06197-OJSHS 2006 Program4 - Bowling Green State University

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06197-OJSHS 2006 Program4 - Bowling Green State University
imagine.design.create
March 20-22, 2013
The
th Annual Ohio Junior Science & Humanities Symposium
50
hosted by Bowling Green State University
Sponsored by
Northwest Ohio Center for Excellence in STEM Education (NWO)
and Bowling Green State University
In cooperation with The Academy of Applied Science and with the support
of the Departments of the Army, Navy, and Air Force
w w w. o j s h s . o r g
The National Association of Secondary School Principals has placed this program on the NASSP National
Advisory List of Student Contests and Activities for 2012-2013
2012 Ohio JSHS Award Winners
Top Row (L to R) David Wang, Aarti Kumar,
and Smriti Gupta
Bottom Row (L to R) Jian Chen, Christopher Ellis,
and Austen Mance
Not pictured - Brian Haidet
2012 Ohio JSHS Participants
Table of Contents
Welcome . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
2013 Ohio JSHS Schedule “At A Glance” . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
2013 Ohio JSHS Schedule for March 20-22, 2013 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-16
Keynote Speaker . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Poster Presenters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18-20
Judges Score Sheet
Paper Presenters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Poster Presenters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
2012 Ohio JSHS Awardees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23-24
2013 Ohio JSHS Awards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25-26
Judging Teams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
Acknowledgments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
2013 Advisory Board . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
History of the Junior Science & Humanities Symposium . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
Cumulative Awards
Thomas Alva Edison Award . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
The Colonel George F. Leist Distinguished Teacher Award . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Ohio JSHS Presenters to the National JSHS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
School of Teaching and Learning
The 50th Annual Ohio Junior Science & Humanities Symposium
1
Welcome
This Presidential message written 50 years ago by President John F. Kennedy
is still relevant today.
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The 50th Annual Ohio Junior Science & Humanities Symposium
Schedule “At a Glance”
Wednesday, March 20
4:00 p.m.-6:00 p.m.
6:15 p.m.
7:00 p.m.
7:30 p.m.
7:45 p.m.-9:30 p.m.
9:40 p.m.
11:00 p.m.
Check In & Registration
Mandatory Meeting for All Participants
Pizza Snack
Board Buses to Ice Arena
Ice Skating
Board Buses to Hampton Inn
Students Report to Assigned Rooms
Hampton Inn, Bowling Green
Great Room, Hampton Inn
Great Room, Hampton Inn
Ice Arena, BGSU
Thursday, March 21
6:00 a.m.-7:45 a.m.
7:50 a.m.
8:30 a.m.
8:45 a.m.-9:45 a.m.
Break (15 minutes)
10:00 a.m.-11:00 a.m.
10:00 a.m.-3:30 p.m.
Break (15 minutes)
11:15 a.m.-12:15 p.m.
10:00 a.m.-3:30 p.m.
12:20 p.m.-1:20 p.m.
1:30 p.m.-2:30 p.m.
10:00 a.m.-3:30 p.m.
Break (15 minutes)
2:00 p.m.
2:45 p.m.-3:45 p.m.
10:00 a.m.-3:30 p.m.
4:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.
5:15 p.m
6:10 p.m.
6:30 p.m.-8:45 p.m.
9:00 p.m.
9:00 p.m.-11:00 p.m.
11:00 p.m.
Breakfast
Board Buses to Olscamp Hall, BGSU
Opening Session
First Paper Session
Olscamp Hall 101B
Olscamp Hall 101B
Second Paper Session
Concurrent Poster Judging
Olscamp Hall 101B
Olscamp Hall 101A
Third Paper Session
Concurrent Poster Judging
Lunch
Fourth Paper Session
Concurrent Poster Judging
Olscamp Hall 101B
Olscamp Hall 101A
The Oaks
Olscamp Hall 101B
Olscamp Hall 101A
JH Students to Planetarium
Marine Biology Lab Tour
Fifth Paper Session
Concurrent Poster Judging
Laboratory Research Tours/Poster Viewing, HS Students
Board Buses to Hampton Inn
Board Buses to Olscamp Hall, BGSU
Banquet/Keynote Presentation
Board Buses to Hampton Inn
Open Activities/Adult Reception
Students Report to Assigned Rooms
Great Room, Hampton Inn
Olscamp Hall 101B
Olscamp Hall 101A
Olscamp Hall 101A
Olscamp Hall 101B
Pool; Great Room, Hampton Inn
Friday, March 22
6:30 a.m.-7:45 a.m.
8:00 a.m.
8:40 a.m.
8:45 a.m.-9:45 a.m.
Break (15 minutes)
10:00 a.m.- 12:00 a.m.
10:00 a.m.-11:00 a.m.
Break (15 minutes)
11:15 a.m.-12:15 p.m.
12:15 p.m.
1:45 p.m.
2:00 p.m.
2:30 p.m.
3:00 p.m.
Room Checkout/Breakfast
Board Buses to Olscamp Hall, BGSU
Announcements
Sixth Paper Session
Concurrent Poster Viewing
Great Room, Hampton Inn
Olscamp Hall 101B
Olscamp Hall 101B
Olscamp Hall 101A
Peer Poster Judging, Junior High Students
Seventh Paper Session
Olscamp Hall 101A
Olscamp Hall 101B
Eighth Paper Session
Concurrent Poster Viewing
Lunch
Judges Meeting/ Luncheon
Advisory Board Luncheon
Student Advisory Board Meeting
Group Photograph
Students Dismantle Posters
Awards Ceremony
Adjournment
Olscamp Hall 101B
Olscamp Hall 101A
The Oaks
The Oaks
The Oaks
The Oaks
Student Union, Center Stairwell
Olscamp Hall 101B
Olscamp Hall 101B
The 50th Annual Ohio Junior Science & Humanities Symposium
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Schedule of Events
Wednesday, March 20
4:00 p.m.-6:00 p.m.
6:15 p.m.
7:00 p.m.
7:30 p.m.
7:45 p.m.-9:30 p.m.
9:40 p.m.
11:00 p.m.
Check In & Registration
Mandatory Meeting for All Participants
Pizza Snack
Board Buses to Ice Area
Ice Skating
Board Buses to Hampton Inn
Students Report to Assigned Rooms
Hampton Inn, Bowling Green
Great Room, Hampton Inn
Great Room, Hampton Inn
6:00 a.m.-7:45 a.m.
7:50 a.m.
8:30 a.m.
Breakfast
Board Buses to Olscamp Hall, BGSU
Opening Session
Great Room, Hampton Inn
Presentation of Colors:
Pershing Rifles Color Guard, Army ROTC, Bowling Green State University
Ice Arena, BGSU
Thursday, March 21
Olscamp Hall 101B
Opening Remarks
Robert Midden, Ph.D., Northwest Ohio Center for Excellence in STEM Education Director, Associate Professor
of Chemistry, Bowling Green State University
Mary Ellen Mazey, Ph.D., President, Bowling Green State University
LTC Douglas A. Mohler, U.S. Army, Commander /Professor, Military Science, Bowling Green State University
Ms. Blythe Tipping, Ohio JSHS Assistant Coordinator, Science Teacher, Sylvania Southview High School
8:45 a.m.-9:45 a.m.
First Paper Session
Olscamp Hall 101B
8:45 a.m.
Kyle Davis, Big Walnut High School
“Size Variation with Altitude in the Rufous-Collared Sparrow”
Bergmann’s Rule, which states that as temperature decreases body size increases, is a common expression used to test size
variation. Bergmann’s Rule relates body size to latitude. Heat is generated by the body volume and lost across its surface.
Therefore, larger homeotherms with their proportionately larger volume and smaller surface were expected to withstand cold
better than small homeotherms. Since environmental temperature also decreases with altitude, I tested the possible relationship
between body size and altitude in Rufous-collared Sparrows (Zonotrichia capensis), which are abundant; range through the
tropics and from sea level to the snow line in the Andes. Due to the range of temperatures, I expected a similar change in body
size with altitude as described for latitude by Bergmann’s Rule. To estimate the change in size, I measured the tarsometatarsus,
which include 198 specimens from the Peruvian Andes in the collections of Louisiana State University, the University of Michigan,
and Cornel University. The change is slight, but if I group the specimens into increments of 700 m from sea level to 4,000+ m, there
is a gradual increase in size from sea level to the snow line. Based on the coefficient correlation, the average tibiotarsal length
increases in size following the coefficient correlation (0= no change, 1= increase in same direction, and -1= increase in opposite
direction). This change was minimal (.3) but shows there is change in size with altitude following Bergmann’s Rule which states as
temperature decreases body size increases. When looking at the importance to humanity, one can say that the Peru subspecies
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The 50th Annual Ohio Junior Science & Humanities Symposium
Schedule of Events
Thursday, March 21 (Cont.)
of the Rufous-collared Sparrow can be used as an indicator species to see if global climate or an increase in global
temperature change is effecting the environment. This can be shown, for instance, if the climate increases causing
the lower area birds (sea level) to push up higher into the mountain for adequate habitat. This would cause the
higher altitude dwellers to move up until the top is reached where they cannot move any more. This reaction to
the increased temperature could cause the highest altitude dwellers to either leave, find a new way to compete, or
cause them to die off. So, when there is an expected mass extinction, the Rufous-collared Sparrow can be used to
judge when this may happen and allow us to keep it from happening.
9:05 a.m.
Daniel Radomski, Gahanna Lincoln High School
“Developing A Cost Efficient Muscle Based Vision Responding Prototype”
The purpose of this research was to develop a method of controlling a robot with a user’s eye movements. Amputees,
for example, often have limited mobility. With this study it could be possible to give all amputees the ability to move
wherever they please in the limits of a motorize wheel chair. This study underwent different building, testing, and
programming. First, a program was formulated to make the robot act in the desired fashion. Next, an EKG sensor was
tested and configured to work with said program in order to get the prototype to work properly. Finally the project
was tested for efficiency. Once the program was made, the EKG sensors were placed above and below the eye and on
the outsides of the eyes. The program that was developed for this project read the sensor and correlated the
movement of the Lego NXT based prototype robot with the user’s eye movement. The robot was then given to
different users and tested for speed of completing a basic course after the user had time to get used to the controls.
Through EKG based sensory, this project targets opening the doors to the use of eye movement as a method of
control. The prototype built in this study offers a base structure to keep the cost efficient while still accomplishing
its task. Tracking eye movement could allow amputees more freedom and movement in their everyday life.
9:25 a.m.
