Gilbertsville Honors Firefighter Jim Pochy and His Wife, Susie

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Gilbertsville Honors Firefighter Jim Pochy and His Wife, Susie
VOL. 147 - NO. 41
SIDNEY, NEW YORK — THURSDAY, OCT. 24, 2013
SUGGESTED PRICE 75¢
Gilbertsville Honors Firefighter
Jim Pochy and His Wife, Susie
GILBERTSVILLE - Asking Jim and Susie Pochy to tell
a few stories from years past
is like opening the nozzle on a
fire hose - almost a literal fire
hose because between them
they have almost a century of
experience with the Gilbertsville Fire Department and
that’s a lot of stories. Jim was
recently honored for 50 years
of service and Susie will soon
reach that milestone as well.
Jim, or Pooch as he’s
known to his many friends,
got started in the fire department many years ago when he
was in high school and student
volunteers were needed to assist during a tragic drowning
in the nearby Butternut Creek.
While helping he met some
of the members of the fire department who encouraged him
to join up. Like a lot of young
couples, they got involved in
things together, so when Jim
joined the fire department,
Susie joined the auxiliary and
they’ve been serving the com-
JIM AND SUSIE POCHY are shown here with the truck
that was dedicated in Jim’s honor and the plaque presented to him for his fifty years of service.
Trick-Or-Treat!
Halloween Fun Is Planned for Tri-Town Area Youth
Halloween is a fun time for
the youngsters. Many of our
local communities designate
Trick or Treat times and organizations hold special events.
The following are several of
the special events, others are
elsewhere in this newspaper
and additional Halloween
events will be included next
week. Motorists are cautioned
to be particularly watchful for
the children on village streets.
Young children going out
Trick or Treating should be
accompanied by an adult.
AFTON – A fun night for all
ages will be held in the Family
Life Center at the First Baptist
Church in Afton on Thursday,
Oct. 31. From 6 to 8 p.m. there
will be games, entertainment
and refreshments of cider and
donuts. All are welcome to
come in costume.
BAINBRIDGE – The annual Halloween festivities in
the Village of Bainbridge will
be celebrated on Thursday,
Oct. 31. Children are encouraged to trick-or-treat between
the hours of 5 and 7 p.m. The
Bainbridge Lions Club will
be hosting their annual Night
of Fun at the Greenlawn Elementary School from 7 to
8:30 p.m.
SIDNEY – The Sidney
Village Board has declared
Thursday, Oct. 31 between 5
p.m. and dusk, Trick or Treat
night in the village. If you
would like the young visitors,
please turn your porch light
on.
UNADILLA – The annual
Unadilla Halloween
Parade will be held at 7 p.m.
on Thursday, Oct. 31 in the
Unadilla Elementary School
gymnasium. Prizes will go to
all participants as well as lst,
2nd, 3rd place and best of costume. Refreshments will be
provided. The parade is sponsored by Unadilla Community
Service.
TWO MEET AND GREETS were held recently by GOP
candidates for the Sidney Town Board. Present were
(l-r) Jody Proffitt, candidate for a council seat; Eugene
“Gene” Pigford, candidate for supervisor; and John
Woodyshek, candidate for a council seat. The events
were held at the Sidney Municipal Public Library and
The Schoolhouse in Sidney Center.
munity together ever since.
Back in those early days almost every weekend was spent
at fire department competitions throughout the region.
Even their eventual wedding
date had to be selected so as
not to interfere with what was
called “motorhose competition” in those days. Work and
late-night card games at the
firehouse were the norm.
There is no better couple
than Jim and Susie to ask how
the fire service has changed
in the past decades. In his 21
years as fire chief, Jim fought
many fires including some
big ones, notably barn fires
where the crews would spend
all night battling the fire. But
nowadays barn and silo fires
are rare since the hay and silage are kept in plastic outside.
Good enforcement of building
codes has likewise cut down
on chimney fires.
Jim laughs when he recalls
the changes in fire equipment.
In the 1960s the fire service
had very little money so they
built things themselves. One
clever guy in the department
managed to shoehorn a big
V8 engine into a surplus army
vehicle for which it was never
intended, but it worked. Split
axle transmissions and doubleclutch shifting have given way
to automatic transmissions on
trucks that drive more like big
cars than army tanks.
One regrettable change has
been the drop-off in volunteer
fire department membership.
In its prime, the Gilbertsville
Fire Department could field
55 members but now has
barely half that number. When
asked to speculate on the reason for this, the Pochys suggest that people now feel too
busy to participate in the fire
service. That comment leads
to a smile and the memory of
times when there would be a
late-night fire alarm and Jim
and Susie would bundle their
young son into the back seat of
their car where he would sleep
while mom and dad fought to
save lives and property.
It’s all part of what Susie
calls being “community people” and Gilbertsville has been
lucky to have the two of them
in its community for more
than 50 years.
Afton GOP to
Host “Meet the
Candidates”
AFTON – The Town of
Afton Republican Committee
will host a “meet and greet”
with the candidates on Saturday, Oct. 26, from 1 to 3 p.m.
at Vincent’s Restaurant, Main
St., Afton.
Pam Wylubski is running
for town justice with Bob Tallmadge and Chris Warren running on the Republican ticket
for seats on the town council.
John Lawrence seeks to serve
the community as town supervisor with Rose Klatz as
town clerk. The Republican
candidate for highway superintendent is Lynn Shultis. Ernie Cutting is the candidate for
Chenango County Sheriff.
Delaware Co. IDA Completes Building Project
To Bring New Business to Sidney Industrial Park
DELHI - The Delaware
County Industrial Development Agency recently completed a building renovation
project to attract a new business into the Industrial Park
in Sidney. Cobalt Packaging,
LLC, a 100% woman-owned,
full service contract packaging company that specializes
in complete project management has moved into the
building located at 8 Winkler
Rd., Sidney. Formerly home to
AJS and Viking Distribution,
8 Winkler Rd. was purchased
by the Delaware County Industrial Development Agency
(IDA) in 2010. As a result of
a $160,000 investment by the
IDA in a variety of renovations, including the installation of a second loading dock,
the building now provides
space for Cobalt’s packaging
and fulfillment operations, and
warehouse space for Huff Ice
Cream.
Founded in 2009 by Kim
Crandell-Ashworth,
Cobalt
Packaging, LLC (Cobalt)
began as an owner-operated
business, which provided
print management and project
coordination for several large
consumer goods companies
from an office in Rochester.
Several years later, Cobalt has
taken on two partners and is
building its capacity. The new
facility will allow for the onsite processing and fulfillment
of promotional packing orders
for the ever-growing number
of customers. The increased
processing capabilities are
anticipated to result in the
creation of approximately 20
jobs over the first two years of
operation.
Working with the Village of
Sidney, the Delaware County
IDA learned of the Cobalt’s
desire to locate a facility along
I-88. Andy Matviak, Mayor
of the Village of Sidney said,
“Anytime we can bring new
job opportunities to our residents it’s exciting. John Redente, the village’s economic
development official, played a
key role in initially approaching Cobalt and facilitating an
introduction with Delaware of the assistance of both officCounty Economic Develop- es. The process moved quite
ment and the IDA.” After seamlessly from start to finish
meeting with the owners of and the new space is working
the company and identifying well for our business.” stated
the requirements for a facil- Cobalt Packaging, LLC, CEO,
ity that would meet the needs Kim Crandell-Ashworth.
The 8 Winkler
of the business, the
Road facility is
IDA presented the 8
Cobalt
also a secondWinkler Rd. property to Cobalt’s own- Packaging, LLC ary warehousing location of
ers as an option. The
Expected to
Huff Ice Cream.
facility was lacking
Create
With the susa couple key attained growth of
tributes necessary
20 New Jobs
their distribution
for the building,
business, Huff
but an agreement
was reached between the IDA Ice Cream needed additional
and Cobalt for the renovations space to support their expandto be undertaken and a lease ing operations. Huff Ice Cream
agreement was executed. With has been a tenant of the facilthe building renovations com- ity since the IDA purchased
plete, Cobalt is now operating the building in 2010. Huff
from the new location. “This assisted in the attraction of
location likely would not have Cobalt to the area by agreeing
ever been explored without the to a co-tenancy of the facility
networking between the Vil- so long as the IDA completed
lage of Sidney and the Dela- a number of renovations in
ware County Industrial Devel- order to allow the facility to
opment Agency to identify a meet the needs of both compa(Continued on Page 13)
site. We are truly appreciative
Progress Is Positive On
New Amphenol Facility
SIDNEY – Progress on the
new Amphenol Aerospace
facility on Delaware Ave.,
Sidney continues to be positive. With good fall weather
winding down, the major exterior work to date has been
completed and interior work
is now underway.
Amphenol employees were
told that the manufacturing
portion of the building is 100
per cent complete with steel
decking and about 10 per cent
is covered with membrane.
Wooden spots are framed out
which have the air conditioning units placed on top of
them.
Inside the manufacturing
building, the concrete floors
were expected to be poured
along with the electrical and
mechanical crews moving
ahead.
The absence of the crane on
site is a sign that all of the steel
work has been completed, as
well as the office area.
Political
Candidates’
Statements
Pages 10, 11, 12
Letters to the
Editor
Pages 4, 5, 6
INTERIOR of the new Amphenol facility on Delaware Ave.,
Sidney as it looks toward the West end.
2 — Tri-Town News — Thursday, October 24, 2013
Methodist Church to Perform
Community Service Oct. 27
SIDNEY - On Sunday, Oct.
27, the Sidney United Methodist Church will be leaving the
building. In conjunction with
“Make a Difference Day,”
worshippers at the Sidney
UMC will be engaging in a
variety of community service
projects, including work at
Keith Clark Park, delivering
communion to shut ins, shopping for the food bank, writing
cards to the sick and more.
If you would like to help
the church leave the building
please meet at the church at
10:15 a.m. for a brief service
before heading out into the
community.
Area Children are Invited
To All Hallow’s Eve Event
SIDNEY – Area children in
grades kindergarten through
sixth are invited to an All
Hallow’s Eve celebration at
the Sidney United Methodist
Church on Thursday, Oct. 31.
From 6:30 to 8 p.m. children will enjoy a variety of
games, activities, Bible stories
and snacks. Children are welcome to come in costumes appropriate for a church setting.
Prizes will be given out.
Did you know that All Hallow’s Eve is the first part of
an ancient Christian celebration which also includes All
Saint’s (or Hallow’s) and All
Soul’s Days?
The celebration at the
church is intended as a fun
time for children emphasizing a sharing of treats and fun
with no tricks.
Pine Ridge Groceries
WEEKLY
MEAT and CHEESE
SPECIALS
WE DO MEAT
AND CHEESE
PLATTERS
Meats And Cheeses Sliced In Store.
Buy sliced or chunked—any amount you desire.
BUY BULK BY THE POUND and $AVE —
Variety of Bread Flours - Including Gluten-Free Products
Nuts – Dried Fruits – Snack Mixes – and Lots More!
FROM THE DELI —
Wide Variety of Meats and Cheeses - Including several kinds
of Swiss, Cheddar and Yogurt Cheese
GILBERTSVILLE – A free
community dinner will be held
Thursday, Oct. 24 at 5:30 p.m.
at the Christ Church, Route
51, Gilbertsville. Join your
friends and neighbors to enjoy this month’s meal of ham,
scalloped potatoes, vegetables
and dessert. All are welcome.
EAST GUILFORD - East
Guilford United Presbyterian
Church will be holding their
Annual Roast Beef Dinner on
Friday, Oct. 25 from 4:30 to
6:30 p.m. The location of the
church is at the intersection of
County Highway 35 and State
Route 8. The menu includes:
roast beef, mashed potatoes,
gravy, green beans, squash,
quick breads, rolls, homemade
applesauce and homemade
pies with cheese. There will
be take-out dinners available.
Come and enjoy a wonderful
meal prepared by the members
of the church.
MORRIS - The Morris Fire
Department Auxiliary will be
hosting its Annual Election
Day Dinner on Tuesday, Nov.
5 at the Morris Fire House,
Main St., Morris. The menu
will include fried chicken by
Tullers Catering, baked white
or sweet potato served with
butter, cinnamon and brown
sugar, green beans, coleslaw,
cranberry sauce, biscuits
with butter and honey, cherry
or apple pie and coffee, tea,
lemonade or milk. Takeouts
will be available at 4:30 p.m.
and seated dinners will start
at 5 p.m. until gone. Cost is
a free-will offering. All are
welcome.
UNADILLA – The Monthly Monday Night Dinner at
the Unadilla United Method-
Bruce Warren
For
Coventry Town Justice
“A pleasure to
recommend
Bruce Warren
for the position
of Coventry
Town Justice”’
Margery Secrest
“Our Town” Nov. 1,2,3
Starts 25th OWP Season
FALL SUPPERS
“Bruce
Warren is the
best man for
the job.”
The Honorable
Russell Lerwick,
Former Coventry
Town Justice
ist Church will be held Oct.
28 from 4 p.m. until all are
served. The menu will include roast pork and stuffing,
mashed potatoes, veggies,
apples and desserts.
HARPURSVILLE – The
Harpursville United Methodist
Church will hold its annual turkey dinner on Saturday, Nov.
2 from 4:30 p.m. until all are
served. The menu consists of
roast turkey, stuffing, mashed
potatoes, gravy, squash, fresh
frozen corn, cabbage salad,
fresh cranberry relish, pickles,
rolls, quick breads and assorted pies.
UNADILLA – A weekly
luncheon is being served every
Wednesday at 12:30 p.m. at St.
Matthews Episcopal Church,
Unadilla. A free will offering is
appreciated.
Turkey Supper
Is Cancelled
WELLS BRIDGE – Due to
unexpected events, the Wells
Bridge Fire Dept. Auxiliary
will not be holding their annual turkey supper this year.
ACCO Brands
To Conduct
Pump Test
SIDNEY - ACCO Brands
will be conducting a pump test
on either Oct. 29 afternoon or
Oct. 30 late morning. This procedure may cause roily water
for residents. If you find that
your water is discolored on either of these two days, run the
cold water until it clears up.
Church to Hold
Bazaar, Bake Sale
Saturday, Oct. 26
BAINBRIDGE - A White
Elephant sale, featuring household goods, holiday decorations, games, books, and much
more is taking place from 9
a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturday,
Oct. 26 at the First Presbyterian Church of Bainbridge.
An assortment of baked
goods such as seasonal pies,
cookies, breads, and cakes
will also be available for sale.
Bring a friend and join us for a
luncheon of homemade soups
and sandwiches. Food is available for dine-in or take-out. We
hope to see you there.
BAINBRIDGE – When the
curtain opens on “Our Town”
Nov. 1, 2 and 3 in the Bainbridge
Town Hall Theatre, Bainbridge
of the early 1900s won’t be so
far removed.
Not unlike Grover’s Corners, the fictitious New England
town Thornton Wilder based his
play on, Bainbridge boasted a
bustling newspaper. Like “Our
Town’s” editor Webb and family play a major role in Wilder’s
play, editor Henry A. Clark &
Son (Charles) of the Bainbridge
Republican had a nose for news
and played a big role in community affairs. Upon purchasing the paper in 1890 from
Harvey Ireland, who since 1871
had printed it from a garage at
the rear of his home at the intersection of Kirby and West
Main, they relocated the paper
to the old Heaton Emery Factory at West Main St. and Railroad Ave. Since the Bainbridge
Express, started in 1894 with
publishing out of Parsons (now
Pearsall’s Laundromat), literally
came and went, the Bainbridge
Republican was the only newspaper in Bainbridge until about
1929. There had been papers
prior and in 1930, Charles Clark
sold out to The Deposit Courier
owned Bainbridge News, which
renamed it the Bainbridge News
and Republican. In 1959, the
Bainbridge News became part
of The Sidney Record, both now
part of the Tri-Town News.
With its ideal location on the
street housing the creamery,
railroad, jail, Corporation Hall
where town meetings were held
and taxes paid, the Bainbridge
Republican office of the early
1900s did not lack for news. In
the early 1900s, the Clarks and
their Bainbridge Republican
cornered the market on community news and in “Our Town,”
set in New England where early
Bainbridge settlers came from,
editor Webb and family are
somewhat the topic of community news with the courtship
and wedding of their daughter,
Emily.
Editor and Mrs. Webb, played
by Howard L. Hannum and Lori
Bennett, have daughter Emily
(Emily Cooley) and son, Wally,
(Torey Cooley). Their neighbors
are Dr. and Mrs. Gibbs (Jim
Woodham and Ronni Cooley)
with son, George (Leonardo
Frascatore) and daughter, Rebecca (Lisi Dunaway.) Narrator/stage manager Gary VanDusen introduces various other
community members portrayed
by Jonathan Fitch, Alex Leggitt,
Richard Martens, Dan Spencer,
Joy Moore, John Hitt and Bobbi
Northrup.
Curtain for the Out of the
Woodwork Players production of “Our Town” is at 7 p.m.
Friday and Saturday, Nov. 1
and 2, with a 2 p.m. matinee
on Sunday, Nov. 3. For information or ticket reservations,
contact director Trish Guokas at
693-1041.
Tri-Town Relay For Life
Kick-Off Meeting Is Nov. 4
SIDNEY - The Kick Off
for the 10th annual Tri-Town
Relay For Life will be held on
Monday, Nov. 4, at the United
Methodist Church, Liberty St.,
Sidney. Everyone is invited to
attend. Our theme this year will
be “A Decade of Hope”. Refreshments will be served starting at 5:30 p.m. The meeting
will begin at 6 p.m.
Relay For Life is a signature
activity of the American Cancer Society. It is an overnight
event to raise money for cancer
research, education, advocacy,
and services for cancer patients.
It is a fun time for families and
friends, and yet, it is a serious
time, as we honor survivors for
their courage and strength and
remember loved ones lost to
cancer. This is a time when the
community can come together
to do their part to fight cancer.
The Relay For Life will be held
at General Clinton Park in Bainbridge on May 2 and 3, 2014.
The American Cancer Society and the Relay For Life
Committee would like to thank
all those who were involved this
past year. A big thank you to
our team captains, participants,
sponsors and the community.
Last May we had 25 teams, 465
participants, 63 survivors, who
took part in this event. The luminary ceremony had a total of
1,615 candles lighting the track.
The total gross from this event
was $98,503.
We would like to invite survivors, businesses, schools,
churches, organizations, families, previous team captains,
potential new teams, caregivers,
and families to come and hear
what this next year event is all
about. Please mark your calendar for Monday, Nov. 4 at 5:30
p.m. For questions or information please e-mail Maryann
Mika, committee chair, at [email protected] or call
the American Cancer Society at
1-800-277-2345 or the local office at 563-9634. With the help
of people like you, we hope to
find a cure.
ELECT THE WINNING TEAM
TOWN SUPERVISOR
The Peoples’ Choice,
NOT the Politicians’!
• 24 years as Coventry Resident, Helping the Community
• Former Member & Chairman of Coventry Town Planning
Board
• Retired Law Enforcement Officer
• 37 years working experience with the Courts and the Laws
of New York State
• Ready, Willing, and Able to Serve the needs of our Town,
24/7, 365 days a year
TOWN COUNCIL
VIDE BLE
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BUD
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JOBS TYLE
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RESP
Bringing back civility and reason to the
Sidney Town Board.
Paid for by the Town of Sidney Republican Committee
Tri-Town News — Thursday, October 24, 2013— 3
Free Film Series
This Sun., Oct. 27
Features “Argo”
Halloween Last Day to Sign-up ENJOY
For Operation Merry Christmas PANCAKES!
SIDNEY – Time is running
out! If you have not signed
your children up for Operation
Merry Christmas yet, please
do so now.
Call Ginny Ireland at 9678119 or Nadine or Nancy Peck
at 563-8119. If no answer,
leave a message and we will
SIDNEY – The Friends of
the Libraries will present the
2013 Academy Award winner for Best Picture, “Argo”,
this Sunday, Oct. 27 at 1:30
p.m. in the Smart Community
Room at the Sidney Memorial
Library. Admission is free and
open to the public. Complimentary popcorn and bottled
water will be served. Bring a
friend and enjoy watching this
dramatic and nail-biting thriller on our big screen.
Village Holding
Leaf/Brush Pickup
On Wednesdays
UNADILLA - Village of
Unadilla brush/leaf pick up is
underway. All leaves must be
bagged. Do not rake to curb.
They will not be picked up.
The Village of Unadilla
would like to inform residents
that on Wednesdays the department of public works will
be making curbside pickup
of leaves, grass clippings and
brush. No leaves will be picked
up unless they are bagged.
Any bags with garbage, litter, paper or other trash will
not be accepted. Brush must
be neatly piled with cut ends
facing same direction at curb.
No large trees or stumps and
no items with thorns unless
placed in open containers. If
brush is not piled neatly the
village crew will have the
option of not picking up the
brush. Bags should not weigh
over 40 pounds.
SOUP
KITCHEN
BAINBRIDGE – The Soup
Kitchen at the Bainbridge
United Methodist Church will
be open this Saturday from
11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.
SIDNEY - A full meal is
served at St. Paul’s Episcopal
Church, 25 River St., Sidney
every Wednesday from 9:3011:45 a.m. We are no longer
serving just soups, rather, full
meals are served. Food selections vary by week. All are
welcome.
SHARE THE
BOUNTY
SIDNEY - Join your friends
and neighbors for a free community dinner on Friday, Oct.
25 from 4:30-6:30 p.m. at
the Sidney United Methodist Church, 12 Liberty Street.
Many thanks to Masonville
Federated Church for preparing and serving this meal.
The menu includes macaroni
and cheese, salad and dessert.
Please note the change in day
and date due to Halloween.
Unadilla Will
Flush Hydrants
UNADILLA - The Village
of Unadilla will be flushing
hydrants and water mains on
Oct. 23, 24 and 25 from 9 p.m.
to 5 a.m. This is done to improve the quality of the water.
Residents are cautioned that
water may be temporarily discolored during this time.
get back to you as long as you
leave your name and a phone
number.
Last day to sign up for this
year is Oct. 31.
Operation Merry Christmas
has been bringing Christmas
cheer to area children many
years.
Leaf Pick-Up Is Underway
In the Village of Sidney
Feinberg Brothers Bluegrass
At Town Hall Opry Oct. 26
BAINBRIDGE – Audiences are in for a pre-Halloween
“treat” this Saturday, Oct. 26,
when The Feinberg Brothers
take the Town Hall Opry stage
at 8 p.m. in the Bainbridge
Town Hall Theatre.
Brothers Rourke and Patrick Feinberg rate high among
the top, young bluegrass artists in the Northeastern United
States and, according to Folk
Talk Magazine’s reviewer, are
“the most authentic sounding
folkie kids I’ve heard this
year, singing songs of rails
and backwoods like they were
born to it.”
Hailing from Long Island,
where such greats as Andy
and Patrick Falco, Terry
McGill, Dave Thompson,
Dave Hampton and Michael
Cleveland “dropped in” for
jamming sessions while they
were growing up, the Feinberg Brothers began making
guest appearances at the ages
of 7 and 9. They played with
McGill’s band Straight Drive,
Miller’s Crossing and with
Dan Paisley and the Southern
Grass.
Though “born into bluegrass,” their classical training
on guitar, fiddle and mandolin
allows them to take their talent to new heights while incorporating “an understanding
of bluegrass well beyond their
years.”
Recent gigs have included
Southern Hospitality in Manhattan, Randolph Beer in
NYC, Lodi’s “Pickin’ in the
Pasture” bluegrass festival and
the Jalopy Theatre & School
of Music in Brooklyn.
Often joining them are
Keith Edwards on bass, Terry McGill on banjo and Ron
Feinberg, who bills himself as
“their older brother.”
Come out to the Town Hall
Theatre Saturday, Oct. 26, and
be “treated” to down home
bluegrass, home-baked and
“popped” goodies and a Gallery of visual arts featuring the
work of Cookie Witham.
See the ad elsewhere in this
issue for more details.
SIDNEY - The leaf pickup
program for this year in the
Village of Sidney is underway.
The Village will be utilizing
its vacuum leaf loader for the
collection of leaves. People
are encouraged to utilize as
much of their leaves as possible by composting, rototilling
into gardens, using for mulch,
etc. All other leaves should be
raked to the curb (not in the
gutter) for village pickup.
If the homeowner prefers,
leaves may be placed in reusable containers at the curb to
be dumped and run through
the leaf machine. It is preferred that bags not be used.
However, where there is no
free lawn or if for other rea-
sons it is not practical to pile
the leaves at the curb, clear
bags may be used.
The village will be continuing to use a “sweep” basis for
leaf collection where we will
pick up leaves in each of six
sections in rotation. Once
leaves are collected on a street
we expect not to return until
all other streets in all other
sections are served. The status
of the collection will be kept
current at the office of the Sidney Village Clerk. There will
be no scheduled pickup days.
People are asked to not park
their vehicles on the street
where they will conflict with
the leaf pickup.
NINEVEH – The Nineveh
Presbyterian Church will host
an all-you-can-eat pancake
breakfast Saturday, Oct. 26 from
7 a.m. until 11 a.m. The menu
includes pancakes, French toast,
sausage, scrambled eggs, home
fries and beverage.
UNADILLA – The Unadilla
Rod and Gun Club will be serving breakfast every Sunday
through Nov. 10 from 8 to 11
a.m. at the club on Butternut Rd.
The menu includes unlimited
pancakes, two eggs, ham or sausage and beverage. The Rod and
Gun Club celebrates 42 years of
serving breakfasts.
CHICKEN
BBQS
SIDNEY – A Chicken Barbecue by Wilsons will be
held this Thursday, Oct. 24 in
the parking lot at the Country Store, Union St., Sidney.
Chicken halves and side dishes will be available starting at
11 a.m. until gone. The barbecue is being sponsored by Unadilla Tops.
LOURDES
Women’s Health Center
Cookie Witham to Show
Artwork in The Gallery
BAINBRIDGE - Jericho
Arts Council invites you to
join Cookie Witham in the
Town Hall Gallery, 15 N.
Main St., Bainbridge, on Saturday, Oct. 26 from 7-10 p.m.
and Sunday, Oct.27 from noon
till 2 p.m. She welcomes you
to browse through an assortment of artwork she enjoys
creating: pottery, primitive rug
hooking and photography.
“After moving from the
Capital District to Clayton in
1998, I discovered a treasure
in the north country at The
Thousand Islands Arts Center. I started with two diverse
beginner classes - Garden Pottery and Primitive Rug Hooking - loved them both and have
pursued each medium with
a passion. My husband and I
moved here to Bainbridge two
years ago and I’ve finally got-
ten my kiln up and running.
My business card’s heading
is ‘A Claycookie for your
Garden’, telling you that my
pottery runs the gamut from
functional to frivolous.
My rug hooking involves
designing, collecting new and
recycled wool, dyeing, hooking cut strips of wool through
a linen backing to form small
rugs, pillows, wall hangings
and ornaments. I’ll also share
a few photographs from our
gardens up north.”
Come to the Town Hall
Theatre Saturday night to be
entertained by the Feinberg
Brothers and don’t forget to
come in to the Gallery (no
charge if only attending the
exhibit). Stop by Sunday after
church, I’ll be working on my
current hooked rug, and there
may be coffee and scones.
Pictured left to right:
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Patricia Barton, Clerical MOA
Niru Anne, MD, FACS, Breast and Cancer Surgeon
Cyndi French, Clinical MOA
Molly Kresge, Ultrasound Tech
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4 — Tri-Town News — Thursday, October 24, 2013
The Tri-Town News
P.O. Box 208, 5 Winkler Rd., Sidney, NY 13838
Telephone: (607) 561-3526 • FAX: (607) 563-8999
E-mail: [email protected]
www.tritownnews.com
The Tri-Town News (UPSPS 618-740) is published
Thursdays for $32 per year in the counties of Broome,
Chenango, Delaware and Otsego, $30 for e-mail
subscriptions and $37 elsewhere by Paden Publishing,
LLC, 5 Winkler Road, Sidney, NY, 13838. Periodical
postage paid at Sidney, New York.
Deadlines: The deadline for submitting items for
publication for the current week is Monday at noon for the
church page and community calendar and 5 p.m. for news
items, letters to the editor, display ads, classified ads and
legal notices. Holidays and special sections may require
earlier deadlines that will be posted.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to:
THE TRI-TOWN NEWS
P.O. Box 208, Sidney, NY 13838
(The Sidney Record established 1882. The Sidney Enterprise
established 1895. The Bainbridge News and the Bainbridge
Republican established 1867. Combined as the Sidney Record
and Bainbridge News February 1959.) Continuing the Unadilla
Times (established 1854) October 4, 1967. Continuing the Afton
Enterprise and Harpursville Budget February 1969. Name
changed to Tri-Town News, February 1, 1968.
Kenneth S. Paden...................................Publisher
Nancy Sue Burns.........................................Editor
Anna Ritchey.......................Advertising Manager
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
New Blood
Is Needed On
Afton Town Board
There are two seats on the
Afton Town Board up for election this year. I ask you to vote
for Rich Cuthbertson and Alan
Steinberg. I, Mary Jo Long,
have served on the Afton
Town Board for eight years
and I know that new blood is
needed on the town board.
Rich Cuthbertson has a
broad and informed perspective on the conditions and
needs of Afton based on his
experience in community activities such as directing and
acting in community theater
groups, serving as president
of Sertoma, and participating
in several veterans groups.
He also brings a much-needed
sense of humor and wit that
will help the board to get on
with the important work to be
done.
Alan Steinberg has been a
leader in the Afton community
for a long time and he will be
a great addition to the town
board. Alan was on the Afton
School Board for 10 years.
He also has organized and led
volunteer groups for keeping
and maintaining the old town
hall in the village rather than
borrow hundreds of thousands of dollars to build a
new town hall away from the
center of our community. Out
of his concern that industrial
hydrofracking will injure our
community, he organized and
leads monthly monitoring of
our local waterways and has
done baseline air quality testing. This summer Alan helped
organize the new community
garden behind the village hall.
Both of these candidates
live in the Village of Afton.
The decisions of the town
board, such as its 4-to-1 vote
asking to be fracked first if gas
drilling comes to New York,
affect the village as much as
the town. The truck routes of
several gas well applications
pending with the Department
of Environmental Conservation go through the center of
Afton. The Afton Town Board
also voted 4-to-1 to build a
new and expensive town hall.
