Sunday - Indiana University Bloomington

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Sunday - Indiana University Bloomington
April
2005
wfiu.indiana.edu
Sunday, April 17, 8 p.m.
Also this month:
• Music of the Baroque
• Reaching Out to
Troubled Youth
• Renata Tebaldi:
The Voice of an Angel
• The Future of Moral
Values
• Artist of the Month:
Ray E. Cramer
• . . . and more!
April 2005
Vol. 53, No. 4
Directions in Sound (USPS314900) is published each month
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and Television Services, 1229
East 7th Street, Bloomington, IN
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Come Rain or Come Shine:
A Musical Celebration of
Harold Arlen
Music of the
Baroque: Bach’s B
Minor Mass
The Voice of an
Angel: A Tribute to
Renata Tebaldi
Sunday, April 17, 8 p.m.
Sunday, April 3, 8 p.m.
Sunday, April 10, 8 p.m.
You may not know his name, but you’ve certainly heard his
music. Harold Arlen wrote some of the most beautiful popular
songs of the twentieth century. He composed the songs for
several Broadway musicals and dozens of Hollywood movies,
including “The Wizard of Oz” (his “Over the Rainbow” was
recently named the Number One Song of the Century), and “A
Star is Born,”—over 400 songs in all. They include the standards
“It’s Only A Paper Moon,” “Stormy Weather,” “Get Happy,”
“I’ve Got the World on A String,” and “Ac-Cent-Tchu-Ate the
Positive.”
This hour-long special surveys the life and accomplishments of one of America’s
finest songwriters. Hosted
by NPR Special Correspondent Susan Stamberg, there
are interviews with singers
Michael Feinstein, Bobby
Arlen composes while his dog
Short and Margaret Whiting,
Shmutts observes
cultural historians John Lahr
and Max Wilk, and the composer’s
adopted son, Sam Arlen.
The program also features rare
archival material of Harold Arlen
singing and talking about his work,
as well as interviews with his major
lyricists Johnny Mercer and E.Y.
“Yip” Harburg. Judy Garland,
Frank Sinatra, Lena Horne, and Ella
Fitzgerald are among the singers
whose interpretations of Arlen songs
will be highlighted in the special.
Let the musical wizardry of HarArlen at the piano
old Arlen transport you . . . over the
rainbow.
Music of the Baroque offers a special concert for the Easter season: Johann Sebastian Bach’s Mass in B Minor.
The concert
was recorded at
St. Paul’s Church,
Chicago, and
conducted by
Jane Glover. The
soloists include
Nathalie Paulin,
soprano; Phyllis
Pancella, mezzosoprano; Frank
Kelley, tenor;
James Maddalena, baritone; and
was directed by
Jane Glover
Edward Zelnis,
chorus director of Music of the Baroque.
Music of the Baroque was founded
in Hyde Park, Illinois, 33 years ago by
Conductor Laureate Thomas S. Wikman.
From its church choir roots, Music of the
Baroque has grown to be the Midwest’s
largest baroque professional chorus
and orchestra specializing in the performance of sixteenth, seventeenth and early
eighteenth century music. Over the past
three decades, the ensemble has brought
Chicago audiences their first, and in some
cases, only performances of many early
masterpieces; among them, Monteverdi’s
L’Orfeo, Telemann’s Day of Judgement,
Mozart’s Idomeneo and numerous Handel
operas and oratorios.
The chorus and orchestra comprise
approximately 60 professional musicians.
Chorus members have active operatic and
recital careers and many perform regularly
both in the United States and abroad.
Many members of the Music of the Baroque orchestra are also members of other
leading ensembles, including the Chicago
Symphony and Lyric Opera orchestras.
I know that my voice has entered into
the hearts of many people and has caused
beautiful reactions. Some, hearing me sing,
have become more religious; some who
were ill felt joy; friends, while in hospital,
played my tapes whenever they felt ill;
they all said that my voice gave them the
strength needed to stand the pain.
— Renata Tebaldi
Programming, Policies, or this Guide: If you have any questions about something you heard on the radio, station policies or this programming guide, call
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Page 2 / Directions in Sound / April 2005
Judy Garland and Arlen
Cover and above Arlen photos courtesy S. A. Music Co. www.HaroldArlen.com
Host Jon Tolansky brings recordings
from her performances and the entire
time-span of her opera, concert and recital
career. Singers such as Marilyn Horne, Evelyn Lear, Carol Neblett, Thomas Steward;
conductor Sir Edward Downes; recording
executives Ernest Gilbert and Christopher
Raeburn; voice coach Maria Cleva and
opera intendant Sir John Tooley offer
remembrances from their experiences with
Tebaldi.
When Renata Tebaldi died in 2004
at the age of 82, Luciano Pavarotti said,
“Farewell, Renata. Your memory and your
voice will be etched on my heart forever.”
Gray Matters:
Learning
Throughout Life
Sunday, April 17, 9 p.m.
Renata Tebaldi as Tosca
Italian soprano Renata Tebaldi was
renowned for her angelic voice. Along
with Maria Callas, she was considered
one of the greatest divas of the post-World
War II era. Her consummate artistry
made her a beloved prima donna at the
Metropolitan Opera, La Scala Opera of
Milan and Lyric Opera of Chicago.
Miss Tebaldi’s rich, flexible, easily
produced sound, wide range and warm
stage presence endeared her to audiences
worldwide. While placid in temperament
and unassuming in dramatic intensity
compared to her fiery Greek-American
rival Maria Callas, many listeners felt the
sheer beauty of her singing more than
compensated for any lack of dramatic
conviction.
For years, opera fans devoured details
of what they perceived as a prima donna
duel between Miss Tebaldi and Maria
Callas. But much of the supposed rivalry
was actually whipped up by the media.
After her retirement, Miss Tebaldi told an
interviewer she had never considered fiery
Callas as a rival.
This program is a tribute to the great
Renata Tebaldi in the words of distinguished musicians and others, who knew
and worked with her.
New brain research affirms that throughout life people can study, read, observe,
and inquire. Education neither begins nor
ends in the classroom, and life is filled
with opportunities for learning.
Learning Throughout Life explores
new brain research across the life span,
from early brain development to lifelong
learning. Nobel laureate Dr. Eric Kandel
and other preeminent brain researchers
probe several
intriguing questions:
Do individuals
learn the same no
matter what their
age? How does
learning throughout
life influence how
one ages? Are there
things we can do to
“rev up” our brain
Dr. Eric Kandel
for learning?
New findings refute the widely held
belief that memory loss is unavoidable
with aging. Research now shows that
one’s mental abilities can be modified, and
there may be ways of intervening—actually changing the ways people alter their
skills and outlooks. And in recent years,
evidence has emerged that challenges the
longstanding belief that humans are born
with all the brain cells or neurons they
will ever have. Join host Garrick Utley for
modern proof of the old saying, “You’re
never too old to learn.”
April 2005 / Directions in Sound / Page 3
Speaking of Faith:
The Future of
Moral Values
Humankind:
Reaching Out to
Troubled Youth
Sunday, April 24, 8 p.m.
Sunday, April 24, 9 p.m.
Speaking of Faith is public radio’s conversation about belief, meaning, ethics, and
ideas. Each program focuses on a different theme, asking writers, thinkers, and
theologians to discuss how religion shapes
everyday life.
The headline of the 2004 presidential race has been written: In a time of
economic uncertainty and international
instability, “moral values” is the most
important issue in the minds of American voters. This program explores moral
values—an idea that confuses and divides
Americans. Political analyst Steven Waldman helps explore what these words do
and do not convey to liberals and conservatives, and why they still matter. What is
at stake when both sides fail to understand
the moral convictions of the other?
Host and
producer Krista
Tippett is a
journalist and
former diplomat
with a Masters
of Divinity from
Yale University.
While at Yale
in the 1990’s,
she worked as
a chaplain to
Krista Tippett
Alzheimer’s
patients, and
was involved in the creation and management of programs for the homeless and
inner-city children in New Haven and
Philadelphia. Before creating Speaking of
Faith, she consulted with a number of organizations, including the internationally
renowned Institute for Ecumenical and
Cultural Research at St. John’s Abbey and
University. She has reported for numerous
news organizations including Time, Newsweek, Die Zeit, and ABC.
Humankind presents the riveting stories
of everyday people who have found real
purpose in life. Living by their principles—
compassion, service, generosity, spirituality, equality, and integrity—they make a
profound difference in the quality of life in
their communities.
Hosted and produced by David Freudberg, Humankind helps listeners examine
some of humanity’s biggest questions and
illuminates the lives of ordinary people
who, by their example, can inspire us all.
In the first half of the program, we follow
Chicago dramatist Meade Palidofsky,
founder of the Music Theatre Workshop.
She uses musical theater as a therapeutic
tool in her work with juvenile offenders,
who write and perform plays while incarcerated. In the process, they see their lives
through a new lens.
Through art, language, and catharsis,
her stage company has transformed bleak
lives and fostered success and a renewed
commitment to life. Listen to young former inmates, their performances, and an
in-depth interview with this woman who is
helping a lost generation.
Page 4 / Directions in Sound / April 2005
Camerata Orchestra
Salutes American
Music
Bill McGlaughlin, Sylvia McNair and
Charles Webb to appear
It will be red, white and Rhapsody in Blue
as the Camerata Orchestra of Bloomington brings together stellar artists for a
concert of all-American composers.
“An American Salute” will be guestconducted by Bill McGlaughlin, host of
Saint Paul Sunday (heard Sundays at noon
on WFIU). Two-time Grammy Awardwinner and IU graduate Sylvia McNair
will perform beloved songs by Harold Arlen, Vernon Duke, and George Gershwin,
and IU School of Music Dean Emeritus
Charles Webb will bring his pianistic
Famed child advocate and National
Book Award-winning author Jonathan
Kozol is profiled in the program’s second
half. He talks about his work among the
impoverished children of a neighborhood
in the South
Bronx that
was served
by dedicated
educators.
Unique,
powerful,
and committed, Kozol
has been a
longtime
defender of
poor children, school
Teaching artist Leah Ignacio (r)
reform, and
works with two participants of the
the power
Music Theatre Workshop.
of young
people in the face of harrowing odds. In
this half-hour, he traces his career from an
angry young man to a seasoned observer
who finds reasons for hope even in adverse
conditions. Still zealous, Kozol prompts
questions every parent will feel deeply,
every listener will want to discuss, and all
of us should ask ourselves:
“How does living in poverty hurt a
child? How can teachers avoid burnout
working with impoverished children? How
does the quality of a child’s education
determine his or her future?”
virtuosity to
Gershwin’s
Rhapsody in Blue.
Rounding out
the program are
beloved pieces by
Bernstein, Barber
and Copland.
WFIU is providing media support
for the concert,
Sylvia McNair
which takes places
in Carmichael Hall at Bloomington High
School South on Sunday, April 3 at 7 p.m.
“I am eagerly looking forward to
performing Gershwin’s Rhapsody in
Blue with the Camerata Orchestra,” said
Charles Webb. “The Rhapsody is an
exciting piece, full of inventive ideas, and
represents Gershwin at his best.”
Founded in 1989 by concertmistress
Lenore Hatfield, the Camerata Orchestra
offers a professional musical setting to IU
faculty, retired faculty, music students and
townspeople. Most of the members are
former principals from major orchestras
here and abroad. The Camerata also commissions and performs works by major
contemporary American composers.
When he’s
not hosting Saint
Paul Sunday guest
conductor Bill
McGlaughlin holds
conducting positions with leading
orchestras and
composes his own
music, which has
been performed by
Bill McGlaughlin
the Camerata.
“I have very fond memories of being
in Bloomington with the Camerata,” says
McGlaughlin. “I’ve never worked with
Sylvia McNair before, having had to content myself with worshipping from afar.
I’m looking forward with anticipation, not
to say glee, at the prospect of collaborating with her.”
The three artists and Lenore Hatfield
chose the music for the concert. “We
wanted a reflection of the American spirit
in the first half of the twentieth century,”
says McGlaughlin, “and tried to represent
the Jazz Age with Rhapsody in Blue. We
added two pieces from the war years,
one whimsical and jazzy—the Bernstein
Interludes from ‘On The Town’ and then
in conclusion, Aaron Copland’s Third
Symphony which celebrates a triumph.
Barber’s Overture to the School for Scandal is a personal favorite of Lenore’s and
fits the program very well.”
This will be the first time that acclaimed lyric soprano Sylvia McNair
will perform with the Camerata. With
the orchestra, McNair will sing George
Gershwin’s “The Man I Love” and “They
Can’t Take That Away From Me.” At
the piano Charles Webb will accompany
Ms. McNair on songs of Cole Porter and
Hoagy Carmichael.