Omar Gad, Sylvania Southview High School
“The Relationship between Tibial Plateau Geometry and Anterior Cruciate Ligament Strain”
The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) stabilizes the knee, allowing athletes to jump, cut, and sprint. After 200,000
athletes tear their ACL each year, they not only face ACL reconstruction surgery and rehabilitation for six months,
but also are at risk for developing osteoarthritis and other major knee injuries. Athletes suffer ACL tears either through
contact or non-contact mechanisms. Non-contact mechanisms result from multi-axis loading, which include a
combination of mechanisms: anterior shear, abduction, and internal rotation. The tibial plateau articulates with the
femur during any weight-bearing exercise; therefore, anatomical differences may influence how these two bones
interact. Studies have found a posteriorly directed tibial slope is associated with athletes who suffer ACL injuries. The
aim of this study was to determine whether a relationship exists between peak ACL strain and tibial plateau geometry.
Consequently, a more posteriorly directed tibial slope would be associated with higher peak ACL strain. Seventeen
cadaveric legs were tested utilizing a custom designed drop-stand to simulate landing. Numerous combinations of
multi-axis loading moments along with axial loading were applied sequentially until failure. Tibial plateau geometry,
specified as the lateral tibial slope (LTS) and the medial tibial slope (MTS), was measured using CT scans that were taken
before testing. A general linear model examined the relationships between peak ACL strain and the MTS and LTS. The
test indicated that MTS was not statistically significant (p=0.45), while indicating a statistically significant relationship
between ACL strain and LTS (p=0.02). By observing anatomical differences in the tibial plateau, physicians, coaches,
and athletes can be proactive in the prevention of ACL injury.
The 50th Annual Ohio Junior Science & Humanities Symposium
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Schedule of Events
Thursday, March 21 (Cont.)
Announcements and Break (15 minutes)
10:00 a.m.-11:00 a.m.
10:00 a.m.-3:30 p.m.
Second Paper Session
Concurrent Poster Judging
Olscamp Hall 101B
Olscamp Hall 101A
10:00 a.m.
Elijah Bedel, West Union High School
“Age and Radial Growth Rates of Ancient Cedars (Juniperus and Thuja) in Adams County, Ohio”
Old growth, cliff-dwelling forests exist worldwide but none have been definitively documented in Adams County,
Ohio. Two species that survive in dolomite cliff habitats are northern white cedar (Thuja occidentalis) and eastern red
cedar (Juniperus virginiana). They obtain great longevity and low radial growth rates when growing on cliffs. This study
examined the age and radial growth rates of 38 red and 38 white cedars growing on dolomite cliffs at two sites
within the Edge of Appalachia Preserve System in Adams County, Ohio. Cross sections of downed, cliff grown
trees were taken and ring counts were conducted to obtain tree age. Radial growth rates were determined by dividing
the radius (mm) by the number of rings (age). White cedar possessed the greater longevity of the two species, a mean
of 211.358 years, and a higher growth rate, a mean of 0.798 mm per year. Red cedar had a mean of 189.846 years
and 0.698 mm per year. Radial growth rates and age were similar likely because both have a stem-strip growth pattern
and respond similarly when growing on cliffs. Linear regressions determined if radial growth rates were predictable
based on tree age for either species. No correlation existed between age and radial growth rate for either red cedar
(R= -0.0023) or white cedar (R= -0.0014) growing on cliffs. This study illustrates that cliff grown red and white
cedars have the potential for developing old growth forests and warrant consideration for protection by conservation
organizations.
10:20 a.m.
Yuran Chen, Sylvania Southview High School
“Examining Changes in Na+/K+ ATPase Expressions During Oxygen Glucose Deprivation”
Sodium-potassium ATPase plays an important role in the balance of ions across cell membranes. More importantly, its
function has been correlated with the health of brain cells. This implies a link to stroke research, as cells are often
damaged by ionic imbalances that occur during stroke-like symptoms. In addition, poly-phenolic compounds have
been shown to have neuroprotective effects, so the main purpose of this project was to correlate the neuprotective
properties of poly-phenolic compounds to the function of sodium-potassium ATPase. The initial belief was that the
compound would be able to significantly increase cell viability and ATPase concentration. In the first stage of this
project, PC-12 cells were subjected to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) with and without the presence of a poly-phenol compound. Cells were treated in concentrations of 0.1 μm, 10 μm, and 50 μm of the compound. MTT assays were
conducted to determine viability. In the second step, the cells were once again tested with and without the presence
of the compound in OGD conditions. The experimental conditions were given the same drug concentrations, but a
sodium-potassium ATPase assay was conducted. Overall, the results supported the hypothesis and significantly
increased both cell viability and sodium-potassium ATPase expression rate (p<0.05)
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The 50th Annual Ohio Junior Science & Humanities Symposium
Schedule of Events
Thursday, March 21 (Cont.)
10:40 a.m.
Shreetej Reddy, William Mason High School
“Formulation of a Compressed Oxygen/ Hydrogen Gas Dual Pneumatic Piston Engine System”
Modern models for compressed air engines are eco-friendly; however, these engines use petroleum to help increase
the air pressure and rate of expansion to push the piston. This results in harmful carbon emissions. Therefore, a type
of compressed air engine that does not emit emissions is ideal. I have designed an engine that utilizes compressed
air, as well as a clean combustion reaction between oxygen and hydrogen gas to expand the piston. Due to its
practical application as an engine system in vehicles, two important features, safety and functionality, were needed to
be taken into account during the design/calculation process. The functionality of the vehicle comes from its ability
to work efficiently while reaching its optimal velocity and acceleration. The safety comes from the safe storage
pressure of hydrogen gas and a proper ignition/valve system that does not cause any unwarranted combustions. In
order to ensure safety, while maintaining the functionality of the engine, a unique buffer tank system, which is
essentially a lower pressure mixture tank, was used. A set optimal velocity was the starting point of the calculations
because the safety was ensured with the buffer tank. For experimentation, a one-half sized scale model of the engine
was built. The engine had reached a high rpm, including various trials with over 1000 rpm as a result, but it did not
reach the calculated optimal rpm of 1260.45, due to various mechanical and thermodynamic inefficiencies. However,
the results were very successful, which implies that this clean compressed air engine can be a potential automotive
energy option for the future.
Announcements and Break (15 minutes)
11:15 a.m.-12:15 p.m.
10:00 a.m.-3:30 p.m.
Third Paper Session
Concurrent Poster Judging
Olscamp Hall 101B
Olscamp Hall 101A
11:15 a.m.
Timothy Lee, Sylvania Southview High School
“The Human Mind's Need for Categorization and Identification of the Physical and Social Worlds”
This study intends to understand the human mind's need to categorize both physically and socially. Physical
categorization can be examined in relation to Jenkins Type A/B behavior pattern, while social categorization follows
Tajfel and Turner's social categorization theory. Based heavily on these two concepts, the experiment tested these two
hypotheses: (a) If personality type affects optimal time and efficiency to organize physical objects, then a person with
Type A personality will identify and categorize objects more optimally than a person with Type B personality; and
(b) If social group status is a determinant in identification and categorization, then both minority and nonminority
racial group members will tend to identify themselves with their own group categories. Participants from a local high
school (N=39) sorted physical objects and also answered questions relating to pictures of different racial groups. After
data analysis, the hypotheses were generally supported. This shows that humans need to categorize both physically
and socially, and also that these two are not categorized the same way. By better understanding a national identity in
diverse countries such as the United States, this could reduce prejudice and ensure a lasting, thriving society.
The 50th Annual Ohio Junior Science & Humanities Symposium
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Schedule of Events
Thursday, March 21 (Cont.)
11:35 a.m.
Bluyé DeMessie, William Mason High School
“Sustainable and Low Cost Approach for Cleaning Metal Contaminated Water Using Pyrolyzed Banana Peels”
Wastes of Banana peels (BW) and banana peels pyrolyzed at 500°C and 600°C (PBW 500 and PBW 600) were tested as
low-cost adsorbents for Cu(II) removal from aqueous solutions. The adsorbents properties were characterized through
a variety of methods including thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA), Fourier transfer infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), pH
electrophoresis, BET surface area analysis, SEM imaging, and X-Ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. Pyrolysis of dried banana
peel formed large surface area adsorbent (50 – 60 m2/g), with high surface zeta potential which resulted in a
dramatic increase of the adsorption capacity by two orders of magnitude. In order to reduce the total number of
experiments to achieve the best conditions of the batch adsorption procedure, three sets of statistical designs of
experiments were carried-out for each adsorbent. Initially, a full 24 factorial design for each adsorbent with two
central points, a total of 18 experiments, were performed. The test were made to optimize the following factors: mass
of adsorbent (m), pH of solution, tumbling time (t) and initial Cu(II) ion concentration (Co). These results for the
optimization of the systems, a central composite surface analysis design indicated that the pH of the solution was most
significant by analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the tumbling time was insignificant. The batch adsorption data from
the factorial experiment studies was used for multivariable regression analysis with 3 factors (m, Co, t) and two
interaction variables (m×pH, Co×pH) was carried-out for each adsorbent. After optimizing the batch adsorption
system by statistical design of experiments, two equilibrium adsorption isotherms for Cu(II) uptake using BW and
PBW 500 performed, Langmuir and Freundlich. These isotherms fitted to the linear Langmuir and Freundlich models.
The Freundlich’s model fit the equilibrium data better and shows the degree of favorability of adsorption of Cu (II) ions
with banana peel and pyrolized banana peel 500 were 0.75 and 1.25 respectively, with adsorption capacities of
351.1 mg/g, respectively. A kinetic study was performed to determine the pseudo second order kinetic model. Using
the linearized form of the model the rate of adsorption for PBW 500 was found to be 3.73 mg/mgh. Extracting
metal pollutants from water using pyrolyzed banana peel as an adsorbent is a low cost, affordable and sustainable
approach for cleaning contaminated waters.
11:55 a.m.
Evren Gokcen, Gahanna Lincoln High School
“Vision-Based Adaptive Navigation and Target-Tracking System”
8
The purpose of this project was to develop a real-time vision-based adaptive navigation and target-tracking system.
The advent of increased computing power and availability of low-cost visual sensors has resulted in more widespread
research in Computer Vision, a field of study that has now become highly relevant and widely applicable. Computer
Vision was chosen as the primary area of research because of the large amount of versatile information it can provide
and, ultimately, because of its great potential to enable machines to perform human-like tasks and elevate the
quality of life. First, the development environment was set up, integrating a video camera and a Bluetooth wireless
communication device with a personal computer. A vehicle was designed using a robotic subsystem. Next, an
algorithm was developed to detect objects of interest, in this case a vehicle and its destination. Input from the
camera was used to calculate the angle and distance to direct the vehicle, through the wireless connection, to the
target destination from any starting location within the range of the camera. Finally, an optimal path-finding algorithm
was introduced to enable the vehicle to navigate its way safely to a destination despite the addition of obstacles and
the changing of obstacle locations. The efficiency of the system was greatly improved with the addition of a novel
algorithm. The system proved to be very robust. Not only did it always calculate the optimal safe path, but the system
also was adaptive and operated in real-time. Furthermore, the novel algorithm improved the efficiency of the initial
system by more than 60%, a highly significant difference. Future areas of research were identified through the findings
of this project. The success of the system and the rapid pace of advancements indicate that additional investigation on
this subject could have far-reaching benefits.