Though Aftonians voted 2-to1 to defeat that proposal, the
incumbents, out of spite, keep
trying to spend more money
renting another space, buying
a double wide for a town hall,
or buying an existing building that is expensive and too
large, rather than maintain the
current town hall.
Mary Jo Long
Two Candidates
Care About
Afton’s Future
I am writing in support of
two fine candidates running
for seats on the Afton Town
Board, Alan Steinberg and
Rich Cuthbertson. These two
gentlemen are very concerned
about the direction the current
town board has taken in support of hydrofracking, lack of
real protection for our roads
and lack of proper maintenance for our historic town
hall. They also support a more
open and active town government and an annual town budget seen by all residents.
Remember, both Afton Village and Town residents can
vote for Afton Town Board
members. It’s time for a
change. Elect Rich and Alan,
their leadership will greatly
benefit all of Afton.
April Leggett
Letters to the Editor are appreciated. However,
because of space and subject considerations we are
limited in the number of letters we can publish. Our
long standing policy is that we do not publish letters
that are printed free of charge on the editorial page
supporting or in opposition to any candidate seeking
public office or any item up for public vote in the last
issue before the vote; only paid ads can be accepted.
All letters must be signed and represent the opinion
of the letter writer and not necessarily that of the
newspaper. The deadline for submitting a Letter to
the Editor is Monday at 5 p.m. of the current week.
IN THE GOOD OLD DAYS
SIDNEY
25 YEARS AGO
October 26, 1988
Construction of a new fast
food and family restaurant and
updating and expansion of a
present business will make
the property on the corner of
Union St. and Sherman Ave.
in Sidney an asset to the village. A Hardee’s Restaurant
will be built on the property
and Sidney Auto Body, now
located on the site, will update
their facility and put up a 42 by
26 ft. addition. Jack Thomas,
who owns the property, told
the Tri-Town News on Monday that he had entered into a
formal agreement for the sale
of the property with Upstate
Empire Group, Inc. who hold
the franchise rights for Hardee’s, a well-known chain of
fast food, family restaurants.
Construction of a new Su-
If you have old
photos you would
like to see in the
Tri-Town News,
please bring them
by our offices in the
Sidney Industrial
Park. We can scan
them while you
wait on Wednesday
afternoon or Friday,
you can leave them
off to be mailed
back, or you can
e-mail copies (300
dpi) to us at [email protected]
tritownnews.com.
Statements By
Afton Candidates
Are of Concern
The political candidates’
statements in the Tri-Town
News Oct. 17, 2013 issue of
Rich Cuthbertson and Alan
Steinberg concern me greatly.
The current Afton Town Board
has delivered all service to the
residents of Afton without a
meaningful tax increase.
I am a retired senior citizen
living on a fixed income like
many of my friends and neighbors. After reading the letter to
the editor in the same issue I
wonder how they figure that
$116,000 is a modest plan to
renovate an old brick building
worth less than $40,000.
At the Sept. 12 Afton Town
Board meeting I was stunned
that after a board member requested time to review the
request for proposal that Alan
Steinberg and the rest of the
Afton Visions Group walked
out of the meeting.
How concerned are they
about Afton town business
when half the agenda of business remained? If they don’t
get their own way if they’re
elected will the town business
be neglected?
Rich Cuthbertson in the
past three years has only been
at two town board meetings.
How does he know anything
about town business?
Wayne Leidecker
You Matter
Please Vote
Chenango County, Town
of Guilford residents, this is
your opportunity to make your
voices heard. In the 50 years
we have been in Guilford, we
per 8 Motel at Sidney is one
step closer to reality. Fowler
Finch told the Tri-Town News
last week that he had received
payment for the 1.15 acre site
for the new motel. The site is
located next to Pizza Hut on
Delaware St.
Madman’s Video Vault at
21 Union St., Sidney, the site
for years of Ken’s Diner, will
hold their Grand Opening this
Friday and Saturday. Owners
Frank and Lori McCormack
have been operating a full service video store in Norwich
for about three years.
Alumni and students attended homecoming as Sidney
School celebrated 100 years.
Sidney field hockey coach
Mary Morrison won her 150th
game as head coach of the
varsity team as they defeated
the Sherburne-Earlville Marauders 2-1 in overtime.
Sidney Lady Harriers captured the championship at
Whitney Point.
Country singer Shelly West,
daughter of Dottie West, performed at the Sidney Cinema
Oct. 16.
SIDNEY
50 YEARS AGO
October 23, 1963
Hotaling Sales & Service is
spending a quarter of a million
dollars on plant expansion in
Sidney and Oneonta, where
new buildings are now under
construction. The new building in Sidney is being built in
the new Sidney Plaza Shopping area and will be located
between the Family Bargain
Center and Ken’s Diner on
Steiner Rd. It will contain approximately 13,500 square
feet. Hotaling’s anticipate
vacating their present Sidney
location on Cartwright Ave.
when their new building is
completed.
We are proud to have a
growing newspaper which
serves this dynamic area. During the past year, we have invested over $10,000 in new
machinery and facilities to
enable us to bring you a better
newspaper serving the entire
area. This year we purchased a
new Linotype machine which
is controlled automatically by
perforated tape.
Charles McKilligan and
Alan Veargason, both of Sidney, have joined the cast of
“The Torch Bearers,” the first
of three plays to be presented
by Tri-Town Theatre this season. Supervisor of costumes
for the play, Marion Yandeau
of Unadilla, is searching for
clothing of the 1920s particularly men’s tuxedos, spats and
ladies’ evening dresses of this
period. “The Showing Up of
Blanco Posnet,” a comedy
melodrama by Bernard Shaw
and “Harvey” the popular
comedy by Mary Chase, are
the second and third plays of
the season. Season tickets are
on sale at Truman’s Pharmacy in Bainbridge, Waldron’s
Paint Store in Sidney and the
Unadilla Five & Dime.
BAINBRIDGE
25 YEARS AGO
October 26, 1988
At the Oct. 20 meeting
of the Bainbridge-Guilford
School Board, the vote was
four to two to pursue the
merger with the Afton district
in terms of conducting a straw
vote. Board members emphasized that the agreement to
proceed was with the stipulation that it be when B-G was
ready, not necessarily according to Afton’s timeline.
BAINBRIDGE
50 YEARS AGO
October 23, 1963
William C. Boggs has been
can’t remember a more important election regarding the future of our community.
May we be so bold as to say
why we are supporting: Tom
Ives for town councilman;
George Seneck, for town supervisor; and Ken Fogarty, for
town councilman.
Tom Ives has a proven track
record of listening to our concerns. Whether agreeing with
us or not, we feel he does listen and tries to make the best
decision. He is a life-long
resident with two sons in our
school system and we believe
he wants the best for them as
well as your children’s future.
George Seneck works tirelessly to stay abreast of issues
affecting rural areas such as
ours.
Whenever we have called
with a concern he has answered us, or found out the
answer, in a timely manner.
Ken Fogarty has regularly
attended our Guilford Town
Board meetings and if elected,
is interested in forming citizen
input committees regarding:
tax relief, economic development and financial environmental protections.
Ronald (Pete) & Ruth
Tompkins
Town of Guilford
a strong sense of patriotism.
Unlike one of her opponents
who has been observed not
participating in the recitation
of the Pledge of Allegiance
before the town board meetings, Barb has always proudly
pledged her allegiance to this
great nation and its flag.
Barb has been very active
in community organizations
including the fire department,
the local school board, and
currently the Guilford Water
Board. She is a regular attendee of the Guilford Town
Board meetings. She has courageously stood before them
and voiced her opinions, questioned their actions, and made
suggestions to them. She has
a strong sense of right and
wrong, which guides her to do
what is right, even if it is difficult. This is the kind of representation that the people of
the township of Guilford need.
We do not need another person
on the board who always says
“yes” to everything that comes
before them without question.
Right now, our property
rights have been put in jeopardy by those who feel they know
more about what we should do
with our property, than we do.
We need Barb to stand up to
protect our property rights and
to keep the spending and taxes
under control in this township.
Barb is very concerned about
a number of important issues
in Guilford, not just one. Barb
believes in transparency in the
operations of Guilford. Everything done in our town should
be above board and open to
the public.
Barb would use a good,
honest, common-sense approach to running the Town of
Guilford, that we need. This is
the same common sense that
Barb Odell Is Best
Candidate For Guilford
I am writing in support of
Barb Odell, who is a candidate for the Guilford Town
Board. Barb and her husband
have spent their lives working
the family farm and raising
their family in this township.
Barb is an outstanding citizen
who deeply loves her community and her country and has
named the new manager of
the Bern Furniture Store in
Bainbridge.
Two Bainbridge-Guilford
seniors, Carl Osterhout and
Stephen Norris, have been
chosen to sing in the All State
Choir.
Mr. and Mrs. Wayne King,
of King’s Clothing Store in
Bainbridge, attended the National Association of Men’s
Sportswear Buyer’s Spring
Fashion Exhibition in New
York last weekend.
UNADILLA
25 YEARS AGO
October 26, 1988
Ribbon cutting ceremonies
last Thursday officially opened
1.4 miles of reconstructed Rt.
7 that includes Unadilla’s
Main St. State Department of
Transportation officials used
the opportunity to put in a
plug for the Rebuild New York
Transportation Bond Act that
will come up for vote in this
November’s election.
Unadilla
Elementary
School now has “Big Toys”
playground thanks to Unadilla PTO, volunteers and
the Great American (Victory
Markets) truck that delivered
the pieces.
UNADILLA
55 YEARS AGO
October 24, 1958
The Unadilla Diner, owned
and operated by Mr. and
Mrs. Al Braunstein for several years, was sold this week
to Jim Garvey and Larry
Henchey of the metropolitan area. The new proprietors
are experienced in the diner
business, having successfully
conducted the Rainbow and
Woodland diners on the south
shore of Long Island. Both
men are married with families
of three children.
Roberta Higbie and James
H. Ingalls were married in
Wells Bridge Oct. 11.
Howard Knapp is appointed
District Grand Lecturer of the
Otsego-Schoharie
District,
Order of the Eastern Star.
she has used in running a family farm, working at Amphenol, serving in the community,
and raising a family. We need
Barb Odell on the Guilford
Town Board, so please be sure
to get out and vote for Barb on
Nov. 5.
Gilda Ward
Vote for Those
Who Will Bring
Civility, Reason
I have been reading some
of the paid ads in your paper regarding the upcoming
town election and I must say
that I am a little surprised and
disappointed.
I understand that people can
disagree on particular issues,
especially complicated and
important issues such as drilling for natural gas in our area.
I can even understand that
sometimes tempers can flare
and all too often demagoguery
can take the place of informed,
intelligent debate and discussion. Things can be said in the
heat of the moment that people
would not otherwise say about
their neighbors and friends.
Unfortunately, I think it
crosses a line when we see
personal attacks and scurrilous remarks in the papers.
This is a town election between people we have known
most of our lives. There is no
reason to twist their words
into things they never meant.
That is why I will be voting
for Gene Pigford, John Woodyshek and Jody Proffitt for
town board. They will bring
civility and reason back to the
town board.
Edward A. Abbot, Jr.
Letters to the Editor
Continued on Page 5
Tri-Town News — Thursday, October 24, 2013— 5
LETTERS TO
THE EDITOR
(Continued from Page 4)
Three Democrats
Will Serve Their
Community Well
On Nov. 5 the voters of Sidney will have the opportunity
to re-elect Pete Cordes to the
town council. Pete has served
on the board for 16 years. Sidney residents, as well as fellow
board members, will benefit
not only from his experience,
but from his willingness to
listen and consider the view
points of all. In 2012 he served
during the time the board was
reduced to three members. He
voted his conscience and opposed the budge for 2013 because he was not in favor of
using capital reserves to keep
from any tax increase. Pete realizes that keeping the budget
in check cannot depend upon
the continued practice of using these reserves; it depends
upon consulting with the various departments and considering input from town’s citizens
before any budget is finalized.
If re-elected Pete will continue
to work with his fellow board
members, keeping in mind
what is best for the Town of
Sidney.
For the past year Bill Heath,
who is currently on the board
and seeking election as supervisor, has worked with Pete.
Bill has shown the leadership
qualities necessary to lead the
Sidney Town Board and to represent us at the county board
of supervisors. The elction of
these two experienced board
members, along with the extensive business background
of town board candidate, Paul
Muratore, will serve our community well. I urge to vote for
the Sidney First and Democratic candidates on Tuesday,
Nov. 5.
Susan Sklenarik,
Chair, Sidney Democratic
Committee
Vote for Three
Who Understand
“Home Rule”
I have long been an advocate of home rule. At the
debate of two weeks ago I
was heartened by the question asked regarding whether
the candidates were in favor
of home rule or not. I was,
though, saddened to learn that
by home rule, the asker meant
whether or not the candidates
were in favor of usurping the
rights of property owners under the current moratorium on
any and all natural gas drilling or even exploration in the
Town of Sidney.
Home rule, they seem to
believe, is about being able to
quash any form of meaningful and informed discussion
on the issue of people’s right
to utilize their own property
as they deem appropriate. I
am truly appalled at such an
interpretation. I was in favor
of home rule when Maurice
Hinchey and his state cohorts
took away the rights of local
government in the Adirondack
Park Agency. I was in favor of
home rule when he tried to do
the same thing in the Catskills
and failed only to have the
City of New York succeed in
wrenching those rights from
most of the towns and communities in Delaware County.
I did not hear any of these
people fighting for home rule
then. No, most of them were
applauding the subjugation
of local government in favor
of the state or New York City
in the name of rampant environmentalism. Home rule is
not about using the color of
law to negate people’s property rights, it is about fighting
the state and federal governments when they overstep
their bounds and usurp the
power that should belong to
communities.
Home rule is about stopping the state and federal government from handing down
mandate upon mandate to the
local town and school boards
that turn our local officials into
figureheads with the authority
only to raise taxes to pay for
services they are forced from
above to provide, whether
their population wants them
or not. Home rule is not a tool
to be used to strip a property
owner’s individual right to his
land and the profits derived
from it. That is rather something else entirely.
I will be voting for Gene
Pigford and the Woodyshek/
Proffitt ticket because they
know the difference.
Bill Hunt
Three Will Base
Decisions On
Facts, Evidence
I am happy to say that I support the Gene Pigford/John
Woodyshek/Jody Proffitt team
of candidates for the Sidney
Town Board this year. I have
listened to the debate that was
held on Oct. 3 and I believe
that this will be a very important election year. The decision
we will be making this year is
whether we will move forward
with a slate of local candidates
who will work for the overall
betterment of our community
or if we will elect a few people
with a personal gripe against
natural gas drilling and little
else on their agenda.
The Pigford/Woodyshek/
Proffitt team has lived in this
area long enough to know that
Sidney is not, and has never
been, a “bedroom community”
to some much larger city. It is
not some natural preserve that
must be “made sustainable.”
On the contrary, it is a complete community that has been
sustainable for over 200 years.
This community has been
home to a carriage factory, an
automobile factory, a novelty
works, a glass works, a magneto factory, a cheese factory,
a silk mill, a calendar plant,
an aerospace industry, a wood
laminating plant and railroad
tie manufactory, two railroads
and countless small businesses
operated in people’s garages,
barns and houses. We have
survived two world wars, a
revolution, a civil war, several
depressions, recessions and
cut backs. We have been home
to many churches including
the First Baptist Church of
Sidney, which was incorporated on Nov. 24, 1869.
Now, we are told by some
people and their supporters
that we need to be made “sustainable,” which is their very
coy way of suggesting that
natural gas is somehow not
“sustainable.” I am not sure
whether I want natural gas
drilling in Sidney or not, but
I do know that the decision as
to how we will proceed should
be made the way we have always made decisions; based
THE AFTON HISTORICAL SOCIETY
REMEMBERS
“THE WAY WE WERE”
AFTON HISTORICAL SOCIETY
116 South Main Street
Afton, NY 13730
HISTORICAL MINUTES NO. 1,057
by Charles J. Decker, Afton Town and Village Historian
OCTOBER 2013
On October 19, Vicky House, Town Historian for Oxford,
spoke to the Afton Historical Society and guests about
“Covered Bridges of the Civil War.” Vicky is very active in the
Chenango County Civil War Commemoration Project. She
has researched and given programs on several Civil War related subjects. The covered bridges about which she spoke
were either burned or somehow involved in that great conflict.
She brought 21 poster boards with excellent illustrations of
Hamden covered bridge
those bridges.
in Delaware County was
Our area had quite a few covered bridges, but as we were
built in 1859. The cost
not in the battle zone, they were not subject to destruction in
of approach and bridge
the war. A few have survived, but most have succumbed to
was $1,000. It still carried
floods, winds, or decay.
light traffic in 1974. Still
The East Side and West Side of Afton were first connectstanding.
ed by a covered toll bridge in 1829. It was built by Lord and
Bottom at a cost of $2,400. It was swept away by a tornado
shortly after the Civil War. The next year it was replaced by another covered bridge built by Jacob
Cass at a cost of $3,000. Inferior in construction, it was carried away by an ice floe after about eighteen months. It was replaced in 1868 by the famous suspension bridge, the first toll-free bridge across
the Susquehanna River.
Middlebridge, an Afton neighborhood, was named for the covered bridge which was between where
Melondy Hill Road and Latimer Road join the East River Road or County Road 39. It was near Ball’s
Island. That bridge, built in the 1820s, was swept away in a freshet. In Bainbridge, a covered bridge
was built in 1845 after an older, open bridge was carried away by a flood. The new bridge was raised
from its piers by high water two or three years after being built and floated downstream, where it broke
up. Another bridge was built from salvaged timbers plus newly sawed ones. It was a two-way bridge,
partly open and partly covered. It was used until 1899 when the western span collapsed under a heavy
ice floe.
As can be seen, weather was the biggest threat to wooden covered bridges. In 1974, Ward Herman,
a former teacher in Afton, published the book “Spans of Time” about the many covered bridges in
Delaware County.
on facts and real evidence, not
on rhetoric and brow beating.
The Pigford/Woodyshek/Proffitt team will proceed with
facts and science. That is why
I will be marking their ballot
next week.
Robert H. Hunt
Vote Democrats
In for Sidney
Town Board
Over the past two years we
have had elections that have
started to change the style and
image of the Sidney Town
Board. This November will
allow us to continue this positive direction.
William “Bill” Heath, candidate for town supervisor,
will bring a strong belief in
government by the people. In
his time on the board he has
brought reason and common
sense to the issues. Bill also
attends all county meetings
that have prepared him for this
very important position. Bill
wants to keep budgets under
control and taxes low.
Pete Cordes brings to the
board a vast knowledge of
how the town board functions.
His many years of experience
on the board have shown how
important it is to listen to all
sides of issues. I have known
Pete for over 50 years. He is
honest, and concerned for the
direction the town should be
going in.
Paul Muratore is new to running for office, but not new to
being active in town business.
Paul, a business owner, has
worked hard to help Democrats during the past two elections. While he began as working against fracking issues, he
has expanded his view of Sidney and wants to see it grow,
evolve and address the important issues facing the board.
I strongly recommend
that the candidates listed
above receive your votes this
November.
Floyd Howard
Republicans
Need to Vote In
Sidney Election
In the past Sidney Town
elections, not enough Republicans got out to vote. Since
Republicans hold a slight majority of voters in the town, we
want and need you to get out
and vote this time.
The present town board is
preventing progress. An example is their present moratorium opposition to natural
gas development in the Town
of Sidney. Since 1820, almost
200 years, natural gas construction in N.Y. State and
the Town of Sidney has safely
been accomplished.
The purpose of a moratorium is to delay. In the two
years the moratorium has been
in effect, the present board has
done nothing to prepare for the
inevitable gas development.
Mainly, use your American
privilege and get out and vote
on Tuesday, Nov. 5.
Doug Fessenden
GOP Candidates
Will Help Sidney
Move Forward
Given our recent troubles
in Congress and some of the
things that I have seen and
heard at the state and national
level of the Republican party,
I am heartened to see that in
Sidney, the cloth-coat core of
the Republican party is still
alive and well.
The slate of candidates
presented in Sidney consists
of three well educated, well
respected and well informed
people who have exhibited wisdom and moderation
throughout their lives. They
are not demagogues, pounding on a single issue with little
to no real science to back their
often conflicting claims. Rather, they are reasonable people
who will help us move Sidney
forward with facts, sound logic and a willingness to discuss
issues.
It is good to finally have a
slate of candidates that makes
one feel proud of his party
again. Let the reformation
of our party go forth from
Sidney.
Eleanor Snow
Letters to the Editor
Continued on Page 6
$1,000 REWARD
Information to arrest and conviction of
anyone connected to the burglary at
420 Hunt Rd., Afton - quads and
personal property.
Must be willing to stand up at trial
under oath.
Call Detective Powell 607-337-1863
Check out our website at www.tritownnews.com
or like us on Facebook.
6 — Tri-Town News — Thursday, October 24, 2013
LETTERS TO
THE EDITOR
(Continued from Page 5)
This Year Local
Republicans
Have It Right
As a lifelong Republican and resident of Sidney, I
would like to applaud the local Republican party for the
slate of candidates they have
placed forward this year. I
believe Gene Pigford is the
perfect candidate for our town
supervisor. His kind manner
and well considered speech
combined with his scientific
education and experience in
community service are just the
combination we sorely need to
lead our council.
John Woodyshek is not only
experienced in municipal government, but experienced in
our municipal government, for
over 30 years. He is already up
to speed with the things our
community will be facing and
he has the education and experience that will serve us well
for the next two years.
Finally, though he has only
lived in Sidney a short time,
I believe Jody Proffitt will
be an asset to the board with
his broad-based experience
in both the private and public
sector. Most important, these
people will work well together
and are dedicated to the idea
that they will be good listeners
who will work with the people
of this town. I think this year
the Republicans have got it
just right.
Pete Players
Vote in Support
Of Home Rule
On Nov. 5 we have an opportunity to vote in support
of Home Rule and grass roots
politics. William Heath, Paul
Muratore and Pete Cordes are
running for supervisor and
town council seats on the Independent and the Democratic
Party Lines.
Sidney needs strong advocates on Delaware County
and local government boards
to preserve our water and air
quality, the beauty, diversity, peace and safety of our
community.
Both the New York Association of Towns in 2012 and
the Albany Law School in the
spring of this year held tutorials for local government officials to help them understand
and prepare for the possibility
of HVHP methane extraction
and associated infrastructure
like the proposed Constitution
Pipeline. Passage of moratoria
on gas extractive activities followed by land use and highway
protective legislation were advised as wise precautionary
measures. Multinational extractive industries do not have
the same goals for our community as we have, they have
no home or allegiance to their
neighbors but citizens do.
NY State Attorney General
Eric Schneiderman advised
small New York towns to formulate town plans for their future and he advocated a code
of ethics to protect towns from
profiteers.
Being mindful that democratic decision making and the
protection of individual rights
and property rights in a transparent and inclusive political
process will guide us towards
a healthy and happy local
economy.
Vote Heath, Muratore and
Cordes for the Sidney First
Party.
Cathy McNulty Lilac Hill
Farm and Friends of Sustainable Sidney
GOP Candidates
Will Move Sidney
In a Positive Way
The Township of Sidney
stands at an important crossroads as its citizens approach
the upcoming election on
Tuesday, Nov. 5.
Sidney Township has been
described in its Comprehensive Plan as zoned predominately residential-agricultural.
This zoning must continue to
reflect and protect the rural
character of the community.
Agricultural uses encompass
much of the land along the
Susquehanna River and valley
areas of the town.
However, the village has
historically also supported
Richard W. Wakeman, Inc.
Commercial Construction
Richard W. Wakeman LLC
Authorized Butler Building Dealer
Oil & Stone Driveways
SIDNEY • 607-369-5601
[email protected]
small to medium-sized industries that continue to provide
employment for many of the
residents in the hamlet, town
and village.
The challenge facing the
new town board will be to find
a balance that protects recreational and agricultural concerns, facilitates cost effective
energy sources for industries
and residents of the township,
and do so with a significantly
challenged budget within
which to operate.
The future destiny of Sidney Township has almost as
much to do with a Vision and
Strategic Plan for the future,
as it has to do with addressing
the earlier mentioned present
issues facing the township.
The hamlet of Sidney Center
and the village of Sidney are
already identifying priorities
that will be important in addressing some of their present
concerns, as well as focusing
on their further development.
Republican candidates Jody
Proffitt, John Woodyshek and
myself, Eugene Pigford, candidate for Sidney Town Supervisor, stand ready to serve all
residents of the township, and
request your vote on Nov. 5 to
help move Sidney Township
towards a positive future.
Gene Pigford
Vote Common
Sense in Town
Of Sidney Election
In response to Albert Crudo’s letter from last week, it
made me think of what a great
country we are in where even
the most distorted views are
protected by the freedom of
speech that this country provides. This is a fine example
of what we are all subjected to
by cable news, internet sites,
slanted newspapers and TV
commercials, where the left
wing loons and the right wing
zealots all have an agenda.
It must be successful or they
would not spend millions of
dollars in trying to convince
voters to their way of thinking.
I would urge all to go back and
read that letter, investigate for
themselves, apply common
sense and vote accordingly.
While we are involved in
a small town council race, all
races matter to some degree
as they affect our lives. The
gas well boom and fracking
have divided our community,
county and state. Personally
I do not have the expertise to
determine for myself if fracking is dangerous or not, I have
to rely on state government,
national government, other
professionals, and the studies
that they do to determine an
opinion.
I guess that is the problem
that I have with our current
town council. They established a moratorium on gas
well drilling where none of
them have the expertise to
CORDES
paid for by Friends of Sustainable Sidney
these 3 men are
y
e
already working for us!
Sidn
MURATORE
HEATH
CHEF PAUL
Bill, Pet e an d Pa ul a l l dona te the i r ti me an d en er g y t o lo cal
commu n it y p ro jec ts - w hi c h ma k e s S i dne y a g r eat p lace t o live.
ON NOV. 5, VOTE FOR PEOPLE WITH A HISTORY OF COMMUNITY SERVICE
CORDES
HEATH
MURATORE
eventually decide whether to
drill or not. It is highly unlikely that the Town of Sidney
will do their own study. I believe they did it because that is
their view no matter what the
state or national government
will decide, they do not want
drilling. All elected officials
are elected to represent all of
the constituents, not just a percentage. Because they passed
this moratorium, it shows arrogance that only their opinion
counts, and they will not work
for the best interests of all citizens. This attitude is one that I
intend to vote against.
I also caught a radio commercial by a Mr. Muratore
where he states that he is
against eminent domain. While
that is fine, if he is elected, he
cannot do anything about eminent domain, as this is state
law where the courts will decide on what is legal or not.
As a town councilman he will
have no say if eminent domain
will be in the Town of Sidney.
He is entitled to his opinion
like everyone else, but to run
a commercial like that further
shows a willingness to scare a
less informed voter.
Also, how long before these
councilmen decide they don’t
want farming or quarrying or
logging or small businesses or
large businesses in our town
and decide to try to ban these?
I would suggest to all, vote
common sense and find a candidate that will try to work for
all of the people and in the best
interests of the town.
Jim Omahen,
Sidney
Elect Candidate
To Help Sidney
Reach Its Potential
I consider Sidney one of the
most beautiful areas in all of
NYS. It has a long history of
being a ‘town to watch’, and
the positive attributes Sidney
has to offer are many- breathtaking natural beauty, innumerable year-round outdoor
activities, charming antique
shops, great restaurants and
super-friendly people.
Unfortunately, much of
Sidney’s extraordinary potential is not being realized and
that is a shame and a waste.
With the base we already
have, and our unlimited potential for growth the goals we
can reach are only limited by
our imagination and ingenuity. But to accomplish great
things, we need a town board
that is progressive, a board
that works together for the
good of all Sidney residents.
And this board must be 100%
transparent, because although
you elect us to represent you,
the board must never forget
that we are there to serve you,
and must always be accessible
and open to your concerns and
answerable to you.
I would like the opportunity
to be a positive part of the Sidney Town Board, to contribute
my extensive business knowledge, marketing and organizational skills to help Sidney
achieve the prosperity and
respect it deserves. We need
more innovative people on the
board (there are already a few)
so we can steer Sidney into
this still relatively new millennium in a manner that supports
and grows the local economy,
while preserving our natural
resources, our clean air, water
and land that we are so fortunate to have, as many areas in
our country fall into drought
or toxic conditions. Because
what good is an economy if
there is no inhabitable environment for it (or us) to exist
in? It doesn’t make sense to
trade one for the other.
So I’m asking all my neighbors, fellow community group
members and the many of
you who I consider friends,
to spread the word to support
me, so I in turn, can assist our
community in reaching its full,
amazing potential.
I’m Paul Muratore and I’d
be honored to represent the
people of Sidney through our
town council. Please don’t forget to vote Nov. 5.
Paul Muratore
Help Steer
Sidney In
Right Direction
My name is Ed Smith. My
wife, Amanda and I own a
small horse farm on the outskirts of town, and we, like
many of our friends and
neighbors, are concerned.
Concerned where our town is
going, and in what direction.
Sensitive issues regarding
the town budget, the hospital,
our taxes, the future safety of
our clean air and water, the
effects of the pipeline and the
reasons to ensure a better life
for our younger generation
are all major hurdles for our
town board to consider, and I
believe that we have the right
candidates this year to address
these issues.
Bill Heath, running for
Sidney Town Supervisor, although having only a year of
experience as a councilman,
has progressed immensely
in town operations, and has
shown that our town government can be run with respect
and integrity.
Pete Cordes, running for reelection for town councilman,
has always been there for the
good and welfare of our citizens. Sixteen years of service
shows exactly that.
Paul Muratore is just loaded
with new ideas and visions to
help develop and promote new
businesses in our area, but
what’s more, he wants to do
it environmentally safe, and
he, along with Bill and Pete
wish to see Sidney prosper
and grow.
Folks, on Tuesday, Nov. 5,
let’s help steer Sidney in the
right direction. Vote Democratic. Vote – Bill Heath, supervisor; Paul Muratore – for
town council and re-elect Pete
Cordes for town council.