Reflecting on the last time he performed with the Camerata, Charles Webb
said, “I remember my pleasure at performing with the Camerata as a guest organ
soloist several years ago. The orchestra
contains excellent players and plays with
excitement and a real love for the music
that is being performed. We should have a
good time together.”
And so will you! Tickets are available
in advance at O’Malia’s on College Mall
Road, or at the door.
Musical Highlights
for April
by Robert Lumpkin, Music Director
Artist of the Month
WFIU’s Artist of
the Month for April
is wind ensemble
conductor Ray E.
Cramer. Professor
Cramer is president
of the Midwest
Clinic, an international band and
orchestra convention
Ray E. Cramer
with over 14,000
attendees representing 28 countries, and
is president of the American Bandmasters
Association. He is in demand internationally as guest conductor, clinician, and
adjudicator. Join us on WFIU to hear Ray
Cramer leading the IU Wind Ensemble on
a number of occasions this month. We’ll
hear them on Wednesday, April 6 at 7:07
p.m. in a performance of the Divertimento
by Jindrich Feld. On Thursday the 14th
at the same time, Dr. Cramer and the IU
Wind Ensemble return with Blue Shades
composed in 1996 by Frank Ticheli. Tune
in for David Gillingham’s beautiful Be
Thou My Vision on Wednesday, April 20
at 10:12 p.m., and on the Wednesday the
27th, we’ll hear the artists in five of the
Chants d’Auvergne by Joseph Canteloube
featuring soprano Kate Van Eck.
New Releases
Our featured new releases for April
include a new recording entitled Ghosts
by the Terre Haute Philharmonia á Vent
conducted by John Boyd. We’ll be sampling the brand new Klavier release several
times during the month, and on Monday,
April 25 at 7:07 p.m., join us for the title
work on that new CD, Ghosts, by Stephen
McNeff. Tenor Ian Bostridge and pianist
Leif Ove Andsnes have a recent release
from EMI Classics of Schubert’s vocal
masterpiece, Die Winterreise, and we’ll
air that on Wednesday, April 6 at 10:12
p.m. The following Monday, the 11th, at
7:07 p.m., join us for the Symphony No.
3 in C, Op. 52 by Jean Sibelius. That’s
played by the London Symphony Orchestra conducted by Colin Davis on a recent
LSO Live release. Ralph Vaughn Williams’
Symphony No. 4 in f comes your way on
a new Naxos recording on Wednesday the
20th at 10:12 p.m. We’ll hear Paul David
conducting the Bournemouth Symphony
Orchestra. There’s a special treat for our
Stravinsky fans on Wednesday the 27th at
10:12 p.m. From a new Naxos release,
Robert Craft leads the Philharmonia Orchestra and a stellar cast of soloists in the
oratorio/opera, Oedipus Rex.
April 2005 / Directions in Sound / Page 5
The Radio Reader
Community Events
“Night Fall”
by Nelson DeMille
Begins: Friday, April 1
WFIU is the media sponsor for the following events. Find more information on these
and other activities on the calendar page
of our Web site: www.indiana.edu.
with Dick Estell
Based on true events,
but unlike anything
you’ve ever read before,
The New York Times
best-selling author Nelson DeMille has created
what may be his finest
work to date.
DeMille
In the summer of
1996, on a deserted
Long Island beach at dusk, a man and a
woman are frolicking in front of a video
camera. Suddenly a terrible blast lights up
the dark summer sky. TWA Flight 800 has
just exploded in midair with 230 souls on
board, and the video camera has recorded
the last moments of the doomed airliner.
Five years later, the government has
declared the crash a result of mechanical failure. But John Corey, an ex-NYPD
detective who is now a contract agent with
the Federal Anti-Terrorist Task Force, is
persuaded by Kate Mayfield, his wife and
task force partner, that the case deserves a
second look. Kate is aware that some 200
individuals witnessed a strange, missile-like
trail that rose from the ocean and appeared to home in on the airliner seconds
before the fateful explosion. These witnesses are convinced that this missile, not
mechanical failure, was responsible for the
deaths of 230 persons.
“Night Fall” raises questions about
national security, questions with more
resonance today than at any other time in
our history.
Mozart Magic
Saturday, April 2 at 7:30 p.m.
First Christian Church in Columbus
The Columbus Indiana Philharmonic presents Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s elegant
Symphony No. 35 along with the beautiful Franz Joseph Haydn Cello Concerto
performed by Ryan Lannan, who played
in the youth programs and in the Philharmonic while a high school student and an
IU music major. The Columbus Indiana
Children’s Choir and the Columbus
Philharmonic Chorus join forces for Franz
Schubert’s Mass in G plus other choral
works. David Bowden conducts.
Terre Haute Symphony Orchestra
Saturday, April 9 at 7:30 p.m.
Hulman Center
The Terre Haute Symphony Orchestra
under the direction of David Bowden will
celebrate the 60th anniversary of the end
of World War II with Richard Rodgers’
Victory at Sea and other memorable music
from the 40s and 50s, including Music
of the Big Bands. Tenor Neil Jones is the
featured soloist.
Homeward Bound South Central Walk
Third Street Park, Bloomington
Sunday, April 10 at 2 p.m.
Registration starts at noon
Homeward Bound is Indiana’s 5K walk to
fight homelessness and promote affordable
housing. Individuals and teams come together from dozens of companies and community organizations for a day of festivities and an opportunity to raise awareness
and mitigate the effects of homelessness.
The event is sponsored by homeless and
affordable housing service providers that
will host thousands of walkers. The events
have raised more than $83,000 since 2003
and is one of eight walks statewide.
“Arcadia” by Tom Stoppard
April 22-24, 28-30 at 8 p.m., Sunday
matinee at 2 p.m.
This play juxtaposes the members of a 19th
century family in one room in their house
with their descendants in the same room
and house in the present day. Stoppard
contrasts the events of the 19th century
with the modern day attempt to rebuild
and decipher the same occurrences. The
characters force us to take stock of our
concepts of history as they assign motive
and meaning to the evidence that is left to
them. “Arcadia” is about how we formulate and understand ideas.
Passion & Virtuosity
Saturday, April 30 at 7:30 p.m.
Erne Auditorium
Columbus North High School
The final concert of the season for the
Columbus Indiana Philharmonic will have
an international flair. Naoko Ogihara lives
in Europe and her parents, Mr. and Mrs.
Yoshimitsu Ogihara live in Columbus.
Naoko will perform French composer
Edouard Lalo’s Symphonie Espagnole for
Violin and Orchestra and the enchanting
Symphony No. 5 by Tchaikovsky. David
Bowden conducts.
Broadcasts from the
IU School of Music
April 3 – Third House
This hour-long questionand-answer session with
legislators from the Indiana
General Assembly provides
insight into current legislative activities. The featured
legislators represent most of
the WFIU listening area and
answer questions from local residents. Produced in the studios
of WTIU, Third House is simulcast live on that station. If you
have any questions that you would like to submit, send them in
advance to [email protected] or call 812-855-2102 or 800-5537893.
April 10 – Glen Gass Part 1
April 17 – Glen Gass Part 2
IU music professor Glenn Gass was
among the first to offer classes on the
history of rock ’n roll in a music school
or conservatory. He also teaches a
survey course on the history of Western classical music and takes groups of
students to London for a course on The
Beatles. His musical works have been
performed internationally, and he is the
author of the Random House textbook
“A History of Rock Music,” a book
he once described as “a text that takes
the music seriously, not a glossy type
of thing about rock stars.” He spoke
with WFIU’s David Brent Johnson. This
interview is broadcast in two one-hour
segments. (repeat)
WELCHER—Zion; Stephen Pratt/IU Wind
Ens. (Airs: 4/1/ at 3 p.m.)
April 24 – Gary Snyder
BRITTEN—Hymn to St. Cecilia, Op. 27;
John Poole/Pro Arte Singers (Airs: 4/4 at 7
p.m., 4/5 at 10 a.m., 4/8 ar 3 p.m.)
Poet, scholar, and environmental activist, Gary Snyder has published eighteen
collections of poetry including the
Pulitzer Prize-winning “Turtle Island.”
Synthesizing a master’s command of
words with influences from Zen Buddhism and Asian languages, Snyder
brings poetry, ecology, and public policy
into harmony. As a tireless activist as
well as beloved poet, Snyder has been
called the Thoreau of his generation
and “a poet of wildness” by his peers.
His other works include the National
Book Award finalist “No Nature,” “A
Place in Space: Ethics, Aesthetics, and
Watersheds,” and “Mountains and Rivers Without End.” He was interviewed
in San Francisco for City Arts and Lectures by A Prairie Home Companion’s
Garrison Keillor.
MOZART—Rondo in a, K. 511; Jonathan
Biss, p. (Airs: 4/11 at 7 p.m., 4/12 at 10
a.m., 4/15 at 3 p.m.)
HANDEL—Praise of Harmony; Stanley
Ritchie/IU Baroque Orch.; Pro Arte Singers
(dir., John Poole) (Airs: 4/18 at 7 p.m.,
4/19 at 10 a.m., 4/22 at 3 p.m.)
BARTOK—Violin Sonata No. 1; Miriam
Fried, vln.; Jonathan Biss, p. (Airs: 4/20 at
10 p.m.)
BRAHMS—Violin Sonata No. 2 in A, Op.
100; Federico Agostini, vln.; Reiko Neriki,
p. (Airs: 4/25 at 7 p.m., 4/26 at 10 a.m.)
Page 6 / Directions in Sound / April 2005
Profiles
Peter Noble-Kuchera
at the Movies
WFIU’s new movie reviewer Peter
Noble-Kuchera is both a creator
and a connoisseur of movies.
He sold a science-fiction screenplay when he lived in Los Angeles,
and he is now writing a script that
is slated for production in Bloomington this summer.
Peter has also studied film criticism in IU’s Communication and
Culture department. His approach
to movie reviewing is to be “wide
open” to the experience. “I try to
pay attention to what the movie
Peter Noble-Kuchera
did to me, and how it did it, and
be honest to that.”
Peter sees this as a time of transition for the century-old art
form.
“Right now, film is being phased out of the mainstream, and
digital photography and CGI are moving in,” he says. “A medium you could touch with your hands is being traded for a more
mediated one. What a painful and exciting time to be writing
about movies.”
A peak experience for Noble-Kuchera was watching movies at
a huge Cinerama theater in Minneapolis.
“The Cooper Theatre had a screen 106 feet wide and 36 feet
tall. That was the greatest place to see a movie. That’s where I
saw ‘2001: A Space Odyssey.’ Thus Spake Zarathustra played as
the sun rose over the Earth—far out, man!”
Peter has also held the job of projectionist. He recalls an incident this is every projectionist’s nightmare.
“I was test screening a print of ‘The Fugitive,’ just before
opening night. When I returned to the projection booth, I discovered that the center hub of the reel had popped out. The film
had flown off the platter and shot everywhere, literally filling the
room like the spaghetti in the children’s book ‘Strega Nona.’ So
a friend and I led the film out of the projection booth, down the
stairs, out the door, and around the parking lot, and rolled it up
again. It was printed on some kind of superfilm; it simply would
not break.”
Peter has happier memories from behind the camera. Like the
lucky break he got when shooting a scene that called for a gathering storm.
“I spent everything I had on a single all-night shoot. We were
shooting outside, on the street. As the camera rolled, a deluge
came. The world itself became a movie, and we were all in it.”
Peter Noble-Kuchera’s reviews can be heard Tuesdays at 10:06
a.m. and 3:10 p.m. and on Fridays at 9:03 a.m. and 11:06 a.m. If
you miss a broadcast, you can read it on our Web site: www.wfiu.
indiana.edu. Click on the Arts & Culture tab, then in the Reviews
& Interviews box click on Movie Reviews by Peter NobleKuchera.
April 2005 / Directions in Sound / Page 7
Schickele Mixes
with Bloomington
Audience
Local residents got a chance to meet with
Professor Peter Schickele after he gave a
concert at the IU Auditorium in February.
The Schickele Mix host was in town for
his “P.D.Q. Bach and Peter Schickele: The
Jekyll and Hyde Tour.” (Schickele Mix is
heard on WFIU Sundays at 1 p.m.) The
concert featured music by Schickele and his
alter-ego, P.D.Q. Bach, Johann Sebastian’s
last and least offspring, who Schickele “discovered” in the 1950s. The concert was the
culminating event of the 2005 Bloomington
Area Arts Council’s Arts Week.
“Jekyll and Hyde” title refers to the
“good” and “evil” parts of the concert
program. The “Hyde” pieces included such
P.D.Q. Bach classics as the recently discovered Four Next-to-Last Songs and Shepherd
on the Rocks, With a Twist.