The 50th Annual Ohio Junior Science & Humanities Symposium
Schedule of Events
Thursday, March 21 (Cont.)
12:20 p.m.-1:20 p.m.
Lunch
The Oaks
1:30 p.m.-2:30 p.m.
10:00 a.m.-3:30 p.m.
Fourth Paper Session
Concurrent Poster Judging
Olscamp Hall 101B
Olscamp Hall 101A
1:30 p.m.
Susan Johnson, Bowling Green High School
“Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria in Surface Waters”
This experiment was a study of antibiotic resistance in the surface waters of Bowling Green, Ohio. The objective was to
determine if there is more antibiotic resistance down gradient of the waste water treatment plant than up gradient of
the waste water treatment plant. Water samples were collected and plated on Standard Methods Agar. Plates were
then replicated onto standard methods agar, standard methods agar with vancomycin added, standard methods agar
with tetracycline added, standard methods agar with sulfadiazine added, and standard methods agar with triclosan
added. The average number of bacteria found on each plate with antibiotic added divided by the average number of
bacteria grown on the standard methods agar plate gave the percentage of resistant bacteria to each particular
antibiotic. The experiment had three repetitions. The first repetition showed there was more antibiotic resistance down
gradient of the waste water treatment plant than up gradient of it. The second and third repetition showed there was
no significant difference in the amount of resistance down gradient and up gradient of the waste water treatment
plant. The results of the three repetitions were averaged and graphed with error bars added. The graphs showed
no significant difference in any of the data. The conclusion was antibiotic resistance is not significantly different down
gradient or up gradient of the waste water treatment plant.
1:50 p.m.
Michaela Dean, Rutherford B. Hayes High School
“The Effects of Common Domestic Animal Manures on Soybeans”
This study was designed to determine which common domestic animal manure was the best fertilizer for soybeans. It
was hypothesized that soybeans grown using dairy cow manure tea would have the largest yield. Soybeans were
grown using sheep, chicken, horse, and dairy cow manure tea fertilizer. The control group was grown with water only.
This experiment consisted of one trial with 30 soybean plants, with a total of 6 plants per category. The soybeans were
allowed to grow for 80 days, then harvested, placed in a forced air drying oven, and weighed to find the dry weight. In
the end, soybeans grown with chicken manure tea weighed the most and had the most seeds per plant. Soybeans
grown with cow manure tea had more pods. The hypothesis was proven to be incorrect because the overall yield of
the plants in the chicken category was highest. There are several possible explanations for this outcome: the research
that the hypothesis was based on was faulty; previous experimentation tested the initial vigor of growth, which is
different than the yield; a spider mite infestation, which ultimately ended this experiment; or the different nutritional
requirements of the soybeans during different stages of growth. If this experiment were to be repeated, the insect that
is used to control the spider mite infestation would be restocked. In conclusion, this study will help to maximize the
yield of an economically useful crop through organic means.
The 50th Annual Ohio Junior Science & Humanities Symposium
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Schedule of Events
Thursday, March 21 (Cont.)
2:10 p.m.
Zachary Binns, Gahanna Lincoln High School
“Investigating the Effects of Chemicals Found in Hydraulic Fracturing Fluid on Colinus virginianus and Daphnia magna”
The purpose of this project was to examine the effects of chemicals in hydraulic fracturing fluid on the environment.
Varying widely from well site to well site, a combination of benzene, toluene, hydrochloric acid, and acetone was used
to create a solution simulating the contents of common fracturing fluid. While the chemicals found in fracturing fluid
are well known and thoroughly studied, their effect at the extremely low concentrations found in the fluid are not well
documented. The oil and gas industry claims the concentrations are so low as to have no evident environmental
impact. Skeptics claim that hydraulic fracturing is greatly damaging the environment. This research investigated only
the hazardous chemicals in fracturing fluids. Using .1 ml, .01 ml, .001 ml, and .0001 ml chemical solutions to simulate
hydraulic fracturing fluid, northern bobwhite quail (Colinus virginianus) and the micro crustacean Daphnia magna were
used for testing. Quail were yolk-injected on the seventh day in test groups for .01 ml, .001 ml, and .0001 ml.
Measurements of beak length, weight, volume and cranial circumference after artificial hatching on the 21st day of
development showed significant results only in decreased beak length in the .01 ml and .001 ml tests (p = .005 and
.0255). However, because .0001 ml is most similar to hydraulic fracturing fluid, there is little data to suggest any link
between fracking chemical concentrations and adverse effects in quail. The change in heart rate of daphnia when
introduced to the chemical solution was measured. Concentration of .1 ml caused a large heart rate drop with an
extremely significant p value of .0001. The .01 ml solution also showed significant results (p = .0005). However, lower
concentrations similar to fracking fluid showed no significant effects. Overall, results suggest little link between
hydraulic fracturing fluid chemicals and negative effects in tested animals. Further research is suggested.
Announcements and Break (15 minutes)
2:00 p.m.
Junior High Students to Planetarium
Marine Biology Lab Tour
2:45 p.m.-3:45 p.m.
10:00 a.m.-3:30 p.m.
Fifth Paper Session
Concurrent Poster Judging
Olscamp Hall 101B
Olscamp Hall 101A
2:45 p.m.
Niket Yadav, Lakota West High School
“Modulatory effect of Mint Constituents on the Innate Response of Lung Macrophages in Infection Models”
Mint (Mentha arvensis) is used in traditional medicine to treat various infectious and inflammatory ailments of the
digestive and respiratory systems. The purpose of this study was to investigate the mode of action of mint and its
potential to serve as a source of modern medicine? In this direction, I investigated the effect of mint extract (ME) and
selected mint constituents namely, rosmerinic acid (RM), L-menthol, and L-menthone, toward murine alveolar
macrophages using two infection models, the bacterial agent Mycobacterium smegmatis and the bacterial virulence
factor lipopolysaccharide (LPS). ME caused significant reduction (p≤0.05) of pro-inflammatory mediators (cytokines,
nitric oxide) in response to LPS and of pathogen load (via enhanced phagocytosis and diminished pathogen
multiplication) in response to infection. On the other hand, ME and its components RM and menthone showed
antioxidant activity in terms of significant reduction (p≤0.05) in reactive oxygen species (ROS). Further mechanistic
investigation showed that ME reduces pro-inflammatory cytokines via modulation of MAP kinases (p38, JNK) in
the LPS-responsive TLR pathway. Taken together, it can be concluded that this natural product protects lung cells via
modulation of inflammation, oxidative stress, and pathogen build up in infection models, thus making it a promising
source to derive modern therapeutics.
10
The 50th Annual Ohio Junior Science & Humanities Symposium
Schedule of Events
Thursday, March 21 (Cont.)
3:05 p.m.
Aman Kumar, William Mason High School
“Effect of Hole Orientation, Size, and Actuality on Pantherophis guttatus Path Choice”
Snakes moving through terrestrial habitats face many functional challenges including maneuvering into small areas
with varied length, width, height, and orientation. Although most terrestrial locomotion of snakes is moderately
understood, the effect of varied hole structure on snakes decision making is poorly understood, despite the daily
interaction of snakes with holes. The path choice was quantified and the kinematics of corn snakes (Pantherophis
guttatus) by placing the snakes into an arena where they were to make a decision on which hole to choose. Concertina
locomotion was used by the snakes when they were introduced through the PVC release system. It was clear that the
snakes exhibited lateral bending and muscle activity that was propagated posteriorly with a constant speed. This
indicated that the snakes were using lateral undulation when maneuvering towards a specific hole. Modified hole
orientation and size barely, if any, affected the snake’s spatial decision making. Only hole-actuality demonstrated an
effect on the decision of hole choice. Analysis of digitized kinematic data showed that the snake showed three main
movements in the arena. A snake chose to move directly toward the hole, travel in reverse towards the start of the
release system, and directly to the wall of the arena. Snakes appeared to ignore the visual aspect of the hole in each
experiment, but rather looked for a simply dark area. This initial data offers a deeper understanding of how snakes make
decisions in their environment and their kinematics in a terrestrial environment.
3:25 p.m.
Samantha Huhn, Sylvania Southview High School
“The Effects of the Matrix [M] Protein in the Vesicular Stomatitis Virus for Oncolytic Gene Therapy in the Treatment
of Lung Cancer”
Lung cancer is a terminal illness; this research looked into an oncolytic gene therapy treatment for lung cancer.
Vesicular Stomatitis (VSV) is a common laboratory virus that is often used in the study of the evolution of viruses and
viral mutations. VSV contains a Matrix [M] Protein that has been proven to kill cancer. Thirteen replicas of VSV were
examined for their potential to kill lung cancer (H23) cells. In addition, healthy (BHK) cells were used to determine
how VSV affects healthy cells. Each replica was administered to several wells of lung cancer and healthy cells. The
effectiveness of the virus in killing the cell sample was measured through plaque counts and fluorescence read by an
ELISA reader. The finding of this research was that VSV replica Orange B was the strongest. With two exceptions
(replicas Yellow B and Yellow A), it was found through a simple regression test found that no correlation was present
between dilutions used and fluorescence read by the ELISA Reader. The ANOVA test found that all dilutions of every
size killed lung cancer cells (F=1.44, p=0.16). The applications of this research are that VSV can be used to treat lung
cancer in the future, with an emphasis on Replica Orange B, since it was the most effective.
4:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.
5:15 p.m.
6:10 p.m.
6:30 p.m.-8:45 p.m.
Laboratory Tours/ Poster Viewing, High School Students
Board Buses to Hampton Inn
Board Buses to Olscamp Hall, BGSU
Banquet/Keynote Presentation
Olscamp Hall 101B
Keynote Presentation
Exploring the Universe in the 21st Century
Dr. Karen S. Bjorkman, Dean of the College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics, The University of Toledo
9:00 p.m.
9:00 p.m.-11:00 p.m.
11:00 p.m.
Board Buses to Hampton Inn
Open Activities/Adult Reception
Students Report to Assigned Rooms
Pool; Great Room, Hampton Inn
The 50th Annual Ohio Junior Science & Humanities Symposium
11
Schedule of Events
Friday, March 22
6:30 a.m.-7:45 a.m.
8:00 a.m.
8:40 a.m.
Room Checkout/Breakfast
Board Buses to Olscamp Hall, BGSU
Announcements
Great Room, Hampton Inn
8:45 a.m.-9:45 a.m.
