ANNA - Stacks are the Stanford

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ANNA - Stacks are the Stanford
Stanford University Libraries
1
61.05 125
779 046
I
A N N A
Frank Lloyd Wright Collection
Gift of
Professor and Mrs. Paul R.
Hanna
Stanford University Libraries
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FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT
HANNA-HONEYCOMB HOUSE
VOLUME 57
AUGUST 1982
THROUGH
DECEMBER 1982
Digitized by the Internet Archive
in
2012
http://archive.org/details/fllwhhh57unse
ARCHIVES
FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT'S HANNA HOUSE
1.
This series of ringbinders contains original
copies of correspondence with frank lloyd
Wright and others, telegrams, telephone notes,
contracts, building specifications, financial
transactions, and other items, covering more
than a half-century from 1930.
Mr.
Wright's designing of the project; the
construction of the several buildings; the
role of Stanford University; the public and
architects'
interest in the project; evalua-
tion by the clients; and other related aspects.
2.
In
addition to more than 60 ringbinders, the
archival collection contains 184 sketches and
drawings (mostly blueprints) by frank lloyd
Wright, consultants, and the hannas.
3.
The collection includes five albums of photo-
graphs OF THE ORIGINAL HILL SITE, STAGES OF
CONSTRUCTION, EXTERIOR AND INTERIOR SCENES OF
FURNISHINGS AND FURNITURE.
OVER 500 PHOTOS
WERE TAKEN BY PROFESSIONAL ARCHITECTURAL PHOTO-
GRAPHERS AND THE HANNAS.
(CONTINUED)
4.
Archival material contained
Volumes 1 through
57 is available for research purposes on microin
film in the archives of the stanford university
Library.
The microfilm series is available for
purchase from the architectural history foundation
or the MIT Press.
Ringbinder volumes subsequent
to Volume 57 are not recorded on microfilm.
5.
The collection contains seven original drawings
by Mr. Wright.
These were given by the Hannas
to Stanford University in 1985 and are not in-
cluded in the microfilmed material.
6.
There are more than a dozen ringbinder volumes
of general materials on Frank Lloyd Wright;
most are clippings from magazines and newspapers.
ARCHIVES
FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT'S HANNA HOUSE
INTRODUCTION TO MICROFILM SERIES
A MICROFILM SERIES, SEVEN (7) REELS, RECORDS THREE
SEPARATE BUT RELATED ARCHIVAL COLLECTIONS GIVEN TO THE
Stanford University archives by Paul
1.
R.
and Jean
S.
Hanna:
Fifty-three (53) binder volumes of correspondence
with Frank Lloyd Wright and others, telegrams
telephone notes, contracts, building specifications,
financial transactions, and other items, covering a
HALF-CENTURY FROM 1930 THROUGH 1981.
(Archives for the
years 1982-1985 are not microfilmed and are to be found only
in binder volumes #54 through #61.)
CIRCA 6,000 PAGES OF
documents record the story of mr. wright's designing
of the project, the construction of several buildings-
accomplished
in
five phases, the role of stanford
University, the public and architects'
interest in the
project, an evaluation by the clients, and many
related aspects.
2.
184 sketches and drawings (mostly blueprints) by
Frank Lloyd Wright, consultants, and the Hannas.
3.
Five (5) albums of photographs of the original site,
stages of construction, exterior and interior
shots, furniture and furnishings.
over 500 photos
taken by professional architectural photographers
and by the clients.
This microfilm series is available from the Architectural
History Foundation or the MIT Press.
(1)
These microfilms are copyright
©1981
by the Archi-
tectural History Foundation and the Massachusetts
Institute of Technology.
The letters, notes, drawings, and telegrams by Frank
Lloyd Wright and letters from the office of Frank Lloyd
Wright are copyright ©1981 by the Frank Lloyd Wright
Foundation,
All rights reserved.
Permission
in
writing to reproduce any part of these
microfilms must be obtained from the publishers, from
the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation, or from Stanford
University.
A publication entitled Frank Lloyd Wright's Hanna House:
the Clients'
Report by Paul
R.
and Jean
S.
Hanna
available as background from the publishers:
is
The
Architectural History Foundation/MIT Press.
1981—9 x 10— 168pp.— 125 black and white illus.,
12 pp. color illus. --$25.00
The publishers provide a special guide to accompany
these microfilms.
this guide booklet contains:
index to the 53 binder volumes of documents,
(1)
an
(2)
a list and brief
(3)
over 500 photographs,
description of 184 blueprints, and
(2)
>
a
a
in
H
„FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT
ISELECTED DRAWINGS
PORTFOLIO
VOL.3
\The Concluding Volume
A.D.AEDITA
Tokyo
i
FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT SELECTED DRAWINGS
™»
Edited by Yukio Futagawa and
VOL 3
PORTFOLIO
I
The Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation^ Introduction by Olgivanna Lloyd Wright
I-
50 COLOR PLATES
"Frank Lloyd Wright - Selected Drawings
Portfolio, Vol. 3" is the concluding volume
in b series of portfolios which have heen
edited hy A.D.A. in close cooperation with
frank Lloyd Wright Foundation. Vol.
I he
House for Henry Cooper, La Grange. Illinois, 1890
"The House Beautiful", Graphic Design, River lores!
101
Project:
• IQ2-
Illinois. 1896
103 House for Joseph Husser. Chicago. Illinois, 1899
104. Project; Cheltenham Beach Resort Park. Cltii auo Illinois
1899
•105. Project: Ladies Home Journal" A Small House on the
each of the 2 preceding volumes,
contains 50 drawings which we have
carefully selected, with the aid of Mrs.
Olgivanna Lloyd Wright, from among the
drawings Wright left in his atelier at
like
3,
The Concluding Volume
le
I
•
Frank Lloyd Wriejii is said to have made
thousands of drawings in his
lifetime
as
an architect.
His
unique
delicately
perspective
technique
and
colored perspective drawings are crysta
Canada, 1901
107. Project: Lexington Terrace. Apartment Building lor E.C
Waller. Chicago. Illinois. 1901 - 19(19
several tens of
•
winch
importance
historical
unmistakable,
10. Project:
1
h
""Frank
the
Lloyd /Vnght
VoR 1.2 and
1
Tcnn.
ISO plates which jdi
Significant examples ol Wright* \Mirk by
J
faithfully reproducing the origiVll shade^ ""^
>»»—•
of the delicate colors >f Wright s\
The first two volumes (Vol.
publ
1
contain
San rancisoo Call,
1912
1 18. Project; Odawara Hotel, Nagoya, Japan. 1917
•119. Hollyhock House for Aline Bamsdall. Olive Hill.
Los Angeles. California, 191
San
Lloyd
Wright
Bortfolii
'
I
available
be
Will
in
Selected
and 3" and
written
1982,
<
122. House
123
Male From 1890 to 1947 and
D
Slorcr,
Hollywood. California, 1923
National Lite Insurance Office Building for A.M.
Proji
Johnson, Chicago, lUinofaJlC4
House foi Mrs SpGe! Will
ladnej
on
worth,
\l25. Project: Steel Cathedral for William Norman Guthrie.
New York. New York. Ittg
M2,6. Abstraction: "The Jewelry Shop Window". 1927
127\ Projecl: San Mauos-in-llte-Desert, Resorr Hotel for Dr.
5
Alexander Chandler, Chandler, Arizona, 1928
12* House lor Richard Lloydjaiws, Tulsa, Oklahoma, >2'>
129. House lor Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Jacobl, Ma, lis.. n WfjCOfUUI,
1936
HO* Projecl Lillle San Man QjhResarl Inn for Di Alexanrj
Chandler, Chandler, Imon
1936
difornia,
|31C Project: House for Ralph Jeitei Palo
in
matter
from the Administration
Building for inarkm Company. Chicago,
Illinois,
to a Desert Spa for Elizabeth
Arden, phoenix, An/on.
I
Madre
Sierra
I
hy Mrs.
H
I
in
Edward Doheny.
foi
I
John
Di
toi
It
H
ranging
i
ranciico, California,
Mountains, neai Lo\ Vngeles, California, 1921
hirKs nnis, Los Angeles. California. 1923
121. House foi
important
i
lealures an ^introduction
subject
I
120. Project: Ranch Resorl
third volumi completes this
Frank
AW
17. Project: Press Building tor the
1
mope, and Japan.
Drawings
City Naiional Bank and Hotel. Mason City, Iowa. 1909
Cullen, Downer's (.rove Illinois,
S
1911
I
series
I
116. Project: House tor
1977, Vol. 2 published in 1979) hi
very well received in the United St
I
Thomas Hardy. Racine. Wisconsin, 1905
Studio and Residence for Richard Bock, Maywood,
.
Selected Drawings Portfolio,
The
Buffalo
Illinois. 1906
•111. Remodelling of Town House for C. Thaxter Shaw, Montreal,
Canada, 1906
• 112. Project: Ladies Home Journal"Fireproo[ House",
1906
113. Project: House lor Walter Gcrts, Glencoe. Illinois. 1906
14 Project House lor William Norman Guthrie. Sewance
contemporary architecture.
Collectively,
Company
York. 1903
109. House for
Inotpr:
indelible
108. Administration Building for the Larkin
New
Qzitions ol his architecture. Many project
are a
priceless
drawings he
has left
treasure- house of concepts and ide;
3"
1900
Prairie".
106. Project: House for Victor Metzger, Dcsbarats, Ontario.
Taliesm.
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oloi plates
ina case
In
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[Plate board)
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Florida,
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Vol
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copyright
© T>eTtam\y>a>yd WngKd
A.D.A.
EDITA
Tokyo
i
i
—
FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT
SELECTED DRAWINGS
VOL.1
PORTFOLIO
Edited by Yukio Futagawo
& The Frank Lloyd
Wright Foundation
Introduction by Olgivanna Lloyd Wright
Features rcknown works by Wright such as The Frederic C. Robie
House, "Fallingwater", Unity Temple. Midway Gardens, The Imperial
Hotel, The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum etc.
but powerful drawings have been superbly
Wright's delicate
reproduced and contribute a new understanding of the significance of
the great master of Modern Architecture.
European Edition limited to 220 Copies
American Edition limited
I
I
to
500 Copies
Park for Wolf Lake, near Chicago,
IlllnO
Project: Rogers Lacy Hotel. Dallas, iexas, 1946
Project: Play Resort and Sports Club for Huntington Hartford,
Hollywood Hills, California, 1947
Project: Cottage Group Center for Huntington Hartford.
Hollywood Hills. California, 1947
Project: Civic Center for Pittsburgh Point Park, Pittsburgh,
23.
Project: Gordon Strong Automobile Objective a
Sugar Loaf Mountain. Maryland. 1923
Project: Wellington and Ralph Cudney House, San Marcos-in
the-Desert, Chandler, Arizona, 1927
Project: San Marcos-in-lhe-Desert Winter Resort for Dr.
Alexander Chandler, Chandler. Arizona. 192 7
Hillside Buildings fur the Taliesin Fellowship, Spring Green.
Wisconsin, 1933
"Fallingwater", Edgar J. Kaufmann House. Bear Run,
Pennsylvania, 1936
John A.
24.
"Wingspread", Herbei
19.
895
WardW.
Willits
House, Highland Park,
Illinois,
Apartments
Project: Lexington Terrace
1902
20.
for E.C. Waller,
1901-1909
Cinema for San Diego, San Diego,
Unity Temple, Oak Park, Illinois, 190S
Chic
21.
Illinois,
Project:
Frederick C. Robie House, Chicago,
California,
Illinois.
1905
22.
1903
Sherman M. Booth House, Glencoe, Illinois, 1911
Midway Gardens, Chicago, Illinois, 1913
Imperial Hotel, Tokyo, Japan, 1913
! Bluffs Development for Sherman M. Booth,
Illll:
1915
Glen
Decatur, Illinois, 1915
Project: M.W. Wood Hou:
A.D. German Warehouse Richland Center, Wisconsin, 191 5
Project:
.
,
e
Barnsdall, Olive Hill, Los Angeles,
California, 1915
Project: Edward H. Doheny Ranch Re; rt. Sierra Madre
Mountains, California, 1921
:iln>.
Project: Floating Cabin, Tahoe Summe r Resort, lake
1
California, 1922
LakeTaho.
Project: Cabin, Shore type. Tahoe Sum
California, 1922
"La Miniatura", Mrs. George Madison Millard House, Pasaden:
.
California,
"The
Hill,
1923
Little Dipper", Kindergarten for Aline Barnsdall. Olive
Los Angeles. California, 1923
F.
Project;
25.
Johnson House, Windy Point,
26.
27.
28.
29.
30.
31.
32.
33.
34.
Monona Terrace Civ c Center, Lake Mon
Madis
1938
George D. Sturges House, Bentwood Heights. California, 1 9
"Suntop Homes", Quadruple House for Otto Mallery, Ardir
Pennsylvania, 1939
Lloyd Lewis Houst, Lihenyville, Illinois, 1940
Rose Pauson House, Phoenix, Arizona. 1940
John C. Pew House, Shorewood Hills, Madison, Wisconsin,
1940
Project: "Sijistan", House for John Nesbitt, Los Angeles,
Project:
Burton Tremaine Observatory and Inn, Meteor Crater,
Arizona, 1948
Wisconsin, 1937
,
Project: Theater for Alir
t
Pennsylvania, 1947
:
,
House, Dallas, Tei
Raul Bailleres House, A<
Raul Bailleres Hoi
Mai
iMem rial,
;e,
Gillin
Electric
Pro;
"The Golden B
Compai
.",
o,
;o.
Italy,
i
1952
19S2
1953
Building, San Mateo,
Skyscraper for Chicago,
Illinois,
19!
Mile High Skyscraper,
"The
Illinois",
Chicago,
Illinois,
1956
Project: "Oasis", Arizona State Capitol, Phoenix, Arizona,
19S7
Norman, Oklahoma, 1958
The Donahoe Triptych for Mrs. Daniel J. Donahoe,
Project: Trinity Chapel,
California, 1941
Project:
Project: V.C. Morris House, San Francisco, California, 1945
Project: Calico Mills Office Building and Store for the Sarab
Company, Ahmedabad, India, 1946
Project; Rogers Lacy Hotel. Dallas. Texas, 1946
Solomon R. Cuggenheim Museum, New York, New York,
1943-1959
Phoenix. Arizona, 1959
FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT
SELECTED DRAWINGS
PORTFOLIO VOL.2BB
Edited by Yukio Futagawa & The Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation
Introduction by Olgivanna Lloyd Wright
Features Wright's residential works, ranging from small projects like
the Millard House, to large projects such as the Uroadacrc City Plan.
Residential architecture, especially in America, has been greatly
influenced by Wright's excellent concepts many of which are
portrayed in the drawings that make up this volume.
European Edition limited to 200 Copies
American Edition limited to 700 Copies
(Exclusive Distributor in U.S.A.
Ilcnz<
Press Publishers, Ltd.,
i
New
York)
William H. Winslow S tables, River Forest, Illinois, 189
Frank Lloyd Wright Studio, Oak Park, Illinois. 1 895
s Apartments, Chicago, Hlinoi
Susan Lawrence Dan House, Springfield, lllin
Isidore Heller Hous
Chicago, Illinois, 1896
Project: Ladies Hoi
Journal: "A Home in a
.
.
.
.
Project:
Edward Schroeder House, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. 191
Frank Lloyd Wright Studio-Residence, Goethe Street,
Project:
Chic
.
lllin.
Summer Colony, Lake Tahoe.
Texas, 1925
1900
F.B. Henderson House, Elmhurst, Illinois, 1901
E.H. Cheney House, Oak Park, Illinois, 1903
Project: H.J. Ullman House, Oak Park, Illinois, 1904
Project: House in Wood and Plaster for Highland Park, Illinois,
1904
Thomas Hardy House, Racine, Wisconsin, 1904
W.R. Heath House, Buffalo, New York, 1905
George Madison Millard House, Highland Park, Illinois, 1906
F.F. Tomek House, Riverside. Illinois, 1907
E.E. Boynton House, Rochester, New York, 1908
Mrs. Thomas Gale House, Oak Park, Illinois. 1909
Project: Frank Lloyd Wright Studio-Residence. Fiesole
(Florence), Italy, 1910
Bitter Root inn, Darby, Montana, 1911
Project:
Hunting Lodge, Tahoe
California, 1922
Project: Desert Cottage for Arthur Sachse, Mojave Desert,
California, 1922
Project: Mrs. Samuel William Gladney House, Fort Worth,
Project:
"Kindersymphonie" Playhouse No.3.
for the Oak
Park, Illinois, 1926
School for Negro Children, La Jolla,
Park Playground Association,
Rosenwald
California, 1928
Project:
Oak
Project: The;
Mural: "City by the Sea", executed for the Music Pavilion,
Taliesin West, Scottsdale, Arizona, 19S5-19S8
Project: "Alladin", John Gillin House, Hollywood, California,
,
Florida Southern College, Lakeland, Florida,
Project:
Project:
Project:
House for LIFE Magazine, 1938
John Nesbitt House, Carmel, California, 1940
John Nesbitt House. "Sijistan" (remodelling of the
Charles Ennis House), Los Angeles, California, 1941
85.
19S2
Wisconsin. 1952
Project: Point View Residences, Apartment Tower for the
Edgar J. Kaufmann Charitable Trust, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania,
1938
84.
Florida.
Hillside Theatre Curtain. Taliesin Playhouse, Spring Green,
Project: St. Mark's
Tower for the Vestry of St. Mark's in the
Bouwehe, Rev. William Norman Guthrie, New York, 1929
s Shop for Leo Bramson, Oak Park, Illinois, 1937
Paul R. Hanna louse, Stanford, California, 1936
82.
83.
Twin Suspension Bridges
tor Pittsburgh Point
Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, 1947
Project: Self-Service Garage, Edgar J. Kaufmann, Pittsburgh,
Pennsylvania, 1949
Project: "Boulder House" for Mr, and Mrs. Edgar J.
Kaufmann, Palm Springs, California, 1951
Project: Fraternity House for Zeta Beta Tau, Gainesville,
Project:
Community
The Solomon
R.
Guggenheim Museum, New York. New York.
1943
Herbert Jacohs House, "The Solar Hemicycle", Middleton,
Wisconsin. 1944
87. Project: Stuart Haldorn House; "The Wave", Carmel,
86.
California,
1953
1956
Annunciation Greek Orthodox Church, Milwaukee, Wisconsin.
1956-1958
Project: Bramlett Motor Hotel, Memphis, Tennessee, 1956
Project: Detail of Opera House, Plan for Greater Baghdad,
Baghdad. Iraq, 1957
Project: Broadacre City Plan (The Living City). 1934. 1958
Project: Marin Fair Pavilion. Marin County Civic Center, San
Raphael, California, 1959
1945
Q/§)
A.D. A.
EDITA
3-12-14 Sendagaya. Shibuya-ku,
Tokyo Co.,Ltd.
Tokyo
151,
Japan Phone 03-403-1581
Printed in Japan
s~ a- >a
820232
INSTITUTION
HOOVER
ON
AND
WAR, REVOLUTION
PEACE
Stanford, California 94305
August A, 1982
Mr. Edgar Tafel
14 East 11th Street
New York, NY 10003
Dear Edgar:
We enjoy your letters - they are so full of activity and
enthusiasm!
The idea of doing an "oral history" of your Frank Lloyd
Wright correspondence and memorabilia sounds exciting.
By all means do it and get it published.
How can one see your documentary on Fallingwater?
is it distributed?
How
You mentioned having an assistant editing some of your
articles.
Let us hear more.
Our book sold out the first printing by Christmas.
second printing now.
In
Cor
'tf>ic^^^
Paul R. Hanna
Senior Research Fellow
PRH:atk
(-/
s
,
I
820232 B
Stanford University
Museum
EDUCATIONAL SERVICES PROGRAM
of Art
HANNA-HONEYCOMB HOUSE
The Hanna-Honeycomb House, designed by Frank Lloyd Wright, was constructed on
the Stanford campus in 1937.
The plan of the house is based on an hexagonal
module.
Characteristics of Mr. Wright's Prairie houses and Usonian houses
are evident in the design.
The American Institute of Architects designated the Hanna-Honeycomb House as
one of seventeen buildings designed by Frank Lloyd Wright that exemplify the
architect's contribution to American culture.
In 1978, the house was entered
on the National Register of Historic Places.
Professor and Mrs. Paul R. Hanna gave their home to Stanford University in
1974.
The house presently is the private residence of the Provost of the
University and his family.
Docents conduct hour- long tours of the Hanna-Honeycomb House on the second
Each tour is
and fourth Thursdays of the month at 2:00, 2:15 and 2:30.
It is recommended that reservalimited to ten adults by reservation only.
tions be made at least one month in advance of the requested date through
the office of the Educational Services Program, 415/497-3469.
Recommen ded rea ding:
Period ica
I
"A Great Frank Lloyd Wright House," House Beaut
"Honeycomb House," Architectural
Record
,
vol.
i
f
84,
u
,
vol.
July,
105, January
1963.
1938.
Books
Blake, Peter.
The Master Bui Iders
New York: Norton, 1976.
Hanna, Paul
Report
P.
.
A.
Knopf,
S.
-
1960
Inc.,
/
The Clients'
I
Scully, Vincent.
.
Alfred
Frank Lloyd Wright's Hanna House
The M. .T. Press, 1981.
Cambridge, MA:
and Jean
Hitchcock, Henry Russell.
Sloan and Pearce, 1942
Wright, Fi
Horizc
New York:
.
'.
In
/
New York:
the Nature of Materials
New York:
Da Capo Press, 1975.
Frank Lloyd Wright
.
.
New York:
loyd.
The Japanese Print,
ss, 1967.
The Natura
I
House.
New York:
Stanford, California
an
George Braziller,
Interpretation
Horizon Press,
94305
(415)
.
Due
II
1960.
New York:
1954.
497-3469
6/s:
82C2S2
£.
Educational Services Program
Stanford University Museum ol Art
HANNA HONEYCOMB HOUSE
Stantord. California
415/497-3469
To:
Your reservation for
tour of the Hanna-Honeycomb House is on
for
visitors.
If any member of your group must cancel a
reservation, please
notify the office of the Educational Services Program at
the
Stanford Museum of Art, 415/497-3469.
a
Committee for Art docents from the Stanford Museum of Art conduct
the tours.
Please arrive ten minutes before the time of your tour.
Tours begin promptly and last one hour.
Because each tour is limited to ten adults, please do not bring
visitors who have no reservations.
Children under 17, including
infants, are not permitted on tours.
The Hanna-Honeycomb House is a private residence located
at
737 Frenchman's Road.
Please respect the privacy of the occupants
by not opening closets or drawers, or handling household
objects.
Visitors will be asked to leave umbrellas and large bags
in the
house foyer.
No smoking
is
permitted on the premises.
Permission to photograph the exterior of the house is limited
to
restricted areas and is not permitted during the tour.
Photographing
the interior is prohibited.
Please park on Frenchman's Road and walk up the driveway
to meet the
docent on the brick steps leading from the parking circle
to the
terrace.