The “Jekyll” part of the program featured songs and rounds by Peter Schickele,
including the hilarious Shakespeare Song—
rock ‘n’ roll settings of famous Shakespeare
speeches.
Pam Davidson of Bloomington described
the concert as “So funky funny, so off the
wall.”
“The guy behind me had this infectious
laugh and we were all on the floor laughing.”
Karina Avanesian, a graduate student in
the piano program at the School of Music,
joined her husband Tony in calling the concert “really funny!”
For some audience members, it was a
chance to re-meet Schickele after a long
absence. Pianist Edward Auer had seen
Schickele the last time he was in Bloomington. David Jensen, who attended the concert
with his wife, harpsichordist Janet Scott,
knew Schickele from his childhood.
“We grew up together in Fargo,” Jensen
said. “Peter’s father was an agricultural
professor at the North Dakota Agricultural
College. In the mid-fifties, Peter and his
brother spent Christmases with us. We’d
have impromptu concerts.
“I first heard Peter perform the ‘Shakespeare Song’ fifty years ago. Of course it
wasn’t as polished back then.”
Jensen, who works in the School of
Music’s piano shop where he is charge of
tuning, maintaining and rebuilding instruments, offered that the evening’s concert was
“Wonderful! Peter’s performances are always
wonderful.”
Page 8 / Directions in Sound / April 2005
Peter Schickele signs programs for
Michael McRobbie’s son and daughter
Schickele’s SemiSerious Side
There’s another side to Peter Schickele
besides the zany, rumpled professor who
will do anything for a musical laugh.
Schickele is also an accomplished composer of more than 100 pieces for orchestra, chorus, chamber ensemble, voice, film
and television.
After greeting audience members from
his recent IU Auditorium concert, the composer relaxed over a chicken dinner and
had a chance to reflect on musical matters.
Schickele spends about half the year
composing classical music at his home
in Woodstock, New York. But when he’s
touring, he has a hard time finding time to
compose.
“On the road it’s very uneven,” he
said. “As I get older, I try not to have
composing deadlines when I’m traveling. It’s more important to take a nap. At
least that’s what I try to do—I’m not very
disciplined!” He’s currently working on a
viola concerto that will be premiered by
the Pasadena [California] Symphony.
His IU concert featured some rather
off-the-wall rounds.
“I like rounds, they’re fun. They are
not inherently a public performance art.
They’re really made for the people singing them, so I work out little endings for
them.”
At one point in the concert, Schickele
and tenor David Düsing sang a song in
“retrograde inversion.” Standing across
from each other, they simultaneously sang
from opposite sides of the same sheet of
music.
“Writing those pieces takes me right
out to the edge of my intellectual capacity,” Schickele said, laughing. “I can barely
keep track of what’s going on.”
He’s used similar tricks in other pieces.
“I wrote one once for violin and French
horn. Which means that even though it’s
in treble clef, the French horn is a transposing instrument—it sounds a fifth down
from what it’s written. So you get another
relationship in that case. It’s fascinating!”
He adds with a laugh, “But tiring.”
When asked what kind of music he
listens to for pleasure, Schickele was
stumped.
“I don’t know how to answer that.
Somehow I listen technically and emotionally at the same time. Though I don’t do
it consciously, I try to picture or imagine
what the notes actually are.”
Shifting the topic somewhat, he mused,
“I find that composers often don’t like
to talk about non-musical inspirations in
their works because a lot of listeners exaggerate that. Thinking that a symphony is
telling story, just like a novel. It usually
isn’t.”
“I often get extra-musical associations
after I’ve written it. A movement in one
of my string quartets is called “Bugs”
because after I wrote it, it reminded me of
bugs scurrying. Even Robert Schumann
said that of a lot of his pieces—that the
evocative titles came after the piece was
written.”
Summing up, he said, “The trouble
with talking about music is that if you can
really say what it’s about in words, there’s
no point in writing the piece. A lot of poets say that. ‘What does this poem mean?
Well, if I could tell you, I would’ve written
it with prose.’”
Terre Haute Says
“Bravo!” to Arts
Advocates
George Walker was emcee at the 20042005 “Bravo!” Awards ceremony in Terre
Haute, which recognized the achievements
of arts advocates in the Wabash Valley.
Mayor Kevin Burke presented the awards
to individuals, organizations, and businesses whose efforts on behalf of the arts
have made a substantial contribution.
The winners included arts educators,
volunteers, youth service providers, professionals and patrons.
The awards were sponsored by Arts Illiana, the arts council for the Wabash Valley. Executive Director Jon Robeson said
the events served to recognize the wealth
of artistic talent in the community.
“We just want to celebrate the jewels
that we have here among us,” he told the
Tribune-Star. “It’s the time of year when
we can step back and celebrate . . . the
people who have dedicated their lives to
their craft.”
This year’s “Bravo!” Award winners
included Terre Haute South Vigo High
School art teacher Rod Bradfield, Terre
Haute City Councilman Todd Nation, and
Terre Haute North High School student
Jenna Sagraves. Chairman of Indiana
State University’s art department and
Arts Illiana Dele Jegede assisted with the
awards ceremony.
George Walker praised Terre Haute
Mayor Kevin Burke as, “an eloquent
spokesman, a good storyteller and a bit of
a stand up comedian.”
“I had the honor of reading the pieces
to a very warm friendly audience of arts
supporters,” George added. “The youngest award winner was a high school student dancer, and the oldest was one of the
founders of the Covered Bridge Society.”
NPR Purge Shocks
Listeners
WASHINGTON, D.C., April 1 – In a
move that sent shocks throughout the
public radio community, National Public
Radio announced the firings of several top
personalities at a press conference today.
The announcements were made by NPR’s
aggressive new marketing executive,
Edward Cahn, Jr. He said that Morning
Edition host Steve Inskeep will be replaced
by “shock jock” Howard Stern.
“We believe that Howard will bring
a new perspective to the program,” Mr.
Cahn said.
Explaining the firing of Morning Edition co-host Renee Montagne, Mr. Cahn
explained, “We love Renee, but she’s a bit
cerebral.” He introduced her replacement,
celebrity Paris Hilton.
“I know some listeners will object to
these changes,” Mr. Cahn commented,
“but new ideas are always attacked at
first.”
Former Fresh Air host Terry Gross is
reputed to have suffered a breakdown
after learning of her replacement by talk
show host Rush Limbaugh.
Two other victims of the purge, Car
Talk’s Tom and Ray Magliozzi, have
refused to yield their microphones to their
replacements, Mary-Kate and Ashley
Olsen.
According to industry insiders, replacements for non-NPR program hosts are also
expected. Under consideration to replace
Hearts of Space host Stephen Hill are
Robin Williams and George Carlin.
Continued on page 10
Special attractions honoring the
WFIU MemberCard include the
following benefits of the month. For
a complete listing of the more than
280 membership benefits, including
many businesses new to the MemberCard in the greater Indianapolis
area, visit membercard.com. Or call
toll-free 1-888-727-4411 for the
most recent updates.
Benefits of the Month:
Marengo Cave
360 East State Road 64
Marengo
812-365-2705
www.cavecountrycanoes.com
Valid for two-for-one admission
to any single tour or combo tour
throughout the month.
Indianapolis Chamber Orchestra
Indiana History Center
450 West Ohio Street
Indianapolis
317-940-9607
www.icomusic.org
Valid for two-for-one admission to
the “Beethoven!” concert April 29,
8 p.m. or April 30, 5:30 p.m. You
must show your MemberCard when
picking up your tickets. Subject to
availability.
Participant changes:
Gib & Denzils Restaurant
2130 South Walnut Street
Bloomington
Closed
Robin Williams
Schickele
MemberCard
George Carlin
Zamberletti Restaurant
1429 South 25th Street
Terre Haute
Offer expired
To receive an updated Membership
Benefits Directory, or to replace
a lost one, call the Membership
Department at 800-662-3311 or
812-855-6114.
April 2005 / Directions in Sound / Page 9
Weekday
Saturday
12:01 AM NPR NEWS
12:06 AM CLASSICAL MUSIC OVERNIGHT
5:00 AM BBC WORLD SERVICE
6:00 AM MORNING EDITION
NPR’s award-winning news program, with
local and state news at 6:06, 7:06, and 8:06.
8:50 AM MARKETPLACE
A daily rundown of financial news from Public Radio International. Followed by Indiana
Business News.
9:04 AM SPEAK YOUR MIND
(On selected days.)
9:00 AM CLASSICAL MUSIC WITH
GEORGE WALKER
Featuring new releases and recordings from
the WFIU library. (See daily listings for
program highlights.)
9:03 AM MOVIE REVIEW (Friday)
10:01 AM BBC NEWS
10:06 AM CLASSICAL MUSIC WITH
GEORGE WALKER (con’t.)
MOVIE REVIEW (Tuesday)
10:58 AM A MOMENT OF SCIENCE
11:01 AM NPR NEWS
11:05 AM CLASSICAL MUSIC WITH
GEORGE WALKER (con’t.)
11:06 AM MOVIE REVIEW (Friday)
11:26 AM A MOMENT OF INDIANA
HISTORY (Mondays)
11:27 AM RADIO READER
11:55 AM STARDATE
11:56 AM SPEAK YOUR MIND
(On selected days.)
12:01 PM NPR & LOCAL NEWS
12:06 PM FRESH AIR
(ASK THE MAYOR airs every Wednesday;
NOON EDITION airs every Friday.)
1:00 PM PERFORMANCE TODAY
2:01 PM NPR NEWS
2:00 PM ADVENTURES IN GOOD MUSIC
3:01 PM NPR AND LOCAL NEWS
3:08 PM CLASSICAL MUSIC WITH
GEORGE WALKER (con’t.)
3:10 PM MOVIE REVIEW (Tuesday)
3:25 PM COMPOSERS DATEBOOK
(Monday to Wednesday)
3:25 PM FOCUS ON FLOWERS
(Thursday and Friday)
3:30 PM JUST YOU AND ME
WITH JOE BOURNE
4:55 PM A MOMENT OF SCIENCE
5:00 PM ALL THINGS CONSIDERED
News coverage and commentary from
National Public Radio, with local and state
news at 5:04 and 5:33.
6:30 PM MARKETPLACE
(Followed by Indiana Business News)
7:00 PM A CONGRESSIONAL MOMENT
(Fridays)
7:01 PM THE WRITER’S ALMANAC
7:06 PM EVENING CLASSICAL MUSIC
(FRESH AIR on Fridays.)
7:58 PM A MOMENT OF INDIANA
HISTORY (Wednesdays)
8:02 PM A MOMENT OF INDIANA
HISTORY (Fridays)
9:00 PM THE BIG BANDS (Fridays)
10:01 PM BBC & LOCAL NEWS
10:08 PM STARDATE
10:09 PM AFTERGLOW (Fridays)
See program grid on back cover, and daily listings, for details of weeknight programming.
12:00 AM CLASSICAL MUSIC OVERNIGHT
7:01 AM NPR & LOCAL NEWS
7:07 AM FOCUS ON FLOWERS
7:47 AM SATURDAY FEATURE/RADIO
PUBLIC
8:00 AM WEEKEND EDITION
10:00 AM CAR TALK
11:00 AM SAYS YOU!
11:30 AM TALKING HISTORY
(Start time may be affected by opera start
time.)
12:01 PM NPR & LOCAL NEWS
(Start time may be affected by opera start
time.)
12:06 PM STARDATE
(Start time may be affected by opera start
time.)
12:08 PM CLASSICAL MUSIC
(Start time may be affected by opera start
time.)
12:30 PM METROPOLITAN OPERA
(Start times may vary.)
4:00 PM ALL THINGS CONSIDERED
(Start time may be delayed by opera.)
5:00 PM GARRISON KEILLOR’S
A PRAIRIE HOME COMPANION
7:00 PM HOMETOWN
WITH TOM ROZNOWSKI
7:05 PM THE FOLK SAMPLER
8:05 PM THE THISTLE AND SHAMROCK
9:09 PM AFROPOP WORLDWIDE
10:00 PM PORTRAITS IN BLUE
11:05 PM NEWS
11:07 PM STARDATE
11:09 PM NIGHT LIGHTS
Page 10 / Directions in Sound / April 2005
Sunday
12:00 AM CLASSICAL MUSIC OVERNIGHT
7:01 AM NPR & LOCAL NEWS
7:07 AM FOCUS ON FLOWERS
7:55 PM A CONGRESSIONAL MOMENT
(Fridays)
8:00 AM WEEKEND EDITION
10:00 AM THIS AMERICAN LIFE
11:00 AM LIVING ON EARTH
11:23 AM EARTHNOTE
11:25 AM CLASSICAL MUSIC
11:46 AM THE POETS WEAVE
11:52 AM STARDATE
11:55 AM LOCAL NEWS
12:00 PM SAINT PAUL SUNDAY
1:00 PM SCHICKELE MIX
2:00 PM BROADWAY REVISITED
3:00 PM WEEKEND RADIO
3:57 PM EARTHNOTE
4:00 PM COMPACT DISCOVERIES
5:01 PM ALL THINGS CONSIDERED
6:01 PM NPR NEWS
6:06 PM SOUND MEDICINE
7:00 PM PROFILES
8:00 PM SPECIALS (See detailed listings.)