Sixth Paper Session
Concurrent Poster Viewing
Olscamp Hall 101B
Olscamp Hall 101A
Olscamp Hall 101B
8:45 a.m.
Kazune Pax, Sylvania Southview High School
“The Correlation of the Concentration of Household Toxins and the Mortality of Daphnia magna”
The effect of common toxins on the mortality of Daphnia magna was tested. Common toxins leaked into water
systems include household chemicals. These toxins have a detrimental effect on the wildlife. Because of the increasing
concentrations of many toxins, it is important to see how it is affecting the bottom of the food chain. It was believed
that the toxins would harm the D. magna to the point where they cannot digest and metabolize properly. In addition,
there would be a correlation between the mortality of the D. magna and the concentration of the toxin. Varying
concentrations of salt, Miracle Grow, Diazinon, Ortho Home Defense Max, Soft Soap, and Ultra Downy Fabric Softener
were made by mixing the toxins with distilled water. The D. magna were subjected to the varying concentrations, fed
with 04-methylumbelliferyl, then placed under a black light so that the healthy ones could be counted. The data
supported the hypothesis for some of the toxins. All but fabric softener and soap had a point where the D. magna could
not survive. The salt and Miracle Grow had a statistically significant logarithmic correlation (R = -0.87, P-value < 0.05
and R = -0.96, P-value < 0.05 respectively). The Soft Soap and Ultra Downy Fabric Softener were not statistically
significant (R = 0.06, P-value = 0.90 and R = -0.15, P-value = 0.75 respectively). No usable data could be obtained from
the Diazinon and Ortho Home Defense Max pesticides. This shows that something must give in order to protect the
environment. Many of the harmful concentrations are below the standard concentration.
9:05 a.m.
Ryan Richards, Gahanna Lincoln High School
“Development and Testing of a Highly Maneuverable Ballast System for ROV Applications”
The purpose of this project was to develop a highly maneuverable ballast system that is controllable on all three
planes in addition to the basic capabilities of surfacing and submerging. A ballast system of this sort has applications
with underwater remotely operated vehicles [ROV]. An ROV that can accurately adjust its roll, pitch, and yaw, all
individually, is vastly more maneuverable than one that is controllable on yaw alone. The ballast system was designed
on Alibre, a 3D modeling program, before any parts were purchased. This program provided exact weights, volumes,
densities, and moments of inertia that were needed to construct a ballast system with the desired maneuverability.
Before actually building the system, the moments of inertia, provided by Alibre, showed that the system would be
capable of 30 degrees of roll to either side, and 45 degrees of pitch forward and aft. The prototype was designed to be
extremely adaptable. Internal components can be completely removed from the system to make adjustments. The
ºservos can be removed and switched with servos of varying torques to alter the system’s maximum operation depth
or simply to change the speed at which the pistons can move. Counterweights can be added or removed to provide
varying degrees of pitch and roll. Experimentation showed that if too much weight is added or removed, the ballast
system will not retain its ability to change buoyancy via piston adjustment. The final prototype performed extremely
well. The system was capable of achieving the desired 30 degrees of roll and 45 degrees of pitch, in addition to having
the capability of submerging and surfacing. The ballast system was also able to maintain a specific depth without the
aid of floatation devices to simulate change in water density. This prototype shows great promise for helping increase
the maneuverability and efficiency of ROVs.
12
The 50th Annual Ohio Junior Science & Humanities Symposium
Schedule of Events
Friday, March 22 (Cont.)
9:25 a.m.
Peeyush Shrivastava, William Mason High School
“Investigations Into CaMKII Regulation of Cardiac Excitability”
Long QT Syndrome (LQTS) and Brugada Syndrome are cardiac diseases characterized by distinct abnormalities in the
electrocardiogram as well as increased susceptibility to arrhythmogenesis. A βIV-spectrin/CaMKII signaling complex
has been identified as an imperative component in regulation of CaMKII phosphorylation of Nav1.5, a voltage gated
sodium channel whose dysfunction has been shown to induce LQTS or Brugada Syndrome depending on CaMKII
phosphorylation regulation. Kv4.3, a voltage gated potassium channel, has been identified as a binding partner for
both active and inactive CaMKII sites. This suggests that coupling between Kv4.3 and CaMKII proteins is imperative in
proper activation of CaMKII. Furthermore, the findings of this study suggest that not only does CaMKII have a
dynamic coupling association with Kv4.3, but also putative phosphorylation sites. CaMKII phosphorylation of Kv4.3
justifies the inconsistency between qv4J sinoatrial cells and ventricular myocytes, which suggest pathogenesis of
Brugada Syndrome as well as LQTS. In order to determine the interaction between Kv4.3 and CaMKII, a variety of
different techniques were used. First, PCR site-directed mutagenesis was conducted in order to translate Kv4.3
mutations as contributors to human disease. In addition, HEK cell transfections were performed using a KCND3-pIRESGFP vector. Collectively, the data support the concept that Kv4.3 is a potential component of the βIV-spectrin/CaMKII
signaling complex where changes in targeting of CaMKII disrupt K+ channel activity. Ultimately, the data support the
hypothesis that disrupted CaMKII targeting alters Kv4.3 channel activity, altering repolarization duration in cardiac
action potential, and undesirably increasing susceptibility to arrhythmogenesis in the qv4J model.
Announcements and Break (15 minutes)
10:00 a.m.- 12:00 a.m.
10:00 a.m.-11:00 a.m.
Peer Poster Judging, Junior High Students
Seventh Paper Session
Olscamp Hall 101A
Olscamp Hall 101B
10:00 a.m.
Chrysta Beck, Pettisville Local Schools
“A Comparative Study of the Meat Quality on Different Strains of Gallus domesticus”
It is important to know how meat quality affects different strains of Gallus domesticus. Hypothesis 1 stated the Ross 708
X Hubbard broiler strain would grow the largest because it is a combination of two family lines that support high food
efficiency along with tolerance to multiple climates. Hypothesis II stated the Ross 708 X Hubbard broiler strain would
have the most desirable meat quality because the broilers will not be affected by the environment as dramatically as
the other strains due to the Ross 708 X Hubbard strain’s genetics. Three pens with same dimensions were constructed
in three separate buildings. The pens were prepared by disinfecting each, placing sawdust on the floors, hanging
feeders, heat lamps, and filling waterers. Twenty-five straight-run chicks of each strain were placed in one of the 3 pens.
Chicks were massed weekly, and food consumption was collected daily. The Jumbo Cornish X broiler grew the largest
with an average mass of 2.62 kilograms, and the Cobb X Cobb grew the least with a mass of 2.16 kilograms. An ANOVA
statistical analysis of the data indicates there is a significant difference in the different broilers strains (F=14.84;
p=0.000). The Jumbo Cornish X was the most efficient in converting food into body mass, and the Hubbard X Ross 708
was the least efficient strain. Body measurements of the different broiler strains showed the Hubbard X Ross 708 had
a shorter but wider breast. The Cobb X Cobb had a longer and thinner breast. The strain with meat that had the most
The 50th Annual Ohio Junior Science & Humanities Symposium
13
Schedule of Events
Friday, March 22 (Cont.)
water retention was the Cobb X Cobb, which lost 0.07 kilograms of water when thawed. Hypothesis I and Hypothesis
II were not supported. This may have been because the birds were not raised in the same building. More trials could
be conducted with smaller flocks so all of the pens could fit into one facility. The data could have also been affected by
a pecking order that naturally develops in a flock, which causes some birds to consume more than others within the
same pen.
10:20 a.m.
Jasmine Serpen, Sylvania Southview High School
“The Effect of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms and Discovered Haplotypes in HMOX-1 Gene on Susceptibility to
Various Diseases”
This paper presents a study of human HMOX-1 gene for single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP’s) and clusters of SNP’s
with high co-occurrence probabilities or haplotypes. The motivation is to discover potential links between SNP’s or
haplotypes and diseases. The study entailed a variety of bio-medical informatics approaches to locate and identify
SNP’s and haplotypes on the HMOX-1 gene, for which the data was obtained from the NCBI database. Three haplotypes
were discovered and validated through statistical analysis based on the linkage disequilibrium measure (using squared
correlation coefficient of linkage disequilibrium) and the p-value was found to be <0.001 for any allele. Within one
haplotype group, the correlation between any two SNP’s was found to be high, with the correlation coefficient being
greater than 0.7 in all cases. The correlation between any two SNP’s not belonging to a haplotype group was
significantly lower (< 0.2). The haplotypes are mutually exclusive and encompass the entire global population as
represented in the 1000 genomes database. The geographical mapping of the haplotypes illustrates the potential for
haplotype groups to form clusters that exist preferentially in certain geographical regions. This provides reasonable
speculation for associations between haplotype groups forming allele genetic markers and diseases localized in
different geographical regions that are caused due to genetic variants.
10:40 a.m.
John Sun, Ottawa Hills High School
“The Inhibitory Effect of EGCG on TGF-β1 Mediated Fibrotic process in Lung Fibroblasts”
Objectives: Lung fibrosis is characterized by overproduction of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, such as collagen,
by activated fibroblasts. Although the etiology of this disease is unknown, transforming growth factor beta-1(TGF-β1)
is generally considered to play a central role in the development of fibrosis. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), a major
component of green tea, has been shown to have a strong antifibrotic effect on many organ fibrosis, including rat
model pulmonary fibrosis, though its precise effect on TGF-β1 remains unclear. To our knowledge, no studies have
been done to investigate these effects on human lung fibroblasts. This study investigates whether EGCG has
inhibitory effects on TGF-β1 mediated fibrotic process in lung fibroblasts and the mechanisms. Methods: Lung
fibroblasts were treated with TGF-β1 or EGCG together with TGF-β1. Collagen 1 (COL1), a-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA),
type I and Type II TGF-β receptors (TGFBR1,2) and phospho- Smad3 were measured by real time PCR and western blot.
Results: TGF-β1dramatically increased COL1, a-SMA, TGFBR1, TGFBR2, phopho-Smad3 expression. EGCG suppresses
TGF-β1 induced COL1, α-SMA, TGFBR1, TGFBR2 and phospho-Smad3 at mRNA and protein level. Conclusion: EGCG has
anti-fibrotic effects on TGF-β mediated fibrotic process in the lung fibroblasts. The antifibrogenic effect of EGCG is
mediated through interruption of TGF-β1/Smad3 signaling. EGCG has a potential therapeutic role in the treatment and
prevention of lung fibrosis.
14
The 50th Annual Ohio Junior Science & Humanities Symposium
Schedule of Events
Friday, March 22 (Cont.)
Announcements and Break (15 minutes)
11:15 a.m.-12:15 p.m.