Ed Smith
Sidney
Sidney Candidate Responds
To Recent Letters,
Advertisements
This is in response to recent
letters to the editor, paid ads
in the Tri-Town News and on
WCDO radio bashing both
myself and Mr. Proffitt and
criticizing comments made at
the so called “debate. ” First,
the “debate.” I urge all voters, if you didn’t already hear
the debate, to access it online
and listen to it in its entirety
at WCDOradio.com and click
on “audio archives” and select “2013 Sidney Community
forum.”
In terms of transparency,
as brought up at the “debate,”
you will hear the discussion
including my comments (at
37:30) that transparency, as
they seem to define it, can
be a two edged sword with
liability attached to it and,
more importantly, that in my
opinion, “Transparency is not
a substitute for electing (the
right) qualified people in the
first place.” When transparency means putting all town
business on the internet with
advance notice of all matters it
carries with it the responsibility to maintain the site which
could be costly in itself. Also
the village discussed some of
the pros and cons of this and
the question was raised, “what
additional liability could this
place on a municipality and
would this interpret into law-
suits if things were missed? Is
it worth it?”
Jobs and revenue: Listen
to their plan, or lack thereof,
of bringing in jobs as if jobs
are out there for the asking
and will just magically appear
because you want them. And
about revenue streams? What
are they actually going to do
about it? What are they waiting
for? The reality is that it takes
work to bring in new jobs and
lots of it. And you must first
position the town to protect
what we have and do what
we can to encourage them to
grow here and others as well.
The greatest potential for new
jobs is from existing industry
directly or from entities in
support of those industries.
One of the most important
things we can do in this direction is not stand in the way of
the pipeline. This pipeline can
be our salvation. The concept
of bringing gas from other directions has been talked about
for many, many years but the
economics have not been there
and it hasn’t happened. In recent times Corning Gas came
to the same conclusion when
they looked into tapping into
an existing main in the Binghamton direction to serve Sidney. It was too costly. The fact
that a major gas company has
selected a route for their pipeline that comes right through
the Town of Sidney adjacent
to the Village of Sidney is an
opportunity that we should
take advantage of that could
provide cleaner, less expensive energy to heat our homes,
and businesses and provide the
energy needed for industry.
The Heath-Cordes-Muratore slate lost the debate on
the issues on their own home
court and now resort instead
to personal ugly attacks and
mudslinging. If there is anything good to all this, it demonstrates their one-issue program and shows their true
colors. What is going on now
is exactly the problem, disrespect for anyone who will not
buy into their pie-in -the-sky,
unsupported claims and accusations and bogus solutions.
It is clear that this election
is not just about individuals. It
is about philosophically opposite teams.
We think the voters have
had enough of Sidney bashing
and personal attacks. A clear
message needs to be sent to
the Heath-Cordes-Muratore
group that it’s over. The opportunity to clean house is
here. We want to do what’s
right for you and we want to
bring back Sidney Community pride. Regardless of your
party, please vote for Gene
Pigford, Jody Proffitt and John
Woodyshek. Also, please read
my candidate message.
John J. Woodyshek,
Candidate for
Sidney Town Council
No political letters to the
editor will be accepted
next week. Our long
standing policy is that
we do not publish letters
that are printed free
of charge supporting
or in opposition to any
candidate seeking
public office or any item
up for public vote in the
last issue before the
vote; only paid ads can
be accepted. All letters
must be signed and
represent the opinion of
the letter writer and not
necessarily that of the
newspaper.
Tri-Town News — Thursday, October 24, 2013— 7
Tri Town Theatre Remembers
As It Celebrates 50th Anniversary
SIDNEY - Tri Town Theatre
celebrates its 50th anniversary
season with more than 150 musicals, dramas and comedies performed over the years in the tritown area. For the past 50 years
TTT actors, singers, musicians,
directors and crew have worked
tirelessly to bring live theatre to
this area and it has been a labor
of love for them. The volunteer
theatre members recall the thrill
of putting together a quality
show and cast, exhilaration of
opening night, and the applause
and laughter from audiences.
They also remember late night
rehearsals, last minute set building, unexpected mishaps on and
offstage, exciting moments of
drama – also on and offstage
- and the unique experience of
taking shows on the road.
Jack Deuel, longtime TTT director, recalls how it all began.
In 1963, Jack was asked by tritown area Chambers of Commerce to form a theatre group.
“The Torch Bearers” was the
first TTT play presented in fall
of 1963. Opening night was to
be Friday, Nov. 22, 1963 which
was the day of President John
F. Kennedy’s assassination. It
was a sad, sobering time for
the entire nation; most Americans were gathered in churches
or around their television sets.
That evening’s performance
was canceled, but the show
went on the next week. And that
was the beginning of what is
now Tri Town Theatre.
In the early days of TTT,
shows were performed on a different night in each of the school
auditoriums in Bainbridge, Sidney and Unadilla. The whole
set, including costumes and
props had to be moved from
town to town. Larry Henchey,
veteran actor in many TTT
shows, remembers that on one
of the school stages, there was
no passage for actors backstage.
He had to exit the building,
walk around outside during the
show, and come in another door
to enter on the other side of the
stage. Larry and his late wife
Harriet worked on many shows;
even his children, Tamara (“The
Miracle Worker”) and Tom
(“On Borrowed Time”), acted
in shows. He remembers how
Tom DeMulder made a very believable, enchanting leprechaun
in “Finian’s Rainbow.”
The musicals in those days
were lavish and large-scale,
with fabulous costumes like the
huge wide-brimmed ladies’ hats
in the Ascot scene of “My Fair
Lady”, complicated sets, and a
full orchestra and chorus. One
of the most memorable TTT
members was the late Ellen
Danforth, wife of Dr. Danforth,
and longtime costume chair.
Ellen’s entire three-story home
stored all of TTT costumes – including hats, jewelry, scarves,
shoes, and elegant, beaded ball
gowns and formal tuxedoes. It
was always an adventure for an
actor to visit Ellen’s shop for a
costume fitting; one felt like a
child playing dress up. She had
countless storage boxes carefully labeled and organized on
each floor of the house. Many of
the finer dresses and hats were
donated by community members, but Ellen or her assistants
would hand sew nun’s habits
for “The Sound of Music” or a
dozen men’s red riding coats for
“Mame.” Ellen always said, “If
actors feel comfortable in their
costumes, they will relax and
enjoy being on stage more.”
She was right.
A memorable Tri Town Theatre actor is David Hawkins,
star of at least 20 or 30 shows
such as “South Pacific,” “Lend
Me a Tenor,” “Camelot,” “Bye
Bye Birdie,” “Mousetrap,” and
“Pack of Lies.” David often
credits his acting abilities to
“the Jack Deuel School of Act-
Coventry Museum to Host
Blackfoot Artist Mon., Oct. 28
ing.” He says, “Jack was always
perfecting, always looking for
more from an actor; he was a
joy to work with. Jack would
try to tweak our performances
for the next show, even giving
us notes between acts on the
same night.” David is now in
rehearsal for TTT’s fall show,
“Kiss Me Kate” which will be
presented on Nov. 15, 16 and
17 on the Unatego High School
stage.
Director Susan Jerauld, currently rehearsing the fall musical “Kiss Me Kate,” has been
active in Tri Town Theatre for
many years, acting in “The
King and I,” “Enchanted April,”
“Private Lives,” “Dangerous
Liaisons,” “The Crucible” and
many more. She has directed a
number of musicals and is currently enjoying working with
the “Kiss Me Kate” cast. Susan
and husband Scott have been the
driving force behind the little
theatre group for years. They,
and many other volunteers before them, are the life’s blood of
Tri Town Theatre.
COVENTRYVILLE - Attention all traditional and contemporary crafter makers, and
admirers of the Native American art passed down from the
Coventry area’s individuals and
families, who shaped our shared
past. On Monday, Oct. 28, Cynthia N. Shapley (Clearsky), local Blackfoot artist, beadwork
maker and bead loomer, will offer a unique program “Creating
Native American Beadwork,
Bead Looming and Beadwork
Pieces, Using Traditional Designs, Colors, Materials and
Tools.”
The Coventry Museum will
be open for visitors to tour, before the program, from 5:45 to
6:15 p.m. Program starts at 6:30
p.m. at the community meeting
room in the Coventryville Congregational Church, 113 Co. Rd.
27 (near four-way intersection
with State Hwy. 206), Coventryville. For more information
call 639-4073.
Pack up and bring your bead
work craft, and curiosity about
these first American art forms.
Her interactive program will
include: a display of some of
her current work including both
traditional designs and contemporary designs of her own;
description of how as a young
woman, she learned to use a
handmade wooden bead loom,
and other traditional beading
tools, to create ancestral designs, out of traditional colors
and materials; and real time
demonstrations of those skills
on that wooden loom, which
she uses to this very day. This
will be a great opportunity for
“young crafters” to get a quick
lesson in beadwork.
This program will leave ample time to answer the questions
of attendees and to share any
beadwork you choose to bring
with you.
All of the Coventry Town
Museum’s presentations are
family friendly, young people
are always welcomed. Light
refreshments will be served.
There is lots of parking.
New Medicare plans for 2014!
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Monthly Plan
Premium (1)
Flex Benefit
Part B Deductible
PCP Copay
Specialist Copay
Outpatient Surgery in a
Hospital
Outpatient Surgery in an
Ambulatory Surgical Center
Lab Tests
X-rays
Preventive Services
MRIs, CT Scans, PET
Scans
Inpatient Copay
Part D Prescription Drug
Coverage
Preventive Dental
$104.90
Fidelis Medicare
Advantage without
Rx (HMO-POS)
$0
Fidelis Medicare
Advantage Flex
(HMO-POS)
$37.20
None
$147
20%
20%
20%
None
None
$10
$20
$285
$500 per year
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$15
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$285
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0% - 20%
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$1,184
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Yes, with $0 deductible
for preferred and
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Yes
$285 per day for days 1-5,
per admission
No
$285 per day for
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per admission
No
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Yes, with $0 deductible
Yes
Call 1-800-860-8707 (TTY: 1-800-558-1125)
8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. seven days a week from October 1 to February 14,
and Monday through Friday, 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. from February 15 through September 30
Enroll anytime at fideliscare.org
The benefit information provided is a brief summary, not a complete description of benefits. For more information contact the plan. Limitations,
copayments, and restrictions may apply. Benefits, formulary, pharmacy network, premium and/or copayments/coinsurance may change on
January 1 of each year. 1You must continue to pay your Medicare Part B premium. 2Out-of-network services may require more out-of-pocket
expense than in-network services. Benefit restrictions apply. 3These are 2013 amounts and may change for 2014.
Fidelis Care is a health plan with a Medicare contract
H3328_FC 13097 CMS Accepted
8 — Tri-Town News — Thursday, October 24, 2013
OBITUARIES
Lisa Benedetto
Patricia Grant Hakes
SIDNEY CENTER - Lisa
Benedetto, 32, of Sidney
Center, passed away on Monday, Oct. 21, 2013 at Bassett
Healthcare in Cooperstown.
Lisa was born Oct. 24, 1980
in Long Island, the daughter of
Mark and Rose Benedetto.
Lisa loved listening to
Country music, going to the
Delaware County Fair where
she loved the food, and enjoyed the holidays. She was
a simple down to earth person and everyone that met her
loved her.
Lisa is survived by her loving family, her parents, Mark
and Rose; her grandmothers,
Irene Benedetto and Margaret
Ennis; her uncle, Jeff Benedetto; aunts, Livia and uncle Russell Bassett, Karen and uncle
John Fitzgerald and Patricia
and uncle Jimmy Warmuth;
her cousins, Lindsey, Jesse,
Audrey, Chelsea, Ava and
Elizabeth; her special friends,
Izzy and Cassey Caratelli and
Susan and Mike Spacoforno.
She was predeceased by her
grandpa, Louis Benedetto; her
uncle, Stephan Benedetto; and
aunt, Linda Ennis.
Friends may call on Thursday, Oct. 24 from 2 to 4 p.m.
and 6 to 8 p.m. at the Courtney
Funeral Home, 25 Townsend
St., Walton. A prayer service
will be held at 7:30 p.m. at the
funeral home.
A Mass of the Christian
Burial will be held on Friday,
Oct. 25 at 11 a.m. at St. John
the Baptist Catholic Church,
16 Benton Ave., Walton with
Father Edward J. Golding,
Celebrant. Burial will follow
in the Walton Cemetery, 55
Fancher Ave., Walton.
A special thanks to the
nurses of the Dialysis Unit at
O. S.
Memorial Contributions in
Lisa’s memory may be made
to the Northeastern Association of the Blind at Albany,
301 Washington Ave., Albany,
NY 12206.
Condolences to the family
may be made online by visiting www.courtneyfh.com.
HARPURSVILLE - Patricia Grant Hakes, 84, formerly
of Harpursville, passed into
the light on Oct. 14, 2013, and
will soon be taking up residence at Glenwood Cemetery
in Afton.
Pat embraced each chapter
of her life with determination
and a positive outlook. From
her early days as a fun-loving
career girl, to her role as a wife
and mother, to her volunteer
work, and all the challenges
in between, Pat always gave
110%.
Pat was preceded in death
by her beloved husband, Robert Hakes; her brother, MacDonald Grant; and sister-inlaw, Frances; her sister, Alice
Vroman; and brother-in-law,
John; her brothers, Herbert
and Eric Grant and brothersin-law, Gorton Tinklepaugh
and Stephen Quimby.
She is survived by her sister, Vivian Quimby; daughters, Betsy and Susanna Hakes
(Paula Bollen); sister-in-law,
Carol Tinklepaugh; nieces,
Joanna and Carol Vroman,
Pat Stuart (Jim), Liz Vroman
(Brad), Linda Hauer, Debbie
Palmer, Susan (Sheldon) Butler, Barbara Fairchild and Holli Fish; nephews, Bruce Grant,
Donald and Steve Quimby,
and Dave, Mike and Matt Butler; and many grandnieces and
grandnephews. Pat is also survived by special family friend,
Lance Bunker.
The family is deeply grateful to the individuals who
cared for Pat during her stay
at Elizabeth Church Manor,
especially those who provided
support and comfort during
Pat’s final days.
A Memorial service was
held Oct. 19, at Osterhoudt
Madden
Funeral
Home,
Harpursville.
In lieu of flowers, memorial donations may be made to
the Unadilla Friends Church,
C/O Pauline DeForest, Treasurer, 285 County Highway 2,
Mount Upton, NY 13809.
IN MEMORIAM
Linda Louise Brenneis
9/22/50-10/16/02
They say there is a reason
They say that time will heal
But neither time nor reason
Will change the way we feel
For no one knows the
heartache
That lies behind our smiles
No one knows how many
times
We have broken down and
cried
We want to tell you
something
So there won’t be any doubt
You’re so wonderful to think
of
But so hard to be without
10-241w)nc
He was helpful, thoughtful
of others and always, if there
was a need, he was there when
you called on him. He will be
deeply missed by his family
and friends.
Services were held on Oct.
7 at Loucks Funeral Home, Ellenville followed by full military honors.
Rexford C. Survilla
AFTON - Rexford C. Survilla, 69, of Afton, died Friday
morning, Oct. 18, 2013 at his
home.
He was predeceased by
his parents, Dominic and Ida
Belle Survilla; a sister, Shirley
Strong; and his beloved dog,
“Lucky.”
He is survived by his children, Jean Survilla Kerr, Orlando, Fla., Cindy Strong
and Bill Pierson, Afton and
Christine and Robert Davis,
Nineveh; eight grandchildren,
Jaimie and Kevin Welch,
Robert Davis Jr., Arthur Kocijanski, Cheyenne Survilla,
Courtney and Ashlyn Kocijanski and Matthew and Casey
Kerr;
great-grandchildren,
Kadin and Gavin Welch; two
brothers, Stanley Survilla,
Binghamton and Lyle Survilla, Afton; sister and brotherin-law, Willie and John Lysczarz, Dryden; special nephew,
James Strong, Afton; special
friend, David Strong; and also
several nieces and nephews.
He was a retired employee
of Olums.
Funeral services will be held
at the Osterhoudt-Madden Funeral Home, 69-71 Maple St.,
Harpursville on Wednesday,
Oct. 23 at 11 a.m. Rev. William
Fowler will officiate. The family will receive friends at the
Osterhoudt-Madden Funeral
Home on Wednesday from 10
to 11 a.m. prior to service.
On-line condolences may
be made at www.omaddenfh.
com.
Ralph R. Rivenburg
ELLENVILLE - Ralph R.
Rivenburg, formerly of Sidney, passed away on Tuesday,
Oct. 1, 2013 at Ellenville Regional Hospital. He was 72.
He was the son of the late
William and Edna Morgan
Rivenburg, born on July 23,
1941 in Walton.
He proudly served our country in the US Army and the US
Navy throughout the Vietnam War. For many years he
worked as a security officer in
Sidney for Amphenol. His sister took ill in Ellenville, so he
moved and worked as a guard
there for over eight years.
Ralph will be remembered
as having a great sense of humor, kind hearted, very reliable, a hard worker, someone
you could always count on.
Westcott
Funeral Home
is in full operation and
has been since 1976.
Under the management of
JAMES C. MAGEE,
we are here to serve you
in your time of loss.
123 Main Street, Unadilla, NY 13849
607-369-4122
Marta Vega
AFTON - Marta Vega, 85,
of Afton, died Tuesday afternoon, Oct. 15, 2013 at Lourdes
Hospital.
She was born on Feb. 2,
1928. Marta enjoyed sewing,
cooking, gardening and visiting with her family.
She was predeceased by her
husband, Virgilio Vega.
She is survived by her three
children, Liduvinia Gonzales,
Afton, Rafael and Karin Vega,
Candor and Martha McDermott, Afton; 10 grandchildren,
Ollie and Denise Gonzales, Afton, Ellery Gonzales, Georgia,
CARD OF THANKS
I want to thank all friends,
neighbors and family for all
the cards, e-mails, and phone
calls I received concerning the
death of my husband, Niles E.
Wilcox.
He will be truly missed by
all of us. We spent over 68
years together and had a good
life. Thank you.
Marjorie Wilcox
115 Palmetto Drive,
Roxboro, North Carolina
27574
[email protected]
10-24(1w)nc
Miguel and Dana Vega, New
York City, Diana and Rich
Carver, Ithaca, Daniel Vega,
Candor, Lisa Vega, New York
City, Tracy McDermott, New
York City, Eric and Christina
Vega, Vestal, Anjelica McDermott, Afton and James
McDermott, Albany; 12 greatgrandchildren, Luke, Dakota,
Michelle, Troy, Ciera, David,
Gage, Ben, Tommy, Jennifer,
Gabriella and Dominic; three
nieces and several friends.
Funeral services were held
at the Osterhoudt-Madden
Funeral Home, Harpursville
on Oct. 18. Rev. Colin Gibson
officiated.
On-line condolences may
be made at www.omaddenfh.
com.
Kathy Wright
PRESTON - Kathy (McNitt) Osborne Wright of Preston passed away peacefully
Wednesday, October 16, 2013
at home with her loving family and friends at her side.
Kathy was born on January 24, 1953 daughter of the
late Emma (Osborne) and
Lynn McNitt in New Berlin.
Kathy was a lifelong resident
of the area and attended Norwich High School. On May
10, 1969 she married her husband Richard L. Wright. She
worked for 22 years at A & P
and later worked for 10 years
at Save-A-Lot in Norwich.
Kathy was a devoted and
loving wife, mother, grandmother and friend. Kathy will
be remembered as a kindhearted and strong woman.
Kathy’s devotion to the people
she loved was endless. If Kathy
saw that someone was in need
of a mother or grandmother
she took them right under her
wing and into her home. Kathy
was an avid NASCAR fan and
enjoyed many happy times
with her “racing family”, Joy,
Robert, Phil, Patty, Bob and
Chic. Kathy loved animals and
spoiling her grandchildren.
Kathy was predeceased by
her son, Scott Wright.
She is survived by her loving husband, Richard; and
her daughters, Marylynn
Lovelace, Preston and Joddy
Wright and her partner Doug
Ackley, South New Berlin;
grandchildren, Lyndsay Provo, Preston, Derrick Wright,
South New Berlin and Dalin
Wright, South New Berlin; her
special friends that she opened
her heart and home to, Talya
Soto (Franklin), Elmira and
Becky Hagenbuch and Linda
Larry; brothers, John and Ann
McNitt, Advance, N.C., Terry
and Teresta McNitt, Ottumwa,
Ill.; sisters, Barb and Rick Morey, New Hartford and Betty
Ann Reese, Binghamton; and
several nieces, nephews and
cousins; and her beloved dog,
Buddy.
A memorial service was
held on Oct. 19 at the R.J.
Fahy Funeral Home. Pastor
Debbie Myers officiated.
The family would like to
give a special thank you to
Chenango County Hospice.
Memorial
contributions
may be made to Chenango
County Hospice, 21 Hayes St.,
Norwich, NY 13815.
There are no charges for
obituaries placed in The
Tri-Town News. We do
reserve the right to edit
them to fit our standards and
request that only obituaries
for people with local
connections be submitted.
Our deadline is Monday at 5
p.m. You may submit them to
[email protected]
Writer Seeks Info for Biography
On William E. Dimorier
By Ann Silverthorn, Erie, Pa.
I am a writer from Erie,
Pa., and for nearly a decade, I
have been corresponding with
Charles Decker, Afton Historian, regarding a biographical
research project focused on
William E. Dimorier (18711951). William was born and
died in Afton, and over the
years, he spent time in several
other Chenango and Broome
County locations including Colesville, Sanford and
Windsor.
Decker has provided a great
deal of information that has
been critical to the progress
of my research. Now, I am appealing to you for any information you might have about
William and his family.
Who was William E. Dimorier, and why should you
care about him as much as I
do?
William was the son of Robert Huddleston Dimorier and
Phoebe J. Titus. He had three
siblings, John, who married
Zilpha J. Sackett, Fred, who
married Kate L. Priest, and
Mary, who wed James Burton
Wood.
William never married. Instead, he dedicated his life to
education, first in one-room
schoolhouses in your area and
then in the school district of
the City of Erie, Pa., where
his contributions were vast.
He also contributed funds to
the education of a student in
China, Yiao Liang, through
the Baptist mission of August
I. Nasmith.
To share some background
with you, almost 10 years ago,
I acquired Mr. Dimorier’s
handwritten journal of original
poetry at an Erie, Pa., printinghouse auction and recognized
the quality of his writing at
first glance. His poetry features religious themes, classical references, and images of
the sea. I was intrigued and
wanted to know more about
this poet.
Through my research, I
learned that William graduated from Afton High School
in 1897 at the age of 26. Why
did he complete high school
so late?
It seems that prior to, or just
after, earning his high-school
diploma, William taught in
several schools, including
Russell Hill, Melondy Hill,
the Baker District and Vallonia Springs.
In addition to teaching, William held two pastorates, one
in Brisben and one in McDonough. He was also a member of the First Baptist Church
in Afton.
After graduating from Afton High School, William
Dimorier attended Colgate
University, earning an English degree in 1903. That fall,
he joined the faculty at Keuka
College and a year later, at the
Cook Academy.
In 1906, William arrived in
Erie to teach English to high
school students. He stayed
for nearly 40 years, much of
that time serving as assistant
principal of Academy High
School. He spent nearly every
summer back home in New
York. While in Erie, William
raised funds to build Veterans
Stadium, served as business
manager for the nationally
known Academy Singers, ran
the Teachers Bureau, officiated at athletic events, and
self-published two books of
poetry.
William spent most nights
and weekends at the high
school, and he spent most summers in Chenango and Broome
Counties. Upon his retirement
from the Erie School District
in 1941, he returned to Afton
to live with his sister, Mary
Wood, until he passed away in
1951.
My goal for this project is to
publish William E. Dimorier’s
biography and republish his
poetry, most of which is in the
public domain. In addition, I
hope that he receives recognition from the Erie School District, something that was not
done when he retired (a yearbook later paid tribute to him).
I also plan to donate some artifacts to the Afton Historical
Society, so that the community
can learn more about him, and
I hope that he will receive recognition there, as well.
Last summer, I traveled to
Afton and was pleased to finally meet Charles Decker, in
person, at the Afton Museum.
During that visit, he provided
even more artifacts to fill out
William’s life story, In addition, William’s grand-niece,
Beverly Wood Douglas, and
her friend Pat Dean, guided
me on a tour of key locations
and landmarks pertinent to Mr.
Dimorier’s life.
Now that my project is
nearing completion, I am appealing to your community for
information or artifacts, however small; that might pertain
to William E. Dimorier and his
family.
If you have information
about William E. Dimorier,
or would like more information about the project, please
contact me: Ann Silverthorn,
4017 Sierra Drive, Erie, PA
16506 or via e-mail at: [email protected] or
phone: 814-450-8549.
Historical Society
Announces
Winners
AFTON – The winners of
the raffle conducted by the Afton Historical Society are:
First prize, quilt, Mary Ellen
Parliman, Afton; second prize,
$25 gas card, Starr Latronica,
Binghamton.
Also, five 2014 Historical Society Calendars, John
Simonds, Afton; Judy Smith,
Yorba Linda, Calif.; Barbara
Johnson, Afton; Dawn Sicker,
Afton; and Linda Beswick,
Tunnel.
Congratulations to each of
these winners.
Village Board
To Meet Nov. 19
UNADILLA - The Village
of Unadilla Board of Trustees
will be holding their regularly
scheduled meeting on Tuesday, Nov. 19 at 6:30 p.m. at
the Firehouse, 77 Clifton St.,
Unadilla.
Tri-Town News — Thursday, October 24, 2013— 9
POLICE BLOTTER
New York State Police
Oct. 13 - SP Norwich arrested Ruthann H. Maricle, 26, of
Norwich, on a Bench Warrant
issued by the Town of Guilford
Court. The warrant was issued
after Maricle failed to pay fines
associated with a previous arrest for driving while intoxicated. Maricle was arraigned
in the Town of Guilford Court
and remanded to the Chenango
County Jail in lieu of $571.65
cash bail.
CHAPLAIN SCOTT J. PAYNE (seated in the wagon) and his unit, the 1st Virginia Light Artillery-Powhatan Battery, are
shown with the wagon he restored and donated to the Old Mill Village in New Milford, Pa.
Bainbridge Native Celebrates Five Years
Ministering at Civil War Reenacting Events
By Scott J. Payne
On Oct. 6, at the Old Mill
Village in New Milford, Pa.,
Living His-Story Ministries
celebrated its fifth anniversary
of sharing the Gospel of Christ
with the Civil War reenacting
community. At this event I was
once again on the field with my
men of the 1st Virginia Light
Artillery-Powhatan
Battery,
providing prayers, encouragement, first aid and moral support to them.
Living His-Story Ministries
was founded in 2008 after I
noticed the great need for a
Christian influence and discipling in the Civil War reenacting community. I am a native
of Bainbridge and earned my
Eagle Scout award as a member of Troop 88, Sidney. Living His-Story Ministries is a
non-denominational ministry
whose main target group is
those who are interested in the
American Civil War, either as a
casual student or a full fledged
reenactor. I have seen the Lord
work mightily over these five
years.
I have had the opportunity to
minister to the public, as well
as my fellow reenactors during
our encampments together. The
Sunday morning worship service is always the center point
of an event’s itinerary. I have
preached in barns, schoolhouses, churches and even at the
former site of the Elmira Civil
War Prison Camp in Elmira.
During these events I set up my
tent and fly in an area called the
“living history” area. This is
kind of like a “hands on” area
of the encampment. The public
can walk through and ask any
questions they may have about
a variety of subjects. This allows me to interact with the
public on Saturday and Sunday
afternoons. Both days include a
battle scenario and sometimes
an after battle triage. I offer a
prayer of safety for all participants in the battle and during
the battle I am on the field with
my boys and administer first
aid and give water and encouragement to the wounded. In the
after battle triage I am able to
help with the wounded as well
as giving prayers for those who
are wounded and for those who
are taken prisoner. For those
who witness these events they
know what my beliefs are. In
this part of the reenactments
the “acting” part takes a back
seat.
During the “off season” I
have numerous opportunities
to conduct Civil War programs
on various subjects. I have spoken at churches, libraries and
schools on various subject including my personal favorite,
“The Christian Soldier: Thom-
as “Stonewall” Jackson”. Other topics include “The Battle
of Gettysburg”, “The Elmira
Prison Camp”, “Chaplains of
the Civil War”, “Revivals During the Civil War”, “The Battle
of Antietam” and many others.
This always affords me another
opportunity to share the Gospel
with those in attendance. History is history, and these men
of faith lived their lives in accordance with the Scriptures
and were great leaders because
of their great faith.
In my “off time” I write articles for various Civil War
magazines and have been published numerous times in the
Camp Chase Gazette and the
Citizens Companion, both of
which are Civil War reenacting magazines, The Gazette is
geared for the soldier reenactor and the Companion is more
for the civilian reenactor. The
article topics have included
“Chaplains In Gray” which
earned me membership into
the Bonnie Blue Flag Society
of the Sons of Confederate
Veterans, of which I am an associate member, “Living HisStory Ministries” and “What I
Learned on Smallpox Island”,
about the sermon I preached
at the Elmira Prison Camp in
2012, and numerous other articles reporting on reenactments
I have been involved in. Living His-Story Ministries was
featured on the cover of local
Christian newspaper, “The Independent Baptist Voice” on
Oct. 21, 2009. The ministry,
as well as events I have taken
place in, has been featured in
the Tri-Town News in Sidney
numerous times as well as The
Deposit Courier. I am also in
the process of writing and illustrating my first book “Amos
and His Adventure at Antietam” in “The Battlefield Critters” series. This series follows the main character, Amos
the Crow, as he searches for
his parents who were last seen
flying away from the battlefield of Manassas, Va. in July
of 1861. I am also a Guardian
member of the Sons of Confederate Veterans. This entails
the guardianship of the grave
of a Confederate soldier. I am
care taking the grave of Walter
Abram Baldwin of the 22nd
Georgia Heavy Artillery, who
is buried in the East Guilford
Cemetery in East Guilford.