10:01 PM NPR & LOCAL NEWS
10:05 PM STARDATE
10:08 PM MUSIC FROM THE HEARTS OF
SPACE
11:08 PM LATE NIGHT MUSIC
NPR Purge Shocks
Listeners
Continued from page 9
April Fools! Relax, dear reader, NPR isn’t
replacing anyone. This article is only our
April Fool’s joke, and we hope it gave you
a chuckle. It’s our way of thanking you
for your support, which means the world
to us and keeps public radio running. And
we ain’t fooling!
Key to abbreviations.
b., bass; bar., baritone; bssn., bassoon; c.,
contralto; cl., clarinet; cond., conductor; cont.,
continuo; ct., countertenor; db., double bass;
ch., chamber; E.hn., English horn; ens., ensemble; fl., flute; gt., guitar; hn., horn; hp., harp;
hpsd., harpsichord; intro., introduction; instr.,
instrument; kbd., keyboard; ms., mezzo-soprano; ob., oboe; orch., orchestra; org., organ;
Phil., Philharmonic; p., piano; perc., percussion;
qt., quartet; rec., recorder; sax., saxophone; s.,
soprano; str., string; sym., symphony; t., tenor;
tb., trombone; timp., timpani; tpt., trumpet;
trans., transcribed; var., variations; vla., viola;
vlc., violoncello; vln., violin. Upper case letters
indicate major keys; lower case letters indicate
minor keys.
2 Saturday
3 Sunday
10:00 AM CAR TALK
With hosts Tom and Ray Magliozzi
11:00 AM SAYS YOU!
With host Richard Sher
11:30 AM TALKING HISTORY
Fred Nielsen discusses the American
constitution with Carol Berkin, professor
of history at Baruch College and the City
University of New York. Tracy Campbell
comments on election irregularities.
12:09 PM CLASSICAL MUSIC
STRAVINSKY—Scherzo à la Russe; Michael
Gielen/SWR Sym. Orch. Baden-Baden &
Freiburg
HANDEL—Concerto grosso in c, Op. 6,
No. 8 HWV 326; Stanley Ritchie, vln.;
Linda Quan, vln.; Myron Lutzke, vlc.;
Christopher Hogwood/ Handel & Haydn
Society
12:30 PM METROPOLITAN OPERA
STRAUSS, R.—Der Rosenkavalier
Donald Runnicles, cond.; Angela Denoke
(Marschallin), Susan Graham (Octavian),
Laura Aikin (Sophie), Matthew Polenzani
(Italian Singer), Hakan Hagegard (Faninal),
Peter Rose (Baron Ochs)
12:00 AM PORTRAITS IN BLUE
Muddy Waters: The Last Years, Vol. 1,
1970s Chicago Blues
1 Friday
9:05 AM CLASSICAL MUSIC WITH
GEORGE WALKER
9am MENDELSSOHN—A MIDSUMMER
NIGHT’S DREAM: Overture; Yoel Levi/
Atlanta Sym.
10am CHOPIN—Ballade No. 3 in A-flat,
Op. 47; Stephen Hough, p.
11am STRAUSS, R.—DER
ROSENKAVALIER, OP. 59: Waltzes; Fritz
Reiner/Chicago Sym.
3pm WELCHER—Zion; Stephen Pratt/IU
Wind Ens.
8:00 PM MARIAN McPARTLAND’S
PIANO JAZZ
Jane Jarvis
9:00 PM THE BIG BANDS
“Duke Ellington
Treasury Shows,
Pt. 1”
The Ellington
band’s live
broadcasts in
April 1945 for
the U.S. Treasury
Department’s war
bond drive.
10:09 PM
AFTERGLOW
Duke
With host Joe
Bourne
Susan Graham
6:00 PM GARRISON KEILLOR’S
A PRAIRIE HOME COMPANION
A live broadcast from Town Hall in New
York City.
8:00 PM HOMETOWN
WITH TOM ROZNOWSKI
“A Distant Postmark”
8:05 PM THE FOLK SAMPLER
“Decisions”
9:05 PM THE THISTLE AND SHAMROCK
“Jim Malcolm”
For over a decade, vocalist Jim Malcolm,
with Old Blind Dogs, has played an active
part in the Scottish music scene.
10:07 PM AFROPOP WORLDWIDE
With host Georges Collinet
11:00 PM NIGHT LIGHTS
“The Art of Pepper”
Alto saxophonist Art Pepper’s mid-1950s
recordings.
Muddy Waters
10:00 AM THIS AMERICAN LIFE
With host Ira Glass
11:00 AM LIVING ON EARTH
With host Steve Curwood
11:25 AM CLASSICAL MUSIC
LAURIDSEN—Ubi caritas et amor; Stephen
Layton/Polyphony
DEBUSSY—Cello Sonata; Tsuyoshi
Tsutsumi, vlc.; Ronald Turini, p.
11:47 AM THE POETS WEAVE
With host Jenny Kander
12:00 PM SAINT PAUL SUNDAY
Borromeo Str. Qt.
HAYDN—STRING QUARTET IN E-FLAT,
OP. 64, NO. 6, HOB. III:64: IV. Finale:
Presto
BRAHMS—STRING QUARTET IN A , OP.
51, NO. 2: Andante Moderato
JANACEK—String Quartet No. 2 “Intimate
Letters”
1:00 PM SCHICKELE MIX
“Accordion Hits the Big Time!”
2:00 PM BROADWAY REVISITED
“Spring Is Here”
3:00 PM WEEKEND RADIO
Art is the topic with The Second City’s
“Museum Piece,” Peter Cook and Dudley
Moore’s “Art Gallery,” Stan Freberg’s “Pop
Art Interview” and Tom Paxton’s “Talking
Pop Art.”
4:00 PM COMPACT DISCOVERIES
“Duke Ellington”
Duke Ellington’s jazz interpretation of
Tchaikovsky’s “Nutcracker Suite” and
Grieg’s “Peer Gynt Suite No. 1” is interposed
with the originals.
6:00 PM SOUND MEDICINE
Host Barbara Lewis West interviews
physicians from the Indiana University
School of Medicine on this program from
WFYI Public Radio.
7:00 PM THIRD HOUSE
A discussion of issues before the legislature
(simulcast of the program seen at 7:00 p.m.
on WTIU television).
8:00 PM MUSIC OF THE BAROQUE
“Bach’s B Minor Mass”
Jane Glover conducts the Chicago early
music ensemble in Bach’s masterpiece. We’ll
also hear soprano Nathalie Paulin, mezzosoprano Phyllis Pancella, tenor Frank Kelly
and baritone James Maddalena.
10:05 PM MUSIC FROM THE HEARTS OF
SPACE
With host Stephen Hill
11:08 PM LATE NIGHT MUSIC
SCHOCKER—Nymphs; Honors Flute Ens.
BENNETT, RICH. R.—Morning Music;
John Boyd/Philharmonia à Vent
BANFIELD—Symphony No. 6 “Four Songs
for Five American Voices”; Jack Schantz,
tpt.; John English, tpt.; Alan Balter/Akron
Sym. Orch.
4 Monday
9:05 AM CLASSICAL MUSIC WITH
GEORGE WALKER
9am BRAHMS—VARIATIONS ON A
THEME BY HAYDN, OP. 56B: Theme and
Finale; Murray Perahia, p.; Georg Solti, p.
10am VILLA-LOBOS—Guitar Concerto;
Sharon Isbin, gt.; José Serebrier/New York
Phil.
Sharon Isbin
11am GLAZUNOV—SEASONS, OP. 67:
No. 1, “Winter”; José Serebrier/Royal
Scottish Natl.Orch.
3pm HOLST—Capriccio; John Boyd/
Philharmonia à Vent
7:06 PM EVENING CLASSICAL MUSIC
COPLAND—Short Symphony (Symphony
No. 2); Leonard Slatkin/Saint Louis Sym.
Orch.
MOZART—Concerto No. 10 in E-flat for
Two Pianos, K. 365; Murray Perahia, p.;
Radu Lupu, p.; English Ch. Orch.
BRITTEN—Hymn to St. Cecilia, Op. 27;
John Poole/Pro Arte Singers
8:00 PM LIVE! AT THE
CONCERTGEBOUW
Alexander Melnikov, p.; Vassily Sinaisky/
Royal Concertgebouw Orch.
RACHMANINOFF—Piano Concerto No. 1
in f-sharp, Op. 1
TCHAIKOVSKY—Manfred Symphony, Op.
58
April 2005 / Directions in Sound / Page 11
10:09 PM PIPEDREAMS
“Pro Organist!”
A conversation with recitalist and
recording engineer/producer Fred Hohman,
who introduces performances from his
enterprising CD/video label Pro Organo.
5 Tuesday
9:05 AM CLASSICAL MUSIC WITH
GEORGE WALKER
9am CRESTON—Janus, Op. 77; David
Alan Miller/Albany Sym. Orch.
10am BRITTEN—Hymn to St. Cecilia, Op.
27; John Poole/Pro Arte Singers
11am GLAZUNOV—SEASONS, OP.
67: No. 2, “Spring”; José Serebrier/Royal
Scottish Natl. Orch.
3pm MOZART—Fantasia in f, K. 608;
Murray Perahia, p.; Radu Lupu, p.
Radu Lupu
7:05 PM FROM THE TOP
From the Top presents its first ever “All
Composers Show.” Today’s special
highlights episode features some of the best
original music heard on the show—written
and performed by kids from 11 to 18 years
old.
8:05 PM ETHER GAME
“Sweet Will”
The great bard was born in April and he
died in April, so the Ether Game Brain Trust
is taking this opportunity to make much ado
about music influenced by the poetry and
plays of Shakespeare.
10:09 PM THE VOCAL SCENE WITH
GEORGE JELLINEK
“Voices of Spring”
11:08 PM LATE NIGHT MUSIC
FASCH—Concerto in D for Trumpet,
Two Oboes, Strings and Continuo; George
Vosburgh, tpt.; Arnie Roth/Czech Phil. Ch.
Orch.
CHOPIN—Cello Sonata in g, Op. 65; Janos
Starker, vlc.; György Sebok, p.
BRITTEN—Simple Symphony, Op. 4;
Steuart Bedford/Northern Sinfonia
Page 12 / Directions in Sound / April 2005
6 Wednesday
9:05 AM CLASSICAL MUSIC WITH
GEORGE WALKER
9am LAURIDSEN—Ave Maria; Stephen
Layton/Polyphony
10am MOZART—Concerto No. 10 in E-flat
for Two Pianos, K. 365; Murray Perahia, p.;
Radu Lupu, p.; English Ch. Orch.
11am GLAZUNOV—SEASONS, OP. 67:
No. 3, “Summer”; José Serebrier/Royal
Scottish Natl. Orch.
7:06 PM EVENING CLASSICAL MUSIC
BEETHOVEN—Variations in E-flat on an
Original Theme, Op. 44; Castle Trio
OFFENBACH—Concerto militaire in G for
Cello and Orchestra; Guido Schiefen, vlc.;
Helmuth Froschauer/West German Radio
Sym. Orch.
FELD—Divertimento; Ray E. Cramer/IU
Wind Ens.
8:00 PM NEW YORK PHILHARMONIC
Neville Marriner, cond.; Susan Gritton, s.;
Patricia Risley, ms.; Women of the New
York Choral Artists, Joseph Flummerfelt,
director; actors to be announced, Edward
Berkeley, stage director
MENDELSSOHN/SHAKESPEARE—A
Midsummer Night’s Dream (complete
incidental music combined with Edward
Berkeley’s adaptation for a full cast of actors)
10:12 PM LATE NIGHT MUSIC
BACH—Fantasia and Fugue in a, BWV 944;
Angela Hewitt, p.
SCHUBERT—Winterreise, D. 911; Ian
Bostridge, t.; Leif Ove Andsnes, p.
MOZART—Piano Concerto No. 19 in F,
K. 459; John O’Conor, p.; Gerard Schwarz/
Scottish Ch. Orch.
7 Thursday
9:05 AM CLASSICAL MUSIC WITH
GEORGE WALKER
9am REICHA—Wind Quintet in C, Op. 91,
No. 1; Michael Thompson Wind Qnt.