Eighth Paper Session
Concurrent Viewing
Olscamp Hall 101B
Olscamp Hall 101A
11:15 a.m
Brandon Muschlitz, Gahanna Lincoln High School
The Comparison of Synthetic and Natural Fibers in Concrete Mixtures”
The purpose of this research was to compare natural fibers and synthetic fibers in concrete mixtures as well as to
standard samples of concrete and mortar. Each sample was tested on compressive strength tests of three days and
seven days as well as tests of water absorption and freeze-thaw. Three-day compressive strength tests found that cork
and paper fiber samples were statistically significant at a p=.05 level. By rejecting the null hypothesis, cork and paper
samples are statistically less strong than control samples. Water absorption tests found that concrete and mortar
samples gained less than 1.55 grams of water, but all fiber samples gained more than 2.2 grams of water. Comparing
synthetic to natural fibers, jute fibers absorbed statistically less water than the synthetic fibers tested.
Results suggest that natural fibers may be an alternative to synthetic fibers to concrete mixtures. Furthermore, natural
fibers may be less expensive than synthetic fibers and could be an alternative to synthetic fibers for developing
countries. Tests performed on concrete samples provide a well-rounded basis for evaluating each sample. Fibrous
concrete has many real world applications and could prove to be a safer alternative in natural disaster prone areas.
11:35 a.m
David Wang, William Mason High School
“Elucidation of histone deacetylase 3 c-terminus structure through ab initio protein prediction methods
(Phase 2)”
Histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3) is a transcription regulator which represses genes through the deacetylation of lysine
residues on histone tails. It is implicated in the regulation of cancer through transcriptional repression of pathways
leading to apoptosis. However, the structure of the c-terminus for HDAC3 (residues 370-428) is unknown, despite the
key role which it may play in determining HDAC3 function. Here, the c-terminus structure was predicted using a
two-phased approach involving the utilization of aggregate prediction server results for secondary structure
prediction as well as a novel algorithm for the prediction and analysis of potential docking sites for tertiary structure
prediction. Through protein docking, a quantitative measure was designed in which the effectiveness of docking site
predictions could be analyzed. The predicted structure suggests that in order to contribute to catalytic activity, the
c-terminus of HDAC3 bonds with the n-terminus of deacetylase activating domain in order to stabilize the protein
complex formed between SMRT/NCoR and HDAC3.
The 50th Annual Ohio Junior Science & Humanities Symposium
15
Schedule of Events
Friday, March 22 (Cont.)
11:55 a.m
Mitchell Pallaki, Saint Ignatius High School
“The Optimal Oil Absorbent Cleanup Analysis”
Oil spills are dangerous and economically devastating. This study evaluates which substance will absorb/adsorb the
most oil in salt versus fresh water, and therefore, be the optimal method for oil spill clean-up. It was hypothesized that
booms made of natural substances, such as hair and dog fur, when tested in a water-to-oil solution of a constant
concentration might perform better at absorbing oil than polypropylene, the industry standard. Furthermore, booms
tested in salt water would absorb more oil than in fresh water baths. N=20 fresh water trials and N=20 salt water trials
were conducted using 40-19g booms. They were prepared from each of the following substances: hair, dog fur,
dryer lint, polystyrene, polypropylene and peat moss. Each was tested to determine the booms’ absorptive properties
in simulated oil baths of both fresh and salt water. Booms were placed in oil: water baths with a 750:100 ml ratio for
5 minutes and removed. The remaining oil and water volume was measured and subtracted from the original volume,
and the amount of oil and water absorbed was calculated. The percentage of oil absorbed to the total amount of
liquid in the Fresh Water Bath is as follows: Hair 84%, Dog Fur 84%, Peat moss 80%, Polypropylene 79%, Polystyrene
75%, Lint 10%. The percentage of oil absorbed to the total amount of liquid in the Salt Water Bath is as follows: Dog
Fur 99%, Polypropylene 97%, Peat moss 93%, Polystyrene 77%, Hair 74%, Lint 13%. The average oil absorption in the
salt water and fresh water for the various substances were similar. The polypropylene, hair, and dog fur ab/adsorbed
the most oil. Boom efficiency was better in each case in salt water, except for hair. Dog fur efficiency exceeded
polypropylene in both environments. According to this study, dog fur is the optimal, environmentally friendly
substance for oil spill clean-up.
12:15 p.m.
1:45 p.m.
2:00 p.m.
2:30 p.m.
3:00 p.m.
Lunch
Judges Meeting/Luncheon
Advisory Board Luncheon
Student Advisory Board Meeting
Group Photograph
Students Dismantle Posters
Awards Ceremony
Adjournment
50th anniv s a r y
er
16
The 50th Annual Ohio Junior Science & Humanities Symposium
The Oaks
The Oaks
The Oaks
The Oaks
Student Union, Center Stairwell
Olscamp Hall 101A
Olscamp Hall 101B
Keynote Speaker
Dr. Karen S. Bjorkman
Distinguished University Professor of Astronomy
Dean of the College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics, The University of Toledo
Exploring the Universe in the 21st Century
Karen Bjorkman is an astronomer and astrophysicist who became fascinated with science, and particularly astronomy,
as a child watching the Apollo moon landings in real time on grainy black and white TV images. She obtained her B.S.
in Physics at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, worked for several years at an aerospace company as a
systems engineer, and then returned to graduate school for her M.S. and Ph.D. in Astrophysics at the University of
Colorado in Boulder.
After graduate school, she was a staff scientist at the Space Astronomy Laboratory of the University of
Wisconsin-Madison, where she was co-Investigator for the Wisconsin Ultraviolet Photo-Polarimeter Experiment
(WUPPE for short), a telescope that was flown twice on the NASA Space Shuttle. During the shuttle missions, she
worked on the operations team at the NASA Payload Operations Control Center. In 1996, she came to The University
of Toledo (UT) as an Assistant Professor, rising through the ranks to become a Full Professor in 2003. For several years
she was the Director of the Ritter Observatory. In 2009 she was selected as a Distinguished University Professor. She
was chair of the Department of Physics and Astronomy from 2008-2010, and in December 2010 she was named Dean
of the College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics at UT.
Dr. Bjorkman’s research focuses on disks around stars and (for some of these disks) their possible connections with
planetary systems around other stars. She uses observational data from both space-based and ground-based
telescopes around the world to study these objects. She has been awarded significant amounts of grant funding
and observing time at major observatories to support her research. She has been an invited speaker at national and
international astronomy meetings.
Dr. Bjorkman has provided significant service to the international astronomical community, and has been heavily
involved in education and public outreach. She regularly gives public talks on astronomy, space, and science, and
she was the original founder of the long-running Universe in the Parks program at the University of Wisconsin. She is
a co-founder of the Northwest Ohio chapter of the Association for Women in Science (AWIS) at UT. She currently serves
on the NSF Program Review Panel for the U.S. national observatories. Her awards include a Cottrell Scholar Award,
the Sigma Xi/Dion D. Raftopolous Award for Outstanding Research, a UT Outstanding Teaching Award, three NASA
Group Achievement Awards, and an Ohio Excellence in Education award.
The 50th Annual Ohio Junior Science & Humanities Symposium
17
2013 Poster Presenters
Brooke Ashbaugh, Hilltop High School
“Reading and Comprehension with Distractions”
Clare Bacon, Gahanna Lincoln High School
“A Study on the Effectiveness of Probiotic Bacteria
After Ultra-Violet Ray Induced Mutation Rain”
Taylor Batt, Hilltop High School
“Effect of Medicine on Wound Repair”
Gabriel Beck, Pettisville Local Schools
“The Effect of Different Types of Soap on the
Growth of Bacteria”
Andrew Blonsky, Homeschool
“Building a Better Speed Bump”
Mica Brooks, Our Lady of the Elms
“Concrete Air Void and Unit Weight Relations
Michael Burchfield, Sylvania Southview High School
“The Effects of Table Tennis on Reaction Time”
Sydnie Butterfield, Hilltop Junior High School
“The Effect of Intense and Regular Colors on the
Sight of Dogs”
Haylee Carroll, Hilltop High School
“Do Orthotics and Insoles Affect Performance?”
Kanithra Chandra, Solon High School
“The Analysis of the Antagonistic Characteristics of
the Extract of Centella asiatica, a South Asian Herb
on Breast Cancer Cell Lines MCF-7 and MDA-231”
Allison Clausius, Sylvania Southview High School
“Observing Energy Consumption at Southview and
Northview High Schools and its Effect on Green
House Gas Emissions”
Sevil Clifford, Sylvania Southview High School
“Comparing the Use of Sequential and Simultaneous
Lineups to Eyewitness Reliability”
18
Kailey Creamer, Hilltop High School
“The Bacteria Content in Ice at Fast Food
Restaurants”
Jacob Dennis, Pettisville Local Schools
“The Effect of Row Spacing on Glycine max”
Bhakti Dixit, Sylvania Southview High School
“The Effects of Baking Soda and Peroxide on
Stained Teeth”
Catherine Dong, Sylvania Southview High School
“The Role of Tyrosine 704 in Cell Proliferation and
Survival”
Griffin Dubanowich, Buckeye Valley High School
“The Impact of the Pin 7 Gene on the Set Point
Angles of Lateral Roots in the Arabidopsis
Thaliana Plant”
Nicolette Dunson, Hilltop High School
“What Beverage Deteriorates Animal Stomach
Lining the Quickest?”
Aric Floyd, Hawken Upper School
“Synthesis of Phase-Controlled Iron Oxide
Nanoparticles”
Ismael Gad, Sylvania Southview High School
“The Effects of Manuka Honey on Streptococcus
salivarius”
Shaleen Goel, Sylvania Southview High School
“The Effects of Different Moods on Memory
Retrieval”
Rachel Green, Louisville High School
“The Effects of Distance from the Pollution
Source on the Amount of Air Pollution”
Bradley Grimm, Hilltop High School
“Effectiveness of Household Cleaners on
Escherichia coli”
Ramya Gutta, Mason High School
“Enhancing Properties of Recycled Paper Pulp
Using Chemicals”
The 50th Annual Ohio Junior Science & Humanities Symposium
2013 Poster Presenters
Nate Hartzler, Pettisville Local Schools
“Does the Type of Wood Affect a Bows Ability to
Project an Arrow?”
Lauren Jenkins, Ottawa Hills High School
“Comparison of Horseshoe wear on Dirt vs.