The past five years have afforded me the opportunity to
meet many folks from all walks
of life and be able to share with
them a small portion of our nation’s history. J. William Jones,
who was the chaplain for the
13th Virginia Infantry, as well
as the author of the authoritative
book on revivals in the Confederacy, Christ In The Camp, was
quoted after the War as saying: lain allows me to be myself
“Any history of this war that and portray the general work
omits the discussion of the in- of the Confederate chaplain as
fluence of religion (Christian- well as the other ministries that
ity) on it is incomplete.” That occurred in the Confederate
is why during any presentation camps. The work of Colporand of course, any sermon or teurs, whose main ministry was
message that is preached by to distribute Christian literame, the Word of God and His ture, ie: tracts, Gospels of John,
influence on so many lives dur- New Testaments and Bibles, is
ing the years of 1861-1865 is incorporated into my ministry
not hidden, but brought to the this way. I distribute a variety
of period correct tract reproforefront and expounded on.
During these last five years ductions to those in attendance.
I have portrayed a variety of I also have compiled a vast
Godly individuals who lived list of chaplains and the work
during the Civil War. I have they did during the War. I have
produced a booklet
portrayed “The
that includes some
Gray Ghost” ColLiving
of these chaplains. I
onel John SingleHis-Stories
have also compiled
ton Mosby, Maa booklet of officers
jor Robert Lewis
Ministries
who were ChrisDabney who was,
tians and included
“Stonewall”
a short biography
Jackson’s chaplain and Chief of Staff, Con- on their lives, (except “Stonefederate officer General John wall” Jackson and his wife,
Brown Gordon, Major Lewis Mary Anna, which are both a
Tilghman Moore (Mary Tyler bit lengthier)! Both of these are
Moore’s great-great-grandfa- handed out to anyone who is
ther). Portraying these indi- interested in them.
As we head into the final two
viduals had its pros and cons.
The familiarity of the names years of the Civil War Sesquimade it easy for Civil War centennial, interest in the War
buffs to ask questions about is at a high. I will be involved
the individual as well as other in many events and reenactaspects of the War. The prob- ments during this time and I
lem was that I couldn’t know pray that the Lord will continue
everything about that particular to use this ministry to spread
person’s life and portray them His Word.
100% accurately.
If you are interested in
Then the Lord worked in having Chaplain Scott cona mighty way. In August of duct a presentation at your
2011, I was asked to be the church, school or any where
chaplain for the 1st Virginia else for your group, feel free
Light Artillery: Powhatan Bat- to contact me at 467-4936 or
tery. Most of the members are e-mail me at [email protected]
not Christians, so I am not only yahoo.com, Living His-Story
allowed to witness to the pub- Ministries also has a website
lic, but to my fellow reenactors at: livinghisstoryministries.
as well. This position of chap- blogspot.com.
TOWN OF AFTON
REPUBLICAN COMMITTEE
Meet the Candidates
Sat., Oct. 26 • 1-3 p.m.
____________
PAM WYLUBSKI
BOB TALLMADGE
CHRIS WARREN
JOHN LAWRENCE
ROSE KLATZ
LYNN SHULTIS
-
TOWN JUSTICE
TOWN COUNCIL
TOWN COUNCIL
TOWN SUPERVISOR
TOWN CLERK
HIGHWAY
SUPERINTENDENT
ERNIE CUTTING - CHENANGO CO.
SHERIFF
Sidney Police
Oct. 1 - Jordan Jaindl, 23, of
Binghamton, for third degree aggravated unlicensed
operator and operating with
a suspended registration.
Oct. 3 - Shannon Effner, 24,
of Sidney, for third degree
aggravated
unlicensed
operator.
Rebecca Powers, 37, of
Sidney, for third degree
aggravated
unlicensed
operator.
William Beery IV, 38 of
Virginia Beach, Va., for
third degree aggravated unlicensed operator.
Oct. 4 - William Collazo, 38, of
Sidney, for petit larceny.
Dustin Jennings, 27, of
Afton, for two counts endangering the welfare of
a child and second degree
harassment.
Victoria Gordin, 25, of
Unadilla for petit larceny.
Oct. 5 - Brian Wells, 36, of Sidney, for resisting arrest and
disorderly conduct.
Oct. 6 - Jordan King, 21, of Unadilla, for DWI, second degree aggravated unlicensed
operator with more than
.08% b.a.c.
Oct. 7 - Danielle Lathan, 28, of
Sidney, for second degree
harassment.
Michael Nodine, 26, of Sidney, for second degree
harassment.
Oct. 8 - Linda Collazo, 48,
of Sidney, for issued bad
check.
Oct. 11 - Justin Wakefield, 28,
of Constantia, for DWI and
more .08% b.a.c.
Oct. 15 - Tyler Kane, 22, of Bainbridge, for second degree
aggravated harassment.
Christina Romano, 22, of
Walton, for petit larceny.
Oct. 17 - Kristin Yale, 25, of
Sidney, for DWI and with
more .08% b.a.c.
Oct. 20 - Gage Leach, 18, of
Norwich, for fourth degree
attempted arson and endangering the welfare of a
child.
Austin Demuth, 18, of
Oxford, for fourth degree
attempted arson and endangering the welfare of a
child.
Delaware County Sheriff
Oct. 21 - The Delaware
County Sheriff’s Office arrested
Khalil M. Derios, age 19, of
Oneonta, for unlawful possession of marijuana. Derios was
released on an appearance ticket
to appear in the Town of Franklin Court to answer the charge.
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____________
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337-4218
uhs.net
10 — Tri-Town News — Thursday, October 24, 2013
POLITICAL CANDIDATES’ STATEMENTS
BAINBRIDGE
Gary Richman
Seeks Re-Election
To Highway Post
BAINBRIDGE - I’m Gary
Richman, seeking re-election
to the position of highway superintendent for the Town of
Bainbridge.
I have served as highway
superintendent since November 1995. Prior to my election,
I served on the assessment
board of review for one year,
followed by 12 years as Bainbridge Town Councilman.
Before entering my current
position, I worked for 25 years
in the construction business.
This involved operating heavy
equipment, including cranes,
on large construction sites in
the North East area. I have a
CDL license, necessary in operating our trucks, as well as a
crane operator’s license. These
years of experience have given
me the invaluable knowledge
I’ve needed in serving my superintendent position.
I maintain the town roads
in all aspects, including paving, oil and stone, replacing
culverts, cleaning ditches,
mowing, among many other
duties, staying within our
yearly budget. Every year it
MINI-BAZAAR
RUMMAGE SALE AND LUNCH
SATURDAY, OCT. 26 • 9 A.M. -1 P.M.
United Methodist Church, Main St., Unadilla
LUNCH FROM 11 A.M. TO 1 P.M.
Soup, Sandwiches and Dessert
Offered by the United Methodist Women.
Come browse, find gifts
or rummage and enjoy lunch!
YOU’RE INVITED!
The Friends of Sustainable Sidney
are hosting a “Meet Our Candidates” BREAKFAST
Sunday, October 27th 8:30-11AM
EGGS ! BACON ! THOSE HOMEFRIES !
CORDES! HEATH! MURATORE!
$5 suggested donationALL proceeds will be donated to the GMRCS
(old Sidney Center schoolhouse)
Old Sidney Center Schoolhouse, 10770 County Route 23
ON NOVEMBER 5, VOTE FOR CANDIDATES WHO ARE FOR THE PEOPLE
CORDES HEATH MURATORE
gets more difficult due to the
increasing costs. We replace
trucks and equipment as to our
equipment replacement schedule. I worked with FEMA and
recovered expenses for storm
damage in 2006 and 2011.
During the winter months, I
start work at 3 a.m. every day
to check the roads and stay in
contact with the school superintendent of their condition,
when necessary for school
closing. The roads also get
checked as needed throughout
the day.
We have taken over five
new roads since my election
into office. Some had to be rebuilt to town specifications. I
also maintain the town pool as
well as the recreation area and
the 45 acre Clinton Park.
Upon request of the Highway Association, I attend
Lobby Day every year in Albany. We lobby in attempt
to receive more aid from the
state for the CHIPS program.
I also attended Cornell Local Road School for the past
18 years for education on
safety programs and highway
regulations that change. For
eight years I’ve been elected
as president of Chenango
County Highway Association.
Also, I am a board member of
the Chenango County Safety
Council.
I have lived and worked
in Bainbridge all my life and
truly care about our community. I’m very active in the
Bainbridge Lions Club. I am a
past president twice and have
received the Lion of the Year
award twice. I serve as director on the board for the Bainbridge Community Foundation and I’m on the board of
The Bainbridge Greenlawn
Cemetery Association.
During my 18 years of service, I feel I have proven to
have served my position to the
fullest and always made myself available.
When I’m re-elected, I will
continue to serve my position
as I have done for the past 18
years “With Commitment.”
BUTTERNUTS
nuts Town Board.
Scot and his wife, Anita, are
20-year residents of the Town
of Butternuts.
With a Masters Degree
in science education, Lueck
taught science in the Sidney
district for 20 years and is now
doing substitute teacher work
in the GMU school district.
Scot is also an interior firefighter and secretary for the
Gilbertsville Fire Department
as well as serving the town as
constable and dog control officer. In other volunteer work,
Scot does a lot for the animal
shelter in Sidney, including
writing their newsletter and
the dog adoption columns for
local newspapers.
Lueck is now running for the
Butternuts Town Board and, if
elected, promises to work with
residents to develop sensible
solutions to the issues that will
confront the town as change
comes to it in the future. He
believes that local residents
have the talents and abilities
necessary to determine their
own future as a town while
preserving the peace and quiet
that they value so much.
COVENTRY
Judge Joseph Agunzo
For Coventry Town Justice
COVENTRY - My name is
Joseph Agunzo. I am currently
serving as Coventry Town Justice, a position I was appointed
to on Jan. 1, 2013.
After serving 20 years as a
New York City Police Officer,
I retired to scenic Coventry. I
have collectively applied my
law enforcement experience
towards performing as your
town magistrate with great
pride.
My endorsements include
the New York State Rifle and
Pistol Association, (NYSRPA), New York City Patrolmen’s Benevolent Association
(NYCPBA), New York State
Troopers Police Benevolent
Association
(NYSTPBA),
and the New York City Sergeant Benevolent Association
(NYCSBA).
Please remember to vote
Nov. 5.
Robert Boudreau Seeks
Re-election to Town Council
Scot Lueck
Seeks Seat On
Butternuts Board
BUTTERNUTS – Scot Lueck is a candidate for Butter-
COVENTRY - Robert E.
Boudreau is seeking re-election as councilman in the
Town of Coventry.
I would like to thank you
for electing me as your councilman for the last four years.
My first two years as deputy
supervisor, we, the town board,
had no increase in taxes. Even
with major flood damage to the
roads in 2009, there was no increase. I also spent a lot of my
own time working on hiring
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a new assessor at the end of
my first two years. We finally
got it done. The third year as
councilman I voted no to raising taxes above the state tax
cap of 2%. It was passed three
to two. Before they voted to go
above the 2% tax cap, the town
board had the public vote with
a show of hands. There were
only two people that had their
hands held high for higher
taxes and John Wicks was one
of them. If you want to see his
hand held high, it is on www.
thecoventryvillegazatte.com
website youtube.
“As for the judge situation,”
the town board had not one,
but two interviews for all candidates for judge. We read all
the resumes and interviewed
all candidates. The town board
came to a decision, (quite
quickly I might add) and the
town board voted unanimously for Joseph A. Agunzo as
town judge. In my opinion, the
best man for the job. With our
economy doing so well (I say
this with total sarcasm), taxes
are going up again this coming year. Just under the tax
cap. My hunch is if the present supervisor gets re-elected
again, the taxes will definitely
go over the tax cap for the next
three years. We shall see after
Nov. 5. We need to look forward for a brighter future for
you, the people of Coventry.
I will be on the Republican
ballot for councilman and Joseph A. Agunzo for judge, and
will also be on the Independent ballot with George Broeg
for councilman and Gwendolyn M. Hinman for supervisor.
We all would appreciate your
vote.
The ballot can be a little
confusing, we vote for two
councilmen, one supervisor,
and one judge.
George Broeg
Seeks Return
To Council Seat
COVENTRY - George
Broeg is running for re-election for town council in
Coventry.
I want to thank all the people who voted for me in the
primary and hope you will
support me on Election Day.
It has been a quick four
years in serving the people
of Coventry. We have made
progress in some areas, but
there is still much more work
to be done.
I was the driving force, and
the liaison for the town board
in transitioning to a new town
assessor. I kept my word to
the people of Coventry and
worked hard to see the process
through, and sort out our new
assessor Brian Fitts. He is re-
spectful to the people of Coventry, is fair in his practices
and openly offers the formula
on how he came to the assessment. This was all we ever
wanted in an assessor for Coventry, and it is what you, the
people of Coventry, deserve.
I have also kept my word
to the people of Coventry by
fighting higher taxes and voted against raising your taxes. I
will always work hard to keep
taxes low in Coventry.
I hope we will get a chance
to speak before Election Day,
but if I miss you I am always
available to you on my home
line 639-3088. If you have any
questions regarding the town,
please do not hesitate to call
me - I welcome your calls.
I want to thank all the people that have supported me the
last four years, and I hope to
serve you all for another four
years.
Please come out on Election
Day and vote, Tuesday, Nov.
5. Your vote counts.
Gwendolyn Hinman
Is Candidate For
Coventry Supervisor
COVENTRY – Gwendolyn “Gwen” Hinman is a
candidate for Coventry Town
Supervisor.
Being a lifelong resident, local farmer and town business
owner, with my family living
and working in this area, I
want the best for this town
and its citizens. As a farmer,
and with my sisters owner
of the community store, I am
keenly aware of what it’s like
to struggle to just make ends
meet. This fact is the cornerstone of my qualifications as
supervisor.
As a farmer and store owner
(with gas pumps) the regulations, permits, licenses, inspections by county, state
and federal are nearly endless
and require accurate record
keeping as well as timely
reporting.
Farming and business ownership (with employees) also
requires accounting and bookkeeping skills. Add to that insurance, workers comp., tax
reporting, well you get it, I
have the experience to do the
job.
Our town must become
much more business friendly.
Each new or expanded business is a new or expanded revenue stream into our tax base.
I am respectfully asking for
your vote in November. A vote
for me is a vote for farmers,
local business, less tax, less
government, more compassion
and a better day for Coventry.
Please Vote Nov. 5
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Tri-Town News — Thursday, October 24, 2013— 11
is important to the Town of
Coventry.
that need to be made, as supervisor, for the future of the
Town of Sidney.
John E. Wicks, Jr.
Seeks Coventry
Town Board Seat
George Westcott
Seeks Re-election
As Coventry Supervisor
COVENTRY – George L.
Westcott is seeking re-election as the Town of Coventry
Supervisor.
I am a long time resident of
the Town of Coventry, I graduated from Afton Central High
School in 1978. After graduation I went to work at the
Raymond Corporation and in
1982 joined the United States
Air Force. My career included
over 21 years of honorable
service in the United States
Air Force where my last tour
of duty was in Afghanistan
fighting the War on Terror. I
returned to the Town of Coventry to live and work at the
Raymond Corporation as a
manager. Prior to that I worked
at Lockheed Martin as a master planner on government
contracts. My educational
background includes a Bachelor of Science in aviation,
plus numerous management
and leadership schools while
in the Air Force and private
employment.
I sit on the Chenango County Board of Town Supervisors
and hold seats on the Public
Works and Personnel Committees as well. I am familiar with
“Generally Accepted Accounting Principles” and compiled
budgets and submitted them
for approval and disbursement in my present employment. I also understand the
importance of state, county,
Civil Service and town laws
and how they affect the Town
of Coventry and its residents.
I also believe in transparency
and openness of all the town’s
records for the Town of Coventry people to view.
Since serving as Coventry Town Supervisor, I have
worked to make improvements to the Town of Coventry. With the mutual aid of the
town board I have completed
unfinished state audits and
implemented financial and vehicle use policies for the use of
the town’s resources. I was instrumental in the drafting and
finalization of a local law providing for a partial exemption
from town property taxes to
persons with disabilities who
have limited income. Also,
during my tenure I researched,
interviewed and with the town
board’s approval, appointed
a new assessor to fill the vacancy left to me by the prior
supervisor’s appointment. Responding to the concerns of
town constituents, I took the
lead to get thousands of tires
cleaned up on the property
across the street from the town
hall. Working in partnership
with governmental agencies
and property owners to make
necessary agreements for the
cleanup, all tires have been removed and properly disposed
of. I have helped to improve
community involvement by
making the towns resources
available for groups and activities such as 4H, the Blueberry
Festival, softball teams from
the local area and the months’
long EMT training course
drawing EMT personnel from
several towns.
I will be available on Oct.
27 to answer questions during “Meet and Greet the Candidates” from 3-5 p.m. at the
Silo Restaurant. I ask that the
voters come out to support me
on Nov. 5 at the general election and believe every vote
COVENTRY – John E.
Wicks, Jr., is seeking the position as councilman on the
Coventry Town Board.
I have been a resident of
Coventry for 58 years. My
wife, Diane and I have been
married for 38 years and have
a daughter.
I am a retired farmer, as
well as a produce (potato)
farmer. I was vice president
of the Coventry Milk Producers Co-op for 35 years. I was a
member of the Dairy Farmers
of America for five years.
Three summers were spent
mowing for the Coventry
Highway Department.
I would like to see taxes
and spending held in check
and more incentive to add new
businesses in our town.
I am a concerned citizen of
Coventry and made it a point
of attending most of the town
board meetings.
Please come out to support
me Nov. 5, as every vote is
important.
SIDNEY
William Heath
Is Candidate For
Sidney Supervisor
SIDNEY - William “Bill”
Heath is running for the position of Town of Sidney
Supervisor.
I have spent the majority of my life in and around
the Sidney area. A position
at ACCO Brands (then Keith
Clark) 28 years ago, brought
me back to this area permanently. Throughout my career
at ACCO Brands, I have taken
advantage of different types of
training from “working with
difficult people” to different
management styles. One of
the most rewarding programs
I attended was the Leadership
Delaware program sponsored
by SUNY Delhi.
I also have a history of community service, holding the
position of secretary for the
Delaware Valley Humane Society since 2002. As a member
of the DVHS board, I assisted
with re-writing the organizations by-laws and many of the
policies and procedures they
still follow.
Having been a councilman
for the past nine months, there
are a number of issues that I
see that need to be addressed.
Transparency is one of those
issues. The community should
be aware of what the town
board is doing. A web site is
in progress that will help accomplish this goal. Items to
be posted on this site include
property assessments, meeting
schedules, agendas prior to
meetings and minutes following, any news that would affect
the community, issues brought
up at the county level, links to
other sites and forms needed
to obtain information from the
clerk. Also, at monthly meetings, time should be allotted
for people to speak on issues
that affect them and the town.
I believe the combination
of experience I have gained
through ACCO Brands, the
Delaware Valley Humane Society and the months I have
spent as a councilman will
help guide me in the decisions
Eugene Pigford
Seeks Post As
Sidney Supervisor
SIDNEY – R. Eugene
(Gene) Pigford is the Republican candidate for Sidney Town
Supervisor.
Gene, with his wife Edie,
have three married children
and six grandchildren ranging in age from 21 to two
years old. Gene and Edie
have been property owners in
Sidney Township for over 40
years, and reside in the family home that belonged first to
Edie’s grandparents and then
to her parents prior to their
occupancy.
Gene is a former high
school teacher of physics and
chemistry.
He is a retired Lt. Colonel
(ordained clergyman) from
The Salvation Army with
over 40 years of pastoral and
administrative experience in
the Eastern US and Canada.
Gene has had six years experience as chief ecclesiastical
and administrative officer for
all Salvation Army operations
in Northeast Ohio and Upstate
New York, total budgets for
each in excess of $25 million. For three years he was
the principal of the Salvation
Army School (now College)
for Officer Training located
in Suffern. He holds a Masters Degree from Columbia
University, NYC, in educational administration. Gene
has served on Salvation Army
Emergency Disaster teams
both locally and nationally.
In recent years he has been
the treasurer of Fagan Flyers,
the Sidney Airport Auxiliary
group and has attended town
board meetings for the last
three years.
He believes that the next
Sidney Town Supervisor
should maintain the following
priorities:
1. A coordinated plan for
encouraging community development initiatives in the
town, village and hamlet of
Sidney Center.
2. Careful management of
town fiscal resources.
3. Specific guidelines protecting town environmental
resources.
4. Encouragement of industry and job opportunities in the
township.
5. A long-range vision and
strategic plan for the future of
Sidney Township.
6. Mutual respect for all
persons residing in Sidney
Township; as well as for all
who participate in town board
proceedings.
The present dominating
party on the board already has
two guaranteed seats in 2014.
To insure representation from
both parties’ perspectives,
your vote for all Republican
candidates is urgently requested on Nov. 5.
devastated our communities
in the Delaware and Susquehanna River Basins.
I have management experience both in the private and
public sectors, which will enable me to make decisions
based on facts and needs.
I encourage everyone to
review the New York Codes,
Rules and Regulations at the
NYS DEC Website, http://
www.dec.ny.gov/energy/205.
html, regarding the about the
Regulations on Gas Drilling.
Also, please review the Proposed Constitutional Amendments at the Board of Election
Website, http://www.elections.
ny.gov/ProposedConsAmendments.html
Please elect me to Sidney
Town Council.
Jody S. Proffitt
Is Candidate For
Council Seat
SIDNEY - Jody S. Proffitt
is a candidate for Sidney Town
Council.
I grew up in Deposit, graduated from Deposit Central
School in 1979. I attended
Tompkins Cortland Community College (TC3) in Dryden,
majoring in criminal justice. I
was a member of the Deposit
Fire Department and Emergency Squad. In 1986 I began
my employment with Delaware County in the capacity of
a Deputy Sheriff.
In 2004 Sandy, my wife
now for 25 years, and daughters, Stephanie and Natasha,
moved into our new home in
Palm Coast, Fla. and I worked
as a construction superintendant at St. Maartins Condominium project in Daytona
Beach Shores, Fla. Sandy and
I returned home from Florida in August, 2006 and purchased the home we live in
now. I returned to the position
of Deputy Sheriff with Delaware County in March 2008
and was promoted to Sergeant
in 2010.
I am a certified Police General Topics Instructor, and have
instructed at Law Enforcement
and Correction’s Academies.
I am a certified instructor for
the Fire Police Course held in
Delhi. I am a member of the
Sidney Moose Club, St. Ann’s
Episcopal Church and Vestry
member, and Law Enforcement Training Directors Association of New York.
I will bring to the Sidney
Town Board 24 years of public service experience in Delaware County. I’ve worked with
elected officials, government
and private sector employees
and volunteers, to obtain resources needed for Delaware
County during the floods that
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John Woodyshek
Seeks Seat On
Sidney Board
SIDNEY - I am running for
a seat on the Town of Sidney
Council. I bring to the table my
40 years of municipal government experience, 34 of which
have been here in Sidney, and the
ability to listen to and resolve issues; I think those that know me
know that I do my homework,
think things through, try to be
fair and logical, I’m prepared
to explain and defend positions
taken, and to do what’s right.
The Sidney Town Board does
not need to be controversial,
or confrontational. It needs to
be respectful and respected. It
needs to be fiscally responsible.
Sidney needs to be progressive,
not regressive and positive in its
actions and perception. Sidney
fortunately has a lot of attributes
that most municipalities our size
do not have that we can and must
accentuate: jobs, a hospital, recreation facilities and programs,
a well equipped and trained fire
department, a library second to
none, housing, water and wastewater infrastructure, rail and
interstate highway transportation, large and small shopping
opportunities, an airport, an Industrial Park, East Sidney Lake,
senior citizen living, parks, nature trails, daycare, community
service organizations and places
of worship and much more. We
should be instilling in our residents, our students, and also in
our transient workforce (that we
have been blessed with) all the
reasons why they should feel
good about working, residing,
building their homes and raising
their families here.
On Specific Issues:
• The Town Council needs
to respectfully listen to its constituents, all of them, and find
solutions to issues.
• Pipeline: This can be an
important addition to Sidney’s
infrastructure and can provide
the source for cleaner and less
expensive energy to homes,
(Continued on Page 12)
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Starting Nov. 7 - Thurs. Night Dinners
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Presents The Town Hall Opry
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Saturday,
Oct. 26
at 8 pm
Admission
$12.00 Adults • $10.00 Seniors & Students
$25.00 Family • $60 Opry Passes for the year
Refreshments
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The Town Hall Theatre
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www.jerichoarts.com
12 — Tri-Town News — Thursday, October 24, 2013
POLITICAL CANDIDATES’ STATEMENTS
(Contineud from age 11)
businesses and industry. On the
other hand, there are negative
impacts to this that are primarily to individual property owners where the actual pipeline
is proposed. This is a federally
regulated activity and there are
laws in place to deal with these
impacts that are specific to each
property owner. The most practical thing that the town can do
is insist that the property owners’ desires are accommodated
by the gas company and Federal
Government in the location of
the pipe wherever reasonably
possible and, in any event, that
they are compensated accordingly for the intrusion on their
property.
• Hospital: In general I think
that it would be better if the
town was not in the landlord
business; however in any event,
the town should be commended
for their efforts since the closing of the hospital is apparently
turning the fiscal situation at
the hospital around from where
it was four years ago. It is imperative that we nurture the TriTown Hospital agreements and
that we continue the emergency
room services and efforts to
expand on other medical care
activities.
• Sidney Center Wastewater:
The town needs to be directly
involved in (not leaving it to
others) and complete the feasibility study already authorized.
The town needs to interact in
the evaluation of options and
should pursue an option affordable to the affected property
owners.
• Housing: Existing codes
should be reasonably enforced.
Funding for rehabilitation
should be investigated. Existing hazards such as the one recently discussed in Sidney Center, should be handled through
code enforcement and at least
be required to be secured by the
owner.
• Sidney Highway Department: Maintenance of town
highways is a critically important function of the town and
must be provided with a responsible budget.
• Gas exploration and extracting: This has gotten way out of
perspective. The regulation of
gas exploration and extraction is
and should be the responsibility
of New York State. They have
the resources. We don’t. They
have the science, the personnel,
the testimonials, and five years
of Pennsylvania experience to
ensure that whatever they approve, if anything, they can do
it right and enforce the regulations that undoubtedly they
would add to any approval. If
they approve anything, they are
not going to open the door wide
open and allow the gas companies to do what they want. We
as a town and our State Legislators should demand that the
state strictly control and regulate whatever they approve; that
they protect the public from
contamination; that they protect
COVENTRY VOTERS
YOU ARE INVITED
“Meet & Greet”
CANDIDATES
FOR TOWN OFFICES
REPUBLICAN/DEMOCRAT/
INDEPENDENT CANDIDATES
Please join us at the
SILO RESTAURANT
Sunday, October 27
3:00 PM – 5:00 PM
Complimentary coffee and desserts will be served.
UNADILLA TOWN
RESIDENTS
on Nov. 5th
VOTE FOR EXPERIENCE
ED FRAZIER, JR.
GREG RELIC
Co. Representative
Supervisor
GEORGE D. BANTA, III ROGER J. CECCE
Councilman
Councilman
RODNEY RENWICK
Highway Superintendent
TERRY L. YODER
RAY JOHNSON
Councilman
Assessor
STEPHEN GREER
Town Justice
YOUR VOTE COUNTS!
Paid for by the
Unadilla Town
Republican Committee
the rights of property owners to
utilize resources on their property provided they do not (other
than temporarily) interfere with
the peaceful use of properties
adjoining any exploration or
extraction site and that, in the
event of violations or damages,
the responsible parties are held
accountable. Furthermore, the
financial resources that may be
necessary to correct problems if
they should occur should be required to be provided up front.
At this time the town does not
need to get involved with this
and should stay out of it and
focus on real and more pressing town issues of which there
is no shortage. The town must
review existing town highways
and pass legislation if necessary
to insure adequate control and
protection of town roads.
I believe that Sidney can take
care of Sidney.
We don’t need “outsiders”
coming here to tell us what we
can do with our property and resources or how to run the town’s
business. Sidney can do it. And
we don’t need to be the battleground for everybody’s crusade
which in recent years and continuing to date has solved nothing but has given Sidney a black
eye and has made us out to be
a laughing stock locally, at the
county level and even nationally. This has to stop now. Town
business is serious business handling serious taxpayer money
(taxes over $1M; budgets over
$2M) and should be performed
by qualified, thoughtful, community-minded persons.
You can’t run town business
by thumbing your nose at residents with good faith issues, or
at the Delaware County Planning Board when they provide
requested guidance or at your
own town attorney by ignoring
his counsel as you pass a local
law, and you can’t disregard
taxpaying landowners. If in conflict, we need to strive to find a
common acceptable ground to
operate from and not continue
to polarize this community. We
cannot afford to allow Sidney to
stagnate.
I bring my track record of
volunteer community service
and my experience in municipal government, budgeting,
problem solving, and working
with the public to the table for
the betterment of the Town of
Sidney.
Personally:
• I am a long time member of
the Sidney Rotary Club where
I have had a special focus on
community service.
• I am an active member of
Sacred Heart Catholic Church,
Sidney.
• I’m a member of the Cullman
Community Day Committee.
• I retired in 2012 with 34
years of service as engineer for
the Village of Sidney; where I
administered the Dept. of Public
Works, Water and Wastewater
utilities and was involved in airport improvements and funding,
Industrial Park Development,
parks improvements, library
expansions, commercial and
residential development.
• I have extensive experience
in municipal government and
working with state and federal
representatives and agencies.
• I’m a graduate of Penn State
University with a B.S. degree in
civil engineering.
• I’m a licensed professional
engineer.
• I received the Citizen of the
Years award in 2000 and again
in 2007 as one of a group honored by the Chamber of Commerce for the response to the
flood of 2006.
• I reside on Bridge Street in
the Village of Sidney with my
wife of 43 years, Faith.
• I/we have three children,
graduates of SCHS and five
grandchildren; one of which has
graduated and four are currently
in school at Sidney.
Goals:
1. Provide fiscally responsible
budgeting and pay off our
hospital debt.
2. Position Sidney to grow
economically.
3. Protect what we have in
terms of jobs and lifestyle.
4. Promote respect.
Of course we don’t know
what the next town issue will be,
but whatever it is, we as a community need to be prepared: first
by placing the right persons on
the Sidney Town Council and a
supervisor who can be counted
on to make the right decisions
on behalf of you and the town,
and secondly, they need to be
guided not by party or personality, but by what’s in the best
interest of the Town of Sidney.