If the walk up the inclined driveway
would be difficult for
members of your group, drop them off at the brick steps
before parking
on Frenchman's Road.
These guidelines for tours of the Hanna-Honeycomb
House have been
established by the Office of the Provost and the Department
of Art at
Stanford University.
I
Hanna-Honeycomb Hous<
FRENCHMAN'S
JUNIP EROSERRA
.
to
San Francisco
94305
1/
^
^
-
J*°
1
-J
"
and
J^eisutv
the ^/brts
Taliesin:
By Frederick
C.
New
Klein
Spring Green, Wis.
"Work, Life and Love I trans/erred to
the beloved ancestral Valley where my
would be
in bought the low hill on which Tahestn
now stands. She offered it to me as a
/ began to build Taliesin to
refuge
get my back against the wall and fight
for all I saw 1 had to fight.
mother foreseeing
.
.
the plight I
.
#
*
#
Frank Lloyd Wright
famous house in this
West
Scottsdale, Ariz.
/
And
that's the rub:
long years of part
time use and part-time care threaten to do
what fire couldn't, which is bring down for
good this most personal monument of the
man many consider America's greatest ar-
we do. Everyone who knew him well or
worked with him held him in the highest
required.
regard," says Thomas Casey, who came
here in 1950 as a student and later returned
to join the firm. "Do we imitate him? Not
consciously. We make our own assessments of any job we take. But wCtcould do
worse than imitate him. Look around our
cities and see what some of his detractors
To be sure, things aren't as bad as they
were a few years age when one architectural journal called Taiiesin "a vast, crumbling ruin." In 1976,
beit reluctantly,
Mi Wright
s heirs, al-
accepted National Land-
status for the site and $300,000 in fed-
make much-needed
eral funds to
comes
through strongest in its school, which remains unique 50 years after its founding. It
has tightened its curriculum of late because it is seeking the accreditation it previously disdained, but it remains true to
Mr. Wright's conviction that architectural
education should be broad, informal, active
and humanistic.
school's 25 students range
from
17-
year-old high school graduates to adults
with extensive academic backgrounds.
Chosen as much for "character " and personal habits (early rising is one) as for
scholastic credentials, they enter and leave
the school without regard for conventional
academic calendars.
Advanced students work as draftsmen
architects, school foundation staff members and their families share in all facets
of the daily life of Taliesin, including gardening, tour-guiding and cooking and dishwashing in a common kitchen. Their communal lifestyle and shared beliefs give the
place a monastic
air.
repairs.
shows a presentable face to
pilgrims who come to admire the work of
the Master.
But looks are deceiving and the Frank
Lloyd Wright Foundation, which owns and
operates the 700-acre property here as well
as Taliesin West, calculate that about $2.5
million more is needed to fully restore the
of buildings.
"What it comes down to is that anyone
who would give us money would want a
voice in how we operate, and we're not
Mr. Wright's lifetime the Taliesin
In
community
also farmed the gently rolling
land here. The residents no longer do that
because their stay is too brief and so much
of their time is spent maintaining the
buildings that dot the landscape.
There are three main buildings. The
most striking, of course, is Taliesin itself,
the
stone-and-wood
multi-level,
home
name, meaning "shining
brow," is derived from its situation just below the crest of the dominant hill on the
property.
The architectural firm and
whose
Welsh
about to offer that," says Charles Montooth, a member of Taliesin Associated Architects, the firm whose revenues provide
most of the foundation a income.
school are based about three-quarters of a
Mr. Montooth and his colleagues -inMr. Wright's widow Olgivanna,
who is in her 80s- say they are determined
to keep Taliesin "alive," which is to say
working. The work goes on at Taliesin Associated Architects, staffed by pupils of
Mr. Wright, and at the Frank Lloyd Wright
sky-lit central drafting
cluding
School of Architecture,
The firm's
members
are designers of
Mr. Wright's
ideas of an "organic" architecture -basically fluid interior spaces and a smooth integration of structure and setting. They
adapt some 200 building schemes Mr.
12
The people who run
original structures based on
Wright left behind when he died in 1959,
and teach at the school. Some in the proJesslon regard the concern as more of a religious cult than an architectural firm. It's
Taliesin have inves
tigated other possible sources of funds, but
thus far have found none to iheir liking
Their reluctance to surrender even swuc <>i
their decisionmaking prerogatives is at'
least
matched by
their dislike of the
j»».s
ture of the supplicant.
for instance, one
is.
avenue that has been considered and rejected, even though about 3,000 visitors a
summer find their way here and pay $4 to
tour the school with little encouragement
from the foundation
The designs Mr. Wright left the firm aw
doubtlessly of value, but the Taliesin group
will sell them only if it can retain full sr
chitectural controi over the resulting but!
ings. These terms haven't been acceptable
i
The
Taliesin today
complex
and $200,000 a year to the upJtMf)
and Arizona proj>eriHs
which isn't enough to do ail the work thai
$100,000
Increased tourism
Taliesin's torch-carrying aspect
at Taliesin Associated Architects. Students,
chitect.
mark
of the Wisconsin
built."
the desert outside of
in
a charge that doesn't go down well here.
"Do we revere Mr. Wright? Certainly
built Taliesin, his
beautiful part of
southern Wisconsin in 1911. He rebuilt it in
1915 and again in 1925 after fires all but destroyed It. For 48 oi his 92 years it was his
primary residence and workplace and the
home of the school of architecture he
founded to cany on nis principles.
Taliesin still is a home, studio, school
and, now, shrine, but only in the summer;
at other times, the people and institutions
thai survive Mr. Wright base themselves
at Taliesin
820234
Life for the Master's Shrine?
mile away in an H-shaped unit Mr. Wright
designed in 1902 as a school to be operated
by his aunts. Its main feature is a huge,
room. In between
are a cluster of connected utility buildings
that the architect built to harmonize with
the complex's other structures.
The utility buildings are in most obvious
need of overhauling; their foundations are
crumbling and their roofs and walls have
gaping holes. In the other buildings, electrical and mechanical systems need repair, foundations need shoring, roofs need
resurfacing and there is much interior
plastering to be done.
The problem
of
the
is
money. More than
Foundation's annual
W;'<
revenues of
about $1.75 million come from its architectural business which, like that of other
architects, has had its ups and downs in re
cent years. It can devote only between
of the plans -all
realized since his
many. Only a handful
to
for
homes-have been
death.
For now, the foundation
hope that its architectural
day lead
it
is
content
arm
will
to prosperity, and, indeed,
to
one
its
business has improved of late. Among its
current projects are a 600-room hotel neai
Denver, a resort-motel in Ventura. Calif., m
theatre In Bartiesville, Okla. and an offx e
building in Scottsdale.
"There are many Individuals and im.naround the country that believe in
what Mr. Wright did and want to see his
work carried on," says Richard Carney,
tutions
the group's treasurer. "Somehow, we have
to find a way to convince them that the
best way to do this is to allow his suae;,
sors to continue to build according to his
ideas."
Afr. Klein is a member of the Jour
nais Chicago bureau.
Hanna
Lloyd
Wright's
Frank
House: The Clients' Report by Paul R.
and Jean S. Hanna. New York/Cambridge: Architectural History Founda-
820235
tion/MIT Press. 1981. 148 pages. Nu-
merous
illustrations;
predominantly
black-and-white. $25.00, hardcover.
Seduced by Frank Lloyd Wright's notions of domesticity and organic architecture, Paul and Jean Hanna em-
barked in 1930 on an architect-client,
master-disciple relationship with him
that was to shape their lives. He designed for them his first home based
on the hexagonal form of the bees's
honeycomb. So that their own desires
would not be subsumed toward the
fulfillment of his formal dream, the
Hannas strove to actively participate in
the house's creation. They kept elaborate records of this collaboration, sav-
ing
correspondence
contracts,
(the
was near Stanford University;
Wright was at Taliesin), drawings,
photographs, and notes spanning
nearly 50 years. The highlights of that
site
material comprise this clients' report.
Like a study in emotional range, the
tenor of the Hannas' letters to Wright
reveal a cycle from confidence to confusion. In response to their countless
queries. Wright cabled quips and
counter-plans, enticing the clients to
Kierkegaardian leaps of faith through
his well-crafted hoops. In between,
their belief short-circuited, ensuring a
steady supply of diverting dialogues.
After the Hannas wired Wright a geologist's report of a geologic fault bisecting the site, he resolutely replied: "I
built the Imperial Hotel." Why. since
they were "hardly pygmies" had he designed "procrustean beds |.'U)"| nibs
124"). .iikI doorwnvs (19")?" Because,
assured die architect, shop proportions urn- as liiiiisv and wasteful as
And besides, as the
iln\ were uglv
Hannas came to understand, slaudard si/es would have violated his
chosen design module.
The nightmares, from cost and time
overruns (largely attributable to the
120 degree angles) to fee and design
disputes, never eclipsed the realization of both artist's and patrons'
dreams in this symbiotic relationship
between unequals. The book is revelatory of not only what it was like to work
with Frank Lloyd Wright, but of the nature of other client-designer associaions as well, for though the results are
seldom so exemplary, the conflicts and
compromises weathered by both par(
t
ties are
no more
day.—SW
easily resolved
to-
METROPOLIS JUL/AUG 82
21
820236
HOOVER
INSTITUTION
ON
AND
WAR, REVOLUTION
PEACE
Stanford, California 94505
August 16, 1982
Mr.
Wil
1
i
am Marl in
210 East Pearson Street
Chicago, IL 60511
Dear Bill
:
Please do not speculate any nore on the unidentified
letters.
I
would be terribly upset if such were
ever mentioned in
airy
way.
I
-:m
sire
you can
understand my feelings.
Corii-rKy,
Paul
P.
Manna
Senio^ research Fellow
PRH:atk
HOOVER INSTITUTION
ON WAR. REVOLUTION AND
'sff&
PZACE
Stanford. California 94305
Augus- 16, 19E2
Will iam Marl in
210 East Pearson Street
Chicago, IL 60611
Mr.
Dear Bill
I
•
:
am sorry
at once.
I
did not answer your correspondence
Kosher is in Alaska, until
Paul
August 23 and
I
must have his answer en
your proposition re the Martin Papers.
Hastily,
Paul R. Manna
Senior Research Fellow
PRH:atk
820237
HOOVER
INSTITUTION
ON
AND
WAR, REVOLUTION
PEACE
Stanford, California 94305
August 16, 1982
Wi ] 1 i am Marl i n
210 East Pearson Street
Chicago, IL 60611
Mr.
Dear Bill
:
have not been able to think no re about an article on
I
Frank Lloyd Wright and the hexagonal grid system.
Jean
and I are wery busy putting our papers in shape for
transfer to the Stanford Archives. That will take
another two months.
Then I hope to think about the
Wright article.
In the meantime, I am collecting
more background on this aspect of his work.
I
should
not commit myself to complete an article by November.
You mention plans for
more.
a
trip to California.
Tell me
Cordial ly,
Paul
R.
HannT
Senior Research Fellow
PRH:atk
8202^8
820239
EDGAR
14
EAST
llth
Dear Paul
ARCHITECT
TAFEL,
STREET,
NEW YORK.
N.
Y.
10003
19
(212)
673-6000
August
Thought the attached might be of interest if you havnt
seen it- somehow it leaves one saddened- the quotes of Carney
and Montooth are like interviews with longtime has beensMontooth is supposedly the PR director at Taliesin, and
all I ever see him direct is a rake near leaves, and washing
dishes.
Sad.
Ward Willetts
I hear from several grapevines that the
H use in Chicago is going to Austin Texas- to be rebuilt
there.
The Texans are waking up to the need for culture,
and Chicago is about as far East they would dare.
Anywaythey might be a better place for the depositary of my
collection- the more I delve into it, the more it seems
£ake it seriously, and get some committments
I should iBally
soon- ot would take a lot of work, but would be worth it.
Have ruled out Columbia, and maybe the Art Institute- they
never showed any more than passi gg interest- but when
you meet the heads of both, its easy to understand.
Am nailed down for the rest of the summer here- some projects
on the horizon, but nothing really exciting- except a house
or two.
Was up to see Jack Howe's house design in New
Caanen- the one we have supervised- the ownee went and boiught
a boat instead of paying contractor, and the house never gets
completed- its like a fine piece of canintry from one end to
anotKher.
Did I ask- how many books (yours) were in the first printing
Am interested- here's reply card.
that sold out?
Best to you and
;
3«sC2
,
820240
JOHN K HOWE,
BURNSVILLE PARKWAY BURNSVILLE, MINNESOTA
151
ARCHITECT
55337
TELEPHONE
(612)890 1896
Auoust 22, 1982
R. Manna
Institution on Var, ^evolution and Peace
Stanford, California 94-305
9r
.
Paul
•-'(Dover
Dear Paul
was glad to get your letter of July 29 and to know that you
have followed my career with satisfaction, I have your book,
have read it, and found it most interesting; though I noted
only one brief mention of my name
T
Mr. "'right was resoonsible for the innovative design of your
house, and he worked on or checked every drawing that was
made of your house during his lifetime.
T he
Moult, Lusk, Hanna, Carlson, Jurgenson and McCallum were the
first Usonian houses,
r,
right had been talking about the
need for low cost, largely prefabricated houses since the
sheet steel "minimum", "two car", and "two-zone" houses designed
for ^roadacre City. The request by H. C. Moult, who had a millwork company in Wichita, Kansas, for a low-cost house of wood,
to be largely prefabricated in the mill, was the catalyst for
the Usonian houses, of which yours and the Jacobs were the first
to be built. Nothing further materialized with the Hoult house,
so Mr.
right developed the olan and ideas further for the
Jacobs house.
right rrade a fellowship project of these ideas, asking
each of us to make olans for typical houses using these ideas
and laying them out on unit systems (or modules) based on the
square, rectangle, and hexagon.
Mr.
AL'324r^
-
>
,
820241
Dage two
"hough Mr. Wright had talked about the hexagon as an ideal
unit for a house, he had not designed one. He felt it was
more sympathetic to human movement, being more plastic
with its 190° angles, than the 90° angles, which tend to box
people in.
remember, it was on a plan Cornelia had made on a hexagona
I
unit system that he began the design of your house; (the Hoult
and Lusk on plans I had made on a rectangular unit system, the
Jurgenson on a previous plan Mr. Wright had made for Broadacre
City).
As
So, indeed, your house was the first building by him "to
have used the geometry of the bees"; as to "first ever" in
the world, only ~od knows. The house for the Misses Motz,
Cornelia's aunts, was started by Cornelia and worked on by
Mr, Wright. This was the second such house. I suggest you
verify all this with Cornelia.
hope I have satisfactorily responded to the questions
you raised in your letter. If I can be of any further help,
please let me know.
I
With best wishes to you and Jean.
""
i
ncere
I
y
Z^l
,
.
John H. Howe
P.
8.
T he
address you have: 15709 James Avenue South is correct
(our home address
"he above address: 1 51 "'est Burnsville Parkway is also
correct (my office address).
)
.
HOOVER
INSTITUTION
AND
ON
WAR, REVOLUTION
820242
PEACE
Stanford, California 94305
August 24, 1982
Bruce Pfeiffer
Director of Archives
The Frank Lloyd Wright Memorial Foundation
Taliesin
Spring Green, WI 53588
Mr.
Dear Bruce:
Paul Mosher has returned from Alaska and
call of last week.
I
told him of your telephone
I
find Mr. Mosher Associate Director of Stanford University Libraries,
agrees with what I said to you.
Stanford is pleased to have been able
to join the Unive rsity of New York at Buffalo in preventing the Frank
Lloyd Wright/Mart in papers from being sold piece by piece for their
autograph value a nd scattered to the winds.
Buffalo and Stanford will
be working on the se archives for some time sorting, arranging, and inJea n and I are giving almost full-time to the several
dexing them.
thousand papers i n the Martin collection.
It will be many months before
the materials wil 1 be available to scholarly research.
And when they
are added to the Frank Lloyd Wright/Hanna collection, we will monitor
their use careful ly.
,
The two checks, one
My cancelled checks have been returned by my bank.
for Portfolio No. 3, and one for half of our royalties from the publishers
If Mrs. Wright has received the checks, I would
were not included.
If the checks were not received by you
appreciate a note for my records.
or Mrs. Wright, let me know at once so I can stop-payment and issue
replacements.
Jean and I are planning to attend the SAH meetings in Phoenix April 6
through 10, 1983.
We are eagerly looking forward to seeing you all at
that time.
Our love to Mrs. Wright and the Fellowship
Cordially,
Aaa^J^
R. Hanna
Senior Research Fellow
Paul
PRHiatk
bcc:
Paul Mos
a
Walk Jones & Francis Man,
Inc.
S202AS
August
1982
24,
Dr. and Mrs. Paul R. Hanna
Hoover Institution
Stanford University
Stanford, CA 94305
Dear Dr. and Mrs. Hanna,
have just finished reading your recent book "Frank Lloyd Wright's
Hanna House, The Client's Report." It is a beautiful documentation
of the evolution and history of a classic piece of architecture.
I
The house captured my
interest when, as an architecture student in
in House Beautiful's January issue
publication
still keep on file.
was enthralled upon seeing it
(exterior only) in the spring of 1979.
1963,
I
saw
it
—
published
I
I
My urge
to write you back in 1963 and again in 1979 is now belatedly
being realized.
have simply wished to thank and congratulate you
both for having helped create such a magnificent work of art. Frank
continually
Lloyd Wright undoubtedly deserves credits but, as
become more aware, it takes both a creative architect and a good
I
I
client to
produce
The Hanna House
a
good building.
is
a classic
example of this theory
at
work.
Sin
Martin E. Gorman, Jr., AIA
Senior Vice President
MEG:jk
Architecture
Engineering
Planning
Interior
Design
Walk C.Jones, III, AIA
Francis Mah, AIA
Tilman E. Eddins
Michael F. Finefield, AIA
R. Allan Goeltz
Martin E. Gorman,
S.J. Klettner
Box 171206
Memphis, Tennessee 381 17
901 767 6710
Jr.,
AIA
David A. Pang, RA
L. Eugene Smith
Lawrence V. Tomlinson, RA
Richard N. Van Frank, AIA
v.
Paul
INSTITUTION
HOOVER
AND
ON
WAR, REVOLUTION
Turner82< v
FLLW
__
PEACE
Stanford, California 94305
August 25, 1982
Mr. John H. Howe, Architect
151 Burns ville Parkway
Burnsville, MN 55337
Dear Jack:
Jean and
I
were pleased
to get
your letter yesterday.
You
raised a point that begets memories of our disappointing
experiences with publishing.
In the 550-page manuscript we sent
the publisher two years ago, we made frequent reference to John
H. Howe and to others of the FLLW Fellowship who were deeply
involved in preparing the drawings and the specifications of our
house.
We spoke of the contributions you and others made and
of numerous events that made possible the wonderful buildings in
which we had the satisfaction of living so many years.
reducing the manuscript from 550 typed pages to 150
print pages of illustrations and text, many specific references to
individuals and events were drastically reduced in quantity.
But
in
know you are familiar with this author/publisher problem. The
I
author has to take the editor's decision on what to print in
order to bring out a volume that won't cost so much that its
retail price will limit the market.
So you can sense our disappointment that the final volume has so
few references to you. In the original manuscript we submitted,
we included the statement you prepared
for Wisconsin
newspapers. The editors did not use your statement of several
pages of typed material.
Other letters from you to us were
submitted but not used.
Your name does appear on page 93, along with the Fellowship
members who visited us in 1938, and in the "Acknowledgments."
But these two references in no way do justice to the drafting
contributions you
indeed sorry.
made
to our project.
For this omission we are
(continued)
^
'
820245
Mr. John H. Howe, Architect
August 25, 1982
Page Two
But to respond to the major content of your August 22, 1982
letter— your report on Mr. Wright and his interest in preAnd your
fabrication of the first Usonian houses is excellent.
account of the early work "on unit systems (or modules) based on
the square, rectangle, and hexagons" is exactly what we hoped
for.
We shall, with your permission, quote you in the article we
are preparing on the hexagonal grid systems.
We have communicated with Cornelia on the origin of the
hexagonal grid system as you suggested.
Again, thank you for your helpful response.
touch with you.
We
will
keep
Paul R. Hanna
Senior Research Fellow
PRH:atk
in
EDGAR
14
EAST
I
t
I
STREET.
h
ARCHITECT
820246
TAFEL,
NEW
MEMORANDUM
.
-YORK.
PATE
N.
*9
Y.
10003
(212)
673-6000
^^
PROJECT,
TQ;
\^K~*+*^
FROM:
^
\
<^
V^^AJ^f
\
'
LOCATION
C.
C
Last week was in Madison for a series of things, and
had the oppertunity of going to Taliesin- Mrs W had
a dinner and c0oncert for the local Shakespere
players, and I was invited.
There as no time to talk- Dr Joe ussured me into the loggia,
forth for a few moments- saying words to the
and Mrs W heldf
effect that I had strayed, had gotten what Ibhave from my
experiences there, etc etc... then we all repaired to
the Hillside complex for dinner and concert of chorus,
quartette, violmn, etc.
The same crowd I knw are well
and there- Wes was on his way back from Arizona.
Been working on two articles for publication- one due
this wekk, for the stanp commemorative of FALLINGWAKER.
for Readers Digest stamp sepertment.
^A/U
.
.
—
|^Re letters- some 24, with all the other copies of letters
to Mr Wright, and memorabilia- have finally thought out a
procedure- which is to talk into a recorder about each,
have the talks typed up, and the see what place the
whole thing should have. Maybe auction it off like
the D D Martin lot?
That would be interesting. Anyway,
I hav e to get it further along, and from now til Fall will be
the time- especially sine the big YMCA job went to others.
^Thrs^g
Just got another house to design- somewhat a bore.
Anywaythats about the score for the time
hope alls well,
and best to jean
/.
311C?
OFFICE
MEMORANDUM
•
STANFORD UNIVERSITY
•
OFFICE
MEMORANDUM
•
STANFORD UNIVERSITY
•
OFFICE
MEMORANDUM
8302$.$ A
Date
To
27 August
1982
Paul Hanna
Hoover Institution
>
z
-n
O
JO
O
c
2
<
m
JO
From
Roxanne Nilan
University Archives
Subject
Microfilm
2
Paul,
O
XI
>
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o
c
5
I've checked with Mark Larwood Co. for an estimate on the microfilming
of those archival records relating to University Services and your
At
other Stanford activities remaining in the University Archives.
13.25c per frame, the copying fee would be approximately $600. (This
is somewhat of a rough estimate since it is impossible to carry out
an actual item count.)
>
z
-n
o
JO
While our meager budget could not handle this, I'd be happy to have
a copy made for the Hoover Archives if they wish to pay for it.
The
copying can be done fairly conveniently any time this coming quarter.
O
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JO
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:
820J?47
JOHN
151
H.
HOWE,
BURNSVILLE PARKWAY BURNSVILLE, MINNESOTA
August
31
,
1
ARCHITECT
55337
TELEPHONE
(612)8 90 1896
982
Paul R. u anna
woover Institution on War, -evolution and Peace
Stanford, California Q4-305
Dr.
lear Paul
hasty reoly to your letter of August 25'
am qlad to oive oermission to you to quote
in your article what I wrote in my last letter
to you concerninq the backoround of the "honeycomb
plan".