Synthetic Racetrack Surfaces”
Rona Jiang, Sylvania Southview High School
“Differing Levels of Nitrogen and Toxic Boron on
Azolla caroliniana”
Ragavi Lanka, Sylvania Southview High School
“The Effect of Carbohydrate Mediums on Yeast
Fermentation”
Jaclyn Lovejoy, Hilltop Junior High School
“Gerbils Affected by Light”
Lance Lu, Sylvania Southview High School
“The Relationship Between Friendship and the
Other-race Effect”
Emily Maneval, Hilltop High School
“The Effectiveness of Different Acne Medications
on Bacteria”
Tim Maneval, Hilltop Junior High School
“Soil vs Hydroponics”
Hannah Meller, Pettisville Local Schools
“A Comparison of the Effect of Various Environments
on the Yield of Lactuca sativa”
Jered Nathan, Hilltop High School
“The Effects of pH level on Brine Shrimp Survival”
Deborah Okeke, Sylvania Southview High School
“Suggestive Interviewing and Its Effect on False
Memory”
Sara Pharazyn, Buckeye Valley High School
“Determining How Quickly Different Pollutants
Travel Through Soil: Part 2”
Mallory Rowan, Gahanna Lincoln High School
“An Investigation of the Effects of Garcinol on
the Regenerative Abilities in Dugesia tigrina”
Sydney Schmitt, Hilltop High School
“Does Liquid Foundation or Pressed Powder
Grow More Bacteria?”
Kayla Settlemire, Hilltop High School
“Gender Response to Frustration”
Emily Sheng, Sylvania Southview High School
“Word Association and the Stroop Effect”
Kyle Shepherd, Louisville High School
“The Effect of Keyword Length on the Time it
Takes to Encrypt a Message”
Shival Sinha, Sylvania Southview High School
“The Effect of Music on Blood Pressure”
Jackie Smith, Hilltop High School
“Which Dental Crown is Strongest?”
Mohamed Meziane-Tani, Sylvania Southview High
School
“The Effects of Varied Food Sources on the Efficiency
of Physarum polycehphalum in Solving Mazes”
Elaine Souder, Louisville High School
“The Optimal Environment for Ethanol Production”
Brittney Mocherman, Hilltop High School
“Does Tap Or Spring Water Have the Most Bacteria
After Sitting for Several Days?”
Emma Strick, Berea High School
“The Presence of Sunscreen in Lake Erie and its
Effect on Freshwater Ecosystems”
The 50th Annual Ohio Junior Science & Humanities Symposium
19
2013 Poster Presenters
Doug Synowka, Louisville High School
“The Effects of a Fruit Based Fertilizer on Growth
of Cat Grass”
Lily Yan, Sylvania Southview High School
“Constructing a Solar Powered Toy Car with Similar
Velocity Rates as an AAA Battery Powered Toy Car”
Phillip Thomas, Louisville High School
“How Environmental Factors Affect the Grouping
of Deer”
Eric Zhu, Sylvania Southview High School
“The Effects of Differing Levels of Melatonin on
the Lifespan of Caenorhabditis elegans”
Leah Thompson, Hilltop High School
“Which Hand Soap Works Best at Eliminating
Bacteria?”
Frances Zwick, Louisville High-School
“The Effects of Time of Year on Duration and Shape
of Path of Hurricanes and Tropical Storms in the
Atlantic Hurricane Season”
Megan Trent, Hilltop High School
“How Age Affects Identification of Edible and
Non-edible Products”
20
The 50th Annual Ohio Junior Science & Humanities Symposium
Judges Score Sheet for
Paper Presenters
Name of Student __________________________________ Name of Judge: __________________________________
School______________________________________________________________________________________________
The Ohio JSHS recognizes students for original research achievements in the sciences, technology, engineering, or
mathematics (STEM). The overall requirement for a paper presentation is that students demonstrate valid investigation
and experimentation aimed at discovery of knowledge. The judging criteria and scoring for the Ohio JSHS are presented
in the following chart. This scale has a total score of 30 points and serves as the basis for discussions among the judging
team. The decisions of the judging team are final.
1= Fair
2 = Satisfactory
3 = Good
4 = Excellent
5 = Superior
Suggested
Weight
Judging Criteria
Statement and identification of research problem
• Is the problem clearly stated?
• Does the presenter demonstrate understanding of existing knowledge about the research problem?
1 2 3 4 5
Scientific thought, creativity/originality
• Process skills demonstrated by the student in the solution to the research problem and/or the
research design
• Student demonstrates his or her individual contributions to and understanding of the
research problem
• Level of effort
1 2 3 4 5
Research design, procedures (materials & methods), results
1. Science
• Appropriateness of research design and procedures
• Identification and control of variables
• Reproducibility
2. Engineering, computer science, technology
• Workable solution that is acceptable to a potential user
• Recognition of economic feasibility of solution
• Recognition of relationship between design and end product
• Tested for performance under conditions of use
• Results offer an improvement over previous alternatives
1 2 3 4 5
Discussion/conclusions
• Clarity in stating conclusion
• Logical conclusion that is relevant to the research problem and the results of experimentation
or testing
• Recognizes limits and significance of results
• Evidence of student’s understanding of the scientific or technological principles
• Theoretical or practical implications recognized
• What was learned?
1 2 3 4 5
Skill in communicating research results–oral presentation and written report
• Clarity in communicating research results to non-specialized audience and to judges
• Definition of terms as necessary
• Appropriate use of audio-visuals
• Response to questions from audience and judges
Acknowledgment of sources and major assistance received
1 2 3 4 5
1 2 3 4 5
TOTAL SCORE
The 50th Annual Ohio Junior Science & Humanities Symposium
21
Judges Score Sheet for
Poster Presenters
1
2
3
4
Needs Improvement
Acceptable
Good
Excellent
Appearance/
Clarity
The poster is difficult to
understand, and/or lacks
important information or
has largely excessive and
superfluous information.
Organization and
appearance of the poster
is adequate but could be
improved; some sections
are significantly deficient
or excessive.
Poster is logically
organized; use of
headings, fonts, etc. is
good; some text is
overly lengthy and/or
contains errors
Poster is logically
organized; effectively
uses headings, fonts,
colors and white space;
text is concise and
error-free
Abstract*
Abstract does not
represent student’s
research or is seriously
deficient in terms of
accuracy, completeness,
clarity and conciseness.
Abstract is adequate;
but has significant
deficiency in accuracy,
completeness, clarity,
and/or conciseness.
Abstract mostly
represents student’s
research; but is slightly
deficient in accuracy,
completeness, clarity,
or conciseness.
Abstract accurately
represents the student’s
research; clearly and
accurately summarizes
the project and is
complete and concise.
Research
Questions*
Research questions are
unclear and not aligned
to the purpose of the
study
Research questions are
adequately defined but
have significant lack of
clarity or alignment with
the purpose of the study
Research questions are
well defined but have
slight lack of clarity or
alignment with the
purpose of the study
Research questions are
very clearly defined and
well aligned with the
purpose of the study
Significance of
the Research
Explanation of the
research problem and
its connection to broader
issues is largely deficient
Explanation of research
problem and its connection to broader issues is
significantly deficient but
has some good points.
Explanation of research
problem and its connection to broader issues has
minor deficiencies or is
slightly weak
Student clearly explains
the research problem
being addressed by the
study; clear connections
are made to broader issues
Research
Methods
Methods are not
appropriate for the
purpose of the study
or the description is
seriously deficient
Methods are somewhat
appropriate and/or the
description has some
significant deficiencies
Methods are largely
well chosen and well
described but there are
some slight deficiencies
Methods creatively and
effectively support the
purpose of the study
and the description is
complete, easy to
understand, and concise
Conclusions*
Unreasonable conclusions
are provided and/or no
supporting evidence is
provided
Conclusions are
appropriate but there are
significant deficiencies in
evidence or reasoning
Conclusions are
reasonable and
supported by evidence
but there are slight
deficiencies
All appropriate
conclusions are cited
and well justified by
evidence, reasoning is
sound and complete
Student identification
of limitations is largely
lacking or deficient
Student identification
and explanation of
limitations has
significant deficiencies
Student identification
and explanation of
limitations has slight
deficiencies
Student clearly and
completely identifies
and explains all
limitations in the study
Graphs and/or tables are
largely deficient with
major flaws or omissions
Graphs and/or tables
have significant
deficiencies in organization, completeness, or
appropriateness
Graphs and/or tables
have slight deficiencies
in organization,
completeness, accuracy,
or appropriateness
Graphs and/or tables
are appropriate, well
organized, complete,
and accurate
Student demonstrates
little or incorrect
knowledge of project
when answering
questions
There are some
significant deficiencies in
the student’s knowledge
of the project when
answering questions
There are slight
deficiencies in the
student’s knowledge
of the project when
answering questions.
Student is very
knowledgeable about
the project; effectively
handles difficult
questions
Student interacts
poorly, unprofessionally,
or inappropriately with
the judge
Student speaking and
interaction with the
judge is adequate but
lacks some clarity,
confidence, and poise.