I am prepared to do what’s
right and to help move the Sidney Town Board in a new direction. Hopefully one of respect
and responsible government
through rational and thoughtful
cooperation and I ask for your
vote on Nov. 5.
Also, I can’t do it alone,
and the board cannot continue
to operate the way it has with
the same people (even in the
last year) and expect different
results. This year there is an
opportunity to elect a new supervisor and two new councilmen. It’s time to focus on doing
what’s right and take the Town
of Sidney in a responsible direction by electing Jody Proffitt
and John Woodyshek to Sidney
Town Council and Gene Pigford
as Supervisor.
UNADILLA
Ed Frazier Seeks
Second Term As
District #1 Rep.
UNADILLA – Ed Frazier is
currently running for his second two-year term as District
#1, Town of Unadilla Representative to the Otsego County
Board of Representatives. He
has been nominated to run on
the Republican, Conservative
and the Independent lines.
Ed and his wife, Stephanie,
have lived in Unadilla for over
20 years and have two daughters, Cassidy and Mallory,
who attend the Unatego High/
Middle Schools.
Frazier has previously
served Unadilla as a member of the Zoning Board of
Appeals, village trustee and
several terms as mayor. He is
self-employed as co-owner of
Cohen & Frazier Builders, a
full service home building and
remodeling company. He also
co-owns a property management company that purchases
neglected properties and rehabilitates them into income producing rental units. They have
one project in process currently in the Town of Sidney.
Since his election to the
county board, Frazier has been
appointed to the public works,
the Inter-governmental Affairs
and the administration committees. Serving on these diverse committees has allowed
him to gain a great deal of
knowledge of the inner-workings of the county’s building
services, highway, tourism,
board of elections, economic
development, veterans, real
property, solid waste, planning
and the treasury departments.
Please allow Ed to keep
working for Unadilla by voting for him this November.
Ray Johnson
Seeks Re-election
To Assessor Post
UNADILLA – Ray Johnson, Town of Unadilla Assessor, wishes to continue in his
current post.
Ray is currently completing his 46th year as Town of
Unadilla Assessor, 45 of them
as chairman of the board of
assessors.
Ray grew up in Mt. Upton and is a graduate of Mt.
Upton High School. Ray has
three sons and one daughter,
all graduates of Unatego High
School. A 60 year member
of the American Legion Post
758, he presently serves as
the commander, a position
he has served on for over 40
years. Ray served under several town supervisors and has
a good working relationship
with them all as well as the
other members of the town
board, especially the retired
clerk, Jancy Cole.
Ray has made many friendships with the residents in the
township as well as with other
assessors in various towns in
Otsego County.
Ray is running for election
as an independent under the
United party and would appreciate your vote once again.
Rodney Renwick
Seeks Re-Election
To Highway Post
UNADILLA - Rodney Renwick is seeking re-election as
the Town of Unadilla Highway Superintendent. During
Rodney’s first term as highway superintendent he diligently worked to manage the
highway department budget
and implemented a number of
changes, which improved the
efficiency of the highway department. Rodney completely
computerized and maintains
the highway department records, thereby allowing him to
eliminate the use of a highway
bookkeeper resulting in savings of over $10,000 per year.
He restructured the town plow
routes and reduced plowing time to an average of 2.5
hours per route. Rodney also
reduced the size of the highway department through attrition. Rodney is a working
supervisor – he has a regular
winter plowing route and can
frequently be seen working
side-by–side with the rest of
the highway crew on daily
jobs. Rodney dedicates his full
time and effort to the position
of highway superintendent and
does not have any other source
of outside employment.
Rodney also expanded department revenue by selling
scrap metal and using on-line
auctions to sell surplus equipment. These activities have
netted the town nearly $40,000
since he took office. As result
of his efforts, the highway department has spent less than
allocated by the town board
each year since Rodney took
office. In fact, the 2013 annual
highway department budget
was $26,000 less than when he
came into office in 2010.
During Rodney’s first term
as highway superintendent the
floods of 2011 occurred and
washed out numerous town
roads including major damage
to Lovers Lane, Sand Hill and
Prentice Gorge. On behalf of
the town, Rodney applied for
and was awarded FEMA assistance to repair these roads.
Rodney also worked with several state and federal agencies
and was awarded funding to
perform several mitigation
projects in other areas of the
town. In total, the amount
awarded to the town for flood
recovery and mitigation was
approximately $1.6 million.
During a review of the FEMA
awards, the independent auditors commented that the
records maintained by Rodney were exemplary and they
found no deficiencies with
any of the projects. As a result
of these efforts, many of the
town roads are now in better
condition than before the flood
and the town is now better prepared to deal with similar disasters in the future.
Rodney has also worked
hard to establish and maintain a cooperative working
relationship with other local
agencies such as the Village of
Unadilla, neighboring towns
and Unatego Central School
District. One major project
in this area was the radio upgrade for the town. As a result,
of coordination and sharing
radio service and frequencies
the towns, schools and local
fire department can all “talk”
to each other on the radios allowing for better coordination
during an emergency.
Rodney was honored as the
Unadilla Fire Department Citizen of the Year for 2013 for
all of his efforts.
Rodney would like to continue as the Town of Unadilla
Highway Superintendent and
respectfully asks for your support on Nov. 5. If you have
any questions, comments or
concerns that you wish to discuss, please contact Rodney at
369-2325.
Tracy Winchester
Is Candidate for
Highway Position
UNADILLA - Tracy Winchester announces he is a candidate for the Town of Unadilla Highway Superintendent,
on the Independent ticket,
Safer Roads.
He’s a life-long resident of
Unadilla and a small business
owner for the past 10 years.
He has 20+ years of experience in excavation and road
construction. He started as a
laborer, equipment operator
and promoted to supervisor.
He has good supervisory
and communication skills,
integrity, hard-working, resourceful and will establish
and maintain a satisfactory
working relationship with residents, employees and board
members.
If elected he will ask the
Unadilla Town Board to revisit renewing the contract
between Otsego County and
the Town of Unadilla. He feels
this is a necessity for the Town
of Unadilla to continue snowplowing all roads in the Town
of Unadilla vs. Otsego County
plowing the roads.
I ask the voters to come out
and support me on Nov. 5 from
6 a.m. to 9 p.m. at the Unadilla
Town Hall, 1648 St. Hwy 7. I
believe every vote is important
to the Town of Unadilla.
Note: No
candidate
statements will
be accepted
for next
week’s paper
- only paid
advertisements
Tri-Town News — Thursday, October 24, 2013— 13
IDA Completes Building Project
(Continued from Page 1)
nies. “The Delaware County
IDA has and continues to be
supportive of our business and
that support has facilitated our
company’s growth into new
and diverse product lines,”
stated John Huff, CEO of Huff
Ice Cream. With the completion of this project Huff will
utilize approximately 1/3 of
the building and provides approximately four local jobs.
James Thomson, Chairman
of the Delaware County Industrial Development Agency
stated, “The IDA is seeking
to take a more aggressive role
in the location and expansion
decisions of new and existing
companies. Whether investing in the renovation of buildings, site development and/or
infrastructure the IDA strives
to meet the needs businesses
to support their job-creating
operations.” The Delaware
County Department of Economic Development and the
IDA strive to meet the needs
of both new and existing businesses throughout the county.
To learn about the initiatives
and programs available to
local business through Delaware County IDA, please visit
the County’s Economic Development website at www.
dcecodev.com or contact: The
Delaware County Department
of Economic Development,
One Courthouse Square, Suite
4; Delhi, NY 13753; by phoning 746-8595 or e-mailing
[email protected] To stay
informed please “like” the departments page on Facebook
at www.facebook.com/DelawareCountyEconomicDevelopment/.
WELLS BRIDGE NEWS
IRENE MCCUMBER, CORRESPONDENT
[email protected] • 988-0038
Church
Sand Hill Methodist Church
worships and Sunday school
are both at 11:30 a.m. on
Sunday mornings with Pastor
Nancy Stanley.
Unadilla Center Church
worship is Sunday at 10:30
a.m. with Pastor Doug
Besemer.
Suppers
There will be a Harvest Fall
dinner Sunday, Oct. 27 at 12
p.m. at the Sand Hill Methodist Community House. Bring
a dish to pass and your own
table service. Come and join
the fun.
Prayers
Prayers please for Tim Davis and Ellen Smith.
Personals
The Unatego Community
Church had a group of Word
For Life collegians; about 20
young adults lead the service
and sang for the fellowship
part. It was Appreciation Sunday for the pastor.
Ethel
Berggren,
three
grandsons and the group of
collegians came and raked her
lawn one day this last week.
Kristian, Erik, Nelson Berggren and some of their friends
worked in the kitchen at the
ham dinner last Saturday at
the Unadilla Center Church.
It went real well and the food
was good.
On Sunday, Mr. and Mrs.
Norm Mccumber visited Ellen
Smith to see how she was doing, she was in Bassett Hospital for four days this last week.
They also visited Dick and
Lucky Stanton.
A back yard barbecue was
enjoyed by 52 relatives and
friends of Steve and Jayne
Bolton on Merriman Hill Rd.
Four Civil Service
Exams Scheduled
DELHI – Delaware County
is offering the following Civil
Service examinations:
Senior Account Clerk, Senior Account Clerk Typist,
Principal Account Clerk and
Principal Account Clerk Typist, at various locations as they
occur. The last filing date is
Nov. 4
For more information regarding these examinations,
interested parties may call the
Delaware County Personnel
Office at 746-2318; visit the
office at 1 Courthouse SquareSuite 2, Delhi or check our
web site at www.co.delaware.
ny.us.
They were celebrating the
wedding of Bett Bolton and
Sara Stevens. They were married on Oct. 5 at the Covered
Bridge Gardens. The flower
girl was Loralie, the daughter.
They are living in Schenevus.
There is two weeks left of
the good pancake breakfast
at the Fish and Game Club in
Unadilla.
Alice Harageones’ son Geo
and daughter Katlyn spent
Sunday afternoon setting up
tree stands and selling fruit
for FFA for school. They had
a nice day.
Seniors
The Happy Time Senior
Citizens group will meet
Wednesday, Nov. 13 at noon
in the Wells Bridge firehouse,
upstairs rooms. Roast turkey
and dressing will be provided.
Please bring a dish to share
and own table service. Those
attending are also asked to
bring an item for the local
food bank. New members are
always welcome.
School
Well our Unatego boy’s
football team did it again Friday night. Good show guys!
We are proud of you.
The Platts had a Halloween
party at the Community house
in Sand Hill for their daughter Jess and eight friends on
Saturday night, what a night
of fun.
Free Food
Distribution
Is This Friday
HAMDEN – Delaware Opportunities Inc. will be conducting a distribution of surplus donated food to Delaware
County residents on Friday,
Oct. 25 from 10:30 a.m. until
all food is distributed. The distribution will take place in the
parking lot behind the Delaware Opportunities headquarters located at 35430 St. Hwy.
10 in Hamden. This distribution is limited to Delaware
County residents. For more
information contact Tammy
Clark Nutrition Advocate at
746-1670 or Linda Vausse,
Food Bank Coordinator at
746-1685.
Participants should bring
boxes and/or bags and dress
for the weather as there is no
indoor space available for
those waiting for food. Households must appear in person to
receive food. No notes will be
accepted for this distribution.
A CHEERFUL PROSPECT
BY ALICIA (MARSLAND) GEROMEL
The idea that compromise
is the “sensible” way to deal
with conflict has definite limits. I have seen a policewoman
chastising victims of a peeping
tom (who liked to watch them
with binoculars then call 911,
making false allegations). She
told them, “You know you are
at least half the problem. You
have to stop reacting and just
ignore him.” In this instance,
all the father had done was
hang a blanket on their front
porch so they could sit in the
breeze on a hot summer evening. He then walked to the
end of the block to check from
that angle whether the neighbor was able to peer past the
blanket. He neither looked at
or in any other way acknowledged the problem individual.
Said “neighbor” then called
the police to report that the father had threatened him with
bodily harm. Shortly thereafter, to cap off the evening,
Protective Services arrived to
interview the children as to
whether their mother had been
closeted
“inappropriately”
with a playmate of theirs.
In the face of this gross
persecution, police warned
the poor parents, “If anyone
calls us again, SOMEONE is
going to jail.” This included
the innocent parties, if they
should be harassed in any new
and creative way by their tormenter. This absence of any
common sense response to a
clearly crazy neighbor finally
forced this family to move out
of their trailer court.
All because the knee jerk
reaction was “compromise.”
In many of the instances I
have described the concept of
equal guilt and compromise
presents a quick and easy way
for teachers, police, judges,
attorneys and case workers to
shut down conflict, especially
since it is often quite difficult
to find out precisely what the
truth is. This is due to that fact
that – duh! – some people lie.
Rather than spend time ferreting out who is telling the truth,
how much more convenient to
simply assume that EVERYONE is lying!
On the national and international scene, we can see
many people advocating similar strategies in the name of
peace-making. Some equate
innocent Americans blown
up in Boston with their terrorist killers, by saying that they
are complicit in the problems
which “force” terrorists to
resort to violence. Some see
no difference between Hamas
and the Israeli army, or Taliban and allied forces in Afghanistan. When the Taliban
uses women and children as
shields, capitalizing on our
dislike of killing noncombatants, such folks blame US
when innocents die.
Compromise is only appropriate where the parties in conflict are on a reasonably equal
footing, both morally and in
terms of their relative power.
When a teacher or mediator
ignores this and treats the bully and victim as equals, they
fail to teach morality at all.
The bully ends up with little
understanding of how he was
wrong, and the victim learns
to keep their mouth shut.
The result is peace of a kind,
but an enforced peace covering a simmering resentment.
We can see the consequences
in our schools and cities and
even in countries around the
world.
DAWSON BACKUS, age 14, shot his first deer during
the Youth Deer Hunting weekend. He was hunting in
Bainbridge with his dad, Jim Dix. He is shown here with
the 6 point, 140 lb. buck.
Senior Center
To Celebrate
13th Anniversary
HARPURSVILLE – Eastern Broome Senior Center
will celebrate their 13th anniversary this Friday, Oct. 25.
Special music will be provided
at 12:15 p.m. by The Bill and
Roy Band.
All are invited to come
early for coffee, tea and goodies. At 11 a.m. we will be
honoring our senior center
volunteers. Punch and cake
will be served about noon, as
well as a delicious lunch. You
may choose fish Florentine or
chicken Marengo, served with
baked potato, baby carrot,
bread, beverage and dessert.
Reservations need to be made
one day in advance by calling
693-2069.
Our pub bar is also available on a walk-in basis.
is pleased to announce the
Opening
of his new
Dental Office at
51A Union Street,
Sidney
New Patients Welcome
Please Call
607-563-1724
Having a mammogram is one of the most
important ways to detect breast cancer
early, so we're hoping our Pearls of Wisdom
program will inspire women to get a regular
mammogram. Every woman who receives
her annual mammogram at UHS will
receive a beautiful necklace with a single
freshwater pearl, with our compliments.
Sidney Elks To
Host Halloween
Party Oct. 27
SIDNEY – The Sidney Elks
Lodge #2175 will host a Halloween Party on Oct. 27 from
2 to 4 p.m.
All area children up to age
12 are invited to attend. All
children must be accompanied
by an adult.
There will be games, refreshments and costume judging with prizes. All those who
attend will receive a goodie
bag.
And, for the following years that you receive
your annual mammogram at UHS, we'll
give you a gift certificate for another pearl
to add to your necklace.
October is Breast Cancer
Awareness Month
Digital mammography is available at
UHS. You can schedule your mammogram
by calling one of our convenient locations.
DEADLINES
All ads, news stories,
photos, etc. for
inclusion in the paper
must be in by
(Holiday Week – Friday 5 pm)
Fight cancer with
everything we’ve got
We Thank You For Your
Cooperation
www.uhs.net
MONDAY 5:00 PM
Dr. Payam Goudarzi
To schedule your mammogram:
UHS Vestal: 762-2494
UHS Delaware Valley Hospital: 865-2126
UHS Imaging–Norwich: 337-4999
UHS Imaging–Sidney: 561-2212*
*Digital mammo will be available in November
14 — Tri-Town News — Thursday, October 24, 2013
TRI-TOWN AREA
BOWLING RESULTS
INDEPENDENT LEAGUE
Margie & Tim
11
3
Date Nite
10
4
Eileen & John
10
4
Mr. T & I
8
3
Whales & Grump
4 10
Chris & Ted
4 10
Bobby & Robert
3 11
Scratch Game: E. Tallmadge, 224; A. Rowe, 248.
Scratch Series: E. Tallmadge,
563; A. Rowe, 649. Hdcp
Game: E. Tallmadge, 242;
A. Rowe, 248. Hdcp. Series:
E. Tallmadge, 617; A. Rowe,
617.
Honor Games: A. Rowe,
245, 223; E. Tallmadge, 224;
D. Whaley, 217, 211; B. Tallmadge, 211; M. Mott, 204; C.
Puerile, 201.
Honor Series: A. Rowe,
646.
20TH CENTURY LANES
Mon. Morn. Coffee
Four on Floor
36 12
Country Girls
32 16
YoYos
24 24
Silver Belles
20 28
The Foxes
18 30
Rosebuds
14 34
High Game: R. Tietjen, 244.
High Series: R. Tietjen, 572;
S. Straka, 572.
Honor Games: R. Tietjen,
195, 244; D. Fisher, 159,
150, 158; C. Leizear, 169; C.
Daughtrey, 161, 244; S. Cutting, 165; S. Straka, 182, 220,
170; J. Roof, 152, 162, 215; B.
Daley, 160; J. Ruling, 150; G.
Lindroth, 162, 152; S. Harris,
154; A. Berg, 162; R. Fisher,
194, 191, 184; J. Davis, 159;
S. Beames, 185, 150.
Honor Series: R. Tietjen,
572; S. Straka, 572; D. Fisher, 467; J. Roof, 529; S. Cutting, 455; R. Fisher, 569; S.
Beames, 457.
GALAXY BOWL
Chambers O’Hara Classic
Butler Auto Sales
26 10
Dags Auto Parts
26 10
Tabone Chiropractic 26 10
Wagner Lumber
24 12
Neighbors Insurance 22 14
Galaxy Bowl
16 20
All Star Auto
16 20
Justice Construction 12 24
Prinz Excavating
12 24
Honor Games: Mertz, 257;
Erceg, 247; Rowe, 246; Riesen, 246; Delello, 246; Haynes
Jr., 236; Cawley, 233; Luca,
232; Walker, 231; Brewer,
230; Finch, 227; J. Harmon,
226; O’Hara, 225; B. Harmon,
222; Smith, 222; Shelton, 221;
Monroe, 219; Hoke, 219; Ireland, 210; Macumber, 209;
Johnson, 208; Cole, 205; Umbra, 202; Mason, 202; Tallmadge, 200; Prinz, 200.
High Series: Mertz, 707;
Cawley, 659; Walker, 656;
Brewer, 656; Riesen, 655;
Luca, 637; Hoke, 632; Delello, 631; Erceg, 629; Harmon,
625; Smith, 624; Finch, 609;
Shelton, 603; Tallmadge, 600.
Wed. Early Birds
Trash Mashers
38 18
Take it or Leave it 34 14
Hwy 7 Pink Ladies 32 24
J&M Trophies
24 32
Lottie’s Angels
24 32
Bruning Enterprises 16 40
High Game: K. Bruning,
182. High Series: L. Cole,
516.
Honor Game: L. Cole, 180;
B. Lakin, 180; K. Bruning,
182.
Thurs. Night Men’s Hdcp
244 Racing
117.5
Galaxy Bowl
117.5
Bainbridge Memorials115
Butler Auto
114.5
Jims Auto Repair
112.5
New Concept Mach
108
Dags Auto Parts
108
Lil Dave’s Excav
94
J&M Trophies
91
Henry’s Drive In
72
High Game: Keesler, 279cg.
High Series: Hitt, 714.
Honor Games: Halbert,
226; Smith, 204, 232; Johnson, 222, 216cg; Macumber,
206; J. Lambrecht, 244; MacDonald, 245; Hulbert, 206;
O’Hara, 223, 267; Monroe,
236, 215; D. Lambrecht, 225;
Davis, 212, 243, 203; Hitt,
268, 235, 211; Walker, 234;
Mason, 201; Mertz, 204; Cole,
200, 236cg; Shelton, 204, 214;
Beers, 244cg; Gray, 207; Keesler, 215; Cawley, 214, 215cg;
Martin, 213cg, 220; Ga. Gifford, 221; Ge. Gifford, 227,
224; Aylesworth, 203, 209,
223; Brewer, 228, 237cg; Anderson, 206.
Honor Series: O’Hara, 683;
Keesler, 664; Davis, 658;
Monroe, 641; Aylesworth,
635; Ge. Gifford, 635; Brewer, 627; Smith, 617; Cole, 617;
For Classifieds, Display Ads,
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(Please Print)
Name
Address
City
State
Zip
Shelton, 615; Cawley, 610;
Martin, 609; Walker, 608.
Thurs. Morn Winter
Ups & Downs
48
8
Twisted Siblings
39 17
Gutter Dusters
30 26
Friends
30 26
Pin Pals
27 29
Up & Coming
27 29
Pinseekers
24 32
Morning Glories
23 33
Ladybugs
20 36
Unknown
4 20
High Game: Burlison, 258.
High Series: Burlison, 659.
Honor Games: Burlison,
196, 205, 258; Bruning, 170,
166, 156; Stevens, 177; Butler,
176, 167; Fritzsch, 163, 221,
167; Tietjen, 150; Macumber,
172, 159, 166; Decker, 176;
Adams, 156, 156; Daughtrey,
179, 159, 166; Bookhout,
158,163; Basile, 152.
Honor Series: Burlison,
659; Bruning, 492; stevens,
452; Butler, 485; Fritzsch,
551; Macumber, 524; Decker,
462; Daughtrey, 504; Bookhout, 466.
New subscribers please mail a check for $30 to:
The Tri-Town News, PO Box 208, Sidney, NY 13838-0208
Or we can charge your Visa card or MasterCard
Card number
Expiration date
Name on card
RICH
JOHNSON
bowled a 300 at Galaxy
Bowl on Oct. 7. He was
bowling on the Monday
Night Scratch League.
His team was Dag’s Auto
Parts. His teammates
were Gary Huston,
Jarred Mertz, and Toby
Umbra. His scores were
300-234-226=760. This
was his fourth for the
association.
BOX SCORES
BOYS’ SOCCER
EDMESTON 5, FRANKLIN 0
(Oct. 14 at Franklin)
Edmeston 3 2 - 5
Franklin 0 0 - 0
Edmeston goals-assists: Linton Wainright
2-1, Austin Plows 1-0, Clayton Lyon 1-0,
Austin Axtell 1-0, Dante Cornnell 0-1.
Goalie saves: Logan Vibbard (E) 1, Nick
DeVries (E) 3; Turner Thies (F) 9, Derek
Beers (F) 2.
Shots-cornerkicks: Edmeston 15-8;
Franklin 4-2.
LAURENS 1,
GILBERTSVILLE-MT. UPTON 0
(Oct. 14 at G-MU)
Laurens 0 1 - 0
G-MU 0 0 - 0
Laurens goals-assists: Carter Powers
1-0.
Goalies: Zach Schinski (L) 2; Austin
Burnside (G), Nate Fuller (G).
Shots-cornerkicks: Laurens 4-1; G-MU
9-3.
WINDSOR 1, AFTON 0
(Oct. 15 at Windsor)
Afton 0 0 – 0
Windsor 0 1 – 1
Windsor goals-assists: Matt Beaudoin 10, Sebastian Wells 0-1.
Goalie saves: Kyle Hinman (A) 7; Noah
Jones (W) 1, Aaron Williams (W) 1.
Shots-cornerkicks: Afton 5-2; Windsor
13-8.
NORWICH 2, SIDNEY 0
(Oct. 16 at Sidney)
Norwich 1 1 – 2
Sidney 0 0 – 0
Norwich goals-assists: Killian Benedict 10, Curtis Woodard 1-0, Chris Trevisani 0-2.
Goalie saves: Keegan Prime (N) 6; Wyatt
McKee (S) 3.
Shots-cornerkicks: Norwich 9-0; Sidney
7-3.
UNATEGO 1,
BAINBRIDGE-GUILFORD 0
(Oct. 16 at Unatego)
B-G 0 0 – 0
Unatego 0 1 – 1
Unatego goals-assists: Spencer Wilson
1-0, Jasper Humphries 0-1.
Goalie saves: Brandt McCall (B-G) 8;
Mark Maruszewski (U) 8.
Shots-cornerkicks: B-G 9-3; Unatego
14-5.
AFTON 2, OXFORD 1
(Oct. 16 at Afton)
Oxford 1 0 – 1
Afton 0 2 – 2
Oxford goals-assists: Jeff Lawton 1-0;
Matt Moore 0-1.
Afton g-a: Conor Graven-Briggs 2-0; Joe
DeVona 0-1.
Goalie saves: Jake McConnell (O) 13;
Kyle Hinman (A) 12.
Shots-cornerkicks: Oxford 20-1; Afton
29-6.
MIDSTATE ATHLETIC CONFERENCE
CHAMPIONSHIP
GREENE 2, WALTON 1
(Oct. 18 at Walton)
Greene 1 1 – 2
Walton 0 1 – 1
Greene goals-assists: Luke Day 1-1,
Brian Leone 1-0.
Walton g-a: Nate Pieper 1-0.
Goalie saves: Conner Moriarity (G) 9;
Dylan Walley (W) 11.
Shots-cornerkicks: Greene 14-7; Walton
11-3.
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Unatego Girls Pound UV
To Win MAC Soccer Title
GIRLS SOCCER
LAURENS 3,
GILBERTSVILLE-MT. UPTON 0
(Oct. 14 at Laurens)
G-MU 0 0 - 0
Laurens 3 0 - 3
Laurens goals-assists: Amanda Salamon
1-1, Rachel Murello 1-0, Rachelle Soucia 1-0,
Claire Fraser 0-1.
Goalie saves: Katie Schultes (G) 2;
Courtney Sherry (L) 1.
Shots-cornerkicks: G-MU 5-3; Laurens
8-5.
SIDNEY 1, DELHI 0
(Oct. 15 at Sidney)
Delhi 0 0 – 0
Sidney 1 0 – 1
Sidney goals-assists: Mackensie Gravelin
1-0, Sam Bordeau 0-1.
Goalie saves: Jolene Krom (S) 7; Kaitlynn
Finch (D) 4.
Shots-cornerkicks: Sidney 7-2; Delhi 8-3.
WHITNEY POINT 4,
UNION-ENDICOTT 0
(Oct. 15 at WP)
U-E 0 0 – 0
WP 2 2 – 4
WP goals-assists: Emma Maslin 3-1,
Brittney Randle 1-0, Caitlin James 0-1, Graci
Standis-Warpus 0-1.
Goalie saves: Victoria Mattarell (U-E) 13;
Mackenzie Cafferty (WP) 0.
Shots-cornerkicks: U-E 1-1; WP 28-7.
GREENE 5, SIDNEY 4
(Oct. 16 at Greene)
Sidney 1 3 – 4
Greene 1 4 – 5
Sidney goals-assists: Jenna McDonald 30, Katie Kirk 1-0, Rebecca Loibl 0-1.
Greene g-a: Paige Wilcox 5-0.
Goalie saves: Jolene Krom (S) 2; Lindsey
Brown (G) 9.
Shots-cornerkicks: Sidney 13-5; Greene
16-4.
FRANKLIN 2, EDMESTON 0
(Oct. 16 at Edmeston)
Franklin 1 1 - 2
Edmeston 0 0 - 0
Franklin goals-assists: Mariah McNeilly
1-0, Lacey Cox 1-0.
Goalie saves: Jordan Beers (F) 6;
Catherine Johnson (E) 9.
Shots-cornerkicks:
Franklin
13-3;
Edmeston 7-2.
UNATEGO 6, WALTON 0
(Oct. 16 at Walton)
Walton 0 0 - 0
Unatego 3 3 - 6
Unatego goals-assists: Torri Halaquist 21, Cambre Codington 1-0, Mary Rommer 1-0,
Cassidy Newman 1-0, Courtney Bullis 1-0,
Mariah Scott 0-1, Emily Slawson 0-1.
Shots-cornerkicks: Walton 2-0; Unatego
21-4.
Goalie saves: Lili Sinischalchi (W) 7,
Janine Velardi 8 (W); Megan Faulkner (U) 1,
Cassidy Frazier (U) 0, Beth Carey (U) 1.
MIDSTATE ATHLETIC CONFERENCE
CHAMPIONSHIPS
UNATEGO 5,
UNADILLA VALLEY 1
(Oct. 18 at UV)
Unatego 4 1 - 5
UV 0 1 - 1
Unatego goals-assists: Tanner Reed 2-0,
Torri Halaquist 1-1, Samantha Pikaard 1-0,
Allyson Butler 1-0, Kayla Komenda 0-2, Emily
Slawson 0-1.
UV g-a: Taylor Davis 1-0.
Shots-cornerkicks: Unatego 16-3; UV
10-3.
Goalie saves: Megan Faulkner (U) 5,
Cassidy Frazier (U) 2; Abbie Oglesby (UV) 8.
FIELD HOCKEY
SIDNEY 3, WALTON 0
(Oct. 14 at Walton)
Sidney 2 1 - 3
Walton 0 0 - 0
Sidney goals-assists: Hannah Wood 2-0,
Nicole Smith 1-0, Katy DeShaw 0-1.
Goalie saves: Kelsey Decker (S) 1; Emily
Bartlett (W) 9, Sam Bowker (W) 3.
Shots-penalty corners: Sidney 15-12;
Walton 1-6.
MARATHON 1, SIDNEY 0
(Oct. 15 at Marathon)
Sidney 0 0 – 0
Marathon 1 0 – 1
Marathon goals-assists: Giovanna Lisi 10, Eryn Griep 0-1.
Goalie saves: Kelsey Decker (S) 8; Gwen
Schear (M) 4.
Shots-penalty corners: Sidney 5-7;
Marathon 9-5.