A
T
We still have our cottaqe in the T aliesin Valley,
and are on our way down there this weekend.
With best wishes,
Jorin
u
.
u owe
v-.
A_r—
820248
HOOVER INSTITUTION
ON WAR, REVOLUTION AND PEACE
Stanford, California 94305
August 31, 1982
Martin E. Gorman, Jr., AIA
Senior Vice President
Walk Jones & Francis Man, Inc.
Box 171206
Memphis, Tennessee 38117
Mr.
Dear Mr. Gorman:
Your letter is
Thank you!
a
joy to my wife and myself.
I
understand the next issue of the Frank Lloyd
Wright Newsletter will carry an article about
gather from your letter that
Hanna House.
I
you collect, so I am sending you a current review on the recent book.
Cordially
Hanna
Senior Research Fellow
Paul
PRH:atk
Enclosure
R.
i^>»
/-'a/
FF.'CE
MEMORANDUM
•
STANFORD UNIVERSITY
•
OFFICE
MEMORANDUM
Vi
Date:
To
Paul
Mosher
From
Paul
Hanna
Subject.-
EDGAR TAFEL
t
August 31, 1982
820249
>
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-n
O
XI
o
C
Z
If you can make out Tafel's typing, this will interes tHe now toys with the idea that he may auction
you.
his archives.
He is hungry for money.
2
I
shall
to him.
PRHratk
be much interested in his reply to your lette r»
>
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c
5
>
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o
XI
o
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<
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TO
O
2
O
XI
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;
HANNAS' HONEYCOMB HOUSE
B20248A
Young architects and/or architectural students
1
who might find in the nitty-gritty details of building
house a guide to what to expect from clients;
example of one modus operandi of architect, clients, and construction workers; examples, in illus-
this
trations, of superb blueprints.
2. Young people aspiring to create their dream
house might profit from such details as:
Selecting an architect
Selecting a site for their house
Selecting a general style of architecture
Protocol of relations between architect
and
client:
when to say "no"; when to
when to respond "yes"
capitulate; and
enthusiastically
3. Citizens
concerned with the preservation of
historic buildings
The completed manuscript of the Hannas ran to
550 typed pages of text, plus many photographs
(both black and white and color) that range from
the
first
planning, through ground-breaking, to the
five phases of construction, and
completion of the
finally, the efforts to preserve their
they would no longer need
the interest of costs) that a
Frank Lloyd Wright's Hanna House: The Clients'
Report* was written by Paul and Jean Hanna over a
period of three years. The material in their book
was based on documents saved by the Hannas for
50 years. Some six-thousand items include such
ephemera as workmen's hourly wages, building materials and supplies, construction field notes, along
with scores of letters to and from Frank Lloyd
Wright and to and from Stanford University colleagues and officials. All these items authenticate
the trials and tribulations, the joys, disappointments
and satisfactions experienced by the Hannas as they
struggled to achieve "the perfect house".
For
whom
did the
Hannas write
—
lives as
book? Of
own satisfaction; for their
momento of an important period
youngsters; for friends who wanted
course, for their
dren
their
a
chilin their
to
know
"the true story" of their relation with their archi-
and their university.
But there were three other groups that the Hannas felt might profit from a comprehensive review
of the experiences of clients in planning and contect
struction of their house:
home
after
The editors felt (in
book of that size would
it.
not be marketable. Hence, the editors reduced the
book to a total of 148 pages of text and illustrations. Even so, the curtailed product provides a
rather comprehensive picture of the step-by-step
procedures which culminated in the house built on
the Stanford University campus during the years
1937-1982.
Hannas pulled no punches in the recital of the
problems encountered not only in the process of
constructing Mr. Wright's first completely hexagonal dwelling, but in the agonies and ecstasies of
frequent confrontation with their architect. All
details of such incidents are carefully documented
no statements are based on memory alone (an
illusive and often faulty handmaiden).
The period of construction of Honeycomb House
was a matter of building in phases:
The main house and carport
1
The guest house, hobby shop, and storeroom
2.
The garden house and pool
3.
Remodeling the bedrooms-library area of
4.
the main house
Construction of lower driveway and brick
5.
retaining walls
6.
Remodeling of hobby shop
apartment
takers'
into a care-
.
820249
The
was encompassed in Wright's
Hannas' 1 935 request of
Mr. Wright was that he design for them a house
suitable for the family of five, but one that could
be altered to conform with changing family comentire project
original plan for the house.
their
dream house.
Two
11
options presented them-
selves as possible solutions:
Remain in the house until death, when the
1
house, through their wills, would go to the university;
position. Miraculously, he succeeded.
2.
Give the house to the university now, move
make
The Hanna House became a study in artistic articulation. Not the least evidence of this artifice was
out, and help the university
found in the furniture and furnishings. Much of the
former was built into the structure: couches, ben-
so
ches, bookcases, shelves, beds, display cases, decks,
would use the house
and library desks. The moveable furniture, much of
which was designed by Mr. Wright, consisted of
dining room chairs and tables, end tables, living
room chairs and hassocks, as well as carpets and
aeroshade curtains. Some pieces, made in Hong Kong
to Hannas' specifications, were carefully articulated
to blend with the geometry of the hexagonal module.
sion of internationally visible, visiting scholars. Each
Equally important to the artifice of the project
was the site. Hanna House was designed to emerge
from the site and be part of it. The landscaping, the
Hannas' responsibility with suggestions from Mr.
Wright, grew along with the structure.
When the Hannas' youngsters had all flown off
to build their own nests, the Hannas followed Mr.
Wright's plans for converting the house to more
spacious accommodations for the parents. This arrangement the Hannas continued to enjoy foranother ten years.
Although Hannas had speculated from time to
time about what would become of their house when
they no longer needed it, it wasn't until 1973 that
they began to consider seriously the idsposition of
use of the house.
Hannas opted for the second possibility and in
doing in 1975 offered their house to Stanford
University with the understanding that Stanford
would lecture
as the domicile for a succes-
at the university for a year,
and while
Hanna-Honeycomb House.
Toward this end, the Hannas recommended that
the University remodel the hoppy shop into an
so doing, live
in
apartment for caretakers who would look after the
house and grounds and generally serve the visiting
scholar. The hobby shop is in the process of conversion.
The house has been plaqued by several organizaHouse Association of
tions, including the Historic
America.
At the moment, the Provost of the University
occupies the house. The Hannas are living in a condominium on campus. The house is open to visitors
(by appointment). Such appointments are made
through the Hanna-Honeycomb House Docents of
the Stanford University Museum.
*Paul R. and Jean S. Hanna: Frank Lloyd Wright's Hanna
House: The Clients' Report. New York City, The Architectural History Foundation and Cambridge, the MIT Press.
1981. $25.00.
PAUL
R.
AND JEANS. HANNA/HOOVER
INSTITUTION/STANFORD UNIVERSITY
CO
H
W
53
OFFICE
820?50
OF
MacKIE AND KAMRATH
FERNDALE
2713
FRED
KARL
MacKIE
j
F
J
PLACE
R
KAMRATH
HOUSTON
ARCHITECTS
TEXAS 77098
7IJ
3
9-2696
2
FA IA
FAIA
PARTNERS
LLOYD
BORGET
AIA
ELDRED M BRUNSON JR AIA
ROSS lllll GILLETTE
VINCENT
1
B
HUGHES
JR
i0
AIA
J -irM
September 1982
Paul Harma
Hoover Institution
Stanford, California
D-r.
94305
js
Dear Paul:
This is simply to confirm our telephone call yesterday as to the
Gardina will arrive in San Francisco from
times we discussed.
China on the morning of Wednesday, 13 October.
I will arrive the
next day, Thursday, 14 October from Houston. We will be pleased
to see you and Jean for lunch and dinner Friday, 15 October.
I
believe we were both looking at the month of September instead of
October on our calendars while we were talking.
We hope to obtain reservations at the downtown Holiday Inn for our
stay as Gardina would like to be downtown.
will presume the above time with youall will be O.K. unless I hear
from you otherwise.
Likewise, if there are any changes in our plans,
I'll inform you.
I
Looking forward to seeing youall again.
Cordially,
Karl Kamrath, F.A.I. A.
KK
gs
J
3
-
^820251
H
DatE:
To
From
.Al
El
p aul
September 2, 1982
sen
Hanna
:
Subject^TANFORDIS outdoor sculpture
Now that you have several new pieces of outdoor sculpture in place, and a new Rodin
garden in the making, I assume you will have new listings to add to the several now
in circulation.
I
attach an old list now used by Docents.
By the way, I enjoyed the story in Palo Alto Weekly for June
you are responsible for it.
2
1982.
I
am sure
What would you think of adding Frank Lloyd Wright's Stone Urn which he designed for
Inumarus gave this urn to me when the hotel was demolished,
the Tokyo Imperial Hotel?
The placeWe placed it in our garden at Hanna House.
Many people ask to see it.
I
ment is such that the occupants of the house need not be disturbed by viewers.
enclose a photo of the uncrating of the urn.
PRH:atk
Enclosures
^t*t-
U/
820252
HOOVER INSTITUTION
ON WAR, REVOLUTION AND PEACE
Stanford, California 94305
September 2, 1982
Bruce B. Pfeiffer
Director of Archives
The Frank Lloyd Wright Memorial Foundation
Taliesin
Spring Green, WI 53588
Mr.
'
Dear Bruce:
We are receiving reviews of the book on our
house.
The one enclosed is from Hamline
University and we thought you might like
to have a copy for your archives.
Paul R. Hanna
Senior Research Fellow
PRH:atk
Enclosure
u*, Aa.
820253
INSTITUTION
HOOVER
ON
AND
WAR, REVOLUTION
PEACE
Stanford, California 94305
September
Mr.
W.
2,
1982
Storrer
A.
1009 Gervais Street
Columbia, SC 29201
Dear Bill
:
By this time you no doubt have your program planned for
SAH in Phoenix.
Jean and I are working on our presentation
of experiences with Mr. Wright.
We are spending much of our time these days organizing and
indexing the FLLW/Martin archival collection which New York
University at Buffalo and Stanford acquired jointly.
An
extraordinary collection with over 200 handwritten or
typed letters signed by Wright.
Many studies of Mr. Wright
in
are possible by research
these documents.
It will be
months before these papers are ready for use by scholars.
On to Phoenix!
Cordi
Paul R. Hanna
Senior Research Fellow
PRHratk
820254
HOOVER INSTITUTION
ON WAR, REVOLUTION AND PEACE
Stanford, California 94305
September 3, 1982
Bob Englund
News Editor
Hamline University
MN 55104
St. Paul
Mr.
,
Dear Bob Englund:
want to thank you for your
I
excellent review appearing in the July
issue of the Hamline University of our
Wright book.
Your informative and sensitive writing is a pleasure to read.
We shall cherish this tribute to the
Jean and
book.
Paul R. Hanna
Senior Research Fellow
PRH:atk
bcc:
Lonnie Tuttle
Hamline
Carol A. Schultz Lindahl)
Department of Special Collections
THE STANFORD UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES
STANFORD. CAI IIORNIA
44305
September 3, 1982
820255
Stanton F. Biddle
Associate Director of University Libraries
State University of New York at Buffalo
Buffalo, NY 14206
Mr.
Dear Mr. Biddle:
Enclosed is a corrected draft of the announcement of the acquisition
As I menof the Darwin D. Martin/Frank Lloyd Wright Collection.
tioned in our telephone conversation, this release will circulate
Further publicity on the collection will
to our major donors only.
occur once the papers have been fully processed and are available
to researchers.
We would appreciate your sending us advance copies of any written
understand that the
announcements pertaining to the collection.
I
publicity for your September 15 reception is ready to be released
and copies of the release may not reach us before that date.
This
is acceptable since we have discussed the wording and agree that the
purchase price will not be released, that the collection will be
referred to as a joint acquisition rather than a joint purchase, and
that it be understood that the acquisition was made possible through
the generous gifts of private donors.
Thank you very much for consulting us on this matter, and we look
forward to seeing the announcements you've released.
Yours truly,
Rudisell
Manuscripts Librarian
Carol A.
CARrek
End.
cc:
y
Paul
R.
Hanna
SEP10J982
sep^1CC2
820256
DEAR H&G
QI
read with interest your November 1981 story about the "Honeycomb" house in Palo Alto, California. I,
want to build a Frank Lloyd
Wright house. Are plans available?
too,
—E.
A
G.,
College Station, Tex.
The Frank Lloyd Wright Foun-
dation doesn't duplicate existing
Frank Lloyd Wright buildings for oth-
and
er clients
locations.
However,
it
about 150 unexecuted designs for residences designed by Frank
has on
Lloyd Wright between 1936 and 1959
its firm
Taliesen Associated Architects
could possibly execute on
suitable sites, for its usual fee. These
designs can be modified to suit a cli-
Measured drawings are not building
you would have to hire an architect to redraw them to conform to
current building codes and (unless cost
is no object) stock building materials.
provided Wright's original
design concept isn't affected. For details, query the Director of Archives,
For information on ordering copies of
measured drawings, write the Library
of Congress Historic American Buildings Survey, Prints & Photographs Division, Architecture, Design &
Engineering Collections, Washington,
D.C. 20540.
Working from material elsewhere at
the Library of Congress, architect Russell Swinton Oatman (132 Mirick
Road, Princeton, Mass. 01541) developed stock building plans adapted
from Wright's design for his 1889 Studio in Oak Park, Illinois a modernized-shingle-style house atypical of
Wright. For details, write Mr. Oatman
that
continued from page 30
file
—
—
ent's needs,
Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation, Taliesen West, Scottsdale, Ariz. 85261.
Fourteen houses designed by Wright
(not including the Hannas') are
among
American buildings from
which public-domain measured drawings were made under the Works Progress Administration in the '30s.
the 16,000
plans
—
—
for his "Victorian" catalogue $4 ppd.
QMy
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small amount of radioactive material.
Where can I learn more whether or not
it's a significant health risk?
—C.S., New York,
Y.
The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission has published a
booklet "What You Should Know
About Smoke Detectors." For a free
copy (while supply lasts), write the
C
o
X
-P
c
landlord has installed an ionization smoke detector in my
apartment. I've since heard that any
ionization smoke detector contains a
«5
s
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Commission
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phone
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Washington, D.C.
residents can call the Mayor's Office
Smoke Detector Hotline at 212-5661333. You may request the Mayor's
-Boy recliner
•H
CO
2-
at
the continental U.S., teletoll-free 800-638-8326; in Maryland call 800-492-8363. New York City
or, in
5
love."
A La-Z-Boy*
chair is easy to love
like no other, for the comfort of
its exclusive three-way footrest
and contour-action support— and
for the luxury of choosing from
the widest range of styles and
fabrics. Be sure to look for the
label that tells you it's a genuine
La-Z-Boy chair. See your Yellow
Pages for La-Z-Boy chairs,
Office Fact Sheet on the
smoke
detec-
and a statement from the New
York City Health Department by writing the Mayor's Action Center, 61
tor law
Chambers St., New York, N.Y. 10007,
and enclosing a self-addressed,
stamped envelope.
This controversy was discussed in
the January 1977 and August 1980 issues of Consumer Reports (Consumers
Union, Mount Vernon, N.Y. 10550)
and in The New York Times on December 10, 1981, and February 11,
1982. Reference copies are at most
metropolitan public
libraries.
available at fine furniture stores
and La-Z-Boy Showcase Shoppes.
La-Z-Boy
Chair
Company
Q
A
Where can I buy a pet door so
our
that
can let themselves in
and out?
H. M., Covington, La.
Here are some mail-order sources
retrievers
—
for four different self-closing pet
doors:
E & R
Enterprises,
4100 Old Daven-
port Road., Dubuque, Iowa 52001
(free brochure).
Sporting Dog Specialties, P.O. Box 68,
Spencerport, N.Y. 14559 (2 models,
free catalogue).
Turen,
03766
Etna Road., Lebanon, N.H.
(free brochure).
820?57
September 5, 1982
Paul H. Mosher, Director of Collection Development
Cecil Green Library
Stanford University
Stanford, California 94305
Dear Paul:
Thank you for sending the documents that belong in the pre-1914 portion
of the Darwin D. Martin Collection. It was a gesture of admirable good faith
and we will be happy to reciprocate If similar materials appear in our half
of the collection. Unfortunately any attempt at cataloguing Is being delayed
until I can complete my manuscript on Wright's Larkln Administration Building.
I expect to be finished soon.
Among the materials sent by you we found both an original and a xerox
copy of an account sheet dated Nov. 23, 1914. We are returning the copy as it
may be vital to the completeness of your collection.
We will be preparing a press release next week which will be sent to you
prior to release for your review. On September 15 we are having a reception
in the University Archives for donors and other Interested people in the
Buffalo community. A selection of the pre- 19 14 documents will be a view at
that time.
Please give my regards to the Hannas. I enjoyed meeting you in Chicago.
Sincerely,
Jack Cuinan, Associate Professor
cc:
Shonnie Finnegan
Paul and Jean Hanna
820258
<***
THE FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT MEMORIAL FOUNDATION
TALIESIN WEST
SCOTTSDALE. ARIZONA
85252
Paul Hanna
Hoover Institution
on War Revolution and Peace
Stanford University
Stanford, California 94305
Dr.
Dear Dr. Hanna,
Bruce gave me your letter of August 24th concerning the two checks
which were not with your cancelled checks. We did receive these
two checks -- but the Memorial Foundation financial department is
short-handed and as a result everything is a little slow. The checks
have now been deposited and should get back to you by the end of
the month.
We really appreciate receiving the royalty.
with Memorial Foundation projects.
This will be a big help
The Portfolios have arrived and will be sent out in the next few
weeks.
Our best to you and Mrs. Hanna.
Sincerely,
Richard Carney
Treasurer
RC:sjl
±w
,
820259
September 13, 1982
Peter Rubinstein
1053 Bush Street #15
San Francisco, CA 94109
Mr. Paul R. and Ms. Jean S. Hanna
Pearce Mitchell
Stanford University
Stanford, Ca 94305
Dear Mr
&
Ms
.
Hanna
Thank you very much for the priviledge of touring the Hanna Honeycomb
House and looking at the original plans and documents . You have done a
wonderful service for all of us Frank Lloyd Wright fans.
Thank you also for your hospitality it was a special opportunity for me
as a architect to meet the people who made the Hanna House possible.
Yours,
Peter Rubinstein
PR/jl
cc:
Anne Marselis
HOOVER
INSTITUTION
AND
ON
WAR, REVOLUTION
PEACE
Stanford, California 94305
September 15, 1982
Mr. Richard Carney, Treasurer
The Frank Lloyd Wright Memorial Foundation
Taliesin West
Scottsdale, AZ 85252
Dear Dick:
Thank you for your note that our two checks arrived.
We hope future checks from royalties will be more
gratifying.
Thank
The beautiful Portfolio III arrived safely.
We are giving it to the Stanford Art Library
you.
to go with the two previous folios.
A wonderful
project.
Our love to Mrs. Wright and greet our friends in the
Fellowship.
Co^ttally,
Paul R. Hanna
Senior Research Fellow
PRH:atk
8202^0
820261
Wrjr*'
und.
ith distinction in the
i
War
Confederate General
in
of Kentucky and was
at
n'ted States Senator-elect
Auction Trends
'I.
numbers 7-10,
letters of A. S.
in.
>y
4,
1970,
Johnston
Earl Moore
1858, and Young's
Secretary of
War John
ause.
Returning to the interesting arena of public vendue around the
country,
we
something
are
reminded
for nodding!
where you get
Book Galleries at San
of over 200 letters signed by the
that
The
Francisco offered a collection
auctions are
California
famous architect Frank Lloyd Wright to a patron D. Martin at
Buffalo, N.Y. and others, 1903-1934. Some letters or passages
reiterate Wright's art and architectural philosophy and defend
some of his decisions. The group fetched $75, OCX) against a top
estimate of $30,000. Two drawings of a proposed Martin family
mausoleum with Wright's hand printed name sold for $5,500. A
buyer's ten percent premium was added.
Benjamin Chew, Quaker, was Chief Justice of the Pennsylvania
Supreme Court before the American Revolution. He built a fine
large home in 1763 in Germantown, now part of Philadelphia.
The home called "Cliveden' was in the center of the fierce
,
fighting of the
Battle of
Germantown
against
British
forces,
October 4, 1777. The house suffered heavy battle damage but
was restored and occupied by generations of the Chew family. It
still stands today and is now in the custody of the National
Preservation Trust organization. The family descendants recently
donated a huge collection of over 200,000 family manuscript
items, pamphlets and law books to the Historical Society of
Pennsylvania. In order to discharge a family legal obligation
was necessary
to
withhold several items which were sold
Manuscripts, Vol. XXXIV
No. 3, Summer 1982
at
it
New
203
Date:
To
.
September 15, 1982
Marilyn Fogel
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Hanna
From
^ au ^
SUBJECT:
T0URS 0F HANNA H0USE
This request just arrived.
it along to you.
I
am passing
We hope the new season goes well
and your colleagues.
O
for you
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820262
.
-
.
820263
EDGAR
14
EAST
llth
ARCHITECT
TAFEL,
STREET,
NEW YORK,
N,
10003
Y.
(212)
673-6000
September 8, 1982
C
Mr. Paul H. Mosher
The Stanford University Libraries
Stanford, California 94305
COL
EP15J9B2
»
•
i
J
DEVELOP.
L
Dear Mr. Mosher:
Your good letter has just arrived, as I am off for a midwestern
trek.
The attached is pertinent to what you write about- the
list was nrade up. I wrote, about a year ago, when I started
thinking about disposing of some of my "memorabilia"
For some background- Columbia's Avery wanted the material, and
last January, I was in touch with the Burnham people, for they
got the Herbert Jacobs letters, etc., through some of my instigation- Herbert had come to Columbia, but that didn't seem to be
of value, then he obtained an endowment grant to annotate each
letter and piece
he was a newspaperman in Madison and had Wright
do two houses) .. .bit with Burnham; it's the same thingt give us
your materials, and we will give tax deductions/'
(
vV
Also, I thought of taking each letter, etc., and doing an"oral
It would
history" of it- as I remember the circumstances, etc.
possibly be done by talking into a machine, then having it all
typed out, and then edited.
That takes doing- and from the labor
iousness of my book, I know the amount of time. Also, my book
just covered expenses, nothing for my time- but, I had to get it
out of "my system"- I hate all the thoughts and actions of the
professional historians who set history in their own false imageswe, who were there, should be doing the doing.
I had heard all about the collection of Martin letters- and how it
It seemed a shame
was divided up between yourselves and Buffalo.
that something couldn't have been worked out in advance- but then,
these things happen, and decisions are made, like in architecture,
under strange and momentary situations.
All this- and I haven't come to the point. My letters, if you saw
them, with the other materials, are the only communication between
Mr. Wright and an architect- over many years- and they are archiI do feel they should be in some
tectually oriented, naturally.
archive that is always available to students of the subject. And,
Just where I'd
they would be better with my recollections in 1982.