Student is professional
with only slight
deficiency in clarity,
confidence, or poise
Student is professional
and displays excellent
enthusiasm, confidence,
and poise
Scoring Category
Limitations
Graphs and/
or Tables*
Knowledge of
Project/Handling
of Questions
Presence
22
* Score zero if not provided at all
The 50 Annual Ohio Junior Science & Humanities Symposium
th
Score
TOTAL SCORE
of 40
Research Paper Awardees: 2012
1st Place Winner
– Christopher Ellis, Sylvania Southview High School
• $2,000 Ohio JSHS College Scholarship sponsored by the United States Army, Navy, and Air Force
• Attended the 2012 National JSHS held in Bethesda, Maryland, with expenses paid
• Presented his Research Paper at the 2012 National JSHS
• Competed for a $12,000, $8,000 or $4,000 scholarship plus an expenses-paid trip to the London
International Youth Science Forum (LIYSF)
2nd Place Winner
– Brian Haidet, Sylvania Southview High School
• $1,500 Ohio JSHS College Scholarship sponsored by the United States Army, Navy, and Air Force
• Attended the 2012 National JSHS held in Bethesda, Maryland, with expenses paid
• Presented his Research Paper at the 2012 National JSHS
• Competed for a $12,000, $8,000 or $4,000 scholarship plus an expenses-paid trip to the London
International Youth Science Forum (LIYSF)
3rd Place Winner
– Aarti Kumar, William Mason High School
• $1,000 Ohio JSHS College Scholarship sponsored by the United States Army, Navy, and Air Force
• Attended the 2012 National JSHS held in Bethesda, Maryland, with expenses paid
• Presented her Research Paper in the Poster Session at the 2012 National JSHS
4th Place Winner
– Jian Chen, Gahanna Lincoln High School
• $500 Award sponsored by the College of Arts and Sciences, BGSU
• Attended the 2012 National JSHS held in Bethesda, Maryland, with expenses paid
5th Place Winner – Austen Mance, Sylvania Southview High School
• $250 Award sponsored by the Chemistry Department, BGSU
• Attended the 2012 National JSHS held in Bethesda, Maryland, with expenses paid
1st Alternate
– David Wang, William Mason High School
• $150 Award sponsored by College of Education and Human Development, BGSU
2nd Alternate
– Smriti Gupta, Sylvania Southview High School
• $100 Award sponsored by the Physics and Astronomy Department, BGSU
Thomas Alva Edison Award
• $250 Award sponsored by the
Department of Biological Sciences, BGSU
Chrysta Beck, Pettisville High School &
Bluye DeMessie, William Mason High School
The 50th Annual Ohio Junior Science & Humanities Symposium
23
Research Poster Awardees: 2012
Peoples’ Choice Awards
High School Division
1st Place: Omar Gad, Sylvania Southview High School
2nd Place: Jared Galloway, Fairland High School
3rd Place: Sumit Banerjee, Maumee Valley Country Day
Cherice Peters, Fairland High School
Alex Ragusitu, Sylvania Southview High School
Nisitha Sengottuvel, Gahanna Lincoln High School
Elaine Souder, Louisville High School
Junior High Division
Luke Kleilein, Buckeye Valley Middle School
Kaela Ream, Buckeye Valley Middle School
Andrew Sauder, Pettisville Junior High School
Teacher Awardee: 2012
Colonel George F. Leist Distinguished Teacher Award
– Mr. Fred Donelson, Gahanna Lincoln High School
• $500 School Award sponsored by the United States Army,
Navy, and Air Force
Mr. Fred Donelson, Gahanna Lincoln High School
24
The 50th Annual Ohio Junior Science & Humanities Symposium
Research Paper Awards: 2013
1st Place Winner
$2,000 College Scholarship sponsored by the United States Army, Navy, and Air Force
• Presents research paper at the National JSHS with expenses paid
• Chance to compete for an expenses-paid trip to the London International Youth Science Forum (LIYSF)
2nd Place Winner
$1,500 College Scholarship sponsored by the United States Army, Navy, and Air Force
• Presents research paper at the National JSHS with expenses paid
• Chance to compete for an expenses-paid trip to the London International Youth Science Forum (LIYSF)
The 1st and 2nd place winners have an opportunity to win the following awards at the National JSHS:
• Six $12,000 undergraduate tuition scholarships, awarded to each of the 1st place finalists in the the
National research paper competition
• Six $8,000 undergraduate tuition scholarships, awarded to each of the 2nd place finalists in the the
National research paper competition
• Six $4,000 undergraduate tuition scholarships, awarded to each of the 3rd place finalists in the the
National research paper competition
• An expenses-paid trip to the London International Youth Science Forum, an exchange program bringing
together over 400 participants from 60 nations. The London trip is awarded to each of the 1st place
National JSHS finalists; the runner-ups are alternate winners.
3rd Place Winner
$1,000 College Scholarship sponsored by the United States Army, Navy, and Air Force
• Presents poster at the National JSHS with expenses paid
• Expenses-paid trip to the the National JSHS
4th Place Winner
$500 Award sponsored by the College of Arts and Sciences, BGSU
• Expenses-paid trip to the the National JSHS
5th Place Winner
$250 Award sponsored by the Department of Chemistry, BGSU
• Expenses-paid trip to the the National JSHS
1st Alternate
$150 Award sponsored by the College of Education and Human Development, BGSU
2nd Alternate
$100 Award sponsored by the Department of Physics and Astronomy, BGSU
Thomas Alva Edison Award
$250 Award sponsored by the Department of Biological Sciences, BGSU
The 50th Annual Ohio Junior Science & Humanities Symposium
25
Research Poster Awards: 2013
“Best in Show” Award: 9th and 12th Grade Overall
$100 Gift Certificate
1st Place: 9th and 10th Grade Award
$50 Gift Certificate
1st Place: 11th and 12th Grade Award
$50 Gift Certificate
2nd Place: 9th and 10th Grade Award
50th anniv s a r y
er
$25 Gift Certificate
2nd Place: 11th and 12th Grade Award
$25 Gift Certificate
Teacher Awardee: 2013
Colonel George F. Leist Distinguished Teacher Award
$500 Teacher Award for Classroom Materials sponsored by the United States Army, Navy, and Air Force
26
The 50th Annual Ohio Junior Science & Humanities Symposium
Judging Teams
2013 Ohio Junior Science & Humanities Symposium
Paper Judges
Dr. Anjali Gray
Dr. Jon Bjorkman
Dr. David Meel
Dr. Stephania Messersmith
Dr. Joanne Rebbeck
Mr. Gerald Szelagowski
Biology & Health Sciences, Lourdes University
Physics & Astronomy, The University of Toledo
Mathematics & Statistics, Bowling Green State University
Chemistry, Bowling Green State University
United States Department of Agriculture, Forest Service
Geologist, Industrial Chemist, Retired
Poster Judges
Dr. Jonathan Bostic
Mr. Jake Burgoon
Dr. Steven Chung
Dr. Kate Dellenbusch
Dr. Enrique Gomezdelcampo
Dr. Jeremy Klosterman
Dr. John Laird
Dr. Raymond Larson
Dr. Andrew Layden
Dr. Kate Mejiritski
Dr. Bob Midden
Dr. Cordula Mora
Dr. Kurt Panter
Dr. Matt Partin
Dr. William Scovell
Dr. Glenn Tiede
Dr. Eileen Underwood
Dr. Rick Worch
Dr. Guy Zimmerman
School of Teaching and Learning, BGSU
NWO/COSMOS, BGSU
Chemistry, BGSU
Physics and Astronomy, BGSU
Environment and Sustainability, BGSU
Chemistry, BGSU
Physics and Astronomy, BGSU
Biological Sciences, BGSU
Physics and Astronomy, BGSU
Chemistry, BGSU
Chemistry, BGSU
Psychology, BGSU
Geology Department, BGSU
Biological Sciences, BGSU
Emeritus Professor, BGSU
Physics and Astronomy, BGSU
Biological Sciences, BGSU
School of Teaching and Learning, BGSU
Computer Science, BGSU
The 50th Annual Ohio Junior Science & Humanities Symposium
27
Acknowledgments
2013 Ohio Junior Science & Humanities Symposium
Dr. Emilio Duran, Ohio JSHS Director, School of Teaching and Learning, BGSU
Dr. Robert Midden, NWO/COSMOS Director, Department of Chemistry, BGSU
LTC Douglas A. Mohler, U.S. Army, Commander/Professor, Military Science, BGSU
Ms. Iris Szelagowski, Ohio JSHS Coordinator, Science Teacher, Retired
Ms. Donna Meller, Ohio JSHS Assistant Coordinator, Science Teacher, Pettisville Local Schools
Ms. Blythe Tipping, Ohio JSHS Assistant Coordinator, Science Teacher, Sylvania Southview High School
Session Moderators
Fred Donelson
Cristin Hagans
Abbie Smith
Robert Sudomir
Matt Wallschlaeger
Gahanna Lincoln High School, Teacher
Hilltop High School, Teacher
Millcreek-West Unity High School, Teacher
Louisville High School, Teacher
Big Walnut High School, Teacher
Support Staff
Lisa Addis
Jessica Belcher
Jacob Burgoon
Patie Ball
NWO/COSMOS, Graphic Design/Web Support
NWO/COSMOS, Registration/Web Support
NWO/COSMOS, Evaluation
Photographer
Session Presiders/Program Assistants/Chaperones
BGSU Undergraduate Students
Bowling Green State University Laboratory Research Tours
Planetarium - Dale Smith, Ph.D.; Planetarium Director
Chemistry Lab - Stephania Messersmith, Ph.D.; Chemistry Research Lab and Steven Chung, Ph.D.; Department of Chemistry
Herpetology Lab - Eileen M. Underwood, Ph.D.; Department of Biological Sciences
Marine Biology Lab - Matthew L. Partin, Ph.D.; Marine Lab Coordinator; Department of Biological Sciences
Physics Lab – John B. Laird Ph.D.; Chair, Department of Physics and Astronomy
University Sponsors
Community Sponsors
College of Arts and Sciences, BGSU
College of Education and Human Development, BGSU
Department of Biological Sciences, BGSU
Department of Chemistry, BGSU
Department of Physics and Astronomy, BGSU
Northwest Ohio Center for Excellence in STEM Education, BGSU
School of Teaching and Learning, BGSU
Larry Fioritto, Perstorp Polyols, Inc., Toledo
Sylvan Studios, Sylvania
Always Promoting, Maumee
28
Special Thanks
Ice Arena, BGSU
The Oaks, BGSU
Hampton Inn, Bowling Green
The 50th Annual Ohio Junior Science & Humanities Symposium
Advisory Board
2013 Ohio Junior Science & Humanities Symposium
Dr. Emilio Duran, Ohio JSHS Director
School of Teaching and Learning, BGSU
Dr. Robert Midden, NWO/COSMOS Director
Department of Chemistry, BGSU
Ms. Iris Szelagowski
Ohio JSHS Coordinator
Ms. Donna Meller
Pettisville High School
Ohio JSHS Assistant Coordinator
Ms. Blythe Tipping
Sylvania Southview High School
Ohio JSHS Assistant Coordinator
Ms. Lisa Addis
NWO/COSMOS, BGSU
Dr. Lena Ballone Duran
School of Teaching and Learning, BGSU
Ms. Jessica Belcher
NWO/COSMOS, BGSU
Mr. Jacob Burgoon
NWO/COSMOS, BGSU
Ms. Ann Burkam
Buckeye Valley Middle School
Mr. Fred Donelson
Gahanna Lincoln High School
Mr. Hans Glandorff
Bowling Green High School
Ms. Cristin Hagans
Hilltop High School
Mr. George B. Leist
Lucas Country Board of DD
Ms. Linda Lower
Perstorp Polyols, Inc.
Ms. Rebekah Rice
Gahanna Lincoln High School
Ms. Abbie Smith
Millcreek-West Unity School
Ms. Susan Stearns
NWO/COSMOS, BGSU
Mr. Robert Sudomir
Louisville High School
Mr. Gerald Szelagowski
Geologist, Industrial Chemist, Retired
Mr. Daniel Yaussy
Ohio State University
Ms. Leslie Yaussy, RN, BSN
Public Health Nurse, Adv. Professional, Delaware
50th anniv s a r y
er
The 50th Annual Ohio Junior Science & Humanities Symposium
29
History of the Ohio JSHS
Colonel George F. Leist, U. S. Army
Founder, Junior Science & Humanities Symposium
Recognized by The Academy of Applied Science
for Pioneering Effects and Vision
Colonel George F. Leist, an Ohio native, graduated from West
Point in 1937 and was commissioned as a 2nd Lieutenant in the
United States Army. At the beginning of his distinguished
military career, he served as Coast Artillery Officer in New York
and Virginia. During World War II, Colonel Leist had combat experience with the First U.S. Army and
the Ninth Air Force Ordinance in North Africa, Italy, and England. He participated in the Invasion of
France and then moved on to Belgium and Germany. He was awarded the Bronze Star and Army
Commendation medals. His post-war duty and research experiences included the fields of engineering
and metallurgy at MIT.