WHITNEY POINT 4, GREENE 0
NEW BERLIN – Tanner
Reed scored twice and Torri
Halaquist scored once and
assisted on another goal
Friday in lifting Unatego to the
Midstate Athletic Conference
girls’ soccer title with a 51 victory at Unadilla Valley
Friday.
It was Unatego’s ninth
MAC title in the league’s 13year existence.
Unatego (14-2), after a slow
start, dominated the Storm and
led 4-0 at halftime.
Reed scored unassisted
11:38 into the match before
Halaquist made it a 2-0 game
with 21:24 to play off a
corner kick – Emily Slawson
contributing the helper.
Samantha Pikaard and
Allyson Butler also scored
over the final 13 minutes of
the opening half.
Kayla Komenda assisted
twice for the Spartans, who
got a second-half goal from
Reed. Unatego is seeded
third in the Section IV Class
C tournament and will host
Sidney on Thursday at 3:30
p.m.
Taylor Davis scored in the
second half for UV (8-7).
(Oct. 15 at Greene)
WP 2 2 – 4
Greene 0 0 – 0
WP goals-assists: Alexis Benscoter 1-0,
Courtney Dunham 2-0, Courtney Richards 11, Taylor Theleman 0-1, Rachel Burchell 0-2.
Goalie saves: Danell Jones (WP) 0; Julia
Amell (G) 12.
Shots-penalty corners: WP 18-9; Greene
0-1.
breaststroke: Paulisczak (O-M) 1:32.04; 400
freestyle relay: Whitney Point (Nancy Illsey,
Pardoe, Curtis, Marissa Taylor) 5:15.25.
MAINE-ENDWELL 1, GREENE 0 (OT)
(Oct. 17 at Greene)
M-E 0 0 – 1
Greene 0 0 – 0
M-E goals-assists: Jillian Greene 1-0.
Goalie saves: Cassie Miller (M-E) 2; Julia
Amell (G) 2.
Shots-penalty corners: M-E 3-6; Greene
2-8.
VESTAL 3, AFTON 0
(Oct. 17 at Vestal)
Afton 0 0 – 0
Vestal 2 1 – 3
Vestal goals-assists: Alexandra Evans 20, Tori Jo Kakusian 1-0, Nicole Jennings 0-1,
Emily Barnard 0-1.
Goalie saves: Olivia Landry (V) 5; Tori
Lent (A) 11.
Shots-penalty corners: Vestal 20-6; Afton
5-7.
CROSS COUNTRY
GOLDEN EAGLES INVITATIONAL
(Oct. 15 at Whitney Point)
BOYS
Team scores: 1. Chenango Forks 46; 2.
Southern Cayuga 76; 3. Norwich 81; 4. Athens
85; 5. Groton 111; 6. Johnson City 135; 7.
Afton 176; Harpursville incomplete; Lansing
incomplete; New Roots incomplete; Marathon
incomplete; Sidney incomplete; Downsville
incomplete; Unadilla Valley incomplete;
Gilbertsville-Mount Upton incomplete
Leading Individuals: 1. Jason Jenks
(G) 17:41.7; 2. Tom Miller (SC) 17:44.0; 3.
Robert Jeffrey (N) 17:45.5; 4. Gabe. Herbst
(At.) 18:18.9; 5. Luke Warpus (CF) 18:28.7;
6. Joe DeVona (Af.) 18:43.1; 7. Frank Garcia
(N) 18:52.0; 8. Chris Roberts (CF) 18:53.5;
9. Dustin Johnson (UV) 18:56.7; 10. Dean
Howard (S) 19:01.1.
GIRLS
Team scores: 1. Chenango Forks 43; 2.
Athens 60; 3. Johnson City 76; 4. Groton
109; 5. Lansing XC 110; 6. Southern Cayuga
120; Gilbertsville Mount Upton incomplete;
Harpursville incomplete; Afton incomplete;
Marathon incomplete; Norwich incomplete;
Downsville incomplete; Tioga incomplete;
Unadilla Valley incomplete; Whitney Point
incomplete
Leading Individuals: 1. Bethany Murphy
(SC) 21:50.7; 2. Emily Cluck (JC) 21:57.2;
3. Mary Page (CF) 22:11.4; 4. Emily Niman
(CF) 22:21.4; 5. Maria Hudock (At.) 22:45.9;
6. Lauren Pruyne (At.) 23:07.2; 7. Daphne
Knapp (Af.) 23:17.4; 8. Leah Forehand (G)
23:19.3; 9. Martha Clemens (N) 23:33.4; 10.
Olivia Longhouse (L) 24:02.3.
GIRLS’ SWIMMING
GREENE 62, WHITNEY POINT 53
(Oct. 15 at Greene)
200-yard medley relay: Greene (Margot
McDermott, Kailey Yanusas, Ashley Beebe,
Taylor Wahlers) 2:25.43; 200 freestyle: Annie
Whitman (G) 2:36.95; 200 individual medley:
Yanusas (G) 2:41.52; 50 freestyle: Nicole
Flohr (G) :30.58; Diving: Wahlers (G) 113.15;
100 butterfly: Emily Curtis (WP) 1:15.32; 100
freestyle: Julia Arboit (G) 59.75; 500 freestyle:
McDermott (G) 6:47.08; 200 free relay:
Greene (Arboit, Wahlers, Yanusas, Chelsea
Carlson) 1:56.77; 100 backstroke: Curtis
(WP) 1:16.21; 100 breaststroke: Payton
Cutting (G) 1:22.31; Records: Greene 5-5.
ODESSA-MONTOUR 59, WHITNEY POINT
28
(Oct. 17 at O-M)
200-yard medley relay: O-M (Maia
Rumsey, Jenelle Bleiler, Courtney Neumire,
Emelia Paulisczak) 2:22.67; 200 freestyle:
Taylor Rounds (O-M) 2:20.46; 200 individual
medley: Jordan Little (O-M) 2:41.46; 50
freestyle: Emma Raymond (O-M) 31.42;
100 butterfly: Emily Curtis (WP) 1:18.31;
100 freestyle: Raymond (O-M) 1:12.14;
500 freestyle: Abby Paradoe (WP) 7:07.54;
200 free relay: O-M (Rumsey, Rounds,
Gabby Cain, Maddie Lodge) 2:09.15;
100 backstroke: Curtis (WP) 1:14.23; 100
MIDSTATE ATHLETIC CONFERENCE
CHAMPIONSHIPS
UNATEGO 5,
UNADILLA VALLEY 1
(Oct. 18 at UV)
Unatego 4 1 - 5
UV 0 1 - 1
Unatego goals-assists: Tanner Reed 2-0,
Torri Halaquist 1-1, Samantha Pikaard 1-0,
Allyson Butler 1-0, Kayla Komenda 0-2, Emily
Slawson 0-1.
UV g-a: Taylor Davis 1-0.
Shots-cornerkicks: Unatego 16-3; UV
10-3.
Goalie saves: Megan Faulkner (U) 5,
Cassidy Frazier (U) 2; Abbie Oglesby (UV) 8.
VESTAL 4, SIDNEY 1
(Oct. 19 at Vestal)
Sidney 0 1 – 1
Vestal 4 0 – 4
Sidney goals-assists: Hannah Wood.
Vestal g-a: Emily Schutt 2-0, Baylee
Burghardt 1-1, Emily Barnard 1-1, Tori Jo
Kakusian 0-1.
Goalie saves: Kelsey Decker (S) 9; Emma
Stockwin (V) 5
Shots-penalty corners: Sidney 7-6; Vestal
16-9.
WHITNEY POINT 2,
CICERO-NORTH SYRACUSE 1
(Oct. 19 at C-NS)
WP 0 2 – 2
C-NS 1 0 -1
WP goals-assists: Elaina Burchell 2-0,
Taylor Clink 0-1.
C-NS g-a: M. Albi 1-0, M. Caveny 0-1.
Goalie saves: Danell Jones (WP) 10; H.
White (C-NS) 7.
Shots-penalty corners: WP 15-12; C-NS
11-6.
VOLLEYBALL
BAINBRIDGE-GUILFORD 3, UNADILLA
VALLEY 0
(Oct. 16 at UV)
Game scores: 25-23; 25-19; 25-21.
B-G: Aces: Morgan Bullis 2, Tierney
Decker 2; Kills: Alissa Rivera 2; Assists: Bullis
4; Blocks: Bullis 4.
UV: Aces: Haley Benson 3, Renee
DelSontro; Kills: Benson 4; Assists: Nicole
Mackey 6, Shannon McIntyre 6.
WALTON 3, GREENE 0
(Oct. 16 at Greene)
Game scores: 25-9, 25-20, 25-18.
Walton: Aces: Amber Pierce 6; Kills: Tiora
Nichols 6; Assists: Danielle Reynolds 6;
Blocks: Chenoa Macken 1.
Greene: Aces: Kayli Dickenson 3; Kills:
Emily Parrish 3, Mary Messina 3; Assists:
Emily Montclione 4.
SIDNEY 3, DELHI 0
(Oct. 16 at Delhi)
Game scores: 25-13, 25-19, 25-12.
Sidney: Aces: Sarah Kokell 7; Kills: Jilleen
Livingston 7; Assists: Paige Redmond 15;
Blocks: Alyssa Cranston 1.
Delhi: Aces: Mindy Schmitz 3; Kills:
Allison Hannigan 2; Assists: Sierra Benedict
3; Blocks: Hannigan 3, Cathy DeDominics 3.
HARPURSVILLE 3, UNATEGO 0
(Oct. 16 at Unatego)
Game scores: 25-12; 25-14; 25-22.
H’ville: Aces: Erika Whitney 10; Kills:
Madison Paugh 6, Maddison VanEtten 6;
Assists: Megan Matts 15; Blocks: Rachel
Ballard 1.
Unatego: Aces: Kali Benedict 6; Kills:
Taylor Reed 2, Marissa Woodard 2; Assists:
Reed 3; Blocks: Kassie McKee 1, Reed 1,
Leanne McKee 1.
DEPOSIT 3, OXFORD 0
(Oct. 17 at Oxford)
Deposit: Aces: Shelby Pettersen 5; Kills:
Pettersen 5, Natalie Bielecki 5; Assists:
Pettersen 8.
Oxford: Aces: Patti Simpson 1, Taylor
Chapman 1; Kills: Leah Kann 2.
HARPURSVILLE 3, SIDNEY 0
(Oct. 18 at Sidney)
Game scores: 25-16; 25-14; 25-17.
H’ville: Aces: Sarah Miller 5; Kills: Miller
12; Assists: Megan Matts 20; Blocks: Rachel
Ballard 2.
Sidney: Aces: Taylor Krom 2; Kills: Jilleen
Livingston 5; Assists: Paige Redmond 6;
Blocks: Alyssa Cranston 1.
UNATEGO 3, AFTON 1
(Oct. 18 at Unatego)
Game scores: 25-11, 23-25, 25-19,
25-14.
Afton: Aces: Sabrina Button 2; Kills: Aliska
Hubbard 7; Assists: Hubbard 8; Blocks: Emily
Greenwood 1.
Unatego: Aces: Marissa Woodard 10, Kali
Benedict 9; Kills: Woodard 6, Kassie McKee
5; Assists: Taylor Reed 4, Leanne McKee 3;
Blocks: Hannah Bohacek 2.
Tri-Town News — Thursday, October 24, 2013— 15
Sidney Stopped
By Tioga
Juggernaut
ANDREW KIMMEL takes a handoff from Devon Dean
in Harpursville’s 47-22 victory at Oxford Friday night.
The Hornets will host Spencer-Van Etten in a Class D
quarterfinal Saturday.
Photo By Pete Mansheffer
CODY SNOW tries to run away from an Oxford defender
in Harpursville’s 47-22 victory Friday night.
Photo By Pete Mansheffer
HARPURSVILLE QUARTERBACK DEVON DEAN finds running room in the Hornets’
47-22 victory at Oxford Friday night.
Photo By Pete Mansheffer
Harpursville Routs Oxford, 47-22
OXFORD
–
Visiting
Harpursville
forced
six
turnovers and Steven Lee
rushed for 138 yards on
12 carries as the Hornets
rebounded from a tough loss
to unbeaten Tioga for the 4722 Section IV football win at
Oxford Friday night.
Fourth-seeded Harpursville
(6-1) will host fifth-seeded
Spencer-Van Etten Saturday at
1:30 p.m. in the quarterfinals
of the Section IV Class D
tournament.
Three
Oxford
(1-6)
interceptions in the first half
led to three scores and helped
the Hornets to a 29-0 lead at
half.
Devon Dean (6-of-13,
110 yards passing, 49 yards
rushing) ran for two scores
and threw for two others in the
first half and added another
touchdown pass in the third
quarter.
Oxford closed out the game
by scoring 22 unanswered
Unatego Tunes Up For Playoffs
With 45-19 Win at UV
NEW BERLIN – Unatego’s
offense wasn’t the only unit
scoring Friday night, as the
Spartans’ defense returned two
fumbles for scores and both the
punt and kickoff return teams
scored in a 45-19 victory at
winless Unadilla Valley.
The victory set up secondseeded Unatego (6-1, 50) to host seventh-seed
Moravia Friday night at 7
p.m. in a Section IV Class D
quarterfinal.
Tanner Winchester scored
touchdowns on an 81-yard
reception to open the game
and a 41-yard punt return early
in the second quarter.
Kellen Komenda also scored
in two different fashions,
grabbing a 75-yard scoring
strike and bringing the second
half kickoff 80 yards for the
score.
Quarterback
Josh
Feyerabend was efficient,
completing 5-of-6 passes for
199 yards while adding 94
yards rushing.
UV had its best offensive
night of the season, highlighted
by Alex Avolio’s 33-carry,
160-yard evening.
UNATEGO 45,
UNADILLA VALLEY 19
(Oct. 18 at UV)
Unatego 12 14 13 6 - 45
UV 0 0 0 19 – 19
First Quarter
U: Tanner Winchester 81 pass from Josh
Feyerabend (kick blocked)
U: Kellen Komenda 75 pass from Josh
Feyerabend (kick blocked)
Second Quarter
U: Tanner Winchester 41 punt return
(Feyerabend kick)
U: Joel VanAlstine 26 fumble recovery
(Feyerabend kick)
Third Quarter
U: Kellen Komenda 80 kickoff return (kick
failed)
U: Josh Feyerabend 75 run (Feyerabend
kick)
Fourth Quarter
U: Austin Hughs 41 run (kick blocked)
UV: Alex Avolio 16 run (kick failed)
UV: Dillon Rifanburg 10 run (kick failed)
UV: Alex Avolio 7 run (Brett Hanslmaier
kick)
Rushing
Unatego: Josh Feyerabend 13-94, Austin
Hughs 2-39, Brandon Gillette 2-5, Corbin
Henry 7-(-20).
UV: Alex Avolio 33-160, Robert Sponable
4-52, Dillon Rifanburg 5-23, Ryan Postma
5-(-13).
Passing
Unatego: Josh Feyerabend 5-6-0-199
UV: Ryan Postma 2-4-2-29
Receiving
Unatego: Kellen Komenda 3-108, Tanner
Winchester 1-81, Ryan Marszal 1-10.
UV: Brett Hanslmeier 2-29.
WCDO Will Air Two Play-Off
Football Games This Weekend
SIDNEY -Local high school
football interest turns to the
first round of the Section IV
Class D play-offs this weekend. The WCDO broadcast
team of Harry Graves and Anthony Beers will follow games
on both Friday and Saturday.
The Unatego Spartans finished with one of the best records of all area teams. The
Green and Gold, unbeaten
in Division V play, will host
Moravia at 7 p.m. on Friday,
Oct. 25. The Moravia Blue
Devils were runners-up in Division VII with a 3-2 record.
The Saturday afternoon
game will feature the SpencerVan Etten Panthers at Harpursville. Both teams placed second in their respective races.
The Hornets finished at 4-1 in
Division VI while S-VE tied
Moravia at 3-2 in Division
VII. Kick-off is scheduled for
1:30 p.m.
WCDO serves Chenango,
Delaware, and Otsego counties from 100.9 on the FM
radio dial and 1490 AM. All
sportscasts are also streamed
“live” on WCDOsports.com
and can be heard worldwide
over the internet.
points in the fourth quarter,
including two touchdown runs
by Nik Hansen, who rushed
for a game-high 152 yards on
26 carries.
Cameron Heggie also had
five catches for 78 yards.
Oxford will travel to
Unadilla Valley Friday night
for a 7 p.m. game.
HARPURSVILLE 47, OXFORD 22
(Oct. 18 at Oxford)
H’ville 13 16 12 6 - 47
Oxford 0 0 0 22 - 22
First Quarter
H: Devon Dean 18 run (William Wilsey
kick)
H: Dylan Smith 20 pass from Dean (kick
failed)
Second Quarter
H: Jon Andrews 14 pass from Dean (Cody
Snow run)
H: Dean 12 run (Steven Lee run)
Third Quarter
H: Snow 38 pass from Dean (run failed)
H: Snow 5 run (kick failed)
Fourth Quarter
H: Dillon Lindsey 98 interception return
(kick failed)
O: Nik Hansen 6 run (Hansen run)
O: Cameron Heggie 40 pass from Lane
Barry (Nick Neer Run)
O: Hansen 26 run (run failed)
Rushing
Harpursville: Devon Dean 6-49, Steven
Lee 12-138, Andrew Kimmel 8-45, Dante
Carroll 5-23, Cody Snow 4-14, Mitchell Weist
4-15.
Oxford: Bryan Simpson 7-15, Joe Jackson
1-5, Nick Neer 9-9, Nik Hansen 26-152.
Passing
Harpursville: Devon Dean 6-13-0-110
Oxford: Lane Barry 6-15-3-84
Receiving
Harpursville: Steven Lee 1-11, Jon
Andrews 2-25, Dylan Smith 1-20, Cody Snow
2-54.
Oxford: Cameron Heggie 5-78, Nick
Neer 1-6.
B-G Gridders Play Walton Tough
But Denied Victory, 27-22
BAINBRIDGE – Austin
Kilmer rushed for 83 yards
on 17 carries and scored three
times and visiting Walton
hung on for a 27-22 Section
IV Division V football win at
Bainbridge-Guilford Friday
night.
Kilmer scored on runs of 40
and 1 yard and also caught a
24-yard touchdown pass from
Blake Hitt.
B-G (1-6) kept it close
throughout, but could not
push past the Warriors, who
scored on Kilmer’s reception
with just four seconds left in
the half for the 27-16 lead.
Cole Webb, who ran for a
score in the first quarter, threw
a 20-yard touchdown pass
to Mike Carlin in the fourth
quarter, but B-G, who had
three possessions in the final
TIOGA – Jesse Manuel
rushed 17 times for 221 yards
and three first-half touchdowns
and unbeaten Tioga continued
its march through Section
IV competition with a 348 waxing of visiting Sidney
Friday night in a Division VI
matchup.
The two teams meet again
Friday night at Tioga in a
Section IV Class D quarterfinal.
Sidney is seeded eighth while
Tioga, ranked second in the
state and two-time defending
Class D champion, is the top
seed.
Manuel scored on runs of 7,
58 and 20 yards and Brad Jump
added a 50-yard interception
in the second quarter and a 58yard touchdown in the third
to give Tioga, who downed
Harpursville in a battle of
unbeatens a week earlier, a 340 lead.
Sidney scored in the fourth
quarter on Tanner Schunk’s 11yard run and Brandon Bessett’s
two-point conversion.
Bessett and Mike Chase
had 62 and 66 yards rushing,
respectively.
TIOGA 34, SIDNEY 8
(Oct. 18 at Tioga)
Sidney 0 0 0 8 - 8
Tioga 14 13 7 0 - 34
First Quarter
T: Jesse Manuel 7 run (Tanner Folk kick)
T: Jesse Manuel 58 run (Tanner Folk kick)
Second Quarter
T: Jesse Manuel 20 run (Tanner Folk kick)
T: Brad Jump 50 int. return (kick failed)
Third Quarter
T: Brad Jump 58 run (Tanner Folk kick)
Fourth Quarter
S: Tanner Schunk 11 run (Brandon
Bessett run)
Rushing
Sidney: Tanner Schunk 3-27, Patrick
Vibbard 6(-19), Brandon Bessett 8-62, Mike
Chase 8-66.
Tioga: Jeff Lynch 1-15, Brad Jump 12143, Aaron Brentnall 1-(-1), Jesse Manuel
17-221, Ryan Vergason 6-29, Jake Lewis 13, Anthony Obregon 1-(-1), Matt Jump 4-18,
Adam Zwierlein 6-23.
Passing
Sidney: Patrick Vibbard 6-24-1-50
Tioga: Ryan Vergason 1-4-1-14
Receiving
Sidney: Jordan Constable 2-25, Dylan
Gifford 2-25.
Tioga: Jesse Manuel 1-14.
7:30, couldn’t finish any of
them off.
Carlin had 105 yards
rushing and another 68 yards
receiving, while Webb threw
for 74 yards on 5-of-18
completions.
The victory was longtime
Walton coach Jim Hoover’s
298th.
Rushing
Walton: Derek Mead 14-89, Colin Adam 535, Austin Kilmer 17-83, Blake Hitt 2-(-3).
B-G: Lucas Butcher 6-2, Spencer Stevens
8-38, Mike Carlin 17-105, Cole Webb 9-16,
Chris Appledorn 1-4.
Passing
Walton: Blake Hitt 1-4-24
B-G: Cole Webb 5-18-74
Receiving
Walton: Austin Kilmer 1-24.
B-G: Mike Carlin 4-68, Lucas Butcher
1-6.
WALTON 27,
BAINBRIDGE-GUILFORD 22
(Oct. 18 at B-G)
Walton 15 12 0 0 - 27
B-G 13 3 0 6 - 22
W: Colin Adam 9 run (Robert Mer kick)
B-G: Mike Carlin 34 run (Lucas Butcher
kick)
W: Austin Kilmer 40 run (Dylan Wood
run)
B-G: Cole Webb 30 run (kick failed)
W: Austin Kilmer 1 run (run failed)
B-G: Lucas Butcher 35 FG
W: Austin Kilmer 24 pass from Blake Hitt
(run failed)
B-G: Mike Carlin 20 pass from Cole Webb
(run failed)
Please e-mail
sports stories and
photos to Pete
Mansheffer at:
[email protected]
tritownnews.com
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16 — Tri-Town News — Thursday, October 24, 2013
CHURCHES
SIDNEY
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
28 River St., Sidney
Kenneth Southworth, Pastor
Church Office: 563-8456
Parsonage: 563-1166
[email protected]
www.sidneyfbc.com
“To See Unbelieving People Become Committed
Followers of Jesus Christ”
Sunday, Oct. 27
9:30 a.m. - Classes for all ages; 10:45Gathered Worship; Flock Groups as
designated; 3:30-4:45 - Teen Girl
Class; 5 p.m. - Youth Group;
6 p.m. - Informal Evening Service
Wednesday, Oct. 30
9 a.m. - Men’s breakfast and Bible
study; 6 p.m. - Team Kids; 6:30 p.m.
- Gathered Prayer
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL
CHURCH
1 Bridge St., Sidney • 563-1329
(across from library)
Pat Robinson, Pastor
Church Office: Tues., Thurs., Fri.
8:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.
Sunday, Oct. 27
9:30 a.m. - Bible Study; 10:30 a.m. Worship Service; Children’s Sunday
School; 11:30 a.m. - Coffee Hour;
Wednesday, Oct. 30
7 p.m. - Boy Scout Troop 99
SIDNEY ASSEMBLY OF GOD
Plankenhorn Rd., Sidney
Church Office: 563-8247
[email protected]
Rev. Bernard Knutsen
Sunday
9:30 a.m. - Sunday School;
10:45 a.m. -Worship Service
(Nursery Available)
Tuesday
6:45 p.m. - Royal Rangers and Girls’
Ministries
Wednesday
5:45 p.m.- Hour of Prayer;
6:45 p.m. - Bible Study
SIDNEY UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
12 Liberty St., Sidney • 563-1921
Rev. Tom Pullyblank
Office Hours: 9:30 a.m. to 12:30
p.m. Tuesday through Friday
Thursday, Oct. 24
9:30 a.m. - Food Bank; 4 p.m. - Girl
Scouts Hunger Banquet; 7 p.m.
- Square Dance; Peanut Brittle
Friday, Oct. 25
4:30 p.m. - Martial Arts Class;
4:30-6:30 p.m. - Share the Bounty;
Peanut Brittle
Saturday, Oct. 26
9 a.m. - Scrapbooking
Sunday, Oct. 27
9 a.m. - Sunday School; Bible Study;
10:30 a.m. - Brief Service followed
by the Church Has Left the Building
to perform serivces for the community; Noon - lunch in fellowship hall
Monday, Oct. 28
9:30 a.m. - Food Bank
4:30 p.m .- Martial Arts; 7 p.m. - AA;
Peanut Brittle
Tuesday, Oct. 29
12:30 p.m - Lydia Crafts
Wednesday, Oct. 30
6 p.m. - Bell Choir; 6:30 p.m. - Boy
Scouts; 7 p.m. - Chancel Choir
Thursday, Oct. 31
9:30 a.m. - Food Bank; 7 p.m.
- Square Dance
ST. LUKE’S LUTHERAN CHURCH
W. Main St., Sidney • 563-1806
Rev. Ernie Varga, Pastor
607-265-3829 or cell 413-212-8202
Friday, Oct. 25
Noon - Rotary
Saturday, Oct. 26
8 a.m.- AARP Driving Course
Sunday, Oct. 27
9 a.m. - Christian Education;
10 a.m. - Traditional Service-Reformation Sunday; 11 a.m. - Fellowship
and Coffee;
Wednesday, Oct. 30
11 a.m. - Study group; 7 p.m. - Choir
Coming Sun., Nov. 3 - 12:30 p.m.
- Pampered Chef Party
SACRED HEART CHURCH
Liberty Street, Sidney
Saturday Mass: 5:30 p.m.
Sunday Mass: 8:30 and 10:30 a.m.
Mon. - Fri.: Daily Mass at 9 a.m.
Confessions Saturday:
4:30-5 p.m. or by appointment, call
563-1591 from 9 a.m.- noon
FAITH COMMUNITY CHURCH
32 West Main and Adams Sts.,
Sidney
Jim Ingalls, Pastor • 967-8167
Sunday
10 a.m. - Noon. - Bible Study;
6 p.m. - Worship Service.
Wednesday
6 p.m. - Bible Study.
CHURCH OF CHRIST
26 Cartwright Ave., Sidney
Larry Bailey, Preacher • 563-9695
Sunday
Radio Program: Bible Truth - WCHN,
7:45 - 8 a.m., 970 AM; WCDO, 8:15
- 8:30 a.m., 1490 AM, 101 FM;
10 a.m. - Bible Class; 11 a.m. - Worship Assembly.
Wednesday
10 - 11 a.m. - Bible Study;
7 - 8 p.m. - Bible Study/Worship.
ST. PAUL’S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
25 River St., Sidney • 563-3391
The Rev’d Jim Shevlin, FHC Rector
563-3391 or 624-1470
Sundays
10 a.m. - Holy Communion, and
Annointing for Healing in Jesus’
Name, followed by coffee and
fellowship
Tuesdays
11 a.m. - Bible Study (bring bag
lunch)
Wednesdays
9:30-11:45 a.m. - Free clothing and
Lunch; Noon - Mass
CIRCLE DRIVE ALLIANCE CHURCH
6 Circle Drive, Sidney
Church Office: 563-1120
Rev. Adam Sellen
Associate Pastor Levi Owens
www.cdaconline.com
Sunday
8:30 a.m. & 11 a.m.- Worship Services; 5:30-7:30 p.m. - Youth Group
Wednesday
6 p.m. - Women’s Prayer ministry;
6:30-8 p.m.- Children’s Faith Weavers; 7 p.m. - Prayer Meeting
SIDNEY BIBLE BAPTIST CHURCH
32 West Main St. (Corner of Adams
and West Main- Faith Community
Church Building), Sidney
Pastor Frank Donnelly
607-334-6206
Sundays
10 a.m. - Sunday School; 11 a.m.
- Worship; 4 p.m. - Evening Service
Wednesdays
6:30 p.m. - Prayer Meeting
UNITED PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
OF EAST GUILFORD
Rev. Patty Wolff, Pastor
563-1083 or 369-4630
Corner of State Rt. 8 and Co. 35,
www.eastguilfordpc.org
Thursday, Oct. 17
7 p.m. - Dessert and Bible study
Sunday, Oct. 20
9 a.m. - Worship
Wednesday, Oct. 23
7 a.m. - Men’s Breakfast and Bible
Study; 9 a.m. - Work Bee to make
applesauce
Thursday, Oct. 24
9 a.m. - Work Bee to prepare for
Roast Beef Dinner; 7 p.m. - Dessert
and Bible study
Coming Friday, Oct. 25Roast Beef Dinner
SIDNEY CENTER
BAPTIST CHURCH
10440 Main St. • 369-9571
Pastor Dennis Murray
Sunday
9:45 a.m. - Praise and Bible Study;
10:30 a.m. - Morning Worship
Service
Wednesday
6:30 p.m. - Midweek Prayer and
Bible Study
SIDNEY CENTER
FAMILY & FRIENDS CHURCH
Meets at Sidney Center Fire Hall
Speakers Bill Orr and Judy McCall
Sunday
11 a.m. - Worship
UNADILLA
FELLOWSHIP BAPTIST
LIGHTHOUSE CHURCH
1050 Covered Bridge Rd., Unadilla
Handicapped Accessible. Nursery Available
Sundays
10 a.m. - Sunday School for all ages;
11 a.m. - Morning Worship; 6:30
p.m. - Evening Praise and Worship
hour
Tuesday
10 a.m. - Ladies’ Bible Study
Wednesday
7 p.m. - Bible Study and Prayer/Teen
Time
UNADILLA FRIENDS CHURCH
Rogers Hollow, Unadilla
Benjamin Shaw, Pastor •563-2266
Sunday
10:30 a.m. - Morning Worship.
FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
170 Main Street, Unadilla • 369-2052
Doug Besemer, Pastor
96 E. Main St., Afton • 639-3746
Mary Upright, Pastor
Every Thursday
7 p.m. - AA and Al-anon meet
Every Sunday
9 a.m. - Worship Service followed by
coffee and fellowship
Monday, Friday and Saturday
11 a.m. - Noon - Food Pantry and
Clothing Pantry
Thursday
6:30 p.m. - Bible Study and Prayer
Sunday
10:30 a.m. - Sunday Worship;
Children’s Ministries available during
service
Every Tuesday
ST. AGNES CATHOLIC
CHURCH OF AFTON
7 p.m. - Grieving Support Group
Every Wednesday
5:30 p.m. - Bible Study
First Wednesday of the Month
7 p.m. - Faith Discovery
Second Wednesday of the Month
6:30 p.m. - Trustee meeting;
7 p.m. - Administrative Council
Monday, Friday, Saturday
11-12 noon - Food Pantry open
Fr. Darr Schoenhofen
14 Spring Street • 967-4481
Sunday
8:30 a.m. - Mass
AFTON PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
UNADILLA CENTER
UNITED METHODIST
GILBERTSVILLE
Pastor Douglas B. Besemer
1203 Butternut Rd., Unadilla
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
240 Main St., Unadilla • 369-3081
Rev. Scott Garno, Rector
Wardens: William Goodrich and
Bonnie Barr
Sunday
9 a.m.- Service
Wednesday
Noon - Holy Communion; 12:30 p.m.
- Luncheon, free will offering. All are
welcome.
Handicapped accessible.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
156 Main St., Unadilla
369-4630
Guest Lay Preacher Nathaniel Jackson
Sunday
9:30 a.m. - Sunday School;
10:30 a.m. - Worship
Handicapped accessible.
AFTON
UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
34 Spring St., Afton • 639-2082
Gary Kubitz, Pastor
Sunday
10:45 a.m. - Morning Worship;
coffee and fellowship following
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
OF AFTON
30 Caswell St., Afton • 639-1030
Christopher Prezorski, Pastor
Kelly Todd, Asst. Pastor
www.fbcafton.org
Sunday
9:30-11 a.m. - Morning Worship;
11 a.m. - noon - Children’s Sunday
School groups; 11:05 a.m. - Teen
and Adult Life Groups
Wednesday
6:45 p.m. - Prayer and Praise
NORTH AFTON
UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
Co. Rd. 17, Afton, NY
Lay Leader Valeda Banta
Sunday
10:30 a.m. - Worship.
ST. ANN’S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
125 S. Main St., PO Box 22, Afton
www.stannsaftonny.org
Rev. David Hanselman, Rector
Handicapped accessible.
Regular Sunday Service
9:15 a.m. - 1st and 3rd Sundays
Holy Eucharist; 2nd and 4th and 5th
Sundays Morning Prayer
Each Tuesday
6:30 p.m.- SERTOMA, Parish Hall
Each Thursday
8 p.m. - Alcoholics Anonymous
closed meeting, Parish Hall
Each Sunday
8 p.m. - Alcoholics Anonymous
MERCY FELLOWSHIP
967 Rt. 41 (1.2 miles) N. of Rt. 7, Afton
John Snel, Pastor
Church: 639-1964 • Study: 693-3692
Sundays
10 a.m. - Worship Service
Fridays
7 p.m. - Prayer Meeting and Bible
Study
HOPE CONGREGATIONAL
CHURCH
129 Main St., Afton
Church 639-4237 • Office 226-0791
Rev. Maryann Palmetier
Fridays
9 a.m .- noon - Bread Giveaway
Sundays
9 a.m. - Coffee Time; 9:30 a.m.
- Morning Worship; 4th Sunday of
each month, fellowship brunch following worship)
“Come as you are!” - All Welcome
Member of NACCC
Handicap Accessible
HIGHER GROUND CHRISTIAN
CHURCH
967-2223 • grace4missions.com
Mike Kauffman and John Gregory,
Pastors
Sunday
9 a.m. - Worship.
Wednesday
(Except 1st Wed. of Month)
7 p.m. - Prayer Meeting
Academy St., Afton • 639-2121
Handicap Accessible
ST. MATTHEW’S
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
We are handicap accessible. Childcare is
available.
GRACE CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Sunday
11 a.m.-Worship followed by
Fellowship
Regular Sunday Services
10:30 a.m. - Worship Service;
Sunday School
10 a.m. - Worship
First Sunday of each Month
Communion
Thursday and Saturdays
9 a.m. - 1 p.m. - New Beginnings
Thrift Store open
113 Marion Ave., Gilbertsville
Pastor Mark Piedmonte
783-2867 • Like us on Facebook
[email protected]
Office Hours: Tues. Noon-5 p.m.;
Wed.-Fri. 9-5; Sat. 10-2
Saturday
10 a.m. - Noon (or by appt.)- Lamb’s
Rack FREE Clothing Closet
Sunday
11 a.m. - Worship Service
4th Thursday of Month
Senior Moments - Programs of interest for senior citizens
The church is handicapped accessible.
GILBERTSVILLE BAPTIST
CHURCH
Commercial and Elm Sts.
(607)783-2993 Church
Rev. Kurt Funke, Pastor
859-2436 or 316-3056
Office Hours: Tues. 9-Noon; Wed.
1-4 p.m.; Thurs. 1-4 or by Apt.
WBBC KELSEY BROOK CHAPEL
Non-Denominational
3642 St. Hwy. 206, West Bainbridge
967-4484
Sunday
10:30 a.m. - Worship Service, meal
following service by donation
OTEGO
OTEGO PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
18 River Street • 988-2861
Sunday
9 a.m. - Worship including Children’s Conversation and Children’s
Sunday School; 10 a.m. - Coffee
Hour; 10:30 a.m. - Adult Sunday
School.
Buildings are ramp accessible.
OTEGO UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH
8 Church Street • 988-2866
Pastor Rev. Emily Huyge
Sunday
11 a.m.- Worship
Elevator Access to all levels.
FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCH
OF OTEGO
W. Branch, Otsdawa Rd.,
Co. Rt. 6, Otego • 988-7144
Pastor Bill Allen
Tuesday
10 a.m. - Tot Time story time; 11:30
a.m. - Adult Bible Study
Emerg. Food Pantry 764-8365.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH OF
MOUNT UPTON
Chester N. Shew, Pastor • 764-8361
Thursday
7 p.m. - Bible Study
Sunday
9:45 a.m. - Sunday School
10:45 a.m. - Worship Service
HARPURSVILLE
UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
Sue Shields, Pastor
222-3175
Sunday
10 a.m. - Sunday School;
11 a.m. - Morning Worship
HARPURSVILLE BAPTIST CHURCH
41 Cumber Rd. • 693-2422
Wednesday
6:30 p.m. - Prayer Service;
Teen Scene
Sunday
10 a.m. - Sunday School;
10:45 a.m. - Morning Worship;
6:30 p.m. - Evening Service.
NINEVEH PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH
Rte. 7, Nineveh • 693-1919
Rev. Emrys Tyler
Thursday
6:30 p.m. - Bible Study
Sunday
9:30 a.m. - Morning Worship; 10:45
a.m. - Sunday School
Tuesday
1-5 p.m. - Pastoral office hours;
Wednesday
9 a.m. - Bible Study
7 p.m. - Adult Choir Rehearsal
THREE PINES
COMMUNITY CHAPEL
E. Windsor Road (Doraville)
Nineveh • 693-1897
Pastor Michael Brown• 849-4364
Sunday
9:30 a.m. - Morning Worship; Sunday
School during service
Tuesday
9-11 a.m. - Coffee Fellowship
Wednesday
10 a.m. - Choir practice, FPC; 11
a.m.- Bible Study; 3:15-4:30 p.m.
- Joy Club, NLFH
Sunday
9:30 a.m. - Sunday Morning Service; 10:50 a.m. - Prayer Service;
11:15 a.m. - Sunday school; 6:30
p.m. - Evening Service
CHRIST CHURCH
UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
TROUT CREEK
COMMUNITY CHURCH
Rev. Dr. John Hill • 895-9917
Pastor Judy Travis
Sunday
9:15 a.m. - Treadwell service;
10:45 a.m. - Franklin service; followed by coffee hour
Regular Sundays
9 a.m. - Sunday School;
10 a.m. - Worship Service;
11 a.m. - Fellowship
38 Marion Ave., Gilbertsville
783-2267
[email protected]
Sunday
9:30 a.m. - Sunday school; 10 a.m.
- Adults and children service, Holy
Communion; 4:30 p.m.- Service of
Christian Healing; 6:30 p.m. - Celebrate Recovery Service
BAINBRIDGE
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
12 S. Main St., Bainbridge
967-8034 • www.bainbridgefbc.com
Pastor: Rev. John Koopman
Clerk: Mrs. Secrest
Church is handicapped accessible through the
back door. Pastor is in when the frog is on the door.
Mail newsletter articles to [email protected]
or drop in the church box
FRANKLIN
Handicapped Accessible
ST. PAUL’S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Corner of Main and Institute Sts.
Rev. Scott Garno
829-6404
Sunday
8:15 a.m. - Service with Holy
Eucharist, except first Sunday of
the month when Holy Eucharist is at
1:30 p.m. with dish to pass lunch
First Thursday of Month
5-7 p.m. - Soup Supper by donation
COMMUNITY BIBLE CHURCH
25 Center St., Franklin • 829-5471
Dr. Walt Schlundt, Pastor
www.cb-church.org
Sunday, Oct. 27
9 a.m. - Adult Sunday School;
10 a.m. - Worship service; 10:15
a.m. - Children’s Sunday School-Junior Church
Wednesday, Oct. 30
Noon- Bible Study; 1:30 p.m. - Planning Committee meeting
Sunday
10:45 a.m. - Worship Service with
nursery and Kingdom Kids for
children K-4th grade
BAINBRIDGE UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
UNATEGO COMMUNITY CHURCH
27 N. Main St., Bainbridge • 967-2782
Gary Kubitz, Pastor
Sunday Services
9 a.m. - Worship Service;
9:15 a.m. - Sunday School; coffee
and fellowship following service
Assisted listening system for those with special
hearing needs.
ST. PETER’S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
On the Park Bainbridge • 967-3441
The church with the red doors.
Pat Hawkins. Sr. Warden 895-6489
Sue Shove, Jr. Warden 639-2065
Regular Sunday Services
8 a.m. and 11 a.m.
ST. JOHN THE EVANGELIST
CATHOLIC CHURCH
32 S. Main St., Bainbridge • 967-4481
Fr. Darr Schoenhofen
Sunday
10 a.m. - Sunday School;
11 a.m. - Morning Worship
Wednesday
6:30 p.m. - Prayer Meeting/Bible
Study
AREA
Brian Cutting, Pastor
Office: 369-7425
[email protected]
Saturday
11 a.m .- 1 p.m .- Otego Food Pantry
open; 6:30-10 p.m. - YFC Youth
Center in Unadilla, 16 Watson St.
open
Sunday
10:30 a.m. - Worship at Otego building (290 Main St.); with contemporary and traditional music, relevant
and biblical message, nursery and
kids JAM time for elementary kids
Thursday
6:30 p.m. - YFC club at Unadilla
Elementary
NAKSIBENDI HAKKANI
MUSLIM CENTER
1663 Wheat Hill Rd.,
Sidney Center • 607-369-4816
Five Prayers Daily
Thursday
Evening Program
Friday
1 p.m. - Jummah
MASONVILLE FEDERATED
CHURCH
Thursday
6:30 p.m. - Bible Study
Sunday
9:45 a.m. - Adult Sunday School;
11 a.m. - Worship Service,
Children’s Sunday School
SAND HILL
UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
Nancy Stanley, Pastor
Sunday
8:30 a.m. - Morning Worship
Communion 1st Sunday of the
month & food pantry
UNION VALLEY
UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
Lay Pastor Andrew Doyle
607-316-7546
Sunday
10:30 a.m. - Morning Worship and
Sunday School. Coffee and Fellowship follows.
GUILFORD UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
Co. Rte. 35, Main St., Guilford
Sunday
9:15 a.m. - Worship Service.
Community Emergency Food Bank
Call 895-6822.
WELLS BRIDGE BAPTIST
COVENTRY UNITED METHODIST
Saturday
4:30 p.m. - Reconciliation
5:15 p.m. - Vigil Mass
Sunday
11 a.m. - Sunday Mass
David Steensma, Pastor
7 Church St., Wells Bridge
607-988-7090
Sunday
11 a.m. - Worship Service
Wednesday
6:30 p.m. - Prayer and Bible Study
Sunday
9 a.m. - Morning Worship and Sunday School, young family friendly;
fellowship and coffee hour follows.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
- BAINBRIDGE
MOUNT UPTON
UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
COVENTRYVILLE
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL UCC
Rev. Diarmuid O’Hara, Pastor
967-8021
www.ChristianChurchesOnline.com/
firstpresbyterianbainbridge
Rev. Brandilynne Craver
Pastor Joyce Besemer
113 Co. Rt. 27, Bainbridge
Thursday, Oct. 17
6:30 p.m.- Beatitudes Group meets
Sunday
8:45 a.m. - Sunday School;
Friday
6:30-8 p.m. - Fun-n-Faith Youth
Group for ages 10+
Sunday
11 a.m. - Worship Service.
First Sunday: Holy Communion
Third Sunday: Prayers for Healing
Lay Pastor Andrew Doyle
607-316-7546
Sunday
10:30 a.m. - Worship and Sunday
School; coffee hour
Wednesday
6:30 p.m. - Bible study; Quilt Group
Friday
Tri-Town News — Thursday, October 24, 2013— 17
Church Thanks Community
Announces Nov. 2, 16 Events
AFTON - Hope Church,
annual host of “Hope for Afton Day,” is taking pre-orders
for their Nov. 2 barbecue and
toy donations for their Nov. 16
Toy Giveaway.
Thanking
community
members for their participation and patronage at all of
the past year’s events, Hope
announces that Nov. 2 will be
the last BBQ of the year, and
Saturday, Nov. 16 will be the
Christmas Bazaar and annual
winter coat giveaway. Toys
are now being collected for
distribution during the Toy
Giveaway and Mitten Tree,
featuring free mittens, hats
and scarves, coming up on
Saturday, Dec. 14. Toy donors
should leave their items in
the toy box on the side porch
of the church, located at 129
Main St., Afton.
Hope for Afton Day was,
once again, a great success
and the church thanks all of
the vendors and food booths
for being part of that day.
Without you, there would be
no event.
Special thanks go out to
Rob Humphrey for initiating
the 5-K run this year. This was
well-received and a huge success with proceeds going to
the upgrade of Liggitt Park
Playground. Rob wants to do
the event annually with proceeds designated for different
community projects.
Jerry Marvin coordinated
the Hope for Afton Day car
display. Pink Faith was there
to remind us of the great work
they do in the community
and of the need to make us
all aware of the fight against
breast cancer.
Those wishing to pre-order
barbecue for Saturday, Nov. 2,
please call, 607-226-0791.
Free Clothing
Sat. in Afton
AFTON - St. Ann’s Episcopal Church, Main St, Afton, will have a free clothing
giveaway on Saturday, Oct. 26
from 9 a.m. to noon. Everyone
is welcome.
Mended Hearts Support Group
To Meet Monday, Oct. 28
SIDNEY - Mended Hearts
Support Group will meet on
Monday, Oct. 28 at Tri-Town
Regional Hospital, first floor
conference room, at 2 p.m.
This will be our last meeting
of the year. Our guest speaker
will be Bonnie Radley from
the Office for the Aging. She
will be presenting a program
called “A Matter of Balance.”
Mended Hearts is a nationwide volunteer-led support
group for heart patients and
their families. Its focus is on
helping people who are recov-
CURCHES
(Continued from Page 16)
6:30 p.m. - Quilt Group
TRUE LIFE CHRISTIAN CHURCH
www.truelifechristianchurch.org
2899 St. Hwy. 206, Bainbridge, NY
(Coventryville)
Pastor Karl Slifee, Sr.
Ph. 656-7619, Cell: 607-343-4743
Assoc. Pastor Harold Harris
Ph. 656-7833, Cell: 607-316-8144
Regular Sunday
9:30-10:15 a.m. - Sunday School;
10:30 a.m. - noon - Worship; Fellowship after church
Wednesday
7 p.m. - Bible study and prayer
meeting
Second Saturday of Every Month
7 a.m. - Men’s Prayer breakfast
NORTHFIELD
COMMUNITY CHURCH
Pastor Marv Root 829-2369
5118 County Hwy. 23
Sunday
10 a.m. - Sunday School
11 a.m. - Sunday Morning Worship
Wednesday
6:30 p.m. - Bible Study
Please have all changes
to church notices to
our offices by Monday
at noon. Listings run
from the Thursday the
paper comes out to the
following Thursday. Send
your changes to TriTown News, 5 Winkler
Road, Sidney, NY 13838
or e-mail [email protected]
tritownnews.com .
ering from heart surgery or another major cardiac event.
At Mended Hearts meetings, members gain insight
from other patients and from
guest speakers who are experts on topics such as pharmacy, nutrition or rehabilitation. There is an emphasis on
learning to adopt and enjoy a
healthy lifestyle that can prevent a recurrence down the
road. Come join us the fourth
Monday of each month from
April through October at 2
p.m. in 2014 to listen, share
your experience and discuss
matters relating to heart surgery. For more information
call 563-2690.
EASTERN BROOME
SENIOR CENTER
27 GOLDEN LN., HARPURSVILLE
693-2069
FRIDAY, OCT. 25
Noon - Hot lunch: fish
Florentine or chicken
Marengo, baked potato, baby
carrots, roll and pumpkin pie;
11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m -walkin: pub burger bar
MONDAY, OCT. 28
Hot lunch by reservation
on Friday prior - chicken
parmesan sandwich, pasta
bean soup and fruit cocktail
TUESDAY, OCT. 29
8 - 9:30 a.m. - Breakfast,
walk-in; Noon - Hot lunch by
reservation: roast pork and
dressing with gravy, green
beans, bread and under the
sea salad
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 30
Noon - Hot lunch by
reservation: Gramma’s
meatloaf with gravy, mac
and cheese, spinach, bread
and banana; 11:30 a.m.12:30 p.m. walk-in soup and
sandwich bar
THURSDAY, OCT. 31
10:30 a.m.-noon, walk-in
Golden Griddle Brunch
– breakfast or lunch choices
inc. monthly special – turkey
Reuben sandwich and soup
FRIDAY, NOV. 1
Noon - Hot lunch: broiled fish
or pepper steak with gravy,
Chantilly potatoes, tossed
salad, bread and sherbet;
11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m -walkin: pub burger bar
MASONVILLE NEWS
ANNE SCOTT, CORRESPONDENT
TELEPHONE 265-3368
Upcoming Events
Saturday, Oct. 26 is the Halloween party at the Masonville
Federated Church from 6 to 8
p.m. Have lots of fun and come
with costume or not, all are invited. Please bring a non-perishable item for the food pantry
at the church if you are able.
Friday, Nov. 1 there will
be an auction/fund raiser for
the Masonville Rod and Gun
Club at the Sidney American
Legion.
Tuesday, Nov. 5, get out
and vote and make your voice
heard. Polls are open at the
Masonville Town Hall from 6
a.m. to 9 p.m.
Saturday, Nov. 16, is the first
day of rifle deer hunting season
and the hunter’s ham dinner
at the Masonville Federated
church at 3 p.m. until all are
served. More details as these
Halloween Party
At Senior Center
Is Thurs., Oct. 31
HALLOWEEN - A Halloween Party will be held Thursday, Oct. 31 from 9:30 a.m.1:30 p.m. at Eastern Broome
Senior Center. Golden Griddle
will be served from 10:30
a.m.-noon.
Come out to your local senior center and join us for
spooky fun and games, goodies, costumes, and prizes. We
will start the morning with
treats and then have some
laughs with silly games. Our
annual costume contest and
parade around the center will
begin at 11 a.m. followed by
a chance to win a handmade
door prize. Then enjoy playing
orange and black Bingo from
11:45 a.m.-1:15 p.m. Please
bring a Bingo item that is orange or black in color for a
prize. Be sure to try our Golden Griddle brunch with a nice
variety of menu choices. In
addition to our regular menu,
we will be offering mac and
cheese with spider hotdogs,
just stop by as no reservation
is necessary.
SIDNEY
SENIOR MEALS
SITE MGR.: Joanne Gill
PHONE 563-2212
FRIDAY, OCT. 25
Roast pork with gravy, mashed
potatoes, peas, applesauce,
whole wheat bread, Jello
MONDAY, OCT. 28
Turkey Divan, sweet potatoes,
green beans, cranberry sauce,
whole wheat bread, chocolate
pudding
TUESDAY, OCT. 29
Pot roast with gravy, mashed
potatoes, mixed vegetables,
cran-apple juice, dinner roll,
fruit cocktail
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 30
Spaghetti and meatballs, Italian
blend vegetables, tossed salad,
garlic bread, apple crisp
THURSDAY, OCT. 31
Round house chicken, rice
pilaf, Brussels sprouts, rosey
apple relish, whole wheat
bread, white cake with
strawberries
FRIDAY, NOV. 1
Baked tilapia Parisienne, baked
potato, orangey beets, cranpineapple juice, whole wheat
bread, peachy cream pudding
events come closer.
Daylight Savings Time Ends
Sunday, Nov. 3 ends daylight savings time. Don’t forget to set your clocks back one
hour before retiring on Saturday evening.
School News
There is no school on Friday, Oct. 25 for Staff Development Day. Thursday, Oct. 31 is
Halloween and trick-or-treaters will be out there walking
the roads and in town, please
be careful while driving and
watch out for all the costumed
children.
There will be a blood drive at
the high school that day also.
Good
luck
students,
your first marking period is
approaching.
Birthdays
Birthday greetings this week
go out to Lori Schneider on
Oct. 26; Robert Huntington on
Oct. 30; Bonnie Tripp and Troy
Ramage on Nov. 1; Ellen Dean
Howard, Sam Sherman and
Alisha Lent on Nov. 2. Have a
great day everyone.
Church News
Sunday, Oct. 27 adult Sunday school is at 9:45 a.m. with
regular church services at 11
a.m. and during church service there is children’s classes.
Monday, Oct. 28 will be church
council at 6:30 p.m. at church.
Remember that the Operation Christmas Child is ongoing and you may fill your
boxes and leave them at the
church on Sundays with the
last day being Sunday, Nov. 3.
Call Anne Warner at 265-3577
if you wish to have some time
to help at the Share the Bounty
meal at the Sidney Methodist
Church on Friday, Oct. 25.
Thursdays at 6:30 p.m. is
Bible study at the parsonage.
The Food Pantry is open
from 1 to 3 p.m. on Friday,
Oct. 25.
The Pastoral Search Committee will be having a discussion about getting a pastor, all
church members are invited to
come at 6:30 p.m. when the
church council meets. Sunday, Oct. 27 is Stewardship
Sunday.
Celebrate the Season Bazaar
At United Methodist Church
SIDNEY – The traditional
“Celebrate the Season” Bazaar, sponsored by the UMW,
will be held at the Sidney
United Methodist Church, 12
Liberty St. on Friday and Saturday, Nov. 1 and 2.
Favorites will include a luncheon from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30
p.m. on Friday and a pancake
breakfast on Saturday from 8
to 11 a.m. Both events feature
delicious food and friendly
service.
From 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on
Friday, Nov. 1 and 9 a.m. until
noon on Saturday, Nov. 2 there
will be booths with a variety of
items from books and stuffed
animals in the Kids Korner
to delicious treats including
the church’s famous peanut
brittle. There will also be a
wonderful selection of plants,
produce, handmade items and
holiday decorations.
Plan to take advantage of
the bazaar to do a little early
holiday shopping, or shop for
yourself.
See the ad in this newspaper
for more information.
The Major’s Inn To Hold
Holiday Bazaar Nov. 8, 9
GILBERTSVILLE - The
Major’s Inn Foundation will
host their annual Holiday Bazaar, feast and festivities Friday and Saturday, Nov. 8 and
9, in the Tudor Style Major’s
Inn located on Rte. 51 in
Gilbertsville.
From 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
each day, there will be a wide
array of holiday decorations
and a selection of gift items
available for purchase. Enjoy
the ambiance of the inn itself
while you shop and dine.
Delicious lunches will be
offered each day with proceeds from meals and the sale
of holiday “presents” going
toward the continued restoration of The Major’s Inn. This
charming building is listed on
the National Register of Historic Places.
For more information, call
783-2393 or 783-2967.
Otsego Co. Fair Stockholders
Annual Meeting is Sat., Nov. 2
LAURENS - The annual
meeting of the stockholders
of the Otsego County Fair Association, Inc. will be held on
Saturday, Nov. 2 at the Laurens
Masonic Hall in Laurens.
The business meeting will
begin at 1 p.m. to elect five
directors, each for a three year
term. Reports of the officers
and superintendents of the various departments will be given
and any other business that
may properly come before the
meeting.
Seeking re-election for the
three year terms are Alicia Bowen of Hartwick, Lisa Jones of
Morris, Frank Proper of Cherry
Valley and Leslie Rathbun of
Schenevus. Other nominations
are Caren Kelsey of Hartwick,
Bill Martin of West Laurens and
John Vunk of Edmeston.
Other board members serving are Richard Ballard of Morris, Jill Foerster of Morris, Judy
Harris of New Berlin, Helene
Kraham of Cooperstown, Michael Mabie of Cherry Valley,
Lewis Miller of New Berlin,
James Powers of South New
Berlin, Doug Roberts of Schenevus, Duane Trask of West
Oneonta and Avis Waite of
Edmeston
Ballots are to be mailed so as
to reach the fair address on or
before Nov. 1 or may be hand
delivered to the annual meeting
by 1 p.m.
School Board
Meets Oct. 28
HARPURSVILLE - The
Harpursville Central School
Board of Education will hold
a regular meeting on Monday,
Oct. 28 at 7 p.m. in the high
school library.
COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 25
UNADILLA COMMUNITY FOOD BANK –
Unadilla Methodist Church, 11 a.m. to Noon
MASONVILLE FOOD PANTRY - 1-3 p.m., Masonville
Federated Church
TODDLER STORY TIME – 9:30-10 a.m., Sidney Mem.
Public Library, for children 18 months to 3 years
FAMILY MOVIE MORNING - 10:30 a.m., Smart Room,
Sidney Memorial Public Library
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 26
UNADILLA COMMUNITY FOOD BANK –
Unadilla Methodist Church, 11 a.m. to noon
BINGO – 7 p.m., Sidney Fire Dept. Training Center
LEGO TIME – Noon- 2 p.m., Unadilla Public Library
AFTON HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM – Open 10 a.m.
- 1 p.m. or by appointment, call Charles Decker at 639-2720
DEPOSIT FLEA MARKET - 9 a.m. - 4 p.m., Masonic Lodge
PREPARATION FOR CHILDBIRTH & DELIVERY - 9
a.m. - noon, Chenango Memorial Hospital, 179 N. Broad St.,
Norwich, designe for mothers-to-be in their third trimester.
Registration: 337-4145.
BAZAAR & BAKE SALE - 9 a.m. - 2 p.m., Bainbridge
First Presbyterian Church. Also white elephant sale.
THE FEINBERG BROTHERS - 8 p.m., Bainbridge Town
Hall Opry, 15 N. Main St., Bainbridge, bluegrass, tickets
available at the door or call 967-7228
ARTIST COOKIE WITHAM - 7-10 p.m., Bainbridge Town
Hall Gallery, 15 N. Main St., Bainbridge, pottery, primitive
ruhooking, photography, free
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 27
BAINBRIDGE MUSEUM OPEN – 2-4 p.m., 38 S. Main St.
FRANKLIN FARMERS MARKET - 10 a.m. - 2 p.m., 25
Institute St., Rt. 357, Franklin, rain or shine
ARTIST COOKIE WITHAM - noon-2 p.m., Bainbridge
Town Hall Gallery, 15 N. Main St., Bainbridge, pottery, primitive ruhooking, photography, free
FRIENDS OF THE LIBRARIES FREE FILM SERIES 1:30 p.m., Argo, Smart Community Room, Sidney Memorial
Public Library
MONDAY, OCTOBER 28
AFTON ECUMENICAL FOOD PANTRY – Afton United
Methodist Church, 24 Spring St., Mon. 5-7 p.m.,
Wed. 9-11 a.m.
SIDNEY COMMUNITY FOOD BANK – Sidney United
Methodist Church, Liberty St., 9:30-11:30 a.m., upstairs
UNADILLA COMMUNITY FOOD BANK –
Unadilla Methodist Church, 11 a.m. to Noon
BAINBRIDGE COUNCIL OF CHURCHES
FOOD PANTRY – Bainbridge United Methodist Church
back entrance, 8-10 a.m.
ZUMBA GOLD - 1-1:45 p.m., Eastern Broome Senior
Center, Harpursville
HARPURSVILLE BOARD OF EDUCATION MEETING 7 p.m., High School Library
MENDED HEARTS SUPPORT GROUP - 2 p.m., TriTown Regional Hospital, information: 563-2690
DIABETES SUPPORT GROUP - 6 p.m., Chenango
Memorial Hospital, Basement Conf. Room, 179 N. Board
St., Norwich. Information: 337-4136.
BAINBRIDGE LIONS CLUB - 6:30 p.m., Jerry’s Inn
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 29
PRESCHOOL STORY HOUR – Tues. & Thurs. 9:30-10:15
a.m., Sidney Mem. Public Library, for children ready for preschool or kindergarten
PRESCHOOL STORY TIME - 10:30 a.m., Unadilla Public
Library, Info. 369-3131
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 30
SIDNEY HISTORICAL ROOM – Civic Center, Room 218;
open 4-6 p.m. or by appt., call Joelene 563-1425
AFTON ECUMENICAL FOOD PANTRY – Afton United
Methodist Church, 24 Spring St., Mon. 5-7 p.m.,
Wed. 9-11 a.m.
TOPS OF UNADILLA – 9 a.m., Unadilla United Methodist
“Taking Pounds Off Sensibly”
LAP SIT STORY TIME – 9:30-10 a.m., Sidney Mem. Public
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 31
HAVE A FUN & SAFE HALLOWEEN!
PRESCHOOL STORY HOUR – Tues. & Thurs. 9:30-10:15
a.m., Sidney Mem. Public Library, for children ready for
preschool or kindergarten
SIDNEY HISTORICAL ROOM – Civic Center, Room 218;
open 9:30 a.m. - noon or by appointment, call Joelene 5631425.