I'm
Meanwhile,
don't
know.
have the time, energy and purpose- I
on
sabprofessor
a
being
practicing architecture- it's not like
batical .. .and lastly- I wouldn't have a thing to do with them to be
generations of hate for Mr. Wright,
with the AIA- they have had
That's the picture- and give
and anyone who worked for/with him.
Paul my best... and as we say, "ba^k) to the drawing board". Many
thanks for your interest, and let's keep^ in touch.
n
X
/
/'
yL
/_
6V
820264
Date:
To
From
:
:
Subject:
Paul
Mosher
Paul
Hanna
September 15, 1982
oF
FLLW CORRESPONDENCE TO EDGAR TAFEL
gather from Tafel's letter to you, dated September 8, 1982, as well as from previous
I
discussions between Tafel and myself, that what he wants is for us to make him a cash
offer for his collection of letters from FLLW.
He should be far more interested in having his
does not need the money.
collection of 21 FLLW letters kept together with other collections than wanting
to receive cash for sale of individual letters as implied in his reference to
an Altman sale.
Tafel
I
suggest you pick up his concern about the time to transcribe his taped recollections
about each of the 21 letters.
We might offer to furnish the blank tapes.
When he
has dictated his comment on each letter, he could send us the collection and the
tapes.
We would transcribe the tapes and give me a typed copy to edit.
We would
then establish an Edgar Tafel Collection of Frank Lloyd Wright Archives at Stanford
University for the use of scholars.
This strategy might work, but there is always the possibility that Altmans, or
someone else, would put up the cash and Tafel is eager enough for profit to split the
collection.
If we miss, sorry.
But we should continue to try until we get it or he
sells.
PRH:atk
820?65
Professor Paul
R.
and Jean
S.
Hanna
commissioned Frank Lloyd Wright to
design their home on the Stanford
University campus in 1936.
They
completed the first construction
phase in 1937.
Their book relating
fifty years of experiences as clients
of Mr. Wright is reviewed elsewhere
in this
issue of Newsletter.
September 16, 1982
OFFICE
MEMORANDUM
•
STANFORD UNIVERSITY
•
OFFICE
MEMORANDUM
820266
Date:
To
:
From
:
Subject:
September 21, 82 J
Professor Paul Hanna
Marilyn Foge]
z
n
2
o
z
Hanna House Tours
Thank you for referring the letter
I have sent
from Donald Philo to me.
him information about times of tours.
5
5
2
>
z
I also thank you for the copy of the
book review from the Hamline University
alumni magazine. It is a well written
article and I shall be pleased to pass
it along to the other Hanna House docents.
g
I have just returned from my vacation
and have been met with the strike and
its inconveniences.
The confirmation
letters and information sheets that
I promised to send you have not been
reproduced in my absence due to the
unavailability of the campus Copy Center.
I have not overlooked your request by
any means, and thank you for your
patience.
Though the tours of the Hanna House are
a small percentage of all the tours we
give, by far the majority of telephone
inquiries are about House tours. The
public interest in the House and the
tours is continually increasing. Most
of the visitors during this month's tours
are architects. The interest and the
statistics are both gratifying to us and
I know to you as well.
5
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820267
HOOVER
INSTITUTION
ON
AND
WAR, REVOLUTION
PEACE
Stanford, California 94305
September 24, 1982
Thornton
70 Latham Lane
Berkeley, CA 94708
Mrs.
E.
L.
_
,
$2*t-SlXV
Dear Mrs. Thornton:
Please accept our apologies for being so tardy in responding
The enclosed brochure had
to your kind letter of August 5.
just gone to the printers and it seemed wise to wait for a
"hot off the press" copy.
We hope you do not have to wait too long for your tour for
the demand exceeds the capacity to handle requests immediately.
We are most pleased that you enjoyed our book.
Cordially,
.
R. Hanna
Senior Research Fellow
Paul
PRH:atk
Enclosure
L9L*"3,lf8*
820268
EDGAR
14
EAST
llth
ARCHITECT
TAFEL,
STREET,
NEW YORK,
N.
Y.
10003
(212)
673-6000
The "gala" at Fallingwater is all set- Bob Mocher arrived here
on the first, we fly to Pittsburgh, pick up Wes there, drive down
to the house- there wilo be some lectures, a seminar, etc, and we will
be trlling about the house from our vantages, etc etc.... its great
The whole thing
that Bob can come- he is making a special trip.
is put together by the Penna AIA, ...<, they have to go outside
their Establishment to getsomething exciting'
They
tell I'm to get some kind of award for my efforts with Mr W, and
should
what I have done about it thru the years.
So, it
be interesting- there will be "rap" sessions with students- which li
enjoy more that talking with other architects-
Dec first is the opening of the Littlw Room hgere at the MetThe Fallingwater stamp- my Readers Digest piece for their
Commemerative book is at press now- not too exciting a piece, but
better than what Arch'l Digest did about my piece for the
Lovness house- Arch Digest could dull up the Declaration of
Independance!
Am in midst of remodeel ing a house I did in 1950- one of
my best- now owned by a charming, delightful Chinese couplethey have had it for 8 years, and lived with it well.
What
ja>y to see real appriciative life going on....
has nww life- will know better next month,
Film:
Have a fine
outfit and sponser
takes on another aspect, but hell,
any port in the storm.
These people dont talk money, they
talk substance.
And, no worry abouttfthe bad times going
on-
Hope alls well- theres real talk from "out West" about my
letter collection- just have to get it together with the
commentary written out.... thanks again for introducing it
at your institution....
Best to Jean too
ZZ?^V""
i
*
820269
*
INSTITUTION
HOOVER
ON
AND
WAR, REVOLUTION
PEACE
Stanford, California 94305
September 24, 1982
Mrs.
E.
L.
Thornton
70 Latham Lane
Berkeley, CA 94708
Dear Mrs. Thornton:
Please accept our apologies for being so tardy in responding
The enclosed brochure had
to your kind letter of August 5.
just gone to the printers and it seemed wise to wait for a
"hot off the press" copy.
We hope you do not have to wait too long for your tour for
the demand exceeds the capacity to handle requests immediately,
We are most pleased that you enjoyed our book.
Cordially,
.
~p^$Ah^^^
Hanna
Senior Research Fellow
Paul
PRH:atk
Enclosure
c-c
*y u.
R.
H^
1TUTION
270
^°
September 24, 1982
J^CO
inornton
Lane
„ Keley, CA 94708
..dm
Dear Mrs. Thornton:
Please accept our apologies for being so tardy in responding
The enclosed brochure had
to your kind letter of August 5.
just gone to the printers and it seemed wise to wait for a
"hot off the press" copy.
We hope you do not have to wait too long for your tour for
the demand exceeds the capacity to handle requests immediately
We are most pleased that you enjoyed our book.
Cordially,
R. Hanna
Senior Research Fellow
Paul
PRHratk
Enclosure
MA
£)a.TVcw4<
^i&Z^i*'*.
W
-
H^Lum^ Hox
\
/^/LL-U/
HOOVER INSTITUTION
820271
ON WAR, REVOLUTION AND PEACE
Stanford, California 94305
September 30, 1982
Dr. Marion Smith
77 Pearce Mitchell
Stanford, CA 94305
Dear Marion:
Thank you for the tear-sheet.
We
had somehow missed it, and are very glad
to have it for the collection.
Cordially,
Paul R. Hanna
Senior Research Fellow
PRH:atk
820272
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182
HOOVER
INSTITUTION
ON
AND
WAR, REVOLUTION
PEACE
Stanford, California 94305
October 5, 1982
Mr. Michael J.
Stepner
Newsletter Editor
Office of Planning Department
City Administration Building
2020 C Street
San Diego, CA 92101
Dear Mr. Stepner:
In June I received from you a letter regarding a story
for your "Newsletter of the Californian Preservation Action
League."
We have been slow in preparing a piece from which you might
draw what you wish to prepare a statement that could be a
review of the book.
As I reread the enclosed, it seems too flattering and,
therefore, we hesitate to be listed as authors.
And it is
undoubtedly too favorable to be published as is. You may
wish to rewrite it or give to someone to prepare a less
favorable review for your newsletter. We are not "touchy"
about such things and leave entirely to your judgement
what to do with the piece.
We enclose two photos showing my wife and me standing in
front of the 53 volume archival collecting and holding one
of them.
Select either one.
Also enclosed is a brochure about the book which is in its
second printing.
If we can answer any questions, call me at my office, area
415-497-1086.
Paul R. Hanna
Senior Research Fellow
PRH:atk
Enclosures
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20274
OFFICE
MEMORANDUM
•
STANFORD UNIVERSITY
•
OFFICE
MEMORANDUM
820275
Date:
To
:
October
7,
1982
Professor Paul Hanna
£
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Marilyn Fogel <7^J7"
Educational Services
-<
Subject:
Hanna House
O
Thank you for sending me the brochures for
The Clients' Report
I have shared them with
the oth r docents.
Each will find the information useful in answering questions regarding
the book.
We do not feel it would be appropriate
to distribute the brochures during a tour.
However, as I believe I mentioned earlier, the
book is always on display in the house and we
docents do point it out to visitors during the
.
tours.
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The academic 1981-82 year was a short one for
touring the Hanna House.
The tours began in
January, 1982 and continued through July.
Nevertheless, the statistics are quite high.
There were 42 tours with an attendance of 456
during the seven month touring period.
Of
the 456 visitors, 63 were architects, 29 architectural students, 34 art history students,
that identified themselves to us.
I convey
second-hand their appreciation to you and
Mrs. Hanna.
Best wishes to both of you.
Are you still
working as cashier during breakfast???
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OFFICE
MEMORANDUM
•
STANFORD UNIVERSITY
•
Date:
To
:
From
:
Subject:
OFFICE
820276
MEMORANDUM
Oct. 12, 1982
Paul Hanna
Hoover Institution
Dr.
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Special Collections, Green Library
carol
30
The House Beautiful
O
thought you might be interested in seeing
I
the attached description of Gannett s The
House Beautiful which is being offered for
sale by W. Thomas Taylor of Austin (Catalogue
It's a bit out of our price range, but
30).
interesting just the same.
Are you familiar
with this work?
1
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820277
Dear Jean and Paul,
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We thought you would like to see
the enclosed review of the Hanna House
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Hope you had a pleasant summer!
ID
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AS
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Regards,
.
OFFICE
MEMORANDUM
•
STANFORD UNIVERSITY
•
OFFICE
MEMORANDUM
820278
Date:
To
October
12,
1982
Professor Paul Hanna
From
1ari lyn
Fogel
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Subject:
•
Hanna House
O
have scheduled Mrs. Thornton and her
daughter to visit the Hanna House at 2:00
on November 11.
am enclosing your letter
with her note as a reference.
I
I
Also enclosed is a copy of another fan letter
written by a recent visitor to the Hanna
House.
Darrel
Carey was the docent.
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Warmest regards to you and Mrs. Hanna,
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BOOKS
820279
AMERICAN ARCHITECTURE AND URBANISM
PAUL
R. and
Wright's
JEAN
MA,
Cambridge,
HANNA, Frank
1981, 148 pp.,
Lloyd
Clients' Report,
and London: The Architec-
Foundation and
History
tural
S.
Hanna House: The
illus.
MIT
Press,
$25.00.
meant
to lead to prefabrication
sive housing;
New
illus.
H.
HEINZ, Frank Lloyd
A.
York:
Wright,
Martin's Press, 1982, 96 pp.,
St.
$11.95 (paper).
ALLEN BROOKS, ed.
Selected
Comment on
MA,
and London:
illus.
$17.50.
MIT
Writings on Wright:
Wright,
Cambridge,
Press, 1981,
129
pp.,
70 emerges from
Frank Lloyd Wright's Hanna House an even
man,
sly
at
and optimistic, graced with
extraordinary patience, a twinkle often
words and always
in his eyes.
this disappointingly
in his
Halfway through
perfunctory "clients'
port" there's a wonderful
letter
re-
of Wright's
late in 1937. He has just visited Paul
Hanna and Jean Hanna in their new "Honeycomb" house in Palo Alto, California, and after
from
detailing nine items
corrected ("All
Writings on Wright, a conscientious anthol-
man or average college professor.
Wright, who listed Thorstein Veblen among his
ogy by H. Allen Brooks, stands as much the
average
The
most valuable of these three new titles. His
choices from the vast repertoire have the virtue
Theory of the Leisure Class which noted of
of being often unexpected, rather than the vice
must have
relished that passage in
people of scholarly pursuits that "there
class in the
community
portion of
its
than these."
comb,"
is
no
an extra effort to embrace essays or reminiscen-
conspicuous waste
ces or vignettes not so easily obtainable else-
of the "Honey-
where, or not previously translated, or not even
substance
in
Hannas unfortunately present
fussy, pompous, socially ambi-
themselves as
and generally humorless. It is true that
they now acknowledge the arrogance and
"childish wailing" of their communications to
Wright they cared little that he had broken
his ribs falling from a road grader, or that he
later waged a dangerous bout with pneumonia
yet what is one to make of their attitude in
little
still
to be undertaken or
things," he writes, "but
—
—
donating the "Honeycomb" to the uni-
finally
versity in the belief that "a distinguished guest,
if
world
truly of
even
if
would be acceptable
Drawn
from what the Hannas describe as more than
book
is
accumulated documentation,
less interesting,
illustrated,
"You look so well in the
bee cells that were made to imprison you in
sunlight." Certainly no other work of architec-
House
one"), he ends:
stature,
not an accredited professor"?
eight feet of
and sometimes
less
this
well
than the January
1963 issue of
which was devoted to the
Beautiful,
"Honeycomb" and which
cost only
60
cents.
tence.
One
is
even reminded of the passage
in
.
chose to
fill
.
our Hives with Honey and Wax,
Mankind with
two Noblest
of Things, which are Sweetness and Light." Of
course metaphor was not enough for the
Hannas, who later cultivated an orchard and
added two hives of bees.
thus furnishing
Wright had been so eager
the hexagonal
Hannas
to
the
experiment with
module that even before
the
leased their steeply sloping site from
A. Heinz,
of Wright's architecture
It
testi-
exceptionally illuminating.
also serves to remind
more experienced
ers that the best writing
about Wright
read-
has*
not
issued from the confines of academic architectural history.
What a
ander Woollcott's
how
to savor Alex-
it is
profile of 1930: ".
.
.
happily would the house grow like a vine
how unerringly would every
and frame the landscape ... no
the modern world has brought to archi-
on that
window
one
delight
[sic]
in
hill-crest,
foresee
tecture so
good
a
mind, so leaping an imagina-
tion, or so fresh a sense of beauty."
Or, again, a
1929 book review by Lewis Mumford,
how
a remarkable demonstration of
in itself
impover-
ished architectural criticism has been in this
country since he gave
it
up:
".
.
Mr. Wright
.
not the forerunner of Le Corbusier but,
is
is
in a real
not that he
made it over in his
image, but that he has kept the way open for a
type of architecture which can come into existence only in a much more humanized and so-
curiously blended
it.
His color pho-
cially
adept generation than our own."
DONALD HOFFMAN
particularly that of the interior of the Heurtley
The Kansas City Star
house, where the splended richness of form,
pattern, color, space,
and surprise should win
Wright even more devotees. The text
is
negli-
gible, the captions occasionally questionable.
(Wright's
in his
first
own
was not
room but in his office in the
if we trust his own account in
indirect ceiling lighting
dining
An
enport house
grammar
also was
mony should prove
tographs are fresh and sometimes quite lovely,
on paper looked like a collection of oldfashioned bathroom tiles, spreading as if by mitosis and resulting in procrustean corners and
niches. The necessary adjustments to the site
meant high retaining walls of concrete faced in
"Honeycomb"
is
with an eagerness to exploit
graphical plot plan he sent them a house plan
brick, thereby confusing the essential
is a picture book by
whose singleminded pursuit
Frank Lloyd Wright
Thomas
Schiller Building,
of redwood and glass.
students of
Wright's architecture, this gathering of
has dominated the scene and
Stanford University and furnished him a topo-
that
To young
previously published.
sense, his successor ... his value
ture has been better described in a single sen-
Jonathan Swift's "Battle of the Books" in
which the bees declare: ".
we have rather
made
of being willfully eccentric. Brooks has
that spends a larger pro-
In telling this story
the
very important in a finished performance like
this
largest of the
from affordable by the
far
tious,
Frank Lloyd Wright
larger
and inexpen-
ended by being the
"Usonian" houses,
heroes,
THOMAS
it
Autobiography; the inglenook of the Davis
certainly not his last; he did not
enjoy "an absolutely free hand"
in the
house because he had to content the
1981, 325 pp.,
illus.
$20.00
(cloth),
$9.95
(paper).
Dana
client's
mother by incorporating a parlor from the family homestead; and the special settle and tabourettes in the Robie house living room are
latter-day replicas, not authentic pieces.)
FRANCIS R. KOWSKY et al., Buffalo ArchiA Guide, Cambridge, MA: MIT Press,
tecture:
Buffalo Architecture:
tatively
written
A Guide is
regional
an authori-
guidebook
should be of interest and value to
all
which
architects,
and planners. Written
and edited by an assemblage of distinguished
architectural historians,
M5
.
Stanford University
Museum
of
An
820280
'^M'"mt'
educational services program
October
13,
1982
Mrs. Albert H. Hastorf
737 Frenchman's Road
Stanford, California 94305
Dear Barbara,
would like to share with you the statistics for Hanna House
tours during the 1981-82 academic year.
I
Forty-five tours were conducted from January through July, 1982,
Of the 456 visitors, there were 63 architects, 29 architectural
students, and 34 art history students who identified themselves
to us.
convey their appreciation to you and to Provost
I
Hastorf
Warmest regards,
Mari
I
yn Fogel
Director of Educational Services
cc:
Professor and Mrs. Paul Hanna
Lorenz Eitner
Joan Parker
Dr.
\\~\
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memo
^°
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c^ocb:^
Oa-
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r.n*:
Stanford, California
94305
(415)
497-3469
HOOVER
INSTITUTION
ON
AND
WAR, REVOLUTION
PEACE
820?8t
Stanford, California 94305
October 26, 1982
Thomas A. Heinz, Editor
The Frank Lloyd Wright Newsletter
P. 0. Box 2100
Oak Park, IL 60303
Mr.
Dear Tom:
Jerry Dorfman and I were delighted to have had the chance to
visit with you. And thank you for taking us to Meigs Airport
I am eager to receive the next edition of Newsletter
and
would like to put in an order for twenty extra copies.
,
I have a phone call in for Stanley Marcus.
him here about November 5.
I
am expecting
Have not yet been able to get hold of Hannah Gray, but will
work on it.
I take it you may be coming to the west coast soon.
know well in advance so we can arrange to be home.
Let us
Paul R. Hanna
Senior Research Fellow
PRHratk
t
14
D
to.
EAST
A
„
K
llth
AKUHIIb^l
lAhtL,
STREET,
NEW YORK.
MEMORANDUM
DATE
N.
Y.
10003
673-6000
(212)
^ **^
8 20282
PROJECT.
LOCATION.
C.C
Just had a call from Dr Jos Satin of U of Cal at Fresno- they
have gotten their book of Mr Wright's letters together, it is at
printers, and should be out sometime about the first of the
year- I ventured to review it for the AIA JOurnal- will akk themam anxious to see the collection- they
they generally acceptwent thru some 2500 or more, and selected 250- maybe some of yours
are there?
I have three he says- and says they do me proud...
a couple of them arent so nice-^he got so mad from time to time he
had to blow off that steam.
T is beok is long way from what
he started at-vi am delighted my thoughts brought it forth
while we are all around to see it happen,,
Jacobse_s were here last week, we had dinner up there
near Lncoln Cwnter- I had been to Fallingwater for the
award thing, and felt good about it- somehow the AIA doesnt
think any of us Taliesiners existed- we too are, as Tome Wolfe says,
amonst the living dead. Am driving Wolfe down to Allentown
when he lecturres at "my museum" on the 14th<,<,<>. his new book
has one chapter from Bautjaus . „ „ . „
.
Arch Digest of Nov came out with the watered down piece I did
on the Lovness houses- they didnt say if I was an architect, veternarian, or animal stuf fer„
Teres a name for
I like the latter
them.
The Readers Digest piece is better- will send you
of that when it arrives- the issue of the stamp was way
a piece
ahead of their page for their collectors.
.
„ »
-
I hear Tom Heinz was discharged from his duties at the Metropolitan
Museum of Art's Little House operation- just what went on, I dont knowant imagine the ftXXXE worst for him.
Wes tried to patch up the
differances, and when I told him Tom had stolen my place, Wes ranred
on about the former apprentice that stole Taliesin's job at Florida
Southern College
„
„
. .
Am working onstudies for the redo of the lobby of the only Sullivan
building here in NYC- it wasnt ever much, will have a budjet do in
getting the spitit of Sullivan, with exhibition corner, to include
photos, models, etc etc
Owner of building is a fine yound man who
1
wants to do the right thing- right for $35,000! Thats the extent of
his rightgeousness, financially,,
Hope alls well- my film program at Steelcase fell thru- am
looking for another sponsor,,,,., it was a hard KXX blow- had
Oh well- and I wontl go the govt r^ute,
done much to get it going,,
it would take forever, and someone at high leveJL would think
Mr Wright a commie.. and that would die too„
I
.
P^TO
O^"""*'
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Vvl
,
820283
Stanford University
Museum
of Art
educational services program
'^piR^JC'
HANNA-HONEYCOMB HOUSE
The Hanna-Honeycomb House, designed by Frank Lloyd Wright, was constructed on
the Stanford campus in 1937.
The plan of the house is based on an hexagonal
module.
Charactef sties of Mr. Wright's Prairie houses and Usonian houses
are evident in the design.
i
The American Institute of Architects designated the Hanna-Honeycomb House as
one of seventeen buildings designed by Frank Lloyd Wright that exemplify the
architect's contribution to American culture.
In 1978, the house was entered
on the National Register of Historic Places.
Professor and Mrs. Paul R. Hanna gave their home to Stanford University in
1974.
The house presently is the private residence of the Provost of the
University and his family.
Docents conduct hour- long tours of the Hanna-Honeycomb House on the second
and fourth Thursdays of the month at 2:00, 2:15 and 2:30.
Each tour is
It is recommended that reservalimited to ten adults by reservation only.
tions be made at least one month in advance of the requested date through
the office of the Educational Services Program, 415/497-3469.
Recommended reading:
Per iod ca
i
I
s
"A Great Frank Lloyd Wright House,'' House Beaut
"Honeycomb House," Architectural
Record
,
vol.
i
f u
84,
I
,
vol.
July,
105, January
1963.
1938.
Books
Blake, Peter.
The Master Bui Iders
New York: Norton, 1976.
Hanna, Paul
Report
R.
.
New York:
.
A.
Knopf,
Frank Lloyd Wright's Hanna House
and Jean S.
The M. .T. Press, 1981.
Cambridge, MA:
Scully, Vincent.
-
1960
Inc.,
The Clients'
I
Hitchcock, Henry Russell.