Following the 1958 launch of the Russian satellite Sputnik, Colonel Leist, then the Commanding Officer
of the Office of Ordinance Research in North Carolina, initiated the Junior Science and Humanities
Symposium (JSHS) for secondary school science students. The first symposium took place at Duke
University in 1958 and spread throughout the United States to many universities during the next four
years. In 1962, the National JSHS was created; the Ohio JSHS was initiated the following year in 1963.
The first Ohio JSHS was held at Bowling Green State University where Dr. Gerald Acker served as Director.
Other universities that have served as host for the Ohio JSHS include Ohio University, Kent State,
The Medical College of Ohio (now The University of Toledo Medical School), and The University of Toledo.
The JSHS Program has been sponsored by the United States Department of the Army since its
inception. The Departments of the Navy and Air Force joined this initiative after 1995 to increase and
encourage student interest in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). This sponsorship
and the cooperative efforts of universities throughout the nation have expanded the JSHS. This program
now encompasses forty-eight regional symposia reaching high schools throughout the United States,
Puerto Rico, and DOD Schools in Europe and the Pacific.
Six years ago, the Ohio JSHS returned to Bowling Green State University with Dr. Emilio Duran as Director.
This year, BGSU and the School of Teaching and Learning at BGSU with the support of The Northwest
Ohio Center for Excellence in STEM Education will host the 50th Ohio JSHS. In this tradition, Colonel Leist’s
legacy lives on through the accomplishments of the many students who have experienced the JSHS
program with its opportunities for achievement and recognition in scientific research. Through
international dissemination, JSHS participants have the opportunity to share their research endeavors
with students not only nationally, but also globally.
30
The 50th Annual Ohio Junior Science & Humanities Symposium
Cumulative Awards
Thomas Alva Edison Award
The Thomas Alva Edison Award is presented each year to the student who has independently constructed
research equipment and carried out a successful research investigation. The following students are past
winners of this award:
Year
1978
1979
1981
1982
1983
1984
1985
1986
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
1992
1993
1994
1995
1996
1997
1998
1999
2000
2001
2002
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012
2012
Name
Robert Pearsall
Diana Lauck
James Kasner
Cindy Raymond
Eric Wertz
Lyle Reusser
David Roberts
Eric Germann
Rodney Hartman
Matthew Fuerst
Michael McGrath
Mathew Heston
Michael Ruthemeyer
Gregory Lohman
Aimee Springowski
Jeff Smith
Stephan M. Gogola
Adreanna Decker
Lev Horodyskyj
Lev Horodyskyj
Andrew Sauer
Margaret Engoren
Lindsey Heine
James Ristow
Jared Steed
Jared Steed
Robbie Christian
Alex Liber
Ruth Chang
Victoria Ellis
Elizabeth Engoren
Abigail Styron
Russell Kittel
Sulaiman Mustapha
Chrysta Beck
Bluye DeMessie
School
Patrick Henry High School, Hamler
Ravenna High School, Ravenna
West Holmes High School, Millersburg
Roosevelt High School, Kent
Lakeview High School, Stow
West Holmes High School, Millersburg
Westerville North High School
Lincolnview High School, Van Wert Co.
Bloom-Carroll High School, Carroll
Wickliffe Senior High School
Ashland City High School
Carrollton High School
St. Xavier High School, Cincinnati
Highland High School, Medina
Brookside High School, Sheffield Lake
Sylvania Southview High School
Theodore Roosevelt High School, Kent
Barnesville High School
Padua Franciscan High School, North Royalton
Padua Franciscan High School, North Royalton
St. Xavier High School, Cincinnati
Sylvania Southview High School
Sylvania Southview High School
Theodore Roosevelt High School, Kent
Buckeye Valley High School, Delaware
Buckeye Valley High School, Delaware
Hoover High School, North Canton
Sylvania Southview High School
Sylvania Southview High School
Sylvania Southview High School
Sylvania Southview High School
Hilltop High School, Alvordton
Gahanna Lincoln High School
Toledo Islamic Academy
Pettisville High School
William Mason High School
The 50th Annual Ohio Junior Science & Humanities Symposium
31
The Colonel George F. Leist Distinguished
Teacher Award
Each year, an Ohio teacher is selected to receive The Colonel George F. Leist Distinguished Teacher Award.
The United States Army, Navy, and Air Force sponsor this award of $500 to purchase books, supplies,
and equipment for the school. The following teachers have been honored as past winners of the
Colonel George F. Leist Distinguished Teacher Award:
32
Year
Name
School
1978
Father Charles S. Sweeney
St. John’s High School, Toledo
1979
Father James Lotze
St. John’s High School, Toledo
1980
Earl Shafer
Bowling Green High School
1981
Jerry Jividen
Hudson High School
1982
Jon Secaur
Roosevelt High School, Kent
1983
Sister Mary Blandina
Cardinal Stritch High School, Toledo
1984
Rebecca Stricklin
Oak Hills High School, Cincinnati
1985
Kay Ballantine
Sheridan High School, Thornville
1986
Iris Szelagowski
Woodward High School, Toledo
1987
Diane Gabriel
Bloom-Carroll High School, Carroll
1988
Spencer E. Reams
Benjamin Logan High School, Zanesfield
1989
Father Charles S. Sweeney
St. John’s High School, Toledo
1990
Jon Secaur
Roosevelt High School, Kent
1991
John A. Blakeman
Perkins High School, Sandusky
1992
Penny Karabedian Cobau
Sylvania Southview High School
1993
Vaughn D. Leigh
Hudson High School
1994
Penny Karabedian Cobau
Sylvania Southview High School
1995
Kathleen Keller
Carroll High School, Dayton
1996
John Jameson
Cincinnati Country Day
1997
Evelyn Davidson
Ursuline Academy, Cincinnati
1998
Paula Butler
Cincinnati Country Day
1999
Barbara Kraemer
Padua Franciscan High School, North Royalton
2000
Susan Sanders
Padua Franciscan High School, North Royalton
2001
Tim Giulivg
Padua Franciscan High School, North Royalton
2002
Darla Warnecke
Miller City High School
2003
Peggy Sheets
Upper Arlington High School
2004
Connie Hubbard
Hoover High School, North Canton
2005
Ann Burkam
Buckeye Valley Middle School, Delaware
2006
Hans Glandorff
Bowling Green High School
2007
Connie Hubbard
Hoover High School, North Canton
2008
Donna Meller
Pettisville Local Schools, Wauseon
2009
Cristin Hagans
Hilltop High School, West Unity
2010
Blythe Tipping
Sylvania Southview High School
2011
Robert Sudomir
Louisville High School
2012
Fred Donelson
Gahanna Lincoln High School
The 50th Annual Ohio Junior Science & Humanities Symposium
Cumulative Record of the State of Ohio Student
Presenters to the National JSHS
Year
Name
School
Year
Name
School
1966-L
1967-L
1968-L
1969-L
Patricia Fraser
Mark Meuty
Katharine Lowenhaupt
Susan Krueger
1970-L
1971-L
1972-L
1973-L
1974-L
1975-L
1976
1977
1978
1979-L
1980
1981
1982
1983
1984
1985
1986
1987
1988
Bruce Arthur
Robert Butcher
Jon Alexander
William Steers
Francis Sydnor
Jane Stoffregen
Harlan Krumholz
Paul Cahill
Kevin Anderson
Eric Evans
Carl Von Patterson
Kelly McAleese
Robert Sturgill
Shirley Bodi
Douglas Gorman
Robert Freeman
Jill Thomley
Kenneth Clubok
Ron Birnbaum
1994-L
1995
1996
1997
1998
1999
2000-L
Scott Damrauer
Amy Caudy
Paul Gemin
Smita Dé
Stephanie Meyers
Jason Lee Douglas
Ulyana Horodyskyj
2001
Ulyana Horodyskyj
2002
Ulyana Horodyskyj
2003-L
2004
2005
1989
1990
1991
1992
1993
Aaron P. Garcia
Simon Solotko
Joann Elizabeth Roy
Andrew Gano
Daniel Stevenson
Regina HS, Mayfield Heights
Woodward HS, Toledo
Walnut Hills HS, Cincinnati
Magnificant HS,
North Olmsted
Westerville HS
Wapakoneta HS
St. John’s HS, Maumee
St. John’s HS, Toledo
St. John’s HS, Toledo
St. Ursula Academy, Toledo
Meadowdale HS, Dayton
East HS, Akron
St. John’s HS, Toledo
Stow HS
Ravenna HS
Black River HS, Medina
St. John’s HS Toledo
Cardinal Stritch HS, Toledo
Oak Hills HS, Cincinnati
Sheridan HS, Thornville
Woodward HS, Toledo
Athens HS
Maumee Valley Country Day
School, Toledo
St. John’s HS, Toledo
Roosevelt HS, Kent
Perkins HS, Sandusky
Sylvania Southview HS
Hudson HS
James Zhou
Paul Hoffman
Paul Scheid
Laura Johnson
Daniel Litt
Madhav Chopra
Jyotiraditya Sinha
Saumitra Thakur
Aaditya Shidham
David Litt
Keith Hawkins
Kevin Hawkins
Karen Kruzer
Dennis Tseng
Austen Mance
Himanshu Savardekar
Christopher Ellis
Brian Haidet
Sylvania Southview HS
Big Walnut HS, Sunbury
Carroll HS, Dayton
Cincinnati Country Day School
Ursuline Academy, Cincinnati
Cincinnati Country Day School
Padua Franciscan HS, North
Royalton
Padua Franciscan HS, North
Royalton
Padua Franciscan HS, North
Royalton
Upper Arlington HS
Upper Arlington HS
Gilmour Academy, Gates Mills
Upper Arlington HS
Orange HS, Pepper Pike
Hoover HS, North Canton
Hoover HS, North Canton
Sylvania Southview HS
Upper Arlington HS
Orange HS, Pepper Pike
GlenOak HS, Canton
GlenOak HS, Canton
West Geauga HS, Chesterland
William Mason HS, Mason
Sylvania Southview HS
Dublin Coffman HS
Sylvania Southview HS
Sylvania Southview HS
2006
2007
2008-L
2009-L
2010
2011
2012
L = Winners of National JSHS who presented papers at the London International Youth Science Forum (LIYSF).
The 50th Annual Ohio Junior Science & Humanities Symposium
33
The 50th Annual Ohio Junior
Science & Humanities Symposium
March 20-22, 2013
50th anniv s a r y
er
Sponsored by:
School of Teaching and Learning