
sharing a fierce drrotion to the d.lI:ee!OI·S vision. And leading the cast.
two motion plcture acton ot unparalleled intensity.
Sean ~nn and aobert Duvall.
OF CALFORNA POSITIONS
Join Us For Ot.r 25th AI\MVERSARV CfI fRRATION!
Sea World of California is currently seeking people for our Merchandise, Food Service, Park Operations & Tour Department.
Merch.ndl. . has openings for S.'es Assocl.tes and Stock
CI.rIcs, Food Service for Food Service Attend.nts, Walt.rs and
W.ltre...., Cooks and W.rehouse Workers.
Park Operations has openings for Adml ..ions Attendants and
Park Operations Hosts Clnd Hostesses. Tours has openings for
Narrators, who are eligible to be promoted to Tour Guides.
If you are a student, we will make every attempt to accommodate
your school schedule. If you are a working mother. we will schedule for times when your children are in school. Senior citizens are
welcomed with open arms. If you are a college student home on
Easter break , come in and apply. You may be hired on the spot
and given a starting date for the end of your school year.
Rather than a specific set of qualifications, we are looking for a
certain type of person . A person interested in excellence. with a
high degree of energy and a positive outlook on life.
To be happy and successful at Sea World . you must be an individual who thrives and is comfortable in a rapidly changing .
sometimes hectic environment. A flexible personality and good
sense of humor are two key qualities. You must be a team playerboth in your own department and all the other departments in Sea
World .
These are excellent opportunities for the right candidates. We offer
competitive wages and benefits. plus the chance to grow professionally in your chosen career.
JOIN US FOR THE CELEBRATION OF OUR LIFE.
Please stop by our Employment Center Monday - Friday from
9-4PM .
SEA WORLD
1720 So. Shores ROMI, San Diego, CA 92109
An Equal Opportunity Employer
'
FRAIKIl MY DEAR.
I DONi 6IYEADAMI.
fM 601161'0 HAYE MY
TAIENI
SENIORS
IF YOU HAVEN'T
RECEIVED YOUR
APPOINTMENT CARD
IN THE MAIL OR WOULD LIKE TO CHANGE YOUR
APPOINTMENT - CALL
534-1414
IMMEDIATELY!
.WDlfao
(111) 22I-I7SIi
_ .~way Drf¥t
• EICOfIDIOO
(11It 741-2537
NorIII County FIi,
211d LIVtI, ...., MIy C•.
• WEST HOLLYWOOD
1213) 2J5.IZI5
_S........IvtI.
...
Big City
SIIIMH HLPHO MU
,AM
;:¥~~l~~==
-- - ----
Continued from page 1
After losing his job, he be ~
gins to face the reasons for the
problems that are destroying
his life. While having dinner
with his ex~coworker, Megan
(Swoosie Kurtz), he gets drunk
and tells her how he met his
wife, and how she one day
decided to stay in Paris.
In his drunken state he
makes an unsuccessful pass at
Megan, becomes embarassed
and leaves. Going back to his
apartment he finds his brother,
Michael (Charlie Schlatter)
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L..I\I
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ON TH MOV _
See Our Pur ole & Whife Soofh 00 ReveUe P!CUQ
Rush Chair-mOIl : Jeff ROH,Hrul 515-0269
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PI6'O.S6 Oft6t Your Pa1(ooaqe To 01)( Spon~ o(~
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F001LuNG ~ fH1(H~Hr (: H t) ~ . "'..-.0 :-A
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LIMIT ONE ((IJ P(l'j
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Prof~
Fr~~
notes
Parking
HOURS: M-TH 8-7, FRI. 8-6, SAT. 10-5
3211 Holiday Court, La Jolla
Next To St. Germaints
A103
Art and reason
When Ma rk and I decided to spend
the weekend at his mother's hOllse,
I never imagined I would be walking
into a mOll e' nightmare. There were
cat everywhere.
Cat plaques, cat statues, cat clocks,
cven a cat mat. I couldn't begin to duplicate her collection of kitty litter if! spent
a year at a garage sa le. Conspicuously
ab ent, however, was a real cat. Strange,
I tho ught, and began to tear that a
weekend with cat woman could be a
lot less than purr-fect.
But then he came home, and
Mark introduced her. She wa
dre ed surprisi ngly well-no
leopard pants. In fact, you
could say she was the cat's meow,
but Hi rather not.
She offered me a cup of Dutch Chocolate Mint. Now that wa omething
I c u Id relate to. Then she brought it
our in the mo t beautiful, di tinctly
unfeline china Hi ever een. As we
ipped, I found outthat Mrs. Ca mpbell
ha my ame weakne '" for chocolate,
loves the theater a much as I do, but,
incredihly ncver saw "Cats." So Mark
and I arc taking her next month.
411-"49
Kiefer Sutherland and
Michael]. Fox
waiting for him. Jamie had
been avoiding his brother
because he didn't want to deal
with the anniversary of their
mother's death.
To cope with this reminder
he snorts some "Bolivian
marching powder," and thinks
back to the last moments he
spent with his mother. This
poignant scene between Wiest
and Fox shows the strong rela~
tionship Jamie had with his
mother.
Jamie realizes he has hit rock
bottom at a party when he sees
Amanda with her new fiance.
At the party, he calls Vicky
(Tracy Pollan), Tad's whole~
some cOllRin. tlnd begins to
come to grips with his prob~
lems, as he informs her of his
mother's death.
The role of Vicky is small,
as are the roles of most of the
characters in "Bright Lights,
Jason Robards appears in "Bright
Lights , Big City."
General Foods International Coffees.
Share the feeling.
8
hiatus April 7. 1988
Big City," but Vicky's caring
nature can be seen in the few
scenes she appears. Unfortu~
nately, with Pollan cast as Fox's
love interest, it is easy to think
of the fresh out of high school
Alex and Ellen seen on "Fam~
ily Ties."
The ending of the movie, as
the book's, is powerful in that
Jamie steps out of the pseudo~
"bright IIghtlS" "f the night
into the light of the awakening
dawn.

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