Sloan and Pearce, 1942
In
/
New York:
the Nature of Materials
Da Capo Press, 1975.
New York:
Frank Lloyd Wright
.
.
New York:
Wright, Frank Lloyd.
The Japanese Print, an
Horizon Press, 1967.
.
Alfred
The Natural House.
New York:
Stanford, California
George Braziller,
Interpretation
Horizon Press,
94305
(415)
497-3469
1954.
.
Due
I
I
1960.
New York:
/
820284
Educational Services Program
Stanford University Museum of Art
Stanford, California
HANNA HONEYCOMB HOUSE
94305
415/497-3469
To:
Your reservation for a tour of the Hanna-Honeycomb House is on
visitors.
at
for
member
of
group
reservation,
please
If any
your
must cancel a
notify the office of the Educational Services Program at the
Stanford Museum of Art, 415/497-3469.
Committee for Art docents from the Stanford Museum of Art conduct
Please arrive ten minutes before the time of your tour.
the tours.
Tours begin promptly and last one hour.
Because each tour is limited to ten adults, please do not bring
visitors who have no reservations.
Children under 17, including
tours.
infants, are not permitted on
The Hanna-Honeycomb House is a private residence located at
737 Frenchman's Road.
Please respect the privacy of the occupants
by not opening closets or drawers, or handling household objects.
Visitors will be asked to leave umbrellas and large bags in the
house foyer.
No smoking
is
permitted on the premises.
Permission to photograph the exterior of the house is limited to
restricted areas and is not permitted during the tour.
Photographing
the interior is prohibited.
Please park on Frenchman's Road and walk up the driveway to meet the
docent on the brick steps leading from the parking circle to the
If the walk up the inclined driveway would be difficult for
terrace.
members of your group, drop them off at the brick steps before parking
on Frenchman's Road.
These guidelines for tours of the Hanna-Honeycomb House have been
established by the Office of the Provost and the Department of Art at
Stanford University.
I
Hanna-Honeycomb House
FRENCHMAN'S
JUNIPEROSERRA
PETER COUTTS
ELCAMINOREAL
m__*
to
San Francisco
HOOVER
INSTITUTION
ON
AND
WAR, REVOLUTION
PEACE
Stanford, California 94305
November 2, 1982
Mr. Jeremy M. Norman, Chairman
Local Arrangements Committee
.1983 Manuscript Society
Jeremy Norman & Co. , Inc.
442 Post Street
San Francisco, CA 94102
Dear Jeremy Norman:
have scheduled Thursday, May 26, 1983 to speak to your
organization on the Wright-Hanna House archives.
As that
date approaches, I presume you or Carol Rudisell will give
me particular instructions on time limits, etc.
I
We
My wife and I are pleased to join you at your luncheon.
can assure you that the docents do a splendid. job of directing
the tours of the Hanna House.
Sincerely,
Paul R. Hanna
Senior Research Fellow
PRH:atk
cc:
Carol
bcc: DennJ
Rudisell
;
e
LlmAre
(C +
'
i
t
820285
2 The Stanford Daily
Features
Stanford sculpture
$iw± «r»
S^Z/l/^^,
s.UtA'L <^u MtJ^fu^.
r«W>^ AJZ^Jh*
820286
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER
A large number of
interesting
sculptures decorate
the campus. These
pieces of art, often
sculpted by
distinguished
artists, offer
students a unique
opportunity to view
a diverse collection
ofart.
Photos by Steve Sisskind
3,
1982
X
HOOVER
INSTITUTION
ON
AND
WAR. REVOLUTION
PEACE
Stanford. California 94305
820287
Jovember 5, 1982
Ms. Katherine Kimelman
Art Museum
Stanford, CA 94305
Dear Katherine Kimelman:
My wife and
in showing
I
want to thank you for your courtesy
us the bronze
sculptures which we had
donated to Stanford University.
It was a
delight
to see our pieces again.
AAJt/<ffi4s»*>+
—
Paul R. Hanna
Senior Research Fellow
.
PRH:atk
820J?88
Tafel, Architect
Avenue, New York, New York
Edgar
74
Fifth
10011
(212)
989-9720
Kurt Karmin, Geoffrey A. Paine, Gerard van Baarsel
11 November-
dear Jean and Paul
Since this damned lib- we address everyone in sight, and I'm sore
Guess who answers the
for my sectetary is off on jury duty.
worse.
fehone. My bad typing gets
Last night at dinner party for (ex) president of New School here,
the John Loebs- apparwntly they knew you back in
was a couplethe mid-30' s at Stanford, and remember the house, and the bunk beds that
thats their rememberance!
qere too small for children
They
are both avid watercolorists now- he has retired from his financial
endeavors, and has doone well for the New School
dont rememner if I wrote- the last company that was thinking
of finaning the film has backed away- we had a great change in
plot- one of four or five people "who were there" walking us thru
several of Mr Wright's buildings
Edg. K, Wes, Aaron ( hav t
told him) maybe Jack Howe- it should be done whilst we are still
round to taell the story ourselves.
How would we like the gospel
according to St Mighael Graves, or Sir Charles Jenks?
Anywaywe are looking for othersI just dont give up.
I
Meanwhile back at the ranch- working on the lobby of the only Sullivan
building here- tried to keep the news from Landmarks- or they
would get into the picture and rough us all up- they would demand
backup for anything and everything that is done
and make it
run into skyrocket costs- ...." after all, the client is there
to preserve history and pay and pay and and pay...."
Lookingforward to the opening of the Little House Met Roomwas there with Bob Mosher when he was here,
and they are having a
hard time getting it reqdy for the first of December. Apparently
Tom Heinz has been fired, and isnt in the picture anymore. Deserves
him right. Scoundrel.
Hear from Don Hoffman he made off with
some chairs from Dana house, and gave them to the U of 111- robbing
Peter to pay Paul.
The attached was sent from pwrson in Pittsburgh
I canr
remember if I wrote yoy that Taliesin and Mc G Hill came to
an understanding about the alleged copyright infringements- of whixh
I pay half.... $375 is way down from to ten thousand demanded
Maybe we can all be friends again- Brice called and helped set it
They should have started it at all. .^rr^ but then, theres no
up.
ccountirqg for whatsoever.
"V
enuf
hope alls well- am anxiou(s to see the first manuscript
of "Letters to Apprentices" that FresrVo (U of Cal ) press is doing
np originals- seleced 250 from some 2 5 Our---.
C\
*"-••>
f'
nV 1
6
820289
THE STANFORD UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES
Office
of the Director
Dec.
Prof. Paul R. and Mrs. Jean
Hoover Institution
S.
3,
1982
Hanna
Dear Paul and Jean:
wanted to acknowledge personally my appreciation of the whole series
I
of gifts of Frank Lloyd Wright material (a copy of which is attached), but
also--and quite as important—the personal time, effort, enthusiasm, and love
which have made this substantial benefaction even more meaningful and significant.
I
have asked Denise Ridard and David Weber to be sure that the whole
package of gifts which you enumerated for us are properly acknowledged, and
appraised as appropriate, and this may already have been done--if not, it
is in progress.
However, formal acknowledgments are never enough in cases
of this kind.
There has been a very profound understanding of the kind of
developmental effort that ultimately makes research library collections
truly great and useful for research.
It has at times reminded me of the
unfolding of a complex and fascinating flower, of which the final blooming
reveals many more colors and layers than the initial bud.
My gratitude
for the materials and for your efforts is indeed profound, even more so
now that the University's financial situation over the years ahead seems
increasingly perilous.
It is marvellous during times of increasing stringency and restraint to have pockets of development such as this which help
to reverse the process of constriction and shrinking.
My gratitude to you
both is great, and my personal enjoyment at working with you, Paul, and having
the opportunity to share your insights and enthusiasms, has been one of my
great pleasures at Stanford, and I very much look forward to its continuation
over the years ahead.
With warmest wishes,
-4jixI
H. Mosher
Director of Collection Development
Paul
PHM:gms
Cecil
H. Green
Library
Stanford, California 94305
(415) 497-2016
SVEN H. A. BRUNTJEN, phD
Ci*£i r<c IjQ
Art Consultation and Appraisals
December 1982
19
Professor and Mrs. Paul Hanna
20 Pearce Mitchell Place
Stanford, CA 94305
I have examined the following item presented to the Stanford University
Art Library by Professor and Mrs. Paul Hanna of Stanford, CA:
Frank Lloyd Wright: Selected Drawings Portfolio
.
Vol. 3.
In my opinion, this item has a total 1982 fair-market value for gift
purposes of $500.00.
Sven H. A. Brunt j en
711 SouthdaleWay, Woodside, California 94062 (415) 368-3503
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Change
is
inevitable and necessary.
Those who are current participants can
influence the direction of change, the rate of change, and the methods of
change. As justice Sandra Day O'Connor reminded us at Commencement:
"... There are amazing ways in which the individual can impact on society,
even as
a
volunteer and without reference to any governmental act at
The University
much
more
all."
than in any
dynamic experience.
Some change has come from internal impetus and some from external, some
was long planned and some quite sudden in occurrence, some with foreseen
consequences and some with consequences unforeseen — but all stimulating.
Libraries have
changed
other recent year. Considered in
as
its totality, it
or
has been
this year
a
Two
examples can serve to point up these currents at play. The first is the
addition of glass to enclose the center well on the upper floors of the J. Henry
Meyer Memorial Library. Due to the size, central location, and encouraging
acoustics of this interior space, students over the past fifteen years found it a
convenient location to take study breaks, sometimes with puckish motives,
sometimes with disturbing consequences. Furniture rearrangements, a white
sound system, and efforts at behavioral modification were all tried, but none
was deemed as effective as glazing in the well. An undergraduate student on the
Academic Council Committee on Libraries urged that it not be postponed until
summer, so the job was done at the beginning of Spring Quarter with very
salutary effects.
A second instance was the implementation by the Research Libraries Group of a
improved network file system for book ordering and cataloging and its
unanticipated impact on the Libraries. The system's use was so immediate and
heavy throughout the country that computer capacity was exceeded, resulting
in poor operating conditions for a good part of this academic year. The new
RLIN system was worth waiting for, yet the first, temporary consequences of
this change were major perturbations in library purchasing and processing
routines as well as in the provision of services to faculty and students.
vastly
An
organization operates in a specific environment, and it survives and grows
through changes in that environment. To do so, it must adapt to pressures,
respond tft demands, and make the best use of opportunities which present
themselves. Adaptation is generally of an incremental nature within a
conceptual framework, an accumulation of minor steps is taken toward the
organization's stated goals. The University Libraries have used such statements
of goals accompanied by three-year specific objectives as a way of keeping our
eyes focused on the general direction being pursued, while forces for change
may at times seem to be pushing us to one side or the other of the desired course.
At the beginning of this academic year, a new iteration of this goals and
objectives document was compiled, aired with faculty and students on the
Committee on Libraries, and provided to the University.
—
Change
is
inevitable and necessary.
Those who are current participants can
influence the direction of change, the rate of change, and the methods of
change. As Justice Sandra Day O'Connor reminded us at Commencement:
"... There are amazing ways in which the individual can impact on society,
even as
a
volunteer and without reference to any governmental act at
The University
Libraries have changed as much or more
other recent year. Considered
in its totality, it
this year
all."
than
in
any
has been a dynamic experience.
Some change has come from internal impetus and some from external, some
was long planned and some quite sudden in occurrence, some with foreseen
consequences and some with consequences unforeseen — but all stimulating.
Two
examples can serve to point up these currents
at play.
The
first is
addition of glass to enclose the center well on the upper floors of the
Meyer Memorial
Due
J.
the
Henry
and encouraging
acoustics of this interior space, students over the past fifteen years found it a
convenient location to take study breaks, sometimes with puckish motives,
sometimes with disturbing consequences. Furniture rearrangements, a white
sound system, and efforts at behavioral modification were all tried, but none
was deemed as effective as glazing in the well. An undergraduate student on the
Academic Council Committee on Libraries urged that it not be postponed until
summer, so the job was done at the beginning of Spring Quarter with very
Library.
to the size, central location,
salutary effects.
A second instance was the implementation by
the Research Libraries Group of a
improved network file system for book ordering and cataloging and its
unanticipated impact on the Libraries. The system's use was so immediate and
heavy throughout the country that computer capacity was exceeded, resulting
in poor operating conditions for a good part of this academic year. The new
RLIN system was worth waiting for, yet the first, temporary consequences of
this change were major perturbations in library purchasing and processing
routines as well as in the provision of services to faculty and students.
vastly
An
organization operates in a specific environment, and it survives and grows
through changes in that environment. To do so, it must adapt to pressures,
respond to demands, and make the best use of opportunities which present
themselves. Adaptation is generally of an incremental nature within a
conceptual framework, an accumulation of minor steps is taken toward the
organization's stated goals. The University Libraries have used such statements
of goals accompanied by three-year specific objectives as a way of keeping our
eyes focused on the general direction being pursued, while forces for change
may at times seem to be pushing us to one side or the other of the desired course.
At the beginning of this academic year, a new iteration of this goals and
objectives document was compiled, aired with faculty and students on the
Committee on Libraries, and provided to the University.
—
fortunate that, although this year saw many changes, none of them was
overwhelming. Major, radical changes are not only difficult but generally
unwise. Information on which to base decisions for change is often less than
would be desirable, and accurate predictions about the future are problematic.
Personnel are often wedded to prevailing patterns of behavior and can only
It is
accommodate
a certain pace of change. These patterns are supported not only
by formal organizational structure, but also by employee skills and personal
relationships developed over extended periods of time. Furthermore, the
Libraries' clientele requires a rather stable
that they can accomplish their library
and dependable service pattern so
work without being surprised,
frustrated,
or required to spend extra time.
Thus,
it
is
well for the faculty and students to be aware that electronic exit
control equipment has been added recently in
Meyer
Library, Cubberley Educa-
tion Library, and the Engineering Library, with others to follow in the years
immediately ahead.
for Stanford to
It is
well for our readers to
house some of
its
know that plans are progressing
less-used collections in a specially-designed
University of California Library Facility in Richmond, which will be ready for
occupancy in the fall of 1982. And it was well that our readers have
experimented this year with the direct use of an on-line catalog in the Engineering Library, Meyer Library and Green Library, which is likely to be the common
method of accessing catalog records in a few years.
Even though theory points to the advisability of incrementalism, profound
change can occur when some large force affects the organizational infrastructure: for example, a computerized approach to cataloging. Once such a new
system is adopted, substantial changes will take place in patterns of behavior,
organizational structure, employment criteria, and procedures used by staff in
performance of their tasks. These will occur in a ripple effect as personnel adjust
their mode of operation to the demands of the new system. While the costs of
initiating and implementing such a major system may be high, maintaining an
outmoded system may be just as costly. Thus the ability to change is affected by
what has gone before, by the strength of argument and planning of current
participants, by financial capacities, and by the time of supervisors, department
chiefs, and directors to think through the options, gain confidence in the
direction being proposed, communicate with their colleagues, develop procedures to implement the new direction, and inform the community served by the
fifteen units comprising the Stanford University Libraries. Each decision is
grounded in the results of previous decisions, the sum being progress toward a
new standard of achievement or a new concept of service.
An example of a change in program that has been emerging
in
recent years
is
improved services to the science and technology community through a stronger
science department. Fundraising will be undertaken to build up endowment of
book funds in the sciences, a weakness of the Libraries for many years.
Another example of programmatic change
is
collections and services for the social sciences
the
renewed
comparable
effort to provide
in effectiveness to
those currently offered in the sciences and humanities. Studies have
shown
the
need for improvements in collections, more effective bibliographic instruction
and faculty contact, and suggest that there may be some unnecessary title
duplication between libraries. A major program of collection analysis has been
undertaken in social science disciplines in order to gain more precise and
accurate identification of collection needs. Reassignment of expert staff and a
significant appointment to a vacant position have provided the professional
capacity needed to guide and manage the new social science effort. Meetings
with faculty in half a dozen departments have helped shape the direction that
should be pursued, and a review of book funds in support of those needs will lead
to revised allocations. A sophisticated title-overlap study will be high on the
agenda of the University Library Council subcommittee that oversees collection
coordination. It is hoped that appropriate enhancement of social science book
funds will follow that of the sciences and technology as the next major effort to
convey to our friends the message that endowment of the collection acquisition
program is a sine qua non for maintaining the strength of a first-rate teaching and
research library in straitened financial times.
Looking at the internal circumstance of the Libraries, there are forces for
change within the library itself as well as from the University at large. A major
example this year is the Library Program and Process Study, a year-long effort
were in discussion with University
was
to seek strategies enabling the
February 1981, and its
library to operate and manage itself more effectively within the prospective
context of diminishing resources during this decade. The study in the Libraries
looked at the quality of the work environment, the style of communication
processes and decision-making, decentralization of management and delegation
of authority, methods of operating in a physically decentralized system, and
interaction between the academic and the business parts within the libraries as
well as those same relationships in the University itself. A survey of all library
staff was undertaken in the summer of 1981 to gather information on attitudes,
in organizational
officers in
development.
Its
origins
intent
working conditions, leadership, peer relationships, job satisfaction, and expectations. Led by a Steering Committee comprised of University and Library
managers, this study reflects the importance of interrelationships between the
Libraries and the University. The results of the survey and of the Program and
Process Study will effect change in the Libraries which can be beneficial to staff
and to operations as experienced by members of the community. While some of
the library staff would press for radical change in structure, policy, or
procedure, others would say that the very duration of this project illustrates
that major change requires wide participation, much deliberation, and careful
choices so that forward-looking moves are taken with long-term beneficial
results.
Some change is easy to comprehend. This year, ground was broken for the
Braun Music Center, of which one-third will be devoted to the new Music
Library. A naming donor for the Music Library is being sought. Renovation of
the Green Library Staff Room was completed. A Visiting Scholars' Reading
Room is operational, and fundraising is under way for a more complete facility
to meet the needs of those visiting scholars who cannot be accommodated in
faculty studies. Early American Imprints in a large microform publication are
being analyzed under a federal grant and made available nationwide through
the
RLIN system.
Other developments may be
slow
in materializing.
An
of a subtler nature
instance
is
and the benefits may be rather
the staff development and continuing
education program. The Libraries have had as
a
goal the development of staff so
that they are challenged and their skills used to the greatest extent possible.
own
Their
satisfaction should result in benefits to library operation
and thus
to
the University. Encouragement of individual growth was enhanced by appoint-
ment
of a Staff
Development Officer
in
the Library Personnel Office to
work
in
Employee Relations Department, which offers a variety of skills training. The goals of this program are to
offer in-house learning opportunities to improve staff members' job skills, make
available opportunities for staff to prepare for advancement in responsibilities,
and stimulate the growth of work-related interests and abilities.
collaboration with the University Personnel and
During 1981-82, monthly orientations
series of orientation
for
new
staff
were held
meetings with Library Directors for
as well as
new professional
two
staff.
The Library Personnel Office sponsored an expanded series of workshops on
such supervisory skills as performance appraisal, employment procedures,
benefit programs, and employee relations. The Libraries' Systems Office
offered workshops on computerized cataloging and acquisitions and in the
sending and receiving of electronic messages. Opportunities to strengthen
job-related skills are routinely offered via short-term staff exchanges. Personal
management and communication techniques were aided by new
and well-attended seminars. Career aspirations of staff must be heard continually and programs reevaluated to assure that planned development and
training activities are appropriate to the needs both of the organization and of
its individual members.
skills in stress
Change does not always
require financial adjustment or increased budgets. Yet
there are certainly consequences of budgetary change, and the one percent cut
in the
were
will have its impact. Although library book funds
concern for the continued strength of the book funds is
University officers. The consequences of a change here can
budget for 1982-83
hit especially hard,
shared with
many
affect the quality of the Libraries adversely or beneficially for decades to
come.
Although change is welcomed, it must be carefully monitored. The Libraries
need and welcome the comments, suggestions and perceptions of faculty and
students throughout the University as well as of University officers who may
have a broader view and other perspectives that can benefit the shaping of
change in the University Libraries for the years ahead.
Beyond the developments
cited above, a
few other selected highlights of the
year should be noted:
•
was a celebratory dedication of the Louis R. Lurie
Rotunda and the Charles and Frances Field Room in the Department of
Special Collections: handsome and functional space in the renovated original
wing (1919) of the Cecil H. Green Library for the exhibition of rare and
In the fall of 1981, there
specialized material and for the quiet, private study of these materials.
•
The
Barchas Collection in the
I. and Cecile M.
and partial purchase provides in one stroke a
tremendously increased capacity in the History of Science. The Barchas
acquisition of the
Samuel
History of Science as partial
gift
Collection will be described in considerable detail in next year's report. In the
meantime,
element of
•
gifts of
this
funds are being sought to underwrite the purchase
magnificent collection.
The book fund endowment campaign to meet the challenge from the National Endowment for the Humanities was successfully completed and is
described later
in this report.
•
The Jonsson Library
•
The Warren
of Government Documents was named in honor of
Margaret and Erik Jonsson, and renovation of its quarters in Green Library
was made possible by a gift of The Jonsson Foundation.
Howell Award was inaugurated
acknowledge extraordifriends. The Award,
symbolizing beneficial relationships between the Stanford Libraries and
book collectors, book dealers, artists, and others in the world of books, was
named in honor of Warren R. Howell's fiftieth anniversary of association
with the firm of John Howell Books and the seventieth anniversary of that
eminent antiquarian establishment. The first Award was presented to
Warren R. Howell himself "In gratitude for his continuing counsel and for his
generous contributions to the collections of fine and rare books and
manuscripts so needed for scholarship."
R.
nary support of the University Libraries by
to
its
—
The year 1981-1982 was
a year of excellent progress in the collections, some
unforeseen issues, a good many opportunities, and a fair amount of reasonable
change. For all of this, appreciation is due to the University officers who gave so
much support and encouragement
friends
is
have been possible. To
for your joining in the
DAVID
C.
to the Libraries.
Generous help from Library
would otherwise not
also greatly appreciated for the acquisitions that
WEBER
all
who share in
effort.
these endeavors,
I
express
my gratitude
ABOUT THE
YEAR'S GIFTS
marked the successful completion
April 30th
of the Library portion of the
Challenge Grant awarded to Stanford by the National Endowment for the
Humanities (NEH) three and one half years earlier. Gifts in that period from
many friends of Stanford and counting toward the NEH Grant amounted to
$954,621.
NEH
matched
this
sum on
a
one-third basis, providing $318,207 to
the Stanford University Libraries for the acquisition of research materials in the
humanities.
The
total of eligible gifts of funds, the appraised value of eligible
gifts-in-kind,
and
improvement
in
education
in
it
matching funds was $1,272,828, a truly impressive
Libraries will be able to do to support research and
the humanities.
Achieving the
exceeding
NEH
what the
NEH
Challenge Grant goal of $915,000 on time, and then
within a grace period, would not have been possible without the
generosity and good will of the
many
contributors and the sustained assistance
of the committee of volunteers headed by Marie Louise
berg.