10am HANDEL—Ode for the Birthday
of Queen Anne, HWV 74; Susan Gritton,
s.; Robin Blaze, ct.; Michael George, b.;
Stephen Cleobury/Acad. of Ancient Music/
Choir of King’s College, Cambridge
11am GLAZUNOV—SEASONS, OP. 67:
No. 4, “Autumn”; José Serebrier/Royal
Scottish Natl. Orch.
3pm TURINA—Tres Danzas Andaluzas
[Three Andaluzian Dances], Op. 8; Jordi
Masó, p.
7:06 PM EVENING CLASSICAL MUSIC
PUCCINI—TOSCA: “Recondita armonia,”
and “E lucevan le stelle”; José Cura, t.;
Plácido Domingo/Philharmonia Orch.
CHOPIN—Rondo in C, Op. 73; Frederic
Chiu, p.
GLAZUNOV—Symphony No. 5 in B-flat,
Op. 55; José Serebrier/Royal Scottish Natl.
Orch.
8:00 PM CENTER STAGE FROM WOLF
TRAP
Stephen Hough, p.; Australian Ch. Orch.;
Eugenie McAllister, fl.; Frederick Koch, p.;
Meagan Miller, s.; Kim Pensinger Witman, p.
MOZART—Piano Concerto No. 9 in E-flat,
K. 271 “Jeunehomme”
KOCH—Three Soliloquies
BEASER—Four Dickinson Songs
9:00 PM HARMONIA
“Heinrich Scheidemann/Cleveland Johnson”
Our guest tonight is organist and
musicologist Cleveland Johnson, playing
music from his recent recordings of the
complete works of 17th century German
composer Heinrich Scheidemann. We’ll
also sample the 16th century Siena Lute
Book from a new CD by lutenist Jacob
Heringman.
10:09 PM INDIANAPOLIS SYMPHONY
ORCHESTRA
William Henry Curry, cond.; Roger Roe,
eng. hn.
WHITFIELD—Scherzo No.2 in e
SIBELIUS—LEMMINKAINEN SUITE, OP.
22: The Swan of Tuonela
SIBELIUS—LEMMINKAINEN SUITE, OP.
22L: Lemminkainen’s Return
TCHAIKOVSKY—Francesca da Rimini,
Op.32
8 Friday
9:05 AM CLASSICAL MUSIC WITH
GEORGE WALKER
9am BRITTEN—Suite on English Folk
Tunes ‘A Time There Was,’ Op. 90; Bradley
Creswick/Northern Sinfonia
10am OFFENBACH—Concerto militaire in
G for Cello and Orchestra; Guido Schiefen,
vlc.; Helmuth Froschauer/West German
Radio Sym. Orch.
11am PUCCINI—Tosca Fantasy (arr.
Hermann); Eugene Rousseau, sax.; Frederick
Fennell/Winds of Indiana
3pm BRITTEN—Hymn to St. Cecilia, Op.
27; John Poole/Pro Arte Singers
8:00 PM MARIAN McPARTLAND’S
PIANO JAZZ
Loren Schoenberg
9:00 PM THE BIG BANDS
“Big Band Jukebox”
A monthly look at hits (and obscurities)
from the big bands in the 1930-1955 era.
10:09 PM AFTERGLOW
With host Joe Bourne
with the soul of a church.” Anna Rubin
comments on the history of polio, Jonas
Salk’s vaccine and an upcoming exhibition
at the Smithsonian.
12:09 PM CLASSICAL MUSIC
BEETHOVEN—Menuet in E-flat, WoO 82;
Olli Mustonen, p.
SCHICKELE—Dances for Three; Trio
Indiana
12:30 PM METROPOLITAN OPERA
PUCCINI—Tosca
James Conlon, cond.; Maria Guleghina
(Tosca), Salvatore Licitra (Cavaradossi),
Mark Delavan (Scarpia)
Maria Guleghina
5:00 PM GARRISON KEILLOR’S
A PRAIRIE HOME COMPANION
A live broadcast from New York, NY at
Town Hall.
7:00 PM HOMETOWN
WITH TOM ROZNOWSKI
“Gift From The Rajah”
7:05 PM THE FOLK SAMPLER
With host Mike Flynn
8:05 PM THE THISTLE AND SHAMROCK
“Lowlands”
From Stirling Castle’s rock, to the shipyards
on the banks of the Clyde, the Scottish
Lowlands have always been a hive of human
activity. We’ll take a walk through time in
the Lowlands with music from Archie Fisher,
Dick Gaughan, Deaf Shepherd, and others.
9:05 PM AFROPOP WORLDWIDE
With host Georges Collinet
10:07 PM PORTRAITS IN BLUE
John Lee Hooker, Vol. 7, 1950s Detroit Blue
John Lee Hooker
9 Saturday
10:00 AM CAR TALK
With hosts Tom and Ray Magliozzi
11:00 AM SAYS YOU!
With host Richard Sher
11:30 AM TALKING HISTORY
Host Bryan Le Beau and James Morone
discuss how “America became a nation
11:00 PM NIGHT LIGHTS
“Let’s Spring One”
Seasonal jazz odes from June Christy,
Thelonious Monk, Red Norvo, and others.
10 Sunday
11 Monday
10:00 AM THIS AMERICAN LIFE
With host Ira Glass
11:00 AM LIVING ON EARTH
With host Steve Curwood
11:25 AM CLASSICAL MUSIC
LISZT—ANNEES DE PELERINAGE,
DEUXIEME ANNEE: No. 6 “Sonetto 123
del Petrarca”; Frederic Chiu, p.
BRITTEN—Canticle III: Still Falls the Rain,
Op. 55; Philip Langridge, t.; Frank Lloyd,
hn.; Steuart Bedford, p.
11:47 AM THE POETS WEAVE
With host Jenny Kander
12:00 PM SAINT PAUL SUNDAY
Seattle Ch. Players; Karen Bentley Pollick,
vla.; Byron Schenkman, hpsd.;
Michael Partington, gt.; Karen P. Thomas/
Seattle Pro Musica
NARBUTAITE—Winter Serenade
TULVE—Island
TUUR—Architectonics VII
MAGI—A Tre
VASKS—Plainscapes
1:00 PM SCHICKELE MIX
“Schickele Mix Sports Radio”
2:00 PM BROADWAY REVISITED
“‘The Girl Friend’ meets ‘The Boy Friend’”
3:00 PM WEEKEND RADIO
We hold a somewhat late observance of
Doctor’s Day (March 30) with appropriate
items by Nichols and May as well as
“The PIXY School of Brain Surgery and
Medicine,” and Oscar Brand’s “Surgery”
and “Doing the Appendectomy.”
4:00 PM COMPACT DISCOVERIES
“James Brooks-Bruzzese”
The recordings of the conductor of the
Symphony of the Americas, based in Ft.
Lauderdale, are featured.
6:00 PM SOUND MEDICINE
Host Barbara Lewis West interviews
physicians from the Indiana University
School of Medicine on this program from
WFYI Public Radio.
7:00 PM PROFILES
Glen Gass, Pt. 1
8:00 PM A TRIBUTE TO RENATA
TEBALDI
“La Voce d’Angelo”
Host Jon Tolansky presents this portrait
of the great soprano with recordings from
throughout her career. We’ll hear from
Renata Tebaldi herself as well as from
Marilyn Horne, Evelyn Lear, Carol Neblitt,
Edward Downes and others.
10:05 PM MUSIC FROM THE HEARTS OF
SPACE
With host Stephen Hill
11:08 PM LATE NIGHT MUSIC
RUTTER—Cantus; Stephen Cleobury/Choir
of King’s College & The Wallace Collection
CRESTON—Violin Concerto No. 2, Op.
78; Gregory Fulkerson, vln.; David Alan
Miller/Albany Sym. Orch.
FOX, F.—Four Times Round; Ray E.
Cramer/IU Wind Ens.
9:05 AM CLASSICAL MUSIC WITH
GEORGE WALKER
9am MOZART—Piano Concerto No. 12 in
A, K. 414; Fazil Say, p.; Howard Griffiths/
Zurich Ch. Orch.
10am REICHA—Wind Quintet in B-flat,
Op. 88, No. 5; Michael Thompson Wind
Qnt.
11am HANDEL—Zadok the Priest
(Coronation Anthem No. 1), HWV 258;
Stephen Cleobury/Acad. of Ancient Music/
Choir of King’s College, Cambridge
3pm BRITTEN—Lachrymae, Op. 48a
“Reflections on a Song of John Dowland”;
Philip Dukes, vla.; Bradley Creswick/
Northern Sinfonia
7:06 PM EVENING CLASSICAL MUSIC
MOZART—Rondo in a, K. 511; Jonathan
Biss, p.
SIBELIUS—Symphony No. 3 in C, Op. 52;
Colin Davis/London Sym. Orch.
VANDINI—Cello Sonata in C; Susan
Moses, vlc.; Jeannette Koekkoek, hpsd.;
David Cole, continuo vlc.
8:00 PM LIVE! AT THE
CONCERTGEBOUW
Jan Willem de Vriend/Combattimento
Consort Amsterdam/Collegium Vocale Gent
PURCELL—Come ye sons of art away, Z.
323 (Birthday Ode for Queen Mary II);
PURCELL—Music for the Funeral of Queen
Mary in c, Z. 860;
PURCELL—Dido and Aeneas, Z. 626
10:09 PM PIPEDREAMS
“Texas Treasures”
Four substantial instruments, two of them
quite new, are showcased by a quintet of
talented local recitalists.
12 Tuesday
9:05 AM CLASSICAL MUSIC WITH
GEORGE WALKER
9am OFFENBACH—Introduction et Valse
mélancolique, Op. 14; Guido Schiefen, vlc.;
Gérard Oskamp/West German Radio Sym.
Orch.
10am MOZART—Rondo in a, K. 511;
Jonathan Biss, p.
11am CHOPIN—Scherzo in E, Op. 54;
Stephen Hough, p.
3pm BACH—Fantasia and Fugue in a, BWV
904; Angela Hewitt, p.
7:05 PM FROM THE TOP
From the Paramount Theater in Abilene
Texas, this program features young
musicians from both inside and outside
Texas, including a 14-member fiddle
ensemble from Abilene.
8:05 PM ETHER GAME
“Bird Songs”
As the weather starts to warm up, Ether
Game hears the chirping of birds not just
outside our windows, but also in the 13
pieces of this warbling edition.
April 2005 / Directions in Sound / Page 13
10:09 PM THE VOCAL SCENE WITH
GEORGE JELLINEK
“An Hour with Elizabeth Söderström”
11:08 PM LATE NIGHT MUSIC
HANDEL—Zadok the Priest (Coronation
Anthem No. 1), HWV 258; Stephen
Cleobury/Acad. of Ancient Music/Choir of
King’s College, Cambridge
BRAHMS—Six Piano Pieces, Op. 118;
György Sebok, p.
OFFENBACH—Concerto Rondo for
Cello and Orchestra; Guido Schiefen, vlc.;
Helmuth Froschauer/West German Radio
Sym. Orch.
13 Wednesday
9:05 AM CLASSICAL MUSIC WITH
GEORGE WALKER
9am HANDEL—Let thy Hand be
Strengthened (Coronation Anthem No.
2), HWV 259; Stephen Cleobury/Acad.
of Ancient Music/Choir of King’s College,
Cambridge
10am CRESTON—Violin Concerto No. 2,
Op. 78; Gregory Fulkerson, vln.; David Alan
Miller/Albany Sym. Orch.
11am BACH—Brandenburg Concerto No.
2 in F, BWV 1047; George Vosburgh, tpt.;
Arnie Roth/Musica Anima Ch.
7:06 PM EVENING CLASSICAL MUSIC
TURINA—Two Dances on Traditional
Spanish Themes, Op. 41; Jordi Masó, p.
LAURIDSEN—Lux Aeterna; Polyphony;
Stephen Layton/Britten Sinfonia
STRAVINSKY—L’HISTOIRE DU SOLDAT
[THE SOLDIER’S TALE]; Jean-Louis
Haguenauer, p.; Michel Lethiec, cl.; Annick
Roussin, vln.
8:00 PM NEW YORK PHILHARMONIC
Kent Nagano, cond.; Sheryl Staples, vln.;
Sherry Sylar, ob.
BACH (arr. Nodaira)—The Art of the
Fugue, BWV 1080: Selections
BACH—Concerto in c for Violin and Oboe,
BWV 1060
MESSIAEN—Eclairs sur l’Au-Dela . . .
[Illuminations of the Beyond . . .]
10:12 PM LATE NIGHT MUSIC
ROUSSEL—Impromptu, Op. 21; Susann
McDonald, hp.
GLAZUNOV—Seasons, Op. 67; José
Serebrier/Royal Scottish Natl. Orch.
MOZART—Andante and Variations in G
for Piano 4 Hands, K. 501; Murray Perahia,
p.; Radu Lupu, p.