BAINBRIDGE COUNCIL OF CHURCHES
FOOD PANTRY – Bainbridge United Methodist Church
back entrance, 8-10 a.m.
SIDNEY COMMUNITY FOOD BANK – Sidney United
Methodist Church, Liberty St., 9:30-11:30 a.m., upstairs
18 — Tri-Town News — Thursday, October 24, 2013
BUY IT • SELL IT • FIND IT
CLASSIFIEDS
CARD OF THANKS
FOR RENT
FOR SALE
LEGAL NOTICE
LEGAL NOTICE
LEGAL NOTICE
ST. JUDE NOVENA
THE COUNTRY MOTEL
- Rt. 7, Sidney, offers clean
and comfortable extended stay
rooms at reasonable rates. All
rooms have microwaves and
refrigerators. Sorry no pets.
Call 563-1035.
10-15tfc
FOR SALE
$99 DOWN
payment plan gets your
brand new or pre-owned piece
of furniture or mattress set
home that same day. Brand new
full mattress sets with warranty
$199! Beds and bedrooms our
specialty. New, floor model,
vintage, antique and pre owned
furniture for all rooms all in
one big place. Pete’s Furniture Barn, 1687 Rt. 7 Unadilla
13849. Lowest prices around.
Across from the drive-in movie.
607-369-2458 or 607-434-0334
Browse from home at http://
petesfurniturebarn.com.
We can order you any of the
brand new items at the prices
shown there.
3-15(eow)tf
PLEASE TAKE NOTICE
That the Bainbridge Town
Board will hold a public hearing on Thursday, November 7,
2013 at 7:30 P.M. in the Bainbridge Town Hall, 15 North
Main Street, Bainbridge, NY
on the preliminary budget for
2014. A copy of the preliminary budget is available at the
Town Clerk’s Office where
any interested person can inspect it during regular office
hours.
Pursuant to Section 113 of
the Town Law, the proposed
salaries for elected officials
for 2014 are:
Supervisor
$ 7,200.00
Councilman (4)
2,336.75
each
Town Clerk
35,230.00
Highway Superintendent
48,994.00
Justices (2)
9,412.00 each
At the hearing, any person may speak in favor of or
against the budget or any item
therein.
By Order of the
Bainbridge Town Board
Deborah Hromada
Town Clerk
10-24(1w)c
WINTER HIGHWAY
DEPARTMENT
PROCEDURES
It is the Highway Department of the Town of Unadilla’s goal to keep the Town
Highways in a passable condition during the winter months.
Any obstructions located in
the Town of Unadilla right of
way may hinder the ability of
snow removal and storage. In
an attempt to clear roads, the
drivers try to be careful not
to damage any obstruction in
the right of way. However,
that is not always possible.
Any damage to mail boxes
and fences when the Highway
Department is maintaining the
roads during the winter will
not be repaired or replaced
by the Town. Therefore, the
repairs/replacement will be at
the owner’s expense.
Vehicles parked on the Town
right of way are also a hindrance when clearing winter
road conditions. Attempts will
be made to contact the owners
in order that the vehicles can
be removed, however, if the
Town Highway Department is
unable to reach the owner, the
vehicle(s) will be towed at the
owners expense.
Rodney Renwick
Highway Superintendent
Town of Unadilla
November 1, 2013
10-24(1w)c
The Town of Unadilla advertises for sealed bids for one
Medium Duty Truck.
Specifications will be available and bids will be accepted
at the Town Clerk’s Office,
1648 State Hwy 7, Unadilla,
NY 13849: up to 6:30 on November 7th, 2013 at which
time the Town Board will meet
and open all bids. A non collusive bidding certificate must
be attached. The Town Board
reserves the right to accept or
reject any and all bids.
By order of the
Unadilla Town Board
Terry L. Yoder,
Town Clerk
Rodney Renwick,
Highway Superintendent
10-24(1w)c
May the Sacred Heart of Jesus be adored, glorified, loved
and preserved throughout the
world now and forever. Sacred
Heart of Jesus, pray for us.
St. Jude, Worker of Miracles,
pray for us. St. Jude, Helper
of the Hopeless, pray for us.
Say it for 9 days. It has never
been known to fail. Publication must be promised. Thank
you St. Jude.
RD
10-24(1w)p
EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the Fair
Housing Act which makes it illegal
to advertise “any preference
limitation or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
handicap, familial status, or
national origin, or an intention to
make any such preference.”
Familial status includes children
under the age of 18 living with
parents or legal custodians,
pregnant women, and people
securing custody of children under
the age of 18.
This newspaper will not
knowingly accept any advertising
for real estate which is in violation
of the law. Our readers are hereby
informed that all dwellings
advertised in this newspaper are
available on an equal opportunity
basis.
To
complain
of
discrimination call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The toll-free
telephone number for the hearing
impaired is 1-800-543-8294.
BAINBRIDGE - 1 ½ bedroom apartment for rent, $375
per month plus utilities. Garage privileges, references
required, no pets, no smoking. Available November. Call
967-5706.
10-24(1w)p
BAINBRIDGE – 5 Evans
St., very nice house for rent.
Perfect for senior citizens.
967-5028.
10-31(2w)p
SERVICES OFFERED
HOLIDAY
CLEANING
appointments available. Busy
Beaver Cleaning Service.
Weekly, monthly, one time.
Est. 2003. Impeccable references, fully insured. 607431-3182 [email protected]
gmail.com
12-5(8w)c
WANTED TO BUY
HURLBURT COIN AND
PAPER - Buying old U.S.
gold, silver and copper coins,
paper currency. Also buying
antique fishing lures, gold and
silver pocket watches. Cash
offers. Appraisals. Ken - 607235-2818.
12-4wtfc
The Tri-Town News
CLASSIFIED
ADS
$4.50
$4.50 per week for the first 20 words,
5¢ for each word over 20 words
Fill out and mail this coupon with your payment to the
Classified Department, PO Box 208, Sidney, NY 13838, or
call us at 561-3526 to place an ad. All ads must be in our
hands by Monday at 5 p.m. for Thursday’s paper.
Name ________________________________________________
Adress _______________________________________________
Phone ___________________________No of Weeks to run ____
Heading to be placed under ______________________________
1________________ 2 ________________ 3 ________________
4________________ 5 ________________ 6 ________________
7________________ 8 ________________ 9 ________________
10______________ 11 _______________ 12 ________________
13______________ 14 _______________ 15 ________________
16______________ 17 _______________ 18 ________________
19______________ 20 _______________
This many words $4.50.
5¢ per word from here.
21______________ 22 _______________ 23 ________________
CAPTURE THE FINAL
DAYS OF FALL w/your
family at the Fly Creek Cider Mill! Or visit our online
store - cheese, cider, fudge!
www.flycreekcidermill.com.
607-547-9692.
10-24(1w)c
FAMILY SALE
MOVING SALE! October
26 and 27, 9 a.m. each day. 12
N. Washington Ave., Oxford.
10-24(1w)p
HELP WANTED
The Sidney Central School
District has the following position open for the 2013-2014
school year:
Transportation
One (1) Bus Driver – 3 hours
per day, 5 days per week, 184
days per year, Monday-Friday.
Pay is $12.43/hour with benefits. CDL B license with passenger endorsement, air brake,
and school bus endorsements
preferred. We will train if
needed.
One (1) Bus Monitor
– 3 hours per day, 5 days per
week, 184 days per year, Monday-Friday. Pay is $9.34/hour
with benefits.
If interested, please apply
at the Sidney Curriculum/
Payroll Office, 95 West Main
Street, Sidney, NY 13838 by
November 1, 2013. Transportation questions can be
directed to Michael Blincoe,
561-7710.
10-24(1w)c
The Town of Unadilla is
now accepting applications
for the position of Motor
Equipment Operator. Applicants may send a resume to
the Town Office, PO Box 455,
Unadilla, NY 13849. Applications are also available at the
Town Hall.
Rodney Renwick
Highway Superintendent
Town of Unadilla
10-24(1w)c
24______________ 25 _______________ 26 ________________
27______________ 28 _______________ 29 ________________
30______________ 31 _______________ 32 ________________
33______________ 34 _______________ 35 ________________
No. of words over 20 = __________
x 5¢ = ________
+ $4.50
= subtotal __________
x No. of weeks __________
= TOTAL ENCLOSED ________________
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE OF PUBLIC
HEARING
NOTICE IS HERBY GIVEN the Sidney Town Board
will hold a Public Hearing at
7:00 p.m. November 7, 2013
at the Civic Center, Sidney,
NY. Topic will be proposed
Local Law #2 for the year
2013, which will be “A Local
Law to Override the Tax Levy
Limit Established in General
Municipal Law 3-C.”
Dated: October 11, 2013
Lisa A. French, Clerk
10-24(2w)c
LEGAL NOTICE
Notice is hereby given
that the fiscal affairs of the
Bainbridge-Guilford Central
School District for the fiscal
year beginning July 1, 2012
and ending June 30, 2013 have
been examined by the independent auditing firm of Piaker &
Lyons, CPAs, pursuant to Section 35 of the General Municipal Law. The report is filed in
the business office as a public
record for inspection by all interested persons. The Annual
Financial Report in the form
filed with the State Education
Department is also available
in the school district’s business office from 8:00 a.m. until 4:00 p.m. weekdays for any
interested persons. The audit
report along with an abbreviated version of the Financial
Statements called the MD&A
(Management Discussion and
Analysis) is available on our
District website: www.bgcsd.
org.
Kenneth C. Wilcox, Jr.,
MBA
Assistant Superintendent
for Business
Bainbridge-Guilford Central School District
10-24(1w)c
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE OF SPECIAL
MEETING
NOTICE IS HERBY GIVEN the Sidney Town Board
will hold a Special Meeting/
Budget Workshop at 7:00 p.m.
on October 24, 2013 in the
boardroom or any other room,
if required, at the Civic Center, Sidney, NY. Topic will be
2014 Tentative Budget.
Dated: October 11, 2013
Lisa A. French, Clerk
10-24(2w)c
LEGAL NOTICE
The annual meeting of The
Butternuts Cemetery Association (Brookside and Prentiss
Cemeteries) of Gilbertsville
will be held downstairs in the
Butternut Valley Grange Hall,
7 Bloom Street on Saturday,
October 26 starting at 7 PM.
All Plot owners are urged to
attend.
Roberta Halbert, Secty.
9-26, 10-24(2w)c
LEGAL NOTICE
SEASONAL ROADS
Notice is hereby given that
the Town of Unadilla Highway Superintendent, Rodney
Renwick, has designated the
following roads as seasonal
roads. These roads will not be
maintained from November 1,
2013 through May 1, 2014.
Prentice Gorge Road
Hinman Road
Mile of Dentwood Drive
Meadow Lane
Signs have been posted in
those areas.
Rodney Renwick
Highway Superintendent
Town of Unadilla
November 1, 2013
10-24(1w)c
LEGAL NOTICE
PLEASE TAKE NOTICE
that the General Election for
the Village of Unadilla will
be held on Tuesday, March
18th, 2014 from 12:00 noon
until 9:00 pm at the Community House Library, 193 Main
Street, Unadilla, NY. To be
elected are the following:
Mayor – 2 Year Term
Trustee - 2 Year Term
Trustee - 2 Year Term
The first date upon which
an individual may sign an independent nominating petition
is February 4th, 2014. Independent Nominating petitions
must be filed at the Village
Office on or before February
11th, 2014.
An official notice of this
election will be published and
posted at a later date.
Dated: October 22, 2013
By the Direction of the
Village of Unadilla Board
of Trustees.
Suzette E. Hayes
Village Clerk/Treasurer
10-24(1w)c
Call 607-561-3526 to place
YOUR Classified Ad!
LEGAL NOTICE
TOWN OF UNADILLA
NOTICE OF PUBLIC
HEARING
PLEASE TAKE NOTICE
that a public hearing will be
held by the Town Board of the
Town of Unadilla on Tuesday,
October 22, 2013, at 5 p.m.
at the Town Hall, 1648 State
Hwy 7, Unadilla, New York,
regarding the adoption of Local Law No. 1 of the Town of
Unadilla for the year 2013,
entitled “A Local Law authorizing a property tax levy in
excess of the limit established
in General Municipal Law §3c.” A copy of the proposed
Local Law is on file and may
be examined in the office of
the Town Clerk.
Persons with disabilities,
who require assistance in attending said public hearing,
or in furnishing comments
and suggestions, should contact the undersigned to request
such assistance. Communications in writing in relation
thereto may be filed with the
Town Board or at such public
hearing.
Dated: October 15, 2013
Terry Yoder
Town Clerk
10-24(1w)c
Puzzle solutions for
Oct. 3
Puzzle 1 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.44)
7
4
3
6
1
2
8
5
9
2
6
1
5
8
9
3
7
4
8
9
5
4
3
7
2
1
6
6
3
8
2
9
5
1
4
7
5
1
4
3
7
8
6
9
2
9
2
7
1
4
6
5
3
8
1
7
2
9
6
3
4
8
5
4
8
6
7
5
1
9
2
3
3
5
9
8
2
4
7
6
1
Tri-Town News — Thursday, October 24, 2013— 19
Puzzle Corner
hyphenated)
57. Permit
59. Hokkaido native
60. Apple spray
61. Japanese-American
62. Alka-Seltzer sound
63. Clean by rubbing gently
64. Chasers
65. Transmitted
66. Damon of “Good Will
Hunting”
Across
1. “Darn it!”
5. 0.001 of an inch (pl.)
9. Kenyan tribesman
14. Gulf of ___, off the coast of
Yemen
15. Assortment
16. Eyeball benders
17. ___ fruit
18. Arm bone
19. Jimmies
20. Aggressive expression of
one’s views (hyphenated)
23. Gauge
24. Let
27. Door-to-door salesman
31. When it’s broken, that’s good
32. Bumpkin
35. Western blue flag, e.g.
36. “Roots,” e.g.
37. California fractures (3 wds)
40. “What are the ___?”
41. “The Prime of Miss ___
Brodie,” film
42. Doing nothing
43. “A pox on you!”
44. Letters sent by plane
46. BB rifle, e.g.
48. Deliver
53. Big wheel bike (British,
Down
1. Member of an African people
of N Nigeria and S Niger
2. Barely beats
3. Prison rooms
4. Bowie’s weapon
5. Puddinglike dessert
6. Misfortunes
7. Ancestry
8. Fly high
9. More apathetic
10. Table part
11. Minnesota’s capital (2 wds)
12. “___ we having fun yet?”
13. “___ alive!” (contraction)
21. Colorado resort
22. Amount of hair
25. American symbol
26. “Dang!”
28. More terrible
29. Chimera
30. Jungle climber
32. Pie cuts, essentially
33. Passageway below
34. ___-relief
36. Blue
37. Chesterfield, e.g.
38. Spirit capable of appearing
in human or animal form
(Muslim)
39. Seafood entree
44. Mame, for one
45. Increase rapidly in number
47. Pool contents?
49. Medieval oboe
50. Eyelashes
51. Not fitting
52. “Snowy” bird
54. Blabs
55. Carpentry tool
56. Soon, to a bard
57. Former measure of the U.S.
economy (acronym)
58. “Flying Down to ___”
Puzzle 1 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.42)
8
3
7
5
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Puzzle solutions for
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OPEN HOUSE
Sunday, Oct. 27 • 1 to 3 p.m.
Puzzle 1 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.44)
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9 James St., Sidney. Priced to Sell $174,900
Carol Greene. Lic. Real Estate Agent
PRUDENTIAL FOX
PROPERTIES
Business & Service Directory
AC & APPLIANCES
ATTORNEYS
ATTORNEYS
VEP
• Video Entertainment Plus
• VEP Appliance & Air
Conditioning
• VEP Electric & Plumbing
• VEP Kitchen & Bath
Residential & Commercial • Sales & Service
89 MAIN ST., SIDNEY
607-563-1434
D & D Trophies
140 Main St., Afton
BAINBRIDGE OFFICE • (607) 967-2221
29 No. Main Street, Bainbridge, NY • www.CGLawOffices.com
Toll Free: 1-877-Coughlin
Main Office In: Binghamton Branch Offices In: Hancock • Ithaca • Owego • Montrose • Endicott
Full Service Florist
Serving all the
Tri-Town Area
& Funeral Homes
967-7111
The Village Florist
5 East Main St., Bainbridge
Mon.-Fri. 9-5; Sat. 9-1
WINDOWS
Joelle Greene, LCSW
Ken Greene, LCSWR
Individual,
Marital and
Family Therapy
2567 St. Hwy. 7
Bainbridge, NY 13733
[email protected]
DOORS
Manufacture to Install... We Do It All!!
M A D I S O N
V
madisonvinyl.com
CLEANING/PET SITTING
Office & Residential
CLEANING
FULLY INSURED
For The Best In
Personal Service
Pet Sitting
Available
607-639-1515
The Largest Selection of Batteries in the Area
FOREIGN & DOMESTIC Used Batteries starting at $30.00
Special Orders upon Request
Sewing
Machines
Eureka
Vacuum
Cleaners
RENT-A-JON
CALL TODAY! 561-3526
BUTTS CONCRETE
Masonville, NY 13804
607-265-3394
AUTOMOTIVE
Your Complete Auto Repair Center
For All Your Mechanical Needs
CLOTHING
CONSIGNMENT
STORE
Hundreds Sept. 14 = Mid–Oct. =
Of Items ~ Costumes 20% Off
Name
& Winter
Sale ~
Brands! Outerwear Fall Items!
78 Genesee St., Greene
656-7304
SATELLITE SYSTEMS
Jim Wakefield, Owner
Quality Affordable Transportation
• Brakes • NYS Inspections • Batteries
• Struts • Tires • L.O.F. • Exhaust
607-334-3773
5012 St. Hwy. 12, Norwich, NY
COUNSELING
Anxious, Frustrated, Depressed?
Without Peace Of Mind?
Norman R. Kanzer,
M.A., M.Ed.
PECK ENTERPRISES
229 Main St., Unadilla
(between Brown’s Pharmacy & Village Variety)
607-369-5700 or
Toll Free 1-877-661-1093
COUNSELING
Christ-Centered Christian Counselor
Serving individuals, couples, and families.
Consultations and Psychological Evaluations for
academic and behavioral problems
Located Near Downtown Sidney
Call For Appt.:
607-316-6636
Reasonable Fees
PSYCHOTHERAPY
Reach 4,100 Homes
Each Week!
18
$
PER MONTH
Deadline last Wed.
of prior month.
Minimum 3 months.
If we can’t fix it, throw it away
PAINTING
THIS SPACE FOR RENT
PAINTING
PORTABLE
TOILETS
Short Term • Long Term
• Special Events •
SIZES 0-12
+ MATERNITY
607-639-1833
1-800CRANKIT
LEAD BATTERY
REDEMPTION
CENTER
I N Y L
Ph. (607)967-4323
NEW & USED
1364 St. Hwy. 7, Afton
Mon.-Fri. 8-4
SEWING MACHINES
CLOTHING
www.freewebs.com/thekidsroomny
BATTERIES
607-244-4668
Replacement Windows
and Exterior Doors
Find us
on
Trophies, Plaques,
Medals, Ribbons,
Specialty Gifts
Call/Fax 639-2828
“Building Relationships On Results”
COUNSELING
FLORIST
TROPHIES
• Interior/Exterior Painting
• Decks Pressure Washed
CALL LEE YAGER AT
and Sealed • Etc...
607-656-7195
• Insured
• Free Estimates
CELL: 607-222-8369
REACH 12,000 READERS EACH WEEK!
Run the same business directory ad
in The Tri-Town News and our sister
publications Chenango American,
Oxford Review-Times and Whitney Point
Reporter.
20 — Tri-Town News — Thursday, October 24, 2013
Ahoy, Me Hearties!
SIDNEY - Have a swashbuckling adventure on the
high seas at a Pirate Party this
Halloween. There’s grub to be
ate, crafts to be made, treasure to hunt and games to be
played. Dress in your finest pi-
rate garb, or you just may walk
the plank. Hoist your sails and
chart your course for the Sidney Memorial Public Library
Monday, Oct. 28 at 3:30 p.m.,
for ages 2 to 7. Call 563-1200
for more details.
Family Movie Will Be Shown
At Sidney Library Friday, Oct. 25
SIDNEY - Join us at the Sidney Memorial Public Library
for a Family Movie Morning.
Friday, Oct. 25 at 10:30 a.m.,
a new family-friendly movie
will be shown in our Smart
Community Room. All ages
are welcome. Find out what
happens when a family of
cavemen journey through an
unfamiliar and fantastic world
after their home is destroyed.
4thual
Ann
Sat., Oct. 26
from 10 am-3 pm
CRAFTS - SALES - FOOD
UNBELIEVABLE
SAVINGS INSIDE!
Chuck D’Imperio to Present
“My Town Is a Cathedral”
SIDNEY - The Sidney
Chamber of Commerce will be
sponsoring a Meet and Greet
event on Monday, Oct. 28 from
6:30-8:30 p.m. at the Sidney
Golf Course. Chuck D’Imperior
will presents “My Town is a
Cathedral: Sidney As I Remember It.” Tickets are available
through advanced sale only,
seating is limited. If you would
like to purchase a ticket please
contact the Chamber office or
any Chamber director.
In “My Town is a Cathedral”
award-winning
broadcaster,
author and newspaper columnist Chuck D’Imperio gives a
funny, delightful and poignant
presentation of growing up in
the 1950s and 1960s in Small
Town, U.S.A. The subject matter is Chuck’s hometown of
Sidney, a small working class
community of 5,000 situated
along the banks of the Susquehanna River in rural Central
New York.
The vignettes he describes
Get the
50% OFF
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FOR ONLY $1
Antiques and Consignments
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Tri-Town News
sent to your
mailbox or
your e-mail
inbox!
Call 607561-3526
will resonate with everyone who
grew up in a similar environment: the parades, the eccentric
old timers, the watering holes,
the Mom and Pop businesses on
Main Street, the working class
neighborhoods filled with houses with big porches, driveways
filled with big station wagons
and back yards filled with big
families. Chuck has given this
presentation numerous times
around New York State and he
is excited about bringing his
presentation, “My Town is a
Cathedral” back to where it all
started...Sidney!”
Church to Hold
Bazaar, Bake Sale
Saturday, Oct. 26
BAINBRIDGE - A White
Elephant sale, featuring household goods, holiday decorations, games, books, and much
more is taking place from 9
a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturday,
Oct. 26 at the First Presbyterian Church of Bainbridge.
An assortment of baked
goods such as seasonal pies,
cookies, breads, and cakes
will also be available for sale.
Bring a friend and join us for a
luncheon of homemade soups
and sandwiches. Food is available for dine-in or take-out. We
hope to see you there.
It’s Our Warm & Fuzzy Sale...
Saving You Money On Your
Heating Bill!
UP TO
$1,200
VALUE
WARM WINTER COAT
DRIVE...
As part of this sale we are
collecting slightly used
coats for families in the
area HELP US MAKE
EVERYONE WARM THIS
WINTER...DROP OFF AT
OUR DEALERSHIP
- Cork O’Hara, Owner
• Every Vehicle’s Price Has Been Reduced For
This Sale Up To $1,500
• Every Chambers & O’Hara Vehicle Is Equipped
With A Prescription To Beat The Cost Of Cold
Winter Months
• Every Car, Truck, Van And SUV Includes A
Now Prescription Bottle With A Prescription For
Low OMG RATES thru Sidney Federal
Thru
Up To $1,200 Towards Your Heating Bill
Credit Union to Qualified Buyers.
Nov. 15,
See dealer for details.
For This Year!
2013!
Solve Your Winter Heating Woes & Drive Away With A Quality Vehicle Equipped
With A Prescription Good For Up To $1,200 Off Your Heating Bill This Winter!
•Great Selection Of Guaranteed Pre-owned Vehicles • Low, Low Financing Rates
• Easy Financing... Financing Specialist On Premises • Test Drive Today • Low, Low Prices
Was
NOW
2010 Kia Rio LX.....................................................................................................................9,469...................$8,969
4 dr., 4 cyl., auto, A/C, rear defrost, CD, tilt wheel, silver, 62,792 miles
2010 Toyota RAV4...............................................................................................................16,969................$16,469
4 dr., 4WD, 4 cyl., auto, A/C, p. windows, p. locks, cruise, tilt, CD, silver, 43,463 one owner miles
2010 Honda Accord EX-L....................................................................................................17,469................$16,969
4 dr., 4 cyl., auto, A/C, p. sunroof, alloys, p. seat, p. windows, p. locks, cruise, tilt, CD, silver, 32,888 one owner miles
2010 Toyota Corolla “S”.....................................................................................................16,469................$15,969
4 dr., 4 cyl., auto, A/C, p. sunroof, alloys, p. windows, p. locks, cruise, tilt, CD, red, 37,700 miles
2007 Hummer H3.................................................................................................................17,969................$16,969
HELPING WITH THE MAILINGS for the United Way of
Sidney’s annual campaign are members of the Boys &
Girls Club of Sidney.
Boys & Girls Club of Sidney Youth
Donate Time to Sidney United Way
SIDNEY – Oct. 9 through
Oct. 11 proved to be very
busy and very productive days
for members of the Boys &
Girls Club of Sidney. As an
annual tradition, thousands
of United Way of Sidney annual campaign mailings were
put together by BGCS club
members. What started off as
a Torch Club and Keystone
Club community service activity quickly became a clubwide activity with all ages
and groups volunteering. The
overwhelming willingness of
club youth to assist with what
could have been a cumbersome task, and use teamwork
and delegation amongst themselves to complete the task
was a powerful example of
the leadership skills and positive character attributes each
of our members possess.
Volunteering and commu-
nity service are very important
activities for our youth to engage in, as such activities can
have far reaching impacts upon
individual lives and communities. The commitment, motivation, diligence and work
ethic required to complete
community service projects,
all contribute to the ongoing
character development of our
youth and their appreciation
of intrinsic rewards (an internal sense of satisfaction for
helping someone/something).
Tangible rewards used to
recognize and appreciate youth
efforts, however, are also useful in keeping youth engaged,
especially chocolate and pizza. A special thanks to club
staff member Samantha Burns
for her delicious brownies and
The United Way of Sidney for
providing a pizza party to all
our participating youth.
Free Skin Cancer Screening
Will Be Offered Saturday, Nov. 2
UNADILLA – Covered
Bridge Gardens in Unadilla is
sponsoring a free Skin Cancer
Screening on Saturday, Nov.
2.
Farmers, road workers,
electric linemen and anyone
who spends time in the sun is
especially encouraged to take
advantage of this opportunity
to detect any early signs of
skin cancer.
The free clinic will be
held from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
at Covered Bridge Gardens,
1532 Covered Bridge Road,
Unadilla.
Join us for free skin cancer
screenings, as well as free flu
shots. There will also be information and sales of personal
protective equipment, door
prizes and refreshments.
Screenings for this inaugural Rural Farming Community
Skin Cancer Screening will
be provided by the New York
Center for Agricultural Medicine and Health, a program of
Bassett Healthcare Network.
Appointments and walk-ins
are welcome. To make an appointment, call Samantha at
(800) 343-7527, ext. 292.
4 dr., 4WD, 5 cyl., auto, A/C, p. sunroof, alloy, tilt, CD, p. windows, p. locks, cruise, tilt, blue, 80,555 miles
2005 Ford F350 Superduty Ext. Cab..................................................................................22,469................$21,969
Dually, 4WD, diesel, auto, A/C, p. seat, p. windows, p. locks, cruise, tilt, CD, black, 63,442 miles
2005 Dodge Dakota Quad Cab Laramie............................................................................15,969................$14,969
4WD, V8, auto, A/C, alloy, cruise, tilt, p. seat, p. windows, p. locks, dk. red, 55,121 one owner miles
2004 Dodge Dakota Reg. Cab SXT.....................................................................................12,469.................$11,969
4WD, 6 cyl., auto, A/C, alloy, CD, matching fiberglass cap, red, 29,510 miles
2003 Dodge Ram Quad Cab SLT........................................................................................10,969................$10,469
4WD, V8, auto, A/C, p. windows, p. locks, cruise, tilt, alloy, tow pkg., gold, 87,687 miles
MANY MORE VEHICLES ON OUR LOT WITH REDUCED PRICES! STOP BY & CHECK IT OUT!
SHOP US 24-7 AND APPLY FOR A LOAN ONLINE AT WWW.CHAMBERSOHARA.COM
- Our Vehicles Include These Powertrain Warranties: 12 Mos./12k Miles-0 To
50k Miles; 6 Mos./6k Miles 50k To 80k Miles
BIRTHDAY CLUB
Buy On Your Birthday
Get $250 Cash!
Plus $100 Every Year!
(75 Member to Date)
Mon, Tues.,
Thurs. 8 a.m. - 8
p.m.;
Wed. & Fri. 8-6;
Sat. 8-3
DIRECTLY NEXT TO THE CAR WASH,
- Over 100 Cars, Vans, Trucks &SUVs
Available
• Need A Rental Car? We Have Them!
RTE 7., RIVERSIDE SIDNEY
www.chambersohara.com
563-4311
Girl Scouts to Scare-up Fun
In Haunted House Oct. 25, 26
BAINBRIDGE -The Bainbridge-Guilford Girl Scout
Service Unit 365 is once again
having their annual Haunted
House on Friday, Oct. 25 and
Saturday, Oct. 26 from 79 p.m. We are very excited
and cannot wait to once again
scare up some fun.
We will have our Haunted
House rain or shine along with
cider and donuts. Our haunted
hayride will depend on the
weather. We do ask that all
children under the age of 10
be supervised by an adult, and
that any older kids be respectful of our props and people
who work in and around the
haunted house.
We love to do as many community activities as we can
with little to no cost to keep
us and our kids entertained
without having to travel far.
In the future we would like to
expand this event to include
more activities throughout
the day. If you have ideas or
something you may be able to
offer, please contact Jessica
Chambers at 267-2378. In the
meantime, please come and
enjoy a scary stroll through
our house.
Beware! It may be scary
for young children but all are
welcome. One of our goals
when expanding this event is
to have a more child friendly
version during the day. There
is no charge but donations are
gratefully accepted to cover
our costs.