Members were Charles
Schwabacher RosenRosemary
D. Field, Frances Dinkelspiel Green,
Cross Hornby, Paul H. Mosher, Nancy Barry Munger, Graham C. Wilson, Byra
Wreden, and Professors W.B. Carnochan and William A. Clebsch.
J.
As mentioned earlier, the acquisition of the Barchas Collection in the History of
Science was made possible partly by a munificent gift of the senior Barchases
and partly by a purchase commitment by the University, a commitment for
which fundraising is underway. Next year's report will include descriptions of
selected items from this extraordinary collection of rare primary and secondary
sources and reference editions
in
the history of science.
The J. Burke Knapp Endowed Book Fund for the purchase of library resources in
Third World development was established as a gift of friends and associates on
Mr. Knapp's retirement from the vice presidency of the World Bank. An
that is helpfully unrestricted as to purpose was the
generous gift of Dewey Donnell.
endowed book fund
Gifts
amounting
to
$27,409
in
memory
of or in tribute to people or on
anniversary occasions were made by 349 donors. Memorial
gifts to the Libraries
are lastingly meaningful, and bookplates acknowledging such gifts
in
were placed
appropriate volumes purchased for the libraries of Art, Music, Engineering,
Branner Earth Sciences, and Cubberley Education as well as for the
Meyer Memorial Library and the Cecil H. Green Library.
Here follow a
materials, and
partial
list
J.
Henry
of gifts of funds, descriptions of selected gifts of
partial lists of additional gifts-in-kind
and of volunteers
who
we
contributed time and talent to the Libraries this year. With this report
acknowledge publicly our gratitude
to so
many
friends of Stanford.
— D.c.w.
PARTIAL LIST OF GIFTS OF FUNDS
Barbara
Anne Ames
Mrs. Robert Van Vleck Anderson
Roger Anderson
The John Arrillaga Foundation
Atlantic Richfield Foundation
Howard M. Avery
Mr. and Mrs. Robert M. Bacon
C. Douglas Baillie
Professors Jack and Patricia Barchas
Jack W. Barr
Mr. and Mrs. Chester H. Brandon
Mrs. Edward L. Ginzton
Mr. and Mrs. William K. Glikbarg
Mr. and Mrs. Harry R. Goff
Dr. and Mrs. Edwin M. Good
Grace Foundation
Mr. and Mrs. Cecil H. Green
Mr. and Mrs. William H. Green
Richard S. Gregory
Mr. and Mrs. Morgan A. Gunst, Jr.
Frederick M. Half
Paul R. and Jean
S.
Hanna
Reid R. Briggs
Mrs. Walter Haneberg
Andrew
Mr.
Mr.
Mr.
Mr.
Mr.
H. Burnett
Dorothy
Burton
Carlton E. Byrne
Mr. and Mrs. Richard Carey
Professor and Mrs. W.B. Carnochan
J.
Mrs. Frances
J.
Chapman
Mr. and Mrs. Author E. Charette
Gerald A. Costello
James S. Copley Foundation
Council on Library Resources,
Inc.
Estate of Gertrude C. Creswell
Mr. and Mrs. William G. Davidson
Denny's Incorporated
Mrs. Joanna Despres
Mr. and Mrs. Frank De Vol
Professor and Mrs. John W. Dodds
Dewey Donnell
Mr. and Mrs. Ben C. Duniway
Eichleay Foundation
Dr. R. James Farrer
Mr. and Mrs. Charles D. Field
Mrs. O.C. Field
Mr. and Mrs. Nathan C. Finch
Thomas W. Ford
Mr. and Mrs. John M. Fowle
John
F.
Gallagher
The Hon. John Gavin
and Mrs. Robert C. Harris
and Mrs. William N. Harris
and Mrs. Ernest F. Hassbaum
and Mrs. L. Nelson Hayhurst
and Mrs. John C. Hays
Dr. and Mrs. Charles L. Heiskell
Estate of Margaret Hertlein
David B. Heyler, Jr.
Arthur J. Hill
Mr. and Mrs. Jack K. Horton
Warren R. Howell
Mr. and Mrs. Colin B. Hunter
Professor and Mrs. Paul Dehart Hurd
Mr. and Mrs. William H. Hurt
IBM
Mr. and Mrs. Leon
E. Irish
The Jackman Charitable Trust
Mr. and
Mr. and
Mr. and
Mr. and
Michael
Mrs. Leonard Jacobs
Mrs. David
S.
Jacobson
Mrs. George D. Jagels
Mrs. Arthur J. Kates
L.
Katzev
Richard D. Katzev
John H. Kemble
Ronald P. Klein
Mrs. Frederick J. Klemeyer
Rosalind A.
Knapp
Mr. and Mrs. P.D. Knecht
Professor and Mrs. George H. Knoles
Mr. and Mrs. Edward
Mr. and Mrs. L.W. Lane, Jr.
Mrs. Elizabeth Lanz
Richard F. Lazier
Mr. and Mrs. Roger Lewis
Jane Sommerich
Dr.
Dan
R. Lightfoot
Stanford Associates
Jr.
Stanford Education Club of San Francisco
Kenyon Law
Virginia Morrison
Mothers' Club of Stanford University
Roy
E.
Frank
J.
Norman
Novak
Curtis
Tamkin
J. Tanenbaum
S.
Charles
Samuel Taylor
Mr. and Mrs. Norman Terry
Mrs. Patricia Z. Thompson
Dr. Joan B. Trauner
TRW
Union Oil Company of California
Ben F. Vaughan III
Mrs. Patricia Vinnicombe
Mr. and Mrs. Victor von Schlegell
Warner Communications, Inc.
Mr. and Mrs. George Waters
Edwin E. Williams
Mr. and Mrs. Harold B. Williams
W. Robbins, Jr.
J. Rosenberg
Miles L. Rubin
Estate of Eugene S. Sanden
Mrs. Leonard Schiff
Mrs. Alan
J.
Marguerite H. Sullivan
Mrs. Darwin Teilhet
Irving
Anne
Family
H. Strouse
Roger C. and
Mr. and Mrs.
Mr. and Mrs.
Mr. and Mrs.
Jr.
David Packard
Francesca T. Peck
The Joe & Lois Perkins Foundation
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas P. Pike
Mr. and Mrs. James M. Pollak
Mr. and Mrs. C. Vincent Prothro
Mrs. I. James Quillen
Mrs. Dorothy F. Regnery
Lucy E. Ritter
Dr.
&
Levi Strauss Foundation
Munger
Naftzger,
Jr.
Robert D. Steiner
Mrs. John S. Stephens
Dean and
Charles T.
Starling
Robert H. Stegeman,
Moran
Mr. and Mrs.
Mr. and Mrs.
Dr. and Mrs.
Mr. and Mrs.
Soares
Mr. and Mrs. Davidson G. Sommers
Mrs. Roy V. Sowers
Caryll M. and Norman F. Sprague
Foundation
Mr. and Mrs. William M. Martin,
Mrs. Roland Meyer
Mrs. Gavin Miller
Mr. and Mrs. A. A. Milligan
William R.
J.
Schutte
III
Rhona Williams
James H. Schwabacher, Jr.
James W. Scott, Jr.
Mrs. George F. Sensabaugh
Mr. and Mrs. Forrest N. Shumway
Garrett K. Smith
Estate of Beatrice
G.W. Wood
Dr. and Mrs. Sheldon C.
Woodward
Mr. and Mrs. Charles H. Woolf
Bradley W. Wyatt
9
SELECTED GIFTS TO THE COLLECTIONS
JAMES
D.
ADAMS
Three folders of the papers
of his grandfather, William
primarily of correspondence between Breakey,
a
forces during the Civil War, and his wife, Jennie. Written
and from
battlefields
F.
Breakey, consisting
volunteer surgeon for the Union
from Washington, D.C.
such as Fredericksburg, Centerville, Manassas Junction, and
Gettysburg, the letters are especially rich with details concerning the camp
soldiers
and
of February
life
of
and reminiscences of significant historical figures. In his letter
1863, Breakey describes his brief encounters with Secretary of War
officers,
7,
Stanton and with the President and
his wife.
Manuscript chapters of Our United States of America, a popular seventh grade level
history textbook by Ephraim Douglas Adams, professor of history at Stanford,
1902-30.
DR.
EDWARD ALLATT
Seventy-three items, consisting largely of letters written to Dr. Allatt by the
late Lorna Smith, civil rights and social reform worker. The letters, mostly
written during 1968-78, contain reminiscences of novelists Theodore Dreiser
and Upton Sinclair and of political activist Stokely Carmichael. The gift complements the Lorna Smith Papers, which were previously donated to the Libraries
by Smith.
THE ASSOCIATES OF THE STANFORD UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES
To mark
the dedication of the
new
quarters of the Department of Special
Collections, the Associates presented to the Libraries an important thirteenth-
century manuscript entitled the
Marseilles).
The Statutes
Statuta Civitatis Massilie (Statutes of
the City of
are perhaps the earliest extant redaction of the laws and
customs of medieval Marseilles, a "commune" or self-governing municipality.
Marseilles was the chief port of the county of Provence which inl252 passed to
the Capetian dynasty of France, upon the marriage of Count Charles of Anjou
to Countess Beatrice of Provence. The Statutes record the laws and customs of
Marseilles at that time, together with the two peace treaties between the city
and Count Charles. This was drawn up as a coherent whole in 1265, or shortly
thereafter, by a scribe who signed himself Magister Henricus. A smaller section
of the manuscript, containing material dated as early as 1228, was drafted about
1317. The Stanford manuscript, one of only two extant illuminated folio copies
of theStatutes, appears to have been hitherto unknown, or at least unrecorded. It
includes such varied fare as the conduct of city government, the regulation of
trade and manufacture, the treatment of Jews, crusaders, and pilgrims, and
public morality, including prostitution and public sanitation.
See also the
gift of
Frank Lloyd Wright material on page 30.
10
MR.
AND
MRS. FRED
BACSIK
A.
Handel, Georg Friedrich.
An
Belshazzar.
Handel. London: Printed for Wright
first
performed
at
King's Theatre,
&
Oratorio
in Score,
Composed by Mr.
Co. [1784]. This edition of the oratorio
London on March
27, 1745,
is
the
first
complete edition of the work and includes Haubraken's portrait of Handel.
Handel, Georg Friedrich. Joshua an Oratorio
in
Composed by Mr. Handel. London: Printed
complete edition of the work uses many
Wm.
for
Score as
and removing the original
Covent Garden on March 9, 1748.
performed
Hill,
William Henry. Anioine
William
at
E. Hill et fils,
1908.
Stradivarius, sa vie
A
was Originally
first
from John Walsh's
singers' names. It was
of the plates
editions, adding bass figurings
first
it
Randall [1774]. This
et
son oeuvre
(1644-1737). Londres:
translation of the original 1902 edition in English
which contains more than twenty
full-color plates of exceptional fidelity
clarity.
s
J
n
[•
\
Curator to
i //
W*
11
>
/.
I!.\'v
,|;
I
;
and
PROFESSORS JACK
AND
D.
PATRICIA
R.
BARCHAS AND ISAAC BARCHAS
Vesalius, Andreas. De humani corporis
fabrica.
Basileae:
Ioannem Oporinum
[1555]. In 1543 Copernicus published his description of the heliocentric
universe, creating the "revolution" that bears his name. In the
Vesalius effected
a
revolution in the study of
human anatomy
same
year,
by depicting the
human body. De humani corporis fabrica has memorable
woodcuts of human skeletons and flayed figures leaning on architectural props
results of dissection of the
or posing against landscapes. In the second edition (1555), the title-page
dissection scene
is
newly cut and
there are improvements upon the
splendid condition internally.
The
in
some
details of the text
first edition.
This copy
binding, dated 1582,
is
is
and typography
an excellent one,
contemporary
in
blind-
stamped pigskin over boards, also in basically good condition but formerly in
need of expert conservation. The donors generously provided an additional gift
which allowed the binding repairs to be done at once.
12
RUDOLF
D.
Newton,
AND
JEAN
L.
Sir Isaac.
BARCHAS
Philosophiae
naturnlis
mathematica.
principia
No collection
Societatis Regiae ac typis Josephi Streater, 1687.
Londini:
in
iussu
the history of
science could be complete without a copy of the first edition of Newton's
Principia,
the
work in which Newton posited
the inverse square law and set forth
Edmond
Halley (later of cometary fame)
through the press, beginning by persuading the Royal
Society to order its printing "in a large Quarto, of a fair letter." The book and
this copy
lives up to that understated description. Text, mathematical
notations, and diagrams are all elegantly integrated on pages that are pleasing to
the eye, if still a challenge to the intellect. This copy is in a contemporary calf
binding, possibly of French origin, although this is the"two-Iine"imprint issue,
commonly considered to have been printed for English distribution, as
distinguished from the "three-line" imprint issue which was apparently directed
at the Continental market. This copy also has the bookplate of Herbert McLean
the fundamental laws of mechanics.
ushered the
Principia
—
—
Evans.
PHILOSOPHIC
NATURALIS
PRINCIPIA
MATHEMATICA
Autore
J S.
NEWT OK,
Trin.
Profcflbre Lwafutto,
Mathefeos
CoU. Cantab. Soc.
& Societatis Regalis SoJali.
IMPRIMATURS.
P
E P Y
S,
J.l,t
K<(.
5.
fe
P
R
£
S
|
E S
1 68<5.
LONDINI,
Juflii
Socielatts Regi.<r
ac Typis Jofepbi Slnaler.
plures Bibliopolas.
Armo
Proftat
MDCLXXXVII.
13
apud
MR.
AND
MRS. SAMUEL
I.
BARCHAS
The magnificent history of science collection assembled by Samuel I. and Cecile
M. Barchas came to the Stanford University Libraries partly as a generous gift
from Mr. and Mrs. Barchas and partly
obtain underwriting
be described
more
gifts.
fully in
as a
The Barchas
purchase for which Stanford hopes to
Collection in the History of Science will
next year's report.
PROFESSOR JULIAN BLAUSTEIN
Included
in
the long
list
of motion picture scripts given by Professor Blaustein
year are some notable recent works (The French
this
Lieutenant's
Malice) as well as older screenplays (Broken Arrow, From Here
MR.
AND
Woman, Absence
of
to Eternity).
MRS. ERNEST BORN
The archive of textual and graphic
materials pertaining to the publication of The
Plan of St. Gall, Berkeley: University of California Press, 1979.
work by
The three-volume
Born and Professor Walter Horn, University of
California, is a study of the ninth-century Carolingian monastery of St. Gall in
eastern Switzerland. The original monastery plan, drawn probably in the year
820, provided the clues by which the authors could reconstruct the daily life and
economy of this monastic community. The resulting publication was, in its own
exceptional format, an example of detailed scholarship of a graphic artifact
architect Ernest
producing yet another significant and beautiful object.
DONALD BURCHAM
Photograph album, 1898-1903, compiled by his parents, Emilie Henry Burcham
and J.T. Burcham, during their undergraduate years at Stanford. This delightful
turn-of-the-century album of over 100 cyanotypes and black and white prints
and twenty-eight postcards focuses on the student's view of the construction of
the new quadrangle and Memorial Church, popular outings to Pacific Grove
and Lick Observatory, roommates, and the boarding house. Mrs. Burcham's
annotations provide contemporary background on student events and activities
now
considered Stanford tradition.
PROFESSOR W.B. CARNOCHAN
A fine collection of letters, account books, and legal documents pertaining to the
Gibbon family and
estate,
from the years 1583-1820. The collection represents a
portion of the papers of Lord Sheffield (John Holroyd), close friend, editor, and
executor of Edward Gibbon. Highlighting the collection are two previously
unpublished autograph letters from Edward Gibbon, eminent historian and
author of The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, to Abigail Holroyd,
14
first Lady Sheffield. In addition to papers of Edward Gibbon, Sr., Dorothea
Gibbon, Hester Gibbon, Daniel Levade, W. Charrier de Severy and others, the
collection also contains an impressive legal document written on vellum and
the
bearing the seal of
Queen
Elizabeth
.^V^.^.-
i-.
u
v>
.
|i4
I.
erf*
-t-
^.
- *-««
..A,
<..i'..fi
MRS. JOHN CEIDEBURG
The typed manuscript, with editor's notes, of Sam McDonald's Farm: Stanford
reminiscences, by Emanual B. "Sam" McDonald and edited by Holly Ceideburg,
1954. Sam McDonald, the well-loved Stanford staff member, worked at the
University from 1903 until his retirement in 1954. In this autobiography, which
Sam
called his "monsterpiece," he describes his experiences working with the
Stanford community, from students to groundskeepers to presidents. Today he
is
especially
remembered
for his barbecue feasts
the Stanford Children's Convalescent
athletic grounds, but he
is
for his
perhaps best memorialized by
near La Honda. Also included
clippings
on Labor Day
Home and
in this gift
from
15
as supervisor of
Sam McDonald
his close friend
and correspondence, 1953-57, about
to raise funds for
work
his activities
is
his
and
Park,
scrapbook of
interests.
DR. ESTHER
CLARK
Genealogical papers, photographs, and art
came
work of her father, Arthur Bridgeman
1893 as an instructor of drawing and
remained on the faculty until his retirement in 1931. He served not only as head
of the department of graphic arts but as chairman of the controversial Student
Affairs Committee and as consulting architect for many faculty residences and
the Lou Henry Hoover House. The ninety-one original wood blocks and copper
engravings reveal Clark's versatility in the printing medium and reflect his
strong interest in architectural and landscape subjects.
Clark. Professor Clark
ROBERT
H.
CORNELL
Fifty-one 78
Thomas
to Stanford in
rpm recordings
including
historic
commercial recordings of
Theodore Roosevelt, and William H. Taft and radio broadcasts
of messages and speeches delivered by King Edward VIII, Haile Selassie, Hirosi
Saito, Herbert Hoover, Hitler, Goebbels, Mussolini, and General John J.
Edison,
Pershing. Also included
SAMUEL
R.
is
the broadcast of the 1936 Schmeling-Louis fight.
DURAND
Samuel
Durand, to another uncle, 1894.
Young Durand was finishing his senior year at Stanford after following his
favorite engineering professor west from the University of Wisconsin, and
wrote to his brother about the life of the undergraduate with the eyes of a more
skeptical upper-classman. Obviously less impressed by the shining newness of
the campus, Durand comments incisively on faculty and classes, baseball and
dramatics, and on the University's indomitable first president, David Starr
Five manuscript letters of his uncle,
B.
Jordan.
THE ESTATE OF PROFESSOR ALFRED FRANKENSTEIN
Over 3,400 publications in the visual arts — from important exhibition catalogs
and monographs on artists to scholarly surveys of art historical periods. This
was the working library of an extremely versatile writer and teacher who was
one of the country's top newspaper art critics and, at the same time, the author
of such highly-respected scholarly
works
as After the Hunt: William Harnett and
900 (1969) and William Sidney Mount (1975).
Frankenstein taught the history of American art at Stanford from 1973 to 1981.
Other American
Still-life Painters,
I
8 70-
7
HARRY M. GRIFFON
A collection of Henry Miller manuscripts including twenty-two letters, twentytwo postcards, and several broadsides sent by Miller to Frances Cleveland Karle,
and one letter from Miller to Karle's son, Harry Griffon. Miller's relationship
with Karle was based on their common interest in astrology, and some of
Miller's most revealing letters were replies to astrological charts done for him
by Karle.
The correspondence
discusses the prospects for an unexpurgated
16
American edition
of Tropic
of
Cancer,
California, and his feelings about
his
women,
watercolors,
in Europe and
and children. The
life
love, marriage,
and four postcards from Emil White, a friend
and neighbor of Miller, to Karle, and four letters from White to Harry Griffon.
The correspondence between White and Karle, dated 1962-66, contains personal recollections and other references concerning Miller, one of twentiethcentury America's most controversial writers.
collection also includes six letters
In addition to the manuscripts, the gift includes copies of several editions of
Henry Miller's works. Nearly all
them are first editions of Reunion
Cancer, first
published in 1934,
Among
are autographed or inscribed by Miller.
in
is
Barcelona (1959)
andNexus (1960). The Tropicof
represented by a copy of the Grove Press
signed
bound and signed edition of one hundred numbered copies
From Germany, where he was traveling in 1961, Miller sent to
Mrs. Karle a copy of Der Engel ist tnein Wasserzeichen, Koln (1961), describing it as a
"handsome album of my watercolors, done by a big German firm in Cologne."
He adds that he is "sick of travel. Been everywhere."
"specially
.
.
.
by the author."
ROBERT
A
R.
GROS
fine collection of letters
and manuscripts, both autograph and typed,
consisting of twelve manuscripts and thirteen letters and notes from authors
IrvinS. Cobb, Clarence
P.
Marquand,
Da rrow, Arthur Hailey, Robinson and Una Jeff ers, John
and Harold Bell Wright. Of special note is a
Will Rogers,
manuscript version of Robinson Jeffers' poem, "Suicide's Stone," containing
eighteen lines of text, eight of which are significantly different from the
published version appearing
in Jeffers' works, Tamar and Other Poems (1924) and
Tamar and Other Poems (1925). In 1939, Jeffers penned a note to
Gros on the face of the manuscript stating, "My wife found this among some old
papers. It is perhaps the first draft, and certainly the only surviving draft, of the
The Roan
Stallion,
poem called 'Suicide's
was written probably
Stone,'
in
on page 250 of Roan
Stallion,
Tamar and Other Poems.
It
1920."
WENDELL HAMMON
Additions to the photographic collections of the University Archives include a
rare mounted albumen print showing Mrs. Jane Lathrop Stanford with her
companion, Bertha Berner, seated in a rickshaw on their visit to Japan in 1904
shortly after Mrs. Stanford relinquished her administrative duties to the Stanford University Board of Trustees. Mrs. Stanford greatly admired Japan and
arranged for the purchase of several important acquisitions for the Stanford
Museum of Art on this trip. Also included in the gift are four stereographic
views of the turn-of-the-century Stanford campus.
PROFESSOR AND MRS. PAUL
R.
HANNA
See the description of Frank Lloyd Wright material on page 30.
17
MRS. PHILIP W. HARSH
From
memory
W. Harsh, professor of
and his three children, Virginia,
Marjorie, and Philip. A remarkable collection of twenty-seven early editions of
the Roman classical author Plautus and several early editions of other classical
the library of and in
of the late Philip
classics at Stanford, a gift of his wife Elizabeth
playwrights, including:
Aeschylus. Tragoediae
1518].
Though
this
[in
is
Greek]. [Venetiis,
the
editio princeps
in
aedibus Aldi et Andreae soceri,
of Aeschylus, and the editor Franciscus
Asulanus declares he has taken care to match the editorial standards set by
Aldus Manutius, this edition is known for a major editorial oversight. Asulanus
failed to perceive he was working with an imperfect manuscript that lacked
several leaves at the end of "Agamemnon" and the beginning of the
"Choephoroe." The discontinuous texts are printed as a single rather puzzling
dramatic work.
Aldum, 1503] 2 vols, in 1. Four
were published before 1500, but this important Aldine
Euripides. Tragoediae [in Greek]. [Venetiis, apud
plays of Euripides
imprint
is
the
first
nearly complete edition, with eighteen of the nineteen extant
plays.