STRAVINSKY—Les Noces [The Wedding];
International Piano Qt.; Tristan Fry Perc.
Ens.; Robert Craft/Simon Joly Chorale
HANDEL—Water Music Suite No. 1 in
F, HWV 348; John Eliot Gardiner/English
Baroque Soloists
Page 14 / Directions in Sound / April 2005
14 Thursday
9:05 AM CLASSICAL MUSIC WITH
GEORGE WALKER
9am RODRIGO—Concierto de Aranjuez;
Sharon Isbin, gt.; José Serebrier/New York
Phil.
10am MOZART—Concerto No. 7 in F for
Three Pianos, K. 242 “Lodron” (Arr. for
two pianos by Mozart); Murray Perahia, p.;
Radu Lupu, p.; English Ch. Orch.
11am LAURIDSEN—Ubi caritas et amor;
Stephen Layton/Polyphony
3pm HANDEL—The King Shall Rejoice
(Coronation Anthem No. 3), HWV 260;
Stephen Cleobury/Acad. of Ancient Music/
Choir of King’s College, Cambridge
7:06 PM EVENING CLASSICAL MUSIC
MOZART—DIE ZAUBERFLOTE [THE
MAGIC FLUTE], K. 620: “Ach, ich fühl’s”
[“I feel it”]; Kathleen Battle, s.; James
Levine/Metropolitan Opera Orch.
SCHUBERT—Piano Trio in B-flat, Op. 99,
D. 898; The Suk Trio
TICHELI—Blue Shades; Ray E. Cramer/IU
Wind Ens.
8:00 PM SPOLETO CHAMBER MUSIC
Paula Robison, fl.; Tara Helen O’Connor, fl.;
Andres Diaz, vlc.; Charles Wadsworth, hpsd.
BACH—Trio Sonata in C
Chee Yun, vln.; Daniel Phillips, vla.; Jeremy
Denk, p.; Andres Diaz, vlc.
BRAHMS— Piano Quartet No. 1 in g, Op.
25
9:00 PM HARMONIA
“Michael McCraw”
Tonight, our guest is Michael McCraw,
a baroque bassoon virtuoso and the new
director of Indiana University’s renowned
Early Music Institute.
10:09 PM INDIANAPOLIS SYMPHONY
ORCHESTRA
Mario Venzago, cond.; Lynn Harrell, vlc.
HERBERT—Cello Concerto No.2 in e,
Op.30
DVORAK—Symphony No.9 in e, Op.95
“From the New World”
15 Friday
9:05 AM CLASSICAL MUSIC WITH
GEORGE WALKER
9am SIBELIUS—Symphony No. 7 in C, Op.
105; Colin Davis/London Sym. Orch.
10am TOMASI—Trumpet Concerto; George
Vosburgh, tpt.; Arnie Roth/Czech Phil. Ch.
Orch.
11am MOZART—DIE ZAUBERFLOTE
[THE MAGIC FLUTE], K. 620: “Die Hölle
Rache”; Cyndia Sieden, s.; John Eliot
Gardiner/English Baroque Soloists
3pm MOZART—Rondo in a, K. 511;
Jonathan Biss, p.
8:00 PM MARIAN McPARTLAND’S
PIANO JAZZ
Burt Bacharach
9:00 PM THE BIG BANDS
“Georgie Auld”
The music of tenor saxophonist and
bandleader Georgie Auld.
10:09 PM AFTERGLOW
With host Joe Bourne
16 Saturday
10:00 AM CAR TALK
With hosts Tom and Ray Magliozzi
11:00 AM SAYS YOU!
With host Richard Sher
11:30 AM TALKING HISTORY
The subject is Albert Einstein, with Elizabeth
Stoddard, Assistant Professor of Physics
at the University of Missouri Kansas City,
and William Ashworth joins us to give an
historical perspective to the life and works
of the great physicist.
12:09 PM CLASSICAL MUSIC
BACH—ORCHESTRAL SUITE NO. 2
IN b, BWV 1067: Badinerie; Christopher
Krueger, fl.; Martin Pearlman/Boston
Baroque Orch.
WIENIAWSKI—Fantaisie Brillante on
Themes from Gounod’s “Faust,” Op. 20;
Corey Cerovsek, vln..; Katja Cerovsek, p.
12:30 PM METROPOLITAN OPERA
MOZART—The Magic Flute
James Levine, cond.; Lisa Milne (Pamina),
Erika Miklósa (Queen of the Night),
Matthew Polenzani (Tamino), Matthias
Goerne (Papageno), René Pape (Speaker),
Kurt Moll (Sarastro)
5:00 PM GARRISON KEILLOR’S
A PRAIRIE HOME COMPANION
A live broadcast from New York, NY at
Town Hall.
7:00 PM HOMETOWN
WITH TOM ROZNOWSKI
“Apron Strings”
7:05 PM THE FOLK SAMPLER
With host Mike Flynn
8:05 PM THE THISTLE AND SHAMROCK
“Spring is in the Airs”‘
For Nightnoise (Joe McKenna, Kim
Robertson, Liz Carroll and Jacqui McShee)
spring is certainly in the airs, as well as jigs,
reels, and songs. Join us for a scent of the
season.
9:05 PM AFROPOP WORLDWIDE
With host Georges Collinet
10:07 PM PORTRAITS IN BLUE
Elmore James, Vol. 4, 1960s Chicago Blues
11:00 PM NIGHT LIGHTS
“Jazz Goes to Cold War”
The U.S. State Department-sponsored tours
of Duke Ellington, Louis Armstrong, and
Dizzy Gillespie.
17 Sunday
10:00 AM THIS AMERICAN LIFE
With host Ira Glass
11:00 AM LIVING ON EARTH
With host Steve Curwood
11:25 AM CLASSICAL MUSIC
OFFENBACH—La course en traîneau
(Sleigh Ride); Guido Schiefen, vlc.; David de
Villiers/West German Radio Sym. Orch.
RAVEL—Sonata for Violin and Piano, Op.
Posth.; Franco Gulli, vln.; Enrica Cavallo, p.
11:47 AM THE POETS WEAVE
With host Jenny Kander
12:00 PM SAINT PAUL SUNDAY
Rachel Barton-Pine, vln.; Matthew Hagle, p.
BACH—VIOLIN SONATA IN G, BWV
1019: III. Siciliana
PISENDEL—SONATA IN A MINOR: I.
Largo
WESTHOFF—SUITE NO. 2 IN A: IV.
Gigue
BEETHOVEN—VIOLIN SONATA NO. 8
IN G, OP. 30, NO. 3: I. Allegro assai
THOMAS—Rush (World Premi re)
RAVEL—Sonata for Violin and Piano
MACKENZIE—PIBROCH SUITE: Dance
1:00 PM SCHICKELE MIX
“Ostinati Obbligati”
2:00 PM BROADWAY REVISITED
“Sarah Vaughan and Billy Eckstine”
3:00 PM WEEKEND RADIO
With the baseball season underway we
present Ernie Anderson and Tim Conway in
“Baseball News Conference” and “Travel
Secretary for the Cleveland Indians.” We’ll
also hear poems by Alastair Reid.
4:00 PM COMPACT DISCOVERIES
“Symphonic Klezmer”
Fred Flaxman presents two lively and
tuneful works by Canadian composers Sid
Robinovitch and Srul Irving Glick.
6:00 PM SOUND MEDICINE
Host Barbara Lewis West interviews
physicians from the Indiana University
School of Medicine on this program from
WFYI Public Radio.
7:00 PM PROFILES
Glen Gass, Pt. 2
8:00 PM COME RAIN OR COME SHINE
“A Musical Celebration of Harold Arlen”
Arlen wrote the scores for dozens of
Hollywood movies, including “The
Wizard of Oz” and “A Star is Born,” and
several Broadway shows. Hosted by Susan
Stamberg, the program features interviews
with Michael Feinstein, Bobby Short, John
Lahr and others.
9:00 PM GRAY MATTERS
“Learning Throughout Life”
Hosted by Garrick Utley, our program
explores new brain research across the
life span, from early brain development
to lifelong learning. We’ll hear from
Nobel laureate Dr. Eric Kandel and other
preeminent brain researchers.
10:05 PM MUSIC FROM THE HEARTS OF
SPACE
With host Stephen Hill
11:08 PM LATE NIGHT MUSIC
DZUBAY—HyPer Mix (Sent to Analyze
Life-forms); James Aikman, co-composer;
David Dzubay, co-composer
CHIHARA—Guitar Concerto; Pepe
Romero, gt.; Jens Lindemann, tpt.; Neville
Marriner/London Sym. Orch.
MARSHALL, C.—L’homme arme
Variations; John Boyd/Philharmonia à Vent
18 Monday
9:05 AM CLASSICAL MUSIC WITH
GEORGE WALKER
9am PREVIN—Reflections; Sophie Shao,
vlc.; Lelie Ann Resnick, eng. hn.; André
Previn/Sym. Orch. of the Curtis Inst. of
Music
10am GLAZUNOV—Seasons, Op. 67; José
Serebrier/Royal Scottish Natl. Orch.
11am MOZART—Andante and Variations
in G for Piano 4 Hands, K. 501; Murray
Perahia, p.; Radu Lupu, p.
3pm CHOPIN—Scherzo in b, Op. 20;
Stephen Hough, p.
7:06 PM EVENING CLASSICAL MUSIC
FAURE—Elégie, Op. 24; Janos Starker, vlc.;
Walter Susskind/Philharmonia Orch.
REICHA—Wind Quintet in C, Op. 91, No.
1; Michael Thompson Wind Qnt.
HANDEL—Praise of Harmony; Pro Arte
Singers (John Poole, dir.); Stanley Ritchie/IU
Baroque Orch.
8:00 PM LIVE! AT THE
CONCERTGEBOUW
Leo van Doeselaar, org.; Ingo Metzmacher/
Royal Concertgebouw Orch.
CARTER—Boston Concerto
RIHM—Unbenannt IV for Organ and
Orchestra
LUTOSLAWSKI—Concerto for Orchestra
10:09 PM PIPEDREAMS
“Kid’s Stuff”
Just like the fairy stories we once enjoyed,
our childhood years provoke music both
charming and challenging.
7:05 PM FROM THE TOP
From Albuquerque this week, we’ll hear an
18-year-old New Mexico trumpet player/
rock climber, and the world premiere of a
piano trio by a 17-year-old composer from
Georgia.
8:05 PM ETHER GAME
“B.E., as in Before E-Mail”
In this age of e-mail, Ether Game celebrates
the nearly lost art of writing a letter. From
the quill pen to the ballpoint, letters from
composers, musicians and those who knew
them are the focus of this game.
10:09 PM THE VOCAL SCENE WITH
GEORGE JELLINEK
“Musings on ‘Martha’”
11:08 PM LATE NIGHT MUSIC
SCRIABIN—TWENTY-FOUR PRELUDES,
OP. 11: Preludes No. 19-24; Karen Shaw, p.
PONCE—Concierto del sur (Concerto of the
South); Sharon Isbin, gt.; José Serebrier/New
York Phil.
BRITTEN—Suite on English Folk Tunes ‘A
Time There Was,’ Op. 90; Bradley Creswick/
Northern Sinfonia
20 Wednesday
9:05 AM CLASSICAL MUSIC WITH
GEORGE WALKER
9am CRESTON—Symphony No. 4, Op. 52;
David Alan Miller/Albany Sym. Orch.
10am BRITTEN—A Charm of Lullabies,
Op. 41; Catherine Wyn-Rogers, ms.; Bradley
Creswick/Northern Sinfonia
11am OFFENBACH—Réverie au bord de le
mer; Guido Schiefen, vlc.; Gérard Oskamp/
West German Radio Sym.
7:06 PM EVENING CLASSICAL MUSIC
CHOPIN—Ballade No. 2 in F, Op. 38;
Stephen Hough, p.
19 Tuesday
9:05 AM CLASSICAL MUSIC WITH
GEORGE WALKER
9am REICHA—Wind Quintet in B-flat, Op.
88, No. 5; Michael Thompson Wind Qnt.
10am HANDEL—Praise of Harmony;
Pro Arte Singers (John Poole, dir.); Stanley
Ritchie/IU Baroque Orch.
11am FASCH—Concerto in D for Trumpet,
Two Oboes, Strings and Continuo; George
Vosburgh, tpt.; Arnie Roth/Czech Phil. Ch.
Orch.
3pm MOZART—Rondo in a, K. 511;
Jonathan Biss, p.
Stephen Hough
SIBELIUS—Symphony No. 7 in C, Op. 105;
Colin Davis/London Sym. Orch.
DEVIENNE—Quartet in F, Op. 73, No.