Plautus, Titus Maccius. Comedie .XX.
in
vicem collatis diligentissime emendate.
V arroniane ex anHquis
[Lyon] 1513.
imitation of a particular Aldine edition,
it is
listed
recentioribusq; exemplaribus
Though
this edition
by Renouard, the bibliographer of Aldine imprints, because
same type
is
not an
with the "Lyon counterfeits"
as the deliberate counterfeits. This edition
is
rare,
it is
and
printed in the
this
copy
is
in
notably excellent condition.
Comoediae
Plautus, Titus Maccius.
fideliorislpressionis
.
.
.
vigiti
.
.
.
novissime ex collatioe Floretiae
recognitae. [Venetiis, Melchiore
Sessam
et
Petru de
Ravanis, 1518]. In this folio edition, bits of text of the plays are surrounded by
18
printed commentaries from a
number of scholars. Some pages
are entirely given
over to commentary. Woodcuts of simple dramatic scenes illustrate the
text,
with the same few cuts used repeatedly throughout the volume.
Plautus, Titus Maccius. Ex Plauti comoediis .XX. quarum carmina magna
mensum suum
restituta sunt.
[Venetiis, in aedibus Aldi, et
ex parte in
Andreae Asulani
soceri]
1522. In describing this edition, the bibliographers take the publishers to task
made
for having
arbitrary textual changes without consulting manuscript
sources.
Plautus, Titus Maccius.
invicem
collatis, diligent
Though
M.
Plauti comoediae
XX,
issime recognitae. Parisii,
this edition,
exantiquis, recentioribusque exemplaribus
ex officina Roberti Stephani, 1530.
according to the bibliographical
the Aldine 1522 just described and must share in
its
critics, differs little
from
limitations, nevertheless
copy is an extraordinary one. On a number of pages there are contemporary
manuscript annotations always a welcome find but these, quite remarkably,
this
—
—
are in English. Therefore this
volume has considerable scholarly research
Plautus, Titus Maccius. Comoediae XX.
diligente cura
Camerarii Pabeperg. emendatius nunc quam ante unquam ab
adsingulas Comoediae Argumentis
[ca.
1538].
& Annotationibus.
&
singulari studio loachimi
Adiectis etiam eiusdem
ullo, ediiae:
Basileae, per loan nem
The classical authors capably edited by
value.
Hervagium
the sixteenth century scholar
Ioachim Camerarius range from Aesop to Xenophon. As in this edition of
Plautus, Camerarius typically compared the text transmitted
in
then newly-available manuscripts, recorded variant readings, and provided
commentaries and annotations.
brief
Seneca, Lucius Annaeus. Tragoediae
On
1493.]
cu
duobus comentis. [Venetiis,
Matheu Capcasam,
each page of this folio edition, the text of Seneca's plays
is
accom-
panied by the commentaries of Bernard in us Marmita and Daniel Caietanus, printed
in a
handsome Roman
Also
in
the collection
is
type, with occasional
Greek phrases
in the
commentary.
the edition printed in Venice (1517) by the Aldine press
under the directorship of Andrea d'Asola and his sons. The text alone is printed,
with no commentary, and only a brief "argument" for each play. This copy is bound
in teal
morocco
extra, with gold tooling, by Riviere.
Terentius Afer, Publius. Comoediae
Basileae,
apud
annotations distinguish this
some manner
Preliminary research
fact that of
cum Donaii commentariis.
is
the possibility that the annotations are by,
ascribable to, the Swiss humanist Henricus Glareanus.
is
already under
way
to ascertain
if
the handwriting
Glareanus. Whatever the outcome of that inquiry,
is
in
a significant
in the profuse manuscript annotations and
Even the printed commentaries are commented upon, with only a
research opportunity remains
glosses.
elegantissimae,
Copious contemporary manuscript
copy of an otherwise standard scholarly edition of
Terence's comedies. Most exciting
or in
sex
Nicol. Brylingerum, 1548.
19
dedicatory epistle and essay by Erasmus, and Melanchthon's "arguments and
annotations,"
left
untouched.
Terentius Afer, Publius.
Terentius, a
M.
Antonio Mureto
locis
prope innumerabilibus
apud Paulum Manutium, 1555. The popularity and salability
of Terence's comedies is demonstrated by the quantity of editions issued in the
first century of printing. Dozens of editions had appeared before the Aldine
press issued its first in 1517, and sixteen more editions subsequently bore the
Aldine imprint. Included in Mrs. Harsh's gift is the 1555 Aldine in which
annotations by the French humanist Antoine Muret are first published. The
Harsh copy bears the Syston Park bookplate.
emendatus. Venetiis,
LAUDER HODGES
Photographs and correspondence, 1891-1903, of his father, Charles E. Hodges,
draftsman for architect Charles Coolidge during Stanford's initial construction
and later resident architect under Mrs. Jane Lathrop Stanford. Included are two
photograph albums, one of formal campus scenes compiled for Hodges in 1902
who had
by John D. McGilvray, Stanford's major building contractor
finished the outer quadrangle, and a second
exterior views of Stanford
album
of
more informal
interior
just
and
houses, fraternities, and the campus
faculty
residence of Mrs. Stanford's brother aned business manager, Charles Lathrop.
From 1898
until her death in 1905, Mrs. Stanford took a strong personal
interest in the construction of the University's buildings; in eight letters,
Hodges describes
to Mrs. Stanford the
work under way and provides
a detailed
description of the symbolism represented by the carved frieze surrounding the
quadrangle's Memorial Arch. Also included
in the gift are
other ephemera and
photographs relating to Mrs. Stanford and the early university.
WARREN
R.
HOWELL
A number
of volumes, including:
Adresse des Actionnaires de
Paris:
la
Caisse d'Escompte, a Nosseigneurs de I'Assemblee Nationale.
Baudouin, 1789. Also: France. Assemblee nationale constituante, 1789-
91. Rapport des Commissaires de I'Assemblee Nationale charges desurveiller
Caisse d'Escompte.
Paris: l'lmprimerie Nationale, 1790.
Two
les
operations de la
of the Stanford
Library's collecting interests, the history of science and the French Revolution,
are united in these pamphlets.
was
met
actively
his
engaged
death
The French chemist Antoine Laurent
Lavoisier
in civil affairs as well as in science. Tragically, in
at the guillotine. Earlier, as a director of the
1794 he
Caisse d'Escompte
(discount bank), Lavoisier had administrative and perhaps participatory respon-
the bank's communication to the National Assembly. When the
Assembly reported on the bank's operations, the bank statement issued with
the report was subject to verification by Lavoisier and his fellow directors.
sibility for
20
Quam Chemiam Vocant, Antiquissimi Authores. Basileae: P. Perna,
1 of 2. The study of alchemy is not slighted by those who
Auriferae Artis,
1572.
Volume
appreciate
its
long history and
its
importance to the psychological theories and
is one of the
1572 in two volumes, it
in 1613 translated into
practice of C.G. Jung. Auriferae Artis ("of the gold-producing art")
primary compilations of the literature; first published
was subsequently reprinted twice, enlarged, and
in
German.
Bacon, Sir Francis. De Dignitate
In his projected but
Bacon took the
his time,
et
Augmentis Scientiarum. Paris: P. Mettayer, 1624.
unavoidably uncompleted major opus, the
role of an administrator,
prepared an agenda naming areas
methods
for achieving
Instauratio is
To make
his
The Advancement
work
the
objectives.
of Learning,
accessible to
its
One
written
London
in
is
all
Magna,
knowledge
in
need of work, and described the
in
familiar published part of the
in
English and published in 1605.
entire intended audience,
translated into Latin and in the process enlarged and changed
Dignitate ...
Instauratio
surveyed the state of
the Advancement after metamorphosis.
It
it
Bacon had
it
considerably. De
was published
first in
1623, followed by this Paris edition.
Catena, Pietro. Sphaera. Padua: G. Perchacinus, 1561. Bound with: Proclus
Diadochus. Sphaera.
facilitate
[Edited by P. Catena]
study of the history of cosmology
Padua:
it
is
L.
Pasquatus, 1565.
To
important to provide works
showing the persistence of old or incorrect theories in addition to the more
exciting first appearances of the new. These two works were issued about two
decades after Copernicus' De revolutionibus and fall into the camp of the old. They
were prepared by Pietro Catena, a prominent sixteenth-century architect who,
when
considering the structure of the universe, not surprisingly subscribed to
the old geocentric theory.
Cuvier, Georges L.C.F.D. Tableau Elementaire
Baudoin,
An
de
I'Histoire
animaux.
des
Paris:
6 [1798]. Baron Cuvier advanced the principles and practice of
zoological classification and, by adhering to a belief in the fixity of species,
retarded the development of evolutionary theory in nineteenth century France.
The
gift of this sizeable treatise,
provides the library with
Dibner
all
together with another
gift
made
this year,
four Cuvier works singled out for notice by Bern
in Heralds of Science.
Dariot, Claude. Dariotus Redivivus: Or,
a Briefelntroduction
Conducing
to
the
Judgement
of
London: A. Kemb, 1653. The sixteenth-century French physician
Dariot incorporated astrological tenets in his medical writings. It is an index of
the Stars
.
.
.
the popularity of medical astrology that this treatise
was translated
into English
and issued three times, with this last one appearing half a century after Dariot's
death. Each English edition was enlarged and updated. Additions in 1653 include
an astrologically founded "Tract concerning the Weather, or Change of the
Aire."
21
Celeftial" Worlds'
UlSCOVER'D:
CONJECTURES
INHABITANTS
p Lfl
and Product ion
Worlds
in the Planets
Written
Latin by
in
CHRISTUM
And
0\ft
I
•>
I
infirrib'tl
INI
S
HUTGEA
lo his Brother
Wl
HUTGENS
•ra'cleii
'
,-mJ Enhrre-J.
L
Huygens, Christian. The
Inhabitants, Plants,
Celestial
and Productions
Worlds Discover'd;
of the
Worlds
Conjectures Concerning the
or,
in the Planets.
London:
J.
Knapton,
1722. In this English translation of Huygens' Kosmotheoros, one senses the
perceived size of the universe expanding as
Huygens reasons away the
remnants of the medieval sphere of fixed stars. Having made structural
improvements on the telescope, Huygens made significant new observations.
With arguments taking strength from these observations, Huygens says, in
essence, that as the sun is like the other stars, so might any of those stars have
planets, and those planets life.
Made before the Royal Society
Concerning the Use of
Springing
or Elastique Motions.
New Hypothesis of
London: J. Martyn, 1674. A variety of practical and scientific subjects held
Petty's interest, but his primary concerns were death and taxes. He was an early
and important economic theorist. In a stylish and somewhat wry dedicatory
Petty, Sir William. The Discourse
Duplicate Proportion
epistle,
.
.
.
commanded
Petty reports being
discourse because
"(I
.
.
.
Together with a
by the Royal Society to print this
suppose) the Society are content, that this Exercise pass
foraSample
of what they are doing." What he is doing, in part, is"toexcite
the World to the study of a little Ma thema ticks, by shewing the use of Duplicate
Proportions in some of the most weighty of Humane affairs, which Notion a
.
.
.
child of 12 years old
may
Smyth, Henry de Wolf. A
Energy for Military
learn in an hour."
General Account
Purposes
of the
Development
under the Auspices
of
the
of Methods of
United States
Using Atomic
Government.
[Washington, D.C., 1945] ".
.the administrative history of the Atomic Bomb
project and the basic scientific knowledge on which the several developments
.
.
22
were based" are described in this report which is addressed to the "substantial
group of engineers and scientific men who can understand such things and who
can explain the potentialities of atomic bombs to their fellow citizens." This
is
a
prepublication issue of the report, produced by photo-offset from typescript.
Several published versions of the report appeared later in 1945, and the text
still in
print
under
its
alternate
title,
is
Atomic Energy for Military Purposes.
JAMES WARREN HUMPHREY
A bound
Widemann ranch in the Butano and Punta
San Mateo County, California. The document,
prepared in 1920, outlines the ownership of 10,628 acres near Pescadero and
traces the land's history back to 1837, when Romana Sanchez solicited for
herself a grant of the land called "Butano." This fine document provides
valuable information on land tenure in California, first under the Mexican
government and then under the United States. It supplements the papers of the
Steele Family Ranch, which was situated in the Punta del Aho Nuevo area, that
are in the Department of Special Collections.
del
abstract of
title to
Ano Nuevo ranchos
the C.H.
in
THE ESTATE OF ROBERT LETTS JONES
An uncommon
addition to the Libraries' antiquarian
map
collection, including
maps covering a range of areas, periods, and types. Among these
are several maps by the great cartographers Abraham Ortelius, Joan Blaeu, John
Speed, and others. Especially worthy of note is the Ortelius 1573 map of Ireland,
drawn with the west at the top and in good early hand-coloring. Also by
fifty-nine early
map
of the Azores, which contains three elaborate
and a frisky sea-monster. Blaeu's fine 1640 map of
the Caribbean includes the north coast of South America, Central America,
Gulf of Mexico, Florida, and north to "Cheseapeac" Bay. Outline color accents
the shores and compass roses, while sailing ships and an elaborate dedication
add interest to this remarkably accurate map. John Speed's 1610 map of
Cambridgeshire carries an inset street plan of Cambridge, figures in academic
robes, and handsome borders filled with colorful coats of arms. One small map
of western North America shows California as an island, evidence of the belief
that prevailed roughly from 1625 to 1750. These early maps were all engraved
on sheets of copper, printed on sturdy hand-made papers, and hand-colored by
Ortelius
is
the 1584
cartouches, ships in
full sail,
trained colorists.
PROFESSOR JOHN
D.
KRUMBOLTZ
Correspondence, memoranda, and other papers, 1960-78, relating to Professor
Krumboltz's teaching responsibilities in the Stanford School of Education and
to his interests in programmed instruction. At Stanford since 1961, Professor
23
Krumboltz
guidance.
is
A
known
especially
and
Krumboltz Papers, received by
for his research in education counseling
significant addition to the John D.
the University Archives last year.
JEAN
F.
LOW
A
nineteen-page typescript of "Rich
Updike's Bech: A Book. The typescript
Russia," the
in
is
first
chapter of John
highlighted by Updike's manuscript
emendations and signature.
ARTHUR McEWEN
Letter, vol. 1, no. 1-vol. 3, no. 11. San Francisco, Feb. 17, 1894June 15, 1895. A complete run of a remarkable, diverting, and rare periodical
given by the publisher's grandson. A contemporary review, reprinted in the
Arthur McEwen's
Letter itself,
marks the
periodical's return after a lapse in publication:
peppery than ever. It
conscienced Judges and
heavy."
Names
is
actually incandescent.
social
wolves of
all
Political
it is
"more
jayhawkers, thin-
breeds, are catching
it
again hot and
noticed in the early issues are familiar ones: Huntington, de
Young, Stanford.
MRS. ELLEN MILLER
Three manuscript boxes containing the papers of James Arthur Miller, engineer
and pioneer in the field of sound recording. As a federal telegraph engineer,
Miller helped establish the United States-France radio circuit during World War
and sent, from the Bordeaux station, the first radio-telegraph message to go
around the world. He was the developer of the Philips-Miller method of sound
reproduction and "Millertape," which was used almost exclusively on Radio
Luxembourg, the world's largest radio station in the 1930's. The papers include
correspondence, notes, patents, and photographs and are supplemented by
equipment invented by Miller, memorabilia, and several books, pamphlets, and
journals in the fields of electrical engineering and sound reproduction.
I
WILLIAM
R.
MORAN
Photocopies of one hundred sixty-six issues of the trade magazine The
Victor,
Voice of
dating from 1912 to the 1930's. Published by the Victor Talking Machine
Company for its dealers,
this
in-house journal
is
an important and rare source of
phonographic, trade, and advertising history as well as biographical information
on
DR.
artists
AND
under contract
MRS. H. SIDNEY
to Victor.
NEWCOMER
The Newcomer Family Papers, 1854-1945,
dence, diaries, essays, and journals.
including account books, correspon-
A true gem of the collection is a diary kept by
24
Rebecca Newcomer, who was born in 1863. The diary serves also as a record of
the activities and development of her first-born son, Harry Sidney, donor of the
papers,
from the time
of his birth until after he received his Bachelor of Arts
The
degree from the University of Wisconsin
in
record of the child-rearing practices of
Victorian
a
1909.
attempts to avoid any sex stereotyping of her
other
Newcomer
Papers,
Rebecca Newcomer's diary
innovative research on the lives of Victorian
DR. HASKELL
F.
child's
is an excellent
and reveals her
activities. Along with the
diary
woman
will
further recent
women.
NORMAN
Geoffroy Saint-Hilaire, Isidore. "Histoire Naturelle Generale des Regnes
Organiques," ca. 1849-53. By inclination a mathematician, Isidore Geoffroy
Saint-Hilaire
work
was nevertheless co-opted by his zoologist father, Etienne, to
He did some original work of merit, including development
in that field.
of a system of "parallel" evolution and classification in the
Lamarckian
This manuscript, representing about one third of the whole work,
textual changes and looks like a work-in-progress, but there are
to the printer.
It
tradition.
is full
of
some directions
should be interesting to compare the manuscript with the text
published in Paris, 1854-62, in three volumes.
\
25
Pomies, Marc. "Cours de Theorie," Lyon, 1867.
manual,
A
manuscript instruction
French, for weaving on a draw-loom to produce fine fabrics. Intricate
in
figures are
woven
into
many of the
fabrics,
and dozens of swatches reveal their
complexity and beauty. Line diagrams and patterns painted on graph paper
show how
to set
up the loom for each design. The manuscript
source for studying the technology of textile production, and
samples
will
is
a
a
valuable
look at the
enliven anyone's image of nineteenth-century clothing and
upholstery fabric.
PACIFIC TELEPHONE
AND TELEGRAPH COMPANY
Three master tapes and four long-play records featuring pioneering wide range
and stereo recordings made by the Bell Telephone Laboratories in 1931-32 of
Leopold Stokowski conducting the Philadelphia Orchestra in Wagner orchestral
excerpts. These tapes and discs complement Pacific Telephone's gift in 1980 of
other Stokowski performances also recorded by the Bell Laboratories.
PROFESSOR PETER PARET
To complement autograph manuscripts and correspondence
deriving from the
Paul Cassirer Verlag, given in previous years, Professor Paret has given
number
a
The publication dates range from
of the books published by that firm.
1910-29 and include plays by Ernst Barlach, Adolf Kestenberg, Heinrich Mann,
Otto Siegl, and Ulrich Steindorff, and works by Ernst Bloch and Adolf
Grabowsky. Two examples of the Grabowsky titles are supplied, one from the
edition limited to 300 copies and one from the special edition of just twelve
copies. In addition, there is an anthology of poems written by German soldiers,
1914-15, illustrated by the expressionist Max Beckmann, and, in contrast, a
German translation by Alfred Wolfenstein of poems by Percy Bysshe Shelley.
EDWARD
Seven
T.
QUEVEDO
linear feet of the personal papers of his father,
leading political figure in the Mexican American
Eduardo Quevedo.
community
A
of Los Angeles,
Eduardo Quevedo was a veteran of efforts to mobilize California's Mexican
American voters into a major political force. Politically active for over thirty
years, he was a candidate in the 1940 race for assemblyman in the state's 52nd
District and in 1942 in the 40th District. He served as president of the
Coordinating Council of Latin American Youth during and after the Zoot Suit
Riots of 1943, and in 1960 he organized the Mexican-American Political
Association.
The Quevedo Papers include correspondence,
and reports from the years 1929-68, making them
26
leaflets,
a particularly
photographs,
valuable source
queVedo
ASSEMBLYMAN C
Mexican Americans during the interwar and World War II
are a welcome addition to Stanford's continually
expanding Chicano Studies manuscript collections.
for the history of
periods.
The Quevedo Papers
KENNETH REICHARD
Over 700
original photographic views taken at Stanford by professional
photographer Kenneth Reichard during the postwar decade 1948-58 for use in
the Stanford Alumni Review and other Stanford publications. Well represented
are Big Game celebrations, the Hammer and Coffin society, and Stanford
faculty. Scenes of campus life commissioned by the University for full-page
newspaper advertisements during the early 1950's document the dramatically
growing University.
IRVING W. ROBBINS,
JR.
Whitman, Walt. American Bard. [Santa Cruz] The Lime Kiln Press, 1981. This
handsome folio volume is the final publication from the Lime Kiln Press under
the direction of its Master Printer, William Everson. Everson, a poet, has
refashioned Whitman's 1855 Preface to Leaves of Grass, giving it poetic form. This
form provides new insight into the text and is important in studying both
Everson and Whitman as poets. The book is a fitting, even an essential, addition
to
our major collection of Everson's work.
GARY SALT
Fourteen screenplays (including Mommie Dearest and
teleplays (representing such major series as Fantasy
Bionic
Woman) added to the frequently consulted
script writing.
27
Shoot the
Moon) and twelve
and The
collection of contemporary
Island, Emergency!,
VICTORIA SCHUCK
See the description of Frank Lloyd Wright material on page
PHILIP
30.
SHERIDAN
Correspondence between Professor John S. McClelland and his former student
Philip Sheridan, spanning the years from Sheridan's graduation from Stanford
with a master's degree in English in 1940 to McClelland's death in 1961.
Professor McClelland received three degrees from Stanford and served on the
Stanford faculty from 1925 until his retirement in 1955. Augmenting this
correspondence is Sheridan's first draft of what was planned to be a memorial
volume to McClelland. In addition to the biographical introduction and
selections from the professor's letters to several correspondents, Mr. Sheridan
provides an insightful personal commentary on McClelland's life and works by
elaborating on the University's official memorial resolution.
MARK STEPHENS
Research materials supporting the writing of his Three Mile Island (1980). Mr.
Stephens has amassed here a wide range of primary source material on the
nuclear power issue by searching out both
official and unofficial sources; the
comprised of interview and research notes, correspondence,
reports, and his manuscript chapters.
collection
HOWARD
is
W.
SUGARMAN
Four hundred fifty-six 78 rpm recordings of classical instrumental and vocal
music including a particularly fine collection of chamber music and selections in
which Stravinsky, Hindemith, and Dohnanyi conduct or perform their own
compositions. These join Stanford's holdings in the Archive of Recorded Sound.
ROBERT WALLSTEN
Three autograph
letters written and signed by John Steinbeck to Wallsten
during 1960-62, providing insightful commentary on literary techniques and
methods of overcoming writer's block. They also discuss more personal
matters, such as the death of a dear friend, Harold Guinzburg.
PROFESSOR VIRGIL
K.
WHITAKER
Cardano, Girolamo.
Proxeneta, Seu de Prudenlia Civili Liber.
Lugduni Batavorum: ex
Officina Elzeviriana, 1627. Well-regarded for his contributions to mathematics,
Cardano
music.
additionally wrote
The
conduct of
Proxeneta
life.
This
on medicine, physics, philosophy,
religion,
and
belongs to the genre of writings advising on the right
is
the
first edition,
author's death.
28
published half
a
century after the
RAY
L.
WILBUR
Extensive correspondence, photographs and other papers of the Wilbur and
Lyman families, spanning the years 1829 to 1949. Especially well-represented is
Mr. Wilbur's father, Ray Lyman Wilbur, third president of Stanford University
and a member of its class of 1896. President Wilbur's correspondence with his
family during those undergraduate years, 1892-96, breathes
undergraduate
changed little.
—
life
into our
decade while showing that the worries of the
have
finances, roommates, classwork, and social activities
perception of the University's
first
—
MRS. JANET LEWIS WINTERS
The Winters Collection of manuscripts details the extraordinary breadth and
complexity oftheim pact made onthe course of modern American literature by
Arthur Yvor Winters, poet, critic, and professor, and his wife, Janet Lewis,
novelist, poet, and librettist. The papers exhibit an exceptional range of
material, from correspondence and manuscripts to early drafts of poems and
novels, accompanied by related newsclippings and reviews. The manuscript
works are highlighted by Winters' Forms of Discovery, The Poetry of E. A. Robinson, and
Quest for Reality, along with Lewis' The Birthday of the Infanta and The Ghost of Monsieur
Scarron. The correspondence, most notably elucidating the effects of Winters'
critical stance and revealing the extent of this couple's compassion for other
writers and their tireless dedication to the written word, includes letters
29
Cunningham, F.R.
Theodore Roethke, and William Saroyan. The
gift includes copies of The Gyroscope, a literary magazine founded by the Winterses,
with Howard Baker, and rare printings of Winters' The Immobile Wind and The
received from such major figures as Louise Bogan, J.V.
Leavis, Katherine
Anne
Porter,
Bare Hills.
This collection complements Janet Lewis' previous
gifts,
which have included
correspondence, manuscripts, musical scores, and photographs pertaining to
her work The Wife
of
Martin Guerre.
The
information about the Winterses'
current gift provides additional valuable
circle of friends, writers,
and
critics that
developed during Yvor Winters' more than forty years at Stanford.
MR.
AND
MRS. WILLIAM
P.
WREDEN
Clement, R.M. "Life of Cable Ropes." Manuscript notebook, 1883-89. Vital
statistics from the early days of the San Francisco cable car system are recorded
in this pocket-sized leather-bound notebook. In addition to data about the
length, weight, and composition of ropes installed on the various cable car lines,
there are incidental memos, such as this one concerning the Hayes Street rope:
"Pulled apart Sunday Sept. 2, '88 at 4.30 P.M. and shutdown until 8. A.M. Sept.
3, '88. Rope caught on a depression stub. Thusly the cause of such a long delay."
"Map
1853."
of the survey of the partition of the San Francisquito Rancho
At the death of Maria Jose Mesa, widow of Don Rafael Soto, her Rancho
Rinconada del Arroyo de San Francisquito was surveyed and divided among her
children. The Rancho described on this rare survey map was bordered by
present-day El Camino Real and San Francisquito Creek and later became the
central portion of today's city of Palo Alto. This manuscript map of the 2,229acre Rancho documents the transition from Mexican to American land-holding
in Palo Alto's early American history.
.
The papers
of Professor Sidney
Dean Townley,
.
.
consisting of professional
correspondence, original manuscripts, research notes, and some publications.
As Professor
of
Astronomy and Geodesy, Professor Townley served on the
Stanford faculty from 1907 until his retirement
GIFTS OF FRANK LLOYD
The Stanford
from
The
clients
first of
1932.
WRIGHT MATERIAL
Libraries have acquired several important archival collections
who commissioned Frank
Lloyd Wright to design their homes.
these collections was given by Professor and Mrs. Paul R. Hanna,
who preserved all of their correspondence and
of their
in
Hanna-Honeycomb House on
telegrams related to the building
the Stanford University campus. These
include exchanges since 1930 with Mr. Wright,
The Frank Lloyd Wright
Foundation, Stanford University, and others. Over 6,000 pages of these papers
30
v.
I
Alto
-.-It.
lniiM
tl
-
'
.-.•
-
'
ilk !..
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are preserved and indexed, along with an additional ten ring-binders of general
Wright ephemeral material. Some 500 photographs taken during and after
construction of the house are arranged and identified in seven volumes.
The
drawings and blueprints of the Hanna-Honeycomb
House, so-called because of the hexagonal grid theme Wright created for the
Hanna house. The house was given by the Hannas to Stanford University in the
mid-1970's. The Hannas gave their library of books written by or about Mr.
Wright to the Stanford Art Library. The structures and the related library and
collection also includes 184
archives offer scholars opportunities for research in architectural history.
second extensive collection comes from Buffalo, New York, where the
Darwin D. Martin family preserved correspondence and papers dealing with
Mr. Wright's work on the famous Larkin building and several houses for the
A
Martins, the Bartons, and the Heaths,
Company. This
collection has
the State University of
been
all
executive officers of the Larkin
jointly acquired
New York at Buffalo.
As
by Stanford University and
far as
is
known,
this
is
the
first
two universities jointly acquiring an archival collection of Mr. Wright's
works and sharing the material for research purposes. Stanford was able to
case of
participate in the acquisition of this collection because of gifts
and Jean
S.
Hanna and by
made by Paul
R.
the Associates of the Stanford University Libraries.
31
Buffalo retains the original documents from the year 1888 through 1914 and
Stanford has the originals from 1915 through 1979. Each institution has
photocopies of originals held by the other; thus each university has
a
a set of
complete
combining both originals and copies. In this Frank Lloyd Wright/
Martin Collection are more than 200 letters, handwritten or typed, signed or
initialed by Mr. Wright. There are over 2,000 letters addressed to Mr. Wright by
the several clients. Several drafts of manuscripts which were prepared by Mr.
Wright for possible publication are included. The financial transactions and the
art and architectural discussions in these papers go beyond the designing and
building of the structures in the Buffalo area, forming an important research
collection for studies of the diverse facets of this extraordinary man.
collection by
Stanford continues to receive important Frank Lloyd Wright archives.
latest gift
was an exceptional
The
collection of manuscripts pertaining to the
residence designed for Dr. Victoria Schuck by Frank Lloyd Wright.
The
was to have been built in South Hadley,
Massachusetts, but unfortunately was never constructed. The collection is
beautifully designed residence
dated 1955-70 and includes three drawings in colored pencil, four blueprints
consisting of the original and revised elevations and floor plans, a typed letter
a letter written by Mrs. Wright, and twenty-five additional
and documents constituting the correspondence exchanged between Dr.
Schuck and members of the Taliesin Associated Architects of the Frank Lloyd
Wright Foundation. The collection is a nice complement to Stanford's Wright
manuscripts pertaining to the Hanna-Honeycomb House at Stanford and to the
Martin House and others in Buffalo.
signed by Wright,
letters
32
SELECTED ADDITIONAL DONORS OF BOOKS, JOURNALS,
MANUSCRIPTS, RECORDINGS, AND SPECIAL MATERIALS
William
Abrahams
Professor Bernard Kronick
Professor Paul Kruger
Professor David Baerncopf
Professor Albert Bandura
Geraldine Leilani Bell
in
Florence
memory
Charles A. Bell
Handsel G.
I.
Professor
of
J.
Earle
Loomis
J.
Murray Luck
May
Professor Lewis
Bell
B.
Mayhew
Gordon H. Bower
Helen Cameron
Alice Coogan
Professor Wanda M. Corn
Professor Walter Meyerhof
Professor Carl Djerassi
Mrs. Jean Nobotny
Professor John W. Dodds
Mrs. Carl Noller
Professor Albert
Nonesuch Records
Mary D. Norton
Mary Noyes
Professor
Warren D. Mohr
H.T. Morse
Professor John
Elsen
E.
Michael Fein
Stephen H. Field
Mrs. Sue Friedlaender
Professor Milton Friedman
Estate of Mrs. W.P. Fuller,
James E. O'Brien
Mrs. Warren Olney
Professor Peter Paret
Mrs. Irma Goldner
I.
Dr.
Gerald Peter Piano
Gonzalez,
Professor William
J.
Dr. Stefan T. Possony
Jr.
Goode
Professor Calvin
Gordon
Jean Haber Green
Mrs.
J.
Quate
Rather
Mr. and Mrs. Michael Schapiro
Mr. and Mrs. M.J. Shannon
George H. Grinnell
Professor Alfred H.
F.
Professor Lelland
H.J.
Professor Albert
III
Professor Richard H. Pantell
Jr.
Franklin Gilliam
Dr. Frank
Nixon
E.
Grommon
J.
Roy Sherman
Guerard
Leslie
Lynn Hamilton
Smith
Professor A.E. Sokol
Mrs. Frederick Hanssen
Professor Peter D.L. Stansky
Professor Stephen
Mr. and Mrs. Stanford
E.
Harris
E.
Professor Robert D. Hess
Professor Lois M. Stolz
Professor Charles T. Horngren
Professor Patrick Suppes
Robert Hurowitz
Robert W. Taylor
Professor Eric Hutchinson
Dr. Frederick
Howard Karno
William
Mirka Knaster
Mrs. Peggy Kompfner
Aseneth
E.
E. Terman
Wadsworth
L. Willits
Mrs. W. Gordon Zeeveld
Professor Georg Kreisel
33
Steinbeck
STANFORD UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES
The Associates
Members
of the
of the
Academic Council
Stanford University Libraries
Committee on
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE
Michael Jameson, Chairman, Classics
J. Novak, Chairman
Harry R. Goff, Vice-Chairman
Carl E. McDowell, Vice-Chairman
Susan Getman Abernethy,
Daniel Bershader, Aeronautics and
Dr. Frank
Astronautics
Carl W. Bielefeldt, Religious Studies
Bruce Buchanan, Computer Sciences
Collier, Anthropology
George A.
Secretary-Treasurer
David Botsford
Mrs. William P. Wreden
Mrs. Darwin Teilhet, Immediate
Past
Edmundo
Herbert
Lindenberger,
English
sity Libraries
Hassbaum
McMahon
Heyeck
Paul H. Mosher, ex officio
Mrs. Roy V. Sowers
George Waters
David C. Weber, ex officio
H. Donald Winbigler
Robin
S.
David C. Weber, University Libraries
Paul H. Mosher, Secretary, Univer-
Roger L. Cairns
W.B. Carnochan
Robert R. Gros
F.
Fuenzalida, Education
Comparative Literature and
Chairman
Christine M.
F.
Richard T. Hoppe, Radiology
BOARD OF DIRECTORS
Mrs. Ernest
Libraries
R.
STUDENT MEMBERS
Diane Allemang
Priscilla Blinco
Baron
Hamman
Edith Zitelli
Officers of the Stanford University Libraries
David C. Weber, Director
Dale B. Canelas, Associate Director
Joseph A. Jezukewicz, Assistant
Director
Paul H. Mosher, Associate Director
James N. Myers, Associate Director
34
Visiting
Committee
to the
Stanford University Libraries
David
B.
Heyler,
Jr.,
Chairman
Mrs. Edgar A. Luce,
Jr.
Reid R. Briggs
Mrs. Ferdinand Mendenhal
C. Wendell Carlsmith
Reg Murphy
Dewey Donnell
Luis G. Nogales
Charles D. Field
W. Parmer
Fuller
Dr. Haskell
Mrs. Cecil H. Green
Richard
E.
Guggenhime
L.
Heiskell
Roger W. Heyns
Warren R. Howell
George D. Jagels
Mrs. Franklin Pitcher Johnson,
Mrs. Shirley P. Katzev
Mrs. Melvin
B.
Norman
Roland Pierotti
Lucy E. Ritter
Mrs. Alan J. Rosenberg
Bernard Rosenthal
Dr. Victoria Schuck
David H. Stam
Mrs. Fulton W. Haight
Dr. Charles
F.
John T. Packard
Gerard Piel
III
Jr.
Kenyon Law
Starling
Mrs. William
P.
Lane
fcunnli pni
mrniMiciirtrinum*
mufti' hrcdvuir
WZltOft III .A"''!:
ptonir«rien»i( n
UitfriclUiirfn.-r.jnmimi; ilu
nnrim
ni
mi hik
.rwjn.Tju
H
itUCKCt*SHtJ*fcrW
Marseilles Statutes, gift of the
Associates of the Stanford University Libraries
35
Wreden
APPRECIATION OF VOLUNTEERS
Time, talent, and energy were contributed to the advancement of the Libraries
and the Library Associates by volunteers too numerous to name, but we thank
them
all and want particularly to acknowledge Dolly Ashley, Diana Auger,
David Botsford, Catherine Condran, Kathryn Cusick, William and Norma
Davidson, Oswalda Deva, John Dodds, Charles Field, Paul Hanna, Evelyn
Hassbaum, Gale Herrick, Sally Herrick, Robin Heyeck, Jacqueline Kemnitzer,
George Knoles, Mary Lawrence, Lawrence Lazarus, Mary Beth McEachran,
Gaye Miller, Richard and Perrina Muffley, Robert and Betty Lou Nordman,
Frank Novak, Arnold Olds, Jean Owens, Norman Philbrick, Betsy Pomeroy,
Jessie Ray, Harry Sanders, Frances Schiff, Joanne Sonnichsen, Margaret
Sowers, Margaret Speidel, Charles Tanenbaum, Hildegarde Teilhet, Ralph and
Lois Watt, Natalie Weber, Gertrude and Harry Williams, and Byra Wreden.
Three thousand copies printed
in October 1982
Graphic Arts, Redwood City
Photographs by Willem Jansz
Calligraphy by Eric Hutchinson
Designed by Candice Woo
Typeface is Comp/Edit Andover;
Set by Grace Evans, Word Graphics
Printed by
T &
J
820299
Out of this
came
I,
ike (he
beautiful simplicity
growth pattern of
a crystal,
a
ground work of hexagons, 26" on
a
side,
of
this
establishes the basic pattern
plan
floor
the
spaces
an
orderly
it
and the
encloses,
consistency
complex form of the
I
redwood
of
sizes
maintaining
within
structure.
partitions,
the
Chim-
neys, retaining walls, and thin
thick
laid
2- ,/
i"
out
on the lines of this grillage, result
GUEST PARKINS
plan
in
an easy flow from space
like
contour
lines,
to
space and,
they bring about
an easy marriage between the building
and
its
gently sloping
plan, overlying this basic
free,
site.
web
The
in
a
asymmetrical design, avoids the
rigidity
and monotony
of a series of
four-walled enclosures. The result
fluid continuity that
is
a
makes each room
seem an extension of another.
LINE OF HOOF OVEIHUNG^
/
^ <W
\J*zif/f7ff//
T^j,^
F
R.
A.
n
K.
LLOYD WR.IGH
.^
«~J<.-Jt...lt...JU..,i..Jl ..s
LINE OF TB.ELLIS
AR.Ct4ITEC"T
House Bt*
•
*nuaii
i&^iSf*
^^s^^fcA.jx.fajjfea^
ASOVe—
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1
.
10
820300
HANNAS' HONEYCOMB HOUSE
Young architects and/or architectural students
1
who might find in the nitty-gritty details of building
''"^ FRANK
l\mlR.m>il
.*,.,.
4
.s.i*„.,.„
A
LLOYD
WRKJHTS
HANNA
HOUSE
house a guide to what to expect from clients;
example of one modus operandi of architect, clients, and construction workers; examples, in illus-
this
trations, of superb blueprints.
2. Young people aspiring to create their dream
house might profit from such details as:
Selecting an architect
Selecting a site for their house
Selecting a general style of architecture
Protocol of relations between architect
and
client:
when to say "no"; when to
when to respond "yes"
capitulate; and
enthusiastically
3. Citizens
concerned with the preservation of
historic buildings
The completed manuscript of the Hannas ran to
550 typed pages of text, plus many photographs
(both black and white and color) that range from
the
first
planning, through ground-breaking, to the
five phases of construction, and
completion of the
finally, the efforts to preserve their
home
after
they would no longer need it. The editors felt (in
the interest of costs) that a book of that size would
not be marketable. Hence, the editors reduced the
book to a total of 148 pages of text and illustrations. Even so, the curtailed product provides a
Frank Lloyd Wright's Hanna House: The Clients'
Report* was written by Paul and Jean Hanna over a
rather comprehensive picture of the step-by-step
The material in their book
was based on documents saved by the Hannas for
the Stanford University
period of three years.
50 years. Some six-thousand items include such
ephemera as workmen's hourly wages, building materials and supplies, construction field notes, along
with scores of letters to and from Frank Lloyd
Wright and to and from Stanford University colleagues and officials. All these items authenticate
the trials and tribulations, the joys, disappointments
and satisfactions experienced by the Hannas as they
struggled to achieve "the perfect house".
For whom did the Hannas write their book? Of
own satisfaction; for their chilmpmento of an important period in their
youngsters; for friends who wanted to know
course, for their
dren
—
lives as
a
"the true story" of their relation with their archi-
and their university.
But there were three other groups that the Hannas felt might profit from a comprehensive review
of the experiences of clients in planning and con-
1937-1982.
Hannas pulled no punches in the recital of the
problems encountered not only in the process of
constructing Mr. Wright's first completely hexagonal dwelling, but in the agonies and ecstasies of
frequent confrontation with their architect. All
details of such incidents are carefully documented;
no statements are based on memory alone (an
illusive and often faulty handmaiden).
The period of construction of Honeycomb House
was a matter of building in phases:
The main house and carport
1.
The guest house, hobby shop, and storeroom
2.
The garden house and pool
3.
4.
Remodeling the bedrooms-library area of
tect
struction of their house:
in the house built on
campus during the years
procedures which culminated
5.
the main house
Construction of lower driveway and
brie'
retaining walls
6.
Remodeling of hobby shop into a
takers' apartment
r
Jte-
.
820^00^, 1
The
was encompassed in Wright's
Hannas' 1935 request of
Mr. Wright was that he design for them a house
suitable for the family of five, but one that could
be altered to conform with changing family comentire project
original plan for the house.
position. Miraculously, he succeeded.
The Hanna House became a study in artistic articulation. Not the least evidence of this artifice was
found in the furniture and furnishings. Much of the
former was built into the structure: couches, ben-
their
dream house.
Two
options presented them-
selves as possible solutions:
Remain in the house until death, when the
1
house, through their wills, would go to the university;
2.
Give the house to the university now, move
out, and help the university
make
use of the house.
Hannas opted for the second possibility and in
so doing in 1975 offered their house to Stanford
University with the understanding that Stanford
ches, bookcases, shelves, beds, display cases, decks,
would use the house
and library desks. The moveable furniture, much of
which was designed by Mr. Wright, consisted of
dining room chairs and tables, end tables, living'
room chairs and hassocks, as well as carpets and
aeroshade curtains. Some pieces, made in Hong Kong
to Hannas' specifications, were carefully articulated
to blend with the geometry of the hexagonal module.
sion of internationally visible, visiting scholars. Each
Equally important to the artifice of the project
was the site. Hanna House was designed to emerge
from the site and be part of it. The landscaping, the
Hannas' responsibility with suggestions from Mr.
Wright, grew along with the structure.
When the Hannas' youngsters had all flown off
to build their own nests, the Hannas followed Mr.
Wright's plans for converting the house to more
spacious accommodations for the parents. This arrangement the Hannas continued to enjoy for another ten years.
Although Hannas had speculated from time to
time about what would become of their house when
they no longer needed it, it wasn't until 1973 that
</
they began to consider seriously the(i£Tsposition of
scholar.
would lecture
as the domicile for a succes-
at the university for a year,
and while
Hanna-Honeycomb House.
end, the Hannas recommended
so doing, live in
Toward
this
that
the University remodel the hoftlpy shop into an
apartment for caretakers who would look after the
house and grounds and generally serve the visiting
The hobby shop is in the process of con-
version.
The house has been plaqued by several organizaHouse Association of
tions, including the Historic
America.
At the moment, the Provost of the University
occupies the house. The Hannas are living in a condominium on campus. The house is open to visitors
(by appointment). Such appointments are made
through the Hanna-Honeycomb House Docents of
the Stanford University Museum.
*Paul R. and Jean S. Hanna: Frank Lloyd Wright's Hanna
House: The Clients' Report. New York City, The Architectural History Foundation and Cambridge, the MIT Press.
1981. $25.00.
PAUL
R.
AND JEANS. HANNA/HOOVER
INSTITUTION/STANFORD UNIVERSITY
i<
#_
^t~**.
f"^
8203C1
HOOVER INSTITUTION
AND
ON
WAR, REVOLUTION
PEACE
Stanford. California 94305
December 13, 1982
Californians for Preservation
Action
P. 0. Box 2169
Sacramento, CA 95810
Gentlemen:
We have just received the Fall 1982 issue
of California Preservation and are very
much pleased with the story of our home on
pages 10 and 11.
How may we obtain an additional 25 copies
which we might use in a campaign in California to obtain new members for the
Historical House Association of America?
Cordially,
>aul R. Hanna
Senior Research Fellow
PRH:atk
HOOVER INSTITUTION
ON WAR, REVOLUTION AND PEACE
Stanford. California 94305
December
1982
29,
Mr. William Marlin
210 East Pearson Street
Chicago, IL 60611
Dear
Bill:
Thanks for your holiday greeting.
for you a good 1983.
Your note
I
is
hope
much
appreciated.
Stanford and Buffalo are jointly paying a
professional indexer to prepare a monograph
It will be
on the Marti n/FLLW papers.
some time before th job is completed. In
the meantime, nothing is to be said about
the matter.
Jean and I are off to snorkel for several
weeks off Cancun, Mexico.
&*a^C
Paul R. Hanna
Senior Research Fellow
PRHratk
820303
' '-S)<-^
HOOVER
INSTITUTION
ON
AND
WAR, REVOLUTION
8M304
PEACE
Stanford, California 94305
December
29, 1982
Mr. Frederick W. Willett, Jr.
4160 N.W. 21st Street - Apt. G-201
Lauderhill, FL 33313
Dear Mr. Willett:
Your letter of December 15, 1982 was forwarded to me from Hanna House
by Stanford's Provost who occupies the residence. We gave the house to
Stanford University in 1977.
Your intent to build a scale model of Hanna Honeycomb fascinates us. The
only model ever built of this house we did with an Erector set in 1936.
Mr.
Wright always intended to build a model for exhibition, but never did. Your
desire to do so is a very worthy one.
Have you seen our book? I enclose a brochure. And the flyer states that
seven rolls of microfilm make available 184 blue prints and drawings, plus
over 6,000 documents about this residence. The archives are complete and
However, you may find
available to scholars through Stanford University.
that some research library in Florida has the microfilms.
I am sending you
an index of the microfilmed collection.
Are you interested in making a model for us? We are asked frequently to
show slides and lecture about the house. A beautiful model would add
greatly to understanding what Frank Lloyd Wright created in this first
attempt to design and build a hexagonal grid dwelling. For instance, we
have been asked to speak about our house at the annual meeting of the
Society of Architectural Historians to be held in Phoenix in early April. A
model to use in a lecture such as this would be excellent.
We would like to assist you in your enterprise. If you wish to telephone us,
you may reach me at my office (415) 497-1086, or my residence evenings or
weekends (415) 322-8977.
Paul R. Hanna
Senior Research Fellow
PRH:atk
Enclosure
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