2; Kim Walker, bssn.; Members of the
Alexander Qt.
8:00 PM NEW YORK PHILHARMONIC
Charles Dutoit, cond.; Susanne Mentzer,
ms.; Paul Groves, t.; Willard White, b.;
Christopher Feigum, b.-bar.; Westminster
Symphonic Choir; Brooklyn Youth Chorus
BERLIOZ—La Damnation de Faust
April 2005 / Directions in Sound / Page 15
10:12 PM LATE NIGHT MUSIC
GILLINGHAM—Be Thou My Vision; Ray
E. Cramer/IU Wind Ens.
VAUGHAN WILLIAMS—Symphony No. 4
in f; Paul Daniel/Bournemouth Sym. Orch.
BARTOK—Violin Sonata No. 1; Miriam
Fried, vln.; Jonathan Biss, p.
BRITTEN—Canticle II: Abraham and Isaac,
Op. 51; Jean Rigby, ca.; Philip Langridge, t.;
Steuart Bedford, p.
WEBERN—Im Sommerwind; Riccardo
Chailly/Royal Concertgebouw Orch.
21 Thursday
9:05 AM CLASSICAL MUSIC WITH
GEORGE WALKER
9am MOZART—Piano Concerto No. 21 in
C, K. 467; Fazil Say, p.; Howard Griffiths/
Zurich Ch. Orch.
10am SIBELIUS—Symphony No. 3 in C,
Op. 52; Colin Davis/London Sym. Orch.
11am HANDEL—My Heart is Inditing
(Coronation Anthem No. 4), HWV 261;
Stephen Cleobury/Acad. of Ancient Music/
Choir of King’s College, Cambridge
3pm TURINA—Danzas Gitanas I, Op. 55;
Jordi Masó, p.
7:06 PM EVENING CLASSICAL MUSIC
CHOPIN—Ballade No. 1 in g, Op. 23;
Stephen Hough, p.
BACH—Suite No. 3 in C for Solo Cello,
BWV 1009; Janos Starker, vlc.
WAGNER—DIE WALKURE: Farewell and
Magic Fire Music; Bryn Terfel, bar.; Claudio
Abbado/Berlin Phil.
8:00 PM SPOLETO CHAMBER MUSIC
Chee Yun, vln.; Corey Cerovsek; vln.;
Andres Diaz, vlc.; Charles Wadsworth, hpsd.
PERGOLESI—Sonata in G for Two Violins
Courtenay Budd, s.; Charles Wadsworth, p.
MAHLER—”Ich atmet ‘einem linden duft;”
“Leibst du um Schonheit;” “Hansel and
Gretel”
STRAUSS, R.—”Nacht;” “Cäcilie”
Corey Cerovsek, vln.; Chee Yun, vln.; Daniel
Phillips, vla.; Alisa Weilerstein, vlc.; St.
Lawrence Str. Qt.
MENDELSSOHN—String Octet in E-flat,
Op. 20
9:00 PM HARMONIA
“German Baroque Lute/Telemann Recorder
Duos”
Join us for German Baroque music for two
lutes, played by Lucas Harris and Daniel
Swenberg. Also, we’ll carry the “duet”
theme forward with a new release of
Telemann duets played by Lisette Kielson
and Patrick O’Malley.
10:09 PM INDIANAPOLIS SYMPHONY
ORCHESTRA
Patrick Summers, cond.; Christopher
O’Reilly, p.
RAVEL—Valses nobles et sentimentales
CHOPIN—Andate Spianato & Grand
Polonaise, Op.22
DAUGHERTY—Le tombeau de Liberace
STRAUSS, R.—Till Eulenspiegel’s Merry
Pranks, Op.28
Page 16 / Directions in Sound / April 2005
22 Friday
24 Sunday
25 Monday
9:05 AM CLASSICAL MUSIC WITH
GEORGE WALKER
9am VAUGHAN WILLIAMS—Symphony
No. 4 in f; Paul Daniel/Bournemouth Sym.
Orch.
10am PONCE—Concierto del sur (Concerto
of the South); Sharon Isbin, gt.; José
Serebrier/New York Phil.
11am WAGNER—DIE WALKURE: Magic
Fire Music; Eugene Ormandy/Philadelphia
Orch.
3pm HANDEL—Praise of Harmony; Pro
Arte Singers (John Poole, dir.); Stanley
Ritchie/IU Baroque Orch.
8:00 PM MARIAN McPARTLAND’S
PIANO JAZZ
Earma Thompson
9:00 PM THE BIG BANDS
“Academy of Swing, Pt. 1”
The big bands in American popular culture
1930-45: music from Glenn Miller, Count
Basie, Tommy Dorsey, Jimmy Lunceford,
and Kay Kyser.
10:09 PM AFTERGLOW
With host Joe Bourne
10:00 AM THIS AMERICAN LIFE
With host Ira Glass
11:00 AM LIVING ON EARTH
With host Steve Curwood
11:25 AM CLASSICAL MUSIC
BRITTEN—Canticle I: My Beloved is
Mine, Op. 40; Philip Langridge, t.; Steuart
Bedford, p.
BRUCH—Kol Nidrei, Op. 47; Mischa
Maisky, vlc.; Semyon Bychkov/Orch. de
Paris
11:47 AM THE POETS WEAVE
With host Jenny Kander
12:00 PM SAINT PAUL SUNDAY
Ch. Music Society of Lincoln Center
MOZART—STRING QUINTET IN
E-FLAT, K 614: IV. Allegro di molto, V.
Allegro
BERMEL—Soul Garden for viola and string
quintet
DVORAK—String Sextet in A, Op. 48
1:00 PM SCHICKELE MIX
“P. G. & I”
2:00 PM BROADWAY REVISITED
“Going Places”
3:00 PM WEEKEND RADIO
Join us for Ruth Draper’s “Doctors and
Diets” and “Marian the Librarian,” and
Charlie Manna’s “The Perfect Squelch” in
honor of National Library Week.
4:00 PM COMPACT DISCOVERIES
“A Buster Walk Jamboree”
Fred Flaxman presents a look at melodious
memories from an imaginary radio series.
6:00 PM SOUND MEDICINE
Host Barbara Lewis West interviews
physicians from the Indiana University
School of Medicine on this program from
WFYI Public Radio.
7:00 PM PROFILES
Gary Snyder
8:00 PM SPEAKING OF FAITH
“The Future of Moral Values”
This program explores the enduring issues
beneath the moral values debate, and why
they matter for our future.
9:00 PM HUMANKIND
“Reaching Out to Troubled Youth”
We visit Chicago dramatist Meade
Palidofsky, who uses theater as a therapeutic
tool in her work with juvenile offenders, and
with Jonathan Kozol, who works with the
children in South Bronx neighborhood.
10:05 PM MUSIC FROM THE HEARTS OF
SPACE
With host Stephen Hill
11:08 PM LATE NIGHT MUSIC
SPILLMAN—Two Songs for Bass Trombone
and Piano; Charles Vernon, b. tb.; Eric
Ewazen, p.
BAKER, D.—Images of Childhood; Paul
Freeman/Czech Natl. Sym.
HOOVER—Medieval Suite for Flute and
Piano; Jeannine Dennis, fl.; Philip Amalong,
p.
9:05 AM CLASSICAL MUSIC WITH
GEORGE WALKER
9am BACH—Partita in A, BWV 832;
Angela Hewitt, p.
10am BERLIOZ—Rob Roy Overture;
Alexander Gibson/Scottish Natl. Orch.
11am BRITTEN—Temporal Variations;
Nicholas Daniel, ob.; Bradley Creswick/
Northern Sinfonia
3pm OFFENBACH—Deux âmes au ciel
(Elegy), Op. 25; Guido Schiefen, vlc.; David
de Villiers/West German Radio Sym. Orch.
7:06 PM EVENING CLASSICAL MUSIC
HANDEL—Concerto Grosso in G, Op.
3, No. 3, HWV 314; Bradley Creswick/
Northern Sinfonia
MCNEFF—Ghosts; John Boyd/
Philharmonia à Vent
BRAHMS—Violin Sonata No. 2 in A, Op.
100; Federico Agostini, vln.; Reiko Neriki,
p.
8:00 PM LIVE! AT THE
CONCERTGEBOUW
Ronald Brautigam, p.; Roy Goodman/Radio
Ch. Orch.
WAGNER—Siegfried Idyll
BRAHMS—Piano Concerto No. 1 in d, Op.
15
10:09 PM PIPEDREAMS
“Going On Record”
A four-century survey of organ music
and a review of some resplendent recent
recordings.
23 Saturday
10:00 AM CAR TALK
With hosts Tom and Ray Magliozzi
11:00 AM SAYS YOU!
With host Richard Sher
11:30 AM METROPOLITAN OPERA
WAGNER—Die Walküre
Valery Gergiev, cond.; Olga Sergeeva
(Brünnhilde), Katarina Dalayman (Sieglinde), Larissa Diadkova (Fricka), Plácido
Domingo (Siegmund), Mikhail Kit (Wotan),
Stephen Milling (Hunding)
5:00 PM GARRISON KEILLOR’S
A PRAIRIE HOME COMPANION
A live broadcast from New York City’s
Town Hall.
7:00 PM HOMETOWN
WITH TOM ROZNOWSKI
“His Friends Called Him ‘Jack’”
7:05 PM THE FOLK SAMPLER
With host Mike Flynn
8:05 PM THE THISTLE AND SHAMROCK
“Hands On”
Old songs provide a lens through which
we can view a simpler time, when manual
labor filled the day. Hear of horse-drawn
ploughs, handloom weavers, and coal-faced
workers, with music from Davy Steele, Dick
Gaughan, Christine Kydd, and many more.
9:05 PM AFROPOP WORLDWIDE
With host Georges Collinet
10:07 PM PORTRAITS IN BLUE
Tiny Bradshaw, Vol. 3, 1950s Jump Blues
11:00 PM NIGHT LIGHTS
“Jazz Cameos”
Jazz soloists on pop records by the Rolling
Stones, the Doors, Carole King, Lou Reed,
and others.
26 Tuesday
9:05 AM CLASSICAL MUSIC WITH
GEORGE WALKER
9am GLAZUNOV—Symphony No. 5 in
B-flat, Op. 55; José Serebrier/Royal Scottish
Natl. Orch.
10am BRAHMS—Violin Sonata No. 2 in
A, Op. 100; Federico Agostini, vln.; Reiko
Neriki, p.
11am VAUGHAN WILLIAMS—Norfolk
Rhapsody No. 1; Stuart Green, vla.; Paul
Daniel/Bournemouth Sym. Orch.
3pm TARREGA—Recuerdos de la
Alhambra; David Russell, gt.
7:05 PM FROM THE TOP
From a new concert facility in
Southborough, Massachusetts, a piano
duo from the Boston area and a quartet
playing the work of a 10-year-old New York
composer.
8:05 PM ETHER GAME
“Wet and Wild”
From rivers to oceans to seas to puddles,
Ether Game is all wet for this celebration of
H2O. Galoshes recommended.
10:09 PM THE VOCAL SCENE WITH
GEORGE JELLINEK
“Opera in Zurich”
11:08 PM LATE NIGHT MUSIC
BACH—Suite in f, BWV 823; Angela
Hewitt, p.
VAUGHAN WILLIAMS—Symphony No. 5
in D; Leonard Slatkin/Philharmonia Orch.
LAURIDSEN—Ave Maria; Stephen Layton/
Polyphony
27 Wednesday
9:05 AM CLASSICAL MUSIC WITH
GEORGE WALKER
9am COPLAND—RODEO: Four Dance
Episodes; Leonard Bernstein/New York Phil.
10am MOZART—Piano Concerto No. 23
in A, K. 488; Fazil Say, p.; Howard Griffiths/
Zurich Ch. Orch.
11am GILLIS—Symphony “X” (“The Big
D”); David Alan Miller/Albany Sym. Orch.
7:06 PM EVENING CLASSICAL MUSIC
MENDELSSOHN—Songs Without Words,
Op. 102; Luba Edlina, p.
VAUGHAN WILLIAMS—Flos Campi; Paul
Silverthorne, vla.; Paul Daniel/Bournemouth
Sym. Orch./Bournemouth Sym. Chorus
CANTELOUBE—CHANTS
D’AUVERGNE: Five Songs; Kate Van Eck,
s.; Ray E. Cramer/IU Wind Ens.
8:00 PM NEW YORK PHILHARMONIC
Christoph von Dohnanyi, cond.; Mitsuko
Uchida, p.; Thomas Stacy, eng. hn.
LIGETI—Atmospheres
BEETHOVEN—Piano Concerto No. 4 in G,
Op. 58
SIBELIUS—LEMMINKAINEN SUITE, OP.
22: The Swan of Tuonela
JANACEK—Sinfonietta
10:12 PM LATE NIGHT MUSIC
BACH—Fantasia and Fugue in a, BWV 904;
Angela Hewitt, p.
STRAVINSKY—Oedipus Rex; Edward Fox,
speaker; Jennifer Lane, ms.; Martyn Hill, t.;
Joseph Cornwell, t.; David Wilson-Johnson,
b.-bar.; Andrew Greenan, b.; Robert
Craft/Philharmonia Orch./Simon Joly Male
Chorus
KODALY—Duo for Violin and Cello, Op.
7; Josef Gingold, vln.; Janos Starker, vlc.
TOMASI—Trumpet Concerto; George
Vosburgh, tpt.; Arnie Roth/Czech Phil. Ch.
Orch.
28 Thursday
9:05 AM CLASSICAL MUSIC WITH
GEORGE WALKER
9am OFFENBACH—Concerto Rondo for
Cello and Orchestra; Guido Schiefen, vlc.;
Helmuth Froschauer/West German Radio
Sym. Orch.
10am NERUDA—Trumpet Concerto in
E-flat; George Vosburgh, tpt.; Arnie Roth/
Czech Phil. Ch. Orch.
11am CRESTON—Janus, Op. 77; David
Alan Miller/Albany Sym. Orch.
3pm LAURIDSEN—O magnum mysterium;
Stephen Layton/Polyphony
7:06 PM EVENING CLASSICAL MUSIC
GOUNOD—FAUST: “Salut! Demeure
chaste et pure”; Franco Corelli, t.; Richard
Bonynge/London Sym. Orch.
VAUGHAN WILLIAMS—Norfolk
Rhapsody No. 1; Stuart Green, vla.; Paul
Daniel/Bournemouth Sym. Orch.
REICHA—Wind Quintet in B-flat, Op. 88,
No. 5; Michael Thompson Wind Qnt.
8:00 PM SPOLETO CHAMBER MUSIC
Todd Palmer, cl.; Corey Cerovsek,vln.;
Wendy Chen, p.
STRAVINSKY—L’Histoire du Soldat
[Soldier’s Tale]
Chee Yun, vln.; Wendy Chen, p.
BRAHMS—Violin Snata No. 3 in d, Op.
108
Chee Yun, vln.; Andres Diaz, vlc.; Wendy
Chen, p.
SCHOENFELD—Café Music
9:00 PM HARMONIA
“Guillaume de Machaut/EMA Winners”
This week, we travel from the Middle Ages
to the end of the Renaissance with the music
of Guillaume de Machaut, winners of the
2004 Early Music America competition, and
new releases of music by Orlando de Lassus
and Claudio Monteverdi.
10:09 PM INDIANAPOLIS SYMPHONY
ORCHESTRA
Emmanuel Villaume, cond.
MOZART—Symphony No.29 in A, K.186a
Mario Venzago, cond.; Joshua Bell vln.
TCHAIKOVSKY—Violin Concerto in D,
Op.35
29 Friday
9:05 AM CLASSICAL MUSIC WITH
GEORGE WALKER
9am BRITTEN—Simple Symphony, Op. 4;
Steuart Bedford/Northern Sinfonia
10am REICHA—Wind Quintet in C, Op.
91, No. 1; Michael Thompson Wind Qnt.
11am GOUNOD—FAUST: Ballet music;
Vladimir Golschmann/Saint Louis Sym.
Orch.
3pm CHOPIN—Scherzo in c-sharp, Op. 39;
Stephen Hough, p.
8:00 PM MARIAN McPARTLAND’S PIANO
JAZZ
Joey Calderazzo
9:00 PM THE BIG BANDS
“Academy of Swing, Pt. 2”
The big bands in American popular culture
after World War II. Music from Duke
Ellington, Harry James, Woody Herman,
and Billy May.
10:09 PM AFTERGLOW
With host Joe Bourne
April 2005 / Directions in Sound / Page 17
30 Saturday
10:00 AM CAR TALK
With hosts Tom and Ray Magliozzi
11:00 AM SAYS YOU!
With host Richard Sher
Children and
Autism:
Time is Brain
Thursday, April 7 at 8pm
11:30 AM TALKING HISTORY
With host Bryan Le Beau
12:09 PM CLASSICAL MUSIC
SCHUBERT—An den Mond [To the
Moon], D. 296; Matthias Goerne, bar.;
Andreas Haefliger, p.
VIVALDI—Violin Concerto in A., Op.
11, No. 3, RV336; Stanley Ritchie, vln.;
Christopher Hogwood/Acad. of Ancient
Music
Christopher Hogwood
12:30 PM METROPOLITAN OPERA
GOUNOD—Faust
James Levine, cond.; Soile Isokoski
(Marguerite), Kristine Jepson (Siébel),
Roberto Alagna (Faust), Dmitri
Hvorostovsky (Valentin), René Pape
(Méphistophélès)
5:00 PM GARRISON KEILLOR’S
A PRAIRIE HOME COMPANION
A live broadcast from Chrysler Hall in
Norfolk, Virginia.
7:00 PM HOMETOWN
WITH TOM ROZNOWSKI
“Melon In a Bucket”
7:05 PM THE FOLK SAMPLER
With host Mike Flynn
8:05 PM THE THISTLE AND SHAMROCK
“Passing the Torch”
Scotland’s National Centre for Excellence
in Traditional Music is a haven for talented
youth. This week we hear these students’
remarkable voices at work.
9:05 PM AFROPOP WORLDWIDE
With host Georges Collinet
10:07 PM PORTRAITS IN BLUE
Bullmoose Jackson, Vol. 1, 1940s Ballads
and Blues
11:00 PM NIGHT LIGHTS
“The Subterraneans”
A look at the 1960 movie based on Jack
Kerouac’s novel, featuring a cast of jazz
musicians.
Page 18 / Directions in Sound / April 2005
It is rare these days not to know
someone with an autistic child.
While scientists remain mystified
about what causes the complex
neurological disorder, experts
say that early diagnosis and appropriate intervention are key to
helping autistic children reach
their potential. To address this
issue, WTIU presents Children
and Autism: Time is Brain.
Produced by Penn State Public Broadcasting and distributed
by American Public Television (APT) this 60-minute documentary
features two families faced with the daunting challenge of raising a
child with autism, their therapists, and a board certified behavior
analyst with more than 25 years of experience designing learning
environments for people with autism and developmental disabilities.
Susan Trainor, the mother of an autistic child, is one of the family members featured in the documentary. She implores parents who
suspect their child may be autistic not to ‘wait and see.’ “Time is
brain,” Trainor says, “Don’t wait. Don’t be afraid of that diagnosis. That diagnosis is a
tool. It’s not a stigma.”
Therapist Christina
Burk agrees with Trainor
saying, “The term ‘time
is brain’ is absolutely
accurate for children with
autism, because the earlier we find them and the
earlier we can get them
good treatment, the better
off they’ll be.”
Classified as a spectrum disorder, the symptoms and characteristics of autism can present themselves in a wide variety of combinations, from mild to severe. Autistic children typically have deficits
in the areas of social interaction and communication skills. Parents
often describe a child who doesn’t want to be cuddled and can’t express his needs. They may say he appears fascinated with spinning
objects such as ceiling fans, or may have odd repetitive movements
like hand flapping.
PROGRAMMING AND
OPERATING SUPPORT
Indiana University
CORPORATE SILVER
CINERGY
Delta Tau Delta
Friends of the Unitarian
Universalist Church,
Bloomington
PYNCO, Inc.–Bedford
CORPORATE BENEFACTORS
Bloomington Iron and Metal
Innovative Medical Care–
Dr. Michael Kane
KP Pharmaceutical Technology,
Inc.
Dr. Matthew Parmenter at
The Foot and Ankle Center
Dr. David Southwick, Hand and
Microvascular Surgeon–
Terre Haute
Tipton Lakes Athletic Club–
Columbus
Wininger Stolberg Homes
CORPORATE SPONSORS
Brown Hill Nursery–Columbus
Drs. David J. Howell &
Timothy A. Pliske, DDS–
Bloomington & Bedford
Well Being Psychological Services
in Bloomington–Paul Shriver
CORPORATE MEMBERS
Bloomington Veterinary Hospital
Brown County Hotels and
Restaurants:
• Brown County Inn
• Nashville House
• The Ordinary
• The Seasons
Dr. Phillip Crooke, Obstetrics
and Gynecology
Dermatology Center of Indiana–
Drs. Bryne, McTigue and Reeck
Glusenkamp Designscape
Horticultural Service
G. C. Mangum Construction–
Nashville
May Insurance Agency
Neuter Scooter
Oliver Winery
Smart and Johnson Title
Company–Columbus
Strategic Development Group, Inc.
World Wide Automotive Services
PROGRAM UNDERWRITERS
4th Street Festival of Arts and
Crafts
A.G. Edwards & Sons, Inc.—
Columbus
Air-Tech Heating & Cooling
Andrews, Harrell, Mann, Carmin,
and Parker P.C.
Appletree Cleaning Co.
Argentum Jewelry
Baugh Enterprises Commercial
Printing & Bulk Mail Services
Bicycle Garage
BloomingFoods
Bloomington Area Arts Council
Bloomington Area Birth Services
Bloomington Cardiology
Bloomington Hospital &
Healthcare System
Bloomington Shuttle Service
Bloomington Symphony Orchestra
Joan H. Bowden, LCSW
Bunger and Robertson, Attorneys
at Law
By Hand Gallery
Caveat Emptor Books
Center for Behavioral Health
Columbus Area Arts Council
Columbus Container Inc.
Columbus Optical
Columbus Regional Hospital
Columbus Indiana Philharmonic
Orchestra
The Comfortable Back Store
Commercial Service of
Bloomington
Crawlspace Doctor
Day & Carter Mortuary, Bedford
DePauw University
EcoLogic
Eye Center of Southern Indiana
First Presbyterian Church of
Columbus
First United Methodist Church
Fossil Rain
Four Seasons Retirement
Framing Guild
Gilbert Construction
Greentree at Westwood
Good Earth Compost
Goods for Cooks
Hamilton Center
The Herald-Times
Heritage Fund of Bartholomew
County
Hills O’Brown Realty
Hills O’Brown Property
Management
Home Instead Senior Care
HoosierNet
Hoosier Energy
Indiana Criminal Justice Institute
Indianapolis Museum of Art—
Columbus Gallery
Indianapolis Opera
The Irish Lion Restaurant and Pub
ISU The May Agency
IU Art Museum
IU Bloomington Continuing
Studies
IU Credit Union
IU Division of Recreational Sports
IU Division of Residential
Programs & Services
IU Home Pages
IU Honors Program in Foreign
Languages
IU Medical Sciences Program
IU Press
IU School of Music
The Kinsey Institute
Kirby-Risk Supply Co.
Kokomo-Howard County Public
Library
Kronodynamics
Laughing Planet Café
L. B. Stant and Associates
Mallor, Clendening, Grodner &
Bohrer, Attorneys at Law
May Videography
Meadowood Retirement
Community
Medicaid Solutions
Midwest Counseling Center
Monroe Bank
Montage Furniture and Design
Oliver Wine Company
Organization of American
Historians
Pak Mail
Plumb, Inc.
Providence Center
Regions Bank
Relish
Reynolds Remodeling
Roadworthy Guitar & Amp
Royal on the East Side
Royal Toyota Volvo
Dr. Byron Rutledge
Ryder Magazine
Smithville Telephone Company
Soma Coffee House and Juice Bar
J.R. Stallsmith & Co.
St. Mark’s United Methodist
Church
Stephens Honda Hyundai
Stone Cabin Design
Trojan Horse Restaurant
Twisted Limb Paperworks
University Information
Technology Services
Vance Music Center
Dan Williamson
WonderLab
World Wide Automotive Service
Yarns Unlimited
Elizabeth A. York MS, LCSW
These community minded
businesses support locally produced programs on
WFIU.
We thank them for their
partnership and encourage
you to thank and support
them.
LOCAL PROGRAM
PRODUCTION SUPPORT
Avers Electric
(Ether Game)
Closets Too!
(Noon Edition)
The Gallery
(Afterglow)
Pygmalion’s Art Supplies
(Ether Game)
Romy Remodeling
(Big Bands)
The Toy Chest of Nashville
(Ether Game)
NATIONALLY SYNDICATED
PROGRAM SUPPORT
Nakamichi Foundation American Early Music
Series
(Harmonia)
The Oakley Foundation,
Terre Haute
(Hometown)
Office of the IU Chancellor,
Bloomington
(A Moment of Science)
Office of the IU Vice
President for Research
(A Moment of Science)
PYNCO, Inc., Bedford
(Harmonia)
April 2005 / Directions in Sound / Page 19

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